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Sample records for victrometer ionization chambers

  1. An ionization chamber with magnetic levitated electrodes

    CERN Document Server

    Kawaguchi, T

    1999-01-01

    A new type of ionization chamber which has magnetically levitated electrodes has been developed. The electrodes are supplied voltages for the repelling of ions by a battery which is also levitated with the electrodes. The characteristics of this ionization chamber are investigated in this paper.

  2. Making MUSIC: A multiple sampling ionization chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shumard, B. [Argonne National Laboratory, Building 203 H-113, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)]. E-mail: shumard@phy.anl.gov; Henderson, D.J. [Argonne National Laboratory, Building 203 H-113, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Rehm, K.E. [Argonne National Laboratory, Building 203 H-113, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Tang, X.D. [Argonne National Laboratory, Building 203 H-113, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2007-08-15

    A multiple sampling ionization chamber (MUSIC) was developed for use in conjunction with the Atlas scattering chamber (ATSCAT). This chamber was developed to study the ({alpha}, p) reaction in stable and radioactive beams. The gas filled ionization chamber is used as a target and detector for both particles in the outgoing channel (p + beam particles for elastic scattering or p + residual nucleus for ({alpha}, p) reactions). The MUSIC detector is followed by a Si array to provide a trigger for anode events. The anode events are gated by a gating grid so that only ({alpha}, p) reactions where the proton reaches the Si detector result in an anode event. The MUSIC detector is a segmented ionization chamber. The active length of the chamber is 11.95 in. and is divided into 16 equal anode segments (3.5 in. x 0.70 in. with 0.3 in. spacing between pads). The dead area of the chamber was reduced by the addition of a Delrin snout that extends 0.875 in. into the chamber from the front face, to which a mylar window is affixed. 0.5 in. above the anode is a Frisch grid that is held at ground potential. 0.5 in. above the Frisch grid is a gating grid. The gating grid functions as a drift electron barrier, effectively halting the gathering of signals. Setting two sets of alternating wires at differing potentials creates a lateral electric field which traps the drift electrons, stopping the collection of anode signals. The chamber also has a reinforced mylar exit window separating the Si array from the target gas. This allows protons from the ({alpha}, p) reaction to be detected. The detection of these protons opens the gating grid to allow the drift electrons released from the ionizing gas during the ({alpha}, p) reaction to reach the anode segment below the reaction.

  3. IKAR, a ionization chamber for WA9

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1976-01-01

    This ionization chamber arrived at CERN from Leningrad for a high precision study of hadron elastic scattering by a CERN-Clermont-Ferrand-Leningrad-Lyon-Uppsala Collaboration in the H3 beam (WA9). G.A. Korolev (third from right) looks at the drawings.

  4. Liquid ionization chambers for LET determination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaiser, Franz-Joachim; Bassler, Niels; Tölli, Heikki

    Physik. 42, 303-344,        1913. [3]    KRAMERS, H.A.: On a modification of Jaffe's theory pf column-ionization. Physica. 10, 18,        665-675, 1952. [4]    CHU, J.C.H., GRANT, WH., ALMOND, P.R.: A liquid Ionization Chamber for neutron        dosimetry. Phys. Med. Biol. 6, 25, 1133-1148, 1980....

  5. Current-voltage characteristic of parallel-plane ionization chamber with inhomogeneous ionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoyanov, D G [Faculty of Engineering and Pedagogy in Sliven, Technical University of Sofia, 59, Bourgasko Shaussee Blvd, 8800 Sliven (Bulgaria)

    2007-08-15

    The balances of particles and charges in the volume of parallel-plane ionization chamber are considered. Differential equations describing the distribution of current densities in the chamber volume are obtained. As a result of the differential equations solution an analytical form of the current-voltage characteristic of parallel-plane ionization chamber with inhomogeneous ionization in the volume is obtained.

  6. Characterization of a homemade ionization chamber for radiotherapy beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neves, Lucio P., E-mail: lpneves@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN/SP), Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes 2242, 05508-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Perini, Ana P., E-mail: aperini@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN/SP), Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes 2242, 05508-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Santos, Gelson P. dos, E-mail: gpsantos@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN/SP), Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes 2242, 05508-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Xavier, Marcos, E-mail: mxavier@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN/SP), Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes 2242, 05508-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Khoury, Helen J., E-mail: khoury@ufpe.br [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Departamento de Energia Nuclear, Av. Prof. Luiz Freire 1000, 50740-540 Recife (Brazil); Caldas, Linda V.E., E-mail: lcaldas@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN/SP), Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes 2242, 05508-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2012-07-15

    A homemade cylindrical ionization chamber was studied for routine use in therapy beams of {sup 60}Co and X-rays. Several characterization tests were performed: leakage current, saturation, ion collection efficiency, polarity effect, stability, stabilization time, chamber orientation and energy dependence. All results obtained were within international recommendations. Therefore the homemade ionization chamber presents usefulness for routine dosimetric procedures in radiotherapy beams. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A homemade ionization chamber was studied for routine use in radiotherapy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Several characterization tests were performed and the results were satisfactory. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This chamber was compared to commercial ones and the results were similar. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This chamber is suitable for calibration procedures in {sup 60}Co beams.

  7. Characterization of a CT ionization chamber for radiation field mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perini, Ana P., E-mail: aperini@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN), Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes 2242, 05508-000, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Neves, Lucio P., E-mail: lpneves@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN), Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes 2242, 05508-000, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Vivolo, Vitor, E-mail: vivolo@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN), Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes 2242, 05508-000, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Xavier, Marcos, E-mail: mxavier@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN), Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes 2242, 05508-000, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Khoury, Helen J., E-mail: hjkhoury@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Departamento de Energia Nuclear, Av. Prof. Luiz Freire 1000, 50740-540, Recife, PE (Brazil); Caldas, Linda V.E., E-mail: lcaldas@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN), Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes 2242, 05508-000, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-15

    A pencil-type ionization chamber, developed at Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), was characterized with the objective to verify the possibility of its application in radiation field mapping procedures. The characterization tests were evaluated, and the results were satisfactory. The results obtained for the X radiation field mapping with the homemade chamber were compared with those of a PTW Farmer-type chamber (TN 30011-1). The maximum difference observed in this comparison was only 1.25%, showing good agreement. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new ionization chamber was made and tested for radiation field mapping. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This ionization chamber was made using only accessible low cost materials. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The operational tests were made and the results were within the recommended limits. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The field map was compared with a commercial chamber presenting a 1.25% difference. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Our chamber presents potential for assurance reliability in calibration procedures.

  8. Characterization of a free air ionization chamber for low energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Natalia F.; Xavier, Marcos; Vivolo, Vitor; Caldas, Linda V.E., E-mail: nsilva@ipen.br, E-mail: mxavier@ipen.br, E-mail: vivolo@ipen.br, E-mail: lcaldas@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleres (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Free air ionization chambers are used by most primary metrology laboratories as primary standards of the quantities air kerma and exposure in X-ray beams. The free air ionization chamber for low energies of the Calibration Laboratory (LCI) of IPEN showed in a characterization test a problem in the set responsible for the variation of its sensitive volume. After a modification in the support of the micrometers used for the movement of the internal cylinder and the establishment of a new alignment system protocol, the tests were redone. The objective of this work was to present the results obtained in the new condition. (author)

  9. Gridded Ionization Chamber; Camara de ionizacion con reja

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manero Amoros, F.

    1962-07-01

    In the present paper the working principles of a gridded ionization chamber are given, and all the different factors that determine its resolution power are analyzed in detail. One of these devices, built in the Physics Division of the JEN and designed specially for use in measurements of alpha spectroscopy, is described. finally the main applications, in which the chamber can be used, are shown. (Author) 17 refs.

  10. Computational evaluation of a pencil ionization chamber in a standard diagnostic radiology beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendonca, Dalila Souza Costa; Neves, Lucio Pereira; Perini, Ana Paula, E-mail: anapaula.perini@ufu.br [Universidade Federal de Uberlandia (UFU), MG (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica; Santos, William S.; Caldas, Linda V.E. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Belinato, Walmir [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia da Bahia (IFBA), Vitoria da Conquista, BA (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    In this work a pencil ionization chamber was evaluated. This evaluation consisted in the determination of the influence of the ionization chamber components in its response. For this purpose, the Monte Carlo simulations and the spectrum of the standard diagnostic radiology beam (RQR5) were utilized. The results obtained, showed that the influence of the ionization chamber components presented no significant influence on the chamber response. Therefore, this ionization chamber is a good alternative for dosimetry in diagnostic radiology. (author)

  11. Examining the influence of humidity on reference ionization chamber performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwen, Malcolm R; Taank, Jaswinder

    2017-02-01

    International dosimetry protocols require measurements made with a vented ionization chamber to be corrected for the influence of air density by using the standard temperature-pressure correction factor. The effect of humidity, on the other hand, is generally ignored with the provision that the relative humidity (RH) is within certain limits (typically 20% to 80%). However, there is little experimental data in the published literature as to the true effect of humidity on modern reference-class ionization chambers. This investigation used two different radiation beams - a Co-60 irradiator and an Sr-90 check source - to examine the effect of humidity on several Farmer-type ionization chambers. An environmental cabinet controlled the humidity. For the Co-60 beam, the irradiation was external, whereas for the Sr-90 measurements, the source itself was placed within the cabinet. Extensive measurements were carried out to ensure that the experimental setup provided reproducible readings. Four chamber types were investigated: IBA FC65-G, IBA FC65-P, PTW 30013 and Exradin A19. The different wall materials provided potentially different mechanical responses (i.e., in terms of expansion/contraction) to the water content in the air. The relative humidity was varied between 8% and 98% and measurements were made with both increasing and decreasing humidity to investigate any possible hysteresis effects. Measurements in Co-60 were consistent with the published data obtained with primary standard cavity chambers in ICRU Report 31 (i.e., a very small variation 10%). The measurements in the Sr-90 field showed no dependence with the relative humidity, within the measurement uncertainties (0.05%, k = 1). Very good repeatability of the ionization current was obtained over successive wet/dry cycles, no hysteresis was observed, and there was no dependence on chamber type. These results indicate that humidity has no significant effect on these particular types of ionization chambers

  12. Study of the response of low pressure ionization chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Nebot Del Busto, E; Effinger, E; Grishin, V; Herranz Alvarez, J

    2012-01-01

    The Beam Loss Monitoring System (BLM) of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is based on parallel plate Ionization Chambers (IC) with active volume 1.5l and a nitrogen filling gas at 0.1 bar overpressure. At the largest loss locations, the ICs generate signals large enough to saturate the read-out electronics. A reduction of the active volume and filling pressure in the ICs would decrease the amount of charge collected in the electrodes, and so provide a higher saturation limit using the same electronics. This makes Little Ionization Chambers (LIC) with both reduced pressure and small active volume a good candidate for these high radiation areas. In this contribution we present measurements performed with several LIC monitors with reduced active volume and various filling pressures. These detectors were tested under various conditions with different beam setups, with standard LHC ICs used for calibration purposes

  13. Electrical design considerations for a 40MHz gas ionization chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Datte, P.; Manfredi, P.F.; Millaud, J.E.; Turner, W.C.; Placidi, M.; Ratti, L.; Speziali, V.; Traversi, G.

    2001-06-01

    The front IR quadrupole absorbers (TAS) and the IR neutral particle absorbers (TAN) in the high luminosity insertions of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) each absorb approximately 1.8 TeV of forward collision products on average per pp interaction ({approx}235W at design luminosity 1034cm-2s-1). This secondary particle flux can be exploited to provide a useful storage ring operations tool for optimization of luminosity. A novel segmented, multi-gap, pressurized gas ionization chambers is being developed for sampling the energy deposited near the maxima of the hadronic/electromagnetic showers in these absorbers. The ionization chamber must be capable of resolving individual bunch crossings at 40MHz. The ionization chamber is segmented into quadrants; each quadrant consists of sixty (40x40)mm2 Cu plates 1.0mm thick, with 0.5mm gaps. The 0.5mm gap width has been chosen so that the time for the ionization electrons to drift across the gap, is short enough to produce at the output of the shaping amplifier, a signal that returns to the base line is less than the 25ns bunch spacing of the LHC. From noise considerations in the presence of a cable the stack of plates are connected electrically 10 in parallel, 6 in series to achieve an equivalent detector capacitance Cd{approx}50pF. This type connection forms an electrode inductive Le and electrode capacitive Ce network that must be optimized to transfer charge from the chamber to the sensing amplifier. This paper describes the design of the collection electrodes optimized for 40 MHz operation.

  14. Analytical form of current-voltage characteristic of parallel-plane, cylindrical and spherical ionization chambers with homogeneous ionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoyanov, D G [Faculty of Engineering and Pedagogy in Sliven, Technical University of Sofia, 59, Bourgasko Shaussee Blvd, 8800 Sliven (Bulgaria)

    2007-11-15

    The elementary processes taking place in the formation of charged particles and their flow in parallel-plane, cylindrical and spherical geometry cases of ionization chamber are considered. On the basis of particles and charges balance a differential equation describing the distribution of current densities in the ionization chamber volume is obtained. As a result of the differential equation solution an analytical form of the current-voltage characteristic of an ionization chamber with homogeneous ionization is obtained. For the parallel-plane case comparision with experimental data is performed.

  15. An ionization chamber shower detector for the LHC luminosity monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Beche, J F; Datte, P S; Haguenauer, Maurice; Manfredi, P F; Millaud, J E; Placidi, Massimo; Ratti, L; Re, V; Riot, V J; Schmickler, Hermann; Speziali, V; Turner, W C

    2000-01-01

    The front IR quadrupole absorbers (TAS) and the IR neutral particle absorbers (TAN) in the high luminosity insertions of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) each absorb approximately 1.8 TeV of forward collision products on average per pp interaction (~235 W at design luminosity 10/sup 34/ cm/sup -2/ s/sup -1/). This secondary particle flux can be exploited to provide a useful storage ring operations tool for optimization of luminosity. A novel segmented, multi-gap, pressurized gas ionization chamber is being developed for sampling the energy deposited near the maxima of the hadronic/electromagnetic showers in these absorbers. The system design choices have been strongly influenced by optimization of signal to noise ratio and by the very high radiation environment. The ionization chambers are instrumented with low noise, fast, pulse shaping electronics to be capable of resolving individual bunch crossings at 40 MHz. Data on each bunch are to be separately accumulated over multiple bunch crossings until the desire...

  16. A measure method of the time respond function for gas ionization chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Wang Li; Qing Shang Yu

    2002-01-01

    In quick scanning radiography system, the time respond speed of array gas ionization chamber effects the image clarity directly. The author presents a measure method of the time respond function for gas ionization chamber. The image clarity will be improved by inverse convoluting the image data

  17. On the Frisch-Grid signal in ionization chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Adili, A. [EC-JRC - Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements, B-2440 Geel (Belgium); Division of Applied Nuclear Physics, Uppsala University, S-751 20 Uppsala (Sweden); Hambsch, F.-J., E-mail: Franz-Josef.HAMBSCH@ec.europa.eu [EC-JRC - Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements, B-2440 Geel (Belgium); Bencardino, R. [EC-JRC - Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements, B-2440 Geel (Belgium); Pomp, S. [Division of Applied Nuclear Physics, Uppsala University, S-751 20 Uppsala (Sweden); Oberstedt, S. [EC-JRC - Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements, B-2440 Geel (Belgium); Zeynalov, Sh. [JINR - Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, R-141980 (Russian Federation)

    2012-04-11

    A recent theoretical approach concerning the grid-inefficiency (GI) problem in Twin Frisch-Grid Ionization Chambers was validated experimentally. The experimental verification focused on the induced signal on the anode plate. In this work the investigation was extended by studying the grid signal. The aim was to verify the grid-signal dependency on the grid inefficiency {sigma}. The measurements were made with fission fragments from {sup 252}Cf(sf), using two different grids, with 1 and 2 mm wire distances, leading to the GI values: {sigma}=0.031 and {sigma}=0.083, respectively. The theoretical grid signal was confirmed because the detected grid pulse-height distribution was smaller for the larger {sigma}. By applying the additive GI correction approach, the two grid pulse heights were consistent. In the second part of the work, the corrected grid signal was used to deduce emission angles of the fission fragments. It is inconvenient to treat the grid signal by means of conventional analogue electronics, because of its bipolarity. Therefore, the anode and grid signals were summed to create a unipolar, angle-dependent pulse height. Until now the so-called summing method has been the well-established approach to deduce the angle from the grid signal. However, this operation relies strongly on an accurate and stable calibration between the two summed signals. By application of digital-signal processing, the grid signal's bipolarity is no longer an issue. Hence one can bypass the intermediate summation step of the two different pre-amplifier signals, which leads to higher stability. In this work the grid approach was compared to the summing method in three cases: {sup 252}Cf(sf), {sup 235}U(n,f) and {sup 234}U(n,f). By using the grid directly, the angular resolution was found equally good in the first case but gave 7% and 20% improvements, respectively, in the latter cases.

  18. Investigating the contamination of accelerated radioactive beams with an ionization chamber at MINIBALL

    CERN Document Server

    Zidarova, Radostina

    2017-01-01

    My summer student project involved the operation and calibration of an ionization chamber, which was used at MINIBALL for investigating and determining the contamination in post-accelerated radioactive beams used for Coulomb excitation and transfer reaction experiments.

  19. Experimental and Monte Carlo evaluation of an ionization chamber in a {sup 60}Co beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perini, Ana P.; Neves, Lucio Pereira, E-mail: anapaula.perini@ufu.br [Universidade Federal de Uberlandia (INFIS/UFU), MG (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica; Santos, William S.; Caldas, Linda V.E. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleres (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Recently a special parallel-plate ionization chamber was developed and characterized at the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares. The operational tests presented results within the recommended limits. In order to determine the influence of some components of the ionization chamber on its response, Monte Carlo simulations were carried out. The experimental and simulation results pointed out that the dosimeter evaluated in the present work has favorable properties to be applied to {sup 60}Co dosimetry at calibration laboratories. (author)

  20. On line high dose static position monitoring by ionization chamber detector for industrial gamma irradiators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, Ary A. [Universidade Estadual de Londrina-Depto de Fisica, Rodovia Celso Garcia Cid, km 38, 086051-990 Londrina (Brazil); Vieira, Jose M. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares-IPEN/CNEN-SP, Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2242-Cidade Universitaria, 05508-900 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Hamada, Margarida M. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares-IPEN/CNEN-SP, Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2242-Cidade Universitaria, 05508-900 Sao Paulo (Brazil)], E-mail: mmhamada@ipen.br

    2010-04-15

    A 1 cm{sup 3} cylindrical ionization chamber was developed to measure high doses on line during the sample irradiation in static position, in a {sup 60}Co industrial plant. The developed ionization chamber showed to be suitable for use as a dosimeter on line. A good linearity of the detector was found between the dose and the accumulated charge, independently of the different dose rates caused by absorbing materials.

  1. Pencil beam proton radiography using a multilayer ionization chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farace, Paolo; Righetto, Roberto; Meijers, Arturs

    2016-06-01

    A pencil beam proton radiography (PR) method, using a commercial multilayer ionization chamber (MLIC) integrated with a treatment planning system (TPS) was developed. A Giraffe (IBA Dosimetry) MLIC (±0.5 mm accuracy) was used to obtain pencil beam PR by delivering spots uniformly positioned at a 5.0 mm distance in a 9  ×  9 square of spots. PRs of an electron-density (with tissue-equivalent inserts) phantom and a head phantom were acquired. The integral depth dose (IDD) curves of the delivered spots were computed by the TPS in a volume of water simulating the MLIC, and virtually added to the CT at the exit side of the phantoms. For each spot, measured and calculated IDD were overlapped in order to compute a map of range errors. On the head-phantom, the maximum dose from PR acquisition was estimated. Additionally, on the head phantom the impact on the range errors map was estimated in case of a 1 mm position misalignment. In the electron-density phantom, range errors were within 1 mm in the soft-tissue rods, but greater in the dense-rod. In the head-phantom the range errors were  -0.9  ±  2.7 mm on the whole map and within 1 mm in the brain area. On both phantoms greater errors were observed at inhomogeneity interfaces, due to sensitivity to small misalignment, and inaccurate TPS dose computation. The effect of the 1 mm misalignment was clearly visible on the range error map and produced an increased spread of range errors (-1.0  ±  3.8 mm on the whole map). The dose to the patient for such PR acquisitions would be acceptable as the maximum dose to the head phantom was  <2cGyE. By the described 2D method, allowing to discriminate misalignments, range verification can be performed in selected areas to implement an in vivo quality assurance program.

  2. Pre-evaluation of an ionization chamber for clinical radiotherapy dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neves, Lucio P.; Perini, Ana P.; Xavier, Marcos; Caldas, Linda V.E., E-mail: mxavier@ipen.b, E-mail: lcaldas@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Khoury, Helen J., E-mail: khoury@ufpe.b [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear

    2011-07-01

    This work presents some pre-operational tests for characterization of a new homemade ionization chamber developed at the Calibration Laboratory of Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP). This chamber was designed for use in radiotherapy dosimetry. To study the utilization of this chamber in radiotherapy, some tests were undertaken: short- and medium-term stabilities, saturation curve, recombination loss, polarity effect and leakage current. All results obtained in these tests were within the international recommendations. (author)

  3. Performance of a parallel plate ionization chamber in beta radiation dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonio, Patricia L.; Caldas, Linda V.E., E-mail: patrilan@ipen.b, E-mail: lcaldas@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    A homemade parallel plate ionization chamber with graphite collecting electrode, and developed for use in mammography beams, was tested in relation to its usefulness in beta radiation dosimetry at the Calibration Laboratory of IPEN. Characterization tests of this ionization chamber were performed, using the Sr-90 + Y-90, Kr-85 and Pm-147 sources of a beta secondary standard system. The results of saturation, leakage current, stabilization time, response stability, linearity, angular dependence, and calibration coefficients are within the recommended limits of international recommendations that indicate that this chamber may be used for beta radiation dosimetry. (author)

  4. Development and evaluation of a Monte Carlo Code System for analysis of ionization chamber responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, J.O.; Gabriel, T.A.

    1987-07-01

    This document reports on the development and testing of a Monte Carlo code system for calculating the response of an ionization chamber to mixed neutron and photon radiation environment. The code system, Monte Carlo Ionization Chamber Analysis Package (MICAP), determines the neutron, photon, and total responses of the ionization chamber to the mixed field radiation environment. The Monte Carlo method performs accurate simulations of the physical processes involved in detecting radiation using ionization chambers, and eliminates limitations inherent in approximate methods. To evaluate MICAP, comparisons were made with results obtained using other code systems and with experimental results. Separate comparisons with other code systems verified the validity of the neutron, photon, and charged particle transport processes and the nuclear models used to describe the individual neutron reactions, respectively. Comparisons with mono-energetic photon calibration experiments and with mixed neutron and photon radiation experiments verified the applicability of MICAP for analyzing the response of ionization chambers to mixed field radiation environments. 47 refs., 23 figs., 20 tabs.

  5. Evaluation of a plane-parallel ionization chamber for low-energy radiotherapy beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perini, Ana Paula; Neves, Lucio Pereira; Santos, William de Souza; Caldas, Linda V.E., E-mail: aperini@ipen.br, E-mail: lpneves@ipen.br, E-mail: wssantos@ipen.br, E-mail: lcaldas@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    A plane-parallel ionization chamber, with a sensitive volume of 6.3 cm{sup 3}, developed at the Calibration Laboratory of IPEN (LCI), was utilized to verify the possibility of its application in low-energy X-ray beam qualities for radiotherapy (T-qualities). This homemade ion chamber was manufactured using polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) coated with graphite, and co-axial cables. In order to evaluate the performance of this ionization chamber, some characterization tests were performed: short- and medium-term stability, leakage current, saturation, ion collection efficiency, polarity effect and linearity of response. The maximum value obtained in the short-term stability test was 0.2%, in accordance with the limit value of 0.3% provided by the IEC 60731 standard. The saturation curve was obtained varying the applied voltage from -400 V to +400 V, in steps of 50 V, using the charge collecting time of 20 s. From the saturation curve two other characteristics were analyzed: the polarity effect and the ion collection efficiency, with results within the international recommendations. The leakage current of the ionization chamber was measured in time intervals of 20 minutes, before and after its irradiations, and all the results obtained were in agreement with the IEC 60731 standard. The linearity of response was verified utilizing the T-50(b) radiation quality, and the ionization chamber was exposed to different air kerma rates. The response of the ionization chamber presented a linear behavior. Therefore, all results were considered satisfactory, within international recommendations, indicating that this homemade ionization chamber presents potential routine use in dosimetry of low-energy radiotherapy beams. (author)

  6. Initial test results of an ionization chamber shower detector for a LHC luminosity monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Datte, P S; Haguenauer, Maurice; Manfredi, P F; Manghisoni, M; Millaud, J E; Placidi, Massimo; Ratti, L; Riot, V J; Schmickler, Hermann; Speziali, V; Traversi, G; Turner, W C

    2003-01-01

    A novel segmented multigap pressurized gas ionization chamber is being developed for optimization of the luminosity of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The ionization chambers are to be installed in the front quadrupole and 0 degrees neutral particle absorbers in the high luminosity interaction regions (IRs) and sample the energy deposited near the maxima of the hadronic/electromagnetic showers in these absorbers. The ionization chambers are instrumented with low noise, fast pulse-shaping electronics to be capable of resolving individual bunch crossings at 40 MHz. In this paper, we report the initial results of our second test of this instrumentation in a super proton synchrotron (SPS) external proton beam. Single 300 GeV protons are used to simulate the hadronic/electromagnetic showers produced by the forward collision products from the interaction regions of the LHC. The capability of instrumentation to measure the luminosity of individual bunches in a 40 MHz bunch train is demonstrated. (10 refs) .

  7. Influence of the radioactive source position inside the well-type ionization chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuahara, L.T.; Correa, E.L.; Potiens, M.P.A., E-mail: liliankuahara@usp.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleres (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The activimeter, instrument used in radionuclide activity measurement, consists primarily of a well type ionization chamber coupled to a special electronic device. Its response, after calibration, is shown in activity units (Becquerel or Curie). The goal of this study is to verify radioactive source position influence over activity measured by this instrument. Radioactive sources measurements were made at different depths inside the ionization chamber well. Results showed maximum variation of -23 %, -28 % and -15 % for {sup 57}Co, {sup 133}Ba and {sup 137}Cs, respectively. (author)

  8. Performance of three pencil-type ionization chambers (10 cm) in computed tomography standard beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, Maysa C. de; Xavier, Marcos; Caldas, Linda V.E., E-mail: mcastro@ipen.br, E-mail: mxavier@ipen.br, E-mail: lcaldas@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleres (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The use of computed tomography (CT) has increased over the years, thus generating a concern about the doses received by patients undergoing this procedure. Therefore, it is necessary to perform routinely beam dosimetry with the use of a pencil-type ionization chamber. This detector is the most utilized in the procedures of quality control tests on this kind of equipment. The objective of this work was to perform some characterization tests in standard CT beams, as the saturation curve, polarity effect, ion collection efficiency and linearity of response, using three ionization chambers, one commercial and two developed at the IPEN. (author)

  9. Development and testing of a Monte Carlo code system for analysis of ionization chamber responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, J.O.; Gabriel, T.A.

    1986-01-01

    To predict the perturbation of interactions between radiation and material by the presence of a detector, a differential Monte Carlo computer code system entitled MICAP was developed and tested. This code system determines the neutron, photon, and total response of an ionization chamber to mixed field radiation environments. To demonstrate the ability of MICAP in calculating an ionization chamber response function, a comparison was made to 05S, an established Monte Carlo code extensively used to accurately calibrate liquid organic scintillators. Both code systems modeled an organic scintillator with a parallel beam of monoenergetic neutrons incident on the scintillator. (LEW)

  10. Response and Monte Carlo evaluation of a reference ionization chamber for radioprotection level at calibration laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Lucio P.; Vivolo, Vitor; Perini, Ana P.; Caldas, Linda V. E.

    2015-07-01

    A special parallel plate ionization chamber, inserted in a slab phantom for the personal dose equivalent Hp(10) determination, was developed and characterized in this work. This ionization chamber has collecting electrodes and window made of graphite, and the walls and phantom made of PMMA. The tests comprise experimental evaluation following international standards and Monte Carlo simulations, employing the PENELOPE code to evaluate the design of this new dosimeter. The experimental tests were conducted employing the radioprotection level quality N-60 established at the IPEN, and all results were within the recommended standards.

  11. A magnetically levitated electrode ionization chamber of the noncontact measurement type

    CERN Document Server

    Kawaguchi, T

    2002-01-01

    A new type of ionization chamber with levitated electrode has been developed. In this ionization chamber, an ion-collection electrode levitates in the air without getting any physical support from the insulator. The electrode is charged by an electrostatic charger without physical contact. The charge of the electrode is read out at a Faraday cage periodically at a given time interval without physical contact. Because its electrode levitates, the ionization chamber produces no background current caused by leaks or piezo current. In addition, as the charging of its electrode and the read-out of its charge are carried out without physical contact, no irregular charge or contact potential difference due to the chattering between electrode and contact point occurs. Through experiments, it was found that this ionization chamber was able to measure the gamma-ray dose such as the environmental radiation with a high degree of sensitivity. The minimum detectable value of ionization current when accumulated for 1 h is a...

  12. SCALP: Scintillating ionization chamber for ALPha particle production in neutron induced reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galhaut, B.; Durand, D.; Lecolley, F. R.; Ledoux, X.; Lehaut, G.; Manduci, L.; Mary, P.

    2017-09-01

    The SCALP collaboration has the ambition to build a scintillating ionization chamber in order to study and measure the cross section of the α-particle production in neutron induced reactions. More specifically on 16O and 19F targets. Using the deposited energy (ionization) and the time of flight measurement (scintillation) with a great accuracy, all the nuclear reaction taking part on this project will be identify.

  13. Development of a Grid Ionization Chamber for a Dram of α Ray

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YANG Lu;WANG Qiang;ZHENG Yu-lai;WANG Guo-bao

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This article introduced the parallel grid ionization chamber that used to measure the α radioactivity, which had a independent vacuum system. The system was composed of main body of the chamber, gas-filled and electronics system. Energy resolution was 26 keV for 239Pu, background was 10 counts for one hour from 4 MeV to 6 MeV energy range, the stability of 24 hours was less than 0.5% . The chamber can measure the energy of nuclide and analyze the energy spectrum structure to identify nuclear.

  14. The stability of liquid-filled matrix ionization chamber electronic portal imaging devices for dosimetry purposes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Louwe, R. J. W.; Tielenburg, R.; van Ingen, K. M.; Mijnheer, B. J.; van Herk, M. B.

    2004-01-01

    This study was performed to determine the stability of liquid-filled matrix ionization chamber (LiFi-type) electronic portal imaging devices (EPID) for dosimetric purposes. The short- and long-term stability of the response was investigated, as well as the importance of factors influencing the

  15. A user's guide to MICAP: A Monte Carlo Ionization Chamber Analysis Package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, J.O.; Gabriel, T.A.

    1988-01-01

    A collection of computer codes entitled MICAP - A Monte Carlo Ionization Chamber Analysis Package has been developed to determine the response of a gas-filled cavity ionization chamber in a mixed neutron and photon radiation environment. In particular, MICAP determines the neutron, photon, and total response of the ionization chamber. The applicability of MICAP encompasses all aspects of mixed field dosimetry analysis including detector design, preexperimental planning and post-experimental analysis. The MICAP codes include: RDNDF for reading and processing ENDF/B-formatted cross section files, MICRO for manipulating microscopic cross section data sets, MACRO for creating macroscopic cross section data sets, NEUTRON for transporting neutrons, RECOMB for calculating correction data due to ionization chamber saturation effects, HEAVY for transporting recoil heavy ions and charged particles, PECSP for generating photon and electron cross section and material data sets, PHOTPREP for generating photon source input tapes, and PHOTON for transporting photons and electrons. The codes are generally tailored to provide numerous input options, but whenever possible, default values are supplied which yield adequate results. All of the MICAP codes function independently, and are operational on the ORNL IBM 3033 computer system. 14 refs., 27 figs., 49 tabs.

  16. A comparison of different experimental methods for general recombination correction for liquid ionization chambers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Jonas; Kaiser, Franz-Joachim; Gomez, Faustino

    2012-01-01

    Radiation dosimetry of highly modulated dose distributions requires a detector with a high spatial resolution. Liquid filled ionization chambers (LICs) have the potential to become a valuable tool for the characterization of such radiation fields. However, the effect of an increased recombination...

  17. Measurement of ionization chamber absorbed dose k(Q) factors in megavoltage photon beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwen, Malcolm R

    2010-05-01

    Absorbed dose beam quality conversion factors (k(Q) factors) were obtained for 27 different types of ionization chamber. The aim was to obtain objective evidence on the performance of a wide range of chambers currently available, and potentially used for reference dosimetry, and to investigate the accuracy of the k(Q) calculation algorithm used in the TG-51 protocol. Measurements were made using the 60Co irradiator and Elekta Precise linac facilities at the National Research Council of Canada. The objective was to characterize the chambers over the range of energies applicable to TG-51 and determine whether each chamber met the requirements of a reference-class instrument. Chamber settling, leakage current, ion recombination and polarity, and waterproofing sleeve effects were investigated, and absorbed dose calibration coefficients were obtained for 60Co and 6, 10, and 25 MV photon beams. Only thimble-type chambers were considered in this investigation and were classified into three groups: (i) Reference chambers ("standard" 0.6 cm3 Farmer-type chambers and their derivatives traditionally used for beam output calibration); (ii) scanning chambers (typically 0.1 cm3 volume chambers used for beam commissioning with 3-D scanning phantoms); and (iii) microchambers (very small volume ion chambers (measured and calculated k(Q) factors was within 0.4%; for some chambers, differences of more than 1% were seen that may be related to the recombination/polarity results. Use of such chambers could result in significant errors in the determination of reference dose in the clinic. Based on the experimental evidence obtained here, specification for a reference-class ionization chamber could be developed that would minimize the error in using a dosimetry protocol with calculated beam quality conversion factors. The experimental k(Q) data obtained here for a wide range of thimble chambers can be used when choosing suitable detectors for reference dosimetry and are intended to be

  18. The Time Response of Glass Resistive Plate Chambers to Heavily Ionizing Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Artamonov, A; Bogomilov, M; Booth, C; Borghi, S; Catanesi, M G; Chimenti, P; Gastaldi, Ugo; Giani, S; Graulich, J S; Grégoire, G; Grossheim, A; Guglielmi, A; Ivantchenko, V; Kolev, D; Meurer, C; Mezzetto, M; Panman, J; Popov, B; Radicioni, E; Schroeter, R; Temnikov, P; Chernyaev, E; Tsenov, R; Tsukerman, I; Wiebusch, C

    2007-01-01

    The HARP system of resistive plate chambers (RPCs) was designed to perform particle identification by the measurement of the difference in the time-of-flight of different particles. In previous papers an apparent discrepancy was shown between the response of the RPCs to minimum ionizing pions and heavily ionizing protons. Using the kinematics of elastic scattering off a hydrogen target a controlled beam of low momentum recoil protons was directed onto the chambers. With this method the trajectory and momentum, and hence the time-of-flight of the protons can be precisely predicted without need for a measurement of momentum of the protons. It is demonstrated that the measurement of the time-of-arrival of particles by the thin gas-gap glass RPC system of the HARP experiment depends on the primary ionization deposited by the particle in the detector.

  19. Evaluation of linearity of response and angular dependence of an ionization chamber for dosimetry in computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perini, Ana P.; Neves, Lucio P.; Xavier, Marcos; Caldas, Linda V.E., E-mail: mxavier@ipen.b, E-mail: lcaldas@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Khoury, Helen J., E-mail: khoury@ufpe.b [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear

    2011-07-01

    In this paper a pencil-type ionization chamber designed and manufactured at Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares was evaluated for dosimetric applications in computed tomography beams. To evaluate the performance of this chamber two tests were undertaken: linearity of response and angular dependence. The results obtained in these tests showed good results, within the international recommendations. Moreover, this homemade ionization chamber is easy to manufacture, of low cost and efficient. (author)

  20. SU-E-T-623: Polarity Effects for Small Volume Ionization Chambers in Cobalt-60 Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Y; Bhatnagar, J; Huq, M Saiful [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute and UPMC Cancer Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the polarity effects for small volume ionization chambers in {sup 60}Co gamma-ray beams using the Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion. Methods: Measurements were made for 7 small volume ionization chambers (a PTW 31016, an Exradin A14, 2 Capintec PR0-5P, and 3 Exradin A16) using a PTW UNIDOSwebline Universal Dosemeter and an ELEKTA solid water phantom with proper inserts. For each ion chamber, the temperature/pressure corrected electric charge readings were obtained for 16 voltage values (±50V, ±100V, ±200V, ±300V, ±400V, ±500V, ±600V, ±700V). For each voltage, a five-minute leakage charge reading and a series of 2-minute readings were continuously taken during irradiation until 5 stable signals (less than 0.05% variation) were obtained. The average of the 5 reading was then used for the calculation of the polarity corrections at the voltage and for generating the saturation curves. Results: The polarity effects are more pronounced at high or low voltages than at the medium voltages for all chambers studied. The voltage dependence of the 3 Exradin A16 chambers is similar in shape. The polarity corrections for the Exradin A16 chambers changes rapidly from about 1 at 500V to about 0.98 at 700V. The polarity corrections for the 7 ion chambers at 300V are in the range from 0.9925 (for the PTW31016) to 1.0035 (for an Exradin A16). Conclusion: The polarity corrections for certain micro-chambers are large even at normal operating voltage.

  1. Towards reference dosimetry for the MR-linac: magnetic field correction of the ionization chamber reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, K.; van Asselen, B.; Kok, J. G. M.; Aalbers, A. H. L.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.; Raaymakers, B. W.

    2013-09-01

    In the UMC Utrecht a prototype MR-linac has been installed. The system consists of a 6 MV Elekta (Crawley, UK) linear accelerator and a 1.5 T Philips (Best, The Netherlands) Achieva MRI system. This paper investigates the feasibility to correct the ionization chamber reading for the magnetic field within the dosimetry calibration method described by Almond et al (1999 Med. Phys. 26 1847-70). Firstly, the feasibility of using an ionization chamber in an MR-linac was assessed by investigating possible influences of the magnetic field on NE2571 Farmer-type ionization chamber characteristics: linearity, repeatability, orientation in the magnetic field; and AAPM TG51 correction factor for voltage polarity and ion recombination. We found that these AAPM correction factors for the NE2571 chamber were not influenced by the magnetic field. Secondly, the influence of the permanent 1.5 T magnetic field on the NE2571 chamber reading was quantified. The reading is influenced by the magnetic field; therefore, a correction factor has been added. For the standardized setup used in this paper, the NE2571 chamber reading increases by 4.9% (± 0.2%) due to the transverse 1.5 T magnetic field. Dosimetry measurements in an MR-linac are feasible, if a setup-specific magnetic field correction factor (P1.5 T) for the charge reading is introduced. For the setup investigated in this paper, the P1.5 T has a value of 0.953.

  2. Hard disk drive based microsecond x-ray chopper for characterization of ionization chambers and photodiodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Müller, O., E-mail: o.mueller@uni-wuppertal.de; Lützenkirchen-Hecht, D.; Frahm, R. [Bergische Universität Wuppertal, Gaußstraße 20, Wuppertal 42119 (Germany)

    2015-03-15

    A fast X-ray chopper capable of producing ms long X-ray pulses with a typical rise time of few μs was realized. It is ideally suited to investigate the temporal response of X-ray detectors with response times of the order of μs to ms, in particular, any kind of ionization chambers and large area photo diodes. The drive mechanism consists of a brushless DC motor and driver electronics from a common hard disk drive, keeping the cost at an absolute minimum. Due to its simple construction and small dimensions, this chopper operates at home lab based X-ray tubes and synchrotron radiation sources as well. The dynamics of the most important detectors used in time resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy, namely, ionization chambers and Passivated Implanted Planar Silicon photodiodes, were investigated in detail. The results emphasize the applicability of this X-ray chopper.

  3. Characterization of Tandem systems of commercial ionization chambers for radiation dosimetry (radiotherapy level)

    CERN Document Server

    Galhardo, E P

    1998-01-01

    The use of X rays for radiotherapy purposes is of great importance for Medicine, and it is necessary to control periodically the performance of the ionization chambers and the radiation beams in order to obtain the best results. The verification of the beam characteristics is made by using standard dosimetry procedures which include the determination of the half-value layers and the exposure rates or the absorbed dose rates in air. Several Tandem systems were set up and tested, using commercial ionization chambers in the energy interval from 14 up to 130 KeV at the Instrumentation Calibration Laboratory of IPEN and at other three institutions, in substitution to the routine conventional procedure of determination of half-value layers using absorbers. The obtained results show the usefulness of these Tandem system for the routine dosimetric procedures of radiotherapy X radiation beams.

  4. Validation of the neutron and gamma fields in the JSI TRIGA reactor using in-core fission and ionization chambers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žerovnik, Gašper; Kaiba, Tanja; Radulović, Vladimir; Jazbec, Anže; Rupnik, Sebastjan; Barbot, Loïc; Fourmentel, Damien; Snoj, Luka

    2015-02-01

    CEA developed fission chambers and ionization chambers were utilized at the JSI TRIGA reactor to measure neutron and gamma fields. The measured axial fission rate distributions in the reactor core are generally in good agreement with the calculated values using the Monte Carlo model of the reactor thus verifying both the computational model and the fission chambers. In future, multiple absolutely calibrated fission chambers could be used for more accurate online reactor thermal power monitoring. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. On the use of unshielded cables in ionization chamber dosimetry for total-skin electron therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhe; Agostinelli, Alfred; Nath, Ravinder

    1998-03-01

    The dosimetry of total-skin electron therapy (TSET) usually requires ionization chamber measurements in a large electron beam (up to ). Exposing the chamber's electric cable, its connector and part of the extension cable to the large electron beam will introduce unwanted electronic signals that may lead to inaccurate dosimetry results. While the best strategy to minimize the cable-induced electronic signal is to shield the cables and its connector from the primary electrons, as has been recommended by the AAPM Task Group Report 23 on TSET, cables without additional shielding are often used in TSET dosimetry measurements for logistic reasons, for example when an automatic scanning dosimetry is used. This paper systematically investigates the consequences and the acceptability of using an unshielded cable in ionization chamber dosimetry in a large TSET electron beam. In this paper, we separate cable-induced signals into two types. The type-I signal includes all charges induced which do not change sign upon switching the chamber polarity, and type II includes all those that do. The type-I signal is easily cancelled by the polarity averaging method. The type-II cable-induced signal is independent of the depth of the chamber in a phantom and its magnitude relative to the true signal determines the acceptability of a cable for use under unshielded conditions. Three different cables were evaluated in two different TSET beams in this investigation. For dosimetry near the depth of maximum buildup, the cable-induced dosimetry error was found to be less than 0.2% when the two-polarity averaging technique was applied. At greater depths, the relative dosimetry error was found to increase at a rate approximately equal to the inverse of the electron depth dose. Since the application of the two-polarity averaging technique requires a constant-irradiation condition, it was demonstrated that an additional error of up to 4% could be introduced if the unshielded cable's spatial

  6. Development and characterization of a new graphite ionization chamber for dosimetry of {sup 60}Co beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neves, Lucio Pereira; Perini, Ana Paula; Santos, William de Souza; Caldas, Linda V.E., E-mail: lpneves@ipen.br, E-mail: aperini@ipen.br, E-mail: wssantos@ipen.br, E-mail: lcaldas@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    Ionization chambers are the most employed dosimeters for precise measurements, as those required in radiotherapy. In this work, a new graphite ionization chamber was developed and characterized in order to compose a primary standard system for the beam dosimetry of the {sup 60}Co sources. This dosimeter is a cylindrical type ionization chamber, with walls and collecting electrode made of high-purity graphite, and the insulators and stem made of Teflon®. The walls are 3.0 mm thick, and it has a sensitive volume of 1.40 cm{sup 3}. The characterization was divided in two steps: experimental and Monte Carlo evaluations. This new dosimeter was evaluated in relation to its saturation curve, ion collection efficiency, polarity effect, short- and medium-term stabilities, leakage current, stabilization time, linearity of response and angular dependence. All results presented values within the established limits. The second part of the characterization process involved the determination of the correction factors, obtained by Monte Carlo simulations. Comparing these correction factors values with those from other primary standard laboratories, the highest differences were those for the wall and stem correction factors. The air-kerma rate of the {sup 60}Co source was determined with this new dosimeter and with the IPEN standard system, presenting a difference of 1.7%. These results indicate that this new dosimeter may be used as a primary standard system for {sup 60}Co gamma beams. (author)

  7. Dosimetric characteristics of the novel 2D ionization chamber array OCTAVIUS Detector 1500.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelljes, T S; Harmeyer, A; Reuter, J; Looe, H K; Chofor, N; Harder, D; Poppe, B

    2015-04-01

    The dosimetric properties of the OCTAVIUS Detector 1500 (OD1500) ionization chamber array (PTW-Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany) have been investigated. A comparative study was carried out with the OCTAVIUS Detector 729 and OCTAVIUS Detector 1000 SRS arrays. The OD1500 array is an air vented ionization chamber array with 1405 detectors in a 27 × 27 cm(2) measurement area arranged in a checkerboard pattern with a chamber-to-chamber distance of 10 mm in each row. A sampling step width of 5 mm can be achieved by merging two measurements shifted by 5 mm, thus fulfilling the Nyquist theorem for intensity modulated dose distributions. The stability, linearity, and dose per pulse dependence were investigated using a Semiflex 31013 chamber (PTW-Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany) as a reference detector. The effective depth of measurement was determined by measuring TPR curves with the array and a Roos chamber type 31004 (PTW-Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany). Comparative output factor measurements were performed with the array, the Semiflex 31010 ionization chamber and the Diode 60012 (both PTW-Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany). The energy dependence of the OD1500 was measured by comparing the array's readings to those of a Semiflex 31010 ionization chamber for varying mean photon energies at the depth of measurement, applying to the Semiflex chamber readings the correction factor kNR for nonreference conditions. The Gaussian lateral dose response function of a single array detector was determined by searching the convolution kernel suitable to convert the slit beam profiles measured with a Diode 60012 into those measured with the array's central chamber. An intensity modulated dose distribution measured with the array was verified by comparing a OD1500 measurement to TPS calculations and film measurements. The stability and interchamber sensitivity variation of the OD1500 array were within ±0.2% and ±0.58%, respectively. Dose linearity was within 1% over the range from 5 to 1000 MU. The

  8. Study of the replacement correction factors for ionization chamber dosimetry by Monte Carlo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lilie

    In ionization chamber radiation dosimetry, the introduction of the ion chamber into medium will unavoidably distort the radiation field near the chamber because the chamber cavity material (air) is different from the medium. A replacement correction factor, Prepl was introduced in order to correct the chamber readings to give an accurate radiation dose in the medium without the presence of the chamber. Generally it is very hard to measure the values of Prepl since they are intertwined with the chamber wall effect. In addition, the P repl values always come together with the stopping-power ratio of the two media involved. This makes the problem of determining the P repl values even more complicated. Monte Carlo simulation is an ideal method to investigate the replacement correction factors. In this study, four different methods of calculating the values of Prepl by Monte Carlo simulation are discussed. Two of the methods are designated as 'direct' methods in the sense that the evaluation of the stopping-power ratio is not necessary. The systematic uncertainties of the two direct methods are estimated to be about 0.1-0.2% which comes from the ambiguous definition of the energy cutoff Delta used in the Spencer-Attix cavity theory. The two direct methods are used to calculate the values of P repl for both plane-parallel chambers and cylindrical thimble chambers in either electron beams or photon beams. The calculation results are compared to measurements. For electron beams, good agreements are obtained. For thimble chambers in photon beams, significant discrepancies are observed between calculations and measurements. The experiments are thus investigated and the procedures are simulated by the Monte Carlo method. It is found that the interpretation of the measured data as the replacement correction factors in dosimetry protocols are not correct. In applying the calculation to the BIPM graphite chamber in a 60Co beam, the calculated values of P repl differ from those

  9. An evaluation of ionization chambers for the relative dosimetry of kilovoltage x-ray beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Robin; Mo, Zhao; Haque, Mamoon; Baldock, Clive

    2009-09-01

    In this work, the authors have evaluated ten different ionization chambers for the relative dosimetry of kilovoltage x-ray beams in the energy range of 50-280 kVp. Percentage depth doses in water and relative detector response (in Solid Water and in air) were measured for each of the x-ray beams studied using a number of chambers. Measured depth dose data were compared with Monte Carlo calculated depth doses using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo package and the BEAMnrc user code. The accuracy of the phase space files generated by BEAMnrc was verified by calculating the half-value layer and comparing with the measured half-value layer of each x-ray beam. The results indicate that the Advanced Markus, Markus, NACP, and Roos parallel plate ionization chambers were suitable for the measurement of depth dose data in this beam quality range with an uncertainty of less than 3%, including in the regions close to the water surface. While the relative detector response of the Farmer and scanning thimble chambers exhibited a better energy response, they were not suitable for depth dose measurements in the first 5 mm below the water surface with differences of up to 12% in the surface dose measurement for the 50 kVp x-ray beam. These differences were due to dose artifacts generated by the chamber size and the dose gradient. However, at depths greater than 5 mm, the Farmer and thimble scanning chambers gave uncertainties of less than 3% for the depth dose measurements for all beam energies. The PTW PinPoint 31006 chamber was found to give varying dose differences of up to 8% depending on the x-ray beam energy; this was attributed to the steel central electrode. The authors recommend that one of the parallel plate ionization chambers investigated be used to determine depth dose data for kilovoltage x-ray beams in the energy range studied and give correct dose information close to the surface and at depth in the water phantom.

  10. Dependence with air density of the response of the PTW SourceCheck ionization chamber for low energy brachytherapy sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornero-López, Ana M; Guirado, Damián; Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Ruiz-Arrebola, Samuel; Simancas, Fernando; Gazdic-Santic, Maja; Lallena, Antonio M

    2013-12-01

    Air-communicating well ionization chambers are commonly used to assess air kerma strength of sources used in brachytherapy. The signal produced is supposed to be proportional to the air density within the chamber and, therefore, a density-independent air kerma strength is obtained when the measurement is corrected to standard atmospheric conditions using the usual temperature and pressure correction factor. Nevertheless, when assessing low energy sources, the ionization chambers may not fulfill that condition and a residual density dependence still remains after correction. In this work, the authors examined the behavior of the PTW 34051 SourceCheck ionization chamber when measuring the air kerma strength of (125)I seeds. Four different SourceCheck chambers were analyzed. With each one of them, two series of measurements of the air kerma strength for (125)I selectSeed(TM) brachytherapy sources were performed inside a pressure chamber and varying the pressure in a range from 747 to 1040 hPa (560 to 780 mm Hg). The temperature and relative humidity were kept basically constant. An analogous experiment was performed by taking measurements at different altitudes above sea level. Contrary to other well-known ionization chambers, like the HDR1000 PLUS, in which the temperature-pressure correction factor overcorrects the measurements, in the SourceCheck ionization chamber they are undercorrected. At a typical atmospheric situation of 933 hPa (700 mm Hg) and 20 °C, this undercorrection turns out to be 1.5%. Corrected measurements show a residual linear dependence on the density and, as a consequence, an additional density dependent correction must be applied. The slope of this residual linear density dependence is different for each SourceCheck chamber investigated. The results obtained by taking measurements at different altitudes are compatible with those obtained with the pressure chamber. Variations of the altitude and changes in the weather conditions may produce

  11. Space charge effect measurements for a multi-channel ionization chamber used for synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasr, Amgad

    2012-07-18

    In vivo coronary angiography is one of the techniques used to investigate the heart diseases, by using catheter to inject a contrast medium of a given absorption coefficient into the heart vessels. Taking X-ray images produced by X-ray tube or synchrotron radiation for visualizing the blood in the coronary arteries. As the synchrotron radiation generated by the relativistic charged particle at the bending magnets, which emits high intensity photons in comparison with the X-ray tube. The intensity of the synchrotron radiation is varies with time. However for medical imaging it's necessary to measure the incoming intensity with the integrated time. The thesis work includes building a Multi-channel ionization chamber which can be filled with noble gases N{sub 2}, Ar and Xe with controlled inner pressure up to 30 bar. This affects the better absorption efficiency in measuring the high intensity synchrotron beam fluctuation. The detector is a part of the experimental setup used in the k-edge digital subtraction angiography project, which will be used for correcting the angiography images taken by another detector at the same time. The Multi-channel ionization chamber calibration characteristics are measured using 2 kW X-ray tube with molybdenum anode with characteristic energy of 17.44 keV. According to the fast drift velocity of the electrons relative to the positive ions, the electrons will be collected faster at the anode and will induce current signals, while the positive ions is still drifting towards the cathode. However the accumulation of the slow ions inside the detector disturbs the homogeneous applied electric field and leads to what is known a space charge effect. In this work the space charge effect is measured with very high synchrotron photons intensity from EDR beam line at BESSYII. The strong attenuation in the measured amplitude signal occurs when operating the chamber in the recombination region. A plateau is observed at the amplitude signal when

  12. SU-E-T-114: Characterization of the Spatial Response Functions of Ionization Chambers for Photon Beam Dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looe, H K; Stelljes, T S; Harder, D; Poppe, B

    2012-06-01

    The finite extension of an ionization chamber gives rise to a spatial averaging effect, known as the "volume effect". In order to provide the appropriate corrections, the response functions along its lateral and longitudinal directions are characterized using Gaussian distributions, whose standard deviations slat and slong have been determined for a large set of clinical dosimeters. Nine cylindrical ionization chambers, two parallel-plate chambers and two 2D ionization chamber arrays have been examined by scanning rectangular photon fields along their short axes. The true profiles D(x) were known from scans with a small Si diode. The ionization chambers were aligned with their symmetry axes either perpendicular or parallel to the scan direction in order to obtain slat and slong separately. In a search process, D(x) was numerically convolved with normalized one-dimensional Gaussian kernels K(x) of varying s. The best fit between the convolution product D(x) * K(x) and the measured profile M(x) of the ionization chamber was used to determine parameters slat and slong of the Gaussian kernels. For both the lateral and longitudinal directions, very good agreement was found between M(x) and the convolution products of D(x) with Gaussian kernels K(x). For all chambers, their 2s values are similar to the cavity dimensions, which means that the "tails" of the Gaussian response functions reach into the exterior of the chambers, - an effect of the ranges of the secondary electrons. At higher photon energies response functions K(x) are slightly wider, but no detectable depth dependence has been observed. We have shown that the response functions of ionization chambers can be described by Gaussian distributions, confirming earlier observations, and we determined their standard deviations in both the lateral and longitudinal directions. Using these response functions, appropriate correction methods determined to eliminate the volume effect can be applied. © 2012 American

  13. Multi-Sampling Ionization Chamber (MUSIC) for measurements of fusion reactions with radioactive beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carnelli, P.F.F. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Laboratorio TANDAR, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, B1650KNA, San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas, Av. Rivadavia 1917, C1033AAJ Buenos Aires (Argentina); Almaraz-Calderon, S. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Rehm, K.E., E-mail: rehm@anl.gov [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Albers, M.; Alcorta, M.; Bertone, P.F.; Digiovine, B.; Esbensen, H. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Fernández Niello, J. [Laboratorio TANDAR, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, B1650KNA, San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Universidad Nacional de San Martín, Campus Miguelete, B1650BWA San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Henderson, D.; Jiang, C.L. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Lai, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Marley, S.T.; Nusair, O.; Palchan-Hazan, T.; Pardo, R.C. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Paul, M. [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem (Israel); Ugalde, C. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2015-11-01

    A detection technique for high-efficiency measurements of fusion reactions with low-intensity radioactive beams was developed. The technique is based on a Multi-Sampling Ionization Chamber (MUSIC) operating as an active target and detection system, where the ionization gas acts as both target and counting gas. In this way, we can sample an excitation function in an energy range determined by the gas pressure, without changing the beam energy. The detector provides internal normalization to the incident beam and drastically reduces the measuring time. In a first experiment we tested the performance of the technique by measuring the {sup 10,13,15}C+{sup 12}C fusion reactions at energies around the Coulomb barrier.

  14. (n,{alpha}) cross section measurement of gaseous sample using gridded ionization chamber. Cross section determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanami, Toshiya; Baba, Mamoru; Saito, Keiichiro; Ibara, Yasutaka; Hirakawa, Naohiro [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1997-03-01

    We are developing a method of (n,{alpha}) cross section measurement using gaseous samples in a gridded ionization chamber (GIC). This method enables cross section measurements in large solid angle without the distortion by the energy loss in a sample, but requires a method to estimate the detection efficiency. We solve this problem by using GIC signals and a tight neutron collimation. The validity of this method was confirmed through the {sup 12}C(n,{alpha}{sub 0}){sup 9}Be measurement. We applied this method to the {sup 16}O(n,{alpha}){sup 13}C cross section around 14.1 MeV. (author)

  15. (n, {alpha}) cross section measurement of light nuclei using gridded ionization chamber and gaseous sample

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanami, Toshiya; Baba, Mamoru; Saito, Keiichiro; Ibara, Yasutaka; Yamazaki, Tetsuro; Sato, Jun; Hirakawa, Naohiro [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan)

    1998-03-01

    We have developed a measuring method of (n, {alpha}) cross section by using gaseous sample in a gridded ionization chamber. In this study, we measured the {sup 12}C(n, {alpha}{sub 0}) and the {sup 16}O(n, {alpha}{sub 0}), (n, {alpha}{sub 123}) cross sections for En=11.5 and 12.8 MeV neutrons. We also deduced the {sup 12}C(n, x{alpha}) spectrum and analyzed the data by a kinematic calculation combined with the reaction data of the {sup 12}C(n, n`3{alpha}). (author)

  16. Application of patent BR102013018500-0 in well type ionization chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sousa, C.H.S.; Peixoto, J.G.P., E-mail: chenriques2@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The definition of the radioactive sample position in a well type ionization chamber is the largest source of uncertainty in the measurement of quantity activity. The determination of this parameter in two activimeter helped to improve their accuracies, from 2.62 and 2.59% to 3.87 and 1.74%, with and without the use of the positioning device, concluding, that with their use has reached an uncertainty of U = 0.2276 and 0.2677 % (k = 2) 95.45%. (author)

  17. Proton energy determination using activated yttrium foils and ionization chambers for activity assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila-Rodriguez, M. A.; Rajander, J.; Lill, J.-O.; Gagnon, K.; Schlesinger, J.; Wilson, J. S.; McQuarrie, S. A.; Solin, O.

    2009-05-01

    Excitation functions of the 89Y(p, xn) nuclear reactions were measured up to 18 MeV by the conventional activation method using the stacked-foil technique, and the irradiation of single foils. Activity assays of the irradiated foils were performed via ionization chamber and gamma spectroscopy methods. Activity ratios of the activation products were measured in two different facilities and evaluated for use as a practical and simple method for proton energy determinations. Cross section values measured in this work were compared with published data and with theoretical values as determined by the nuclear reaction model code EMPIRE II. In general, there was a good agreement between the experimental and theoretical values of the cross section data. Activity ratios of the isomeric and ground state of 89Zr measured via ionization chamber were found to be useful for proton energy determinations in the energy range from 7 to 15 MeV. Proton energies above 13 MeV were accurately determined using the 89gZr/ 88Zr and 89gZr/ 88Y activity ratios measured via gamma spectroscopy.

  18. Charge collection efficiency in ionization chambers exposed to electron beams with high dose per pulse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laitano, R F; Guerra, A S; Pimpinella, M; Caporali, C; Petrucci, A

    2006-12-21

    The correction for charge recombination was determined for different plane-parallel ionization chambers exposed to clinical electron beams with low and high dose per pulse, respectively. The electron energy was nearly the same (about 7 and 9 MeV) for any of the beams used. Boag's two-voltage analysis (TVA) was used to determine the correction for ion losses, k(s), relevant to each chamber considered. The presence of free electrons in the air of the chamber cavity was accounted for in determining k(s) by TVA. The determination of k(s) was made on the basis of the models for ion recombination proposed in past years by Boag, Hochhäuser and Balk to account for the presence of free electrons. The absorbed dose measurements in both low-dose-per-pulse (less than 0.3 mGy per pulse) and high-dose-per-pulse (20-120 mGy per pulse range) electron beams were compared with ferrous sulphate chemical dosimetry, a method independent of the dose per pulse. The results of the comparison support the conclusion that one of the models is more adequate to correct for ion recombination, even in high-dose-per-pulse conditions, provided that the fraction of free electrons is properly assessed. In this respect the drift velocity and the time constant for attachment of electrons in the air of the chamber cavity are rather critical parameters because of their dependence on chamber dimensions and operational conditions. Finally, a determination of the factor k(s) was also made by zero extrapolation of the 1/Q versus 1/V saturation curves, leading to the conclusion that this method does not provide consistent results in high-dose-per-pulse beams.

  19. Laboratory implantation for well type ionization chambers calibration; Implantacao de um laboratorio para calibracao de camaras de ionizacao tipo poco

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vianello, E.A.; Dias, D.J.; Almeida, C.E. de [Laboratorio de Ciencias Radiologicas- LCR- DBB (UERJ). R. Sao Francisco Xavier, 524- Pav. HLC, sala 136 terreo- CEP 20.550-013. Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    1998-12-31

    The Radiological Science Laboratory is implanting a service for calibration of well type chambers by IAEA training program. The kerma rate in the air (mu Gy/h) of the linear Cs-137 reference source CDCS-J4 have been determined using a well type chamber Standard Imaging HDR-1000 model, which have been calibrated at Secondary Standard Laboratory Calibration of IAEA, whereas two HDR-1000 Plus chambers were calibrated too, following the same standards. The results were compared with Wisconsin University calibration certification and has demonstrated that well type ionization chamber calibration can be used in brachytherapy for several kinds of radionuclides. (Author)

  20. Technical Note: Experimental determination of the effective point of measurement of two cylindrical ionization chambers in a clinical proton beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugama, Yuya, E-mail: yuya.sugama@gmail.com [Proton Therapy Center, Aizawa Hospital, Nagano 390-0821, Japan and Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Medicine and Engineering, University of Yamanashi, Yamanashi 409-3898 (Japan); Nishio, Teiji [Institute of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima 734-8551 (Japan); Onishi, Hiroshi [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Medicine and Engineering, University of Yamanashi, Yamanashi 409-3898 (Japan)

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: IAEA TRS-398 notes that cylindrical ionization chambers are preferred for reference proton dosimetry. If a cylindrical ionization chamber is used in a phantom to measure the dose as a function of depth, the effective point of measurement (EPOM) must be taken into account. IAEA TRS-398 recommends a displacement of 0.75 times the inner cavity radius (0.75R) for heavy ion beams. Theoretical models by Palmans and by Bhullar and Watchman confirmed this value. However, the experimental results vary from author to author. The purpose of this study is to accurately measure the displacement and explain the past experimental discrepancies. Methods: In this work, we measured the EPOM of cylindrical ionization chambers with high accuracy by comparing the Bragg-peak position obtained with cylindrical ionization chambers (PTW 30013, PTW 31016) to that obtained using a plane-parallel ionization chamber (PTW 34045). Results: The EPOMs of PTW 30013 and 31016 were shifted by 0.92 ± 0.07 R with R = 3.05 mm and 0.90 ± 0.14 R with R = 1.45 mm, respectively, from the reference point toward the source. Conclusions: The EPOMs obtained were greater than the value of 0.75R proposed by the IAEA TRS-398 and the analytical results.

  1. Development of special ionization chambers for a quality control program in mammography; Desenvolvimento de camaras de ionizacao especiais para controle de qualidade em mamografia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Jonas Oliveira da

    2013-07-01

    Mammography is an imaging method that uses X-rays. The use of ionization chambers in mammography quality control programs presents an essential role which is to verify whether the parameters of the patient exposure are correct. However, the commercial ionization chambers for dosimetry in mammography represent a high cost for small and medium size clinics that wish to have this equipment or for professionals that work with quality control programs. The innovative feature of this work was to develop ionization chambers for this purpose. In this work ionization chambers for X radiation beams in the mammography energy range were designed, constructed and characterized. The ionization chambers were tested in standard X radiation beams at the LCI/IPEN. The main characterization tests performed with the ionization chambers were: saturation curve, linearity of response, angular and energy dependence. The response stability tests of the ionization chambers were also conducted at the LCI, presenting results within 2.0 % for long-term stability. The results of the remaining tests are in accordance with international standards. These ionization chambers were also submitted to quality control tests of mammography equipment: linearity of the air kerma rates, determination of half-value layers and mean glandular doses. The results for air kerma rate linearity were less than 10 %, as recommended in international standards. The mean glandular dose obtained with the developed chambers presented values comparable to those of commercial ionization chambers tested, with an estimated variation within international standards. (author)

  2. Evaluation of a special pencil ionization chamber by the Monte Carlo method; Avaliacao de uma camara de ionizacao tipo lapis especial pelo metodo de Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendonca, Dalila; Neves, Lucio P.; Perini, Ana P., E-mail: anapaula.perini@ufu.br [Universidade Federal de Uberlandia (INFIS/UFU), Uberlandia, MG (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica; Santos, William S.; Caldas, Linda V.E. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleres (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    A special pencil type ionization chamber, developed at the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, was characterized by means of Monte Carlo simulation to determine the influence of its components on its response. The main differences between this ionization chamber and commercial ionization chambers are related to its configuration and constituent materials. The simulations were made employing the MCNP-4C Monte Carlo code. The highest influence was obtained for the body of PMMA: 7.0%. (author)

  3. Methodology for calibration of ionization chambers for X-ray of low energy in absorbed dose to water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, C.T.; Vivolo, V.; Potiens, M.P.A., E-mail: camila_fmedica@hotmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleres (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The beams of low energy X-ray (10 to 150 kV) are used in several places in the world to treat a wide variety of surface disorders, and between these malignancies. As in Brazil, at this moment, there is no calibration laboratory providing the control service or calibration of parallel plate ionization chambers, the aim of this project was to establish a methodology for calibration of this kind of ionization chambers at low energy X-ray beams in terms of absorbed dose to water using simulators in the LCI. (author)

  4. Performance of a multi-axis ionization chamber array in a 1.5 T magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, K.; Kok, J. G. M.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.; Raaymakers, B. W.

    2014-04-01

    At the UMC Utrecht a prototype MR-linac has been installed. The system consists of an 8 MV Elekta linear accelerator and a 1.5 T Philips MRI system. This paper investigates the performance of the IC PROFILER™, a multi-axis ionization chamber array, in a 1.5 T magnetic field. The influence of the magnetic field on the IC PROFILER™ reproducibility, dose response linearity, pulse rate frequency dependence, power to electronics, panel orientation and ionization chamber shape were investigated. The linearity, reproducibility, pulse rate frequency dependence, panel orientation and ionization chamber shape are unaffected by the magnetic field. When the measurements results are normalized to the centre reference chamber, the measurements can commence unaltered. Orientation of the ionization chambers in the magnetic field is of importance, therefore caution must be taken when comparing or normalizing results from several different axes. IC PROFILER™ dose profiles were compared with film dose profiles obtained simultaneously in the MR-linac. Deviation between the film and the IC PROFILER™ data was caused by the noise in the film, indicating correct performance of the IC PROFILER™ in the transverse 1.5 T magnetic field.

  5. A large area position-sensitive ionization chamber for heavy-ion-induced reaction studies

    CERN Document Server

    Pant, L M; Dinesh, B V; Thomas, R G; Saxena, A; Sawant, Y S; Choudhury, R K

    2002-01-01

    A large area position-sensitive ionization chamber with a wide dynamic range has been developed to measure the mass, charge and energy of the heavy ions and the fission fragments produced in heavy-ion-induced reactions. The split anode geometry of the detector makes it suitable for both particle identification and energy measurements for heavy ions and fission fragments. The detector has been tested with alpha particles from sup 2 sup 4 sup 1 Am- sup 2 sup 3 sup 9 Pu source, fission fragments from sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf and the heavy-ion beams from the 14UD Mumbai Pelletron accelerator facility. Using this detector, measurements on mass and total kinetic energy distributions in heavy-ion-induced fusion-fission reactions have been carried out for a wide range of excitation energies. Results on deep inelastic collisions and mass-energy correlations on different systems using this detector setup are discussed.

  6. Air filled ionization chambers and their response to high LET radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaiser, Franz-Joachim; Bassler, Niels; Tölli, Heikki

    Background Air filled ionization chambers (ICs) are widely used for absolute dosimetry, not only in photon beams but also in beams of heavy charged particles. Within the IC, electron hole pairs are generated by the energy deposition originating from incoming radiation. High-LET particles create...... a high density of charge carriers in the core of particle tracks. As a consequence an increased (so called "initial") recombination of the charge carriers takes place, besides of the general (volume) recombination described by the Boag theory. A theory for a sub-type of initial recombination ("columnar......" recombination) is the Jaffe theory, which was developed in 1913 by Jaffe. He solved a differential equation by applying several simplifications and approximations such as a Gaussian shaped track whose width serves as free parameter. These simplifications and the use of an simplified charge carrier distribution...

  7. Quality assurance of proton beams using a multilayer ionization chamber system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanesar, Sandeep; Sahoo, Narayan; Kerr, Matthew; Taylor, M Brad; Summers, Paige; Zhu, X Ronald; Poenisch, Falk; Gillin, Michael

    2013-09-01

    The measurement of percentage depth-dose (PDD) distributions for the quality assurance of clinical proton beams is most commonly performed with a computerized water tank dosimetry system with ionization chamber, commonly referred to as water tank. Although the accuracy and reproducibility of this method is well established, it can be time-consuming if a large number of measurements are required. In this work the authors evaluate the linearity, reproducibility, sensitivity to field size, accuracy, and time-savings of another system: the Zebra, a multilayer ionization chamber system. The Zebra, consisting of 180 parallel-plate ionization chambers with 2 mm resolution, was used to measure depth-dose distributions. The measurements were performed for scattered and scanned proton pencil beams of multiple energies delivered by the Hitachi PROBEAT synchrotron-based delivery system. For scattered beams, the Zebra-measured depth-dose distributions were compared with those measured with the water tank. The principal descriptors extracted for comparisons were: range, the depth of the distal 90% dose; spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) length, the region between the proximal 95% and distal 90% dose; and distal-dose fall off (DDF), the region between the distal 80% and 20% dose. For scanned beams, the Zebra-measured ranges were compared with those acquired using a Bragg peak chamber during commissioning. The Zebra demonstrated better than 1% reproducibility and monitor unit linearity. The response of the Zebra was found to be sensitive to radiation field sizes greater than 12.5 × 12.5 cm; hence, the measurements used to determine accuracy were performed using a field size of 10 × 10 cm. For the scattered proton beams, PDD distributions showed 1.5% agreement within the SOBP, and 3.8% outside. Range values agreed within -0.1 ± 0.4 mm, with a maximum deviation of 1.2 mm. SOBP length values agreed within 0 ± 2 mm, with a maximum deviation of 6 mm. DDF values agreed within 0.3 ± 0

  8. Quality assurance of proton beams using a multilayer ionization chamber system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhanesar, Sandeep; Sahoo, Narayan; Kerr, Matthew; Taylor, M. Brad; Summers, Paige; Zhu, X. Ronald; Poenisch, Falk; Gillin, Michael [Department of Radiation Physics and Proton Therapy Center, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Unit 94, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Department of Radiation Physics and Proton Therapy Center, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Unit 94, Houston, Texas 77030 and The University of Texas at Houston Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, 6767 Bertner Avenue, S3.8344, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Department of Radiation Physics and Proton Therapy Center, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Unit 94, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Department of Radiation Physics and Proton Therapy Center, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Unit 94, Houston, Texas 77030 and The University of Texas at Houston Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, 6767 Bertner Avenue, S3.8344, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: The measurement of percentage depth-dose (PDD) distributions for the quality assurance of clinical proton beams is most commonly performed with a computerized water tank dosimetry system with ionization chamber, commonly referred to as water tank. Although the accuracy and reproducibility of this method is well established, it can be time-consuming if a large number of measurements are required. In this work the authors evaluate the linearity, reproducibility, sensitivity to field size, accuracy, and time-savings of another system: the Zebra, a multilayer ionization chamber system.Methods: The Zebra, consisting of 180 parallel-plate ionization chambers with 2 mm resolution, was used to measure depth-dose distributions. The measurements were performed for scattered and scanned proton pencil beams of multiple energies delivered by the Hitachi PROBEAT synchrotron-based delivery system. For scattered beams, the Zebra-measured depth-dose distributions were compared with those measured with the water tank. The principal descriptors extracted for comparisons were: range, the depth of the distal 90% dose; spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) length, the region between the proximal 95% and distal 90% dose; and distal-dose fall off (DDF), the region between the distal 80% and 20% dose. For scanned beams, the Zebra-measured ranges were compared with those acquired using a Bragg peak chamber during commissioning.Results: The Zebra demonstrated better than 1% reproducibility and monitor unit linearity. The response of the Zebra was found to be sensitive to radiation field sizes greater than 12.5 × 12.5 cm; hence, the measurements used to determine accuracy were performed using a field size of 10 × 10 cm. For the scattered proton beams, PDD distributions showed 1.5% agreement within the SOBP, and 3.8% outside. Range values agreed within −0.1 ± 0.4 mm, with a maximum deviation of 1.2 mm. SOBP length values agreed within 0 ± 2 mm, with a maximum deviation of 6 mm. DDF

  9. SU-F-T-310: Does a Head-Mounted Ionization Chamber Detect IMRT Errors?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wegener, S; Herzog, B; Sauer, O [University of Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The conventional plan verification strategy is delivering a plan to a QA-phantom before the first treatment. Monitoring each fraction of the patient treatment in real-time would improve patient safety. We evaluated how well a new detector, the IQM (iRT Systems, Germany), is capable of detecting errors we induced into IMRT plans of three different treatment regions. Results were compared to an established phantom. Methods: Clinical plans of a brain, prostate and head-and-neck patient were modified in the Pinnacle planning system, such that they resulted in either several percent lower prescribed doses to the target volume or several percent higher doses to relevant organs at risk. Unaltered plans were measured on three days, modified plans once, each with the IQM at an Elekta Synergy with an Agility MLC. All plans were also measured with the ArcCHECK with the cavity plug and a PTW semiflex 31010 ionization chamber inserted. Measurements were evaluated with SNC patient software. Results: Repeated IQM measurements of the original plans were reproducible, such that a 1% deviation from the mean as warning and 3% as action level as suggested by the manufacturer seemed reasonable. The IQM detected most of the simulated errors including wrong energy, a faulty leaf, wrong trial exported and a 2 mm shift of one leaf bank. Detection limits were reached for two plans - a 2 mm field position error and a leaf bank offset combined with an MU change. ArcCHECK evaluation according to our current standards also left undetected errors. Ionization chamber evaluation alone would leave most errors undetected. Conclusion: The IQM detected most errors and performed as well as currently established phantoms with the advantage that it can be used throughout the whole treatment. Drawback is that it does not indicate the source of the error.

  10. Multiple sampling ionization chamber (MUSIC) for measuring the charge of relativistic heavy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christie, W.B.; Romero, J.L.; Brady, F.P.; Tull, C.E.; Castaneda, C.M.; Barasch, E.F.; Webb, M.L.; Drummond, J.R.; Crawford, H.J.; Flores, I.

    1987-04-01

    A large area (1 m x 2 m) multiple sampling ionization chamber (MUSIC) has been constructed and tested. The MUSIC detector makes multiple measurements of energy 'loss', dE/dx, for a relativistic heavy ion. Given the velocity, the charge of the ion can be extracted from the energy loss distributions. The widths of the distributions we observe are much narrower than predicted by Vavilov's theory for energy loss while agreeing well with the theory of Badhwar which deals with the energy deposited. The versatile design of MUSIC allows a variety of anode configurations which results in a large dynamic range of charge. In our tests to date we have observed charge resolutions of 0.25e fwhm for 727 MeV/nucleon /sup 40/Ar and 0.30e fwhm for 1.08 GeV/nucleon /sup 139/La and /sup 139/La fragments. Vertical position and multiple track determination are obtained by using time projection chamber electronics. Preliminary tests indicate that the position resolution is also very good with sigmaapprox. =100 ..mu..m.

  11. Correction factors for the INER-improved free-air ionization chambers calculated with the Monte Carlo method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Uei-Tyng; Chu, Chien-Hau

    2006-05-01

    Monte Carlo method was used to simulate the correction factors for electron loss and scattered photons for two improved cylindrical free-air ionization chambers (FACs) constructed at the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER, Taiwan). The method is based on weighting correction factors for mono-energetic photons with X-ray spectra. The newly obtained correction factors for the medium-energy free-air chamber were compared with the current values, which were based on a least-squares fit to experimental data published in the NBS Handbook 64 [Wyckoff, H.O., Attix, F.H., 1969. Design of free-air ionization chambers. National Bureau Standards Handbook, No. 64. US Government Printing Office, Washington, DC, pp. 1-16; Chen, W.L., Su, S.H., Su, L.L., Hwang, W.S., 1999. Improved free-air ionization chamber for the measurement of X-rays. Metrologia 36, 19-24]. The comparison results showed the agreement between the Monte Carlo method and experimental data is within 0.22%. In addition, mono-energetic correction factors for the low-energy free-air chamber were calculated. Average correction factors were then derived for measured and theoretical X-ray spectra at 30-50 kVp. Although the measured and calculated spectra differ slightly, the resulting differences in the derived correction factors are less than 0.02%.

  12. Lateral response heterogeneity of Bragg peak ionization chambers for narrow-beam photon and proton dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuess, Peter; Böhlen, Till T.; Lechner, Wolfgang; Elia, Alessio; Georg, Dietmar; Palmans, Hugo

    2017-12-01

    Large area ionization chambers (LAICs) can be used to measure output factors of narrow beams. Dose area product measurements are proposed as an alternative to central-axis point dose measurements. Using such detectors requires detailed information on the uniformity of the response along the sensitive area. Eight LAICs were investigated in this study: four of type PTW-34070 (LAICThick) and four of type PTW-34080 (LAICThin). Measurements were performed in an x-ray unit using peak voltages of 100–200 kVp and a collimated beam of 3.1 mm (FWHM). The LAICs were moved with a step size of 5 mm to measure the chamber response at lateral positions. To account for beam positions where only a fraction of the beam impinged within the sensitive area of the LAICs, a corrected response was calculated which was the basis to calculate the relative response. The impact of a heterogeneous LAIC response, based on the obtained response maps was henceforth investigated for proton pencil beams and small field photon beams. A pronounced heterogeneity of the responses was observed in the investigated LAICs. The response of LAICThick generally decreased with increasing radius, resulting in a response correction of up to 5%. This correction was more pronounced and more diverse (up to 10%) for LAICThin. Considering a proton pencil beam the systematic offset for reference dosimetry was 2.4–4.1% for LAICThick and  ‑9.5 to 9.4% for LAICThin. For relative dosimetry (e.g. integral depth-dose curves) systematic response variation by 0.8–1.9% were found. For a decreasing photon field size the systematic offset for absolute dose measurements showed a 2.5–4.5% overestimation of the response for 6  ×  6 mm2 field sizes for LAICThick. For LAICThin the response varied even over a range of 20%. This study highlights the need for chamber-dependent response maps when using LAICs for absolute and relative dosimetry with proton pencil beams or small photon beams.

  13. Testing an ionization chamber with gaseous samples and measurements of the (n, alpha) reaction cross sections

    CERN Document Server

    Gledenov, Yu M; Salatskii, V I; Sedyshev, P V; Andrzejewski, J; Szalanski, P

    1999-01-01

    A new ionization chamber with gaseous samples (GIC) has been designed and tested on the thermal and resonance neutron beams of FLNP's neutron sources. The exposed gas volume serves as a target for neutrons. The obtained thermal cross sections for the sup 1 sup 7 O(n, alpha) sup 1 sup 4 C, sup 2 sup 1 Ne(n, alpha) sup 1 sup 8 O and sup 3 sup 6 Ar(n, alpha) sup 3 sup 3 S reactions are (233+-12) mb, (0.18+-0.09) mb and (5.43+-0.27) mb, respectively. These measurements have been performed on a pure beam of thermal neutrons from the high flux reactor IBR-2; and they demonstrated high efficiency and reliability of the method. Compared to samples on substrates, the application of gaseous samples makes the beam background essentially lower, and what is more important, the background component is totally absent due to the absence of Li and B microimpurities in gaseous samples while they do present in the samples on substrates. The method is also applicable to measurements with resonance neutrons. The recovery capabili...

  14. Particle identification technique using grid ionization chamber at China Spallation Neutron Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yingtan; Fan, Ruirui; Zhang, Qingmin; He, Yuefeng; Sun, Zhijia; Zhou, Liang; Tang, Jingyu; Bai, Huaiyong; Jiang, Haoyu; Zhang, Guohui

    2017-11-01

    Back-n white neutron source at China Spallation Neutron Source facility requires a detector with charged-particle identification ability for measuring nuclear cross sections. Therefore, a grid ionization chamber (GIC) with an adjustable distance between the cathode and grid was designed and built. Moreover, a corresponding particle identification algorithm is proposed in order to use the signals of the anode (QA) and cathode (QC), or the signal (QA) of the anode and the time difference (Δ t) between the cathode and anode signals, based on the interactive behaviors of charged particles and the GIC's working principle. First, the GIC performance was measured using a 241Am α source for preliminary performance testing, which provided an energy resolution of 5.25%. Its good particle identification performance was demonstrated by identifying 3H and 4He from neutron reactions with 6Li using a 2D QC-QA plot and Δ t-QA plot. Furthermore, 3H and 4He can be completely distinguished from the updated 2D QC-QA plot and Δ t-QA plot, in which 3H with a small incident angle is selected. Finally, it was concluded that our GIC with the proposed particle identification algorithm could identify charged particles effectively for the future measurement of nuclear cross sections.

  15. Measurement of differential (n,x{alpha}) cross section using 4{pi} gridded ionization chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanami, Toshiya; Baba, Mamoru; Matsuyama, Shigeo; Kiyosumi, Takehide; Nauchi, Yasushi; Saito, Keiichiro; Hirakawa, Naohiro [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Kawano, Toshihiko

    1997-03-01

    We carried out the measurements of high resolution {alpha} emission spectra of {sup 58}Ni and {sup nat}Ni between 4.5 and 6.5 MeV, and {sup 12}C(n,x{alpha}) cross section using a 4{pi} gridded ionization chamber. In Ni measurement, overall energy resolution was improved to around 200 keV by optimizing a sample thickness and a neutron source width. Measured alpha spectra showed separate peaks corresponding to the ground and low-lying excited states of the residual nucleus ({sup 55}Fe). These results were compared with another direct measurement and statistical model calculations. In {sup 12}C measurement, GIC was applied for (n,x{alpha}) reactions of light nuclei. This application is difficult to (n,x{alpha}) cross sections of light nuclei, because of the influences of large recoil energy and multi-body break-up. We developed new methods which eliminate the effects of recoil nuclei and multi-body break-up and applied them to {sup 12}C(n,x{alpha}) reaction at En=14.1 MeV. In our experiment, the {sup 12}C(n,{alpha}{sub 0}){sup 9}Be angular differential cross section and {sup 12}C(n,n`3{alpha}) cross section were obtained. (author)

  16. Comparison of entrance and exit dose measurements using ionization chambers and silicon diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heukelom, S; Lanson, J H; Mijnheer, B J

    1991-01-01

    A high precision patient dosimetry method has been developed, based on the use of p-type diodes. First, entrance as well as exit dose calibration factors have to be determined under reference irradiation conditions. Secondly, a set of correction factors must be added for situations deviating from the reference conditions, i.e. for different source-skin distances, phantom (patient) thicknesses, field sizes or for insertion of a wedge into the photon beam. Finally some other detector characteristics such as the temperature dependence of the response have to be taken into account. For most irradiation conditions this procedure is sufficiently accurate to allow entrance as well as exist dose determinations with a diode to be in good agreement with dose values measured by an ionization chamber. The main factors effecting the value of the correction factors, the dependence of the diode sensitivity on the energy and the dose per pulse, have been investigated to explain some of the observed phenomena. Despite a strong energy dependence of the sensitivity, the correction factors are, for a particular type of diode, the same for 4 and 8 MV x-ray beams. The variation in the values for the correction factors with integrated dose received by the diode is small. These findings indicate that the correction factors, once available, can be applied under a number of circumstances. Due to the difference in behaviour of various diodes, even from the same batch, it is, however, necessary to determine the characteristics for each diode individually.

  17. Dual ring multilayer ionization chamber and theory-based correction technique for scanning proton therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayanagi, Taisuke; Nihongi, Hideaki; Nishiuchi, Hideaki; Tadokoro, Masahiro; Ito, Yuki; Nakashima, Chihiro; Fujitaka, Shinichiro; Umezawa, Masumi; Matsuda, Koji; Sakae, Takeji; Terunuma, Toshiyuki

    2016-07-01

    To develop a multilayer ionization chamber (MLIC) and a correction technique that suppresses differences between the MLIC and water phantom measurements in order to achieve fast and accurate depth dose measurements in pencil beam scanning proton therapy. The authors distinguish between a calibration procedure and an additional correction: 1-the calibration for variations in the air gap thickness and the electrometer gains is addressed without involving measurements in water; 2-the correction is addressed to suppress the difference between depth dose profiles in water and in the MLIC materials due to the nuclear interaction cross sections by a semiempirical model tuned by using measurements in water. In the correction technique, raw MLIC data are obtained for each energy layer and integrated after multiplying them by the correction factor because the correction factor depends on incident energy. The MLIC described here has been designed especially for pencil beam scanning proton therapy. This MLIC is called a dual ring multilayer ionization chamber (DRMLIC). The shape of the electrodes allows the DRMLIC to measure both the percentage depth dose (PDD) and integrated depth dose (IDD) because ionization electrons are collected from inner and outer air gaps independently. IDDs for which the beam energies were 71.6, 120.6, 159, 180.6, and 221.4 MeV were measured and compared with water phantom results. Furthermore, the measured PDDs along the central axis of the proton field with a nominal field size of 10 × 10 cm(2) were compared. The spread out Bragg peak was 20 cm for fields with a range of 30.6 and 3 cm for fields with a range of 6.9 cm. The IDDs measured with the DRMLIC using the correction technique were consistent with those that of the water phantom; except for the beam energy of 71.6 MeV, all of the points satisfied the 1% dose/1 mm distance to agreement criterion of the gamma index. The 71.6 MeV depth dose profile showed slight differences in the shallow

  18. D-IMRT verification with a 2D pixel ionization chamber: dosimetric and clinical results in head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stasi, M [Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment (IRCC), Candiolo and A.S.O. Ordine Maurizano, Torino (Italy); Giordanengo, S [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Via P. Giuria 1, I-10125 Torino (Italy); Cirio, R [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Via P. Giuria 1, I-10125 Torino (Italy)] [and others

    2005-10-07

    Dynamic intensity-modulated radiotherapy (D-IMRT) using the sliding-window technique is currently applied for selected treatments of head and neck cancer at Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment of Candiolo (Turin, Italy). In the present work, a PiXel-segmented ionization Chamber (PXC) has been used for the verification of 19 fields used for four different head and neck cancers. The device consists of a 32 x 32 matrix of 1024 parallel-plate ionization chambers arranged in a square of 24 x 24 cm{sup 2} area. Each chamber has 0.4 cm diameter and 0.55 cm height; a distance of 0.75 cm separates the centre of adjacent chambers. The sensitive volume of each single ionization chamber is 0.07 cm{sup 3}. Each of the 1024 independent ionization chambers is read out with a custom microelectronics chip. The output factors in water obtained with the PXC at a depth of 10 cm were compared to other detectors and the maximum difference was 1.9% for field sizes down to 3 x 3 cm{sup 2}. Beam profiles for different field dimensions were measured with the PXC and two other types of ionization chambers; the maximum distance to agreement (DTA) in the 20-80% penumbra region of a 3 x 3 cm{sup 2} field was 0.09 cm. The leaf speed of the multileaf collimator was varied between 0.07 and 2 cm s{sup -1} and the detector response was constant to better than 0.6%. The behaviour of the PXC was measured while varying the dose rate between 0.21 and 1.21 Gy min{sup -1}; the mean difference was 0.50% and the maximum difference was 0.96%. Using fields obtained with an enhanced dynamic wedge and a staircase-like (step) IMRT field, the PXC has been tested for simple 1D modulated beams; comparison with film gave a maximum DTA of 0.12 cm. The PXC was then used to check four different IMRT plans for head and neck cancer treatment: cervical chordoma, parotid, ethmoid and skull base. In the comparison of the PXC versus film and PXC versus treatment planning system, the number of pixels with {gamma

  19. Project, construction and characterization of ionization chambers for use as standard systems in X and gamma radiation beams; Projeto, construcao e caracterizacao de camaras de ionizacao para utilizacao como sistemas padroes em feixes de radiacao X e gama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perini, Ana Paula

    2013-07-01

    Ionization chambers present some advantages in relation to other dosimeters: easiness of handling, low energy dependence and high precision. The advantages associated to ionization chambers and the large number of diagnostic radiology exams and therapeutic treatments motivated the development of this PhD program. In this project ionization chambers were developed and characterized to be applied in diagnostic radiology and therapy beam dosimetry, with high precision and performance, in compliance with international recommendations. They were assembled in a simple way, utilizing low-cost national materials, so they can be reproduced and applied at calibration laboratories. The project of these ionization chambers presents some differences in relation to commercial ionization chambers, as the materials utilized and geometrical arrangements. Besides the development of the ionization chambers to be utilized in standard X-ray beam dosimetry as work standard systems, two graphite parallel-plate ionization chambers were developed and characterized to be applied as reference standard systems for determining the air kerma rates of gamma radiation sources. Comparing the air kerma rates determined with the reference standard of the Calibration Laboratory of IPEN, a Farmer ionization chamber, with the values of the air kerma rates obtained with the graphite ionization chambers, the maximum differences obtained were only 1.7% and 1.2% for the G1 and G2 graphite ionization chambers, respectively. Moreover, these ionization chambers presented correction factors close to 1.000, which is ideal for an ionization chamber be characterized as a reference standard system. (author)

  20. Measurement of the response-ratio of an ionization chamber filled with dry air to that filled with P-10 gas in the calibration of gas monitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunoki, Akira; Kawada, Yasushi; Hino, Yoshio

    2017-11-13

    We developed a new method to determine the response ratio of an ionization chamber (Ohkura ionization chamber: type I-4096 01/06) filled with dry air to that filled with P-10 gas. The response-ratio was obtained by comparing the output currents of the ionization chamber after introduction of radioactive gasses of identical activities contained in two small vessels. The obtained ratio was 0.690 ± 0.003, which agreed with the results obtained by other methods. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A standard Fricke dosimeter compared to an ionization chamber used for dosimetric characterization of 60Co photon beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussous, Ouiza; Medjadj, Toufik

    2016-06-01

    The main objective of this study was to investigate the Fricke dosimeter water equivalent system for measurement of dosimetric parameters for photon beam. The parameters measured with the Fricke dosimeter were compared to those obtained with an ionization chamber. In this work characteristics for 60Co γ-rays of field sizes ranging from 5 × 5 cm2 to 20 × 20 cm2 are reported. The measurements were carried out in the secondary standard dosimetry laboratory using a collimated 60Co gamma source therapy unit. The 60Co beam output in terms of absorbed dose to water was obtained as per IAEA TRS 398 recommendations using cylindrical ionization chamber, whose ND,w has been supplied by the IAEA's reference laboratory. Specific quantities measured include: output factors, peak scatter factor, lateral beam profiles and percentage depth dose. The Fricke dosimeters were irradiated in a water phantom using the suitable poly (methyl methacrylate), PMMA stand. Our results demonstrate that Fricke dosimeter and ionization chamber agree with each other.

  2. The stability of liquid-filled matrix ionization chamber electronic portal imaging devices for dosimetry purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louwe, R J W; Tielenburg, R; van Ingen, K M; Mijnheer, B J; van Herk, M B

    2004-04-01

    This study was performed to determine the stability of liquid-filled matrix ionization chamber (LiFi-type) electronic portal imaging devices (EPID) for dosimetric purposes. The short- and long-term stability of the response was investigated, as well as the importance of factors influencing the response (e.g., temperature fluctuations, radiation damage, and the performance of the electronic hardware). It was shown that testing the performance of the electronic hardware as well as the short-term stability of the imagers may reveal the cause of a poor long-term stability of the imager response. In addition, the short-term stability was measured to verify the validity of the fitted dose-response curve immediately after beam startup. The long-term stability of these imagers could be considerably improved by correcting for room temperature fluctuations and gradual changes in response due to radiation damage. As a result, the reproducibility was better than 1% (1 SD) over a period of two years. The results of this study were used to formulate recommendations for a quality control program for portal dosimetry. The effect of such a program was assessed by comparing the results of portal dosimetry and in vivo dosimetry using diodes during the treatment of 31 prostate patients. The improvement of the results for portal dosimetry was consistent with the deviations observed with the reproducibility tests in that particular period. After a correction for the variation in response of the imager, the average difference between the measured and prescribed dose during the treatment of prostate patients was -0.7%+/-1.5% (1 SD), and -0.6%+/-1.1% (1 SD) for EPID and diode in vivo dosimetry, respectively. It can be concluded that a high stability of the response can be achieved for this type of EPID by applying a rigorous quality control program.

  3. Initial recombination in the track of heavy charged particles: numerical solution for air filled ionization chambers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Franz-Joachim; Bassler, Niels; Tölli, Heikki; Jäkel, Oliver

    2012-03-01

    Modern particle therapy facilities enable sub-millimeter precision in dose deposition. Here, also ionization chambers (ICs) are used, which requires knowledge of the recombination effects. Up to now, recombination is corrected using phenomenological approaches for practical reasons. In this study the effect of the underlying dose distribution on columnar recombination, a quantitative model for initial recombination, is investigated. Jaffé's theory, formulated in 1913 quantifies initial recombination by elemental processes, providing an analytical (closed) solution. Here, we investigate the effect of the underlying charged carrier distribution around a carbon ion track. The fundamental partial differential equation, formulated by Jaffé, is solved numerically taking into account more realistic charge carrier distributions by the use of a computer program (Gascoigne 3D). The investigated charge carrier distributions are based on track structure models, which follow a 1/r(2) behavior at larger radii and show a constant value at small radii. The results of the calculations are compared to the initial formulation and to data obtained in experiments using carbon ion beams. The comparison between the experimental data and the calculations shows that the initial approach made by Jaffé is able to reproduce the effects of initial recombination. The amorphous track structure based charge carrier distribution does not reproduce the experimental data well. A small additional correction in the assessment of the saturation current or charge is suggested by the data. The established model of columnar recombination reproduces the experimental data well, whereas the extensions using track structure models do not show such an agreement. Additionally, the effect of initial recombination on the saturation curve (i.e. Jaffé plot) does not follow a linear behavior as suggested by current dosimetry protocols, therefore higher order corrections (such as the investigated ones) might be

  4. Comparison and uncertainty evaluation of different calibration protocols and ionization chambers for low-energy surface brachytherapy dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candela-Juan, C., E-mail: ccanjuan@gmail.com [Radiation Oncology Department, La Fe University and Polytechnic Hospital, Valencia 46026 (Spain); Vijande, J. [Department of Atomic, Molecular, and Nuclear Physics, University of Valencia, Burjassot 46100, Spain and Instituto de Física Corpuscular (UV-CSIC), Paterna 46980 (Spain); García-Martínez, T. [Radiation Oncology Department, Hospital La Ribera, Alzira 46600 (Spain); Niatsetski, Y.; Nauta, G.; Schuurman, J. [Elekta Brachytherapy, Veenendaal 3905 TH (Netherlands); Ouhib, Z. [Radiation Oncology Department, Lynn Regional Cancer Center, Boca Raton Community Hospital, Boca Raton, Florida 33486 (United States); Ballester, F. [Department of Atomic, Molecular, and Nuclear Physics, University of Valencia, Burjassot 46100 (Spain); Perez-Calatayud, J. [Radiation Oncology Department, La Fe University and Polytechnic Hospital, Valencia 46026, Spain and Department of Radiotherapy, Clínica Benidorm, Benidorm 03501 (Spain)

    2015-08-15

    Purpose: A surface electronic brachytherapy (EBT) device is in fact an x-ray source collimated with specific applicators. Low-energy (<100 kVp) x-ray beam dosimetry faces several challenges that need to be addressed. A number of calibration protocols have been published for x-ray beam dosimetry. The media in which measurements are performed are the fundamental difference between them. The aim of this study was to evaluate the surface dose rate of a low-energy x-ray source with small field applicators using different calibration standards and different small-volume ionization chambers, comparing the values and uncertainties of each methodology. Methods: The surface dose rate of the EBT unit Esteya (Elekta Brachytherapy, The Netherlands), a 69.5 kVp x-ray source with applicators of 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 mm diameter, was evaluated using the AAPM TG-61 (based on air kerma) and International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) TRS-398 (based on absorbed dose to water) dosimetry protocols for low-energy photon beams. A plane parallel T34013 ionization chamber (PTW Freiburg, Germany) calibrated in terms of both absorbed dose to water and air kerma was used to compare the two dosimetry protocols. Another PTW chamber of the same model was used to evaluate the reproducibility between these chambers. Measurements were also performed with two different Exradin A20 (Standard Imaging, Inc., Middleton, WI) chambers calibrated in terms of air kerma. Results: Differences between surface dose rates measured in air and in water using the T34013 chamber range from 1.6% to 3.3%. No field size dependence has been observed. Differences are below 3.7% when measurements with the A20 and the T34013 chambers calibrated in air are compared. Estimated uncertainty (with coverage factor k = 1) for the T34013 chamber calibrated in water is 2.2%–2.4%, whereas it increases to 2.5% and 2.7% for the A20 and T34013 chambers calibrated in air, respectively. The output factors, measured with the PTW chambers

  5. Monte Carlo study of ionization chamber magnetic field correction factors as a function of angle and beam quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkov, Victor N; Rogers, David W O

    2017-12-07

    To use EGSnrc Monte Carlo simulations for magnetic field dosimetry to determine optimal measurement orientations, calculate beam quality conversion factors for 32 cylindrical and three parallel-plate (PP) ion chambers, evaluate the beam quality and angular dependence of these factors, and examine the magnetic field effects on %dd(10)x and TPR1020 METHODS: Beam quality conversion factors,kQmag, and magnetic field conversion factors, kB=kQmag/kQ , are calculated as a function of chamber rotation for six cylindrical ionization chamber and either a 60 Co beam with a 0.35 T magnetic field or a 7 MV beam with a 1.5 T field, both magnetic fields are perpendicular to the photon beam. The chambers' sensitive air volumes are varied by either using the entire geometric volume or excluding the air volume associated with the first 1 mm away from the stem. The kB and =kQmag factors are evaluated using four clinical photon spectra. The variation in %dd(10)x and TPR1020 as a function of magnetic field for six photon spectra are studied using DOSXYZnrc. When the magnetic field is perpendicular to the photon beam, orienting the chamber parallel with the magnetic field reduces the magnetic field effect on chamber response (i.e., dose to air per unit water dose) and variations due to the unknown sensitive volume are essentially eliminated. Calculated kB factors are within 1% of unity for the majority of cylindrical chambers, although larger kB values are associated with chambers with high-Z electrodes. PP chambers have kB correction factors as large as 8.9% and have a larger angular sensitivity compared to cylindrical chambers. Values of kB for cylindrical ion chambers are independent of beam quality, except for chambers with high-Z electrodes. For %dd(10)x values between 63.3% and 73.8%, kB varies by at most (0.26± 0.15)% when the magnetic field is perpendicular to the photon beam and parallel to the chamber. Differences in %dd(10)x, between no magnetic field and with a 1.5 T field

  6. Experimental determination of the effective point of measurement of cylindrical ionization chambers for high-energy photon and electron beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yanxiao; Willomitzer, Christian; Zakaria, Golam Abu; Hartmann, Guenther H

    2010-01-01

    Measurements of depth-dose curves in water phantom using a cylindrical ionization chamber require that its effective point of measurement is located at the measuring depth. Recommendations for the position of the effective point of measurement with respect to the central axis valid for high-energy electron and photon beams are given in dosimetry protocols. According to these protocols, the use of a constant shift P(eff) is currently recommended. However, this is still based on a very limited set of experimental results. It is therefore expected that an improved knowledge of the exact position of the effective point of measurement will further improve the accuracy of dosimetry. Recent publications have revealed that the position of the effective point of measurement is indeed varying with beam energy, field size and also with chamber geometry. The aim of this study is to investigate whether the shift of P(eff) can be taken to be constant and independent from the beam energy. An experimental determination of the effective point of measurement is presented based on a comparison between cylindrical chambers and a plane-parallel chamber using conventional dosimetry equipment. For electron beams, the determination is based on the comparison of halfvalue depth R(50) between the cylindrical chamber of interest and a well guarded plane-parallel Roos chamber. For photon beams, the depth of dose maximum, d(max), the depth of 80% dose, d(80), and the dose parameter PDD(10) were used. It was again found that the effective point of measurement for both, electron and photon beams Dosimetry, depends on the beam energy. The deviation from a constant value remains very small for photons, whereas significant deviations were found for electrons. It is therefore concluded that use of a single upstream shift value from the centre of the cylindrical chamber as recommended in current dosimetry protocols is adequate for photons, however inadequate for accurate electron beam dosimetry.

  7. Development and characterization of special ionization chambers for computed tomography beams; Desenvolvimento e caracterizacao de camaras de ionizacao especiais para feixes de tomografia computadorizada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, Maysa Costa de

    2016-10-01

    The use of computed tomography (CT) for imaging procedures is growing due to advances in the CT equipment technology, because they allow the obtention of images with better resolution than through other techniques. Therefore, they are responsible for increasing the dose radiation of patients during the procedure. This fact led to a greater concern about the doses received by patients who undergo this type of examination. To perform the dosimetry in CT beams, the most widely used instrument is the pencil type ionization chamber, because this dosimeter has a uniform response to the incident radiation beam for all angles. The conventional ionization chamber, which is available on the market, has a sensitive volume length of 10 cm; however, some studies have shown that this dosimeter has underestimated the dose values. Therefore, in this study two ionization chambers with sensitive volume lengths of 10 cm and 30 cm, making use of low cost national materials, were developed at the Calibration Laboratory of Instruments (LCI-IPEN/CNEN). The characterization of these chambers was performed, and the results were obtained within the international recommended limits. As an application, the developed ionization chambers and a commercial chamber were tested in a clinical tomograph. The developed ionization chambers were analyzed in a complete way for their possible uses. (author)

  8. Correction factors for ionization chamber dosimetry in CyberKnife: Machine-specific, plan-class, and clinical fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gago-Arias, Araceli; Antolin, Elena; Fayos-Ferrer, Francisco; Simon, Rocio; Gonzalez-Castano, Diego M.; Palmans, Hugo; Sharpe, Peter; Gomez, Faustino; Pardo-Montero, Juan [Departamento de Fisica de Particulas, Facultad de Fisica, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, A Coruna 15782 (Spain); Servicio de Fisica Medica, Hospital Ruber Internacional, Madrid 28034 (Spain); Departamento de Fisica de Particulas, Facultad de Fisica, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, A Coruna 15782, Spain and Laboratorio de Radiofisica, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, A Coruna 15782 (Spain); National Physical Laboratory, Teddington, Middx TW11 OLW (United Kingdom); Departamento de Fisica de Particulas, Facultad de Fisica, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, A Coruna 15782, Spain and Laboratorio de Radiofisica, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, A Coruna 15782 (Spain); Departamento de Fisica de Particulas, Facultad de Fisica, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, A Coruna 15782 (Spain)

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: The aim of this work is the application of the formalism for ionization chamber reference dosimetry of small and nonstandard fields [R. Alfonso, P. Andreo, R. Capote, M. S. Huq, W. Kilby, P. Kjaell, T. R. Mackie, H. Palmans, K. Rosser, J. Seuntjens, W. Ullrich, and S. Vatnitsky, 'A new formalism for reference dosimetry of small and nonstandard fields,' Med. Phys. 35, 5179-5186 (2008)] to the CyberKnife robotic radiosurgery system. Correction factors for intermediate calibration fields, a machine-specific reference field (msr) and two plan-class specific reference fields (pcsr), have been studied. Furthermore, the applicability of the new formalism to clinical dosimetry has been analyzed through the investigation of two clinical treatments. Methods: PTW31014 and Scanditronix-Wellhofer CC13 ionization chamber measurements were performed for the fields under investigation. Absorbed dose to water was determined using alanine reference dosimetry, and experimental correction factors were calculated from alanine to ionization chamber readings ratios. In addition, correction factors were calculated for the intermediate calibration fields and one of the clinical treatment fields using the Monte Carlo method and these were compared with the experimental values. Results: Overall correction factors deviating from unity by approximately 2% were obtained from both measurements and simulations, with values below and above unity for the studied intermediate calibration fields and clinical fields for the ionization chambers under consideration. Monte Carlo simulations yielded correction factors comparable with those obtained from measurements for the machine-specific reference field, although differences from 1% to 3.3% were observed between measured and calculated correction factors for the composite intermediate calibration fields. Dose distribution inhomogeneities are thought to be responsible for such discrepancies. Conclusions: The differences found between

  9. Evaluation of the energy dependence of ionization chambers pencil type calibrated beam tomography standards; Avaliacao da dependencia energetica de camaras de ionizacao do tipo lapis calibradas em feixes padroes de tomografia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontes, Ladyjane Pereira; Potiens, Maria da Penha A., E-mail: lpfontes@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleres (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The Instrument Calibration Laboratory of IPEN (LCI - IPEN) performs calibrations of pencil-type ionization chambers (IC) used in measures of dosimetric survey on clinical systems of Computed Tomography (CT). Many users make mistakes when using a calibrated ionization chamber in their CT dosimetry systems. In this work a methodology for determination of factors of correction for quality (Kq) through the calibration curve that is specific for each ionization chamber was established. Furthermore, it was possible to demonstrate the energy dependence on an pencil-type Ionization Chamber(IC) calibrated at the LCI - IPEN. (author)

  10. Beta-efficiency of a typical gas-flow ionization chamber using GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussain Abid

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available GEANT4 based Monte Carlo simulations have been carried out for the determination of efficiency and conversion factors of a gas-flow ionization chamber for beta particles emitted by 86 different radioisotopes covering the average-b energy range of 5.69 keV-2.061 MeV. Good agreements were found between the GEANT4 predicted values and corresponding experimental data, as well as with EGS4 based calculations. For the reported set of b-emitters, the values of the conversion factor have been established in the range of 0.5×1013-2.5×1013 Bqcm-3/A. The computed xenon-to-air conversion factor ratios have attained the minimum value of 0.2 in the range of 0.1-1 MeV. As the radius and/or volume of the ion chamber increases, conversion factors approach a flat energy response. These simulations show a small, but significant dependence of ionization efficiency on the type of wall material.

  11. SU-E-T-113: Volume Effect Correction Factor KV for Small-Field Photon Dosimetry with Ionization Chambers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looe, H K; Stelljes, T S; Harder, D; Poppe, B

    2012-06-01

    The volume effect of ionization chambers gives rise to a spatial averaging effect that can be expressed mathematically as the convolution of the true dose profile with the detector's response function. The latter has been shown to be best described by Gaussian distribution. Based on this knowledge, the volume effect correction factor kV is derived. To derive kV, a sixth degree polynomial is fitted to the true dose profile: D(x) = a0 + a2×2 + a4×4 + a6×6. The measured dose profile M(x) is calculated as the convolution product of D(x) with a one-dimensional normalized Gauss function with standard deviation s. Therefore kV at the dose maximum has the value D(0)/M(0), which is a function of the coefficients a0,2,4,6 and the detector specific s. In the case where D(x) is unknown, kV can be derived analogously from M(x) so that M(x) = b0 + b2×2 + b4×4 + b6×6, where kV can now be expressed as a function of the coefficients b0,2,4,6 and s. The magnitudes of kV,lat and kV,long were calculated for 1 to 5 cm dose profiles using measured s values, both in the lateral and the longitudinal directions, for a set of common ionization chambers. At field widths above 2 cm, the values of kV,lat fall below 1.01 for all the chambers evaluated, whereas it needs field widths above 4 cm to get all values of kV,long below 1.01. Since the detector's signal is integrated over the sensitive volume, the total kV can be calculated as kV,total = kV,lat . kV,long. In this work, a correction is developed to eliminate the volume effect of ionization chambers when they are positioned in the maxima of dose profiles, particularly for the performance of output factor measurements for the calibration of narrow photon beams. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  12. Calibration of well-type ionization chambers; Calibracao de camaras de ionizacao do tipo poco

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, C.F.E.; Leite, S.P.; Pires, E.J.; Magalhaes, L.A.G.; David, M.G.; Almeida, C.E. de, E-mail: cfealves@gmail.com [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Ciencias Radiologicas; Di Prinzio, R. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents the methodology developed by the Laboratorio de Ciencias Radiologicas and presently in use for determining of the calibration coefficient for well-type chambers used in the dosimetry of {sup 192}Ir high dose rate sources. Uncertainty analysis involving the calibration procedure are discussed. (author)

  13. Air density dependence of the response of the PTW SourceCheck 4pi ionization chamber for125I brachytherapy seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres Del Río, J; Tornero-López, A M; Guirado, D; Pérez-Calatayud, J; Lallena, A M

    2017-06-01

    To analyze the air density dependence of the response of the new SourceCheck 4pi ionization chamber, manufactured by PTW. The air density dependence of three different SourceCheck 4pi chambers was studied by measuring 125 I sources. Measurements were taken by varying the pressure from 746.6 to 986.6hPa in a pressure chamber. Three different HDR 1000 Plus ionization chambers were also analyzed under similar conditions. A linear and a potential-like function of the air density were fitted to experimental data and their achievement in describing them was analyzed. SourceCheck 4pi chamber response showed a residual dependence on the air density once the standard pressure and temperature factor was applied. The chamber response was overestimated when the air density was below that under normal atmospheric conditions. A similar dependence was found for the HDR 1000 Plus chambers analyzed. A linear function of the air density permitted a very good description of this residual dependence, better than with a potential function. No significant variability between the different specimens of the same chamber model studied was found. The effect of overestimation observed in the chamber responses once they are corrected for the standard pressure and temperature may represent a non-negligible ∼4% overestimation in high altitude cities as ours (700m AMSL). This overestimation behaves linearly with the air density in all cases analyzed. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Monte Carlo study of the depth-dependent fluence perturbation in parallel-plate ionization chambers in electron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zink, K., E-mail: klemens.zink@kmub.thm.de [Institute of Medical Physics and Radiation Protection (IMPS), University of Applied Sciences Giessen, Giessen D-35390, Germany and Department of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, University Medical Center Giessen-Marburg, Marburg D-35043 (Germany); Czarnecki, D.; Voigts-Rhetz, P. von [Institute of Medical Physics and Radiation Protection (IMPS), University of Applied Sciences Giessen, Giessen D-35390 (Germany); Looe, H. K. [Clinic for Radiation Therapy, Pius-Hospital, Oldenburg D-26129, Germany and WG Medical Radiation Physics, Carl von Ossietzky University, Oldenburg D-26129 (Germany); Harder, D. [Prof. em., Medical Physics and Biophysics, Georg August University, Göttingen D-37073 (Germany)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: The electron fluence inside a parallel-plate ionization chamber positioned in a water phantom and exposed to a clinical electron beam deviates from the unperturbed fluence in water in absence of the chamber. One reason for the fluence perturbation is the well-known “inscattering effect,” whose physical cause is the lack of electron scattering in the gas-filled cavity. Correction factors determined to correct for this effect have long been recommended. However, more recent Monte Carlo calculations have led to some doubt about the range of validity of these corrections. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to reanalyze the development of the fluence perturbation with depth and to review the function of the guard rings. Methods: Spatially resolved Monte Carlo simulations of the dose profiles within gas-filled cavities with various radii in clinical electron beams have been performed in order to determine the radial variation of the fluence perturbation in a coin-shaped cavity, to study the influences of the radius of the collecting electrode and of the width of the guard ring upon the indicated value of the ionization chamber formed by the cavity, and to investigate the development of the perturbation as a function of the depth in an electron-irradiated phantom. The simulations were performed for a primary electron energy of 6 MeV. Results: The Monte Carlo simulations clearly demonstrated a surprisingly large in- and outward electron transport across the lateral cavity boundary. This results in a strong influence of the depth-dependent development of the electron field in the surrounding medium upon the chamber reading. In the buildup region of the depth-dose curve, the in–out balance of the electron fluence is positive and shows the well-known dose oscillation near the cavity/water boundary. At the depth of the dose maximum the in–out balance is equilibrated, and in the falling part of the depth-dose curve it is negative, as shown here the

  15. A novel convolution-based approach to address ionization chamber volume averaging effect in model-based treatment planning systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barraclough, Brendan; Li, Jonathan G.; Lebron, Sharon; Fan, Qiyong; Liu, Chihray; Yan, Guanghua

    2015-08-01

    The ionization chamber volume averaging effect is a well-known issue without an elegant solution. The purpose of this study is to propose a novel convolution-based approach to address the volume averaging effect in model-based treatment planning systems (TPSs). Ionization chamber-measured beam profiles can be regarded as the convolution between the detector response function and the implicit real profiles. Existing approaches address the issue by trying to remove the volume averaging effect from the measurement. In contrast, our proposed method imports the measured profiles directly into the TPS and addresses the problem by reoptimizing pertinent parameters of the TPS beam model. In the iterative beam modeling process, the TPS-calculated beam profiles are convolved with the same detector response function. Beam model parameters responsible for the penumbra are optimized to drive the convolved profiles to match the measured profiles. Since the convolved and the measured profiles are subject to identical volume averaging effect, the calculated profiles match the real profiles when the optimization converges. The method was applied to reoptimize a CC13 beam model commissioned with profiles measured with a standard ionization chamber (Scanditronix Wellhofer, Bartlett, TN). The reoptimized beam model was validated by comparing the TPS-calculated profiles with diode-measured profiles. Its performance in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) quality assurance (QA) for ten head-and-neck patients was compared with the CC13 beam model and a clinical beam model (manually optimized, clinically proven) using standard Gamma comparisons. The beam profiles calculated with the reoptimized beam model showed excellent agreement with diode measurement at all measured geometries. Performance of the reoptimized beam model was comparable with that of the clinical beam model in IMRT QA. The average passing rates using the reoptimized beam model increased substantially from 92.1% to

  16. Calibration of ionization chambers in IAEA water phantom; Kalibrering av ionekamre i IAEA-vannfantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjerke, H.; Mikkelborg, O.

    1995-11-01

    The calibration in a water phantom is realised at the Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory in Norway. The method is valid for chambers used in high energy radiation therapy. The method, setup and corrections in the calibration are described. The absorbed dose to air calibration factor, N{sub D}, will have an uncertainty of {approx}0.8% (k=1). 15 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. Dosimetry in VMAT for prostate using ionization chambers of different volumes; Verificacao dosimetrica em VMAT para prostata com camaras de ionizacao de volumes diferentes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groppo, Daniela P.; Anderson, Ernani; Pavan, Guilherme A., E-mail: danielagroppo@grupocoi.com, E-mail: ernanianderson@grupocoi.com [Clinicas Oncologicas Integradas (Grupo COI), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Caldas, Linda V.E., E-mail: lcaldas@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    The volumetric modulated arc therapy is one of the most modern radiotherapy techniques. The advents of this modality in the dose delivery can also contribute to errors during the execution of the treatment, therefore various types of quality control are carried out. The individual assessment of dose delivered to the patient is also an important quality control test and required by the current regulations. The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of different volume ionization chambers for dosimetry of VMAT treatments for prostate cancer. Three ionization chambers were evaluated and all of them showed satisfactory results. (author)

  18. Comparison of the half-value layer: ionization chambers vs solid-state meters; Comparacao entre medidas de camada semirredutora: camara de ionizacao vs medidores de estado solido

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, L.C.S.; Navarro, V.C.C.; Navarro, M.V.T.; Macedo, E.M., E-mail: larapereira@ifba.edu.br [Instituto Federal da Bahia (LABPROSAUD/IFBA), Salvador, BA (Brazil). Laboratorio de Produtos para a Saude

    2015-07-01

    Generally, the half value layer (HVL) is determined by using ionization chambers and aluminum filters. However, some solid-state dosimeters allow simultaneous measurements of X-ray's parameters, among which the HVL. The main objective of this study was to compare the HVL's values indicated by four different solid-state dosimeters, whose values were measured by ionization chambers. The maximum difference found between the two methods was 11.42%, one the solid-state dosimeters, showing that the use these instruments to determine CSR in industrial X-ray should be subject to a more thorough evaluation. (author)

  19. Two-dimensional and quasi-three-dimensional dosimetry of hadron and photon beams with the Magic Cube and the Pixel Ionization Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirio, R.; Garelli, E.; Schulte, R.; Amerio, S.; Boriano, A.; Bourhaleb, F.; Coutrakon, G.; Donetti, M.; Giordanengo, S.; Koss, P.; Madon, E.; Marchetto, F.; Nastasi, U.; Peroni, C.; Santuari, D.; Sardo, A.; Scielzo, G.; Stasi, M.; Trevisiol, E.

    2004-08-01

    Two detectors for fast two-dimensional (2D) and quasi-three-dimensional (quasi-3D) verification of the dose delivered by radiotherapy beams have been developed at University and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN) of Torino. The Magic Cube is a stack of strip-segmented ionization chambers interleaved with water-equivalent slabs. The parallel plate ionization chambers have a sensitive area of 24 × 24 cm2, and consist of 0.375 cm wide and 24 cm long strips. There are a total of 64 strips per chamber. The Magic Cube has been tested with the clinical proton beam at Loma Linda University Medical Centre (LLUMC), and was shown to be capable of fast and precise quasi-3D dose verification. The Pixel Ionization Chamber (PXC) is a detector with pixel anode segmentation. It is a 32 × 32 matrix of 1024 cylindrical ionization cells arranged in a square 24 × 24 cm2 area. Each cell has 0.4 cm diameter and 0.55 cm height, at a pitch of 0.75 cm separates the centre of adjacent cells. The sensitive volume of each single ionization cell is 0.07 cm3. The detectors are read out using custom designed front-end microelectronics and a personal computer-based data acquisition system. The PXC has been used to verify dynamic intensity-modulated radiotherapy for head-and-neck and breast cancers.

  20. Two-dimensional and quasi-three-dimensional dosimetry of hadron and photon beams with the Magic Cube and the Pixel Ionization Chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cirio, R [Experimental Physics Department of the University and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Via P. Giuria 1, I-10125 Torino (Italy); Garelli, E [Experimental Physics Department of the University and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Via P. Giuria 1, I-10125 Torino (Italy); Schulte, R [Loma Linda University Medical Center, 11234 Anderson St, Loma Linda, CA 92354 (United States)] [and others

    2004-08-21

    Two detectors for fast two-dimensional (2D) and quasi-three-dimensional (quasi-3D) verification of the dose delivered by radiotherapy beams have been developed at University and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN) of Torino. The Magic Cube is a stack of strip-segmented ionization chambers interleaved with water-equivalent slabs. The parallel plate ionization chambers have a sensitive area of 24 x 24 cm{sup 2}, and consist of 0.375 cm wide and 24 cm long strips. There are a total of 64 strips per chamber. The Magic Cube has been tested with the clinical proton beam at Loma Linda University Medical Centre (LLUMC), and was shown to be capable of fast and precise quasi-3D dose verification. The Pixel Ionization Chamber (PXC) is a detector with pixel anode segmentation. It is a 32 x 32 matrix of 1024 cylindrical ionization cells arranged in a square 24 x 24 cm{sup 2} area. Each cell has 0.4 cm diameter and 0.55 cm height, at a pitch of 0.75 cm separates the centre of adjacent cells. The sensitive volume of each single ionization cell is 0.07 cm{sup 3}. The detectors are read out using custom designed front-end microelectronics and a personal computer-based data acquisition system. The PXC has been used to verify dynamic intensity-modulated radiotherapy for head-and-neck and breast cancers.

  1. Development for PRESPEC: New front end electronic for multi sampling ionization chambers of the GSI-fragment separator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pietri, Stephane; Gerl, Juergen; Kurz, Nik; Nociforo, Chiara; Schaffner, Henning; Simon, Haik [GSI, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    To study detailed structure effects during in-beam gamma spectroscopy experiments at the GSI fragment separator high particles rates are needed at the final focal plane. The use of new position detector (TPC) having higher rate capability than the previous Multi-Wire Proportional Counter put the ionization chambers (MUSICs) used for the {delta}-E measurement as the limiting factor. The current electronics used for those detector does not allow to sustain rates of up to 100 kHz that the coming experimental program will request. Indeed at those rates the analog electronic is not able to disentangle pile-up events and thus give a wrong Z identification for the incoming nucleus. The ongoing work on new digital electronic and on signal characterization to allow higher rates capability of those detectors is presented.

  2. A method for measuring the electron drift velocity in working gas using a Frisch-grid ionization chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, Huaiyong; Wang, Zhimin; Zhang, Luyu; Chen, Jinxiang; Zhang, Guohui, E-mail: guohuizhang@pku.edu.cn

    2016-12-21

    A method for measuring the electron drift velocity in working gas is proposed. Based on the cathode and the anode signal waveforms of the Frisch-grid ionization chamber, the electron drift velocity is extracted. With this method, the electron drift velocities in Ar + 10% CH{sub 4}, Ar + 3.5% CO{sub 2} and Kr + 2.7% CO{sub 2} gases have been measured and the results are compared with the existing measurements and the simulating results. Using this method, the electron drift velocity can be monitored throughout the experiment of charged particle without bothering the measurement of other parameters, such as the energy and orientation.

  3. Study of the performance of the ATLAS monitored drift tube chambers under the influence of heavily ionizing $\\alpha$-particles

    CERN Document Server

    Sampsonidis, Dimitrios; Liolios, Anastasios; Manolopoulou, Metaxia; Petridou, C

    2004-01-01

    The MDT chambers of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer will operate in a heavy LHC background environment mainly from photons and neutrons. The ionization produced by neutron recoils is much higher than the one from photons or muons and can be simulated by the use of alpha particles. A systematic study of the behavior of the ATLAS Monitored Drift Tubes (MDTs) under controlled irradiation has been performed. The presence of alpha particles results in the reduction of the gas gain due to space charge effects. The gas gain reduction has been studied in a single tube set up using a well controlled radium (/sup 226/Ra) source in order to enrich the tube gas (Ar/CO/sub 2/) with the alpha emitter /sup 220/Rn and irradiate the tubes internally. The results are confronted with Garfield simulations.

  4. A twin Frisch-grid ionization chamber as a selective detector for the delayed gamma-spectroscopy of fission fragments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaudefroy, L., E-mail: laurent.gaudefroy@cea.fr [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Roger, T., E-mail: roger@ganil.fr [GANIL, CEA/DSM-CNRS/IN2P3, BP 55027, F-14076 Caen (France); Pancin, J., E-mail: pancin@ganil.fr [GANIL, CEA/DSM-CNRS/IN2P3, BP 55027, F-14076 Caen (France); Spitaels, C. [GANIL, CEA/DSM-CNRS/IN2P3, BP 55027, F-14076 Caen (France); Aupiais, J. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Mottier, J. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire, Université Paris-Sud-11-CNRS-IN2P3, F-91406 Orsay (France)

    2017-05-21

    We present a twin Frisch-grid ionization chamber. The detector is meant to provide high selective power for the study of delayed gamma-ray spectroscopy of fission fragments produced via {sup 252}Cf spontaneous fission. A mean energy resolution on the kinetic energy of fission fragments of 675 keV (FWHM) is achieved and allows us to resolve masses of fragments for fission events where neutron emission is not energetically possible. The mean mass resolution measured for these particular events amounts to 0.54 mass units (FWHM). For fission events with neutron emission a resolution of 4 mass units (FWHM) is reported. Information on fragment emission angle is measured with a resolution of 0.1 on the difference of the cosines determined for both halves of the detector. A charge resolution of 4.5 charge units (FWHM) is also demonstrated.

  5. Eight years of IMRT quality assurance with ionization chambers and film dosimetry: experience of the montpellier comprehensive cancer center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background To present the results of quality assurance (QA) in IMRT of film dosimetry and ionization chambers measurements with an eight year follow-up. Methods All treatment plans were validated under the linear accelerator by absolute and relative measures obtained with ionization chambers (IC) and with XomatV and EDR2 films (Kodak). Results The average difference between IC measured and computed dose at isocenter with the gantry angle of 0° was 0.07 ± 1.22% (average ± 1 SD) for 2316 prostate, 1.33 ± 3.22% for 808 head and neck (h&n), and 0.37 ± 0.62% for 108 measurements of prostate bed fields. Pelvic treatment showed differences of 0.49 ± 1.86% in 26 fields for prostate cases and 2.07 ± 2.83% in 109 fields of anal canal. Composite measurement at isocenter for each patient showed an average difference with computed dose of 0.05 ± 0.87% for 386 prostate, 1.49 ± 1.86% for 158 h&n, 0.37 ± 0.34% for 23 prostate bed, 0.80 ± 0.28% for 4 pelvis, and 2.31 ± 0.56% for 17 anal canal cases. On the first 250 h&n analyzed by film in absolute dose, the average of the points crossing a gamma index 3% and 3 mm was 93%. This value reached 99% for the prostate fields. Conclusion More than 3500 beams were found to be within the limits defined as validated for treatment between 2001 and 2008. PMID:21774795

  6. Scattering study at free air ionization chamber diaphragm; Estudo do espalhamento no diafragma da camara de ionizacao de ar livre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Alexandre Lo Bianco dos

    2011-07-01

    The maim of this work consisted in the assessment of the correction factor for air kerma, due to scattered radiation in the diaphragm of the free-air ionization chamber model 481. LNMRl measurements were made to acquire x-ray spectra corresponding to the Qualities RQR-M, described in IEC 61627 standards (2005). These spectra were used as input data in the MC simulations. The operational range of energy spectra provide up to 35 keV. This energy range is typically used in diagnostic radiology, although there is not primary standard for air kerma. The determination of this factor is a fundamental process in the primary standardization of the air kerma. These factors were obtained by computer simulation using the Penelope code. The results are k{sub RQR-M1}=0,9946, k{sub RQR} {sub -M2}=0,9932, k{sub RQR-M3}=0,9978 and k{sub RQR-M4}=0,9885; with uncertainties of 0,007 and coverage factor equal to 2. lt can be concluded that, with respect to the diaphragm, the chamber can be used in the primary standard of air kerma. (author)

  7. Electron beam quality kQ,Q0 factors for various ionization chambers: a Monte Carlo investigation with penelope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erazo, F.; Brualla, L.; Lallena, A. M.

    2014-11-01

    In this work we calculate the beam quality correction factor {{k}\\text{Q,{{\\text{Q}}0}}} for various plane-parallel ionization chambers. A set of Monte Carlo calculations using the code penelope/penEasy have been carried out to calculate the overall correction factor fc,Q for eight electron beams corresponding to a Varian Clinac 2100 C/D, with nominal energies ranging between 6 MeV and 22 MeV, for a 60Co beam, that has been used as the reference quality Q0 and also for eight monoenergetic electron beams reproducing the quality index R50 of the Clinac beams. Two field sizes, 10 × 10 cm2 and 20 × 20 cm2 have been considered. The {{k}\\text{Q,{{\\text{Q}}0}}} factors have been calculated as the ratio between fc,Q and {{f}\\text{c,{{\\text{Q}}0}}} . Values for the Exradin A10, A11, A11TW, P11, P11TW, T11 and T11TW ionization chambers, manufactured by Standard Imaging, as well as for the NACP-02 have been obtained. The results found with the Clinac beams for the two field sizes analyzed show differences below 0.6%, even in the case of the higher energy electron beams. The {{k}\\text{Q,{{\\text{Q}}0}}} values obtained with the Clinac beams are 1% larger than those found with the monoenergetic beams for the higher energies, above 12 MeV. This difference can be ascribed to secondary photons produced in the linac head and the air path towards the phantom. Contrary to what was quoted in a previous work (Sempau et al 2004 Phys. Med. Biol. 49 4427-44), the beam quality correction factors obtained with the complete Clinac geometries and with the monoenergetic beams differ significantly for energies above 12 MeV. Material differences existing between chambers that have the same geometry produce non-negligible modifications in the value of these correction factors.

  8. Fast-Neutron Spectrometry Using a 3He Ionization Chamber and Digital Pulse Shape Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. L. Chichester; J. T. Johnson; E. H. Seabury

    2010-05-01

    Digital pulse shape analysis (dPSA) has been used with a Cuttler-Shalev type 3He proportional counter to measure the fast neutron spectra of bare 252Cf and 241AmBe neutron sources. Measurements have also been made to determine the attenuated fast neutron spectra of 252Cf shielded by several materials including water, graphite, liquid nitrogen, magnesium, and tungsten. Rise-time dPSA has been employed using the common rise-time approach for analyzing n +3He ? 1H + 3H ionization events and a new approach has been developed to improve the fidelity of these measurements. Simulations have been performed for the different experimental arrangements and are compared, demonstrating general agreement between the dPSA processed fast neutron spectra and predictions.

  9. Radiation dosimetry in magnetic fields with Farmer-type ionization chambers: determination of magnetic field correction factors for different magnetic field strengths and field orientations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spindeldreier, C K; Schrenk, O; Bakenecker, A; Kawrakow, I; Burigo, L; Karger, C P; Greilich, S; Pfaffenberger, A

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this work was to determine magnetic field correction factors that are needed for dosimetry in hybrid devices for MR-guided radiotherapy for Farmer-type ionization chambers for different magnetic field strengths and field orientations. The response of six custom-built Farmer-type chambers irradiated at a 6 MV linac was measured in a water tank positioned in a magnet with magnetic field strengths between 0.0 T and 1.1 T. Chamber axis, beam and magnetic field were perpendicular to each other and both magnetic field directions were investigated. EGSnrc Monte Carlo simulations were compared to the measurements and simulations with different field orientations were performed. For all geometries, magnetic field correction factors, [Formula: see text], and perturbation factors were calculated. A maximum increase of 8.8% in chamber response was measured for the magnetic field perpendicular to chamber and beam axis. The measured chamber response could be reproduced by adjusting the dead volume layer near the chamber stem in the Monte Carlo simulations. For the magnetic field parallel to the chamber axis or parallel to the beam, the simulated response increased by 1.1% at maximum for field strengths up to 1.1 T. A complex dependence of the response was found on chamber radius, magnetic field strength and orientation of beam, chamber axis and magnetic field direction. Especially for magnetic fields perpendicular to beam and chamber axis, the exact sensitive volume has to be considered in the simulations. To minimize magnetic field correction factors and the influence of dead volumes on the response of Farmer chambers, a measurement set-up with the magnetic field parallel to the chamber axis or parallel to the beam is recommended for dosimetry.

  10. Derivation of radiation quality average parameters in neutron-gamma radiation fields with the high-pressure ionization chamber: theory and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makrigiorgos, G M

    1989-06-01

    The established radiation quality parameters in mixed neutron-gamma radiation fields may be measured by applying the initial (columnar) recombination of ions in tissue-equivalent (TE) high-pressure ionization chambers (recombination chambers). The mean quality factor can be determined to within 10-15% for mixed fields with neutrons ranging from thermal to 10 MeV, and the dose mean LET of the proton component can be determined to within 10-15% if the gamma-ray absorbed dose fraction is known. These average parameters are derived by measuring the ratio of the ionization currents collected at two high-field strengths and constant gas pressure applied to the ionization chamber. By utilizing approximate correlations between physical parameters in the neutron energy region from thermal to 10 MeV, the dose mean LET of the heavy ion component, the overall dose mean LET, and the microdosimetric parameter y0,D of the mixed field can also be derived. Experimental verification of the method is presented for various neutron-gamma radiation spectra in air and in water by comparison to theoretical calculations and results from low-pressure proportional counter measurements. Good agreement is shown. The TE high-pressure ionization chamber appears to have wide potential for use as a dose-equivalent meter in radiation protection or as a beam characterization device in radiobiology.

  11. Application of the correction factor for radiation qualityK{sub q} in dosimetry with pencil-type ionization chambers using a Tandem system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontes, Ladyjane Pereira; Potiens, Maria da Penha Albuquerque, E-mail: lpfontes@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-11-01

    The pencil-type ionization chamber widely used in computed tomography (CT) dosimetry, is a measuring instrument that has a cylindrical shape and provides uniform response independent of the angle of incidence of ionizing radiation. Calibration and measurements performed with the pencil-type ionization chamber are done in terms of Kerma product in air-length (P{sub k,l}) and values are given in Gy.cm. To obtain the values of (P{sub k,l}) during clinical measurements, the readings performed with the ionization chamber are multiplied by the calibration coefficient (N{sub k,l}) and the correction factor C for quality (K{sub q}) which are given in Calibration certificates of the chambers. The application of the correction factor for radiation quality K{sub q} is done as a function of the effective energy of the beam that is determined by the Half Value layer (HVL) calculation. In order to estimate the HVL values in this work, a Tandem system made up of cylindrical aluminum and PMMA absorber layers was used as a low cost and easy to apply method. From the Tandem curve, it was possible to construct the calibration curve and obtain the appropriate K{sub q} to the beam of the computed tomography equipment studied. (author)

  12. Technical Note : A direct ray-tracing method to compute integral depth dose in pencil beam proton radiography with a multilayer ionization chamber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farace, Paolo; Righetto, Roberto; Deffet, Sylvain; Meijers, Arturs; Vander Stappen, Francois

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To introduce a fast ray-tracing algorithm in pencil proton radiography (PR) with a multilayer ionization chamber (MLIC) for in vivo range error mapping. Methods: Pencil beam PR was obtained by delivering spots uniformly positioned in a square (45x45 mm(2) field-of-view) of 9x9 spots capable

  13. Determination of absorbed dose to water in a clinical carbon ion beam by means of fluorescent nuclear track detectors, ionization chambers, and water calorimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osinga-Blaettermann, Julia-Maria

    2016-12-20

    Until now, dosimetry of carbon ions with ionization chambers has not reached the same level of accuracy as of high-energy photons. This is mainly caused by the threefold higher uncertainty of the k{sub Q,Q{sub 0}}-factor of ionization chambers, which is derived by calculations due to a lack of experimental data. The current thesis comprises two major aims with respect to the dosimetry of carbon ion beams: first, the investigation of the potential of fluorescent nuclear track detectors for fluence-based dosimetry and second, the experimental determination of the k{sub Q,Q{sub 0}}-factor. The direct comparison of fluence- and ionization-based measurements has shown a significant discrepancy of 4.5 %, which re-opened the discussion on the accuracy of calculated k{sub Q,Q{sub 0}}-factors. Therefore, absorbed dose to water measurements by means of water calorimetry have been performed allowing for the direct calibration of ionization chambers and thus for the experimental determination of k{sub Q,Q{sub 0}}. For the first time it could be shown that the experimental determination of k{sub Q,Q{sub 0}} for carbon ion beams is achievable with a standard measurement uncertainty of 0.8 %. This corresponds to a threefold reduction of the uncertainty compared to calculated values and therefore enables to significantly decrease the overall uncertainty related to ionization-based dosimetry of clinical carbon ion beams.

  14. Laser Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy of Neutral and Ionized Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in the Cosmic Simulation Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejaoui, Salma; Salama, Farid; Contreras, Cesar; Sciamma O'Brien, Ella; Foing, Bernard; Pascale, Ehrenfreund

    2015-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules are considered the best carriers to account for the ubiquitous infrared emission bands. PAHs have also been proposed as candidates to explain the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs), a series of absorption features seen on the interstellar extinction curve and are plausible carriers for the extended red emission (ERE), a photoluminescent process associated with a wide variety of interstellar environments. Extensive efforts have been devoted over the past two decades to characterize the physical and chemical properties of PAH molecules and ions in space. Absorption spectra of PAH molecules and ions trapped in solid matrices have been compared to the DIBs. Absorption spectra of several cold, isolated gas-phase PAHs have also been measured under experimental conditions that mimic the interstellar conditions. The purpose of this study is to provide a new dimension to the existing spectroscopic database of neutral and single ionized PAHs that is largely based on absorption spectra by adding emission spectroscopy data. The measurements are based on the laser induced fluorescence (LIF) technique and are performed with the Pulsed Discharge Nozzle (PDN) of the COSmIC laboratory facility at NASA Ames laboratory. The PDN generates a plasma in a free supersonic jet expansion to simulate the physical and the chemical conditions in interstellar environments. We focus, here, on the fluorescence spectra of large neutral PAHs and their cations where there is a lack of fluorescence spectroscopy data. The astronomical implications of the data (e.g., ERE) are examined.

  15. Determination of absorbed dose to water from a miniature kilovoltage x-ray source using a parallel-plate ionization chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Peter G. F.; Popovic, Marija; Seuntjens, Jan

    2018-01-01

    Electronic brachytherapy sources are widely accepted as alternatives to radionuclide-based systems. Yet, formal dosimetry standards for these devices to independently complement the dose protocol provided by the manufacturer are lacking. This article presents a formalism for calculating and independently verifying the absorbed dose to water from a kV x-ray source (The INTRABEAM System) measured in a water phantom with an ionization chamber calibrated in terms of air-kerma. This formalism uses a Monte Carlo (MC) calculated chamber conversion factor, CQ , to convert air-kerma in a reference beam to absorbed dose to water in the measurement beam. In this work CQ was determined for a PTW 34013 parallel-plate ionization chamber. Our results show that CQ was sensitive to the chamber plate separation tolerance, with differences of up to 15%. CQ was also found to have a depth dependence which varied with chamber plate separation (0 to 10% variation for the smallest and largest cavity height, over 3 to 30 mm depth). However for all chamber dimensions investigated, CQ was found to be significantly larger than the manufacturer reported value, suggesting that the manufacturer recommended method of dose calculation could be underestimating the dose to water.

  16. SU-C-201-03: Ionization Chamber Collection Efficiency in Pulsed Radiation Fields of High Pulse Dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gotz, M; Karsch, L [Oncoray - National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden - Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Pawelke, J [Oncoray - National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden - Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden - Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the reduction of collection efficiency of ionization chambers (IC) by volume recombination and its correction in pulsed fields of very high pulse dose. Methods: Measurements of the collection efficiency of a plane-parallel advanced Markus IC (PTW 34045, 1mm electrode spacing, 300V nominal voltage) were obtained for collection voltages of 100V and 300V by irradiation with a pulsed electron beam (20MeV) of varied pulse dose up to approximately 600mGy (0.8nC liberated charge). A reference measurement was performed with a Faraday cup behind the chamber. It was calibrated for the liberated charge in the IC by a linear fit of IC measurement to reference measurement at low pulse doses. The results were compared to the commonly used two voltage approximation (TVA) and to established theories for volume recombination, with and without considering a fraction of free electrons. In addition, an equation system describing the charge transport and reactions in the chamber was solved numerically. Results: At 100V collection voltage and moderate pulse doses the established theories accurately predict the observed collection efficiency, but at extreme pulse doses a fraction of free electrons needs to be considered. At 300V the observed collection efficiency deviates distinctly from that predicted by any of the established theories, even at low pulse doses. However, the numeric solution of the equation system is able to reproduce the measured collection efficiency across the entire dose range of both voltages with a single set of parameters. Conclusion: At high electric fields (3000V/cm here) the existing theoretical descriptions of collection efficiency, including the TVA, are inadequate to predict pulse dose dependency. Even at low pulse doses they might underestimate collection efficiency. The presented, more accurate numeric solution, which considers additional effects like electric shielding by the charges, might provide a valuable tool for future

  17. Method to calibrate an ionization chamber for measuring indoor radon concentrations with standard gamma-ray sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Yuzuru; Tokumori, Kenji; Iwata, Toru; Sakae, Takeji; Ishibashi, Kenji; Katase, Akira

    1989-06-01

    Most instruments for measuring radon concentrations in the air should be calibrated using air with known radon concentrations, obtained from a solution of radium. However, safe handling of such a solution of alpha-active elements can be troublesome. Standard gamma-ray sources of low activity are handled more safely and typically used to obtain the absolute detection efficiency of a Ge detector with high accuracy. A new method has been developed to calibrate a radon detector with such sources. A radon exhalation rate for a substance containing a small amount of radium is measured with the radon detector to be calibrated. After this, the vessel containing the radium is sealed so that the radon does not escape from it. The buildup of the activity of 214Bi in it is obtained from gamma-ray measurements and gives the radon exhalation rate on the basis of the activity of the standard sources. From the comparison between the two values of the exhalation rate, the radon detector is calibrated. A plane multiwire-electrode ionization chamber is used as a radon detector, and its detection efficiency is calculated from its geometrical form. The radon exhalation rate computed from the calculated efficiency agrees with that determined from the activity of the standard gamma-ray sources within their specified 6% error.

  18. Use of parallel-plate ionization chambers in reference dosimetry of NOVAC and LIAC(®) mobile electron linear accelerators for intraoperative radiotherapy: a multi-center survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalchi, Paolo; Ciccotelli, Alessia; Felici, Giuseppe; Petrucci, Assunta; Massafra, Raffaella; Piazzi, Valeria; D'Avenia, Paola; Cavagnetto, Francesca; Cattani, Federica; Romagnoli, Raffaella; Soriani, Antonella

    2017-01-01

    LIAC(®) and NOVAC are two mobile linear accelerators dedicated to intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT), generating electron beams in the energy range of 3-12 MeV. Due to high dose-per-pulse (up to 70 mGy per pulse), in 2003 the Italian National Institute of Health (ISS) stated that "for the measure of dose to water in reference conditions, ionization chambers cannot be employed and no published dosimetry protocol can be used". As a consequence, ferrous sulphate (or, alternatively alanine) dosimetry was recommended. Based on a retrospective multi-center survey, a comparison with ferrous sulphate dosimetry is now used to validate the parallel-plate ionization chambers for reference dosimetry of NOVAC and LIAC. The IAEA TRS-398 dosimetry protocol was applied except for the reference irradiation setup and the determination of the ion-recombination correction factor ks . Moreover the depth of maximum dose (R100 ) instead of zref as measurement depth was chosen by the majority of centers, thus implying a renormalization of the beam-quality correction factor kQ,Qo , based on water-air stopping power ratios. Regarding the ks determination, a previously published method, independent of ferrous sulphate dosimetry, was adopted. All the centers participating in this study had used both ferrous sulphate dosimeters and ionization chambers in water phantoms for dosimetry under reference conditions. The mean percentage difference between ionization chambers and ferrous sulphate dosimetry was -0.5% with a dispersion of 3.9% (2σ). Moreover, the uncertainty analysis allowed the agreement between ionization chambers and ferrous sulphate dosimetry to be verified. These results did not show any significant dependence on electron energy, thus indirectly confirming kQ,Qo renormalization. The results from the centers using zref as the measurement depth were similar to the other data, but further focused studies could aim at investigating possible dependences of the dose differences

  19. Gas gain operations with single photon resolution using an integrating ionization chamber in small-angle X-ray scattering experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Menk, R H; Besch, H J; Walenta, Albert H; Amenitsch, H; Bernstorff, S

    2000-01-01

    In this work a combination of an ionization chamber with one-dimensional spatial resolution and a MicroCAT structure will be presented. Initially, MicroCAT was thought of as a shielding grid (Frisch-grid) but later was used as an active electron amplification device that enables single X-ray photon resolution measurements at low fluxes even with integrating readout electronics. Moreover, the adjustable gas gain that continuously covers the entire range from pure ionization chamber mode up to high gas gains (30000 and more) provides stable operation yielding a huge dynamic range of about 10 sup 8 and more. First measurements on biological samples using small angle X-ray scattering techniques with synchrotron radiation will be presented.

  20. Method for detecting and distinguishing between specific types of environmental radiation using a high pressure ionization chamber with pulse-mode readout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degtiarenko, Pavel V.

    2017-12-19

    An environmental radiation detector for detecting and distinguishing between all types of environmental radiation, including photons, charged particles, and neutrons. A large volume high pressure ionization chamber (HPIC) includes BF.sub.3 gas at a specific concentration to render the radiation detector sensitive to the reactions of neutron capture in Boron-10 isotope. A pulse-mode readout is connected to the ionization chamber capable of measuring both the height and the width of the pulse. The heavy charged products of the neutron capture reaction deposit significant characteristic energy of the reaction in the immediate vicinity of the reaction in the gas, producing a signal with a pulse height proportional to the reaction energy, and a narrow pulse width corresponding to the essentially pointlike energy deposition in the gas. Readout of the pulse height and the pulse width parameters of the signals enables distinguishing between the different types of environmental radiation, such as gamma (x-rays), cosmic muons, and neutrons.

  1. Calibration methods of plane-parallel ionization chambers used in electron dosimetry; Metodos de calibracao de camaras de ionizacao de placas paralelas para dosimetria de feixes de eletrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulla, Roseli Tadeu

    1999-07-01

    The use of linear accelerators in radiotherapy is of great importance in Medicine, and according to international recommendations the electron beam dosimetry has to be performed using plane-parallel ionization chambers, previously calibrated in standard gamma radiation fields at accredited laboratories. In this work, calibration methods of plane-parallel ionization chambers used in dosimetry procedures of high energy electron beams of clinical accelerators were presented, tested and intercompared. The experiments were carried out using gamma radiation beams of {sup 60} Co at the Calibration Laboratory of Clinical Dosemeters at IPEN and electron beams od 4 to 16 MeV at the Radiotherapy Department of Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo. A method was chosen to be established at IPEN. Proposals of the calibration procedure, calibration certificate and data sheets are presented. (author)

  2. Technical note: A new wedge-shaped ionization chamber component module for BEAMnrc to model the integral quality monitoring system®

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oderinde, Oluwaseyi Michael; du Plessis, FCP

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a new component module (CM) namely IQM to accurately model the integral quality monitoring (IQM) system® to be used in the BEAMnrc Monte Carlo (MC) code. The IQM is essentially a double wedge ionization chamber with the central electrode plate bisecting the wedge. The IQM CM allows the user to characterize the double wedge of this ionization chamber and BEAMnrc can then accurately calculate the dose in this CM including its enclosed air regions. This has been verified against measured data. The newly created CM was added into the standard BEAMnrc CMs, and it will be made available through the NRCC website. The BEAMnrc graphical user interface (GUI) and particle ray-tracing techniques were used to validate the IQM geometry. In subsequent MC simulations, the dose scored in the IQM was verified against measured data over a range of square fields ranging from 1 × 1-30 × 30 cm2. The IQM system is designed for the present day need for a device that could verify beam output in real-time during treatment. This CM is authentic, and it can serve as a basis for researchers that have an interest in real-time beam delivery checking using wedge-shaped ionization chamber based instruments like the IQM.

  3. Measurement of absorbed dose-to-water for an HDR {sup 192}Ir source with ionization chambers in a sandwich setup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araki, Fujio; Kouno, Tomohiro; Ohno, Takeshi [Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, 4-24-1 Kuhonji, Kumamoto 862-0976 (Japan); Kakei, Kiyotaka; Yoshiyama, Fumiaki [Department of Radiotherapy, Kumamoto University Hospital, 1-1-1 Honjyo, Kumamoto 860-8556 (Japan); Kawamura, Shinji [Department of Radiotherapy, Miyazaki University Hospital, 5200 Kihara Ohaza Kiyotake-Machi, Miyazaki 889-1692 (Japan)

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: In this study, a dedicated device for ion chamber measurements of absorbed dose-to-water for a Nucletron microSelectron-v2 HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy source is presented. The device uses two ionization chambers in a so-called sandwich assembly. Using this setup and by taking the average reading of the two chambers, any dose error due to difficulties in absolute positioning (centering) of the source in between the chambers is cancelled to first order. The method's accuracy was examined by comparing measurements with absorbed dose-to-water determination based on the AAPM TG-43 protocol.Methods: The optimal source-to-chamber distance (SCD) for {sup 192}Ir dosimetry was determined from ion chamber measurements in a water phantom. The {sup 192}Ir source was sandwiched between two Exradin A1SL chambers (0.057 cm{sup 3}) at the optimal SCD separation. The measured ionization was converted to the absorbed dose-to-water using a {sup 60}Co calibration factor and a Monte Carlo-calculated beam quality conversion factor, k{sub Q}, for {sup 60}Co to {sup 192}Ir. An uncertainty estimate of the proposed method was determined based on reproducibility of measurements at different institutions for the same type of source.Results: The optimal distance for the A1SL chamber measurements was determined to be 5 cm from the {sup 192}Ir source center, considering the depth dependency of k{sub Q} for {sup 60}Co to {sup 192}Ir and the chamber positioning. The absorbed dose to water measured at (5 cm, 90°) on the transverse axis was 1.3% lower than TG-43 values and its reproducibility and overall uncertainty were 0.8% and 1.7%, respectively. The measurement doses at anisotropic points agreed within 1.5% with TG-43 values.Conclusions: The ion chamber measurement of absorbed dose-to-water with a sandwich method for the {sup 192}Ir source provides a more accurate, direct, and reference dose compared to the dose-to-water determination based on air-kerma strength in the TG-43

  4. Comparison of depth-dose distributions of proton therapeutic beams calculated by means of logical detectors and ionization chamber modeled in Monte Carlo codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pietrzak, Robert [Department of Nuclear Physics and Its Applications, Institute of Physics, University of Silesia, Katowice (Poland); Konefał, Adam, E-mail: adam.konefal@us.edu.pl [Department of Nuclear Physics and Its Applications, Institute of Physics, University of Silesia, Katowice (Poland); Sokół, Maria; Orlef, Andrzej [Department of Medical Physics, Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center, Institute of Oncology, Gliwice (Poland)

    2016-08-01

    The success of proton therapy depends strongly on the precision of treatment planning. Dose distribution in biological tissue may be obtained from Monte Carlo simulations using various scientific codes making it possible to perform very accurate calculations. However, there are many factors affecting the accuracy of modeling. One of them is a structure of objects called bins registering a dose. In this work the influence of bin structure on the dose distributions was examined. The MCNPX code calculations of Bragg curve for the 60 MeV proton beam were done in two ways: using simple logical detectors being the volumes determined in water, and using a precise model of ionization chamber used in clinical dosimetry. The results of the simulations were verified experimentally in the water phantom with Marcus ionization chamber. The average local dose difference between the measured relative doses in the water phantom and those calculated by means of the logical detectors was 1.4% at first 25 mm, whereas in the full depth range this difference was 1.6% for the maximum uncertainty in the calculations less than 2.4% and for the maximum measuring error of 1%. In case of the relative doses calculated with the use of the ionization chamber model this average difference was somewhat greater, being 2.3% at depths up to 25 mm and 2.4% in the full range of depths for the maximum uncertainty in the calculations of 3%. In the dose calculations the ionization chamber model does not offer any additional advantages over the logical detectors. The results provided by both models are similar and in good agreement with the measurements, however, the logical detector approach is a more time-effective method. - Highlights: • Influence of the bin structure on the proton dose distributions was examined for the MC simulations. • The considered relative proton dose distributions in water correspond to the clinical application. • MC simulations performed with the logical detectors and the

  5. SU-E-T-174: Synopsis of the Experimental and Monte Carlo Calculated Values of the Radial EPOM Shift of Cylindrical Ionization Chambers for Photon-Beam Dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harder, D; Looe, H; Poppe, B

    2012-06-01

    According to the concept of the effective point of measurement (EPOM), the values of depth z serving as the variable of photon-beam depth dose distributions in water measured with cylindrical ionization chambers are commonly corrected according to the formula zeff=zR+▵z, were zeff is the depth of the EPOM, zR the depth of the reference point of the chamber, i.e. of its symmetry axis, and Az the EPOM shift. Agreed-upon values of the EPOM shift are for instance ▵z=-0.6r (IAEA TRS 398, 2000) and ▵z=-0.5r (DIN6800-2,2008) with r=radius of the air-filled volume. The EPOM concept holds in the falling as well as in the rising curve branch. The Az versus r relationship is currently reviewed. Measurements of the EPOM shift of cylindrical ionization chambers for 6/15 MV photons had been based upon a comparison with depth dependent dose distributions in water measured with the Roos chamber (PTW Freiburg). Its EPOM position (1.5 mm below the front face) had been determined by comparison with radiochrome films. (Looe et al, Phys.Med.Biol. 2011;56:4267-4290). Available are also the experimental EPOM shift values by Huang et al, Physica Medica 2010;26:126-131 and the classical value of Johansson et al, IAEA -SM-222/35,243-270(1978). Accurate Monte Carlo values had been supplied by Tessier and Kawrakow, Med.Phys. 2010;37:96-107. As shown by the graphical display of Az versus r, the relationship is nonlinear, shaped as a hockey stick, with values around -0.2 mm for the "pinpoint" chambers and with values near -1.4 mm for the often-used chambers with radii near 3 mm. For r ranging from 1 to 4 mm, the relationship can be approximated by ▵z = -(2.25 mm)×[1-exp(-0.0122 r̂4)] with r in mm. Time has come for a nonlinear updating of the EPOM shift versus radius relationship of cylindrical ionization chambers applied in photon-beam dosimetry. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  6. Correction factors for A1SL ionization chamber dosimetry in TomoTherapy: Machine-specific, plan-class, and clinical fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gago-Arias, Araceli; Rodriguez-Romero, Ruth; Sanchez-Rubio, Patricia; Miguel Gonzalez-Castano, Diego; Gomez, Faustino; Nunez, Luis; Palmans, Hugo; Sharpe, Peter; Pardo-Montero, Juan [Departamento de Fisica de Particulas, Facultad de Fisica, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Servicio de Radiofisica, Hospital Universitario Puerta de Hierro, Madrid 28222 (Spain); Departamento de Fisica de Particulas, Facultad de Fisica, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, 15782 (Spain) and Radiation Physics Laboratory, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, 15782 (Spain); Servicio de Radiofisica, Hospital Universitario Puerta de Hierro, Madrid, 28222 (Spain); National Physical Laboratory, Teddington, Middx, TW11 OLW (United Kingdom); Departamento de Fisica de Particulas, Facultad de Fisica, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, 15782 (Spain)

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: Recently, an international working group on nonstandard fields presented a new formalism for ionization chamber reference dosimetry of small and nonstandard fields [Alfonso et al., Med. Phys. 35, 5179-5186 (2008)] which has been adopted by AAPM TG-148. This work presents an experimental determination of the correction factors for reference dosimetry with an Exradin A1SL thimble ionization chamber in a TomoTherapy unit, focusing on: (i) machine-specific reference field, (ii) plan-class-specific reference field, and (iii) two clinical treatments. Methods: Ionization chamber measurements were performed in the TomoTherapy unit for intermediate (machine-specific and plan-class-specific) calibration fields, based on the reference conditions defined by AAPM TG-148, and two clinical treatments (lung and head-and-neck). Alanine reference dosimetry was employed to determine absorbed dose to water at the point of interest for the fields under investigation. The corresponding chamber correction factors were calculated from alanine to ionization chamber measurements ratios. Results: Two different methods of determining the beam quality correction factor k{sub Q,Q{sub 0}} for the A1SL ionization chamber in this TomoTherapy unit, where reference conditions for conventional beam quality determination cannot be met, result in consistent values. The observed values of overall correction factors obtained for intermediate and clinical fields are consistently around 0.98 with a typical expanded relative uncertainty of 2% (k = 2), which when considered make such correction factors compatible with unity. However, all of them are systematically lower than unity, which is shown to be significant when a hypothesis test assuming a t-student distribution is performed (p=1.8x10{sup -2}). Correction factors k{sub Q{sub c{sub l{sub i{sub n,Q{sub p{sub c{sub s{sub r}{sup f{sub c}{sub l}{sub i}{sub n},f{sub p}{sub c}{sub s}{sub r}}}}}}}}}} and k{sub Q{sub c{sub l{sub i{sub n,Q{sub m{sub s

  7. SU-E-T-177: Deconvolution of Line Dose Profiles with Ionization Chambers - Experiences with the First Software Implementation in Mephisto 3.0.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppe, B; Looe, H; Stelljes, T; Harder, D

    2012-06-01

    To evaluate the first implementation of a deconvolution algorithm in a commercial water phantom scanning software. Line dose profile measurements in a water phantom are an essential part of a quality assurance system and in base data measurements in radiotherapy. Usually these measurements are performed with waterproof ionization chambers of various sizes. These dose profile measurements are broadened by the Gaussian response functions of the detectors. In recent studies we showed that the undisturbed line dose profiles can be reconstruced by iterative deconvolution of the measured signal profiles with the Gaussian detector response functions. Recently, the proposed method was implemented in Mephisto 3.0. In this work we analyze the applicability and the limits of the deconvolution algorithm for several chambers by comparing the result with diode measurements. As long as the dose gradient becomes not too steep the deconvolution algorithm is able to reconstruct the undisturbed dose profiles with sufficient accuracy. Deviations occur for smallest field sizes in which the width of the detector's lateral response functions reaches the dimensions of the field. A simple chart for those limits is derived. The implemented deconvolution algorithm allows a fast and simple correction of measured dose profiles broadened by the volume effect of the ionization chambers. It offers therefore for the first time a clinical deconvolution of the profiles on a regular base and by this the implementation of undisturbed base data in the treatment planning systems as well as in the quality assurance process in modern radiotherapy. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  8. Dosimetric verification of IMRT treatments using ionization chamber, radiographic film and gamma function; Verificacao dosimetrica de tratamentos de IMRT utilizando camara de ionizacao, filme radiografico e funcao gama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, Tatiana M.M.T.; Casagrande, Thais M.; Neves-Junior, Wellington F.P.; Mancini, Anselmo; Pelosi, Edilson L.; Haddad, Cecilia M.K.; Silva, Joao L.F., E-mail: tatiana.alves@hsl.org.b [Sociedade Beneficente de Senhoras Hospital Sirio-Libanes, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Setor de Radioterapia

    2010-06-15

    This study aimed to evaluate the method adopted for patient specific intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) quality assurance through the verification of planned and measured dose distributions and analyzing the correlation of the results with the acceptance criteria previously established. In the planning system, the patients complete plan is transferred to the computed tomography images of a pelvis or head and neck (HN) phantom composed of slabs of polymethylmethacrylate with an ionization chamber and radiographic film in the coronal plane. The dose measured with the ionization chamber and the dose distribution obtained with the film were compared with the planning. The comparison between measured and planned dose distributions was performed using the gamma function (y), assessing the percentage of points that meet the criteria of 3% dose difference and 3mm distance to agreement. By the previous analysis of 111 plans an acceptance criteria was defined based on the average results and after that they were applied on 30 new cases. The acceptance criteria were: 1.8+-1.4% (prostate), 2.7+-1.9% (HN) and 2.1+-1.7% (others) for the mean absolute errors between the doses provided by the planning system and those measured with the ionization chamber. The criteria for the average percentage of agreement (y<-1) between the dose distributions was 97.2+-2.8% (prostate), 95.2+-3.3% (HN) and 92.3+-7.4% (others). The new analyzed cases showed mean absolute errors of 1.1+-1.2% (prostate), 2.2+-1.5% (HN) and 1.6+-1.2% (others) and average percentage of agreement of 98.3+-1.0% (prostate), 95.2+-2.3% (HN) and 96.7+-2.9% (others). The acceptance criteria agreed with other authors and were respected by the planning verified posteriorly. We conclude that the established acceptance criteria are appropriate for the reality of our institution, and we are able to treat the patients safely. (author)

  9. Long-term stability of liquid ionization chambers with regard to their qualification as local reference dosimeters for low dose-rate absorbed dose measurements in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahar-Gogani, J; Grindborg, J E; Johansson, B E; Wickman, G

    2001-03-01

    The long-term sensitivity and calibration stability of liquid ionization chambers (LICs) has been studied at a local and a secondary standards dosimetry laboratory over a period of 3 years. The chambers were transported several times by mail between the two laboratories for measurements. The LICs used in this work are designed for absorbed dose measurements in the dose rate region of 0.1-100 mGy min(-1) and have a liquid layer thickness of 1 mm and a sensitive volume of 16.2 mm3. The liquids used as sensitive media in the chambers are mixtures of isooctane (C8H18) and tetramethylsilane (Si(CH3)4) in different proportions (about 2 to 1). Operating at a polarizing voltage of 300 V the leakage current of the chambers was stable and never exceeded 3% of the observable current at a dose rate of about 1 mGy min(-1). The volume sensitivity of the chambers was measured to be of the order of 10(-9) C Gy(-1) mm3. No systematic changes in the absorbed dose to water calibration was observed for any of the chambers during the test period (sigma Measurements showed that the LIC response varies by 0.15% per 1% change in applied voltage around 300 V. No significant change could be observed in the LIC sensitivity after a single absorbed dose of 15 kGy. The results indicate that the LIC can be made to serve as a calibration transfer instrument and a reference detector for absorbed dose to water determinations providing good precision and long-term reproducibility.

  10. Conception and realization of a parallel-plate free-air ionization chamber for the absolute dosimetry of an ultrasoft X-ray beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groetz, J.-E., E-mail: jegroetz@univ-fcomte.fr; Mavon, C.; Fromm, M. [Laboratoire Chrono-Environnement, UMR CNRS 6249, Université de Franche-Comté, 16 route de Gray, 25030 Besançon Cedex (France); Ounoughi, N. [Laboratoire Chrono-Environnement, UMR CNRS 6249, Université de Franche-Comté, 16 route de Gray, 25030 Besançon Cedex (France); Laboratoire de Physique des Rayonnements et Applications, Université de Jijel, B.P. 98 Ouled Aissa, Jijel 18000 (Algeria); Belafrites, A. [Laboratoire de Physique des Rayonnements et Applications, Université de Jijel, B.P. 98 Ouled Aissa, Jijel 18000 (Algeria)

    2014-08-15

    We report the design of a millimeter-sized parallel plate free-air ionization chamber (IC) aimed at determining the absolute air kerma rate of an ultra-soft X-ray beam (E = 1.5 keV). The size of the IC was determined so that the measurement volume satisfies the condition of charged-particle equilibrium. The correction factors necessary to properly measure the absolute kerma using the IC have been established. Particular attention was given to the determination of the effective mean energy for the 1.5 keV photons using the PENELOPE code. Other correction factors were determined by means of computer simulation (COMSOL™and FLUKA). Measurements of air kerma rates under specific operating parameters of the lab-bench X-ray source have been performed at various distances from that source and compared to Monte Carlo calculations. We show that the developed ionization chamber makes it possible to determine accurate photon fluence rates in routine work and will constitute substantial time-savings for future radiobiological experiments based on the use of ultra-soft X-rays.

  11. Intercomparison of ionization chambers in standard X-ray beams, at radiotherapy, diagnostic radiology and radioprotection levels; Intercomparacao de camaras de ionizacao em feixes padroes de raios X, niveis radioterapia, radiodiagnostico e radioprotecao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bessa, Ana Carolina Moreira de

    2006-07-01

    Since the calibration of radiation measurement instruments and the knowledge of their major characteristics are very important subjects, several different types of ionization chambers were intercompared in terms of their calibration coefficients and their energy dependence, in radiotherapy, diagnostic radiology and radioprotection standard beams. An intercomparison of radionuclide calibrators for nuclear medicine was performed, using three radionuclides: {sup 67}Ga, {sup 201}Tl and {sup 99m}Tc; the results obtained were all within the requirements of the national standard CNEN-NE-3.05. In order to complete the range of radiation qualities of the Calibration Laboratory of IPEN, standard radiation beam qualities, radiation protection and low energy radiation therapy levels, were established, according international recommendations. Three methodologies for the calibration of unsealed ionization chambers in X-ray beams were studied and compared. A set of Victoreen ionization chambers, specially designed for use in laboratorial intercomparisons, was submitted to characterization tests. The performance of these Victoreen ionization chambers showed that they are suitable for use in radioprotection beams, because the results obtained agree with international recommendations. However, these Victoreen ionization chambers can be used in radiotherapy and diagnostic radiology beams only with some considerations, since their performance in these beams, especially in relation to the energy dependence and stabilization time tests, did not agree with the international recommendations for dosimeters used in radiotherapy and diagnostic radiology beams. This work presents data on the performance of several types of ionization chambers in different X-ray beams, that may be useful for choosing the appropriate instrument for measurements in ionizing radiation beams. (author)

  12. Comparison of the measured radiation dose-rate by the ionization chamber and G (Geiger-Mueller) counter after radioactive lodine therapy in differentiated thyroid cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Kwang Hun [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Kyungbuk National University Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kgu Hwan [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Daegu Health College, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Radioactive iodine(131I) treatment reduces recurrence and increases survival in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer. However, it is important in terms of radiation safety management to measure the radiation dose rate generated from the patient because the radiation emitted from the patient may cause the exposure. Research methods, it measured radiation dose-rate according to the elapsed time from 1 m from the upper abdomen of the patient by intake of radioactive iodine. Directly comparing the changes over time, high dose rate sensitivity and efficiency is statistically significant, and higher chamber than GM counter(p<0.05). Low dose rate sensitivity and efficiency in the chamber had lower levels than gm counter, but not statistically significant(p>0.05). In this study confirmed the characteristics of calibrated ionization chamber and GM counter according to the radiation intensity during high-dose radioactive iodine therapy by measuring the accurate and rapid radiation dose rate to the patient explains, discharged patients will be reduced to worry about radiation hazard of family and others person.

  13. Experimental determination of the effective point of measurement and the displacement correction factor for cylindrical ionization chambers in a 6 MV photon beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legrand, C; Hartmann, G H; Karger, C P

    2012-11-07

    The displacement effect of cylindrical ionization chambers is taken into account either by an effective point of measurement (EPOM) or, alternatively, by using a displacement correction factor. The dependence of these effects on water was examined as a function of the cavity radius for (60)Co gamma radiation in a previous paper. This paper describes results for high-energy photon beams using the same measurement technique. Additionally, the displacement correction factor was directly measured. Absorbed doses measured under reference conditions following the international protocol IAEA TRS-398 and the German protocol DIN 6800-2 agreed well between the chambers with different cavity radii within a standard uncertainty of 0.2%. However, there was a constant difference of 0.2% between both protocols. Similar to our observations made in (60)Co, absorbed doses measured with the different chambers at depths beyond the maximum showed deviations of up to 0.6% and 0.5% for IAEA TRS-398 and DIN 6800-2, respectively, and deviations of more than 1% were found for both protocols in the build-up and maximum region. We therefore propose modified formulas for the determination of the EPOM and the displacement correction factor.

  14. Monte Carlo simulations and benchmark measurements on the response of TE(TE) and Mg(Ar) ionization chambers in photon, electron and neutron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Yi-Chun [Health Physics Division, Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taoyuan County, Taiwan (China); Huang, Tseng-Te, E-mail: huangtt@iner.gov.tw [Health Physics Division, Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taoyuan County, Taiwan (China); Liu, Yuan-Hao [Nuclear Science and Technology Development Center, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu City, Taiwan (China); Chen, Wei-Lin [Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu City, Taiwan (China); Chen, Yen-Fu [Atomic Energy Council, New Taipei City, Taiwan (China); Wu, Shu-Wei [Dept. of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Nievaart, Sander [Institute for Energy, Joint Research Centre, European Commission, Petten (Netherlands); Jiang, Shiang-Huei [Dept. of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China)

    2015-06-01

    The paired ionization chambers (ICs) technique is commonly employed to determine neutron and photon doses in radiology or radiotherapy neutron beams, where neutron dose shows very strong dependence on the accuracy of accompanying high energy photon dose. During the dose derivation, it is an important issue to evaluate the photon and electron response functions of two commercially available ionization chambers, denoted as TE(TE) and Mg(Ar), used in our reactor based epithermal neutron beam. Nowadays, most perturbation corrections for accurate dose determination and many treatment planning systems are based on the Monte Carlo technique. We used general purposed Monte Carlo codes, MCNP5, EGSnrc, FLUKA or GEANT4 for benchmark verifications among them and carefully measured values for a precise estimation of chamber current from absorbed dose rate of cavity gas. Also, energy dependent response functions of two chambers were calculated in a parallel beam with mono-energies from 20 keV to 20 MeV photons and electrons by using the optimal simple spherical and detailed IC models. The measurements were performed in the well-defined (a) four primary M-80, M-100, M120 and M150 X-ray calibration fields, (b) primary {sup 60}Co calibration beam, (c) 6 MV and 10 MV photon, (d) 6 MeV and 18 MeV electron LINACs in hospital and (e) BNCT clinical trials neutron beam. For the TE(TE) chamber, all codes were almost identical over the whole photon energy range. In the Mg(Ar) chamber, MCNP5 showed lower response than other codes for photon energy region below 0.1 MeV and presented similar response above 0.2 MeV (agreed within 5% in the simple spherical model). With the increase of electron energy, the response difference between MCNP5 and other codes became larger in both chambers. Compared with the measured currents, MCNP5 had the difference from the measurement data within 5% for the {sup 60}Co, 6 MV, 10 MV, 6 MeV and 18 MeV LINACs beams. But for the Mg(Ar) chamber, the derivations

  15. Two years experience with quality assurance protocol for patient related Rapid Arc treatment plan verification using a two dimensional ionization chamber array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vorwerk Hilke

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To verify the dose distribution and number of monitor units (MU for dynamic treatment techniques like volumetric modulated single arc radiation therapy - Rapid Arc - each patient treatment plan has to be verified prior to the first treatment. The purpose of this study was to develop a patient related treatment plan verification protocol using a two dimensional ionization chamber array (MatriXX, IBA, Schwarzenbruck, Germany. Method Measurements were done to determine the dependence between response of 2D ionization chamber array, beam direction, and field size. Also the reproducibility of the measurements was checked. For the patient related verifications the original patient Rapid Arc treatment plan was projected on CT dataset of the MatriXX and the dose distribution was calculated. After irradiation of the Rapid Arc verification plans measured and calculated 2D dose distributions were compared using the gamma evaluation method implemented in the measuring software OmniPro (version 1.5, IBA, Schwarzenbruck, Germany. Results The dependence between response of 2D ionization chamber array, field size and beam direction has shown a passing rate of 99% for field sizes between 7 cm × 7 cm and 24 cm × 24 cm for measurements of single arc. For smaller and larger field sizes than 7 cm × 7 cm and 24 cm × 24 cm the passing rate was less than 99%. The reproducibility was within a passing rate of 99% and 100%. The accuracy of the whole process including the uncertainty of the measuring system, treatment planning system, linear accelerator and isocentric laser system in the treatment room was acceptable for treatment plan verification using gamma criteria of 3% and 3 mm, 2D global gamma index. Conclusion It was possible to verify the 2D dose distribution and MU of Rapid Arc treatment plans using the MatriXX. The use of the MatriXX for Rapid Arc treatment plan verification in clinical routine is reasonable. The passing rate should be 99

  16. Development and clinical evaluation of an ionization chamber array with 3.5 mm pixel pitch for quality assurance in advanced radiotherapy techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Togno, M., E-mail: michele.togno@iba-group.com [Physik-Department, Technische Universität München, Munich 85748 (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, Technische Universität München, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich 81675 (Germany); IBA Dosimetry GmbH, Schwarzenbruck 90592 (Germany); Wilkens, J. J. [Physik-Department, Technische Universität München, Munich 85748, Germany and Department of Radiation Oncology, Technische Universität München, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich 81675 (Germany); Menichelli, D. [IBA Dosimetry GmbH, Schwarzenbruck 90592 (Germany); Oechsner, M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Technische Universität München, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich 81675 (Germany); Perez-Andujar, A.; Morin, O. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California 94143 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: To characterize a new air vented ionization chamber technology, suitable to build detector arrays with small pixel pitch and independence of sensitivity on dose per pulse. Methods: The prototype under test is a linear array of air vented ionization chambers, consisting of 80 pixels with 3.5 mm pixel pitch distance and a sensitive volume of about 4 mm{sup 3}. The detector has been characterized with {sup 60}Co radiation and MV x rays from different linear accelerators (with flattened and unflattened beam qualities). Sensitivity dependence on dose per pulse has been evaluated under MV x rays by changing both the source to detector distance and the beam quality. Bias voltage has been varied in order to evaluate the charge collection efficiency in the most critical conditions. Relative dose profiles have been measured for both flattened and unflattened distributions with different field sizes. The reference detectors were a commercial array of ionization chambers and an amorphous silicon flat panel in direct conversion configuration. Profiles of dose distribution have been measured also with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) patient plans. Comparison has been done with a commercial diode array and with Gafchromic EBT3 films. Results: Repeatability and stability under continuous gamma irradiation are within 0.3%, in spite of low active volume and sensitivity (∼200 pC/Gy). Deviation from linearity is in the range [0.3%, −0.9%] for a dose of at least 20 cGy, while a worsening of linearity is observed below 10 cGy. Charge collection efficiency with 2.67 mGy/pulse is higher than 99%, leading to a ±0.9% sensitivity change in the range 0.09–2.67 mGy/pulse (covering all flattened and unflattened beam qualities). Tissue to phantom ratios show an agreement within 0.6% with the reference detector up to 34 cm depth. For field sizes in the range 2 × 2 to 15 × 15 cm{sup 2}, the

  17. Measurements of miniature ionization chamber currents in the JSI TRIGA Mark II reactor demonstrate the importance of the delayed contribution to the photon field in nuclear reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radulović, Vladimir; Fourmentel, Damien; Barbot, Loïc; Villard, Jean-François; Kaiba, Tanja; Gašper, Žerovnik; Snoj, Luka

    2015-12-01

    The characterization of experimental locations of a research nuclear reactor implies the determination of neutron and photon flux levels within, with the best achievable accuracy. In nuclear reactors, photon fluxes are commonly calculated by Monte Carlo simulations but rarely measured on-line. In this context, experiments were conducted with a miniature gas ionization chamber (MIC) based on miniature fission chamber mechanical parts, recently developed by the CEA (French Atomic Energy and Alternative Energies Commission) irradiated in the core of the Jožef Stefan Institute TRIGA Mark II reactor in Ljubljana, Slovenia. The aim of the study was to compare the measured MIC currents with calculated currents based on simulations with the MCNP6 code. A discrepancy of around 50% was observed between the measured and the calculated currents; in the latter taking into consideration only the prompt photon field. Further experimental measurements of MIC currents following reactor SCRAMs (reactor shutdown with rapid insertions of control rods) provide evidence that over 30% of the total measured signal is due to the delayed photon field, originating from fission and activation products, which are untreated in the calculations. In the comparison between the measured and calculated values, these findings imply an overall discrepancy of less than 20% of the total signal which is still unexplained.

  18. Field correction factors for a PTW-31016 Pinpoint ionization chamber for both flattened and unflattened beams. Study of the main sources of uncertainties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puxeu-Vaqué, Josep; Duch, Maria A; Nailon, William H; Cruz Lizuain, M; Ginjaume, Mercè

    2017-05-01

    The primary aim of this study was to determine correction factors, kQclin,Qmsrfclin,fmsr for a PTW-31016 ionization chamber on field sizes from 0.5 cm × 0.5 cm to 2 cm × 2 cm for both flattened (FF) and flattened filter-free (FFF) beams produced in a TrueBeam clinical accelerator. The secondary objective was the determination of field output factors, ΩQclin,Qmsrfclin,fmsr over this range of field sizes using both Monte Carlo (MC) simulation and measurements. kQclin,Qmsrfclin,fmsr for the PTW-31016 chamber were calculated by MC simulation for field sizes of 0.5 cm × 0.5 cm, 1 cm × 1 cm, and 2 cm × 2 cm. MC simulations were performed with the PENELOPE code system for the 10 MV FFF Particle Space File from a TrueBeam linear accelerator (LINAC) provided by the manufacturer (Varian Medical Systems, Inc. Palo Alto, CA, USA). Simulations were repeated taking into account chamber manufacturing tolerances and accelerator jaw positioning in order to assess the uncertainty of the calculated correction factors. Output ratios were measured on square fields ranging from 0.5 cm × 0.5 cm to 10 cm × 10 cm for 6 MV and 10 MV FF and FFF beams produced by a TrueBeam using a PTW-31016 ionization chamber; a Sun Nuclear Edge detector (SunNuclear Corp., Melbourne, FL, USA) and TLD-700R (Harshaw, Thermo Scientific, Waltham, MA, USA). The validity of the proposed correction factors was verified using the calculated correction factors for the determination of ΩQclin,Qmsrfclin,fmsr using a PTW-31016 at the four TrueBeam energies and comparing the results with both TLD-700R measurements and MC simulations. Finally, the proposed correction factors were used to assess the correction factors of the SunNuclear Edge detector. The present work provides a set of MC calculated correction factors for a PTW-31016 chamber used on a TrueBeam FF and FFF mode. For the 0.5 cm × 0.5 cm square field size, kQclin,Qmsrfclin,fmsr is equal to 1.17 with a combined uncertainty of 2% (k = 1). A detailed

  19. Comparison of ionization chamber calibration for mimeographs in W/Mo and W/Al qualities; Comparacao de calibracoes de camaras de ionizacao para mamografia nas qualidades W/Mo and W/Al

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Lara; Macedo, Eric; Navarro, Marcus; Ferreira, Mario; Garcia, Igor; Pires, Evandro; Leite, Handerson; Navarro, Valeria, E-mail: larapereira@ifba.edu.br [Instituto Federal da Bahia (LABPROSAUD/IFBA), Salvador , BA (Brazil). Lab. de Produtos para Saude

    2016-07-01

    The calibration of ionization chambers for mammography laboratories seek to keep pace with technological advancement of manufacturers who have used new combinations anode/filter in mammography beyond the classic combinations of molybdenum and rhodium. This paper proposes to investigate the equivalence between calibrations of chambers different using the combinations W/Mo and W/Al at LABPROSAUD. The results showed a variation less than 1% on relationship between the calibration coefficients obtained in the evaluated combinations anode/filter for an uncertainty of 2.4%. The excellent performance of the chambers suggests a new possibility of calibration in the mammography quality at LABPROSAUD. (author)

  20. TU-F-CAMPUS-T-01: Calculation of KQ for a Variety of Commercially Available Ionization Chambers in the Presence of An External Magnetic Field for MR-Linac Dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O’Brien, D J; Mathis, M V P; Ibbott, G; Sawakuchi, G O [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Roberts, D A [Elekta Limited, Crawley, West Sussex (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The strong magnetic fields associated with MRI have a significant impact on the dosimetry of radiotherapy beams as well as on the response of the detectors used to measure it. In order to calibrate the dose delivered by these beams, it is necessary to correct for these effects when performing measurements with ionization chambers. Methods: Detailed models of 16 commercially-available ionization chambers were implemented in Geant4. To validate these models, calculations of the beam quality correction factor kQ (defined by TG-51) were performed using the spectrum from a 6 MV Elekta SL25. kQ values were then recalculated for each detector with a 1.5 T external magnetic field applied uniformly across the geometry. Chamber, beam and B-field were all orthogonal. Results: The comparison between the kQ calculations and TG-51 showed agreement within 1.4%. The B-field calculations indicate that the change in kQ values due to the B-field is strongly affected by the volume and material of the ionization chamber. All large volume (>0.5 cm {sup 3}) ionization chambers had lower kQ values when used in a B-field. The kQ values for small volume chambers were very sensitive to the chambers’ collecting volume and could be higher or lower when used in a B-field. Conclusions: Of the chambers tested, the PTW 30011 demonstrated the smallest correction of just 1.2%. The next step is to calculate kQ using the energy spectrum from an actual MR-linac. Further validation of these results against measurements will be paramount before they can be used. Funding provided by Elekta Limited. The MR-linac spectrum will be provided by Elekta Limited based on a machine they have designed.

  1. Automatic control system for measuring currents produced by ionization chambers; Automatizacao de um sistema de medidas de correntes produzidas por camaras de ionizacao e aplicacao na calibracao do {sup 18}F e {sup 153}Sm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brancaccio, Franco

    2002-07-01

    Ionization Chambers in current mode operation are usually used in Nuclear Metrology. Activity measurements are quickly performed by Ionization Chambers, with very good precision. For this purpose measurements of very low ionization currents, carried out by high quality instrumentation, are required. Usually, electrometers perform the current integration method under command of signals from an automation system, in order to reduce the measurement uncertainties. Among the measurement systems at the Laboratorio de Metrologia Nuclear (LMN) of IPEN, there are two ionization chamber systems. In the present work, an automation system developed for current integration measurements is described. This automation system is composed by software (graphic interface and control) and an electronic module connected to a microcomputer, by means of a commercial data acquisition card. Several test measurements were performed in order to determine the intrinsic uncertainty, linearity and stability of the system. Using calibrated radioactive solutions, the IG12/A20 chamber calibration factors for {sup 18}F and {sup 153}Sm were obtained, making possible to determine activities of these radionuclides. (author)

  2. Implementation of a laboratory for manufacture, repair and electric calibration of dosemeters based in ionization chambers utilized in radiotherapy; Implementacao de um laboratorio para manutencao, reparo e calibracao eletrica de dosimetros baseados em camaras de ionizacao, utilizados em radioterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, P.H.B.; Peres, M.A.L.; Moreira, A.J.C.; Nette, H.P. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria. Av. Salvador Allende S/N. Barra de Tijuca CEP: 22780-160. Caixa Postal: 37750 Rio de Janeiro-RJ (Brazil)

    1998-12-31

    Manufacturers of ionization chamber dosimeters for radiotherapy maintain only sales representatives in Brazil with no servicing capability causing difficulties to customers/users to get broken equipment back into operation. Aiming to partially solve this problem, a laboratory for maintenance, repair and electrical calibration was started in 1995 with the support of a two year IAEA Technical Assistance Project (BRA/1/031). (Author)

  3. Air Kerma Calibration Factors and kch Values for PTW Soft X-ray, NACP and Roos Ionization Chambers at Very Low X-ray Energies (0.035 mm - 1.0 mm Al HVL)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ipe, Nisy E.

    1999-07-08

    Several national and international protocols have been established for the dosimetry of x-ray beams used in radiotherapy. For the very low energy x-rays (0.035mm-1.0 mm Al HVL) only two codes are available: the UK IPEMB Code of Practice and the German standard, DIN 6809 Part 4. The measurement of very low energy x-ray beams is normally performed with parallel plate ionization chambers calibrated at a standards laboratory and characterized by an air kerma calibration factor N{sub k}. According to the IPEMB Code of Practice the absorbed dose in the user's beam should be determined by taking measurements with the parallel plate chamber positioned such that its entrance window is at the surface of a full-scatter water equivalent phantom. The absorbed dose to water can then be determined using an equation which includes a factor, k{sub ch}, which accounts for the change in response of the ionization chamber between the calibration in air and measurement at the surface of the phantom. N{sub k} and k{sub ch} values for the PTW soft X-ray, NACP and Roos ionization chambers are reported. It was found that k{sub ch} values varied from about 1.01 to 1.08 depending on the chamber, beam quality and phantom material. It is recommended that the IPEMB Code of Practice should be revised to incorporate these values.

  4. Simulation of the Interaction of X-rays with a Gas in an Ionization Chamber by the Monte Carlo Method; Simulacion Monte Carlo de la Interaccion de Rays X con el Gas de una Camara de Ionizacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grau Carles, A.; Garcia Gomez-Tejedor, G.

    2001-07-01

    The final objective of any ionization chamber is the measurement of the energy amount or radiation dose absorbed by the gas into the chamber. The final value depends on the composition of the gas, its density and temperature, the ionization chamber geometry, and type and intensity of the radiation. We describe a Monte Carlo simulation method, which allows one to compute the dose absorbed by the gas for a X-ray beam. Verification of model has been carried out by simulating the attenuation of standard X-ray radiation through the half value layers established in the ISO 4037 report, while assuming a Weibull type energy distribution for the incident photons. (Author) 6 refs.

  5. SU-G-TeP2-13: Patient-Specific Reduction of Range Uncertainties in Proton Therapy by Proton Radiography with a Multi-Layer Ionization Chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deffet, S; Macq, B [Universite catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Farace, P; Righetto, R [Trento Hospital / APSS, Trento (Italy); Vander Stappen, F [Ion Beam Applications (IBA), Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The conversion from Hounsfield units (HU) to stopping powers is a major source of range uncertainty in proton therapy (PT). Our contribution shows how proton radiographs (PR) acquired with a multi-layer ionization chamber in a PT center can be used for accurate patient positioning and subsequently for patient-specific optimization of the conversion from HU to stopping powers. Methods: A multi-layer ionization chamber was used to measure the integral depth-dose (IDD) of 220 MeV pencil beam spots passing through several anthropomorphic phantoms. The whole area of interest was imaged by repositioning the couch and by acquiring a 45×45 mm{sup 2} frame for each position. A rigid registration algorithm was implemented to correct the positioning error between the proton radiographs and the planning CT. After registration, the stopping power map obtained from the planning CT with the calibration curve of the treatment planning system was used together with the water equivalent thickness gained from two proton radiographs to generate a phantom-specific stopping power map. Results: Our results show that it is possible to make a registration with submillimeter accuracy from proton radiography obtained by sending beamlets separated by more than 1 mm. This was made possible by the complex shape of the IDD due to the presence of lateral heterogeneities along the path of the beam. Submillimeter positioning was still possible with a 5 mm spot spacing. Phantom specific stopping power maps obtained by minimizing the range error were cross-verified by the acquisition of an additional proton radiography where the phantom was positioned in a random but known manner. Conclusion: Our results indicate that a CT-PR registration algorithm together with range-error based optimization can be used to produce a patient-specific stopping power map. Sylvain Deffet reports financial funding of its PhD thesis by Ion Beam Applications (IBA) during the confines of the study and outside the

  6. Extrapolation Ionization Chamber Dosimetry of Fluorescent X-Ray Energies from 4.5 to 19.6 keV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakowski, Joseph T; Tucker, Mark A; Snyder, Michael G; Makar, Simon P; Yudele, Mark; Burmeister, Jay; Joiner, Michael C

    2016-09-01

    Characteristic X rays of energies less than approximately 20 keV are of interest in radiobiology and radiation oncology. There is evidence that these low-energy photons produce higher relative biological effectiveness (RBE) and lower oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) relative to higher energies. Lower energy X rays also offer the advantage of healthy tissue sparing beyond the target treatment depth. Electronic brachytherapy systems that can deliver characteristic and bremsstrahlung X rays of varying energy are in clinical use as well as under development. We performed low-energy extrapolation ionization chamber dosimetry using two methods: 1. the exposure-to-dose method; and 2. the Burlin theory method combined with the extrapolation chamber method of Klevenhagen. We investigated fluorescent X rays emitted from seven metals: titanium (Ti, Z = 22); chromium (Cr, Z = 24); iron (Fe, Z = 26); cobalt (Co, Z = 27); copper (Cu, Z = 29); zinc (Zn, Z = 30); and molybdenum (Mo, Z = 42). X rays were produced by irradiation of the metals with a 55 kVp, 45 mA silver anode spectrum. The data obtained were air kerma rate (cGy/min), and radiation dose rate (cGy/min) in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) solution and water. Air kerma rates ranged from 3.55 ± 0.10 to 14.36 ± 0.39 cGy/min. Dose rates ranged from 3.85 ± 0.10 to 16.96 ± 0.46 cGy/min in PBS and 3.59 ± 0.10 to 16.06 ± 0.43 cGy/min in water. Dose-rate energy dependence of both models was examined by taking a ratio of measured to Monte Carlo calculated dose rates. Dosimetry method 1 exhibited a linear relationship across all energies with a slope of 0.0127 keV(-1) and R(2) of 0.9276. Method 2 exhibited a linear relationship across all energies with a slope of 0.0467 keV(-1) and R(2) of 0.9933. Method 1 or 2 may be used as a relative dosimetry system to derive dose rates to water by using a second reference ion chamber with a NIST-traceable calibration for the molybdenum spectrum.

  7. Determination of the air attenuation and electronic loss for the free air concentric cylinders ionization chamber; Determinacao da atenuacao do ar e perda eletronica para a camara de ionizacao de ar livre de cilindros concentricos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Hebert Pinto Silveira de

    2010-07-01

    Along the latest years, the LNMRI has been proceeding a continuous research work with a concentric cylinders type free air ionizing chamber (VICTOREEN, model 481), aiming to establish it as a new national standard, and, as a consequence, replace the worldwide accepted secondary standard, calibrated by PTB. Taking into account that the absolute determination of kerma in air with a free air ionizing chamber implies the acquirement of a number of correction factors. The main objective of the present work comprises the determination of the two factors, specifically, electronic loss (k{sub e}) and air attenuation (k{sub a}). The correction factors were obtained through mammography qualities reference spectrum, using Monte Carlo simulation method. The Penelope code was used in the simulation procedures. Simulations took place in two stages, the acquirement of specters related to the qualities of interest (mammography) with the x ray tube (Pantak, model HF160 e Panalytical, model XRF window), and the free-air ionization chamber. The data were compared to those related to the BIPM chamber, to electronic loss were not detected. The comparison between air attenuation factors was obtained data bellow 0.13%. (author)

  8. Comparison of the response of a NaI scintillation crystal with a pressurized ionization chamber as a function of altitude, radiation level and Ra-226 concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Provencher, R.; Smith, G.; Borak, T.B.; Kearney, P.

    1986-01-01

    The Grand Junction Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action-Radiological Survey Activities Group (UMTRA-RASA) program employs a screening method in which external exposure rates are used to determine if a property contaminated with uranium mill tailings is eligible for remedial action. Portable NaI detectors are used by survey technicians to locate contaminated areas and determine exposure rates. The exposure rate is calculated using a regression equation derived from paired measurements made with a pressurized ionization chamber (PIC) and a NaI detector. During July of 1985 extensive measurements were taken using a PIC and a NaI scintillator with both analogue and digital readout for a wide range of exposure rates and at a variety of elevations. The surface soil was sampled at most of these locations and analyzed for /sup 226/Ra. The response of the NaI detectors was shown to be highly correlated to radiation level but not to /sup 226/Ra concentration or elevation.

  9. The estimation of lung dose from mid-perineum ionization chamber measurements in total body irradiations: A quality control check on dose delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cross, P. [Saint Vincent`s Hospital, Darlinghurst, NSW (Australia)

    1995-11-01

    A series of patients (eleven males and eight females) receiving total body irradiation prior to bone marrow transplantation was monitored during treatment by recording the dose from an ionization chamber placed between the thighs in the mid-perineal region. The treatment was delivered by opposed lateral 6 MV photon beams. The patient was encompassed by the radiation field with the maximum collimator opening at a distance of 3.49 m from the X-ray focus to the patient mid-line. An analysis was made of the measured dose and the calculated percentage average lung dose for each patient in the series to seek a correlation between measured doses and patients` anatomical data so that estimates of delivered lung doses could be made. Whilst a global factor can be applied to measured dose to predict lung dose, it is concluded that perineal dose measurements distal to the region where dose is prescribed (mean lung dose) are sub-optimal for checks on target dose delivery. Entrance and exit dose measurements at the level of dose prescription (in the thorax) are preferable for more accurate predictions and quality control checks. 6 refs., 1 tab., 2 figs.

  10. Evaluation of a new pencil-type ionization chamber for dosimetry in computerized tomography beams; Avaliacao de uma nova camara de ionizacao tipo lapis para dosimetria em feixes de tomografia computadorizada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, Maysa C. de; Neves, Lucio P.; Silva, Natalia F. da; Santos, William de S.; Caldas, Linda V.E., E-mail: maysadecastro@gmail.com, E-mail: lpneves@ipen.br, E-mail: na.fiorini@gmail.com, E-mail: wssantos@ipen.br, E-mail: lcaldas@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    For performing dosimetry in computed tomography beams (CT), use is made of a pencil-type ionization chamber, since this has a uniform response to this type of beam. The common commercial chambers in Brazil have a sensitive volume length of 10 cm. Several studies of prototypes of this type of ionization chamber have been conducted, using different materials and geometric configurations, in the Calibration Laboratory Instruments of the Institute of Nuclear and Energy Research (LCI) and these showed results within internationally acceptable limits. These ion chambers of 10 cm are widely used nowadays, however studies have revealed that they have underestimated the dose values. In order to solve this problem, we developed a chamber with sensitive volume length of 30 cm. As these are not yet very common and no study has yet been performed on LCI conditions on their behavior, is important that the characteristics of these dosemeters are known, and the influence of its various components. For your review, we will use the Monte Carlo code Penelope, freely distributed by the IAEA. This method has revealed results consistent with other codes. The results for this new prototype can be used in dosimetry of the CT of the hospitals and calibration laboratories as the LCI.

  11. Relative dosimetry of photon beam of 6 MV with a liquid ionization chamber; Dosimetria relativa de un haz de fotones de 6 MV con una camara de ionizacion liquida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benitez Villegas, E. M.; Casado Villalon, F. J.; Martin-Cueto, J. A.; Caudepon Moreno, F.; Garcia Pareja, S.; Galan Montenegro, P.

    2011-07-01

    The increasing use of reduced size fields in the special techniques of treatment generates regions with high dose gradients. It therefore requires the use of detectors that present high spatial resolution. The aim of this study is to compare the dosimetric measurements obtained with a liquid ionization chamber PTW MicroLion recently acquired with other commonly used detectors for a photon beam of 6 MV linear electron accelerator Varian 600DBX.

  12. Automated system with LabVIEW for the obtention of voltage plateau, graphic of sensitivity and operation voltage in an ionization chamber; Sistema automatizado con LabVIEW para la obtencion de meseta de voltaje, grafica de sensitividad y voltaje de operacion en una camara de ionizacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz E, P. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Departamento de Ingenieria Electronica, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2001-07-01

    The work developed for the Laguna Verde Nuclear Power Central allows to obtain the voltage plateau, graphic of sensitivity and operation voltage of three types of ionization chambers which are used in their monitoring systems of process radiation. The automated system is based in a personal computer (Pc) for controlling and acquiring data from the different instruments used, its programming was realized with virtual instruments (LabVIEW, National Instruments software). The system also realizes a diagnosis of the ionization chamber and determine whether the parameters obtained are inside of the manufacturer specifications, that is to say, it determines when the ionization chamber must be replaced. (Author)

  13. The effect of a compression paddle on energy response, calibration and measurement with mammographic dosimeters using ionization chambers and solid-state detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hourdakis, C J; Boziari, A; Koumbouli, E [Ionizing Radiation Calibration Laboratory, Greek Atomic Energy Commission, PO Box 60092, 15310 Agia Paraskevi, Athens, Attiki (Greece)], E-mail: khour@gaec.gr

    2009-02-21

    A compression paddle is always used in mammography x-ray examinations, in order to improve image quality and reduce patient doses. Although clinical dose measurements should be performed with the paddle to interfere with the x-ray beam, calibration of mammography dosimeters is performed free in air without the presence of the paddle. The paddle hardens the x-ray beam, which has an impact on a dosimeter performance, particularly on high-energy-dependent detectors. Due to the paddle, clinical mammography x-ray systems may exhibit beams with HVL values exceeding those of the IEC 61267 RQR-M series qualities at which dosimeters are usually calibrated. In this study, the influence of the paddle in mammography dosimetry is examined, in Mo/Mo anode/filter x-ray qualities. PMMA slabs of 1, 2 and 3 mm thickness and Al foils of 0.05, 0.10 and 0.15 mm thicknesses were used to simulate the paddles, producing beams with HVL values from 0.28 up to 0.43 mmAl. In these qualities, four solid-state (ST) detectors and three ionizations chambers (IC) were calibrated in terms of Kair and N{sub K} and k{sub Q} were deduced. The results showed that all IC and two modern-type ST dosimeters have a flat energy response in the above HVL range (less than 3%), so their calibration factor at RQR-M2 quality could be safely used for clinical measurements. Two other ST dosimeters exhibit up to 20% energy response, so differences up to 15% in dose measurement may be observed if the effect of paddle on their performance is ignored. Finally, the need of additional mammographic calibration qualities to the existing IEC 61267 RQR-M series is examined and discussed.

  14. Water equivalent thickness of immobilization devices in proton therapy planning - Modelling at treatment planning and validation by measurements with a multi-layer ionization chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellin, Francesco; Righetto, Roberto; Fava, Giovanni; Trevisan, Diego; Amelio, Dante; Farace, Paolo

    2017-03-01

    To investigate the range errors made in treatment planning due to the presence of the immobilization devices along the proton beam path. The measured water equivalent thickness (WET) of selected devices was measured by a high-energy spot and a multi-layer ionization chamber and compared with that predicted by treatment planning system (TPS). Two treatment couches, two thermoplastic masks (both un-stretched and stretched) and one headrest were selected. At TPS, every immobilization device was modelled as being part of the patient. The following parameters were assessed: CT acquisition protocol, dose-calculation grid-sizes (1.5 and 3.0mm) and beam-entrance with respect to the devices (coplanar and non-coplanar). Finally, the potential errors produced by a wrong manual separation between treatment couch and the CT table (not present during treatment) were investigated. In the thermoplastic mask, there was a clear effect due to beam entrance, a moderate effect due to the CT protocols and almost no effect due to TPS grid-size, with 1mm errors observed only when thick un-stretched portions were crossed by non-coplanar beams. In the treatment couches the WET errors were negligible (0.5mm with a 3.0mm grid-size. In the headrest, WET errors were negligible (0.2mm). With only one exception (un-stretched mask, non-coplanar beams), the WET of all the immobilization devices was properly modelled by the TPS. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Ionization chambers for LET determination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaiser, Franz-Joachim; Bassler, Niels; Tölli, Heikki

    2010-01-01

    Modern radiotherapy facilities for cancer treatment such as the Heavy Ion Therapy Centre (HIT) in Heidelberg (Germany) enable sub millimetre precision in dose deposition. For the measurement of such dose distributions and  characterization of the particle beams, detectors with high spatial resolu...

  16. Accuracy of the electron transport in mcnp5 and its suitability for ionization chamber response simulations: A comparison with the egsnrc and penelope codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koivunoro, Hanna; Siiskonen, Teemu; Kotiluoto, Petri; Auterinen, Iiro; Hippelaeinen, Eero; Savolainen, Sauli [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 64, FI-00014 Helsinki University (Finland) and Department of Oncology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, FI-00029 HUS (Finland); STUK-Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, P.O. Box 14, FI-00881 Helsinki (Finland); VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1000, FI-02044 VTT (Finland); Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 64, FI-00014 Helsinki University (Finland); HUS Medical Imaging Centre, Helsinki University Central Hospital, FI-00029 HUS (Finland)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: In this work, accuracy of the mcnp5 code in the electron transport calculations and its suitability for ionization chamber (IC) response simulations in photon beams are studied in comparison to egsnrc and penelope codes. Methods: The electron transport is studied by comparing the depth dose distributions in a water phantom subdivided into thin layers using incident energies (0.05, 0.1, 1, and 10 MeV) for the broad parallel electron beams. The IC response simulations are studied in water phantom in three dosimetric gas materials (air, argon, and methane based tissue equivalent gas) for photon beams ({sup 60}Co source, 6 MV linear medical accelerator, and mono-energetic 2 MeV photon source). Two optional electron transport models of mcnp5 are evaluated: the ITS-based electron energy indexing (mcnp5{sub ITS}) and the new detailed electron energy-loss straggling logic (mcnp5{sub new}). The electron substep length (ESTEP parameter) dependency in mcnp5 is investigated as well. Results: For the electron beam studies, large discrepancies (>3%) are observed between the mcnp5 dose distributions and the reference codes at 1 MeV and lower energies. The discrepancy is especially notable for 0.1 and 0.05 MeV electron beams. The boundary crossing artifacts, which are well known for the mcnp5{sub ITS}, are observed for the mcnp5{sub new} only at 0.1 and 0.05 MeV beam energies. If the excessive boundary crossing is eliminated by using single scoring cells, the mcnp5{sub ITS} provides dose distributions that agree better with the reference codes than mcnp5{sub new}. The mcnp5 dose estimates for the gas cavity agree within 1% with the reference codes, if the mcnp5{sub ITS} is applied or electron substep length is set adequately for the gas in the cavity using the mcnp5{sub new}. The mcnp5{sub new} results are found highly dependent on the chosen electron substep length and might lead up to 15% underestimation of the absorbed dose. Conclusions: Since the mcnp5 electron

  17. Technical Note: A direct ray-tracing method to compute integral depth dose in pencil beam proton radiography with a multilayer ionization chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farace, Paolo; Righetto, Roberto; Deffet, Sylvain; Meijers, Arturs; Vander Stappen, Francois

    2016-12-01

    To introduce a fast ray-tracing algorithm in pencil proton radiography (PR) with a multilayer ionization chamber (MLIC) for in vivo range error mapping. Pencil beam PR was obtained by delivering spots uniformly positioned in a square (45 × 45 mm2 field-of-view) of 9 × 9 spots capable of crossing the phantoms (210 MeV). The exit beam was collected by a MLIC to sample the integral depth dose (IDDMLIC). PRs of an electron-density and of a head phantom were acquired by moving the couch to obtain multiple 45 × 45 mm2 frames. To map the corresponding range errors, the two-dimensional set of IDDMLIC was compared with (i) the integral depth dose computed by the treatment planning system (TPS) by both analytic (IDDTPS) and Monte Carlo (IDDMC) algorithms in a volume of water simulating the MLIC at the CT, and (ii) the integral depth dose directly computed by a simple ray-tracing algorithm (IDDdirect) through the same CT data. The exact spatial position of the spot pattern was numerically adjusted testing different in-plane positions and selecting the one that minimized the range differences between IDDdirect and IDDMLIC. Range error mapping was feasible by both the TPS and the ray-tracing methods, but very sensitive to even small misalignments. In homogeneous regions, the range errors computed by the direct ray-tracing algorithm matched the results obtained by both the analytic and the Monte Carlo algorithms. In both phantoms, lateral heterogeneities were better modeled by the ray-tracing and the Monte Carlo algorithms than by the analytic TPS computation. Accordingly, when the pencil beam crossed lateral heterogeneities, the range errors mapped by the direct algorithm matched better the Monte Carlo maps than those obtained by the analytic algorithm. Finally, the simplicity of the ray-tracing algorithm allowed to implement a prototype procedure for automated spatial alignment. The ray-tracing algorithm can reliably replace the TPS method in MLIC PR for in vivo range

  18. Dosimetric verification of IMRT treatments using ionization chamber, radiographic film and gamma function;Verificacao dosimetrica de tratamentos de IMRT utilizando camara de ionizacao, filme radiografico e funcao gama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, Tatiana M.M.T.; Casagrande, Thais M.; Neves-Junior, Wellington F.P.; Mancini, Anselmo; Pelosi, Edilson L.; Haddad, Cecilia M.K.; Silva, Joao L.F. [Sociedade Beneficente de Senhoras Hospital Sirio-Libanes, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Servico de Radioterapia

    2009-07-01

    This study aims to evaluate the method adopted for patient specific intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) quality assurance through the verification of planned and measured dose distributions and analyzing the correlation of the results with the acceptance criteria previously established. In the planning system, the patient's complete plan is transferred to the computed tomography images of a pelvis or head and neck (HN) phantom composed of slabs of polymethylmethacrylate with an ionization chamber and radiographic film in the coronal plane. The dose measured with the ionization chamber and the dose distribution obtained with the film are compared with the planning. The comparison between measured and planned dose distributions was performed using the gamma function (gamma), assessing the percentage of points that meet the criteria of 3% dose difference and 3 mm distance to agreement. By the previous analysis of 111 plans an acceptance criteria was defined based on the average results and after that they were applied on 30 new cases. The acceptance criteria were: 1.8%+-1.4% (prostate), 2.7%+-1.9% (HN) and 2.1%+-1.7% (others) for the mean absolute errors between the doses provided by the planning system and those measured with the ionization chamber. The criteria for the average percentage of agreement (gamma<=1) between the dose distributions was 97.2%+-2.8% (prostate), 95.2%+-3.3% (HN) and 92.3%+-7.4% (others). The new analyzed cases showed mean absolute errors of 1.1%+-1.2% (prostate), 2.2%+-1.5% (HN) and 1.6%+-1.2% (others) and average percentage of agreement of 98.3%+-1.0% (prostate), 95.2%+-2.3% (HN) and 96.7%+-2.9% (others). The acceptance criteria agreed with other authors and were respected by the planning verified posteriorly. We conclude that the established acceptance criteria are appropriate for the reality of our institution, and we are able to treat the patients safely. (author)

  19. Description of the XXXIV ARCAL Project {sup R}epairing and calibration of electrometers and ionization chambers used in radiotherapy; Descripcion del proyecto ARCAL XXXIV {sup R}eparacion y calibracion de electrometros y camaras de ionizacion utilizados en radioterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz E, P.; Villaverde L, A. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2002-07-01

    The technological tools from what the humanity has for the illnesses diagnosis and the cancer treatment, are based in great extent in the use of ionizing radiations. This situation worries to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), which has implemented technical cooperation programs for protecting the human health. In Latin America the ARCAL program (Regional Agreement of Cooperation for Promotion of Nuclear Science and Technology in Latina America and the Caribbean was created. The Project ARCAL XXXIV has as objective to establish three regional centers of repairing, maintenance and electric calibration of clinical dosemeters, equipment made up for an ionization chamber and an electrometer which is used in radiotherapy to generate calibration procedures, personnel training, establishment of an intercomparison net for the electrometers control used as standards and designing current intensity sources which serve as work standards for each one of the participant countries, Mexico is one of them. (Author)

  20. Characterization of a free-air ionization chamber in direct X-ray beams as used in mammography; Caracterizacao de uma camara de ionizacao de ar-livre em feixes diretos de raios X utilizados em mamografia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, Mateus Hilario de

    2014-08-01

    At this work stability and characterization tests were undertaken on a Victoreen free-air ionization chamber, model 481. The tests were realized using direct X-ray beams as a contribution for its establishment as a primary standard system of the quantity air kerma. The characterization tests were: saturation curve, ion collection efficiency, polarity effect, response linearity with the air kerma rate and response linearity with the chamber volume variation. The ion collection efficiency allowed the determination of the ion recombination factor. Most of the test results showed agreement with the limits established by international standards. Furthermore, the air attenuation factors for the mammography beams with aluminum and molybdenum filters were obtained. The factors for photon transmission and scattering at the diaphragm edges were also determined for mammography beams with aluminum filter and for the standard beam with molybdenum filter. (author)

  1. Determination of the air attenuation correction factor for a free air ionization chamber; Determinacao do fator de correcao para atenuacao no ar para uma camara de ionizacao de ar livre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Natalia F.; Cintra, Felipe B.; Castro, Maysa C. de; Caldas, Linda V.E., E-mail: nsilva@ipen.br, E-mail: fbelonsi@ipen.br, E-mail: mcastro@ipen.br, E-mail: lcaldas@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this work is to present the experimental and simulation results for the air attenuation correction factor for a free air ionization chamber with concentric cylinders of Victoreen, model 481-5. This correction factor was obtained for the standard mammography qualities established in the Instrument Calibration Laboratory (LCI) of IPEN. The values were compared with the results from the German primary standard laboratory Physikalisch- Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), and maximum differences of 0.40% in relation to the experimental value and 0.31% in relation to the simulated value were obtained. (author)

  2. Calibração das câmaras de ionização para feixes de tomografia computadorizada no Brasil: a realidade atual Calibration of ionization chambers for computed tomography beams in Brazil: the present reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Figueiredo Maia

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: O objetivo deste trabalho foi estabelecer, no Laboratório de Calibração de Instrumentos do Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares, uma metodologia de calibração específica para as câmaras de ionização tipo lápis, que são utilizadas em procedimentos dosimétricos em feixes de tomografia computadorizada, seguindo as mais recentes recomendações internacionais. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Foram utilizados, neste estudo, um equipamento de radiação X industrial, várias câmaras de ionização, um sistema de colimação móvel (tipo diafragma e vários filtros de alumínio de alta pureza. RESULTADOS: Foram estabelecidos os campos padrões de radiodiagnóstico descritos na norma internacional IEC 61267, e foi elaborado um procedimento de calibração adequado para as câmaras de ionização tipo lápis. CONCLUSÃO: Atualmente, já é possível calibrar apropriadamente as câmaras de ionização tipo lápis no Brasil. O procedimento de calibração foi definido com base nas recomendações internacionais e em testes feitos com duas metodologias distintas.OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to establish a calibration methodology specific for pencil ionization chambers used in computed tomography dosimetric procedures, in compliance with the most recent recommendations. The study was developed at the Calibration Laboratory of the Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares. MATERIALS AND METHODS: An industrial x-ray equipment, several types of ionization chambers, a mobile collimator (diaphragm type, and several high purity aluminum filters were utilized in this study. RESULTS: Diagnostic radiology standard irradiation fields were established according to IEC 61267 standard, and an adequate calibration procedure for pencil ionization chambers was elaborated. CONCLUSION: The appropriate calibration of pencil ionization chambers is already a reality in Brazil. The calibration procedure was defined on the basis of

  3. Establishment of a primary standard system for low energy X-rays using a free air ionization chamber; Estabelecimento de um sistema padrao primario para raios-X de energias baixas com uma camara de ionizacao de ar livre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Natalia Fiorini da

    2016-08-01

    In this work a primary standard system was established for low energy X-rays (10 kV to 50 kV), using a free air ionization chamber with concentric cylinders, Victoreen (Model 481-5), at the Calibration Laboratory of Instruments (LCI) of the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP). For this, a new ionization chamber alignment protocol was developed for the radiation system and a modification on the micrometer housing used for the movement of the internal cylinders was ma de. The results obtained for the stability and characterization tests showed to be within the limits established by the standards IEC 61674 and IEC 60731. The correction factors for photon attenuation in the air, transmission and scattering in the diaphragm, scattering and fluorescence and ion recombination were also determined. These values were compared with those obtained by the German primary standard laboratory, Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), showing good agreement. Finally, the absolute values of the quantity air kerma rate for the standard qualities direct beams MWV28 and WMV35 and the attenuated beams WMH28 and WMH35 were determined; the results are in agreement, with a maximum difference of 3,8% with the values obtained using the secondary standard system of LCI. (author)

  4. Comparing of the yield curve of the pediatric X-ray equipment using thermoluminescent dosimeters and cylindrical ionization chamber; Comparacao da curva de rendimento de um aparelho de raios X pediatrico utilizando dosimetros termoluminescentes e camara de ionizacao cilindrica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filipov, Danielle, E-mail: dfilipov@utfpr.edu.br [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Schelin, Hugo R., E-mail: ledesmaiorgealberto@gmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisa Pele Pequeno Principe, Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Tilly Junior, Joao G., E-mail: joao.tilly@derax.com.br [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Hospital de Clinicas

    2014-07-01

    The determination of the yield curve of a radiographic equipment should be realized once a year, or when the unit be serviced. Besides being a requirement of ANVISA, through this test is possible to determine the incident air kerma (at a given point in the center of the beam) - INAK. Based on these concepts, the main objective of this work is the comparison of yield curves of the pediatric X-ray apparatus using two different detectors: one cylindrical ionization chamber and thermoluminescent dosimeters type LiF: Mg, Cu, P, as per protocol RLA / 9/057 IAEA. Then the equation of the yield curve (generated by each detector) was used to determine the INAK of 10 pediatric examinations, performed on this equipment. After the process of calibration of both detectors, they were placed side by side at a focus of the tube equipment for determining the performance of the same curve. Finally, using the curves generated by two detectors, INAK values of the 10 tests were calculated (from the kVp values, and mAs focus-patient of each exams), generating difference values at most 5%. As a conclusion, it can be said that the TLD lithium fluoride doped with Mg, Cu and P and the cylindrical ionization chambers may be used satisfactorily to determine the yield curve, whether as quality control or dosimetry.

  5. Evaluation of the use of radiochromic films alongside of the ionization chamber and TLDs in measuring peripheral doses; Avaliacao do uso de filmes radiocromicos ao lado de camara de ionizacao e TLDs na mensuracao de doses perifericas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soboll, Danyel S.; Wolter, Brenda Von; Nascimento, Josiane Q., E-mail: soboll@utfpr.edu.br [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Viamonte, Alfredo; Alves, Victor G.L., E-mail: aviamonte@inca.gov.br [Instituto Nacional de Cancer (PQRT/INCA), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Qualidade em Radioterapia

    2014-07-01

    The objective of this work is to submit radiochromic films, thermoluminescent dosimeters and ionization chamber to identical situations irradiation, in order to assess their capabilities in measuring peripheral doses. The growing number of survivors of childhood cancer has created the need to investigate the cause of the sequelae of treatment. Measurements of peripheral radiation to the radiotherapy target region increment the knowledge of the subject and assist in the development of protection methods. As the periphery of the radiation spectrum is different from that in the beam, the energy independence supposedly provided in radiochromic films can overcome the energy dependence found of ionization and TLD chambers, in order to discard the necessity of correction of the values if films are used. In this work the three dosimeters were exposed to doses arising from the issuance of 6 MV beams, field 10 cm x 10 cm and 500 UM. The dosimeters were placed at 0, 10, 17.5 and 30 cm from the central ray, always under 5 cm of water. The results showed that the figures reported by the films have high average standard deviation and for more conclusive results is necessary to proceed with the radiations, employing more intense beams.

  6. Determination of recombination and polarity correction factors, kS and kP, for small cylindrical ionization chambers PTW 31021 and PTW 31022 in pulsed filtered and unfiltered beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruggmoser, Gregor; Saum, Rainer; Kranzer, Rafael

    2018-01-11

    The aim of this technical communication is to provide correction factors for recombination and polarity effect for two new ionization chambers PTW PinPoint 3D (type 31022) and PTW Semiflex 3D (type 31021). The correction factors provided are for the (based on the) German DIN 6800-2 dosimetry protocol and the AAPM TG51 protocol. The measurements were made in filtered and unfiltered high-energy photon beams in a water equivalent phantom at maximum depth of the PDD and a field size on the surface of 10cm×10cm. The design of the new chamber types leads to an ion collection efficiency and a polarity effect that are well within the specifications requested by pertinent dosimetry protocols including the addendum of TG-51. It was confirmed that the recombination effect of both chambers mainly depends on dose per pulse and is independent of the filtration of the photon beam. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  7. Uncertainty evaluation of the kerma in the air, related to the active volume in the ionization chamber of concentric cylinders, by Monte Carlo simulation; Avaliacao de incerteza no kerma no ar, em relacao ao volume ativo da camara de ionizacao de cilindros concentricos, por simulacao de Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo Bianco, A.S.; Oliveira, H.P.S.; Peixoto, J.G.P., E-mail: abianco@ird.gov.b [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Lab. Nacional de Metrologia das Radiacoes Ionizantes (LNMRI)

    2009-07-01

    To implant the primary standard of the magnitude kerma in the air for X-ray between 10 - 50 keV, the National Metrology Laboratory of Ionizing Radiations (LNMRI) must evaluate all the uncertainties of measurement related with Victtoren chamber. So, it was evaluated the uncertainty of the kerma in the air consequent of the inaccuracy in the active volume of the chamber using the calculation of Monte Carlo as a tool through the Penelope software

  8. Standard Test Method for Application of Ionization Chambers to Assess the Low Energy Gamma Component of Cobalt-60 Irradiators Used in Radiation-Hardness Testing of Silicon Electronic Devices

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 Low energy components in the photon energy spectrum of Co-60 irradiators lead to absorbed dose enhancement effects in the radiation-hardness testing of silicon electronic devices. These low energy components may lead to errors in determining the absorbed dose in a specific device under test. This method covers procedures for the use of a specialized ionization chamber to determine a figure of merit for the relative importance of such effects. It also gives the design and instructions for assembling this chamber. 1.2 This method is applicable to measurements in Co-60 radiation fields where the range of exposure rates is 7 × 10 −6 to 3 × 10−2 C kg −1 s−1 (approximately 100 R/h to 100 R/s). For guidance in applying this method to radiation fields where the exposure rate is >100 R/s, see Appendix X1. Note 1—See Terminology E170 for definition of exposure and its units. 1.3 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are for information onl...

  9. SU-E-P-35: Real-Time Patient Transit Dose Verification of Volumetric Modulated Arc Radiotherapy by a 2D Ionization Chamber Array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, X

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To explore the real-time dose verification method in volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) with a 2D array ion chamber array. Methods: The 2D ion chamber array was fixed on the panel of electronic portal imaging device (EPID). Source-detector distance (SDD)was 140cm. 8mm RW3 solid water was added to the detector panel to achieve maximum readings.The patient plans for esophageal, prostate and liver cancers were selected to deliver on the cylindrical Cheese phantom 5 times in order to validate the reproducibility of doses. Real-time patient transit dose measurements were performed at each fraction. Dose distributions wereevaluated using gamma index criteria of 3mm DTA and 3% dose difference referred to the firsttime Result. Results: The gamma index pass rate in the Cheese phantom were about 98%; The gamma index pass rate for esophageal, liver and prostate cancer patient were about 92%,94%, and 92%, respectively; Gamma pass rate for all single fraction were more than 90%. Conclusion: The 2D array is capable of monitoring the real time transit doses during VMAT delivery. It is helpful to improve the treatment accuracy.

  10. Comparison between IAEA/TRS-277 and IAEA/TRS-398 protocols for electron beam dosimetry with cylindrical ionization chambers; Comparacao entre os protocolos IAEA/TRS-277 e IAEA/TRS-398 para dosimetria em feixes de eletrons com camaras de ionizacao cilindricas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Roberto Salomon de

    2004-07-01

    With the purpose to guarantee an uncertainty in the dosimetry in radiation therapy, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) published in 1987 the Technical Reports Series (TRS) number 277 - Absorbed Dose Determination in Photon and Electron Beams - An International Code of Practice -, updated in 1997, when was published its second edition. In 2000 was published the TRS number 398 - Absorbed Dose Determination in External Beam Radiotherapy - An International Code of Practice for Dosimetry Based on Standards of Absorbed Dose to Water. The TRS number 398 brings a great conceptual change in relation to the basis of the formalism, before based on calibration factor in terms of air kerma, and now based on calibration factor in terms of absorbed dose in water. Since the TRS number 398 was published, the Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratories are calibrating the user's ionization chambers in terms of absorbed dose to water. However, nor all the clinics in Rio de Janeiro and Brazil have its ionization chambers calibrated in terms of absorbed dose to water. The National Cancer Institute, where the measurements were taken, was the first institution in the Rio de Janeiro to have its ionization chambers calibrated in terms of a new formalism. This work describes a comparison between dosimetry done with a cylindrical ionization chamber under electron beams utilizing the TRS number 277 formalism, based on air kerma, and the TRS number 398 formalism, based on absorbed dose to water, reporting the uncertainties variation of the dosimetry associated to each protocol. (author)

  11. Use of well-type ionization chambers in radioactive metrology; Utilisation des chambres d'ionisation a puits en metrologie radioactive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalmazzone, J.; Guiho, J.P. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1968-07-01

    A summary is given of the results of our observations and experiments gathered together over a period of 10 years in the Radioelement Measurements Laboratory, concerning the use of well-type chambers in refined metrology. The optimum conditions for obtaining good reproducibility are defined; this is indispensable if improved sensitivity and accuracy are required. For this, we consider, and measure, the effects of: the nature and the shape of the sources and of the containers; the random form of the response and its statistical treatment; the non-linearity and the show drift of the installation. A sound knowledge of the causes of error, the application of adequate correction methods and an exact calculation of the error, all make it possible to carry out measurements under the best conditions for obtaining a good reproducibility. The accuracy can attain 1.5 per cent. (author) [French] Nous resumons les resultats de nos observations et experiences, accumules depuis plus de dix ans au L. M. R., sur l'usage des chambres a puits en metrologie fine. Nous definissons les conditions optimum de reproductibilite des mesures, prealable indispensable a une sensibilite et une precision accrues. Pour y parvenir, nous considerons et mesurons les effets de: la geometrie et la nature des sources ainsi que du flaconnage; la forme aleatoire de la reponse et son traitement statistique; la non-linearite et la derive lente de l'installation. La bonne connaissance des causes d'erreurs, l'application de methodes de corrections adequates et un calcul d'erreur rigoureux nous permettent de faire des mesures dans d'excellentes conditions de reproductibilite, avec une exactitude pouvant atteindre 1.5 pour cent. (auteur)

  12. Test chamber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leferink, Frank Bernardus Johannes

    2009-01-01

    A test chamber for measuring electromagnetic radiation emitted by an apparatus to be tested or for exposing an apparatus to be tested to an electromagnetic radiation field. The test chamber includes a reverberation chamber made of a conductive tent fabric. To create a statistically uniform field in

  13. Test chamber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leferink, Frank Bernardus Johannes

    1999-01-01

    A test chamber for measuring electromagnetic radiation emitted by an apparatus to be tested or for exposing an apparatus to be tested to an electromagnetic radiation field. The test chamber includes a reverberation chamber made of a conductive tent fabric. To create a statistically uniform field in

  14. Point absorbed dose verification for volumetric modulated arc therapy plans. A comparative study between ionization microchamber and chamber array; Verificacion de dosis absorbida en un punto para planes de arcoterapia volumetrica modulada. Estudio comparativo entre microcamara de ionizacion y matriz de camaras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caudepon Moreno, F.; Pizarro Trigo, F.; Sanchez Jimenez, J.; Nunez Martinez, L.; Morillas Ruiz, J.; Palomo Llinares, R.

    2016-10-01

    According to the international recommendations a quality control must be made for IMRT treatments before these can be delivered. These recommendations are applied to volumetric modulated arc therapy treatments in our Department. As a part of the verifications chain, measurements of absorbed dose in a phantom point and in the phantom volume are made for a specific patient with ionization chamber and ionization chambers array, respectively. The aim of this issue is to compare measurements of absorbed dose between these two kinds of detectors. The predictions of absorbed dose from Treatment Planning System are taken as the reference one. The differences among these measurements and the reference are calculated for 105 specific patients. A statistical analysis shows that the measurements of absorbed dose with chamber and array are strongly correlated. This result allows us to eliminate from our verifications chain the measurements of absorbed dose in a phantom point with ionization chamber because these ones are included in measurements of absorbed dose in the volume with a very small statistic risk. As a result, much time can be saved in the verifications process without any lack of quality. (Author)

  15. Experimental comparison of profiles of acquired small fields with ionization chambers, diodes, radiochromic s and TLD films; Comparacion experimental de perfiles de campos pequenos adquiridos con camaras de ionizacion, diodos, peliculas radiocromicas y TLD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venencia, D.; Garrigo, E. [Instituto Privado de Radioterapia, Obispo Oro 423, X5000BFI Cordoba (Argentina); Filipuzzi, M. [Instituto Balseiro, Centro Atomico Bariloche, Av. Bustillo 9500, 8400 Bariloche - Rio Negro (Argentina); Germanier, A., E-mail: devenencia@radioncologia-zunino.org [Centro de Excelencia en Productos y Procesos, Santa Maria de Punilla, 5164 Cordoba (Argentina)

    2014-08-15

    The use of radiation small fields, introduced by new techniques, can bring a considerable uncertainty in the precision of the acquired profiles, due to the conditions of lateral electronic non-equilibrium and the perturbations introduced by the detectors (volume effect and alteration of the charged particles flowing) [Das et al., 2007]. The development of new miniature detectors looks to diminish the uncertainty created by the material and the size of the sensitive volume of the dosimeter. For this reason, comparative measurements for three sizes of square field were carried out (20 mm, 10 mm and 5 mm, of side) using a detectors series: 3 ionization chambers (PTW-31003, IBA-CC04, PTW-31016), 2 diodes (PTW-60012, IBA-Sfd), thermoluminescent detectors micro-cubes of 1 mm of edge (TLD-700) and radiochromic s films EBT-3. These last two were used as reference detectors, due to their spatial high resolution and similar performance with Monte Carlo simulations [Francescon et al., 1998]. So much the thermoluminescent detectors as the radiochromic films resolved the profiles in a similar way. Both diodes responded correctly, but the rest of the detectors overestimated the gloom of the fields, which allows conclude that the used TLD (and both diodes) can resolve field sizes correctly, usually utilized in radio-surgery, without producing significant alterations in the acquired data. (author)

  16. Analysis of dosimetry of a Gamma Knife Perfexion using polystyrene and solid water phantoms for small volume ionization chambers; Analise da dosimetria de um Gamma Knife Perfexion utilizando phantoms de poliestireno e de agua solida para camaras de ionizacao de volume pequeno

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, N.A.; Potiens, M.P.A., E-mail: nathaliaac@ymail.com [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Saraiva, C.W.C. [Hospital do Coracao (HCor), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Benmakhlouf, H. [Stockholm University, Karolinska Hospital (Sweden)

    2016-07-01

    The Gamma Knife Perfexion (GKP) is a radiosurgery equipment that has been developed by Elekta. Its dose-rate calibration is performed using phantoms developed by Elekta and a small volume ionization chamber. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the collected charge values obtained in its dosimetry using two different phantoms, polystyrene and solid water and the ion chambers PTW Semiflex, volume 0,125 cm{sup 3}, model 31010 and PTW Pinpoint, volume 0,016 cm{sup 3}, model 31016. (author)

  17. Ussing Chamber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhout, J.; Wortelboer, H.; Verhoeckx, K.

    2015-01-01

    The Ussing chamber system is named after the Danish zoologist Hans Ussing, who invented the device in the 1950s to measure the short-circuit current as an indicator of net ion transport taking place across frog skin (Ussing and Zerahn, Acta Physiol Scand 23:110-127, 1951). Ussing chambers are

  18. wire chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    Proportional multi-wire chamber. Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle. Proportional wire chambers allow a much quicker reading than the optical or magnetoscriptive readout wire chambers.

  19. Automatic system for ionization chamber current measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brancaccio, Franco; Dias, Mauro S; Koskinas, Marina F

    2004-12-01

    The present work describes an automatic system developed for current integration measurements at the Laboratório de Metrologia Nuclear of Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares. This system includes software (graphic user interface and control) and a module connected to a microcomputer, by means of a commercial data acquisition card. Measurements were performed in order to check the performance and for validating the proposed design.

  20. Wire chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1967-01-01

    Magnetoscriptive readout wire chamber.Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle.

  1. Wire Chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    Magnetoscriptive readout wire chamber. Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle.

  2. wire chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    Was used in ISR (Intersecting Storage Ring) split field magnet experiment. Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle.

  3. wire chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1985-01-01

    Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle.

  4. wire chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle.

  5. Wire chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle.

  6. Use of the statistical control of processes through checking before treatment realised with the ionization chamber and by electronic portal system of imaging (E.P.I.D.) in intensity modulated radiotherapy (I.M.R.T.); Utilisation de la maitrise statistique des processus dans le cadre des controles avant traitement realises avec la chambre d'ionisation et par systeme d'imagerie portale electronique (EPID) en radiotherapie conformationnelle avec modulation d'intensite (RCMI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villani, N.; Gerard, K.; Noel, A. [Nancy univ., Lab. de Recherche en Radiophysique, CRAN UMR 7039, CNRS, Centre Alexis-Vautrin, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Marchesi, V.; Huger, S. [Centre Alexis-Vautrin, Unite de Radiophysique Medicale, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)

    2009-10-15

    The expected results are to demonstrate that it is possible to reduce the times devoted to the pre-treatment controls, while keeping an optimal safety, on substituting the measures of the ionization chamber by this one of the electronic portal imaging device (E.P.I.D.). (N.C.)

  7. Characterization of a extrapolation chamber in standard X-ray beam, radiodiagnosis level; Caracterizacao de uma camara de extrapolacao em feixes padroes de raios X, nivel radiodiagnostico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Eric A.B. da; Caldas, Linda V.E., E-mail: ebrito@usp.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-10-26

    The extrapolation chamber is a ionization chamber used for detection low energy radiation and can be used as an standard instrument for beta radiation beams. This type of ionization chamber have as main characteristic the variation of sensible volume. This paper performs a study of characterization of a PTW commercial extrapolation chamber, in the energy interval of the qualities of conventional radiodiagnostic

  8. Weld Development for Aluminum Fission Chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cross, Carl Edward [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Martinez, Jesse Norris [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-05-16

    The Sigma welding team was approached to help fabricate a small fission chamber (roughly ½ inch dia. x ½ inch tall cylinder). These chambers are used as radiation sensors that contain small traces of radionuclides (Cf 252, U 235, and U 238) that serve to ionize gas atoms in addition to external radiation. When a voltage is applied within the chamber, the resulting ion flow can be calibrated and monitored. Aluminum has the advantage of not forming radioactive compounds when exposed to high external radiation (except from minor Na alloy content). Since aluminum has not been used before in this application, this presented an unexplored challenge.

  9. Drift Chambers detectors; Detectores de deriva

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duran, I.; Martinez laso, L.

    1989-07-01

    We present here a review of High Energy Physics detectors based on drift chambers. The ionization, drift diffusion, multiplication and detection principles are described. Most common drift media are analysed, and a classification of the detectors according to its geometry is done. Finally the standard read-out methods are displayed and the limits of the spatial resolution are discussed. (Author) 115 refs.

  10. The dosimetry of ionizing radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Bjaerngard, Bengt E; Kase, Kenneth R

    1987-01-01

    The Dosimetry of Ionizing Radiation, Volume II, attempts to fill the need for updated reference material on the field of radiation dosimetry. This book presents some broad topics in dosimetry and a variety of radiation dosimetry instrumentation and its application. The book opens with a chapter that extends and applies the concepts of microdosimetry to biological systems. This is followed by separate chapters on the state- of-the-art equipment and techniques used to determine neutron spectra; studies to determine recombination effects in ionization chambers exposed to high-intensity pulsed ra

  11. Doriot Climatic Chambers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Doriot Climatic Chambers are two, 60-feet long, 11-feet high, 15-feet wide chambers that are owned and operated by NSRDEC. The Doriot Climatic Chambers are among...

  12. Directed Energy Anechoic Chamber

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Directed Energy Anechoic Chamber comprises a power anechoic chamber and one transverse electromagnetic cell for characterizing radiofrequency (RF) responses of...

  13. TU-F-BRE-03: Application of a Novel Mass-Density Compensation Optimization Method to Improve the Response of a Liquid-Filled Ionization Chamber in Nonstandard Fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamio, Y [CHUM - Notre Dame, Montreal, QC (Canada); Bouchard, H [National Physical Laboratory, Teddington, Middlesex (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To improve the response of the microLion detector (PTW 31018) in small field conditions by optimizing the density of the detector's non-sensitive components using a novel method based on the detector's dose response function. Methods: The central values h(0,0) of the perturbation functions for the microLion detector and a volume of water equivalent to its sensitive volume were calculated using the Monte Carlo user code egs-chamber by scoring the dose absorbed by a 6 MV photon pencil beam incident on their centroids. Values of h(0,0) were plotted as a function of the density of the microLion's graphite electrode with the detector placed in the axial orientation. The optimized density was found by finding the minimal value of h(0,0). Results: A density of 1.37 g/cm3 was found to minimize the perturbation function of the microLion detector. The modified microLion's response was then evaluated in small square fields with sides in the range of 5 – 40 mm and found to be consistent with highly watere-quivalent detectors such as a scintillating detector (Exradin W1) and a generic alanine detector in both axial and radial orientations. Conclusion: This work illustrates a novel method which can used to optimize the design of radiation detectors in small fields. This method should also work with other optimization parameters (e.g. thickness of electrode). Density-compensated detectors have the potential to eliminate the need to evaluate nonstandard field correction factors as described by the IAEA-AAPM formalism (Alfonso et al.) and simplify future dosimetry protocols for SRS/SBRT modalities. Finally, we also expect an improvement in the response of density-compensated detectors for composite IMRT fields.

  14. Comparação entre fatores de calibração em termos de dose absorvida no ar para uma câmara de ionização de placas paralelas Comparison of absorbed dose to air calibration factors for a parallel plate ionization chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roseli T. Bulla

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: O objetivo deste trabalho foi realizar uma comparação entre os fatores de calibração em termos de dose absorvida no ar determinados em feixes gama (60Co e de elétrons. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Foram utilizados um irradiador de 60Co e um acelerador linear Varian, modelo Clinac 2100C, com feixes de fótons e de elétrons. Foram testadas uma câmara de ionização cilíndrica e três de placas paralelas. RESULTADOS: Os sistemas de medidas foram submetidos aos testes preliminares (estabilidade de resposta e corrente de fuga, com resultados muito bons. Os fatores de calibração em termos de dose absorvida no ar foram determinados utilizando-se quatro sistemas de medidas e dois tipos de objetos simuladores, com a obtenção de resultados dentro das recomendações internacionais. CONCLUSÃO: Os resultados mostraram que os fatores de calibração em termos de dose absorvida no ar obtidos para câmaras de ionização de placas paralelas, determinados em feixes de 60Co, são no máximo 1,2% mais altos que os valores obtidos em feixes de elétrons de altas energias.OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to compare the absorbed dose to air calibration factors determined in gamma (60Co and electron beams. MATERIALS AND METHODS: An irradiator with a 60Co source and a Varian, Clinac 2100C linear accelerator with photon and electron beams were utilized. One thimble-type and three parallel-plate ionization chambers were tested. RESULTS: The measurement systems were submitted to preliminary tests (response stability and leakage current, with quite good results. The absorbed dose to air calibration factors were determined using four measurement systems and two types of phantoms. Results were obtained in compliance with the international recommendations. CONCLUSION: Absorbed dose to air calibration factors obtained for parallel plate ionization chambers, determined in 60Co beams, at maximum, are 1.2% higher than the values obtained in high energy

  15. OPAL Central Detector (Including vertex, jet and Z chambers)

    CERN Multimedia

    OPAL was one of the four experiments installed at the LEP particle accelerator from 1989 - 2000. OPAL's central tracking system consists of (in order of increasing radius) a silicon microvertex detector, a vertex detector, a jet chamber, and z-chambers. All the tracking detectors work by observing the ionization of atoms by charged particles passing by: when the atoms are ionized, electrons are knocked out of their atomic orbitals, and are then able to move freely in the detector. These ionization electrons are detected in the different parts of the tracking system. (This piece includes the vertex, jet and Z chambers) In the picture above, the central detector is the piece being removed to the right.

  16. Time Projection Chamber at TRIUMF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryman, D.; Leitch, M.; Navon, I.; Numao, T.; Schlatter, P.; Dixit, M.S.; Hargrove, C.K.; Mes, H.; Bennett, A.; Macdonald, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    The Time Projection Chamber at TRIUMF is being used to search for muon-electron conversion. The best spatial resolution in the TPC, sigma approx. = 200 ..mu..m, occurs at the minimum drift length and for an optimum track-to-anode crossing angle determined by the magnetic field. The observed resolution is dependent on the diffusion of the drifting electrons, the track-to-anode crossing angle, vector E X vector B effects near the anode wire and the discrete nature of the ionization process. Distortion due to positive ions leaking back into the drift volume from the anode wire region have been nearly eliminated by the use of a pulsed dual grid system.

  17. Prototype multiwire proportional chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1975-01-01

    Chambers of this type were initially developed within the Alpha project (finally not approved). They were designed such to minimize the radiation length with a view to a mass spectrometer of high resolution meant to replace the Omega detector. The chambers were clearly forerunners for the (drift) chambers later built for R606 with the novel technique of crimping the wires. See also photo 7510039X.

  18. Streamer chamber: pion decay

    CERN Multimedia

    1992-01-01

    The real particles produced in the decay of a positive pion can be seen in this image from a streamer chamber. Streamer chambers consist of a gas chamber through which a strong pulsed electric field is passed, creating sparks as a charged particle passes through it. A magnetic field is added to cause the decay products to follow curved paths so that their charge and momentum can be measured.

  19. Electromagnetic reverberation chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Besnier, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Dedicated to a complete presentation on all aspects of reverberation chambers, this book provides the physical principles behind these test systems in a very progressive manner. The detailed panorama of parameters governing the operation of electromagnetic reverberation chambers details various applications such as radiated immunity, emissivity, and shielding efficiency experiments.In addition, the reader is provided with the elements of electromagnetic theory and statistics required to take full advantage of the basic operational rules of reverberation chambers, including calibration proc

  20. Refrigeration Test Chamber

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The enclosed and environmentally controlled chamber is able to test four units (single-phase) simultaneously at conditions ranging from tundra to desert temperatures...

  1. DORIOT CLIMATIC CHAMBERS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Doriot Climatic Chambers reproduce environmental conditions occurring anywhere around the world. They provide an invaluable service by significantly reducing the...

  2. Ionization distribution near a relativistic particle track in gas

    CERN Document Server

    Grichine, V M

    2009-01-01

    The space distribution of ionization produced by relativistic charged particle around its trajectory is discussed in the framework of photo-absorption ionization model. The mean root square transverse radius of the ionization space distribution shows relativistic rise. The rise is due to relativistic increasing of Cherenkov photon generation. The photons with energy more than the first ionization potential have small but finite range which is typically much more than the range of an electron with the same energy. Calculations illustrating this effect were done using the gas mixture proposed for ALICE LHC time projection chamber.

  3. The Mobile Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharfstein, Gregory; Cox, Russell

    2012-01-01

    A document discusses a simulation chamber that represents a shift from the thermal-vacuum chamber stereotype. This innovation, currently in development, combines the capabilities of space simulation chambers, the user-friendliness of modern-day electronics, and the modularity of plug-and-play computing. The Mobile Chamber is a customized test chamber that can be deployed with great ease, and is capable of bringing payloads at temperatures down to 20 K, in high vacuum, and with the desired metrology instruments integrated to the systems control. Flexure plans to lease Mobile Chambers, making them affordable for smaller budgets and available to a larger customer base. A key feature of this design will be an Apple iPad-like user interface that allows someone with minimal training to control the environment inside the chamber, and to simulate the required extreme environments. The feedback of thermal, pressure, and other measurements is delivered in a 3D CAD model of the chamber's payload and support hardware. This GUI will provide the user with a better understanding of the payload than any existing thermal-vacuum system.

  4. DELPHI time projection chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1989-01-01

    The time projection chamber is inserted inside the central detector of the DELPHI experiment. Gas is ionised in the chamber as a charged particle passes through, producing an electric signal from which the path of the particle can be found. DELPHI, which ran from 1989 to 2000 on the LEP accelerator, was primarily concerned with particle identification.

  5. BEBC bubble chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1972-01-01

    Looking up into the interior of BEBC bubble chamber from the expansion cylinder. At the top of the chamber two fish-eye lenses are installed and three other fish-eye ports are blanked off. In the centre is a heat exchanger.

  6. Climatic chamber ergometer

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Atkins, AR

    1968-01-01

    Full Text Available The design and calibration of an ergometer for exercising subjects during calorimetric studies in the climate chamber, are described. The ergometer is built into the climatic chamber and forms an integral part of the whole instrumentation system foe...

  7. Use of a streamer chamber for low energy nuclear physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Bibber, K.; Pang, W.; Avery, M.; Bloemhof, E.

    1979-10-01

    A small streamer chamber has been implemented for low energy heavy ion reaction studies at the LBL 88-inch cyclotron. The response of the chamber to light and heavy ions below 35 MeV/nucleon has been examined. The limited sensitivity of light output as a function of ionization works to advantage in recording a wide variety of tracks in the same photograph whose energy loss may vary considerably. Furthermore, as gas targets are attractive for several reasons, we have investigated the suitability of Ar and Xe for use in streamer chambers.

  8. PS wire chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1970-01-01

    A wire chamber used at CERN's Proton Synchrotron accelerator in the 1970s. Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle.

  9. ALICE Time Projection Chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    Lippmann, C

    2013-01-01

    The Time Projection Chamber (TPC) is the main device in the ALICE 'central barrel' for the tracking and identification (PID) of charged particles. It has to cope with unprecedented densities of charges particles.

  10. Obelix Wire Chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1986-01-01

    Two wire chambers made originally for the R807 Experiment at CERN's Intersecting Storage Rings. In 1986 they were used for the PS 201 experiment (Obelix Experiment) at LEAR, the Low Energy Antiproton Ring. The group of researchers from Turin, using the chambers at that time, changed the acquisition system using for the first time 8 bit (10 bit non linear) analog to digital conversion for incoming signals from the chambers. The acquisition system was controlled by 54 CPU and 80 digital signal processors. The power required for all the electronics was 40 kW. For the period, this system was one of the most powerful on-line apparatus in the world. The Obelix Experiment was closed in 1996. To find more about how a wire chamber works, see the description for object CERN-OBJ-DE-038.

  11. Vacuum chamber 'bicone'

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    This chamber is now in the National Museum of History and Technology, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC, USA, where it was exposed in an exhibit on the History of High Energy Accelerators (1977).

  12. The physics of Resistive Plate Chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Riegler, Werner

    2004-01-01

    Over the last 3 years we investigated theoretical aspects of Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC) in order to clarify some of the outstanding questions on space charge effects, high efficiency of small gap RPCs, charge spectra, signal shape and time resolution. In a series of reports we analyzed RPC performance including all detector aspects covering primary ionization, avalanche multiplication, space charge effects, signal induction in presence of resistive materials, crosstalk along detectors with long strips and front-end electronics. Using detector gas parameters entirely based on theoretical predictions and physical models for avalanche development and space charge effects we are able to reproduce measurements for 2 and 0.3 mm RPCs to very high accuracy without any additional assumptions. This fact gives a profound insight into the workings of RPCs and also underlines the striking difference in operation regime when compared to wire chambers. A summary of this work as well as recent results on three-dimensiona...

  13. Target Chamber Manipulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantillo, Anthony; Watson, Matthew

    2015-11-01

    A system has been developed to allow remote actuation of sensors in a high vacuum target chamber used with a particle accelerator. Typically, sensors of various types are placed into the target chamber at specific radial and angular positions relative to the beam line and target. The chamber is then evacuated and the experiments are performed for those sensor positions. Then, the chamber is opened, the sensors are repositioned to new angles or radii, and the process is repeated, with a separate pump-down cycle for each set of sensor positions. The new sensor positioning system allows scientists to pre-set the radii of up to a dozen sensors, and then remotely actuate their angular positions without breaking the vacuum of the target chamber. This reduces the time required to reposition sensors from 6 hours to 1 minute. The sensors are placed into one of two tracks that are separately actuated using vacuum-grade stepping motors. The positions of the sensors are verified using absolute optical rotary encoders, and the positions are accurate to 0.5 degrees. The positions of the sensors are electronically recorded and time-stamped after every change. User control is through a GUI using LabVIEW.

  14. Ionization Energies of Lanthanides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Peter F.; Smith, Barry C.

    2010-01-01

    This article describes how data are used to analyze the pattern of ionization energies of the lanthanide elements. Different observed pathways of ionization between different ground states are discussed, and the effects of pairing, exchange, and orbital interactions on ionization energies of the lanthanides are evaluated. When all the above…

  15. The KLOE drift chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Adinolfi, M; Ambrosino, F; Andryakov, A; Antonelli, A; Antonelli, M; Anulli, F; Bacci, C; Bankamp, A; Barbiellini, G; Bellini, F; Bencivenni, G; Bertolucci, Sergio; Bini, C; Bloise, C; Bocci, V; Bossi, F; Branchini, P; Bulychjov, S A; Cabibbo, G; Calcaterra, A; Caloi, R; Campana, P; Capon, G; Carboni, G; Cardini, A; Casarsa, M; Cataldi, G; Ceradini, F; Cervelli, F; Cevenini, F; Chiefari, G; Ciambrone, P; Conetti, S; Conticelli, S; Lucia, E D; Robertis, G D; Sangro, R D; Simone, P D; Zorzi, G D; Dell'Agnello, S; Denig, A; Domenico, A D; Donato, C D; Falco, S D; Doria, A; Drago, E; Elia, V; Erriquez, O; Farilla, A; Felici, G; Ferrari, A; Ferrer, M L; Finocchiaro, G; Forti, C; Franceschi, A; Franzini, P; Gao, M L; Gatti, C; Gauzzi, P; Giovannella, S; Golovatyuk, V; Gorini, E; Grancagnolo, F; Grandegger, W; Graziani, E; Guarnaccia, P; Von Hagel, U; Han, H G; Han, S W; Huang, X; Incagli, M; Ingrosso, L; Jang, Y Y; Kim, W; Kluge, W; Kulikov, V; Lacava, F; Lanfranchi, G; Lee-Franzini, J; Lomtadze, F; Luisi, C; Mao Chen Sheng; Martemyanov, M; Matsyuk, M; Mei, W; Merola, L; Messi, R; Miscetti, S; Moalem, A; Moccia, S; Moulson, M; Müller, S; Murtas, F; Napolitano, M; Nedosekin, A; Panareo, M; Pacciani, L; Pagès, P; Palutan, M; Paoluzi, L; Pasqualucci, E; Passalacqua, L; Passaseo, M; Passeri, A; Patera, V; Petrolo, E; Petrucci, Guido; Picca, D; Pirozzi, G; Pistillo, C; Pollack, M; Pontecorvo, L; Primavera, M; Ruggieri, F; Santangelo, P; Santovetti, E; Saracino, G; Schamberger, R D; Schwick, C; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Scuri, F; Sfiligoi, I; Shan, J; Silano, P; Spadaro, T; Spagnolo, S; Spiriti, E; Stanescu, C; Tong, G L; Tortora, L; Valente, E; Valente, P; Valeriani, B; Venanzoni, G; Veneziano, Stefano; Wu, Y; Xie, Y G; Zhao, P P; Zhou, Y

    2001-01-01

    The tracking detector of the KLOE experiment is 4 m diameter, 3.3 m length drift chamber, designed to contain a large fraction of the decays of low-energy K sub L produced at the Frascati DAPHINE phi-factory. The chamber is made by a thin carbon fiber structure and operated with a helium-based gas mixture in order to minimise conversion of low-energy photons and multiple scattering inside the sensitive volume. The tracking information is provided by 58 layers of stereo wires defing 12,582 cells, 2x2 cm sup 2 in size in the 12 innermost layers and 3x3 cm sup 2 in the outer ones. Details of the chamber design, calibration procedure and tracking performances are presented.

  16. DELPHI Barrel Muon Chamber Module

    CERN Multimedia

    1989-01-01

    The module was used as part of the muon identification system on the barrel of the DELPHI detector at LEP, and was in active use from 1989 to 2000. The module consists of 7 individual muons chambers arranged in 2 layers. Chambers in the upper layer are staggered by half a chamber width with respect to the lower layer. Each individual chamber is a drift chamber consisting of an anode wire, 47 microns in diameter, and a wrapped copper delay line. Each chamber provided 3 signal for each muon passing through the chamber, from which a 3D space-point could be reconstructed.

  17. Charpak hemispherical wire chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1970-01-01

    pieces. Mesures are of the largest one. Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle.

  18. micro strip gas chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1998-01-01

    About 16 000 Micro Strip Gas Chambers like this one will be used in the CMS tracking detector. They will measure the tracks of charged particles to a hundredth of a millimetre precision in the region near the collision point where the density of particles is very high. Each chamber is filled with a gas mixture of argon and dimethyl ether. Charged particles passing through ionise the gas, knocking out electrons which are collected on the aluminium strips visible under the microscope. Such detectors are being used in radiography. They give higher resolution imaging and reduce the required dose of radiation.

  19. Suppressing drift chamber diffusion without magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Martoff, C J; Ohnuki, T; Spooner, N J C; Lehner, M

    2000-01-01

    The spatial resolution in drift chamber detectors for ionizing radiation is limited by diffusion of the primary electrons. A strong magnetic field along the drift direction is often applied (Fancher et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 161 (1979) 383) because it suppresses the transverse diffusion, improving the resolution but at considerable increase in cost and complexity. Here we show that transverse track diffusion can be strongly suppressed without any magnetic field. This is achieved by using a gas additive which reversibly captures primary ionization electrons, forming negative ions. The ions drift with thermal energies even at very high drift fields and low pressures (E/P=28.5 V/cm torr), and the diffusion decreases with increasing drift field. Upon arrival at the avalanche region of the chamber the negative ions are efficiently stripped and ordinary avalanche gain is obtained. Using this technique, r.m.s. transverse diffusion less than 200 mu m has been achieved over a 15 cm drift path at 40 torr with ze...

  20. LEP Vacuum Chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    This is a cut-out of a LEP vacuum chamber for dipole magnets showing the beam channel and the pumping channel with the getter (NEG) strip and its insulating supports. A water pipe connected to the cooling channel can also be seen at the back.The lead radiation shield lining is also shown. See also 8305563X.

  1. Scanning bubble chamber pictures

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    These were taken at the 2 m hydrogen bubble chamber. The photo shows an early Shiva system where the pre-measurements needed to qualify the event were done manually (cf photo 7408136X). The scanning tables were located in bld. 12. Gilberte Saulmier sits on foreground, Inge Arents at centre.

  2. Heavy liquid bubble chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1965-01-01

    The CERN Heavy liquid bubble chamber being installed in the north experimental hall at the PS. On the left, the 1180 litre body; in the centre the magnet, which can produce a field of 26 800 gauss; on the right the expansion mechanism.

  3. Rocket Combustion Chamber Coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Richard R. (Inventor); McKechnie, Timothy N. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A coating with the ability to protect (1) the inside wall (i.e., lining) of a rocket engine combustion chamber and (2) parts of other apparatuses that utilize or are exposed to combustive or high temperature environments. The novelty of this invention lies in the manner a protective coating is embedded into the lining.

  4. Chamber Profile Measurement System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-10-01

    travel with the proper electronics. Other features of tihe gage assembly are: 1. Micrometer controlled down chamber positioning of the master template to...pressure sensitive "stiff stick" for infinitely varying the rate of travel from zero to maximum. A manual vernier control is incorporated to permit fine

  5. LEP vacuum chamber, prototype

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1983-01-01

    Final prototype for the LEP vacuum chamber, see 8305170 for more details. Here we see the strips of the NEG pump, providing "distributed pumping". The strips are made from a Zr-Ti-Fe alloy. By passing an electrical current, they were heated to 700 deg C.

  6. Precise gain measurement of the LHCb muon chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Dané, E; Pinci, D; Sarti, A

    2006-01-01

    The muon detector of the LHCb experiment, which will operate at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, consists of five muon tracking stations placed along the beam axis and equipped mainly with multi-wire proportional chambers (MWPC). In the present paper we report the results of a precise measurement of the gain of the MWPC’s as a function of the anode voltage. A precise evaluation of the primary ionization current (of about 5 pA) was performed. The absolute gain of the chambers was deduced as a function of the anode voltage and compared with the prediction of the Diethorn formula.

  7. Multiwire proportional chamber development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doolittle, R. F.; Pollvogt, U.; Eskovitz, A. J.

    1973-01-01

    The development of large area multiwire proportional chambers, to be used as high resolution spatial detectors in cosmic ray experiments is described. A readout system was developed which uses a directly coupled, lumped element delay-line whose characteristics are independent of the MWPC design. A complete analysis of the delay-line and the readout electronic system shows that a spatial resolution of about 0.1 mm can be reached with the MWPC operating in the strictly proportional region. This was confirmed by measurements with a small MWPC and Fe-55 X-rays. A simplified analysis was carried out to estimate the theoretical limit of spatial resolution due to delta-rays, spread of the discharge along the anode wire, and inclined trajectories. To calculate the gas gain of MWPC's of different geometrical configurations a method was developed which is based on the knowledge of the first Townsend coefficient of the chamber gas.

  8. Determination of the correction factor for attenuation, dispersion and production of electrons (K{sub wall}) in the wall of graphite of a ionization chamber Pattern National Type CC01 in fields of gamma radiation of {sup 60}Co; Determinacion del factor de correccion por atenuacion, dispersion y produccion de electrones (K{sub wall}) en la pared de grafito de una Camara de Ionizacion Patron Nacional Tipo CC01 en campos de radiacion gamma de {sup 60} Co

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez R, J.T.; Morales P, J.; Cruz E, P. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2001-12-15

    It was determined the Kwall correction factor for the wall of graphite of the chamber of the pattern national type CC01 series 133 for a radiation field Gamma of {sup 60}Co. With this end to measured the currents of ionization l(x) as function of the thickness of the wall of the chamber: X=4,8,12,16 and 20 mm.The mensurations for each thickness consisting of three groups, of sizes n = 30 or 60 data for each group; obtaining 8 complete groups of mensurations independent in eight different dates.The determinate the factor carried out using three regression models: lineal, logarithmic and quadratic, models that were tried to validate with the tests of : i) Shapiro-Wilk and {chi}{sup 2} for the normality of the entrance data ii) Tests of Bartlett for variances homogeneity among groups for each thickness iii) The tests of Duncan for the stockings among groups of each thickness, and iv) The tests of adjustment lack (LOF) for the models used. Nevertheless, alone the models of the group of corresponding mensurations at 01-03-2000 17-08-2001 they can be validated by LOF, but not for tests of normality and homogeneity of variances. Among other assignable causes of variation we have: i) The values captured by the system of mensuration of the variables of it influences: pressure, temperature and relative humidity don{sup t} belong together with the existent ones to the moment to capture the l(x). ii) The mensuration room presents flows of air, for what was suited o diminish their volume and to eliminate the flows of air. iii) A protocol settled down of taking of measures that it consisted in: - Pre-irradiation 5 minutes the chamber after the change of polarity and hood change, with a period of stabilization of 5 minutes after the pre-irradiation. - Pre-irradiation for 5 minutes before the taking of the readings, with the object of eliminating variation sources assigned to currents of escapes or due variations to transitory. iv) To realize corrections for relative humidity of

  9. Anechoic Radio Frequency Test Chamber

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This chamber is used for characterization test of such systems as communications gear, tanks, radar, missiles, and helicopters. The dimensions of the chamber are 114...

  10. Vacuum Chambers for LEP sections

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    The picture shows sections of the LEP vacuum chambers to be installed in the dipole magnets (left) and in the quadrupoles (right). The dipole chamber has three channels: the beam chamber, the pumping duct where the NEG (non-evaporabe getter) is installed and the water channel for cooling (on top in the picture). The pumping duct is connected to the beam chamber through holes in the separating wall. The thick lead lining to shield radiation can also be seen. These chambers were manufactured as extruded aluminium alloy profiles.

  11. Wire chambers revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, R J

    1993-04-01

    Detectors used for radioisotope imaging have, historically, been based on scintillating crystal/photomultiplier combinations in various forms. From the rectilinear scanner through to modern gamma cameras and positron cameras, the basic technology has remained much the same. Efforts to overcome the limitations of this form of technology have foundered on the inability to reproduce the required sensitivity, spatial resolution and sensitive area at acceptable cost. Multiwire proportional chambers (MWPCs) have long been used as position-sensitive charged particle detectors in nuclear and high-energy physics. MWPCs are large-area gas-filled ionisation chambers in which large arrays of fine wires are used to measure the position of ionisation produced in the gas by the passage of charged particles. The important properties of MWPCs are high-spatial-resolution, large-area, high-count-rate performance at low cost. For research applications, detectors several metres square have been built and small-area detectors have a charged particle resolution of 0.4 mm at a count rate of several million per second. Modification is required to MWPCs for nuclear medicine imaging. As gamma rays or X-rays cannot be detected directly, they must be converted into photo- or Compton scatter electrons. Photon-electron conversion requires the use of high atomic number materials in the body of the chamber. Pressurised xenon is the most useful form of "gas only" photon-electron convertor and has been used successfully in a gamma camera for the detection of gamma rays at energies below 100 keV. This camera has been developed specifically for high-count-rate first-pass cardiac imaging. This high-pressure xenon gas MWPC is the key to a highly competitive system which can outperform scintillator-based systems. The count rate performance is close to a million counts per second and the intrinsic spatial resolution is better than the best scintillator-based camera. The MWPC camera produces quantitative

  12. Tunnel ionization, population trapping, filamentation and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leang Chin, See; Xu, Huailiang

    2016-11-01

    The advances in femtosecond Ti-sapphire laser technology have led to the discovery of a profusion of new physics. This review starts with a brief historical account of the experimental realization of tunnel ionization, followed by high harmonic generation and the prediction of attosecond pulses. Then, the unique phenomenon of dynamic population trapping during the ionization of atoms and molecules in intense laser fields is introduced. One of the consequences of population trapping in the highly excited states is the neutral dissociation into simple molecular fragments which fluoresce. Such fluorescence could be amplified in femtosecond laser filamentation in gases. The experimental observations of filament-induced fluorescence and lasing in the atmosphere and combustion flames are given. Excitation of molecular rotational wave packets (molecular alignment) and their relaxation and revival in a gas filament are described. Furthermore, filament-induced condensation and precipitation inside a cloud chamber is explained. Lastly, a summary and future outlook is given.

  13. Nucleation in an ultra low ionization environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jens Olaf Pepke; Enghoff, Martin Andreas Bødker; Paling, Sean

    Atmospheric ions can enhance the nucleation of aerosols, as has been established by experiments, observation, and theory. In the clean marine atmosphere ionization is mainly caused by cosmic rays which in turn are controlled by the activity of the Sun, thus providing a potential link between solar...... Laboratory, located 1100 meters below ground, thus reducing the flux of ionizing cosmic radiation by six orders of magnitude. Similarly we have reduced the gamma background by shielding the experiment in lead and copper. Finally we have used air stored for several weeks and passed through an active charcoal...... at near atmospheric conditions. The chamber contains clean air with the addition of water vapour, ozone, and SO2. Using UV lights at 254 nm ozone is photolyzed, leading to the production of sulphuric acid and thus aerosols. An 18 MBq Caesium-137 gamma ray source with various amounts of lead in front...

  14. Review of wire chamber aging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Va' Vra, J.

    1986-02-01

    This paper makes an overview of the wire chamber aging problems as a function of various chamber design parameters. It emphasizes the chemistry point of view and many examples are drawn from the plasma chemistry field as a guidance for a possible effort in the wire chamber field. The paper emphasizes the necessity of variable tuning, the importance of purity of the wire chamber environment, as well as it provides a practical list of presently known recommendations. In addition, several models of the wire chamber aging are qualitatively discussed. The paper is based on a summary talk given at the Wire Chamber Aging Workshop held at LBL, Berkeley on January 16-17, 1986. Presented also at Wire Chamber Conference, Vienna, February 25-28, 1986. 74 refs., 18 figs., 11 tabs.

  15. Modeling chamber transport for heavy-ion fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharp, W.M.; Callahan, D.A.; Tabak, M.; Yu, S.S.; Peterson, P.F.; Welch, D.R.; Rose, D.V.; Olson, C.L.

    2002-10-01

    In a typical thick-liquid-wall scenario for heavy-ion fusion (HIF), between seventy and two hundred high-current beams enter the target chamber through ports and propagate about three meters to the target. Since molten-salt jets are planned to protect the chamber wall, the beams move through vapor from the jets, and collisions between beam ions and this background gas both strip the ions and ionize the gas molecules. Radiation from the preheated target causes further beam stripping and gas ionization. Due to this stripping, beams for heavy-ion fusion are expected to require substantial neutralization in a target chamber. Much recent research has, therefore, focused on beam neutralization by electron sources that were neglected in earlier simulations, including emission from walls and the target, photoionization by the target radiation, and pre-neutralization by a plasma generated along the beam path. When these effects are included in simulations with practicable beam and chamber parameters, the resulting focal spot is approximately the size required by a distributed radiator target.

  16. The time projection chamber at triumf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryman, D.; Leitch, M.; Navon, I.; Numao, T.; Schlatter, P.; Dixit, M. S.; Hargrove, C. K.; Mes, H.; Bennett, A.; Macdonald, J. A.; Skegg, R.; Spuller, J.; Burnham, A.; Hasinoff, M.; Poutissou, J.-M.; Azuelos, G.; Depommier, P.; Martin, J.-P.; Poutissou, R.; Blecher, M.; Gotow, K.; Carter, A. L.

    1984-02-01

    The time projection chamber at TRIUMF is being used to search for muon-electron conversion. The best spatial resolution in the TPC, σ≂200 μm, occurs at the minimum drift length and for an optimum track-to-anode crossing angle determined by the magnetic field. The observed resolution is dependent on th diffusion of the drifting electrons, the track-to-anode crossing angle, E↘×B↘ effects near the anode wire and the discrete nature of the ionization process. Distortions due to positive ions leaking back into the drift volume from the anode wire region have been nearly eliminated by the use of a pulsed dual grid system.

  17. Posterior chamber pseudophakia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simcoe, C W

    1982-01-01

    Anatomically, the most physiological type of implant is that of the posterior chamber of the eye. After a brief historical review of these implants, two models differing by their loops are compared, these being either in the form of a J with narrow extremities or in the form of a C. The latter model possesses definite advantages. Firstly, the point of pressure on the lens capsule is less concentrated, reducing the pressure exerted by the loops and thus avoiding rupture of the zonular ciliaris, Secondly, contact in the form of an are prevents movement of the implant around its axis, a factor favorizing capsule slipping. Thirdly, the improved pressure distribution of the loops resulting from their greater flexibility also prevents the "windscreen wiper syndrome", providing improved stability of the implant. The technique employed avoids all contact taking place with the endothelium. The upper loop is placed in position after closure of the incision. Results in 1532 cases were very positive, and studies are currently being conducted with an implant with four loops in which the optic is within the posterior chamber, and which could be positioned after intracapsular extraction. A system of irrigation-aspiration is described which employs a fine curved canula that is easier to manage and permits improved cleaning of the capsule. Emphasis is placed on the need for narrow, deep, corneal sutures to reduce postoperative astigmatism.

  18. Council Chamber exhibition

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    To complete the revamp of CERN’s Council Chamber, a new exhibition is being installed just in time for the June Council meetings.   Panels will showcase highlights of CERN’s history, using some of the content prepared for the exhibitions marking 50 years of the PS, which were displayed in the main building last November. The previous photo exhibition in the Council Chamber stopped at the 1970s. To avoid the new panels becoming quickly out of date, photos are grouped together around specific infrastructures, rather than following a classic time-line. “We have put the focus on the accelerators – the world-class facilities that CERN has been offering researchers over the years, from the well-known large colliders to the lesser-known smaller facilities,” says Emma Sanders, who worked on the content. The new exhibition will be featured in a future issue of the Bulletin with photos and an interview with Fabienne Marcastel, designer of the exhibit...

  19. Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, M.; Mason, W. B.; Whipple, G. H.; Howland, J. W.

    1952-04-07

    This report presents a review of present knowledge and concepts of the biological effects of ionizing radiations. Among the topics discussed are the physical and chemical effects of ionizing radiation on biological systems, morphological and physiological changes observed in biological systems subjected to ionizing radiations, physiological changes in the intact animal, latent changes following exposure of biological systems to ionizing radiations, factors influencing the biological response to ionizing radiation, relative effects of various ionizing radiations, and biological dosimetry.

  20. Kelvin spray ionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özdemir, Abdil; Lin, Jung-Lee; Gillig, Kent J; Chen, Chung-Hsuan

    2013-11-21

    A novel self-powered dual spray ionization source has been developed for applications in mass spectrometry. This new source does not use any power supply and produces both positive and negative ions simultaneously. The idea behind this ionization source comes from the Kelvin water dropper. The source employs one or two syringes, two pneumatic sprays operated over a range of flow rates (0.15-15 μL min(-1)) and gas pressures (0-150 psi), and two double layered metal screens for ion formation. A variable electrostatic potential from 0 to 4 kV can be produced depending on solvent and gas flow rates that allow gentle ionization of compounds. There are several parameters that affect the performance during ionization of molecules including the flow rate of solvent, gas pressure, solvent acidity, position of spray and metal screens with respect to each other and distance between metal screens and the counter electrode. This ionization method has been successfully applied to solutions of peptides, proteins and non-covalent complexes. In comparison with ESI, the charge number of the most populated state is lower than that from ESI. It indicates that this is a softer ionization technique and it produces more protein ions with folded structures. The unique features of Kelvin spray ionization (KeSI) are that the method is self-powered and ionization occurs at very low potentials by providing very low internal energy to the ions. This advantage can be used for the ionization of very fragile molecules and investigation of non-covalent interactions.

  1. Michigan ATLAS MDT Chamber Mass Production

    CERN Document Server

    Diehl, E; Levin, D; McKee, S; Neal, H; Schick, H; Tarle, G; Thun, R; Weaverdyck, C; Xu, Q; Zhao, Z; Zhou, B

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the ATLAS MDT precision muon chamber construction at the University of Michigan. The chamber assembly facilities, the jigging set up, alignment procedures, and other measurements necessary for chamber assembly are described. The chamber quality assurance monitoring procedures and data for the first year mass production are presented. The chamber gas system assembly facilities, and the chamber leak test procedure together with data also reported. The chamber production database, which monitors chamber production, is also discussed.

  2. A measurement of the relativistic rise in xenon-filled ionisation chambers for cosmic ray iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, J. C.; Parnell, T. A.

    1980-01-01

    The relativistic rise of ionization in a pair of xenon-filled pulse ion chambers was measured for primary iron nuclei during a recent balloon flight. Energy calibration over the range 21.5-60 GeV/n was made with a Freon-12 gas Cerenkov detector. This allowed a comparison with recent calculations of the relativistic rise in xenon counters and an estimate of the ion chamber resolution above 21.5 GeV/n to be made.

  3. A high performance Front End Electronics for drift chamber readout in MEG experiment upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiarello, G. [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica “Ennio De Giorgi” – Universitá del Salento, Via Arnesano, Lecce (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Sez. Lecce, Via Arnesano, Lecce (Italy); Chiri, C.; Corvaglia, A.; Grancagnolo, F. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Sez. Lecce, Via Arnesano, Lecce (Italy); Panareo, M. [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica “Ennio De Giorgi” – Universitá del Salento, Via Arnesano, Lecce (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Sez. Lecce, Via Arnesano, Lecce (Italy); Pepino, A., E-mail: aurora.pepino@le.infn.it [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica “Ennio De Giorgi” – Universitá del Salento, Via Arnesano, Lecce (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Sez. Lecce, Via Arnesano, Lecce (Italy); Pinto, C.; Tassielli, G. [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica “Ennio De Giorgi” – Universitá del Salento, Via Arnesano, Lecce (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Sez. Lecce, Via Arnesano, Lecce (Italy)

    2016-07-11

    Front End (FE) Electronics plays an essential role in Drift Chambers (DC) for time resolution and, therefore, spatial resolution. The use of cluster timing techniques, by measuring the timing of all the individual ionization clusters after the first one, may enable to reach resolutions even below 100 μm in the measurement of the impact parameter. To this purpose, a Front End Electronics with a wide bandwidth and low noise is mandatory in order to acquire and amplify the drift chamber signals.

  4. Mush Column Magma Chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, B. D.

    2002-12-01

    Magma chambers are a necessary concept in understanding the chemical and physical evolution of magma. The concept may well be similar to a transfer function in circuit or time series analysis. It does what needs to be done to transform source magma into eruptible magma. In gravity and geodetic interpretations the causative body is (usually of necessity) geometrically simple and of limited vertical extent; it is clearly difficult to `see' through the uppermost manifestation of the concentrated magma. The presence of plutons in the upper crust has reinforced the view that magma chambers are large pots of magma, but as in the physical representation of a transfer function, actual magma chambers are clearly distinct from virtual magma chambers. Two key features to understanding magmatic systems are that they are vertically integrated over large distances (e.g., 30-100 km), and that all local magmatic processes are controlled by solidification fronts. Heat transfer considerations show that any viable volcanic system must be supported by a vertically extensive plumbing system. Field and geophysical studies point to a common theme of an interconnected stack of sill-like structures extending to great depth. This is a magmatic Mush Column. The large-scale (10s of km) structure resembles the vertical structure inferred at large volcanic centers like Hawaii (e.g., Ryan et al.), and the fine scale (10s to 100s of m) structure is exemplified by ophiolites and deeply eroded sill complexes like the Ferrar dolerites of the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica. The local length scales of the sill reservoirs and interconnecting conduits produce a rich spectrum of crystallization environments with distinct solidification time scales. Extensive horizontal and vertical mushy walls provide conditions conducive to specific processes of differentiation from solidification front instability to sidewall porous flow and wall rock slumping. The size, strength, and time series of eruptive behavior

  5. The ALICE time projection chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2005-01-01

    This time projection chamber is part of the ALICE detector on the new LHC accelerator at CERN. Particles produced in collisions at the core of the detector will follow paths outward through the various sub-detector layers. If these particles carry a charge, they will ionise the gas contained within this chamber producing an electric signal as the ions drift in the chamber's electric field.

  6. Portable electron beam weld chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, J. R.; Dimino, J. M.

    1972-01-01

    Development and characteristics of portable vacuum chamber for skate type electron beam welding are discussed. Construction and operational details of equipment are presented. Illustrations of equipment are provided.

  7. Directed Field Ionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregoric, Vincent C.; Kang, Xinyue; Liu, Zhimin Cheryl; Rowley, Zoe A.; Carroll, Thomas J.; Noel, Michael W.

    2017-04-01

    Selective field ionization is an important experimental technique used to study the state distribution of Rydberg atoms. This is achieved by applying a steadily increasing electric field, which successively ionizes more tightly bound states. An atom prepared in an energy eigenstate encounters many avoided Stark level crossings on the way to ionization. As it traverses these avoided crossings, its amplitude is split among multiple different states, spreading out the time resolved electron ionization signal. By perturbing the electric field ramp, we can change how the atoms traverse the avoided crossings, and thus alter the shape of the ionization signal. We have used a genetic algorithm to evolve these perturbations in real time in order to arrive at a target ionization signal shape. This process is robust to large fluctuations in experimental conditions. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation under Grants No. 1607335 and No. 1607377 and used the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE), which is supported by National Science Foundation Grant Number OCI-1053575.

  8. Effective point of measurement for parallel plate and cylindrical ion chambers in megavoltage electron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voigts-Rhetz, Philip von; Czarnecki, Damian [University of Applied Sciences Giessen, Technische Hochschule Mittelhessen (Germany). Inst. fuer Mediznische Physik und Strahlenschutz (IMPS); Zink, Klemens [University of Applied Sciences Giessen, Technische Hochschule Mittelhessen (Germany). Inst. fuer Mediznische Physik und Strahlenschutz (IMPS); Marburg Univ. Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology

    2014-10-01

    The presence of an air filled ionization chamber in a surrounding medium introduces several fluence perturbations in high energy photon and electron beams which have to be accounted for. One of these perturbations, the displacement effect, may be corrected in two different ways: by a correction factor p{sub dis} or by the application of the concept of the effective point of measurement (EPOM). The latter means, that the volume averaged ionization within the chamber is not reported to the chambers reference point but to a point within the air filled cavity. Within this study the EPOM was determined for four different parallel plate and two cylindrical chambers in megavoltage electron beams using Monte Carlo simulations. The positioning of the chambers with this EPOM at the depth of measurement results in a largely depth independent residual perturbation correction, which is determined within this study for the first time. For the parallel plate chambers the EPOM is independent of the energy of the primary electrons. Whereas for the Advanced Markus chamber the position of the EPOM coincides with the chambers reference point, it is shifted for the other parallel plate chambers several tenths of millimeters downstream the beam direction into the air filled cavity. For the cylindrical chambers there is an increasing shift of the EPOM with increasing electron energy. This shift is in upstream direction, i.e. away from the chambers reference point toward the focus. For the highest electron energy the position of the calculated EPOM is in fairly good agreement with the recommendation given in common dosimetry protocols, for the smallest energy, the calculated EPOM positions deviate about 30% from this recommendation. (orig.)

  9. Reference factor F{sub (CT)Q} and X ray tube ionization yield R{sub (TUBE)Q}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quaresma, D.S. [Observatorio Nacional, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Cardoso, R.S.; Peixoto, J.G.P., E-mail: dansq@on.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The operational facility procedures in diagnostic radiology standardization and calibration, through the relation between the X ray tube current and the ionization chamber current in a radiation quality Q, shown the reference factor F{sub (CT)Q} as the reality estimate to the X ray tube ionization yield, R{sub (TUBE)Q} . (author)

  10. Development of ionization technique for measurement of fast neutron induced fission products yields of {sup 237}Np

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goverdovski, A.A.; Khryachkov, V.A.; Ketlerov, V.V.; Mitrofanov, V.F.; Ostapenko, Yu.B.; Semenova, N.N.; Fomichev, A.N.; Rodina, L.F. [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering, Obninsk (Russian Federation)

    1997-03-01

    Twin gridded ionization chamber and corresponding software was designed for measurements of masses, kinetic energies and nuclear charges of fission fragments from fast neutron induced fission of {sup 237}Np. The ionization detector design, electronics, data acquisition and processing system and the test results are presented in this paper. (J.P.N.)

  11. Fuel cell with ionization membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, Frank T. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A fuel cell is disclosed comprising an ionization membrane having at least one area through which gas is passed, and which ionizes the gas passing therethrough, and a cathode for receiving the ions generated by the ionization membrane. The ionization membrane may include one or more openings in the membrane with electrodes that are located closer than a mean free path of molecules within the gas to be ionized. Methods of manufacture are also provided.

  12. The Big European Bubble Chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    The 3.70 metre Big European Bubble Chamber (BEBC), dismantled on 9 August 1984. During operation it was one of the biggest detectors in the world, producing direct visual recordings of particle tracks. 6.3 million photos of interactions were taken with the chamber in the course of its existence.

  13. Characterization of a Reverberation Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    applied to the same device inside another facility, such as a gigahertz transverse electromagnetic (GTEM) or fully- anechoic chamber for further...and found to be consistent; reflections measured from inside the chamber yielded heavy spiking. The antenna used to transmit power into the room was

  14. Study of an extrapolation chamber in a standard diagnostic radiology beam by Monte Carlo simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vedovato, Uly Pita; Silva, Rayre Janaina Vieira; Neves, Lucio Pereira; Santos, William S.; Perini, Ana Paula, E-mail: anapaula.perini@ufu.br [Universidade Federal de Uberlandia (INFIS/UFU), MG (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica; Caldas, Linda V.E. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Belinato, Walmir [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia da Bahia (IFBA), Vitoria da Conquista, BA (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we studied the influence of the components of an extrapolation ionization chamber in its response. This study was undertaken using the MCNP-5 Monte Carlo code, and the standard diagnostic radiology quality for direct beams (RQR5). Using tally F6 and 2.1 x 10{sup 9} simulated histories, the results showed that the chamber design and material not alter significantly the energy deposited in its sensitive volume. The collecting electrode and support board were the components with more influence on the chamber response. (author)

  15. Detection systems for high energy particle producing gaseous ionization; Sistemas de deteccion de particulas de alta energia mediante ionizacion gaseosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, L.; Duran, I.

    1985-07-01

    This report contains a review on the most used detectors based on the collection of the ionization produced by high energy particles: proportional counters, multiwire proportional chambers, Geiger-Muller counters and drift chambers. In six sections, the fundamental principles, the field configuration and useful gas mixtures, are discussed, most relevant devices are reported along 90 pages with 98 references. (Author) 98 refs.

  16. National Ignition Facility Target Chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wavrik, R W; Cox, J R; Fleming, P J

    2000-10-05

    On June 11, 1999 the Department of Energy dedicated the single largest piece of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, California. The ten (10) meter diameter aluminum target high vacuum chamber will serve as the working end of the largest laser in the world. The output of 192 laser beams will converge at the precise center of the chamber. The laser beams will enter the chamber in two by two arrays to illuminate 10 millimeter long gold cylinders called hohlraums enclosing 2 millimeter capsule containing deuterium, tritium and isotopes of hydrogen. The two isotopes will fuse, thereby creating temperatures and pressures resembling those found only inside stars and in detonated nuclear weapons, but on a minute scale. The NIF Project will serve as an essential facility to insure safety and reliability of our nation's nuclear arsenal as well as demonstrating inertial fusion's contribution to creating electrical power. The paper will discuss the requirements that had to be addressed during the design, fabrication and testing of the target chamber. A team from Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and LLNL with input from industry performed the configuration and basic design of the target chamber. The method of fabrication and construction of the aluminum target chamber was devised by Pitt-Des Moines, Inc. (PDM). PDM also participated in the design of the chamber in areas such as the Target Chamber Realignment and Adjustment System, which would allow realignment of the sphere laser beams in the event of earth settlement or movement from a seismic event. During the fabrication of the target chamber the sphericity tolerances had to be addressed for the individual plates. Procedures were developed for forming, edge preparation and welding of individual plates. Construction plans were developed to allow the field construction of the target chamber to occur parallel to other NIF construction activities. This

  17. The CLEO III drift chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Peterson, D; Briere, R A; Chen, G; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Csorna, S; Dickson, M; Dombrowski, S V; Ecklund, K M; Lyon, A; Marka, S; Meyer, T O; Patterson, J R; Sadoff, A; Thies, P; Thorndike, E H; Urner, D

    2002-01-01

    The CLEO group at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring has constructed and commissioned a new central drift chamber. With 9796 cells arranged in 47 layers ranging in radius from 13.2 to 79 cm, the new drift chamber has a smaller outer radius and fewer wires than the drift chamber it replaces, but allows the CLEO tracking system to have improved momentum resolution. Reduced scattering material in the chamber gas and in the inner skin separating the drift chamber from the silicon vertex detector provides a reduction of the multiple scattering component of the momentum resolution and an extension of the usable measurement length into the silicon. Momentum resolution is further improved through quality control in wire positioning and symmetry of the electric fields in the drift cells which have provided a reduction in the spatial resolution to 88 mu m (averaged over the full drift range).

  18. Ambient ionization mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedev, A. T.

    2015-07-01

    Ambient ionization mass spectrometry emerged as a new scientific discipline only about ten years ago. A considerable body of information has been reported since that time. Keeping the sensitivity, performance and informativity of classical mass spectrometry methods, the new approach made it possible to eliminate laborious sample preparation procedures and triggered the development of miniaturized instruments to work directly in the field. The review concerns the theoretical foundations and design of ambient ionization methods. Their advantages and drawbacks, as well as prospects for application in chemistry, biology, medicine, environmetal analysis, etc., are discussed. The bibliography includes 194 references.

  19. Purging device for suppression chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshino, Koichi.

    1987-11-14

    Purpose: To completely drive out air or the like in the suppression chamber in a short period of time thereby protect bent pipes from embrittled rupture. Constitution: Nitrogen gases, etc. entering through the inlet penetration to the inside of a reactor container are guided downwardly through communication pipeways, and the released downwardly in a stable manner while the blowing speed being retained by blowing mechanisms. Released nitrogen gases, etc. diffuse along the water surface of the suppression chamber and fill the inside of the chamber from below. Air, etc. in the suppression chamber prior to the supply of nitrogen gas, etc. is discharged through the exit penetration from the purging discharge pipe smoothly to the outside. In this way, air is replaced with nitrogen gas, etc., the released nitrogen is not directly blown to bent pipe, the operation is simplified, and the charge/discharge operation can be made in a short time efficiently. (Kamimura, M.).

  20. Vaporization chambers and associated methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Terry D.; Wilding, Bruce M.; McKellar, Michael G.; Shunn, Lee P.

    2017-02-21

    A vaporization chamber may include at least one conduit and a shell. The at least one conduit may have an inlet at a first end, an outlet at a second end and a flow path therebetween. The shell may surround a portion of each conduit and define a chamber surrounding the portion of each conduit. Additionally, a plurality of discrete apertures may be positioned at longitudinal intervals in a wall of each conduit, each discrete aperture of the plurality of discrete apertures sized and configured to direct a jet of fluid into each conduit from the chamber. A liquid may be vaporized by directing a first fluid comprising a liquid into the inlet at the first end of each conduit, directing jets of a second fluid into each conduit from the chamber through discrete apertures in a wall of each conduit and transferring heat from the second fluid to the first fluid.

  1. The multigap resistive plate chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeballos, E. Cerron [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); World Lab., Lausanne (Switzerland); Crotty, I. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Hatzifotiadou, D. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); World Lab., Lausanne (Switzerland); Valverde, J. Lamas [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); World Lab., Lausanne (Switzerland); Univ. Louis Pasteur, Strasbourg (France); Neupane, S. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); World Lab., Lausanne (Switzerland); Williams, M. C. S. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Zichichi, A. [Univ. of Bologna, Bologna (Italy)

    2015-02-03

    The paper describes the multigap resistive plate chamber (RPC). This is a variant of the wide gap RPC. However it has much improved time resolution, while keeping all the other advantages of the wide gap RPC design.

  2. Corona discharge induced snow formation in a cloud chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Jingjing; Wang, Tie-Jun; Li, Ruxin; Du, Shengzhe; Sun, Haiyi; Liu, Yonghong; Tian, Ye; Bai, Yafeng; Liu, Yaoxiang; Chen, Na; Wang, Jingwei; Wang, Cheng; Liu, Jiansheng; Chin, S L; Xu, Zhizhan

    2017-09-18

    Artificial rainmaking is in strong demand especially in arid regions. Traditional methods of seeding various Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN) into the clouds are costly and not environment friendly. Possible solutions based on ionization were proposed more than 100 years ago but there is still a lack of convincing verification or evidence. In this report, we demonstrated for the first time the condensation and precipitation (or snowfall) induced by a corona discharge inside a cloud chamber. Ionic wind was found to have played a more significant role than ions as extra CCN. In comparison with another newly emerging femtosecond laser filamentation ionization method, the snow precipitation induced by the corona discharge has about 4 orders of magnitude higher wall-plug efficiency under similar conditions.

  3. BEBC Big European Bubble Chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1974-01-01

    A view of the dismantling of the magnet of BEBC, the 3.7 m European Bubble Chamber : iron magnetic shielding ; lower and upper parts of the vacuum enclosure of the magnet; turbo-molecular vacuum pumps for the "fish-eye" windows; the two superconducting coils; a handling platform; the two cryostats suspended from the bar of the travelling crane which has a 170 ton carrying capacity. The chamber proper, not dismantled, is inside the shielding.

  4. Detecting special nuclear material using a neutron time projection chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carosi, G.; Bernstein, A.; Bowden, N.; Burke, J.; Carter, D.; Foxe, M.; Heffner, M.; Jovanovic, I.; Mintz, J.; O'Malley, P.

    2010-02-01

    Time projection chambers are 3-dimensional charged particle cameras based on drifting ionization tracks at a known velocity onto an electronic readout plane. These instruments are capable of detecting fast neutrons which are unique signatures of special nuclear material with low natural background rates. Here we describe a neutron Time Projection Chamber (nTPC) developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) which has demonstrated directional sensitivity to fission neutrons along with high rejection of background gamma-ray and electron events. Using a combination hydrogen/methane drift gas at several atmospheres we've demonstrated the ability to point to a Cf-252 source simulating 6kg of weapons grade plutonium at 10's of meters with one hour integration time. Plans for future field deployable devices will also be outlined. )

  5. Anterior chamber depth during hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gracitelli CPB

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Carolina Pelegrini Barbosa Gracitelli,1 Francisco Rosa Stefanini,1 Fernando Penha,1 Miguel Ângelo Góes,2 Sérgio Antonio Draibe,2 Maria Eugênia Canziani,2 Augusto Paranhos Junior1 1Ophthalmology Department, 2Division of Nephrology, Federal University of São Paulo – UNIFESP, São Paulo, Brazil Background: Exacerbation of chronic glaucoma or acute glaucoma is occasionally observed in patients undergoing hemodialysis (HD because of anterior chamber depth changes during this therapy. Purpose: To evaluate anterior chamber depth and axial length in patients during HD sessions. Methods: A total of 67 eyes of 35 patients were prospectively enrolled. Axial length and anterior chamber depth were measured using ultrasonic biometry, and these measures were evaluated at three different times during HD sessions. Body weight and blood pressure pre- and post-HD were also measured. Results: There was no difference in the axial length between the three measurements (P = 0.241. We observed a significantly decreased anterior chamber depth (P = 0.002 during HD sessions. Conclusion: Our results support the idea that there is a change in anterior chamber depth in HD sessions. Keywords: anterior chamber, hemodialysis, axial length, acute angle-closure glaucoma

  6. Web-Based Cathode Strip Chamber Data Display

    CERN Multimedia

    Firmansyah, M

    2013-01-01

    Cathode Strip Chamber (CSC) is a detector that uses gas and high electric field to detect particles. When a particle goes through CSC, it will ionize gas particles and generate electric signal in the anode and cathode of the detector. Analysis of the electric signal data can help physicists to reconstruct path of the particles and determine what happen inside the detector. Using data display, analysis of CSC data becomes easier. One can determine which data is interesting, unusual, or maybe only contain noise.\

  7. The spatial resolution of the time projection chamber at triumf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargrove, C. K.; Mes, H.; Bennett, A.; Bryman, D. A.; Hasinoff, M.; Macdonald, J. A.; Poutissou, J. M.; Numao, T.; Spuller, J.; Azuelos, G.; Poutissou, R.; Blecher, M.; Gotow, K.; Carter, A. L.

    1984-02-01

    The spatial resolution of the time projection chamber at TRIUMF has been investigated. The best resolution, σ ⋍ 200 μ m, occurs at the minimum drift length and for an optimum track to anode crossing angle determined by the magnetic field. The resolution worsens for tracks crossing at larger or smaller angles and for longer drift lengths. The observed resolution is quantitatively reproduced by considering the diffusion of the drifting electrons, the track to anode crossing angle, E × B effects near the anode wire and the discrete nature of the ionization process.

  8. Spatial resolutions of the time projection chamber at TRIUMF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hargrove, C.K.; Mes, H.; Bennett, A.; Bryman, D.A.; Hasinoff, M.; Macdonald, J.A.; Poutissou, J.M.; Numao, T.; Spuller, J.; Azuelos, G.

    1984-02-01

    The spatial resolution of the time projection chamber at TRIUMF has been investigated. The best resolution, sigmaapprox.=200 ..mu..m, occurs at the minimum drift length and for an optimum track to anode crossing angle determined by the magnetic field. The resolution worsens for tracks crossing at larger or smaller angles and for longer drift lengths. The observed resolution is quantitatively reproduced by considering the diffusion of the drifting electrons, the track to anode crossing angle, ExB effects near the anode wire and the discrete nature of the ionization process.

  9. Multiparameter gas scintillation and ionization counter for heavy-ion detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manduchi, C.; Russo-Manduchi, M.T.; Segato, G.F. (Padua Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Fisica; Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Padua (Italy))

    1982-10-15

    A heavy-ion detector system is described for investigations on the nuclear fission process. It consists of two gridded, split anode ionization chambers for simultaneous, correlated measurements of various parameters of complementary fragments such as energy and angular distribution. Energy loss signals are used to discriminate the fission fragments from light elements. Timing adequate for fast coincidence (resolution <= 500 ps) is achieved by utilizing the chamber gas as a scintillation gas.

  10. Emulsion Chamber Technology Experiment (ECT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, John C.; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki

    1996-01-01

    The experimental objective of Emulsion Chamber Technology (ECT) was to develop space-borne emulsion chamber technology so that cosmic rays and nuclear interactions may subsequently be studied at extremely high energies with long exposures in space. A small emulsion chamber was built and flown on flight STS-62 of the Columbia in March 1994. Analysis of the several hundred layers of radiation-sensitive material has shown excellent post-flight condition and suitability for cosmic ray physics analysis at much longer exposures. Temperature control of the stack was 20 +/-1 C throughout the active control period and no significant deviations of temperature or pressure in the chamber were observed over the entire mission operations period. The unfortunate flight attitude of the orbiter (almost 90% Earth viewing) prevented any significant number of heavy particles (Z greater than or equal to 10) reaching the stack and the inverted flow of shower particles in the calorimeter has not allowed evaluation of absolute primary cosmic ray-detection efficiency nor of the practical time limits of useful exposure of these calorimeters in space to the level of detail originally planned. Nevertheless, analysis of the observed backgrounds and quality of the processed photographic and plastic materials after the flight show that productive exposures of emulsion chambers are feasible in low orbit for periods of up to one year or longer. The engineering approaches taken in the ECT program were proven effective and no major environmental obstacles to prolonged flight are evident.

  11. Plasma chemistry in wire chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wise, J.

    1990-05-01

    The phenomenology of wire chamber aging is discussed and fundamentals of proportional counters are presented. Free-radical polymerization and plasma polymerization are discussed. The chemistry of wire aging is reviewed. Similarities between wire chamber plasma (>1 atm dc-discharge) and low-pressure rf-discharge plasmas, which have been more widely studied, are suggested. Construction and use of a system to allow study of the plasma reactions occurring in wire chambers is reported. A proportional tube irradiated by an {sup 55}Fe source is used as a model wire chamber. Condensable species in the proportional tube effluent are concentrated in a cryotrap and analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Several different wire chamber gases (methane, argon/methane, ethane, argon/ethane, propane, argon/isobutane) are tested and their reaction products qualitatively identified. For all gases tested except those containing methane, use of hygroscopic filters to remove trace water and oxygen contaminants from the gas resulted in an increase in the average molecular weight of the products, consistent with results from low-pressure rf-discharge plasmas. It is suggested that because water and oxygen inhibit polymer growth in the gas phase that they may also reduce polymer deposition in proportional tubes and therefore retard wire aging processes. Mechanistic implications of the plasma reactions of hydrocarbons with oxygen are suggested. Unresolved issues in this work and proposals for further study are discussed.

  12. Performance of large area Micro Pixel Chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Nagayoshi, T; Miuchi, K; Ochi, A; Orito, R; Takada, A; Tanimori, T; Ueno, M

    2003-01-01

    A novel gaseous two-dimensional imaging detector "Micro Pixel Chamber (micro-PIC)" has been developed. This detector is based on double sided printed circuit board (PCB). We have developed large area (10cm x 10cm) micro-PICs with 65536 pixel anodes of 400um pitch on a 100um thick insulating substrate. Achieved energy resolution was 30% (FWHM) at 5.9keV, and a gas gain of 7000 was obtained with argon ethane (8:2) gas mixture. This gain is high enough to detect minimum ionizing particles with such a small electrode pitch. Although several discharges occurred during 65 hours continuous operation, the detectors have kept stable operation with high gain. The micro-PIC is a useful detector for many applications e.g. X-ray, gamma ray, and charged particle imaging. The micro electrode structure allows us to measure directions of primary electrons due to incident X-rays or gamma rays, which provide a strong method for X-ray polarimetry and gamma-ray imaging.

  13. "Flat-Fish" Vacuum Chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1978-01-01

    The picture shows a "Flat-Fish" vacuum chamber being prepared in the ISR workshop for testing prior to installation in the Split Field Magnet (SFM) at intersection I4. The two shells of each part were hydroformed from 0.15 mm thick inconel 718 sheet (with end parts in inconel 600 for easier manual welding to the arms) and welded toghether with two strips which were attached by means of thin stainless steel sheets to the Split Field Magnet poles in order to take the vertical component of the atmospheric pressure force. This was the thinnest vacuum chamber ever made for the ISR. Inconel material was chosen for its high elastic modulus and strenght at chamber bake-out temperature. In this picture the thin sheets transferring the vertical component of the atmosferic pressure force are attached to a support frame for testing. See also 7712182, 7712179.

  14. Proportional chambers of the barrel hadron calorimeter of the L3 experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arefiev, A.; Azemoon, T.; Bachmann, U.; Ball, R.C.; Boehlen, W.E.; Capell, M.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.S.; Chumakov, M.; Galaktionov, Yu.

    1989-02-01

    The design and the mass production of the proportional wire chambers for the barrel part of the uranium-gas sampling hadron calorimeter of the L3 detector at the CERN Large Electron-Positron storage ring (LEP) are described. The chambers meet the specific requirements arising from the limited space available to the calorimeter, the radioactivity of uranium, and the physics criteria of good energy and position resolution for incident hadrons. The mass production techniques employed ensured that all of the 371664 chamber cells have uniform response (with 5% accuracy) to ionizing particles. Over 8000 chambers of the same design, in 53 different sizes, were manufactured and tested at the ITEP (Moscow), at the University of Michigan (Ann Arbor) and at the IHEP (Beijing).

  15. [Development of a membrane inlet-single photon ionization/chemical ionization-mass spectrometer for online analysis of VOCs in water].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Lei; Wu, Qing-Hao; Hou, Ke-Yong; Cui, Hua-Peng; Chen, Ping; Zhao, Wu-Duo; Xie, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Hai-Yang

    2011-12-01

    A home-made membrane inlet- single photon ionization/chemical ionization- time-of-flight mass spectrometer has been described. A vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) lamp with photon energy of 10.6 eV was used as the light source for single photon ionization (SPI). Chemical ionization (CI) was achieved through ion-molecule reactions with O2- reactant ions generated by photoelectron ionization. The two ionization modes could be rapidly switched by adjusting electric field in the ionization region within 2 s. Membrane inlet system used for rapid enrichment of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in water was constructed by using a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membrane with a thickness of 50 microm. A purge gas was added to accelerate desorption of analytes from the membrane surface. The purge gas could also help to prevent the pump oil back-streaming into the ionization region from the analyzer chamber and improve the signal to noise ratio (S/N). Achieved detection limits were 2 microg x L(-1) for methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) in SPI mode and 1 microg x L(-1) for chloroform in SPI-CI mode within 10 s analysis time, respectively. The instrument has been successfully applied to the rapid analysis of MTBE in simulated underground water nearby petrol station and VOCs in disinfected drinking water. The results indicate that the instrument has a great application prospect for online analysis of VOCs in water.

  16. Ionization efficiency studies for xenon ions with thesuperconducting ECR ion source VENUS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leitner, Daniela; Lyneis, Claude M.; Todd, DamonS.; Tarvainen,Olli

    2007-06-05

    Ionization efficiency studies for high charge state xenon ions using a calibrated gas leak are presented. A 75% enriched {sup 129}Xe gas leak with a gas flow equivalent to 5.11p{mu}A was used in all the measurements. The experiments were performed at the VENUS (Versatile ECR ion source for Nuclear Science) ion source for 18 GHz, 28 GHz and double frequency operation. Overall, total ionization efficiencies close to 100% and ionization efficiencies into a single charge state up to 22% were measured. The influence of the biased disk on the ionization efficiency was studied and the results were somewhat surprising. When the biased disk was removed from the plasma chamber, the ionization efficiency was dramatically reduced for single frequency operation. However, using double frequency heating the ionization efficiencies achieved without the biased disk almost matched the ionization efficiencies achieved with the biased probe. In addition, we have studied the influence of the support gas on the charge state distribution of the xenon ions. Either pure oxygen or a mixture of oxygen and helium were used as support gases. The addition of a small amount of helium can increase the ionization efficiency into a single charge state by narrowing the charge state distribution. Furthermore by varying the helium flow the most efficient charge state can be shifted over a wide range without compromising the ionization efficiency. This is not possible using only oxygen as support gas. Results from these studies are presented and discussed.

  17. Ionization cross section of partially ionized hydrogen plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baimbetov, F B; Kudyshev, Z A [Department of Physics, al - Farabi Kazakh National University, Almaty (Kazakhstan)], E-mail: Bfb77@kazsu.kz, E-mail: Z.Kudyshev@mail.ru

    2008-05-01

    In present work the electron impact ionization cross section is considered. The electron impact ionization cross section is calculated, based on pseudopotential model of interaction between plasma particles which accounts correlation effects. It is calculated with help of two methods: classical and quantum - mechanical (Born approximation). The ionization cross section is compared with corresponding results of other authors and experimental data. It has been shown that it is very important to take into account an influence of the surrounding during consideration of ionization processes.

  18. A dual deformable reverberation chamber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leferink, Frank Bernardus Johannes

    2009-01-01

    There is disclosed an arrangement for measuring the effectiveness of a shielding material against electromagnetic fields. The arrangement comprises a first and a second reverberation chamber sharing a common wall. The common wall is partly made of the shielding material. A first antenna is arranged

  19. LEP vacuum chamber, early prototype

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1978-01-01

    The same vacuum chamber as in 7810256, read the detailed description there. Here, the 4 strip-shaped ion-getter pumps are poised at the entrance to their slots. Ion-getter pumps were not retained, thermal getter pumps were chosen instead (see 8301153 and 8305170).

  20. Bubble chamber: colour enhanced tracks

    CERN Multimedia

    1998-01-01

    This artistically-enhanced image of real particle tracks was produced in the Big European Bubble Chamber (BEBC). Liquid hydrogen is used to create bubbles along the paths of the particles as a piston expands the medium. A magnetic field is produced in the detector causing the particles to travel in spirals, allowing charge and momentum to be measured.

  1. Testing an hydrogen streamer chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1975-01-01

    A 2x10 cm gap streamer chamber, 35x55 cm2 in surface, was built and tested at CERN. Good tracks of cosmic rays were obtained up to atmospheric pressure, see F. Rohrbach et al, CERN-LAL (Orsay) Collaboration, Nucl. Instr. Methods 141 (1977) 229. Michel Cathenoz stand on the center.

  2. DELPHI's Ring Imaging Cherenkov Chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1989-01-01

    The hundreds of mirrors around this Ring Imaging Cherenkov Chamber reflect cones of light created by fast moving particles to a detector. The velocity of a particle can be measured by the size of the ring produced on the detector. DELPHI, which ran from 1989 to 2000 on the LEP accelerator, was primarily concerned with particle identification.

  3. Plasma production via field ionization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. L. O’Connell

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Plasma production via field ionization occurs when an incoming particle beam is sufficiently dense that the electric field associated with the beam ionizes a neutral vapor or gas. Experiments conducted at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center explore the threshold conditions necessary to induce field ionization by an electron beam in a neutral lithium vapor. By independently varying the transverse beam size, number of electrons per bunch, or bunch length, the radial component of the electric field is controlled to be above or below the threshold for field ionization. Additional experiments ionized neutral xenon and neutral nitric oxide by varying the incoming beam’s bunch length. A self-ionized plasma is an essential step for the viability of plasma-based accelerators for future high-energy experiments.

  4. Metal explosion chambers: designing, manufacturing, application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoyanovskii, O. I.; Zlobin, B. S.; Shtertser, A. A.; Meshcheryakov, Y. P.

    2017-10-01

    Designing of explosion chambers is based on research investigations of the chamber body stress-strain state, which is determined by numerical computation and experimentally by the strain gage technique. Studies show that chamber bottoms are the most loaded elements, and maximal stresses arise in chamber poles. Increasing the shell thickness around poles by welding-in an insert is a simple and saving way to solve this problem. There are structural solutions, enabling reliable hermetic closure and preventing leakage of detonation products from the chamber. Explosion chambers are employed in scientific research and in different industrial applications: explosive welding and hardening, synthesis of new materials, disposal of expired ammunition, and etc.

  5. Growing and Analyzing Biofilms in Flow Chambers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Sternberg, Claus

    2011-01-01

    This unit describes the setup of flow chamber systems for the study of microbial biofilms, and methods for the analysis of structural biofilm formation. Use of flow chambers allows direct microscopic investigation of biofilm formation. The biofilms in flow chambers develop under hydrodynamic...... conditions, and the environment can be carefully controlled and easily changed. The protocols in this unit include construction of the flow chamber and the bubble trap, assembly and sterilization of the flow chamber system, inoculation of the flow chambers, running of the system, image capture and analysis...

  6. LEP vacuum chamber, early prototype

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1978-01-01

    The structure of LEP, with long bending magnets and little access to the vacuum chamber between them, required distributed pumping. This is an early prototype for the LEP vacuum chamber, made from extruded aluminium. The main opening is for the beam. The small channel to the right is for cooling water, to carry away the heat deposited by the synchroton radiation from the beam. The 4 slots in the channel to the left house the strip-shaped ion-getter pumps (see 7810255). The ion-getter pumps depended on the magnetic field of the bending magnets, too low at injection energy for the pumps to function well. Also, a different design was required outside the bending magnets. This design was therefore abandoned, in favour of a thermal getter pump (see 8301153 and 8305170).

  7. Development of multiwire proportional chambers

    CERN Multimedia

    Charpak, G

    1969-01-01

    It has happened quite often in the history of science that theoreticians, confronted with some major difficulty, have successfully gone back thirty years to look at ideas that had then been thrown overboard. But it is rare that experimentalists go back thirty years to look again at equipment which had become out-dated. This is what Charpak and his colleagues did to emerge with the 'multiwire proportional chamber' which has several new features making it a very useful addition to the armoury of particle detectors. In the 1930s, ion-chambers, Geiger- Muller counters and proportional counters, were vital pieces of equipment in nuclear physics research. Other types of detectors have since largely replaced them but now the proportional counter, in new array, is making a comeback.

  8. Applications of ionizing radiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-07-01

    Developments in standard applications and brand new nuclear technologies, with high impact on the future of the agriculture, medicine, industry and the environmental preservation. The Radiation Technology Center (CTR) mission is to apply the radiation and radioisotope technologies in Industry, Health, Agriculture, and Environmental Protection, expanding the scientific knowledge, improving human power resources, transferring technology, generating products and offering services for the Brazilian society. The CTR main R and D activities are in consonance with the IPEN Director Plan (2011-2013) and the Applications of Ionizing Radiation Program, with four subprograms: Irradiation of Food and Agricultural Products; Radiation and Radioisotopes Applications in Industry and Environment; Radioactive Sources and Radiation Applications in Human Health; and Radioactive Facilities and Equipment for the Applications of Nuclear Techniques.

  9. GBO RF Anechoic Chamber & Antenna Test Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — A shielded anechoic chamber measuring 15 by 15 by 37 feet is located in the Jansky Laboratory at Green Bank. This chamber has been outfitted as a far-field antenna...

  10. Pulse height distribution of signals produced by exposing a thin GEM chamber to beta rays from an Sr-90 source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, B. J.; Ha, Y. J.; Hahn, C. H. [Changwon National University, Changwon (Korea, Republic of); Park, S. T. [University of Texas at Arlington, Texas (United States); Yi, C. Y. [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, R. [Ewha Womans University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Researchers at Changwon National University's Radiation Detector Development Laboratory(RDD) fabricated a single-channel double-GEM (gas electron multiplier) chamber and measured the pulse height distribution of signals produced by exposing the chamber to an Sr-90 source provided by the Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science(KRISS). A beta-ray electron incident on the GEM chamber ionizes gaseous molecules in the drift region of the chamber by means of electromagnetic interactions. After the leased electrons are amplified by electron avalanches in the GEM stages, the multiplied electrons go from the lowest GEM foil toward the anode of the chamber and induce one signal pulse, corresponding to the incident electron, on the readout pad. The charge signal distribution measured during Sr-90 radioactive source irradiation was compared with the simulation done by using a Landau probability distribution. The energy loss distribution of beta-ray electrons, which deposited part of their energy in a thin GEM chamber while traversing gases within the drift region of that chamber, was in good agreement with the calculation of the Landau probability distribution. The pulse height distributions for energy losses of beta-ray electrons incident on the chamber due to Sr-90 disintegrations were observed in order to select a suitable gas mixture for the chamber. The ratios of the Ar/CO{sub 2} gas were 75/25, 80/20, 85/15, and 90/10.

  11. Design of a Fully Anechoic Chamber

    OpenAIRE

    Rusz, Roman

    2015-01-01

    This thesis deals with fully anechoic chamber design. The main aim of this thesis is to design fully anechoic chamber according to acoustics laws and customers (Honeywell’s) requirements. The fully anechoic chamber will be used for measuring sound and vibration quantities. This work is divided into two main parts. The first part deals with the general anechoic chamber theory and all its related design aspects. The second part, practical part, focus on specific design according to requirements...

  12. Vacuum chamber at intersection I-6

    CERN Multimedia

    1971-01-01

    The vacuum chamber at intersection region I-6, one of these where experiments in colliding-beam physics will be taking place. The "wheels" prevent the thin wall (1.5 mm) of the chamber from collapsing. The chamber is equipped with heating tapes and its wrapped in thermal insulation. Residual gas pressure at this and other similar regions is around 10_11.

  13. Making a Fish Tank Cloud Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Frances

    2012-01-01

    The cloud chambers described here are large, made from readily available parts, simple to set up and always work. With no source in the chamber, background radiation can be observed. A large chamber means that a long rod containing a weakly radioactive material can be introduced, increasing the chance of seeing decays. Details of equipment and…

  14. A Sensitive Cloud Chamber without Radioactive Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeze, Syoji; Itoh, Akio; Oyama, Ayu; Takahashi, Haruka

    2012-01-01

    We present a sensitive diffusion cloud chamber which does not require any radioactive sources. A major difference from commonly used chambers is the use of a heat sink as its bottom plate. The result of a performance test of the chamber is given. (Contains 8 figures.)

  15. A mathematical model of aerosol holding chambers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zak, M; Madsen, J; Berg, E

    1999-01-01

    A mathematical model of aerosol delivery from holding chambers (spacers) was developed incorporating tidal volume (VT), chamber volume (Vch), apparatus dead space (VD), effect of valve insufficiency and other leaks, loss of aerosol by immediate impact on the chamber wall, and fallout of aerosol...

  16. Growing and analyzing biofilms in flow chambers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Sternberg, Claus

    2011-01-01

    This unit describes the setup of flow chamber systems for the study of microbial biofilms, and methods for the analysis of structural biofilm formation. Use of flow chambers allows direct microscopic investigation of biofilm formation. The biofilms in flow chambers develop under hydrodynamic cond...

  17. External Particle Identifier (EPI) for the Big European Bubble Chamber (BEBC)

    CERN Document Server

    Aderholz, M; Lehraus, Ivan; Matthewson, R; Tejessy, W

    1975-01-01

    A description of a multi-layer proportional counter system being built to identify fast charged secondary particles behind the 3.7 m bubble chamber is given in detail. The device consists of 128 layers, each with 32(6*6 cm/sup 2/) cells across. It will be able to distinguish pions and kaons up to 70 GeV/c by sampling the ionization in the region of the relativistic rise. (8 refs).

  18. Comments on GUT monopole energy loss and ionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagstrom, R.

    1982-01-01

    A few comments about the likely behavior of the electromagnetic energy loss and ionization rates of super-slowly moving magnetic monopoles are presented. The questions of energy loss rates and ionization rates for super-low monopoles passing through matter are considered, concentrating on aspects of these issues which affect practical detection techniques. It is worthwhile here to emphasize that there is a potentially great distinction between energy loss rates and ionization rates and that the magnitude of this distinction is really the great issue which must be settled in order to understand the significance of experimental results from present and proposed investigations of the slow monopole question. Energy loss here means the total dE/dX of the projectile due to interactions with the electrons of the slowing medium. To the extent that nuclear collisions can be neglected, this so-called electronic energy loss is the relevant quantity in questions about whether monopoles stop within the earth's crust, whether they are slowed by interstellar plasmas, or the signal in a truly calorimetric measurement (measuring temperature rises along the trajectory), etc. Most of our successful detection techniques depend upon the promotion of ground state electrons into states which lie above some energy gap in the material of the detector: electrons must be knocked completely free from the gas atoms in a proportional chamber gas, electrons must be promoted to a higher band in solid scintillator plastics. These processes are generically identified as ionization. (WHK)

  19. Chamber B Thermal/Vacuum Chamber: User Test Planning Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montz, Mike E.

    2012-01-01

    Test process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of Chamber B. The User Test Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non-NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their test engineering personnel in test planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the test process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, test article interfaces, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

  20. A mathematical model of aerosol holding chambers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zak, M; Madsen, J; Berg, E

    1999-01-01

    A mathematical model of aerosol delivery from holding chambers (spacers) was developed incorporating tidal volume (VT), chamber volume (Vch), apparatus dead space (VD), effect of valve insufficiency and other leaks, loss of aerosol by immediate impact on the chamber wall, and fallout of aerosol...... in the chamber with time. Four different spacers were connected via filters to a mechanical lung model, and aerosol delivery during "breathing" was determined from drug recovery from the filters. The formula correctly predicted the delivery of budesonide aerosol from the AeroChamber (Trudell Medical, London...

  1. Ionization Mechanism of Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, I.-Chung; Lee, Chuping; Lee, Yuan-Tseh; Ni, Chi-Kung

    2015-07-01

    In past studies, mistakes in determining the ionization mechanism in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) were made because an inappropriate ion-to-neutral ratio was used. The ion-to-neutral ratio of the analyte differs substantially from that of the matrix in MALDI. However, these ratios were not carefully distinguished in previous studies. We begin by describing the properties of ion-to-neutral ratios and reviews early experimental measurements. A discussion of the errors committed in previous theoretical studies and a comparison of recent experimental measurements follow. We then describe a thermal proton transfer model and demonstrate how the model appropriately describes ion-to-neutral ratios and the total ion intensity. Arguments raised to challenge thermal ionization are then discussed. We demonstrate how none of the arguments are valid before concluding that thermal proton transfer must play a crucial role in the ionization process of MALDI.

  2. Solenoidal ionization cooling lattices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. C. Fernow

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available We explore a practical approach for designing ionization cooling channels with periodic solenoidal focusing. We examine the lattice characteristics in terms of the properties of the coils and the cell geometry. The peak magnetic field in the coils is an important engineering constraint in lattice design. We examine the dependence of the peak field, momentum passband locations, and the beta function on the coil parameters. We make a systematic examination of all allowed lattice configurations taking into account the symmetry properties of the current densities and the beta function. We introduce a unique classification for comparing cooling lattice configurations. While solutions with a single coil per cell illustrate most of the effects that are important for cooling channel design, the introduction of additional coils allows more flexibility in selecting the lattice properties. We look at example solutions for the problem of the initial transverse cooling stage of a neutrino factory or muon collider and compare our results with the properties of some published cooling lattice designs. Scaling laws are used to compare solutions from different symmetry classes.

  3. Determination of the thermal and epithermal neutron sensitivities of an LBO chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Endo, Satoru; Kotani, Kei; Kajimoto, Tsuyoshi; Tanaka, Kenichi [Hiroshima University, Quantum Energy Applications, Graduate School of Engineering, Higashi-Hiroshima (Japan); Sato, Hitoshi; Nakajima, Erika [Ibaraki Prefectural University of Health Science, Radiological Sciences, Ibaraki (Japan); Shimazaki, Takuto [Hiroshima University, Quantum Energy Applications, Graduate School of Engineering, Higashi-Hiroshima (Japan); Delta Kogyo Co., Ltd., Hiroshima (Japan); Suda, Mitsuru; Hamano, Tsuyoshi [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba-Shi, Chiba (Japan); Hoshi, Masaharu [Hiroshima University, Institute for Peace Science, Hiroshima (Japan)

    2017-08-15

    An LBO (Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}) walled ionization chamber was designed to monitor the epithermal neutron fluence in boron neutron capture therapy clinical irradiation. The thermal and epithermal neutron sensitivities of the device were evaluated using accelerator neutrons from the {sup 9}Be(d, n) reaction at a deuteron energy of 4 MeV (4 MeV d-Be neutrons). The response of the chamber in terms of the electric charge induced in the LBO chamber was compared with the thermal and epithermal neutron fluences measured using the gold-foil activation method. The thermal and epithermal neutron sensitivities obtained were expressed in units of pC cm{sup 2}, i.e., from the chamber response divided by neutron fluence (cm{sup -2}). The measured LBO chamber sensitivities were 2.23 x 10{sup -7} ± 0.34 x 10{sup -7} (pC cm{sup 2}) for thermal neutrons and 2.00 x 10{sup -5} ± 0.12 x 10{sup -5} (pC cm{sup 2}) for epithermal neutrons. This shows that the LBO chamber is sufficiently sensitive to epithermal neutrons to be useful for epithermal neutron monitoring in BNCT irradiation. (orig.)

  4. Determination of the thermal and epithermal neutron sensitivities of an LBO chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Satoru; Sato, Hitoshi; Shimazaki, Takuto; Nakajima, Erika; Kotani, Kei; Suda, Mitsuru; Hamano, Tsuyoshi; Kajimoto, Tsuyoshi; Tanaka, Kenichi; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2017-08-01

    An LBO (Li2B4O7) walled ionization chamber was designed to monitor the epithermal neutron fluence in boron neutron capture therapy clinical irradiation. The thermal and epithermal neutron sensitivities of the device were evaluated using accelerator neutrons from the (9)Be(d, n) reaction at a deuteron energy of 4 MeV (4 MeV d-Be neutrons). The response of the chamber in terms of the electric charge induced in the LBO chamber was compared with the thermal and epithermal neutron fluences measured using the gold-foil activation method. The thermal and epithermal neutron sensitivities obtained were expressed in units of pC cm(2), i.e., from the chamber response divided by neutron fluence (cm(-2)). The measured LBO chamber sensitivities were 2.23 × 10(-7) ± 0.34 × 10(-7) (pC cm(2)) for thermal neutrons and 2.00 × 10(-5) ± 0.12 × 10(-5) (pC cm(2)) for epithermal neutrons. This shows that the LBO chamber is sufficiently sensitive to epithermal neutrons to be useful for epithermal neutron monitoring in BNCT irradiation.

  5. A silicon microstrip gas chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van der Marel, J. (Radiation Technology Group, Faculty of Applied Physics, Delft Univ. of Tech. (Netherlands)); Van den Bogaard, A. (Delft Inst. of Microelectronics and Submicrotechnology, Delft Univ. of Tech. (Netherlands)); Van Eijk, C.W.E. (Radiation Technology Group, Faculty of Applied Physics, Delft Univ. of Tech. (Netherlands)); Hollander, R.W. (Radiation Technology Group, Faculty of Applied Physics, Delft Univ. of Tech. (Netherlands)); Okx, W.J.C. (Radiation Technology Group, Faculty of Applied Physics, Delft Univ. of Tech. (Netherlands)); Sarro, P.M. (Delft Inst. of Microelectronics and Submicrotechnology, Delft Univ. of Tech. (Netherlands))

    1994-09-01

    We are manufacturing microstrip gas chambers (MSGC) on silicon with an insulating SiO[sub 2] layer. To study the effect of the sheet resistance of the SiO[sub 2] on the operation of the detector several processes to modify the SiO[sub 2] layer have been investigated: ion implantation, boron and phosphorus diffusion, phosphosilicate glass evaporation and polycrystalline silicon deposition. The dependence of the gas gain on the potentials of the different electrodes and the long term stability have been studied. ((orig.))

  6. Pupillary block glaucoma following implantation of a posterior chamber pseudophakos in the anterior chamber.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandal Anil

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Pupillary block glaucoma is a common complication of cataract surgery, especially following anterior chamber intraocular lens implantation. We report a case of pupillary block glaucoma with a posterior chamber IOL that was implanted in the anterior chamber following a complicated extracapsular cataract extraction. The case was successfully managed by explantation of the posterior chamber lens, anterior vitrectomy, peripheral iridectomy and secondary anterior chamber intraocular lens implantation. The intraocular pressure was controlled with a single topical antiglaucoma medication.

  7. Changes in deviation of absorbed dose to water among users by chamber calibration shift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayose, Tetsurou; Saitoh, Hidetoshi; Igari, Mitsunobu; Chang, Weishan; Hashimoto, Shimpei; Morioka, Mie

    2017-07-01

    The JSMP01 dosimetry protocol had adopted the provisional 60Co calibration coefficient [Formula: see text], namely, the product of exposure calibration coefficient N C and conversion coefficient k D,X. After that, the absorbed dose to water D w standard was established, and the JSMP12 protocol adopted the [Formula: see text] calibration. In this study, the influence of the calibration shift on the measurement of D w among users was analyzed. The intercomparison of the D w using an ionization chamber was annually performed by visiting related hospitals. Intercomparison results before and after the calibration shift were analyzed, the deviation of D w among users was re-evaluated, and the cause of deviation was estimated. As a result, the stability of LINAC, calibration of the thermometer and barometer, and collection method of ion recombination were confirmed. The statistical significance of standard deviation of D w was not observed, but that of difference of D w among users was observed between N C and [Formula: see text] calibration. Uncertainty due to chamber-to-chamber variation was reduced by the calibration shift, consequently reducing the uncertainty among users regarding D w. The result also pointed out uncertainty might be reduced by accurate and detailed instructions on the setup of an ionization chamber.

  8. Overview of the n3He Experiment and Target Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrea, Mark; n3He Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The n3He Experiment aims to measure the parity-violating asymmetry in the direction of proton emission relative to the initial neutron polarization direction in the reaction n-> +3 He -> T + p + 765 keV to a high precision. The size of the asymmetry is estimated to be in the range - 9 . 5 - 2 . 5 ×10-8 , and our goal statistical accuracy is 2 ×10-8 . The experiment ran at the Spallation Neutron Source with data taking completing at the end of 2015. The experiment used a Helium-3 ionization chamber as the combined target and detector. Data analysis is underway and is currently in an advanced stage

  9. Readout of TPC Tracking Chambers with GEMs and Pixel Chip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadyk, John; Kim, T.; Freytsis, M.; Button-Shafer, J.; Kadyk, J.; Vahsen, S.E.; Wenzel, W.A.

    2007-12-21

    Two layers of GEMs and the ATLAS Pixel Chip, FEI3, have been combined and tested as a prototype for Time Projection Chamber (TPC) readout at the International Linear Collider (ILC). The double-layer GEM system amplifies charge with gain sufficient to detect all track ionization. The suitability of three gas mixtures for this application was investigated, and gain measurements are presented. A large sample of cosmic ray tracks was reconstructed in 3D by using the simultaneous timing and 2D spatial information from the pixel chip. The chip provides pixel charge measurement as well as timing. These results demonstrate that a double GEM and pixel combination, with a suitably modified pixel ASIC, could meet the stringent readout requirements of the ILC.

  10. Limits to Drift Chamber Resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Riegler, Werner

    1998-01-01

    ATLAS (A Large Toroidal LHC Apparatus) will be a general-purpose experiment at the Large Hadron Collider that will be operational at CERN in the year 2004. The ATLAS muon spectrometer aims for a momentum resolution of 10% for a transverse momentum of pT=1TeV. The precision tracking devices in the muon system will be high pressure drift tubes (MDTs) with a single wire resolution of 1100 chambers covering an area of ≈ 2500m2. The high counting rates in the spectrometer as well as the aim for excellent spatial resolution and high efficiency put severe constraints on the MDT operating parameters. This work describes a detailed study of all the resolution limiting factors in the ATLAS environment. A ’full chain’ simulation of the MDT response to photons and charged particles as well as quantitative comparisons with measurements was performed. The good agreement between simulation and measurements resulted in a profound understanding of the drift chamber processes and the individual contributions to the spat...

  11. Physicist makes muon chamber sing

    CERN Document Server

    2007-01-01

    This Monitored Drift Tube detector, consisting of argon-CO2-filled aluminium tubes with a wire down the centre of each, will track muons in ATLAS; Tiecke used a single tube from one of these detectors to create the pipes in his organ. Particle physicists can make good musicians; but did you know particle detectors can make good music? That's what NIKHEF physicist Henk Tiecke learned when he used pipes cut from the ATLAS Monitored Drift Tube detector (MDT) to build his own working Dutch-style barrel organ in the autumn of 2005. 'I like to work with my hands,' said Tiecke, who worked as a senior physicist at NIKHEF, Amsterdam, on ZEUS until his retirement last summer. Tiecke had already constructed his barrel organ when he visited some colleagues in the ATLAS muon chambers production area at Nikhef in 2005. He noticed that the aluminium tubes they were using to build the chambers were about three centimetres in diameter-just the right size for a pipe in a barrel organ. 'The sound is not as nice as from wooden...

  12. Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Marsh, B

    2013-01-01

    The application of the technique of laser resonance ionization to the production of singly charged ions at radioactive ion beam facilities is discussed. The ability to combine high efficiency and element selectivity makes a resonance ionization laser ion source (RILIS) an important component of many radioactive ion beam facilities. At CERN, for example, the RILIS is the most commonly used ion source of the ISOLDE facility, with a yearly operating time of up to 3000 hours. For some isotopes the RILIS can also be used as a fast and sensitive laser spectroscopy tool, provided that the spectral resolution is sufficiently high to reveal the influence of nuclear structure on the atomic spectra. This enables the study of nuclear properties of isotopes with production rates even lower than one ion per second and, in some cases, enables isomer selective ionization. The solutions available for the implementation of resonance laser ionization at radioactive ion beam facilities are summarized. Aspects such as the laser r...

  13. Biomedical Sensors of Ionizing Radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Pani, S; Speller, R; Royle, G; Olivo, A

    2010-01-01

    Sensors Technology Series Editor-in-Chief's Preface vii Preface ix 1 Biomedical Sensors: Temperature Sensor ... G. Kim Prisk 4 Biomedical Sensors of Ionizing Radiation 129 Robert Speller, Alessandro Olivo, Silvia Pani, and Gary Royle 5 ...

  14. Physics of partially ionized plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Krishan, Vinod

    2016-01-01

    Plasma is one of the four fundamental states of matter; the other three being solid, liquid and gas. Several components, such as molecular clouds, diffuse interstellar gas, the solar atmosphere, the Earth's ionosphere and laboratory plasmas, including fusion plasmas, constitute the partially ionized plasmas. This book discusses different aspects of partially ionized plasmas including multi-fluid description, equilibrium and types of waves. The discussion goes on to cover the reionization phase of the universe, along with a brief description of high discharge plasmas, tokomak plasmas and laser plasmas. Various elastic and inelastic collisions amongst the three particle species are also presented. In addition, the author demonstrates the novelty of partially ionized plasmas using many examples; for instance, in partially ionized plasma the magnetic induction is subjected to the ambipolar diffusion and the Hall effect, as well as the usual resistive dissipation. Also included is an observation of kinematic dynam...

  15. Study of energy dependence of a extrapolation chamber in low energy X-rays beams; Estudo da dependencia energetica de uma camara de extrapolacao em feixes de raios-X de baixa energia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastos, Fernanda M.; Silva, Teogenes A. da, E-mail: fernanda_mbastos@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: silvata@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimeto da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    This work was with the main objective to study the energy dependence of extrapolation chamber in low energy X-rays to determine the value of the uncertainty associated with the variation of the incident radiation energy in the measures in which it is used. For studying the dependence of energy, were conducted comparative ionization current measurements between the extrapolation chamber and two ionization chambers: a chamber mammography, RC6M model, Radcal with energy dependence less than 5% and a 2575 model radioprotection chamber NE Technology; both chambers have very thin windows, allowing its application in low power beams. Measurements were made at four different depths of 1.0 to 4.0 mm extrapolation chamber, 1.0 mm interval, for each reference radiation. The study showed that there is a variable energy dependence on the volume of the extrapolation chamber. In other analysis, it is concluded that the energy dependence of extrapolation chamber becomes smaller when using the slope of the ionization current versus depth for the different radiation reference; this shows that the extrapolation technique, used for the absorbed dose calculation, reduces the uncertainty associated with the influence of the response variation with energy radiation.

  16. Transferring calibration coefficients from ionisation chambers used for diagnostic radiology to transmission chambers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshizumi, Maíra T; Caldas, Linda V E

    2012-07-01

    In this work, the response of a double volume transmission ionisation chamber, developed at the Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares, was compared to that of a commercial transmission chamber. Both ionisation chambers were tested in different X-ray beam qualities using secondary standard ionisation chambers as reference dosimeters. These standard ionisation chambers were a parallel-plate and a cylindrical ionisation chambers, used for diagnostic radiology and mammography beam qualities, respectively. The response of both transmission chambers was compared to that of the secondary standard chambers to obtain coefficients of equivalence. These coefficients allow the transmission chambers to be used as reference equipment. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Numerical studies of wall–plasma interactions and ionization phenomena in an ablative pulsed plasma thruster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Lei [Beijing Research Institute of Precise Mechatronic Controls, Beijing 100076 (China); School of Astronautics, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Zeng, Guangshang; Huang, Yuping [Beijing Research Institute of Precise Mechatronic Controls, Beijing 100076 (China); Tang, Haibin [School of Astronautics, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Liu, Xiangyang [School of Aerospace Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2016-07-15

    Wall–plasma interactions excited by ablation controlled arcs are very critical physical processes in pulsed plasma thrusters (PPTs). Their effects on the ionization processes of ablated vapor into discharge plasma directly determine PPT performances. To reveal the physics governing the ionization phenomena in PPT discharge, a modified model taking into account the pyrolysis effect of heated polytetrafluoroethylene propellant on the wall–plasma interactions was developed. The feasibility of the modified model was analyzed by creating a one-dimensional simulation of a rectangular ablative PPT. The wall–plasma interaction results based on this modified model were found to be more realistic than for the unmodified model; this reflects the dynamic changes of the inflow parameters during discharge in our model. Furthermore, the temporal and spatial variations of the different plasma species in the discharge chamber were numerically studied. The numerical studies showed that polytetrafluoroethylene plasma was mainly composed of monovalent ions; carbon and fluorine ions were concentrated in the upstream and downstream discharge chamber, respectively. The results based on this modified model were in good agreement with the experimental formation times of the various plasma species. A large number of short-lived and highly ionized carbon and fluorine species (divalent and trivalent ions) were created during initial discharge. These highly ionized species reached their peak density earlier than the singly ionized species.

  18. Tests of anechoic chamber for aeroacoustics investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palchikovskiy, V. V.; Bersenev, Yu. V.; Makashov, S. Yu.; Belyaev, I. V.; Korin, I. A.; Sorokin, E. V.; Khramtsov, I. V.; Kustov, O. Yu.

    2016-10-01

    The paper presents the results of qualification tests in the new anechoic chamber of Perm National Research Polytechnic University (PNRPU) built in 2014-2015 and evaluation of the chamber quality in aeroacoustic experiments. It describes design features of the chamber and its sound-absorption lining. The qualification tests were carried out with tonal and broadband noise sources in the frequency range 100 Hz - 20 kHz for two different cases of the source arrangement. In every case, measurements were performed in three directions by traverse microphones. Qualification tests have determined that in the chamber there is a free acoustic field within radius of 2 m for tonal noise and 3 m for broadband noise. There was also evaluated acoustic quality of the chamber by measurements of the jet noise and vortex ring noise. The results of the experiments demonstrate that PNRPU anechoic chamber allows the aeroacoustic measurements to be performed to obtain quantitative results.

  19. The CAST Time Projection Chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Autiero, D.; Carmona, J.M.; Cebrian, S.; Chesi, E.; Davenport, M.; Delattre, M.; Di Lella, L.; Formenti, F.; Irastorza, I.G.; Gomez, H.; Hasinoff, M.; Lakic, B.; Luzon, G.; Morales, J.; Musa, L.; Ortiz, A.; Placci, A.; Rodriguez, A.; Ruz, J.; Villar, J.A.; Zioutas, K.

    2007-01-01

    One of the three X-ray detectors of the CAST experiment searching for solar axions is a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) with a multi-wire proportional counter (MWPC) as a readout structure. Its design has been optimized to provide high sensitivity to the detection of the low intensity X-ray signal expected in the CAST experiment. A low hardware threshold of 0.8 keV is safely set during normal data taking periods, and the overall efficiency for the detection of photons coming from conversion of solar axions is 62 %. Shielding has been installed around the detector, lowering the background level to 4.10 x 10^-5 counts/cm^2/s/keV between 1 and 10 keV. During phase I of the CAST experiment the TPC has provided robust and stable operation, thus contributing with a competitive result to the overall CAST limit on axion-photon coupling and mass.

  20. Electrodynamic modeling applied to micro-strip gas chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, R

    1998-12-31

    Gas gain variations as functions of time, counting rate and substrate resistivity have been observed with Micro-Strip Gas Chambers (MSGC). Such a chamber is here treated as a system of 2 dielectrics, gas and substrate, with finite resistivities. Electric charging between their interface results in variations of the electric field and the gas gain. The electrodynamic equations (including time dependence) for such a system are proposed. A Rule of Charge Accumulation (RCA) is then derived which allows to determine the quantity and sign of charges accumulated on the surface at equilibrium. In order to apply the equations and the rule to MSGCs, a model of gas conductance induced by ionizing radiation is proposed, and a differential equation and some formulae are derived to calculate the rms dispersion and the spatial distribution of electrons (ions) in inhomogeneous electric fields. RCA coupled with a precise simulation of the electric fields gives the first quantitative explanation of gas gain variations of MSGCs. Finally an electrodynamic simulation program is made to reproduce the dynamic process of gain variation due to surface charging with an uncertainty of at most 15% relative to experimental data. As a consequence, the methods for stabilizing operation of MSGCs are proposed. (author) 18 refs.

  1. Vacuum Chamber for the Booster Bending Magnets

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1974-01-01

    To minimize eddy currents, induced by the rising magnetic field, the chamber was made from thin stainless steel of high specific electric resistance. For mechanical stength, it was corrugated in a hydro-forming process. The chamber is curved, to follow the beam's orbital path. Under vacuum, the chamber tends to staighten, the ceramic spacer along half of its length keeps it in place (see also 7402458).

  2. Drift chamber tracking with neural networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindsey, C.S.; Denby, B.; Haggerty, H.

    1992-10-01

    We discuss drift chamber tracking with a commercial log VLSI neural network chip. Voltages proportional to the drift times in a 4-layer drift chamber were presented to the Intel ETANN chip. The network was trained to provide the intercept and slope of straight tracks traversing the chamber. The outputs were recorded and later compared off line to conventional track fits. Two types of network architectures were studied. Applications of neural network tracking to high energy physics detector triggers is discussed.

  3. Resonance ionization scheme development for europium

    CERN Document Server

    Chrysalidis, K; Fedosseev, V N; Marsh, B A; Naubereit, P; Rothe, S; Seiffert, C; Kron, T; Wendt, K

    2017-01-01

    Odd-parity autoionizing states of europium have been investigated by resonance ionization spectroscopy via two-step, two-resonance excitations. The aim of this work was to establish ionization schemes specifically suited for europium ion beam production using the ISOLDE Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Source (RILIS). 13 new RILIS-compatible ionization schemes are proposed. The scheme development was the first application of the Photo Ionization Spectroscopy Apparatus (PISA) which has recently been integrated into the RILIS setup.

  4. Resonance ionization scheme development for europium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chrysalidis, K., E-mail: katerina.chrysalidis@cern.ch; Goodacre, T. Day; Fedosseev, V. N.; Marsh, B. A. [CERN (Switzerland); Naubereit, P. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universität, Institiut für Physik (Germany); Rothe, S.; Seiffert, C. [CERN (Switzerland); Kron, T.; Wendt, K. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universität, Institiut für Physik (Germany)

    2017-11-15

    Odd-parity autoionizing states of europium have been investigated by resonance ionization spectroscopy via two-step, two-resonance excitations. The aim of this work was to establish ionization schemes specifically suited for europium ion beam production using the ISOLDE Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Source (RILIS). 13 new RILIS-compatible ionization schemes are proposed. The scheme development was the first application of the Photo Ionization Spectroscopy Apparatus (PISA) which has recently been integrated into the RILIS setup.

  5. Bicone vacuum chamber for ISR intersection

    CERN Multimedia

    1975-01-01

    This is one of the bicone chambers made of titanium for experiment R 702. The central corrugated part had a very thin titanium wall (0.28 mm). The first of these chambers collapsed in its central part when baked at 300 C (August 1975). After an intensive effort to develop better quality and reproducible welds for this special material, the ISR workshop was able to build two new chambers of this type. One of them was installed at I 7 for R 702 in 1976 and worked perfectly. It was at that time the most "transparent" intersection vacuum chamber. See also 7609219, 7609221.

  6. Anechoic chamber for VHF and UHF bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morikawa, Takao; Sugiura, Akira; Harima, Katsushige; Masuzawa, Hiroshi

    1995-06-01

    Built in 1969, the anechoic chamber of CRL has been used to the fullest by researchers in many fields such as EMI, EMC, antenna design, standard of electric field intensity, and type approval testing. In particular, in the early days of space development in Japan, many satellite-born antennas were developed in this anechoic chamber. However, a quarter of a century has passed since its construction and deteriorated performance due to superannuation sometimes caused difficulties in experiments conducted in the chamber. In 1993, CRL constructed a Measuring Facility for Radio Research (MFRR) and the anechoic chamber for VHF-UHF bands was remodeled as one of the sub-facilities of MFRR. The remodeling work included full replacement of the electromagnetic shielding, absorbers and measurement system. Since the remodeled anechoic chamber is being used not only for EMI tests but also for other purposes, a full-anechoic chamber has been adopted. In addition the chamber has been designed for the frequency range between 30 MHz and 10 GHz. After the remodeling work, the performance of the chamber is greatly improved. The average shielding factor is better than 85 dB for all frequency ranges and the unwanted reflection characteristic is -30 dB for frequencies above 1 GHZ. This paper summarizes the remodeling work, and the specifications and performance of the remodeled anechoic chamber.

  7. Precision Radio Frequency Anechoic Chamber Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Performs measurements and calibration of antennas for satellites and aircraft or groundbased systems. The chamber is primarily used for optimizing antenna...

  8. D0 Central Tracking Chamber Performance Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pizzuto, Domenico [State Univ. of New York (SUNY), Stony Brook, NY (United States)

    1991-01-01

    The performance of the completed DO central tracking chamber was studied using cosmic rays at the State University of New York at Stony Brook. Also studied was a prototype tracking chamber identical in design to the completed DO tracking chamber. The prototype chamber was exposed to a collimated beam of 150 GeV pions at the Fermilab NWA test facility. Results indicate an $R\\Phi$ tracking resolution compatible with the limitations imposed by physical considerations, excellent 2 track resolution, and a high track reconstruction efficiency along with a good rejection power against $\\gamma \\to e^+ e^-$ events.

  9. The Mark II Vertex Drift Chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, J.P.; Baggs, R.; Fujino, D.; Hayes, K.; Hoard, C.; Hower, N.; Hutchinson, D.; Jaros, J.A.; Koetke, D.; Kowalski, L.A.

    1989-03-01

    We have completed constructing and begun operating the Mark II Drift Chamber Vertex Detector. The chamber, based on a modified jet cell design, achieves 30 {mu}m spatial resolution and <1000 {mu}m track-pair resolution in pressurized CO{sub 2} gas mixtures. Special emphasis has been placed on controlling systematic errors including the use of novel construction techniques which permit accurate wire placement. Chamber performance has been studied with cosmic ray tracks collected with the chamber located both inside and outside the Mark II. Results on spatial resolution, average pulse shape, and some properties of CO{sub 2} mixtures are presented. 10 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Biases in methane chamber measurements in peatlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juszczak, R.

    2013-03-01

    The paper presents results of CH4 emission measurements at peatland with the application of the dynamic chamber technique. The measurements were conducted in two types of chambers differing in shape, height, volume and technology used to assure their tightness. The study tested how the following factors: 1) forced chamber headspace mixing or its absence, 2) mistakes of the person conducting measurements, 3) improper application of linear technique for calculating CH4 fluxes, and 4) simulated air sampling typical for static chambers, influence the significance of errors and the underestimation rate of CH4 fluxes measured in situ. It was indicated that chamber headspace mixing allows estimating methane fluxes with a smaller error than in the case of measurements conducted without mixing, and CH4 fluxes in such conditions can be 47 to 58% higher (depending on the chamber type) than in a chamber without fans. Using dynamic chambers and a fast analyzer to measure methane fluxes allows shortening the methane measurement process to a few minutes. On the other hand, using static chambers for methane flux measurements may lead to 70% underestimation of the calculated flux.

  11. D0 central tracking chamber performance studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pizzuto, Domenico [State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States)

    1991-12-01

    The performance of the completed DO central tracking chamber was studied using cosmic rays at the State University of New York at Stony Brook. Also studied was a prototype tracking chamber identical in design to the completed DO tracking chamber. The prototype chamber was exposed to a collimated beam of 150 GeV pions at the Fermilab NWA test facility. Results indicate an RΦ tracking resolution compatible with the limitations imposed by physical considerations, excellent 2 track resolution, and a high track reconstruction efficiency along with a good rejection power against γ → e + e- events.

  12. Ambient ionization mass spectrometry: A tutorial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Min-Zong; Cheng, Sy-Chi; Cho, Yi-Tzu [Department of Chemistry, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Shiea, Jentaie, E-mail: jetea@fac.nsysu.edu.tw [Department of Chemistry, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Cancer Center, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)

    2011-09-19

    Highlights: {yields} Ambient ionization technique allows the direct analysis of sample surfaces with little or no sample pretreatment. {yields} We sort ambient ionization techniques into three main analytical strategies, direct ionization, direct desorption/ionization, and two-step ionization. {yields} The underlying principles of operation, ionization processes, detecting mass ranges, sensitivity, and representative applications of these techniques are described and compared. - Abstract: Ambient ionization is a set of mass spectrometric ionization techniques performed under ambient conditions that allows the direct analysis of sample surfaces with little or no sample pretreatment. Using combinations of different types of sample introduction systems and ionization methods, several novel techniques have been developed over the last few years with many applications (e.g., food safety screening; detection of pharmaceuticals and drug abuse; monitoring of environmental pollutants; detection of explosives for antiterrorism and forensics; characterization of biological compounds for proteomics and metabolomics; molecular imaging analysis; and monitoring chemical and biochemical reactions). Electrospray ionization and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization are the two main ionization principles most commonly used in ambient ionization mass spectrometry. This tutorial paper provides a review of the publications related to ambient ionization techniques. We describe and compare the underlying principles of operation, ionization processes, detecting mass ranges, sensitivity, and representative applications of these techniques.

  13. Dose estimation outside radiation field using Pinpoint and Semiflex ionization chamber detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelaal, Ahmed M.; Attalla, Ehab M.; Elshemey, Wael M.

    2017-10-01

    This work aims to provide a comparison between two important detectors (Pinpoint and Semiflex) that are frequently used in radiation dosimetery in radiotherapy. This is carried out through the employment of both detectors in a quantitative estimation of the change in out-of-field dose with important dosimetric parameters such as field size (from 5×5 cm2 to 30×30 cm2) and depth (from 1.5 cm to 30 cm) at two different energies (6 MV and 15 MV) and two different collimator angles (0-90°). The change in out-of-field dose with Source-Skin-Distance (SSD) from 80 to 115 cm is also studied using both detectors. Results show that, the Pinpoint and Semiflex detectors both reported an increase in out-of-field dose with field size, depth, energy and SSD. In almost all measurements, Pinpoint detector reported considerably higher out-of-field dose values compared to Semiflex. For 6 MV and 0° collimator angle, the out-of-field dose at field size of 30×30 cm2 and at a depth of 1.5 cm is 7.3% for Pinpoint detector compared to 4.3% for Semiflex. At collimator angle of 90°, the out-of-field dose is 6.5% for Pinpoint detector compared to 5.5% for semiflex. The out-of-field dose for a depth of 30 cm and field size of 10×10 cm is 7.9% for Pinpoint detector compared to 5.9% for Semiflex. For 15 MV and 0° collimator angle, the out-of-field dose at field size of 30×30 cm2 and at a depth of 1.5 cm is 7.5% for Pinpoint detector compared 5.1% for Semiflex. At 6 MV, field size of 10×10 cm2 and depth of 1.5 cm, the out-of-field dose at SSD 115 cm is 3.7% for Pinpoint detector compared to 3.4% for Semiflex. The considerably higher out-of-field dose values reported by Pinpoint detector compared to Semiflex may be attributed to the relatively higher sensitivity of Pinpoint detector for low doses (such as out-of-field doses). Therefore, for reliable out-of-field dose measurements a Pinpoint detector is highly recommended.

  14. Study of (α , p) and (α , n) reactions with a Multi-Sampling Ionization Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila, M. L.; Rehm, K. E.; Almaraz-Calderon, S.; Ayangeakaa, A. D.; Dickerson, C.; Hoffman, C. R.; Jiang, C. L.; Kay, B. P.; Lai, J.; Nusair, O.; Pardo, R. C.; Santiago-Gonzalez, D.; Talwar, R.; Ugalde, C.

    2017-07-01

    A large number of (α , p) and (α , n) reactions are known to play a fundamental role in nuclear astrophysics. This work presents a novel technique to study these reactions with the active target system MUSIC whose segmented anode allows the investigation of a large energy range of the excitation function with a single beam energy. In order to verify the method, we performed direct measurements of the previously measured reactions 17O (α , n) 20Ne, 23Na (α , p) 26Mg, and 23Na (α , n) 26Al. These reactions were investigated in inverse kinematics using 4He gas in the detector to study the excitation functions in the energy range of about 2-6 MeV in the center of mass. We found good agreement between the cross sections of the 17O (α , n) 20Ne reaction measured in this work and previous measurements. Furthermore we have successfully performed a simultaneous measurement of the 23Na (α , p) 26Mg and 23Na (α , n) 26Al reactions.

  15. The double-torus ionization chamber ``diogenes'' for multiparameter experiments on light charged particle accompanied fission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heeg, P.; Hoffmann, K. F.; Mutterer, M.; Theobald, J. P.; Weingärtner, K.; Pannicke, J.; Gönnenwein, F.; Barreau, G.; Leroux, B.

    1983-11-01

    A new detector system for the comprehensive investigation of light charged particle accompanied fission is described. First experimental results obtained on neutron induced fission of 235U at the high-flux reactor of the ILL are used to discuss the properties of the system.

  16. Initial recombination in the track of heavy charged particles: Numerical solution for air filled ionization chambers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaiser, Franz-Joachim; Bassler, Niels; Tölli, Heikki

    2012-01-01

    . In this study the effect of the underlying dose distribution on columnar recombination, a quantitative model for initial recombination,is investigated. Material and Methods Jaffe’s theory, formulated in 1913 quantifies initial recombination by elemental processes, providing an analytical (closed) solution. Here...... in the assessment of the saturation current or charge is suggested by the data. Conclusion The established model of columnar recombination reproduces the experimental data well, whereas the extentions using track structure models do not show such an agreement. Additionally, the effect of initial recombination...... on the saturation curve (i.e. Jaffe plot) does not follow a linear behavior as suggested by current dosimetry protocols, therefore higher order corrections (such as the investigated ones) might be necessary....

  17. Study of the linearity of CABRI experimental ionization chambers during RIA transients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecerf, J.; Garnier, Y.; Hudelot, JP.; Duc, B.; Pantera, L.

    2018-01-01

    CABRI is an experimental pulse reactor operated by CEA at the Cadarache research center and funded by the French Nuclear Safety and Radioprotection Institute (IRSN). For the purpose of the CABRI International Program (CIP), operated and managed by IRSN under an OECD/NEA framework it has been refurbished since 2003 to be able to provide experiments in prototypical PWR conditions (155 bar, 300 °C) in order to study the fuel behavior under Reactivity Initiated Accident (RIA) conditions. This paper first reminds the objectives of the power commissioning tests performed on the CABRI facility. The design and location of the neutron detectors monitoring the core power are also presented. Then it focuses on the different methodologies used to calibrate the detectors and check the consistency and co-linearity of the measurements. Finally, it presents the methods used to check the linearity of the neutron detectors up to the high power levels ( 20 GW) reached during power transients. Some results obtained during the power tests campaign are also presented.

  18. Development and evaluation of an inhalation chamber for in vivo tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EDUARDO R. DA SILVA

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The bioavailability, toxicity, and therapeutic efficacy of a drug is directly related to its administration route. The pulmonary route can be accessed by inhalation after fumigation, vaporization or nebulization. Thus, pharmacological and toxicological evaluation accessed by an apparatus specifically designed and validated for this type of administration is extremely important. Based on pre-existing models, an inhalation chamber was developed. This presents a central structure with five animal holders. The nebulized air passes directly and continuously through these holders and subsequently to an outlet. Evaluation of its operation was performed using clove essential oil, a nebulizer, and a flow meter. The air within the chamber was collected by static headspace and analyzed by gas chromatography with a flame ionization detector. For this purpose, a 2.5 minutes chromatographic method was developed. The air flow in each of the five outputs was 0.92 liters per minute. During the first minute, the chamber became saturated with the nebulized material. Homogeneous and continuous operation of the chamber was observed without accumulation of volatile material inside it for 25 minutes. The inhalation chamber works satisfactorily for in vivo tests with medicines designed to be administrated by inhalation.

  19. Theory of dissociative tunneling ionization

    CERN Document Server

    Svensmark, Jens; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2016-01-01

    We present a theoretical study of the dissociative tunneling ionization process. Analytic expressions for the nuclear kinetic energy distribution of the ionization rates are derived. A particularly simple expression for the spectrum is found by using the Born-Oppenheimer (BO) approximation in conjunction with the reflection principle. These spectra are compared to exact non-BO ab initio spectra obtained through model calculations with a quantum mechanical treatment of both the electronic and nuclear degrees freedom. In the regime where the BO approximation is applicable imaging of the BO nuclear wave function is demonstrated to be possible through reverse use of the reflection principle, when accounting appropriately for the electronic ionization rate. A qualitative difference between the exact and BO wave functions in the asymptotic region of large electronic distances is shown. Additionally the behavior of the wave function across the turning line is seen to be reminiscent of light refraction. For weak fiel...

  20. Wide-band antennas for reverberation chambers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogt-Ardatjew, R.A.; van de Beek, G.S.; Leferink, Frank Bernardus Johannes

    2012-01-01

    Shielding effectiveness measurements in a dual vibrating intrinsic reverberation chamber results in very repeatable results for a large frequency range and large dynamic range. Antennas in reverberation chambers do not need any gain, but the losses should be low and the dimensions should be small.

  1. Shielding Effectiveness Measurements using a Reverberation Chamber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leferink, Frank Bernardus Johannes; Bergsma, J.G.; Bergsma, Hans; van Etten, Wim

    2006-01-01

    Shielding effectiveness measurements have been performed using a reverberation chamber. The reverberation chamber methodology as we1l as the measurement setup is described and some results are given. Samples include glass reinforced plastic panels, aluminum panels with many holes, wire mesh, among

  2. 21 CFR 866.2120 - Anaerobic chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2120 Anaerobic chamber. (a) Identification. An anaerobic chamber is a device intended for medical purposes to maintain an anaerobic (oxygen...

  3. Results from the MAC Vertex chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, H.N.

    1987-05-01

    The design, construction, and performance characteristics of a high precision gaseous drift chamber made of thin walled proportional tubes are described. The device achieved an average spatial resolution of 45 ..mu..m in use for physics analysis with the MAC detector. The B-lifetime result obtained with this chamber is discussed.

  4. Validation of a fully anechoic chamber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mandaris, Dwi; Moonen, Dominicus Johannes Guilielmus; van de Beek, G.S.; Buesink, Frederik Johannes Karel; Leferink, Frank Bernardus Johannes

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a technique to characterize the performance of a Fully Anechoic Chamber (FAC) from 500 MHz to 3 GHz based on S-Parameter analysis with antennas and a Vector Network Analyzer (VNA. The measurements have been performed by placing one antenna inside the chamber and performing S11

  5. HVAC&R Equipment Environmental Chambers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description:Large "Truck" ChamberThe large "truck" chamber provides controlled air conditions from -7 °C (20 °F) to 65 °C (150 °F).Air-Conditioner and Heat Pump Test...

  6. The HARP Time Projection Chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Vidal-Sitjes, G

    2003-01-01

    A novel apparatus for the calibration of the HARP Time Projection Chamber has been designed, developed and built. The apparatus consists of a large number of point-like photo-electron sources located at precise positions inside the detector volume. The photo-electron sources are optical quartz fibers on which one end is coated with an aluminum layer of $\\sim$80{\\AA} thickness and are held in place on the High Voltage membrane. The fibers are used to guide UV laser light pulses that generate photoelectrons on the fiber tips and these act as photo-electron emitters. The photoelectrons drift inside the detector and produce the calibration signals. The technique allows to asses $E\\times B$ distortions and to measure drift velocity, ion feedback and time stability in real time. The analog signals generated by the TPC front-end electronics have been characterized. Different methods to extract the amplitude and time of occurrence from the digitized signals have been studied and compared. Fast estimators, like the su...

  7. Automated correction on X-rays calibration using transmission chamber and LabVIEW{sup TM}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Betti, Flavio; Potiens, Maria da Penha Albuquerque, E-mail: fbetti@ipen.b, E-mail: mppalbu@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    Uncertainties during prolonged exposure times on X-rays calibration procedures at the Instruments Calibration facilities at IPEN may suffer from efficiency (and therefore intensity) variations on the industrial X-Ray generator used. Using a transmission chamber as an online reference chamber during the whole irradiation process is proposed in order to compensate for such error source. Also temperature (and pressure) fluctuations may arise from the performance limited calibration room air conditioning system. As an open ionization chamber, that monitor chamber does require calculation of a correction factor due to the temperature and pressure effects on air density. Sending and processing data from all related instruments (electrometer, thermometer and barometer) can be more easily achieved by interfacing them to a host computer running an especially developed algorithm using LabVIEW{sup TM} environment which will not only apply the proper correction factors during runtime, but also determine the exact length of time to reach a desired condition, which can be: time period, charge collected, or air kerma, based on the previous calibration of the whole system using a reference chamber traceable to primary standard dosimetry laboratories. When performing such calibration, two temperature sensors (secondary standard thermistors) are simultaneously used, one for the transmission chamber, and other for the reference chamber. As the substitution method is used during actual customer's calibration, the readings from the second thermistor can also be used when desired for further corrections. Use of LabVIEW{sup TM} programming language allowed for a shorter development time, and it is also extremely convenient to make things easier when improvements and modifications are called for. (author)

  8. Determination of the true null electrode spacing of an extrapolation chamber for X-ray dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueiredo, M.T.T.; Bastos, F.M.; Silva, T.A. da, E-mail: mttf@cdtn.br, E-mail: fmb@cdtn.br, E-mail: silvata@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Pos-Graduacao em Ciencia e Tecnologia da Radiacao, Minerais e Materiais

    2015-07-01

    An accurate determination of the actual null distance is critical for the establishment of primary measurement method for absorbed dose in tissue, since the concept of the true null electrode spacing is used to define the sensitive volume of an extrapolation chamber. In this paper, a critical analysis of two methodologies for determining the true null electrode spacing of an extrapolation chamber was done. Firstly, the ionization current as a function of electrode spacing was measured in ISO 4037 low energy X-ray beams. In the second procedure, a LC Bridge was used to measure the capacitance between the electrodes of a 23392 Böhm model PTW ionization chamber and a reliable relationship between capacitance and relative distance was established. Results showed that the true null spacing values varied from 0.0015 to 0.38 mm. Since capacitance meters with high resolution are not always available in calibration laboratories, the second method showed values with large uncertainties. The first method proved to be highly sensitive to the quality of the X-ray beams used. (author)

  9. Resonance ionization spectroscopy in dysprosium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Studer, D., E-mail: dstuder@uni-mainz.de; Dyrauf, P.; Naubereit, P.; Heinke, R.; Wendt, K. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, Institut für Physik (Germany)

    2017-11-15

    We report on resonance ionization spectroscopy (RIS) of high-lying energy levels in dysprosium. We developed efficient excitation schemes and re-determined the first ionization potential (IP) via analysis of Rydberg convergences. For this purpose both two- and three-step excitation ladders were investigated. An overall ionization efficiency of 25(4) % could be demonstrated in the RISIKO mass separator of Mainz University, using a three-step resonance ionization scheme. Moreover, an extensive analysis of the even-parity 6sns- and 6snd-Rydberg-series convergences, measured via two-step excitation was performed. To account for strong perturbations in the observed s-series, the approach of multichannel quantum defect theory (MQDT) was applied. Considering all individual series limits we extracted an IP-value of 47901.76(5) cm{sup −1}, which agrees with the current literature value of 47901.7(6) cm{sup −1}, but is one order of magnitude more precise.

  10. Characterization of air temperature in modern ion chambers due to phantom geometry and ambient temperature changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saenz, Daniel L; Kirby, Neil; Gutiérrez, Alonso N

    2016-07-01

    Temperature and pressure corrections are necessary to account for the varying mass of air in the sensitive volume of a vented ionization chamber (IC) when performing absolute dose measurements. Locations commonly used to measure the presumed IC air temperature may not accurately represent the chamber cavity air temperature, and phantoms undergoing temperature changes further compound the problem. Prior studies have characterized thermal equilibrium in separate phantoms for Farmer chambers alone. However, the purpose of this study was to characterize the cavity air temperature dependence on changes in the ambient temperature and phantom geometry configuration for a wider and more modern variety of chambers to determine if previously published wait times apply to these chambers as well. Thermal conduction properties were experimentally investigated by modifying a PTW 0.3 cm(3) Semiflex IC with a thermocouple replacing the central electrode. Air cavity temperature versus time was recorded in three phantom geometries characteristic of common absolute dose measurements. The phantoms were (15 ± 1) °C before measurement with an IC at the treatment vault temperature of (21 ± 1) °C. Simulations were conducted to provide a theoretical basis for the measurements and to simulate temperature response of a PTW PinPoint® and Farmer chamber. The simulation methods were first validated by comparison with measured Semiflex chamber thermal response curves before extension to the other chambers. Two thermal equilibria curves were recorded on different time scales. IC temperature initially dropped to the colder phantom temperature but subsequently increased as the phantom itself equilibrated with the warmer room temperature. In a large phantom of dimensions (25.5 × 25.5 × 23.4) cm(3), 3 min was required before the IC temperature reached within 0.5 °C of its equilibrium within the phantom. Similarly, wait times of 2 min were needed for 7.5 and 2 cm slab phantoms. Recording

  11. Proofs of acceptance of ionization cameras for use in radiotherapy; Pruebas de aceptacion de camaras de ionizacion de uso en radioterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davila, Hernan Olaya; Flores, Guillermo, E-mail: holayadavila@gmail.com [Instituto Colombiano de Geologia y Mineria (INGEOMINAS), Bogota, D.C. (Colombia). Laboratorio de Metrologia de las Radiaciones del Servicio Geologico Colombiano; Cantillo, Juliana I.P., E-mail: julianacantillo5@gmail.com [Universidad Pedagogica y Tecnologica de Colombia, Boyaca (Colombia)

    2013-07-01

    Shows the main technical tests released in the Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory (SSDL) of one cylindrical ionization chamber and another plane parallel ionization chamber similar to used in radiotherapy services in Colombia to the radiation dose control that is delivered to the patient to the cancer treatment. The previous test of one calibration see in this work are: correction for recombination losses, polarity dependence, stabilization time, total dose dependence, atmospheric communication, stability check, leakage current and physical integrity. Calculates the acceptability values in the SSDL to be account as reference for the dosimetry systems that are carry in calibration process. (author)

  12. Monitored Drift Chambers in the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Herten, G

    Monitored Drift Chambers (MDT) are used in the ATLAS Detector to measure the momentum of high energy muons. They consist of drift tubes, which are filled with an Ar-CO2 gas mixture at 3 bar gas pressure. About 1200 drift chambers are required for ATLAS. They are up to 6 m long. Nevertheless the position of every wire needs to be known with a precision of 20 µm within a chamber. In addition, optical alignment sensors are required to measure the relative position of adjacent chambers with a precision of 30µm. This gigantic task seems impossible at first instance. Indeed it took many years of R&D to invent the right tools and methods before the first chamber could be built according to specifications. Today, at the time when 50% of the chambers have been produced, we are confident that the goal for ATLAS can be reached. The mechanical precision of the chambers could be verified with the x-ray tomograph at CERN. This ingenious device, developed for the MDT system, is able to measure the wire position insid...

  13. LEP vacuum chamber, cross-section

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1983-01-01

    Cross-section of the final prototype for the LEP vacuum chamber. The elliptic main-opening is for the beam. The small channel to the left is for the cooling water, to carry away the heat deposited by the synchrotron radiation. The square channel to the right houses the Non-Evaporable Getter (NEG) pump. The chamber is made from extruded aluminium. Its outside is clad with lead, to stop the synchrotron radiation emitted by the beam. For good adherence between Pb and Al, the Al chamber was coated with a thin layer of Ni. Ni being slightly magnetic, some resulting problems had to be overcome. See also 8301153.

  14. Cloud chamber photographs of the cosmic radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Rochester, George Dixon

    1952-01-01

    Cloud Chamber Photographs of the Cosmic Radiation focuses on cloud chamber and photographic emulsion wherein the tracks of individual subatomic particles of high energy are studied. The publication first offers information on the technical features of operation and electrons and cascade showers. Discussions focus on the relationship in time and space of counter-controlled tracks; techniques of internal control of the cloud chamber; cascade processes with artificially-produced electrons and photons; and nuclear interaction associated with an extensive shower. The manuscript then elaborates on

  15. Comments on Ionization Cooling Channel Characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neuffer, David [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States). Fermilab Center for Particle Astrophysics

    2013-12-04

    Ionization cooling channels with a wide variety of characteristics and cooling properties are being developed. These channels can produce cooling performances that are largely consistent with the ionization cooling theory developed previously. In this paper we review ionization cooling theory, discuss its application to presently developing cooling channels, and discuss criteria for optimizing cooling.

  16. 29 CFR 1926.53 - Ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ionizing radiation. 1926.53 Section 1926.53 Labor... § 1926.53 Ionizing radiation. (a) In construction and related activities involving the use of sources of ionizing radiation, the pertinent provisions of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Standards for...

  17. Position-sensitive ionization detectors for ionizing beams diagnostics

    CERN Document Server

    Artemiev, A N; Mikhailov, V; Rezvov, V; Yudin, L

    2002-01-01

    Ionizing detectors for on-line non-destructive monitoring of the geometric parameters of ionizing beams have been proposed. Such a detector can be used on a beamline with a residual gas pressure of about 10 sup - sup 3 -10 sup - sup 6 Torr. It measures the product of ionization of the residual gas by the beam under investigation. An electric field moves the ions through a narrow slit into an analyzer. The analyzer field transforms the energy distribution of the ions into a two-dimensional space distribution on the outer analyzer plane. An Open Image Converter Tube (ICT) with an amplifier consisting of two Micro Channel Plates (MCP) forms an image of the real beam cross-section. This image is registered by a video camera, processed and stored on a computer. The detectors were successfully tested on beams of charged particles with wide energy and intensity ranges and on synchrotron radiation beams. Codes developed give the distribution of the beam density along its cross-section, beam profiles, the position of ...

  18. [Measurement of peak correction factor of Farmer chamber for calibration of flattening filter free (FFF) clinical photon beams].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontra, Gábor; Major, Tibor; Polgár, Csaba

    2015-06-01

    Farmer-type ionization chambers are considered the most reliable detectors and for this reason they are most frequently used for the calibration of photon beams of medical linear accelerators. Flattening filter free (FFF) photon beams of linear accelerators have recently started to be used in radiotherapy. The dose profile of FFF beams is peaked in the center of the field and the dose distribution will be inhomogeneous along the axis of the 2.3 cm long measuring volume of the Farmer chamber. The peaked radiation field will result in volume averaging effects in the large Farmer chamber, therefore this chamber will underestimate the true central axis dose. Our objective was to determine the value of the peak correction factor (Kp) of Farmer-type chamber with measurements to avoid the underestimation of the central axis dose during the calibration of FFF radiation fields. Measurements were made with 6 MV and 10 MV flattened (6X and 10X) and FFF beams (6XFFF and 10XFFF) of a Varian TrueBeam medical linear accelerator in a solid water phantom at 10 cm depth. The source surface distance (SSD) was 100 cm, the field size was 10×10 cm and the dose rate was always 400 MU/min during the measurements. We delivered 100 MU in each measurement and the absorbed dose to water was calculated according to the IAEA TRS-398 dosimetry protocol. The measured signals of the ionization chambers were always corrected for the ion recombination loss. The ion recombination correction factors (Kr) were determined with the two-voltage method separately for the used ion chambers and for flattened and unflattened beams. First, we measured the dose to water with PTW TM30012 Farmer chamber in 6XFFF and 6X beams, then calculated the ratio of doses of 6XFFF and 6X beams (R6,Farmer). Immediately after this we repeated the above measurements with PTW TM31010 Semiflex chamber and determined the ratio of doses of 6XFFF and 6X beams again (R6,Semiflex). The length of the sensitive volume of the Semiflex

  19. Reflectivity level of radio anechoic chambers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appel-Hansen, Jørgen

    1973-01-01

    A comparison between the antenna-pattern comparison technique and the free-space voltage standing-wave ratio technique for evaluating the reflectivity level of radio anechoic chambers is presented. Based on an analysis of the two techniques, it is pointed out which parameters influence the measured...... be used to measure the improvements. This work is inspired by the current discussion of finding a figure of merit for anechoic chambers. Based on the results, an evaluation procedure for anechoic chambers is indicated. However, it is pointed out and illustrated by examples that further investigations...... value of the reflectivity level. The comparison is illustrated with experimental results and it is explained why inconsistent and uncorrelated results may be found when the two methods are used. Furthermore, it is demonstrated, by introducing improvements in a chamber, how the reflectivity level can...

  20. RADAR Anechoic Chamber/RCS Measurements Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The RF Anechoic Chamber is 56 feet long by 12 feet high by 13.5 feet wide, with an adjoining electronic computer control room. A double door entrance at one end of...

  1. Developing cloud chambers with high school students

    CERN Document Server

    Ishizuka, Ryo; Sato, Shoma; Zeze, Syoji

    2013-01-01

    The result and outcome of the cloud chamber project, which aims to develop a cloud chamber useful for science education is reported in detail. A project includes both three high school students and a teacher as a part of Super Science High School (SSH) program in our school. We develop a dry ice free cloud chamber using salt and ice (or snow). Technical detail of the chamber is presented. We also argue how the project affects student's cognition, motivation, academic skills and behavior. The research project had been done in very similar way to those of professional researchers, i.e., planning research, applying fund, writing a paper and giving a talk in conferences. From interviews with students, we learn that such style of scientific activity is very effective in promoting student's motivation for learning science.

  2. High Performance Methane Thrust Chamber (HPMTC) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ORBITEC proposes to develop a High-Performance Methane Thrust Chamber (HPMRE) to meet the demands of advanced chemical propulsion systems for deep-space mission...

  3. MAN-IN-SIMULANT TEST (MIST) CHAMBER

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The MIST chamber uses methyl salicylate (oil of wintergreen) vapor as a simulant for HD agent to conduct system level evaluations of chemical protective ensembles....

  4. Chamber Core Structures for Fairing Acoustic Mitigation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lane, Steven A; Henderson, Kyle; Williams, Andrew; Ardelean, Emil

    2007-01-01

    .... A composite chamber core fairing consists of many axial tubes sandwiched between face sheets, tubes that can be used as acoustic dampers to reduce low-frequency interior noise with virtually no added mass...

  5. Developing Cloud Chambers with High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizuka, Ryo; Tan, Nobuaki; Sato, Shoma; Zeze, Syoji

    The result and outcome of the cloud chamber project, which aims to develop a cloud chamber useful for science education is reported in detail. A project includes both three high school students and a teacher as a part of Super Science High School (SSH) program in our school. We develop a dry-ice-free cloud chamber using salt and ice (or snow). Technical details of the chamber are described. We also argue how the project have affected student's cognition, motivation, academic skills and behavior. The research project has taken steps of professional researchers, i.e., in planning research, applying fund, writing a paper and giving a talk in conferences. From interviews with students, we have learnt that such style of scientific activity is very effective in promoting student's motivation for learning science.

  6. Space charge in drift chambers operated with the Xe, CO$_{2}$(15\\%) mixture

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2070213; Blume, C; Braun-Munzinger, P; Bucher, D; Busch, O; Catanescu, V; Ciobanu, M; Daues, H W; Emschermann, D; Fateev, O V; Foka, Y; Garabatos, C; Gunji, T; Herrmann, N; Inuzuka, M; Kislov, E; Lindenstruth, V; Ludolphs, W; Mahmoud, T; Petracek, V; Petrovici, M; Rusanov, I R; Sandoval, A; Santo, R; Schicker, R; Simon, R S; Smykov, L P; Soltveit, H K; Stachel, J; Stelzer, H; Tsiledakis, G; Vulpescu, B; Wessels, J P; Windelband, B; Xu, C; Zaudtke, O; Zanevsky, Yu; Yurevich, V; 10.1016/j.nima.2004.01.076

    2004-01-01

    Using prototype modules of the ALICE Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) we investigate space-charge effects and the dependence of the pion rejection performance on the incident angle of the ionizing particle. The average pulse height distributions in the drift chambers operated with the Xe, CO //2(15%) mixture provide quantitative information on the gas gain reduction due to space charge accumulating during the drift of the primary ionization. Our results demonstrate that the pion rejection performance of a TRD is better for tracks which are not at normal incidence to the anode wires. We present detailed simulations of detector signals, which reproduce the measurements and lend strong support to our interpretation of the measurements in terms of space-charge effects.

  7. Space charge in drift chambers operated with the Xe,CO2(15%) mixture

    CERN Document Server

    Andronic, A

    2004-01-01

    Using prototype modules of the ALICE Transition Radiation Detector we investigate space charge effects and the dependence of the pion rejection performance on the incident angle of the ionizing particle. The average pulse height distributions in the drift chambers operated with the Xe,CO2(15%) mixture provide quantitative information on the gas gain reduction due to space charge accumulating during the drift of the primary ionization. Our results demonstrate that the pion rejection performance of a TRD is better for tracks which are not at normal incidence to the anode wires. We present detailed simulations of detector signals, which reproduce the measurements and lend strong support to our interpretation of the measurements in terms of space charge effects.

  8. New measurement methods for anechoic chamber characterization

    OpenAIRE

    Gómez Alfageme, Juan José; Sanchez Bote, José Luis; Blanco Martín, Elena

    2008-01-01

    As a continuation of the work presented in 122nd AES Convention, this paper tries to study in depth the anechoic chambers qualification. The purpose of this paper is to find parameters that allow the characterization of this type of enclosures. The proposal that becomes in this work is trying to obtain data of the anechoic chambers absorption by means of the transfer functions between pairs of microphones, or by means of the impulse response between pairs of microphones. Based on the results ...

  9. Signal shapes in a TPC wire chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossegger, S.; Riegler, W.

    2010-11-01

    We study signal shapes in Multi Wire Proportional Chambers (MWPCs) and the influence of the electron distribution around the wire on the ion tail characteristics. Simulations of the ion tail for two different geometries, different voltages and therefore gas gains were performed. These simulations are compared to measurements carried out with the ALICE TPC wire chambers for a Ne/CO 2/N 2 gas mixture, which allows to extract the avalanche spread around the anode wires of the MWPC.

  10. Georges Charpak and his multiwire chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1970-01-01

    In 1968, Georges Charpak developed the 'multiwire proportional chamber', a gas-filled box with a large number of parallel detector wires, each connected to individual amplifiers. Linked to a computer, it could achieve a counting rate a thousand times better than existing techniques - without a camera in sight. From left to right, Georges Charpak, Fabio Sauli and Jean-Claude Santiard working on a multiwire chamber in 1970.

  11. The Gargamelle heavy liquid bubble chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1970-01-01

    This image shows the Gargamelle heavy liquid bubble chamber. It was used to detect particles in experiments at the PS between 1970 and 1976 before being moved to the SPS. In 1973, while working on the PS, it detected the first neutral current, an interaction vital to the electroweak theory. In 1978 a large fissure appeared in the body of the chamber and Gargamelle was stopped in 1979.

  12. The world's largest time projection chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2006-01-01

    Peter Glassel, the technical coordinator for the ALICE time projection chamber, is seen sitting inside the detector; the largest in the world at nearly 100 cubic metres. Thousands of wires are connected to read out electronic data produced as particles are created in lead-lead collisions at the centre of the detector. These particles will cause the medium within the time projection chamber to ionise along their tracks allowing the particle paths to be recreated.

  13. Time-zero fission-fragment detector based on low-pressure multiwire proportional chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Assamagan, Ketevi A; Bayatyan, G L; Carlini, R; Danagulyan, S; Eden, T; Egiyan, K; Ent, R; Fenker, H; Gan, L; Gasparian, A; Grigoryan, N K; Greenwood, Z; Gueye, P; Hashimoto, O; Johnston, K; Keppel, C; Knyazyan, S; Majewski, S; Margaryan, A; Margaryan, Yu L; Marikian, G G; Martoff, J; Mkrtchyan, H G; Parlakyan, L; Sato, Y; Sawafta, R; Simicevic, N; Tadevosyan, V; Takahashi, T; Tang, L; Vartanian, G S; Vulcan, W; Wells, S; Wood, S

    1999-01-01

    A time-zero fission fragment (FF) detector, based on the technique of low-pressure multiwire proportional chambers (LPMWPC), has been designed and constructed for the heavy hypernuclear lifetime experiment (E95-002) at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. Its characteristics and the method of time-zero reconstruction were investigated using fission fragments from a sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf spontaneous fission source. The influence of the ionization energy loss was also studied. It is shown that Heptane, Hexane, and Isobutane gases at a pressure of 1-2 Torr are all suitable for such a FF detector. As desired by experiment, a timing resolution of about 200 ps (FWHM) for a chamber size of 21x21 cm sup 2 was achieved.

  14. A gating grid driver for time projection chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangwancharoen, S.; Lynch, W. G.; Barney, J.; Estee, J.; Shane, R.; Tsang, M. B.; Zhang, Y.; Isobe, T.; Kurata-Nishimura, M.; Murakami, T.; Xiao, Z. G.; Zhang, Y. F.; SπRIT Collaboration

    2017-05-01

    A simple but novel driver system has been developed to operate the wire gating grid of a Time Projection Chamber (TPC). This system connects the wires of the gating grid to its driver via low impedance transmission lines. When the gating grid is open, all wires have the same voltage allowing drift electrons, produced by the ionization of the detector gas molecules, to pass through to the anode wires. When the grid is closed, the wires have alternating higher and lower voltages causing the drift electrons to terminate at the more positive wires. Rapid opening of the gating grid with low pickup noise is achieved by quickly shorting the positive and negative wires to attain the average bias potential with N-type and P-type MOSFET switches. The circuit analysis and simulation software SPICE shows that the driver restores the gating grid voltage to 90% of the opening voltage in less than 0.20 μs, for small values of the termination resistors. When tested in the experimental environment of a time projection chamber larger termination resistors were chosen so that the driver opens the gating grid in 0.35 μs. In each case, opening time is basically characterized by the RC constant given by the resistance of the switches and terminating resistors and the capacitance of the gating grid and its transmission line. By adding a second pair of N-type and P-type MOSFET switches, the gating grid is closed by restoring 99% of the original charges to the wires within 3 μs.

  15. A gating grid driver for time projection chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tangwancharoen, S.; Lynch, W.G.; Barney, J.; Estee, J. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Shane, R. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Tsang, M.B., E-mail: tsang@nscl.msu.edu [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Zhang, Y. [Department of Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Isobe, T.; Kurata-Nishimura, M. [RIKEN Nishina Center, Hirosawa 2-1, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Murakami, T. [Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Kita-shirakawa, Kyoto 606–8502 (Japan); Xiao, Z.G. [Department of Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Zhang, Y.F. [College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China)

    2017-05-01

    A simple but novel driver system has been developed to operate the wire gating grid of a Time Projection Chamber (TPC). This system connects the wires of the gating grid to its driver via low impedance transmission lines. When the gating grid is open, all wires have the same voltage allowing drift electrons, produced by the ionization of the detector gas molecules, to pass through to the anode wires. When the grid is closed, the wires have alternating higher and lower voltages causing the drift electrons to terminate at the more positive wires. Rapid opening of the gating grid with low pickup noise is achieved by quickly shorting the positive and negative wires to attain the average bias potential with N-type and P-type MOSFET switches. The circuit analysis and simulation software SPICE shows that the driver restores the gating grid voltage to 90% of the opening voltage in less than 0.20 µs, for small values of the termination resistors. When tested in the experimental environment of a time projection chamber larger termination resistors were chosen so that the driver opens the gating grid in 0.35 µs. In each case, opening time is basically characterized by the RC constant given by the resistance of the switches and terminating resistors and the capacitance of the gating grid and its transmission line. By adding a second pair of N-type and P-type MOSFET switches, the gating grid is closed by restoring 99% of the original charges to the wires within 3 µs.

  16. Laser peripheral iridotomy changes anterior chamber architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theinert, Christian; Wiedemann, Peter; Unterlauft, Jan D

    2017-01-19

    The pressure gradient between anterior and posterior chamber in acute angle closure (AAC) and primary angle closure suspects is balanced by a sufficient laser peripheral iridotomy (LPI). The anterior chamber changes induced by LPI in patients with unilateral AAC were examined and compared to healthy eyes to define threshold values, which may help to discriminate between healthy and diseased eyes. Using Scheimpflug photography, anterior chamber depth (ACD), anterior chamber volume (ACV), anterior chamber angle (ACA), and central corneal thickness (CCT) were measured before and after LPI in both eyes of unilateral AAC cases. These measurements were compared to a group of healthy control eyes to determine threshold values for ACD, ACV, and ACA. The ACD, ACV, and ACA increased significantly in the 25 AAC eyes after LPI. The ACD, ACV, ACA, and CCT values in the AAC eyes obtained before LPI were compared to a control group of 59 healthy eyes with wide open chamber angles. The cutoff values revealed by receiver operating characteristic analysis were 2.1 mm for ACD, 90.5 mm2 for ACV, and 27.25° for ACA. Our results confirm the significant changes of the anterior segments architecture induced by LPI in AAC eyes. The found threshold values for ACD, ACV, and ACA may help in daily clinical routine to discriminate between healthy eyes and those in need for a prophylactic LPI.

  17. Misura delle caratteristiche del rivelatore a Cathode Strip Chambers per l’esperimento Totem

    CERN Document Server

    Boccone, Vittorio

    2004-01-01

    The aim of my thesis was to characterize the Cathode Strip Chamber (CSC) detector of the T1 inelastic detector of the TOTEM experiment. In the first two chapters I briefly introduce the TOTEM physics and the TOTEM experiment. In the third chapter I describe the basic principles of the ionizing detectors relevant to the TOTEM CSCs. Here I show also the results of few simulations done to determine the construction and operating parameters of the detector. The last two chapter are dedicated to the description of the experimental apparatus I build and the discussion of the TOTEM test beam results.

  18. An analytical approach to space charge distortions for time projection chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Rossegger, S; Riegler, W

    2010-01-01

    In a time projection chamber (TPC), the possible ion feedback and also the primary ionization of high multiplicity events result in accumulation of ionic charges inside the gas volume (space charge). This charge introduces electrical field distortions and modifies the cluster trajectory along the drift path, affecting the tracking performance of the detector. In order to calculate the track distortions due to an arbitrary space charge distribution in the TPC, novel representations of the Green's function for a TPC geometry were worked out. This analytical approach finally permits accurate predictions of track distortions due to an arbitrary space charge distribution by solving the Langevin equation.

  19. The dosimetry of ionizing radiation

    CERN Document Server

    1990-01-01

    A continuation of the treatise The Dosimetry of Ionizing Radiation, Volume III builds upon the foundations of Volumes I and II and the tradition of the preceeding treatise Radiation Dosimetry. Volume III contains three comprehensive chapters on the applications of radiation dosimetry in particular research and medical settings, a chapter on unique and useful detectors, and two chapters on Monte Carlo techniques and their applications.

  20. Ionization potentials some variations, implications and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Ahrens, L H

    1983-01-01

    Ionization Potentials: Some Variations, Implications and Applications covers several aspects of ionization potential that is a highly significant parameter in controlling the properties of electric discharge. Comprised of 17 chapters, the book covers topic relevant to ionization potentials, such as properties, concepts, and applications, in order to understand and fully comprehend all aspects of ionization potential. The opening chapter is a review of ionization potentials and a discussion of trends and features. The succeeding chapters then tackle complex topics such as the s and p electrons;

  1. Microwave remote sensing of ionized air.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, S.; Gopalsami, N.; Heifetz, A.; Elmer, T.; Fiflis, P.; Koehl, E. R.; Chien, H. T.; Raptis, A. C. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2011-07-01

    We present observations of microwave scattering from ambient room air ionized with a negative ion generator. The frequency dependence of the radar cross section of ionized air was measured from 26.5 to 40 GHz (Ka-band) in a bistatic mode with an Agilent PNA-X series (model N5245A) vector network analyzer. A detailed calibration scheme is provided to minimize the effect of the stray background field and system frequency response on the target reflection. The feasibility of detecting the microwave reflection from ionized air portends many potential applications such as remote sensing of atmospheric ionization and remote detection of radioactive ionization of air.

  2. In vitro penetration of bleaching agents into the pulp chamber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benetti, Ana Raquel; Valera, M C; Mancini, M N G

    2004-01-01

    To investigate pulp chamber penetration of bleaching agents in teeth following restorative procedures.......To investigate pulp chamber penetration of bleaching agents in teeth following restorative procedures....

  3. The cloud chamber and its metamorphoses; La chambre a brouillard et ses metamorphoses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fadel, K. [Palais de la Decouverte, Dept. de Physique, 75 - Paris (France)

    2010-04-15

    The stunning invention of the Wilson chamber in 1911 stayed almost ignored by the physicist community for more than a decade although it permitted the visualization of the track of an alpha particle as soon as 1911. The detection principle is based on the expansion of a saturated vapor that allows the visualization of a ionizing particle motion through the formation of droplets around the ions created all along the particle path. The original device was too slow (only one expansion per minute) to be used for the detection of rare events unless to operate it for months or years. A decisive step was made in the beginning of the twenties by the Japanese physicist Takeo Shimizu, working at the Cavendish Laboratory. He managed to automate the Wilson chamber and to equip it with 2 mirrors and a camera. This new generation allowed 5 expansion per second and the knowledge of the particle track orientation in space thanks to a simultaneous photography following 2 perpendicular directions. A rate of 4 shots a minute was achieved. The Wilson chamber was constantly improved during its 30 years long career and was only supplanted by the bubble chamber in the fifties. (A.C.)

  4. Ionization-based detectors for gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Colin F

    2015-11-20

    The gas phase ionization detectors are the most widely used detectors for gas chromatography. The column and makeup gases commonly used in gas chromatography are near perfect insulators. This facilitates the detection of a minute number of charge carriers facilitating the use of ionization mechanisms of low efficiency while providing high sensitivity. The main ionization mechanism discussed in this report are combustion in a hydrogen diffusion flame (flame ionization detector), surface ionization in a plasma (thermionic ionization detector), photon ionization (photoionization detector and pulsed discharge helium ionization detector), attachment of thermal electrons (electron-capture detector), and ionization by collision with metastable helium species (helium ionization detector). The design, response characteristics, response mechanism, and suitability for fast gas chromatography are the main features summarized in this report. Mass spectrometric detection and atomic emission detection, which could be considered as ionization detectors of a more sophisticated and complex design, are not discussed in this report. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Beam cooling with ionization losses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubbia, C. [INFN, Sezione di Pavia (Italy) and CERN AB Department, Geneva (Switzerland)]. E-mail: Carlo.Rubbia@cern.ch; Ferrari, A. [CERN AB Department, Geneva (Switzerland); Kadi, Y. [CERN AB Department, Geneva (Switzerland); Vlachoudis, V. [CERN AB Department, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2006-12-01

    This novel type of Ionization Cooling is an effective method in order to enhance the (strong) interaction probability of slow (few MeV/A) ions stored in a small ring. The many traversals through a thin target strongly improve the nuclear reaction rate with respect to a single-pass collision, in a steady configuration in which ionization losses of a target 'foil' (typically few hundred {mu}g/cm{sup 2} thick) are continuously recovered by an RF-cavity. With a flat foil, betatron oscillations are 'cooled', but the momentum spread diverges exponentially, since faster (slower) particles ionize less (more) than the average. In order to 'cool' the beam also longitudinally, a chromaticity has to be introduced with a wedge-shaped 'foil'. Therefore, in equilibrium conditions, multiple scattering and straggling are both balanced by phase-space compression. Classic Ionization Cooling [A.A. Kolomensky, Atomnaya Energiya 19 (1965) 534; Yu.M. Ado, V.I. Balbekov, Atomnaya Energiya 31(1) (1971) 40-44; A.N. Skrinsky, V.V. Parkhomchuk, Sov. J. Nucl. Phys. 12 (1981) 3; E.A. Perevendentsev, A.N. Skrinsky, in: Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on High Energy Acceleration, 1983, p. 485] is designed to cool the direct beam until it has been compressed and extracted for further use. In practice, this limits its applicability to non-interacting muon beams. Instead, in this new method, applicable to strongly interacting collisions, the circulating beam is not extracted. Ionization cooling provides 'in situ' storage of the beam until it is converted by a nuclear interaction with the target. Simple reactions-for instance {sup 7}Li+D->{sup 8}Li+p-are more favourably produced in the 'mirror' kinematical frame, namely with a heavier ion colliding against a gas-jet D{sub 2} target. Kinematics is generally very favourable, with angles in a narrow angular cone (around {approx}10{sup o} for the mentioned reaction) and with a

  6. Organic Aerosol Nucleation and Growth at the CERN CLOUD chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tröstl, Jasmin; Lethipalo, Katrianne; Bianchi, Federico; Sipilä, Mikko; Nieminen, Tuomo; Wagner, Robert; Frege, Carla; Simon, Mario; Weingartner, Ernest; Gysel, Martin; Dommen, Josef; Baltensperger, Urs

    2014-05-01

    It is well known that atmospheric aerosols influence the climate by changing Earth's radiation balance (IPCC 2007 and 2013). Recent models have shown (Merikanto et al. 2009) that aerosol nucleation is one of the biggest sources of low level cloud condensation nuclei. Still, aerosol nucleation and growth are not fully understood. The driving force of nucleation and growth is sulfuric acid. However ambient nucleation and growth rates cannot be explained by solely sulfuric acid as precursor. Recent studies have shown that only traces of precursors like ammonia and dimethylamine enhance the nucleation rates dramatically (Kirkby et al. 2011, Almeida et al., 2013). Thus the role of different aerosol precursor needs to be studied not only in ambient but also in very well controlled chamber experiments. The CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets) experiment enables conducting experiments very close to atmospheric conditions and with a very low contaminant background. The latest CLOUD experiments focus on the role of organics in aerosol nucleation and growth. For this purpose, numerous experiments with alpha-pinene have been conducted at the CERN CLOUD chamber. Several state-of-the-art instruments were used to cover the whole complexity of the experiment. Chamber conditions were set to 40% relative humidity and 5° C. Atmospheric concentrations of SO2, O3, HONO, H2O and alpha-pinene were injected to the chamber. Different oxidation conditions were used, yielding different levels of oxidized organics: (1) OH radicals, (2) Ozone with the OH scavenger H2 (pure ozonolysis) and (3) both. SO2 was injected to allow for sulfuric acid production. Optical UV fibers were used to enable photochemical reactions. A high field cage (30 kV) can be turned on to remove all charged particles in the chamber to enable completely neutral conditions. Comparing neutral conditions to the beam conditions using CERN's proton synchrotron, the fraction of ion-induced nucleation can be studied. Using

  7. Time projection chambers for the T2K experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlen, Dean; T2K/TPC Collaboration

    2010-11-01

    The T2K experiment will study neutrino oscillation properties by directing a high intensity neutrino beam produced at J-PARC in Tokai, Japan, towards the large super-Kamiokande detector located 295 km away, in Kamioka, Japan. The experiment includes a sophisticated near detector complex, 280 m downstream of the neutrino production target. A key element of the near detectors is the ND280 tracker consisting of two active scintillator-bar target systems surrounded by three large time projection chambers (TPCs) for charged particle tracking. The tracker will provide high statistics samples for studying charged current neutrino interaction rates and kinematics prior to oscillation, so as to better understand backgrounds in the far detector. The tracker is surrounded by the UA1/Nomad dipole magnet and the TPCs will measure the charge, momentum, particle type (through ionization energy loss in the gas) of particles passing through them. Novel features of these TPCs include the rectangular box design, constructed from composite panels, the use of bulk micromegas detectors for gas amplification, electronics readout based on a new ASIC, and a photoelectron calibration system. This paper describes the design and construction of the TPCs, the readout electronics, the gas handling system and shows the performance of a completed TPC as deduced from measurements with particle beams, cosmic rays, and the calibration system.

  8. Soft Cold EI - approaching molecular ion only with electron ionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirav, Aviv; Keshet, Uri; Danon, Albert

    2015-11-15

    Cold EI is defined as electron ionization of cold molecules in supersonic molecular beams (SMB). Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) with Cold EI provides informative mass spectra, which combine the usual library-searchable EI fragment ions with enhanced molecular ions for improved library-based identification probabilities. However, in some cases, such as in the analysis of complex petrochemical matrices, a soft ionization method that provides only molecular ions is desirable. GC/MS with Cold EI was used with a fly-through ion source at selected electron energies, including at low electron energies, in an attempt to observe molecular ions alone. We explored low electron energy Cold EI and found that once the sample compound is cooled by the supersonic expansion it can be reheated via reflected scattered helium atoms near the skimmer. Furthermore, once a labile molecular ion is formed it can undergo undesirable collision-induced dissociation (CID) in the same way as in tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS), and the magnitude of such CID can be significant for labile molecular ions such as those of hydrocarbons. In order to reduce these adverse effects we reduced the helium pressure at the ion source and MS vacuum chamber by increasing the nozzle-skimmer distance. Cold EI at low electron energies was explored with a squalane isomer (C30 H62 ) and with n-C24 H50 . It was found that an increased nozzle-skimmer distance resulted in a noticeable increase in the abundance ratio of molecular ions to low mass fragment ions. Consequently, Cold EI at low electron energies and a large nozzle-skimmer distance converts EI into Soft Cold EI while further approaching the ideal of a molecular ion only ionization method. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. On-chip electromembrane extraction for monitoring drug metabolism in real time by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Nickolaj J.; Pedersen, Jacob Sønderby; Poulsen, Nicklas Nørgård

    2012-01-01

    changes in the reaction chamber were continuously detected 9 seconds later in the MS. Most of this time delay was due to transport of the purified extract towards the ESI source. The EME step effectively removed the enzymatic material, buffer and salts from the reaction mixture, and prevented......A temperature controlled (37 °C) metabolic reaction chamber with a volume of 1 mL was coupled directly to electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) by the use of a 50 µm deep counter flow micro-chip electromembrane extraction (EME) system. The EME/ESI-MS system was used to study...

  10. A novel method to estimate the impact parameter on a drift cell by using the information of single ionization clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Signorelli, G., E-mail: giovanni.signorelli@pi.infn.it [INFN Sezione di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); D' Onofrio, A. [INFN Sezione di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Università di Pisa, Dipartimento di Fisica, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Venturini, M. [INFN Sezione di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Scuola Normale Superiore, Piazza dei Cavalieri 7, 56126 Pisa (Italy)

    2016-07-11

    Measuring the time of each ionization cluster in drift chambers has been proposed to improve the single hit resolution, especially for very low mass tracking systems. Ad hoc formulae have been developed to combine the information from the single clusters. We show that the problem falls in a wide category of problems that can be solved with an algorithm called Maximum Possible Spacing (MPS) which has been demonstrated to find the optimal estimator. We show that the MPS approach is applicable and gives the expected results. Its application in a real tracking device, namely the MEG II cylindrical drift chamber, is discussed.

  11. Development of Soft Ionization for Particulate Organic Detection with the Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trimborn, A; Williams, L R; Jayne, J T; Worsnop, D R

    2008-06-19

    During this DOE SBIR Phase II project, we have successfully developed several soft ionization techniques, i.e., ionization schemes which involve less fragmentation of the ions, for use with the Aerodyne time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (ToF-AMS). Vacuum ultraviolet single photon ionization was demonstrated in the laboratory and deployed in field campaigns. Vacuum ultraviolet single photon ionization allows better identification of organic species in aerosol particles as shown in laboratory experiments on single component particles, and in field measurements on complex multi-component particles. Dissociative electron attachment with lower energy electrons (less than 30 eV) was demonstrated in the measurement of particulate organics in chamber experiments in Switzerland, and is now a routine approach with AMS systems configured for bipolar, negative ion detection. This technique is particularly powerful for detection of acidic and other highly oxygenated secondary organic aerosol (SOA) chemical functionality. Low energy electron ionization (10 to 12 eV) is also a softer ionization approach routinely available to AMS users. Finally, Lithium ion attachment has been shown to be sensitive to more alkyl-like chemical functionality in SOA. Results from Mexico City are particularly exciting in observing changes in SOA molecular composition under different photochemical/meteorological conditions. More recent results detecting biomass burns at the Montana fire lab have demonstrated quantitative and selective detection of levoglucosan. These soft ionization techniques provide the ToF-AMS with better capability for identifying organic species in ambient atmospheric aerosol particles. This, in turn, will allow more detailed study of the sources, transformations and fate of organic-containing aerosol.

  12. Repair of isolated double-chambered right ventricle | El Kouache ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The finding of a double-chambered right ventricle (DCRV) is exceptionally rare as an isolated anomaly. It is a congenital cardiac anomaly in which the right ventricle is separated into two chambers, a proximal highpressure chamber and a distal low-pressure chamber, by anomalous muscles or fibrous tissues in the right ...

  13. Space Flight Ionizing Radiation Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koontz, Steve

    2017-01-01

    The space-flight ionizing radiation (IR) environment is dominated by very high-kinetic energy-charged particles with relatively smaller contributions from X-rays and gamma rays. The Earth's surface IR environment is not dominated by the natural radioisotope decay processes. Dr. Steven Koontz's lecture will provide a solid foundation in the basic engineering physics of space radiation environments, beginning with the space radiation environment on the International Space Station and moving outward through the Van Allen belts to cislunar space. The benefits and limitations of radiation shielding materials will also be summarized.

  14. Ionizing radiation metrology. 1. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peixoto, Jose Guilherme P. (ed.)

    2014-07-01

    The main purpose of this publication is to review various concepts, fundamental topics and methods related to the primary or secondary measurements of ionizing radiation. Following the approach proposed by the BIPM Comite Consultatif pour les Etalons de Mesures des Rayonnements Ionisants, the book is fully devoted to three different aspects of metrology, namely: radionuclides and radioactivity; X-rays, Gamma, Electron and Charged Particles; Neutron metrology. Approaches inherent traceability, primary standard (absolute) and secondary (relative), assessment of uncertainties, nuclear instrumentation, and laboratory infrastructure were also contemplated herein. (author)

  15. XUV ionization of aligned molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelkensberg, F.; Siu, W.; Gademann, G. [FOM Institute AMOLF, Science Park 104, NL-1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rouzee, A.; Vrakking, M. J. J. [FOM Institute AMOLF, Science Park 104, NL-1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Max-Born-Institut, Max-Born Strasse 2A, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Johnsson, P. [FOM Institute AMOLF, Science Park 104, NL-1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Physics, Lund University, Post Office Box 118, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Lucchini, M. [Department of Physics, Politecnico di Milano, Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie CNR-IFN, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Lucchese, R. R. [Department of Chemistry, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843-3255 (United States)

    2011-11-15

    New extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) light sources such as high-order-harmonic generation (HHG) and free-electron lasers (FELs), combined with laser-induced alignment techniques, enable novel methods for making molecular movies based on measuring molecular frame photoelectron angular distributions. Experiments are presented where CO{sub 2} molecules were impulsively aligned using a near-infrared laser and ionized using femtosecond XUV pulses obtained by HHG. Measured electron angular distributions reveal contributions from four orbitals and the onset of the influence of the molecular structure.

  16. Change of Pressing Chamber Conicalness at Briquetting Process in Briquetting Machine Pressing Chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Križan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we will present the impact of the conical shape of a pressing chamber, an important structural parameter. Besides the known impact of the technological parameters of pressing chambers, it is also very important to pay attention to their structural parameters. In the introduction, we present a theoretical analysis of pressing chamber conicalness. An experiment aimed at detecting this impact was performed at our institute, and it showed that increasing the conicalness of a pressing chamber improves the quality of the final briquettes. The conicalness of the pressing chamber has a significanteffect on the final briquette quality and on the construction of briquetting machines. The experimental findings presented here show the importance of this parameter in the briquetting process.

  17. Commissioning of SLAC SLD 45-Degree Chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eschenburg, Vance O.

    2002-07-19

    The SLD experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center had a significant gap in its muon tracking coverage, provided by the Warm Iron Calorimeter. Supplemental planes of limited streamer tube chambers were added to improve the coverage in the vicinity of the gap at 0.65 < |cos{theta}| < 0.85. A software effort to upgrade the tracking software for this system is detailed. The commissioning of the forty-five degree chamber region of the SLAC SLD Warm Iron Calorimeter is presented. This task involved the completion of the forty-five degree chamber region geometry for the Warm Iron Calorimeter's fitter and swimmer and the changing of the way multiple scattering effects are treated in the fitter algorithm.

  18. Rapid-Cycling Bubble-Chamber, details

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1980-01-01

    Parts of the hydraulic expansion system of the Rapid-Cycling Bubble-Chamber (RCBC). RCBC was the largest of 3 rapid-cycling bubble-chambers (the others were LEBC and HOLEBC), used as target- and vertex-detectors within the European Hybrid Spectrometer (EHS) in the SPS North Area (EHN1). RCBC contained 250 l of liquid hydrogen and was located inside a 3 T superconducting magnet. It was designed for 30 expansions/s (100 times faster than BEBC), the system shown here allowed 50 expansions/s. RCBC operated from 1981 to 1983 for experiments NA21, NA22 and NA23 at a rate of 15 expansions/s, clocking up a total of over 4 million. In the rear, at left, is bearded Lucien Veillet; Augustin Didona is at the right. See also 8001009. The installation of the piston assembly in the RCBC chamber body is shown in the Annual Report 1980, p.65.

  19. Thermal Vacuum Chamber Repressurization with Instrument Purging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woronowicz, Michael

    2017-01-01

    At the end of James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) OTIS (Optical Telescope Element-OTE-Integrated Science Instrument Module-ISIM) cryogenic vacuum testing in NASA Johnson Space Centers (JSCs) thermal vacuum (TV) Chamber A, contamination control (CC) engineers are mooting the idea that chamber particulate material stirred up by the repressurization process may be kept from falling into the ISIM interior to some degree by activating instrument purge flows over some initial period before opening the chamber valves. This memo describes development of a series of models designed to describe this process. These are strung together in tandem to estimate overpressure evolution from which net outflow velocity behavior may be obtained. Creeping flow assumptions are then used to determine the maximum particle size that may be kept suspended above the ISIM aperture, keeping smaller particles from settling within the instrument module.

  20. High temperature thrust chamber for spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chazen, Melvin L. (Inventor); Mueller, Thomas J. (Inventor); Kruse, William D. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A high temperature thrust chamber for spacecraft (20) is provided herein. The high temperature thrust chamber comprises a hollow body member (12) having an outer surface and an internal surface (16) defining the high temperature chamber (10). The body member (12) is made substantially of rhenium. An alloy (18) consisting of iridium and at least alloying metal selected of the group consisting of rhodium, platinum and palladium is deposited on at least a portion of the internal surface (16) of the body member (12). The iridium and the alloying metal are electrodeposited onto the body member (12). A HIP cycle is performed upon the body member (12) to cause the coating of iridium and the alloying metal to form the alloy (18) which protects the body member (12) from oxidation.

  1. Anterior chamber collapse syndrome in a koala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddle, Vl; Naranjo, C; Bernays, Me

    2014-05-01

    Anterior chamber collapse syndrome has been recognised in various species and is associated with early-life ocular disease or trauma. It is important to differentiate this acquired condition from a congenital malformation. An adult female koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) was referred for assessment of buphthalmos and severe keratitis of the right eye. The degree of keratitis obstructed examination of intraocular structures. Enucleation of the affected eye was performed and the histopathological diagnosis was anterior chamber collapse syndrome and secondary glaucoma. This case contributes to the limited information available in the literature on anterior chamber collapse syndrome, a disease unique in having secondary glaucoma with minimal or no inflammation. The case also expands the literature available on ocular disease in koalas. More specifically, this is the only reported case of glaucoma, of any aetiology, in the koala. © 2014 Australian Veterinary Association.

  2. Swirl chamber for vitrification of fly ashes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zarzycki Robert

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The study presents the concept of a swirl chamber used for vitrification of fly ashes. It assumes the use of coal dust in the process of fly ash melting. The coal dust supplied to the swirl chamber and gasified in the atmosphere of O2, CO2 and H2O allows for obtaining combustible gases composed of CO and H2, which are burnt with the pneumatically supplied fly ash. The above process allows for obtaining a product in the form of a molten slag which does not contain coal grains. The study presents numerical calculations for the process of combustion and gasification of coal dust and opportunities for ensuring adequate parameters in the fly ash melting zone. The combustible gases obtained during the process of gasification can be supplied to the chamber of a pulverized-bed boiler.

  3. Emulsion chamber experiments for the Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkes, R. J.

    Emulsion chambers offer several unique features for the study of ultrahigh-energy cosmic-ray interactions and spectra aboard a permanent manned Space Station. Emulsion-chamber experiments provide the highest acceptance/weight ratio of any current experimental technique, are invulnerable to mechanical shocks and temperature excursions associated with space flight, do not employ volatile or explosive components or materials, and are not dependent upon data communications or recording systems. Space-Station personnel would be employed to replace track-sensitive materials as required by background accumulation. Several emulsion-chamber designs are proposed, including both conventional passive calorimetric detectors and a hybrid superconducting-magnetic-spectrometer system. Results of preliminary simulation studies are presented. Operational logistics are discussed.

  4. Almond Test Body. [for microwave anechoic chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominek, Allen K. (Inventor); Wood, Richard M. (Inventor); Gilreath, Melvin C. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    The invention is an almond shaped test body for use in measuring the performance characteristics of microwave anechoic chambers and for use as a support for components undergoing radar cross-section measurements. The novel aspect of this invention is its shape, which produces a large dynamic scattered field over large angular regions making the almond valuable for verifying the performance of microwave anechoic chambers. As a component mount, the almond exhibits a low return that does not perturb the measurement of the component and it simulates the backscatter characteristics of the component as if over an infinite ground plane.

  5. Sealed Plant-Growth Chamber For Clinostat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Christopher S.; Dreschel, Thomas W.

    1993-01-01

    Laboratory chamber for growing plants used to measure photosynthesis and respiration in simulated microgravity. Holds plant specimens while rotated on clinostat, see article, "Clinostat Delivers Power To Plant-Growth Cabinets" (KSC-11537). Provides way of comparing gas-exchange rates of plants rotated horizontally on clinostat with those of stationary or vertically rotated plants. Gas extracted for analysis without stopping clinostat. Chamber includes potlike base and cylindrical cover, both made of transparent acrylic pipe. Gasket forms seal between cover and bottom plate of base. Cover bolted to pot baseplate, which in turn bolted to clinostat.

  6. Permeability of MDT chambers to water vapor

    CERN Document Server

    Palestini, S

    2003-01-01

    Tests of MDT chambers performed at the GIF facility and in the H8 test-beam area have shown relative high levels of water vapor contamination in the gas-mixture at the detector output. This effects significantly the drift properties of the MDTs. This note shows that amount of water observed is compatible with approximate estimates based on the permeability of Noryl, used in the tube end-plugs, and of EPDM, used in the O-rings of the on-chamber gas distribution.

  7. A view inside the Gargamelle bubble chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1970-01-01

    Gargamelle was the name given to a big bubble chamber built at the Saclay Laboratory in France during the late 1960s. It was designed principally for the detection at CERN of the elusive particles called neutrinos. A bubble chamber contains a liquid under pressure, which reveals the tracks of electrically charged particles as trails of tiny bubbles when the pressure is reduced. Neutrinos have no charge, and so leave no tracks, but the aim with Gargamelle was "see neutrinos" by making visible any charged particles set in motion by the interaction of neutrinos in the liquid

  8. Almond test body. [for microwave anechoic chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominek, Allen K. (Inventor); Wood, Richard M. (Inventor); Gilreath, Melvin C. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    The invention is an almond shaped test body for use in measuring the performance characteristics of microwave anechoic chambers and for use as a support for components undergoing radar cross-section measurements. The novel aspect of this invention is its shape, which produces a large dynamic scattered field over large angular regions making the almond valuable for verifying the performance of microwave anechoic chambers. As a component mount, the almond exhibits a low return that does not perturb the measurement of the component and it simulates the backscatter characteristics of the component as if over an infinite ground plane.

  9. [Plasma ionized magnesium concentration following cardiopulmonary bypass].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaya, Fumimasa; Fukui, Michihiko; Tsuruta, Hiroshi; Kooguchi, Kunihiko; Shimosato, Goshun

    2002-06-01

    We performed a retrospective study to analyze plasma ionized magnesium concentration following cardiopulmonary bypass. Severe decrease of ionized magnesium concentration associated with frequent abnormal ECG sign was found in a patient with magnesium-free cardioplegia. Cardioplegia containing 16 mmol.l-1 of magnesium ion maintained ionized magnesium concentration within normal ranges without postoperative magnesium loading. Use of cardioplegia containing magnesium or adequate magnesium supplement is thought to be essential for patients receiving cardiopulmonary bypass.

  10. Ionizing radiation and orthopaedic prostheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimnac, Clare M.; Kurtz, Steven M.

    2005-07-01

    Ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) materials have been used successfully as one half of the bearing couple (against metallic alloys or ceramics) in total hip and total knee joint replacements for four decades. This review describes the impact of ionizing radiation (used for sterilization and for microstructural modification via crosslinking) on the performance of UHMWPE total joint replacement components. Gamma radiation sterilization in air leads to oxidative degradation of UHMWPE joint components that occurs during shelf-aging and also during in vivo use. Efforts to mitigate oxidative degradation of UHMWPE joint components include gamma radiation sterilization in inert barrier-packaging and processing treatments to reduce free radicals. Ionizing radiation (both gamma and electron-beam) has recently been used to form highly crosslinked UHMWPEs that have better adhesive and abrasive wear resistance than non-crosslinked UHMWPE, thereby potentially improving the long-term performance of total joint replacements. Along with increased wear resistance, however, there are deleterious changes to ductility and fracture resistance of UHMWPE, and an increased risk of fracture of these components remains a clinical concern.

  11. NMR Metabolomics in Ionizing Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Jian Z.; Xiao, Xiongjie; Hu, Mary Y.

    2016-09-08

    Ionizing radiation is an invisible threat that cannot be seen, touched or smelled and exist either as particles or waves. Particle radiation can take the form of alpha, beta or neutrons, as well as high energy space particle radiation such as high energy iron, carbon and proton radiation, etc. (1) Non-particle radiation includes gamma- and x-rays. Publically, there is a growing concern about the adverse health effects due to ionizing radiation mainly because of the following facts. (a) The X-ray diagnostic images are taken routinely on patients. Even though the overall dosage from a single X-ray image such as a chest X-ray scan or a CT scan, also called X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT), is low, repeated usage can cause serious health consequences, in particular with the possibility of developing cancer (2, 3). (b) Human space exploration has gone beyond moon and is planning to send human to the orbit of Mars by the mid-2030s. And a landing on Mars will follow.

  12. Basic performance of a position-sensitive tissue-equivalent proportional chamber (PS-TEPC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishimoto, Yuji, E-mail: yuji.kishimoto@kek.jp [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) (Japan); Sasaki, Shinichi; Saito, Kiwamu; Takahashi, Kazutoshi [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) (Japan); Doke, Tadayoshi [Waseda University (Japan); Miuchi, Kentaro [Kobe University (Japan); Fuse, Tetsuhito; Nagamatsu, Aiko [Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) (Japan); Uchihori, Yukio; Kitamura, Hisashi [National Institute of Radiological Sciences (Japan); Terasawa, Kazuhiro [Keio University (Japan); Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) (Japan)

    2013-12-21

    The characteristics and performance of the prototype of a Position-Sensitive Tissue-Equivalent Proportional Chamber (PS-TEPC), consisting of a miniaturized micro-pixel chamber (μ-PIC), were investigated. The gas–gain curve of the μ-PIC and an approximate function with which to convert measured collected charge into the primary charge ionized by incident heavy-ion particles were obtained. The measured Linear Energy Transfer (LET) indicated good agreement with that of the injected beam calculated using SRIM2008 code in the LET range from 0.4 to 180keV/μm, which roughly covers the whole LET range required for space dosimeters. As expected, the measured energy resolution improved with increasing LET of the injected beam. It was estimated to be 27% for 0.4keV/μm, which is just about the LET of minimum-ionizing particles. Consequently, it was confirmed that the PS-TEPC exhibits no significant undesirable feature but is well suited for space dosimetry.

  13. Ionization probes of molecular structure and chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, P.M. [State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Various photoionization processes provide very sensitive probes for the detection and understanding of the spectra of molecules relevant to combustion processes. The detection of ionization can be selective by using resonant multiphoton ionization or by exploiting the fact that different molecules have different sets of ionization potentials. Therefore, the structure and dynamics of individual molecules can be studied even in a mixed sample. The authors are continuing to develop methods for the selective spectroscopic detection of molecules by ionization, and to use these methods for the study of some molecules of combustion interest.

  14. Ionization cross section for a strongly coupled partially ionized hydrogen plasma: variable phase approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baimbetov, F B; Kudyshev, Z A [Department of Physics, Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, 050012 Almaty (Kazakhstan)], E-mail: Fazylhan.Baimbetov@kaznu.kz, E-mail: Z.Kudyshev@mail.ru

    2009-05-29

    In the present work an electron impact ionization cross section is considered. The electron impact ionization cross section is calculated with the help of a variable phase approach to potential scattering. The Calogero equation is numerically solved, based on a pseudopotential model of interaction between partially ionized plasma particles, which accounts for correlation effects. As a result, scattering phase shifts are obtained. On the basis of the scattering phase shifts, the ionization cross section is calculated.

  15. Vacuum chamber for intersection I-4

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1972-01-01

    Vacuum chamber for intersection I-4 of the ISR being assembled inside a wooden mock-up of the gap of the split-field magnet. The central round-cylinder section is provisional and is to be replaced by an elliptic-cylinder section to give more space vertically for installation of detectors. Supports for the central section are of carbon fibre composite.

  16. Using reverberation chambers for em measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leferink, Frank Bernardus Johannes

    2010-01-01

    Reverberation chambers (RC) are being used for several decades. The main advantage is the high field strength which can be generated, with only modest power. In the last few years the use of RCs became much popular, for testing multi-path propagation for communication links, or testing the coupling

  17. Spark chambers in the Microcosm museum

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loiez

    1990-01-01

    These spark chambers were displayed in CERN's permanent exhibition, Microcosm. These were particle detectors in which the tracks of particles would be seen by sparks created along the particle's path. While touring Microcosm, visitors can learn more about this and other detector methods both past and present.

  18. Intracapsular cataract extraction with anterior chamber intraocular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: To assess the visual outcome of cataract extraction with ACIOL implantation in a Nigerian hospital. Methods: The visual outcome of 50 eyes of 42 patients aged 40 years and above, out of 212 eyes that underwent intracapsular cataract extraction (ICCE) and anterior chamber intraocular lens (ACIOL) implantation, were ...

  19. Lifetime tests for MAC vertex chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, H.N.

    1986-07-01

    A vertex chamber for MAC was proposed to increase precision in the measurement of the B hadron and tau lepton lifetimes. Thin-walled aluminized mylar drift tubes were used for detector elements. A study of radiation hardness was conducted under the conditions of the proposed design using different gases and different operating conditions. (LEW)

  20. Readout system for proportional wire chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Berst, J D; Metzger, G; Meyer, J M; Schultz, G

    1974-01-01

    The authors describe a MWPC read-out system intended for the hyperon experiments at CERN. Its structure is like the familiar CAMAC branch highway, but driven by a spark chamber readout module placed in CAMAC. The different parts of the equipment, which may read up to 4096 wires, and the test system are described. (5 refs).

  1. Presenting Chamber Music to Young Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Terry Fonda

    2011-01-01

    The number of professional ensembles and organizations with dedicated outreach concerts has been steadily increasing over the past decade. More recently, educational concerts pairing chamber music with young children have been documented. The work presented in this article is a study in the efficacy and feasibility of this format. Various music…

  2. The arrival of the CLOUD chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN AVC

    2009-01-01

    The team from the CLOUD experiment - the world’s first experiment using a high-energy particle accelerator to study the climate - were on cloud nine after the arrival of their new three-metre diameter cloud chamber. This marks the end of three years’ R&D; and design, and the start of preparations for data taking later this year.

  3. Prototype vacuum chamber for ISR intersection region

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    The vacuum chambers at the ISR interaction regions had to be as transparent as possible to the secondary particles emerging from the collision points. Made from stainless steel or titanium, only a fraction of a millimeter thick, they were most delicate to handle.

  4. Prototype Vacuum Chamber for ISR Intersection Region

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    The vacuum chambers at the ISR interaction region had to be as transparent as possible to the secondary particles emerging from the collision points. Made from stainless steel or titanium, only a fraction of a millimeter thick, they were most delicate to handle.

  5. Reproducibility of the chamber scarification test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Klaus Ejner

    1996-01-01

    The chamber scarification test is a predictive human skin irritation test developed to rank the irritation potential of products and ingredients meant for repeated use on normal and diseased skin. 12 products or ingredients can be tested simultaneously on the forearm skin of each volunteer. The t...

  6. GRCop-84 Development for Combustion Chamber Liners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, David; Nathal, Michael; Yun, Hee Man; Lerch, Bradley; Greenbauer-Seng, Leslie; Thomas-Ogbuji, Linus; Holmes, Richard

    2000-01-01

    The development, test, and thermophysical & mechanical properties of a GRCop-84 alloy for combustion chamber liners is discussed. Topics discussed include: History of GRCop-84 development, GRCop-84 thermal expansion, thermal conductivity of GRCop-84, yield strength of GRCop-84, GRCop-84 creep lives, GrCop-84 low cycle fatigue (LCF) lives, and hot fire testing of GRCop-84 spool pieces.

  7. The use of microholography in bubble chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Royer, H

    1981-01-01

    In-line holography has been used for the first time in a bubble chamber for the account of the CERN (Geneva, CH). The holograms were recorded with the help of a single-mode pulse laser. Bubble tracks of 25 microns in diameter have been reconstructed with a resolution of 2 microns. (12 refs).

  8. Field ionization of free helium atoms: Correlation between the kinetic energy of ionized atoms and probability of their field ionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piskur, J.; Borg, L. [Institute of Experimental Physics, Graz University of Technology, Petersgasse 16, 8010 Graz (Austria); Stupnik, A.; Leisch, M. [Institute of Solid State Physics, Graz University of Technology, Petersgasse 16, 8010 Graz (Austria); Ernst, W.E. [Institute of Experimental Physics, Graz University of Technology, Petersgasse 16, 8010 Graz (Austria); Holst, B. [Institute of Experimental Physics, Graz University of Technology, Petersgasse 16, 8010 Graz (Austria)], E-mail: bodil@cantab.net

    2008-05-15

    In this paper the correlation between the kinetic energy of helium atoms and the probability of field ionization is investigated by exploiting the narrow velocity distribution of supersonic molecular beams. Field ionization measurements were carried out on supersonic helium beams at 298 K and 95 K corresponding to energies of about 65 meV and 20 meV, respectively, for the individual atoms. The field ionization was performed with a tungsten tip, radius of curvature 12 nm, kept at room temperature. The ionization probability was found to increase by about a factor 10 when the beam was cooled from 298 K to 95 K. The results presented in this paper are of importance for improving the understanding of field ionization and for the development of a new detector for helium and other molecular beams.

  9. A Cosmic Ray Measurement Facility for ATLAS Muon Chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Biebel, O; Boutemeur, M; Brandt, A; Dubbert, J; Duckeck, G; Elmsheuser, J; Fiedler, F; Hertenberger, R; Kortner, O; Nunnemann, T; Rauscher, F; Schaile, A D; Schieferdecker, P; Staude, A; Stiller, W; Ströhmer, R; Vertesi, R

    2003-01-01

    Monitored Drift Tube (MDT) chambers will constitute the large majority of precision detectors in the Muon Spectrometer of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. For commissioning and calibration of MDT chambers, a Cosmic Ray Measurement Facility is in operation at Munich University. The objectives of this facility are to test the chambers and on-chamber electronics, to map the positions of the anode wires within the chambers with the precision needed for standalone muon momentum measurement in ATLAS, and to gain experience in the operation of the chambers and on-line calibration procedures. Until the start of muon chamber installation in ATLAS, 88 chambers built at the Max Planck Institute for Physics in Munich have to be commissioned and calibrated. With a data taking period of one day individual wire positions can be measured with an accuracy of 8.3 micrometers in the chamber plane and 27 micrometers in the direction perpendicular to that plane.

  10. Measurement of changes in linear accelerator photon energy through flatness variation using an ion chamber array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Song; Balter, Peter A; Rose, Mark; Simon, William E

    2013-04-01

    To compare the use of flatness versus percent depth dose (PDD) for determining changes in photon beam energy for a megavoltage linear accelerator. Energy changes were accomplished by adjusting the bending magnet current by up to ± 15% in 5% increments away from the value used clinically. Two metrics for flatness, relative flatness in the central 80% of the field (Flat) and average maximum dose along the diagonals normalized by central axis dose (FDN), were measured using a commercially available planner ionization chamber array. PDD was measured in water at depths of 5 and 10 cm in 3 × 3 cm(2) and 10 × 10 cm(2) fields using a cylindrical chamber. PDD was more sensitive to changes in energy when the beam energy was increased than when it was decreased. For the 18-MV beam in particular, PDD was not sensitive to energy reductions below the nominal energy. The value of Flat was found to be more sensitive to decreases in energy than to increases, with little sensitivity to energy increases above the nominal energy for 18-MV beams. FDN was the only metric that was found to be sensitive to both increases and reductions of energy for both the 6- and 18-MV beams. Flatness based metrics were found to be more sensitive to energy changes than PDD, In particular, FDN was found to be the most sensitive metric to energy changes for photon beams of 6 and 18 MV. The ionization chamber array allows this metric to be conveniently measured as part of routine accelerator quality assurance.

  11. Risks associated with ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, M P

    2003-01-01

    This paper reviews current knowledge on the deterministic and stochastic risks (the latter including the risk of cancer and of hereditary disease) associated with exposure to ionizing radiation. Particular attention is paid to cancer risks following exposure to man-made low linear energy transfer radiation. Excess cancer risks have been observed in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors and in many medically and occupationally exposed groups. In general, the relative risks among Japanese survivors of atomic-bomb explosions are greater than those among comparable subsets in studies of medically exposed individuals. Cell sterilization largely accounts for the discrepancy in relative risks between these two populations, although other factors may contribute, such as the generally higher underlying cancer risks in the medical series than in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors. Risks among occupationally exposed groups such as nuclear workforces and underground miners are generally consistent with those observed in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors.

  12. Tunneling Ionization of Diatomic Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensmark, Jens Søren Sieg

    2016-01-01

    When a molecule is subject to a strong laser field, there is a probability that an electron can escape, even though the electrons are bound by a large potential barrier. This is possible because electrons are quantum mechanical in nature, and they are therefore able to tunnel through potential...... barriers, an ability classical particles do not possess. Tunnelling is a fundamental quantum mechanical process, a process that is distinctly non-classical, so solving this tunnelling problem is not only relevant for molecular physics, but also for quantum theory in general. In this dissertation the theory...... of tunneling ionizaion of molecules is presented and the results of numerical calculations are shown. One perhaps surprising result is, that the frequently used Born-Oppenheimer approximation breaks down for weak fields when describing tunneling ionization. An analytic theory applicable in the weak-field limit...

  13. Ionization cooling ring for muons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Palmer

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Practical ionization cooling rings could lead to lower cost or improved performance in neutrino factory or muon collider designs. The ring modeled here uses realistic three-dimensional fields. The performance of the ring compares favorably with the linear cooling channel used in the second U.S. Neutrino Factory Study. The normalized 6D emittance of an ideal ring is decreased by a factor of approximately 240, compared with a factor of only 15 for the linear channel. We also examine such real-world effects as windows on the absorbers and rf cavities and leaving empty lattice cells for injection and extraction. For realistic conditions the ring decreases the normalized 6D emittance by a factor of 49.

  14. Application of Nonnegative Tensor Factorization for neutron-gamma discrimination of Monte Carlo simulated fission chamber’s output signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mounia Laassiri

    Full Text Available For efficient exploitation of research reactors, it is important to discern neutron flux distribution inside the reactor with the best possible precision. For this reason, fission and ionization chambers are used to measure the neutron field. In these arrays, the sequences of the neutron interaction points in the fission chamber can correctly be identified in order to obtain true neutron energies emitted by nuclei of interest. However, together with the neutrons, gamma-rays are also emitted from nuclei and thereby affect neutron spectra. The originality of this study consists in the application of tensor based blind source separation methods to extract independent components from signals recorded at the fission chamber preamplifier’s output. The objective is to achieve software neutron-gamma discrimination using Nonnegative Tensor Factorization tools. For reasons of nuclear safety, we first simulate the neutron flux inside the TRIGA Mark II Reactor using Monte Carlo methods under Geant4 platform linked to Garfield++. Geant4 simulations allow the fission chamber construction whereas linking the model to Garfield++ permits to simulate drift parameters from the ionization of the filling gas, which is not possible otherwise. Keywords: Fission chamber (FC, Geant4, Garfield++, Neutron-gamma discrimination, Nonnegative Tensor Factorization (NTF

  15. Bystander Effects of Ionizing Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Little, John B. [Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA (United States). Dept. of Genetics and Complex Diseases

    2017-01-17

    The objectives of this grant renewal are to provide administrative support and travel funds to allow the continued participation of the principal investigator (Dr. John B. Little) as an advisor to research initiated by several research fellows from his laboratory. The actual research will be carried out under the direction of Dr. Hatsumi Nagasawa with the collaboration of Dr. Joel Bedford at the Colorado State University, and by Drs. Edouard Azzam and Sonia de Toledo at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey. Dr. Little will advise on the planning of experiments and development of experimental protocols, the analysis of data, and the preparation of manuscripts for publication. The Specific Aims for several of the planned experiments include: 1) to extend studies of the role of recombinational repair in the bystander effect by examining other genes in this pathway and cell lines deficient in excision repair; 2) to continue studies to determine the nature of the damage signal transmitted to bystander cells including the expression of several connexins in the bystander response, and the extent to which the enhanced oxidative metabolism observed in bystander cells may relate to the nature of the transmitted bystander signal; 3) to utilize a genome-wide approach to examine the genetic basis for the hypersensitivity to ionization we have observed in unaffected parents of patients with hereditary retinoblastoma, as well as from a group of apparently normal individuals that show similar radiosensitivity; 4) to complete studies concerning the induction of high frequencies of cells with massive chromosome damage in clonal derivatives of p53 and p21 knockout mouse cell lines; in particular to examine the role of telomere changes in this phenomenon. Overall, the results of these studies should enhance our understanding of the risk of low-dose exposures to ionizing radiation, including human populations to residential radon as well as occupational exposures.

  16. METAL CHELATING AGENTS IV: ELECTRON IONIZATION AND ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The electron ionization (EI) and ammonia chemical ionization [CI (NH3)] mass spectral studies on 2-phenyl acetophenone semicarbazone are reported. The El spectrum shows a clearly identifiable molecular ion peak of weak intensity at m/z 253 and the base peak is observed at m/z 77. The CI (NH3) spectrum is ...

  17. Monte Carlo-based correction factors for ion chamber dosimetry in heterogeneous phantoms for megavoltage photon beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Fujio

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the perturbation correction factors and inhomogeneity correction factors (ICFs) for a thin-walled cylindrical ion chamber in a heterogeneous phantom including solid water, lung and bone plastic materials. The perturbation factors due to the replacement of the air cavity, non-water equivalence of the wall and the stem, non-air equivalence of the central electrode and the overall perturbation factor, PQ, for a cylindrical chamber, in the heterogeneous phantom were calculated with the EGSnrc/Cavity Monte Carlo code for 6 and 15 MV photon beams. The PTW31010 (0.125 cm3) chamber was modeled with Monte Carlo simulations, and was used for measurements and calculations of percentage depth ionization (PDI) or percentage depth dose (PDD). ICFs were calculated from the ratio of the product of the stopping power ratios (SPRs) and PQ of lung or bone to solid water. Finally, the measured PDIs were converted to PDDs by using ICFs and were compared with those calculated by the Monte Carlo method. The perturbation effect for the ion chamber in lung material is insignificant at 5 × 5 and 10 × 10 cm2 fields, but the effect needs to be considered under conditions of lateral electron disequilibrium with a 3 × 3 cm2 field. ICFs in lung varied up to 2% and 4% depending on the field size for 6 and 15 MV, respectively. For bone material, the perturbation effects due to the chamber wall and the stem were more significant at up to 3.5% and 1.6% for 6 MV, respectively. ICFs for bone material were approximately 0.945 and 0.940 for 6 and 15 MV, respectively. The converted PDDs by using ICFs were in good agreement with Monte Carlo calculated PDDs. The chamber perturbation correction and SPRs should strictly be considered for ion chamber dosimetry in heterogeneous media. This is more important for small field dosimetry in lung and bone materials.

  18. Monitoring Liquid Argon Time Projection Chambers With A Raspberry Pi Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patteson, Crystal

    2016-03-01

    The MicroBooNE detector is the first of three liquid argon (LAr) time projection chambers (TPCs) that are central to the short-baseline neutrino program at Fermilab. These chambers consist of thousands of stainless steel or beryllium-copper sense wires that detect ionization electrons produced when neutrinos interact with liquid argon nuclei inside the detector. The wires are several hundred microns in diameter to several meters in length. The construction of such LAr TPCs often takes place in an assembly hall, which is different from the detector hall where the experiment will operate, as was the case with MicroBooNE. Since in situ access to the chamber and its wires in the beamline enclosure can be limited, we investigate the possibility of using a Raspberry Pi single-board computer connected to a low-cost camera installed inside the cryostat as a cost-efficient way to verify the integrity of the wires after transport. We also highlight other benefits of this monitoring device implemented in MicroBooNE, including detector hall surveillance and verification of the status of LED indicators on detector electronics. The author would like to thank Dr. Matthew Toups for his encouragement and guidance on this research project.

  19. Anterior chamber fixation of a posterior chamber intraocular lens: A novel technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Sahap Kükner

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to evaluate the implantation of a posterior chamber intraocular lens (IOL in the anterior chamber (AC with the haptics passing through two iridectomies to the posterior chamber. A total of 33 eyes of 33 patients with inadequate posterior capsular support due to either previous aphakia or posterior capsular rupture during cataract extraction were included in the study. A double iridectomy was performed on all patients using a vitrectomy probe on the midperiphery of the iris. IOLs were implanted in the AC, and the haptics were passed through the iridectomies to the posterior chamber. The mean follow-up time was 25.3 months. AC hemorrhage occurred in five patients during the iridectomy procedure. Corneal edema was detected in eight of 14 patients with primary IOL insertions. Haptic dislocation was detected in only one patient. This technique may be a good alternative to scleral-fixated IOL implantation in eyes with aphakia.

  20. Achievable field strength in reverberation chambers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Eulig

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Feldvariable Kammern (FVK, engl.: modestirred- chamber werden unter anderem für EMV-Störfestigkeitsprüfungen verwendet. Ein häufig genanntes Argument, das die Einführung dieser Kammern als normgerechte Prüfumgebung vorantreiben soll, ist eine hohe Feldstärke, die im Vergleich zu anderen Testumgebungen mit relativ moderaten HF-Leistungen erreicht werden kann. Besonders für sicherheitskritische Geräte, wie Komponenten aus der Avionik- oder KFZ-Industrie, sind heutzutage Testfeldstärken von mehreren 100 V/m notwendig. Derart hohe Feldstärken können in Umgebungen, die ein ebenes Wellenfeld erzeugen oder nachbilden, nur mit großen HFLeistungen generiert werden. Durch die Resonanzeigenschaften einer FVK können demgegenüber mit sehr viel weniger Leistung und damit Verstärkeraufwand vergleichbare Werte der Feldstärke erzeugt werden. Allerdings sinkt mit zunehmendem Volumen die erreichbare Feldstärke bei gleicher Speiseleistung. Idealerweise sollen Feldvariable Kammern bei möglichst niedrigen Frequenzen für EMVTests nutzbar sein, was jedoch ein großes Kammervolumen erfordert. Das Problem, bei niedrigen Frequenzen hohe Feldstärken erzeugen zu können, relativiert deshalb den Vorteil von FVKn gegenüber bekannten Testumgebungen bei niedrigen Testfrequenzen. Der Posterbeitrag erläutert, welche Feldstärken in verschieden großen Feldvariablen Kammern beim Einspeisen einer bestimmten hochfrequenten Leistung erreicht werden können. Anhand dieser Ergebnisse wird aufgezeigt, oberhalb welcher Grenzfrequenz eine Anwendung von FVKn nur sinnvoll erscheint. Mode-stirred chambers (MSCs can be used for radiated immunity tests in EMC testing. Advantageous compared to conventional test methods is the high field strength which can here be generated with less RF-Power. This point is often the main argument for pushing the standardization of MSCs as an other EMC testing environment. Especially for safety-critical electronic equipment like avionic or

  1. RAPID COMMUNICATION: Conducting triangular chambers for EMC measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yi

    1999-03-01

    Conducting rectangular chambers have been used extensively for electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) shielding and measurement applications. In this communication, conducting triangular chambers are investigated as an alternative structure for rectangular EMC reverberation chambers, which are becoming an increasingly important and powerful tool for both radiated immunity and emission tests. A prime consideration of designing such a system is the total possible number of modes inside the chamber. A new approach is introduced to obtain this parameter for three different triangular chambers. The initial study has demonstrated that triangular chambers may offer better performance in some cases than their rectangular counterparts.

  2. Metallic spherical anechoic chamber for antenna pattern measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahbakhsh, Ali; Khalaj-Amirhosseini, Mohammad

    2016-08-01

    Anechoic chambers are used for indoor antenna measurements. The common method of constructing an anechoic chamber is to cover all inside walls by the electromagnetic absorbers. In this paper, a fully metallic spherical chamber structure is presented in which the propagation of the electromagnetic waves inside the chamber is controlled and they are guided to an absorber. In the proposed method, an appropriate quiet zone is obtained, and unlike ordinary anechoic chambers, the absorber usage amount is reduced greatly. The performance of the chamber is evaluated by simulation. The results show that the proposed method could provide a useful technique for the indoor antenna measurements.

  3. An uncommon variant of double-chambered right ventricle masquerading as double-chambered left ventricle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baritakis, Nikolaos; Grapsas, Nikolaos; Kotsalos, Andreas; Davlouros, Periklis

    2018-02-01

    We present a rare case of a double-chambered right ventricle masquerading as a double-chambered left ventricle, which was found incidentally on cardiac imaging in an adult female patient with atypical chest pain. The most common form of double-chambered right ventricle is characterized by compartmentalization of the right ventricle by muscular bands into 2 distinct chambers. The main features of this malformation are a pressure gradient between the 2 compartments, and the frequent (up to 90%) association with a membranous ventricular septal defect. In our case, the muscular band dividing the right ventricle was located in the inferoseptal part of the latter, creating a diminutive cavity that had no communication with the main right ventricle but communicated with the left ventricle creating the false impression of a double-chambered left ventricle. This constitutes a rare variant of double-chambered right ventricle with unknown clinical implications. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  4. Compact Raman Lidar Measurement of Liquid and Vapor Phase Water Under the Influence of Ionizing Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiina Tatsuo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A compact Raman lidar has been developed for studying phase changes of water in the atmosphere under the influence of ionization radiation. The Raman lidar is operated at the wavelength of 349 nm and backscattered Raman signals of liquid and vapor phase water are detected at 396 and 400 nm, respectively. Alpha particles emitted from 241Am of 9 MBq ionize air molecules in a scattering chamber, and the resulting ions lead to the formation of liquid water droplets. From the analysis of Raman signal intensities, it has been found that the increase in the liquid water Raman channel is approximately 3 times as much as the decrease in the vapor phase water Raman channel, which is consistent with the theoretical prediction based on the Raman cross-sections. In addition, the radius of the water droplet is estimated to be 0.2 μm.

  5. Experimental comparison of models for ultrafast impact ionization is silicon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarekegne, Abebe Tilahun; Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2016-01-01

    We compare experimentally the exponential and quadratic (Keldysh formula) impact ionization models using THz induced impact ionization in silicon. We demonstrate that the exponential model offers the best description of impact ionization process for ultrashort electric filed pulses....

  6. Self-detection of x-ray Fresnel transmissivity using photoelectron-induced gas ionization

    OpenAIRE

    Stoupin, Stanislav

    2015-01-01

    Electric response of an x-ray mirror enclosed in a gas flow ionization chamber was studied under the conditions of total external reflection for hard x-rays. It is shown that the electric response of the system as a function of the incidence angle is defined by x-ray Fresnel transmissivity and photon-electron attenuation properties of the mirror material. A simple interpretation of quantum yield of the system is presented. The approach could serve as a basis for non-invasive in-situ diagnosti...

  7. Reduction of the ionization loss distribution width of several simultaneous relativistic particles traversing a scintillation counter

    CERN Document Server

    Aderholz, M; Matthewson, R

    1975-01-01

    A Poisson distribution of number of electrons at the input stages of a photomultiplier has been folded into a Landau-Symon distribution of ionization losses in a plastic scintillator and a distribution of the smallest value out of n detectors was derived analytically for m simultaneous particles. A group of four identical scintillation counters was constructed and the smallest of the four output pulses was used for selective triggering of the bubble chamber flash with the greater precision engendered by the considerably reduced distribution width. (22 refs).

  8. Introduction for Diffusion Chamber Culture Symposium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carsten, A. L.

    1979-01-01

    The diffusion-chamber system has been applied to studies of cell kinetics, progenitor cell quantitation, humoral effects, immunological effects, cytogenetics, organogenesis, and the cellular effects of drugs and physical factors such as radiation, hypoxia, etc. Chamber contents have been analyzed by clot dissolution with measuring of cell content, limiting dilution evaluation, radionuclide utilization (tritiated thymidine labeling), growth of colony number, size and type, CFU-S or CFU-C content, or proliferation by secondary culture in mice or in vitro systems, and chromosome changes. Cell types ranging from embryonal tissues to adult normal and neoplastic tissues have been grown in hosts across species barriers. Advantages and disadvantages of this system are discussed.

  9. The KLOE drift chamber VCI 2001

    CERN Document Server

    Adinolfi, M; Ambrosino, F; Andryakov, A; Antonelli, A; Antonelli, M; Anulli, F; Bacci, C; Bankamp, A; Barbiellini, G; Bellini, F; Bencivenni, G; Bertolucci, Sergio; Bini, C; Bloise, C; Bocci, V; Bossi, F; Branchini, P; Bulychjov, S A; Cabibbo, G; Calcaterra, A; Caloi, R; Campana, P; Capon, G; Carboni, G; Cardini, A; Casarsa, M; Cataldi, G; Ceradini, F; Cervell, F; Cevenini, F; Chiefari, G; Ciambrone, P; Conetti, S; Conticelli, S; De Lucia, E; De Robertis, G; De Simone, P; De Zorzi, G; De Sangro, R; Dell'Agnello, S; Denig, A; Di Domenico, A; Di Donato, C; Di Falco, S; Doria, A; Drago, E; Elia, V; Erriquez, O; Farilla, A; Felici, G; Ferrari, A; Ferrer, M L; Finocchiaro, G; Forti, C; Franceschi, A; Franzini, P; Gao, M L; Gatti, C; Gauzzi, P; Giovannella, S; Golovatyuk, V; Gorini, E; Grancagnolo, F; Grandegger, W; Graziani, E; Guarnaccia, P; Han, H G; Han, S W; Huang, X; Incagli, M; Ingrosso, L; Jang, Y Y; Kim, W; Kluge, W; Kulikov, V; Lacava, F; Lanfranchi, G; Lee-Franzini, J; Lomtadze, F; Luisi, C; Mao Chen Sheng; Martemyanov, M; Matsyuk, M; Mei, W; Merola, L; Messi, R; Miscetti, S; Moalem, A; Moccia, S; Moulson, M; Murtas, F; Müller, S; Napolitano, M; Nedosekin, A; Pacciani, L; Pagès, P; Palutan, M; Panareo, M; Paoluzi, L; Pasqualucci, E; Passalacqua, L; Passaseo, M; Passeri, A; Patera, V; Petrolo, E; Petrucci, Guido; Picca, D; Pirozzi, G; Pistillo, C; Pollack, M; Pontecorvo, L; Primavera, M; Ruggieri, F; Santangelo, P; Santovetti, E; Saracino, G; Schamberger, R D; Schwick, C; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Scuri, F; Sfiligoi, I; Shan, J; Silano, P; Spadaro, T; Spagnolo, S; Spiriti, E; Stanescu, C; Tong, G L; Tortora, L; Valente, E; Valente, P; Valeriani, B; Venanzoni, G; Veneziano, Stefano; Von Hagel, U; Wu, Y; Xie, Y G; Zhao, P P; Zhou, Y

    2002-01-01

    The main goal of the KLOE experiment at the Frascati DAPHINE phi-factory is the study CP violation in kaon decays. The tracking device of the experiment is a drift chamber whose dimensions, 4 m of diameter and 3.3 m length, provide a large acceptance volume for the decay products of low momentum K sub L (lambda sub L =3.4 m). A complete stereo geometry with 12.582 cells arranged in 58 layers guarantees a high and uniform efficiency in the reconstruction of the charged K sub L decays. Very light materials have been chosen both for the drift medium, a helium-based gas mixture, and for the mechanical structure, made of carbon fiber, to minimize multiple scattering and conversion of low-energy photons. The design requirements, the adopted solutions together with the calibration procedure and the tracking performances of the drift chamber are discussed.

  10. Diurnal variations in a sealed radon chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilboy, W. B.; James, P. R.; Farmer, C. P.; Beard, J. E.

    1990-12-01

    During experiments to calibrate a radon-in-air counter, some unexpected diurnal variations have been observed. Inside the sealed stainless-steel chamber of a nominal volume of 3 litres, ionised 218Po atoms from the alpha-decay of 222Rn are attracted by an electric field to a ZnS(Ag) scintillation screen via which subsequent α-decay events are detected. Results for this configuration are presented and also for a modified version in which the scintillation screen is replaced by a high-resolution α-detector. Ambient temperature changes were suspected to be responsible for the observed counting-efficiency variation and this has been confirmed by operating the wall of the chamber at various temperatures between 0°C and about 40°C, which revealed a positive temperature coefficient of ˜1%/°C at 25°C. Possible reasons for this effect are considered.

  11. Wire chambers with their magnetostrictive readout

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    This set of wire chamber planes shaped as a cylinder sector was installed inside the magnet of a polarized spin target modified to allow as well momentum analysis of the produced particles. The experiment (S126) was set up by the CERN-Trieste Collaboration in the PS beam m9 to measure spin effects in the associated production of of a positive kaon and a positive Sigma by interaction of a positive pion with polarized protons.

  12. The Bern Infinitesimal Bubble Chamber (BIBC)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1977-01-01

    The chamber body was machined from a block of aluminium. The visible volume was cylindrical with 65 mm diameter and 35 mm depth. It was filled with propane or freon. It was meant as vertex detector in the search of short-lived particles. It was also used with in-line holography resulting in 8 µm bubble size and 9 cm depth of the field. See E. Ramseyer, B. Hahn and E. Hugentobler, Nucl. Instrum. Methods 201 (1982) 335.

  13. Efficient Determination of Reverberation Chamber Time Constant

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Xiaotian; Robinson, Martin P.; Flintoft, Ian D.; Dawson, John F.

    2017-01-01

    Determination of the rate of energy loss in a reverberation chamber is fundamental to many different measurements such as absorption cross-section, antenna efficiency, radiated power, and shielding effectiveness. Determination of the energy decay time-constant in the time domain by linear fitting the power delay profile, rather than using the frequency domain quality-factor, has the advantage of being independent of the radiation efficiency of antennas used in the measurement. However, determ...

  14. Vacuum Chamber for the Booster Bending Magnets

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1974-01-01

    To minimise eddy currents, induced by the rising magnetic field, the chamber was made from thin stainless steel of high specific electric resistance. For mechanical strength, it was corrugated in a hydro-forming process. The cross-section was designed for maximum strength and maximum aperture. To accept particles with simultaneous large amplitudes in both planes, the cross-section approaches a rectangular shape (see also 7402463).

  15. Cell seeding chamber for bone graft substitutes

    OpenAIRE

    Hennig, J.; Schieker, Matthias; Seitz, H.

    2012-01-01

    There is an increasing demand for bone graft substitutes that are used as osteoconductive scaffolds in the treatment of bone defects and fractures. Achieving optimal bone regeneration requires initial cell seeding of the scaffolds prior to implantation. The cell seeding chamber is a closed assembly. It works like a sandglass. The position of the scaffold is between two reservoirs containing the fluid (e. g. blood). The fluid at the upper reservoir flows through the scaffold driven by gravity....

  16. Ionization Cooling using Parametric Resonances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Rolland P.

    2008-06-07

    Ionization Cooling using Parametric Resonances was an SBIR project begun in July 2004 and ended in January 2008 with Muons, Inc., (Dr. Rolland Johnson, PI), and Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) (Dr. Yaroslav Derbenev, Subcontract PI). The project was to develop the theory and simulations of Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling (PIC) so that it could be used to provide the extra transverse cooling needed for muon colliders in order to relax the requirements on the proton driver, reduce the site boundary radiation, and provide a better environment for experiments. During the course of the project, the theoretical understanding of PIC was developed and a final exposition is ready for publication. Workshops were sponsored by Muons, Inc. in May and September of 2007 that were devoted to the PIC technique. One outcome of the workshops was the interesting and somewhat unexpected realization that the beam emittances using the PIC technique can get small enough that space charge forces can be important. A parallel effort to develop our G4beamline simulation program to include space charge effects was initiated to address this problem. A method of compensating for chromatic aberrations by employing synchrotron motion was developed and simulated. A method of compensating for spherical aberrations using beamline symmetry was also developed and simulated. Different optics designs have been developed using the OptiM program in preparation for applying our G4beamline simulation program, which contains all the power of the Geant4 toolkit. However, no PIC channel design that has been developed has had the desired cooling performance when subjected to the complete G4beamline simulation program. This is believed to be the consequence of the difficulties of correcting the aberrations associated with the naturally large beam angles and beam sizes of the PIC method that are exacerbated by the fringe fields of the rather complicated channel designs that have been

  17. Diurnal Variation of Anterior Chamber Flare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Adam

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To investigate the ideal time and reproducibility of anterior chamber flare measurements. Materials and Methods: Anterior chamber flare measurements were performed with laser flaremetre device at 8 am to 45 volunteers and these measurements were repeated on the same day at 12 pm and 4 pm. Results: Twenty-five (55.5% of the volunteers were women and 20 (44.5% were men; mean age was 28.67±7.40 (18-49 years. The mean anterior chamber flare measurements taken following the ophthalmologic examination were 5.94±1.41 foton/msn at 8 am, 5.65±1.45 foton/msn at 12 pm, and 5.79±1.20 foton/msn at 4 pm. No statistical difference was found between the measurements (p=0.08. Subgroup analysis according to eye color, revealed no significant difference between flare measurements in brown, hazel, and green eyes (p=0.21. Correlation analysis demonstrated association between age and all flare measurements within the day (r=0.24, p=0.03; r=0.41, p=0.01, r=0.27, p=0.01. Conclusion: No significant diurnal change was detected in the flare measurements of our study subjects but positive correlation with age was observed. Hence, all flare measurements within a day are reliable and have high repeatability in healthy subjects. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2015; 45: 52-5

  18. Close cathode chamber: Low material budget MWPC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, Dezső; Kiss, Gábor; Hamar, Gergő; Bencédi, Gyula

    2013-01-01

    Performance of asymmetric-type MWPC-s are presented. In this structure, referred to as Close Cathode Chamber in an earlier study, the material budget is significantly reduced on one hand by the elimination of external support frame, on the other hand by thin detector walls. In this paper it is demonstrated that the outline is compatible with large size detectors (1 m wire length), maintaining mechanical and operation stability, with total weight of 3 kg (including support structure) for a half square meter surface. The detection efficiency and response time is shown to be sufficient for L0 triggering in the ALICE VHMPID layout. Reduced sensitivity to cathode deformations (due to internal overpressure as mechanical strain) is directly demonstrated. On small sized chambers, improvement of position resolution with analog readout is evaluated, reaching 0.09 mm RMS with 2 mm wide cathode segments. Simulation results on signal time evolutions are presented. With the above studies, comparison of classical MWPC-s and the Close Cathode Chamber design is performed in all major aspects.

  19. Menstrual history in altitude chamber trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirmer, J U; Workman, W T

    1992-07-01

    Previous studies have determined a higher rate of altitude-induced decompression sickness (DCS) in women than in men. Women are reportedly at higher risk for developing DCS during menses. A study of menstrual history in women completing altitude chamber training without developing DCS has never been accomplished. The purpose of this study was to collect and analyze menstrual history in these women. Thirteen U.S. Air Force Aerospace Physiology Units participated in a USAF-approved survey for 1 year. After completing altitude chamber flights, data on age, day of menstrual cycle (DMC), birth control pill use (BCP), and mean durations of menstrual cycle and menses were collected. There were 508 responses analyzed. There was no differences between mean duration of menstrual cycle and menses in the Yes (Y) and No (N) BCP groups. Y and N BCP groups were equally distributed across the menstrual cycle. Women completing altitude chamber training without developing DCS appear to be evenly distributed across their menstrual cycle, with use of BCPs not affecting their susceptibility to DCS.

  20. Wire pad chamber for LHCb muon system

    CERN Document Server

    Botchine, B; Lazarev, V A; Sagidova, N; Vorobev, A P; Vorobyov, A; Vorobyov, Alexei

    2000-01-01

    2000-003 Wire pad chambers (WPC) have been proposed for the outer Region 4 of the LHCb Muon System. These are double gap MWPCs with small wire spacing allowing to obtain 99% detection efficiency in a 20 ns time window. The chambers have a rectangular shape with the vertical dimension from 20 cm in Station 1 to 30 cm in Station 5. The horizontal dimensions will be different with the maximal size of 3 meters in Station 5. The wires are in the vertical direction. The short wire length allows to use small wire spacing needed for high time resolution. Also, this helps to obtain the uniform gas gain over the whole chamber area. The WPC has one row of the wire pads formed by grouping wires in separate readout channels. Four WPC prototypes have been built at PNPI and tested in the PS beam at CERN. Here we report on the results from these tests. Also, the results of simulation of the WPC performance are presented.

  1. Testing fireproof materials in a combustion chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulhavy Petr

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with a prototype concept, real experiment and numerical simulation of a combustion chamber, designed for testing fire resistance some new insulating composite materials. This concept of a device used for testing various materials, providing possibility of monitoring temperatures during controlled gas combustion. As a fuel for the combustion process propane butane mixture has been used and also several kinds of burners with various conditions of inlet air (forced, free and fuel flows were tested. The tested samples were layered sandwich materials based on various materials or foams, used as fillers in fire shutters. The temperature distribution was measured by using thermocouples. A simulation of whole concept of experimental chamber has been carried out as the non-premixed combustion process in the commercial final volume sw Pyrosim. The result was to design chamber with a construction suitable, according to the international standards, achieve the required values (temperature in time. Model of the combustion based on a stoichiometric defined mixture of gas and the tested layered samples showed good conformity with experimental results – i.e. thermal distribution inside and heat release rate that has gone through the sample.

  2. Testing fireproof materials in a combustion chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulhavy, Petr; Martinec, Tomas; Novak, Ondrej; Petru, Michal; Srb, Pavel

    This article deals with a prototype concept, real experiment and numerical simulation of a combustion chamber, designed for testing fire resistance some new insulating composite materials. This concept of a device used for testing various materials, providing possibility of monitoring temperatures during controlled gas combustion. As a fuel for the combustion process propane butane mixture has been used and also several kinds of burners with various conditions of inlet air (forced, free) and fuel flows were tested. The tested samples were layered sandwich materials based on various materials or foams, used as fillers in fire shutters. The temperature distribution was measured by using thermocouples. A simulation of whole concept of experimental chamber has been carried out as the non-premixed combustion process in the commercial final volume sw Pyrosim. The result was to design chamber with a construction suitable, according to the international standards, achieve the required values (temperature in time). Model of the combustion based on a stoichiometric defined mixture of gas and the tested layered samples showed good conformity with experimental results - i.e. thermal distribution inside and heat release rate that has gone through the sample.

  3. RF Anechoic Chambers, Tri-Service Research Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — In collaboration with the Navy, there are 12 RF Anechoic and static free exposure chambers located at TSRL. These chambers cover the majority of the RF spectrum and...

  4. Imaging and Controlling Ultrafast Ionization Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, Kenneth

    2008-05-01

    We describe how the combination of an attosecond pulse train (APT) and a synchronized infrared (IR) laser field can be used to image and control ionization dynamics in atomic systems. In two recent experiments, attosecond pulses were used to create a sequence of electron wave packets (EWPs) near the ionization threshold in helium. In the first experiment^, the EWPs were created just below the ionization threshold, and the ionization probability was found to vary strongly with the IR/APT delay. Calculations that reproduce the experimental results demonstrate that this ionization control results from interference between transiently bound EWPs created by different pulses in the train. In the second experiment^, the APT was tailored to produce a sequence of identical EWPs just above the ionization threshold exactly once per laser cycle, allowing us to study a single ionization event stroboscopically. This technique has enabled us to image the coherent electron scattering that takes place when the IR field is sufficiently strong to reverse the initial direction of the electron motion causing it to re-scatter from its parent ion.^P. Johnsson, et al., PRL 99, 233001 (2007).^J. Mauritsson, et al. PRL, to appear (2008).In collaboration with A. L'Huillier, J. Mauritsson, P. Johnsson, T. Remetter, E. Mantsen, M. Swoboda, and T. Ruchon.

  5. Herds of methane chambers grazing bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinham, Alistair; Dunbabin, Matthew

    2014-05-01

    Water to air methane emissions from freshwater reservoirs can be dominated by sediment bubbling (ebullitive) events. Previous work to quantify methane bubbling from a number of Australian sub-tropical reservoirs has shown that this can contribute as much as 95% of total emissions. These bubbling events are controlled by a variety of different factors including water depth, surface and internal waves, wind seiching, atmospheric pressure changes and water levels changes. Key to quantifying the magnitude of this emission pathway is estimating both the bubbling rate as well as the areal extent of bubbling. Both bubbling rate and areal extent are seldom constant and require persistent monitoring over extended time periods before true estimates can be generated. In this paper we present a novel system for persistent monitoring of both bubbling rate and areal extent using multiple robotic surface chambers and adaptive sampling (grazing) algorithms to automate the quantification process. Individual chambers are self-propelled and guided and communicate between each other without the need for supervised control. They can maintain station at a sampling site for a desired incubation period and continuously monitor, record and report fluxes during the incubation. To exploit the methane sensor detection capabilities, the chamber can be automatically lowered to decrease the head-space and increase concentration. The grazing algorithms assign a hierarchical order to chambers within a preselected zone. Chambers then converge on the individual recording the highest 15 minute bubbling rate. Individuals maintain a specified distance apart from each other during each sampling period before all individuals are then required to move to different locations based on a sampling algorithm (systematic or adaptive) exploiting prior measurements. This system has been field tested on a large-scale subtropical reservoir, Little Nerang Dam, and over monthly timescales. Using this technique

  6. Leukemia and ionizing radiation revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuttler, J.M. [Cuttler & Associates Inc., Vaughan, Ontario (Canada); Welsh, J.S. [Loyola University-Chicago, Dept. or Radiation Oncology, Stritch School of Medicine, Maywood, Illinois (United States)

    2016-03-15

    A world-wide radiation health scare was created in the late 19508 to stop the testing of atomic bombs and block the development of nuclear energy. In spite of the large amount of evidence that contradicts the cancer predictions, this fear continues. It impairs the use of low radiation doses in medical diagnostic imaging and radiation therapy. This brief article revisits the second of two key studies, which revolutionized radiation protection, and identifies a serious error that was missed. This error in analyzing the leukemia incidence among the 195,000 survivors, in the combined exposed populations of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, invalidates use of the LNT model for assessing the risk of cancer from ionizing radiation. The threshold acute dose for radiation-induced leukemia, based on about 96,800 humans, is identified to be about 50 rem, or 0.5 Sv. It is reasonable to expect that the thresholds for other cancer types are higher than this level. No predictions or hints of excess cancer risk (or any other health risk) should be made for an acute exposure below this value until there is scientific evidence to support the LNT hypothesis. (author)

  7. Re-ionization and decaying dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodelson, Scott; Jubas, Jay M.

    1991-01-01

    Gunn-Peterson tests suggest that the Universe was reionized after the standard recombination epoch. A systematic treatment is presented of the ionization process by deriving the Boltzmann equations appropriate to this regime. A compact solution for the photon spectrum is found in terms of the ionization ratio. These equations are then solved numerically for the Decaying Dark Matter scenario, wherein neutrinos with mass of order 30 eV radiatively decay producing photons which ionize the intergalactic medium. It was found that the neutrino mass and lifetime are severely constrained by Gunn-Peterson tests, observations of the diffuse photon spectrum in the ultraviolet regime, and the Hubble parameter.

  8. Electrospray ionization and matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry: powerful analytical tools in recombinant protein chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens S.; Svensson, B; Roepstorff, P

    1996-01-01

    Electrospray ionization and matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization are effective ionization methods for mass spectrometry of biomolecules. Here we describe the capabilities of these methods for peptide and protein characterization in biotechnology. An integrated analytical strategy is presen......Electrospray ionization and matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization are effective ionization methods for mass spectrometry of biomolecules. Here we describe the capabilities of these methods for peptide and protein characterization in biotechnology. An integrated analytical strategy...

  9. Anechoic chamber in industrial plants. [construction materials and structural design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpert, E.; Juncu, O.; Lorian, R.; Marfievici, D.; Mararu, I.

    1974-01-01

    A light anechoic chamber for routine acoustical measurements in the machine building industry is reported. The outer housing of the chamber consists of modules cast in glass fiber reinforced polyester resin; the inner housing consists of pyramidal modules cut out of sound absorbing slates. The parameters of this anechoic chamber facilitate acoustical measurements according to ISO and CAEM recommendations.

  10. The HERMES forward tracking chambers construction, operation, and aging effects

    CERN Document Server

    Brack, J T; Clark, S; Ely, J; Fox, B; Hofman, G J; Kinney, E R; Mercer, D J; Rakness, G; Ristinen, R A; Smythe, W R; Warner, D

    2001-01-01

    The design, construction and operation of the HERMES forward (front) tracking chambers and associated electronics are described. Resolution and limited aging tests have been performed on these drift chambers, which use an Ar/CF sub 4 /CO sub 2 (90 : 5 : 5) gas mixture. No degradation in chamber performance has been observed for a cumulative charge in excess of 9 C/cm.

  11. A cylindrical drift chamber with azimuthal and axial position readout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bar-Yam, Z.; Cummings, J.P.; Dowd, J.P.; Eugenio, P.; Hayek, M.; Kern, W.; King, E.; Shenhav, N.; Chung, S.U.; Hackenburg, R.W.; Olchanski, C.; Weygand, D.P.; Willutzki, H.J.; Brabson, B.B.; Crittenden, R.R.; Dzierba, A.R.; Gunter, J.; Lindenbusch, R.; Rust, D.R.; Scott, E.; Smith, P.T.; Sulanke, T.; Teige, S.; Denisov, S.; Dushkin, A.; Kochetkov, V.; Lipaev, V.; Popov, A.; Shein, I.; Soldatov, A.; Anoshina, E.V.; Bodyagin, V.A.; Demianov, A.I.; Gribushin, A.M.; Kodolova, O.L.; Korotkikh, V.L.; Kostin, M.A.; Ostrovidov, A.I.; Sarycheva, L.I.; Sinev, N.B.; Vardanyan, I.N.; Yershov, A.A.; Adams, T.; Bishop, J.M.; Cason, N.M.; Sanjari, A.H.; LoSecco, J.M.; Manak, J.J.; Shephard, W.D.; Stienike, D.L.; Taegar, S.A.; Thompson, D.R.; Brown, D.S.; Pedlar, T.; Seth, K.K.; Wise, J.; Zhao, D.; Adams, G.S.; Napolitano, J.; Nozar, M.; Smith, J.A.; Witkowski, M. [Massachusetts Univ., North Dartmouth, MA (United States)]|[Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, L.I., NY 11973 (United States)]|[Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States)]|[Institute for High Energy Physics, Protvino (Russian Federation)]|[Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation)]|[University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States)]|[Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States)]|[Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY 12180 (United States)

    1997-02-21

    A cylindrical multiwire drift chamber with axial charge-division has been constructed and used in experiment E852 at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It serves as a trigger element and as a tracking device for recoil protons in {pi}{sup -}p interactions. We describe the chamber`s design considerations, details of its construction, electronics, and performance characteristics. (orig.).

  12. 7 CFR 58.423 - Cheese vacuumizing chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cheese vacuumizing chamber. 58.423 Section 58.423 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....423 Cheese vacuumizing chamber. The vacuum chamber shall be satisfactorily constructed and maintained...

  13. Test of an undulated vacuum chamber for the ISR

    CERN Multimedia

    1975-01-01

    This picture shows mechanical tests of an undulated vacuum chamber for downstream arms of ISR intersections. This chamber, made of 0.3 mm thick inconel, had inner dimensions of 150 mm by 50 mm. The deflection under vacuum is measured by dial gauges. On the left one sees the large vessel where vacuum chambers were tested at pressures above atmospheric pressure.

  14. Bi-cone vacuum chamber in the ISR

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1976-01-01

    The "bi-cone" vacuum chamber in ISR intersection I-7, for experiment R702. Made from 0.28 mm thick titanium, it was at its time the most transparent chamber ever built. Ian Wilson is standing next to the chamber. See also 7609219.

  15. Central Drift Chamber for rare kaon decay spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, S.; Blackmore, E.W.; Bryman, D.A.; Cresswell, J.; Numao, T.

    1986-02-01

    Design of the Central Drift Chamber for BNL experiment 787 and measurement of a rare kaon decay are discussed. A jet chamber type cell with 6 sense wires and no interspersed field wires has been designed to achieve good spatial resolution and efficiency in a 1 T magnetic field. Results of the testing of a prototype chamber are presented.

  16. Installation and Commissioning of the new GLM Implantation Chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Pohl, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Summer student report about the work with the new implantation chamber for the GLM branch of ISOLDE. In the context of this project an API for the vacuum system of the new chamber was developed and implemented in web application that will be used to control the new implantation chamber at some point.

  17. 30 CFR 56.7807 - Flushing the combustion chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Flushing the combustion chamber. 56.7807 Section 56.7807 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND... Rotary Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing § 56.7807 Flushing the combustion chamber. The combustion chamber...

  18. 30 CFR 57.7807 - Flushing the combustion chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Flushing the combustion chamber. 57.7807... and Rotary Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing-Surface Only § 57.7807 Flushing the combustion chamber. The combustion chamber of a jet drill stem which has been sitting unoperated in a drill hole shall be...

  19. Engineering analyses of large precision cathode strip chambers for GEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horvath, J.A.; Belser, F.C.; Pratuch, S.M.; Wuest, C.R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Mitselmakher, G. [Superconducting Super Collider Lab., Dallas, TX (United States); Gordeev, A. [Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Johnson, C.V. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)]|[Superconducting Super Collider Lab., Dallas, TX (United States); Polychronakos, V.A. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Golutvin, I.A. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation)

    1993-10-21

    Structural analyses of large precision cathode strip chambers performed up to the date of this publication are documented. Mechanical property data for typical chamber materials are included. This information, originally intended to be an appendix to the {open_quotes}CSC Structural Design Bible,{close_quotes} is presented as a guide for future designers of large chambers.

  20. Safety observation of applying anterior chamber gas injection for unstable anterior chamber at the end of cataract surgery

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yong-Zhi Huang; Tao Sun; Yu-Ting Zhi; Li Li; Lu-Ning Yan

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To observe the surgical effect, complications and assess the safety of applying anterior chamber injection of sterile air to treat instability of anterior chamber occurred at the end of cataract...

  1. A combination drift chamber/pad chamber for very high readout rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spiegel, L.; Cataldi, G.; Elia, V.; Mazur, P.; Murphy, C.T.; Smith, R.P.; Yang, W. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States); Alexopoulos, T.; Durandet, C.; Erwin, A.; Jennings, J. [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States); Antoniazzi, L.; Introzzi, G.; Lanza, A.; Liguori, G.; Torre, P. [Pavia Univ. (Italy)]|[Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Rome (Italy); Arenton, M.; Conetti, S.; Cox, B.; Dukes, E.; Golovatyuk, V.; Hanlet, P.; McManus, A.; Nelson, K.; Recagni, M.; Segal, J.; Sun, J. [Virginia Univ., Charlottesville, VA (United States); Ballagh, C.; Bingham, H.; Kaeding, T.; Lys, J.; Misawa, S. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States); Blankman, A.; Borodin, S.; Kononenko, W.; Newcomer, M.; Selove, W.; Trojak, T.; VanBerg, R.; Zhang, S.N. [Pennsylvania Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Block, M.; Corti, G.; LeCompte, T.; Rosen, J.; Yao, T. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Boden, A.; Cline, D.; Ramachandran, S.; Rhoades, J.; Tokar, S. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States); Budagov, J.; Tsyganov, E. [Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research, Dubna (USSR); Cao, Z.L.; He, M.; Wang, C.; Wei, C.; Zhang, N. [Shandong Univ., Jinan, SD (China); Chen, T.Y.; Yao, N. [Nanjing Univ., JS (China); Clark, K.; Jenkins, M. [University of South Alabama, Mobile, AL (United States); Cooper, M. [Vanier Inst. of the Family, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Creti, P.; Gorini, E.; Grancagnolo, F.; Panareo, M. [Lecce Univ. (Italy)]|[Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Rome (Italy); Fortney, L.; Kowald, W. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States); Haire, M.; Judd, D.; Turnbull, L.; Wagoner, D. [Texas A and M Univ., Prairie View, TX (United States); Lau, K.; Mo, G. [Houston Univ., TX (United States); Trischuk, J. [McGill Univ., Montreal, PQ (Canada)

    1991-11-01

    Six medium-sized ({approx}1 {times} 2 m{sup 2}) drift chambers with pad and stripe readout have been constructed for and are presently operating in Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory experiment E-771. Each chamber module actually represents a pair of identical planes: two sets of anode wires, two sets of stripes, and two sets of pads. The wire planes are read out separately and represent X measurements in the coordinate system of the experiment. The twin stripe and pad planes are internally paired within the chamber modules; stripe signals represent Y measurements and pad signals combination X and Y measurements. Signals which develop on the stripes and pads are mirror (but inverted) images of what is seen on the wires. In addition to being used in the off-line pattern recognition, pad signals are also used as inputs to an on-line high transverse momentum (pt) trigger processor. While the techniques involved in the design and construction of the chambers are not novel, they may be of interest to experiments contemplating very large area, high rate chambers for future spectrometers.

  2. SU-F-T-570: Comparison of Synthetic Diamond, Microionization Chamber, and Radiochromic Film for Absolute Dosimetry of VMAT Radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popple, R; Wu, X; Kraus, J; Thomas, E; Brezovich, I [The University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Patient specific quality assurance of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) plans is challenging because of small target sizes and high dose gradients. We compared three detectors for dosimetry of VMAT SRS plans. Methods: The dose at the center of seventeen targets was measured using a synthetic diamond detector (2.2 mm diameter, 1 µm thickness), a 0.007 cm{sup 3} ionization chamber, and radiochromic film. Measurements were made in a PMMA phantom in the clinical geometry – all gantry and table angles were delivered as planned. The diamond and chamber positions were offset by 1 cm from the film plane, so the isocenter was shifted accordingly to place the center of the target at the detector of interest. To ensure accurate detector placement, the phantom was positioned using kV images. To account for the shift-induced difference in geometry and differing prescription doses between plans, the measurements were normalized to the expected dose calculated by the treatment planning system. Results: The target sizes ranged from 2.8 mm to 34.8 mm (median 14.8 mm). The mean measurement-to-plan ratios were 1.054, 1.076, and 1.023 for RCF, diamond, and chamber, respectively. The mean difference between the chamber and film was −3.2% and between diamond and film was 2.2%. For targets larger than 15 mm, the mean difference relative to film was −0.8% and 0.1% for chamber and diamond, respectively, whereas for targets smaller than 15 mm, the difference was −5.3% and 4.2% for chamber and diamond, respectively. The difference was significant (p=0.005) using the two-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. Conclusion: The detectors agree for target sizes larger than 15 mm. Relative to film, for smaller targets the diamond detector over-responds, whereas the ionization chamber under-responds. Further work is needed to characterize detector response in modulated SRS fields.

  3. A novel non invasive measurement of hemodynamic parameters: Comparison of single-chamber ventricular and dual-chamber pacemaker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid M. Pardede

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available We carried out a cross sectional study to analyze hemodynamic parameters of single-chamber ventricular pacemaker compared with dual-chamber pacemaker by using thoracic electrical bioimpedance monitoring method (Physio Flow™ - a novel simple non-invasive measurement. A total of 48 consecutive outpatients comprised of 27 single chamber pacemaker and 21 dual chamber were analyzed. We measured cardiac parameters: heart rate, stroke volume index, cardiac output index, estimated ejection fraction, end diastolic volume, early diastolic function ratio, thoracic fluid index, and systemic parameters: left cardiac work index and systemic vascular resistance index. Baseline characteristic and pacemaker indication were similar in both groups. Cardiac parameters assessment revealed no significant difference between single-chamber pacemaker and dual-chamber pacemaker in heart rate, stroke volume index, cardiac index, estimated ejection fraction, end-diastolic volume, thoracic fluid index. There was significantly higher early diastolic function ratio in single-chamber pacemaker compared to dual-chamber pacemaker: 92% (10.2-187.7% vs. 100.6% (48.7-403.2%; p=0.006. Systemic parameters assessment revealed significantly higher left cardiac work index in single-chamber group than dual-chamber group 4.9 kg.m/m² (2.8-7.6 kg.m/m² vs. 4.3 kg.m/m² (2.9-7.2 kg.m/m²; p=0.004. There was no significant difference on systemic vascular resistance in single-chamber compared to dual-chamber pacemaker. Single-chamber ventricular pacemaker provides similar stroke volume, cardiac output and left cardiac work, compared to dual-chamber pacemaker. A non-invasive hemodynamic measurement using thoracic electrical bioimpedance is feasible for permanent pacemaker outpatients. (Med J Indones 2008; 17: 25-32Keywords: Permanent pacemaker, single chamber, dual chamber, thoracic electrical bioimpedance, hemodynamic parameter

  4. RILIS-ionized mercury and tellurium beams at ISOLDE CERN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Day Goodacre, T., E-mail: thomas.day.goodacre@cern.ch [CERN (Switzerland); Billowes, J. [The University of Manchester, School of Physics and Astronomy (United Kingdom); Chrysalidis, K. [CERN (Switzerland); Fedorov, D. V. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (Russian Federation); Fedosseev, V. N.; Marsh, B. A. [CERN (Switzerland); Molkanov, P. L. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (Russian Federation); Rossel, R. E.; Rothe, S.; Seiffert, C. [CERN (Switzerland); Wendt, K. D. A. [Johannes Gutenberg Universität, Institut für Physik (Germany)

    2017-11-15

    This paper presents the results of ionization scheme development for application at the ISOLDE Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Source (RILIS). Two new ionization schemes for mercury are presented: a three-step three-resonance ionization scheme, ionizing via an excitation to a Rydberg level and a three-step two-resonance ionization scheme, with a non-resonant final step to the ionization continuum that corresponded to a factor of four higher ionization efficiency. The efficiency of the optimal mercury ionization scheme was measured, together with the efficiency of a new three-step three resonance ionization scheme for tellurium. The efficiencies of the mercury and tellurium ionization schemes were determined to be 6 % and >18 % respectively.

  5. RILIS-ionized mercury and tellurium beams at ISOLDE CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day Goodacre, T.; Billowes, J.; Chrysalidis, K.; Fedorov, D. V.; Fedosseev, V. N.; Marsh, B. A.; Molkanov, P. L.; Rossel, R. E.; Rothe, S.; Seiffert, C.; Wendt, K. D. A.

    2017-11-01

    This paper presents the results of ionization scheme development for application at the ISOLDE Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Source (RILIS). Two new ionization schemes for mercury are presented: a three-step three-resonance ionization scheme, ionizing via an excitation to a Rydberg level and a three-step two-resonance ionization scheme, with a non-resonant final step to the ionization continuum that corresponded to a factor of four higher ionization efficiency. The efficiency of the optimal mercury ionization scheme was measured, together with the efficiency of a new three-step three resonance ionization scheme for tellurium. The efficiencies of the mercury and tellurium ionization schemes were determined to be 6 % and >18 % respectively.

  6. Matrix Assisted Ionization Vacuum (MAIV), a New Ionization Method for Biological Materials Analysis Using Mass Spectrometry*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inutan, Ellen D.; Trimpin, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    The introduction of electrospray ionization (ESI) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) for the mass spectrometric analysis of peptides and proteins had a dramatic impact on biological science. We now report that a wide variety of compounds, including peptides, proteins, and protein complexes, are transported directly from a solid-state small molecule matrix to gas-phase ions when placed into the vacuum of a mass spectrometer without the use of high voltage, a laser, or added heat. This ionization process produces ions having charge states similar to ESI, making the method applicable for high performance mass spectrometers designed for atmospheric pressure ionization. We demonstrate highly sensitive ionization using intermediate pressure MALDI and modified ESI sources. This matrix and vacuum assisted soft ionization method is suitable for the direct surface analysis of biological materials, including tissue, via mass spectrometry. PMID:23242551

  7. Thermal desorption/tunable vacuum-ultraviolet time-of-flight photoionization aerosol mass spectrometry for investigating secondary organic aerosols in chamber experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Wenzheng; Gong, Lei; Shan, Xiaobin; Liu, Fuyi; Wang, Zhenya; Sheng, Liusi

    2011-12-01

    This paper describes thermal desorption/tunable vacuum-ultraviolet photoionization time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometry (TD-VUV-TOF-PIAMS) for the real-time analysis of secondary organic aerosols (SOAs) in smog chamber experiments. SOAs are sampled directly from atmospheric pressure and are focused through an aerodynamic lens assembly into the mass spectrometer. Once the particles have entered the source region, they impact on a heater and are vaporized. The nascent vapor is then softly ionized by tunable VUV synchrotron radiation. TD-VUV-TOF-PIAMS was used in conjunction with the smog chamber to study SOA formation from the photooxidation of toluene with hydroxyl radicals. The ionization energies (IEs) of these SOA products are sometimes very different with each other. As the ideal photon source is tunable, its energy can be adjusted for each molecular to be ionized. The mass spectra obtained at different photon energies are then to be useful for molecular identification. Real-time analysis of the mass spectra of SOAs is compared with previous off-line measurements. These results illustrate the potential of TD-VUV-TOF-PIAMS for direct molecular characterization of SOAs in smog chamber experiments.

  8. Chemi-ionization for Enhanced Plasma Densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ard, S.

    2016-12-01

    The Air Force has long considered ways of creating enhanced plasma density as a method of mitigating the detrimental effects of ionospheric density irregularities. Numerous easily photo-ionizable molecules have been released for study in this regard, yet this approach is inherently limited to daytime use. Recently attention has turned towards chemi-ionization. Several lanthanide metal oxides have bond strengths greater than their IP, such that M + O → MO+ + e- becomes energetically accessible. In 2013 the Metal Oxide Space Cloud (MOSC) mission released vaporized samarium in the lower ionosphere to study its potential as a chemi-ionization agent with atomic oxygen. While successful at producing enhanced densities, several results created questions about the underlying chemistry. This talk will focus on our lab's efforts supporting these releases, both in analysis of the principal thermochemistry and its effects on assessment of previous results, as well as ongoing experiments considering the potential of other chemi-ionization systems for future experiments.

  9. Streak Camera for Strong-Field Ionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kübel, M.; Dube, Z.; Naumov, A. Yu.; Spanner, M.; Paulus, G. G.; Kling, M. F.; Villeneuve, D. M.; Corkum, P. B.; Staudte, A.

    2017-11-01

    Ionization of an atom or molecule by a strong laser field produces suboptical cycle wave packets whose control has given rise to attosecond science. The final states of the wave packets depend on ionization and deflection by the laser field, which are convoluted in conventional experiments. Here, we demonstrate a technique enabling efficient electron deflection, separate from the field driving strong-field ionization. Using a midinfrared deflection field permits one to distinguish electron wave packets generated at different field maxima of an intense few-cycle visible laser pulse. We utilize this capability to trace the scattering of low-energy electrons driven by the midinfrared field. Our approach represents a general technique for studying and controlling strong-field ionization dynamics on the attosecond time scale.

  10. Advanced Modified High Performance Synthetic Jet Actuator with Curved Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tian-Bing (Inventor); Su, Ji (Inventor); Jiang, Xiaoning (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    The advanced modified high performance synthetic jet actuator with optimized curvature shape chamber (ASJA-M) is a synthetic jet actuator (SJA) with a lower volume reservoir or chamber. A curved chamber is used, instead of the conventional cylinder chamber, to reduce the dead volume of the jet chamber and increase the efficiency of the synthetic jet actuator. The shape of the curvature corresponds to the maximum displacement (deformation) profile of the electroactive diaphragm. The jet velocity and mass flow rate for the ASJA-M will be several times higher than conventional piezoelectric actuators.

  11. String quartet chamber music : the personal way of music development

    OpenAIRE

    Montant, Laure

    2012-01-01

    The subject of this thesis is about chamber music and more specifically string quartet. How and why chamber music should be a real part of a musician’s life. In the introduction, it is explained why it is important to play chamber music and what qualities a musician needs to be good at it. Then a description of what is chamber music litterally is exposed. The history recounts what was chamber music from its early beginings until our days and why it has so much evolves. About interpretation, t...

  12. Ionization equilibrium of a magnetized quantum plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinberg, M.; Ortner, J.; Ebeling, W. [Humboldt-Universitaet, Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik

    2001-07-01

    The influence of a constant uniform magnetic field on the ionization equilibrium and the thermodynamic properties of a nondegenerate partially ionized hydrogen plasma is studied for weak and strong magnetic fields. A simple interpolation formula for an effective partition function is proposed, connecting the the low- and high-field results. Furthermore, a closed analytical approximation for the thermodynamic functions in the chemical picture and a Saha equation for weakly and strongly magnetized plasmas are presented. (orig.)

  13. Ionization equilibrium of hot hydrogen plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Potekhin, A Yu

    1996-01-01

    The hydrogen plasma is studied at temperatures T ~ 10^4 - 10^6 K using the free energy minimization method. A simple analytic free energy model is proposed which is accurate at densities up to 1 g/cc and yields convergent internal partition function of atoms. The occupation probability formalism is modified for solving the ionization equilibrium problem. The ionization degree and equation of state are calculated and compared with the results of other models.

  14. Animal Models of Ionizing Radiation Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    level, some epithelial damage was observed (3). Michaelson, et al. (19) demonstrated that dogs developed hypothyroidism two to four years after expos... Pathophysiologic Signs of the Responses of the Nervous System to Ionizing Radiation, In Response of the Nervous System to Ionizing Radiation, Academic Press...Immunol. Ther. Exp., 10:416-459, 1962. 138. Krochak, R.J., and D.G. Baker, Radiation Nephritis. Clinical Manifestations and Pathophysiologic Mechanisms

  15. Drift waves in a weakly ionized plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popovic, M.; Melchior, H.

    1968-01-01

    A dispersion relation for low frequency drift waves in a weakly ionized plasma has been derived, and through numerical calculations the effect of collisions between the charged and the neutral particles is estimated.......A dispersion relation for low frequency drift waves in a weakly ionized plasma has been derived, and through numerical calculations the effect of collisions between the charged and the neutral particles is estimated....

  16. Cost advantage of dual-chamber versus single-chamber cardioverter-defibrillator implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberger, Zachary; Elbel, Brian; McPherson, Craig A; Paltiel, A David; Lampert, Rachel

    2005-09-06

    The purpose of this study was to determine the least expensive strategy for device selection in patients receiving implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs). Device cost for a single-chamber ICD is less than an atrioventricular (dual-chamber) ICD (AV-ICD); however, some patients without clinical need for AV-ICD at implantation might require a later upgrade, potentially offsetting the initial cost advantage of the single-chamber device. Decision analysis was used to estimate expected resource utilization costs of three alternative implantation strategies: 1) single-chamber device in all, with later upgrade to AV-ICD if needed; 2) initial implantation of an AV-ICD in all; and 3) targeted device selection on the basis of results of electrophysiologic testing (presence or absence of induced bradyarrhythmias or atrial arrhythmias). Clinical base estimates were obtained from retrospective review of all patients receiving ICDs between June 1997 and July 2001 at a single university hospital. Economic inputs were collected from national and single-center sources. In patients without other indications for electrophysiologic study (EPS), the expected per-person cost was least with the strategy of universal initial AV-ICD implantation (36,232 dollars) compared with initial single-chamber ICD/upgrade as needed (39,230 dollars) or EPS-guided selection (41,130 dollars). Sensitivity analyses demonstrated that universal AV-ICD implantation remained least expensive with upgrade rates as low as 10%. At a 5% upgrade rate, AV-ICD remained cheapest if the device cost-differential narrowed to 1,568 dollars. For patients undergoing EPS for risk assessment, EP-guided selection was least expensive. The strategy of universal AV-ICD implantation, which provides the benefits of dual-chamber capability while obviating any potential need for future upgrade, is the least costly strategy for most patient populations receiving ICDs.

  17. Dynamic consideration of smog chamber experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. K. Chuang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies of the α-pinene + ozone reaction that address particle nucleation show relatively high molar yields of highly oxidized multifunctional organic molecules with very low saturation concentrations that can form and grow new particles on their own. However, numerous smog-chamber experiments addressing secondary organic aerosol (SOA mass yields, interpreted via equilibrium partitioning theory, suggest that the vast majority of SOA from α-pinene is semivolatile. We explore this paradox by employing a dynamic volatility basis set (VBS model that reproduces the new-particle growth rates observed in the CLOUD experiment at CERN and then modeling SOA mass yield experiments conducted at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU. We find that the base-case simulations do overpredict observed SOA mass but by much less than an equilibrium analysis would suggest; this is because delayed condensation of vapors suppresses the apparent mass yields early in the chamber experiments. We further find that a second VBS model featuring substantial oligomerization of semivolatile monomers can match the CLOUD growth rates with substantially lower SOA mass yields; this is because the lighter monomers have a higher velocity and thus a higher condensation rate for a given mass concentration. The oligomerization simulations are a closer match to the CMU experiments than the base-case simulations, though they overpredict the observations somewhat. However, we also find that if the chemical conditions in CLOUD and the CMU chamber were identical, substantial nucleation would have occurred in the CMU experiments when in fact none occurred. This suggests that the chemical mechanisms differed in the two experiments, perhaps because the high oxidation rates in the SOA formation experiments led to rapid termination of peroxy radical chemistry.

  18. Liquid rocket combustion chamber acoustic characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cândido Magno de Souza

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Over the last 40 years, many solid and liquid rocket motors have experienced combustion instabilities. Among other causes, there is the interaction of acoustic modes with the combustion and/or fluid dynamic processes inside the combustion chamber. Studies have been showing that, even if less than 1% of the available energy is diverted to an acoustic mode, combustion instability can be generated. On one hand, this instability can lead to ballistic pressure changes, couple with other propulsion systems such as guidance or thrust vector control, and in the worst case, cause motor structural failure. In this case, measures, applying acoustic techniques, must be taken to correct/minimize these influences on the combustion. The combustion chamber acoustic behavior in operating conditions can be estimated by considering its behavior in room conditions. In this way, acoustic tests can be easily performed, thus identifying the cavity modes. This paper describes the procedures to characterize the acoustic behavior in the inner cavity of four different configurations of a combustion chamber. Simple analytical models are used to calculate the acoustic resonance frequencies and these results are compared with acoustic natural frequencies measured at room conditions. Some comments about the measurement procedures are done, as well as the next steps for the continuity of this research. The analytical and experimental procedures results showed good agreement. However, limitations on high frequency band as well as in the identification of specific kinds of modes indicate that numerical methods able to model the real cavity geometry and an acoustic experimental modal analysis may be necessary for a more complete analysis. Future works shall also consider the presence of passive acoustic devices such as baffles and resonators capable of introducing damping and avoiding or limiting acoustic instabilities.

  19. Dynamic consideration of smog chamber experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Wayne K.; Donahue, Neil M.

    2017-08-01

    Recent studies of the α-pinene + ozone reaction that address particle nucleation show relatively high molar yields of highly oxidized multifunctional organic molecules with very low saturation concentrations that can form and grow new particles on their own. However, numerous smog-chamber experiments addressing secondary organic aerosol (SOA) mass yields, interpreted via equilibrium partitioning theory, suggest that the vast majority of SOA from α-pinene is semivolatile. We explore this paradox by employing a dynamic volatility basis set (VBS) model that reproduces the new-particle growth rates observed in the CLOUD experiment at CERN and then modeling SOA mass yield experiments conducted at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU). We find that the base-case simulations do overpredict observed SOA mass but by much less than an equilibrium analysis would suggest; this is because delayed condensation of vapors suppresses the apparent mass yields early in the chamber experiments. We further find that a second VBS model featuring substantial oligomerization of semivolatile monomers can match the CLOUD growth rates with substantially lower SOA mass yields; this is because the lighter monomers have a higher velocity and thus a higher condensation rate for a given mass concentration. The oligomerization simulations are a closer match to the CMU experiments than the base-case simulations, though they overpredict the observations somewhat. However, we also find that if the chemical conditions in CLOUD and the CMU chamber were identical, substantial nucleation would have occurred in the CMU experiments when in fact none occurred. This suggests that the chemical mechanisms differed in the two experiments, perhaps because the high oxidation rates in the SOA formation experiments led to rapid termination of peroxy radical chemistry.

  20. Ion recombination correction factor in scanned light-ion beams for absolute dose measurement using plane-parallel ionisation chambers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossomme, S; Horn, J; Brons, S; Jäkel, O; Mairani, A; Ciocca, M; Floquet, V; Romano, F; Rodriguez Garcia, D; Vynckier, S; Palmans, H

    2017-07-07

    Based on international reference dosimetry protocols for light-ion beams, a correction factor (k s) has to be applied to the response of a plane-parallel ionisation chamber, to account for recombination of negative and positive charges in its air cavity before these charges can be collected on the electrodes. In this work, k s for IBA PPC40 Roos-type chambers is investigated in four scanned light-ion beams (proton, helium, carbon and oxygen). To take into account the high dose-rates used with scanned beams and LET-values, experimental results are compared to a model combining two theories. One theory, developed by Jaffé, describes the variation of k s with the ionization density within the ion track (initial recombination) and the other theory, developed by Boag, describes the variation of k s with the dose rate (volume recombination). Excellent agreement is found between experimental and theoretical k s-values. All results confirm that k s cannot be neglected. The solution to minimise k s is to use the ionisation chamber at high voltage. However, one must be aware that charge multiplication may complicate the interpretation of the measurement. For the chamber tested, it was found that a voltage of 300 V can be used without further complication. As the initial recombination has a logarithmic variation as a function of 1/V, the two-voltage method is not applicable to these scanned beams.