WorldWideScience

Sample records for video fluorescence microscopy

  1. Application Of Digitized Fluorescence Microscopy And Video Photobleaching To Study Membrane Dynamics During Cell Locomotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Kenneth A.; Ishihara, A.; Holifield, B.; Lee, J.

    1989-12-01

    Our laboratory is concerned with understanding the dynamic structure of the plasma membrane with particular reference to the movement of membrane constituents during cell locomotion. We employ digitized fluorescence microscopy (DFM) alone or in combination with fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) to investigate individual cells. DFM is really a new form of light microscopy in that the distribution of individual classes of ions, molecules, and macromolecules can be followed in single, living cells. By employing fluorescent antibodies to define antigens or fluorescent analogs of cellular constituents as well as ultra-sensitive, electronic image detectors and video image averaging to improve signal to noise, fluorescent images of living cells can be acquired over an extended period without significant fading and loss of cell viability. FRAP allows the measurement of translational mobility of membrane and cytoplasmic molecules in small regions of single, living cells.

  2. Fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, Michael J; Smith, Ian; Parker, Ian; Bootman, Martin D

    2014-10-01

    Fluorescence microscopy is a major tool with which to monitor cell physiology. Although the concepts of fluorescence and its optical separation using filters remain similar, microscope design varies with the aim of increasing image contrast and spatial resolution. The basics of wide-field microscopy are outlined to emphasize the selection, advantages, and correct use of laser scanning confocal microscopy, two-photon microscopy, scanning disk confocal microscopy, total internal reflection, and super-resolution microscopy. In addition, the principles of how these microscopes form images are reviewed to appreciate their capabilities, limitations, and constraints for operation. © 2014 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  3. Observation of photodynamically-induced cell destruction probed by video microscopy, laser-scanning microscopy, and fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueck, Angelika C.; Strauss, Wolfgang S. L.; Gschwend, Michael H.; Koenig, Karsten; Brunner, B.; Schneckenburger, Herbert; Walt, Heinrich; Steiner, Rudolf W.

    1993-07-01

    In order to study light-induced reactions during PDT, the fluorescence response of the photosensitizer meso-tetra(4-sulfonatophenyl)porphyrin (TPPS4) was observed in different cell systems and correlated with the sensitivity to photodynamic induced destructions. RR 1022 epithelial cells from the rat were grown on microscopic slides at a high and low cell density. Using video microscopy in combination with microspectrofluorometry we observed a different fluorescence behavior for high and low cell conditions during light exposure. A fluorescence relocalization from the cytoplasm to the nucleus and an intensity increase-- correlated with the formation of a new molecular species--could be detected only for low cell density. Moreover, cell cultures at a high density showed to be less sensitive to photodynamic destructions. In addition to cell culture-experiments, we observed the light-induced reactions of TPPS4 accumulated in multicellular tumor spheroids. For these measurements laser scanning microscopy was used. Fluorescence relocalization and intensity increase could be detected only for the peripheric parts of the spheroids. The different fluorescence response seems to reflect different metabolic and physiologic states of the cells.

  4. Introduction to fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiran, Ionita C

    2011-01-01

    This chapter is an overview of basic principles of fluorescence microscopy, including a brief history on the invention of this type of microscopy. The chapter highlights important points related to properties of fluorochromes, resolution in fluorescence microscopy, phase contrast and fluorescence, fluorescence filters, construction of a fluorescence microscope, and tips on the correct use of this equipment.

  5. LEDs for fluorescence microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Young, I.T.; Garini, Y.; Dietrich, H.R.C.; Van Oel, W.; Liqui Lung, G.

    2004-01-01

    Traditional light sources for fluorescence microscopy have been mercury lamps, xenon lamps, and lasers. These sources have been essential in the development of fluorescence microscopy but each can have serious disadvantages: lack of near monochromaticity, heat generation, cost, lifetime of the light

  6. Fluorescence (Multiwave) Confocal Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welzel, J; Kästle, Raphaela; Sattler, Elke C

    2016-10-01

    In addition to reflectance confocal microscopy, multiwave confocal microscopes with different laser wavelengths in combination with exogenous fluorophores allow fluorescence mode confocal microscopy in vivo and ex vivo. Fluorescence mode confocal microscopy improves the contrast between the epithelium and the surrounding soft tissue and allows the depiction of certain structures, like epithelial tumors, nerves, and glands. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santi, Peter A.

    2011-01-01

    Light sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) functions as a non-destructive microtome and microscope that uses a plane of light to optically section and view tissues with subcellular resolution. This method is well suited for imaging deep within transparent tissues or within whole organisms, and because tissues are exposed to only a thin plane of light, specimen photobleaching and phototoxicity are minimized compared to wide-field fluorescence, confocal, or multiphoton microscopy. LSFMs produce well-registered serial sections that are suitable for three-dimensional reconstruction of tissue structures. Because of a lack of a commercial LSFM microscope, numerous versions of light sheet microscopes have been constructed by different investigators. This review describes development of the technology, reviews existing devices, provides details of one LSFM device, and shows examples of images and three-dimensional reconstructions of tissues that were produced by LSFM. PMID:21339178

  8. A method to validate quantitative high-frequency power doppler ultrasound with fluorescence in vivo video microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinter, Stephen Z; Kim, Dae-Ro; Hague, M Nicole; Chambers, Ann F; MacDonald, Ian C; Lacefield, James C

    2014-08-01

    Flow quantification with high-frequency (>20 MHz) power Doppler ultrasound can be performed objectively using the wall-filter selection curve (WFSC) method to select the cutoff velocity that yields a best-estimate color pixel density (CPD). An in vivo video microscopy system (IVVM) is combined with high-frequency power Doppler ultrasound to provide a method for validation of CPD measurements based on WFSCs in mouse testicular vessels. The ultrasound and IVVM systems are instrumented so that the mouse remains on the same imaging platform when switching between the two modalities. In vivo video microscopy provides gold-standard measurements of vascular diameter to validate power Doppler CPD estimates. Measurements in four image planes from three mice exhibit wide variation in the optimal cutoff velocity and indicate that a predetermined cutoff velocity setting can introduce significant errors in studies intended to quantify vascularity. Consistent with previously published flow-phantom data, in vivo WFSCs exhibited three characteristic regions and detectable plateaus. Selection of a cutoff velocity at the right end of the plateau yielded a CPD close to the gold-standard vascular volume fraction estimated using IVVM. An investigator can implement the WFSC method to help adapt cutoff velocity to current blood flow conditions and thereby improve the accuracy of power Doppler for quantitative microvascular imaging. Copyright © 2014 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Fluorescence Microscopy of Single Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Jan; van Dorp, Arthur; Renn, Alois

    2004-01-01

    The investigation of photochemistry and photophysics of individual quantum systems is described with the help of a wide-field fluorescence microscopy approach. The fluorescence single molecules are observed in real time.

  10. Bridging fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giepmans, Ben N. G.

    Development of new fluorescent probes and fluorescence microscopes has led to new ways to study cell biology. With the emergence of specialized microscopy units at most universities and research centers, the use of these techniques is well within reach for a broad research community. A major

  11. Fundamentals of fluorescence and fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, David E

    2013-01-01

    This chapter discusses the fundamental physics of fluorescence. The application of fluorescence to microscopy represents an important transition in the development of microscopy, particularly as it applies to biology. It enables quantitating the amounts of specific molecules within a cell, determining whether molecules are complexing on a molecular level, measuring changes in ionic concentrations within cells and organelles, and measuring molecular dynamics. This chapter also discusses the issues important to quantitative measurement of fluorescence and focuses on four of quantitative measurements of fluorescence--boxcar-gated detection, streak cameras, photon correlation, and phase modulation. Although quantitative measurement presents many pitfalls to the beginner, it also presents significant opportunities to one skilled in the art. This chapter also examines how fluorescence is measured in the steady state and time domain and how fluorescence is applied in the modern epifluorescence microscope. Copyright © 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Membranes and Fluorescence microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagatolli, Luis

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy-based techniques using conventional fluorimeters have been extensively applied since the late 1960s to study different aspects of membrane-related phenomena, i.e., mainly relating to lipid-lipid and lipid-protein (peptide) interactions. Even though fluorescence...

  13. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Munster, E.B.; Gadella, Th.W.J.; Rietdorf, J.

    2005-01-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is a technique to map the spatial distribution of nanosecond excited state lifetimes within microscopic images. FLIM systems have been implemented both in the frequency domain, using sinusoidally intensity-modulated excitation light and modulated

  14. Fluorescence confocal microscopy for pathologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragazzi, Moira; Piana, Simonetta; Longo, Caterina; Castagnetti, Fabio; Foroni, Monica; Ferrari, Guglielmo; Gardini, Giorgio; Pellacani, Giovanni

    2014-03-01

    Confocal microscopy is a non-invasive method of optical imaging that may provide microscopic images of untreated tissue that correspond almost perfectly to hematoxylin- and eosin-stained slides. Nowadays, following two confocal imaging systems are available: (1) reflectance confocal microscopy, based on the natural differences in refractive indices of subcellular structures within the tissues; (2) fluorescence confocal microscopy, based on the use of fluorochromes, such as acridine orange, to increase the contrast epithelium-stroma. In clinical practice to date, confocal microscopy has been used with the goal of obviating the need for excision biopsies, thereby reducing the need for pathological examination. The aim of our study was to test fluorescence confocal microscopy on different types of surgical specimens, specifically breast, lymph node, thyroid, and colon. The confocal images were correlated to the corresponding histological sections in order to provide a morphologic parallel and to highlight current limitations and possible applications of this technology for surgical pathology practice. As a result, neoplastic tissues were easily distinguishable from normal structures and reactive processes such as fibrosis; the use of fluorescence enhanced contrast and image quality in confocal microscopy without compromising final histologic evaluation. Finally, the fluorescence confocal microscopy images of the adipose tissue were as accurate as those of conventional histology and were devoid of the frozen-section-related artefacts that can compromise intraoperative evaluation. Despite some limitations mainly related to black/white images, which require training in imaging interpretation, this study confirms that fluorescence confocal microscopy may represent an alternative to frozen sections in the assessment of margin status in selected settings or when the conservation of the specimen is crucial. This is the first study to employ fluorescent confocal microscopy on

  15. Diffraction phase and fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yongkeun; Popescu, Gabriel; Badizadegan, Kamran; Dasari, Ramachandra R; Feld, Michael S

    2006-09-04

    We have developed diffraction phase and fluorescence (DPF) microscopy as a new technique for simultaneous quantitative phase imaging and epi-fluorescence investigation of live cells. The DPF instrument consists of an interference microscope, which is incorporated into a conventional inverted fluorescence microscope. The quantitative phase images are characterized by sub-nanometer optical path-length stability over periods from milliseconds to a cell lifetime. The potential of the technique for quantifying rapid nanoscale motions in live cells is demonstrated by experiments on red blood cells, while the composite phase-fluorescence imaging mode is exemplified with mitotic kidney cells.

  16. Advanced Methods in Fluorescence Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke Fritzky

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It requires a good deal of will power to resist hyperbole in considering the advances that have been achieved in fluorescence microscopy in the last 25 years. Our effort has been to survey the modalities of microscopic fluorescence imaging available to cell biologists and perhaps useful for diagnostic pathologists. The gamut extends from established confocal laser scanning through multiphoton and TIRF to the emerging technologies of super-resolution microscopy that breech the Abbé limit of resolution. Also considered are the recent innovations in structured and light sheet illumination, the use of FRET and molecular beacons that exploit specific characteristics of designer fluorescent proteins, fluorescence speckles, and second harmonic generation for native anisometric structures like collagen, microtubules and sarcomeres.

  17. Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy (LSFM)

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, Michael W.; Loftus, Andrew F.; Dunn, Sarah E.; Joens, Matthew S.; Fitzpatrick, James A. J.

    2015-01-01

    The development of confocal microscopy techniques introduced the ability to optically section fluorescent samples in the axial dimension, perpendicular to the image plane. These approaches, via the placement of a pinhole in the conjugate image plane, provided superior resolution in the axial (z) dimension resulting in nearly isotropic optical sections. However, increased axial resolution, via pinhole optics, comes at the cost of both speed and excitation efficiency. Light Sheet Fluorescent Mi...

  18. Correlative fluorescence and electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirra, Randall T; Zhang, Peijun

    2014-10-01

    Correlative fluorescence and electron microscopy (CFEM) is a multimodal technique that combines dynamic and localization information from fluorescence methods with ultrastructural data from electron microscopy, to give new information about how cellular components change relative to the spatiotemporal dynamics within their environment. In this review, we will discuss some of the basic techniques and tools of the trade for utilizing this attractive research method, which is becoming a very powerful tool for biology labs. The information obtained from correlative methods has proven to be invaluable in creating consensus between the two types of microscopy, extending the capability of each, and cutting the time and expense associated with using each method separately for comparative analysis. The realization of the advantages of these methods in cell biology has led to rapid improvement in the protocols and has ushered in a new generation of instruments to reach the next level of correlation--integration. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  19. Plasmonics Enhanced Smartphone Fluorescence Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Wei, Qingshan

    2017-05-12

    Smartphone fluorescence microscopy has various applications in point-of-care (POC) testing and diagnostics, ranging from e.g., quantification of immunoassays, detection of microorganisms, to sensing of viruses. An important need in smartphone-based microscopy and sensing techniques is to improve the detection sensitivity to enable quantification of extremely low concentrations of target molecules. Here, we demonstrate a general strategy to enhance the detection sensitivity of a smartphone-based fluorescence microscope by using surface-enhanced fluorescence (SEF) created by a thin metal-film. In this plasmonic design, the samples are placed on a silver-coated glass slide with a thin spacer, and excited by a laser-diode from the backside through a glass hemisphere, generating surface plasmon polaritons. We optimized this mobile SEF system by tuning the metal-film thickness, spacer distance, excitation angle and polarization, and achieved ~10-fold enhancement in fluorescence intensity compared to a bare glass substrate, which enabled us to image single fluorescent particles as small as 50 nm in diameter and single quantum-dots. Furthermore, we quantified the detection limit of this platform by using DNA origami-based brightness standards, demonstrating that ~80 fluorophores per diffraction-limited spot can be readily detected by our mobile microscope, which opens up new opportunities for POC diagnostics and sensing applications in resource-limited-settings.

  20. Plasmonics Enhanced Smartphone Fluorescence Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Qingshan; Acuna, Guillermo; Kim, Seungkyeum; Vietz, Carolin; Tseng, Derek; Chae, Jongjae; Shir, Daniel; Luo, Wei; Tinnefeld, Philip; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2017-05-18

    Smartphone fluorescence microscopy has various applications in point-of-care (POC) testing and diagnostics, ranging from e.g., quantification of immunoassays, detection of microorganisms, to sensing of viruses. An important need in smartphone-based microscopy and sensing techniques is to improve the detection sensitivity to enable quantification of extremely low concentrations of target molecules. Here, we demonstrate a general strategy to enhance the detection sensitivity of a smartphone-based fluorescence microscope by using surface-enhanced fluorescence (SEF) created by a thin metal-film. In this plasmonic design, the samples are placed on a silver-coated glass slide with a thin spacer, and excited by a laser-diode from the backside through a glass hemisphere, generating surface plasmon polaritons. We optimized this mobile SEF system by tuning the metal-film thickness, spacer distance, excitation angle and polarization, and achieved ~10-fold enhancement in fluorescence intensity compared to a bare glass substrate, which enabled us to image single fluorescent particles as small as 50 nm in diameter and single quantum-dots. Furthermore, we quantified the detection limit of this platform by using DNA origami-based brightness standards, demonstrating that ~80 fluorophores per diffraction-limited spot can be readily detected by our mobile microscope, which opens up new opportunities for POC diagnostics and sensing applications in resource-limited-settings.

  1. Leica solution: CARS microscopy at video rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lurquin, V.

    2008-02-01

    Confocal and multiphoton microscopy are powerful techniques to study morphology and dynamics in cells and tissue, if fluorescent labeling is possible or autofluorescence is strong. For non-fluorescent molecules, Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy provides chemical contrast based on intrinsic and highly specific vibrational properties of molecules eliminating the need for labeling. Just as other multiphoton techniques, CARS microscopy possesses three-dimensional sectioning capabilities. Leica Microsystems has combined the CARS imaging technology with its TCS SP5 confocal microscope to provide several advantages for CARS imaging. For CARS microscopy, two picosecond near-infrared lasers are overlapped spatially and temporally and sent into the scanhead of the confocal system. The software allows programmed, automatic switching between these light sources for multi-modal imaging. Furthermore the Leica TCS SP5 can be equipped with a non-descanned detector which will significantly enhance the signal. The Leica TCS SP5 scanhead combines two technologies in one system: a conventional scanner for maximum resolution and a resonant scanner for high time resolution. The fast scanner allows imaging speeds as high as 25 images/per second at a resolution of 512×512 pixel. This corresponds to true video-rate allowing to follow processes at these time-scales as well as the acquisition of three-dimensional stacks in a few seconds. This time resolution is critical to study live animals or human patients for which heart beat and muscle movements lead to a blurring of the image if the acquisition time is high. Furthermore with the resonant scanhead the sectioning is truly confocal and does not suffer from spatial leakage. In summary, CARS microscopy combined with the tandem scanner makes the Leica TCS SP5 a powerful tool for three-dimensional, label-free imaging of chemical and biological samples in vitro and in vivo.

  2. Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy (LSFM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Michael W; Loftus, Andrew F; Dunn, Sarah E; Joens, Matthew S; Fitzpatrick, James A J

    2015-01-05

    The development of confocal microscopy techniques introduced the ability to optically section fluorescent samples in the axial dimension, perpendicular to the image plane. These approaches, via the placement of a pinhole in the conjugate image plane, provided superior resolution in the axial (z) dimension resulting in nearly isotropic optical sections. However, increased axial resolution, via pinhole optics, comes at the cost of both speed and excitation efficiency. Light sheet fluorescent microscopy (LSFM), a century-old idea made possible with modern developments in both excitation and detection optics, provides sub-cellular resolution and optical sectioning capabilities without compromising speed or excitation efficiency. Over the past decade, several variations of LSFM have been implemented each with its own benefits and deficiencies. Here we discuss LSFM fundamentals and outline the basic principles of several major light-sheet-based imaging modalities (SPIM, inverted SPIM, multi-view SPIM, Bessel beam SPIM, and stimulated emission depletion SPIM) while considering their biological relevance in terms of intrusiveness, temporal resolution, and sample requirements. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  3. Agreement between direct fluorescent microscopy and Ziehl ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The sensitivity of smear microscopy for diagnosis of tuberculosis might be improved through treatment of sputum with sodium hypochlorite and application of fluorescent microscopy. This study aimed to determine the agreement between direct Fluorescent Microscopy and Ziehl-Neelsen concentration technique ...

  4. Super-resolution methods for fluorescence microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Mandula, Ondrej

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy is an important tool for biological research. However, the resolution of a standard fluorescence microscope is limited by diffraction, which makes it difficult to observe small details of a specimen’s structure. We have developed two fluorescence microscopy methods that achieve resolution beyond the classical diffraction limit. The first method represents an extension of localisation microscopy. We used nonnegative matrix factorisation (NMF) to model ...

  5. Accuracy and Precision in Quantitative Fluorescence Microscopy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jennifer C. Waters

    2009-01-01

    .... With advances in digital cameras and the discovery and development of genetically encoded fluorophores, there has been a huge increase in the use of fluorescence microscopy to quantify spatial...

  6. Fluorescence microscopy: A tool to study autophagy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Shashank; Manjithaya, Ravi

    2015-08-01

    Autophagy is a cellular recycling process through which a cell degrades old and damaged cellular components such as organelles and proteins and the degradation products are reused to provide energy and building blocks. Dysfunctional autophagy is reported in several pathological situations. Hence, autophagy plays an important role in both cellular homeostasis and diseased conditions. Autophagy can be studied through various techniques including fluorescence based microscopy. With the advancements of newer technologies in fluorescence microscopy, several novel processes of autophagy have been discovered which makes it an essential tool for autophagy research. Moreover, ability to tag fluorescent proteins with sub cellular targets has enabled us to evaluate autophagy processes in real time under fluorescent microscope. In this article, we demonstrate different aspects of autophagy in two different model organisms i.e. yeast and mammalian cells, with the help of fluorescence microscopy.

  7. Concepts for nanoscale resolution in fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hell, Stefan W; Dyba, Marcus; Jakobs, Stefan

    2004-10-01

    Spatio-temporal visualization of cellular structures by fluorescence microscopy has become indispensable in biology. However, the resolution of conventional fluorescence microscopy is limited by diffraction to about 180 nm in the focal plane and to about 500 nm along the optic axis. Recently, concepts have emerged that overcome the diffraction resolution barrier fundamentally. Formed on the basis of reversible saturable optical transitions, these concepts might eventually allow us to investigate hitherto inaccessible details within live cells.

  8. Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Santi, Peter A.

    2011-01-01

    Light sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) functions as a non-destructive microtome and microscope that uses a plane of light to optically section and view tissues with subcellular resolution. This method is well suited for imaging deep within transparent tissues or within whole organisms, and because tissues are exposed to only a thin plane of light, specimen photobleaching and phototoxicity are minimized compared to wide-field fluorescence, confocal, or multiphoton microscopy. LSFMs produce...

  9. Examining Thermally Sprayed Coats By Fluorescence Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Kenneth W., Jr.; Leonhardt, Todd A.

    1994-01-01

    True flaws distinquished from those induced by preparation of specimens. Fluorescence microscopy reveals debonding, porosity, cracks, and other flaws in specimens of thermally sprayed coating materials. Specimen illuminated, and dye it contains fluoresces, emitting light at different wavelength. Filters emphasize contrast between excitation light and emission light. Specimen viewed directly or photographed on color film.

  10. Total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trache, Andreea; Meininger, Gerald A

    2008-08-01

    Total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy represents a method of exciting and visualizing fluorophores present in the near-membrane region of live or fixed cells grown on coverslips. TIRF microscopy is based on the total internal reflection phenomenon that occurs when light passes from a high-refractive medium (e.g., glass) into a low-refractive medium (e.g., cell, water). The evanescent field produced by total internally reflected light excites the fluorescent molecules at the cell-substrate interface and is accompanied by minimal exposure of the remaining cell volume. This technique provides high-contrast fluorescence images, with very low background and virtually no out-of-focus light, ideal for visualization and spectroscopy of single-molecule fluorescence near a surface. This unit presents, in a concise manner, the principle of operation, instrument diversity, and TIRF microscopy applications for the study of biological samples. Copyright 2008 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  11. Use of astronomy filters in fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, Jörg

    2012-02-01

    Monochrome astronomy filters are well suited for use as excitation or suppression filters in fluorescence microscopy. Because of their particular optical design, such filters can be combined with standard halogen light sources for excitation in many fluorescent probes. In this "low energy excitation," photobleaching (fading) or other irritations of native specimens are avoided. Photomicrographs can be taken from living motile fluorescent specimens also with a flash so that fluorescence images can be created free from indistinctness caused by movement. Special filter cubes or dichroic mirrors are not needed for our method. By use of suitable astronomy filters, fluorescence microscopy can be carried out with standard laboratory microscopes equipped with condensers for bright-field (BF) and dark-field (DF) illumination in transmitted light. In BF excitation, the background brightness can be modulated in tiny steps up to dark or black. Moreover, standard industry microscopes fitted with a vertical illuminator for examinations of opaque probes in DF or BF illumination based on incident light (wafer inspections, for instance) can also be used for excitation in epi-illumination when adequate astronomy filters are inserted as excitatory and suppression filters in the illuminating and imaging light path. In all variants, transmission bands can be modulated by transmission shift.

  12. Light sheet fluorescence microscopy: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santi, Peter A

    2011-02-01

    Light sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) functions as a non-destructive microtome and microscope that uses a plane of light to optically section and view tissues with subcellular resolution. This method is well suited for imaging deep within transparent tissues or within whole organisms, and because tissues are exposed to only a thin plane of light, specimen photobleaching and phototoxicity are minimized compared to wide-field fluorescence, confocal, or multiphoton microscopy. LSFMs produce well-registered serial sections that are suitable for three-dimensional reconstruction of tissue structures. Because of a lack of a commercial LSFM microscope, numerous versions of light sheet microscopes have been constructed by different investigators. This review describes development of the technology, reviews existing devices, provides details of one LSFM device, and shows examples of images and three-dimensional reconstructions of tissues that were produced by LSFM.

  13. Photobleaching correction in fluorescence microscopy images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vicente, Nathalie B; Diaz Zamboni, Javier E; Adur, Javier F; Paravani, Enrique V; Casco, Victor H [Microscopy Laboratory, School of Engineering - Bioengineering, National University of Entre Rios (UNER), Ruta 11, Km 10 (3101), Oro Verde, Entre Rios (Argentina)

    2007-11-15

    Fluorophores are used to detect molecular expression by highly specific antigen-antibody reactions in fluorescence microscopy techniques. A portion of the fluorophore emits fluorescence when irradiated with electromagnetic waves of particular wavelengths, enabling its detection. Photobleaching irreversibly destroys fluorophores stimulated by radiation within the excitation spectrum, thus eliminating potentially useful information. Since this process may not be completely prevented, techniques have been developed to slow it down or to correct resulting alterations (mainly, the decrease in fluorescent signal). In the present work, the correction by photobleaching curve was studied using E-cadherin (a cell-cell adhesion molecule) expression in Bufo arenarum embryos. Significant improvements were observed when applying this simple, inexpensive and fast technique.

  14. System for fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Geest, Lambertus K.; Boddeke, Frank R.; van Dijk, Pieter W.; Kamp, Arjen F.; van der Oord, Cornelius J. R.; Stoop, Karel W. J.

    1999-05-01

    One of the promising recent developments in fluorescence microscopy is fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). In this technique the fluorescence lifetime (ns range) of molecules is expressed in the image rather than the intensity of the light emitted by these molecules. This physical property is of interest as it gives information about the local environment of the molecule, such as molecular concentration of O2, Ca2+, pH, and conjugation. We develop an affordable, robust and easy-to-use FLIM workstation which is completely automated and does not need any difficult calibration procedure. The system consists of a standard fluorescence microscope, a modulated excitation light source, a camera, a modulation signal generator and acquisition/processing software. The camera contains an Intensified CCD of which the image intensifier gain is modulated. Depending on the application different light sources can be selected. The current light source contains a 12 mW modulated laser-diode emitting at 635 nm. A homodyne detection scheme with modulation frequencies of 1 to 100 MHz is applied, aiming at a resolution of 0.1 ns or better. High level image acquisition strategies are implemented in software, along with the low level image processing routines for lifetime estimation, calibration and correction. An evaluation of the system and its critical components will be presented in this paper.

  15. Non-radiative excitation fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riachy, Lina; Vézy, Cyrille; Jaffiol, Rodolphe

    2016-03-01

    Non-radiative Excitation Fluorescence Microscopy (NEFM) constitutes a new way to observe biological samples beyond the diffraction limit. Non-radiative excitation of the samples is achieved by coating the substrate with donor species, such as quantum dots (QDs). Thus the dyes are not excited directly by the laser source, as in common fluorescence microscopy, but through a non-radiative energy transfer. To prevent dewetting of the donor film, we have recently implemented a silanization process to covalently bond the QDs on the substrate. An homogeneous monolayer of QDs was then deposited on only one side of the coverslips. Atomic force microscopy was then used to characterize the QD layer. We highlight the potential of our method through the study of Giant Unilamellar Vesicles (GUVs) labeled with DiD as acceptor, in interaction with surface functionalized with poly-L-lysine. In the presence of GUVs, we observed a quenching of QDs emission, together with an emission of DiD located in the membrane, which clearly indicated that non-radiative energy transfer from QDs to DiD occurs.

  16. Radiation Dosimetry via Automated Fluorescence Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castleman, Kenneth R.; Schulze, Mark

    2005-01-01

    A developmental instrument for assessment of radiation-induced damage in human lymphocytes includes an automated fluorescence microscope equipped with a one or more chargecoupled- device (CCD) video camera(s) and circuitry to digitize the video output. The microscope is also equipped with a three-axis translation stage that includes a rotation stage, and a rotary tray that holds as many as thirty specimen slides. The figure depicts one version of the instrument. Once the slides have been prepared and loaded into the tray, the instrument can operate unattended. A computer controls the operation of the stage, tray, and microscope, and processes the digital fluorescence-image data to recognize and count chromosomes that have been broken, presumably by radiation. The design and method of operation of the instrument exploit fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) of metaphase chromosome spreads, which is a technique that has been found to be valuable for monitoring the radiation dose to circulating lymphocytes. In the specific FISH protocol used to prepare specimens for this instrument, metaphase lymphocyte cultures are chosen for high mitotic index and highly condensed chromosomes, then several of the largest chromosomes are labeled with three of four differently colored whole-chromosome-staining dyes. The three dyes, which are used both individually and in various combinations, are fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), Texas Red (or equivalent), and Cy5 (or equivalent); The fourth dye 4',6-diamidino- 2-phenylindole (DAPI) is used as a counterstain. Under control by the computer, the microscope is automatically focused on the cells and each slide is scanned while the computer analyzes the DAPI-fluorescence images to find the metaphases. Each metaphase field is recentered in the field of view and refocused. Then a four-color image (more precisely, a set of images of the same view in the fluorescent colors of the four dyes) is acquired. By use of pattern

  17. Structured illumination microscopy using photoswitchable fluorescent proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirvonen, Liisa; Mandula, Ondrej; Wicker, Kai; Heintzmann, Rainer

    2008-02-01

    In fluorescence microscopy the lateral resolution is limited to about 200 nm because of diffraction. Resolution improvement by a factor of two can be achieved using structured illumination, where a ine grating is projected onto the sample, and the final image is reconstructed from a set of images taken at different grating positions. Further resolution improvement can be achieved by saturating the transitions involved in fluorescence emission. Recently discovered photoswitchable proteins undergo transitions that are saturable at low illumination intensity. Combining this concept with structured illumination, theoretically unlimited resolution can be achieved, where the smallest resolvable distance will be determined by signal-to-noise ratio. This work focuses on the use of the photoswitchable protein Dronpa with structured illumination to achieve nanometre scale resolution in fixed cells.

  18. Eliminating deformations in fluorescence emission difference microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Shangting; Kuang, Cuifang; Rong, Zihao; Liu, Xu

    2014-10-20

    We propose a method for eliminating the deformations in fluorescence emission difference microscopy (FED). Due to excessive subtraction, negative values are inevitable in the original FED method, giving rise to deformations. We propose modulating the beam to generate an extended solid focal spot and a hollow focal spot. Negative image values can be avoided by using these two types of excitation spots in FED imaging. Hence, deformations are eliminated, and the signal-to-noise ratio is improved. In deformation-free imaging, the resolution is higher than that of confocal imaging by 32%. Compared to standard FED imaging with the same level of deformations, our method provides superior resolution.

  19. Fluorescence microscopy-a historical and technical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renz, Malte

    2013-09-01

    For a little more than a century, fluorescence microscopy has been an essential source of major discoveries in cell biology. Recent developments improved both visualization and quantification by fluorescence microscopy imaging and established a methodology of fluorescence microscopy. By outlining basic principles and their historical development, I seek to provide insight into and understanding of the ever-growing tools of fluorescence microscopy. Thereby, this synopsis may help the interested researcher to choose a fluorescence microscopic method capable of addressing a specific scientific question. Copyright © 2013 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  20. Deep-brain imaging via epi-fluorescence Computational Cannula Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ganghun; Nagarajan, Naveen; Pastuzyn, Elissa; Jenks, Kyle; Capecchi, Mario; Shepherd, Jason; Menon, Rajesh

    2017-03-01

    Here we demonstrate widefield (field diameter = 200 μm) fluorescence microscopy and video imaging inside the rodent brain at a depth of 2 mm using a simple surgical glass needle (cannula) of diameter 0.22 mm as the primary optical element. The cannula guides excitation light into the brain and the fluorescence signal out of the brain. Concomitant image-processing algorithms are utilized to convert the spatially scrambled images into fluorescent images and video. The small size of the cannula enables minimally invasive imaging, while the long length (>2 mm) allow for deep-brain imaging with no additional complexity in the optical system. Since no scanning is involved, widefield fluorescence video at the native frame rate of the camera can be achieved.

  1. Evanescent excitation and emission in fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelrod, Daniel

    2013-04-02

    Evanescent light-light that does not propagate but instead decays in intensity over a subwavelength distance-appears in both excitation (as in total internal reflection) and emission (as in near-field imaging) forms in fluorescence microscopy. This review describes the physical connection between these two forms as a consequence of geometrical squeezing of wavefronts, and describes newly established or speculative applications and combinations of the two. In particular, each can be used in analogous ways to produce surface-selective images, to examine the thickness and refractive index of films (such as lipid multilayers or protein layers) on solid supports, and to measure the absolute distance of a fluorophore to a surface. In combination, the two forms can further increase selectivity and reduce background scattering in surface images. The polarization properties of each lead to more sensitive and accurate measures of fluorophore orientation and membrane micromorphology. The phase properties of the evanescent excitation lead to a method of creating a submicroscopic area of total internal reflection illumination or enhanced-resolution structured illumination. Analogously, the phase properties of evanescent emission lead to a method of producing a smaller point spread function, in a technique called virtual supercritical angle fluorescence. Copyright © 2013 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Genetically encoded sensors and fluorescence microscopy for anticancer research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagaynova, Elena V.; Shirmanova, Marina V.; Sergeeva, Tatiana F.; Klementieva, Natalia V.; Mishin, Alexander S.; Gavrina, Alena I.; Zlobovskay, Olga A.; Furman, Olga E.; Dudenkova, Varvara V.; Perelman, Gregory S.; Lukina, Maria M.; Lukyanov, Konstantin A.

    2017-02-01

    Early response of cancer cells to chemical compounds and chemotherapeutic drugs were studied using novel fluorescence tools and microscopy techniques. We applied confocal microscopy, two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy and super-resolution localization-based microscopy to assess structural and functional changes in cancer cells in vitro. The dynamics of energy metabolism, intracellular pH, caspase-3 activation during staurosporine-induced apoptosis as well as actin cytoskeleton rearrangements under chemotherapy were evaluated. We have showed that new genetically encoded sensors and advanced fluorescence microscopy methods provide an efficient way for multiparameter analysis of cell activities

  3. Modulated CMOS camera for fluorescence lifetime microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongtao; Holst, Gerhard; Gratton, Enrico

    2015-12-01

    Widefield frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FD-FLIM) is a fast and accurate method to measure the fluorescence lifetime of entire images. However, the complexity and high costs involved in construction of such a system limit the extensive use of this technique. PCO AG recently released the first luminescence lifetime imaging camera based on a high frequency modulated CMOS image sensor, QMFLIM2. Here we tested and provide operational procedures to calibrate the camera and to improve the accuracy using corrections necessary for image analysis. With its flexible input/output options, we are able to use a modulated laser diode or a 20 MHz pulsed white supercontinuum laser as the light source. The output of the camera consists of a stack of modulated images that can be analyzed by the SimFCS software using the phasor approach. The nonuniform system response across the image sensor must be calibrated at the pixel level. This pixel calibration is crucial and needed for every camera settings, e.g. modulation frequency and exposure time. A significant dependency of the modulation signal on the intensity was also observed and hence an additional calibration is needed for each pixel depending on the pixel intensity level. These corrections are important not only for the fundamental frequency, but also for the higher harmonics when using the pulsed supercontinuum laser. With these post data acquisition corrections, the PCO CMOS-FLIM camera can be used for various biomedical applications requiring a large frame and high speed acquisition. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Quantitative Fluorescence Microscopy of Protein Dynamics in Living Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.M. Ibrahim (Shehu)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractThe advent of confocal microscopy, fast microcomputers with high storage capacity and, moreover, the availability of fluorescent proteins of various excitation and emission properties have made fluorescence microscopy the method of choice in the study of protein behaviour in living

  5. Maximizing the biochemical resolving power of fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Alessandro; Popleteeva, Marina; Venkitaraman, Ashok R

    2013-01-01

    Most recent advances in fluorescence microscopy have focused on achieving spatial resolutions below the diffraction limit. However, the inherent capability of fluorescence microscopy to non-invasively resolve different biochemical or physical environments in biological samples has not yet been formally described, because an adequate and general theoretical framework is lacking. Here, we develop a mathematical characterization of the biochemical resolution in fluorescence detection with Fisher information analysis. To improve the precision and the resolution of quantitative imaging methods, we demonstrate strategies for the optimization of fluorescence lifetime, fluorescence anisotropy and hyperspectral detection, as well as different multi-dimensional techniques. We describe optimized imaging protocols, provide optimization algorithms and describe precision and resolving power in biochemical imaging thanks to the analysis of the general properties of Fisher information in fluorescence detection. These strategies enable the optimal use of the information content available within the limited photon-budget typically available in fluorescence microscopy. This theoretical foundation leads to a generalized strategy for the optimization of multi-dimensional optical detection, and demonstrates how the parallel detection of all properties of fluorescence can maximize the biochemical resolving power of fluorescence microscopy, an approach we term Hyper Dimensional Imaging Microscopy (HDIM). Our work provides a theoretical framework for the description of the biochemical resolution in fluorescence microscopy, irrespective of spatial resolution, and for the development of a new class of microscopes that exploit multi-parametric detection systems.

  6. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) data analysis with TIMP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laptenok, S.; Mullen, K.M.; Borst, J.W.; Stokkum, van I.H.M.; Apanasovich, V.V.; Visser, A.J.W.G.

    2007-01-01

    Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM) allows fluorescence lifetime images of biological objects to be collected at 250 nm spatial resolution and at (sub-)nanosecond temporal resolution. Often ncomp kinetic processes underlie the observed fluorescence at all locations, but the intensity of

  7. Experimental assessment of fluorescence microscopy signal enhancement by stimulated emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dake, Fumihiro; Yazawa, Hiroki

    2017-10-01

    The quantity of photons generated during fluorescence microscopy is principally determined by the quantum yield of the fluorescence dyes and the optical power of the excitation beam. However, even though low quantum yields can produce poor images, it is challenging to tune this parameter, while increasing the power of the excitation beam often results in photodamage. Here, we propose the use of stimulated emission (SE) as a means of enhancing both the signal intensity and signal-to-noise ratio during confocal fluorescence microscopy. This work experimentally confirmed that both these factors can be enhanced by SE radiation, through generating a greater number of photons than are associated with the standard fluorescence signal. We also propose the concept of stimulated emission enhancing fluorescence (SEEF) microscopy, which employs both the SE and fluorescence signals, and demonstrate that the intensity of an SEEF signal is greater than those of the individual SE and fluorescence signals.

  8. Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy Imaging-Guided Confocal Single-Molecule Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Desheng; Kaldaras, Leonora; Lu, H. Peter

    2013-01-01

    We have developed an integrated spectroscopy system combining total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy imaging with confocal single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy for two-dimensional interfaces. This spectroscopy approach is capable of both multiple molecules simultaneously sampling and in situ confocal fluorescence dynamics analyses of individual molecules of interest. We have demonstrated the calibration with fluorescent microspheres, and carried out single-molecule spectroscop...

  9. Fluorescence Microscopy as a Diagnostic Tool for Dermatophytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estela Cubells, Jose R; Victoria Martínez, Ana M; Martínez Leboráns, Lorena; Alegre de Miquel, Víctor

    2016-03-01

    Dermatophytosis is a superficial fungal infection of keratinized tissues. Dermatophytes can cause discomfort but are not usually life threatening. However, the infection can spread and may lead to systemic fungal infections in immunocompromised patients. Currently available diagnostic methods include potassium hydroxide (KOH) testing and periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) staining. However, most diagnostic techniques cannot be performed rapidly; days to weeks may be required for conclusive results. Certain dermatophytes autofluoresce and can be observed under fluorescence microscopy. The authors examined a series of 24 cases of hematoxylin and eosin-stained dermatophytoses using fluorescence microscopy and compared the results with those obtained using PAS staining. The diagnostic performance of fluorescence microscopy was better than that of PAS staining. Fluorescence microscopy allowed the detection of all the cases that were detected using PAS staining. In addition, fluorescence microscopy facilitated the detection of weak fluorescence in 2 cases with ambiguous PAS results. These results support the integration into clinical practice of fluorescence microscopy as a simple and rapid diagnostic tool for evaluating cases of suspected dermatophytosis.

  10. [Fluorescence microscopy detection of dermatophytes with Blankophor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haack, D; Zeller, R; Böhm, K H

    1987-01-01

    It is the first time that a fluorescent microscopic rapid-stain process is compared with the alkali method and with mycological culture examination. 810 skin scrapings primarily from horse, cat, and dog were available for analysis. The preparation of the samples for the fluorescent microscope test is easy and quick. The fluorescent stain solution keeps sufficiently long. When the slide preparations are looked at under the fluorescent microscope, the mycological elements light up and can easily be distinguished under survey enlargement. This leads to a considerable reduction of evaluation time. The microscopic proof of dermatophytes is considerably improved by the introduction of the fluorescent microscopic technique into mycological diagnosis, as this process is clearly superior to the alkali method. Dermatophytes are identified and finally evaluated after finishing the cultural analysis. Furthermore, the fluorescent microscopic proof of yeasts of the kind of Pityrosporum yeasts and of Demodex mites is possible. The not inconsiderable costs of the technical equipment may stand in the way of general and routine use of the fluorescent microscope for diagnosing dermatophytes. However, for laboratories with a large number of submitted skin scrapings, this process can be rated as a useful enrichment of their diagnostic potential.

  11. Hybrid confocal Raman fluorescence microscopy on single cells using semiconductor quantum dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Manen, H.J.; Otto, Cornelis

    2007-01-01

    We have overcome the traditional incompatibility of Raman microscopy with fluorescence microscopy by exploiting the optical properties of semiconductor fluorescent quantum dots (QDs). Here we present a hybrid Raman fluorescence spectral imaging approach for single-cell microscopy applications. We

  12. A framework for creating realistic synthetic fluorescence microscopy image sequences

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mabaso, M

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescence microscopy imaging is an important tool in modern biological research, allowing insights into the processes of biological systems. Automated image analysis algorithms help in extracting information from these images. Validation...

  13. Single-molecule fluorescence microscopy in living Caenorhabditis elegans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Krugten, Jaap; Peterman, Erwin J.G.

    2018-01-01

    Transportation of organelles and biomolecules is vital for many cellular processes. Single-molecule (SM) fluorescence microscopy can expose molecular aspects of the dynamics that remain unresolved in ensemble experiments. For example, trajectories of individual, moving biomolecules can reveal

  14. Fluorescence microscopy for the characterization of structural integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Kenneth W.; Leonhardt, Todd A.

    1991-01-01

    The absorption characteristics of light and the optical technique of fluorescence microscopy for enhancing metallographic interpretation are presented. Characterization of thermally sprayed coatings by optical microscopy suffers because of the tendency for misidentification of the microstructure produced by metallographic preparation. Gray scale, in bright field microscopy, is frequently the only means of differentiating the actual structural details of porosity, cracking, and debonding of coatings. Fluorescence microscopy is a technique that helps to distinguish the artifacts of metallographic preparation (pullout, cracking, debonding) from the microstructure of the specimen by color contrasting structural differences. Alternative instrumentation and the use of other dye systems are also discussed. The combination of epoxy vacuum infiltration with fluorescence microscopy to verify microstructural defects is an effective means to characterize advanced materials and to assess structural integrity.

  15. Saturated virtual fluorescence emission difference microscopy based on detector array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shaocong; Sun, Shiyi; Kuang, Cuifang; Ge, Baoliang; Wang, Wensheng; Liu, Xu

    2017-07-01

    Virtual fluorescence emission difference microscopy (vFED) has been proposed recently to enhance the lateral resolution of confocal microscopy with a detector array, implemented by scanning a doughnut-shaped pattern. Theoretically, the resolution can be enhanced by around 1.3-fold compared with that in confocal microscopy. For further improvement of the resolving ability of vFED, a novel method is presented utilizing fluorescence saturation for super-resolution imaging, which we called saturated virtual fluorescence emission difference microscopy (svFED). With a point detector array, matched solid and hollow point spread functions (PSF) can be obtained by photon reassignment, and the difference results between them can be used to boost the transverse resolution. Results show that the diffraction barrier can be surpassed by at least 34% compared with that in vFED and the resolution is around 2-fold higher than that in confocal microscopy.

  16. Automatic tracking of cells for video microscopy in patch clamp experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peixoto, Helton M; Munguba, Hermany; Cruz, Rossana M S; Guerreiro, Ana M G; Leao, Richardson N

    2014-06-20

    Visualisation of neurons labeled with fluorescent proteins or compounds generally require exposure to intense light for a relatively long period of time, often leading to bleaching of the fluorescent probe and photodamage of the tissue. Here we created a technique to drastically shorten light exposure and improve the targeting of fluorescent labeled cells that is specially useful for patch-clamp recordings. We applied image tracking and mask overlay to reduce the time of fluorescence exposure and minimise mistakes when identifying neurons. Neurons are first identified according to visual criteria (e.g. fluorescence protein expression, shape, viability etc.) and a transmission microscopy image Differential Interference Contrast (DIC) or Dodt contrast containing the cell used as a reference for the tracking algorithm. A fluorescence image can also be acquired later to be used as a mask (that can be overlaid on the target during live transmission video). As patch-clamp experiments require translating the microscope stage, we used pattern matching to track reference neurons in order to move the fluorescence mask to match the new position of the objective in relation to the sample. For the image processing we used the Open Source Computer Vision (OpenCV) library, including the Speeded-Up Robust Features (SURF) for tracking cells. The dataset of images (n = 720) was analyzed under normal conditions of acquisition and with influence of noise (defocusing and brightness). We validated the method in dissociated neuronal cultures and fresh brain slices expressing Enhanced Yellow Fluorescent Protein (eYFP) or Tandem Dimer Tomato (tdTomato) proteins, which considerably decreased the exposure to fluorescence excitation, thereby minimising photodamage. We also show that the neuron tracking can be used in differential interference contrast or Dodt contrast microscopy. The techniques of digital image processing used in this work are an important addition to the set of microscopy

  17. Studying membrane properties using Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stöckl, M.T.; Bizzarri, R.; Subramaniam, Vinod; Mely, Y.; Duportail, G.

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is a powerful tool to investigate the structure and composition of biological membranes. A wide variety of fluorescent probes suitable for FLIM experiments have been described. These compounds differ strongly in the details of their incorporation into

  18. Image processing for drift compensation in fluorescence microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Steffen; Thiagarajan, Viruthachalam; Coutinho, Isabel

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy is characterized by low background noise, thus a fluorescent object appears as an area of high signal/noise. Thermal gradients may result in apparent motion of the object, leading to a blurred image. Here, we have developed an image processing methodology that may remove/r...

  19. Correlative fluorescence and electron microscopy in tissues: immunocytochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, J M; Takizawa, T

    2009-09-01

    Correlative microscopy is a collection of procedures that rely upon two or more imaging modalities to examine the same specimen. The imaging modalities employed should each provide unique information and the combined correlative data should be more information rich than that obtained by any of the imaging methods alone. Currently the most common form of correlative microscopy combines fluorescence and electron microscopy. While much of the correlative microscopy in the literature is derived from studies of model cell culture systems we have focused, primarily, on correlative microscopy in tissue samples. The use of tissue, particularly human tissue, may add constraints not encountered in cell culture systems. Ultrathin cryosections, typically used for immunoelectron microscopy, have served as the substrate for correlative fluorescence and electron microscopic immunolocalization in our studies. In this work, we have employed the bifunctional reporter FluoroNanogold. This labeling reagent contains both a fluorochrome and a gold-cluster compound and can be imaged by sequential fluorescence and electron microscopy. This approach permits the examination of exactly the same sub-cellular structures in both fluorescence and electron microscopy with a high level of spatial resolution.

  20. Improved depth resolution in video-rate line-scanning multiphoton microscopy using temporal focusing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tal, Eran; Oron, Dan; Silberberg, Yaron

    2005-07-01

    By introducing spatiotemporal pulse shaping techniques to multiphoton microscopy it is possible to obtain video-rate images with depth resolution similar to point-by-point scanning multiphoton microscopy while mechanically scanning in only one dimension. This is achieved by temporal focusing of the illumination pulse: The pulsed excitation field is compressed as it propagates through the sample, reaching its shortest duration (and highest peak intensity) at the focal plane before stretching again beyond it. This method is applied to produce, in a simple and scalable setup, video-rate two-photon excitation fluorescence images of Drosophila egg chambers with nearly 100,000 effective pixels and 1.5 μm depth resolution.

  1. Tracking Lithium Ions via Widefield Fluorescence Microscopy for Battery Diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla, Nicolas A; Rea, Morgan T; Foy, Michael; Upadhyay, Sunil P; Desrochers, Kyle A; Derus, Tyler; Knapper, Kassandra A; Hunter, Nathanael H; Wood, Sharla; Hinton, Daniel A; Cavell, Andrew C; Masias, Alvaro G; Goldsmith, Randall H

    2017-07-28

    Direct tracking of lithium ions with time and spatial resolution can provide an important diagnostic tool for understanding mechanisms in lithium ion batteries. A fluorescent indicator of lithium ions, 2-(2-hydroxyphenyl)naphthoxazole, was synthesized and used for real-time tracking of lithium ions via widefield fluorescence microscopy. The fluorophore can be excited with visible light and was shown to enable quantitative determination of the lithium ion diffusion constant in a microfluidic model system for a plasticized polymer electrolyte lithium battery. The use of widefield fluorescence microscopy for in situ tracking of lithium ions in batteries is discussed.

  2. Development and testing of hyperbaric atomic force microscopy (AFM) and fluorescence microscopy for biological applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Agostino, D P; McNally, H A; Dean, J B

    2012-05-01

    A commercially available atomic force microscopy and fluorescence microscope were installed and tested inside a custom-designed hyperbaric chamber to provide the capability to study the effects of hyperbaric gases on biological preparations, including cellular mechanism of oxidative stress. In this report, we list details of installing and testing atomic force microscopy and fluorescence microscopy inside a hyperbaric chamber. The pressure vessel was designed to accommodate a variety of imaging equipment and ensures full functionality at ambient and hyperbaric conditions (≤85 psi). Electrical, gas and fluid lines were installed to enable remote operation of instrumentation under hyperbaric conditions, and to maintain viable biological samples with gas-equilibrated superfusate and/or drugs. Systems were installed for vibration isolation and temperature regulation to maintain atomic force microscopy performance during compression and decompression. Results of atomic force microscopy testing demonstrate sub-nanometre resolution at hyperbaric pressure in dry scans and fluid scans, in both contact mode and tapping mode. Noise levels were less when measurements were taken under hyperbaric pressure with air, helium (He) and nitrogen (N(2) ). Atomic force microscopy and fluorescence microscopy measurements were made on a variety of living cell cultures exposed to hyperbaric gases (He, N(2) , O(2) , air). In summary, atomic force microscopy and fluorescence microscopy were installed and tested for use at hyperbaric pressures and enables the study of cellular and molecular effects of hyperbaric gases and pressure per se in biological preparations. © 2012 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2012 Royal Microscopical Society.

  3. Fluorescence confocal polarizing microscopy: Three-dimensional ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Three-dimensional imaging of the director. O D LAVRENTOVICH. Chemical Physics ... cholesteric LCs. Keywords. 3D imaging; confocal microscopy; liquid crystals; dislocations. PACS Nos 07.60. ... magnetic resonance, x-ray diffraction, optical phase retardation, etc., suffer from the same deficiency: they produce only an ...

  4. Fluorescence confocal polarizing microscopy: Three-dimensional ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A PM image bears only two-dimensional (2D) information, integrating the 3D pattern of optical birefringence over the path of light. Recently, we proposed a technique to image 3D director patterns by fluorescence confocal polarizing microscopy (FCPM). The technique employs the property of LC to orient the fluorescent dye ...

  5. Observation of DNA Molecules Using Fluorescence Microscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    This article describes experiments for an undergraduate instrumental analysis laboratory that aim to observe individual double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) molecules using fluorescence microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). dsDNA molecules are observed under several different conditions to discuss their chemical and physical properties. In…

  6. Adaptive fluorescence microscopy by online feedback image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tischer, Christian; Hilsenstein, Volker; Hanson, Kirsten; Pepperkok, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    Obtaining sufficient statistics in quantitative fluorescence microscopy is often hampered by the tedious and time-consuming task of manually locating comparable specimen and repeatedly launching the same acquisition protocol. Recent advances in combining fluorescence microscopy with online image analysis tackle this problem by fully integrating the task of identifying and locating the specimen of interest in an automated acquisition workflow. Here, we describe the general requirements and specific microscope control and image analysis software solutions for implementing such automated online feedback microscopy. We demonstrate the power of the method by two selected applications addressing high-throughput 3D imaging of sparsely parasite-infected tissue culture cells and automated fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments to quantify the turnover of vesicular coat proteins at ER exit sites. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Fundamentals of fluorescence microscopy exploring life with light

    CERN Document Server

    Mondal, Partha Pratim

    2014-01-01

    This book starts at an introductory level and leads reader to the most advanced developments in fluorescence imaging and super-resolution techniques that have enabled the emergence of new disciplines such as nanobioimaging, multiphoton microscopy, photodynamic therapy, nanometrology and nanosensors. The interdisciplinary subject of fluorescence microscopy and imaging requires complete knowledge of imaging optics and molecular physics. So, this book approaches the subject by introducing optical imaging concepts before going deep into the advanced imaging systems and their applications. Molecular orbital theory forms the basis for understanding fluorescent molecules and thereby facilitates complete explanation of light-matter interaction at the geometrical focus. The two disciplines have some overlap since light controls the states of molecules and conversely, molecular states control the emitted light. These two mechanisms together determine essential fluorescence  factors and phenomena such as, molecular cro...

  8. Fluorescence microscopy with diffraction resolution barrier broken by stimulated emission

    OpenAIRE

    Klar, Thomas A.; Jakobs, Stefan; Dyba, Marcus; Egner, Alexander; Hell, Stefan W.

    2000-01-01

    The diffraction barrier responsible for a finite focal spot size and limited resolution in far-field fluorescence microscopy has been fundamentally broken. This is accomplished by quenching excited organic molecules at the rim of the focal spot through stimulated emission. Along the optic axis, the spot size was reduced by up to 6 times beyond the diffraction barrier. The simultaneous 2-fold improvement in the radial direction rendered a nearly spherical fluorescence spot with a diameter of 9...

  9. Nonlinear light-sheet fluorescence microscopy by photobleaching imprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Liang; Zhu, Liren; Li, Chiye; Wang, Lihong V

    2014-04-06

    We present a nonlinear light-sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) scheme based on photobleaching imprinting. By measuring photobleaching-induced fluorescence decay, our method simultaneously achieves a large imaging field of view and a thin optical section. Furthermore, the scattered-light-induced background is significantly reduced, considerably improving image contrast. Our method is expected to expand the application field of LSFM into the optical quasi-ballistic regime, enabling studies on non-transparent biological samples.

  10. Single-Molecule Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Kudalkar, Emily M.; Davis, Trisha N; Asbury, Charles L.

    2016-01-01

    The advent of total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy has permitted visualization of biological events on an unprecedented scale: the single molecule level. Using TIRF, it is now possible to view complex biological interactions such as cargo transport by a single molecular motor or DNA replication in real-time. TIRF allows for visualization of single molecules by eliminating out-of-focus fluorescence and enhancing the signal-to-noise ratio. TIRF has been instrumental for stud...

  11. Cell imaging by transient fluorescence detected infrared microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmori, Tsutomu; Sakai, Makoto; Ishihara, Miya; Kikuchi, Makoto; Fujii, Masaaki

    2008-02-01

    Transient fluorescence detected infrared (TFD-IR) microscopy was developed to overcome the diffraction limit of infrared (IR) light without a near-field system. This microscopic technique is based on TFD-IR spectroscopy, which converts information on IR absorption to fluorescence intensity by further electronic excitation of vibrationally excited molecules by a probing UV/visible light. Roots of Arabidopsis thaliana and living A549 cells with fluorescent dyes were chosen as samples. In the measurements using the TFD-IR microscope, tunable IR picosecond laser pulses were used in the wavelength range from 2700 to 3700 nm, corresponding to CH, NH, and OH stretching modes. Fluorescence images of the root cells of A. thaliana by the TFD-IR scheme were obtained with super-resolution compared with the resolution of conventional IR microscopy. The resolution is estimated to be less than 2.6 μm by fitting of a gaussian function. However, the TFD-IR images were dominated mainly by the fluorescent dyes because they were almost the same as a conventional fluorescence image. To investigate other contributions hidden by that of fluorescent dyes, we plotted the fluorescence intensity in several 5 μm squares at various IR wavelengths, called a TFD-IR spectrum. For root cells of A. thaliana, the TFD-IR spectra show shapes similar to those of a conventional IR absorption spectrum of the fluorescent dye. Therefore, the TFD-IR images are not due to the cellular components. For an A549 cell, the TFD-IR spectra were different from a conventional IR absorption spectrum of fluorescent dyes in the wavelength region shorter than 3100 nm. We speculate that the spectral difference is due to the cellular components, possibly assigned to the combination band related to amino groups of cellular components bonded covalently to the fluorescent dyes.

  12. Two-color two-photon fluorescence laser scanning microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quentmeier, S; Denicke, S; Gericke, K-H

    2009-11-01

    We present the first realization of a Two-Color Two-Photon Laser-Scanning Microscope (2c2pLSM) and UV fluorescence images of cells acquired with this technique. Fluorescence is induced by two-color two-photon absorption using the fundamental and the second harmonic of a Ti:Sa femtosecond laser. Simultaneous absorption of an 800 nm photon and a 400 nm photon energetically corresponds to one-photon absorption at 266 nm. This technique for Laser-Scanning Microscopy extends the excitation wavelength range of a Ti:Sa powered fluorescence microscope to the UV. In addition to the known advantages of multi-photon microscopy like intrinsic 3D resolution, reduced photo damage and high penetration depth 2c2pLSM offers the possibility of using standard high numeric aperture objectives for UV fluorescence imaging. The effective excitation wavelength of 266 nm corresponds especially well to the excitation spectrum of tryptophan. Hence, it is an ideal tool for label free fluorescence studies and imaging of intrinsic protein fluorescence which originates mainly from tryptophan. Thus a very sensitive natural lifetime probe can be used for monitoring protein reactions or changes in conformation. First measurements of living MIN-6 cells reveal differences between the UV fluorescence lifetimes of the nucleus and cytoplasm. The significance of this method was further demonstrated by monitoring the binding of biotin to avidin.

  13. Fluorescence microscopy for measuring fibril angles in pine tracheids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralph O. Marts

    1955-01-01

    Observation and measurement of fibril angles in increment cores or similar small samples from living pine trees was facilitated by the use of fluorescence microscopy. Although some autofluorescence was present, brighter images could be obtained by staining the specimens with a 0.1% aqueous solution of a fluorochrome (Calcozine flavine TG extra concentrated, Calcozine...

  14. Visualizing Single-molecule DNA Replication with Fluorescence Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tanner, Nathan A.; Loparo, Joseph J.; Oijen, Antoine M. van

    2009-01-01

    We describe a simple fluorescence microscopy-based real-time method for observing DNA replication at the single-molecule level. A circular, forked DNA template is attached to a functionalized glass coverslip and replicated extensively after introduction of replication proteins and nucleotides. The

  15. Breaking the diffraction barrier in fluorescence microscopy by optical shelving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretschneider, Stefan; Eggeling, Christian; Hell, Stefan W

    2007-05-25

    We report the breaking of the diffraction resolution barrier in far-field fluorescence microscopy by transiently shelving the fluorophore in a metastable dark state. Using a relatively modest light intensity of several kW/cm(2) in a focal distribution featuring a local zero, we confine the fluorescence emission to a spot whose diameter is a fraction of the wavelength of light. Nanoscale far-field optical resolution down to 50 nm is demonstrated by imaging microtubules in a mammalian cell and proteins on the plasma membrane of a neuron. The presence of dark states in virtually any fluorescent molecule opens up a new venue for far-field microscopy with resolution that is no longer limited by diffraction.

  16. TIRF microscopy evanescent field calibration using tilted fluorescent microtubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gell, C; Berndt, M; Enderlein, J; Diez, S

    2009-04-01

    Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy has become a powerful tool to study the dynamics of sub-cellular structures and single molecules near substrate surfaces. However, the penetration depth of the evanescent field, that is, the distance at which the excitation intensity has exponentially decayed to 1/e, is often left undetermined. This presents a limit on the spatial information about the imaged structures. Here, we present a novel method to quantitatively characterize the illumination in total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy using tilted, fluorescently labelled, microtubules. We find that the evanescent field is well described by a single exponential function, with a penetration depth close to theoretically predicted values. The use of in vitro reconstituted microtubules as nanoscale probes results in a minimal perturbation of the evanescent field; excitation light scattering is eliminated and the refractive index of the sample environment is unchanged. The presented method has the potential to provide a generic tool for in situ calibration of the evanescent field.

  17. Fluorescence cell imaging and manipulation using conventional halogen lamp microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuo Yamagata

    Full Text Available Technologies for vitally labeling cells with fluorescent dyes have advanced remarkably. However, to excite fluorescent dyes currently requires powerful illumination, which can cause phototoxic damage to the cells and increases the cost of microscopy. We have developed a filter system to excite fluorescent dyes using a conventional transmission microscope equipped with a halogen lamp. This method allows us to observe previously invisible cell organelles, such as the metaphase spindle of oocytes, without causing phototoxicity. Cells remain healthy even after intensive manipulation under fluorescence observation, such as during bovine, porcine and mouse somatic cell cloning using nuclear transfer. This method does not require expensive epifluorescence equipment and so could help to reduce the science gap between developed and developing countries.

  18. Fluorescent microscopy approaches of quantitative soil microbial analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Konstantin; Polyanskaya, Lubov

    2015-04-01

    Classical fluorescent microscopy method was used during the last decades in various microbiological studies of terrestrial ecosystems. The method provides representative results and simple application which is allow to use it both as routine part of amplitudinous research and in small-scaled laboratories. Furthermore, depending on research targets a lot of modifications of fluorescent microscopy method were established. Combination and comparison of several approaches is an opportunity of quantitative estimation of microbial community in soil. The first analytical part of the study was dedicated to soil bacterial density estimation by fluorescent microscopy in dynamic of several 30-days experiments. The purpose of research was estimation of changes in soil bacterial community on the different soil horizons under aerobic and anaerobic conditions with adding nutrients in two experimental sets: cellulose and chitin. Was modified the nalidixic acid method for inhibition of DNA division of gram-negative bacteria, and the method provides the quantification of this bacterial group by fluorescent microscopy. Established approach allowed to estimate 3-4 times more cells of gram-negative bacteria in soil. The functions of actinomyces in soil polymer destruction are traditionally considered as dominant in comparison to gram-negative bacterial group. However, quantification of gram-negative bacteria in chernozem and peatland provides underestimation of classical notion for this bacterial group. Chitin introduction had no positive effect to gram-negative bacterial population density changes in chernozem but concurrently this nutrient provided the fast growing dynamics at the first 3 days of experiment both under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. This is confirming chitinolytic activity of gram-negative bacteria in soil organic matter decomposition. At the next part of research modified method for soil gram-negative bacteria quantification was compared to fluorescent in situ

  19. Fluorescent probes and fluorescence (microscopy) techniques--illuminating biological and biomedical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummen, Gregor P C

    2012-11-28

    Fluorescence, the absorption and re-emission of photons with longer wavelengths, is one of those amazing phenomena of Nature. Its discovery and utilization had, and still has, a major impact on biological and biomedical research, since it enables researchers not just to visualize normal physiological processes with high temporal and spatial resolution, to detect multiple signals concomitantly, to track single molecules in vivo, to replace radioactive assays when possible, but also to shed light on many pathobiological processes underpinning disease states, which would otherwise not be possible. Compounds that exhibit fluorescence are commonly called fluorochromes or fluorophores and one of these fluorescent molecules in particular has significantly enabled life science research to gain new insights in virtually all its sub-disciplines: Green Fluorescent Protein. Because fluorescent proteins are synthesized in vivo, integration of fluorescent detection methods into the biological system via genetic techniques now became feasible. Currently fluorescent proteins are available that virtually span the whole electromagnetic spectrum. Concomitantly, fluorescence imaging techniques were developed, and often progress in one field fueled innovation in the other. Impressively, the properties of fluorescence were utilized to develop new assays and imaging modalities, ranging from energy transfer to image molecular interactions to imaging beyond the diffraction limit with super-resolution microscopy. Here, an overview is provided of recent developments in both fluorescence imaging and fluorochrome engineering, which together constitute the “fluorescence toolbox” in life science research.

  20. Fluorescent Probes and Fluorescence (Microscopy Techniques — Illuminating Biological and Biomedical Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregor P. C. Drummen

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescence, the absorption and re-emission of photons with longer wavelengths, is one of those amazing phenomena of Nature. Its discovery and utilization had, and still has, a major impact on biological and biomedical research, since it enables researchers not just to visualize normal physiological processes with high temporal and spatial resolution, to detect multiple signals concomitantly, to track single molecules in vivo, to replace radioactive assays when possible, but also to shed light on many pathobiological processes underpinning disease states, which would otherwise not be possible. Compounds that exhibit fluorescence are commonly called fluorochromes or fluorophores and one of these fluorescent molecules in particular has significantly enabled life science research to gain new insights in virtually all its sub-disciplines: Green Fluorescent Protein. Because fluorescent proteins are synthesized in vivo, integration of fluorescent detection methods into the biological system via genetic techniques now became feasible. Currently fluorescent proteins are available that virtually span the whole electromagnetic spectrum. Concomitantly, fluorescence imaging techniques were developed, and often progress in one field fueled innovation in the other. Impressively, the properties of fluorescence were utilized to develop new assays and imaging modalities, ranging from energy transfer to image molecular interactions to imaging beyond the diffraction limit with super-resolution microscopy. Here, an overview is provided of recent developments in both fluorescence imaging and fluorochrome engineering, which together constitute the “fluorescence toolbox” in life science research.

  1. Two-Photon Fluorescence Microscopy Developed for Microgravity Fluid Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, David G.; Zimmerli, Gregory A.; Asipauskas, Marius

    2004-01-01

    Recent research efforts within the Microgravity Fluid Physics Branch of the NASA Glenn Research Center have necessitated the development of a microscope capable of high-resolution, three-dimensional imaging of intracellular structure and tissue morphology. Standard optical microscopy works well for thin samples, but it does not allow the imaging of thick samples because of severe degradation caused by out-of-focus object structure. Confocal microscopy, which is a laser-based scanning microscopy, provides improved three-dimensional imaging and true optical sectioning by excluding the out-of-focus light. However, in confocal microscopy, out-of-focus object structure is still illuminated by the incoming beam, which can lead to substantial photo-bleaching. In addition, confocal microscopy is plagued by limited penetration depth, signal loss due to the presence of a confocal pinhole, and the possibility of live-cell damage. Two-photon microscopy is a novel form of laser-based scanning microscopy that allows three-dimensional imaging without many of the problems inherent in confocal microscopy. Unlike one-photon microscopy, it utilizes the nonlinear absorption of two near-infrared photons. However, the efficiency of two-photon absorption is much lower than that of one-photon absorption because of the nonlinear (i.e., quadratic) electric field dependence, so an ultrafast pulsed laser source must typically be employed. On the other hand, this stringent energy density requirement effectively localizes fluorophore excitation to the focal volume. Consequently, two-photon microscopy provides optical sectioning and confocal performance without the need for a signal-limiting pinhole. In addition, there is a reduction in photo-damage because of the longer excitation wavelength, a reduction in background fluorescence, and a 4 increase in penetration depth over confocal methods because of the reduction in Rayleigh scattering.

  2. Fluorescence microscopy with diffraction resolution barrier broken by stimulated emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klar, T A; Jakobs, S; Dyba, M; Egner, A; Hell, S W

    2000-07-18

    The diffraction barrier responsible for a finite focal spot size and limited resolution in far-field fluorescence microscopy has been fundamentally broken. This is accomplished by quenching excited organic molecules at the rim of the focal spot through stimulated emission. Along the optic axis, the spot size was reduced by up to 6 times beyond the diffraction barrier. The simultaneous 2-fold improvement in the radial direction rendered a nearly spherical fluorescence spot with a diameter of 90-110 nm. The spot volume of down to 0.67 attoliters is 18 times smaller than that of confocal microscopy, thus making our results also relevant to three-dimensional photochemistry and single molecule spectroscopy. Images of live cells reveal greater details.

  3. Detection of oxidative hair treatment using fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Silvana; Wunder, Cora; Paulke, Alexander; Verhoff, Marcel A; Schubert-Zsilavecz, Manfred; Toennes, Stefan W

    2016-08-01

    In assessing abstinence from drug or alcohol abuse, hair analysis plays an important role. Cosmetic hair treatment influences the content of deposited drugs which is not always detectable during analysis. Since oxidation of melanin leads to an increase in fluorescence, a microscopic method was developed to distinguish natural from cosmetically treated hair. For validation, natural hair samples were treated with different types of cosmetics and inspected by fluorescence microscopy. Hair samples from 20 volunteers with documented cosmetic treatment and as a proof of concept 100 hair samples from forensic cases were analyzed by this method. Apart from autofluorescence with excitation at 365 nm, no obvious fluorescence was observed in untreated hair samples. Tinting and a natural plant product had no influence on fluorescence, but dyeing procedures including oxidation led to a marked increase in fluorescence. Proof of cosmetic treatment was achieved in hair samples from the 20 volunteers. In 100 forensic cases, 13 samples were characterized as oxidatively treated, which was in accordance with the respective disclosure except for one case where treatment was not admitted. This fluorescence microscopic procedure proved to be fast, easy, and reliable to identify oxidatively treated hair samples, which must be considered especially in evaluating cases of negative drug results. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Seeing phenomena in flatland: studies of monolayers by fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knobler, C M

    1990-08-24

    Monolayers formed at the interface between air and water can be seen with fluorescence microscopy. This allows the phase behavior of these monolayers to be determined by direct observation and opens up the possibility of following the kinetics of phase transformations in two-dimensional systems. Some unexpected morphologies have been discovered that provide information about the nature of monolayer phases and have connections to pattern formation in other systems.

  5. Using Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy to Image Zebrafish Eye Development

    OpenAIRE

    Icha, Jaroslav; Schmied, Christopher; Sidhaye, Jaydeep; Tomancak, Pavel; Preibisch, Stephan; Norden, Caren

    2016-01-01

    Light sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) is gaining more and more popularity as a method to image embryonic development. The main advantages of LSFM compared to confocal systems are its low phototoxicity, gentle mounting strategies, fast acquisition with high signal to noise ratio and the possibility of imaging samples from various angles (views) for long periods of time. Imaging from multiple views unleashes the full potential of LSFM, but at the same time it can create terabyte-sized data...

  6. Macromolecular-scale resolution in biological fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnert, Gerald; Keller, Jan; Medda, Rebecca; Andrei, M Alexandra; Rizzoli, Silvio O; Lührmann, Reinhard; Jahn, Reinhard; Eggeling, Christian; Hell, Stefan W

    2006-08-01

    We demonstrate far-field fluorescence microscopy with a focal-plane resolution of 15-20 nm in biological samples. The 10- to 12-fold multilateral increase in resolution below the diffraction barrier has been enabled by the elimination of molecular triplet state excitation as a major source of photobleaching of a number of dyes in stimulated emission depletion microscopy. Allowing for relaxation of the triplet state between subsequent excitation-depletion cycles yields an up to 30-fold increase in total fluorescence signal as compared with reported stimulated emission depletion illumination schemes. Moreover, it enables the reduction of the effective focal spot area by up to approximately 140-fold below that given by diffraction. Triplet-state relaxation can be realized either by reducing the repetition rate of pulsed lasers or by increasing the scanning speed such that the build-up of the triplet state is effectively prevented. This resolution in immunofluorescence imaging is evidenced by revealing nanoscale protein patterns on endosomes, the punctuated structures of intermediate filaments in neurons, and nuclear protein speckles in mammalian cells with conventional optics. The reported performance of diffraction-unlimited fluorescence microscopy opens up a pathway for addressing fundamental problems in the life sciences.

  7. Compressive fluorescence microscopy for biological and hyperspectral imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studer, Vincent; Bobin, Jérome; Chahid, Makhlad; Mousavi, Hamed Shams; Candes, Emmanuel; Dahan, Maxime

    2012-06-26

    The mathematical theory of compressed sensing (CS) asserts that one can acquire signals from measurements whose rate is much lower than the total bandwidth. Whereas the CS theory is now well developed, challenges concerning hardware implementations of CS-based acquisition devices--especially in optics--have only started being addressed. This paper presents an implementation of compressive sensing in fluorescence microscopy and its applications to biomedical imaging. Our CS microscope combines a dynamic structured wide-field illumination and a fast and sensitive single-point fluorescence detection to enable reconstructions of images of fluorescent beads, cells, and tissues with undersampling ratios (between the number of pixels and number of measurements) up to 32. We further demonstrate a hyperspectral mode and record images with 128 spectral channels and undersampling ratios up to 64, illustrating the potential benefits of CS acquisition for higher-dimensional signals, which typically exhibits extreme redundancy. Altogether, our results emphasize the interest of CS schemes for acquisition at a significantly reduced rate and point to some remaining challenges for CS fluorescence microscopy.

  8. Raman microscopy of bladder cancer cells expressing green fluorescent protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandair, Gurjit S.; Han, Amy L.; Keller, Evan T.; Morris, Michael D.

    2016-11-01

    Gene engineering is a commonly used tool in cellular biology to determine changes in function or expression of downstream targets. However, the impact of genetic modulation on biochemical effects is less frequently evaluated. The aim of this study is to use Raman microscopy to assess the biochemical effects of gene silencing on T24 and UMUC-13 bladder cancer cell lines. Cellular biochemical information related to nucleic acid and lipogenic components was obtained from deconvolved Raman spectra. We show that the green fluorescence protein (GFP), the chromophore that served as a fluorescent reporter for gene silencing, could also be detected by Raman microscopy. Only the gene-silenced UMUC-13 cell lines exhibited low-to-moderate GFP fluorescence as determined by fluorescence imaging and Raman spectroscopic studies. Moreover, we show that gene silencing and cell phenotype had a greater effect on nucleic acid and lipogenic components with minimal interference from GFP expression. Gene silencing was also found to perturb cellular protein secondary structure in which the amount of disorderd protein increased at the expense of more ordered protein. Overall, our study identified the spectral signature for cellular GFP expression and elucidated the effects of gene silencing on cancer cell biochemistry and protein secondary structure.

  9. Controlled light-exposure microscopy reduces photobleaching and phototoxicity in fluorescence live-cell imaging.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoebe, R.A.; van Oven, C.H.; Gadella, Th.W.J.; Dhonukshe, P.B.; van Noorden, C.J.F.; Manders, E.M.M.

    2007-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy of living cells enables visualization of the dynamics and interactions of intracellular molecules. However, fluorescence live-cell imaging is limited by photobleaching and phototoxicity induced by the excitation light. Here we describe controlled light-exposure microscopy

  10. Controlled light-exposure microscopy reduces photobleaching and phototoxicity in fluorescence live-cell imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoebe, R. A.; van Oven, C. H.; Gadella, T. W. J.; Dhonukshe, P. B.; van Noorden, C. J. F.; Manders, E. M. M.

    2007-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy of living cells enables visualization of the dynamics and interactions of intracellular molecules. However, fluorescence live-cell imaging is limited by photobleaching and phototoxicity induced by the excitation light. Here we describe controlled light-exposure microscopy (

  11. Self-labelling enzymes as universal tags for fluorescence microscopy, super-resolution microscopy and electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liss, Viktoria; Barlag, Britta; Nietschke, Monika; Hensel, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Research in cell biology demands advanced microscopy techniques such as confocal fluorescence microscopy (FM), super-resolution microscopy (SRM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) is an approach to combine data on the dynamics of proteins or protein complexes in living cells with the ultrastructural details in the low nanometre scale. To correlate both data sets, markers functional in FM, SRM and TEM are required. Genetically encoded markers such as fluorescent proteins or self-labelling enzyme tags allow observations in living cells. Various genetically encoded tags are available for FM and SRM, but only few tags are suitable for CLEM. Here, we describe the red fluorescent dye tetramethylrhodamine (TMR) as a multimodal marker for CLEM. TMR is used as fluorochrome coupled to ligands of genetically encoded self-labelling enzyme tags HaloTag, SNAP-tag and CLIP-tag in FM and SRM. We demonstrate that TMR can additionally photooxidize diaminobenzidine (DAB) to an osmiophilic polymer visible on TEM sections, thus being a marker suitable for FM, SRM and TEM. We evaluated various organelle markers with enzymatic tags in mammalian cells labelled with TMR-coupled ligands and demonstrate the use as efficient and versatile DAB photooxidizer for CLEM approaches. PMID:26643905

  12. Wide-field fluorescent microscopy and fluorescent imaging flow cytometry on a cell-phone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hongying; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2013-04-11

    Fluorescent microscopy and flow cytometry are widely used tools in biomedical research and clinical diagnosis. However these devices are in general relatively bulky and costly, making them less effective in the resource limited settings. To potentially address these limitations, we have recently demonstrated the integration of wide-field fluorescent microscopy and imaging flow cytometry tools on cell-phones using compact, light-weight, and cost-effective opto-fluidic attachments. In our flow cytometry design, fluorescently labeled cells are flushed through a microfluidic channel that is positioned above the existing cell-phone camera unit. Battery powered light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are butt-coupled to the side of this microfluidic chip, which effectively acts as a multi-mode slab waveguide, where the excitation light is guided to uniformly excite the fluorescent targets. The cell-phone camera records a time lapse movie of the fluorescent cells flowing through the microfluidic channel, where the digital frames of this movie are processed to count the number of the labeled cells within the target solution of interest. Using a similar opto-fluidic design, we can also image these fluorescently labeled cells in static mode by e.g. sandwiching the fluorescent particles between two glass slides and capturing their fluorescent images using the cell-phone camera, which can achieve a spatial resolution of e.g. - 10 μm over a very large field-of-view of - 81 mm(2). This cell-phone based fluorescent imaging flow cytometry and microscopy platform might be useful especially in resource limited settings, for e.g. counting of CD4+ T cells toward monitoring of HIV+ patients or for detection of water-borne parasites in drinking water.

  13. Sample drift correction in 3D fluorescence photoactivation localization microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlodzianoski, Michael J.; Schreiner, John M.; Callahan, Steven P.; Smolková, Katarina; Dlasková, Andrea; Šantorová, Jitka; Ježek, Petr; Bewersdorf, Joerg

    2011-08-01

    The recent development of diffraction-unlimited far-field fluorescence microscopy has overcome the classical resolution limit of ~250 nm of conventional light microscopy by about a factor of ten. The improved resolution, however, reveals not only biological structures at an unprecedented resolution, but is also susceptible to sample drift on a much finer scale than previously relevant. Without correction, sample drift leads to smeared images with decreased resolution, and in the worst case to misinterpretation of the imaged structures. This poses a problem especially for techniques such as Fluorescence Photoactivation Localization Microscopy (FPALM/PALM) or Stochastic Optical Reconstruction Microscopy (STORM), which often require minutes recording time. Here we discuss an approach that corrects for three-dimensional (3D) drift in images of fixed samples without the requirement for fiduciary markers or instrument modifications. Drift is determined by calculating the spatial cross-correlation function between subsets of localized particles imaged at different times. Correction down to ~5 nm precision is achieved despite the fact that different molecules are imaged in each frame. We demonstrate the performance of our drift correction algorithm with different simulated structures and analyze its dependence on particle density and localization precision. By imaging mitochondria with Biplane FPALM we show our algorithm's feasibility in a practical application.

  14. Silicon nitride waveguide platform for fluorescence microscopy of living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinguely, Jean-Claude; Helle, Øystein Ivar; Ahluwalia, Balpreet Singh

    2017-10-30

    Waveguide chip-based microscopy reduces the complexity of total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy, and adds features like large field of view illumination, decoupling of illumination and collection path and easy multimodal imaging. However, for the technique to become widespread there is a need of low-loss and affordable waveguides made of high-refractive index material. Here, we develop and report a low-loss silicon nitride (Si 3 N 4 ) waveguide platform for multi-color TIRF microscopy. Single mode conditions at visible wavelengths (488-660 nm) were achieved using shallow rib geometry. To generate uniform excitation over appropriate dimensions waveguide bends were used to filter-out higher modes followed by adiabatic tapering. Si 3 N 4 material is finally shown to be biocompatible for growing and imaging living cells.

  15. Mobile Digital Fluorescence Microscopy for Diagnosis of Tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapley, Asa; Switz, Neil; Reber, Clay; Davis, J. Lucian; Miller, Cecily; Matovu, John Baptist; Worodria, William; Huang, Laurence; Fletcher, Daniel A.

    2013-01-01

    Access to sputum smear microscopy in high-tuberculosis (TB)-burden regions is limited by a scarcity of microscopes and experienced technicians. We evaluated the accuracy of CellScope, a novel digital fluorescence microscope that may expand access to microscopy. The study utilized smear microscopy slides prepared from sputum specimens submitted by consecutive adults with ≥2 weeks of cough who were admitted to Mulago Hospital (Kampala, Uganda). Conventional light-emitting diode (LED) fluorescence microscopy (FM) and mycobacterial culture were performed by experienced technicians. Two U.S.-based postgraduate researchers without prior microscopy experience restained, imaged, and interpreted the slides using CellScope. We assessed whether sensitivity and specificity of CellScope-based LED FM was noninferior to conventional LED FM by using a preselected margin of inferiority of 15%. Of 525 patients included, 72% were HIV seropositive and 39% had culture-confirmed TB. The proportions of positive results were similar with CellScope and conventional LED FM (34% versus 32%, respectively; P = 0.32), and agreement was substantial. CellScope accuracy was within the noninferiority margin for both sensitivity (63% versus 70%; difference, −7%; 95% confidence interval [CI], −13% to −1%) and specificity (85% versus 92%; difference, −7%; 95% CI, −12% to −3%). A subanalysis of 43 slides evaluated by each CellScope reader found substantial interreader reliability (custom-weighted kappa, 0.65) and variable intrareader reliability (custom-weighted kappa, 0.11 versus 0.48). CellScope offers promise for expanding microscopy services. Future studies should evaluate the device when operated by health workers in low-resource settings, the feasibility of image transmission and analysis by experienced microscopists, and the accuracy of automated image analysis algorithms. PMID:23554191

  16. Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM Data Analysis with TIMP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey Laptenok

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM allows fluorescence lifetime images of biological objects to be collected at 250 nm spatial resolution and at (sub-nanosecond temporal resolution. Often ncomp kinetic processes underlie the observed fluorescence at all locations, but the intensity of the fluorescence associated with each process varies per-location, i.e., per-pixel imaged. Then the statistical challenge is global analysis of the image: use of the fluorescence decay in time at all locations to estimate the ncomp lifetimes associated with the kinetic processes, as well as the amplitude of each kinetic process at each location. Given that typical FLIM images represent on the order of 102 timepoints and 103 locations, meeting this challenge is computationally intensive. Here the utility of the TIMP package for R to solve parameter estimation problems arising in FLIM image analysis is demonstrated. Case studies on simulated and real data evidence the applicability of the partitioned variable projection algorithm implemented in TIMP to the problem domain, and showcase options included in the package for the visual validation of models for FLIM data.

  17. Rapid global fitting of large fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy datasets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean C Warren

    Full Text Available Fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM is widely applied to obtain quantitative information from fluorescence signals, particularly using Förster Resonant Energy Transfer (FRET measurements to map, for example, protein-protein interactions. Extracting FRET efficiencies or population fractions typically entails fitting data to complex fluorescence decay models but such experiments are frequently photon constrained, particularly for live cell or in vivo imaging, and this leads to unacceptable errors when analysing data on a pixel-wise basis. Lifetimes and population fractions may, however, be more robustly extracted using global analysis to simultaneously fit the fluorescence decay data of all pixels in an image or dataset to a multi-exponential model under the assumption that the lifetime components are invariant across the image (dataset. This approach is often considered to be prohibitively slow and/or computationally expensive but we present here a computationally efficient global analysis algorithm for the analysis of time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC or time-gated FLIM data based on variable projection. It makes efficient use of both computer processor and memory resources, requiring less than a minute to analyse time series and multiwell plate datasets with hundreds of FLIM images on standard personal computers. This lifetime analysis takes account of repetitive excitation, including fluorescence photons excited by earlier pulses contributing to the fit, and is able to accommodate time-varying backgrounds and instrument response functions. We demonstrate that this global approach allows us to readily fit time-resolved fluorescence data to complex models including a four-exponential model of a FRET system, for which the FRET efficiencies of the two species of a bi-exponential donor are linked, and polarisation-resolved lifetime data, where a fluorescence intensity and bi-exponential anisotropy decay model is applied to the analysis

  18. Rapid global fitting of large fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Sean C; Margineanu, Anca; Alibhai, Dominic; Kelly, Douglas J; Talbot, Clifford; Alexandrov, Yuriy; Munro, Ian; Katan, Matilda; Dunsby, Chris; French, Paul M W

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) is widely applied to obtain quantitative information from fluorescence signals, particularly using Förster Resonant Energy Transfer (FRET) measurements to map, for example, protein-protein interactions. Extracting FRET efficiencies or population fractions typically entails fitting data to complex fluorescence decay models but such experiments are frequently photon constrained, particularly for live cell or in vivo imaging, and this leads to unacceptable errors when analysing data on a pixel-wise basis. Lifetimes and population fractions may, however, be more robustly extracted using global analysis to simultaneously fit the fluorescence decay data of all pixels in an image or dataset to a multi-exponential model under the assumption that the lifetime components are invariant across the image (dataset). This approach is often considered to be prohibitively slow and/or computationally expensive but we present here a computationally efficient global analysis algorithm for the analysis of time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) or time-gated FLIM data based on variable projection. It makes efficient use of both computer processor and memory resources, requiring less than a minute to analyse time series and multiwell plate datasets with hundreds of FLIM images on standard personal computers. This lifetime analysis takes account of repetitive excitation, including fluorescence photons excited by earlier pulses contributing to the fit, and is able to accommodate time-varying backgrounds and instrument response functions. We demonstrate that this global approach allows us to readily fit time-resolved fluorescence data to complex models including a four-exponential model of a FRET system, for which the FRET efficiencies of the two species of a bi-exponential donor are linked, and polarisation-resolved lifetime data, where a fluorescence intensity and bi-exponential anisotropy decay model is applied to the analysis of live cell

  19. Correlative microscopy: bridging the gap between fluorescence light microscopy and cryo-electron tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartori, Anna; Gatz, Rudolf; Beck, Florian; Rigort, Alexander; Baumeister, Wolfgang; Plitzko, Juergen M

    2007-11-01

    Cryo-electron tomography of frozen-hydrated biological samples offers a means of studying large and complex cellular structures in three-dimensions and with nanometer-scale resolution. The low contrast of unstained biological material embedded in amorphous ice and the need to minimise the exposure of these radiation-sensitive samples to the electron beam result in a poor signal-to-noise ratio. This poses problems not only in the visualisation and interpretation of such tomograms, it is also a problem in surveying the sample and in finding regions which contain the features of interest and which are suitable for recording tomograms. To address this problem, we have developed a correlative fluorescence light microscopy-electron microscopy approach, which guides the search for the structures of interest and allows electron microscopy to zoom in on them. With our approach, the total dose spent on locating regions of interest is negligible. A newly designed cryo-holder allows imaging of fluorescently labelled samples after vitrification. The absolute coordinates of structures identified and located by cryo-light microscopy are transferred to the electron microscope via a Matlab-based user interface. We have successfully tested the experimental setup and the whole procedure with two types of adherent fluorescently labelled cells, a neuronal cell line and keratinocytes, both grown directly on EM grids.

  20. Holographic fluorescence microscopy with incoherent digital holographic adaptive optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Changwon; Kim, Jonghyun; Clark, David C; Lee, Seungjae; Lee, Byoungho; Kim, Myung K

    2015-01-01

    Introduction of adaptive optics technology into astronomy and ophthalmology has made great contributions in these fields, allowing one to recover images blurred by atmospheric turbulence or aberrations of the eye. Similar adaptive optics improvement in microscopic imaging is also of interest to researchers using various techniques. Current technology of adaptive optics typically contains three key elements: a wavefront sensor, wavefront corrector, and controller. These hardware elements tend to be bulky, expensive, and limited in resolution, involving, for example, lenslet arrays for sensing or multiactuator deformable mirrors for correcting. We have previously introduced an alternate approach based on unique capabilities of digital holography, namely direct access to the phase profile of an optical field and the ability to numerically manipulate the phase profile. We have also demonstrated that direct access and compensation of the phase profile are possible not only with conventional coherent digital holography, but also with a new type of digital holography using incoherent light: selfinterference incoherent digital holography (SIDH). The SIDH generates a complex—i.e., amplitude plus phase—hologram from one or several interferograms acquired with incoherent light, such as LEDs, lamps, sunlight, or fluorescence. The complex point spread function can be measured using guide star illumination and it allows deterministic deconvolution of the full-field image. We present experimental demonstration of aberration compensation in holographic fluorescence microscopy using SIDH. Adaptive optics by SIDH provides new tools for improved cellular fluorescence microscopy through intact tissue layers or other types of aberrant media.

  1. Parallel detection experiment of fluorescence confocal microscopy using DMD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qingqing; Zheng, Jihong; Wang, Kangni; Gui, Kun; Guo, Hanming; Zhuang, Songlin

    2016-05-01

    Parallel detection of fluorescence confocal microscopy (PDFCM) system based on Digital Micromirror Device (DMD) is reported in this paper in order to realize simultaneous multi-channel imaging and improve detection speed. DMD is added into PDFCM system, working to take replace of the single traditional pinhole in the confocal system, which divides the laser source into multiple excitation beams. The PDFCM imaging system based on DMD is experimentally set up. The multi-channel image of fluorescence signal of potato cells sample is detected by parallel lateral scanning in order to verify the feasibility of introducing the DMD into fluorescence confocal microscope. In addition, for the purpose of characterizing the microscope, the depth response curve is also acquired. The experimental result shows that in contrast to conventional microscopy, the DMD-based PDFCM system has higher axial resolution and faster detection speed, which may bring some potential benefits in the biology and medicine analysis. SCANNING 38:234-239, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Correlated cryo-fluorescence and cryo-electron microscopy with high spatial precision and improved sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schorb, Martin [Structural and Computational Biology Unit, European Molecular Biology Laboratory, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Briggs, John A.G., E-mail: john.briggs@embl.de [Structural and Computational Biology Unit, European Molecular Biology Laboratory, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Cell Biology and Biophysics Unit, European Molecular Biology Laboratory, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-08-01

    Performing fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy on the same sample allows fluorescent signals to be used to identify and locate features of interest for subsequent imaging by electron microscopy. To carry out such correlative microscopy on vitrified samples appropriate for structural cryo-electron microscopy it is necessary to perform fluorescence microscopy at liquid-nitrogen temperatures. Here we describe an adaptation of a cryo-light microscopy stage to permit use of high-numerical aperture objectives. This allows high-sensitivity and high-resolution fluorescence microscopy of vitrified samples. We describe and apply a correlative cryo-fluorescence and cryo-electron microscopy workflow together with a fiducial bead-based image correlation procedure. This procedure allows us to locate fluorescent bacteriophages in cryo-electron microscopy images with an accuracy on the order of 50 nm, based on their fluorescent signal. It will allow the user to precisely and unambiguously identify and locate objects and events for subsequent high-resolution structural study, based on fluorescent signals. - Highlights: • Workflow for correlated cryo-fluorescence and cryo-electron microscopy. • Cryo-fluorescence microscopy setup incorporating a high numerical aperture objective. • Fluorescent signals located in cryo-electron micrographs with 50 nm spatial precision.

  3. Quantitative high dynamic range beam profiling for fluorescence microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, T. J., E-mail: t.j.mitchell@dur.ac.uk; Saunter, C. D.; O’Nions, W.; Girkin, J. M.; Love, G. D. [Centre for Advanced Instrumentation and Biophysical Sciences Institute, Department of Physics, Durham University, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-15

    Modern developmental biology relies on optically sectioning fluorescence microscope techniques to produce non-destructive in vivo images of developing specimens at high resolution in three dimensions. As optimal performance of these techniques is reliant on the three-dimensional (3D) intensity profile of the illumination employed, the ability to directly record and analyze these profiles is of great use to the fluorescence microscopist or instrument builder. Though excitation beam profiles can be measured indirectly using a sample of fluorescent beads and recording the emission along the microscope detection path, we demonstrate an alternative approach where a miniature camera sensor is used directly within the illumination beam. Measurements taken using our approach are solely concerned with the illumination optics as the detection optics are not involved. We present a miniature beam profiling device and high dynamic range flux reconstruction algorithm that together are capable of accurately reproducing quantitative 3D flux maps over a large focal volume. Performance of this beam profiling system is verified within an optical test bench and demonstrated for fluorescence microscopy by profiling the low NA illumination beam of a single plane illumination microscope. The generality and success of this approach showcases a widely flexible beam amplitude diagnostic tool for use within the life sciences.

  4. Simultaneous Fluorescence and Phosphorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy in Living Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahn, Karolina; Buschmann, Volker; Hille, Carsten

    2015-09-01

    In living cells, there are always a plethora of processes taking place at the same time. Their precise regulation is the basis of cellular functions, since small failures can lead to severe dysfunctions. For a comprehensive understanding of intracellular homeostasis, simultaneous multiparameter detection is a versatile tool for revealing the spatial and temporal interactions of intracellular parameters. Here, a recently developed time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC) board was evaluated for simultaneous fluorescence and phosphorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM/PLIM). Therefore, the metabolic activity in insect salivary glands was investigated by recording ns-decaying intrinsic cellular fluorescence, mainly related to oxidized flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) and the μs-decaying phosphorescence of the oxygen-sensitive ruthenium-complex Kr341. Due to dopamine stimulation, the metabolic activity of salivary glands increased, causing a higher pericellular oxygen consumption and a resulting increase in Kr341 phosphorescence decay time. Furthermore, FAD fluorescence decay time decreased, presumably due to protein binding, thus inducing a quenching of FAD fluorescence decay time. Through application of the metabolic drugs antimycin and FCCP, the recorded signals could be assigned to a mitochondrial origin. The dopamine-induced changes could be observed in sequential FLIM and PLIM recordings, as well as in simultaneous FLIM/PLIM recordings using an intermediate TCSPC timing resolution.

  5. Scanless multitarget-matching multiphoton excitation fluorescence microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junpeng Qiu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Using the combination of a reflective blazed grating and a reflective phase-only diffractive spatial light modulator (SLM, scanless multitarget-matching multiphoton excitation fluorescence microscopy (SMTM-MPM was achieved. The SLM shaped an incoming mode-locked, near-infrared Ti:sapphire laser beam into an excitation pattern with addressable shapes and sizes that matched the samples of interest in the field of view. Temporal and spatial focusing were simultaneously realized by combining an objective lens and a blazed grating. The fluorescence signal from illuminated areas was recorded by a two-dimensional sCMOS camera. Compared with a conventional temporal focusing multiphoton microscope, our microscope achieved effective use of the laser power and decreased photodamage with higher axial resolution.

  6. Fluorescence microscopy imaging of electroperturbation in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yinghua; Vernier, P Thomas; Behrend, Matthew; Wang, Jingjing; Thu, Mya Mya; Gundersen, Martin; Marcu, Laura

    2006-01-01

    We report the design, integration, and validation of a fluorescence microscopy system for imaging of electroperturbation--the effects of nanosecond, megavolt-per-meter pulsed electric fields on biological cells and tissues. Such effects have potential applications in cancer therapy, gene regulation, and biophysical research by noninvasively disrupting intracellular compartments and inducing apoptosis in malignant cells. As the primary observing platform, an epifluorescence microscope integrating a nanosecond high-voltage pulser and a micrometer electrode chamber enable in situ imaging of the intracellular processes triggered by high electric fields. Using specific fluorescence molecular probes, the dynamic biological responses of Jurkat T lymphocytes to nanosecond electric pulses (nanoelectropulses) are studied with this system, including calcium bursts, the polarized translocation of phosphatidylserine (PS), and nuclear enlargement and chromatin/DNA structural changes.

  7. Imaging chromophores with undetectable fluorescence by stimulated emission microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Wei; Lu, Sijia; Chong, Shasha; Roy, Rahul; Holtom, Gary R; Xie, X Sunney

    2009-10-22

    Fluorescence, that is, spontaneous emission, is generally more sensitive than absorption measurement, and is widely used in optical imaging. However, many chromophores, such as haemoglobin and cytochromes, absorb but have undetectable fluorescence because the spontaneous emission is dominated by their fast non-radiative decay. Yet the detection of their absorption is difficult under a microscope. Here we use stimulated emission, which competes effectively with the nonradiative decay, to make the chromophores detectable, and report a new contrast mechanism for optical microscopy. In a pump-probe experiment, on photoexcitation by a pump pulse, the sample is stimulated down to the ground state by a time-delayed probe pulse, the intensity of which is concurrently increased. We extract the miniscule intensity increase with shot-noise-limited sensitivity by using a lock-in amplifier and intensity modulation of the pump beam at a high megahertz frequency. The signal is generated only at the laser foci owing to the nonlinear dependence on the input intensities, providing intrinsic three-dimensional optical sectioning capability. In contrast, conventional one-beam absorption measurement exhibits low sensitivity, lack of three-dimensional sectioning capability, and complication by linear scattering of heterogeneous samples. We demonstrate a variety of applications of stimulated emission microscopy, such as visualizing chromoproteins, non-fluorescent variants of the green fluorescent protein, monitoring lacZ gene expression with a chromogenic reporter, mapping transdermal drug distributions without histological sectioning, and label-free microvascular imaging based on endogenous contrast of haemoglobin. For all these applications, sensitivity is orders of magnitude higher than for spontaneous emission or absorption contrast, permitting nonfluorescent reporters for molecular imaging.

  8. Differential Counting of Asbestos Using Phase Contrast and Fluorescence Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Tomoki; Alexandrov, Maxym; Ishida, Takenori; Hirota, Ryuichi; Ikeda, Takeshi; Sekiguchi, Kiyoshi; Kuroda, Akio

    2016-11-01

    Considering the increasing use of various asbestos substitutes, asbestos risk management in many industries may require accurate techniques for detecting and distinguishing asbestos from non-asbestos fibers. Using fluorescently labeled asbestos-binding proteins, we previously developed a novel method for detection and counting of asbestos fibers under fluorescence microscopy (FM). This method can provide speedy, on-site detection and identification of the asbestos fibers and has higher sensitivity than phase contrast microscopy (PCM). However, current asbestos exposure limits are derived from risk assessments based on epidemiological studies that were conducted using PCM fiber counts. Therefore, the sensitivity of asbestos testing should be maintained at PCM level to properly assess compliance with these limit values. Here, we developed and tested a novel application of FM as a differential counting method that complements PCM analysis and is fully compatible with the PCM-based epidemiological data. In the combined PCM-FM method, the fluorescent asbestos-binding probe is applied prior to filter clearing. The method makes it possible to easily switch between two microscopic techniques while analyzing the same fields of view: PCM is used for counting fibers, and FM for differentiating asbestos from non-asbestos fibers. Using airborne dust samples from demolition sites in Japan, we compared PCM-FM with scanning electron microscopy (SEM)-based differential counting method. Statistical analysis indicated a slight conservative bias of PCM-FM method, combined with relatively high variability across the full range of fiber concentrations in our sample set. Using correlative microscopy, we also evaluated the specificity of FM staining, which is a potential cause of variability between the two methods. The energy-dispersive X-ray analysis indicated that ~95% of fluorescently stained fibers in the demolition site samples were correctly identified as asbestos. While further

  9. Light sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM): past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, John; Lee, Hwee Kuan; Yu, Weimiao; Ahmed, Sohail

    2014-10-07

    Light sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) has emerged as an important imaging modality to follow biology in live 3D samples over time with reduced phototoxicity and photobleaching. In particular, LSFM has been instrumental in revealing the detail of early embryonic development of Zebrafish, Drosophila, and C. elegans. Open access projects, DIY-SPIM, OpenSPIM, and OpenSPIN, now allow LSFM to be set-up easily and at low cost. The aim of this paper is to facilitate the set-up and use of LSFM by reviewing and comparing open access projects, image processing tools and future challenges.

  10. Perspectives in Super-resolved Fluorescence Microscopy: What comes next?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph eCremer

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2014 has been awarded to three scientists involved in the development of STED and PALM super-resolution fluorescence microscopy (SRM methods. They have proven that it is possible to overcome the hundred year old theoretical limit for the resolution potential of light microscopy (of about 200 nm for visible light, which for decades has precluded a direct glimpse of the molecular machinery of life. None of the present-day super-resolution techniques have invalidated the Abbe limit for light optical detection; however, they have found clever ways around it. In this report, we discuss some of the challenges still to be resolved before arising SRM approaches will be fit to bring about the revolution in Biology and Medicine envisaged. Some of the challenges discussed are the applicability to image live and/or large samples, the further enhancement of resolution, future developments of labels, and multi-spectral approaches.

  11. Total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy of Chlamydomonas flagella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Benjamin D; Lechtreck, Karl-Ferdinand; Sakai, Tsuyoshi; Ikebe, Mitsuo; Witman, George B; Marshall, Wallace F

    2009-01-01

    The eukaryotic flagellum is host to a variety of dynamic behaviors, including flagellar beating, the motility of glycoproteins in the flagellar membrane, and intraflagellar transport (IFT), the bidirectional traffic of protein particles between the flagellar base and tip. IFT is of particular interest, as it plays integral roles in flagellar length control, cell signaling, development, and human disease. However, our ability to understand dynamic flagellar processes such as IFT is limited in large part by the fidelity with which we can image these behaviors in living cells. This chapter introduces the application of total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy to visualize the flagella of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The advantages and challenges of TIRF are discussed in comparison to confocal and differential interference contrast techniques. This chapter also reviews current IFT insights gleaned from TIRF microscopy of Chlamydomonas and provides an outlook on the future of the technique, with particular emphasis on combining TIRF with other emerging imaging technologies. 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Reliability of acridine orange fluorescence microscopy in oral cytodiagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilima Prakash

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Context and Aims: The oral cavity is the most predominant location in the head and neck region for primary malignant epithelial tumors. Oral cancer is estimated to be the sixth most common malignancy. Early recognition is imperative for successful treatment and good prognosis. Exfoliative cytology is a simple and reasonably effective technique for rapid initial evaluation of a suspicious oral lesion. The present study was conducted to determine the reliability of acridine orange fluorescence microscopy for cytodiagnosis as a more rapid and easier method for the final evaluation of the cytological specimen. Materials and Methods: Smears were collected from 20 individuals with oral lesions suspicious of malignancy, oral lesions not suggestive of malignancy and normal buccal mucosa. One smear was stained with Papanicolaou stain and another one with acridine orange stain. The differences in the study group and control group were compared by means of the χ2 (Chi-square test. The results were considered statistically significant whenever P was <0.05. Results: The acridine orange fluorescence stain reliably demonstrated malignant cells based on the differential fluorescence - a cytochemical criterion. The efficacy of the stain was higher than the conventional Papanicolaou stain in screening of oral lesions suspicious of malignancy. However, the acridine orange fluorescence stain did not differentiate effectively between malignant cells and rapidly proliferating cells, as the technique is based on the nucleic acid content. Conclusion: The fluorescent acridine orange method can be used reliably for the screening of carcinomas and it is especially helpful in the follow-up detection of recurrent carcinoma in previously treated cases.

  13. Correlative super-resolution fluorescence and electron microscopy using conventional fluorescent proteins in vacuo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peddie, Christopher J; Domart, Marie-Charlotte; Snetkov, Xenia; O'Toole, Peter; Larijani, Banafshe; Way, Michael; Cox, Susan; Collinson, Lucy M

    2017-08-01

    Super-resolution light microscopy, correlative light and electron microscopy, and volume electron microscopy are revolutionising the way in which biological samples are examined and understood. Here, we combine these approaches to deliver super-accurate correlation of fluorescent proteins to cellular structures. We show that YFP and GFP have enhanced blinking properties when embedded in acrylic resin and imaged under partial vacuum, enabling in vacuo single molecule localisation microscopy. In conventional section-based correlative microscopy experiments, the specimen must be moved between imaging systems and/or further manipulated for optimal viewing. These steps can introduce undesirable alterations in the specimen, and complicate correlation between imaging modalities. We avoided these issues by using a scanning electron microscope with integrated optical microscope to acquire both localisation and electron microscopy images, which could then be precisely correlated. Collecting data from ultrathin sections also improved the axial resolution and signal-to-noise ratio of the raw localisation microscopy data. Expanding data collection across an array of sections will allow 3-dimensional correlation over unprecedented volumes. The performance of this technique is demonstrated on vaccinia virus (with YFP) and diacylglycerol in cellular membranes (with GFP). Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Generating live cell data using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toomre, Derek

    2012-04-01

    Live cell fluorescent microscopy is important in elucidating dynamic cellular processes such as cell signaling, membrane trafficking, and cytoskeleton remodeling. Often, transient intermediate states are revealed only when imaged and quantitated at the single-molecule, vesicle, or organelle level. Such insight depends on the spatiotemporal resolution and sensitivity of a given microscopy method. Confocal microscopes optically section the cell and improve image contrast and axial resolution (>600 nm) compared with conventional epifluorescence microscopes. Another approach, which can selectively excite fluorophores in an even thinner optical plane (thin, exponentially decaying, evanescent field of excitation can be generated at the interface of two mediums of different refractive index (RI) (e.g., the glass coverslip and the biological specimen); as such, TIRFM is ill-suited to deep imaging of cells or tissue. However, for processes near the lower cell cortex, the sensitivity of TIRFM is exquisite. The recent availability of a very high numerical-aperture (NA) objective lens (>1.45) and turnkey TIRFM systems by all the major microscopy manufacturers has made TIRFM increasingly accessible and attractive to biologists, especially when performed in a quantitative manner and complemented with orthogonal genetic and molecular manipulations. This article discusses sample preparation for TIRFM, acquisition of time-lapse movies, and quantitative analysis. It also gives examples of imaging cytoskeleton dynamics and exo- and endocytosis using TIRFM.

  15. Augmented microscopy with near-infrared fluorescence detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Jeffrey R.; Martirosyan, Nikolay; Skoch, Jesse; Lemole, G. Michael; Anton, Rein; Romanowski, Marek

    2015-03-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence has become a frequently used intraoperative technique for image-guided surgical interventions. In procedures such as cerebral angiography, surgeons use the optical surgical microscope for the color view of the surgical field, and then switch to an electronic display for the NIR fluorescence images. However, the lack of stereoscopic, real-time, and on-site coregistration adds time and uncertainty to image-guided surgical procedures. To address these limitations, we developed the augmented microscope, whereby the electronically processed NIR fluorescence image is overlaid with the anatomical optical image in real-time within the optical path of the microscope. In vitro, the augmented microscope can detect and display indocyanine green (ICG) concentrations down to 94.5 nM, overlaid with the anatomical color image. We prepared polyacrylamide tissue phantoms with embedded polystyrene beads, yielding scattering properties similar to brain matter. In this model, 194 μM solution of ICG was detectable up to depths of 5 mm. ICG angiography was then performed in anesthetized rats. A dynamic process of ICG distribution in the vascular system overlaid with anatomical color images was observed and recorded. In summary, the augmented microscope demonstrates NIR fluorescence detection with superior real-time coregistration displayed within the ocular of the stereomicroscope. In comparison to other techniques, the augmented microscope retains full stereoscopic vision and optical controls including magnification and focus, camera capture, and multiuser access. Augmented microscopy may find application in surgeries where the use of traditional microscopes can be enhanced by contrast agents and image guided delivery of therapeutics, including oncology, neurosurgery, and ophthalmology.

  16. Investigation of Nematode Diversity using Scanning Electron Microscopy and Fluorescent Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seacor, Taylor; Howell, Carina

    2013-03-01

    Nematode worms account for the vast majority of the animals in the biosphere. They are colossally important to global public health as parasites, and to agriculture both as pests and as beneficial inhabitants of healthy soil. Amphid neurons are the anterior chemosensory neurons in nematodes, mediating critical behaviors including chemotaxis and mating. We are examining the cellular morphology and external anatomy of amphid neurons, using fluorescence microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, respectively, of a wide range of soil nematodes isolated in the wild. We use both classical systematics (e.g. diagnostic keys) and molecular markers (e.g. ribosomal RNA) to classify these wild isolates. Our ultimate aim is to build a detailed anatomical database in order to dissect genetic pathways of neuronal development and function across phylogeny and ecology. Research supported by NSF grants 092304, 0806660, 1058829 and Lock Haven University FPDC grants

  17. Video Object Tracking in Neural Axons with Fluorescence Microscopy Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Yuan

    2014-01-01

    tracking. In this paper, we describe two automated tracking methods for analyzing neurofilament movement based on two different techniques: constrained particle filtering and tracking-by-detection. First, we introduce the constrained particle filtering approach. In this approach, the orientation and position of a particle are constrained by the axon’s shape such that fewer particles are necessary for tracking neurofilament movement than object tracking techniques based on generic particle filtering. Secondly, a tracking-by-detection approach to neurofilament tracking is presented. For this approach, the axon is decomposed into blocks, and the blocks encompassing the moving neurofilaments are detected by graph labeling using Markov random field. Finally, we compare two tracking methods by performing tracking experiments on real time-lapse image sequences of neurofilament movement, and the experimental results show that both methods demonstrate good performance in comparison with the existing approaches, and the tracking accuracy of the tracing-by-detection approach is slightly better between the two.

  18. Dynamic Fluorescence Microscopy of Cellular Uptake of Intercalating Model Drugs by Ultrasound-Activated Microbubbles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammertink, B.H.A.; Deckers, R.; Derieppe, M.; De Cock, I.; Lentacker, I.; Storm, G.; Moonen, C. T.W.; Bos, C.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The combination of ultrasound and microbubbles can facilitate cellular uptake of (model) drugs via transient permeabilization of the cell membrane. By using fluorescent molecules, this process can be studied conveniently with confocal fluorescence microscopy. This study aimed to investigate

  19. Directional bilateral filters for smoothing fluorescence microscopy images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesh, Manasij; Mohan, Kavya; Seelamantula, Chandra Sekhar

    2015-08-01

    Images obtained through fluorescence microscopy at low numerical aperture (NA) are noisy and have poor resolution. Images of specimens such as F-actin filaments obtained using confocal or widefield fluorescence microscopes contain directional information and it is important that an image smoothing or filtering technique preserve the directionality. F-actin filaments are widely studied in pathology because the abnormalities in actin dynamics play a key role in diagnosis of cancer, cardiac diseases, vascular diseases, myofibrillar myopathies, neurological disorders, etc. We develop the directional bilateral filter as a means of filtering out the noise in the image without significantly altering the directionality of the F-actin filaments. The bilateral filter is anisotropic to start with, but we add an additional degree of anisotropy by employing an oriented domain kernel for smoothing. The orientation is locally adapted using a structure tensor and the parameters of the bilateral filter are optimized for within the framework of statistical risk minimization. We show that the directional bilateral filter has better denoising performance than the traditional Gaussian bilateral filter and other denoising techniques such as SURE-LET, non-local means, and guided image filtering at various noise levels in terms of peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR). We also show quantitative improvements in low NA images of F-actin filaments.

  20. Directional bilateral filters for smoothing fluorescence microscopy images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manasij Venkatesh

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Images obtained through fluorescence microscopy at low numerical aperture (NA are noisy and have poor resolution. Images of specimens such as F-actin filaments obtained using confocal or widefield fluorescence microscopes contain directional information and it is important that an image smoothing or filtering technique preserve the directionality. F-actin filaments are widely studied in pathology because the abnormalities in actin dynamics play a key role in diagnosis of cancer, cardiac diseases, vascular diseases, myofibrillar myopathies, neurological disorders, etc. We develop the directional bilateral filter as a means of filtering out the noise in the image without significantly altering the directionality of the F-actin filaments. The bilateral filter is anisotropic to start with, but we add an additional degree of anisotropy by employing an oriented domain kernel for smoothing. The orientation is locally adapted using a structure tensor and the parameters of the bilateral filter are optimized for within the framework of statistical risk minimization. We show that the directional bilateral filter has better denoising performance than the traditional Gaussian bilateral filter and other denoising techniques such as SURE-LET, non-local means, and guided image filtering at various noise levels in terms of peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR. We also show quantitative improvements in low NA images of F-actin filaments.

  1. Bayesian-based deconvolution fluorescence microscopy using dynamically updated nonstationary expectation estimates

    OpenAIRE

    Alexander Wong; Xiao Yu Wang; Maud Gorbet

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy is widely used for the study of biological specimens. Deconvolution can significantly improve the resolution and contrast of images produced using fluorescence microscopy; in particular, Bayesian-based methods have become very popular in deconvolution fluorescence microscopy. An ongoing challenge with Bayesian-based methods is in dealing with the presence of noise in low SNR imaging conditions. In this study, we present a Bayesian-based method for performing deconvolut...

  2. Perfluorodecalin-soluble fluorescent dyes for the monitoring of circulating nanocapsules with intravital fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laudien, J; Naglav, D; Groβ-Heitfeld, C; Ferenz, K B; de Groot, H; Mayer, C; Schulz, S; Schnepf, A; Kirsch, M

    2014-01-01

    Perfluorodecalin (PFD) is an established artificial oxygen carrier due to its physical capability to solve the respiratory gases oxygen and carbon dioxide. PFD-filled poly(n-butyl-cyanoacrylate) (PACA) nanocapsules are already discussed as effective artificial oxygen carriers, and their principal suitability for intravenous administration had been shown. To further elucidate their action in vivo, it is imperative to characterise their preclinical safety and particularly their biodistribution. For these purposes, intravital fluorescence microscopy would display an attractive technique in order to monitor the PACA nanocapsules in vivo, but unfortunately, it is impossible to stain the PACA nanocapsules with a fluorescent dye fulfilling special criteria required for in vivo microscopy. In order to develop such a dye, a long-chained fluorinated thiol was used to modify a BODIPY derivative that is a highly fluorescent organic compound belonging to the difluoro-boraindacene family, as well as to functionalise mesoscopic systems, such as CdSe/ZnS-quantum dots and gold nanoparticles. Furthermore, a functionalisation of porphyrin derivatives was investigated by placing divalent ions in the centre of these systems. Due to the high solubility of all synthesised dyes in PFD, it should be possible to stain PFD-filled particles in general. However, only the functionalised BODIPY derivative was suitable for in vivo monitoring of the PFD-filled PACA nanocapsules.

  3. Multiphoton fluorescence and second harmonic generation microscopy for imaging keratoconus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yen; Lo, Wen; Lin, Sung-Jan; Lin, Wei-Chou; Jee, Shiou-Hwa; Tan, Hsin-Yuan; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2006-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the possible application of multiphoton fluorescence and second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy for imaging the structural features of keratoconus cornea and to evaluate its potential as being a clinical in vivo monitoring technique. Using the near-infrared excitation source from a titanium-sapphire laser pumped by a diode-pumped, solid state (DPSS) laser system, we can induce and simultaneously acquire multiphoton autofluorescence and SHG signals from the cornea specimens with keratoconus. A home-modified commercial microscope system with specified optical components is used for optimal signal detection. Keratoconus cornea button from patient with typical clinical presentation of keratoconus was obtained at the time of penetrating keratoplasty. The specimen was also sent for the histological examination as comparison. In all samples of keratoconus, destruction of lamellar structure with altered collagen fiber orientation was observed within whole layer of the diseased stromal area. In addition, the orientation of the altered collagen fibers within the cone area shows a trend directing toward the apex of the cone, which might implicate the biomechanical response of the keratoconus stroma to the intraocular pressure. Moreover, increased autofluorescent cells were also found in the cone area, with increased density as one approaches the apical area. In conclusion, multiphoton autofluorescence and SHG microscopy non-invasively demonstrated the morphological features of keratoconus cornea, especially the structural alternations of the stromal lamellae. We believe that in the future the multiphoton microscopy can be applied in vivo as an effective, non-invasive diagnostic and monitoring technique for keratoconus.

  4. Correlated Cryo-fluorescence and Cryo-electron Microscopy with High Spatial Precision and Improved Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schorb, Martin; Briggs, John A. G.

    2017-01-01

    Performing fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy on the same sample allows fluorescent signals to be used to identify and locate features of interest for subsequent imaging by electron microscopy. To carry out such correlative microscopy on vitrified samples appropriate for structural cryo-electron microscopy it is necessary to perform fluorescence microscopy at liquid-nitrogen temperatures. Here we describe an adaptation of a cryo-light microscopy stage to permit use of high-numerical aperture objectives. This allows high-sensitivity and high-resolution fluorescence microscopy of vitrified samples. We describe and apply a correlative cryo-fluorescence and cryo-electron microscopy workflow together with a fiducial bead-based image correlation procedure. This procedure allows us to locate fluorescent bacteriophages in cryo-electron microscopy images with an accuracy on the order of 50 nm, based on their fluorescent signal. It will allow the user to precisely and unambiguously identify and locate objects and events for subsequent high-resolution structural study, based on fluorescent signals. PMID:24275379

  5. Correlated cryo-fluorescence and cryo-electron microscopy with high spatial precision and improved sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schorb, Martin; Briggs, John A G

    2014-08-01

    Performing fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy on the same sample allows fluorescent signals to be used to identify and locate features of interest for subsequent imaging by electron microscopy. To carry out such correlative microscopy on vitrified samples appropriate for structural cryo-electron microscopy it is necessary to perform fluorescence microscopy at liquid-nitrogen temperatures. Here we describe an adaptation of a cryo-light microscopy stage to permit use of high-numerical aperture objectives. This allows high-sensitivity and high-resolution fluorescence microscopy of vitrified samples. We describe and apply a correlative cryo-fluorescence and cryo-electron microscopy workflow together with a fiducial bead-based image correlation procedure. This procedure allows us to locate fluorescent bacteriophages in cryo-electron microscopy images with an accuracy on the order of 50 nm, based on their fluorescent signal. It will allow the user to precisely and unambiguously identify and locate objects and events for subsequent high-resolution structural study, based on fluorescent signals. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. High-precision correlative fluorescence and electron cryo microscopy using two independent alignment markers ☆

    OpenAIRE

    Schellenberger, Pascale; Kaufmann, Rainer; Siebert, C. Alistair; Hagen, Christoph; Wodrich, Harald; Grünewald, Kay

    2014-01-01

    Correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) is an emerging technique which combines functional information provided by fluorescence microscopy (FM) with the high-resolution structural information of electron microscopy (EM). So far, correlative cryo microscopy of frozen-hydrated samples has not reached better than micrometre range accuracy. Here, a method is presented that enables the correlation between fluorescently tagged proteins and electron cryo tomography (cryoET) data with nanome...

  7. Video-rate in vivo fluorescence imaging with a line-scanned dual-axis confocal microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ye; Wang, Danni; Khan, Altaz; Wang, Yu; Borwege, Sabine; Sanai, Nader; Liu, Jonathan T. C.

    2015-10-01

    Video-rate optical-sectioning microscopy of living organisms would allow for the investigation of dynamic biological processes and would also reduce motion artifacts, especially for in vivo imaging applications. Previous feasibility studies, with a slow stage-scanned line-scanned dual-axis confocal (LS-DAC) microscope, have demonstrated that LS-DAC microscopy is capable of imaging tissues with subcellular resolution and high contrast at moderate depths of up to several hundred microns. However, the sensitivity and performance of a video-rate LS-DAC imaging system, with low-numerical aperture optics, have yet to be demonstrated. Here, we report on the construction and validation of a video-rate LS-DAC system that possesses sufficient sensitivity to visualize fluorescent contrast agents that are topically applied or systemically delivered in animal and human tissues. We present images of murine oral mucosa that are topically stained with methylene blue, and images of protoporphyrin IX-expressing brain tumor from glioma patients that have been administered 5-aminolevulinic acid prior to surgery. In addition, we demonstrate in vivo fluorescence imaging of red blood cells trafficking within the capillaries of a mouse ear, at frame rates of up to 30 fps. These results can serve as a benchmark for miniature in vivo microscopy devices under development.

  8. Revisit laser scanning fluorescence microscopy performance under fluorescence-lifetime-limited regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Antony C.; Wong, Terence T. W.; Wong, Kenneth K. Y.; Lam, Edmund Y.; Tsia, Kevin K.

    2014-03-01

    Continuing desire for higher-speed laser scanning fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) and progressive advancement in ultrafast and sensitive photodetectors might imply that our conventional understanding of LSFM is not adequate when approaching to the intrinsic speed limit — fluorescence lifetime. In this regard, we here revisit the theoretical framework of LSFM and evaluate its general performance in lifetime-limited and noise-limited regimes. Our model suggests that there still exists an order-of-magnitude gap between the current LSFM speed and the intrinsic limit. An imaging frame rate of > 100 kHz could be viable with the emerging laser-scanning techniques using ultrafast wavelength-swept sources, or optical time-stretch.

  9. Intracellular temperature mapping with a fluorescent polymeric thermometer and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabe, Kohki; Inada, Noriko; Gota, Chie; Harada, Yoshie; Funatsu, Takashi; Uchiyama, Seiichi

    2012-02-28

    Cellular functions are fundamentally regulated by intracellular temperature, which influences biochemical reactions inside a cell. Despite the important contributions to biological and medical applications that it would offer, intracellular temperature mapping has not been achieved. Here we demonstrate the first intracellular temperature mapping based on a fluorescent polymeric thermometer and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy. The spatial and temperature resolutions of our thermometry were at the diffraction limited level (200 nm) and 0.18-0.58 °C. The intracellular temperature distribution we observed indicated that the nucleus and centrosome of a COS7 cell, both showed a significantly higher temperature than the cytoplasm and that the temperature gap between the nucleus and the cytoplasm differed depending on the cell cycle. The heat production from mitochondria was also observed as a proximal local temperature increase. These results showed that our new intracellular thermometry could determine an intrinsic relationship between the temperature and organelle function.

  10. Probing cytotoxicity of nanoparticles and organic compounds using scanning proton microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and fluorescence microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong Yongpeng [Institute of Nuclear Techniques, Shenzhen University, Nanhai Avenue 3688, Shenzhen 518060 (China)], E-mail: yongpengt@yahoo.com.cn; Li Changming [School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637457 (Singapore); Liang Feng [Institute Pasteur of Shanghai, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200025 (China); Chen Jianmin [Shenzhen Municipal Hospital for Chronic Disease Control and Prevention, Guangdong 518020 (China); Zhang Hong; Liu Guoqing; Sun Huibin [Institute of Nuclear Techniques, Shenzhen University, Nanhai Avenue 3688, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Luong, John H.T. [Biotechnology Research Institute, National Research Council Canada, Montreal, Quebec, H4P 2R2 (Canada)

    2008-12-15

    Scanning proton microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and fluorescence microscopy have been used to probe the cytotoxicity effect of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), ethidium bromide (EB) and nanoparticles (ZnO, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2}) on a T lymphoblastic leukemia Jurkat cell line. The increased calcium ion (from CaCl{sub 2}) in the culture medium stimulated the accumulation of BaP and EB inside the cell, leading to cell death. ZnO, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles, however, showed a protective effect against these two organic compounds. Such inorganic nanoparticles complexed with BaP or EB which became less toxic to the cell. Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles as an insoluble particle model scavenged by macrophage were investigated in rats. They were scavenged out of the lung tissue about 48 h after infection. This result suggest that some insoluble inorganic nanoparticles of PM (particulate matters) showed protective effects on organic toxins induced acute toxic effects as they can be scavenged by macrophage cells. Whereas, some inorganic ions such as calcium ion in PM may help environmental organic toxins to penetrate cell membrane and induce higher toxic effect.

  11. Novel Application of Fluorescence Lifetime and Fluorescence Microscopy Enables Quantitative Access to Subcellular Dynamics in Plant Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgass, Kirstin; Caesar, Katharina; Schleifenbaum, Frank; Stierhof, York-Dieter; Meixner, Alfred J.; Harter, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    Background Optical and spectroscopic technologies working at subcellular resolution with quantitative output are required for a deeper understanding of molecular processes and mechanisms in living cells. Such technologies are prerequisite for the realisation of predictive biology at cellular and subcellular level. However, although established in the physical sciences, these techniques are rarely applied to cell biology in the plant sciences. Principal Findings Here, we present a combined application of one-chromophore fluorescence lifetime microscopy and wavelength-selective fluorescence microscopy to analyse the function of a GFP fusion of the Brassinosteroid Insensitive 1 Receptor (BRI1-GFP) with high spatial and temporal resolution in living Arabidopsis cells in their tissue environment. We show a rapid, brassinolide-induced cell wall expansion and a fast BR-regulated change in the BRI1-GFP fluorescence lifetime in the plasmamembrane in vivo. Both cell wall expansion and changes in fluorescence lifetime reflect early BR-induced and BRI1-dependent physiological or signalling processes. Our experiments also show the potential of one-chromophore fluorescence lifetime microscopy for the in vivo monitoring of the biochemical and biophysical subcellular environment using GFP fusion proteins as probes. Significance One-chromophore fluorescence lifetime microscopy, combined with wavelength-specific fluorescence microscopy, opens up new frontiers for in vivo dynamic and quantitative analysis of cellular processes at high resolution which are not addressable by pure imaging technologies or transmission electron microscopy. PMID:19492078

  12. Using Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy to Image Zebrafish Eye Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Icha, Jaroslav; Schmied, Christopher; Sidhaye, Jaydeep; Tomancak, Pavel; Preibisch, Stephan; Norden, Caren

    2016-04-10

    Light sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) is gaining more and more popularity as a method to image embryonic development. The main advantages of LSFM compared to confocal systems are its low phototoxicity, gentle mounting strategies, fast acquisition with high signal to noise ratio and the possibility of imaging samples from various angles (views) for long periods of time. Imaging from multiple views unleashes the full potential of LSFM, but at the same time it can create terabyte-sized datasets. Processing such datasets is the biggest challenge of using LSFM. In this protocol we outline some solutions to this problem. Until recently, LSFM was mostly performed in laboratories that had the expertise to build and operate their own light sheet microscopes. However, in the last three years several commercial implementations of LSFM became available, which are multipurpose and easy to use for any developmental biologist. This article is primarily directed to those researchers, who are not LSFM technology developers, but want to employ LSFM as a tool to answer specific developmental biology questions. Here, we use imaging of zebrafish eye development as an example to introduce the reader to LSFM technology and we demonstrate applications of LSFM across multiple spatial and temporal scales. This article describes a complete experimental protocol starting with the mounting of zebrafish embryos for LSFM. We then outline the options for imaging using the commercially available light sheet microscope. Importantly, we also explain a pipeline for subsequent registration and fusion of multiview datasets using an open source solution implemented as a Fiji plugin. While this protocol focuses on imaging the developing zebrafish eye and processing data from a particular imaging setup, most of the insights and troubleshooting suggestions presented here are of general use and the protocol can be adapted to a variety of light sheet microscopy experiments.

  13. Monitoring the aggregation of single casein micelles using fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomholt, Julie; Moth-Poulsen, Kasper; Harboe, Marianne; Karlson, Anders O; Qvist, Karsten Bruun; Bjørnholm, Thomas; Stamou, Dimitrios G

    2011-02-01

    The aggregation of casein micelles (CMs) induced by milk-clotting enzymes is a process of fundamental importance in the dairy industry for cheese production; however, it is not well characterized on the nanoscale. Here we enabled the monitoring of the kinetics of aggregation between single CMs (30-600 nm in diameter) by immobilizing them on a glass substrate at low densities and subsequently imaging them with fluorescence microscopy. We validated the new method by a quantitative comparison to ensemble measurements of aggregation. Single-particle statistics allowed us to observe for the first time several heterogeneities in CM aggregation. We observed two types of CM growth: a slow increase in the size of CMs and a stepwise increase attributed to interactions between aggregates preformed in solution. Both types of growth exhibit a lag phase that was very heterogeneous between different CMs, suggesting significant differences in their composition or structure. Detailed size histograms of CMs during aggregation also revealed the presence of two distinct subpopulations with different growth amplitudes and kinetics. The dependence of these distinct nanoscale processes/parameters on aggregation conditions is not accessible to bulk measurements that report only ensemble-average values and may prove important to an in-depth understanding of CM aggregation.

  14. Applying two-photon excitation fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy to study photosynthesis in plant leaves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broess, K.; Borst, J.W.; Amerongen, van H.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates to which extent two-photon excitation (TPE) fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy can be applied to study picosecond fluorescence kinetics of individual chloroplasts in leaves. Using femtosecond 860 nm excitation pulses, fluorescence lifetimes can be measured in leaves of

  15. Near-Field Scanning Optical Microscopy of Single Fluorescent Dendritic Molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veerman, J.A.; Levi, S.; van Veggel, F.C.J.M.; Reinhoudt, David; van Hulst, N.F.

    1999-01-01

    Individual dendritic molecules adsorbed o­n glass containing a single fluorescent rhodamine B core have been observed with near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM); height and fluorescence images were obtained simultaneously. The dendritic assemblies can be discriminated from free fluorescent

  16. Breaking the diffraction barrier in fluorescence microscopy at low light intensities by using reversibly photoswitchable proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Hofmann, M.; Eggeling, C.; Jakobs, S.; Hell, S.

    2005-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy is indispensable in many areas of science, but until recently, diffraction has limited the resolution of its lens-based variant. The diffraction barrier has been broken by a saturated depletion of the marker's fluorescent state by stimulated emission, but this approach requires picosecond laser pulses of GW/cm2 intensity. Here, we demonstrate the surpassing of the diffraction barrier in fluorescence microscopy with illumination intensities that are eight orders of magn...

  17. Video rate near-field scanning optical microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukofsky, S. J.; Grober, R. D.

    1997-11-01

    The enhanced transmission efficiency of chemically etched near-field optical fiber probes makes it possible to greatly increase the scanning speed of near-field optical microscopes. This increase in system bandwidth allows sub-diffraction limit imaging of samples at video rates. We demonstrate image acquisition at 10 frames/s, rate-limited by mechanical resonances in our scanner. It is demonstrated that the optical signal to noise ratio is large enough for megahertz single pixel acquisition rates.

  18. Single-molecule fluorescence microscopy review: shedding new light on old problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shashkova, Sviatlana; Leake, Mark C

    2017-08-31

    Fluorescence microscopy is an invaluable tool in the biosciences, a genuine workhorse technique offering exceptional contrast in conjunction with high specificity of labelling with relatively minimal perturbation to biological samples compared with many competing biophysical techniques. Improvements in detector and dye technologies coupled to advances in image analysis methods have fuelled recent development towards single-molecule fluorescence microscopy, which can utilize light microscopy tools to enable the faithful detection and analysis of single fluorescent molecules used as reporter tags in biological samples. For example, the discovery of GFP, initiating the so-called 'green revolution', has pushed experimental tools in the biosciences to a completely new level of functional imaging of living samples, culminating in single fluorescent protein molecule detection. Today, fluorescence microscopy is an indispensable tool in single-molecule investigations, providing a high signal-to-noise ratio for visualization while still retaining the key features in the physiological context of native biological systems. In this review, we discuss some of the recent discoveries in the life sciences which have been enabled using single-molecule fluorescence microscopy, paying particular attention to the so-called 'super-resolution' fluorescence microscopy techniques in live cells, which are at the cutting-edge of these methods. In particular, how these tools can reveal new insights into long-standing puzzles in biology: old problems, which have been impossible to tackle using other more traditional tools until the emergence of new single-molecule fluorescence microscopy techniques. © 2017 The Author(s).

  19. Local characterization of hindered Brownian motion by using digital video microscopy and 3D particle tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dettmer, Simon L.; Keyser, Ulrich F.; Pagliara, Stefano [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, 19 J J Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-15

    In this article we present methods for measuring hindered Brownian motion in the confinement of complex 3D geometries using digital video microscopy. Here we discuss essential features of automated 3D particle tracking as well as diffusion data analysis. By introducing local mean squared displacement-vs-time curves, we are able to simultaneously measure the spatial dependence of diffusion coefficients, tracking accuracies and drift velocities. Such local measurements allow a more detailed and appropriate description of strongly heterogeneous systems as opposed to global measurements. Finite size effects of the tracking region on measuring mean squared displacements are also discussed. The use of these methods was crucial for the measurement of the diffusive behavior of spherical polystyrene particles (505 nm diameter) in a microfluidic chip. The particles explored an array of parallel channels with different cross sections as well as the bulk reservoirs. For this experiment we present the measurement of local tracking accuracies in all three axial directions as well as the diffusivity parallel to the channel axis while we observed no significant flow but purely Brownian motion. Finally, the presented algorithm is suitable also for tracking of fluorescently labeled particles and particles driven by an external force, e.g., electrokinetic or dielectrophoretic forces.

  20. Localization of fluorescently labeled structures in frozen-hydrated samples using integrated light electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faas, F.G.A.; Bárcena, M.A.; Agronskaia, A.V.; Gerritsen, H.C.; Moscicka, K.B.; Diebolder, C.A.; Driel, L.F.; Limpens, R.W.A.L.; Bos, E.; Ravelli, R.B.G.; Koning, R.I.; Koster, A.J.

    2013-01-01

    Correlative light and electron microscopy is an increasingly popular technique to study complex biological systems at various levels of resolution. Fluorescence microscopy can be employed to scan large areas to localize regions of interest which are then analyzed by electron microscopy to obtain

  1. Light sheet-based fluorescence microscopy: more dimensions, more photons, and less photodamage

    OpenAIRE

    Reynaud, Emmanuel G; Kržič, Uroš; Greger, Klaus; Stelzer, Ernst H. K.

    2008-01-01

    Light-sheet-based fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) is a fluorescence technique that combines optical sectioning, the key capability of confocal and two-photon fluorescence microscopes with multiple-view imaging, which is used in optical tomography. In contrast to conventional wide-field and confocal fluorescence microscopes, a light sheet illuminates only the focal plane of the detection objective lens from the side. Excitation is, thus, restricted to the fluorophores in the volume near the foc...

  2. High-precision correlative fluorescence and electron cryo microscopy using two independent alignment markers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schellenberger, Pascale [Oxford Particle Imaging Centre, Division of Structural Biology, Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, University of Oxford, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Kaufmann, Rainer [Oxford Particle Imaging Centre, Division of Structural Biology, Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, University of Oxford, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Department of Biochemistry, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QU (United Kingdom); Siebert, C. Alistair; Hagen, Christoph [Oxford Particle Imaging Centre, Division of Structural Biology, Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, University of Oxford, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Wodrich, Harald [Microbiologie Fondamentale et Pathogénicité, MFP CNRS UMR 5234, University of Bordeaux SEGALEN, 146 rue Leo Seignat, 33076 Bordeaux (France); Grünewald, Kay, E-mail: kay@strubi.ox.ac.uk [Oxford Particle Imaging Centre, Division of Structural Biology, Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, University of Oxford, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom)

    2014-08-01

    Correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) is an emerging technique which combines functional information provided by fluorescence microscopy (FM) with the high-resolution structural information of electron microscopy (EM). So far, correlative cryo microscopy of frozen-hydrated samples has not reached better than micrometre range accuracy. Here, a method is presented that enables the correlation between fluorescently tagged proteins and electron cryo tomography (cryoET) data with nanometre range precision. Specifically, thin areas of vitrified whole cells are examined by correlative fluorescence cryo microscopy (cryoFM) and cryoET. Novel aspects of the presented cryoCLEM workflow not only include the implementation of two independent electron dense fluorescent markers to improve the precision of the alignment, but also the ability of obtaining an estimate of the correlation accuracy for each individual object of interest. The correlative workflow from plunge-freezing to cryoET is detailed step-by-step for the example of locating fluorescence-labelled adenovirus particles trafficking inside a cell. - Highlights: • Vitrified mammalian cell were imaged by fluorescence and electron cryo microscopy. • TetraSpeck fluorescence markers were added to correct shifts between cryo fluorescence channels. • FluoSpheres fiducials were used as reference points to assign new coordinates to cryoEM images. • Adenovirus particles were localised with an average correlation precision of 63 nm.

  3. Fluorescence spectroscopy and confocal microscopy of the mycotoxin citrinin in condensed phase and hydrogel films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauer, Milena H; Gehlen, Marcelo H; de Jesus, Karen; Berlinck, Roberto G S

    2014-05-01

    The emission spectra, quantum yields and fluorescence lifetimes of citrinin in organic solvents and hydrogel films have been determined. Citrinin shows complex fluorescence decays due to the presence of two tautomers in solution and interconversion from excited-state double proton transfer (ESDPT) process. The fluorescence decay times associated with the two tautomers have values near 1 and 5 ns depending on the medium. In hydrogel films of agarose and alginate, fluorescence imaging showed that citrinin is not homogeneously dispersed and highly emissive micrometer spots may be formed. Fluorescence spectrum and decay analysis are used to recognize the presence of citrinin in hydrogel films using confocal fluorescence microscopy and spectroscopy.

  4. Robust fluorescent labelling of micropipettes for use in fluorescence microscopy: application to the observation of a mosquito borne parasite infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaban, Amanda E; Neuman, Keir; Sinnis, Photini; Balaban, Robert S

    2017-08-10

    The ability to monitor micropipette injections with a high-resolution fluorescent microscope has utility for a variety of applications. Herein, different approaches were tested for creating broad-band fluorescently labelled glass micropipettes including: UV cured glass glues, baked glass enamel containing fluorescent dyes as well as nanodiamonds attached during pipette formation in the microforge. The most robust and simplest approach was to use labelled baked enamel on the exterior of the pipette. This approach was tested using pipettes designed to mimic a mosquito proboscis for the injection of the malaria parasite, Plasmodium spp., into the dermis of a living mouse ear. The pipette (∼30 micron diameter) was easily detected in the microscopy field of view and tolerated multiple insertions through the skin. This simple inexpensive approach to fluorescently labelling micropipettes will aid in the development of procedures under the fluorescent microscope. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  5. B-Spline potential function for maximum a-posteriori image reconstruction in fluorescence microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilpa Dilipkumar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available An iterative image reconstruction technique employing B-Spline potential function in a Bayesian framework is proposed for fluorescence microscopy images. B-splines are piecewise polynomials with smooth transition, compact support and are the shortest polynomial splines. Incorporation of the B-spline potential function in the maximum-a-posteriori reconstruction technique resulted in improved contrast, enhanced resolution and substantial background reduction. The proposed technique is validated on simulated data as well as on the images acquired from fluorescence microscopes (widefield, confocal laser scanning fluorescence and super-resolution 4Pi microscopy. A comparative study of the proposed technique with the state-of-art maximum likelihood (ML and maximum-a-posteriori (MAP with quadratic potential function shows its superiority over the others. B-Spline MAP technique can find applications in several imaging modalities of fluorescence microscopy like selective plane illumination microscopy, localization microscopy and STED.

  6. Line scan--structured illumination microscopy super-resolution imaging in thick fluorescent samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandula, Ondrej; Kielhorn, Martin; Wicker, Kai; Krampert, Gerhard; Kleppe, Ingo; Heintzmann, Rainer

    2012-10-22

    Structured illumination microscopy in thick fluorescent samples is a challenging task. The out-of-focus fluorescence background deteriorates the illumination pattern and the reconstructed images suffer from influence of noise. We present a combination of structured illumination microscopy with line scanning. This technique reduces the out-of-focus fluorescence background, which improves the modulation and the quality of the illumination pattern and therefore facilitates the reconstruction. We present super-resolution, optically sectioned images of a thick fluorescent sample, revealing details of the specimen's inner structure.

  7. Chemically Induced Photoswitching of Fluorescent Probes—A General Concept for Super-Resolution Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mike Heilemann

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available We review fluorescent probes that can be photoswitched or photoactivated and are suited for single-molecule localization based super-resolution microscopy. We exploit the underlying photochemical mechanisms that allow photoswitching of many synthetic organic fluorophores in the presence of reducing agents, and study the impact of these on the photoswitching properties of various photoactivatable or photoconvertible fluorescent proteins. We have identified mEos2 as a fluorescent protein that exhibits reversible photoswitching under various imaging buffer conditions and present strategies to characterize reversible photoswitching. Finally, we discuss opportunities to combine fluorescent proteins with organic fluorophores for dual-color photoswitching microscopy.

  8. Monitoring of Apoptosis in 3D Cell Cultures by FRET and Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Weber

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Non-radiative cell membrane associated Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET from an enhanced cyan fluorescent protein (ECFP to an enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP is used for detection of apoptosis in 3-dimensional cell cultures. FRET is visualized in multi-cellular tumor spheroids by light sheet based fluorescence microscopy in combination with microspectral analysis and fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM. Upon application of staurosporine and to some extent after treatment with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA, a specific activator of protein kinase c, the caspase-3 sensitive peptide linker DEVD is cleaved. This results in a reduction of acceptor (EYFP fluorescence as well as a prolongation of the fluorescence lifetime of the donor (ECFP. Fluorescence spectra and lifetimes may, therefore, be used for monitoring of apoptosis in a realistic 3-dimensional system, while light sheet based microscopy appears appropriate for 3D imaging at low light exposure.

  9. Fluorescence intensity decay shape analysis microscopy (FIDSAM) for quantitative and sensitive live-cell imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Sébastien; Elgass, Kirstin; Sackrow, Marcus; Caesar, Katharina; Born, Anne-Kathrin; Maniura, Katharina; Harter, Klaus; Meixner, Alfred J.; Schleifenbaum, Frank

    2010-02-01

    Fluorescence microscopy became an invaluable tool in cell biology in the past 20 years. However, the information that lies in these studies is often corrupted by a cellular fluorescence background known as autofluorescence. Since the unspecific background often overlaps with most commonly used labels in terms of fluorescence spectra and fluorescence lifetime, the use of spectral filters in the emission beampath or timegating in fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) is often no appropriate means for distinction between signal and background. Despite the prevalence of fluorescence techniques only little progress has been reported in techniques that specifically suppress autofluorescence or that clearly discriminate autofluorescence from label fluorescence. Fluorescence intensity decay shape analysis microscopy (FIDSAM) is a novel technique which is based on the image acquisition protocol of FLIM. Whereas FLIM spatially resolved maps the average fluorescence lifetime distribution in a heterogeneous sample such as a cell, FIDSAM enhances the dynamic image contrast by determination of the autofluorescence contribution by comparing the fluorescence decay shape to a reference function. The technique therefore makes use of the key difference between label and autofluorescence, i.e. that for label fluorescence only one emitting species contributes to fluorescence intensity decay curves whereas many different species of minor intensity contribute to autofluorescence. That way, we were able to suppress autofluorescence contributions from chloroplasts in Arabidopsis stoma cells and from cell walls in Arabidopsis hypocotyl cells to background level. Furthermore, we could extend the method to more challenging labels such as the cyan fluorescent protein CFP in human fibroblasts.

  10. Lipid Vesicle Shape Analysis from Populations Using Light Video Microscopy and Computer Vision

    OpenAIRE

    Jernej Zupanc; Barbara Drašler; Sabina Boljte; Veronika Kralj-Iglič; Aleš Iglič; Deniz Erdogmus; Damjana Drobne

    2014-01-01

    We present a method for giant lipid vesicle shape analysis that combines manually guided large-scale video microscopy and computer vision algorithms to enable analyzing vesicle populations. The method retains the benefits of light microscopy and enables non-destructive analysis of vesicles from suspensions containing up to several thousands of lipid vesicles (1-50 µm in diameter). For each sample, image analysis was employed to extract data on vesicle quantity and size distributions of their ...

  11. Real-time monitoring of NKCC2 endocytosis by total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jaykumar, Ankita Bachhawat; Caceres, Paulo S; Sablaban, Ibrahim; Tannous, Bakhos A; Ortiz, Pablo A

    .... We hypothesized that total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy imaging of labeled NKCC2 would allow monitoring of NKCC2 endocytosis in polarized Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) and TAL cells...

  12. Enzyme-Free Detection of Mutations in Cancer DNA Using Synthetic Oligonucleotide Probes and Fluorescence Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miotke, Laura; Maity, Arindam; Ji, Hanlee

    2015-01-01

    of methods since they would allow rapid and relatively inexpensive detection of nucleic acids. Modern fluorescence microscopy is having a huge impact on detection of biomolecules at previously unachievable resolution. However, no straightforward methods to detect DNA in a non-enzymatic way using fluorescence......) and finally, detection by fluorescence microscopy. The LNA containing probes display high binding affinity and specificity to DNA containing mutations, which allows for the detection of mutation abundance with an intercalating EvaGreen dye. We used a second probe, which increases the overall number of base...... pairs in order to produce a higher fluorescence signal by incorporating more dye molecules. Indeed we show here that using EvaGreen dye and LNA probes, genomic DNA containing BRAF V600E mutation could be detected by fluorescence microscopy at low femtomolar concentrations. Notably, this was at least...

  13. Aggregation and Breakup of Colloidal Particle Aggregates in Shear Flow, Studied with Video Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tolpekin, V.A.; Duits, Michael H.G.; van den Ende, Henricus T.M.; Mellema, J.

    2004-01-01

    We used video microscopy to study the behavior of aggregating suspensions in shear flow. Suspensions consisted of 920 nm diameter silica spheres, dispersed in a methanol/bromoform solvent, to which poly(ethylene glycol) (M = 35.000 g) was added to effect weak particle aggregation. With our solvent

  14. Localizing Proteins in Fixed Giardia lamblia and Live Cultured Mammalian Cells by Confocal Fluorescence Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyindodo-Ogari, Lilian; Schwartzbach, Steven D; Skalli, Omar; Estraño, Carlos E

    2016-01-01

    Confocal fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy (EM) are complementary methods for studying the intracellular localization of proteins. Confocal fluorescence microscopy provides a rapid and technically simple method to identify the organelle in which a protein localizes but only EM can identify the suborganellular compartment in which that protein is present. Confocal fluorescence microscopy, however, can provide information not obtainable by EM but required to understand the dynamics and interactions of specific proteins. In addition, confocal fluorescence microscopy of cells transfected with a construct encoding a protein of interest fused to a fluorescent protein tag allows live cell studies of the subcellular localization of that protein and the monitoring in real time of its trafficking. Immunostaining methods for confocal fluorescence microscopy are also faster and less involved than those for EM allowing rapid optimization of the antibody dilution needed and a determination of whether protein antigenicity is maintained under fixation conditions used for EM immunogold labeling. This chapter details a method to determine by confocal fluorescence microscopy the intracellular localization of a protein by transfecting the organism of interest, in this case Giardia lamblia, with the cDNA encoding the protein of interest and then processing these organisms for double label immunofluorescence staining after chemical fixation. Also presented is a method to identify the organelle targeting information in the presequence of a precursor protein, in this case the presequence of the precursor to the Euglena light harvesting chlorophyll a/b binding protein of photosystem II precursor (pLHCPII), using live cell imaging of mammalian COS7 cells transiently transfected with a plasmid encoding a pLHCPII presequence fluorescent protein fusion and stained with organelle-specific fluorescent dyes.

  15. Characteristics of subgingival calculus detection by multiphoton fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Oi-Hong; Lee, Shyh-Yuan; Lai, Yu-Lin; Chen, How-Foo

    2011-06-01

    Subgingival calculus has been recognized as a major cause of periodontitis, which is one of the main chronic infectious diseases of oral cavities and a principal cause of tooth loss in humans. Bacteria deposited in subgingival calculus or plaque cause gingival inflammation, function deterioration, and then periodontitis. However, subgingival calculus within the periodontal pocket is a complicated and potentially delicate structure to be detected with current dental armamentaria, namely dental x-rays and dental probes. Consequently, complete removal of subgingival calculus remains a challenge to periodontal therapies. In this study, the detection of subgingival calculus employing a multiphoton autofluorescence imaging method was characterized in comparison with a one-photon confocal fluorescence imaging technique. Feasibility of such a system was studied based on fluorescence response of gingiva, healthy teeth, and calculus with and without gingiva covered. The multiphoton fluorescence technology perceived the tissue-covered subgingival calculus that cannot be observed by the one-photon confocal fluorescence method.

  16. On the mobility of biomolecules : a fluorescence microscopy approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogaart, Geert van den

    2008-01-01

    This thesis describes the development and application of a number of fluorescence spectroscopy related techniques (FCS, FRAP, DCFBA) to measure diffusion of biomolecules in cells, in membranes and through membrane pores.

  17. Imaging chemical extraction by polymer inclusion membranes using fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Clare A.; Nagul, Edward A.; Cattrall, Robert W.; Kolev, Spas D.; Smith, Trevor A.

    2014-06-01

    Polymer inclusion membranes (PIMs) transport chemicals between bodies of liquid by simultaneously performing chemical extraction and back-extraction. The internal chemical and physical mechanisms by which this transport occurs are, however, poorly understood. Also, some PIMs, which are otherwise optimal for their task, age and lose function after only days, limiting their feasibility for industrial upscaling. Through the application of fluorescence imaging methods we are able for the first time to see where chemical extraction occurs in the membrane. Extraction of fluorescein from solution by PIMs demonstrates inhomogeneities that do not correlate to surface morphology. Fluorescence lifetime imaging demonstrates that regions of increased extraction have distinctly different fluorescence lifetimes to that of the surrounding PIM indicating localized chemical environments, and this is observed to change with membrane age. Fluorescence imaging is shown to allow probing and novel understanding of PIM internal chemical morphology.

  18. Live-cell fluorescent microscopy platforms for real-time monitoring of polyplex-cell interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parhamifar, Ladan; Wu, LinPing; Andersen, Helene

    2014-01-01

    interdisciplinary research platforms and techniques for a more profound understanding of biophysical properties of delivery vehicles and their biological performance, including stability, transfection efficacy and possible cytotoxicity. Fluorescent microscopy has proven to be a useful tool for real-time monitoring...... of performance and intracellular trafficking of polyplexes as well as for assessing cell functionality. This review highlights the application of some of the most promising fluorescent microscopy platforms in relation to polyplex-mediated transfection processes....

  19. Hybrid Rayleigh, Raman and TPE fluorescence spectral confocal microscopy of living cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pully, V.V.; Lenferink, Aufrid T.M.; Otto, Cornelis

    2010-01-01

    A hybrid fluorescence–Raman confocal microscopy platform is presented, which integrates low-wavenumber-resolution Raman imaging, Rayleigh scatter imaging and two-photon fluorescence (TPE) spectral imaging, fast ‘amplitude-only’ TPE-fluorescence imaging and high-spectral-resolution Raman imaging.

  20. phiFLIM: a new method to avoid aliasing in frequency domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Munster, E.B.; Gadella, Th.W.J.

    2004-01-01

    In conventional wide-field frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM), excitation light is intensity-modulated at megahertz frequencies. Emitted fluorescence is recorded by a CCD camera through an image intensifier, which is modulated at the same frequency. From images recorded

  1. Putting super-resolution fluorescence microscopy to work

    OpenAIRE

    Lippincott-Schwartz, J; Manley, Suliana

    2009-01-01

    Super-resolution microscopy is poised to revolutionize our understanding of the workings of the cell. But the technology still has some limitations, and these must be taken into consideration if widespread application is to yield biological insight.

  2. Two-Photon Fluorescence Microscopy for Biomedical Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, David; Zimmerli, Greg; Asipauskas, Marius

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives an overview of two-photon microscopy as it applies to biomedical research. The topics include: 1) Overview; 2) Background; 3) Principles of Operation; 4) Advantages Over Confocal; 5) Modes of Operation; and 6) Applications.

  3. Quantification of shrinkage microcracking in young mortar with fluorescence light microscopy and ESEM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bisschop, J.; Van Mier, J.C.M.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper a method is described to quantify shrinkage microcracking in young mortar by means of crack mapping. Visualisation of the microcracks is realised with two techniques: Fluorescence Light Microscopy (FLM) and Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy (ESEM). The preliminary results

  4. Confocal reader for biochip screening and fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruckstuhl, Thomas; Walser, Andreas; Verdes, Dorinel; Seeger, Stefan

    2005-03-15

    We developed a fluorescence reader for the sensitive detection of surface-generated fluorescence. The system is applicable for high resolution imaging as well as for the readout of large biochips. The surface of a microscope coverslip is scanned with a laser beam focused to a waist diameter of 500 nm (FWHM) by means of a single aspheric lens. Scanning large areas with a focused beam usually evokes the need of automatic control elements to adjust the laser spot to the designated position at the surface. Due to the special design of the reader, the focus keeps at the plane of the surface even when scanning large areas, obviating the requirement of any real time control. Thus the instrument is straightforward and inexpensive. Nevertheless it features a high sensitivity and high optical resolution. The versatility of the instrument is demonstrated by imaging cells and reading out a DNA-chip. The excellent sensitivity is shown by detecting single fluorescently labeled antibodies.

  5. Low power super resolution fluorescence microscopy by lifetime modification and image reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Richard J; Culley, Siân; Bain, Angus J

    2014-05-19

    We demonstrate a new method for obtaining sub-diffraction resolution in fluorescence microscopy. The technique involves the analysis of the time evolution of fluorescence images in the presence of weak and unstructured (fundamental Gaussian) continuous wave stimulated emission depletion. A reduced point spread functions (PSF) is obtained by the recombination of time segments of the evolving image. A significant reduction in the PSF for 20 nm fluorescent beads (ca. 240 nm to 125 nm) is obtained with an on-sample power of 7.5 mW (17 MW/cm2) - substantially lower than that required for spatially structured stimulated emission depletion microscopy.

  6. Optical tracking of embryonic vertebrates behavioural responses using automated time-resolved video-microscopy system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walpitagama, Milanga; Kaslin, Jan; Nugegoda, Dayanthi; Wlodkowic, Donald

    2016-12-01

    The fish embryo toxicity (FET) biotest performed on embryos of zebrafish (Danio rerio) has gained significant popularity as a rapid and inexpensive alternative approach in chemical hazard and risk assessment. The FET was designed to evaluate acute toxicity on embryonic stages of fish exposed to the test chemical. The current standard, similar to most traditional methods for evaluating aquatic toxicity provides, however, little understanding of effects of environmentally relevant concentrations of chemical stressors. We postulate that significant environmental effects such as altered motor functions, physiological alterations reflected in heart rate, effects on development and reproduction can occur at sub-lethal concentrations well below than LC10. Behavioral studies can, therefore, provide a valuable integrative link between physiological and ecological effects. Despite the advantages of behavioral analysis development of behavioral toxicity, biotests is greatly hampered by the lack of dedicated laboratory automation, in particular, user-friendly and automated video microscopy systems. In this work we present a proof-of-concept development of an optical system capable of tracking embryonic vertebrates behavioral responses using automated and vastly miniaturized time-resolved video-microscopy. We have employed miniaturized CMOS cameras to perform high definition video recording and analysis of earliest vertebrate behavioral responses. The main objective was to develop a biocompatible embryo positioning structures that were suitable for high-throughput imaging as well as video capture and video analysis algorithms. This system should support the development of sub-lethal and behavioral markers for accelerated environmental monitoring.

  7. Towards correlative super-resolution fluorescence and electron cryo-microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Wolff, Georg; Hagen, Christoph; Gr?newald, Kay; Kaufmann, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    Correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) has become a powerful tool in life sciences. Particularly cryo-CLEM, the combination of fluorescence cryo-microscopy (cryo-FM) permitting for non-invasive specific multi-colour labelling, with electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) providing the undisturbed structural context at a resolution down to the ?ngstrom range, has enabled a broad range of new biological applications. Imaging rare structures or events in crowded environments, such as inside...

  8. Optimal resolution in Fresnel incoherent correlation holographic fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooker, Gary; Siegel, Nisan; Wang, Victor; Rosen, Joseph

    2011-03-14

    Fresnel Incoherent Correlation Holography (FINCH) enables holograms and 3D images to be created from incoherent light with just a camera and spatial light modulator (SLM). We previously described its application to microscopic incoherent fluorescence wherein one complex hologram contains all the 3D information in the microscope field, obviating the need for scanning or serial sectioning. We now report experiments which have led to the optimal optical, electro-optic, and computational conditions necessary to produce holograms which yield high quality 3D images from fluorescent microscopic specimens. An important improvement from our previous FINCH configurations capitalizes on the polarization sensitivity of the SLM so that the same SLM pixels which create the spherical wave simulating the microscope tube lens, also pass the plane waves from the infinity corrected microscope objective, so that interference between the two wave types at the camera creates a hologram. This advance dramatically improves the resolution of the FINCH system. Results from imaging a fluorescent USAF pattern and a pollen grain slide reveal resolution which approaches the Rayleigh limit by this simple method for 3D fluorescent microscopic imaging.

  9. On-chip cell analysis platform: Implementation of contact fluorescence microscopy in microfluidic chips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takehara, Hiroaki; Kazutaka, Osawa; Haruta, Makito; Noda, Toshihiko; Sasagawa, Kiyotaka; Tokuda, Takashi; Ohta, Jun

    2017-09-01

    Although fluorescence microscopy is the gold standard tool for biomedical research and clinical applications, their use beyond well-established laboratory infrastructures remains limited. The present study investigated a novel on-chip cell analysis platform based on contact fluorescence microscopy and microfluidics. Combined use of a contact fluorescence imager based on complementary metal-oxide semiconductor technology and an ultra-thin glass bottom microfluidic chip enabled both to observe living cells with minimal image distortion and to ease controlling and handling of biological samples (e.g. cells and biological molecules) in the imaged area. A proof-of-concept experiment of on-chip detection of cellular response to endothelial growth factor demonstrated promising use for the recently developed on-chip cell analysis platform. Contact fluorescence microscopy has numerous desirable features including compatibility with plastic microfluidic chips and compatibility with the electrical control system, and thus will fulfill the requirements of a fully automated cell analysis system.

  10. Use of light-emitting diode fluorescence microscopy to detect acid-fast bacilli in sputum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marais, Ben J; Brittle, Wendy; Painczyk, Katrien; Hesseling, Anneke C; Beyers, Nulda; Wasserman, Elizabeth; van Soolingen, Dick; Warren, Rob M

    2008-07-15

    Fluorescence microscopy offers well-described benefits, compared with conventional light microscopy, for the evaluation of sputum smear samples for tuberculosis. However, its use in resource-limited settings has been limited by the high cost of the excitatory light source. We evaluated the diagnostic performance of fluorescence microscopy, using novel light-emitting diode (LED) technology as an alternative to the conventional mercury vapor lamp (MVP). Routinely collected sputum specimens from persons suspected to have tuberculosis who attended community clinics were stained with auramine O and were evaluated using 2 different excitatory light sources (MVP and LED); these specimens were then Ziehl-Neelsen stained and reexamined using light microscopy. Two microscopists independently evaluated all smears. Bacterial culture provided the gold standard. Of the 221 sputum specimens evaluated, 36 (16.3%) were positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis by culture. Sensitivity and specificity documented for the different modalities were 84.7% and 98.9%, respectively, for the LED assessment; 73.6% and 99.8%, respectively, for the MVP assessment; and 61.1% and 98.9%, respectively, for light microscopy. kappa values for interreader variation were 0.87 for the LED assessment, 0.79 for the MVP assessment, and 0.77 for light microscopy. The mean time to read a negative smear was 1.4 min with fluorescence microscopy and 3.6 min with light microscopy, reflecting a time savings of 61% with fluorescence microscopy. LED fluorescence microscopy provides a reliable alternative to conventional methods and has many favorable attributes that facilitate improved, decentralized, diagnostic services.

  11. Timing and Operating Mode Design for Time-Gated Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Steady-state fluorence imaging and time-resolved fluorescence imaging are two important areas in fluorescence imaging research. Fluorescence lifetime imaging is an absolute measurement method which is independent of excitation laser intensity, fluorophore concentration, and photobleaching compared to fluorescence intensity imaging techniques. Time-gated fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM can provide high resolution and high imaging frame during mature FLIM methods. An abstract time-gated FLIM model was given, and important temporal parameters are shown as well. Aiming at different applications of steady and transient fluorescence processes, two different operation modes, timing and lifetime computing algorithm are designed. High resolution and high frame can be achieved by one-excitation one-sampling mode and least square algorithm for steady imaging applications. Correspondingly, one-excitation two-sampling mode and rapid lifetime determination algorithm contribute to transient fluorescence situations.

  12. Fluorescence microscopy of actin- and microtubule-associated septins in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiliotis, E T; Karasmanis, E P; Dolat, L

    2016-01-01

    Septins are a major component of the mammalian cytoskeleton. Septins associate with filamentous actin (F-actin) and microtubules, but the nature and significance of these interactions are not well understood. Fluorescence microscopy of F-actin- and microtubule-associated septins in fixed and living cells has been instrumental in uncovering septin functions in cellular morphogenesis and cytoskeleton-dependent processes (eg, cell division, cell migration). Here, we provide a detailed methodology for the visualization of endogenous septins by immunofluorescence microscopy, discussing sample preparation and reagents that are critical for optimal staining. In addition, we review approaches for the construction and expression of fluorescent septins and their time-lapse imaging with F-actin and microtubules. The recommended methodology is adaptable for high- and superresolution imaging of mammalian cells with various instrumentation, including wide-field and confocal microscopy as well as total internal reflection fluorescence and structured illumination microscopy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Optically sectioned wide-field fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy enabled by structured illumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinsdale, Taylor; Olsovsky, Cory; Rico-Jimenez, Jose J.; Maitland, Kristen C.; Jo, Javier A.; Malik, Bilal H.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the ability of structured illumination microscopy to enhance the ability of fluorescence lifetime imaging to resolve fluorescence lifetimes in relatively thick samples that possess distinct but spectrally overlapping fluorescent layers. Structured illumination fluorescent lifetime imaging microscopy (SI-FLIM) is shown to be able to accurately reconstruct lifetime values in homogenous fluorophore samples (POPOP, NADH, and FAD) as well as accurately measure fluorescent lifetime in two layer models that are layered with NADH/FAD over POPOP, where NADH/FAD and POPOP have spectral overlap. Finally, the ability of SI-FLIM was demonstrated in a hamster cheek pouch ex vivo to show that more accurate lifetimes could be measured for each layer of interest in the oral mucosa (epithelium and submucosa). PMID:28663841

  14. Stochastic Micro-Pattern for Automated Correlative Fluorescence - Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begemann, Isabell; Viplav, Abhiyan; Rasch, Christiane; Galic, Milos

    2015-01-01

    Studies of cellular surface features gain from correlative approaches, where live cell information acquired by fluorescence light microscopy is complemented by ultrastructural information from scanning electron micrographs. Current approaches to spatially align fluorescence images with scanning electron micrographs are technically challenging and often cost or time-intensive. Relying exclusively on open-source software and equipment available in a standard lab, we have developed a method for rapid, software-assisted alignment of fluorescence images with the corresponding scanning electron micrographs via a stochastic gold micro-pattern. Here, we provide detailed instructions for micro-pattern production and image processing, troubleshooting for critical intermediate steps, and examples of membrane ultra-structures aligned with the fluorescence signal of proteins enriched at such sites. Together, the presented method for correlative fluorescence – scanning electron microscopy is versatile, robust and easily integrated into existing workflows, permitting image alignment with accuracy comparable to existing approaches with negligible investment of time or capital. PMID:26647824

  15. Wide-field subdiffraction RESOLFT microscopy using fluorescent protein photoswitching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwentker, Miriam A; Bock, Hannes; Hofmann, Michael; Jakobs, Stefan; Bewersdorf, Jörg; Eggeling, Christian; Hell, Stefan W

    2007-03-01

    Subdiffraction fluorescence imaging is presented in a parallelized wide-field arrangement exploiting the principle of reversible saturable/switchable optical transitions (RESOLFT). The diffraction barrier is overcome by photoswitching ensembles of the label protein asFP595 between a nonfluorescent off- and a fluorescent on-state. Relying on ultralow continuous-wave intensities, reversible protein switching facilitates parallelized fast image acquisition. The RESOLFT principle is implemented by illuminating with intensity distributions featuring zero intensity lines that are further apart than the conventional Abbe resolution limit. The subdiffraction resolution is verified by recording live Escherichia coli bacteria labeled with asFP595. The obtained resolution of 50 nm ( approximately lambda/12) is limited only by the spectroscopic properties of the proteins and the imperfections of the optical implementation, but not on principle grounds. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Multidimensional fluorescence microscopy of multiple organelles in Arabidopsis seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morales Andrea

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The isolation of green fluorescent protein (GFP and the development of spectral variants over the past decade have begun to reveal the dynamic nature of protein trafficking and organelle motility. In planta analyses of this dynamic process have typically been limited to only two organelles or proteins at a time in only a few cell types. Results We generated a transgenic Arabidopsis plant that contains four spectrally different fluorescent proteins. Nuclei, plastids, mitochondria and plasma membranes were genetically tagged with cyan, red, yellow and green fluorescent proteins, respectively. In addition, methods to track nuclei, mitochondria and chloroplasts and quantify the interaction between these organelles at a submicron resolution were developed. These analyzes revealed that N-ethylmaleimide disrupts nuclear-mitochondrial but not nuclear-plastids interactions in root epidermal cells of live Arabidopsis seedlings. Conclusion We developed a tool and associated methods for analyzing the complex dynamic of organelle-organelle interactions in real time in planta. Homozygous transgenic Arabidopsis (Kaleidocell is available through Arabidopsis Biological Resource Center.

  17. Synchronizing atomic force microscopy force mode and fluorescence microscopy in real time for immune cell stimulation and activation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazaux, Séverine; Sadoun, Anaïs; Biarnes-Pelicot, Martine; Martinez, Manuel; Obeid, Sameh; Bongrand, Pierre; Limozin, Laurent; Puech, Pierre-Henri

    2016-01-01

    A method is presented for combining atomic force microscopy (AFM) force mode and fluorescence microscopy in order to (a) mechanically stimulate immune cells while recording the subsequent activation under the form of calcium pulses, and (b) observe the mechanical response of a cell upon photoactivation of a small G protein, namely Rac. Using commercial set-ups and a robust signal coupling the fluorescence excitation light and the cantilever bending, the applied force and activation signals were very easily synchronized. This approach allows to control the entire mechanical history of a single cell up to its activation and response down to a few hundreds of milliseconds, and can be extended with very minimal adaptations to other cellular systems where mechanotransduction is studied, using either purely mechanical stimuli or via a surface bound specific ligand. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. VIPER: a general-purpose digital image-processing system applied to video microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, M; Ittner, W

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes VIPER, the video image-processing system Erlangen. It consists of a general purpose microcomputer, commercially available image-processing hardware modules connected directly to the computer, video input/output-modules such as a TV camera, video recorders and monitors, and a software package. The modular structure and the capabilities of this system are explained. The software is user-friendly, menu-driven and performs image acquisition, transfers, greyscale processing, arithmetics, logical operations, filtering display, colour assignment, graphics, and a couple of management functions. More than 100 image-processing functions are implemented. They are available either by typing a key or by a simple call to the function-subroutine library in application programs. Examples are supplied in the area of biomedical research, e.g. in in-vivo microscopy.

  19. Improved localization of cellular membrane receptors using combined fluorescence microscopy and simultaneous topography and recognition imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duman, M; Pfleger, M; Chtcheglova, L A; Neundlinger, I; Bozna, B L; Ebner, A; Schuetz, G J; Hinterdorfer, P [Institute for Biophysics, University of Linz, Altenbergerstrasse 69, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Zhu, R; Mayer, B [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Nanoscopic Methods in Biophysics, Institute for Biophysics, University of Linz, Altenbergerstrasse 69, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Rankl, C; Moertelmaier, M; Kada, G; Kienberger, F [Agilent Technologies Austria GmbH, Aubrunnerweg 11, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Salio, M; Shepherd, D; Polzella, P; Cerundolo, V [Cancer Research UK Tumor Immunology Group, Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Nuffield Department of Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 9DS (United Kingdom); Dieudonne, M, E-mail: ferry_kienberger@agilent.com [Agilent Technologies Belgium, Wingepark 51, Rotselaar, AN B-3110 (Belgium)

    2010-03-19

    The combination of fluorescence microscopy and atomic force microscopy has a great potential in single-molecule-detection applications, overcoming many of the limitations coming from each individual technique. Here we present a new platform of combined fluorescence and simultaneous topography and recognition imaging (TREC) for improved localization of cellular receptors. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) labeled human sodium-glucose cotransporter (hSGLT1) expressed Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells and endothelial cells (MyEnd) from mouse myocardium stained with phalloidin-rhodamine were used as cell systems to study AFM topography and fluorescence microscopy on the same surface area. Topographical AFM images revealed membrane features such as lamellipodia, cytoskeleton fibers, F-actin filaments and small globular structures with heights ranging from 20 to 30 nm. Combined fluorescence and TREC imaging was applied to detect density, distribution and localization of YFP-labeled CD1d molecules on {alpha}-galactosylceramide ({alpha}GalCer)-loaded THP1 cells. While the expression level, distribution and localization of CD1d molecules on THP1 cells were detected with fluorescence microscopy, the nanoscale distribution of binding sites was investigated with molecular recognition imaging by using a chemically modified AFM tip. Using TREC on the inverted light microscope, the recognition sites of cell receptors were detected in recognition images with domain sizes ranging from {approx} 25 to {approx} 160 nm, with the smaller domains corresponding to a single CD1d molecule.

  20. High-precision correlative fluorescence and electron cryo microscopy using two independent alignment markers☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellenberger, Pascale; Kaufmann, Rainer; Siebert, C. Alistair; Hagen, Christoph; Wodrich, Harald; Grünewald, Kay

    2014-01-01

    Correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) is an emerging technique which combines functional information provided by fluorescence microscopy (FM) with the high-resolution structural information of electron microscopy (EM). So far, correlative cryo microscopy of frozen-hydrated samples has not reached better than micrometre range accuracy. Here, a method is presented that enables the correlation between fluorescently tagged proteins and electron cryo tomography (cryoET) data with nanometre range precision. Specifically, thin areas of vitrified whole cells are examined by correlative fluorescence cryo microscopy (cryoFM) and cryoET. Novel aspects of the presented cryoCLEM workflow not only include the implementation of two independent electron dense fluorescent markers to improve the precision of the alignment, but also the ability of obtaining an estimate of the correlation accuracy for each individual object of interest. The correlative workflow from plunge-freezing to cryoET is detailed step-by-step for the example of locating fluorescence-labelled adenovirus particles trafficking inside a cell. PMID:24262358

  1. Fluorescence microscopy image noise reduction using a stochastically-connected random field model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, S A; Cameron, A; Siva, P; Lui, D; Shafiee, M J; Boroomand, A; Haider, N; Wong, A

    2016-02-17

    Fluorescence microscopy is an essential part of a biologist's toolkit, allowing assaying of many parameters like subcellular localization of proteins, changes in cytoskeletal dynamics, protein-protein interactions, and the concentration of specific cellular ions. A fundamental challenge with using fluorescence microscopy is the presence of noise. This study introduces a novel approach to reducing noise in fluorescence microscopy images. The noise reduction problem is posed as a Maximum A Posteriori estimation problem, and solved using a novel random field model called stochastically-connected random field (SRF), which combines random graph and field theory. Experimental results using synthetic and real fluorescence microscopy data show the proposed approach achieving strong noise reduction performance when compared to several other noise reduction algorithms, using quantitative metrics. The proposed SRF approach was able to achieve strong performance in terms of signal-to-noise ratio in the synthetic results, high signal to noise ratio and contrast to noise ratio in the real fluorescence microscopy data results, and was able to maintain cell structure and subtle details while reducing background and intra-cellular noise.

  2. High-precision correlative fluorescence and electron cryo microscopy using two independent alignment markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellenberger, Pascale; Kaufmann, Rainer; Siebert, C Alistair; Hagen, Christoph; Wodrich, Harald; Grünewald, Kay

    2014-08-01

    Correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) is an emerging technique which combines functional information provided by fluorescence microscopy (FM) with the high-resolution structural information of electron microscopy (EM). So far, correlative cryo microscopy of frozen-hydrated samples has not reached better than micrometre range accuracy. Here, a method is presented that enables the correlation between fluorescently tagged proteins and electron cryo tomography (cryoET) data with nanometre range precision. Specifically, thin areas of vitrified whole cells are examined by correlative fluorescence cryo microscopy (cryoFM) and cryoET. Novel aspects of the presented cryoCLEM workflow not only include the implementation of two independent electron dense fluorescent markers to improve the precision of the alignment, but also the ability of obtaining an estimate of the correlation accuracy for each individual object of interest. The correlative workflow from plunge-freezing to cryoET is detailed step-by-step for the example of locating fluorescence-labelled adenovirus particles trafficking inside a cell. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Hybrid fluorescence and electron cryo-microscopy for simultaneous electron and photon imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Hirofumi; Fukuda, Yoshiyuki; Arai, Yoshihiro; Terakawa, Susumu; Yamamoto, Naoki; Nagayama, Kuniaki

    2014-01-01

    Integration of fluorescence light and transmission electron microscopy into the same device would represent an important advance in correlative microscopy, which traditionally involves two separate microscopes for imaging. To achieve such integration, the primary technical challenge that must be solved regards how to arrange two objective lenses used for light and electron microscopy in such a manner that they can properly focus on a single specimen. To address this issue, both lateral displacement of the specimen between two lenses and specimen rotation have been proposed. Such movement of the specimen allows sequential collection of two kinds of microscopic images of a single target, but prevents simultaneous imaging. This shortcoming has been made up by using a simple optical device, a reflection mirror. Here, we present an approach toward the versatile integration of fluorescence and electron microscopy for simultaneous imaging. The potential of simultaneous hybrid microscopy was demonstrated by fluorescence and electron sequential imaging of a fluorescent protein expressed in cells and cathodoluminescence imaging of fluorescent beads. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Synchronizing atomic force microscopy force mode and fluorescence microscopy in real time for immune cell stimulation and activation studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cazaux, Séverine; Sadoun, Anaïs; Biarnes-Pelicot, Martine; Martinez, Manuel; Obeid, Sameh [Aix Marseille Université, LAI UM 61, Marseille F-13288 (France); Inserm, UMR-S 1067, Marseille F-13288 (France); CNRS, UMR 7333, Marseille F-13288 (France); Bongrand, Pierre [Aix Marseille Université, LAI UM 61, Marseille F-13288 (France); Inserm, UMR-S 1067, Marseille F-13288 (France); CNRS, UMR 7333, Marseille F-13288 (France); APHM, Hôpital de la Conception, Laboratoire d’Immunologie, Marseille F-13385 (France); Limozin, Laurent [Aix Marseille Université, LAI UM 61, Marseille F-13288 (France); Inserm, UMR-S 1067, Marseille F-13288 (France); CNRS, UMR 7333, Marseille F-13288 (France); Puech, Pierre-Henri, E-mail: pierre-henri.puech@inserm.fr [Aix Marseille Université, LAI UM 61, Marseille F-13288 (France); Inserm, UMR-S 1067, Marseille F-13288 (France); CNRS, UMR 7333, Marseille F-13288 (France)

    2016-01-15

    A method is presented for combining atomic force microscopy (AFM) force mode and fluorescence microscopy in order to (a) mechanically stimulate immune cells while recording the subsequent activation under the form of calcium pulses, and (b) observe the mechanical response of a cell upon photoactivation of a small G protein, namely Rac. Using commercial set-ups and a robust signal coupling the fluorescence excitation light and the cantilever bending, the applied force and activation signals were very easily synchronized. This approach allows to control the entire mechanical history of a single cell up to its activation and response down to a few hundreds of milliseconds, and can be extended with very minimal adaptations to other cellular systems where mechanotransduction is studied, using either purely mechanical stimuli or via a surface bound specific ligand. - Highlights: • A signal coupling AFM and fluorescence microscopy was characterized for soft cantilevers. • It can be used as an intrinsic timer to synchronize images and forces. • Mechanical stimulation of single immune cells while recording calcium fluxes was detailed. • Light-induced mechanical modifications of lymphocytes using a PA-Rac protein were demonstrated. • The precautions and limitations of use of this effect were presented.

  5. Video-rate two-photon excited fluorescence lifetime imaging system with interleaved digitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dow, Ximeng Y; Sullivan, Shane Z; Muir, Ryan D; Simpson, Garth J

    2015-07-15

    A fast (up to video rate) two-photon excited fluorescence lifetime imaging system based on interleaved digitization is demonstrated. The system is compatible with existing beam-scanning microscopes with minor electronics and software modification. Proof-of-concept demonstrations were performed using laser dyes and biological tissue.

  6. Fluorescence single-molecule counting assays for protein quantification using epi-fluorescence microscopy with quantum dots labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Dafeng; Liu, Chunxia; Wang, Lei; Jiang, Wei

    2010-03-10

    A single-molecule counting approach for quantifying the antibody affixed to a surface using quantum dots and epi-fluorescence microscopy is presented. Modifying the glass substrates with carboxyl groups provides a hydrophilic surface that reacts with amine groups of an antibody to allow covalent immobilization of the antibody. Nonspecific adsorption of single molecules on the modified surfaces was first investigated. Then, quantum dots were employed to form complexes with surface-immobilized antibody molecules and used as fluorescent probes for single-molecule imaging. Epi-fluorescence microscopy was chosen as the tool for single-molecule fluorescence detection here. The generated fluorescence signals were taken by an electron multiplying charge-coupled device and were found to be proportional to the sample concentrations. Under optimal conditions, a linear response range of 5.0x10(-14)-3.0x10(-12) mol L(-1) was obtained between the number of single molecules and sample concentration via a single-molecule counting approach. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Calibration of a DG–model for fluorescence microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Christian Valdemar

    ) is an impor- tant and widely used microscopy method for visualization of molecular transport processes in living cells. Thus, the motivation for making an automated reliable analysis of the image data is high. In this contribution, we present and comment on the calibration of a Discontinuous......–Galerkin simulator [3, 4] on segmented cell images. The cell geometry is extracted from FLIP images using the Chan– Vese active contours algorithm [1] while the DG simulator is implemented in FEniCS [5]. Simulated FLIP sequences based on optimal parameters from the PDE model are presented, with an overall goal...... of making an automated analysis tool for FLIP images....

  8. Expression-Enhanced Fluorescent Proteins Based on Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein for Super-resolution Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duwé, Sam; De Zitter, Elke; Gielen, Vincent; Moeyaert, Benjamien; Vandenberg, Wim; Grotjohann, Tim; Clays, Koen; Jakobs, Stefan; Van Meervelt, Luc; Dedecker, Peter

    2015-10-27

    "Smart fluorophores", such as reversibly switchable fluorescent proteins, are crucial for advanced fluorescence imaging. However, only a limited number of such labels is available, and many display reduced biological performance compared to more classical variants. We present the development of robustly photoswitchable variants of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), named rsGreens, that display up to 30-fold higher fluorescence in E. coli colonies grown at 37 °C and more than 4-fold higher fluorescence when expressed in HEK293T cells compared to their ancestor protein rsEGFP. This enhancement is not due to an intrinsic increase in the fluorescence brightness of the probes, but rather due to enhanced expression levels that allow many more probe molecules to be functional at any given time. We developed rsGreens displaying a range of photoswitching kinetics and show how these can be used for multimodal diffraction-unlimited fluorescence imaging such as pcSOFI and RESOLFT, achieving a spatial resolution of ∼70 nm. By determining the first ever crystal structures of a negative reversibly switchable FP derived from Aequorea victoria in both the "on"- and "off"-conformation we were able to confirm the presence of a cis-trans isomerization and provide further insights into the mechanisms underlying the photochromism. Our work demonstrates that genetically encoded "smart fluorophores" can be readily optimized for biological performance and provides a practical strategy for developing maturation- and stability-enhanced photochromic fluorescent proteins.

  9. Facile method to stain the bacterial cell surface for super-resolution fluorescence microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunsolus, Ian L.; Hu, Dehong; Mihai, Cosmin; Lohse, Samuel E.; Lee, Chang-Soo; Torelli, Marco; Hamers, Robert J.; Murphy, Catherine; Orr, Galya; Haynes, Christy L.

    2014-01-01

    A method to fluorescently stain the surfaces of both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial cells compatible with super-resolution fluorescence microscopy is presented. This method utilizes a commercially-available fluorescent probe to label primary amines at the surface of the cell. We demonstrate efficient staining of two bacterial strains, the Gram-negative Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and the Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis 168. Using structured illumination microscopy and stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy, which require high quantum yield or specialized dyes, we show that this staining method may be used to resolve the bacterial cell surface with sub-diffraction-limited resolution. We further use this method to identify localization patterns of nanomaterials, specifically cadmium selenide quantum dots, following interaction with bacterial cells.

  10. Image processing in standing-wave fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthi, Vijaykumar

    Fluorescence microscopes are valuable tools in determining the structure of the objects they image, typically, fixed and living cells and their components. However, the axial resolution of such microscopes is much worse than their transverse resolution. In addition, due to the finite aperture of the lenses used in all microscopes, not all the light emitted from the object is collected by the microscope. Every microscope acts like a low-pass filter and is therefore characterized by a transfer function, known as the optical transfer function (OTF). The bandpass region of OTF that determines which frequency components of the object will be transmitted has a characteristic shape with a cone shaped region in the middle in addition to bandlimits. Any object frequency components that fall in this cone shaped region, or outside the bandlimits are lost during imaging. The standing-wave fluorescence microscope (SWIM) uses interference of two beams, resulting in a non-uniform, planar excitation pattern in the specimen. The optical transfer function of this microscope (SWOTF) has three distinct bands, a central band that is identical to the optical transfer function (OTF) in a conventional fluorescence microscope, and two additional sidebands that are offset from the central band. Therefore, the SWOTF has gaps between the central band and the sidebands, and information about the object that falls in the gaps or outside the three bands is lost when imaging. The principal questions answered by this thesis are: (1) Do the data in the sidebands of the SWOTF contribute additional information about the object? (2) Can the information about the object lost in the gaps in the SWOTF be recovered using computational means? In SWFM, three images per plane of focus are required to capture all the information about the object. In the case of multiple plane data sets, there are three stacks of such triplets. In order to answer the questions posed above, the three SWFM images (or stacks

  11. Multiphoton Laser Microscopy and Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging for the Evaluation of the Skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Seidenari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiphoton laser microscopy is a new, non-invasive technique providing access to the skin at a cellular and subcellular level, which is based both on autofluorescence and fluorescence lifetime imaging. Whereas the former considers fluorescence intensity emitted by epidermal and dermal fluorophores and by the extra-cellular matrix, fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM, is generated by the fluorescence decay rate. This innovative technique can be applied to the study of living skin, cell cultures and ex vivo samples. Although still limited to the clinical research field, the development of multiphoton laser microscopy is thought to become suitable for a practical application in the next few years: in this paper, we performed an accurate review of the studies published so far, considering the possible fields of application of this imaging method and providing high quality images acquired in the Department of Dermatology of the University of Modena.

  12. Fibered Confocal Fluorescence Microscopy for the Noninvasive Imaging of Langerhans Cells in Macaques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biliana Todorova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. We developed a new approach to visualize skin Langerhans cells by in vivo fluorescence imaging in nonhuman primates. Procedures. Macaques were intradermally injected with a monoclonal, fluorescently labeled antibody against HLA-DR molecule and were imaged for up to 5 days by fibered confocal microscopy (FCFM. Results. The network of skin Langerhans cells was visualized by in vivo fibered confocal fluorescence microscopy. Quantification of Langerhans cells revealed no changes to cell density with time. Ex vivo experiments confirmed that injected fluorescent HLA-DR antibody specifically targeted Langerhans cells in the epidermis. Conclusions. This study demonstrates the feasibility of single-cell, in vivo imaging as a noninvasive technique to track Langerhans cells in nontransgenic animals.

  13. Creating infinite contrast in fluorescence microscopy by using lanthanide centered emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    R. Carro-Temboury, Miguel; Arppe, Riikka Matleena; Hempel, Casper

    2017-01-01

    The popularity of fluorescence microscopy arises from the inherent mode of action, where the fluorescence emission from probes is used to visualize selected features on a presumed dark background. However, the background is rarely truly dark, and image processing and analysis is needed to enhance...... for completely removing the background signal in spectrally resolved fluorescence microscopy. The methodology is applicable for all probes with narrow and well-defined emission bands (Full width half-maximum emission lines of europium......(III) and terbium(III) ions. We used a model system with zeolites doped with lanthanides immobilized in a polymer stained with several fluorescent dyes regularly used in bioimaging. After smoothing the spectral data recorded in each pixel, they are differentiated. Method I is based on the direct sum of the gradient...

  14. Detecting RNA viruses in living mammalian cells by fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivaraman, Divya; Biswas, Payal; Cella, Lakshmi N; Yates, Marylynn V; Chen, Wilfred

    2011-07-01

    Traditional methods that rely on viral isolation and culture techniques continue to be the gold standards used for detection of infectious viral particles. However, new techniques that rely on visualization of live cells can shed light on understanding virus-host interaction for early stage detection and potential drug discovery. Live-cell imaging techniques that incorporate fluorescent probes into viral components provide opportunities for understanding mRNA expression, interaction, and virus movement and localization. Other viral replication events inside a host cell can be exploited for non-invasive detection, such as single-virus tracking, which does not inhibit viral infectivity or cellular function. This review highlights some of the recent advances made using these novel approaches for visualization of viral entry and replication in live cells. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Femtosecond photoacoustics: integrated two-photon fluorescence and photoacoustic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Raaij, Martijn E.; Lee, Mike; Chérin, Emmanuel; Stefanovic, Bojana; Foster, F. Stuart

    2010-02-01

    Conventional photoacoustic imaging systems excite a photoacoustic wave by illuminating an area on the order of square centimeters with millijoule laser pulses. Spatial resolution is then determined by the ultrasound transducer and is typically on the order of 100 μm. We report on a system that focuses femtosecond, nanojoule pulses to a spot with a diameter of ~ 1 μm to perform laser-scanning photoacoustics with micrometer resolution. Near-infrared femtosecond laser pulses with a pulse energy of 2.4 nanojoules excite a train of photoacoustic waves at the repetition rate of the pulsed laser (80 MHz). These photoacoustic waves are detected by an unfocused single-element ultrasound transducer tuned to 80 MHz. A radiofrequency lock-in amplifier recovers the amplitude of the frequency component of the photoacoustic signal at the pulse repetition frequency. This amplitude is an indicator of the absorption coefficient of the sample at the laser focus and at the laser wavelength. Initial experiments using a graphite rod as absorber reproducibly yield signals in the 0.2 - 2 microvolt range with a signal-to-noise ratio of 18 dB, recovered from 10 mV of broadband noise. The photoacoustic imaging system is integrated in a commercial laser-scanning two-photon fluorescence microscope, enabling simultaneous three-dimensional fluorescence- and photoacoustic imaging. One major application will be to image both morphology and oxygen saturation of microvasculature in the cerebral cortex of anesthetized rodents in vivo in the context of tumor angiogenesis. In this paper we describe the physics of femtosecond photoacoustics and demonstrate initial results.

  16. Fluorescence-Lifetime Imaging Microscopy for Visualization of Quantum Dots’ Endocytic Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leona Damalakiene

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Accumulation of carboxylated polyethylene glycol (PEG CdSe/ZnSquantum dots (QDs has been monitored in living fibroblasts using confocal microscopy for fluorescence intensity and fluorescence-lifetime imaging (FLIM. The wide range of mean photoluminescence (PL lifetime values was observed for the intracellular QDs in different intracellular microenvironment, which revealed structural heterogeneity of endosomes and enabled the distinguishing among endosomes of different maturity.

  17. Microplate-compatible total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy for receptor pharmacology

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Minghan; Zaytseva, Natalya V.; Wu, Qi; Li, Min; Fang, Ye

    2013-01-01

    We report the use of total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy for analyzing receptor pharmacology and the development of a microplate-compatible TIRF imaging system. Using stably expressed green fluorescence protein tagged β2-adrenergic receptor as the reporter, we found that the activation of different receptors results in distinct kinetic signatures of the TIRF intensity of cells. These TIRF signatures closely resemble the characteristics of their respective label-free dynam...

  18. Wide-field TCSPC-based fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhling, Klaus; Hirvonen, Liisa M.; Becker, Wolfgang; Smietana, Stefan; Netz, Holger; Milnes, James; Conneely, Thomas; Le Marois, Alix; Jagutzki, Ottmar

    2016-05-01

    Time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) is a widely used, sensitive, precise, robust and mature technique to measure photon arrival times in applications such as fluorescence spectroscopy and microscopy, light detection and ranging (lidar) and optical tomography. Wide-field TCSPC detection techniques, where the position and the arrival time of the photons are recorded simultaneously, have seen several advances in the last few years, from the microsecond to the picosecond time scale. Here, we summarise some of our recent work in this field with emphasis on microsecond resolution phosphorescence lifetime imaging (PLIM) and nanosecond fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) microscopy.

  19. SIMToolbox: a MATLAB toolbox for structured illumination fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Křížek, Pavel; Lukeš, Tomáš; Ovesný, Martin; Fliegel, Karel; Hagen, Guy M

    2016-01-15

    SIMToolbox is an open-source, modular set of functions for MATLAB equipped with a user-friendly graphical interface and designed for processing two-dimensional and three-dimensional data acquired by structured illumination microscopy (SIM). Both optical sectioning and super-resolution applications are supported. The software is also capable of maximum a posteriori probability image estimation (MAP-SIM), an alternative method for reconstruction of structured illumination images. MAP-SIM can potentially reduce reconstruction artifacts, which commonly occur due to refractive index mismatch within the sample and to imperfections in the illumination. SIMToolbox, example data and the online documentation are freely accessible at http://mmtg.fel.cvut.cz/SIMToolbox. ghagen@uccs.edu Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Breaking the diffraction barrier in fluorescence microscopy at low light intensities by using reversibly photoswitchable proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Michael; Eggeling, Christian; Jakobs, Stefan; Hell, Stefan W

    2005-12-06

    Fluorescence microscopy is indispensable in many areas of science, but until recently, diffraction has limited the resolution of its lens-based variant. The diffraction barrier has been broken by a saturated depletion of the marker's fluorescent state by stimulated emission, but this approach requires picosecond laser pulses of GW/cm2 intensity. Here, we demonstrate the surpassing of the diffraction barrier in fluorescence microscopy with illumination intensities that are eight orders of magnitude smaller. The subdiffraction resolution results from reversible photoswitching of a marker protein between a fluorescence-activated and a nonactivated state, whereby one of the transitions is accomplished by means of a spatial intensity distribution featuring a zero. After characterizing the switching kinetics of the used marker protein asFP595, we demonstrate the current capability of this RESOLFT (reversible saturable optical fluorescence transitions) type of concept to resolve 50-100 nm in the focal plane. The observed resolution is limited only by the photokinetics of the protein and the perfection of the zero. Our results underscore the potential to finally achieve molecular resolution in fluorescence microscopy by technical optimization.

  1. Combining large area fluorescence with multiphoton microscopy for improved detection of oral epithelial neoplasia (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Rahul; Yang, Jinping; Qiu, Suimin; McCammon, Susan; Resto, Vicente; Vargas, Gracie

    2016-03-01

    Volumetric Multiphoton Autofluorescence Microscopy (MPAM) and Second Harmonic Generation Microscopy (SHGM) show promise for revealing indicators of neoplasia representing the complex microstructural organization of mucosa, potentially providing high specificity for detection of neoplasia, but is limited by small imaging area. Large area fluorescence methods on the other hand show high sensitivity appropriate for screening but are hampered by low specificity. In this study, we apply MPAM-SHGM following guidance from large area fluorescence, by either autofluorescence or a targeted metabolic fluorophore, as a potentially clinically viable approach for detection of oral neoplasia. Sites of high neoplastic potentially were identified by large area red/green autofluorescence or by a fluorescently labelled deoxy-glucose analog, 2-deoxy-2-[(7-nitro-2,1,3-benzoxadiazol-4-yl)amino]-D-glucose (2-NBDG) to highlight areas of high glucose uptake across the buccal pouch of a hamster model for OSCC. Follow-up MPAM-SHGM was conducted on regions of interests (ROIs) to assess whether microscopy would reveal microscopic features associated with neoplasia to confirm or exclude large area fluorescence findings. Parameters for analysis included cytologic metrics, 3D epithelial connective tissue interface metrics (MPAM-SHGM) and intensity of fluorescence (widefield). Imaged sites were biopsied and processed for histology and graded by a pathologist. A small sample of human ex vivo tissues were also imaged. A generalized linear model combining image metrics from large area fluorescence and volumetric MPAM-SHGM indicated the ability to delineate normal and inflammation from neoplasia.

  2. FluoroSim: A Visual Problem-Solving Environment for Fluorescence Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quammen, Cory W.; Richardson, Alvin C.; Haase, Julian; Harrison, Benjamin D.; Taylor, Russell M.; Bloom, Kerry S.

    2010-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy provides a powerful method for localization of structures in biological specimens. However, aspects of the image formation process such as noise and blur from the microscope's point-spread function combine to produce an unintuitive image transformation on the true structure of the fluorescing molecules in the specimen, hindering qualitative and quantitative analysis of even simple structures in unprocessed images. We introduce FluoroSim, an interactive fluorescence microscope simulator that can be used to train scientists who use fluorescence microscopy to understand the artifacts that arise from the image formation process, to determine the appropriateness of fluorescence microscopy as an imaging modality in an experiment, and to test and refine hypotheses of model specimens by comparing the output of the simulator to experimental data. FluoroSim renders synthetic fluorescence images from arbitrary geometric models represented as triangle meshes. We describe three rendering algorithms on graphics processing units for computing the convolution of the specimen model with a microscope's point-spread function and report on their performance. We also discuss several cases where the microscope simulator has been used to solve real problems in biology. PMID:20431698

  3. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (flimscopy). Methodology development and application to studies of endosome fusion in single cells

    OpenAIRE

    Oida, T; Sako, Y.; Kusumi, A.

    1993-01-01

    A new method of fluorescence microscopy for cell imaging has been developed that takes advantage of the spatial variations of fluorescence lifetimes in single cells as a source of image contrast, and thus it is named "fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (flimscopy)". Since time-resolved fluorescence measurements are sensitive to molecular dynamics and interactions, flimscopy allows the molecular information to be visualized in single cells. In flimscopy measurements, several (nanosecond)...

  4. Elasticity Maps of Living Neurons Measured by Combined Fluorescence and Atomic Force Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Spedden, Elise; White, James D.; Naumova, Elena N.; Kaplan, David L.; Staii, Cristian

    2013-01-01

    Detailed knowledge of mechanical parameters such as cell elasticity, stiffness of the growth substrate, or traction stresses generated during axonal extensions is essential for understanding the mechanisms that control neuronal growth. Here, we combine atomic force microscopy-based force spectroscopy with fluorescence microscopy to produce systematic, high-resolution elasticity maps for three different types of live neuronal cells: cortical (embryonic rat), embryonic chick dorsal root ganglio...

  5. Resonance fluorescence microscopy via three-dimensional atom localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchadhyayee, Pradipta; Dutta, Bibhas Kumar; Das, Nityananda; Mahapatra, Prasanta Kumar

    2018-02-01

    A scheme is proposed to realize three-dimensional (3D) atom localization in a driven two-level atomic system via resonance fluorescence. The field arrangement for the atom localization involves the application of three mutually orthogonal standing-wave fields and an additional traveling-wave coupling field. We have shown the efficacy of such field arrangement in tuning the spatially modulated resonance in all directions. Under different parametric conditions, the 3D localization patterns originate with various shapes such as sphere, sheets, disk, bowling pin, snake flute, flower vase. High-precision localization is achieved when the radiation field detuning equals twice the combined Rabi frequencies of the standing-wave fields. Application of a traveling-wave field of suitable amplitude at optimum radiation field detuning under symmetric standing-wave configuration leads to 100% detection probability even in sub-wavelength domain. Asymmetric field configuration is also taken into consideration to exhibit atom localization with appreciable precision compared to that of the symmetric case. The momentum distribution of the localized atoms is found to follow the Heisenberg uncertainty principle under the validity of Raman-Nath approximation. The proposed field configuration is suitable for application in the study of atom localization in an optical lattice arrangement.

  6. Observation by fluorescence microscopy of transcription on single combed DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueroui, Z.; Place, C.; Freyssingeas, E.; Berge, B.

    2002-01-01

    Molecular combing is a powerful procedure for aligning a large array of DNA molecules onto a surface. This technique usually leads to an overstretching of about 150% of the molecules' contour length. By changing the magnitude of capillary forces during the combing process, we were able to reduce the relative extension of the DNA molecules. Thus we achieved combing of T7 DNA with an extension close to its molecule contour length. We checked the ability of combed DNA to interact with DNA binding proteins. Using the T7 bacteriophage transcription system, we investigated the transcription activity of RNA polymerase on combed DNA by direct visualization of newly synthesized fluorescent RNAs. Our experiments show that no transcription activity occurs on overstretched DNA molecules, whereas we observe a transcription activity for nonoverstretched molecules. This activity is observed both in multiple initiation experiments and for one immobilized T7 RNA polymerase per promoter. These results open possibilities for the study of single enzyme actions on combed DNA by optical methods. PMID:11983896

  7. Correlative cryo-fluorescence light microscopy and cryo-electron tomography of Streptomyces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koning, Roman I; Celler, Katherine; Willemse, Joost; Bos, Erik; van Wezel, Gilles P; Koster, Abraham J

    2014-01-01

    Light microscopy and electron microscopy are complementary techniques that in a correlative approach enable identification and targeting of fluorescently labeled structures in situ for three-dimensional imaging at nanometer resolution. Correlative imaging allows electron microscopic images to be positioned in a broader temporal and spatial context. We employed cryo-correlative light and electron microscopy (cryo-CLEM), combining cryo-fluorescence light microscopy and cryo-electron tomography, on vitrified Streptomyces bacteria to study cell division. Streptomycetes are mycelial bacteria that grow as long hyphae and reproduce via sporulation. On solid media, Streptomyces subsequently form distinct aerial mycelia where cell division leads to the formation of unigenomic spores which separate and disperse to form new colonies. In liquid media, only vegetative hyphae are present divided by noncell separating crosswalls. Their multicellular life style makes them exciting model systems for the study of bacterial development and cell division. Complex intracellular structures have been visualized with transmission electron microscopy. Here, we describe the methods for cryo-CLEM that we applied for studying Streptomyces. These methods include cell growth, fluorescent labeling, cryo-fixation by vitrification, cryo-light microscopy using a Linkam cryo-stage, image overlay and relocation, cryo-electron tomography using a Titan Krios, and tomographic reconstruction. Additionally, methods for segmentation, volume rendering, and visualization of the correlative data are described. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Time-Resolved Fluorescence Spectroscopy and Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy for Characterization of Dendritic Polymer Nanoparticles and Applications in Nanomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boreham, Alexander; Brodwolf, Robert; Walker, Karolina; Haag, Rainer; Alexiev, Ulrike

    2016-12-24

    The emerging field of nanomedicine provides new approaches for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases, for symptom relief and for monitoring of disease progression. One route of realizing this approach is through carefully constructed nanoparticles. Due to the small size inherent to the nanoparticles a proper characterization is not trivial. This review highlights the application of time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) for the analysis of nanoparticles, covering aspects ranging from molecular properties to particle detection in tissue samples. The latter technique is particularly important as FLIM allows for distinguishing of target molecules from the autofluorescent background and, due to the environmental sensitivity of the fluorescence lifetime, also offers insights into the local environment of the nanoparticle or its interactions with other biomolecules. Thus, these techniques offer highly suitable tools in the fields of particle development, such as organic chemistry, and in the fields of particle application, such as in experimental dermatology or pharmaceutical research.

  9. Time-Resolved Fluorescence Spectroscopy and Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy for Characterization of Dendritic Polymer Nanoparticles and Applications in Nanomedicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Boreham

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The emerging field of nanomedicine provides new approaches for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases, for symptom relief and for monitoring of disease progression. One route of realizing this approach is through carefully constructed nanoparticles. Due to the small size inherent to the nanoparticles a proper characterization is not trivial. This review highlights the application of time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM for the analysis of nanoparticles, covering aspects ranging from molecular properties to particle detection in tissue samples. The latter technique is particularly important as FLIM allows for distinguishing of target molecules from the autofluorescent background and, due to the environmental sensitivity of the fluorescence lifetime, also offers insights into the local environment of the nanoparticle or its interactions with other biomolecules. Thus, these techniques offer highly suitable tools in the fields of particle development, such as organic chemistry, and in the fields of particle application, such as in experimental dermatology or pharmaceutical research.

  10. Creating infinite contrast in fluorescence microscopy by using lanthanide centered emission.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel R Carro-Temboury

    Full Text Available The popularity of fluorescence microscopy arises from the inherent mode of action, where the fluorescence emission from probes is used to visualize selected features on a presumed dark background. However, the background is rarely truly dark, and image processing and analysis is needed to enhance the fluorescent signal that is ascribed to the selected feature. The image acquisition is facilitated by using considerable illumination, bright probes at a relatively high concentration in order to make the fluorescent signal significantly more intense than the background signal. Here, we present two methods for completely removing the background signal in spectrally resolved fluorescence microscopy. The methodology is applicable for all probes with narrow and well-defined emission bands (Full width half-maximum < 20 nm. Here, we use two lanthanide based probes exploiting the narrow emission lines of europium(III and terbium(III ions. We used a model system with zeolites doped with lanthanides immobilized in a polymer stained with several fluorescent dyes regularly used in bioimaging. After smoothing the spectral data recorded in each pixel, they are differentiated. Method I is based on the direct sum of the gradient, while method II resolves the fluorescent signal by subtracting a background calculated via the gradient. Both methods improve signal-to-background ratio significantly and we suggest that spectral imaging of lanthanide-centered emission can be used as a tool to obtain absolute contrast in bioimaging.

  11. Enzyme-Free Detection of Mutations in Cancer DNA Using Synthetic Oligonucleotide Probes and Fluorescence Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miotke, Laura; Maity, Arindam; Ji, Hanlee; Brewer, Jonathan; Astakhova, Kira

    2015-01-01

    Rapid reliable diagnostics of DNA mutations are highly desirable in research and clinical assays. Current development in this field goes simultaneously in two directions: 1) high-throughput methods, and 2) portable assays. Non-enzymatic approaches are attractive for both types of methods since they would allow rapid and relatively inexpensive detection of nucleic acids. Modern fluorescence microscopy is having a huge impact on detection of biomolecules at previously unachievable resolution. However, no straightforward methods to detect DNA in a non-enzymatic way using fluorescence microscopy and nucleic acid analogues have been proposed so far. Here we report a novel enzyme-free approach to efficiently detect cancer mutations. This assay includes gene-specific target enrichment followed by annealing to oligonucleotides containing locked nucleic acids (LNAs) and finally, detection by fluorescence microscopy. The LNA containing probes display high binding affinity and specificity to DNA containing mutations, which allows for the detection of mutation abundance with an intercalating EvaGreen dye. We used a second probe, which increases the overall number of base pairs in order to produce a higher fluorescence signal by incorporating more dye molecules. Indeed we show here that using EvaGreen dye and LNA probes, genomic DNA containing BRAF V600E mutation could be detected by fluorescence microscopy at low femtomolar concentrations. Notably, this was at least 1000-fold above the potential detection limit. Overall, the novel assay we describe could become a new approach to rapid, reliable and enzyme-free diagnostics of cancer or other associated DNA targets. Importantly, stoichiometry of wild type and mutant targets is conserved in our assay, which allows for an accurate estimation of mutant abundance when the detection limit requirement is met. Using fluorescence microscopy, this approach presents the opportunity to detect DNA at single-molecule resolution and directly

  12. Towards single molecule biosensors using super-resolution fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xun; Nicovich, Philip R; Gaus, Katharina; Gooding, J Justin

    2017-07-15

    Conventional immunosensors require many binding events to give a single transducer output which represents the concentration of the analyte in the sample. Because of the requirements to selectively detect species in complex samples, immunosensing interfaces must allow immobilisation of antibodies while repelling nonspecific adsorption of other species. These requirements lead to quite sophisticated interfacial design, often with molecular level control, but we have no tools to characterise how well these interfaces work at the molecular level. The work reported herein is an initial feasibility study to show that antibody-antigen binding events can be monitored at the single molecule level using single molecule localisation microscopy (SMLM). The steps to achieve this first requires showing that indium tin oxide surfaces can be used for SMLM, then that these surfaces can be modified with self-assembled monolayers using organophosphonic acid derivatives, that the amount of antigens and antibodies on the surface can be controlled and monitored at the single molecule level and finally antibody binding to antigen modified surfaces can be monitored. The results show the amount of antibody that binds to an antigen modified surface is dependent on both the concentration of antigen on the surface and the concentration of antibody in solution. This study demonstrates the potential of SMLM for characterising biosensing interfaces and as the transducer in a massively parallel, wide field, single molecule detection scheme for quantitative analysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Confocal microscopy for the histological fluorescence pattern of a recurrent atypical meningioma: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitson, Wesley J; Valdes, Pablo A; Harris, Brent T; Paulsen, Keith D; Roberts, David W

    2011-06-01

    Fluorescence-guided resection with 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA), which has shown promising results in the resection of malignant gliomas, has been used for meningioma resection in an attempt to more clearly delineate the tumor margin. However, no article has investigated the fluorescence pattern of meningiomas on a histological level. Understanding the microscopic pattern of fluorescence could help assess the precision and utility of using 5-ALA for these tumors. We present the case of a recurrent atypical meningioma operated on with 5-ALA fluorescence-guided resection for delineation of tumor tissue from surrounding uninvolved dura. A 53-year-old woman presented with recurrent atypical meningioma of the falx. Prior treatment included surgical resection 6 years earlier with subsequent fractionated radiation therapy and radiosurgery for tumor progression. The patient was given 5-ALA 20 mg/kg body weight dissolved in 100 mL water 3 hours before induction of anesthesia. Intraoperative fluorescence was coregistered with preoperative imaging. Neuropathological analysis of the resected falx with confocal microscopy enabled correlation of fluorescence with the extent of tumor on a histological level. Fluorescence guidance allowed clear intraoperative delineation of tumor tissue from adjacent, uninvolved dura. On a microscopic level, there was a very close correlation of fluorescence with tumor, but some tumor cells did not fluoresce. Copyright © 2011 by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons

  14. Dynamic measurement of the height and volume of migrating cells by a novel fluorescence microscopy technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottier, Céline; Gabella, Chiara; Vianay, Benoît; Buscemi, Lara; Sbalzarini, Ivo F; Meister, Jean-Jacques; Verkhovsky, Alexander B

    2011-11-21

    We propose a new technique to measure the volume of adherent migrating cells. The method is based on a negative staining where a fluorescent, non-cell-permeant dye is added to the extracellular medium. The specimen is observed with a conventional fluorescence microscope in a chamber of uniform height. Given that the fluorescence signal depends on the thickness of the emitting layer, the objects excluding the fluorescent dye (i.e., cells) appear dark, and the decrease of the fluorescent signal with respect to the background is expected to give information about the height and the volume of the object. Using a glass microfabricated pattern with steps of defined heights, we show that the drop in fluorescence intensity is indeed proportional to the height of the step and obtain calibration curves relating fluorescence intensity to height. The technique, termed the fluorescence displacement method, is further validated by comparing our measurements with the ones obtained by atomic force microscopy (AFM). We apply our method to measure the real-time volume dynamics of migrating fish epidermal keratocytes subjected to osmotic stress. The fluorescence displacement technique allows fast and precise monitoring of cell height and volume, thus providing a valuable tool for characterizing the three-dimensional behaviour of migrating cells.

  15. Synchronous-digitization for Video Rate Polarization Modulated Beam Scanning Second Harmonic Generation Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Shane Z; DeWalt, Emma L; Schmitt, Paul D; Muir, Ryan M; Simpson, Garth J

    2015-03-09

    Fast beam-scanning non-linear optical microscopy, coupled with fast (8 MHz) polarization modulation and analytical modeling have enabled simultaneous nonlinear optical Stokes ellipsometry (NOSE) and linear Stokes ellipsometry imaging at video rate (15 Hz). NOSE enables recovery of the complex-valued Jones tensor that describes the polarization-dependent observables, in contrast to polarimetry, in which the polarization stated of the exciting beam is recorded. Each data acquisition consists of 30 images (10 for each detector, with three detectors operating in parallel), each of which corresponds to polarization-dependent results. Processing of this image set by linear fitting contracts down each set of 10 images to a set of 5 parameters for each detector in second harmonic generation (SHG) and three parameters for the transmittance of the fundamental laser beam. Using these parameters, it is possible to recover the Jones tensor elements of the sample at video rate. Video rate imaging is enabled by performing synchronous digitization (SD), in which a PCIe digital oscilloscope card is synchronized to the laser (the laser is the master clock.) Fast polarization modulation was achieved by modulating an electro-optic modulator synchronously with the laser and digitizer, with a simple sine-wave at 1/10th the period of the laser, producing a repeating pattern of 10 polarization states. This approach was validated using Z-cut quartz, and NOSE microscopy was performed for micro-crystals of naproxen.

  16. Synchronous-digitization for video rate polarization modulated beam scanning second harmonic generation microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Shane Z.; DeWalt, Emma L.; Schmitt, Paul D.; Muir, Ryan D.; Simpson, Garth J.

    2015-03-01

    Fast beam-scanning non-linear optical microscopy, coupled with fast (8 MHz) polarization modulation and analytical modeling have enabled simultaneous nonlinear optical Stokes ellipsometry (NOSE) and linear Stokes ellipsometry imaging at video rate (15 Hz). NOSE enables recovery of the complex-valued Jones tensor that describes the polarization-dependent observables, in contrast to polarimetry, in which the polarization stated of the exciting beam is recorded. Each data acquisition consists of 30 images (10 for each detector, with three detectors operating in parallel), each of which corresponds to polarization-dependent results. Processing of this image set by linear fitting contracts down each set of 10 images to a set of 5 parameters for each detector in second harmonic generation (SHG) and three parameters for the transmittance of the fundamental laser beam. Using these parameters, it is possible to recover the Jones tensor elements of the sample at video rate. Video rate imaging is enabled by performing synchronous digitization (SD), in which a PCIe digital oscilloscope card is synchronized to the laser (the laser is the master clock.) Fast polarization modulation was achieved by modulating an electro-optic modulator synchronously with the laser and digitizer, with a simple sine-wave at 1/10th the period of the laser, producing a repeating pattern of 10 polarization states. This approach was validated using Z-cut quartz, and NOSE microscopy was performed for micro-crystals of naproxen.

  17. New hardware and workflows for semi-automated correlative cryo-fluorescence and cryo-electron microscopy/tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Schorb, Martin; Gaechter, Leander; Avinoam, Ori; Sieckmann, Frank; Clarke, Mairi; Bebeacua, Cecilia; Bykov, Yury S.; Sonnen, Andreas F.-P.; Lihl, Reinhard; John A G Briggs

    2017-01-01

    Correlative light and electron microscopy allows features of interest defined by fluorescence signals to be located in an electron micrograph of the same sample. Rare dynamic events or specific objects can be identified, targeted and imaged by electron microscopy or tomography. To combine it with structural studies using cryo-electron microscopy or tomography, fluorescence microscopy must be performed while maintaining the specimen vitrified at liquid-nitrogen temperatures and in a dry enviro...

  18. Removing the effect of blooming from potential energy measurement by employing total internal reflection microscopy integrated with video microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Feng; Gong, Xiangjun; He, Chuanxin; Ngai, To

    2017-10-01

    Total internal reflection microscopy (TIRM) measures the interactions between a colloidal particle and a flat surface in aqueous solution. Recently, TIRM has further integrated with video microscopy (VM) and enabled the simultaneous measurements of multi-particle colloid-surface interactions in the same ensemble. However, there still remain challenges about accurate image acquisition due to blooming. Blooming means the number of photons reaching the detector exceeds its maximum capacity, and the excess photons will either spill to adjacent pixels or not be counted, leading to an obstacle from precise determination of intensity. Our result shows that blooming gives rise to a deviation of the measured potential energy from the classical theory of Derjaguin, Landau, Verway, and Overbeek (DLVO). Therefore, a correction method was developed in this work to deduce the real intensity from the experimental measurement. The relationship between scattered light intensity and exposure time deviates from linearity when blooming occurs. A correction equation was developed to recover the real intensity, which was then confirmed by the accordance between the corresponding potential energy profiles and the DLVO theory. This correction method is suitable for VM systems of colloidal probes illuminated by scattered light, broadening the application of VM imaging to investigate colloidal interactions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Homogeneous vs heterogeneous polymerization catalysis revealed by single-particle fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esfandiari, N Melody; Blum, Suzanne A

    2011-11-16

    A high-sensitivity and high-resolution single-particle fluorescence microscopy technique differentiated between homogeneous and heterogeneous metathesis polymerization catalysis by imaging the location of the early stages of polymerization. By imaging single polymers and single crystals of Grubbs II, polymerization catalysis was revealed to be solely homogeneous rather than heterogeneous or both.

  20. Recent Advances in Biological Single-Molecule Applications of Optical Tweezers and Fluorescence Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi Shabestari, M; Meijering, A E C; Roos, W H; Wuite, G J L; Peterman, E J G

    2017-01-01

    Over the past two decades, single-molecule techniques have evolved into robust tools to study many fundamental biological processes. The combination of optical tweezers with fluorescence microscopy and microfluidics provides a powerful single-molecule manipulation and visualization technique that has found widespread application in biology. In this combined approach, the spatial (~nm) and temporal (~ms) resolution, as well as the force scale (~pN) accessible to optical tweezers is complemented with the power of fluorescence microscopy. Thereby, it provides information on the local presence, identity, spatial dynamics, and conformational dynamics of single biomolecules. Together, these techniques allow comprehensive studies of, among others, molecular motors, protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions, biomolecular conformational changes, and mechanotransduction pathways. In this chapter, recent applications of fluorescence microscopy in combination with optical trapping are discussed. After an introductory section, we provide a description of instrumentation together with the current capabilities and limitations of the approaches. Next we summarize recent studies that applied this combination of techniques in biological systems and highlight some representative biological assays to mark the exquisite opportunities that optical tweezers combined with fluorescence microscopy provide. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Single-molecule fluorescence microscopy on nucleotide excision repair complexes using GFP fusion proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Segers-Nolten, Gezina M.J.; Rademakers, Suzanne; Vermeulen, Wim; Lenferink, Aufrid T.M.; Otto, Cornelis; Hoeijmakers, Jan; Greve, Jan; Koenig, Karsten; Tanke, Hans J.; Schneckenburger, Herbert

    2000-01-01

    Scanning Confocal Fluorescence Microscopy is used for single molecule studies on DNA-protein complexes that occur in Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER). During DNA-damage elimination by the NER-pathway, complex protein structures assemble over DNA. It is our aim to resolve the architecture of these

  2. Recent Advances in Biological Single-Molecule Applications of Optical Tweezers and Fluorescence Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hashemi Shabestari, M; Meijering, A E C; Roos, W H; Wuite, G J L; Peterman, E J G

    2017-01-01

    Over the past two decades, single-molecule techniques have evolved into robust tools to study many fundamental biological processes. The combination of optical tweezers with fluorescence microscopy and microfluidics provides a powerful single-molecule manipulation and visualization technique that

  3. Light sheet-based fluorescence microscopy: more dimensions, more photons, and less photodamage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynaud, Emmanuel G; Krzic, Uros; Greger, Klaus; Stelzer, Ernst H K

    2008-10-01

    Light-sheet-based fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) is a fluorescence technique that combines optical sectioning, the key capability of confocal and two-photon fluorescence microscopes with multiple-view imaging, which is used in optical tomography. In contrast to conventional wide-field and confocal fluorescence microscopes, a light sheet illuminates only the focal plane of the detection objective lens from the side. Excitation is, thus, restricted to the fluorophores in the volume near the focal plane. This provides optical sectioning and allows the use of regular cameras in the detection process. Compared to confocal fluorescence microscopy, LSFM reduces photo bleaching and photo toxicity by up to three orders of magnitude. In LSFM, the specimen is embedded in a transparent block of hydrogel and positioned relative to the stationary light sheet using precise motorized translation and rotation stages. This feature is used to image any plane in a specimen. Additionally, multiple views obtained along different angles can be combined into a single data set with an improved resolution. LSFMs are very well suited for imaging large live specimens over long periods of time. However, they also perform well with very small specimens such as single yeast cells. This perspective introduces the principles of LSFM, explains the challenges of specimen preparation, and introduces the basics of a microscopy that takes advantage of multiple views.

  4. Localization of fluorescently labeled structures in frozen-hydrated samples using integrated light electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faas, F G A; Bárcena, M; Agronskaia, A V; Gerritsen, H C; Moscicka, K B; Diebolder, C A; van Driel, L F; Limpens, R W A L; Bos, E; Ravelli, R B G; Koning, R I; Koster, A J

    2013-03-01

    Correlative light and electron microscopy is an increasingly popular technique to study complex biological systems at various levels of resolution. Fluorescence microscopy can be employed to scan large areas to localize regions of interest which are then analyzed by electron microscopy to obtain morphological and structural information from a selected field of view at nm-scale resolution. Previously, an integrated approach to room temperature correlative microscopy was described. Combined use of light and electron microscopy within one instrument greatly simplifies sample handling, avoids cumbersome experimental overheads, simplifies navigation between the two modalities, and improves the success rate of image correlation. Here, an integrated approach for correlative microscopy under cryogenic conditions is presented. Its advantages over the room temperature approach include safeguarding the native hydrated state of the biological specimen, preservation of the fluorescence signal without risk of quenching due to heavy atom stains, and reduced photo bleaching. The potential of cryo integrated light and electron microscopy is demonstrated for the detection of viable bacteria, the study of in vitro polymerized microtubules, the localization of mitochondria in mouse embryonic fibroblasts, and for a search into virus-induced intracellular membrane modifications within mammalian cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Nuclear uptake of ultrasmall gold-doxorubicin conjugates imaged by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) and electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuan; Shastry, Sathvik; Bradforth, Stephen E; Nadeau, Jay L

    2015-01-07

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) has been used to image free and encapsulated doxorubicin (Dox) uptake into cells, since interaction of Dox with DNA leads to a characteristic lifetime change. However, none of the reported Dox conjugates were able to enter cell nuclei. In this work, we use FLIM to show nuclear uptake of 2.7 nm mean diameter Au nanoparticles conjugated to Dox. The pattern of labelling differed substantially from what was seen with free Dox, with slower nuclear entry and stronger cytoplasmic labelling at all time points. As the cells died, the pattern of labelling changed further as intracellular structures disintegrated, consistent with association of Au-Dox to membranes. The patterns of Au distribution and intracellular structure changes were confirmed using electron microscopy, and indicate different mechanisms of cytotoxicity with stable Au-Dox conjugates compared to Dox alone. Such conjugates are promising tools for overcoming resistance in Dox-resistant cancers.

  6. Quantitative segmentation of fluorescence microscopy images of heterogeneous tissue: Approach for tuning algorithm parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Jenna L.; Harmany, Zachary T.; Mito, Jeffrey K.; Kennedy, Stephanie A.; Kim, Yongbaek; Dodd, Leslie; Geradts, Joseph; Kirsch, David G.; Willett, Rebecca M.; Brown, J. Quincy; Ramanujam, Nimmi

    2013-02-01

    The combination of fluorescent contrast agents with microscopy is a powerful technique to obtain real time images of tissue histology without the need for fixing, sectioning, and staining. The potential of this technology lies in the identification of robust methods for image segmentation and quantitation, particularly in heterogeneous tissues. Our solution is to apply sparse decomposition (SD) to monochrome images of fluorescently-stained microanatomy to segment and quantify distinct tissue types. The clinical utility of our approach is demonstrated by imaging excised margins in a cohort of mice after surgical resection of a sarcoma. Representative images of excised margins were used to optimize the formulation of SD and tune parameters associated with the algorithm. Our results demonstrate that SD is a robust solution that can advance vital fluorescence microscopy as a clinically significant technology.

  7. Discrimination of Dendrobium officinale and Its Common Adulterants by Combination of Normal Light and Fluorescence Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chu Chu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The stems of Dendrobium officinale Kimura et Migo, named Tie-pi-shi-hu, is one of the most endangered and precious species in China. Because of its various pharmacodynamic effects, D. officinale is widely recognized as a high-quality health food in China and other countries in south and south-east Asia. With the rising interest of D. officinale, its products have a high price due to a limited supply. This high price has led to the proliferation of adulterants in the market. To ensure the safe use of D. officinale, a fast and convenient method combining normal and fluorescence microscopy was applied in the present study to distinguish D. officinale from three commonly used adulterants including Zi-pi-shi-hu (D. devonianum, Shui-cao-shi-hu (D. aphyllum, Guang-jie-shi-hu (D. gratiosissimum. The result demonstrated that D. officinale could be identified by the characteristic “two hat-shaped” vascular bundle sheath observed under the fluorescence microscopy and the distribution of raphides under normal light microscopy. The other three adulterants could be discriminated by the vascular bundle differences and the distribution of raphides under normal light microscopy. This work indicated that combination of normal light and fluorescence microscopy is a fast and efficient technique to scientifically distinguish D. officinale from the commonly confused species.

  8. Image scanning fluorescence emission difference microscopy based on a detector array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y; Liu, S; Liu, D; Sun, S; Kuang, C; Ding, Z; Liu, X

    2017-06-01

    We propose a novel imaging method that enables the enhancement of three-dimensional resolution of confocal microscopy significantly and achieve experimentally a new fluorescence emission difference method for the first time, based on the parallel detection with a detector array. Following the principles of photon reassignment in image scanning microscopy, images captured by the detector array were arranged. And by selecting appropriate reassign patterns, the imaging result with enhanced resolution can be achieved with the method of fluorescence emission difference. Two specific methods are proposed in this paper, showing that the difference between an image scanning microscopy image and a confocal image will achieve an improvement of transverse resolution by approximately 43% compared with that in confocal microscopy, and the axial resolution can also be enhanced by at least 22% experimentally and 35% theoretically. Moreover, the methods presented in this paper can improve the lateral resolution by around 10% than fluorescence emission difference and 15% than Airyscan. The mechanism of our methods is verified by numerical simulations and experimental results, and it has significant potential in biomedical applications. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  9. Resonant Scanning with Large Field of View Reduces Photobleaching and Enhances Fluorescence Yield in STED Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yong; Wu, Xundong; Lu, Rong; Zhang, Jin; Toro, Ligia; Stefani, Enrico

    2015-10-01

    Photobleaching is a major limitation of superresolution Stimulated Depletion Emission (STED) microscopy. Fast scanning has long been considered an effective means to reduce photobleaching in fluorescence microscopy, but a careful quantitative study of this issue is missing. In this paper, we show that the photobleaching rate in STED microscopy can be slowed down and the fluorescence yield be enhanced by scanning with high speed, enabled by using large field of view in a custom-built resonant-scanning STED microscope. The effect of scanning speed on photobleaching and fluorescence yield is more remarkable at higher levels of depletion laser irradiance, and virtually disappears in conventional confocal microscopy. With ≥6 GW∙cm(-2) depletion irradiance, we were able to extend the fluorophore survival time of Atto 647N and Abberior STAR 635P by ~80% with 8-fold wider field of view. We confirm that STED Photobleaching is primarily caused by the depletion light acting upon the excited fluorophores. Experimental data agree with a theoretical model. Our results encourage further increasing the linear scanning speed for photobleaching reduction in STED microscopy.

  10. Discrimination of Dendrobium officinale and its common adulterants by combination of normal light and fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Chu; Yin, Huimin; Xia, Li; Cheng, Dongping; Yan, Jizhong; Zhu, Lin

    2014-03-24

    The stems of Dendrobium officinale Kimura et Migo, named Tie-pi-shi-hu, is one of the most endangered and precious species in China. Because of its various pharmacodynamic effects, D. officinale is widely recognized as a high-quality health food in China and other countries in south and south-east Asia. With the rising interest of D. officinale, its products have a high price due to a limited supply. This high price has led to the proliferation of adulterants in the market. To ensure the safe use of D. officinale, a fast and convenient method combining normal and fluorescence microscopy was applied in the present study to distinguish D. officinale from three commonly used adulterants including Zi-pi-shi-hu (D. devonianum), Shui-cao-shi-hu (D. aphyllum), Guang-jie-shi-hu (D. gratiosissimum). The result demonstrated that D. officinale could be identified by the characteristic "two hat-shaped" vascular bundle sheath observed under the fluorescence microscopy and the distribution of raphides under normal light microscopy. The other three adulterants could be discriminated by the vascular bundle differences and the distribution of raphides under normal light microscopy. This work indicated that combination of normal light and fluorescence microscopy is a fast and efficient technique to scientifically distinguish D. officinale from the commonly confused species.

  11. Automated analysis of fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) data based on the Laguerre deconvolution method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pande, Paritosh; Jo, Javier A

    2011-01-01

    In fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM), fluorescence time decay at each pixel of the imaged sample are measured. Every recorded fluorescence decay corresponds to the time convolution of the instrument response with the intrinsic fluorescence impulse response function (IRF), from which the sample fluorescence lifetime is determined. To estimate the IRF, the instrument response thus needs to be deconvolved from the recorded fluorescence decay. We have recently introduced a novel FLIM time-deconvolution method based on the linear expansion of the fluorescence decays on an orthonormal Laguerre basis. Since this method allows simultaneous estimation of the IRFs at all pixels, it performs at least two orders of magnitude faster than standard algorithms. In its original implementation, however, the Laguerre basis, determined by the Laguerre parameter α, is selected using a heuristic approach. Here, we present an automated implementation, whereby the Laguerre parameter α is treated as a free parameter within a nonlinear least squares optimization scheme. The new implementation combines the unmatched inherent computational speed of the Laguerre deconvolution method with a systematic model selection approach. This method will thus facilitate applications of FLIM requiring automatic estimation of the spatial distribution of fluorescence lifetimes, such as in in vivo tissue FLIM imaging.

  12. Two-photon excited fluorescence microscopy application for ex vivo investigation of ocular fundus samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Sven; Hammer, Martin; Schweitzer, Dietrich

    2011-07-01

    Two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) imaging of ocular tissue has recently become a promising tool in ophthalmology for diagnostic and research purposes. The feasibility and the advantages of TPEF imaging, namely deeper tissue penetration and improved high-resolution imaging of microstructures, have been demonstrated lately using human ocular samples. The autofluorescence properties of endogenous fluorophores in ocular fundus tissue are well known from spectrophotometric analysis. But fluorophores, especially when it comes to fluorescence lifetime, typically display a dependence of their fluorescence properties on local environmental parameters. Hence, a more detailed investigation of ocular fundus autofluorescence ideally in vivo is of utmost interest. The aim of this study is to determine space-resolved the stationary and time-resolved fluorescence properties of endogenous fluorophores in ex vivo porcine ocular fundus samples by means of two-photon excited fluorescence spectrum and lifetime imaging microscopy (FSIM/FLIM). By our first results, we characterized the autofluorescence of individual anatomical structures of porcine retina samples excited at 760 nm. The fluorescence properties of almost all investigated retinal layers are relatively homogenous. But as previously unknown, ganglion cell bodies show a significantly shorter fluorescence lifetime compared to the adjacent mueller cells. Since all retinal layers exhibit bi-exponential autofluorescence decays, we were able to achieve a more precise characterization of fluorescence properties of endogenous fluorophores compared to a present in vivo FLIM approach by confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope (cSLO).

  13. Combination of widefield fluorescence imaging and nonlinear optical microscopy of oral epithelial neoplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Rahul; Edward, Kert; Brown, Tyra; Ma, Liang; Yang, Jinping; McCammon, Susan; Motamedi, Massoud; Vargas, Gracie

    2013-03-01

    Multiphoton Autofluorescence Microscopy (MPAM) and Second Harmonic Generation Microscopy (SHGM) have shown the potential for noninvasive assessment of oral precancers and cancers. We have explored a combination of these nonlinear optical microscopic imaging techniques with widefield fluorescence imaging to assess morphometry similar to that of pathologic evaluation as well as information from endogenous fluorophores, which are altered with neoplastic transformation. Widefield fluorescence revealed areas of interest corresponding to sites with precancers or early tumors, generally resulting in a decrease in green emission or increase in red emission. Subsequent microscopy revealed significant differences in morphology between normal, dysplastic/neoplastic mucosa for all layers. Combination of a widefield and a microscopic technique provides a novel approach for tissue morphometric analysis along with large area assessment of tissue autofluorescence properties.

  14. Lipid vesicle shape analysis from populations using light video microscopy and computer vision.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jernej Zupanc

    Full Text Available We present a method for giant lipid vesicle shape analysis that combines manually guided large-scale video microscopy and computer vision algorithms to enable analyzing vesicle populations. The method retains the benefits of light microscopy and enables non-destructive analysis of vesicles from suspensions containing up to several thousands of lipid vesicles (1-50 µm in diameter. For each sample, image analysis was employed to extract data on vesicle quantity and size distributions of their projected diameters and isoperimetric quotients (measure of contour roundness. This process enables a comparison of samples from the same population over time, or the comparison of a treated population to a control. Although vesicles in suspensions are heterogeneous in sizes and shapes and have distinctively non-homogeneous distribution throughout the suspension, this method allows for the capture and analysis of repeatable vesicle samples that are representative of the population inspected.

  15. Improving your four-dimensional image: traveling through a decade of light-sheet-based fluorescence microscopy research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strobl, Frederic; Schmitz, Alexander; Stelzer, Ernst H K

    2017-06-01

    Light-sheet-based fluorescence microscopy features optical sectioning in the excitation process. This reduces phototoxicity and photobleaching by up to four orders of magnitude compared with that caused by confocal fluorescence microscopy, simplifies segmentation and quantification for three-dimensional cell biology, and supports the transition from on-demand to systematic data acquisition in developmental biology applications.

  16. Applying two-photon excitation fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy to study photosynthesis in plant leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broess, Koen; Borst, Jan Willem; van Amerongen, Herbert

    2009-05-01

    This study investigates to which extent two-photon excitation (TPE) fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy can be applied to study picosecond fluorescence kinetics of individual chloroplasts in leaves. Using femtosecond 860 nm excitation pulses, fluorescence lifetimes can be measured in leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana and Alocasia wentii under excitation-annihilation free conditions, both for the F (0)- and the F (m)-state. The corresponding average lifetimes are approximately 250 ps and approximately 1.5 ns, respectively, similar to those of isolated chloroplasts. These values appear to be the same for chloroplasts in the top, middle, and bottom layer of the leaves. With the spatial resolution of approximately 500 nm in the focal (xy) plane and 2 microm in the z direction, it appears to be impossible to fully resolve the grana stacks and stroma lamellae, but variations in the fluorescence lifetimes, and thus of the composition on a pixel-to-pixel base can be observed.

  17. Structural and dynamical aspects of skin studied by multiphoton excitation fluorescence microscopy-based methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloksgaard, Maria; Brewer, Jonathan R.; Bagatolli, Luis

    2013-01-01

    This mini-review reports on applications of particular multiphoton excitation microscopy-based methodologies employed in our laboratory to study skin. These approaches allow in-depth optical sectioning of the tissue, providing spatially resolved information on specific fluorescence probes......' parameters. Specifically, by applying these methods, spatially resolved maps of water dipolar relaxation (generalized polarization function using the 6-lauroyl-2-(N,N-dimethylamino)naphthale probe), activity of protons (fluorescence lifetime imaging using a proton sensitive fluorescence probe--2,7-bis-(2......-carboxyethyl)-5-(and-6)-carboxyfluorescein) and diffusion coefficients of distinct fluorescence probes (raster imaging correlation spectroscopy) can be obtained from different regions of the tissue. Comparative studies of different tissue strata, but also between equivalent regions of normal and abnormal...

  18. Serial Sectioning Of Cells In Three Dimensions With Confocal Scanning Laser Fluorescence Microscopy (Fl-CSLM): Microtomoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelzer, Ernst H.; Stricker, Reiner; Pick, Reinhard; Storz, Clemens; Wijnaendts-Van-Resandt, Roelof W.

    1988-06-01

    The discrimination of out of focus contributions in fluorescence microscopy possible in a confocal setup will establish itself as a supplement to conventional fluorescence microscopy. The improvement of the contrast compared with conventional fluorescence microscopy depends mainly on the density of the fluorescing material and the thickness of the sample. The term thickness, that which microscopists refer to as the size of the specimen along the optical axis, will gain a new quality since a confocal fluorescence microscope may reveal totally different features when recording data in planes that are 0.3μm apart. Differences that have in the past been neglected suddenly become important. The following article will outline important features in the application of confocal fluorescence microscopy in the biological sciences, point out its limitatk'ns, and draw attention to expected developments.

  19. Detection of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in Medicago sativa L. by fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Wilber S; Manoel, Evelin A; Santos, Noemi S; Nunes, Rosane O; Domiciano, Giselli C; Soares, Marcia R

    2017-04-01

    Green technologies, such as phytoremediation, are effective for removing organic pollutants derived from oil and oil products, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Given the increasing popularity of these sustainable remediation techniques, methods based on fluorescence microscopy and multiphoton microscopy for the environmental monitoring of such pollutants have emerged in recent decades as effective tools for phytoremediation studies aimed at understanding the fate of these contaminants in plants. However, little is known about the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in PAH uptake, responses and degradation by plants. Thus, the present study aimed to detect the location of pyrene, anthracene and phenanthrene using fluorescence microscopy techniques in shoots and roots of Medicago sativa L. (alfalfa) plants grown in artificially contaminated soil (150ppm PAHs) for 40days. Leaflet and root samples were then collected and observed under a fluorescence microscope to detect the presence of PAHs in various tissues. One important finding of the present study was intense fluorescence in the glandular secreting trichomes (GSTs) of plants grown in contaminated soil. These trichomes, with a previously unknown function, may be sites of PAH conjugation and degradation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Time-resolved fluorescence microscopy (FLIM) as an analytical tool in skin nanomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexiev, Ulrike; Volz, Pierre; Boreham, Alexander; Brodwolf, Robert

    2017-07-01

    The emerging field of nanomedicine provides new approaches for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases, for symptom relief, and for monitoring of disease progression. Topical application of drug-loaded nanoparticles for the treatment of skin disorders is a promising strategy to overcome the stratum corneum, the upper layer of the skin, which represents an effective physical and biochemical barrier. The understanding of drug penetration into skin and enhanced penetration into skin facilitated by nanocarriers requires analytical tools that ideally allow to visualize the skin, its morphology, the drug carriers, drugs, their transport across the skin and possible interactions, as well as effects of the nanocarriers within the different skin layers. Here, we review some recent developments in the field of fluorescence microscopy, namely Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM)), for improved characterization of nanocarriers, their interactions and penetration into skin. In particular, FLIM allows for the discrimination of target molecules, e.g. fluorescently tagged nanocarriers, against the autofluorescent tissue background and, due to the environmental sensitivity of the fluorescence lifetime, also offers insights into the local environment of the nanoparticle and its interactions with other biomolecules. Thus, FLIM shows the potential to overcome several limits of intensity based microscopy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Nanoscale characterization of vesicle adhesion by normalized total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso Dos Santos, Marcelina; Vézy, Cyrille; Jaffiol, Rodolphe

    2016-06-01

    We recently proposed a straightforward fluorescence microscopy technique to study adhesion of Giant Unilamellar Vesicles. This technique is based on dual observations which combine epi-fluorescence microscopy and total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy: TIRF images are normalized by epi-fluorescence ones. By this way, it is possible to map the membrane/substrate separation distance with a nanometric resolution, typically ~20 nm, with a maximal working range of 300-400 nm. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that this technique is useful to quantify vesicle adhesion from ultra-weak to strong membrane-surface interactions. Thus, we have examined unspecific and specific adhesion conditions. Concerning unspecific adhesion, we have controlled the strength of electrostatic forces between negatively charged vesicles and various functionalized surfaces which exhibit a positive or a negative effective charge. Specific adhesion was highlighted with lock-and-key forces mediated by the well defined biotin/streptavidin recognition. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. On-chip cell analysis platform: Implementation of contact fluorescence microscopy in microfluidic chips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroaki Takehara

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Although fluorescence microscopy is the gold standard tool for biomedical research and clinical applications, their use beyond well-established laboratory infrastructures remains limited. The present study investigated a novel on-chip cell analysis platform based on contact fluorescence microscopy and microfluidics. Combined use of a contact fluorescence imager based on complementary metal-oxide semiconductor technology and an ultra-thin glass bottom microfluidic chip enabled both to observe living cells with minimal image distortion and to ease controlling and handling of biological samples (e.g. cells and biological molecules in the imaged area. A proof-of-concept experiment of on-chip detection of cellular response to endothelial growth factor demonstrated promising use for the recently developed on-chip cell analysis platform. Contact fluorescence microscopy has numerous desirable features including compatibility with plastic microfluidic chips and compatibility with the electrical control system, and thus will fulfill the requirements of a fully automated cell analysis system.

  3. Applying fluorescence microscopy to the investigation of the behavior of foodborne pathogens on produce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandl, Maria T.

    2009-05-01

    In the past decade, the development of new tools to better visualize microbes at the cellular scale has spurred a renaissance in the application of microscopy to the study of bacteria in their natural environment. This renewed interest in microscopy may be largely attributable to the advent of the confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) and to the discovery of the green fluorescent protein. This article provides information about the use of fluorescence microscopy combined with fluorescent labels such as GFP, DsRed, and DNA stains, with immunofluorescence, and with digital image analysis, to examine the behavior of bacteria and other microbes on plant surfaces. Some of the advantages and pitfalls of these methods will be described using practical examples derived from studies of the ecology of foodborne pathogens, namely Salmonella enterica and E. coli O157:H7, on fresh fruit and vegetables. Confocal microscopy has been a powerful approach to uncover some of the factors involved in the association of produce with epidemics caused by these human pathogens and their interaction with other microbes in their nonhost environment.

  4. Quantitative Super-Resolution Microscopy of Nanopipette-Deposited Fluorescent Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennig, Simon; van de Linde, Sebastian; Bergmann, Stephan; Huser, Thomas; Sauer, Markus

    2015-08-25

    We describe a method for the deposition of minute amounts of fluorophore-labeled oligonucleotides with high local precision in conductive and transparent solid layers of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) doped with glycerin and cysteamine (PVA-G-C layers). Deposition of negatively charged fluorescent molecules was accomplished with a setup based on a scanning ion conductance microscope (SICM) using nanopipettes with tip diameters of ∼100 nm by using the ion flux flowing between two electrodes through the nanopipette. To investigate the precision of the local deposition process, we performed in situ super-resolution microscopy by direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM). Exploiting the single-molecule sensitivity and reliability of dSTORM, we determine the number of fluorescent molecules deposited in single spots. The correlation of applied charge and number of deposited molecules enables the quantification of delivered molecules by measuring the charge during the delivery process. We demonstrate the reproducible deposition of 3-168 fluorescent molecules in single spots and the creation of fluorescent structures. The fluorescent structures are highly stable and can be reused several times.

  5. Thermal maturity of Tasmanites microfossils from confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackley, Paul C.; Kus, Jolanta

    2015-01-01

    We report here, for the first time, spectral properties of Tasmanites microfossils determined by confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscopy (CLSM, using Ar 458 nm excitation). The Tasmanites occur in a well-characterized natural maturation sequence (Ro 0.48–0.74%) of Devonian shale (n = 3 samples) from the Appalachian Basin. Spectral property λmax shows excellent agreement (r2 = 0.99) with extant spectra from interlaboratory studies which used conventional fluorescence microscopy techniques. This result suggests spectral measurements from CLSM can be used to infer thermal maturity of fluorescent organic materials in geologic samples. Spectra of regions with high fluorescence intensity at fold apices and flanks in individual Tasmanites are blue-shifted relative to less-deformed areas in the same body that have lower fluorescence intensity. This is interpreted to result from decreased quenching moiety concentration at these locations, and indicates caution is needed in the selection of measurement regions in conventional fluorescence microscopy, where it is common practice to select high intensity regions for improved signal intensity and better signal to noise ratios. This study also documents application of CLSM to microstructural characterization of Tasmanites microfossils. Finally, based on an extant empirical relation between conventional λmax values and bitumen reflectance, λmax values from CLSM of Tasmanites microfossils can be used to calculate a bitumen reflectance equivalent value. The results presented herein can be used as a basis to broaden the future application of CLSM in the geological sciences into hydrocarbon prospecting and basin analysis.

  6. The physical basis of total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy and its cellular applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulter, Natalie S; Pitkeathly, William T E; Smith, Philip J; Rappoport, Joshua Z

    2015-01-01

    Total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy has gained popularity in recent years among cell biologists due to its ability to clearly visualize events that occur at the adherent plasma membrane of cells. TIRF microscopy systems are now commercially available from nearly all microscope suppliers. This review aims to give the reader an introduction to the physical basis of TIRF and considerations that need to be made when purchasing a commercial system. We explain how TIRF can be combined with other microscopy modalities and describe how to use TIRF to study processes such as endocytosis, exocytosis, and focal adhesion dynamics. Finally, we provide a step-by-step guide to imaging and analyzing focal adhesion dynamics in a migrating cell using TIRF microscopy.

  7. Fluorescent dyes with large Stokes shifts for super-resolution optical microscopy of biological objects: A review.

    OpenAIRE

    Sednev, M.; Belov, V.; Hell, S.

    2015-01-01

    The review deals with commercially available organic dyes possessing large Stokes shifts and their applications as fluorescent labels in optical microscopy based on stimulated emission depletion (STED). STED microscopy breaks Abbe’s diffraction barrier and provides optical resolution beyond the diffraction limit. STED microscopy is non-invasive and requires photostable fluorescent markers attached to biomolecules or other objects of interest. Up to now, in most biology-related STED experiment...

  8. Microplate-compatible total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy for receptor pharmacology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Minghan; Zaytseva, Natalya V.; Wu, Qi; Li, Min; Fang, Ye

    2013-05-01

    We report the use of total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy for analyzing receptor pharmacology and the development of a microplate-compatible TIRF imaging system. Using stably expressed green fluorescence protein tagged β2-adrenergic receptor as the reporter, we found that the activation of different receptors results in distinct kinetic signatures of the TIRF intensity of cells. These TIRF signatures closely resemble the characteristics of their respective label-free dynamic mass redistribution signals in the same cells. This suggests that TIRF in microplate can be used for profiling and screening drugs.

  9. Automated and Robust Quantification of Colocalization in Dual-Color Fluorescence Microscopy: A Nonparametric Statistical Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shulei; Arena, Ellen T.; Eliceiri, Kevin W.; Yuan, Ming

    2018-02-01

    Colocalization is a powerful tool to study the interactions between fluorescently labeled molecules in biological fluorescence microscopy. However, existing techniques for colocalization analysis have not undergone continued development especially in regards to robust statistical support. In this paper, we examine two of the most popular quantification techniques for colocalization and argue that they could be improved upon using ideas from nonparametric statistics and scan statistics. In particular, we propose a new colocalization metric that is robust, easily implementable, and optimal in a rigorous statistical testing framework. Application to several benchmark datasets, as well as biological examples, further demonstrates the usefulness of the proposed technique.

  10. Combination of Small Molecule Microarray and Confocal Microscopy Techniques for Live Cell Staining Fluorescent Dye Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attila Bokros

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Discovering new fluorochromes is significantly advanced by high-throughput screening (HTS methods. In the present study a combination of small molecule microarray (SMM prescreening and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM was developed in order to discover novel cell staining fluorescent dyes. Compounds with high native fluorescence were selected from a 14,585-member library and further tested on living cells under the microscope. Eleven compartment-specific, cell-permeable (or plasma membrane-targeted fluorochromes were identified. Their cytotoxicity was tested and found that between 1–10 micromolar range, they were non-toxic even during long-term incubations.

  11. Online multispectral fluorescence lifetime values estimation and overlay onto tissue white-light video frames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorpas, Dimitris; Ma, Dinglong; Bec, Julien; Yankelevich, Diego R.; Marcu, Laura

    2016-03-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging has been shown to be a robust technique for biochemical and functional characterization of tissues and to present great potential for intraoperative tissue diagnosis and guidance of surgical procedures. We report a technique for real-time mapping of fluorescence parameters (i.e. lifetime values) onto the location from where the fluorescence measurements were taken. This is achieved by merging a 450 nm aiming beam generated by a diode laser with the excitation light in a single delivery/collection fiber and by continuously imaging the region of interest with a color CMOS camera. The interrogated locations are then extracted from the acquired frames via color-based segmentation of the aiming beam. Assuming a Gaussian profile of the imaged aiming beam, the segmentation results are fitted to ellipses that are dynamically scaled at the full width of three automatically estimated thresholds (50%, 75%, 90%) of the Gaussian distribution's maximum value. This enables the dynamic augmentation of the white-light video frames with the corresponding fluorescence decay parameters. A fluorescence phantom and fresh tissue samples were used to evaluate this method with motorized and hand-held scanning measurements. At 640x512 pixels resolution the area of interest augmented with fluorescence decay parameters can be imaged at an average 34 frames per second. The developed method has the potential to become a valuable tool for real-time display of optical spectroscopy data during continuous scanning applications that subsequently can be used for tissue characterization and diagnosis.

  12. A fluorescence microscopy assay for monitoring mitophagy in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mijaljica, Dalibor; Prescott, Mark; Devenish, Rodney J

    2011-07-18

    Autophagy is important for turnover of cellular components under a range of different conditions. It serves an essential homeostatic function as well as a quality control mechanism that can target and selectively degrade cellular material including organelles. For example, damaged or redundant mitochondria (Fig. 1), not disposed of by autophagy, can represent a threat to cellular homeostasis and cell survival. In the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, nutrient deprivation (e.g., nitrogen starvation) or damage can promote selective turnover of mitochondria by autophagy in a process termed mitophagy. We describe a simple fluorescence microscopy approach to assess autophagy. For clarity we restrict our description here to show how the approach can be used to monitor mitophagy in yeast cells. The assay makes use of a fluorescent reporter, Rosella, which is a dual-emission biosensor comprising a relatively pH-stable red fluorescent protein linked to a pH-sensitive green fluorescent protein. The operation of this reporter relies on differences in pH between the vacuole (pH - 5.0-5.5) and mitochondria (pH - 8.2) in living cells. Under growing conditions, wild type cells exhibit both red and green fluorescence distributed in a manner characteristic of the mitochondria. Fluorescence emission is not associated with the vacuole. When subjected to nitrogen starvation, a condition which induces mitophagy, in addition to red and green fluorescence labeling the mitochondria, cells exhibit the accumulation of red, but not green fluorescence, in the acidic vacuolar lumen representing the delivery of mitochondria to the vacuole. Scoring cells with red, but not green fluorescent vacuoles can be used as a measure of mitophagic activity in cells.

  13. In vivo multimodality video microscopy of human skin in the vertical plane (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhenguo; Tian, Yunxian; Zhao, Jianhua; Lui, Harvey; McLean, David I.; Zeng, Haishan

    2016-02-01

    Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) and multiphoton microscopy (MPM) are non-invasive methods of acquiring morphological images of the skin in vivo. Most research in this area focuses on instruments that are configured for two-dimensional imaging in a horizontal plane parallel to the skin surface. In contrast, conventional histopathologic evaluation of the skin is based on vertical tissue sections that show microscopic features and their interrelationships according to their depth within the skin. The ability to similarly depict the skin in the vertical plane during in vivo microscopic imaging poses several significant challenges with respect to imaging speed, resolution and extractable information. Aiming to address above challenges, we developed a laser scanning multimodal microscopy system which combines RCM and MPM, and has the ability to do fast xz scanning to achieve high resolution vertical "optical sectioning" of in vivo human skin at video rates. RCM and MPM images are obtained simultaneously and co-registered thereby providing complementary morphological information. To validate the performance of this system vertical section RCM and MPM microscopic images of normal human skin in vivo were obtained at half video rates (15 frames/s). Using our system it is possible to discern the following structures: all layers of the epidermis including the stratum lucidum, the dermal-epidermal junction, and the papillary dermis. Blood flow is also visible as evidenced by blood cell movement within vessels. The effective imaging depth is about 200 micrometers. This system provides a means of interrogating human skin noninvasively at an orientation analogous to conventional histological sectioning.

  14. Evaluation of Approaches for Tracking Virus Particles in Fluorescence Microscopy Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godinez, W. J.; Lampe, M.; Wörz, S.; Müller, B.; Eils, R.; Rohr, K.

    Tracking virus particles in fluorescence microscopy image sequences enables the characterization of the dynamical behavior of these objects. Several approaches have been developed for the task of virus tracking. However, few studies have quantitatively evaluated the performance of the different approaches. Such a comparison is essential to predict the performance of the approaches under realistic conditions. In this paper, we present a quantitative evaluation of eight approaches for tracking virus particles. We have investigated deterministic and probabilistic approaches. The evaluation is based on nine real microscopy image sequences of virus particles, for which ground truth was obtained by manual tracking.

  15. Use of Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM) as a Timer of Cell Cycle S Phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okkelman, Irina A; Dmitriev, Ruslan I; Foley, Tara; Papkovsky, Dmitri B

    2016-01-01

    Incorporation of thymidine analogues in replicating DNA, coupled with antibody and fluorophore staining, allows analysis of cell proliferation, but is currently limited to monolayer cultures, fixed cells and end-point assays. We describe a simple microscopy imaging method for live real-time analysis of cell proliferation, S phase progression over several division cycles, effects of anti-proliferative drugs and other applications. It is based on the prominent (~ 1.7-fold) quenching of fluorescence lifetime of a common cell-permeable nuclear stain, Hoechst 33342 upon the incorporation of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) in genomic DNA and detection by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). We show that quantitative and accurate FLIM technique allows high-content, multi-parametric dynamic analyses, far superior to the intensity-based imaging. We demonstrate its uses with monolayer cell cultures, complex 3D tissue models of tumor cell spheroids and intestinal organoids, and in physiological study with metformin treatment.

  16. Penetration of silver nanoparticles into porcine skin ex vivo using fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy, Raman microscopy, and surface-enhanced Raman scattering microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yongjian; Choe, Chun-Sik; Ahlberg, Sebastian; Meinke, Martina C; Alexiev, Ulrike; Lademann, Juergen; Darvin, Maxim E

    2015-05-01

    In order to investigate the penetration depth of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) inside the skin, porcine ears treated with Ag NPs are measured by two-photon tomography with a fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (TPT-FLIM) technique, confocal Raman microscopy (CRM), and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) microscopy. Ag NPs are coated with poly-N-vinylpyrrolidone and dispersed in pure water solutions. After the application of Ag NPs, porcine ears are stored in the incubator for 24 h at a temperature of 37°C. The TPT-FLIM measurement results show a dramatic decrease of the Ag NPs' signal intensity from the skin surface to a depth of 4 μm. Below 4 μm, the Ag NPs' signal continues to decline, having completely disappeared at 12 to 14 μm depth. CRM shows that the penetration depth of Ag NPs is 11.1 ± 2.1 μm. The penetration depth measured with a highly sensitive SERS microscopy reaches 15.6 ± 8.3 μm. Several results obtained with SERS show that the penetration depth of Ag NPs can exceed the stratum corneum (SC) thickness, which can be explained by both penetration of trace amounts of Ag NPs through the SC barrier and by the measurements inside the hair follicle, which cannot be excluded in the experiment.

  17. Penetration of silver nanoparticles into porcine skin ex vivo using fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy, Raman microscopy, and surface-enhanced Raman scattering microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yongjian; Choe, Chun-Sik; Ahlberg, Sebastian; Meinke, Martina C.; Alexiev, Ulrike; Lademann, Juergen; Darvin, Maxim E.

    2015-05-01

    In order to investigate the penetration depth of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) inside the skin, porcine ears treated with Ag NPs are measured by two-photon tomography with a fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (TPT-FLIM) technique, confocal Raman microscopy (CRM), and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) microscopy. Ag NPs are coated with poly-N-vinylpyrrolidone and dispersed in pure water solutions. After the application of Ag NPs, porcine ears are stored in the incubator for 24 h at a temperature of 37°C. The TPT-FLIM measurement results show a dramatic decrease of the Ag NPs' signal intensity from the skin surface to a depth of 4 μm. Below 4 μm, the Ag NPs' signal continues to decline, having completely disappeared at 12 to 14 μm depth. CRM shows that the penetration depth of Ag NPs is 11.1±2.1 μm. The penetration depth measured with a highly sensitive SERS microscopy reaches 15.6±8.3 μm. Several results obtained with SERS show that the penetration depth of Ag NPs can exceed the stratum corneum (SC) thickness, which can be explained by both penetration of trace amounts of Ag NPs through the SC barrier and by the measurements inside the hair follicle, which cannot be excluded in the experiment.

  18. ANG-2 for quantitative Na(+) determination in living cells by time-resolved fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roder, Phillip; Hille, Carsten

    2014-12-01

    Sodium ions (Na(+)) play an important role in a plethora of cellular processes, which are complex and partly still unexplored. For the investigation of these processes and quantification of intracellular Na(+) concentrations ([Na(+)]i), two-photon coupled fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (2P-FLIM) was performed in the salivary glands of the cockroach Periplaneta americana. For this, the novel Na(+)-sensitive fluorescent dye Asante NaTRIUM Green-2 (ANG-2) was evaluated, both in vitro and in situ. In this context, absorption coefficients, fluorescence quantum yields and 2P action cross-sections were determined for the first time. ANG-2 was 2P-excitable over a broad spectral range and displayed fluorescence in the visible spectral range. Although the fluorescence decay behaviour of ANG-2 was triexponential in vitro, its analysis indicates a Na(+)-sensitivity appropriate for recordings in living cells. The Na(+)-sensitivity was reduced in situ, but the biexponential fluorescence decay behaviour could be successfully analysed in terms of quantitative [Na(+)]i recordings. Thus, physiological 2P-FLIM measurements revealed a dopamine-induced [Na(+)]i rise in cockroach salivary gland cells, which was dependent on a Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) cotransporter (NKCC) activity. It was concluded that ANG-2 is a promising new sodium indicator applicable for diverse biological systems.

  19. Single-Cell Resolution of Uncultured Magnetotactic Bacteria via Fluorescence-Coupled Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinhua; Zhang, Heng; Menguy, Nicolas; Benzerara, Karim; Wang, Fuxian; Lin, Xiaoting; Chen, Zhibao; Pan, Yongxin

    2017-06-15

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) form intracellular chain-assembled nanocrystals of magnetite or greigite termed magnetosomes. The characterization of magnetosome crystals requires electron microscopy due to their nanoscopic sizes. However, electron microscopy does not provide phylogenetic information for MTB. We have developed a strategy for the simultaneous and rapid phylogenetic and biomineralogical characterization of uncultured MTB at the single-cell level. It consists of four steps: (i) enrichment of MTB cells from an environmental sample, (ii) 16S rRNA gene sequencing of MTB, and (iii) fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses coordinated with (iv) transmission or scanning electron microscopy of the probe-hybridized cells. The application of this strategy identified a magnetotactic Gammaproteobacteria strain, SHHR-1, from brackish sediments collected from the Shihe River estuary in Qinhuangdao City, China. SHHR-1 magnetosomes are elongated prismatic magnetites which can be idealized as hexagonal prisms. Taxonomic groups of uncultured MTB were also identified in freshwater sediments from Lake Miyun in northern Beijing via this novel coordinated fluorescence and scanning electron microscopy method based on four group-specific rRNA-targeted probes. Our analyses revealed that major magnetotactic taxonomic groups can be accurately determined only with coordinated scanning electron microscopy observations on fluorescently labeled single cells due to limited group coverage and specificity for existing group-specific MTB fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) probes. Our reported strategy is simple and efficient, offers great promise toward investigating the diversity and biomineralization of MTB, and may also be applied to other functional groups of microorganisms.IMPORTANCE Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) are phylogenetically diverse and biomineralize morphologically diverse magnetic nanocrystals of magnetite or greigite in intracellular structures termed

  20. Three-Dimensional Live Imaging of Filamentous Fungi with Light Sheet-Based Fluorescence Microscopy (LSFM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pampaloni, Francesco; Knuppertz, Laura; Hamann, Andrea; Osiewacz, Heinz D; Stelzer, Ernst H K

    2017-01-01

    We describe a method for the three-dimensional live imaging of filamentous fungi with light sheet-based fluorescence microscopy (LSFM). LSFM provides completely new opportunities to investigate the biology of fungal cells and other microorganisms with high spatial and temporal resolution. As an example, we study the established aging model Podospora anserina. The protocol explains the mounting of the live fungi for the light sheet imaging, the imaging procedure and illustrates basic image processing of data.

  1. Visualization of drug distribution of topical minocycline in human facial skin with fluorescence microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermsmeier, Maiko; Sawant, Tanvee; Lac, Diana; Yamamoto, Akira; Chen, Xin; Nagavarapu, Usha; Evans, Conor L.; Chan, Kin Foong

    2017-02-01

    Minocycline is an antibiotic regularly prescribed to treat acne vulgaris. The only commercially available minocycline comes in an oral dosage form, which often results in systemic adverse effects. A topical minocycline composition (BPX-01) was developed to provide localized and targeted delivery to the epidermis and pilosebaceous unit where acne-related bacteria, Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes), reside. As minocycline is a known fluorophore, fluorescence microscopy was performed to investigate its potential use in visualizing minocycline distribution within tissues. BPX-01 with various concentrations of minocycline, was applied topically to freshly excised human facial skin specimens. Spatial distribution of minocycline and its fluorescence intensity within the stratum corneum, epidermis, dermis, and pilosebaceous unit were assessed. The resulting fluorescence intensity data as a function of minocycline concentration may indicate clinically relevant therapeutic doses of topical BPX-01 needed to kill P. acnes and reduce inflammation for successful clinical outcomes.

  2. Creating infinite contrast in fluorescence microscopy by using lanthanide centered emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    R. Carro-Temboury, Miguel; Arppe, Riikka Matleena; Hempel, Casper

    2017-01-01

    for completely removing the background signal in spectrally resolved fluorescence microscopy. The methodology is applicable for all probes with narrow and well-defined emission bands (Full width half-maximum lanthanide based probes exploiting the narrow emission lines of europium......(III) and terbium(III) ions. We used a model system with zeolites doped with lanthanides immobilized in a polymer stained with several fluorescent dyes regularly used in bioimaging. After smoothing the spectral data recorded in each pixel, they are differentiated. Method I is based on the direct sum of the gradient......, while method II resolves the fluorescent signal by subtracting a background calculated via the gradient. Both methods improve signal-to-background ratio significantly and we suggest that spectral imaging of lanthanide-centered emission can be used as a tool to obtain absolute contrast in bioimaging....

  3. Investigating protein-protein interactions in living cells using fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuansheng; Day, Richard N; Periasamy, Ammasi

    2011-01-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is now routinely used for dynamic measurements of signaling events inside living cells, including detection of protein-protein interactions. An understanding of the basic physics of fluorescence lifetime measurements is required to use this technique. In this protocol, we describe both the time-correlated single photon counting and the frequency-domain methods for FLIM data acquisition and analysis. We describe calibration of both FLIM systems, and demonstrate how they are used to measure the quenched donor fluorescence lifetime that results from Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET ). We then show how the FLIM-FRET methods are used to detect the dimerization of the transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer binding protein-α in live mouse pituitary cell nuclei. Notably, the factors required for accurate determination and reproducibility of lifetime measurements are described. With either method, the entire protocol including specimen preparation, imaging and data analysis takes ~2 d. PMID:21886099

  4. Role of fluorescence microscopy in the assessment of Indian Gondwana coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, B.D. [Birbal Sahni Institute of Paleobotany, Lucknow (India)

    1995-12-25

    When a light of short wavelength excites organic matter, light of relatively longer wavelength is emitted from it and this phenomenon is known as autofluorescence. The coal maceral analysis under fluorescence mode (blue light/UV light excitation), therefore, has been found to be best suited to properly identify, characterize and quantify hydrogen-rich macerals. Utilising this technique, macerals like bituminite, fluorinite and exsudatinite were recognized for the first time. Certain other macerals (alginite and liptodetrinite), normally mistaken for mineral matter under routine petrographic analysis, were also identified. Fluorescence microscopy, thus, not only added to the overall tally of liptinite group of macerals in Indian Gondwana coals, but also to their quantity. In addition to this, recognition of fluorescing vitrinite (perhydrous vitrinite) significantly contributed to the abundance of hydrogen-rich microconstitutents for these coals.

  5. Comparison of Fluorescence Microscopy and Different Growth Media Culture Methods for Acanthamoeba Keratitis Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peretz, Avi; Geffen, Yuval; Socea, Soergiu D; Pastukh, Nina; Graffi, Shmuel

    2015-08-01

    Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK), a potentially blinding infection of the cornea, is caused by a free-living protozoan. Culture and microscopic examination of corneal scraping tissue material is the conventional method for identifying Acanthamoeba. In this article, we compared several methods for AK diagnosis of 32 patients: microscopic examination using fluorescent dye, specific culture on growth media-non-nutrient agar (NNA), culture on liquid growth media-peptone yeast glucose (PYG), and TYI-S-33. AK was found in 14 patients. Thirteen of the specimens were found AK positive by fluorescence microscopic examination, 11 specimens were found AK positive on PYG growth media, and 9 specimens were found AK positive on TYI-S-33 growth media. Only five specimens were found AK positive on NNA growth media. Therefore, we recommend using fluorescence microscopy technique and culture method, especially PYG liquid media. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  6. A new approach to dual-color two-photon microscopy with fluorescent proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebane Aleks

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two-photon dual-color imaging of tissues and cells labeled with fluorescent proteins (FPs is challenging because most two-photon microscopes only provide one laser excitation wavelength at a time. At present, methods for two-photon dual-color imaging are limited due to the requirement of large differences in Stokes shifts between the FPs used and their low two-photon absorption (2PA efficiency. Results Here we present a new method of dual-color two-photon microscopy that uses the simultaneous excitation of the lowest-energy electronic transition of a blue fluorescent protein and a higher-energy electronic transition of a red fluorescent protein. Conclusion Our method does not require large differences in Stokes shifts and can be extended to a variety of FP pairs with larger 2PA efficiency and more optimal imaging properties.

  7. mhFLIM: resolution of heterogeneous fluorescence decays in widefield lifetime microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlachter, S; Elder, A D; Esposito, A; Kaminski, G S; Frank, J H; van Geest, L K; Kaminski, C F

    2009-02-02

    Frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FD-FLIM) is a fast and accurate way of measuring fluorescence lifetimes in widefield microscopy. However, the resolution of multiple exponential fluorescence decays has remained beyond the reach of most practical FD-FLIM systems. In this paper we describe the implementation of FD-FLIM using a 40 MHz pulse train derived from a supercontinuum source for excitation. The technique, which we term multi-harmonic FLIM (mhFLIM), makes it possible to accurately resolve biexponential decays of fluorophores without any a priori information. The system's performance is demonstrated using a mixture of spectrally similar dyes of known composition and also on a multiply-labeled biological sample. The results are compared to those obtained from time correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) microscopy and a good level of agreement is achieved. We also demonstrate the first practical application of an algorithm derived by G. Weber [1] for analysing mhFLIM data. Because it does not require nonlinear minimisation, it offers potential for realtime analysis during acquisition.

  8. Light sheet fluorescence microscopy for in situ cell interaction analysis in mouse lymph nodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Jun; Ozga, Aleksandra J; Swoger, Jim; Sharpe, James; Ripoll, Jorge; Stein, Jens V

    2016-04-01

    Reactive lymph nodes (LNs) are sites where pMHC-loaded dendritic cells (DCs) interact with rare cognate T cells, leading to their clonal expansion. While DC interactions with T cell subsets critically shape the ensuing immune response, surprisingly little is known on their spatial orchestration at physiologically T cell low precursor frequencies. Light sheet fluorescence microscopy and one of its implementations, selective plane illumination microscopy (SPIM), is a powerful method to obtain precise spatial information of entire organs of 0.5-10mm diameter, the size range of murine LNs. Yet, its usefulness for immunological research has thus far not been comprehensively explored. Here, we have tested and defined protocols that preserve fluorescent protein function during lymphoid tissue clearing required for SPIM. Reconstructions of SPIM-generated 3D data sets revealed that calibrated numbers of adoptively transferred T cells and DCs are successfully detected at a single cell level within optically cleared murine LNs. Finally, we define parameters to quantify specific interactions between antigen-specific T cells and pMHC-bearing DCs in murine LNs. In sum, our studies describe the successful application of light sheet fluorescence microscopy to immunologically relevant tissues. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Correlated Fluorescence-Atomic Force Microscopy Studies of the Clathrin Mediated Endocytosis in SKMEL Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Steve; Hor, Amy; Luu, Anh; Kang, Lin; Scott, Brandon; Bailey, Elizabeth; Hoppe, Adam

    Clathrin-mediated endocytosis is one of the central pathways for cargo transport into cells, and plays a major role in the maintenance of cellular functions, such as intercellular signaling, nutrient intake, and turnover of plasma membrane in cells. The clathrin-mediated endocytosis process involves invagination and formation of clathrin-coated vesicles. However, the biophysical mechanisms of vesicle formation are still debated. We investigate clathrin vesicle formation mechanisms through the utilization of tapping-mode atomic force microscopy for high resolution topographical imaging in neutral buffer solution of unroofed cells exposing the inner membrane, combined with fluorescence imaging to definitively label intracellular constituents with specific fluorescent fusion proteins (actin filaments labeled with green phalloidin-antibody and clathrin coated vesicles with the fusion protein Tq2) in SKMEL (Human Melanoma) cells. Results from our work are compared against dynamical polarized total internal fluorescence (TIRF), super-resolution photo-activated localization microscopy (PALM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to draw conclusions regarding the prominent model of vesicle formation in clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Funding provided by NSF MPS/DMR/BMAT award # 1206908.

  10. LED fluorescence microscopy: Novel method for malaria diagnosis compared with routine methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathiwala, Riddhi; Mehta, Preeti R; Nataraj, Gita; Hathiwala, Siddhi

    Rapid and accurate diagnosis of malaria is the need of hour for effective management and controlling drug resistance. The conventional and gold-standard method, Light microscopy (LM), is time-consuming, requires trained staff and well-maintained equipments. The newly developed, rapid diagnostic tests (RDT) are fast and reliable, but give only qualitative results, are expensive and have short shelf life. Light Emission Diode fluorescence microscopy (LED FM) may provide a reliable alternative which can be used for routine diagnosis. In order to assess the effectiveness of LED fluorescence microscopy in malaria diagnosis, a cross-sectional study was conducted at a tertiary care teaching hospital in Mumbai. 2-3ml of blood of 300 patients, who were clinically suspected of having malaria but were not on anti-malarial treatment, was collected in EDTA vials. These specimens were processed to diagnose malaria by three methods, namely-Peripheral smear examination with LM, Peripheral smear examination with LED FM and RDT. The results of all the 3 tests were compared, taking Light Microscopy as the gold standard method. Of the 300 specimens, LM, LED FM and RDT reported 111 (37%), 86 (28.67%) and 107 (35.67%), respectively, as positive. The sensitivity and specificity were respectively 71.2% and 96.3% for LED FM and 91% and 96.8% for RDT. Of the LM positive cases, 53 (47.75%) had parasitic index (PI) LED FM was found to be only moderately sensitive but highly specific in comparison to Light microscopy. In order to improve the performance of this technique, more precise training in fluorescence staining and reading of the slides, will be required. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Light-sheet-based fluorescence microscopy for three-dimensional imaging of biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swoger, Jim; Pampaloni, Francesco; Stelzer, Ernst H K

    2014-01-01

    In modern biology, most optical imaging technologies are applied to two-dimensional cell culture systems; that is, they are used in a cellular context that is defined by hard and flat surfaces. However, a physiological context is not found in single cells cultivated on coverslips. It requires the complex three-dimensional (3D) relationship of cells cultivated in extracellular matrix (ECM) gels, tissue sections, or in naturally developing organisms. In fact, the number of applications of 3D cell cultures in basic research as well as in drug discovery and toxicity testing has been increasing over the past few years. Unfortunately, the imaging of highly scattering multicellular specimens is still challenging. The main issues are the limited optical penetration depth, the phototoxicity, and the fluorophore bleaching. Light-sheet-based fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) overcomes many drawbacks of conventional fluorescence microscopy by using an orthogonal/azimuthal fluorescence arrangement with independent sets of lenses for illumination and detection. The basic idea is to illuminate the specimen from the side with a thin light sheet that overlaps with the focal plane of a wide-field fluorescence microscope. Optical sectioning and minimal phototoxic damage or photobleaching outside a small volume close to the focal plane are intrinsic properties of LSFM. We discuss the basic principles of LSFM and methods for the preparation, embedding, and imaging of 3D specimens used in the life sciences in an implementation of LSFM known as the single (or selective) plane illumination microscope (SPIM).

  12. Quantifying the Assembly of Multicomponent Molecular Machines by Single-Molecule Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, E M; Subramanyam, S; Ghoneim, M; Washington, M Todd; Spies, M

    2016-01-01

    Large, dynamic macromolecular complexes play essential roles in many cellular processes. Knowing how the components of these complexes associate with one another and undergo structural rearrangements is critical to understanding how they function. Single-molecule total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy is a powerful approach for addressing these fundamental issues. In this article, we first discuss single-molecule TIRF microscopes and strategies to immobilize and fluorescently label macromolecules. We then review the use of single-molecule TIRF microscopy to study the formation of binary macromolecular complexes using one-color imaging and inhibitors. We conclude with a discussion of the use of TIRF microscopy to examine the formation of higher-order (i.e., ternary) complexes using multicolor setups. The focus throughout this article is on experimental design, controls, data acquisition, and data analysis. We hope that single-molecule TIRF microscopy, which has largely been the province of specialists, will soon become as common in the tool box of biophysicists and biochemists as structural approaches have become today. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Towards correlative super-resolution fluorescence and electron cryo-microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Georg; Hagen, Christoph; Grünewald, Kay; Kaufmann, Rainer

    2016-09-01

    Correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) has become a powerful tool in life sciences. Particularly cryo-CLEM, the combination of fluorescence cryo-microscopy (cryo-FM) permitting for non-invasive specific multi-colour labelling, with electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) providing the undisturbed structural context at a resolution down to the Ångstrom range, has enabled a broad range of new biological applications. Imaging rare structures or events in crowded environments, such as inside a cell, requires specific fluorescence-based information for guiding cryo-EM data acquisition and/or to verify the identity of the structure of interest. Furthermore, cryo-CLEM can provide information about the arrangement of specific proteins in the wider structural context of their native nano-environment. However, a major obstacle of cryo-CLEM currently hindering many biological applications is the large resolution gap between cryo-FM (typically in the range of ∼400 nm) and cryo-EM (single nanometre to the Ångstrom range). Very recently, first proof of concept experiments demonstrated the feasibility of super-resolution cryo-FM imaging and the correlation with cryo-EM. This opened the door towards super-resolution cryo-CLEM, and thus towards direct correlation of structural details from both imaging modalities. © 2016 Société Française des Microscopies and Société de Biologie Cellulaire de France. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Correlated fluorescence microscopy and cryo-electron tomography of virus-infected or transfected mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampton, Cheri M; Strauss, Joshua D; Ke, Zunlong; Dillard, Rebecca S; Hammonds, Jason E; Alonas, Eric; Desai, Tanay M; Marin, Mariana; Storms, Rachel E; Leon, Fredrick; Melikyan, Gregory B; Santangelo, Philip J; Spearman, Paul W; Wright, Elizabeth R

    2017-01-01

    Correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) combines spatiotemporal information from fluorescence light microscopy (fLM) with high-resolution structural data from cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET). These technologies provide opportunities to bridge knowledge gaps between cell and structural biology. Here we describe our protocol for correlated cryo-fLM, cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), and cryo-ET (i.e., cryo-CLEM) of virus-infected or transfected mammalian cells. Mammalian-derived cells are cultured on EM substrates, using optimized conditions that ensure that the cells are spread thinly across the substrate and are not physically disrupted. The cells are then screened by fLM and vitrified before acquisition of cryo-fLM and cryo-ET images, which is followed by data processing. A complete session from grid preparation through data collection and processing takes 5-15 d for an individual experienced in cryo-EM.

  15. Imaging of human differentiated 3D neural aggregates using light sheet fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gualda, Emilio J; Simão, Daniel; Pinto, Catarina; Alves, Paula M; Brito, Catarina

    2014-01-01

    The development of three dimensional (3D) cell cultures represents a big step for the better understanding of cell behavior and disease in a more natural like environment, providing not only single but multiple cell type interactions in a complex 3D matrix, highly resembling physiological conditions. Light sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) is becoming an excellent tool for fast imaging of such 3D biological structures. We demonstrate the potential of this technique for the imaging of human differentiated 3D neural aggregates in fixed and live samples, namely calcium imaging and cell death processes, showing the power of imaging modality compared with traditional microscopy. The combination of light sheet microscopy and 3D neural cultures will open the door to more challenging experiments involving drug testing at large scale as well as a better understanding of relevant biological processes in a more realistic environment.

  16. Multiple Signal Classification Algorithm (MUSICAL) for super-resolution fluorescence microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Agarwal, Krishna

    2016-01-01

    Super-resolution microscopy is providing unprecedented insights into biology by resolving details much below the diffraction limit. State-of-the-art Single Molecule Localization Microscopy (SMLM) techniques for super-resolution are restricted by long acquisition and computational times, or the need of special fluorophores or chemical environments. Here, we propose a novel statistical super-resolution technique of wide-field fluorescence microscopy called MUltiple SIgnal Classification ALgorithm (MUSICAL) which has several advantages over SMLM techniques. MUSICAL provides resolution down to at least 50 nm, has low requirements on number of frames and excitation power and works even at high fluorophore concentrations. Further, it works with any fluorophore that exhibits blinking on the time scale of the recording. We compare imaging results of MUSICAL with SMLM and four contemporary statistical super-resolution methods for experiments of in-vitro actin filaments and datasets provided by independent research gro...

  17. Imaging of surgical margin in pancreatic metastasis using two-photon excited fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Hong, Zhipeng; Chen, Hong; Chen, Youting; Xu, Yahao; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Shi, Zheng; Chen, Jianxin

    2014-09-01

    Two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) microscopy, has become a powerful tool for imaging unstained tissue samples at subcellular level in biomedical research. The purpose of this study was to determine whether TPEF imaging of histological sections without H-E staining can be used to identify the boundary between normal pancreas and pancreatic metastasis from renal cell carcinoma (RCC). The typical features such as the significant increase of cancerous nests, the absence of pancreatic ductal, the appearance of cancer cells were observed to present the boundary between normal pancreas and pancreatic metastasis from RCC. These results correlated well with the corresponding histological outcomes. With the advent of clinically miniaturized TPEF microscopy and integrative endoscopy, TPEF microscopy has the potential application on surgical location of pancreatic metastasis from RCC in the near future.

  18. Multi-color femtosecond source for simultaneous excitation of multiple fluorescent proteins in two-photon fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ke; Liu, Tzu-Ming; Wu, Juwell; Horton, Nicholas G.; Lin, Charles P.; Xu, Chris

    2013-02-01

    Simultaneous imaging of cells expressing multiple fluorescent proteins (FPs) is of particular interest in applications such as mapping neural circuits, tracking multiple immune cell populations, etc. To visualize both in vivo and ex vivo tissue morphology and physiology at a cellular level deep within scattering tissues, two-photon fluorescence microscopy (2PM) is a powerful tool that has found wide applications. However, simultaneous imaging of multiple FPs with 2PM is greatly hampered by the lack of proper ultrafast lasers offering multi-color femtosecond pulses, each targeting the two-photon absorption peak of a different FP. Here we demonstrate simultaneous two-photon fluorescence excitation of RFP, YFP, and CFP in human melanoma cells engineered to express a "rainbow" pallet of colors, using a novel fiber-based source with energetic, three-color femtosecond pulses. The three-color pulses, centered at 775 nm, 864 nm and 950 nm, are obtained through second harmonic generation of the 1550 nm pump laser and SHG of the solitons at 1728 nm and 1900 nm generated through soliton self-frequency shift (SSFS) of the pump laser in a large-mode-area (LMA) fiber. The resulting wavelengths are well matched to the two-photon absorption peaks of the three FPs for efficient excitation. Our results demonstrate that multi-color femtosecond pulse generation using SSFS and a turn-key, fiber-based femtosecond laser can fulfill the requirements for simultaneous imaging of multiple FPs in 2PM, opening new opportunities for a wide range of biological applications where non-invasive, high-resolution imaging of multiple fluorescent indicators is required.

  19. Video-rate processing in tomographic phase microscopy of biological cells using CUDA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dardikman, Gili; Habaza, Mor; Waller, Laura; Shaked, Natan T

    2016-05-30

    We suggest a new implementation for rapid reconstruction of three-dimensional (3-D) refractive index (RI) maps of biological cells acquired by tomographic phase microscopy (TPM). The TPM computational reconstruction process is extremely time consuming, making the analysis of large data sets unreasonably slow and the real-time 3-D visualization of the results impossible. Our implementation uses new phase extraction, phase unwrapping and Fourier slice algorithms, suitable for efficient CPU or GPU implementations. The experimental setup includes an external off-axis interferometric module connected to an inverted microscope illuminated coherently. We used single cell rotation by micro-manipulation to obtain interferometric projections from 73 viewing angles over a 180° angular range. Our parallel algorithms were implemented using Nvidia's CUDA C platform, running on Nvidia's Tesla K20c GPU. This implementation yields, for the first time to our knowledge, a 3-D reconstruction rate higher than video rate of 25 frames per second for 256 × 256-pixel interferograms with 73 different projection angles (64 × 64 × 64 output). This allows us to calculate additional cellular parameters, while still processing faster than video rate. This technique is expected to find uses for real-time 3-D cell visualization and processing, while yielding fast feedback for medical diagnosis and cell sorting.

  20. Using fluorescence lifetime microscopy to study the subcellular localization of anthocyanins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanoca, Alexandra; Burkel, Brian; Kovinich, Nik; Grotewold, Erich; Eliceiri, Kevin W; Otegui, Marisa S

    2016-12-01

    Anthocyanins are flavonoid pigments that accumulate in most seed plants. They are synthesized in the cytoplasm but accumulate inside the vacuoles. Anthocyanins are pigmented at the lower vacuolar pH, but in the cytoplasm they can be visualized based on their fluorescence properties. Thus, anthocyanins provide an ideal system for the development of new methods to investigate cytoplasmic pools and association with other molecular components. We have analyzed the fluorescence decay of anthocyanins by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM), in both in vitro and in vivo conditions, using wild-type and mutant Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings. Within plant cells, the amplitude-weighted mean fluorescence lifetime (τm ) correlated with distinct subcellular localizations of anthocyanins. The vacuolar pool of anthocyanins exhibited shorter τm than the cytoplasmic pool. Consistently, lowering the pH of anthocyanins in solution shortened their fluorescence decay. We propose that FLIM is a useful tool for understanding the trafficking of anthocyanins and, potentially, for estimating vacuolar pH inside intact plant cells. © 2016 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Mapping absolute tissue endogenous fluorophore concentrations with chemometric wide-field fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhang; Reilley, Michael; Li, Run; Xu, Min

    2017-06-01

    We report chemometric wide-field fluorescence microscopy for imaging the spatial distribution and concentration of endogenous fluorophores in thin tissue sections. Nonnegative factorization aided by spatial diversity is used to learn both the spectral signature and the spatial distribution of endogenous fluorophores from microscopic fluorescence color images obtained under broadband excitation and detection. The absolute concentration map of individual fluorophores is derived by comparing the fluorescence from "pure" fluorophores under the identical imaging condition following the identification of the fluorescence species by its spectral signature. This method is then demonstrated by characterizing the concentration map of endogenous fluorophores (including tryptophan, elastin, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, and flavin adenine dinucleotide) for lung tissue specimens. The absolute concentrations of these fluorophores are all found to decrease significantly from normal, perilesional, to cancerous (squamous cell carcinoma) tissue. Discriminating tissue types using the absolute fluorophore concentration is found to be significantly more accurate than that achievable with the relative fluorescence strength. Quantification of fluorophores in terms of the absolute concentration map is also advantageous in eliminating the uncertainties due to system responses or measurement details, yielding more biologically relevant data, and simplifying the assessment of competing imaging approaches.

  2. Quantitative Fluorescence Sensing Through Highly Autofluorescent, Scattering, and Absorbing Media Using Mobile Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Göröcs, Zoltán

    2016-09-13

    Compact and cost-effective systems for in vivo fluorescence and near-infrared imaging in combination with activatable reporters embedded inside the skin to sample interstitial fluid or blood can enable a variety of biomedical applications. However, the strong autofluorescence of human skin creates an obstacle for fluorescence-based sensing. Here we introduce a method for quantitative fluorescence sensing through highly autofluorescent, scattering, and absorbing media. For this, we created a compact and cost-effective fluorescence microscope weighing <40 g and used it to measure various concentrations of a fluorescent dye embedded inside a tissue phantom, which was designed to mimic the optical characteristics of human skin. We used an elliptical Gaussian beam excitation to digitally separate tissue autofluorescence from target fluorescence, although they severely overlap in both space and optical spectrum. Using ∼10-fold less excitation intensity than the safety limit for skin radiation exposure, we successfully quantified the density of the embedded fluorophores by imaging the skin phantom surface and achieved a detection limit of ∼5 × 105 and ∼2.5 × 107 fluorophores within ∼0.01 μL sample volume that is positioned 0.5 and 2 mm below the phantom surface, corresponding to a concentration of 105.9 pg/mL and 5.3 ng/mL, respectively. We also confirmed that this approach can track the spatial misalignments of the mobile microscope with respect to the embedded target fluorescent volume. This wearable microscopy platform might be useful for designing implantable biochemical sensors with the capability of spatial multiplexing to continuously monitor a panel of biomarkers and chronic conditions even at patients’ home.

  3. Field portable mobile phone based fluorescence microscopy for detection of Giardia lamblia cysts in water samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceylan Koydemir, Hatice; Gorocs, Zoltan; McLeod, Euan; Tseng, Derek; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2015-03-01

    Giardia lamblia is a waterborne parasite that causes an intestinal infection, known as giardiasis, and it is found not only in countries with inadequate sanitation and unsafe water but also streams and lakes of developed countries. Simple, sensitive, and rapid detection of this pathogen is important for monitoring of drinking water. Here we present a cost-effective and field portable mobile-phone based fluorescence microscopy platform designed for automated detection of Giardia lamblia cysts in large volume water samples (i.e., 10 ml) to be used in low-resource field settings. This fluorescence microscope is integrated with a disposable water-sampling cassette, which is based on a flow-through porous polycarbonate membrane and provides a wide surface area for fluorescence imaging and enumeration of the captured Giardia cysts on the membrane. Water sample of interest, containing fluorescently labeled Giardia cysts, is introduced into the absorbent pads that are in contact with the membrane in the cassette by capillary action, which eliminates the need for electrically driven flow for sample processing. Our fluorescence microscope weighs ~170 grams in total and has all the components of a regular microscope, capable of detecting individual fluorescently labeled cysts under light-emitting-diode (LED) based excitation. Including all the sample preparation, labeling and imaging steps, the entire measurement takes less than one hour for a sample volume of 10 ml. This mobile phone based compact and cost-effective fluorescent imaging platform together with its machine learning based cyst counting interface is easy to use and can even work in resource limited and field settings for spatio-temporal monitoring of water quality.

  4. New hardware and workflows for semi-automated correlative cryo-fluorescence and cryo-electron microscopy/tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schorb, Martin; Gaechter, Leander; Avinoam, Ori; Sieckmann, Frank; Clarke, Mairi; Bebeacua, Cecilia; Bykov, Yury S; Sonnen, Andreas F-P; Lihl, Reinhard; Briggs, John A G

    2017-02-01

    Correlative light and electron microscopy allows features of interest defined by fluorescence signals to be located in an electron micrograph of the same sample. Rare dynamic events or specific objects can be identified, targeted and imaged by electron microscopy or tomography. To combine it with structural studies using cryo-electron microscopy or tomography, fluorescence microscopy must be performed while maintaining the specimen vitrified at liquid-nitrogen temperatures and in a dry environment during imaging and transfer. Here we present instrumentation, software and an experimental workflow that improves the ease of use, throughput and performance of correlated cryo-fluorescence and cryo-electron microscopy. The new cryo-stage incorporates a specially modified high-numerical aperture objective lens and provides a stable and clean imaging environment. It is combined with a transfer shuttle for contamination-free loading of the specimen. Optimized microscope control software allows automated acquisition of the entire specimen area by cryo-fluorescence microscopy. The software also facilitates direct transfer of the fluorescence image and associated coordinates to the cryo-electron microscope for subsequent fluorescence-guided automated imaging. Here we describe these technological developments and present a detailed workflow, which we applied for automated cryo-electron microscopy and tomography of various specimens. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Automatic measurement of compression wood cell attributes in fluorescence microscopy images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selig, B; Luengo Hendriks, C L; Bardage, S; Daniel, G; Borgefors, G

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents a new automated method for analyzing compression wood fibers in fluorescence microscopy. Abnormal wood known as compression wood is present in almost every softwood tree harvested. Compression wood fibers show a different cell wall morphology and chemistry compared to normal wood fibers, and their mechanical and physical characteristics are considered detrimental for both construction wood and pulp and paper purposes. Currently there is the need for improved methodologies for characterization of lignin distribution in wood cell walls, such as from compression wood fibers, that will allow for a better understanding of fiber mechanical properties. Traditionally, analysis of fluorescence microscopy images of fiber cross-sections has been done manually, which is time consuming and subjective. Here, we present an automatic method, using digital image analysis, that detects and delineates softwood fibers in fluorescence microscopy images, dividing them into cell lumen, normal and highly lignified areas. It also quantifies the different areas, as well as measures cell wall thickness. The method is evaluated by comparing the automatic with a manual delineation. While the boundaries between the various fiber wall regions are detected using the automatic method with precision similar to inter and intra expert variability, the position of the boundary between lumen and the cell wall has a systematic shift that can be corrected. Our method allows for transverse structural characterization of compression wood fibers, which may allow for improved understanding of the micro-mechanical modeling of wood and pulp fibers. © 2012 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2012 Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health.

  6. Fluorescence Microscopy Methods for Determining the Viability of Bacteria in Association with Mammalian Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, M. Brittany; Criss, Alison K.

    2013-01-01

    Central to the field of bacterial pathogenesis is the ability to define if and how microbes survive after exposure to eukaryotic cells. Current protocols to address these questions include colony count assays, gentamicin protection assays, and electron microscopy. Colony count and gentamicin protection assays only assess the viability of the entire bacterial population and are unable to determine individual bacterial viability. Electron microscopy can be used to determine the viability of individual bacteria and provide information regarding their localization in host cells. However, bacteria often display a range of electron densities, making assessment of viability difficult. This article outlines protocols for the use of fluorescent dyes that reveal the viability of individual bacteria inside and associated with host cells. These assays were developed originally to assess survival of Neisseria gonorrhoeae in primary human neutrophils, but should be applicable to any bacterium-host cell interaction. These protocols combine membrane-permeable fluorescent dyes (SYTO9 and 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole [DAPI]), which stain all bacteria, with membrane-impermeable fluorescent dyes (propidium iodide and SYTOX Green), which are only accessible to nonviable bacteria. Prior to eukaryotic cell permeabilization, an antibody or fluorescent reagent is added to identify extracellular bacteria. Thus these assays discriminate the viability of bacteria adherent to and inside eukaryotic cells. A protocol is also provided for using the viability dyes in combination with fluorescent antibodies to eukaryotic cell markers, in order to determine the subcellular localization of individual bacteria. The bacterial viability dyes discussed in this article are a sensitive complement and/or alternative to traditional microbiology techniques to evaluate the viability of individual bacteria and provide information regarding where bacteria survive in host cells. PMID:24056524

  7. Spectroscopy, microscopy and fluorescence imaging of Origanum vulgare L. basis for nondestructive quality assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novo, Johanna M; Iriel, Analia; Claudia Marchi, María; Gabriela Lagorio, María

    2013-01-01

    The organs of Origanum vulgare L. plant were examined by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and autofluorescence imaging. The different organs were also studied spectroscopically. Fluorescence emission spectra were recorded for intact inflorescences, leaves and stems. Several fluorescence ratios (Blue/Red, Blue/Far-red, Green/Red and Green/Far-red), which varied depending on the considered organ of the plant, were derived. For leaves, a dependence of fluorescence spectra with water content was obtained as well. The intact samples were also analyzed by Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy. These spectra were transformed to the Remission function depending on the wavenumber and two absorption bands (811 and 1740 cm(-1)), which displayed differences according to the plant organ sampled, were detected. These results were consistent with higher carvacrol content in inflorescences. The spectroscopic results were connected with the microscopic observation and with the presence of relevant nutraceutics contained in the plant. The optical indexes derived in this work may serve as potential indicators to be explored in the development of nondestructive methods for oregano quality assessment. © 2013 The American Society of Photobiology.

  8. Combining surface sensitive vibrational spectroscopy and fluorescence microscopy to study biological interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chi; Jasensky, Joshua; Wu, Jing; Chen, Zhan

    2014-03-01

    A multimodal system combining surface sensitive sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy and total-internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy for surface and interface study was developed. Interfacial molecular structural information can be detected using SFG spectroscopy while interfacial fluorescence signal can be visualized using TIRF microscopy from the same sample. As a proof of concept experiment, SFG spectra of fluorescent polystyrene (PS) beads with different surface coverage were correlated with TIRF signal observed. Results showed that SFG signals from the ordered surfactant methyl groups were detected from the substrate surface, while signals from PS phenyl groups on the beads were not seen. Additionally, a lipid monolayer labeled using lipid-associated dye was deposited on a silica substrate and studied in different environments. The contact with water of this lipid monolayer caused SFG signal to disappear, indicating a possible lipid molecular disorder and the formation of lipid bilayers or liposomes in water. TIRF was able to visualize the presence of lipid molecules on the substrate, showing that the lipids were not removed from the substrate surface by water. The integration of the two surface sensitive techniques can simultaneously visualize interfacial molecular dynamics and characterize interfacial molecular structures in situ, which is important and is expected to find extensive applications in biological interface related research.

  9. Investigation of signal-to-noise ratio in frequency-domain multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yide; Khan, Aamir A; Vigil, Genevieve D; Howard, Scott S

    2016-07-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) combined with fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) has enabled three-dimensional quantitative molecular microscopy in vivo. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and thus the imaging rate of MPM-FLIM, which is fundamentally limited by the shot noise and fluorescence saturation, has not been quantitatively studied yet. In this paper, we investigate the SNR performance of the frequency-domain (FD) MPM-FLIM with two figures of merit: the photon economy in the limit of shot noise, and the normalized SNR in the limit of saturation. The theoretical results and Monte Carlo simulations find that two-photon FD-FLIM requires 50% fewer photons to achieve the same SNR as conventional one-photon FLIM. We also analytically show that the MPM-FD-FLIM can exploit the DC and higher harmonic components generated by nonlinear optical mixing of the excitation light to improve SNR, reducing the required number of photons by an additional 50%. Finally, the effect of fluorophore saturation on the experimental SNR performance is discussed.

  10. Imaging nanometer-sized α-synuclein aggregates by superresolution fluorescence localization microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberti, M Julia; Fölling, Jonas; Celej, M Soledad; Bossi, Mariano; Jovin, Thomas M; Jares-Erijman, Elizabeth A

    2012-04-04

    The morphological features of α-synuclein (AS) amyloid aggregation in vitro and in cells were elucidated at the nanoscale by far-field subdiffraction fluorescence localization microscopy. Labeling AS with rhodamine spiroamide probes allowed us to image AS fibrillar structures by fluorescence stochastic nanoscopy with an enhanced resolution at least 10-fold higher than that achieved with conventional, diffraction-limited techniques. The implementation of dual-color detection, combined with atomic force microscopy, revealed the propagation of individual fibrils in vitro. In cells, labeled protein appeared as amyloid aggregates of spheroidal morphology and subdiffraction sizes compatible with in vitro supramolecular intermediates perceived independently by atomic force microscopy and cryo-electron tomography. We estimated the number of monomeric protein units present in these minute structures. This approach is ideally suited for the investigation of the molecular mechanisms of amyloid formation both in vitro and in the cellular milieu. Copyright © 2012 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. HIV taken by STORM: Super-resolution fluorescence microscopy of a viral infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira Cândida F

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The visualization of viral proteins has been hindered by the resolution limit of conventional fluorescent microscopes, as the dimension of any single fluorescent signal is often greater than most virion particles. Super-resolution microscopy has the potential to unveil the distribution of proteins at the resolution approaching electron microscopy without relying on morphological features of existing characteristics of the biological specimen that are needed in EM. Results Using direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM to achieve a lateral resolution of 15–20 nm, we quantified the 2-D molecular distribution of the major structural proteins of the infectious human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 before and after infection of lymphoid cells. We determined that the HIV-1 matrix and capsid proteins undergo restructuring soon after HIV-1 infection. Conclusions This study provides the proof-of-concept for the use of dSTORM to visualize the changes in the molecular distribution of viral proteins during an infection.

  12. FRAP, FLIM, and FRET: Detection and analysis of cellular dynamics on a molecular scale using fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Los Santos, Carla; Chang, Ching-Wei; Mycek, Mary-Ann; Cardullo, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    The combination of fluorescent-probe technology plus modern optical microscopes allows investigators to monitor dynamic events in living cells with exquisite temporal and spatial resolution. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), for example, has long been used to monitor molecular dynamics both within cells and on cellular surfaces. Although bound by the diffraction limit imposed on all optical microscopes, the combination of digital cameras and the application of fluorescence intensity information on large-pixel arrays have allowed such dynamic information to be monitored and quantified. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM), on the other hand, utilizes the information from an ensemble of fluorophores to probe changes in the local environment. Using either fluorescence-intensity or lifetime approaches, fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) microscopy provides information about molecular interactions, with Ångstrom resolution. In this review, we summarize the theoretical framework underlying these methods and illustrate their utility in addressing important problems in reproductive and developmental systems. PMID:26010322

  13. FRAP, FLIM, and FRET: Detection and analysis of cellular dynamics on a molecular scale using fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Los Santos, Carla; Chang, Ching-Wei; Mycek, Mary-Ann; Cardullo, Richard A

    2015-01-01

    The combination of fluorescent-probe technology plus modern optical microscopes allows investigators to monitor dynamic events in living cells with exquisite temporal and spatial resolution. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), for example, has long been used to monitor molecular dynamics both within cells and on cellular surfaces. Although bound by the diffraction limit imposed on all optical microscopes, the combination of digital cameras and the application of fluorescence intensity information on large-pixel arrays have allowed such dynamic information to be monitored and quantified. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM), on the other hand, utilizes the information from an ensemble of fluorophores to probe changes in the local environment. Using either fluorescence-intensity or lifetime approaches, fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) microscopy provides information about molecular interactions, with Ångstrom resolution. In this review, we summarize the theoretical framework underlying these methods and illustrate their utility in addressing important problems in reproductive and developmental systems. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Automated sub-5 nm image registration in integrated correlative fluorescence and electron microscopy using cathodoluminescence pointers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haring, M.T.; Liv Hamarat, N.; Zonnevylle, A.C.; Narvaez Gonzalez, A.C.; Voortman, L.M.; Kruit, P.; Hoogenboom, J.P.

    2017-01-01

    In the biological sciences, data from fluorescence and electron microscopy is correlated to allow fluorescence biomolecule identification within the cellular ultrastructure and/or ultrastructural analysis following live-cell imaging. High-accuracy (sub-100 nm) image overlay requires the addition of

  15. Lipid domains in giant unilamellar vesicles and their correspondence with equilibrium thermodynamic phases: A quantitative fluorescence microscopy imaging approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fidorra, Matthias; Garcia, Alejandra; Ipsen, John Hjort

    2009-01-01

    We report a novel analytical procedure to measure the surface areas of coexisting lipid domains in giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) based on image processing of 3D fluorescence microscopy data. The procedure involves the segmentation of lipid domains from fluorescent image stacks...

  16. The use of fluorescence microscopy to visualise homotypic interactions of tomato spotted wilt virus nucleocapsid protein in living cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snippe, M.; Borst, J.W.; Goldbach, R.W.; Kormelink, R.J.M.

    2005-01-01

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) were employed to study homotypic protein¿protein interactions in living cells. To this end, the nucleocapsid (N) protein of tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) was expressed as a fusion protein with either

  17. Interaction of oxazole yellow dyes with DNA studied with hybrid optical tweezers and fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murade, C U; Subramaniam, V; Otto, C; Bennink, Martin L

    2009-08-05

    We have integrated single molecule fluorescence microscopy imaging into an optical tweezers set-up and studied the force extension behavior of individual DNA molecules in the presence of various YOYO-1 and YO-PRO-1 concentrations. The fluorescence modality was used to record fluorescent images during the stretching and relaxation cycle. Force extension curves recorded in the presence of either dye did not show the overstretching transition that is characteristic for bare DNA. Using the modified wormlike chain model to curve-fit the force extension data revealed a contour length increase of 6% and 30%, respectively, in the presence of YO-PRO-1 and YOYO-1 at 100 nM. The fluorescence images recorded simultaneously showed that the number of bound dye molecules increased as the DNA molecule was stretched and decreased again as the force on the complex was lowered. The binding constants and binding site sizes for YO-PRO-1 and YOYO-1 were determined as a function of the force. The rate of YO-PRO-1 binding and unbinding was found to be 2 orders of magnitude larger than that for YOYO-1. A kinetic model is proposed to explain this observation.

  18. Analysis of Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM) data. Based on a fully automated Laguerre deconvolution method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pande, P; Trivedi, C A; Jo, J A

    2010-01-01

    A novel Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM) deconvolution method based on the linear expansion of fluorescence decays on a set of orthonormal Laguerre functions was recently proposed. The Laguerre deconvolution method applies linear least-square estimation to estimate the expansion coefficients of all pixel decays simultaneously, performing at least two orders of magnitude faster than the other algorithms. In the original Laguerre FLIM deconvolution implementation, however, the Laguerre parameter α is selected using a heuristic approach, making it unsuitable for online applications. In this study, we present a fully automated implementation of the Laguerre FLIM deconvolution, whereby the Laguerre parameter α is treated as a free parameter within a nonlinear least-squares optimization scheme. The performance of this method has been successfully validated on simulated data, and experimental FLIM images of standard fluorescent dyes and endogenous tissue fluorescence. The main advantage of the proposed method is that it does not require any user intervention for tuning up the deconvolution process. Thus, we believe this method will facilitate the translation of FLIM to online applications, including real-time clinical diagnosis.

  19. Exploring the dynamics of cell processes through simulations of fluorescence microscopy experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angiolini, Juan; Plachta, Nicolas; Mocskos, Esteban; Levi, Valeria

    2015-06-02

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) methods are powerful tools for unveiling the dynamical organization of cells. For simple cases, such as molecules passively moving in a homogeneous media, FCS analysis yields analytical functions that can be fitted to the experimental data to recover the phenomenological rate parameters. Unfortunately, many dynamical processes in cells do not follow these simple models, and in many instances it is not possible to obtain an analytical function through a theoretical analysis of a more complex model. In such cases, experimental analysis can be combined with Monte Carlo simulations to aid in interpretation of the data. In response to this need, we developed a method called FERNET (Fluorescence Emission Recipes and Numerical routines Toolkit) based on Monte Carlo simulations and the MCell-Blender platform, which was designed to treat the reaction-diffusion problem under realistic scenarios. This method enables us to set complex geometries of the simulation space, distribute molecules among different compartments, and define interspecies reactions with selected kinetic constants, diffusion coefficients, and species brightness. We apply this method to simulate single- and multiple-point FCS, photon-counting histogram analysis, raster image correlation spectroscopy, and two-color fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy. We believe that this new program could be very useful for predicting and understanding the output of fluorescence microscopy experiments. Copyright © 2015 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Simultaneous cryo X-ray ptychographic and fluorescence microscopy of green algae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Junjing; Vine, David J.; Chen, Si; Nashed, Youssef S. G.; Jin, Qiaoling; Phillips, Nicholas W.; Peterka, Tom; Ross, Rob; Vogt, Stefan; Jacobsen, Chris J.

    2015-02-09

    Trace metals play important roles in normal and in disease-causing biological functions. X-ray fluorescence microscopy reveals trace elements with no dependence on binding affinities (unlike with visible light fluorophores) and with improved sensitivity relative to electron probes. However, X-ray fluorescence is not very sensitive for showing the light elements that comprise the majority of cellular material. Here we show that X-ray ptychography can be combined with fluorescence to image both cellular structure and trace element distribution in frozen-hydrated cells at cryogenic temperatures, with high structural and chemical fidelity. Ptychographic reconstruction algorithms deliver phase and absorption contrast images at a resolution beyond that of the illuminating lens or beam size. Using 5.2-keV X-rays, we have obtained sub-30-nm resolution structural images and similar to 90-nm-resolution fluorescence images of several elements in frozen-hydrated green algae. This combined approach offers a way to study the role of trace elements in their structural context.

  1. Fluorescence and confocal microscopy studies of the ice surface - antifreeze protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pertaya, N.; Thomson, E.; Davies, P. L.; Braslavsky, I.

    2005-03-01

    Biomineralization is a phenomenon in which biological material influences mineral growth on the molecular level. A compelling example involves antifreeze proteins (AFPs) known to prevent fish and insects from freezing. AFPs have many potential applications in agriculture, biomedical science, and can be used as a model platform to understand biomineralization processes for future nanotechnology applications. Here we describe a new approach to study the interaction between AFPs and ice using fluorescence and confocal microscopy combined with a unique ice growth cell. After conjugating green fluorescent protein (GFP) to Type III AFP, we imaged the fluorescence signal around and inside of the ice crystals that emerged from the cooled AFP-GFP solution, and have observed an enhanced fluorescence signal at the edge of the ice crystal. In a second cell we observed a dramatic change in the ice growth morphology when AFPs were introduced into an initially pure system. Further developments of these methods will permit the direct imaging of the location and concentration of the AFPs on ice surfaces and enable a better understanding of their operation. Supported by CIHR, the Bosack and Kruger Foundation, Ohio and Yale Universities.

  2. Exploring the Dynamics of Cell Processes through Simulations of Fluorescence Microscopy Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angiolini, Juan; Plachta, Nicolas; Mocskos, Esteban; Levi, Valeria

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) methods are powerful tools for unveiling the dynamical organization of cells. For simple cases, such as molecules passively moving in a homogeneous media, FCS analysis yields analytical functions that can be fitted to the experimental data to recover the phenomenological rate parameters. Unfortunately, many dynamical processes in cells do not follow these simple models, and in many instances it is not possible to obtain an analytical function through a theoretical analysis of a more complex model. In such cases, experimental analysis can be combined with Monte Carlo simulations to aid in interpretation of the data. In response to this need, we developed a method called FERNET (Fluorescence Emission Recipes and Numerical routines Toolkit) based on Monte Carlo simulations and the MCell-Blender platform, which was designed to treat the reaction-diffusion problem under realistic scenarios. This method enables us to set complex geometries of the simulation space, distribute molecules among different compartments, and define interspecies reactions with selected kinetic constants, diffusion coefficients, and species brightness. We apply this method to simulate single- and multiple-point FCS, photon-counting histogram analysis, raster image correlation spectroscopy, and two-color fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy. We believe that this new program could be very useful for predicting and understanding the output of fluorescence microscopy experiments. PMID:26039162

  3. Fluorescence microscopy evidence for quasi-permanent attachment of antifreeze proteins to ice surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pertaya, Natalya; Marshall, Christopher B; DiPrinzio, Carlos L; Wilen, Larry; Thomson, Erik S; Wettlaufer, J S; Davies, Peter L; Braslavsky, Ido

    2007-05-15

    Many organisms are protected from freezing by the presence of extracellular antifreeze proteins (AFPs), which bind to ice, modify its morphology, and prevent its further growth. These proteins have a wide range of applications including cryopreservation, frost protection, and as models in biomineralization research. However, understanding their mechanism of action remains an outstanding challenge. While the prevailing adsorption-inhibition hypothesis argues that AFPs must bind irreversibly to ice to arrest its growth, other theories suggest that there is exchange between the bound surface proteins and the free proteins in solution. By conjugating green fluorescence protein (GFP) to a fish AFP (Type III), we observed the binding of the AFP to ice. This was accomplished by monitoring the presence of GFP-AFP on the surface of ice crystals several microns in diameter using fluorescence microscopy. The lack of recovery of fluorescence after photobleaching of the GFP component of the surface-bound GFP-AFP shows that there is no equilibrium surface-solution exchange of GFP-AFP and thus supports the adsorption-inhibition mechanism for this type of AFP. Moreover, our study establishes the utility of fluorescently labeled AFPs as a research tool for investigating the mechanisms underlying the activity of this diverse group of proteins.

  4. Fluorescent lifetime imaging microscopy using Europium complexes improves atherosclerotic plaques discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicchieri, Letícia Bonfante; de Andrade Natal, Rodrigo; Courrol, Lilia Coronato

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this study is to characterize arterial tissue with and without atherosclerosis by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) using Europium Chlortetracycline complex (EuCTc) as fluorescent marker. For this study, twelve rabbits were randomly divided into a control group (CG) and an experimental group (EG), where they were fed a normal and hypercholesterolemic diet, respectively, and were treated for 60 days. Cryosections of the aortic arch specimens were cut in a vertical plane, mounted on glass slides, and stained with Europium (Eu), Chlortetracycline (CTc), Europium Chlortetracycline (EuCTc), and Europium Chlortetracycline Magnesium (EuCTcMg) solutions. FLIM images were obtained with excitation at 405 nm. The average autofluorescence lifetime within plaque depositions was ~1.36 ns. Reduced plaque autofluorescence lifetimes of 0.23 and 0.31 ns were observed on incubation with EuCTc and EuCTcMg respectively. It was observed a quenching of collagen, cholesterol and TG emission spectra increasing EuCTc concentration. The drastic reduction in fluorescence lifetimes is due to a resonant energy transfer between collagen, triglycerides, cholesterol and europium complexes, quenching fluorescence.

  5. 3D fluorescence emission difference microscopy based on spatial light modulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangyuan Zhao

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We report three-dimensional fluorescence emission difference (3D-FED microscopy using a spatial light modulator (SLM. Zero phase, 0–2π vortex phase and binary 0-pi phase are loaded on the SLM to generate the corresponding solid, doughnut and z-axis hollow excitation spot, respectively. Our technique achieves super-resolved image by subtracting three differently acquired images with proper subtractive factors. Detailed theoretical analysis and simulation tests are proceeded to testify the performance of 3D-FED. Also, the improvement of lateral and axial resolution is demonstrated by imaging 100nm fluorescent beads. The experiment yields lateral resolution of 140nm and axial resolution of approximate 380nm.

  6. Programmable LED-based integrating sphere light source for wide-field fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Aziz Ul; Anwer, Ayad G; Goldys, Ewa M

    2017-12-01

    Wide-field fluorescence microscopy commonly uses a mercury lamp, which has limited spectral capabilities. We designed and built a programmable integrating sphere light (PISL) source which consists of nine LEDs, light-collecting optics, a commercially available integrating sphere and a baffle. The PISL source is tuneable in the range 365-490nm with a uniform spatial profile and a sufficient power at the objective to carry out spectral imaging. We retrofitted a standard fluorescence inverted microscope DM IRB (Leica) with a PISL source by mounting it together with a highly sensitive low- noise CMOS camera. The capabilities of the setup have been demonstrated by carrying out multispectral autofluorescence imaging of live BV2 cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The Identification of Aluminum in Human Brain Tissue Using Lumogallion and Fluorescence Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, Ambreen; King, Andrew; Troakes, Claire; Exley, Christopher

    2016-10-18

    Aluminum in human brain tissue is implicated in the etiologies of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease. While methods for the accurate and precise measurement of aluminum in human brain tissue are widely acknowledged, the same cannot be said for the visualization of aluminum. Herein we have used transversely-heated graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry to measure aluminum in the brain of a donor with Alzheimer's disease, and we have developed and validated fluorescence microscopy and the fluor lumogallion to show the presence of aluminum in the same tissue. Aluminum is observed as characteristic orange fluorescence that is neither reproduced by other metals nor explained by autofluorescence. This new and relatively simple method to visualize aluminum in human brain tissue should enable more rigorous testing of the aluminum hypothesis of Alzheimer's disease (and other neurological conditions) in the future.

  8. Live Cell Imaging of F-actin Dynamics via Fluorescent Speckle Microscopy (FSM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, James; Danuser, Gaudenz

    2009-01-01

    In this protocol we describe the use of Fluorescent Speckle Microscopy (FSM) to capture high-resolution images of actin dynamics in PtK1 cells. A unique advantage of FSM is its ability to capture the movement and turnover kinetics (assembly/disassembly) of the F-actin network within living cells. This technique is particularly useful in deriving quantitative measurements of F-actin dynamics when paired with computer vision software (qFSM). We describe the selection, microinjection and visualization of fluorescent actin probes in living cells. Importantly, similar procedures are applicable to visualizing other macomolecular assemblies. FSM has been demonstrated for microtubules, intermediate filaments, and adhesion complexes. PMID:19684563

  9. Dynamics of intracellular processes in live-cell systems unveiled by fluorescence correlation microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Bardeci, Nicolás; Angiolini, Juan Francisco; De Rossi, María Cecilia; Bruno, Luciana; Levi, Valeria

    2017-01-01

    Fluorescence fluctuation-based methods are non-invasive microscopy tools especially suited for the study of dynamical aspects of biological processes. These methods examine spontaneous intensity fluctuations produced by fluorescent molecules moving through the small, femtoliter-sized observation volume defined in confocal and multiphoton microscopes. The quantitative analysis of the intensity trace provides information on the processes producing the fluctuations that include diffusion, binding interactions, chemical reactions and photophysical phenomena. In this review, we present the basic principles of the most widespread fluctuation-based methods, discuss their implementation in standard confocal microscopes and briefly revise some examples of their applications to address relevant questions in living cells. The ultimate goal of these methods in the Cell Biology field is to observe biomolecules as they move, interact with targets and perform their biological action in the natural context. © 2016 IUBMB Life, 69(1):8-15, 2017. © 2016 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  10. Parallel excitation-emission multiplexed fluorescence lifetime confocal microscopy for live cell imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ming; Li, Yu; Peng, Leilei

    2014-05-05

    We present a novel excitation-emission multiplexed fluorescence lifetime microscopy (FLIM) method that surpasses current FLIM techniques in multiplexing capability. The method employs Fourier multiplexing to simultaneously acquire confocal fluorescence lifetime images of multiple excitation wavelength and emission color combinations at 44,000 pixels/sec. The system is built with low-cost CW laser sources and standard PMTs with versatile spectral configuration, which can be implemented as an add-on to commercial confocal microscopes. The Fourier lifetime confocal method allows fast multiplexed FLIM imaging, which makes it possible to monitor multiple biological processes in live cells. The low cost and compatibility with commercial systems could also make multiplexed FLIM more accessible to biological research community.

  11. Topography of Cells Revealed by Variable-Angle Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso Dos Santos, Marcelina; Déturche, Régis; Vézy, Cyrille; Jaffiol, Rodolphe

    2016-09-20

    We propose an improved version of variable-angle total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (vaTIRFM) adapted to modern TIRF setup. This technique involves the recording of a stack of TIRF images, by gradually increasing the incident angle of the light beam on the sample. A comprehensive theory was developed to extract the membrane/substrate separation distance from fluorescently labeled cell membranes. A straightforward image processing was then established to compute the topography of cells with a nanometric axial resolution, typically 10-20 nm. To highlight the new opportunities offered by vaTIRFM to quantify adhesion process of motile cells, adhesion of MDA-MB-231 cancer cells on glass substrate coated with fibronectin was examined. Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscopy for in vivo imaging of epidermal reactions to two experimental irritants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suihko, C.; Serup, J.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Fibre-optic fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) is a novel non-invasive technique for in vivo imaging of skin. The cellular structure of the epidermis can be studied. A fluorophore, e.g. fluorescein sodium, is introduced by an intradermal injection or applied...... dermatitis reactions caused by established model irritants, e.g. sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS) and pelargonic acid (PA). Methods: Twelve healthy individuals volunteered. The flexor aspect of the right and the left forearm was exposed to SLS in water and PA in isopropanol and occluded under Finn Chambers...... for 24 h. The reactions were rated clinically and, following epicutaneous and intra-dermal application of fluorescein sodium, studied by fluorescence CLSM, magnification x 1000. Results: Both irritants disturbed the epidermal intercellular borders, which became blurred, thickened and variably altered...

  13. Exciton-polaron quenching in organic thin-film transistors studied by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Per Baunegaard With; Leißner, Till; Osadnik, Andreas

    Organic semiconductors show great potential in electronic and optical applications. However, a major challenge is the degradation of the semiconductor materials that cause a reduction in device performance. Here, we present our investigations of Organic Thin Film Transistors (OTFT) based on the m......Organic semiconductors show great potential in electronic and optical applications. However, a major challenge is the degradation of the semiconductor materials that cause a reduction in device performance. Here, we present our investigations of Organic Thin Film Transistors (OTFT) based...... on the material 5,5-bis(naphthyl)-2,20-bithiophene (NaT2). These types of OTFT have previously been shown to have light emitting properties. Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM) has been used to investigate the exciton-polaron quenching in biased OTFTs. A clear reduction in fluorescence lifetime...

  14. Agreement between Direct Fluorescent Microscopy and Ziehl-Neelsen Concentration Techniques in Detection of Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Northwest Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workineh, Meseret; Maru, Mandie; Seman, Ibrahim; Bezu, Ziyadu; Negash, Markos; Melku, Mulugeta; Gize, Addisu; Shibabaw, Agumas

    2017-09-01

    The sensitivity of smear microscopy for diagnosis of tuberculosis might be improved through treatment of sputum with sodium hypochlorite and application of fluorescent microscopy. This study aimed to determine the agreement between direct Fluorescent Microscopy and Ziehl-Neelsen concentration technique by their ability of detecting acid fast bacilli in resource poor settings. A cross sectional study was conducted at Gondar University Referral Hospital, Northwest Ethiopia. Three sputum specimens were collected from consecutive TB suspects. Direct and concentrated sputum smears were air-dried, heat-fixed and stained by auramine O and Ziehl-Neelsen staining techniques respectively. The stained slides were examined for acid fast bacilli using direct Fluorescent Microscopy and Ziehl-Neelsen concentration techniques. Of 293 specimens, 4.4% and 2.4 % were AFB positive by direct fluorescent microscopy and Ziehl-Neelsen bleach concentrated techniques respectively. There was high percentage of tuberculosis positivity from early morning sputum samples (2.4%) compared to first spot (1.4%) and second spot (1.7%) sputum samples when using Ziehl-Neelsen sodium hypochlorite concentration technique. A moderate agreement was seen between the two methods (Kappa=0.484, P valuefluorescent microscopy has shown high positivity rate compared to Ziehl-Neelsen concentration technique. A moderate agreement was seen between the two methods. Thus, Ziehl-Neelsen bleach sedimentation technique is recommended for detection of pulmonary tuberculosis at peripheral health service level when Fluorescent Microscopy is not available.

  15. High-resolution deep imaging of live cellular spheroids with light-sheet-based fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pampaloni, Francesco; Ansari, Nariman; Stelzer, Ernst H K

    2013-04-01

    Conventional two-dimensional cell monolayers do not provide the geometrical, biochemical and mechanical cues found in real tissues. Cells in real tissues interact through chemical and mechanical stimuli with adjacent cells and via the extracellular matrix. Such a highly interconnected communication network extends along all three dimensions. This architecture is lost in two-dimensional cultures. Therefore, at least in many cases, two-dimensional cell monolayers do not represent a suitable in vitro tool to characterize accurately the biology of real tissues. Many studies performed over the last few years have demonstrated that the differences between three-dimensional and two-dimensional cultured cells are striking at the morphological and molecular levels and that three-dimensional cell cultures can be employed in order to shrink the gap between real tissues and in vitro cell models. End-point and long-term imaging of cellular and sub-cellular processes with fluorescence microscopy provides direct insight into the physiological behavior of three-dimensional cell cultures and their response to chemical or mechanical stimulation. Fluorescence imaging of three-dimensional cell cultures sets new challenges and imposes specific requirements concerning the choice of a suitable microscopy technique. Deep penetration into the specimen, high imaging speed and ultra-low intensity of the excitation light are key requirements. Light-sheet-based fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) offers a favorable combination of these requirements and is therefore currently established as the technique of choice for the study of three-dimensional cell cultures. This review illustrates the benefits of cellular spheroids in the life sciences and suggests that LSFM is essential for investigations of cellular and sub-cellular dynamic processes in three-dimensions over time and space.

  16. High-Throughput Quantification of GFP-LC3+ Dots by Automated Fluorescence Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo-San Pedro, J M; Pietrocola, F; Sica, V; Izzo, V; Sauvat, A; Kepp, O; Maiuri, M C; Kroemer, G; Galluzzi, L

    2017-01-01

    Macroautophagy is a specific variant of autophagy that involves a dedicated double-membraned organelle commonly known as autophagosome. Various methods have been developed to quantify the size of the autophagosomal compartment, which is an indirect indicator of macroautophagic responses, based on the peculiar ability of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 beta (MAP1LC3B; best known as LC3) to accumulate in forming autophagosomes upon maturation. One particularly convenient method to monitor the accumulation of mature LC3 within autophagosomes relies on a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged variant of this protein and fluorescence microscopy. In physiological conditions, cells transfected temporarily or stably with a GFP-LC3-encoding construct exhibit a diffuse green fluorescence over the cytoplasm and nucleus. Conversely, in response to macroautophagy-promoting stimuli, the GFP-LC3 signal becomes punctate and often (but not always) predominantly cytoplasmic. The accumulation of GFP-LC3 in cytoplasmic dots, however, also ensues the blockage of any of the steps that ensure the degradation of mature autophagosomes, calling for the implementation of strategies that accurately discriminate between an increase in autophagic flux and an arrest in autophagic degradation. Various cell lines have been engineered to stably express GFP-LC3, which-combined with the appropriate controls of flux, high-throughput imaging stations, and automated image analysis-offer a relatively straightforward tool to screen large chemical or biological libraries for inducers or inhibitors of autophagy. Here, we describe a simple and robust method for the high-throughput quantification of GFP-LC3+ dots by automated fluorescence microscopy. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Breaking Abbe's diffraction resolution limit in fluorescence microscopy with stimulated emission depletion beams of various shapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klar, T A; Engel, E; Hell, S W

    2001-12-01

    We report on the generation of various hole-centered beams in the focal region of a lens and investigate their effectiveness to break the diffraction barrier in fluorescence microscopy by stimulated emission. Patterning of the phase of the stimulating beam across the entrance pupil of the objective lens produces point-spread-functions with twofold, fourfold, and circular symmetry, which narrow down the focal spot to 65-100 nm. Comparison with high-resolution confocal images exhibits a resolution much beyond the diffraction barrier. Particles that are only 65-nm apart are resolved with focused light.

  18. Mapping Molecular Function to Biological Nanostructure: Combining Structured Illumination Microscopy with Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging (SIM + FLIM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederik Görlitz

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We present a new microscope integrating super-resolved imaging using structured illumination microscopy (SIM with wide-field optically sectioned fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM to provide optical mapping of molecular function and its correlation with biological nanostructure below the conventional diffraction limit. We illustrate this SIM + FLIM capability to map FRET readouts applied to the aggregation of discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1 in Cos 7 cells following ligand stimulation and to the compaction of DNA during the cell cycle.

  19. Single cell adhesion strength assessed with variable-angle total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelina Cardoso Dos Santos

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We propose a new strategy to evaluate adhesion strength at the single cell level. This approach involves variable-angle total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy to monitor in real time the topography of cell membranes, i.e. a map of the membrane/substrate separation distance. According to the Boltzmann distribution, both potential energy profile and dissociation energy related to the interactions between the cell membrane and the substrate were determined from the membrane topography. We have highlighted on glass substrates coated with poly-L-lysine and fibronectin, that the dissociation energy is a reliable parameter to quantify the adhesion strength of MDA-MB-231 motile cells.

  20. Single molecule tracking fluorescence microscopy in mitochondria reveals highly dynamic but confined movement of Tom40.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmenko, Anton; Tankov, Stoyan; English, Brian P; Tarassov, Ivan; Tenson, Tanel; Kamenski, Piotr; Elf, Johan; Hauryliuk, Vasili

    2011-01-01

    Tom40 is an integral protein of the mitochondrial outer membrane, which as the central component of the Translocase of the Outer Membrane (TOM) complex forms a channel for protein import. We characterize the diffusion properties of individual Tom40 molecules fused to the photoconvertable fluorescent protein Dendra2 with millisecond temporal resolution. By imaging individual Tom40 molecules in intact isolated yeast mitochondria using photoactivated localization microscopy with sub-diffraction limited spatial precision, we demonstrate that Tom40 movement in the outer mitochondrial membrane is highly dynamic but confined in nature, suggesting anchoring of the TOM complex as a whole.

  1. Dual optical coherence tomography/fluorescence microscopy for monitoring of Drosophila melanogaster larval heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradu, Adrian; Ma, Lisha; Bloor, James W; Podoleanu, Adrian

    2009-07-01

    This article demonstrates a combined instrument of two imaging modalities to acquire information on cardiac function in larval Drosophila melanogaster: optical coherence tomography (OCT) and laser scanning fluorescence microscopy (LSFM). For this purpose, a dedicated imaging instrument able to sequentially provide cross-sectional OCT and C-scan LSFM images has been developed. With this dual-imaging system, the heart can be easily located and visualized within the specimen and the change of the heart shape in a cardiac cycle can be monitored.

  2. Active Appearance Segmentation for Intensity Inhomogeneity in Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Casper Bo; Lyksborg, Mark; Hecksher-Sørensen, J.

    2016-01-01

    inhomogeneities which are often seen in Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy (LSFM) images. This robustness is achieved by modelling the appearance of an image as a regularized Normalized Gradient Field (rNGF). We perform two experiments to challenge the model. First it is tested using a repeated leave......-one-out approach on images with minimal imperfections where the left out images are corrupted by a simulated bias field and segmented using the AAM. Secondly we test the model on LSFM images with common acquisition problems. In both experiments the proposed approach outperforms the often used AAM implementation...

  3. Total internal reflection fluorescence based multiplane localization microscopy enables super-resolved volume imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Partha Pratim; Hess, Samuel T.

    2017-05-01

    Total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) based geometry is attractive for super-resolution localization microscopy. Although the traditional TIRF configuration enables near-surface 2D imaging, it is not capable of imaging multiple axial planes. We propose a simultaneous multiplane imaging based localization encoded (SMILE) technique in the TIRF configuration that utilizes point spread function (PSF) information (PSF size, corresponding to single molecules located at the focal plane and off-focal planes, and the detected photons per PSF) to reconstruct a near-surface volume stack. The natural spread of the detection PSFs (far from the specimen-coverslip interface) is used to fix the axial locations of single molecules, and the corresponding photon count determines their localization precision. The proposed SMILE microscopy technique enables super-resolved volume reconstruction based on 2D recorded data.

  4. A novel fluorescence imaging technique combining deconvolution microscopy and spectral analysis for quantitative detection of opportunistic pathogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Puil, Michael [Florida Gulf Coast University; Biggerstaff, John P. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Weidow, B. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Price, Jeffery R [ORNL; Naser, S. [University of Central Florida; White, D.C. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Alberte, R. [Florida Gulf Coast University

    2006-01-01

    A novel fluorescence imaging technique based on deconvolution microscopy and spectral analysis is presented here as an alternative to confocal laser scanning microscopy. It allowed rapid, specific and simultaneous identification of five major opportunistic pathogens, relevant for public health, in suspension and provided quantitative results.

  5. Feasibility of magnetic bead technology for concentration of mycobacteria in sputum prior to fluorescence microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manabe Yukari

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Direct sputum smear microscopy is the mainstay of TB diagnosis in most low and middle income countries, and is highly specific for Mycobacterium tuberculosis in such settings. However it is limited by low sensitivity, particularly in HIV co-infected patients. Concentration by centrifugation has been reported to be more sensitive than direct smear preparation, but is only suitable for referral laboratories. Simpler concentration methods that could be applied in peripheral laboratories are urgently needed. Methods We evaluated the feasibility of an early prototype ligand-coated magnetic bead technology to concentrate M. tuberculosis prior to detection by LED-based fluorescence microscopy compared with direct Ziehl-Neelsen microscopy and direct and concentrated fluorescence microscopy in a reference laboratory in Kampala, Uganda. Results were compared with MGIT 960 liquid culture and Lowenstein-Jensen culture. Results Compared to culture, concentrated FM had significantly higher sensitivity than direct ZN (74.8% and 51.4%, magnetic bead-FM (65.4% and direct FM (58.9%. The sensitivity of magnetic bead FM was significantly higher than direct ZN (p Conclusion The sensitivity of the early prototype magnetic bead FM was lower than concentrated FM, similar to direct FM, and significantly higher than direct ZN. Both magnetic bead and concentration by centrifugation led to reduced specificity compared with the direct smear methods. Some magnetic bead FM false positive results were not easily explained and should be further investigated. The prototype version of the magnetic bead procedure tested here was of similar complexity to concentration by centrifugation. As such, if the sensitivity of the magnetic bead FM could be improved in future versions of the technology, this may offer a viable alternative to centrifugation.

  6. Using Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy To Visualize Rhodopsin-Containing Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keffer, J. L.; Sabanayagam, C. R.; Lee, M. E.; DeLong, E. F.; Hahn, M. W.

    2015-01-01

    Sunlight is captured and converted to chemical energy in illuminated environments. Although (bacterio)chlorophyll-based photosystems have been characterized in detail, retinal-based photosystems, rhodopsins, have only recently been identified as important mediators of light energy capture and conversion. Recent estimates suggest that up to 70% of cells in some environments harbor rhodopsins. However, because rhodopsin autofluorescence is low—comparable to that of carotenoids and significantly less than that of (bacterio)chlorophylls—these estimates are based on metagenomic sequence data, not direct observation. We report here the use of ultrasensitive total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy to distinguish between unpigmented, carotenoid-producing, and rhodopsin-expressing bacteria. Escherichia coli cells were engineered to produce lycopene, β-carotene, or retinal. A gene encoding an uncharacterized rhodopsin, actinorhodopsin, was cloned into retinal-producing E. coli. The production of correctly folded and membrane-incorporated actinorhodopsin was confirmed via development of pink color in E. coli and SDS-PAGE. Cells expressing carotenoids or actinorhodopsin were imaged by TIRF microscopy. The 561-nm excitation laser specifically illuminated rhodopsin-containing cells, allowing them to be differentiated from unpigmented and carotenoid-containing cells. Furthermore, water samples collected from the Delaware River were shown by PCR to have rhodopsin-containing organisms and were examined by TIRF microscopy. Individual microorganisms that fluoresced under illumination from the 561-nm laser were identified. These results verify the sensitivity of the TIRF microscopy method for visualizing and distinguishing between different molecules with low autofluorescence, making it useful for analyzing natural samples. PMID:25769822

  7. LED-fluorescence microscopy for diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis under programmatic conditions in India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lord Wasim Reza

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Light-emitting diode fluorescence microscopy (LED-FM has been shown to be more sensitive than conventional bright field microscopy using Ziehl-Neelsen (ZN stain in detecting sputum smear positive tuberculosis in controlled laboratory conditions. In 2012, Auramine O staining based LED-FM replaced conventional ZN microscopy in 200 designated microscopy centres (DMC of medical colleges operating in collaboration with India's Revised National Tuberculosis Control Programme. We aimed to assess the impact of introduction of LED-FM services on sputum smear positive case detection under program conditions. METHODS: This was a before and after comparison study. In 15 randomly selected medical college DMCs, all presumptive TB patients who underwent sputum smear examination in the years 2011 (before LED-FM and 2012 (after LED-FM were compared. An additional 15 comparable DMCs that implemented conventional ZN sputum smear microscopy were also selected for comparison between 2011 and 2012. RESULTS: The proportion of presumptive TB patients (PTPfound sputum smear positive increased by 30%- from 13.6% (3432/25159 in 2011 to 17.8% (4706/26426 in 2012 (P value <0.01 in the sites that implemented LED-FM microscopy, whereas in DMCs where the ZN staining procedure is followed the proportion of sputum smear positive had remained unchanged (13.0%versus 12.6%;P value0.31. CONCLUSION: Use of LED-FM significantly increased the proportion of smear positive cases among presumptive TB patients under routine program conditions in high workload laboratories. The study provides operational evidence needed to scale-up the use of LED-FM in similar settings in India and beyond.

  8. Wide-field imaging through scattering media by scattered light fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yulan; Li, Xun

    2017-08-01

    To obtain images through scattering media, scattered light fluorescence (SLF) microscopy that utilizes the optical memory effect has been developed. However, the small field of view (FOV) of SLF microscopy limits its application. In this paper, we have introduced a re-modulation method to achieve wide-field imaging through scattering media by SLF microscopy. In the re-modulation method, to raster scan the focus across the object plane, the incident wavefront is re-modulated via a spatial light modulator (SLM) in the updated phase compensation calculated using the optimized iterative algorithm. Compared with the conventional optical memory effect method, the re-modulation method can greatly increase the FOV of a SLF microscope. With the phase compensation theoretically calculated, the process of updating the phase compensation of a high speed SLM is fast. The re-modulation method does not increase the imaging time. The re-modulation method is, therefore, expected to make SLF microscopy have much wider applications in biology, medicine and physiology.

  9. Imaging corneal crosslinking by autofluorescence 2-photon microscopy, second harmonic generation, and fluorescence lifetime measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steven, Philipp; Hovakimyan, Marina; Guthoff, Rudolf F; Hüttmann, Gereon; Stachs, Oliver

    2010-12-01

    To evaluate the use of 2-photon microscopy (TPM), which excites tissue autofluorescence, in detecting and calculating the grade of collagen corneal crosslinks, which are not visible through the slitlamp and in vivo confocal microscopy. Departments of Ophthalmology, University of Lübeck, Lübeck, and University of Rostock, Rostock, Germany. Experimental study. Corneas of rabbits were treated with different crosslinking (CXL) protocols. Two weeks after treatment, the corneas were evaluated in vivo by confocal microscopy. Eyes were enucleated and TPM was performed at 710 nm and 826 nm excitation wavelengths to detect tissue autofluorescence, second harmonic generation, and fluorescence lifetime measurements (FLIM). Eyes were then fixed and analyzed by histology. Crosslinking following the standard protocol generated a strong autofluorescence signal in the stroma that was detected by TPM. This signal was weakly present in the control specimens, and a sharp transition zone between the peripheral zone and the CXL zone was seen. On FLIM, an increase in corneal crosslinks was measured when the standard protocol was used. Two-photon microscopy, a noninvasive method, was able to detect the effects of therapeutic CXL and measure the grade of CXL. In addition to postoperative treatment control, the technique has possibilities for use in online dosimetry during 2-photon triggered CXL. Copyright © 2010 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Light sheet-based fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) for the quantitative imaging of cells and tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pampaloni, Francesco; Chang, Bo-Jui; Stelzer, Ernst H K

    2015-04-01

    In light sheet-based fluorescence microscopy (LSFM), only the focal plane is illuminated by a laser light sheet. Hence, only the fluorophores within a thin volume of the specimen are excited. This reduces photo-bleaching and photo-toxic effects by several orders of magnitude compared with any other form of microscopy. Therefore, LSFM (aka single/selective-plane illumination microscopy [SPIM] or digitally scanned light sheet microscopy [DSLM]) is the technique of choice for the three-dimensional imaging of live or fixed and of small or large three-dimensional specimens. The parallel recording of millions of pixels with modern cameras provides an extremely fast acquisition speed. Recent developments address the penetration depth, the resolution and the recording speed of LSFM. The impact of LSFM on research areas such as three-dimensional cell cultures, neurosciences, plant biology and developmental biology is increasing at a rapid pace. The development of high-throughput LSFM is the next leap forward, allowing the application of LSFM in toxicology and drug discovery screening.

  11. Uptake and localization of fluorescent labelled gold nanoparticles in living zebrafish (Danio rerio) using Light Sheet Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjolding, Lars Michael; Asmonaite, G.; Jolk, R.

    2015-01-01

    and determine localization on a whole organism level. Furthermore, methods used to identify nanoparticle uptake have been associated with artefacts induced by sample preparation including staining methods for electron microscopy.  This study used Fluorescent Light Sheet Microscopy (FLSM) to determine uptake...... and localization of fluorescent labelled nanoparticles in living whole organisms with minimal sample preparation. Two strains of D. rerio (wildtype AB and transparent Casper) were exposed to 50 nm PEG coated gold nanoparticles (Au NP) synthesized with 1% of a fluorescent probe (FITC). The fish were exposed...

  12. Monitoring Biosensor Activity in Living Cells with Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard N. Day

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Live-cell microscopy is now routinely used to monitor the activities of the genetically encoded biosensor proteins that are designed to directly measure specific cell signaling events inside cells, tissues, or organisms. Most fluorescent biosensor proteins rely on Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET to report conformational changes in the protein that occur in response to signaling events, and this is commonly measured with intensity-based ratiometric imaging methods. An alternative method for monitoring the activities of the FRET-based biosensor proteins is fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM. FLIM measurements are made in the time domain, and are not affected by factors that commonly limit intensity measurements. In this review, we describe the use of the digital frequency domain (FD FLIM method for the analysis of FRET signals. We illustrate the methods necessary for the calibration of the FD FLIM system, and demonstrate the analysis of data obtained from cells expressing “FRET standard” fusion proteins. We then use the FLIM-FRET approach to monitor the changes in activities of two different biosensor proteins in specific regions of single living cells. Importantly, the factors required for the accurate determination and reproducibility of lifetime measurements are described in detail.

  13. The singlet-oxygen-sensitized delayed fluorescence in mammalian cells: a time-resolved microscopy approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Marek; Biehl, Anna-Louisa; Dědic, Roman; Hála, Jan

    2015-04-01

    The present work provides a proof-of-concept that the singlet oxygen-sensitized delayed fluorescence (SOSDF) can be detected from individual living mammalian cells in a time-resolved microscopy experiment. To this end, 3T3 mouse fibroblasts incubated with 100 μM TPPS4 or TMPyP were used and the microsecond kinetics of the delayed fluorescence (DF) were recorded. The analysis revealed that SOSDF is the major component of the overall DF signal. The microscopy approach enables precise control of experimental conditions - the DF kinetics are clearly influenced by the presence of the (1)O2 quencher (sodium azide), H2O/D2O exchange, and the oxygen concentration. Analysis of SOSDF kinetics, which was reconstructed as a difference DF kinetics between the unquenched and the NaN3-quenched samples, provides a cellular (1)O2 lifetime of τΔ = 1-2 μs and a TPPS4 triplet lifetime of τT = 22 ± 5 μs in agreement with previously published values. The short SOSDF acquisition times, typically in the range of tens of seconds, enable us to study the dynamic cellular processes. It is shown that SOSDF lifetimes increase during PDT-like treatment, which may provide valuable information about changes of the intracellular microenvironment. SOSDF is proposed and evaluated as an alternative tool for (1)O2 detection in biological systems.

  14. Comparative evaluation of performance measures for shading correction in time-lapse fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, L; Kan, A; Leckie, C; Hodgkin, P D

    2017-04-01

    Time-lapse fluorescence microscopy is a valuable technology in cell biology, but it suffers from the inherent problem of intensity inhomogeneity due to uneven illumination or camera nonlinearity, known as shading artefacts. This will lead to inaccurate estimates of single-cell features such as average and total intensity. Numerous shading correction methods have been proposed to remove this effect. In order to compare the performance of different methods, many quantitative performance measures have been developed. However, there is little discussion about which performance measure should be generally applied for evaluation on real data, where the ground truth is absent. In this paper, the state-of-the-art shading correction methods and performance evaluation methods are reviewed. We implement 10 popular shading correction methods on two artificial datasets and four real ones. In order to make an objective comparison between those methods, we employ a number of quantitative performance measures. Extensive validation demonstrates that the coefficient of joint variation (CJV) is the most applicable measure in time-lapse fluorescence images. Based on this measure, we have proposed a novel shading correction method that performs better compared to well-established methods for a range of real data tested. © 2016 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2016 Royal Microscopical Society.

  15. Monitoring biosensor activity in living cells with fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hum, Julia M; Siegel, Amanda P; Pavalko, Fredrick M; Day, Richard N

    2012-11-07

    Live-cell microscopy is now routinely used to monitor the activities of the genetically encoded biosensor proteins that are designed to directly measure specific cell signaling events inside cells, tissues, or organisms. Most fluorescent biosensor proteins rely on Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) to report conformational changes in the protein that occur in response to signaling events, and this is commonly measured with intensity-based ratiometric imaging methods. An alternative method for monitoring the activities of the FRET-based biosensor proteins is fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). FLIM measurements are made in the time domain, and are not affected by factors that commonly limit intensity measurements. In this review, we describe the use of the digital frequency domain (FD) FLIM method for the analysis of FRET signals. We illustrate the methods necessary for the calibration of the FD FLIM system, and demonstrate the analysis of data obtained from cells expressing "FRET standard" fusion proteins. We then use the FLIM-FRET approach to monitor the changes in activities of two different biosensor proteins in specific regions of single living cells. Importantly, the factors required for the accurate determination and reproducibility of lifetime measurements are described in detail.

  16. New light on ion channel imaging by total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisao Yamamura

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Ion channels play pivotal roles in a wide variety of cellular functions; therefore, their physiological characteristics, pharmacological responses, and molecular structures have been extensively investigated. However, the mobility of an ion channel itself in the cell membrane has not been examined in as much detail. A total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF microscope allows fluorophores to be imaged in a restricted region within an evanescent field of less than 200 nm from the interface of the coverslip and plasma membrane in living cells. Thus the TIRF microscope is useful for selectively visualizing the plasmalemmal surface and subplasmalemmal zone. In this review, we focused on a single-molecule analysis of the dynamic movement of ion channels in the plasma membrane using TIRF microscopy. We also described two single-molecule imaging techniques under TIRF microscopy: fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET for the identification of molecules that interact with ion channels, and subunit counting for the determination of subunit stoichiometry in a functional channel. TIRF imaging can also be used to analyze spatiotemporal Ca2+ events in the subplasmalemma. Single-molecule analyses of ion channels and localized Ca2+ signals based on TIRF imaging provide beneficial pharmacological and physiological information concerning the functions of ion channels.

  17. New light on ion channel imaging by total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamura, Hisao; Suzuki, Yoshiaki; Imaizumi, Yuji

    2015-05-01

    Ion channels play pivotal roles in a wide variety of cellular functions; therefore, their physiological characteristics, pharmacological responses, and molecular structures have been extensively investigated. However, the mobility of an ion channel itself in the cell membrane has not been examined in as much detail. A total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscope allows fluorophores to be imaged in a restricted region within an evanescent field of less than 200 nm from the interface of the coverslip and plasma membrane in living cells. Thus the TIRF microscope is useful for selectively visualizing the plasmalemmal surface and subplasmalemmal zone. In this review, we focused on a single-molecule analysis of the dynamic movement of ion channels in the plasma membrane using TIRF microscopy. We also described two single-molecule imaging techniques under TIRF microscopy: fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) for the identification of molecules that interact with ion channels, and subunit counting for the determination of subunit stoichiometry in a functional channel. TIRF imaging can also be used to analyze spatiotemporal Ca(2+) events in the subplasmalemma. Single-molecule analyses of ion channels and localized Ca(2+) signals based on TIRF imaging provide beneficial pharmacological and physiological information concerning the functions of ion channels. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Video-frequency scanning transmission electron microscopy of moving gold nanoparticles in liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ring, Elisabeth A; de Jonge, Niels

    2012-11-01

    Immobilized gold nanoparticles were imaged in a liquid containing water and 50% glycerol with scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). The specimen was enclosed in a liquid compartment formed by two silicon microchips with electron transparent windows. A series of images was recorded at video frequency with a spatial resolution of 1.5nm. The nanoparticles detached from their support after imaging them for several seconds at a magnification of 250,000. Their movement was found to be much different than the movement of nanoparticles moving freely in liquid as described by Brownian Motion. The direction of motion was not random-the nanoparticles moved either in a preferred direction, or radially outwards from the center of the image. The displacement of the gold nanoparticles over time was three orders of magnitude smaller than expected on the basis of Brownian Motion. This finding implies that nanoscale objects of flexible structure or freely floating, including nanoparticles and biological objects, can be imaged with nanoscale resolution, as long as they are in close proximity to a solid support structure. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Endocytosis as a biological response in receptor pharmacology: evaluation by fluorescence microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víctor M Campa

    Full Text Available The activation of G-protein coupled receptors by agonist compounds results in diverse biological responses in cells, such as the endocytosis process consisting in the translocation of receptors from the plasma membrane to the cytoplasm within internalizing vesicles or endosomes. In order to functionally evaluate endocytosis events resulted from pharmacological responses, we have developed an image analysis method -the Q-Endosomes algorithm- that specifically discriminates the fluorescent signal originated at endosomes from that one observed at the plasma membrane in images obtained from living cells by fluorescence microscopy. Mu opioid (MOP receptor tagged at the carboxy-terminus with yellow fluorescent protein (YFP and permanently expressed in HEK293 cells was used as experimental model to validate this methodology. Time-course experiments performed with several agonists resulted in different sigmoid curves depending on the drug used to initiate MOP receptor endocytosis. Thus, endocytosis resulting from the simultaneous activation of co-expressed MOP and serotonin 5-HT2C receptors by morphine plus serotonin was significantly different, in kinetics as well as in maximal response parameters, from the one caused by DAMGO, sufentanyl or methadone. Therefore, this analytical tool permits the pharmacological characterization of receptor endocytosis in living cells with functional and temporal resolution.

  20. Development of new photon-counting detectors for single-molecule fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalet, X.; Colyer, R. A.; Scalia, G.; Ingargiola, A.; Lin, R.; Millaud, J. E.; Weiss, S.; Siegmund, Oswald H. W.; Tremsin, Anton S.; Vallerga, John V.; Cheng, A.; Levi, M.; Aharoni, D.; Arisaka, K.; Villa, F.; Guerrieri, F.; Panzeri, F.; Rech, I.; Gulinatti, A.; Zappa, F.; Ghioni, M.; Cova, S.

    2013-01-01

    Two optical configurations are commonly used in single-molecule fluorescence microscopy: point-like excitation and detection to study freely diffusing molecules, and wide field illumination and detection to study surface immobilized or slowly diffusing molecules. Both approaches have common features, but also differ in significant aspects. In particular, they use different detectors, which share some requirements but also have major technical differences. Currently, two types of detectors best fulfil the needs of each approach: single-photon-counting avalanche diodes (SPADs) for point-like detection, and electron-multiplying charge-coupled devices (EMCCDs) for wide field detection. However, there is room for improvements in both cases. The first configuration suffers from low throughput owing to the analysis of data from a single location. The second, on the other hand, is limited to relatively low frame rates and loses the benefit of single-photon-counting approaches. During the past few years, new developments in point-like and wide field detectors have started addressing some of these issues. Here, we describe our recent progresses towards increasing the throughput of single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy in solution using parallel arrays of SPADs. We also discuss our development of large area photon-counting cameras achieving subnanosecond resolution for fluorescence lifetime imaging applications at the single-molecule level. PMID:23267185

  1. Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy reveals rerouting of SNARE trafficking driving dendritic cell activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verboogen, Daniëlle Rianne José; González Mancha, Natalia; ter Beest, Martin; van den Bogaart, Geert

    2017-01-01

    SNARE proteins play a crucial role in intracellular trafficking by catalyzing membrane fusion, but assigning SNAREs to specific intracellular transport routes is challenging with current techniques. We developed a novel Förster resonance energy transfer-fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FRET-FLIM)-based technique allowing visualization of real-time local interactions of fluorescently tagged SNARE proteins in live cells. We used FRET-FLIM to delineate the trafficking steps underlying the release of the inflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) from human blood-derived dendritic cells. We found that activation of dendritic cells by bacterial lipopolysaccharide leads to increased FRET of fluorescently labeled syntaxin 4 with VAMP3 specifically at the plasma membrane, indicating increased SNARE complex formation, whereas FRET with other tested SNAREs was unaltered. Our results revealed that SNARE complexing is a key regulatory step for cytokine production by immune cells and prove the applicability of FRET-FLIM for visualizing SNARE complexes in live cells with subcellular spatial resolution. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.23525.001 PMID:28524818

  2. Endocytosis as a Biological Response in Receptor Pharmacology: Evaluation by Fluorescence Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela, María J.; de la Rocha, Arlet M. Acanda; Fernandez-Troyano, Juan C.; Barreiro, R. Belén; Lopez-Gimenez, Juan F.

    2015-01-01

    The activation of G-protein coupled receptors by agonist compounds results in diverse biological responses in cells, such as the endocytosis process consisting in the translocation of receptors from the plasma membrane to the cytoplasm within internalizing vesicles or endosomes. In order to functionally evaluate endocytosis events resulted from pharmacological responses, we have developed an image analysis method –the Q-Endosomes algorithm– that specifically discriminates the fluorescent signal originated at endosomes from that one observed at the plasma membrane in images obtained from living cells by fluorescence microscopy. Mu opioid (MOP) receptor tagged at the carboxy-terminus with yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) and permanently expressed in HEK293 cells was used as experimental model to validate this methodology. Time-course experiments performed with several agonists resulted in different sigmoid curves depending on the drug used to initiate MOP receptor endocytosis. Thus, endocytosis resulting from the simultaneous activation of co-expressed MOP and serotonin 5-HT2C receptors by morphine plus serotonin was significantly different, in kinetics as well as in maximal response parameters, from the one caused by DAMGO, sufentanyl or methadone. Therefore, this analytical tool permits the pharmacological characterization of receptor endocytosis in living cells with functional and temporal resolution. PMID:25849355

  3. Visualizing heterogeneity of photosynthetic properties of plant leaves with two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iermak, Ievgeniia; Vink, Jochem; Bader, Arjen N; Wientjes, Emilie; van Amerongen, Herbert

    2016-09-01

    Two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) was used to analyse the distribution and properties of Photosystem I (PSI) and Photosystem II (PSII) in palisade and spongy chloroplasts of leaves from the C3 plant Arabidopsis thaliana and the C4 plant Miscanthus x giganteus. This was achieved by separating the time-resolved fluorescence of PSI and PSII in the leaf. It is found that the PSII antenna size is larger on the abaxial side of A. thaliana leaves, presumably because chloroplasts in the spongy mesophyll are "shaded" by the palisade cells. The number of chlorophylls in PSI on the adaxial side of the A. thaliana leaf is slightly higher. The C4 plant M. x giganteus contains both mesophyll and bundle sheath cells, which have a different PSI/PSII ratio. It is shown that the time-resolved fluorescence of bundle sheath and mesophyll cells can be analysed separately. The relative number of chlorophylls, which belong to PSI (as compared to PSII) in the bundle sheath cells is at least 2.5 times higher than in mesophyll cells. FLIM is thus demonstrated to be a useful technique to study the PSI/PSII ratio and PSII antenna size in well-defined regions of plant leaves without having to isolate pigment-protein complexes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Development of new photon-counting detectors for single-molecule fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalet, X; Colyer, R A; Scalia, G; Ingargiola, A; Lin, R; Millaud, J E; Weiss, S; Siegmund, Oswald H W; Tremsin, Anton S; Vallerga, John V; Cheng, A; Levi, M; Aharoni, D; Arisaka, K; Villa, F; Guerrieri, F; Panzeri, F; Rech, I; Gulinatti, A; Zappa, F; Ghioni, M; Cova, S

    2013-02-05

    Two optical configurations are commonly used in single-molecule fluorescence microscopy: point-like excitation and detection to study freely diffusing molecules, and wide field illumination and detection to study surface immobilized or slowly diffusing molecules. Both approaches have common features, but also differ in significant aspects. In particular, they use different detectors, which share some requirements but also have major technical differences. Currently, two types of detectors best fulfil the needs of each approach: single-photon-counting avalanche diodes (SPADs) for point-like detection, and electron-multiplying charge-coupled devices (EMCCDs) for wide field detection. However, there is room for improvements in both cases. The first configuration suffers from low throughput owing to the analysis of data from a single location. The second, on the other hand, is limited to relatively low frame rates and loses the benefit of single-photon-counting approaches. During the past few years, new developments in point-like and wide field detectors have started addressing some of these issues. Here, we describe our recent progresses towards increasing the throughput of single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy in solution using parallel arrays of SPADs. We also discuss our development of large area photon-counting cameras achieving subnanosecond resolution for fluorescence lifetime imaging applications at the single-molecule level.

  5. Simultaneous Measurement of Mitochondrial Calcium and Mitochondrial Membrane Potential in Live Cells by Fluorescent Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Matthew; Lim, Sze C; Duchen, Michael R

    2017-01-24

    Apart from their essential role in generating ATP, mitochondria also act as local calcium (Ca 2+ ) buffers to tightly regulate intracellular Ca 2+ concentration. To do this, mitochondria utilize the electrochemical potential across their inner membrane (ΔΨm) to sequester Ca 2+ . The influx of Ca 2+ into the mitochondria stimulates three rate-limiting dehydrogenases of the citric acid cycle, increasing electron transfer through the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) complexes. This stimulation maintains ΔΨm, which is temporarily dissipated as the positive calcium ions cross the mitochondrial inner membrane into the mitochondrial matrix. We describe here a method for simultaneously measuring mitochondria Ca 2+ uptake and ΔΨm in live cells using confocal microscopy. By permeabilizing the cells, mitochondrial Ca 2+ can be measured using the fluorescent Ca 2+ indicator Fluo-4, AM, with measurement of ΔΨm using the fluorescent dye tetramethylrhodamine, methyl ester, perchlorate (TMRM). The benefit of this system is that there is very little spectral overlap between the fluorescent dyes, allowing accurate measurement of mitochondrial Ca 2+ and ΔΨm simultaneously. Using the sequential addition of Ca 2+ aliquots, mitochondrial Ca 2+ uptake can be monitored, and the concentration at which Ca 2+ induces mitochondrial membrane permeability transition and the loss of ΔΨm determined.

  6. Rapid diagnosis and intraoperative margin assessment of human lung cancer with fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengyan Wang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A method of rapidly differentiating lung tumor from healthy tissue is extraordinarily needed for both the diagnosis and the intraoperative margin assessment. We assessed the ability of fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM for differentiating human lung cancer and normal tissues with the autofluorescence, and also elucidated the mechanism in tissue studies and cell studies. A 15-patient testing group was used to compare FLIM results with traditional histopathology diagnosis. Based on the endogenous fluorescence lifetimes of the testing group, a criterion line was proposed to distinguish normal and cancerous tissues. Then by blinded examined 41 sections from the validation group of other 16 patients, the sensitivity and specificity of FLIM were determined. The cellular metabolism was studied with specific perturbations of oxidative phosphorylation and glycolysis in cell studies. The fluorescence lifetime of cancerous lung tissues is consistently lower than normal tissues, and this is due to the both decrease of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD lifetimes. A criterion line of lifetime at 1920 ps can be given for differentiating human lung cancer and normal tissues.The sensitivity and specificity of FLIM for lung cancer diagnosis were determined as 92.9% and 92.3%. These findings suggest that NADH and FAD can be used to rapidly diagnose lung cancer. FLIM is a rapid, accurate and highly sensitive technique in the judgment during lung cancer surgery and it can be potential in earlier cancer detection.

  7. Quantitative comparison of 3D third harmonic generation and fluorescence microscopy images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhiqing; Kuzmin, Nikolay V; Groot, Marie Louise; de Munck, Jan C

    2018-01-01

    Third harmonic generation (THG) microscopy is a label-free imaging technique that shows great potential for rapid pathology of brain tissue during brain tumor surgery. However, the interpretation of THG brain images should be quantitatively linked to images of more standard imaging techniques, which so far has been done qualitatively only. We establish here such a quantitative link between THG images of mouse brain tissue and all-nuclei-highlighted fluorescence images, acquired simultaneously from the same tissue area. For quantitative comparison of a substantial pair of images, we present here a segmentation workflow that is applicable for both THG and fluorescence images, with a precision of 91.3 % and 95.8 % achieved respectively. We find that the correspondence between the main features of the two imaging modalities amounts to 88.9 %, providing quantitative evidence of the interpretation of dark holes as brain cells. Moreover, 80 % bright objects in THG images overlap with nuclei highlighted in the fluorescence images, and they are 2 times smaller than the dark holes, showing that cells of different morphologies can be recognized in THG images. We expect that the described quantitative comparison is applicable to other types of brain tissue and with more specific staining experiments for cell type identification. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Rapid diagnosis and intraoperative margin assessment of human lung cancer with fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mengyan; Tang, Feng; Pan, Xiaobo; Yao, Longfang; Wang, Xinyi; Jing, Yueyue; Ma, Jiong; Wang, Guifang; Mi, Lan

    2017-12-01

    A method of rapidly differentiating lung tumor from healthy tissue is extraordinarily needed for both the diagnosis and the intraoperative margin assessment. We assessed the ability of fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) for differentiating human lung cancer and normal tissues with the autofluorescence, and also elucidated the mechanism in tissue studies and cell studies. A 15-patient testing group was used to compare FLIM results with traditional histopathology diagnosis. Based on the endogenous fluorescence lifetimes of the testing group, a criterion line was proposed to distinguish normal and cancerous tissues. Then by blinded examined 41 sections from the validation group of other 16 patients, the sensitivity and specificity of FLIM were determined. The cellular metabolism was studied with specific perturbations of oxidative phosphorylation and glycolysis in cell studies. The fluorescence lifetime of cancerous lung tissues is consistently lower than normal tissues, and this is due to the both decrease of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) lifetimes. A criterion line of lifetime at 1920 ps can be given for differentiating human lung cancer and normal tissues.The sensitivity and specificity of FLIM for lung cancer diagnosis were determined as 92.9% and 92.3%. These findings suggest that NADH and FAD can be used to rapidly diagnose lung cancer. FLIM is a rapid, accurate and highly sensitive technique in the judgment during lung cancer surgery and it can be potential in earlier cancer detection.

  9. Toward Fourier interferometry fluorescence excitation/emission imaging of malignant cells combined with photoacoustic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohen, Elli; Hirschberg, Joseph G.; Berry, John P.; Ozkutuk, Nuri; Ornek, Ceren; Monti, Marco; Leblanc, Roger M.; Schachtschabel, Dietrich O.; Haroon, Sumaira

    2003-10-01

    Dual excitation fluorescence imaging has been used as a first step towards multi-wavelength excitation/emission fluorescence spectral imaging. Target cells are transformed keratinocytes, and other osteosarcoma, human breast and color cancer cells. Mitochondrial membrane potential probes, e.g. TMRM (tetramethylrhodamine methyl ester), Mitotracker Green (Molecular Probes, Inc., Eugene OR,USA; a recently synthesized mitochondrial oxygen probe, [PRE,P1"- pyrene butyl)-2-rhodamine ester] allow dual excitation in the UV plus in teh blue-green spectral regions. Also, using the natural endogenous probe NAD(P)H, preliminary results indicate mitochondrial responses to metabolic challenges (e.g. glucose addition), plus changes in mitochonrial distribution and morphology. In terms of application to biomedicine (for diagnostiscs, prognostsics and drug trials) three parameters have been selected in addition to the natural probe NAD(P)H, i.e. vital fluorescence probing of mitochondria, lysosomes and Golgi apparatus. It is hoped that such a multiparameter approach will allow malignant cell characterization and grading. A new area being introduced is the use of similar methodology for biotechnical applications such as the study of the hydrogen-producing alga Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii, and possible agricultural applications, such as Saccharomyces yeast for oenology. Complementation by Photoacoustic Microscopy is also contemplated, to study the internal conversion component which follows the excitation by photons.

  10. Measuring incidence angle for through-the-objective total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burghardt, Thomas P.

    2012-12-01

    Total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy has the exciting laser beam incident beyond critical angle from the glass side of a glass/aqueous interface formed by the coverslip and aqueous sample. The aqueous side evanescent field decays exponentially with distance from the interface with penetration depth depending on incidence angle. Through-the-objective TIRF has the exciting laser focused at the back focal plane (BFP) creating a refracted parallel beam approaching the interface in the small gap between objective and coverslip, making incidence angle challenging to measure. Objective axial scanning does not affect incidence angle but translates beam and interface intersection detected by the fluorescence center of mass from fluorescent spheres attached to the aqueous side of the interface. Center of mass translation divided by the axial translation is the tangent of the incidence angle that is sampled repeatedly over objective trajectory to obtain a best estimate. Incidence angle is measured for progressively larger radial positions of the focused beam on the BFP. A through-the-objective TIRF microscope, utilizing a micrometer and relay lenses to position the focused beam at the BFP, is calibrated for incidence angle. Calibration depends on microscope characteristics and TIRF objective and is applicable to any interface or sample.

  11. Cellular Mechanisms of Alpha Herpesvirus Egress: Live Cell Fluorescence Microscopy of Pseudorabies Virus Exocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogue, Ian B.; Bosse, Jens B.; Hu, Jiun-Ruey; Thiberge, Stephan Y.; Enquist, Lynn W.

    2014-01-01

    Egress of newly assembled herpesvirus particles from infected cells is a highly dynamic process involving the host secretory pathway working in concert with viral components. To elucidate the location, dynamics, and molecular mechanisms of alpha herpesvirus egress, we developed a live-cell fluorescence microscopy method to visualize the final transport and exocytosis of pseudorabies virus (PRV) particles in non-polarized epithelial cells. This method is based on total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy to selectively image fluorescent virus particles near the plasma membrane, and takes advantage of a virus-encoded pH-sensitive probe to visualize the precise moment and location of particle exocytosis. We performed single-particle tracking and mean squared displacement analysis to characterize particle motion, and imaged a panel of cellular proteins to identify those spatially and dynamically associated with viral exocytosis. Based on our data, individual virus particles travel to the plasma membrane inside small, acidified secretory vesicles. Rab GTPases, Rab6a, Rab8a, and Rab11a, key regulators of the plasma membrane-directed secretory pathway, are present on the virus secretory vesicle. These vesicles undergo fast, directional transport directly to the site of exocytosis, which is most frequently near patches of LL5β, part of a complex that anchors microtubules to the plasma membrane. Vesicles are tightly docked at the site of exocytosis for several seconds, and membrane fusion occurs, displacing the virion a small distance across the plasma membrane. After exocytosis, particles remain tightly confined on the outer cell surface. Based on recent reports in the cell biological and alpha herpesvirus literature, combined with our spatial and dynamic data on viral egress, we propose an integrated model that links together the intracellular transport pathways and exocytosis mechanisms that mediate alpha herpesvirus egress. PMID:25474634

  12. Radiation induced chromatin conformation changes analysed by fluorescent localization microscopy, statistical physics, and graph theory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Zhang

    Full Text Available It has been well established that the architecture of chromatin in cell nuclei is not random but functionally correlated. Chromatin damage caused by ionizing radiation raises complex repair machineries. This is accompanied by local chromatin rearrangements and structural changes which may for instance improve the accessibility of damaged sites for repair protein complexes. Using stably transfected HeLa cells expressing either green fluorescent protein (GFP labelled histone H2B or yellow fluorescent protein (YFP labelled histone H2A, we investigated the positioning of individual histone proteins in cell nuclei by means of high resolution localization microscopy (Spectral Position Determination Microscopy = SPDM. The cells were exposed to ionizing radiation of different doses and aliquots were fixed after different repair times for SPDM imaging. In addition to the repair dependent histone protein pattern, the positioning of antibodies specific for heterochromatin and euchromatin was separately recorded by SPDM. The present paper aims to provide a quantitative description of structural changes of chromatin after irradiation and during repair. It introduces a novel approach to analyse SPDM images by means of statistical physics and graph theory. The method is based on the calculation of the radial distribution functions as well as edge length distributions for graphs defined by a triangulation of the marker positions. The obtained results show that through the cell nucleus the different chromatin re-arrangements as detected by the fluorescent nucleosomal pattern average themselves. In contrast heterochromatic regions alone indicate a relaxation after radiation exposure and re-condensation during repair whereas euchromatin seemed to be unaffected or behave contrarily. SPDM in combination with the analysis techniques applied allows the systematic elucidation of chromatin re-arrangements after irradiation and during repair, if selected sub-regions of

  13. In-focal-plane characterization of excitation distribution for quantitative fluorescence microscopy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Klaus; Brülisauer, Martina; ćaǧin, Emine; Bertsch, Dietmar; Lüthi, Stefan; Heeb, Peter; Stärker, Ulrich; Bernard, André

    2017-06-01

    The applications of fluorescence microscopy span medical diagnostics, bioengineering and biomaterial analytics. Full exploitation of fluorescent microscopy is hampered by imperfections in illumination, detection and filtering. Mainly, errors stem from deviations induced by real-world components inducing spatial or angular variations of propagation properties along the optical path, and they can be addressed through consistent and accurate calibration. For many applications, uniform signal to noise ratio (SNR) over the imaging area is required. Homogeneous SNR can be achieved by quantifying and compensating for the signal bias. We present a method to quantitatively characterize novel reference materials as a calibration reference for biomaterials analytics. The reference materials under investigation comprise thin layers of fluorophores embedded in polymer matrices. These layers are highly homogeneous in their fluorescence response, where cumulative variations do not exceed 1% over the field of view (1.5 x 1.1 mm). An automated and reproducible measurement methodology, enabling sufficient correction for measurement artefacts, is reported. The measurement setup is equipped with an autofocus system, ensuring that the measured film quality is not artificially increased by out-of-focus reduction of the system modulation transfer function. The quantitative characterization method is suitable for analysis of modified bio-materials, especially through patterned protein decoration. The imaging method presented here can be used to statistically analyze protein patterns, thereby increasing both precision and throughput. Further, the method can be developed to include a reference emitter and detector pair on the image surface of the reference object, in order to provide traceable measurements.

  14. Cellular mechanisms of alpha herpesvirus egress: live cell fluorescence microscopy of pseudorabies virus exocytosis.

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    Ian B Hogue

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Egress of newly assembled herpesvirus particles from infected cells is a highly dynamic process involving the host secretory pathway working in concert with viral components. To elucidate the location, dynamics, and molecular mechanisms of alpha herpesvirus egress, we developed a live-cell fluorescence microscopy method to visualize the final transport and exocytosis of pseudorabies virus (PRV particles in non-polarized epithelial cells. This method is based on total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF microscopy to selectively image fluorescent virus particles near the plasma membrane, and takes advantage of a virus-encoded pH-sensitive probe to visualize the precise moment and location of particle exocytosis. We performed single-particle tracking and mean squared displacement analysis to characterize particle motion, and imaged a panel of cellular proteins to identify those spatially and dynamically associated with viral exocytosis. Based on our data, individual virus particles travel to the plasma membrane inside small, acidified secretory vesicles. Rab GTPases, Rab6a, Rab8a, and Rab11a, key regulators of the plasma membrane-directed secretory pathway, are present on the virus secretory vesicle. These vesicles undergo fast, directional transport directly to the site of exocytosis, which is most frequently near patches of LL5β, part of a complex that anchors microtubules to the plasma membrane. Vesicles are tightly docked at the site of exocytosis for several seconds, and membrane fusion occurs, displacing the virion a small distance across the plasma membrane. After exocytosis, particles remain tightly confined on the outer cell surface. Based on recent reports in the cell biological and alpha herpesvirus literature, combined with our spatial and dynamic data on viral egress, we propose an integrated model that links together the intracellular transport pathways and exocytosis mechanisms that mediate alpha herpesvirus egress.

  15. Assessment of LED fluorescence microscopy for the diagnosis of Plasmodium falciparum infections in Gabon

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    Biallas Barbara

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rapid and accurate diagnosis of malaria is central to clinical management and the prevention of drug-overuse, which may lead to resistance development, toxicity and economic losses. So far, light microscopy (LM of Giemsa-stained thick blood smears is the gold standard. Under optimal conditions the procedure is fast and reliable; nevertheless a gain in speed would be a great advantage. Rapid diagnosis tests are an alternative, although they cost more and give qualitative instead of quantitative results. Light-emitting diode (LED fluorescence microscopy (ledFM 400 ×, 1000 × may offer a reliable and cheap alternative, which can be used at the point of care. Methods LedFM and conventional fluorescence microscopy (uvFM were compared to LM in 210 samples from patients with history of fever in the last 24 hours admitted to the Albert Schweitzer Hospital in Lambaréné, Gabon. Results Sensitivities were 99.1% for ledFM and 97.0% for uvFM, specificities 90.7% for ledFM 400 × and 92.6% for ledFM 1000 × and uvFM. High agreement was found in Bland-Altman-plot and Kappa coefficient (ledFM 1000 ×: 0.914, ledFM 400 × and uvFM: 0.895. The time to diagnosis for both FM methods was shorter compared to LM (LM: 43 min, uvFM: 16 min, ledFM 1000 ×: 14 min, ledFM 400 ×: 10 min. Conclusion ledFM is a reliable, accurate, fast and inexpensive tool for daily routine malaria diagnosis and may be used as a point of care diagnostic tool.

  16. Assessment of LED fluorescence microscopy for the diagnosis of Plasmodium falciparum infections in Gabon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, Dominic; Kremsner, Peter G; Lell, Bertrand; Biallas, Barbara; Boettcher, Michael; Mordmüller, Benjamin; Adegnika, Ayola A

    2011-07-18

    Rapid and accurate diagnosis of malaria is central to clinical management and the prevention of drug-overuse, which may lead to resistance development, toxicity and economic losses. So far, light microscopy (LM) of Giemsa-stained thick blood smears is the gold standard. Under optimal conditions the procedure is fast and reliable; nevertheless a gain in speed would be a great advantage. Rapid diagnosis tests are an alternative, although they cost more and give qualitative instead of quantitative results. Light-emitting diode (LED) fluorescence microscopy (ledFM 400 ×, 1000 ×) may offer a reliable and cheap alternative, which can be used at the point of care. LedFM and conventional fluorescence microscopy (uvFM) were compared to LM in 210 samples from patients with history of fever in the last 24 hours admitted to the Albert Schweitzer Hospital in Lambaréné, Gabon. Sensitivities were 99.1% for ledFM and 97.0% for uvFM, specificities 90.7% for ledFM 400 × and 92.6% for ledFM 1000 × and uvFM. High agreement was found in Bland-Altman-plot and Kappa coefficient (ledFM 1000 ×: 0.914, ledFM 400 × and uvFM: 0.895). The time to diagnosis for both FM methods was shorter compared to LM (LM: 43 min, uvFM: 16 min, ledFM 1000 ×: 14 min, ledFM 400 ×: 10 min). ledFM is a reliable, accurate, fast and inexpensive tool for daily routine malaria diagnosis and may be used as a point of care diagnostic tool. © 2011 Lenz et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  17. Feasibility and reliability of pancreatic cancer staging using fiberoptic confocal fluorescence microscopy in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignat, Mihaela; Aprahamian, Marc; Lindner, Veronique; Altmeyer, Anaïs; Perretta, Silvana; Dallemagne, Bernard; Mutter, Didier; Marescaux, Jacques

    2009-11-01

    Surgical management of pancreatic cancer depends on tumor resectability and staging. This study evaluated a new in vivo technique, fiberoptic confocal fluorescence microscopy (FCFM), for detection and staging of pancreatic tumors in rats. FCFM was used with a protease-activated fluorescent marker (ProSense; VisEn Medical Inc, Woburn, MA) for in vivo imaging of solid organs (1.8-microm resolution) in a rat model of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. A preliminary study described the FCFM rendering of normal and pathologic tissues. Subsequently, 2 double-blind studies compared FCFM to standard histology in (1) detection of tumors in rat models of cancer and controls and (2) detection of nodal involvement (splenic, celiac, mesenteric, and colic) 4, 5, and 6 weeks after tumor induction vs controls. Tumor cells displayed a fluorescent ductal pattern compared with non-fluorescent normal pancreas or normal follicular pattern of lymph nodes (LNs). FCFM detected all the pancreatic tumors (1.7-mm mean diameter) and identified 23 LNs that contained metastases of 99 LNs examined. Standard histologic analyses resulted in 1 false-negative result in tumor detection and 2 false negatives in LN detection, whereas FCFM produced no false-negative results. Additional serial sectioning confirmed all tumors and 16 metastatic LNs; FCFM had a negative predictive value of 100% and a positive predictive value of 69.6%. Real-time "virtual biopsy" using FCFM detects tumors and LN metastases with 100% sensitivity and 92.2% specificity in rats, making it a reliable technique for detection and staging of pancreatic cancer.

  18. Single-cell analysis of radiotracers' uptake by fluorescence microscopy: direct and droplet approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallina, M. E.; Kim, T. J.; Vasquez, J.; Tuerkcan, S.; Abbyad, P.; Pratx, G.

    2017-02-01

    Radionuclides are used for sensitive and specific detection of small molecules in vivo and in vitro. Recently, radioluminescence microscopy extended their use to single-cell studies. Here we propose a new single-cell radioisotopic assay that improves throughput while adding sorting capabilities. The new method uses fluorescence-based sensor for revealing single-cell interactions with radioactive molecular markers. This study focuses on comparing two different experimental approaches. Several probes were tested and Dihydrorhodamine 123 was selected as the best compromise between sensitivity, brightness and stability. The sensor was incorporated either directly within the cell cytoplasm (direct approach), or it was coencapsulated with radiolabeled single-cells in oil-dispersed water droplets (droplet approach). Both approaches successfully activated the fluorescence signal following cellular uptake of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and external Xrays exposure. The direct approach offered single-cell resolution and longtime stability ( > 20 hours), moreover it could discriminate FDG uptake at labelling concentration as low as 300 μCi/ml. In cells incubated with Dihydrorhodamine 123 after exposure to high radiation doses (8-16 Gy), the fluorescence signal was found to increase with the depletion of ROS quenchers. On the other side, the droplet approach required higher labelling concentrations (1.00 mCi/ml), and, at the current state of art, three cells per droplet are necessary to produce a fluorescent signal. This approach, however, is independent on cellular oxidative stress and, with further improvements, will be more suitable for studying heterogeneous populations. We anticipate this technology to pave the way for the analysis of single-cell interactions with radiomarkers by radiofluorogenic-activated single-cell sorting.

  19. Two-photon-like microscopy with orders-of-magnitude lower illumination intensity via two-step fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingaramo, Maria; York, Andrew G; Andrade, Eric J; Rainey, Kristin; Patterson, George H

    2015-09-03

    We describe two-step fluorescence microscopy, a new approach to non-linear imaging based on positive reversible photoswitchable fluorescent probes. The protein Padron approximates ideal two-step fluorescent behaviour: it equilibrates to an inactive state, converts to an active state under blue light, and blue light also excites this active state to fluoresce. Both activation and excitation are linear processes, but the total fluorescent signal is quadratic, proportional to the square of the illumination dose. Here, we use Padron's quadratic non-linearity to demonstrate the principle of two-step microscopy, similar in principle to two-photon microscopy but with orders-of-magnitude better cross-section. As with two-photon, quadratic non-linearity from two-step fluorescence improves resolution and reduces unwanted out-of-focus excitation, and is compatible with structured illumination microscopy. We also show two-step and two-photon imaging can be combined to give quartic non-linearity, further improving imaging in challenging samples. With further improvements, two-step fluorophores could replace conventional fluorophores for many imaging applications.

  20. Context based mixture model for cell phase identification in automated fluorescence microscopy

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    Zhou Xiaobo

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Automated identification of cell cycle phases of individual live cells in a large population captured via automated fluorescence microscopy technique is important for cancer drug discovery and cell cycle studies. Time-lapse fluorescence microscopy images provide an important method to study the cell cycle process under different conditions of perturbation. Existing methods are limited in dealing with such time-lapse data sets while manual analysis is not feasible. This paper presents statistical data analysis and statistical pattern recognition to perform this task. Results The data is generated from Hela H2B GFP cells imaged during a 2-day period with images acquired 15 minutes apart using an automated time-lapse fluorescence microscopy. The patterns are described with four kinds of features, including twelve general features, Haralick texture features, Zernike moment features, and wavelet features. To generate a new set of features with more discriminate power, the commonly used feature reduction techniques are used, which include Principle Component Analysis (PCA, Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA, Maximum Margin Criterion (MMC, Stepwise Discriminate Analysis based Feature Selection (SDAFS, and Genetic Algorithm based Feature Selection (GAFS. Then, we propose a Context Based Mixture Model (CBMM for dealing with the time-series cell sequence information and compare it to other traditional classifiers: Support Vector Machine (SVM, Neural Network (NN, and K-Nearest Neighbor (KNN. Being a standard practice in machine learning, we systematically compare the performance of a number of common feature reduction techniques and classifiers to select an optimal combination of a feature reduction technique and a classifier. A cellular database containing 100 manually labelled subsequence is built for evaluating the performance of the classifiers. The generalization error is estimated using the cross validation technique. The

  1. Improving accuracy and precision in biological applications of fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ching-Wei

    The quantitative understanding of cellular and molecular responses in living cells is important for many reasons, including identifying potential molecular targets for treatments of diseases like cancer. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) can quantitatively measure these responses in living cells by producing spatially resolved images of fluorophore lifetime, and has advantages over intensity-based measurements. However, in live-cell microscopy applications using high-intensity light sources such as lasers, maintaining biological viability remains critical. Although high-speed, time-gated FLIM significantly reduces light delivered to live cells, making measurements at low light levels remains a challenge affecting quantitative FLIM results. We can significantly improve both accuracy and precision in gated FLIM applications. We use fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) with fluorescent proteins to detect molecular interactions in living cells: the use of FLIM, better fluorophores, and temperature/CO2 controls can improve live-cell FRET results with higher consistency, better statistics, and less non-specific FRET (for negative control comparisons, p-value = 0.93 (physiological) vs. 9.43E-05 (non-physiological)). Several lifetime determination methods are investigated to optimize gating schemes. We demonstrate a reduction in relative standard deviation (RSD) from 52.57% to 18.93% with optimized gating in an example under typical experimental conditions. We develop two novel total variation (TV) image denoising algorithms, FWTV ( f-weighted TV) and UWTV (u-weighted TV), that can achieve significant improvements for real imaging systems. With live-cell images, they improve the precision of local lifetime determination without significantly altering the global mean lifetime values (high-light cases (RSD = 12.76% at total photon counts (TC) = 100 vs. RSD = 23.03% at TC = 400). Therefore, high-intensity excitation of living cells can be avoided

  2. Gliding motility of Babesia bovis merozoites visualized by time-lapse video microscopy.

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    Masahito Asada

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Babesia bovis is an apicomplexan intraerythrocytic protozoan parasite that induces babesiosis in cattle after transmission by ticks. During specific stages of the apicomplexan parasite lifecycle, such as the sporozoites of Plasmodium falciparum and tachyzoites of Toxoplasma gondii, host cells are targeted for invasion using a unique, active process termed "gliding motility". However, it is not thoroughly understood how the merozoites of B. bovis target and invade host red blood cells (RBCs, and gliding motility has so far not been observed in the parasite. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Gliding motility of B. bovis merozoites was revealed by time-lapse video microscopy. The recorded images revealed that the process included egress of the merozoites from the infected RBC, gliding motility, and subsequent invasion into new RBCs. The gliding motility of B. bovis merozoites was similar to the helical gliding of Toxoplasma tachyzoites. The trails left by the merozoites were detected by indirect immunofluorescence assay using antiserum against B. bovis merozoite surface antigen 1. Inhibition of gliding motility by actin filament polymerization or depolymerization indicated that the gliding motility was driven by actomyosin dependent process. In addition, we revealed the timing of breakdown of the parasitophorous vacuole. Time-lapse image analysis of membrane-stained bovine RBCs showed formation and breakdown of the parasitophorous vacuole within ten minutes of invasion. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first report of the gliding motility of B. bovis. Since merozoites of Plasmodium parasites do not glide on a substrate, the gliding motility of B. bovis merozoites is a notable finding.

  3. Fluorescence lifetime imaging and reflectance confocal microscopy for multiscale imaging of oral precancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbour, Joey M.; Cheng, Shuna; Malik, Bilal H.; Cuenca, Rodrigo; Jo, Javier A.; Wright, John; Cheng, Yi-Shing Lisa; Maitland, Kristen C.

    2013-04-01

    Optical imaging techniques using a variety of contrast mechanisms are under evaluation for early detection of epithelial precancer; however, tradeoffs in field of view (FOV) and resolution may limit their application. Therefore, we present a multiscale multimodal optical imaging system combining macroscopic biochemical imaging of fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) with subcellular morphologic imaging of reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM). The FLIM module images a 16×16 mm2 tissue area with 62.5 μm lateral and 320 ps temporal resolution to guide cellular imaging of suspicious regions. Subsequently, coregistered RCM images are acquired at 7 Hz with 400 μm diameter FOV, mucosa, and a hamster cheek pouch model of oral carcinogenesis. While FLIM is sensitive to biochemical and macroscopic architectural changes in tissue, RCM provides images of cell nuclear morphology, all key indicators of precancer progression.

  4. Germinal Center Dynamics Revealed by Multiphoton Microscopy Using a Photoactivatable Fluorescent Reporter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victora, Gabriel D.; Schwickert, Tanja A.; Fooksman, David R.; Kamphorst, Alice O.; Meyer-Hermann, Michael; Dustin, Michael L.; Nussenzweig, Michel C.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY The germinal center (GC) reaction produces high-affinity antibodies by random mutation and selective clonal expansion of B cells with high-affinity receptors. However, the mechanism by which B cells are selected remains unclear, as does the role of the two anatomically-defined areas of the GC, light zone (LZ) and dark zone (DZ). We combined a new transgenic photoactivatable green fluorescent protein (PA-GFP) tracer with multiphoton laser-scanning microscopy and flow cytometry to examine anatomically defined LZ and DZ B cells and GC selection. We find that B cell division is restricted to the DZ, and that there is a net vector of B cell movement from the DZ to the LZ. The decision to return from the LZ to the DZ and undergo clonal expansion is controlled by T cells, which discern between LZ B cells based on the amount of antigen captured, providing a mechanism for GC selection. PMID:21074050

  5. Motion Analysis of Live Objects by Super-Resolution Fluorescence Microscopy

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    Yao, Chunyan; Zhang, Jianwei; Wu, Guang; Zhang, Houxiang

    2012-01-01

    Motion analysis plays an important role in studing activities or behaviors of live objects in medicine, biotechnology, chemistry, physics, spectroscopy, nanotechnology, enzymology, and biological engineering. This paper briefly reviews the developments in this area mostly in the recent three years, especially for cellular analysis in fluorescence microscopy. The topic has received much attention with the increasing demands in biomedical applications. The tasks of motion analysis include detection and tracking of objects, as well as analysis of motion behavior, living activity, events, motion statistics, and so forth. In the last decades, hundreds of papers have been published in this research topic. They cover a wide area, such as investigation of cell, cancer, virus, sperm, microbe, karyogram, and so forth. These contributions are summarized in this review. Developed methods and practical examples are also introduced. The review is useful to people in the related field for easy referral of the state of the art. PMID:22162725

  6. Versatile visualization of individual single-walled carbon nanotubes with near-infrared fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsyboulski, Dmitri A; Bachilo, Sergei M; Weisman, R Bruce

    2005-05-01

    Fluorescence microscopy in the near-infrared between 950 and 1600 nm has been developed as a novel method to image and study single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in a variety of environments. Intrinsic photoluminescence of disaggregated pristine SWNTs was excited by a diode laser and detected with a two-dimensional InGaAs photodiode array. Individual nanotubes were visualized with a spatial resolution of ca. 1 microm and characterized with polarization measurements and emission spectroscopy. Spatially resolved emission spectra allowed (n,m) identification of single nanotubes and revealed small environmentally induced spectral shifts between segments of long tubes. Nanotube motions in aqueous surfactant were visualized with a time resolution of 50 ms and used to estimate the diffusion coefficient.

  7. Cellular Oxygen and Nutrient Sensing in Microgravity Using Time-Resolved Fluorescence Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szmacinski, Henryk

    2003-01-01

    Oxygen and nutrient sensing is fundamental to the understanding of cell growth and metabolism. This requires identification of optical probes and suitable detection technology without complex calibration procedures. Under this project Microcosm developed an experimental technique that allows for simultaneous imaging of intra- and inter-cellular events. The technique consists of frequency-domain Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM), a set of identified oxygen and pH probes, and methods for fabrication of microsensors. Specifications for electronic and optical components of FLIM instrumentation are provided. Hardware and software were developed for data acquisition and analysis. Principles, procedures, and representative images are demonstrated. Suitable lifetime sensitive oxygen, pH, and glucose probes for intra- and extra-cellular measurements of analyte concentrations have been identified and tested. Lifetime sensing and imaging have been performed using PBS buffer, culture media, and yeast cells as a model systems. Spectral specifications, calibration curves, and probes availability are also provided in the report.

  8. Comparison of nanoparticle diffusion using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and differential dynamic microscopy within concentrated polymer solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokeen, Namita; Issa, Christopher; Mukhopadhyay, Ashis

    2017-12-01

    We studied the diffusion of nanoparticles (NPs) within aqueous entangled solutions of polyethylene oxide (PEO) by using two different optical techniques. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, a method widely used to investigate nanoparticle dynamics in polymer solution, was used to measure the long-time diffusion coefficient (D) of 25 nm radius particles within high molecular weight, Mw = 600 kg/mol PEO in water solutions. Differential dynamic microscopy (DDM) was used to determine the wave-vector dependent dynamics of NPs within the same polymer solutions. Our results showed good agreement between the two methods, including demonstration of normal diffusion and almost identical diffusion coefficients obtained by both techniques. The research extends the scope of DDM to study the dynamics and rheological properties of soft matter at a nanoscale. The measured diffusion coefficients followed a scaling theory, which can be explained by the coupling between polymer dynamics and NP motion.

  9. Infection Counter: Automated Quantification of in Vitro Virus Replication by Fluorescence Microscopy

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    Siân Culley

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The ability to accurately and reliably quantify viral infection is essential to basic and translational virology research. Here, we describe a simple and robust automated method for using fluorescence microscopy to estimate the proportion of virally infected cells in a monolayer. We provide details of the automated analysis workflow along with a freely available open-source ImageJ plugin, Infection Counter, for performing image quantification. Using hepatitis C virus (HCV as an example, we have experimentally verified our method, demonstrating that it is equivalent, if not better, than the established focus-forming assay. Finally, we used Infection Counter to assess the anti-HCV activity of SMBz-CsA, a non-immunosuppressive cyclosporine analogue.

  10. A guide to light-sheet fluorescence microscopy for multiscale imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Rory M; Huisken, Jan

    2017-03-31

    The impact of light-sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) is visible in fields as diverse as developmental and cell biology, anatomical science, biophysics and neuroscience. Although adoption among biologists has been steady, LSFM has not displaced more traditional imaging methods despite its often-superior performance. One reason for this is that the field has largely conformed to a do-it-yourself ethic, although the challenges of big image data cannot be overstated. With the most powerful implementations of LSFM available to only a few groups worldwide, the scope of this technique is unnecessarily limited. Here we elucidate the key developments and define a simple set of underlying principles governing LSFM. In doing so, we aim to clarify the decisions to be made for those who wish to develop and use bespoke light-sheet systems and to assist in identifying the best approaches to apply this powerful technique to myriad biological questions.

  11. Motion Analysis of Live Objects by Super-Resolution Fluorescence Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunyan Yao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Motion analysis plays an important role in studing activities or behaviors of live objects in medicine, biotechnology, chemistry, physics, spectroscopy, nanotechnology, enzymology, and biological engineering. This paper briefly reviews the developments in this area mostly in the recent three years, especially for cellular analysis in fluorescence microscopy. The topic has received much attention with the increasing demands in biomedical applications. The tasks of motion analysis include detection and tracking of objects, as well as analysis of motion behavior, living activity, events, motion statistics, and so forth. In the last decades, hundreds of papers have been published in this research topic. They cover a wide area, such as investigation of cell, cancer, virus, sperm, microbe, karyogram, and so forth. These contributions are summarized in this review. Developed methods and practical examples are also introduced. The review is useful to people in the related field for easy referral of the state of the art.

  12. Optimal Live Cell Tracking for Cell Cycle Study Using Time-Lapse Fluorescent Microscopy Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fuhai; Zhou, Xiaobo; Wong, Stephen T. C.

    Cell cycle study using time-lapse fluorescent microscopy images is important for understanding the mechanisms of cell division and screening of anti-cancer drugs. Cell tracking is necessary for quantifying cell behaviors. However, the complex behaviors and similarity of individual cells in a dense population make the cell population tracking challenging. To deal with these challenges, we propose a novel tracking algorithm, in which the local neighboring information is introduced to distinguish the nearby cells with similar morphology, and the Interacting Multiple Model (IMM) filter is employed to compensate for cell migrations. Based on a similarity metric, integrating the local neighboring information, migration prediction, shape and intensity, the integer programming is used to achieve the most stable association between cells in two consecutive frames. We evaluated the proposed method on the high content screening assays of HeLa cancer cell populations, and achieved 92% average tracking accuracy.

  13. Fluorescence Readout of a Patch Clamped Membrane by Laser Scanning Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhardt, Matthias; Walz, Michael; Beta, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter, we describe how to shield a patch of a cell membrane against extracellularly applied chemoattractant stimuli. Classical patch clamp methodology is applied to allow for controlled shielding of a membrane patch by measuring the seal resistivity. In Dictyostelium cells, a seal resistivity of 50 MΩ proved to be tight enough to exclude molecules from diffusing into the shielded membrane region. This allowed for separating a shielded and a non-shielded region of a cell membrane to study the spatiotemporal dynamics of intracellular chemotactic signaling events at the interface between shielded and non-shielded areas. The spatiotemporal dynamics of signaling events in the membrane was read out by means of appropriate fluorescent markers using laser scanning confocal microscopy.

  14. Compact three-dimensional super-resolution system based on fluorescence emission difference microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dazhao; Chen, Youhua; Fang, Yue; Hussain, Anwar; Kuang, Cuifang; Zhou, Xiaoxu; Xu, Yingke; Liu, Xu

    2017-12-01

    A compact microscope system for three-dimensional (3-D) super-resolution imaging is presented. The super-resolution capability of the system is based on a size-reduced effective 3-D point spread function generated through the fluorescence emission difference (FED) method. The appropriate polarization direction distribution and manipulation allows the panel active area of the spatial light modulator to be fully utilized. This allows simultaneous modulation of the incident light by two kinds of phase masks to be performed with a single spatial light modulator in order to generate a 3-D negative spot. The system is more compact than standard 3-D FED systems while maintaining all the advantages of 3-D FED microscopy. The experimental results demonstrated the improvement in 3-D resolution by nearly 1.7 times and 1.6 times compared to the classic confocal resolution in the lateral and axial directions, respectively.

  15. Imaging with total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy for the cell biologist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattheyses, Alexa L.; Simon, Sanford M.; Rappoport, Joshua Z.

    2010-01-01

    Total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy can be used in a wide range of cell biological applications, and is particularly well suited to analysis of the localization and dynamics of molecules and events near the plasma membrane. The TIRF excitation field decreases exponentially with distance from the cover slip on which cells are grown. This means that fluorophores close to the cover slip (e.g. within ~100 nm) are selectively illuminated, highlighting events that occur within this region. The advantages of using TIRF include the ability to obtain high-contrast images of fluorophores near the plasma membrane, very low background from the bulk of the cell, reduced cellular photodamage and rapid exposure times. In this Commentary, we discuss the applications of TIRF to the study of cell biology, the physical basis of TIRF, experimental setup and troubleshooting. PMID:20971701

  16. Fluorescent Nano-Probes to Image Plant Cell Walls by Super-Resolution STED Microscopy

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    Gabriel Paës

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Lignocellulosic biomass is a complex network of polymers making up the cell walls of plants. It represents a feedstock of sustainable resources to be converted into fuels, chemicals, and materials. Because of its complex architecture, lignocellulose is a recalcitrant material that requires some pretreatments and several types of catalysts to be transformed efficiently. Gaining more knowledge in the architecture of plant cell walls is therefore important to understand and optimize transformation processes. For the first time, super-resolution imaging of poplar wood samples has been performed using the Stimulated Emission Depletion (STED technique. In comparison to standard confocal images, STED reveals new details in cell wall structure, allowing the identification of secondary walls and middle lamella with fine details, while keeping open the possibility to perform topochemistry by the use of relevant fluorescent nano-probes. In particular, the deconvolution of STED images increases the signal-to-noise ratio so that images become very well defined. The obtained results show that the STED super-resolution technique can be easily implemented by using cheap commercial fluorescent rhodamine-PEG nano-probes which outline the architecture of plant cell walls due to their interaction with lignin. Moreover, the sample preparation only requires easily-prepared plant sections of a few tens of micrometers, in addition to an easily-implemented post-treatment of images. Overall, the STED super-resolution technique in combination with a variety of nano-probes can provide a new vision of plant cell wall imaging by filling in the gap between classical photon microscopy and electron microscopy.

  17. Real-time monitoring of NKCC2 endocytosis by total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaykumar, Ankita Bachhawat; Caceres, Paulo S; Sablaban, Ibrahim; Tannous, Bakhos A; Ortiz, Pablo A

    2016-01-15

    The apical Na-K-2Cl cotransporter (NKCC2) mediates NaCl reabsorption by the thick ascending limb (TAL). The amount of NKCC2 at the apical membrane of TAL cells is determined by exocytic delivery, recycling, and endocytosis. Surface biotinylation allows measurement of NKCC2 endocytosis, but it has low time resolution and does not allow imaging of the dynamic process of endocytosis. We hypothesized that total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy imaging of labeled NKCC2 would allow monitoring of NKCC2 endocytosis in polarized Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) and TAL cells. Thus we generated a NKCC2 construct containing a biotin acceptor domain (BAD) sequence between the transmembrane domains 5 and 6. Once expressed in polarized MDCK or TAL cells, surface NKCC2 was specifically biotinylated by exogenous biotin ligase (BirA). We also demonstrate that expression of a secretory form of BirA in TAL cells induces metabolic biotinylation of NKCC2. Labeling biotinylated surface NKCC2 with fluorescent streptavidin showed that most apical NKCC2 was located within small discrete domains or clusters referred to as "puncta" on the TIRF field. NKCC2 puncta were observed to disappear from the TIRF field, indicating an endocytic event which led to a decrease in the number of surface puncta at a rate of 1.18 ± 0.16%/min in MDCK cells, and a rate 1.09 ± 0.08%/min in TAL cells (n = 5). Treating cells with a cholesterol-chelating agent (methyl-β-cyclodextrin) completely blocked NKCC2 endocytosis. We conclude that TIRF microscopy of labeled NKCC2 allows the dynamic imaging of individual endocytic events at the apical membrane of TAL cells. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  18. Detection of Charcot-Leyden crystals by fluorescence microscopy of Papanicolaou-stained smears of sputum, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and bronchial secretions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küpper, T; Spies, S; Wehle, K; Pfitzer, P

    1994-10-01

    Fluorescence microscopy was used to examine Papanicolaou-stained smears of sputum and other secretions from the respiratory tract. Under these conditions Charcot-Leyden crystals (CLC) appear as bright yellow-green fluorescing needles. The study was performed to determine the value of this approach for the diagnosis of allergic lung diseases. The time taken to detect the crystals was recorded and the sensitivity of fluorescence microscopy for the detection of CLC was compared with light microscopy of the same samples. The data show that fluorescence microscopy is superior to light microscopy for the detection of CLC. The characteristic needle-shaped crystal can be recognized easily and fragments of crystals could be easily identified. In doubtful cases of allergic lung diseases, fluorescence microscopy may be used to supplement light microscopy for the detection of Charcot-Leyden crystals.

  19. Modeling enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulosic substrates using fluorescent confocal microscopy II: pretreated biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luterbacher, Jeremy S; Moran-Mirabal, Jose M; Burkholder, Eric W; Walker, Larry P

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we extend imaging and modeling work that was done in Part I of this report for a pure cellulose substrate (filter paper) to more industrially relevant substrates (untreated and pretreated hardwood and switchgrass). Using confocal fluorescence microscopy, we are able to track both the structure of the biomass particle via its autofluorescence, and bound enzyme from a commercial cellulase cocktail supplemented with a small fraction of fluorescently labeled Trichoderma reseii Cel7A. Imaging was performed throughout hydrolysis at temperatures relevant to industrial processing (50°C). Enzyme bound predominantly to areas with low autofluorescence, where structure loss and lignin removal had occurred during pretreatment; this confirms the importance of these processes for successful hydrolysis. The overall shape of both untreated and pretreated hardwood and switchgrass particles showed little change during enzymatic hydrolysis beyond a drop in autofluorescence intensity. The permanence of shape along with a relatively constant bound enzyme signal throughout hydrolysis was similar to observations previously made for filter paper, and was consistent with a modeling geometry of a hollowing out cylinder with widening pores represented as infinite slits. Modeling estimates of available surface areas for pretreated biomass were consistent with previously reported experimental results. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Enhanced simulator software for image validation and interpretation for multimodal localization super-resolution fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdélyi, Miklós; Sinkó, József; Gajdos, Tamás.; Novák, Tibor

    2017-02-01

    Optical super-resolution techniques such as single molecule localization have become one of the most dynamically developed areas in optical microscopy. These techniques routinely provide images of fixed cells or tissues with sub-diffraction spatial resolution, and can even be applied for live cell imaging under appropriate circumstances. Localization techniques are based on the precise fitting of the point spread functions (PSF) to the measured images of stochastically excited, identical fluorescent molecules. These techniques require controlling the rate between the on, off and the bleached states, keeping the number of active fluorescent molecules at an optimum value, so their diffraction limited images can be detected separately both spatially and temporally. Because of the numerous (and sometimes unknown) parameters, the imaging system can only be handled stochastically. For example, the rotation of the dye molecules obscures the polarization dependent PSF shape, and only an averaged distribution - typically estimated by a Gaussian function - is observed. TestSTORM software was developed to generate image stacks for traditional localization microscopes, where localization meant the precise determination of the spatial position of the molecules. However, additional optical properties (polarization, spectra, etc.) of the emitted photons can be used for further monitoring the chemical and physical properties (viscosity, pH, etc.) of the local environment. The image stack generating program was upgraded by several new features, such as: multicolour, polarization dependent PSF, built-in 3D visualization, structured background. These features make the program an ideal tool for optimizing the imaging and sample preparation conditions.

  1. Tracking Functional Tumor Cell Subpopulations of Malignant Glioma by Phasor Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy of NADH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew L. Trinh

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Intra-tumoral heterogeneity is associated with therapeutic resistance of cancer and there exists a need to non-invasively identify functional tumor subpopulations responsible for tumor recurrence. Reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH is a metabolic coenzyme essential in cellular respiration. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM of NADH has been demonstrated to be a powerful label-free indicator for inferring metabolic states of living cells. Using FLIM, we identified a significant shift towards longer NADH fluorescence lifetimes, suggesting an increase in the fraction of protein-bound NADH, in the invasive stem-like tumor-initiating cell (STIC subpopulation relative to the tumor mass-forming cell (TMC subpopulation of malignant gliomas. By applying our previously studied model to transition glioma from a majority of STIC to a majority of TMC in serum-adherent culture conditions following serial passages, we compared changes in NADH states, cellular respirations (oxidative phosphorylation and glycolysis, EGFR expression, and cell-growth speed over passages. We identified a significant positive correlation between free-NADH fraction and cell growth, which was related to an increase of TMC fraction. In comparison, the increase of EGFR and cellular respirations preceded all these changes. In conclusion, FLIM of NADH provides a non-invasive method to monitor the dynamics of tumor heterogeneity before and after treatment.

  2. Validating Intravascular Imaging with Serial Optical Coherence Tomography and Confocal Fluorescence Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pier-Luc Tardif

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases are characterized by the formation of a plaque in the arterial wall. Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS provides high-resolution images allowing delineation of atherosclerotic plaques. When combined with near infrared fluorescence (NIRF, the plaque can also be studied at a molecular level with a large variety of biomarkers. In this work, we present a system enabling automated volumetric histology imaging of excised aortas that can spatially correlate results with combined IVUS/NIRF imaging of lipid-rich atheroma in cholesterol-fed rabbits. Pullbacks in the rabbit aortas were performed with a dual modality IVUS/NIRF catheter developed by our group. Ex vivo three-dimensional (3D histology was performed combining optical coherence tomography (OCT and confocal fluorescence microscopy, providing high-resolution anatomical and molecular information, respectively, to validate in vivo findings. The microscope was combined with a serial slicer allowing for the imaging of the whole vessel automatically. Colocalization of in vivo and ex vivo results is demonstrated. Slices can then be recovered to be tested in conventional histology.

  3. Validating Intravascular Imaging with Serial Optical Coherence Tomography and Confocal Fluorescence Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tardif, Pier-Luc; Bertrand, Marie-Jeanne; Abran, Maxime; Castonguay, Alexandre; Lefebvre, Joël; Stähli, Barbara E; Merlet, Nolwenn; Mihalache-Avram, Teodora; Geoffroy, Pascale; Mecteau, Mélanie; Busseuil, David; Ni, Feng; Abulrob, Abedelnasser; Rhéaume, Éric; L'Allier, Philippe; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Lesage, Frédéric

    2016-12-15

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases are characterized by the formation of a plaque in the arterial wall. Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) provides high-resolution images allowing delineation of atherosclerotic plaques. When combined with near infrared fluorescence (NIRF), the plaque can also be studied at a molecular level with a large variety of biomarkers. In this work, we present a system enabling automated volumetric histology imaging of excised aortas that can spatially correlate results with combined IVUS/NIRF imaging of lipid-rich atheroma in cholesterol-fed rabbits. Pullbacks in the rabbit aortas were performed with a dual modality IVUS/NIRF catheter developed by our group. Ex vivo three-dimensional (3D) histology was performed combining optical coherence tomography (OCT) and confocal fluorescence microscopy, providing high-resolution anatomical and molecular information, respectively, to validate in vivo findings. The microscope was combined with a serial slicer allowing for the imaging of the whole vessel automatically. Colocalization of in vivo and ex vivo results is demonstrated. Slices can then be recovered to be tested in conventional histology.

  4. Two-dimensional materials for improved resolution in total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zia Uddin, Shiekh; Anisuzzaman Talukder, Muhammad

    2017-09-01

    We propose and theoretically demonstrate that two-dimensional materials at the interface between glass and water layers in a total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) technique can decrease the detection volume of a target sample, and hence improve the resolution of the obtained image. In particular, we calculate the change in fluorescence characteristics of the fluorophore labels on a target sample when monolayer black phosphorus, hexagonal boron nitride, and graphene are added at the glass-water interface of a TIRFM structure. We also calculate the change in the detection volume due to the presence of two-dimensional materials, and when the polarization, wavelength, and angle of the incident light vary. We find ≳ 10% and ≳ 5% decrease in the detection volume when monolayer black phosphorus and hexagonal boron nitride are used, respectively, and up to  ∼50% decrease when monolayer graphene is used. The proposed use of the two-dimensional material will significantly improve the resolution of TIRFM technique, and hence facilitate the study of nanoscale biological features.

  5. Characterization of early-stage amyloid aggregates by incorporating extrinsic fluorescence and atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Moonjee; Lee, Hwiin; Lee, Youmin; Lee, Minyung

    2014-11-01

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) oligomers are nanosized bio-assemblies that cause Alzheimer's disease. Characterizing early-stage Aβ aggregates becomes an important issue because it is a prerequisite in exploring small molecule inhibitors that bind to Aβ oligomers. Of special interest are efficient screening systems that characterize the Aβ oligomer size with respect to the aging time. In this work, highly sensitive fluorescence techniques and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were employed to investigate the size determination of Aβ and screening of small molecule inhibitors. A solvatochromic dye, 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonic acid (ANS), was used as an extrinsic fluorophore to monitor the growth mechanism of the Aβ aggregates. Then, the time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy method was employed to estimate the hydrodynamic size of Aβ oligomers. Finally, AFM was used to characterize the Aβ oligomer size in the absence and presence of potential inhibitors. We present that the combination of such three experimental techniques is an excellent way to detect the early stage of Aβ aggregation and to screen small molecule inhibitors.

  6. Total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy illuminator for improved imaging of cell surface events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Daniel S; Jaiswal, Jyoti K; Simon, Sanford

    2012-07-01

    Total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy is a high-contrast imaging technique suitable for observing biological events that occur on or near the cell membrane. The improved contrast is accomplished by restricting the thickness of the excitation field to over an order of a magnitude narrower than the z-resolution of an epi-fluorescence microscope. This technique also increases signal-to-noise, making it a valuable tool for imaging cellular events such as vesicles undergoing exocytosis or endocytosis, viral particle formation, cell signaling, and dynamics of membrane proteins. This protocol describes the basic procedures for setting up a through-the-objective TIRF illuminator and a prism-based TIRF illuminator. In addition, an alternate protocol for incorporating an automated deflection system into through-the-objective TIRF is given. This system can be used to decrease aberrations in the illumination field, to quickly switch between epi- and TIRF illumination, and to adjust the penetration depth during multicolor TIRF applications. In the commentary, a description of the total internal reflection phenomenon is given, critical parameters of a TIRF microscope are discussed, and technical challenges and considerations are reviewed.

  7. Direct quantification of single-molecules of microRNA by total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Ho-Man; Chan, Lai-Sheung; Wong, Ricky Ngok-Shun; Li, Hung-Wing

    2010-08-15

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) express differently in normal and cancerous tissues and thus are regarded as potent cancer biomarkers for early diagnosis. However, the short length and low abundance of miRNAs have brought challenges to the established detection assay in terms of sensitivity and selectivity. In this work, we present a novel miRNA detection assay in single-molecule level with total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM). It is a solution-based hybridization detection system that does not require pretreatment steps such as sample enrichment or signal amplification. The hsa-miR-21 (miR-21) is chosen as target miRNA for its significant elevated content in a variety of cancers as reported previously. Herein, probes of complementary single-stranded oligonucleotide were hybridized in solution to miR-21 and labeled with fluorescent dye YOYO-1. The fluorescent hybrids were imaged by an electron-multiplying charge-coupled device (EMCCD) coupled TIRFM system and quantified by single-molecule counting. This single molecule detection (SMD) assay shows a good correlation between the number of molecules detected and the factual concentration of miRNA. The detection assay is applied to quantify the miR-21 in extracted total RNA samples of cancerous MCF-7 cells, HepG2 cells, and normal HUVEC cells, respectively. The results agreed very well with those from the prevalent real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis. This assay is of high potential for applications in miRNA expression profiling and early cancer diagnosis.

  8. Global analysis of Förster resonance energy transfer in live cells measured by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy exploiting the rise time of acceptor fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laptenok, Sergey P; Borst, Jan Willem; Mullen, Katharine M; van Stokkum, Ivo H M; Visser, Antonie J W G; van Amerongen, Herbert

    2010-07-21

    A methodology is described for the quantitative determination of Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) in live cells using the rise time of acceptor fluorescence as determined with fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). An advantage of this method is that only those molecules that are involved in the energy-transfer process are monitored. This contrasts with current methods that measure either steady-state fluorescence of donor and acceptor molecules or time-resolved fluorescence of donor molecules, and thereby probe a mixture of donor molecules that are involved in FRET and those that are fluorescent but not involved in FRET. The absence of FRET can, for instance, be due to unwanted acceptor bleaching or incomplete maturing of visible proteins that should act as acceptor molecules. In addition, parameters describing the rise of acceptor fluorescence and the decay of donor fluorescence can be determined via simultaneous global analysis of multiple FLIM images, thereby increasing the reliability of the analysis. In the present study, plant protoplasts transfected with fusions of visible fluorescent proteins are used to illustrate the new data analysis method. It is demonstrated that the distances estimated with the present method are substantially smaller than those estimated from the average donor lifetimes, due to a fraction of non-transferring donor molecules. Software to reproduce the presented results is provided in an open-source and freely available package called "TIMP" for "The R project for Statistical Computing".

  9. Elasticity Maps of Living Neurons Measured by Combined Fluorescence and Atomic Force Microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Spedden, Elise; Naumova, Elena N; Kaplan, David L; Staii, Cristian

    2013-01-01

    Detailed knowledge of mechanical parameters such as cell elasticity, stiffness of the growth substrate, or traction stresses generated during axonal extensions is essential for understanding the mechanisms that control neuronal growth. Here we combine Atomic Force Microscopy based force spectroscopy with Fluorescence Microscopy to produce systematic, high-resolution elasticity maps for three different types of live neuronal cells: cortical (embryonic rat), embryonic chick dorsal root ganglion, and P-19 (mouse embryonic carcinoma stem cells) neurons. We measure how the stiffness of neurons changes both during neurite outgrowth and upon disruption of microtubules of the cell. We find reversible local stiffening of the cell during growth, and show that the increase in local elastic modulus is primarily due to the formation of microtubules. We also report that cortical and P-19 neurons have similar elasticity maps, with elastic moduli in the range 0.1-2 kPa, with typical average values of 0.4 kPa (P-19) and 0.2 k...

  10. Mapping of hemoglobin in erythrocytes and erythrocyte ghosts using two photon excitation fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukara, Katarina; Jovanić, Svetlana; Drvenica, Ivana T.; Stančić, Ana; Ilić, Vesna; Rabasović, Mihailo D.; Pantelić, Dejan; Jelenković, Branislav; Bugarski, Branko; Krmpot, Aleksandar J.

    2017-02-01

    The present study describes utilization of two photon excitation fluorescence (2PE) microscopy for visualization of the hemoglobin in human and porcine erythrocytes and their empty membranes (i.e., ghosts). High-quality, label- and fixation-free visualization of hemoglobin was achieved at excitation wavelength 730 nm by detecting visible autofluorescence. Localization in the suspension and spatial distribution (i.e., mapping) of residual hemoglobin in erythrocyte ghosts has been resolved by 2PE. Prior to the 2PE mapping, the presence of residual hemoglobin in the bulk suspension of erythrocyte ghosts was confirmed by cyanmethemoglobin assay. 2PE analysis revealed that the distribution of hemoglobin in intact erythrocytes follows the cells' shape. Two types of erythrocytes, human and porcine, characterized with discocyte and echinocyte morphology, respectively, showed significant differences in hemoglobin distribution. The 2PE images have revealed that despite an extensive washing out procedure after gradual hypotonic hemolysis, a certain amount of hemoglobin localized on the intracellular side always remains bound to the membrane and cannot be eliminated. The obtained results open the possibility to use 2PE microscopy to examine hemoglobin distribution in erythrocytes and estimate the purity level of erythrocyte ghosts in biotechnological processes.

  11. Elasticity maps of living neurons measured by combined fluorescence and atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spedden, Elise; White, James D; Naumova, Elena N; Kaplan, David L; Staii, Cristian

    2012-09-05

    Detailed knowledge of mechanical parameters such as cell elasticity, stiffness of the growth substrate, or traction stresses generated during axonal extensions is essential for understanding the mechanisms that control neuronal growth. Here, we combine atomic force microscopy-based force spectroscopy with fluorescence microscopy to produce systematic, high-resolution elasticity maps for three different types of live neuronal cells: cortical (embryonic rat), embryonic chick dorsal root ganglion, and P-19 (mouse embryonic carcinoma stem cells) neurons. We measure how the stiffness of neurons changes both during neurite outgrowth and upon disruption of microtubules of the cell. We find reversible local stiffening of the cell during growth, and show that the increase in local elastic modulus is primarily due to the formation of microtubules. We also report that cortical and P-19 neurons have similar elasticity maps, with elastic moduli in the range 0.1-2 kPa, with typical average values of 0.4 kPa (P-19) and 0.2 kPa (cortical). In contrast, dorsal root ganglion neurons are stiffer than P-19 and cortical cells, yielding elastic moduli in the range 0.1-8 kPa, with typical average values of 0.9 kPa. Finally, we report no measurable influence of substrate protein coating on cell body elasticity for the three types of neurons. Copyright © 2012 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Diverse protocols for correlative super-resolution fluorescence imaging and electron microscopy of chemically fixed samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopek, Benjamin G.; Paez-Segala, Maria G.; Shtengel, Gleb; Sochacki, Kem A.; Sun, Mei G.; Wang, Yalin; Xu, C. Shan; van Engelenburg, Schuyler B.; Taraska, Justin W.; Looger, Loren L.; Hess, Harald F.

    2017-01-01

    Our groups have recently developed related approaches for sample preparation for super-resolution imaging within endogenous cellular environments using correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM). Four distinct techniques for preparing and acquiring super-resolution CLEM datasets on aldehyde-fixed specimens are provided, including Tokuyasu cryosectioning, whole-cell mount, cell unroofing and platinum replication, and resin embedding and sectioning. Choice of the best protocol for a given application depends on a number of criteria that are discussed in detail. Tokuyasu cryosectioning is relatively rapid but is limited to small, delicate specimens. Whole-cell mount has the simplest sample preparation but is restricted to surface structures. Cell unroofing and platinum replica creates high-contrast, 3-dimensional images of the cytoplasmic surface of the plasma membrane, but is more challenging than whole-cell mount. Resin embedding permits serial sectioning of large samples, but is limited to osmium-resistant probes, and is technically difficult. Expected results from these protocols include super-resolution localization (~10–50 nm) of fluorescent targets within the context of electron microscopy ultrastructure, which can help address cell biological questions. These protocols can be completed in 2–7 days, are compatible with a number of super-resolution imaging protocols, and are broadly applicable across biology. PMID:28384138

  13. Clustered localization of STAT3 during the cell cycle detected by super-resolution fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jing; Chen, Junling; Cai, Mingjun; Xu, Haijiao; Jiang, Junguang; Tong, Ti; Wang, Hongda

    2017-06-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) plays a key role in various cellular processes such as cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis and immune responses. In particular, STAT3 has emerged as a potential molecular target for cancer therapy. The functional role and standard activation mechanism of STAT3 have been well studied, however, the spatial distribution of STAT3 during the cell cycle is poorly known. Therefore, it is indispensable to study STAT3 spatial arrangement and nuclear-cytoplasimic localization at the different phase of cell cycle in cancer cells. By direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy imaging, we find that STAT3 forms various number and size of clusters at the different cell-cycle stage, which could not be clearly observed by conventional fluorescent microscopy. STAT3 clusters get more and larger gradually from G1 to G2 phase, during which time transcription and other related activities goes on consistently. The results suggest that there is an intimate relationship between the clustered characteristic of STAT3 and the cell-cycle behavior. Meanwhile, clustering would facilitate STAT3 rapid response to activating signals due to short distances between molecules. Our data might open a new door to develop an antitumor drug for inhibiting STAT3 signaling pathway by destroying its clusters.

  14. Axicon-based Bessel beams for flat-field illumination in total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Benjamin; Elsayad, Kareem; Heinze, Katrin G

    2017-10-01

    Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRF-M) provides low-invasive high-contrast surface imaging with optical sectioning of typically 100-200 nm. Thus, TIRF-M has become an established tool for imaging surfaces, including cell membranes. For TIRF-M, a homogenous evanescent field of excitation over the whole field of view is generally desired for quantitative microscopy; however, this is not necessarily straightforward to generate with Gaussian beams. In recent years, several improvements on TIRF-M have been developed that have addressed non-uniform scattering fringes and other artifacts. Here, we introduce a cost-effective TIRF setup with a very low degree of complexity and no moving parts, which provides a flattop-like excitation profile. The setup uses a tunable laser ring zoom focus system to generate a full 360° TIRF illumination. Two axicon lenses and one focus lens allow for generation and control of the ring diameter to tune the TIRF excitation angle. We show that 360° laser illumination in combination with a radial polarizer will generate an evanescent Bessel-beam excitation field that exhibits a flattop intensity over an extended part of the field of view, and demonstrate the advantages of this axicon-based Bessel beam illumination for live-cell imaging.

  15. Identification of novel insulin mimetic drugs by quantitative total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzerstorfer, Peter; Stadlbauer, Verena; Chtcheglova, Lilia A; Haselgrübler, Renate; Borgmann, Daniela; Wruss, Jürgen; Hinterdorfer, Peter; Schröder, Klaus; Winkler, Stephan M; Höglinger, Otmar; Weghuber, Julian

    2014-12-01

    Insulin stimulates the transport of glucose in target tissues by triggering the translocation of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) to the plasma membrane. Resistance to insulin, the major abnormality in type 2 diabetes, results in a decreased GLUT4 translocation efficiency. Thus, special attention is being paid to search for compounds that are able to enhance this translocation process in the absence of insulin. Total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy was applied to quantify GLUT4 translocation in highly insulin-sensitive CHO-K1 cells expressing a GLUT4-myc-GFP fusion protein. Using our approach, we demonstrated GLUT4 translocation modulatory properties of selected substances and identified novel potential insulin mimetics. An increase in the TIRF signal was found to correlate with an elevated glucose uptake. Variations in the expression level of the human insulin receptor (hInsR) showed that the insulin mimetics identified stimulate GLUT4 translocation by a mechanism that is independent of the presence of the hInsR. Taken together, the results indicate that TIRF microscopy is an excellent tool for the quantification of GLUT4 translocation and for identifying insulin mimetic drugs. © 2014 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of The British Pharmacological Society.

  16. Simultaneous X-ray fluorescence and scanning X-ray diffraction microscopy at the Australian Synchrotron XFM beamline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Michael W. M.; Phillips, Nicholas W.; van Riessen, Grant A.; Abbey, Brian; Vine, David J.; Nashed, Youssef S. G.; Mudie, Stephen T.; Afshar, Nader; Kirkham, Robin; Chen, Bo; Balaur, Eugeniu; de Jonge, Martin D.

    2016-08-11

    Owing to its extreme sensitivity, quantitative mapping of elemental distributionsviaX-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM) has become a key microanalytical technique. The recent realisation of scanning X-ray diffraction microscopy (SXDM) meanwhile provides an avenue for quantitative super-resolved ultra-structural visualization. The similarity of their experimental geometries indicates excellent prospects for simultaneous acquisition. Here, in both step- and fly-scanning modes, robust, simultaneous XFM-SXDM is demonstrated.

  17. High refractive index silicone gels for simultaneous total internal reflection fluorescence and traction force microscopy of adherent cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar Gutierrez

    Full Text Available Substrate rigidity profoundly impacts cellular behaviors such as migration, gene expression, and cell fate. Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence (TIRF microscopy enables selective visualization of the dynamics of substrate adhesions, vesicle trafficking, and biochemical signaling at the cell-substrate interface. Here we apply high-refractive-index silicone gels to perform TIRF microscopy on substrates with a wide range of physiological elastic moduli and simultaneously measure traction forces exerted by cells on the substrate.

  18. Local Delivery of Fluorescent Dye For Fiber-Optics Confocal Microscopy of the Living Heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao eHuang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Fiber-optics confocal microscopy (FCM is an emerging imaging technology with various applications in basic research and clinical diagnosis. FCM allows for real-time in situ microscopy of tissue at sub-cellular scale. Recently FCM has been investigated for cardiac imaging, in particular, for discrimination of cardiac tissue during pediatric open-heart surgery. FCM relies on fluorescent dyes. The current clinical approach of dye delivery is based on systemic injection, which is associated with high dye consumption and adverse clinical events. In this study, we investigated approaches for local dye delivery during FCM imaging based on dye carriers attached to the imaging probe. Using three-dimensional confocal microscopy, automated bench tests, and FCM imaging we quantitatively characterized dye release of carriers composed of open-pore foam only and foam loaded with agarose hydrogel. In addition, we compared local dye delivery with a model of systemic dye delivery in the isolated perfused rodent heart. We measured the signal-to-noise ratio of images acquired in various regions of the heart. Our evaluations showed that foam-agarose dye carriers exhibited a prolonged dye release versus foam-only carriers. Foam-agarose dye carriers allowed reliable imaging of 5-9 lines, which is comparable to 4-8 min of continuous dye release. Our study in the living heart revealed that the SNR of FCM images using local and systemic dye delivery is not different. However, we observed differences in the imaged tissue microstructure with the two approaches. Structural features characteristic of microvasculature were solely observed for systemic dye delivery. Our findings suggest that local dye delivery approach for FCM imaging constitutes an important alternative to systemic dye delivery. We suggest that the approach for local dye delivery will facilitate clinical translation of FCM, for instance, for FCM imaging during pediatric heart surgery.

  19. Local delivery of fluorescent dye for fiber-optics confocal microscopy of the living heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chao; Kaza, Aditya K; Hitchcock, Robert W; Sachse, Frank B

    2014-01-01

    Fiber-optics confocal microscopy (FCM) is an emerging imaging technology with various applications in basic research and clinical diagnosis. FCM allows for real-time in situ microscopy of tissue at sub-cellular scale. Recently FCM has been investigated for cardiac imaging, in particular, for discrimination of cardiac tissue during pediatric open-heart surgery. FCM relies on fluorescent dyes. The current clinical approach of dye delivery is based on systemic injection, which is associated with high dye consumption, and adverse clinical events. In this study, we investigated approaches for local dye delivery during FCM imaging based on dye carriers attached to the imaging probe. Using three-dimensional confocal microscopy, automated bench tests, and FCM imaging we quantitatively characterized dye release of carriers composed of open-pore foam only and foam loaded with agarose hydrogel. In addition, we compared local dye delivery with a model of systemic dye delivery in the isolated perfused rodent heart. We measured the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of images acquired in various regions of the heart. Our evaluations showed that foam-agarose dye carriers exhibited a prolonged dye release vs. foam-only carriers. Foam-agarose dye carriers allowed reliable imaging of 5-9 lines, which is comparable to 4-8 min of continuous dye release. Our study in the living heart revealed that the SNR of FCM images using local and systemic dye delivery is not different. However, we observed differences in the imaged tissue microstructure with the two approaches. Structural features characteristic of microvasculature were solely observed for systemic dye delivery. Our findings suggest that local dye delivery approach for FCM imaging constitutes an important alternative to systemic dye delivery. We suggest that the approach for local dye delivery will facilitate clinical translation of FCM, for instance, for FCM imaging during pediatric heart surgery.

  20. Multimodal microscopy and the stepwise multi-photon activation fluorescence of melanin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Zhenhua

    The author's work is divided into three aspects: multimodal microscopy, stepwise multi-photon activation fluorescence (SMPAF) of melanin, and customized-profile lenses (CPL) for on-axis laser scanners, which will be introduced respectively. A multimodal microscope provides the ability to image samples with multiple modalities on the same stage, which incorporates the benefits of all modalities. The multimodal microscopes developed in this dissertation are the Keck 3D fusion multimodal microscope 2.0 (3DFM 2.0), upgraded from the old 3DFM with improved performance and flexibility, and the multimodal microscope for targeting small particles (the "Target" system). The control systems developed for both microscopes are low-cost and easy-to-build, with all components off-the-shelf. The control system have not only significantly decreased the complexity and size of the microscope, but also increased the pixel resolution and flexibility. The SMPAF of melanin, activated by a continuous-wave (CW) mode near-infrared (NIR) laser, has potential applications for a low-cost and reliable method of detecting melanin. The photophysics of melanin SMPAF has been studied by theoretical analysis of the excitation process and investigation of the spectra, activation threshold, and photon number absorption of melanin SMPAF. SMPAF images of melanin in mouse hair and skin, mouse melanoma, and human black and white hairs are compared with images taken by conventional multi-photon fluorescence microscopy (MPFM) and confocal reflectance microscopy (CRM). SMPAF images significantly increase specificity and demonstrate the potential to increase sensitivity for melanin detection compared to MPFM images and CRM images. Employing melanin SMPAF imaging to detect melanin inside human skin in vivo has been demonstrated, which proves the effectiveness of melanin detection using SMPAF for medical purposes. Selective melanin ablation with micrometer resolution has been presented using the Target system

  1. Preservation of protein fluorescence in embedded human dendritic cells for targeted 3D light and electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höhn, K; Fuchs, J; Fröber, A; Kirmse, R; Glass, B; Anders-Össwein, M; Walther, P; Kräusslich, H-G; Dietrich, C

    2015-08-01

    In this study, we present a correlative microscopy workflow to combine detailed 3D fluorescence light microscopy data with ultrastructural information gained by 3D focused ion beam assisted scanning electron microscopy. The workflow is based on an optimized high pressure freezing/freeze substitution protocol that preserves good ultrastructural detail along with retaining the fluorescence signal in the resin embedded specimens. Consequently, cellular structures of interest can readily be identified and imaged by state of the art 3D confocal fluorescence microscopy and are precisely referenced with respect to an imprinted coordinate system on the surface of the resin block. This allows precise guidance of the focused ion beam assisted scanning electron microscopy and limits the volume to be imaged to the structure of interest. This, in turn, minimizes the total acquisition time necessary to conduct the time consuming ultrastructural scanning electron microscope imaging while eliminating the risk to miss parts of the target structure. We illustrate the value of this workflow for targeting virus compartments, which are formed in HIV-pulsed mature human dendritic cells. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2015 Royal Microscopical Society.

  2. Fluorescence microscopy image-analysis (FMI) for the characterization of interphase HO˙ production originated by heterogeneous catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuo; Quan, Xie; Wang, Dong

    2017-02-23

    Herein, fluorescence microscopy image-analysis (FMI) visualized the information of interphase HO˙ radicals using luminescent 7-hydroxycoumarin as the marker, revealing the inhomogeneity and intensity of HO˙ production originated by surface-mediated catalysis. The FMI is recommended as a quick-response method for the evaluation of HO˙-assigned heterogeneous catalysis.

  3. Correction for photobleaching in dynamic fluorescence microscopy : application in the assessment of pharmacokinetic parameters in ultrasound-mediated drug delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derieppe, M; Bos, C; de Greef, M; Moonen, C; Denis de Senneville, B

    2015-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated the feasibility of monitoring ultrasound-mediated uptake of a hydrophilic model drug in real time with dynamic confocal fluorescence microscopy. In this study, we evaluate and correct the impact of photobleaching to improve the accuracy of pharmacokinetic parameter

  4. Fluorescence microscopy techniques for quantitative evaluation of organic biocide distribution in antifouling paint coatings: Application to model antifouling coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goodes, L.R.; Dennington, S.P.; Schuppe, H.; Wharton, J.A.; Bakker, M.; Klijnstra, J.W.; Stokes, K.R.

    2012-01-01

    A test matrix of antifouling (AF) coatings including pMMA, an erodible binder and a novel trityl copolymer incorporating Cu 2O and a furan derivative (FD) natural product, were subjected to pontoon immersion and accelerated rotor tests. Fluorescence and optical microscopy techniques were applied to

  5. Short-wavelength two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy of tryptophan with a photonic crystal fiber based light source

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Palero (Jonathan); V.O. Boer (Vincent); J.C. Vijverberg (Jacob); H.C. Gerritsen (Hans); H.J.C.M. Sterenborg (Dick)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractWe report on a novel and simple light source for short-wavelength two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy based on the visible nonsolitonic radiation from a photonic crystal fiber. We demonstrate tunability of the light source by varying the wavelength and intensity of the

  6. Demonstrating Improved Multiple Transport-Mean-Free-Path Imaging Capabilities of Light Sheet Microscopy in the Quantification of Fluorescence Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieckher, Matthias; Psycharakis Daniele Ancora, Stylianos E; Liapis, Evangelos; Zacharopoulos, Athanasios; Ripoll, Jorge; Tavernarakis, Nektarios; Zacharakis, Giannis

    2017-11-23

    Optical microscopy constitutes, one of the most fundamental paradigms for the understanding of complex biological mechanisms in the whole-organism and live-tissue context. Novel imaging techniques such as light sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) and optical projection tomography (OPT) combined with phase-retrieval algorithms (PRT) can produce highly resolved 3D images in multiple transport-mean-free-path scales. Our study aims to exemplify the microscopic capabilities of LSFM when imaging protein dynamics in Caenorhabditis elegans and the distribution of necrotic cells in cancer cell spheroids. To this end, we apply LSFM to quantify the spatio-temporal localization of the GFP-tagged aging and stress response factor DAF-16/FOXO in transgenic C. elegans. Our analysis reveals a linear nuclear localization of DAF-16::GFP across tissues in response to heat stress, using a system that outperforms confocal scanning fluorescent microscopy in imaging speed, 3D resolution and reduced photo-toxicity. Furthermore, we present how PRT can improve the depth-to-resolution-ratio when applied to image the far-red fluorescent dye DRAQ7 which stains dead cells in a T47D cancer cell spheroid recorded with a customized OPT/LSFM system. Our studies demonstrate that LSFM combined with our novel approaches enables higher resolution and more accurate 3D quantification than previously applied technologies, proving its advance as new gold standard for fluorescence microscopy. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Implementation of LED fluorescence microscopy for diagnosis of pulmonary and HIV-associated tuberculosis in a hospital setting in Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chaidir, L.; Parwati, I.; Annisa, J.; Muhsinin, S.; Meilana, I.; Alisjahbana, B.; Crevel, R. van

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fluorescence microscopy (FM) has not been implemented widely in TB endemic settings and little evaluation has been done in HIV-infected patients. We evaluated diagnostic performance, time and costs of FM with light-emitting diodes technology (LED-FM), compared with conventional

  8. Application of fluorescent microscopy and cascade filtration methods for analysis of soil microbial community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Konstantin; Pinchuk, Irina; Gorodnichev, Roman; Polyanskaya, Lubov

    2016-04-01

    Methods establishment of soil microbial cells size estimation called from the importance of current needs of research in microbial ecology. Some of the methods need to be improved for more detailed view of changes happen in microbiome of terrestrial ecosystems. The combination of traditional microscopy methods, fluorescence and filtration in addition to cutting-edge DNA analysis gives a wide range of the approaches for soil microbial ecologists in their research questions. In the most of the cases the bacterial cells size is limited of the natural conditions such as lack of nutrients or stress factors due to heterogeneity of soil system. In the samples of soils, lakes and rivers sediments, snow and rain water the bacterial cells were detected minimally of 0.2 microns. We established the combination of the cascade filtration and fluorescent microscopy for complex analysis of different terrestrial ecosystems and various soil types. Our modification based on the use of successively filtered soil suspension for collection of microbes by the membrane pores decrease. Combination with fluorescence microscopy and DNA analysis via FISH method gave the presentation of microbial interactions and review of ecological strategies of soil microorganisms. Humus horizons of primitive arctic soil were the most favorable for bacterial growth. Quantified biomass of soil bacteria depends on the dominance of cells with specific dimensions caused of stress factors. The average bacterial size of different soil varied from 0.23 to 0.38 microns, however in humus horizons of arctic soil we detected the contrast dominance of the bigger bacterial cells sized of 1.85 microns. Fungi in this case contributed to increase the availability of organic matter for bacteria because the fungal mycelium forms the appreciable part of microbial biomass of primitive arctic soil. The dominant content of bigger bacterial cells in forest and fallow soil as well as the opposite situation in arable soils caused

  9. In Vivo Interaction Studies by Measuring Förster Resonance Energy Transfer Through Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FRET/FLIM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fäßler, Florian; Pimpl, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Combinations of multiple fluorescent fusion proteins are commonly generated and used for colocalization studies in live cell imaging but also biochemical analysis of protein-protein interactions by co-immunoprecipitation in vitro. Advanced microscopy techniques like Förster resonance energy transfer through fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FRET/FLIM) nowadays enable the combination of both approaches. This opens up the possibility to perform a location-specific protein-protein interaction analysis in vivo. To this end, the nonradiant energy transfer from a donor to an acceptor fluorophore (FRET) is harnessed to test for close proximity as an indicator for interaction, while the spectromicroscopical measurement of the fluorescence lifetime by FLIM serves as a readout.Here, we describe FRET/FLIM measurements performed with a Leica TCS SP8/PicoHarp 300 combination to demonstrate the interaction between a RFP-tagged GFP-nanobody and its epitope, GFP, in the cytoplasm of tobacco mesophyll protoplasts.

  10. Transmission electron microscopy, fluorescence microscopy, and confocal raman microscopic analysis of ultrastructural and compositional heterogeneity of Cornus alba L. wood cell wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jianfeng; Ji, Zhe; Zhou, Xia; Zhang, Zhiheng; Xu, Feng

    2013-02-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), fluorescence microscopy, and confocal Raman microscopy can be used to characterize ultrastructural and compositional heterogeneity of plant cell walls. In this study, TEM observations revealed the ultrastructural characterization of Cornus alba L. fiber, vessel, axial parenchyma, ray parenchyma, and pit membrane between cells, notably with the ray parenchyma consisting of two well-defined layers. Fluorescence microscopy evidenced that cell corner middle lamella was more lignified than adjacent compound middle lamella and secondary wall with variation in lignification level from cell to cell. In situ Raman images showed that the inhomogeneity in cell wall components (cellulose and lignin) among different cells and within morphologically distinct cell wall layers. As the significant precursors of lignin biosynthesis, the pattern of coniferyl alcohol and aldehyde (joint abbreviation Lignin-CAA for both structures) distribution in fiber cell wall was also identified by Raman images, with higher concentration occurring in the fiber secondary wall where there was the highest cellulose concentration. Moreover, noteworthy was the observation that higher concentration of lignin and very minor amounts of cellulose were visualized in the pit membrane areas. These complementary microanalytical methods provide more accurate and complete information with regard to ultrastructural and compositional characterization of plant cell walls.

  11. Detection of nucleic acid-protein interactions in plant leaves using fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camborde, Laurent; Jauneau, Alain; Brière, Christian; Deslandes, Laurent; Dumas, Bernard; Gaulin, Elodie

    2017-09-01

    DNA-binding proteins (DNA-BPs) and RNA-binding proteins (RNA-BPs) have critical roles in living cells in all kingdoms of life. Various experimental approaches exist for the study of nucleic acid-protein interactions in vitro and in vivo, but the detection of such interactions at the subcellular level remains challenging. Here we describe how to detect nucleic acid-protein interactions in plant leaves by using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) approach coupled to fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). Proteins of interest (POI) are tagged with a GFP and transiently expressed in plant cells to serve as donor fluorophore. After sample fixation and cell wall permeabilization, leaves are treated with Sytox Orange, a nucleic acid dye that can function as a FRET acceptor. Upon close association of the GFP-tagged POI with Sytox-Orange-stained nucleic acids, a substantial decrease of the GFP lifetime due to FRET between the donor and the acceptor can be monitored. Treatment with RNase before FRET-FLIM measurements allows determination of whether the POI associates with DNA and/or RNA. A step-by-step protocol is provided for sample preparation, data acquisition and analysis. We describe how to calibrate the equipment and include a tutorial explaining the use of the FLIM software. To illustrate our approach, we provide experimental procedures to detect the interaction between plant DNA and two proteins (the AeCRN13 effector from the oomycete Aphanomyces euteiches and the AtWRKY22 defensive transcription factor from Arabidopsis). This protocol allows the detection of protein-nucleic acid interactions in plant cells and can be completed in <2 d.

  12. Revisiting the Cornea and Trabecular Meshwork Junction With 2-Photon Excitation Fluorescence Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marando, Catherine M; Park, Choul Yong; Liao, Jason A; Lee, Jimmy K; Chuck, Roy S

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the collagen and elastin architecture at the junction of the human cornea and trabecular meshwork (TM). The cornea, TM, and ciliary body (CB) tendons of unfixed human corneal buttons were imaged with an inverted 2-photon excited fluorescence microscope (FluoView FV-1000; Olympus, Central Valley, PA). The laser (Ti:sapphire) was tuned to 850 nm for 2-photon excitation. Backscatter signals of second harmonic generation and autofluorescence were collected through a 425/30-nm emission filter and a 525/45-nm emission filter, respectively. The second harmonic generation signal corresponds to collagen fibers, and the autofluorescence signal corresponds to elastin-containing tissue. Tissue structure representations were obtained through software-generated reconstructions of consecutive and overlapping (z-stack) images through a relevant sample depth. Collagen-rich CB tendons insert into the cornea between Descemet membrane (DM) and posterior stroma along with elastin fibers originating from the TM. The CB tendons directly abut DM, and their insertion narrows as they course centrally in the cornea, giving a wedge appearance to these parallel collagen fibers. Approximately 260 μm centrally from the edge of DM, the CB tendons fan out and merge with pre-DM collagen. As the CB tendons enter the cornea, they form a dense collagenous comb-like structure orthogonal to the edge of DM and supported by a delicate elastin network of interwoven fibers originating from the TM. Two-photon excited fluorescence microscopy has improved our understanding of the peripheral corneal architecture. CB tendon insertions in this region may contribute to the radial tears encountered when preparing DM endothelial keratoplasty grafts.

  13. Fluorescent dyes with large Stokes shifts for super-resolution optical microscopy of biological objects: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sednev, Maksim V; Belov, Vladimir N; Hell, Stefan W

    2015-10-22

    The review deals with commercially available organic dyes possessing large Stokes shifts and their applications as fluorescent labels in optical microscopy based on stimulated emission depletion (STED). STED microscopy breaks Abbe's diffraction barrier and provides optical resolution beyond the diffraction limit. STED microscopy is non-invasive and requires photostable fluorescent markers attached to biomolecules or other objects of interest. Up to now, in most biology-related STED experiments, bright and photoresistant dyes with small Stokes shifts of 20-40 nm were used. The rapid progress in STED microscopy showed that organic fluorophores possessing large Stokes shifts are indispensable in multi-color super-resolution techniques. The ultimate result of the imaging relies on the optimal combination of a dye, the bio-conjugation procedure and the performance of the optical microscope. Modern bioconjugation methods, basics of STED microscopy, as well as structures and spectral properties of the presently available fluorescent markers are reviewed and discussed. In particular, the spectral properties of the commercial dyes are tabulated and correlated with the available depletion wavelengths found in STED microscopes produced by LEICA Microsytems, Abberior Instruments and Picoquant GmbH.

  14. Correlative cryo-fluorescence and cryo-scanning electron microscopy as a straightforward tool to study host-pathogen interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strnad, Martin; Elsterová, Jana; Schrenková, Jana; Vancová, Marie; Rego, Ryan O M; Grubhoffer, Libor; Nebesářová, Jana

    2015-12-10

    Correlative light and electron microscopy is an imaging technique that enables identification and targeting of fluorescently tagged structures with subsequent imaging at near-to-nanometer resolution. We established a novel correlative cryo-fluorescence microscopy and cryo-scanning electron microscopy workflow, which enables imaging of the studied object of interest very close to its natural state, devoid of artifacts caused for instance by slow chemical fixation. This system was tested by investigating the interaction of the zoonotic bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi with two mammalian cell lines of neural origin in order to broaden our knowledge about the cell-association mechanisms that precedes the entry of the bacteria into the cell. This method appears to be an unprecedentedly fast (<3 hours), straightforward, and reliable solution to study the finer details of pathogen-host cell interactions and provides important insights into the complex and dynamic relationship between a pathogen and a host.

  15. Total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy for real-time imaging of nanoparticle-cell plasma membrane interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parhamifar, Ladan; Moghimi, S Moein

    2012-01-01

    Nanoparticulate systems are widely used for site-specific drug and gene delivery as well as for medical imaging. The mode of nanoparticle-cell interaction may have a significant effect on the pathway of nanoparticle internalization and subsequent intracellular trafficking. Total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy allows for real-time monitoring of nanoparticle-membrane interaction events, which can provide vital information in relation to design and surface engineering of therapeutic nanoparticles for cell-specific targeting. In contrast to other microscopy techniques, the bleaching effect by lasers in TIRF microscopy is considerably less when using fluorescent nanoparticles and it reduces photo-induced cytotoxicity during visualization of live-cell events since it only illuminates the specific area near or at the plasma membrane.

  16. Lipid asymmetry in DLPC/DSPC supported lipid bilayers, a combined AFM and fluorescence microscopy study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, W; Blanchette, C D; Ratto, T V; Longo, M L

    2005-06-20

    A fundamental attribute of cell membranes is transmembrane asymmetry, specifically the formation of ordered phase domains in one leaflet that are compositionally different from the opposing leaflet of the bilayer. Using model membrane systems, many previous studies have demonstrated the formation of ordered phase domains that display complete transmembrane symmetry but there have been few reports on the more biologically relevant asymmetric membrane structures. Here we report on a combined atomic force microscopy (AFM) and fluorescence microscopy study whereby we observe three different states of transmembrane symmetry in phase-separated supported bilayers formed by vesicle fusion. We find that if the leaflets differ in gel-phase area fraction, then the smaller domains in one leaflet are in registry with the larger domains in the other leaflet and the system is dynamic. In a presumed lipid flip-flop process similar to Ostwald Ripening, the smaller domains in one leaflet erode away while the large domains in the other leaflet grow until complete compositional asymmetry is reached and remains stable. We have quantified this evolution and determined that the lipid flip-flop event happens most frequently at the interface between symmetric and asymmetric DSPC domains. If both leaflets have nearly identical area fraction of gel-phase, gel-phase domains are in registry and are static in comparison to the first state. The stability of these three DSPC domain distributions, the degree of registry observed, and the domain immobility have direct biological significance with regards to maintenance of lipid asymmetry in living cell membranes, communication between inner leaflet and outer leaflet, membrane adhesion, and raft mobility.

  17. A comparative study of gallstones from children and adults using FTIR spectroscopy and fluorescence microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marks Robert S

    2002-02-01

    cholesterol and calcium carbonate. Ring patterns observed mainly in the green stone using fluorescence microscopy have relevance to the mechanism of the stone formation. Our preliminary study suggests that bilirubin and cholesterol are the main risk factors of gallstone disease.

  18. Comparison of supervised machine learning algorithms for waterborne pathogen detection using mobile phone fluorescence microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Ceylan Koydemir, Hatice

    2017-06-14

    Giardia lamblia is a waterborne parasite that affects millions of people every year worldwide, causing a diarrheal illness known as giardiasis. Timely detection of the presence of the cysts of this parasite in drinking water is important to prevent the spread of the disease, especially in resource-limited settings. Here we provide extended experimental testing and evaluation of the performance and repeatability of a field-portable and cost-effective microscopy platform for automated detection and counting of Giardia cysts in water samples, including tap water, non-potable water, and pond water. This compact platform is based on our previous work, and is composed of a smartphone-based fluorescence microscope, a disposable sample processing cassette, and a custom-developed smartphone application. Our mobile phone microscope has a large field of view of ~0.8 cm2 and weighs only ~180 g, excluding the phone. A custom-developed smartphone application provides a user-friendly graphical interface, guiding the users to capture a fluorescence image of the sample filter membrane and analyze it automatically at our servers using an image processing algorithm and training data, consisting of >30,000 images of cysts and >100,000 images of other fluorescent particles that are captured, including, e.g. dust. The total time that it takes from sample preparation to automated cyst counting is less than an hour for each 10 ml of water sample that is tested. We compared the sensitivity and the specificity of our platform using multiple supervised classification models, including support vector machines and nearest neighbors, and demonstrated that a bootstrap aggregating (i.e. bagging) approach using raw image file format provides the best performance for automated detection of Giardia cysts. We evaluated the performance of this machine learning enabled pathogen detection device with water samples taken from different sources (e.g. tap water, non-potable water, pond water) and achieved

  19. Comparison of supervised machine learning algorithms for waterborne pathogen detection using mobile phone fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceylan Koydemir, Hatice; Feng, Steve; Liang, Kyle; Nadkarni, Rohan; Benien, Parul; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2017-06-01

    Giardia lamblia is a waterborne parasite that affects millions of people every year worldwide, causing a diarrheal illness known as giardiasis. Timely detection of the presence of the cysts of this parasite in drinking water is important to prevent the spread of the disease, especially in resource-limited settings. Here we provide extended experimental testing and evaluation of the performance and repeatability of a field-portable and cost-effective microscopy platform for automated detection and counting of Giardia cysts in water samples, including tap water, non-potable water, and pond water. This compact platform is based on our previous work, and is composed of a smartphone-based fluorescence microscope, a disposable sample processing cassette, and a custom-developed smartphone application. Our mobile phone microscope has a large field of view of 0.8 cm2 and weighs only 180 g, excluding the phone. A custom-developed smartphone application provides a user-friendly graphical interface, guiding the users to capture a fluorescence image of the sample filter membrane and analyze it automatically at our servers using an image processing algorithm and training data, consisting of >30,000 images of cysts and >100,000 images of other fluorescent particles that are captured, including, e.g. dust. The total time that it takes from sample preparation to automated cyst counting is less than an hour for each 10 ml of water sample that is tested. We compared the sensitivity and the specificity of our platform using multiple supervised classification models, including support vector machines and nearest neighbors, and demonstrated that a bootstrap aggregating (i.e. bagging) approach using raw image file format provides the best performance for automated detection of Giardia cysts. We evaluated the performance of this machine learning enabled pathogen detection device with water samples taken from different sources (e.g. tap water, non-potable water, pond water) and achieved a

  20. Comparison of supervised machine learning algorithms for waterborne pathogen detection using mobile phone fluorescence microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ceylan Koydemir Hatice

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Giardia lamblia is a waterborne parasite that affects millions of people every year worldwide, causing a diarrheal illness known as giardiasis. Timely detection of the presence of the cysts of this parasite in drinking water is important to prevent the spread of the disease, especially in resource-limited settings. Here we provide extended experimental testing and evaluation of the performance and repeatability of a field-portable and cost-effective microscopy platform for automated detection and counting of Giardia cysts in water samples, including tap water, non-potable water, and pond water. This compact platform is based on our previous work, and is composed of a smartphone-based fluorescence microscope, a disposable sample processing cassette, and a custom-developed smartphone application. Our mobile phone microscope has a large field of view of ~0.8 cm2 and weighs only ~180 g, excluding the phone. A custom-developed smartphone application provides a user-friendly graphical interface, guiding the users to capture a fluorescence image of the sample filter membrane and analyze it automatically at our servers using an image processing algorithm and training data, consisting of >30,000 images of cysts and >100,000 images of other fluorescent particles that are captured, including, e.g. dust. The total time that it takes from sample preparation to automated cyst counting is less than an hour for each 10 ml of water sample that is tested. We compared the sensitivity and the specificity of our platform using multiple supervised classification models, including support vector machines and nearest neighbors, and demonstrated that a bootstrap aggregating (i.e. bagging approach using raw image file format provides the best performance for automated detection of Giardia cysts. We evaluated the performance of this machine learning enabled pathogen detection device with water samples taken from different sources (e.g. tap water, non-potable water, pond

  1. Morphologically constrained spectral unmixing by dictionary learning for multiplex fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megjhani, Murad; Correa de Sampaio, Pedro; Leigh Carstens, Julienne; Kalluri, Raghu; Roysam, Badrinath

    2017-07-15

    Current spectral unmixing methods for multiplex fluorescence microscopy have a limited ability to cope with high spectral overlap as they only analyze spectral information over individual pixels. Here, we present adaptive Morphologically Constrained Spectral Unmixing (MCSU) algorithms that overcome this limitation by exploiting morphological differences between sub-cellular structures, and their local spatial context. The proposed method was effective at improving spectral unmixing performance by exploiting: (i) a set of dictionary-based models for object morphologies learned from the image data; and (ii) models of spatial context learned from the image data using a total variation algorithm. The method was evaluated on multi-spectral images of multiplex-labeled pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) tissue samples. The former constraint ensures that neighbouring pixels correspond to morphologically similar structures, and the latter constraint ensures that neighbouring pixels have similar spectral signatures. The average Mean Squared Error (MSE) and Signal Reconstruction Error (SRE) ratio of the proposed method was 39.6% less and 8% more, respectively, compared to the best of all other algorithms that do not exploit these spatial constraints. Open source software (MATLAB). broysam@central.uh.edu. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  2. Joint volumetric extraction and enhancement of vasculature from low-SNR 3-D fluorescence microscopy images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almasi, Sepideh; Ben-Zvi, Ayal; Lacoste, Baptiste; Gu, Chenghua; Miller, Eric L; Xu, Xiaoyin

    2017-03-01

    To simultaneously overcome the challenges imposed by the nature of optical imaging characterized by a range of artifacts including space-varying signal to noise ratio (SNR), scattered light, and non-uniform illumination, we developed a novel method that segments the 3-D vasculature directly from original fluorescence microscopy images eliminating the need for employing pre- and post-processing steps such as noise removal and segmentation refinement as used with the majority of segmentation techniques. Our method comprises two initialization and constrained recovery and enhancement stages. The initialization approach is fully automated using features derived from bi-scale statistical measures and produces seed points robust to non-uniform illumination, low SNR, and local structural variations. This algorithm achieves the goal of segmentation via design of an iterative approach that extracts the structure through voting of feature vectors formed by distance, local intensity gradient, and median measures. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of the experimental results obtained from synthetic and real data prove the effcacy of this method in comparison to the state-of-the-art enhancing-segmenting methods. The algorithmic simplicity, freedom from having a priori probabilistic information about the noise, and structural definition gives this algorithm a wide potential range of applications where i.e. structural complexity significantly complicates the segmentation problem.

  3. Membrane targeted horseradish peroxidase as a marker for correlative fluorescence and electron microscopy studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianli Li

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Synaptic dynamics and reorganization are fundamental features of synaptic plasticity both during synaptic circuit development and in the mature CNS underlying learning, memory, and experience-dependent circuit rearrangements. Combining in vivo time-lapse fluorescence imaging and retrospective electron microscopic analysis provides a powerful technique to decipher the rules governing dynamics of neuronal structure and synaptic connections. Here we have generated a membrane-targeted horseradish peroxidase that allows identification of transfected cells without obscuring the intracellular ultrastructure or organelles and in particular allows identification of synaptic sites using electron microscopy. The expression of mHRP does not affect dendritic arbor growth or dynamics of transfected neurons. Co-expression of EGFP and mHRP was used to study neuronal morphology at both the light and electron microscopic levels. mHRP expression greatly facilitates 3D reconstruction based on serial EM sections. We expect this reagent will be valuable for studying the mechanisms that guide construction of neuronal networks.

  4. Unidirectional growth of heavy meromyosin clusters along actin filaments revealed by real-time fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirakawa, Rika; Nishikawa, Yusuke; Uyeda, Taro Q P; Tokuraku, Kiyotaka

    2017-12-01

    Heavy meromyosin (HMM) forms clusters along actin filaments under low ATP concentrations. Here, we observed the growth of HMM clusters under low concentrations of ATP in real time using fluorescence microscopy. When actin filaments were loosely immobilized on positively charged lipid bilayers, clusters of HMM-GFP were readily formed. Time-lapse observation revealed that the clusters grew unidirectionally. When we used a mixture of actin filaments and copolymers of actin and acto-S1dC, a chimeric protein of actin and the myosin motor domain, HMM-GFP preferentially formed clusters along the copolymers. We thus suggest that binding of myosin motors carrying ADP and Pi induces unidirectional conformational changes in actin filaments and allosterically recruits more myosin binding. In contrast, when actin filaments and copolymers were anchored to glass substrate via stable biotin-avidin linkage, higher concentrations of HMM-GFP were required to form clusters than on the lipid bilayer. Moreover, actin filaments and copolymers were not discriminated regarding preferential cluster formation. This is presumably because the myosin-induced cooperative conformational changes in actin filaments involve changes in the helical twist. Consistent with this, cofilin clusters, which supertwist the helix, were readily formed along loosely immobilized actin filaments, but not along those anchored via biotin-avidin linkage. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. The Yeast Resource Center Public Image Repository: A large database of fluorescence microscopy images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riffle Michael

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is increasing interest in the development of computational methods to analyze fluorescent microscopy images and enable automated large-scale analysis of the subcellular localization of proteins. Determining the subcellular localization is an integral part of identifying a protein's function, and the application of bioinformatics to this problem provides a valuable tool for the annotation of proteomes. Training and validating algorithms used in image analysis research typically rely on large sets of image data, and would benefit from a large, well-annotated and highly-available database of images and associated metadata. Description The Yeast Resource Center Public Image Repository (YRC PIR is a large database of images depicting the subcellular localization and colocalization of proteins. Designed especially for computational biologists who need large numbers of images, the YRC PIR contains 532,182 TIFF images from nearly 85,000 separate experiments and their associated experimental data. All images and associated data are searchable, and the results browsable, through an intuitive web interface. Search results, experiments, individual images or the entire dataset may be downloaded as standards-compliant OME-TIFF data. Conclusions The YRC PIR is a powerful resource for researchers to find, view, and download many images and associated metadata depicting the subcellular localization and colocalization of proteins, or classes of proteins, in a standards-compliant format. The YRC PIR is freely available at http://images.yeastrc.org/.

  6. The Yeast Resource Center Public Image Repository: A large database of fluorescence microscopy images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riffle, Michael; Davis, Trisha N

    2010-05-19

    There is increasing interest in the development of computational methods to analyze fluorescent microscopy images and enable automated large-scale analysis of the subcellular localization of proteins. Determining the subcellular localization is an integral part of identifying a protein's function, and the application of bioinformatics to this problem provides a valuable tool for the annotation of proteomes. Training and validating algorithms used in image analysis research typically rely on large sets of image data, and would benefit from a large, well-annotated and highly-available database of images and associated metadata. The Yeast Resource Center Public Image Repository (YRC PIR) is a large database of images depicting the subcellular localization and colocalization of proteins. Designed especially for computational biologists who need large numbers of images, the YRC PIR contains 532,182 TIFF images from nearly 85,000 separate experiments and their associated experimental data. All images and associated data are searchable, and the results browsable, through an intuitive web interface. Search results, experiments, individual images or the entire dataset may be downloaded as standards-compliant OME-TIFF data. The YRC PIR is a powerful resource for researchers to find, view, and download many images and associated metadata depicting the subcellular localization and colocalization of proteins, or classes of proteins, in a standards-compliant format. The YRC PIR is freely available at http://images.yeastrc.org/.

  7. Comparison of in vivo and ex vivo imaging of the microvasculature with 2-photon fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinman, Joe; Koletar, Margaret; Stefanovic, Bojana; Sled, John G.

    2016-03-01

    This study evaluates 2-Photon fluorescence microscopy of in vivo and ex vivo cleared samples for visualizing cortical vasculature. Four mice brains were imaged with in vivo 2PFM. Mice were then perfused with a FITC gel and cleared in fructose. The same regions imaged in vivo were imaged ex vivo. Vessels were segmented automatically in both images using an in-house developed algorithm that accounts for the anisotropic and spatially varying PSF ex vivo. Through non-linear warping, the ex vivo image and tracing were aligned to the in vivo image. The corresponding vessels were identified through a local search algorithm. This enabled comparison of identical vessels in vivo/ex vivo. A similar process was conducted on the in vivo tracing to determine the percentage of vessels perfused. Of all the vessels identified over the four brains in vivo, 98% were present ex vivo. There was a trend towards reduced vessel diameter ex vivo by 12.7%, and the shrinkage varied between specimens (0% to 26%). Large diameter surface vessels, through a process termed 'shadowing', attenuated in vivo signal from deeper cortical vessels by 40% at 300 μm below the cortical surface, which does not occur ex vivo. In summary, though there is a mean diameter shrinkage ex vivo, ex vivo imaging has a reduced shadowing artifact. Additionally, since imaging depths are only limited by the working distance of the microscope objective, ex vivo imaging is more suitable for imaging large portions of the brain.

  8. Imaging transient formation of diffusion layers with fluorescence-enabled electrochemical microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oja, Stephen M; Zhang, Bo

    2014-12-16

    Fluorescence-enabled electrochemical microscopy (FEEM) is demonstrated as a new technique to image transient concentration profiles of redox species generated on ultramicroelectrodes (UMEs). FEEM converts an electrical signal into an optical signal by electrically coupling a conventional redox reaction to a fluorogenic reporter reaction on a closed bipolar electrode. We describe the implementation of FEEM for diffusion layer imaging and use an array of thousands of parallel bipolar electrodes to image the diffusion layers of UMEs in two and three dimensions. This new technique provides a way to image an entire 2-dimensional lateral cross section of a dynamic diffusion layer in a single experiment. By taking several of these lateral cross sections at different axial positions in the diffusion layer, a 3-dimensional image of the diffusion layer can be built. We image the diffusion layer of a 10 μm diameter carbon fiber electrode over the course of a cyclic voltammetry experiment and compare the FEEM-generated images to concentration profiles generated from numerical simulation. We also image the diffusion layer of a two electrode array consisting of two 10 μm diameter carbon fibers over the course of a potential step experiment.

  9. Comparison of fluorescence microscopy and solid-phase cytometry methods for counting bacteria in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisle, John T.; Hamilton, Martin A.; Willse, Alan R.; McFeters, Gordon A.

    2004-01-01

    Total direct counts of bacterial abundance are central in assessing the biomass and bacteriological quality of water in ecological and industrial applications. Several factors have been identified that contribute to the variability in bacterial abundance counts when using fluorescent microscopy, the most significant of which is retaining an adequate number of cells per filter to ensure an acceptable level of statistical confidence in the resulting data. Previous studies that have assessed the components of total-direct-count methods that contribute to this variance have attempted to maintain a bacterial cell abundance value per filter of approximately 106 cells filter-1. In this study we have established the lower limit for the number of bacterial cells per filter at which the statistical reliability of the abundance estimate is no longer acceptable. Our results indicate that when the numbers of bacterial cells per filter were progressively reduced below 105, the microscopic methods increasingly overestimated the true bacterial abundance (range, 15.0 to 99.3%). The solid-phase cytometer only slightly overestimated the true bacterial abundances and was more consistent over the same range of bacterial abundances per filter (range, 8.9 to 12.5%). The solid-phase cytometer method for conducting total direct counts of bacteria was less biased and performed significantly better than any of the microscope methods. It was also found that microscopic count data from counting 5 fields on three separate filters were statistically equivalent to data from counting 20 fields on a single filter.

  10. A flow bioreactor system compatible with real-time two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Nian; Riedl, Julia A; Carvajal-Berrio, Daniel A; Davis, Zackary; Monaghan, Michael G; Layland, Shannon Lee; Hinderer, Svenja; Schenke-Layland, Katja

    2017-11-17

    Bioreactors are essential cell and tissue culture tools that allow the introduction of biophysical signals into in vitro cultures. One major limitation is the need to interrupt experiments and sacrifice samples at certain time points for analyses. To address this issue, we designed a bioreactor that combines high-resolution contact-free imaging and continuous flow in a closed system that is compatible with various types of microscopes. The high-throughput fluid flow bioreactor was combined with two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (2P-FLIM) and validated. The hydrodynamics of the bioreactor chamber were characterized using COMSOL. The simulation of shear stress indicated that the bioreactor system provides homogeneous and reproducible flow conditions. The designed bioreactor was used to investigate the effects of low shear stress on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). In a scratch assay, we observed decreased migration of HUVECs under shear stress conditions. Furthermore, metabolic activity shifts from glycolysis to oxidative phosphorylation-dependent mechanisms in HUVECs cultured under low shear stress conditions were detected using 2P-FLIM. Future applications for this bioreactor range from observing cell fate development in real-time to monitoring the environmental effects on cells or metabolic changes due to drug applications. Creative Commons Attribution license.

  11. Implementation of fluorescence confocal mosaicking microscopy by ``early adopter'' Mohs surgeons and dermatologists: recent progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Manu; Rajadhyaksha, Milind; Nehal, Kishwer

    2017-02-01

    Confocal mosaicking microscopy (CMM) enables rapid imaging of large areas of fresh tissue ex vivo without the processing that is necessary for conventional histology. When performed in fluorescence mode using acridine orange (nuclear specific dye), it enhances nuclei-to-dermis contrast that enables detection of all types of basal cell carcinomas (BCCs), including micronodular and thin strands of infiltrative types. So far, this technique has been mostly validated in research settings for the detection of residual BCC tumor margins with high sensitivity of 89% to 96% and specificity of 99% to 89%. Recently, CMM has advanced to implementation and testing in clinical settings by "early adopter" Mohs surgeons, as an adjunct to frozen section during Mohs surgery. We summarize the development of CMM guided imaging of ex vivo skin tissues from bench to bedside. We also present its current state of application in routine clinical workflow not only for the assessment of residual BCC margins in the Mohs surgical setting but also for some melanocytic lesions and other skin conditions in clinical dermatology settings. Last, we also discuss the potential limitations of this technology as well as future developments. As this technology advances further, it may serve as an adjunct to standard histology and enable rapid surgical pathology of skin cancers at the bedside.

  12. Correlated fluorescence-atomic force microscopy studies of the clathrin mediated endocytosis in SKMEL cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hor, Amy; Luu, Anh; Kang, Lin; Scott, Brandon; Bailey, Elizabeth; Hoppe, Adam; Smith, Steve

    2017-02-01

    Clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) is one of the central pathways for cargo transport into cells, and plays a major role in the maintenance of cellular functions, such as intercellular signaling, nutrient intake, and turnover of plasma membrane in cells. The clathrin-mediated endocytosis process involves invagination and formation of clathrin-coated vesicles. However, the biophysical mechanisms of vesicle formation are still debated. Currently, there are two models describing membrane bending during the formation of clathrin cages: the first involves the deposition of all clathrin molecules to the plasma membrane, forming a flat lattice prior to membrane bending, whereas in the second model, membrane bending happens simultaneously as the clathrin arrives to the site to form a clathrin-coated cage. We investigate clathrin vesicle formation mechanisms through the utilization of tapping-mode atomic force microscopy for high resolution topographical imaging in neutral buffer solution of unroofed cells exposing the inner membrane, combined with fluorescence imaging to definitively label intracellular constituents with specific fluorophores (actin filaments labeled with green phalloidin and clathrin coated vesicles with the fusion protein Tq2) in SKMEL (Human Melanoma) cells. An extensive statistical survey of many hundreds of CME events, at various stages of progression, are observed via this method, allowing inferences about the dominant mechanisms active in CME in SKMEL cells. Results indicate a mixed model incorporating aspects of both the aforementioned mechanisms for CME.

  13. Examining self-compatibility in plum (Prunus domestica L. by fluorescence microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolić Dragan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Self-compatibility in 18 European plum cultivars was examined using the method of fluorescence microscopy. According to selfcompatibility, cultivars were divided into two groups: self-compatible and self-incompatible. In self-compatible cultivars the number of pistils, where pollen tubes reached the base of the style varied from 32.00% (Anna Späth to 91.18% (Wangenheims Frühzwetsche. Mean number of pollen tubes at the base of style in these cultivars ranged from 0.52 to 3.97. Cultivars were considered self-incompatible if pollen tubes stopped their growth in the style along with forming characteristic swellings at their tips. Of the studied cultivars, 13 were found to be self-compatible: Wangenheims Frühzwetsche, Cacanska Lepotica, Valjevka, California Blue, Cacanska Rodna, Italian Prune, Stanley, Požegaca, Herman, Bluefre, Jelica, Ruth Gerstetter and Anna Späth, while 5 were found to be self-incompatible: Cacanska Rana, Zimmers Frühzwetsche, Cacanska Najbolja, Pacific and President.

  14. Endolymph movement visualized with light sheet fluorescence microscopy in an acute hydrops model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Daniel J; Pastras, Christopher J; Curthoys, Ian S; Southwell, Cassandra S; Van Roon, Lieke

    2016-09-01

    There are a variety of techniques available to investigate endolymph dynamics, primarily seeking to understand the cause of endolymphatic hydrops. Here we have taken the novel approach of injecting, via a glass micropipette, fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran (FITC-dex) and artificial endolymph into scala media of anaesthetized guinea pigs, with subsequent imaging of the inner ear using Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy (LSFM) as a means to obtain highly resolved 3D visualization of fluid movements. Our results demonstrate endolymph movement into the utricle, semicircular canals and endolymphatic duct and sac when more than 2.5 μl of fluid had been injected into scala media, with no apparent movement of fluid into the perilymphatic compartments. There was no movement of endolymph into these compartments when less than 2.5 μl was injected. The remarkable uptake of the FITC-dex into the endolymphatic duct, including an absorption into the periductal channels surrounding the endolymphatic duct, highlights the functional role this structure plays in endolymph volume regulation. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Stripe artifact elimination based on nonsubsampled contourlet transform for light sheet fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiao; Zang, Yali; Dong, Di; Zhang, Liwen; Fang, Mengjie; Yang, Xin; Arranz, Alicia; Ripoll, Jorge; Hui, Hui; Tian, Jie

    2016-10-01

    Stripe artifacts, caused by high-absorption or high-scattering structures in the illumination light path, are a common drawback in both unidirectional and multidirectional light sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM), significantly deteriorating image quality. To circumvent this problem, we present an effective multidirectional stripe remover (MDSR) method based on nonsubsampled contourlet transform (NSCT), which can be used for both unidirectional and multidirectional LSFM. In MDSR, a fast Fourier transform (FFT) filter is designed in the NSCT domain to shrink the stripe components and eliminate the noise. Benefiting from the properties of being multiscale and multidirectional, MDSR succeeds in eliminating stripe artifacts in both unidirectional and multidirectional LSFM. To validate the method, MDSR has been tested on images from a custom-made unidirectional LSFM system and a commercial multidirectional LSFM system, clearly demonstrating that MDSR effectively removes most of the stripe artifacts. Moreover, we performed a comparative experiment with the variational stationary noise remover and the wavelet-FFT methods and quantitatively analyzed the results with a peak signal-to-noise ratio, showing an improved noise removal when using the MDSR method.

  16. Methylene blue is a good background stain for tuberculosis light-emitting diode fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Deun, A; Aung, K J M; Hamid Salim, A; Gumusboga, M; Nandi, P; Hossain, Md A

    2010-12-01

    Damien Foundation Bangladesh tuberculosis (TB) control projects. To compare blue ink, potassium permanganate and methylene blue background staining for transmitted light-emitting diode (LED) TB fluorescence microscopy (FM). Auramine smears made in triplicate from Ziehl-Neelsen (ZN) acid-fast bacilli (AFB) positive or negative sputum and stained with one of the background variations were read blind by LED FM. Reference laboratory rechecking of discordant series was used before and after auramine restaining as the gold standard. Of 1977 series evaluated, 991 (50.1%) were made from ZN-positive specimens. There were 919, 942 and 958 FM true-positives with blue ink, permanganate and methylene blue counterstaining, against respectively 12, 12 and 16 false-positives. Methylene blue counterstaining was more sensitive (95.6%, 95%CI 94.2-96.8) than blue ink or permanganate (92.7%, 95%CI 90.9-94.3 and 93.6%, 95%CI 91.9-95.0; respectively P < 0.01 and < 0.05). No AFB could be found in 85% and 18% of 180 discordant series without and with restaining. Methylene blue is at least equivalent to potassium permanganate counterstaining for FM using blue LED transmitted excitation and is cheaper than blue ink. Restaining of all smears prior to first re-reading may be unavoidable for blinded rechecking of auramine-stained smears for external quality assessment.

  17. Phase retrieval and 3D imaging in gold nanoparticles based fluorescence microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilovitsh, Tali; Ilovitsh, Asaf; Weiss, Aryeh M.; Meir, Rinat; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2017-02-01

    Optical sectioning microscopy can provide highly detailed three dimensional (3D) images of biological samples. However, it requires acquisition of many images per volume, and is therefore time consuming, and may not be suitable for live cell 3D imaging. We propose the use of the modified Gerchberg-Saxton phase retrieval algorithm to enable full 3D imaging of gold nanoparticles tagged sample using only two images. The reconstructed field is free space propagated to all other focus planes using post processing, and the 2D z-stack is merged to create a 3D image of the sample with high fidelity. Because we propose to apply the phase retrieving on nano particles, the regular ambiguities typical to the Gerchberg-Saxton algorithm, are eliminated. The proposed concept is then further enhanced also for tracking of single fluorescent particles within a three dimensional (3D) cellular environment based on image processing algorithms that can significantly increases localization accuracy of the 3D point spread function in respect to regular Gaussian fitting. All proposed concepts are validated both on simulated data as well as experimentally.

  18. Development of an automated asbestos counting software based on fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrov, Maxym; Ichida, Etsuko; Nishimura, Tomoki; Aoki, Kousuke; Ishida, Takenori; Hirota, Ryuichi; Ikeda, Takeshi; Kawasaki, Tetsuo; Kuroda, Akio

    2015-01-01

    An emerging alternative to the commonly used analytical methods for asbestos analysis is fluorescence microscopy (FM), which relies on highly specific asbestos-binding probes to distinguish asbestos from interfering non-asbestos fibers. However, all types of microscopic asbestos analysis require laborious examination of large number of fields of view and are prone to subjective errors and large variability between asbestos counts by different analysts and laboratories. A possible solution to these problems is automated counting of asbestos fibers by image analysis software, which would lower the cost and increase the reliability of asbestos testing. This study seeks to develop a fiber recognition and counting software for FM-based asbestos analysis. We discuss the main features of the developed software and the results of its testing. Software testing showed good correlation between automated and manual counts for the samples with medium and high fiber concentrations. At low fiber concentrations, the automated counts were less accurate, leading us to implement correction mode for automated counts. While the full automation of asbestos analysis would require further improvements in accuracy of fiber identification, the developed software could already assist professional asbestos analysts and record detailed fiber dimensions for the use in epidemiological research.

  19. Towards an automated analysis of video-microscopy images of fungal morphogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diéguez-Uribeondo, Javier

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Fungal morphogenesis is an exciting field of cell biology and several mathematical models have been developed to describe it. These models require experimental evidences to be corroborated and, therefore, there is a continuous search for new microscopy and image analysis techniques. In this work, we have used a Canny-edge-detector based technique to automate the generation of hyphal profiles and calculation of morphogenetic parameters such as diameter, elongation rates and hyphoid fitness. The results show that the data obtained with this technique are similar to published data generated with manualbased tracing techniques and that have been carried out on the same species or genus. Thus, we show that application of edge detector-based technique to hyphal growth represents an efficient and accurate method to study hyphal morphogenesis. This represents the first step towards an automated analysis of videomicroscopy images of fungal morphogenesis.La morfogénesis de los hongos es un área de estudio de gran relevancia en la biología celular y en la que se han desarrollado varios modelos matemáticos. Los modelos matemáticos de procesos biológicos precisan de pruebas experimentales que apoyen y corroboren las predicciones teóricas y, por este motivo, existe una búsqueda continua de nuevas técnicas de microscopía y análisis de imágenes para su aplicación en el estudio del crecimiento celular. En este trabajo hemos utilizado una técnica basada en un detector de contornos llamado “Canny-edge-detectorâ€� con el objetivo de automatizar la generación de perfiles de hifas y el cálculo de parámetros morfogenéticos, tales como: el diámetro, la velocidad de elongación y el ajuste con el perfil hifoide, es decir, el perfil teórico de las hifas de los hongos. Los resultados obtenidos son similares a los datos publicados a partir de técnicas manuales de trazado de contornos, generados en la misma especie y género. De esta manera

  20. Immunocytochemical analysis of cisplatin-induced platinum-DNA adducts with double-fluorescence video microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, C.; Vries, E.G.E. de; Dam, W.A.; Wilkinson, M.H.F.; Hollema, H.; Hoekstra, H.J.; Mulder, N.H.

    To detect low-level DNA platination, a sensitive immunocyto- and histochemical technique was developed using a polyclonal antibody. The antibody GPt, derived after immunization of rabbits with highly platinated DNA and purified with affinity chromatography, detected the main platinum (Pt)-containing

  1. Video-mosaicking of in vivo reflectance confocal microscopy images for noninvasive examination of skin lesion (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kose, Kivanc; Gou, Mengran; Yelamos, Oriol; Cordova, Miguel A.; Rossi, Anthony; Nehal, Kishwer S.; Camps, Octavia I.; Dy, Jennifer G.; Brooks, Dana H.; Rajadhyaksha, Milind

    2017-02-01

    In this report we describe a computer vision based pipeline to convert in-vivo reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) videos collected with a handheld system into large field of view (FOV) mosaics. For many applications such as imaging of hard to access lesions, intraoperative assessment of MOHS margins, or delineation of lesion margins beyond clinical borders, raster scan based mosaicing techniques have clinically significant limitations. In such cases, clinicians often capture RCM videos by freely moving a handheld microscope over the area of interest, but the resulting videos lose large-scale spatial relationships. Videomosaicking is a standard computational imaging technique to register, and stitch together consecutive frames of videos into large FOV high resolution mosaics. However, mosaicing RCM videos collected in-vivo has unique challenges: (i) tissue may deform or warp due to physical contact with the microscope objective lens, (ii) discontinuities or "jumps" between consecutive images and motion blur artifacts may occur, due to manual operation of the microscope, and (iii) optical sectioning and resolution may vary between consecutive images due to scattering and aberrations induced by changes in imaging depth and tissue morphology. We addressed these challenges by adapting or developing new algorithmic methods for videomosaicking, specifically by modeling non-rigid deformations, followed by automatically detecting discontinuities (cut locations) and, finally, applying a data-driven image stitching approach that fully preserves resolution and tissue morphologic detail without imposing arbitrary pre-defined boundaries. We will present example mosaics obtained by clinical imaging of both melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancers. The ability to combine freehand mosaicing for handheld microscopes with preserved cellular resolution will have high impact application in diverse clinical settings, including low-resource healthcare systems.

  2. Interfacing 3D magnetic twisting cytometry with confocal fluorescence microscopy to image force responses in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuejin; Wei, Fuxiang; Poh, Yeh-Chuin; Jia, Qiong; Chen, Junjian; Chen, Junwei; Luo, Junyu; Yao, Wenting; Zhou, Wenwen; Huang, Wei; Yang, Fang; Zhang, Yao; Wang, Ning

    2017-07-01

    Cells and tissues can undergo a variety of biological and structural changes in response to mechanical forces. Only a few existing techniques are available for quantification of structural changes at high resolution in response to forces applied along different directions. 3D-magnetic twisting cytometry (3D-MTC) is a technique for applying local mechanical stresses to living cells. Here we describe a protocol for interfacing 3D-MTC with confocal fluorescence microscopy. In 3D-MTC, ferromagnetic beads are bound to the cell surface via surface receptors, followed by their magnetization in any desired direction. A magnetic twisting field in a different direction is then applied to generate rotational shear stresses in any desired direction. This protocol describes how to combine magnetic-field-induced mechanical stimulation with confocal fluorescence microscopy and provides an optional extension for super-resolution imaging using stimulated emission depletion (STED) nanoscopy. This technology allows for rapid real-time acquisition of a living cell's mechanical responses to forces via specific receptors and for quantifying structural and biochemical changes in the same cell using confocal fluorescence microscopy or STED. The integrated 3D-MTC-microscopy platform takes ∼20 d to construct, and the experimental procedures require ∼4 d when carried out by a life sciences graduate student.

  3. Reversible optical control of cyanine fluorescence in fixed and living cells: optical lock-in detection immunofluorescence imaging microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yuling; Petchprayoon, Chutima; Mao, Shu; Marriott, Gerard

    2013-02-05

    Optical switch probes undergo rapid and reversible transitions between two distinct states, one of which may fluoresce. This class of probe is used in various super-resolution imaging techniques and in the high-contrast imaging technique of optical lock-in detection (OLID) microscopy. Here, we introduce optimized optical switches for studies in living cells under standard conditions of cell culture. In particular, a highly fluorescent cyanine probe (Cy or Cy3) is directly or indirectly linked to naphthoxazine (NISO), a highly efficient optical switch that undergoes robust, 405/532 nm-driven transitions between a colourless spiro (SP) state and a colourful merocyanine (MC) state. The intensity of Cy fluorescence in these Cy/Cy3-NISO probes is reversibly modulated between a low and high value in SP and MC states, respectively, as a result of Förster resonance energy transfer. Cy/Cy3-NISO probes are targeted to specific proteins in living cells where defined waveforms of Cy3 fluorescence are generated by optical switching of the SP and MC states. Finally, we introduce a new imaging technique (called OLID-immunofluorescence microscopy) that combines optical modulation of Cy3 fluorescence from Cy3/NISO co-labelled antibodies within fixed cells and OLID analysis to significantly improve image contrast in samples having high background or rare antigens.

  4. Correlative and integrated light and electron microscopy of in-resin GFP fluorescence, used to localise diacylglycerol in mammalian cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peddie, Christopher J.; Blight, Ken; Wilson, Emma [Electron Microscopy Unit, London Research Institute, Cancer Research UK, London WC2A 3LY (United Kingdom); Melia, Charlotte [Electron Microscopy Unit, London Research Institute, Cancer Research UK, London WC2A 3LY (United Kingdom); Cell Biophysics Laboratory, London Research Institute, Cancer Research UK, London WC2A 3LY (United Kingdom); Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Leiden University Medical Centre, 2300 RC Leiden (Netherlands); Marrison, Jo [Department of Biology, The University of York, Heslington, York (United Kingdom); Carzaniga, Raffaella [Electron Microscopy Unit, London Research Institute, Cancer Research UK, London WC2A 3LY (United Kingdom); Domart, Marie-Charlotte [Electron Microscopy Unit, London Research Institute, Cancer Research UK, London WC2A 3LY (United Kingdom); Cell Biophysics Laboratory, London Research Institute, Cancer Research UK, London WC2A 3LY (United Kingdom); O' Toole, Peter [Department of Biology, The University of York, Heslington, York (United Kingdom); Larijani, Banafshe [Cell Biophysics Laboratory, London Research Institute, Cancer Research UK, London WC2A 3LY (United Kingdom); Cell Biophysics Laboratory, Unidad de Biofísica (CSIC-UPV/EHU),Sarriena s/n, 48940 Leioa (Spain); IKERBASQUE, Basque Foundation for Science, Bilbao (Spain); Collinson, Lucy M. [Electron Microscopy Unit, London Research Institute, Cancer Research UK, London WC2A 3LY (United Kingdom)

    2014-08-01

    Fluorescence microscopy of GFP-tagged proteins is a fundamental tool in cell biology, but without seeing the structure of the surrounding cellular space, functional information can be lost. Here we present a protocol that preserves GFP and mCherry fluorescence in mammalian cells embedded in resin with electron contrast to reveal cellular ultrastructure. Ultrathin in-resin fluorescence (IRF) sections were imaged simultaneously for fluorescence and electron signals in an integrated light and scanning electron microscope. We show, for the first time, that GFP is stable and active in resin sections in vacuo. We applied our protocol to study the subcellular localisation of diacylglycerol (DAG), a modulator of membrane morphology and membrane dynamics in nuclear envelope assembly. We show that DAG is localised to the nuclear envelope, nucleoplasmic reticulum and curved tips of the Golgi apparatus. With these developments, we demonstrate that integrated imaging is maturing into a powerful tool for accurate molecular localisation to structure. - Highlights: • GFP and mCherry fluorescence are preserved in heavy-metal stained mammalian cells embedded in resin • Fluorophores are stable and intensity is sufficient for detection in ultrathin sections • Overlay of separate LM and EM images from the same ultrathin section improves CLEM protein localisation precision • GFP is stable and active in the vacuum of an integrated light and scanning EM • Integrated light and electron microscopy shows new subcellular locations of the lipid diacylglycerol.

  5. Physically-based in silico light sheet microscopy for visualizing fluorescent brain models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdellah, Marwan; Bilgili, Ahmet; Eilemann, Stefan; Markram, Henry; Schürmann, Felix

    2015-01-01

    We present a physically-based computational model of the light sheet fluorescence microscope (LSFM). Based on Monte Carlo ray tracing and geometric optics, our method simulates the operational aspects and image formation process of the LSFM. This simulated, in silico LSFM creates synthetic images of digital fluorescent specimens that can resemble those generated by a real LSFM, as opposed to established visualization methods producing visually-plausible images. We also propose an accurate fluorescence rendering model which takes into account the intrinsic characteristics of fluorescent dyes to simulate the light interaction with fluorescent biological specimen. We demonstrate first results of our visualization pipeline to a simplified brain tissue model reconstructed from the somatosensory cortex of a young rat. The modeling aspects of the LSFM units are qualitatively analysed, and the results of the fluorescence model were quantitatively validated against the fluorescence brightness equation and characteristic emission spectra of different fluorescent dyes. Modelling and simulation.

  6. Using total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy to visualize cortical actin and microtubules in the Drosophila syncytial embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Rebecca L; Rozov, Orr; Watkins, Simon C; McCartney, Brooke M

    2009-10-01

    The Drosophila syncytial embryo is a powerful developmental model system for studying dynamic coordinated cytoskeletal rearrangements. Confocal microscopy has begun to reveal more about the cytoskeletal changes that occur during embryogenesis. Total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy provides a promising new approach for the visualization of cortical events with heightened axial resolution. We have applied TIRF microscopy to the Drosophila embryo to visualize cortical microtubule and actin dynamics in the syncytial blastoderm. Here, we describe the details of this technique, and report qualitative assessments of cortical microtubules and actin in the Drosophila syncytial embryo. In addition, we identified a peak of cortical microtubules during anaphase of each nuclear cycle in the syncytial blastoderm, and using images generated by TIRF microscopy, we quantitatively analyzed microtubule dynamics during this time.

  7. GPU accelerated real-time confocal fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) based on the analog mean-delay (AMD) method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byungyeon; Park, Byungjun; Lee, Seungrag; Won, Youngjae

    2016-12-01

    We demonstrated GPU accelerated real-time confocal fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) based on the analog mean-delay (AMD) method. Our algorithm was verified for various fluorescence lifetimes and photon numbers. The GPU processing time was faster than the physical scanning time for images up to 800 × 800, and more than 149 times faster than a single core CPU. The frame rate of our system was demonstrated to be 13 fps for a 200 × 200 pixel image when observing maize vascular tissue. This system can be utilized for observing dynamic biological reactions, medical diagnosis, and real-time industrial inspection.

  8. Dynamic characterization of hydrophobic and hydrophilic solutes in oleic-acid enhanced transdermal delivery using two-photon fluorescence microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tseng, Te-Yu; Yang, Chiu-Sheng; Chen, Yang-Fang [Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Tsung-Hua [Department of Dermatology, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, New Taipei City, Taiwan (China); Dong, Chen-Yuan, E-mail: cydong@phys.ntu.edu.tw [Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Center for Quantum Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Center for Optoelectronic Biomedicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2014-10-20

    In this letter, we propose an efficient methodology of investigating dynamic properties of sulforhodamine B and rhodamine B hexyl ester molecules transporting across ex-vivo human stratum corneum with and without oleic acid enhancement. Three-dimensional, time-lapse fluorescence images of the stratum corneum can be obtained using two-photon fluorescence microscopy. Furthermore, temporal quantifications of transport enhancements in diffusion parameters can be achieved with the use of Fick's second law. Dynamic characterization of solutes transporting across the stratum corneum is an effective method for understanding transient phenomena in transdermal delivery of probe molecules, leading to improved delivery strategies of molecular species for therapeutic purposes.

  9. A simple optical fiber device for quantitative fluorescence microscopy of single living cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Graft, M.; van Graft, Marja; Oosterhuis, B.; Oosterhuis, Bernard; van der Werf, Kees; de Grooth, B.G.; Greve, Jan

    1993-01-01

    simple and relatively inexpensive system is described for obtaining quantitative fluorescence measurements on single living cells loaded with a fluorescent probe to study cell physiological processes. The light emitted from the fluorescent cells is captured by and transported through an optical

  10. Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patricia A. Moss; Les Groom

    2001-01-01

    Microscopy is the study and interpretation of images produced by a microscope. "Interpretation" is the keyword, because the microscope enables one to see structures that are too small or too close together to be resolved by the unaided eye. (The human eye cannot separate two points or lines that are closer together than 0.1 mm.) it is important to...

  11. Simultaneous cathodoluminescence and electron microscopy cytometry of cellular vesicles labeled with fluorescent nanodiamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajan, Sounderya; Pioche-Durieu, Catherine; Tizei, Luiz H. G.; Fang, Chia-Yi; Bertrand, Jean-Rémi; Le Cam, Eric; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Treussart, François; Kociak, Mathieu

    2016-06-01

    Light and Transmission Electron Microscopies (LM and TEM) hold potential in bioimaging owing to the advantages of fast imaging of multiple cells with LM and ultrastructure resolution offered by TEM. Integrated or correlated LM and TEM are the current approaches to combine the advantages of both techniques. Here we propose an alternative in which the electron beam of a scanning TEM (STEM) is used to excite concomitantly the luminescence of nanoparticle labels (a process known as cathodoluminescence, CL), and image the cell ultrastructure. This CL-STEM imaging allows obtaining luminescence spectra and imaging ultrastructure simultaneously. We present a proof of principle experiment, showing the potential of this technique in image cytometry of cell vesicular components. To label the vesicles we used fluorescent diamond nanocrystals (nanodiamonds, NDs) of size ~150 nm coated with different cationic polymers, known to trigger different internalization pathways. Each polymer was associated with a type of ND with a different emission spectrum. With CL-STEM, for each individual vesicle, we were able to measure (i) their size with nanometric resolution, (ii) their content in different ND labels, and realize intracellular component cytometry. In contrast to the recently reported organelle flow cytometry technique that requires cell sonication, CL-STEM-based image cytometry preserves the cell integrity and provides a much higher resolution in size. Although this novel approach is still limited by a low throughput, the automatization of data acquisition and image analysis, combined with improved intracellular targeting, should facilitate applications in cell biology at the subcellular level.Light and Transmission Electron Microscopies (LM and TEM) hold potential in bioimaging owing to the advantages of fast imaging of multiple cells with LM and ultrastructure resolution offered by TEM. Integrated or correlated LM and TEM are the current approaches to combine the advantages of

  12. A fast image registration approach of neural activities in light-sheet fluorescence microscopy images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Hui; Hui, Hui; Hu, Chaoen; Yang, Xin; Tian, Jie

    2017-03-01

    The ability of fast and single-neuron resolution imaging of neural activities enables light-sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) as a powerful imaging technique in functional neural connection applications. The state-of-art LSFM imaging system can record the neuronal activities of entire brain for small animal, such as zebrafish or C. elegans at single-neuron resolution. However, the stimulated and spontaneous movements in animal brain result in inconsistent neuron positions during recording process. It is time consuming to register the acquired large-scale images with conventional method. In this work, we address the problem of fast registration of neural positions in stacks of LSFM images. This is necessary to register brain structures and activities. To achieve fast registration of neural activities, we present a rigid registration architecture by implementation of Graphics Processing Unit (GPU). In this approach, the image stacks were preprocessed on GPU by mean stretching to reduce the computation effort. The present image was registered to the previous image stack that considered as reference. A fast Fourier transform (FFT) algorithm was used for calculating the shift of the image stack. The calculations for image registration were performed in different threads while the preparation functionality was refactored and called only once by the master thread. We implemented our registration algorithm on NVIDIA Quadro K4200 GPU under Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) programming environment. The experimental results showed that the registration computation can speed-up to 550ms for a full high-resolution brain image. Our approach also has potential to be used for other dynamic image registrations in biomedical applications.

  13. Identification of fluorescent compounds with non-specific binding property via high throughput live cell microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeeta Nath

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Compounds exhibiting low non-specific intracellular binding or non-stickiness are concomitant with rapid clearing and in high demand for live-cell imaging assays because they allow for intracellular receptor localization with a high signal/noise ratio. The non-stickiness property is particularly important for imaging intracellular receptors due to the equilibria involved. METHOD: Three mammalian cell lines with diverse genetic backgrounds were used to screen a combinatorial fluorescence library via high throughput live cell microscopy for potential ligands with high in- and out-flux properties. The binding properties of ligands identified from the first screen were subsequently validated on plant root hair. A correlative analysis was then performed between each ligand and its corresponding physiochemical and structural properties. RESULTS: The non-stickiness property of each ligand was quantified as a function of the temporal uptake and retention on a cell-by-cell basis. Our data shows that (i mammalian systems can serve as a pre-screening tool for complex plant species that are not amenable to high-throughput imaging; (ii retention and spatial localization of chemical compounds vary within and between each cell line; and (iii the structural similarities of compounds can infer their non-specific binding properties. CONCLUSION: We have validated a protocol for identifying chemical compounds with non-specific binding properties that is testable across diverse species. Further analysis reveals an overlap between the non-stickiness property and the structural similarity of compounds. The net result is a more robust screening assay for identifying desirable ligands that can be used to monitor intracellular localization. Several new applications of the screening protocol and results are also presented.

  14. Segmentation and Quantitative Analysis of Apoptosis of Chinese Hamster Ovary Cells from Fluorescence Microscopy Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yuncheng; Budman, Hector M; Duever, Thomas A

    2017-06-01

    Accurate and fast quantitative analysis of living cells from fluorescence microscopy images is useful for evaluating experimental outcomes and cell culture protocols. An algorithm is developed in this work to automatically segment and distinguish apoptotic cells from normal cells. The algorithm involves three steps consisting of two segmentation steps and a classification step. The segmentation steps are: (i) a coarse segmentation, combining a range filter with a marching square method, is used as a prefiltering step to provide the approximate positions of cells within a two-dimensional matrix used to store cells' images and the count of the number of cells for a given image; and (ii) a fine segmentation step using the Active Contours Without Edges method is applied to the boundaries of cells identified in the coarse segmentation step. Although this basic two-step approach provides accurate edges when the cells in a given image are sparsely distributed, the occurrence of clusters of cells in high cell density samples requires further processing. Hence, a novel algorithm for clusters is developed to identify the edges of cells within clusters and to approximate their morphological features. Based on the segmentation results, a support vector machine classifier that uses three morphological features: the mean value of pixel intensities in the cellular regions, the variance of pixel intensities in the vicinity of cell boundaries, and the lengths of the boundaries, is developed for distinguishing apoptotic cells from normal cells. The algorithm is shown to be efficient in terms of computational time, quantitative analysis, and differentiation accuracy, as compared with the use of the active contours method without the proposed preliminary coarse segmentation step.

  15. Quantifying exocytosis by combination of membrane capacitance measurements and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy in chromaffin cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ute Becherer

    Full Text Available Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRF-Microscopy allows the observation of individual secretory vesicles in real-time during exocytosis. In contrast to electrophysiological methods, such as membrane capacitance recording or carbon fiber amperometry, TIRF-Microscopy also enables the observation of vesicles as they reside close to the plasma membrane prior to fusion. However, TIRF-Microscopy is limited to the visualization of vesicles that are located near the membrane attached to the glass coverslip on which the cell grows. This has raised concerns as to whether exocytosis measured with TIRF-Microscopy is comparable to global secretion of the cell measured with membrane capacitance recording. Here we address this concern by combining TIRF-Microscopy and membrane capacitance recording to quantify exocytosis from adrenal chromaffin cells. We found that secretion measured with TIRF-Microscopy is representative of the overall secretion of the cells, thereby validating for the first time the TIRF method as a measure of secretion. Furthermore, the combination of these two techniques provides a new tool for investigating the molecular mechanism of synaptic transmission with combined electrophysiological and imaging techniques.

  16. Integrated Transmission Electron and Single-Molecule Fluorescence Microscopy Correlates Reactivity with Ultrastructure in a Single Catalyst Particle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriks, Frank C; Mohammadian, Sajjad; Ristanović, Zoran; Kalirai, Sam; Meirer, Florian; Vogt, Eelco T C; Bruijnincx, Pieter C A; Gerritsen, Hans C; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2018-01-02

    Establishing structure-activity relationships in complex, hierarchically structured nanomaterials, such as fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) catalysts, requires characterization with complementary, correlated analysis techniques. An integrated setup has been developed to perform transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and single-molecule fluorescence (SMF) microscopy on such nanostructured samples. Correlated structure-reactivity information was obtained for 100 nm thin, microtomed sections of a single FCC catalyst particle using this novel SMF-TEM high-resolution combination. High reactivity in a thiophene oligomerization probe reaction correlated well with TEM-derived zeolite locations, while matrix components, such as clay and amorphous binder material, were found not to display activity. Differences in fluorescence intensity were also observed within and between distinct zeolite aggregate domains, indicating that not all zeolite domains are equally active. © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  17. Probing the dynamics of doxorubicin-DNA intercalation during the initial activation of apoptosis by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Nai-Tzu; Wu, Chia-Yan; Chung, Chao-Yu; Hwu, Yeukuang; Cheng, Shih-Hsun; Mou, Chung-Yuan; Lo, Leu-Wei

    2012-01-01

    Doxorubicin is a potent anthracycline antibiotic, commonly used to treat a wide range of cancers. Although postulated to intercalate between DNA bases, many of the details of doxorubicin's mechanism of action remain unclear. In this work, we demonstrate the ability of fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) to dynamically monitor doxorubicin-DNA intercalation during the earliest stages of apoptosis. The fluorescence lifetime of doxorubicin in nuclei is found to decrease rapidly during the first 2 hours following drug administration, suggesting significant changes in the doxorubicin-DNA binding site's microenvironment upon apoptosis initiation. Decreases in doxorubicin fluorescence lifetimes were found to be concurrent with increases in phosphorylation of H2AX (an immediate signal of DNA double-strand breakage), but preceded activation of caspase-3 (a late signature of apoptosis) by more than 150 minutes. Time-dependent doxorubicin FLIM analyses of the effects of pretreating cells with either Cyclopentylidene-[4-(4-chlorophenyl)thiazol-2-yl)-hydrazine (a histone acetyltransferase inhibitor) or Trichostatin A (a histone deacetylase inhibitor) revealed significant correlation of fluorescence lifetime with the stage of chromatin decondensation. Taken together, our findings suggest that monitoring the dynamics of doxorubicin fluorescence lifetimes can provide valuable information during the earliest phases of doxorubicin-induced apoptosis; and implicate that FLIM can serve as a sensitive, high-resolution tool for the elucidation of intercellular mechanisms and kinetics of anti-cancer drugs that bear fluorescent moieties.

  18. Probing the dynamics of doxorubicin-DNA intercalation during the initial activation of apoptosis by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nai-Tzu Chen

    Full Text Available Doxorubicin is a potent anthracycline antibiotic, commonly used to treat a wide range of cancers. Although postulated to intercalate between DNA bases, many of the details of doxorubicin's mechanism of action remain unclear. In this work, we demonstrate the ability of fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM to dynamically monitor doxorubicin-DNA intercalation during the earliest stages of apoptosis. The fluorescence lifetime of doxorubicin in nuclei is found to decrease rapidly during the first 2 hours following drug administration, suggesting significant changes in the doxorubicin-DNA binding site's microenvironment upon apoptosis initiation. Decreases in doxorubicin fluorescence lifetimes were found to be concurrent with increases in phosphorylation of H2AX (an immediate signal of DNA double-strand breakage, but preceded activation of caspase-3 (a late signature of apoptosis by more than 150 minutes. Time-dependent doxorubicin FLIM analyses of the effects of pretreating cells with either Cyclopentylidene-[4-(4-chlorophenylthiazol-2-yl-hydrazine (a histone acetyltransferase inhibitor or Trichostatin A (a histone deacetylase inhibitor revealed significant correlation of fluorescence lifetime with the stage of chromatin decondensation. Taken together, our findings suggest that monitoring the dynamics of doxorubicin fluorescence lifetimes can provide valuable information during the earliest phases of doxorubicin-induced apoptosis; and implicate that FLIM can serve as a sensitive, high-resolution tool for the elucidation of intercellular mechanisms and kinetics of anti-cancer drugs that bear fluorescent moieties.

  19. Nucleic acid distribution pattern in avian erythrocytes and mammalian lymphocytes: comparative studies by fluorescence microscopy and digital imaging analytical techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isitor, G N; Asgarali, Z; Pouching, K

    2008-12-01

    Nucleated erythrocytes of healthy domestic chicken and ducks, and lymphocytes of healthy Sprague Dawley rats were evaluated for nucleic acid distribution pattern, employing light and fluorescence microscopy procedures, as well as digital imaging analytical methods. The results demonstrate a unique organization of nuclear DNA of mature chicken and duck erythrocytes, as well as immature duck erythrocytes, as delineated spherical nuclear bodies that mostly corresponded with euchromatin zones of the cells in routine Wright-stain blood smears. The nuclear DNA of the rat lymphocytes, on the other hand, was observed as a more diffuse green fluorescing nuclear areas, with punctate variably-sized diffuse areas of RNA red fluorescence. RNA red color fluorescence was also evident in the narrow cytoplasm of the lymphocytes, especially in large lymphocytes, in comparison with the cytoplasm of the mature avian erythrocytes that completely lacked any nucleic acid fluorescence. Nuclear RNA fluorescence was lacking in the mature chicken erythrocytes, compared with those of the mature and immature duck erythrocytes as well as lymphocytes of both avian and rats blood. The significance of these findings lies in the establishment of normal benchmarks for the nuclear and cytoplasmic nucleic acid pattern in eukaryotic cells. These normal benchmarks become valuable in rapid diagnostic situations associated with pathologies, such as the presence of viral nuclear and cytoplasmic inclusion bodies that can alter the nucleic acid pattern of the host cells, and in conditions of cellular abnormal protein aggregations. Variability of cellular nucleic acid pattern can also aid in prognostic assessments of neoplastic conditions.

  20. Performance of LED-based fluorescence microscopy to diagnose tuberculosis in a peripheral health centre in Nairobi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryline Bonnet

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sputum microscopy is the only tuberculosis (TB diagnostic available at peripheral levels of care in resource limited countries. Its sensitivity is low, particularly in high HIV prevalence settings. Fluorescence microscopy (FM can improve performance of microscopy and with the new light emitting diode (LED technologies could be appropriate for peripheral settings. The study aimed to compare the performance of LED-FM versus Ziehl-Neelsen (ZN microscopy and to assess feasibility of LED-FM at a low level of care in a high HIV prevalence country. METHODS: A prospective study was conducted in an urban health clinic in Nairobi, Kenya. Three sputum specimens were collected over 2 days from suspected TB patients. Each sample was processed with Auramine O and ZN methods and a 4(th specimen was collected for TB culture reference standard. Auramine smears were read using the same microscope, equipped with the FluoLED™ fluorescence illuminator. Inter-reader agreement, reading time and technicians' acceptability assessed feasibility. RESULTS: 497 patients were included and 1394 specimens were collected. The detection yields of LED-FM and ZN microscopy were 20.3% and 20.6% (p = 0.64, respectively. Sensitivity was 73.2% for LED-FM and 72% for ZN microscopy, p = 0.32. It was 96.7% and 95.9% for specificity, p = 0.53. Inter-reader agreement was high (kappa = 0.9. Mean reading time was three times faster than ZN microscopy with very good acceptance by technicians. CONCLUSIONS: Although it did not increase sensitivity, the faster reading time combined with very good acceptance and ease of use supports the introduction of LED-FM at the peripheral laboratory level of high TB and HIV burden countries.

  1. Performance of LED-based fluorescence microscopy to diagnose tuberculosis in a peripheral health centre in Nairobi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, Maryline; Gagnidze, Laramie; Githui, Willie; Guérin, Philippe Jean; Bonte, Laurence; Varaine, Francis; Ramsay, Andrew

    2011-02-18

    Sputum microscopy is the only tuberculosis (TB) diagnostic available at peripheral levels of care in resource limited countries. Its sensitivity is low, particularly in high HIV prevalence settings. Fluorescence microscopy (FM) can improve performance of microscopy and with the new light emitting diode (LED) technologies could be appropriate for peripheral settings. The study aimed to compare the performance of LED-FM versus Ziehl-Neelsen (ZN) microscopy and to assess feasibility of LED-FM at a low level of care in a high HIV prevalence country. A prospective study was conducted in an urban health clinic in Nairobi, Kenya. Three sputum specimens were collected over 2 days from suspected TB patients. Each sample was processed with Auramine O and ZN methods and a 4(th) specimen was collected for TB culture reference standard. Auramine smears were read using the same microscope, equipped with the FluoLED™ fluorescence illuminator. Inter-reader agreement, reading time and technicians' acceptability assessed feasibility. 497 patients were included and 1394 specimens were collected. The detection yields of LED-FM and ZN microscopy were 20.3% and 20.6% (p = 0.64), respectively. Sensitivity was 73.2% for LED-FM and 72% for ZN microscopy, p = 0.32. It was 96.7% and 95.9% for specificity, p = 0.53. Inter-reader agreement was high (kappa = 0.9). Mean reading time was three times faster than ZN microscopy with very good acceptance by technicians. Although it did not increase sensitivity, the faster reading time combined with very good acceptance and ease of use supports the introduction of LED-FM at the peripheral laboratory level of high TB and HIV burden countries.

  2. LED-FISH: Fluorescence microscopy based on light emitting diodes for the molecular analysis of Her-2/neu oncogene amplification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vollmer Ekkehard

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Light emitting diodes (LED, which are available as small monochromatic light sources with characteristic features such as maximum illumination power combined with minimum energy consumption and extremely long lifespan have already proved as a highly potential low-cost alternative for specific diagnostic applications in clinical medicine such as tuberculosis fluorescence microscopy. Likewise, the most reliable evaluation of Her-2/neu (c-erbB2 gene amplification, which has been established in the last few years for routine diagnosis in clinical pathology as determinant towards Herceptin-based treatment of patients with breast cancer, is based on fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH and corresponding high priced fluorescence equipment. In order to test the possibility to utilize the advantages of low-cost LED technology on FISH analysis of c-erbB2 gene expression for routine diagnostic purposes, the applicability of a standard bright field Carl Zeiss Axiostar Plus microscope equipped with a Fraen AFTER* LED Fluorescence Microscope Kit for the detection of Her-2/neu gene signals was compared to an advanced Nikon Eclipse 80i fluorescence microscope in combination with a conventional 100W mercury vapor lamp. Both microscopes were fitted with the same Quicam FAST CCD digital camera to unequivocally compare the quality of the captured images. C-erbB2 gene expression was analyzed in 30 different human tissue samples of primary invasive breast cancer, following formalin fixation and subsequent paraffin-embedding. The Her2/neu gene signals (green were identifiable in the tumor cells in all cases and images of equal quality were captured under almost identical conditions by 480 nm (blue LED module equipped standard Axiostar microscope as compared to conventional fluorescence microscopy. In this first attempt, these monochromatic LED elements proved in principle to be suitable for the detection of Her-2/neu gene expression by FISH. Thus, our own

  3. Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM) as a Tool to Investigate Hypoxia-Induced Protein-Protein Interaction in Living Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schützhold, Vera; Fandrey, Joachim; Prost-Fingerle, Katrin

    2018-01-01

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) is widely used as a method to investigate protein-protein interactions in living cells. A FRET pair donor fluorophore in close proximity to an appropriate acceptor fluorophore transfers emission energy to the acceptor, resulting in a shorter lifetime of the donor fluorescence. When the respective FRET donor and acceptor are fused with two proteins of interest, a reduction in donor lifetime, as detected by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM), can be taken as proof of close proximity between the fluorophores and therefore interaction between the proteins of interest. Here, we describe the usage of time-domain FLIM-FRET in hypoxia-related research when we record the interaction of the hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) subunits HIF-1α and HIF-1β in living cells in a temperature- and CO 2 -controlled environment under the microscope.

  4. Automated sub-5 nm image registration in integrated correlative fluorescence and electron microscopy using cathodoluminescence pointers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haring, Martijn T.; Liv, Nalan; Zonnevylle, A. Christiaan; Narvaez, Angela C.; Voortman, Lenard M.; Kruit, Pieter; Hoogenboom, Jacob P.

    2017-03-01

    In the biological sciences, data from fluorescence and electron microscopy is correlated to allow fluorescence biomolecule identification within the cellular ultrastructure and/or ultrastructural analysis following live-cell imaging. High-accuracy (sub-100 nm) image overlay requires the addition of fiducial markers, which makes overlay accuracy dependent on the number of fiducials present in the region of interest. Here, we report an automated method for light-electron image overlay at high accuracy, i.e. below 5 nm. Our method relies on direct visualization of the electron beam position in the fluorescence detection channel using cathodoluminescence pointers. We show that image overlay using cathodoluminescence pointers corrects for image distortions, is independent of user interpretation, and does not require fiducials, allowing image correlation with molecular precision anywhere on a sample.

  5. Direct visualization of secretion from single bovine adrenal chromaffin cells by laser-induced native fluorescence imaging microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong, W.; Yeung, E.S. [Ames Laboratory---USDOE and Department of Chemistry, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States)

    1998-03-01

    Direct visualization of the secretion process of individual bovine adrenal chromaffin cells was achieved with laser-induced native fluorescence imaging microscopy. By monitoring the native fluorescence of catecholamines excited by the 275 nm laser line with an intensified charge-coupled-device (CCD) camera, we obtained good temporal and spatial resolution simultaneously without using additional fluorescent probes. Large variations were found among individual cells in terms of the amounts of catecholamines secreted and the rates of secretion. Different regions of a cell also behave differently during the secretion process. However, the degree of this local heterogeneity is smaller than in neurons and neuralgia. The influence of deep-ultraviolet (UV) laser excitation on cells is also discussed. This quantitative imaging technique provides a useful noninvasive approach for the study of dynamic cellular changes and the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of secretory processes. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital Society for Applied Spectroscopy}

  6. Micro-Droplet Detection Method for Measuring the Concentration of Alkaline Phosphatase-Labeled Nanoparticles in Fluorescence Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rufeng Li

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper developed and evaluated a quantitative image analysis method to measure the concentration of the nanoparticles on which alkaline phosphatase (AP was immobilized. These AP-labeled nanoparticles are widely used as signal markers for tagging biomolecules at nanometer and sub-nanometer scales. The AP-labeled nanoparticle concentration measurement can then be directly used to quantitatively analyze the biomolecular concentration. Micro-droplets are mono-dispersed micro-reactors that can be used to encapsulate and detect AP-labeled nanoparticles. Micro-droplets include both empty micro-droplets and fluorescent micro-droplets, while fluorescent micro-droplets are generated from the fluorescence reaction between the APs adhering to a single nanoparticle and corresponding fluorogenic substrates within droplets. By detecting micro-droplets and calculating the proportion of fluorescent micro-droplets to the overall micro-droplets, we can calculate the AP-labeled nanoparticle concentration. The proposed micro-droplet detection method includes the following steps: (1 Gaussian filtering to remove the noise of overall fluorescent targets, (2 a contrast-limited, adaptive histogram equalization processing to enhance the contrast of weakly luminescent micro-droplets, (3 an red maximizing inter-class variance thresholding method (OTSU to segment the enhanced image for getting the binary map of the overall micro-droplets, (4 a circular Hough transform (CHT method to detect overall micro-droplets and (5 an intensity-mean-based thresholding segmentation method to extract the fluorescent micro-droplets. The experimental results of fluorescent micro-droplet images show that the average accuracy of our micro-droplet detection method is 0.9586; the average true positive rate is 0.9502; and the average false positive rate is 0.0073. The detection method can be successfully applied to measure AP-labeled nanoparticle concentration in fluorescence microscopy.

  7. Clearing up the signal: spectral imaging and linear unmixing in fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Timo; Marrison, Joanne; Hogg, Karen; O'Toole, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The ongoing progress in fluorescence labeling and in microscope instrumentation allows the generation and the imaging of complex biological samples that contain increasing numbers of fluorophores. For the correct quantitative analysis of datasets with multiple fluorescence channels, it is essential that the signals of the different fluorophores are reliably separated. Due to the width of fluorescence spectra, this cannot always be achieved using the fluorescence filters in the microscope. In such cases spectral imaging of the fluorescence data and subsequent linear unmixing allows the separation even of highly overlapping fluorophores into pure signals. In this chapter, the problems of fluorescence cross talk are defined, the concept of spectral imaging and separation by linear unmixing is described, and an overview of the microscope types suitable for spectral imaging are given.

  8. Intracellular concentration map of magnesium in whole cells by combined use of X-ray fluorescence microscopy and atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagomarsino, Stefano, E-mail: stefano.lagomarsino@cnr.it [IPCF-CNR -UOS Roma c/o Dip Fisica Universita' ' Sapienza' , P.le A. Moro, 2 Rome (Italy); Physics Department, Universita' Sapienza, P.le A. Moro, 2 Rome (Italy); Iotti, Stefano [Dipartimento di Medicina Interna, dell' Invecchiamento e Malattie Nefrologiche Universita di Bologna, Via Massarenti, 9 40138 Bologna (Italy); Istituto Nazionale Biostrutture e Biosistemi - Rome (Italy); Farruggia, Giovanna [Dipartimento di Biochimica ' G. Moruzzi' Universita di Bologna, Via Irnerio, 48 40126 Bologna (Italy); Cedola, Alessia [IFN-CNR - V. Cineto Romano, 42 00156 Rome (Italy); Trapani, Valentina [Istituto di Patologia Generale - Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore - Facolta di Medicina ' A. Gemelli' L.go F. Vito, 1 00168 Rome (Italy); Fratini, Michela [IFN-CNR - V. Cineto Romano, 42 00156 Rome (Italy); Bukreeva, Inna [IFN-CNR - V. Cineto Romano, 42 00156 Rome (Italy); Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography, Leninskii prospekt 59, Moscow, 119333 (Russian Federation); Notargiacomo, Andrea [IFN-CNR - V. Cineto Romano, 42 00156 Rome (Italy); Mastrototaro, Lucia [Istituto di Patologia Generale - Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore - Facolta di Medicina ' A. Gemelli' L.go F. Vito, 1 00168 Rome (Italy); Marraccini, Chiara [Dipartimento di Medicina Interna, dell' Invecchiamento e Malattie Nefrologiche Universita di Bologna, Via Massarenti, 9 40138 Bologna (Italy); and others

    2011-11-15

    We report a novel experimental approach to derive quantitative concentration map of light elements in whole cells by combining two complementary nano-probe methods: X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XRFM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The concentration is derived by normalizing point-by-point the elemental (here Mg) spatial distribution obtained by XRFM, by the thickness measured using AFM. The considerable difference between the elemental distribution and the concentration maps indicates that this procedure is essential to obtain reliable information on the role and function of elements in whole cells. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer X-ray fluorescence and AFM have been measured on the same de-hydrated whole cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The element distribution has been normalized point-by-point by the cell thickness. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The element (Mg) concentration map has been obtained on a whole cell. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The element concentration map is quite different from the distribution map. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Higher Mg concentration is found in the cell periphery.

  9. A Parallel Distributed-Memory Particle Method Enables Acquisition-Rate Segmentation of Large Fluorescence Microscopy Images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaser Afshar

    Full Text Available Modern fluorescence microscopy modalities, such as light-sheet microscopy, are capable of acquiring large three-dimensional images at high data rate. This creates a bottleneck in computational processing and analysis of the acquired images, as the rate of acquisition outpaces the speed of processing. Moreover, images can be so large that they do not fit the main memory of a single computer. We address both issues by developing a distributed parallel algorithm for segmentation of large fluorescence microscopy images. The method is based on the versatile Discrete Region Competition algorithm, which has previously proven useful in microscopy image segmentation. The present distributed implementation decomposes the input image into smaller sub-images that are distributed across multiple computers. Using network communication, the computers orchestrate the collectively solving of the global segmentation problem. This not only enables segmentation of large images (we test images of up to 10(10 pixels, but also accelerates segmentation to match the time scale of image acquisition. Such acquisition-rate image segmentation is a prerequisite for the smart microscopes of the future and enables online data compression and interactive experiments.

  10. A Parallel Distributed-Memory Particle Method Enables Acquisition-Rate Segmentation of Large Fluorescence Microscopy Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afshar, Yaser; Sbalzarini, Ivo F

    2016-01-01

    Modern fluorescence microscopy modalities, such as light-sheet microscopy, are capable of acquiring large three-dimensional images at high data rate. This creates a bottleneck in computational processing and analysis of the acquired images, as the rate of acquisition outpaces the speed of processing. Moreover, images can be so large that they do not fit the main memory of a single computer. We address both issues by developing a distributed parallel algorithm for segmentation of large fluorescence microscopy images. The method is based on the versatile Discrete Region Competition algorithm, which has previously proven useful in microscopy image segmentation. The present distributed implementation decomposes the input image into smaller sub-images that are distributed across multiple computers. Using network communication, the computers orchestrate the collectively solving of the global segmentation problem. This not only enables segmentation of large images (we test images of up to 10(10) pixels), but also accelerates segmentation to match the time scale of image acquisition. Such acquisition-rate image segmentation is a prerequisite for the smart microscopes of the future and enables online data compression and interactive experiments.

  11. Biological reactivity of nanoparticles: mosaics from optical microscopy videos of giant lipid vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zupanc, Jernej; Dobnikar, Andrej; Drobne, Damjana; Valant, Janez; Erdogmus, Deniz; Bas, Erhan

    2011-02-01

    Emerging fields such as nanomedicine and nanotoxicology, demand new information on the effects of nanoparticles on biological membranes and lipid vesicles are suitable as an experimental model for bio-nano interaction studies. This paper describes image processing algorithms which stitch video sequences into mosaics and recording the shapes of thousands of lipid vesicles, which were used to assess the effect of CoFe2O4 nanoparticles on the population of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine lipid vesicles. The applicability of this methodology for assessing the potential of engineered nanoparticles to affect morphological properties of lipid membranes is discussed.

  12. Non-rigid multi-frame registration of cell nuclei in live cell fluorescence microscopy image data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tektonidis, Marco; Kim, Il-Han; Chen, Yi-Chun M; Eils, Roland; Spector, David L; Rohr, Karl

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of the motion of subcellular particles in live cell microscopy images is essential for understanding biological processes within cells. For accurate quantification of the particle motion, compensation of the motion and deformation of the cell nucleus is required. We introduce a non-rigid multi-frame registration approach for live cell fluorescence microscopy image data. Compared to existing approaches using pairwise registration, our approach exploits information from multiple consecutive images simultaneously to improve the registration accuracy. We present three intensity-based variants of the multi-frame registration approach and we investigate two different temporal weighting schemes. The approach has been successfully applied to synthetic and live cell microscopy image sequences, and an experimental comparison with non-rigid pairwise registration has been carried out. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Dual-mode super-resolution imaging with stimulated emission depletion microscopy and fluorescence emission difference microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yifan; Ma, Ye; Kuang, Cuifang; Fang, Yue; Xu, Yingke; Liu, Xu; Ding, Zhihua

    2015-06-10

    Dual-mode super-resolution imaging system with two different super-resolution imaging methods, STED and FED, is presented. Electrical shutters controlled by the host computer are introduced to switch the two imaging modes. Principles of both methods are analyzed theoretically, and enhancements in the lateral resolution and SNR are demonstrated theoretically and experimentally. Results show that both imaging methods offered by the proposed system can break the diffraction barrier. Furthermore, the presented system provides a meaningful way to image fluorescent samples by a corresponding imaging mode according to the specific characteristics of samples analyzed for study. For samples that can endure high-power illumination, it is appropriate to use the STED mode to achieve a better resolution, while for samples that are vulnerable to high intensity, the FED method is a better choice because no high-power beam is needed, and the FED method can provide better resolution than STED when no high-power beam is allowed. The flexible switching of the two super-resolution imaging modes can help researchers to make most of the advantages of each imaging method. It is believed that the presented system has the potential to be widely used in future nanoscale investigations.

  14. An FFT-based Method for Attenuation Correction in Fluorescence Confocal Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roerdink, J.B.T.M.; Bakker, M.

    1993-01-01

    A problem in three-dimensional imaging by a confocal scanning laser microscope (CSLM) in the (epi)fluorescence mode is the darkening of the deeper layers due to absorption and scattering of both the excitation and the fluorescence light. In this paper we propose a new method to correct for these

  15. An FFT-based method for attenuation correction in fluorescence confocal microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.B.T.M. Roerdink (Jos); M. Bakker (Miente)

    1993-01-01

    htmlabstractA problem in three-dimensional imaging by a confocal scanning laser microscope (CSLM) in the (epi)fluorescence mode is the darkening of the deeper layers due to absorption and scattering of both the excitation and the fluorescence light. In this paper we propose a new method to correct

  16. Aro: a machine learning approach to identifying single molecules and estimating classification error in fluorescence microscopy images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Allison Chia-Yi; Rifkin, Scott A

    2015-03-27

    Recent techniques for tagging and visualizing single molecules in fixed or living organisms and cell lines have been revolutionizing our understanding of the spatial and temporal dynamics of fundamental biological processes. However, fluorescence microscopy images are often noisy, and it can be difficult to distinguish a fluorescently labeled single molecule from background speckle. We present a computational pipeline to distinguish the true signal of fluorescently labeled molecules from background fluorescence and noise. We test our technique using the challenging case of wide-field, epifluorescence microscope image stacks from single molecule fluorescence in situ experiments on nematode embryos where there can be substantial out-of-focus light and structured noise. The software recognizes and classifies individual mRNA spots by measuring several features of local intensity maxima and classifying them with a supervised random forest classifier. A key innovation of this software is that, by estimating the probability that each local maximum is a true spot in a statistically principled way, it makes it possible to estimate the error introduced by image classification. This can be used to assess the quality of the data and to estimate a confidence interval for the molecule count estimate, all of which are important for quantitative interpretations of the results of single-molecule experiments. The software classifies spots in these images well, with >95% AUROC on realistic artificial data and outperforms other commonly used techniques on challenging real data. Its interval estimates provide a unique measure of the quality of an image and confidence in the classification.

  17. High-Throughput Accurate Single-Cell Screening of Euglena gracilis with Fluorescence-Assisted Optofluidic Time-Stretch Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Baoshan; Lei, Cheng; Ito, Takuro; Jiang, Yiyue; Ozeki, Yasuyuki; Goda, Keisuke

    2016-01-01

    The development of reliable, sustainable, and economical sources of alternative fuels is an important, but challenging goal for the world. As an alternative to liquid fossil fuels, algal biofuel is expected to play a key role in alleviating global warming since algae absorb atmospheric CO2 via photosynthesis. Among various algae for fuel production, Euglena gracilis is an attractive microalgal species as it is known to produce wax ester (good for biodiesel and aviation fuel) within lipid droplets. To date, while there exist many techniques for inducing microalgal cells to produce and accumulate lipid with high efficiency, few analytical methods are available for characterizing a population of such lipid-accumulated microalgae including E. gracilis with high throughout, high accuracy, and single-cell resolution simultaneously. Here we demonstrate high-throughput, high-accuracy, single-cell screening of E. gracilis with fluorescence-assisted optofluidic time-stretch microscopy-a method that combines the strengths of microfluidic cell focusing, optical time-stretch microscopy, and fluorescence detection used in conventional flow cytometry. Specifically, our fluorescence-assisted optofluidic time-stretch microscope consists of an optical time-stretch microscope and a fluorescence analyzer on top of a hydrodynamically focusing microfluidic device and can detect fluorescence from every E. gracilis cell in a population and simultaneously obtain its image with a high throughput of 10,000 cells/s. With the multi-dimensional information acquired by the system, we classify nitrogen-sufficient (ordinary) and nitrogen-deficient (lipid-accumulated) E. gracilis cells with a low false positive rate of 1.0%. This method holds promise for evaluating cultivation techniques and selective breeding for microalgae-based biofuel production.

  18. High-Throughput Accurate Single-Cell Screening of Euglena gracilis with Fluorescence-Assisted Optofluidic Time-Stretch Microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baoshan Guo

    Full Text Available The development of reliable, sustainable, and economical sources of alternative fuels is an important, but challenging goal for the world. As an alternative to liquid fossil fuels, algal biofuel is expected to play a key role in alleviating global warming since algae absorb atmospheric CO2 via photosynthesis. Among various algae for fuel production, Euglena gracilis is an attractive microalgal species as it is known to produce wax ester (good for biodiesel and aviation fuel within lipid droplets. To date, while there exist many techniques for inducing microalgal cells to produce and accumulate lipid with high efficiency, few analytical methods are available for characterizing a population of such lipid-accumulated microalgae including E. gracilis with high throughout, high accuracy, and single-cell resolution simultaneously. Here we demonstrate high-throughput, high-accuracy, single-cell screening of E. gracilis with fluorescence-assisted optofluidic time-stretch microscopy-a method that combines the strengths of microfluidic cell focusing, optical time-stretch microscopy, and fluorescence detection used in conventional flow cytometry. Specifically, our fluorescence-assisted optofluidic time-stretch microscope consists of an optical time-stretch microscope and a fluorescence analyzer on top of a hydrodynamically focusing microfluidic device and can detect fluorescence from every E. gracilis cell in a population and simultaneously obtain its image with a high throughput of 10,000 cells/s. With the multi-dimensional information acquired by the system, we classify nitrogen-sufficient (ordinary and nitrogen-deficient (lipid-accumulated E. gracilis cells with a low false positive rate of 1.0%. This method holds promise for evaluating cultivation techniques and selective breeding for microalgae-based biofuel production.

  19. Confocal microscopy evaluation of stromal fluorescence intensity after standard and accelerated iontophoresis-assisted corneal cross-linking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzini, Manuela; Curcio, Claudia; Spoerl, Eberhard; Calienno, Roberta; Mastropasqua, Alessandra; Colasante, Martina; Mastropasqua, Rodolfo; Nubile, Mario; Mastropasqua, Leonardo

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study is to determine modifications in stromal fluorescence intensity after different corneal cross-linking (CXL) procedures and to correlate stromal fluorescence to corneal biomechanical resistance. For confocal microscopy study, 15 human cadaver corneas were examined. Three served as control (group 1), three were just soaked with iontophoresis procedure (group 2), three were treated with standard epi-off technique (group 3), and six underwent iontophoresis imbibition. Three of later six were irradiated for 30 min with 3 mW/cm(2) UVA (group 4) and three for 9 min at 10 mW/cm(2) UVA (group 5). Confocal microscopy was performed to quantify the fluorescence intensity in the cornea at different stromal depths. For biomechanical study, 30 human cadaver corneas were randomly divided into five groups and treated as previously described. Static stress-strain measurements of the corneas were performed. Iontophoresis imbibition followed by 10mW/cm(2) irradiation proved to increase stromal fluorescence into the corneal stroma and significant differences were revealed between group 3 and 5 both at 100 (p = 0.0171) and 250 µm (p = 0.0024), respectively. Biomechanical analysis showed an improvement of corneal resistance in group 5. Iontophoresis imbibition followed by accelerated irradiation increased the stromal fluorescence and is related to an improvement of biomechanical resistance. This approach may represent a new strategy to achieve greater concentrations of riboflavin without removing corneal epithelium and improve clinical results while reducing the side effects of CXL.

  20. Usefulness of light emitting diode (LED) fluorescent microscopy as a tool for rapid and effective method for the diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatun, Z; Kamal, M; Roy, C K; Sultana, T; Rahman, M Q; Azad, M B A S; Ahmed, A N N

    2011-04-01

    Tuberculosis remains world's leading cause of death from a single infectious agent. Fluorescence microscopy offers well-described benefits, comparing with brightfield microscopy, for the evaluation sputum smear samples for tuberculosis. We evaluated the diagnostic performance of fluorescence microscopy, using novel Light Emitting Diode (LED) technology as an alternative to the conventional fluorescence microscopy by Auramine stain as well as brightfield microscopy by Ziehl-Neelsen (ZN) stain. The objective of the study was to see the usefulness of LED fluorescent microscopy in the diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis. This is a prospective study consisted of 150 sputum samples from the patients of NIDCH, Mohakhali. All samples were stained by auramine and ZN stain at BSMMU and culture was done in Lowenstein-Jensen (L-J) media as gold standard at NTRL, Mohakhali. In this study total 66 (44%) out of 150 sputum specimens were positive for Mycobacterium Tuberculosis by culture. Sensitivity and specificity documented for the different modalities were 95.38% and 94.11%, respectively, for the LED assessment; 68.18% and 90.47%, respectively, for the CFM assessment; and 56.06% and 97.61%, respectively, for brightfield microscopy by ZN stain. The difference in their case detection rate was statistically significant (chi2=119.38, p<0.001). Fluorescence Microscopy (FM) is more sensitive than ZN for diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis. However, since FM is more sensitive and rapid, using this method (LED) in clinical laboratories with large specimen numbers is recommended.

  1. Radiative decay engineering 8: Coupled emission microscopy for lens-free high-throughput fluorescence detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Liangfu; Badugu, Ramachandram; Zhang, Douguo; Wang, Ruxue; Descrovi, Emiliano; Lakowicz, Joseph R

    2017-08-15

    Fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging are now used throughout the biosciences. Fluorescence microscopes, spectrofluorometers, microwell plate readers and microarray imagers all use multiple optical components to collect, redirect and focus the emission onto single point or array imaging detectors. For almost all biological samples, except those with regular nanoscale features, emission occurs in all directions. With the exception of complex microscope objectives with large collection angles (NA ≤ 0.5), all these instruments collect only a small fraction of the total emission. Because of the increasing knowledge base on fluorophores within near-field (fluorescence or leakage radiation from nanostructures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Solving the mysteries of the bacterial cell – application of novel techniques in fluorescence microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Donczew

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We have reviewed how the development of fluorescent markers, triggered by the discovery of green fluorescence protein and its other color variants leading to the establishment of methods for studies of protein interactions with application of fluorescent proteins, affected the view of bacterial cell organization. Application of the new microscopic methods allowed localization of proteins and chromosomal regions, and observation of their migration in real time. These studies revealed the spatial organization of bacterial cells which includes specific subcellular localization of proteins, the presence of dynamic cytoskeletal structures, orchestrated and active segregation of chromosomes, and spatiotemporal gene regulation.

  3. Fluorescence light microscopy of pulmonary surfactant at the air-water interface of an air bubble of adjustable size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knebel, D; Sieber, M; Reichelt, R; Galla, H-J; Amrein, M

    2002-07-01

    The structural dynamics of pulmonary surfactant was studied by epifluorescence light microscopy at the air-water interface of a bubble as a model close to nature for an alveolus. Small unilamellar vesicles of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol, a small amount of a fluorescent dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine-analog, and surfactant-associated protein C were injected into the buffer solution. They aggregated to large clusters in the presence of Ca(2+) and adsorbed from these units to the interface. This gave rise to an interfacial film that eventually became fully condensed with dark, polygonal domains in a fluorescent matrix. When now the bubble size was increased or decreased, respectively, the film expanded or contracted. Upon expansion of the bubble, the dark areas became larger to the debit of the bright matrix and reversed upon contraction. We were able to observe single domains during the whole process. The film remained condensed, even when the interface was increased to twice its original size. From comparison with scanning force microscopy directly at the air-water interface, the fluorescent areas proved to be lipid bilayers associated with the (dark) monolayer. In the lung, such multilayer phase acts as a reservoir that guarantees a full molecular coverage of the alveolar interface during the breathing cycle and provides mechanical stability to the film.

  4. Live Imaging of Cellular Internalization of Single Colloidal Particle by Combined Label-Free and Fluorescence Total Internal Reflection Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Gerard D; Vllasaliu, Driton; Falcone, Franco H; Somekh, Michael G; Stolnik, Snjezana

    2015-11-02

    In this work we utilize the combination of label-free total internal reflection microscopy and total internal reflectance fluorescence (TIRM/TIRF) microscopy to achieve a simultaneous, live imaging of single, label-free colloidal particle endocytosis by individual cells. The TIRM arm of the microscope enables label free imaging of the colloid and cell membrane features, while the TIRF arm images the dynamics of fluorescent-labeled clathrin (protein involved in endocytosis via clathrin pathway), expressed in transfected 3T3 fibroblasts cells. Using a model polymeric colloid and cells with a fluorescently tagged clathrin endocytosis pathway, we demonstrate that wide field TIRM/TIRF coimaging enables live visualization of the process of colloidal particle interaction with the labeled cell structure, which is valuable for discerning the membrane events and route of colloid internalization by the cell. We further show that 500 nm in diameter model polystyrene colloid associates with clathrin, prior to and during its cellular internalization. This association is not apparent with larger, 1 μm in diameter colloids, indicating an upper particle size limit for clathrin-mediated endocytosis.

  5. Confocal fluorescence microscopy for rapid evaluation of invasive tumor cellularity of inflammatory breast carcinoma core needle biopsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobbs, Jessica; Krishnamurthy, Savitri; Kyrish, Matthew; Benveniste, Ana Paula; Yang, Wei; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Tissue sampling is a problematic issue for inflammatory breast carcinoma, and immediate evaluation following core needle biopsy is needed to evaluate specimen adequacy. We sought to determine if confocal fluorescence microscopy provides sufficient resolution to evaluate specimen adequacy by comparing invasive tumor cellularity estimated from standard histologic images to invasive tumor cellularity estimated from confocal images of breast core needle biopsy specimens. Grayscale confocal fluorescence images of breast core needle biopsy specimens were acquired following proflavine application. A breast-dedicated pathologist evaluated invasive tumor cellularity in histologic images with hematoxylin and eosin staining and in grayscale and false-colored confocal images of cores. Agreement between cellularity estimates was quantified using a kappa coefficient. 23 cores from 23 patients with suspected inflammatory breast carcinoma were imaged. Confocal images were acquired in an average of less than 2 min per core. Invasive tumor cellularity estimated from histologic and grayscale confocal images showed moderate agreement by kappa coefficient: κ = 0.48 ± 0.09 (p fluorescence microscopy can be performed immediately following specimen acquisition and could indicate the need for additional biopsies at the initial visit.

  6. Fluorescence colocalization microscopy analysis can be improved by combining object-recognition with pixel-intensity-correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Bernhard; Hochreiter, Bernhard; Herbst, Ruth; Schmid, Johannes A

    2017-01-01

    The question whether two proteins interact with each other or whether a protein localizes to a certain region of the cell is often addressed with fluorescence microscopy and analysis of a potential colocalization of fluorescence markers. Since a mere visual estimation does not allow quantification of the degree of colocalization, different statistical methods of pixel-intensity correlation are commonly used to score it. We observed that these correlation coefficients are prone to false positive results and tend to show high values even for molecules that reside in different organelles. Our aim was to improve this type of analysis and we developed a novel method combining object-recognition based colocalization analysis with pixel-intensity correlation to calculate an object-corrected Pearson coefficient. We designed a macro for the Fiji-version of the software ImageJ and tested the performance systematically with various organelle markers revealing an improved robustness of our approach over classical methods. In order to prove that colocalization does not necessarily mean a physical interaction, we performed FRET (fluorescence resonance energy transfer) microscopy. This confirmed that non-interacting molecules can exhibit a nearly complete colocalization, but that they do not show any significant FRET signal in contrast to proteins that are bound to each other. © 2017 The Authors. Biotechnology Journal published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. A novel fluorescence microscopy approach to estimate quality loss of stored fruit fillings as a result of browning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cropotova, Janna; Tylewicz, Urszula; Cocci, Emiliano; Romani, Santina; Dalla Rosa, Marco

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to estimate the quality deterioration of apple fillings during storage. Moreover, a potentiality of novel time-saving and non-invasive method based on fluorescence microscopy for prompt ascertainment of non-enzymatic browning initiation in fruit fillings was investigated. Apple filling samples were obtained by mixing different quantities of fruit and stabilizing agents (inulin, pectin and gellan gum), thermally processed and stored for 6-month. The preservation of antioxidant capacity (determined by DPPH method) in apple fillings was indirectly correlated with decrease in total polyphenols content that varied from 34±22 to 56±17% and concomitant accumulation of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), ranging from 3.4±0.1 to 8±1mg/kg in comparison to initial apple puree values. The mean intensity of the fluorescence emission spectra of apple filling samples and initial apple puree was highly correlated (R(2)>0.95) with the HMF content, showing a good potentiality of fluorescence microscopy method to estimate non-enzymatic browning. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. [Fluorescence microscopy and HPLC assay for rapid detection of distribution and content of resveratrol in Polygonum cuspidatum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Xiao-Ying; Dong, Ai-Wen; Guan, Qiong-Yu; Wu, Feng

    2012-12-01

    To establish fluorescence microscopy combined with HPLC method for rapid detection the distribution and content of resveratrol tissues in different growth stages of Polygonum cuspidatum. Used sequential experiment to design conditions of frozen and observe of the section by fluorescence microscopy; Resveratrol was extracted by ultrasonic-assisted extraction and its content was detected by HPLC. The results showed that frozen condition for concentration of gum Arabic was from 20% (dipping time was 5 - 6 h) to 40% (2 - 5 min), the freezer temperature was -5 degrees C, and the thickness was 15 microm. Resveratrol in polygonum cuspidatum was mainly accumulated in the organs, tissues and cells of fiber and cellulose, its content in rhizomes declined as the following sequence: spinal cord > xylem > phloem > periderm; Its content declined in organ as the following sequence: buds > rhizomes > ground stem > leaves; The content of resveratrol in root increased with age. The results of fluorescence microscopic observation is in accordance with the HPLC results, indicating that the method is simple, fast and reliable, and provides a fast and reliable detection method for the determination of optimum harvesting period of Polygonum cuspidatum and acquisition of quality.

  9. Opportunities and limitations for combined fly-scan ptychography and fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Junjing; Vine, David J.; Chen, Si; Nashed, Youssef S. G.; Peterka, Tom; Ross, Rob; Vogt, Stefan; Jacobsen, Chris J.

    2015-09-01

    X-ray fluorescence offers unparalleled sensitivity for imaging the nanoscale distribution of trace elements in micrometer thick samples, while x-ray ptychography offers an approach to image weakly fluorescing lighter elements at a resolution beyond that of the x-ray lens used. These methods can be used in combination, and in continuous scan mode for rapid data acquisition when using multiple probe mode reconstruction methods. We discuss here the opportunities and limitations of making use of additional information provided by ptychography to improve x-ray fluorescence images in two ways: by using position-error-correction algorithms to correct for scan distortions in fluorescence scans, and by considering the signal-to-noise limits on previously-demonstrated ptychographic probe deconvolution methods. This highlights the advantages of using a combined approach.

  10. Single-Molecule Fluorescence Studies of Membrane Transporters Using Total Internal Reflection Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudsmits, Joris M H; van Oijen, Antoine M; Slotboom, Dirk J

    2017-01-01

    Cells are delineated by a lipid bilayer that physically separates the inside from the outer environment. Most polar, charged, or large molecules require proteins to reduce the energetic barrier for passage across the membrane and to achieve transport rates that are relevant for life. Here, we describe techniques to visualize the functioning of membrane transport proteins with fluorescent probes at the single-molecule level. First, we explain how to produce membrane-reconstituted transporters with fluorescent labels. Next, we detail the construction of a microfluidic flow cell to image immobilized proteoliposomes on a total internal reflection fluorescence microscope. We conclude by describing the methods that are needed to analyze fluorescence movies and obtain useful single-molecule data. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Fluorescent layers for characterization of sectioning microscopy with coverslipuncorrected and water immersion objectives

    KAUST Repository

    Antonini, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    We describe a new method to generate thin (thickness > 200 nm) and ultrathin (thickness < 200 nm) fluorescent layers to be used for microscope optical characterization. These layers are obtained by ultramicrotomy sectioning of fluorescent acrylic slides. This technique generates sub-resolution sheets with high fluorescence emission and uniform thickness, permitting to determine the z-response of different optical sectioning systems. Compared to the state of the art, the here proposed technique allows shorter and easier manufacturing procedure. Moreover, these fluorescent layers can be employed without protective coverslips, allowing the use of the Sectioned Imaging Property (SIP)-chart characterization method with coverslip-uncorrected objectives, water immersion objectives and micro-endoscopes. © 2014 Optical Society of America.

  12. Detection of protein interactions based on GFP fragment complementation by fluorescence microscopy and spectrofluorometry

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Torrado, Mario; Iglesias, Raquel; Mikhailov, Alexander T

    2008-01-01

    ...) spectrofluorometric detection of reassembled GFP fluorescent signals directly in lysates from cell suspension thereby avoiding, in many cases, the need for tag-affinity isolation of protein complexes; and (iii...

  13. Combined use of X-ray fluorescence microscopy, phase contrast imaging for high resolution quantitative iron mapping in inflamed cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramaccioni, C.; Procopio, A.; Farruggia, G.; Malucelli, E.; Iotti, S.; Notargiacomo, A.; Fratini, M.; Yang, Y.; Pacureanu, A.; Cloetens, P.; Bohic, S.; Massimi, L.; Cutone, A.; Valenti, P.; Rosa, L.; Berlutti, F.; Lagomarsino, S.

    2017-06-01

    X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XRFM) is a powerful technique to detect and localize elements in cells. To derive information useful for biology and medicine, it is essential not only to localize, but also to map quantitatively the element concentration. Here we applied quantitative XRFM to iron in phagocytic cells. Iron, a primary component of living cells, can become toxic when present in excess. In human fluids, free iron is maintained at 10-18 M concentration thanks to iron binding proteins as lactoferrin (Lf). The iron homeostasis, involving the physiological ratio of iron between tissues/secretions and blood, is strictly regulated by ferroportin, the sole protein able to export iron from cells to blood. Inflammatory processes induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or bacterial pathoge inhibit ferroportin synthesis in epithelial and phagocytic cells thus hindering iron export, increasing intracellular iron and bacterial multiplication. In this respect, Lf is emerging as an important regulator of both iron and inflammatory homeostasis. Here we studied phagocytic cells inflamed by bacterial LPS and untreated or treated with milk derived bovine Lf. Quantitative mapping of iron concentration and mass fraction at high spatial resolution is obtained combining X-ray fluorescence microscopy, atomic force microscopy and synchrotron phase contrast imaging.

  14. csiLSFM combines light-sheet fluorescence microscopy and coherent structured illumination for a lateral resolution below 100 nm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Bo-Jui; Perez Meza, Victor Didier; Stelzer, Ernst H K

    2017-05-09

    Light-sheet-based fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) features optical sectioning in the excitation process. It minimizes fluorophore bleaching as well as phototoxic effects and provides a true axial resolution. The detection path resembles properties of conventional fluorescence microscopy. Structured illumination microscopy (SIM) is attractive for superresolution because of its moderate excitation intensity, high acquisition speed, and compatibility with all fluorophores. We introduce SIM to LSFM because the combination pushes the lateral resolution to the physical limit of linear SIM. The instrument requires three objective lenses and relies on methods to control two counterpropagating coherent light sheets that generate excitation patterns in the focal plane of the detection lens. SIM patterns with the finest line spacing in the far field become available along multiple orientations. Flexible control of rotation, frequency, and phase shift of the perfectly modulated light sheet are demonstrated. Images of beads prove a near-isotropic lateral resolution of sub-100 nm. Images of yeast endoplasmic reticulum show that coherent structured illumination (csi) LSFM performs with physiologically relevant specimens.

  15. Physically-based in silico light sheet microscopy for visualizing fluorescent brain models

    OpenAIRE

    Abdellah, Marwan; Bilgili, Ahmet; Eilemann, Stefan; Markram, Henry; Schürmann, Felix

    2015-01-01

    Background We present a physically-based computational model of the light sheet fluorescence microscope (LSFM). Based on Monte Carlo ray tracing and geometric optics, our method simulates the operational aspects and image formation process of the LSFM. This simulated, in silico LSFM creates synthetic images of digital fluorescent specimens that can resemble those generated by a real LSFM, as opposed to established visualization methods producing visually-plausible images. We also propose an a...

  16. Light sheet-based fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) reduces phototoxic effects and provides new means for the modern life sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pampaloni, Francesco; Ansari, Nari; Girard, Philippe; Stelzer, Ernst H. K.

    2011-07-01

    Most optical technologies are applied to flat, basically two-dimensional cellular systems. However, physiological meaningful information relies on the morphology, the mechanical properties and the biochemistry of a cell's context. A cell requires the complex three-dimensional relationship to other cells. However, the observation of multi-cellular biological specimens remains a challenge. Specimens scatter and absorb light, thus, the delivery of the probing light and the collection of the signal light become inefficient; many endogenous biochemical compounds also absorb light and suffer degradation of some sort (photo-toxicity), which induces malfunction of a specimen. In conventional and confocal fluorescence microscopy, whenever a single plane, the entire specimen is illuminated. Recording stacks of images along the optical Z-axis thus illuminates the entire specimen once for each plane. Hence, cells are illuminated 10-20 and fish 100-300 times more often than they are observed. This can be avoided by changing the optical arrangement. The basic idea is to use light sheets, which are fed into the specimen from the side and overlap with the focal plane of a wide-field fluorescence microscope. In contrast to an epi-fluorescence arrangement, such an azimuthal fluorescence arrangement uses two independently operated lenses for illumination and detection. Optical sectioning and no photo-toxic damage or photo-bleaching outside a small volume close to the focal plane are intrinsic properties. Light sheet-based fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) takes advantage of modern camera technologies. LSFM can be operated with laser cutters and for fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. During the last few years, LSFM was used to record zebrafish development from the early 32-cell stage until late neurulation with sub-cellular resolution and short sampling periods (60-90 sec/stack). The recording speed was five 4-Megapixel large frames/sec with a dynamic range of 12-14 bit. We followed

  17. Direct visualization of the reaction transformation and signal amplification in a DNA molecular machine with total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Rui; Wang, Haiyan; Liu, Rui; Zhang, Shusheng

    2013-01-01

    In this study, as a proof of concept, the signal amplification in an artificial DNA molecular machine was directly visualized via total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM). The molecular machine brought about obvious morphology change in DNA nanostructures as well as signal amplifications. On one hand, through a triggered and autonomically repeated RCA, a DNA nano-complex featuring a "locked" circular DNA template (serving as raw feed) was converted into a long periodically repeated strand, i.e., the RCA products. On the other hand, this RCA was repeated in three controllable reaction phases, bring about progressive signal amplification. It was testified that the RCA products (presented as long thread-like fluorescent objects) can be easily distinguished from the inputted DNA probes (presented as fluorescent dots), thus the transformation in reaction can be visualized. Also, by quantitive counting of the aforementioned fluorescence objects, the progress of the reaction through the phases, along with time, and over the lysozyme concentration can be demonstrated through TIRFM visualization. Overall, it was demonstrated that TIRFM is an efficient approach to quantitatively visualize the biochemical processes at single-molecule level.

  18. Correlative and integrated light and electron microscopy of in-resin GFP fluorescence, used to localise diacylglycerol in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peddie, Christopher J; Blight, Ken; Wilson, Emma; Melia, Charlotte; Marrison, Jo; Carzaniga, Raffaella; Domart, Marie-Charlotte; O'Toole, Peter; Larijani, Banafshe; Collinson, Lucy M

    2014-08-