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  1. Public access defibrillation—results from the Victorian Ambulance Cardiac Arrest Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lijovic, M; Bernard, S; Nehme, Z; Walker, T; Smith, K

    2014-12-01

    To assess the impact of automated external defibrillator (AED) use by bystanders in Victoria, Australia on survival of adults suffering an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) in a public place compared to those first defibrillated by emergency medical services (EMS). We analysed data from the Victorian Ambulance Cardiac Arrest Registry for individuals aged >15 years who were defibrillated in a public place between 1 July 2002 and 30 June 2013, excluding events due to trauma or witnessed by EMS. Of 2270 OHCA cases who arrested in a public place, 2117 (93.4%) were first defibrillated by EMS and 153 (6.7%) were first defibrillated by a bystander using a public AED. Use of public AEDs increased almost 11-fold between 2002/2003 and 2012/2013, from 1.7% to 18.5%, respectively (p defibrillation occurred sooner in bystander defibrillation (5.2 versus 10.0 min, p defibrillated patients was significantly higher than for those first defibrillated by EMS (45% versus 31%, p defibrillation by a bystander using an AED was associated with a 62% increase in the odds of survival to hospital discharge (adjusted odds ratio 1.62, 95% CI: 1.12–2.34, p = 0.010) compared to first defibrillation by EMS. Survival to hospital discharge is improved in patients first defibrillated using a public AED prior to EMS arrival in Victoria, Australia. Encouragingly, bystander AED use in Victoria has increased over time. More widespread availability of AEDs may further improve outcomes of OHCA in public places.

  2. Games of Character: Team Sports, Games, and Character Development in Victorian Public Schools, 1850-1900

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    Dishon, Gideon

    2017-01-01

    This article examines the ascendance of team sports as tools of "character building" in British Victorian public schools in the second half of the nineteenth century. The focus of this enquiry is the commonly overlooked pedagogical innovation underlying this process--the utilisation of "organised games" as educational tools.…

  3. Outlaw, hackers, victorian amateurs: diagnosing public participation in the life sciences today

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher M. Kelty

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available This essay reflects on three figures that can be used to make sense of the changing nature of public participation in the life sciences today: outlaws, hackers and Victorian gentlemen. Occasioned by a symposium held at UCLA (Outlaw Biology: Public Participation in the Age of Big Bio, the essay introduces several different modes of participation (DIY Bio, Bio Art, At home clinical genetics, patient advocacy and others and makes three points: 1 that public participation is first a problem of legitimacy, not legality or safety; 2 that public participation is itself enabled by and thrives on the infrastructure of mainstream biology; and 3 that we need a new set of concepts (other than inside/outside for describing the nature of public participation in biological research and innovation today.

  4. How do ICT project managers manage project knowledge in the public sector? An empirical enquiry from the Victorian Public Sector in Australia

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    Yakub Karagoz

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Projects are temporal organisation forms that are highly knowledge-intensive and play an important role in modern public (and private sector organisations. The effective and efficient creation, dissemination, application and conservation of relevant knowledge are a critical success factor in the management of projects. Yet, project management (PM and knowledge management (KM are two distinct disciplines. This paper explores the relationship between PM and KM by analysing the literature at the intersection of those disciplines and presenting the empirical results of a case study of the Victorian Public Sector (VPS in Australia. A series of 14 interviews were conducted to explore how ICT project managers manage project knowledge across the departments of the VPS. Findings show a strong preference among the participants for informal, face-to-face interactions and agile approaches to facilitate knowledge transfer and creation in ICT project environments.

  5. Developing Sustainable Leadership Capability in the Victorian State and Public Library Sector

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    McCarten, Melanie

    2011-01-01

    There have been substantial changes in the labour market over the past few years and survey results indicate 60% of staff will leave public library service over the next decade. While this creates opportunities for library staff, limited training budgets and a focus on compliance and specific library skills training have led to a gap in the formal…

  6. Reading Victorian Sculpture

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    Angela Dunstan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This introduction reflects on reading sculpture in Victorian culture, and in Victorian studies. How did the Victorians read sculpture? How should we read it today? What might a sculpture connote in different contexts: the home, the street, the gallery, the colony? How broadly should we define what we describe as ‘Victorian sculpture’, in light of nineteenth-century industrial and technological innovation? For the Victorians, as for modern readers of Victorian sculpture, legibility remains a prime preoccupation when addressing these questions. This introduction suggests that Victorian sculpture’s resistance to reading renders it fertile ground for revisiting and reinterpreting individual works, their creators, textual responses to them, and the greater significance of their cumulative cultural imprint.

  7. Implementing Sustainable Data Collection for a Cardiac Outcomes Registry in an Australian Public Hospital.

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    Cox, Nicholas; Brennan, Angela; Dinh, Diem; Brien, Rita; Cowie, Kath; Stub, Dion; Reid, Christopher M; Lefkovits, Jeffrey

    2017-03-12

    Clinical outcome registries are an increasingly vital component of ensuring quality and safety of patient care. However, Australian hospitals rarely have additional resources or the capacity to fund the additional staff time to complete the task of data collection and entry. At the same time, registry funding models do not support staff for the collection of data at the site but are directed towards the central registry tasks of data reporting, managing and quality monitoring. The sustainability of a registry is contingent on building efficiencies into data management and collection. We describe the methods used in a large Victorian public hospital to develop a sustainable data collection system for the Victorian Cardiac Outcomes Registry (VCOR), using existing staff and resources common to many public hospitals. We describe the features of the registry and the hospital specific strategies that allowed us to do this as part of our routine business of providing good quality cardiac care. All clinical staff involved in patient care were given some data collection task with the entry of these data embedded into the staff's daily workflow. A senior cardiology registrar was empowered to allocate data entry tasks to colleagues when data were found to be incomplete. The task of 30-day follow-up proved the most onerous part of data collection. Cath-lab nursing staff were allocated this role. With hospital accreditation and funding models moving towards performance based quality indicators, collection of accurate and reliable information is crucial. Our experience demonstrates the successful implementation of clinical outcome registry data collection in a financially constrained public hospital environment utilising existing resources. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Strategic management of Public Hospitals' medical services.

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    Hao, Aimin; Yi, Tao; Li, Xia; Wei, Lei; Huang, Pei; Xu, Xinzhou; Yi, Lihua

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The quality of medical services provided by competing public hospitals is the primary consideration of the public in determining the selection of a specific hospital for treatment. The main objective of strategic planning is to improve the quality of public hospital medical services. This paper provides an introduction to the history, significance, principles and practices of public hospital medical service strategy, as well as advancing the opinion that public hospital service strategy must not merely aim to produce but actually result in the highest possible level of quality, convenience, efficiency and patient satisfaction.

  9. Self-Help v State Intervention: The 1850 Public Libraries Act as a Reflection of Mid-Victorian Doctrine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charing, Sarah

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the passage in the United Kingdom of the Public Libraries Act of 1850 and its reflections of social and political attitudes prevalent at the time, particularly laissez-faire and utilitarianism. Individualism, national education, and middle class concern for the poor are discussed. (60 references) (LRW)

  10. Private and public patients in public hospitals in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shmueli, Amir; Savage, Elizabeth

    2014-04-01

    The nature of the private-public mix in health insurance and in health care is a major issue in most health systems. To compare the hospitalization characteristics of private and public patients hospitalized in public hospitals. We focused on planned, overnight and same-day admissions, discharged during 2004-2005 from the public New South Wales hospitals, and run fixed-effects regressions in order to identify the effect of accommodation status (private/public) on the hospitalization characteristics. Private patients have one third less waiting days than public patients, and they are assigned higher urgency of admission. Length of stay and length of visit are both unrelated to the accommodation status, however, private patients tend to have more hours in ICU and more procedures performed during the hospitalization. In-hospital mortality and the number of transfers (wards) are not affected by the accommodation status. Private patients are treated differently than public patients in public hospitals, reinforcing the private health insurance-related inequity in inpatient care identified by others. Two health policy issues emerge from the findings: the role of private health insurance in the Australian socialized medicine system, and in particular, in the public hospitals; and the way public hospitals are reimbursed for private patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Introduction: Victorian Theatricalities

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    Michael Dobson

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available After a barrage of manipulative fan-letters from Sir Merton and Annie Russell-Cotes, Sir Henry Irving, titan of the Victorian stage and the first actor to be knighted, eventually came to stay, briefly, at East Cliff Hall in Bournemouth. A peculiar but attractive compound of Scots baronial castle, Italian villa, French château and Bournemouth seaside bungalow, complete with lavish Art Nouveau interiors and a fountain in the entrance lobby, the house was always designed in and of itself as a dramatic location and was also intended as a magnet for theatrical celebrities. Sir Merton and Annie amply stuffed it with nineteenth-century British paintings, miscellaneous sculptures, and souvenirs of their extensive overseas holidays. Today the Russell-Cotes Art Gallery and Museum remains the late Victorian treasure house par excellence, and I can imagine few more vivid short-cuts into the culture and mindset of the late nineteenth-century haute bourgeoisie than an afternoon spent marvelling at the tons of accumulated trophies and bibelots cluttering its rooms or the acres of tastefully-exposed nipples adorning its walls. What the Russell-Cotes Museum also makes clear, even at its gloomiest, is the key place of drama in the Victorian imagination. After Irving's death in 1905, the Russell-Cotes bought many of Irving's personal effects at auction. Adding these to their existing collection of Irving memorabilia and other theatrical paintings and souvenirs, they converted the bedroom in which Irving had stayed into a permanent shrine to his memory. The Henry Irving Room would make an ideal introduction to most of the contents of this volume.

  12. Public cardiopulmonary resuscitation training rates and awareness of hands-only cardiopulmonary resuscitation: a cross-sectional survey of Victorians.

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    Bray, Janet E; Smith, Karen; Case, Rosalind; Cartledge, Susie; Straney, Lahn; Finn, Judith

    2017-04-01

    To provide contemporary Australian data on the public's training in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and awareness of hands-only CPR. A cross-sectional telephone survey in April 2016 of adult residents of the Australian state of Victoria was conducted. Primary outcomes were rates of CPR training and awareness of hands-only CPR. Of the 404 adults surveyed (mean age 55 ± 17 years, 59% female, 73% metropolitan residents), 274 (68%) had undergone CPR training. Only 50% (n = 201) had heard of hands-only CPR, with most citing first-aid courses (41%) and media (36%) as sources of information. Of those who had undergone training, the majority had received training more than 5 years previously (52%) and only 28% had received training or refreshed training in the past 12 months. Most received training in a formal first-aid class (43%), and received training as a requirement for work (67%). The most common reasons for not having training were: they had never thought about it (59%), did not have time (25%) and did not know where to learn (15%). Compared to standard CPR, a greater proportion of respondents were willing to provide hands-only CPR for strangers (67% vs 86%, P CPR training rates and awareness of hands-only CPR. Further promotion of hands-only CPR and self-instruction (e.g. DVD kits or online) may see further improvements in CPR training and bystander CPR rates. © 2017 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  13. Geographical variation in incidence of knee arthroscopy for patients with osteoarthritis: a population-based analysis of Victorian hospital separations data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohensky, M; Barker, A; Morello, R; De Steiger, R N; Gorelik, A; Brand, C

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate the frequency and geographical variation in knee arthroscopy for adults (>25 years) with a concomitant diagnosis of osteoarthritis. This was a retrospective cohort study of hospital separations involving an elective knee arthroscopy in public and private hospitals in Victoria, Australia. Participants included patients receiving knee arthroscopies with a diagnosis code indicating osteoarthritis (OA) from 1 July 2008 to 30 June 2009. Records were excluded if the patient was under 25 years or their arthroscopy involved a ligament reconstruction. Crude rates per 100 000 population and negative binomial regression offset by total knee arthroscopy volume were used to analyse differences by region. There were 9620 arthroscopic procedures meeting the inclusion criteria. There were 5500 (57.2%) admissions where the principal diagnosis was knee OA (gonarthrosis) and 3510 (36.5%) where the principal diagnosis indicated a mechanical derangement and there was a primary or associated diagnosis of OA. When we examined the incidence rate ratios (IRR) by region, after adjustment for relevant factors and accounting for the total knee arthroscopy volume within each region, we identified significant variation in knee arthroscopy rates for patients with OA. The region with the highest adjusted IRR was Barwon South Western (IRR: 1.26, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.16-1.36) and the region with lowest adjusted incidence rate ratio was the Gippsland region (IRR: 0.89, 95% CI: 0.80-0.98). We identified considerable geographical variation in arthroscopies for people with OA across Victoria. Further investigation is needed to understand whether this variation is a reflection of differences in OA prevalence, clinical decision-making or access. © 2014 The Authors; Internal Medicine Journal © 2014 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  14. Historical trends in public general hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mix, P

    1991-01-01

    This article examines utilization trends in Canadian public general hospitals from 1976 to 1986-87. These trends are then compared with a previous period, and with hospital trends in the United States. Findings for this report are based on both provincial and national data. There was an overall decline in the number of hospitals with a decrease in small (1-49 beds) and an increase in large (300+ beds) hospitals. The net result is a 7% increase in the number of beds, though due to the larger population there was a 3% decrease in the bed rate per population. The bed occupancy rate increased from 77% to 83% and the average length of stay also increased. The number of separations increased slightly but rates per population declined. Patient-days per population increased in most provinces and there was a significant increase in long-stay units. Despite general uniformity amongst the provinces there were some notable variations. The trends indicate a reversal of the situation in the 1953-1973 period which was marked by an expansion in the hospital system. Hospitals in the United States showed somewhat similar trends with the exception of length of stay. The trends may be ascribed to factors such as increased efficiency, the development of alternatives to inpatient care, technical improvements, demographic changes and the individuality of the provincial health care systems.

  15. Readmissions at a public safety net hospital.

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    Eri Shimizu

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: We aimed to determine factors related to avoidability of 30-day readmissions at our public, safety net hospital in the United States (US. METHODS: We prospectively reviewed medical records of adult internal medicine patients with scheduled and unscheduled 30-day readmissions. We also interviewed patients if they were available. An independent panel used pre-specified, objective criteria to adjudicate potential avoidability. RESULTS: Of 153 readmissions evaluated, 68% were unscheduled. Among these, 67% were unavoidable, primarily due to disease progression and development of new diagnoses. Scheduled readmissions accounted for 32% of readmissions and most (69% were clinically appropriate and unavoidable. The scheduled but avoidable readmissions (31% were attributed largely to limited resources in our healthcare system. CONCLUSIONS: Most readmissions at our public, safety net hospital were unavoidable, even among our unscheduled readmissions. Surprisingly, one-third of our overall readmissions were scheduled, the majority reflecting appropriate management strategies designed to reduce unnecessary hospital days. The scheduled but avoidable readmissions were due to constrained access to non-emergent, expensive procedures that are typically not reimbursed given our system's payor mix, a problem which likely plague other safety net systems. These findings suggest that readmissions do not necessarily reflect inadequate medical care, may reflect resource constraints that are unlikely to be addressable in systems caring for a large burden of uninsured patients, and merit individualized review.

  16. Being Lister: ethos and Victorian medical discourse.

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    Connor, J J; Connor, J T H

    2008-06-01

    Stylistic analysis and rhetorical theory are used in this study to inform our understanding of impediments to the successful uptake of a new medical idea. Through examination of the work of the Victorian surgeon Joseph Lister, who was described by one biographer as suffering from "stylistic ham-handedness", the study provides insights into the difficulty that Lister had in explaining his theory of antiseptic surgery. Using three comparisons-Lister's scientific style in public discourse with that of his students, and Lister's scientific style in private discourse with those of both a surbordinate and a superior-the study suggests that the rhetorical concept of ethos played a major role in his communication difficulties. In this way, it presents a more nuanced perspective on modern presentations of "model" communications versus communication failures: that is, that problematic written discourse offers as useful a heuristic device as does exemplary discourse.

  17. Perioperative nursing in public university hospitals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Erik Elgaard; Olsen, Ida Østrup; Tewes, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    of the longstanding relationship between nursing and technology, it is interesting that few studies with this focus have been performed. Therefore, our research question was: What is the content of perioperative nursing and how do nurses facilitate the interaction between nursing care and technology in highly...... specialized operating rooms in public university hospitals? METHODS: An ethnography involving participant observations and interviews was conducted during a 9-month study period. The participants comprised 24 nurses from 9 different operating wards at 2 university hospitals in different regions of Denmark...... the patients were viewed contributed to the development of three levels of interaction between technology and nursing care: the interaction, declining interaction, and failing interaction levels. CONCLUSION: Nursing practice at the interaction level is characterized by flexibility and excellence, while...

  18. Surgery cancellations at a public hospital

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    Erika Pittelkow

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the frequency of cancellation of scheduledsurgeries at a public hospital in the city of São Paulo, and to identifythe reasons of cancellation. Methods: A descriptive, exploratory,retrospective study, with quantitative analysis, of records ofprocedures cancelled and medical charts of patients whose surgerieswere cancelled, between January 2006 and July 2007. Results: Ofthe 6,149 (100% surgeries scheduled for the period surveyed, 701(11.4% were canceled and 5,448 (88.6% conducted; among thesurgeries cancelled, most were general surgeries (237/33.8% andorthopedic surgery (200/28.5%; surgeons or assistant surgeons(518/73.9% and anesthesiologists (183/26.1% were responsible forcancellations. The primary reasons for cancellation were unfavorableclinical status of patients (225/32.1%, no show up of patients(119/17.0%, change in medical management (79/11.3%, patientnot appropriately prepared (53/7.5% and lack of material (52/7.4%.Conclusions: This study enabled identifying the frequency and causesof surgical cancellations at a public hospital, so as to contribute toimproving professional performance in this area.

  19. Household Clearances in Victorian Fiction

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    David Trotter

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The deathbed apart, there are few scenes more profoundly disturbing in nineteenth-century fiction than the household clearance, or the process of 'selling up': the identification of domestic material goods for sale at auction, either in situ, or elsewhere. Of course, we shouldn't be surprised at this, if the Victorians took the idea of home anything like as seriously as they made out. How could such a violation or wilful sacrifice of domesticity not be profoundly disturbing? This essay argues that scenes of household clearance in nineteenth-century fiction possess a density and an edge which exceed any shock they might have administered to the sensibilities of the house-proud. Such scenes expose to critical view an aspect of existence otherwise generally understood, then as now, not to require or to benefit from illumination. The aims of the essay are twofold: 1 to demonstrate the pervasiveness of scenes of household clearance in Victorian fiction, with reference to Dickens, Thackeray, Eliot, Hardy, and others; 2 to put forward an explanation for the imaginative charge they carry, which runs counter to a strong emphasis in the current understanding of nineteenth-century fiction's perspective on a newly abundant material culture.

  20. CONSUMER'S SATISFACTION MEASUREMENT IN PUBLIC HOSPITALS

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    Andreea Cipriana MUNTEAN

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Customer satisfaction is an important indicator in determining the future coordinates of any entrepreneurial activity, be it company, institution or non-governmental organization. Our research is performed in the public hospital units from Alba County. The purpose of this paper is to identify an instrument for measuring the satisfaction of consumers of health services respectively patients. The questionnaire has led to validate/invalidate the working hypotheses assumed at the start of the study. We also found data regarding the place of activities of the respondents to the questionnaire, in order to see further what extent the employment rebounds on achieving the service tasks and responsibilities and the involvement physicians in decision making. In other words, we observed specific influence of the working environment of those.

  1. [Adequacy of nutritionist (dietician) resources in Chilean public hospitals].

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    Crovetto M, Mirta

    2015-11-01

    Human resource deficit is an important management problem in Chilean public hospitals. To analyze the adequacy of Nutritionist (Dietician) resources in public hospitals. A questionnaire about Nutritionist resources was sent to head Nutritionists of all public Chilean hospitals, asking about the number of Nutritionists per service, number of hospital beds and number of daily rations served. Results were analyzed based on the Technical Guideline about Nutritional and Feeding Services of public hospitals issued by the Chilean Ministry of Health in 2005. According to the guideline, there should be 1,396 nutritionists working in public hospitals and the results of the survey showed that there were only 603 professionals with a 57% deficit. There is a huge gap between the amount of Nutritionists (Dieticians) required and those effectively working in public hospitals.

  2. Constructing Masculinities under Thomas Arnold of Rugby (1828-1842): Gender, Educational Policy and School Life in an Early-Victorian Public School

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    Neddam, Fabrice

    2004-01-01

    Thomas Arnold has been a controversial figure for historians of the English public schools. He has been depicted either as the great reformer of these famous institutions or as an ordinary head master who did not do better than his contemporary colleagues. This article seeks to continue the debate about the assessment of his head master-ship by…

  3. Linking public health agencies and hospitals for improved emergency preparedness: North Carolina's public health epidemiologist program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Markiewicz, Milissa; Bevc, Christine A; Hegle, Jennifer; Horney, Jennifer A; Davies, Megan; MacDonald, Pia D M

    2012-01-01

    In 2003, 11 public health epidemiologists were placed in North Carolina's largest hospitals to enhance communication between public health agencies and healthcare systems for improved emergency preparedness...

  4. A conflict of analysis: analytical chemistry and milk adulteration in Victorian Britain.

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    Steere-Williams, Jacob

    2014-08-01

    This article centres on a particularly intense debate within British analytical chemistry in the late nineteenth century, between local public analysts and the government chemists of the Inland Revenue Service. The two groups differed in both practical methodologies and in the interpretation of analytical findings. The most striking debates in this period were related to milk analysis, highlighted especially in Victorian courtrooms. It was in protracted court cases, such as the well known Manchester Milk Case in 1883, that analytical chemistry was performed between local public analysts and the government chemists, who were often both used as expert witnesses. Victorian courtrooms were thus important sites in the context of the uneven professionalisation of chemistry. I use this tension to highlight what Christopher Hamlin has called the defining feature of Victorian public health, namely conflicts of professional jurisdiction, which adds nuance to histories of the struggle of professionalisation and public credibility in analytical chemistry.

  5. Qualitative analysis of direction of public hospital reforms in China.

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    Zhao, Dahai; Zhang, Zhiruo

    2017-07-03

    Reforms in public hospitals are among the most important improvements in China's health care system over the last two decades. However, the reforms that should be implemented in public hospitals are unclear. Thus, a feasible direction of reforms in Chinese public hospitals is suggested and reliable policy suggestions are provided for the government to reform public hospitals. The data used in this study were mainly derived from a qualitative study. Focus group discussions and in-depth interviews were conducted in Shanghai, Guangdong, and Gansu between May and December 2014. Government funding accounted for approximately eight percent of the total annual revenue of public hospitals in China, and the insufficient government subsidy considerably affects the operation mechanism of public hospitals. However, solely increasing this subsidy cannot address the inappropriate incentives of public hospitals in China. The most crucial step in setting the direction of reforms in public hospitals in China is transforming inappropriate incentives by implementing a new evaluation index system for directors and physicians in public hospitals.

  6. Public hospitals in financial distress: Is privatization a strategic choice?

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    Ramamonjiarivelo, Zo; Weech-Maldonado, Robert; Hearld, Larry; Menachemi, Nir; Epané, Josué Patien; O'Connor, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    As safety net providers, public hospitals operate in more challenging environments than private hospitals. Such environments put public hospitals at greater risk of financial distress, which may result in privatization and deterioration of the safety net. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether financial distress is associated with privatization among public hospitals. We used panel data merged from the American Hospital Association Annual Survey, Medicare Cost Reports, Area Resource File, and Local Area Unemployment Statistics. Our study population consisted of all U.S. nonfederal acute care public hospitals in 1997 tracked through 2009, resulting in 6,426 hospital-year observations. The dependent variable "privatization" was defined as conversion from public status to either private not-for-profit or private for-profit status. The main independent variable, "financial distress," was based on the Altman Z-score methodology. Control variables included market and organizational factors. Two random-effects logistic regression models with state and year fixed-effects were constructed. The independent and control variables were lagged by 1 year and 2 years for Models 1 and 2, respectively. Public hospitals in financial distress had greater odds of being privatized than public hospitals not in financial distress: (OR = 4.53, p hospital operating at a loss, which in turn may help keep the hospital open and preserve access to care for the community. Privatizing a financially distressed public hospital may be a better strategic alternative than closure. The Altman Z-score could be used as a managerial tool to monitor hospitals' financial condition and take corrective actions.

  7. Dialysis in public and private hospitals in Queensland.

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    Gray, N A; Dent, H; McDonald, S P

    2012-08-01

    Clinical outcomes for patients treated in public and private hospitals may be different. The aim of the study was to compare the characteristics and outcomes of patients receiving dialysis at public and private hospitals in Queensland. Incident adult dialysis patients in Queensland registered with the Australia and New Zealand Dialysis and Transplant Registry between 1999 and 2009 were classified by dialysis modality at either a public or private hospital. Outcomes were dialysis patient characteristics and survival. Three thousand, three hundred and ten patients commenced dialysis in public hospitals, 1939 haemodialysis (HD) and 1371 peritoneal dialysis (PD). Seven hundred and ninety-three patients commenced dialysis in private hospitals, 757 HD and 36 PD. Compared with public HD, private HD patients were older, had more coronary artery disease and less diabetes, and were more likely to live in an urban area. Public HD patients were more likely to be obese and referred late to a nephrologist. Nearly all indigenous patients were managed in public hospitals. Private patients were more likely to have an arteriovenous fistula or graft at first HD (P < 0.001) but not after excluding late referrals (P = 0.09). Public hospitals provided longer HD sessions and more HD hours per week for all age groups except 75+ years. Compared with public hospital HD, patient survival adjusted for multiple variables was comparable for private hospital HD (hazard ratio 1.20 (95% confidence interval 0.98-1.46, P = 0.07)) but worse for public PD (hazard ratio 1.14 (95% confidence interval 1.05-1.24, P = 0.002)). Private HD patients are older and less likely to be diabetic than public patients. Patient survival is worse for public PD than public HD. © 2012 The Authors. Internal Medicine Journal © 2012 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  8. Management challenges at the intersection of public policy environments and strategic decision making in public hospitals.

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    Longest, Beaufort B

    2012-01-01

    Hospitals in the United States are heavily impacted by public policies that affect them. For example, Medicare and Medicaid programs account for more than half the revenue in most of the nation's almost 5,000 community hospitals, including the almost 1,100 public hospitals controlled by state and local governments (American Hospital Association, 2012). The public hospitals are especially closely aligned with and controlled by governmental entities compared with hospitals with other kinds of sponsorship. This article addresses the management challenges at the intersection of the strategic management of public hospitals and their public policy environments. Public hospitals are complicated entities designed not only to provide health services but also in many cases to play key roles in health-related research and education and to play important general economic development roles in their communities. The multi-faceted strategic decision making in these organizations is as heavily affected by their public policy environments as by their business, demographic, technological or other external environments. Effectively managing the intersection of their public policy environments and their strategic management is indeed vital for contemporary public hospitals. This article is intended to clarify certain aspects of this intersection through a description and model of the strategic activity in public hospitals and the connection between this activity and their external environments. Specific attention is focused on the concept of public policy environments and their features. Attention is also given to how managers can assess public policy environments and incorporate the results into strategic activities.

  9. The role of public relations activities in hospital choice.

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    Tengilimoglu, Dilaver; Yesiltas, Mehmet; Kisa, Adnan; Dziegielewski, Sophia F

    2007-01-01

    Public relations activities for all organizations can have an important effect on consumer decision-making when buying goods or services. This study examines the effect that public relations activities can have regarding consumer decisions and choice. To explore exemplify this relationship a questionnaire was given to 971 patients within public, university and private hospitals in Ankara, Turkey. Study results show that public relations activities were a crucial factor in determining consumer hospital choice. The majority of respondents reported that the behaviors and attitude of personnel as public relations activities that support the hospital's reputation within the public were the primary variables in hospital choice. Health care managers can use these findings to further understand how patients make informed choices related to usage of a health care facility and to develop and/or improve public relations activities.

  10. Management of incomplete abortions at South African public hospitals

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. The objective of this report was to review and describe the management of incomplete abortion by public sector hospitals. Design. A descriptive study in which data were collected prospectively from routine hospital records on all women admitted with incomplete abortion to a stratified random sample of hospitals ...

  11. Innovations in health service delivery: the corporatization of public hospitals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Harding, April; Preker, Alexander S

    2003-01-01

    ... hospitals play a critical role in ensuring delivery of health services, less is known about how to improve the efficiency and quality of care provided. Much can be learned in this respect from the experiences of hospital reforms initiated during the 1990s. Innovations in Health Service Delivery: The Corporatization of Public Hospitals is an a...

  12. Patient satisfaction in Turkey: differences between public and private hospitals.

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    Tengilimoglu, D; Kisa, A; Dziegielewski, S F

    1999-02-01

    This article reports the results of a patient-satisfaction survey administered by interview to 2045 adults discharged from several major public and private hospitals in Turkey. The direct measurement of patient-satisfaction is a new phenomenon for this country. An instrument was designed similar to those available in the United States and administered during exit interviews. Two primary areas of analyses were determined in comparing services provided by these public and private hospitals: demographic factors with regard to accessibility and consumer perceptions of the quality of service provided. Relationships and percentages within and among the five public and two private hospitals are reported. Several statistically significant differences were found between the hospitals, with the private hospitals achieving the greatest satisfaction on most of the quality of services issues examined. Future recommendations outline the need to take into account the public's perception of these hospitals and enhancing customer satisfaction as a means of increasing service utilization.

  13. Re-thinking barriers to organizational change in public hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Nigel; Saltman, Richard B

    2017-01-01

    Public hospitals are well known to be difficult to reform. This paper provides a comprehensive six-part analytic framework that can help policymakers and managers better shape their organizational and institutional behavior. The paper first describes three separate structural characteristics which, together, inhibit effective problem description and policy design for public hospitals. These three structural constraints are i) the dysfunctional characteristics found in most organizations, ii) the particular dysfunctions of professional health sector organizations, and iii) the additional dysfunctional dimensions of politically managed organizations. While the problems in each of these three dimensions of public hospital organization are well-known, and the first two dimensions clearly affect private as well as publicly run hospitals, insufficient attention has been paid to the combined impact of all three factors in making public hospitals particularly difficult to manage and steer. Further, these three structural dimensions interact in an institutional environment defined by three restrictive context limitations, again two of which also affect private hospitals but all three of which compound the management dilemmas in public hospitals. The first contextual limitation is the inherent complexity of delivering high quality, safe, and affordable modern inpatient care in a hospital setting. The second contextual limitation is a set of specific market failures in public hospitals, which limit the scope of the standard financial incentives and reform measures. The third and last contextual limitation is the unique problem of generalized and localized anxiety , which accompanies the delivery of medical services, and which suffuses decision-making on the part of patients, medical staff, hospital management, and political actors alike. This combination of six institutional characteristics - three structural dimensions and three contextual dimensions - can help explain why

  14. Managing retrenchment in French public hospitals: philosophical and regulatory constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobczak, P M; Fottler, M D; Chastagner, D

    1988-01-01

    The French hospital system is experiencing economic stresses similar to those experienced by US hospitals. Pressures for cost containment have occurred due to changes in health care funding. The public hospital system is facing unprecedented severe retrenchment. Innovative strategies for managing retrenchment have been restricted by regulatory and philosophical constraints. What is needed is to provide more autonomy for individual hospital managers together with greater accountability for achievement of results.

  15. Additional funding mechanisms for Public Hospitals in Greece: the case of Chania Mental Health Hospital

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    Golna Christina

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives To investigate whether the long term lease of public hospital owned land could be an additional financing mechanism for Greek public (mental health hospitals. Methods We performed a financial analysis of the official 2008 data of a case - study hospital (Mental Health Hospital of Chania. We used a capital budgeting approach to investigate whether value is created for the public hospital by engaging its assets in a project for the development of a private renal dialysis Unit. Results The development of the private unit in hospital owned land is a good investment decision, as it generates high project Net Present Value and Internal Rate of Return. When the project commences generating operating cash flows, nearly €400.000 will be paid annually to the Mental Health Hospital of Chania as rent, thereby gradually decreasing the annual deficit of the hospital. Conclusions Revenue generated from the long term lease of public hospital land is crucial to gradually eliminate hospital deficit. The Ministry of Health should encourage similar forms of Public Private Partnerships in order to ensure the sustainability of public (mental hospitals.

  16. Public hospital autonomy in China in an international context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Pauline; Cao, Qi; Wang, Hufeng

    2014-01-01

    Following decades of change in health care structures and modes of funding, China has recently been making pilot reforms to the governance of its public hospitals, primarily by increasing the autonomy of public hospitals and redefining the roles of the health authorities. In this paper, we analyse the historical evolution and current situation of public hospital governance in China, focussing the range of governance models being tried out in pilot cities across China. We then draw on the experiences of public hospital governance reform in a wide range of other countries to consider the nature of the Chinese pilots. We find that the key difference in China is that the public hospitals in the pilot schemes do not receive sufficient funding from government and are able to distribute profits to staff. This creates incentives to charge patients for excessive treatment. This situation has undermined public service orientation in Chinese public hospitals. We conclude that the pilot reforms of governance will not be sufficient to remedy all the problems facing these hospitals, although they are a step in the right direction. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Dickens, Victorian Mental Sciences and Mnemonic Errancy

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    Greta Perletti

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available While Dickens's alertness to debates about the physiology of the mind has been the subject of a number of critical investigations in the past two decades (especially with respect to Dickens's interest in mesmerism, this article investigates the relationship between Dickens's fiction and theories of memory within Victorian mental science. By focusing on a fantasy of 'memory extirpation' that was circulating in Victorian culture, this article reflects on the ways in which Dickens's writing engaged with (and perhaps even contributed to Victorian philosophical and psychological discourses on self and memory. Through an analysis of an emerging psychology of memory, this article shows how Dickens's fiction comes to terms with the risks that memory poses as well as its creative possibilities.

  18. Organizational culture and its relationship with hospital performance in public hospitals in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ping; Bundorf, Kate; Le Chang, Ji; Huang, Jin Xin; Xue, Di

    2011-12-01

    To measure perceptions of organizational culture among employees of public hospitals in China and to determine whether perceptions are associated with hospital performance. Hospital, employee, and patient surveys from 87 Chinese public hospitals conducted during 2009. Developed and administered a tool to assess organizational culture in Chinese public hospitals. Used factor analysis to create measures of organizational culture. Analyzed the relationships between employee type and perceptions of culture and between perceptions of culture and hospital performance using multivariate models. Employees perceived the culture of Chinese public hospitals as stronger in internal rules and regulations, and weaker in empowerment. Hospitals in which employees perceived that the culture emphasized cost control were more profitable and had higher rates of outpatient visits and bed days per physician per day but also had lower levels of patient satisfaction. Hospitals with cultures perceived as customer-focused had longer length of stay but lower patient satisfaction. Managers in Chinese public hospitals should consider whether the culture of their organization will enable them to respond effectively to their changing environment. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  19. Selecting public relations personnel of hospitals by analytic network process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Sen-Kuei; Chang, Kuei-Lun

    2009-01-01

    This study describes the use of analytic network process (ANP) in the Taiwanese hospital public relations personnel selection process. Starting with interviewing 48 practitioners and executives in north Taiwan, we collected selection criteria. Then, we retained the 12 critical criteria that were mentioned above 40 times by theses respondents, including: interpersonal skill, experience, negotiation, language, ability to follow orders, cognitive ability, adaptation to environment, adaptation to company, emotion, loyalty, attitude, and Response. Finally, we discussed with the 20 executives to take these important criteria into three perspectives to structure the hierarchy for hospital public relations personnel selection. After discussing with practitioners and executives, we find that selecting criteria are interrelated. The ANP, which incorporates interdependence relationships, is a new approach for multi-criteria decision-making. Thus, we apply ANP to select the most optimal public relations personnel of hospitals. An empirical study of public relations personnel selection problems in Taiwan hospitals is conducted to illustrate how the selection procedure works.

  20. The role of public university hospitals in a globalized world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slama, Slim

    2012-01-01

    Globalization has increased interdependence between countries and highlighted the importance of international cooperation for improving global health outcomes. International hospital partnerships aimed at expanding education, research opportunities or improving services are increasingly being shaped by globalization processes. Focusing on public university hospitals, this article calls for a critical review of the motives, processes and impact of international hospital partnerships in a changing landscape characterized by economic uncertainty and a global power shift to emerging economies.

  1. [Prevalence of pain in Andalusian public hospitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echevarria Moreno, M; Ortega Garcia, J L; Herrera Silva, J; Galvez Mateo, R; Torres Morera, L M; de la Torre Liebanas, R

    2014-12-01

    To determine the prevalence of pain in medical and surgical patients admitted to reference hospitals in Andalusia, as well as their features and the most population groups most affected. A cross-sectional, multicenter epidemiological study was conducted simultaneously on the population admitted to 5 hospitals. Using a structured questionnaire the demographics, hospital area, presence of pain at the time of the interview, and pre- and post-variables related to the intensity of pain and its treatment at 24h were investigated. All patients over 18 years old were included, except those patients with difficulty in understanding the questionnaire, and psychiatric and obstetric patients. Pain intensity was assessed by simple verbal scale. Of the 1,236 patients included, 54.2% were male, with 51.1% of patients aged 65 years, and 69.17% were admitted to medical areas. Pain was observed in 52.9% of patients admitted to the surgical area compared to 29.4% in the medical area. Of the 19.4% who reported having had pain in the last 24h prior to the questionnaire, 57.7% of them were surgical patients and 32% were medical, PDolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. The Provision of the Disabled Facilities in Public Hospitals

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    Talib Yuhainis Abdul

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The implementation of Person with Disabilities Act 2008 has become an eye opener towards the provision of disabled facilities in all public buildings especially regarding healthcare accessibility. The aim of this research is to analyse the provision of the disabled facilities provided in a public hospital in Perak, Malaysia. To support the research, it was supporting with two objectives that are to identify the designs and requirements of disabled facilities that need to be fulfilled according to Uniform Building By-Laws (UBBL and other standard regulations and to identify the level of awareness of public on disabled facilities in the public hospital. For the purpose of the research, the observation method has been done towards three (3 selected hospital in Perak and questionnaire survey have been distributed to 96 respondents among the staff and visitors of the hospitals. All the data collected from the questionnaire survey and the checklist using UBBL standard requirement, then analysed using the SPSS V.21. The outcome of the observation indicates that most of the hospitals were provided with the disabled facilities, but there are still some rooms for improvement regarding specifications and the provision itself. In a nutshell, this research helps the management of the hospital together with the public on the importance of the provision of the disabled facilities in public buildings.

  3. Financial profiling of public hospitals: an application by data mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozgulbas, Nermin; Koyuncugil, Ali Serhan

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an application of the data mining method to determine the financial profiles of the public hospitals in Turkey. The study is based on the data compiled in 2004, covering 645 public hospitals run by the Ministry of Health (MoH) as the main provider of primary and secondary health services in Turkey. The public hospitals, currently financed by a mixture of funds allocated from the general budget and individually operated revolving funds, need urgent solutions to their financial problems as a part of an ongoing national reform effort. The analysis adopts the Chi-Square Automatic Interaction Detector (CHAID) decision tree algorithm, as one of the most efficient and up-to-date data mining method used for segmentation. The study has found that the public hospitals could be categorized by the CHAID into 12 different profiles in terms of their financial performance. These profiles have guided us in determining the key financial indicators to be focused upon in the public hospitals and present best practices to improve their respective financial performances. The findings have also allowed policy suggestions as to the financial strategies that may be considered in improving the financial performance of the public hospitals toward a successful health sector reform in Turkey. Copyright (c) 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Hospital information system institutionalization processes in indonesian public, government-owned and privately owned hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handayani, P W; Hidayanto, A N; Ayuningtyas, Dumilah; Budi, Indra

    2016-11-01

    The Hospital Information System (HIS) could help hospitals as a public entity to provide optimal health services. One of the main challenges of HIS implementation is an institutional change. Using institutional theory as the analytical lens, this study aims to explain the institutionalization of HIS as an instance of e-health initiatives in Indonesia. Furthermore, this paper aims for hospital management and researchers to improve the understanding of the social forces that influence hospital personnel's HIS acceptance within an organizational context. We use case studies from four public, government-owned hospitals and four privately owned (public and specialty) hospitals to explain the HIS institutionalization process by exploring the three concepts of institutional theory: institutional isomorphism, institutional logic, and institutional entrepreneurship. This study reveals that differences exist between public, government-owned and private hospitals with regard to the institutionalization process: public, government-owned hospitals' management is more motivated to implement HIS to comply with the regulations, while private hospitals' management views HIS as an urgent requirement that must be achieved. The study findings also reveal that various institutional isomorphism mechanisms and forms of institutional logic emerge during the process. Finally, three factors-self-efficacy, social influence, and management support-have a significant influence on the individual acceptance of HIS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Defining Publics in Public Relations: The Case of a Suburban Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunig, James E.

    1978-01-01

    Offers a behavioral definition of a public, demonstrates how the definition can be used by public relations practitioners in researching and analyzing their publics, and reports on a formulative study of a suburban hospital that can serve as a model for public relations practitioners who wish to do similar research. (Author/GW)

  6. Feminist Thinking on Education in Victorian England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Laura

    2011-01-01

    This article examines some of the conversations that took place between women's rights advocates on the subject of female education. The relationship between Victorian feminism and educational reform was a complex one, and historians have long argued over whether campaigns for women's schools and colleges can be termed "feminist". This article…

  7. Moral Education in the Victorian Sunday School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tholfsen, Trygve R.

    1980-01-01

    The teachings of the Victorian Sunday school reflected an evangelical subculture that had become comfortably adapted to the world around it. The social values of the middle and lower classes took their place beside traditional virtues of piety, charity, and honesty. (Author/KC)

  8. Streaming for Mathematics in Victorian Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forgasz, Helen

    2010-01-01

    Streaming (or ability grouping) for mathematics learning is a contentious issue. It can also be considered an issue of equity or social justice as some students may be adversely affected by the practice. Currently, the Victorian Department of Education and Early Childhood Development (DEECD) does not appear to have clear guidelines on streaming.…

  9. Female Researchers in Neo-Victorian Fiction

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    Lai-Ming Tammy Ho

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Neo-Victorian novelists sometimes use postgraduate students – trainee academics – who research nineteenth-century writers as protagonists. This article discusses four neo-Victorian novels, Lloyd Jones’s Mister Pip (2006, Justine Picardie’s Daphne (2008, A.N. Wilson’s A Jealous Ghost (2005 and Scarlett Thomas’s The End of Mr Y (2006, in which female postgraduate students take the centre stage. In Victorian literature, which mirrors the gender bias in the academic world and in society at large at that time, most scholars are male. The contemporary writers’ choice of female trainee academics is worth investigating as it speaks to the visibly changed gender make-up of contemporary academia. However, this utopian situation is complicated by the fact that the writers have chosen to frustrate the characters’ entry into the world of scholarship by having them leave the university environment altogether before the end of the novel. The fact that these females all choose to depart the university forms a contrast with notions of the university found in Victorian novels, in which leaving or not attending university might have detrimental effects on the characters.

  10. Hospital marketers sold on value of custom publications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, T

    1998-01-01

    More and more hospital marketing and public relations executives are recognizing that publications, such as newsletters and magazines, are a very important part of their arsenal of marketing tools. They're also finding that custom publishers are valuable allies when it comes to target market opportunities.

  11. Early readmission in a high complexity public hospital in cardiology

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    Herminia Ricci

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the early readmission of patients in a high complexity public hospital in cardiology. Methods: this is a descriptive, documental and retrospective study, carried out in a public hospital. Results: in 2012, 729 of the 9,218 hospitalized patients were readmitted, 47.9% of them were readmitted within 30 days after discharge, 61% were men, with a mean age of 57 years old, with the main medical diagnosis of heart disease (heart failure, treatment of acute coronary syndrome, among others on admission (44.7% and readmission (45.8%. Most were readmitted for the same medical reason that led to their first hospitalization. Conclusion: considering the profile of the population admitted and readmitted to the institution, it is believed that the rate of readmission is mainly due to the profile of the patients, considering the high prevalence of non-communicable chronic diseases, and coronary artery disease considered unapproachable for percutaneous or surgical when hospitalized.

  12. Nursing organizational climates in public and private hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, I García; Castillo, R F; Santa-Bárbara, E S

    2014-06-01

    Researchers study climate to gain an understanding of the psychological environment of organizations, especially in healthcare institutions. Climate is considered to be the set of recurring patterns of individual and group behaviour in an organization. There is evidence confirming a relationship between ethical climate within organizations and job satisfaction. The aim of this study is to describe organizational climate for nursing personnel in public and private hospitals and to confirm the relationships among the climate variables of such hospitals. A correlational study was carried out to measure the organizational climate of one public hospital and two private hospitals in Granada. The Work Environment Scale was used for data collection. The Work Environment Scale includes 10 scales, ranging from 0 to 9, which were used to evaluate social, demographic and organizational climate variables. In this study, 386 subjects were surveyed in three hospitals. A total of 87% of the participants were female and 16% were male. Most participants were nurses (65.6%), followed by nursing aides (20%), and technicians (14.4%). The results obtained reflected different patterns of organizational climate formation, based on hospital type (i.e. public or private) within the Spanish context. Most of the dimensions were below the midpoint of the scale. In conclusion, in public hospitals, there is a greater specialization and the organizational climate is more salient than in the private hospitals. In addition, in the public hospitals, the characteristics of the human resources and their management can have a significant impact on the perception of the climate, which gives greater importance to the organizational climate as decisive of the ethical climate. © The Author(s) 2013.

  13. Linking public health agencies and hospitals for improved emergency preparedness: North Carolina's public health epidemiologist program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markiewicz, Milissa; Bevc, Christine A; Hegle, Jennifer; Horney, Jennifer A; Davies, Megan; MacDonald, Pia D M

    2012-02-23

    In 2003, 11 public health epidemiologists were placed in North Carolina's largest hospitals to enhance communication between public health agencies and healthcare systems for improved emergency preparedness. We describe the specific services public health epidemiologists provide to local health departments, the North Carolina Division of Public Health, and the hospitals in which they are based, and assess the value of these services to stakeholders. We surveyed and/or interviewed public health epidemiologists, communicable disease nurses based at local health departments, North Carolina Division of Public Health staff, and public health epidemiologists' hospital supervisors to 1) elicit the services provided by public health epidemiologists in daily practice and during emergencies and 2) examine the value of these services. Interviews were transcribed and imported into ATLAS.ti for coding and analysis. Descriptive analyses were performed on quantitative survey data. Public health epidemiologists conduct syndromic surveillance of community-acquired infections and potential bioterrorism events, assist local health departments and the North Carolina Division of Public Health with public health investigations, educate clinicians on diseases of public health importance, and enhance communication between hospitals and public health agencies. Stakeholders place on a high value on the unique services provided by public health epidemiologists. Public health epidemiologists effectively link public health agencies and hospitals to enhance syndromic surveillance, communicable disease management, and public health emergency preparedness and response. This comprehensive description of the program and its value to stakeholders, both in routine daily practice and in responding to a major public health emergency, can inform other states that may wish to establish a similar program as part of their larger public health emergency preparedness and response system.

  14. Linking public health agencies and hospitals for improved emergency preparedness: North Carolina's public health epidemiologist program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markiewicz Milissa

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 2003, 11 public health epidemiologists were placed in North Carolina's largest hospitals to enhance communication between public health agencies and healthcare systems for improved emergency preparedness. We describe the specific services public health epidemiologists provide to local health departments, the North Carolina Division of Public Health, and the hospitals in which they are based, and assess the value of these services to stakeholders. Methods We surveyed and/or interviewed public health epidemiologists, communicable disease nurses based at local health departments, North Carolina Division of Public Health staff, and public health epidemiologists' hospital supervisors to 1 elicit the services provided by public health epidemiologists in daily practice and during emergencies and 2 examine the value of these services. Interviews were transcribed and imported into ATLAS.ti for coding and analysis. Descriptive analyses were performed on quantitative survey data. Results Public health epidemiologists conduct syndromic surveillance of community-acquired infections and potential bioterrorism events, assist local health departments and the North Carolina Division of Public Health with public health investigations, educate clinicians on diseases of public health importance, and enhance communication between hospitals and public health agencies. Stakeholders place on a high value on the unique services provided by public health epidemiologists. Conclusions Public health epidemiologists effectively link public health agencies and hospitals to enhance syndromic surveillance, communicable disease management, and public health emergency preparedness and response. This comprehensive description of the program and its value to stakeholders, both in routine daily practice and in responding to a major public health emergency, can inform other states that may wish to establish a similar program as part of their larger public

  15. Measuring Patient Safety Culture in Riyadh's Hospitals: A Comparison between Public and Private Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ahmadi, Talal A

    2009-01-01

    The issue of patient safety has received an increasing attention worldwide. In Saudi Arabia, policy makers and health organizations continually strive to substantially reduce medical errors and improve quality of health care. The aim of this research was to explore the perceptions of Riyadh hospitals' staff on patient safety and error reporting and to identify factors that influence the levels of frequency of events reported. A cross-sectional survey, using Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSPSC), was carried out in 2008. The questionnaire was distributed to all hospitals' staff in Riyadh, which included nine public hospitals and two private hospitals. A total of 1224 questionnaires were returned over a six-month period, giving a response rate of 47.4%. Organizational learning was the safety culture dimension with the highest positive response (75.9%), while the non-punitive response to error received the lowest positive response (21.1%). The key areas that need improvement in public hospitals include handoffs and transitions, communication openness, staffing, and non-punitive response to error. The private hospitals need an improvement in two aspects; staffing and non-punitive response to error. The results show that all types of mistakes were reported more frequency in private hospitals than in public hospitals. Most respondents reported "no events" in the twelve months preceding the survey, with the percentage of not reporting being higher in private sector compared to public hospitals. The high percent of "no event" reports may represent under-reporting in all hospitals. Regression analysis indicated that event reporting was influenced by feedback and communication about error, staff position, teamwork across units, non- punitive response to error, supervisor/managers expectations and actions promoting patients safety, and type of hospital. Areas needs improvement in Riyadh hospitals includes handoffs and transitions, communication openness, staffing

  16. THE FACTORS AFFECTING SATISFACTION LEVELS IN HOSPITALIZED PATIENTS: AN APPLICATION IN PUBLIC HOSPITAL

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    Neşe ACAR

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to determine the factors that affect the level of satisfaction of services provided by public hospitals. Patients' satisfaction levels were measured by interviewing 156 patients in a public hospital. Factor analysis of the data obtained from the research resulted in five factors called nurses 'behaviors, physical conditions, doctors' behavior, technical staff behaviors, food and beverage. MANOVA analysis was conducted to determine the differences in the perception of factors with respect to the demographic characteristics of the patients and differences were found in terms of profession. It has been seen that it is important that public hospitals have specialist doctors and modern equipment and that they have qualities such as the quality of the health personnel in preferring patients to public hospitals.

  17. [Evaluation of the efficiency and quality of hospitals publicly owned with private management and hospitals of the public sector].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraldes, Maria Do Rosário

    2007-01-01

    , and by the Garcia de Orta Hospital, which are the less efficient hospitals. In Group V, with central hospitals and hospitals with functions of central hospital, it is the Hospital of Vila Real/Régua, EPE, to present the best situation of the Composite Efficiency Indicator, followed by the Santo António Hospital, EPE, the Santa Maria Hospital, EPE, and the HUC, while the hospitals with a worst situation of the Composite Efficiency Indicator are the Hospitals of Faro, Evora and S. José. In Group VI hospitals with a better Composite Efficiency Indicator are the hospitals of Santa Marta, Gama Pinto Institute and Orthopedic Hospital of Outão, while the Estefânia Hospital is the most inefficient. Tondela, Valongo and Peniche Hospitals (Group I), have a good value of the Composite Efficiency and Quality Indicator, while Barcelos, Oliveira de Azeméis and Póvoa de Varzim/Vila do Conde Hospitals (Group II) present also good values of this indicator. The Hospitals of Vila Franca de Xira, Bragança and Setúbal (Group III), the Hospitals of Santarém, Garcia de Orta, and Curry Cabral (Group IV), the Hospital of Vila Real/Régua, the Egas Moniz Hospital and the Santa Maria Hospital (Group V), and the Gama Pinto Institute, the Orthopedic Hospital of Outão, and the Santa Cruz Hospital (Group VI) are the best classified in their groups. EPE Hospitals (Hospitals publicly owned with private management) are the best classified in their groups in what efficiency is concerned, what is a better result tan the one shown in 2003. The lower inequality in relation to management indicators, in all hospital groups, exists in the areas of expenditure with inpatient care by user, what shows the existence of a norm of proceeding, in this traditional hospital area. The higher inequalities are those of day hospital, drugs in day hospital, drugs in outpatient care and rehabilitation by user. In what management indicators are concerned incentives must be created. The most efficient hospitals

  18. The issues of translating Flaubert and Zola in victorian England

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    Denise Merkle

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The late-Victorian two-tier public (circulating libraries, e.g., Mudie’s Select Library and private (secret literary societies, e.g. The Lutetian Society publishing field was at the centre of profound social transformations tied to literacy. The hierarchical structure of the field reveals the degree to which speech has traditionally been controlled in Britain, in alignment with the country’s rigid class structure. This reality marks a sharp contrast with the generally held view that Great Britain has historically been a model of free speech and democratic values. The article explains that the bourgeoning moral majority preoccupied with protecting the moral integrity of newly literate working class readers and women readers of all classes wished to quell the perceived scourge of pornography, believed to be promoted by dissolute foreigners and British aristocrats. In order to avoid prosecution, editors and translators needed to consider not only patterns of reader expectations, but also the discursive constraints that aligned with Victorian values. An example of an editor who overestimated the degree of freedom of expression was Henry Vizetelly, who attempted to provide working class and female readers with translations of Zola’s and Flaubert’s works. While Madame Bovary was not banned by the courts, many of Zola’s novels were.

  19. Selling Sentiment: The Commodification of Emotion in Victorian Visual Culture

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    Sonia Solicari

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available This essay argues that the Victorian sentimental impulse was motivated by the sharing of emotion and the dynamics of communal and interactive feeling. Integral to the popularity of sentiment was its recognition factor by means of established tropes and conventions. Arguably, the same familiarity that made narrative art accessible also made advertising successful and many of the same motifs ran from exhibition watercolours to book illustration to posters. Works of sentiment operated as emotional souvenirs so that material proof of feeling could be easily digested, displayed and revisited. The essay looks closer at the investment of emotion in ephemeral images, such as music-sheet covers, and the ways in which forms of feeling were standardised and reproduced in keeping with a new art-buying public and the possibilities of wider image dissemination. Focusing upon issues raised during the curation of a current exhibition at the Victoria and Albert Museum ( 'A Show of Emotion: Victorian Sentiment in Prints and Drawings', 7 Dec 2006 – 10 Sep 2007 this essay explores the ways in which the sentimental pervaded nineteenth-century visual culture and how, in the cut-throat commercial world of image production, sentiment became manifest and identifiable if only as a notional phenomenon.

  20. Organizational climate: Comparing private and public hospitals within professional roles

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    Diana Rojas

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This study compares the organizational climate differences within professional roles in private and public hospitals. We focused on how physicians, administrative, healthcare and non-healthcare staff either in the public or in the private perceived their work environment and each organizational climate dimension. Data came from organizational-climate questionnaires administered in 2010 and 2012 to 19616 and 1276 health employees in public and private hospitals in the Tuscany Region respectively. We applied exploratory factoranalysis to verify the validity and internal consistency between items in the questionnaire and t-test, one-way analysis of variance to compare mean perceptions regarding to the dimensions across different groups of respondents. We measured four dimensions: “training opportunities”, “managerial tools”, “organization” and “management & leadership style” and overall job satisfaction. Hospital status in the professional roles was found significant in the staff's perceptions (p≤0.05.

  1. Prevalence of congenital malformation in newborns of the public hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Aritana Pereira Ramos; Maria Nice Dutra de Oliveira; Jefferson Paixão Cardoso

    2008-01-01

    The study aimmed to estimate the predominance of congenital malformations in newborns of the Public Hospital in the Jequié city, Brazil. It was utilized spring of secondary facts, from the fact-gathering of available manuals in the Service of Medical Files of the hospital, in the period of January of 2005 to December of 2006. It was utilized instrument of collection standardized where information about characteristics they were collected of the mother, general characteristics of the newborn...

  2. Implementing Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative policy: the case of New Zealand public hospitals

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    Gauld Robin

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies show that when the Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI is implemented breastfeeding rates increase. However, there are likely to be various barriers to BFHI implementation. This article reports on an empirical study of government-directed BFHI implementation in the New Zealand public hospital system. It focuses primarily on the barriers encountered through implementing the first Two Steps of the BFHI: developing BFHI policy and communicating it to staff; and providing necessary staff training. Methods Qualitative interview data were collected from six lactation consultants. These interviewees emerged via a purposive sample of public hospitals that represent the full range of New Zealand public hospitals. Using a content analysis technique, key themes were drawn from the transcribed interview data. Results Analysis revealed eight themes: the hospitals were in varying stages of BFHI policy development; hospital policy was not necessarily based on government policy; hospital policies were communicated in differing ways and dependent on resources; factors outside of hospital control impacted on capacity to improve breastfeeding rates; and complex organisational matters pose a barrier to educating personnel involved in the birthing process. Conclusion The findings of this study provide empirical support for prior articles about the process of BFHI policy development and implementation. The study also shows that implementation is multi-faceted and complex.

  3. Explaining turnover intention in Korean public community hospitals: occupational differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jee-In; Chang, Hyejung

    2008-01-01

    Personnel in public hospitals had relatively low job satisfaction despite of tenure employment. High turnover rates degrade hospital image and incur additional costs related to recruitment and training. The purposes of this study were to describe the occupational differences and to identify factors affecting turnover intention among public hospital personnel. A questionnaire survey was conducted as part of Administrative Services Quality Evaluation Program by Seoul metropolitan municipality from 1 November to 1 December in 2003. The subjects were 1251 entire hospital personnel in four hospitals. The questionnaire was designed to measure job satisfaction, organizational commitment, turnover intention, and demographic characteristics. Logistic regression analysis was performed to determine factors influencing turnover intention. There were significant differences in job satisfaction, organizational commitment, and turnover intention according to the occupations. The turnover intention rates were highest among physicians, followed by paramedicals and nursing staffs and then administrators. The significant factors affecting turnover intention were involvement and loyalty among physicians, hospital type, satisfaction with systems and loyalty among nursing staffs, satisfaction with relationship and loyalty among administrators, and loyalty among paramedicals. There were different moderators that influence turnover intentions of hospital personnel. Loyalty had the most important effect upon turnover intention in all occupations. 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd

  4. Identification Crises: Victorian Women and Wayward Reading

    OpenAIRE

    Knox, Marisa

    2013-01-01

    In the Victorian period, no assumption about female reading generated more ambivalence and anxiety than the supposedly feminine facility for identifying with fictional characters and plots. Simultaneously, no assumption about women's reading seemed to be more axiomatic. Conservatives and radicals, feminists and anti-feminists, artists and scientists, and novelists and critics throughout the long nineteenth century believed implicitly in women's essential tendency to internalize textual perspe...

  5. Job satisfaction among nurses in a public hospital in Gauteng

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Selebi

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The nursing profession in South Africa has lost skilled nurses due to intense international recruitment drives. The public hospital in this study has also failed to recruit and retain skilled nurses. The shortage of skilled nurses has led to deterioration in patient nursing care. The aim of this study: The aim of this study was to describe the level of job satisfaction among nurses in a public hospital. The methodology: A quantitative, descriptive survey was conducted. The data were collected using the Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire. The sample included nurses working in a specific public hospital. Results: Generally all the nurses experienced low satisfaction (42% with the motivational aspects of their job, such as motivation, responsibility, opportunity for creativity and innovation, independence, and recognition. Nurses also experienced very low levels of satisfaction (22% with the hygiene aspects of their job, namely, relationships in the workplace, supervisors’ decision-making skills, supervision, working conditions, policies, job security, and salaries. Conclusions: Health services need to be made aware of the high level of dissatisfaction of nurses. The hospital struggles to keep nurses in their posts, and could benefit from taking note of the results of this study. The findings indicate some of the aspects which need to be considered in a human resource planning strategy for nurses. The hospital and nursing management needs to rethink nurses’ salaries, supervision methods and relationships, and also how the Department of Health policies are implemented.

  6. Management of incomplete abortions at South African public hospitals

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abortions at South African public hospitals. S Fawcus. J Mclntyre, R K Jewkes, H Rees,. J M Katzenellenbogen, R Shabodien. C J Lombard,. H Truter and the National Incomplete Abortion Study. Reference Group. Objective. The objective of this report was to review and describe the management of incomplete abortion by.

  7. Analysis of determinants of public hospitals efficiency in Cameroon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Data Envelopment Analysis model was used and sources of inefficiency were analysed using a censored Tobit model. We noted that more than half of the public health establishments analysed: district hospitals, district health and integrated health centres covered, revealed a pure technical inefficiency. Further, the ...

  8. Monitoring Cataract Surgical Outcome in a Public Hospital in Orlu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the proportion and causes of poor visual outcome of cataract operations done in a public hospital in southeast Nigeria and propose actions to improve the cataract surgical outcome. Method: A prospective observational analysis of the initial hundred cases of cataract operations done in Imo State ...

  9. Management of incomplete abortions at South African public hospitals

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    . J Mclntyre, R K Jewkes, H Rees,. J M Katzenellenbogen, R Shabodien. C J Lombard,. H Truter and the ... Public sector hospitals in South Africa. Patients. Women with ..... and length of stay for low-risk patients tended to be longer. The aim of ...

  10. Assessment of antiretroviral treatment outcome in public hospitals ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Assessment of antiretroviral treatment outcome in public hospitals, South Nations Nationalities and Peoples Region, Ethiopia. ... Kaplan-Meier models were used to estimate mortality and Cox proportional hazards models to identify predictors of mortality. Results: The median age was 30 years and 73.6% were in the age ...

  11. A pharmacist-led system-change smoking cessation intervention for smokers admitted to Australian public hospitals (GIVE UP FOR GOOD): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Dennis; Abramson, Michael J; Bonevski, Billie; Taylor, Simone; Poole, Susan; Weeks, Gregory R; Dooley, Michael J; George, Johnson

    2013-05-21

    Intensive smoking cessation interventions initiated during hospitalisation are effective, but currently not widely available. Strategies are needed to integrate smoking cessation treatment into routine inpatient care. Pharmacist-led interventions for smoking cessation are feasible and efficacious in both ambulatory and community pharmacy settings. However, there is a lack of evidence from large scale studies of the effectiveness of pharmacist guided programs initiated during patient hospitalisation in achieving long-term abstinence. This study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of a pharmacist-led system change intervention initiated during hospitalisation in Australian public hospitals. A multi-centre, randomised controlled trial will be conducted with 12 months follow-up. Smokers, 18 years or older, will be recruited from the wards of three Victorian public hospitals. Participants will be randomly assigned to a usual care or intervention group using a computer generated randomisation list. The intervention group will receive at least three smoking cessation support sessions by a trained pharmacist: the first during the hospital stay, the second on or immediately after discharge and the third within one month post-discharge. All smoking cessation medications will be provided free of charge during the hospital stay and for at least one week after discharge. Participants randomised to usual care will receive the current care routinely provided by the hospital. All measurements at baseline, discharge, one, six and 12 months will be performed by a blinded Research Assistant. The primary outcome measures are carbon monoxide validated 7-day point prevalence abstinence at six and 12 months. This is the first large scale study to develop and test a pharmacist-led system change intervention program initiated during patient hospitalisation. If successful, the program could be considered for wider implementation across other hospitals. ACTRN12612000368831.

  12. Insurance against germ theory: commerce and conservatism in late-Victorian medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alborn, T L

    2001-01-01

    This article highlights the role played by commercial life insurance companies in determining the response to tuberculosis in Britain between 1865 and 1920. Late-Victorian life offices hired two sorts of physicians to help them screen out high-risk proposals: provincial medical examiners, who collected fees for examining candidates; and salaried medical advisors, who developed guidelines for the medical examination and interpreted the examiners' findings for the head office. The latter set of physicians, many of whom worked at specialist consumption hospitals in London, established an orthodoxy among life offices that privileged hereditarian explanations for the cause of tuberculosis. The provincial examiners resisted that orthodoxy, arguing that advances in public health and treatment rendered irrelevant any apparent correlation between family history and tuberculosis. In adjudicating this internal dispute, life offices stood by their salaried advisors, but in the process pushed them away from viewing disease in terms of specific causes and toward viewing disease in terms of statistical correlation. This victory of statistics over etiology preserved, at least for the rest of the twentieth century, the institutional prominence of insurance as a technique for coping with medical uncertainty.

  13. The transit of Venus enterprise in Victorian Britain

    CERN Document Server

    Ratcliff, Jessica

    2008-01-01

    In nineteenth century, the British Government spent money measuring the distance between the earth and the sun using observations of the transit of Venus. This book presents a narrative of the two Victorian transit programmes. It draws out their cultural significance and explores the nature of 'big science' in late-Victorian Britain.

  14. Cultural circumcision in EU public hospitals--an ethical discussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusa, Margherita; Barilan, Y Michael

    2009-10-01

    The paper explores the ethical aspects of introducing cultural circumcision of children into the EU public health system. We reject commonplace arguments against circumcision: considerations of good medical practice, justice, bodily integrity, autonomy and the analogy from female genital mutilation. From the unique structure of patient-medicine interaction, we argue that the incorporation of cultural circumcision into EU public health services is a kind of medicalization, which does not fit the ethos of universal healthcare. However, we support a utilitarian argument that finds hospital based circumcision safer than non-medicalized alternatives. The argument concerning medicalization and the utilitarian argument both rely on preliminary empirical data, which depend on future validation

  15. Theoretical and perceived balance of power inside Spanish public hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvadores, P; Schneider, J; Zubero, I

    2001-01-01

    The hierarchical pyramid inside Spanish public hospitals was radically changed by the Health Reform Law promulgated in 1986. According to it, the manpower of the hospitals was divided into three divisions (Medical, Nursing, General Services/Administration), which from then on occupied the same level, only subject to the general manager. Ten years after the implementation of the law, the present study was designed in order to investigate if the legal changes had indeed produced a real change in the balance of power inside the hospitals, as perceived by the different workers within them. A questionnaire was administered to 1,027 workers from four different public hospitals (two university-based and two district hospitals). The participants belonged to all divisions, and to all three operative levels (staff, supervisory and managerial) within them. The questionnaire inquired about the perceived power inside each division and hierarchical level, as well as about that of the other divisions and hierarchical levels. Every division attributed the least power to itself. The Nursing and the Administrative division attributed the highest power to the physicians, and these attributed the highest power to the General Services/Administrative division. All hierarchical levels (including the formal top of the pyramid) attributed significantly more power to the other than to them. More than ten years after the implementation of the new law, the majority of workers still perceive that the real power within the hospitals is held by the physicians (whereas these feel that it has shifted to the administrators). No division or hierarchical level believes it holds any significant degree of power, and this carries with it the danger of also not accepting any responsibility.

  16. The Adaptive Capabilities of Organizations. Case of Polish Public Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariola Ciszewska-Mlinaric

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Information gathering and analysis, reaction design and implementation, and activities correction and learning are three types of adaptive capabilities connected to three phases of organizational adaptation to the environment. The primary objective of this article is to present how adaptive capabilities of high and low performers differ. In the second part of the article the key factors influencing the adaptive capabilities of Polish public hospitals will be identified and examined.

  17. Comparison of childbirth care models in public hospitals, Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Vogt,Sibylle Emilie; da Silva, K?tia Silveira; Dias,Marcos Augusto Bastos

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare collaborative and traditional childbirth care models. METHODS Cross-sectional study with 655 primiparous women in four public health system hospitals in Belo Horizonte, MG, Southeastern Brazil, in 2011 (333 women for the collaborative model and 322 for the traditional model, including those with induced or premature labor). Data were collected using interviews and medical records. The Chi-square test was used to compare the outcomes and multivariate logistic regression to...

  18. Cervical Spinal Cord Injury at the Victorian Spinal Cord Injury Service: Epidemiology of the Last Decade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon C.P. Lau

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Cervical spinal cord injury (CSCI is a significant medical and socioeconomic problem. In Victoria, Australia, there has been limited research into the incidence of CSCI. The Austin Hospital's Victorian Spinal Cord Injury Service (VSCIS is a tertiary referral hospital that accepts referrals for surgical management and ongoing neurological rehabilitation for south eastern Australia. The aim of this study was to characterise the epidemiology of CSCI managed operatively at the VSCIS over the last decade, in order to help fashion public health campaigns. Methods This was a retrospective review of medical records from January 2000 to December 2009 of all patients who underwent surgical management of acute CSCI in the VSCIS catchment region. Patients treated non-operatively were excluded. Outcome measures included: demographics, mechanism of injury and associated factors (like alcohol and patient neurological status. Results Men were much more likely to have CSCI than women, with a 4:1 ratio, and the highest incidence of CSCI for men was in their 20s (39%. The most common cause of CSCI was transport related (52%, followed by falls (23% and water-related incidents (16%. Falls were more prevalent among those >50 years. Alcohol was associated in 22% of all CSCIs, including 42% of water-related injuries. Discussion Our retrospective epidemiological study identified at-risk groups presenting to our spinal injury service. Young males in their 20s were associated with an increased risk of transport-related accidents, water-related incidents in the summer months and accidents associated with alcohol. Another high risk group were men >50 years who suffer falls, both from standing and from greater heights. Public awareness campaigns should target these groups to lower incidence of CSCI.

  19. Physicians' job satisfaction and motivation in a public academic hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira Vasconcelos Filho, Paulo; de Souza, Miriam Regina; Elias, Paulo Eduardo Mangeon; D'Ávila Viana, Ana Luiza

    2016-12-07

    Physician shortage is a global issue that concerns Brazil's authorities. The organizational structure and the environment of a medical institution can hide a low-quality life of a physician. This study examines the relationship between the hospital work environment and physicians' job satisfaction and motivation when working in a large public academic hospital. The study was restricted to one large, multispecialty Brazil's hospital. Six hundred hospital physicians were invited to participate by e-mail. A short version of the Physician Worklife Survey (PWS) was used to measure working satisfaction. Physicians were also asked for socio-demographic information, medical specialty, and the intention to continue working in the hospital. Data from 141 questionnaires were included in the analyses. Forty-five physicians graduated from the hospital's university, and they did not intend to leave the hospital under any circumstance (affective bond). The motivating factor for beginning the career at the hospital and to continue working there were the connection to the medical school and the hospital status as a "prestigious academic hospital"; the physicians were more satisfied with the career than the specialty. Only 30% completely agreed with the statement "If I had to start my career over again, I would choose my current specialty," while 45% completely agreed with the statement "I am not well compensated given my training and experience." The greater point of satisfaction was the relationship with physician colleagues. They are annoyed about the amount of calls they are requested to take and about how work encroaches on their personal time. No significant differences between medical specialties were found in the analysis. The participants were satisfied with their profession. The fact that they remained at the hospital was related to the academic environment, the relationship with colleagues, and the high prestige in which society holds the institution. The points of

  20. Prioritizing lean management practices in public and private hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Matloub; Malik, Mohsin

    2016-05-16

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to prioritize 21 healthcare wastes in public and private hospitals of United Arab Emirates (UAE). Design/methodology/approach - Seven healthcare wastes linked with lean management are further decomposed in to sub-criteria and to deal with this complexity of multi criteria decision-making process, analytical hierarchical process (AHP) method is used in this research. Findings - AHP framework for this study resulted in a ranking of 21 healthcare wastes in public and private hospitals of UAE. It has been found that management in private healthcare systems of UAE is putting more emphasis on the inventory waste. On the other hand, over processing waste has got highest weight in public hospitals of UAE. Research limitations/implications - The future directions of this research would be to apply a lean set of tools for the value stream optimization of the prioritized key improvement areas. Practical implications - This is a contribution to the continuing research into lean management, giving practitioners and designers a practical way for measuring and implementing lean practices across health organizations. Originality/value - The contribution of this research, through successive stages of data collection, measurement analysis and refinement, is a set of reliable and valid framework that can be subsequently used in conceptualization, prioritization of the waste reduction strategies in healthcare management.

  1. Measuring cost efficiency in the Nordic hospitals--a cross-sectional comparison of public hospitals in 2002

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linna, Miika; Häkkinen, Unto; Peltola, Mikko

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the performance of hospital care in four Nordic countries: Norway, Finland, Sweden and Denmark. Using national discharge registries and cost data from hospitals, cost efficiency in the production of somatic hospital care was calculated for public hospitals. Data...

  2. Organizational climate in a public hospital from Quindio Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubén Darío Agudelo Loaiza

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To characterize the organizational climate perceived by the assistance and administrative staff members at a public hospital in Quindio-Colombia 2015. Method: A quantitative correlational study, which measures the organizational climate of a low complexity hospital through the characterization of twelve dimensions. The population being studied was conformed by 114 assistance and administrative staff members who belong to a public hospital in Quindío-Colombia. Results: The measurement of the organizational climate provided a result of a global average of 69.81 with a score of 3.9 being classified as a medium level for the organizational climate. There was evidence of a highly meaningful positive bond between the organizational climate and the dimension of interpersonal relationships and between this one with the external coordination. Conclusion: There is evidence of the importance given by the staff members to the “friendly interaction” that is interpreted as a respectful and effective relationship with their co-workers, which is, in turn, necessary for the generation of a teamwork environment. Additionally, it was found that a high degree of importance regarding interpersonal relationships with the external coordination is given; fact that can be understood as the value staff members confere to the participative leadership within their perception of organizational climate.

  3. Determinants of patient satisfaction with public hospital services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladhari, Riadh; Rigaux-Bricmont, Benny

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this research is to propose and test a model of the causal relationships among the constructs of perceived service quality, consumption emotions, and satisfaction among users of public hospital services. The conceptual model proposed in this study postulates that: (a) perceived service quality is positively related to positive emotions and negatively related to negative emotions; (b) perceived service quality is positively related to patient satisfaction; and (c) positive emotions are positively related to patient satisfaction and negative emotions are negatively related to patient satisfaction. The model was tested with data from an empirical study in the Canadian public hospital setting. Data were collected from 314 respondents. The relationships between the constructs were tested using structural equation modeling by means of the EQS software. All hypothesized relationships were supported. The results confirm that perceived service quality exerts both direct and indirect effects (through positive and negative emotions) on satisfaction. The study demonstrates that emotions play an important role in determining satisfaction with hospital services.

  4. Financial analysis of diabetic patients hospitalizations submitted to lower limb amputation in a public hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Santos Silva

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This study is a documental descriptive analysis which aimed to verify the cost established in 2006, in relation to the hospitalization of 21 diabetic patients submitted to the lower limb amputation in a public hospital and the value transferred by the Unified Health System (SUS regarding this procedure. Among the studied patients, 57.14% were female and 42.86% male, aged 40 to 90 years. The time of diagnosis varied from 5 to 25 years. The average of hospitalization was 14 days per patient. The cost to the hospital was R$ 99,455.74, average cost per patient was R$ 4,735.98. The total amount transferred by SUS to the hospital was R$ 27,740.15, a cost 3.6 times lower than the hospital costs. The SUS transferring is in accordance with the predetermined values for its table of procedure. Prevention is the only alternative to reduce the rate of amputation and improve survival of diabetes patients. It is necessary an early diagnosis and better control of diabetes mellitus with appropriate government and institutional policies.

  5. Workplace Bullying Among the Nursing Staff of Greek Public Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karatza, Christine; Zyga, Sofia; Tziaferi, Styliani; Prezerakos, Panagiotis

    2017-02-01

    In this quantitative, cross-sectional study, the authors identified the impact of workplace bullying on nursing staff employed at select Greek public hospitals. They conducted the study using the Negative Acts Questionnaire with a convenience sample of 841 participants employed by five Greek hospitals in the 1st Regional Health Authority of Attica. One third of the respondents reported having been psychologically harassed at work in the past 6 months. According to the results, the impact workplace bullying has on nursing staff varies depending on the existence of a supportive familial or friend environment and if nurses parent children. These findings demonstrate the value of family and friend support when coping with workplace bullying.

  6. Managing healthcare waste in Ghana: a comparative study of public and private hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abor, Patience Aseweh

    2013-01-01

    The paper aims to examine the healthcare waste management practices of selected hospitals in Ghana. The study adopted a multiple case approach, using two public and two private hospitals. Findings indicate that both public hospitals and one private hospital have a waste management policy. Public and private hospitals have waste management plans and waste management teams. Public hospitals were found to generate more waste than the private hospitals. One private hospital and the public hospitals segregate their waste into different categories. This is done by first identifying the waste type and then separating non-infectious or general waste from infectious waste. Both public and private hospitals have internal storage facilities for temporarily storing the waste before they are finally disposed off-site. On-site transportation in the public hospitals is done by using wheelbarrows, while covered bins with wheels are used to transport waste on-site in the private hospitals. In public and private hospitals, off-site transportation of the hospital waste is undertaken by Municipal Assemblies with the use of trucks. Both public and private hospitals employ standard methods for disposing of healthcare waste. The article provides insights into healthcare waste management from a Ghanaian perspective.

  7. The natural theology of Victorian industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Nick

    2015-03-01

    As clergymen in Britain celebrated the Great Exhibition in the summer of 1851 and drew appropriate moral lessons, there was widespread agreement that the triumphs of industry on display represented the fulfilment of God's will. The basic assumption was that overcoming God's curse on Adam had been possible only through sustained hard work - industry in the early Victorian sense - and that this imperative work ethic had always been God's intention for mankind. In elaborating the details, preachers combined the British tradition of natural theology with the Scottish Enlightenment's progressive science of man to paint a picture of the slow recovery of man from the Fall through his own industry. This was the very story of civilization itself, with God the driving force. The celebrants were quite clear that it was divine providence that had ordained the greatness of Great Britain. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. [Public music concerts in a psychiatric hospital: effects on public opinion and as therapy for patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takasaka, Y; Yokota, O; Tanioka, T; Nagata, K; Yasuoka, K; Toda, H

    2001-01-01

    We investigate the effects of music therapy concerts, which were held 60 times over a four year period, 1992 to 1996, in Geiyo Psychiatric Hospital, Kochi Prefecture and found that; 1) Musicians who performed at the concerts were not only from Kochi prefecture but also from other prefectures (10 times) and from four foreign countries (7 times). 2) Live concerts in a small hall had a positive influence on patients and drew the patient's attention and interest away from their hallucinations and delusions to the real world. Moreover, the concerts provided the patients with chances to acquire social graces such as being well-groomed. 3) Explanations by the musicians, interviews with the musicians and the seasonal choruses accompanied by the musicians were helpful to give the patients motives for recovering communication skills and to interact with society. 4) Inquiries to the patients about the concerts indicated discrepancies between the poor observed estimations during the concerts (83.3%) and the good subjective impressions expressed by the patients (82.0%), suggesting that the patients were not good at expressing their internal emotions through facial expressions or attitudes. 5) Many citizens including children came to the concerts and/or gave aid to the hospital because the concerts were open to the public and we suggest that this contributed to improving the general publics' image of psychiatric hospitals. Questionnaires revealed that 90% of people in a control group had a bad image of psychiatric hospitals in Japan, but only 32% of the members of the general public who attended our concerts had a bad image of psychiatric hospitals. In addition, the revolving ratio of the hospital beds rose from 0.4 to 1.2 over the four years, which also suggests a beneficial effect on the patients.

  9. Communication satisfaction of professional nurses working in public hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, J-D; Bezuidenhout, M C; Roos, J H

    2015-11-01

    This study aimed to establish and describe the level of communication satisfaction that professional nurses experience in selected public hospitals in the City of Johannesburg, South Africa. The success of any organisation depends on the effectiveness of its communication systems and the interaction between staff members. Data were collected by means of questionnaires, based on the Communication Satisfaction Questionnaire (CSQ), from a sample of 265 professional nurses from different categories, chosen using a disproportionate random stratified sampling method. The results indicated poor personal feedback between nurse managers (operational managers) and professional nurses, as well as dissatisfaction among nurse managers and professional nurses with regard to informal communication channels. A lack of information pertaining to policies, change, financial standing and achievements of hospitals was identified. Nurse managers should play a leadership role in bringing staff of different departments together by creating interactive communication forums for the sharing of ideas. The results emphasise the need for nurse managers to improve communication satisfaction at all levels of the hospital services in order to enhance staff satisfaction and create a positive working environment for staff members. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Nursing Management Published by John wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. PREVALENCE OF CONGENITAL MALFORMATION IN NEWBORNS OF THE PUBLIC HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aritana Pereira Ramos

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The study aimmed to estimate the predominance of congenital malformations in newborns of the Public Hospital in the Jequié city, Brazil. It was utilized spring of secondary facts, from the factgathering of available manuals in the Service of Medical Files of the hospital, in the period of January of 2005 to December of 2006. It was utilized instrument of collection standardized where information about characteristics they were collected of the mother, general characteristics of the newborn and bad-congenital formation. The results show predominance of 3.1% of born infants been with evil congenital formation. Among these, it prevailed the of the male sex (64,0%, premature (56,7% of normal birth (56,7%, with adequate weight (70,0%, classified in the majority of isolated form (76,7%, of smaller clinical importance (63,0% and evolving for high hospital with 60.0% of the cases; 71.0% of the deaths occurred between the newborns were due to specific malformations of the nervous system, however this pathology next to of the osteomuscular system. The majority of the mothers had between 17 and 24 years (46,7%, carried out more of seven consults prenatal (30,0% and live in the urban zone of the town (60,0%; 71.0% of the deaths occurred between the newborns were due to specific malformations of the nervous system. Those finds are compatible with others finds described in the Brazilian scientific literature, what is going to reflect about the implementation of public politics with infrastructure qualified service implementation in the perspective of prevention, detection and cares of those individuals in all of the levels of the net of health.

  11. Prevalence of congenital malformation in newborns of the public hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aritana Pereira Ramos

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The study aimmed to estimate the predominance of congenital malformations in newborns of the Public Hospital in the Jequié city, Brazil. It was utilized spring of secondary facts, from the fact-gathering of available manuals in the Service of Medical Files of the hospital, in the period of January of 2005 to December of 2006. It was utilized instrument of collection standardized where information about characteristics they were collected of the mother, general characteristics of the newborn and bad-congenital formation. The results show predominance of 3.1% of born infants been with evil-congenital formation. Among these, it prevailed the of the male sex (64,0%, premature (56,7% of normal birth (56,7%, with adequate weight (70,0%, classified in the majority of isolated form (76,7%, of smaller clinical importance (63,0% and evolving for high hospital with 60.0% of the cases; 71.0% of the deaths occurred between the newborns were due to specific malformations of the nervous system, however this pathology next to of the osteomuscular system. The majority of the mothers had between 17 and 24 years (46,7%, carried out more of seven consults prenatal (30,0% and live in the urban zone of the town (60,0%; 71.0% of the deaths occurred between the newborns were due to specific malformations of the nervous system. Those finds are compatible with others finds described in the Brazilian scientific literature, what is going to reflect about the implementation of public politics with infrastructure qualified service implementation in the perspective of prevention, detection and cares of those individuals in all of the levels of the net of health.

  12. By-Product of Industrialization: The Victorian Myth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intercom, 1976

    1976-01-01

    A case study designed to provide a picture of sex stereotypes in Europe and America before and after the industrial revolution. Qualities most often exhibited and admired by Victorian men and women are described. (Author/DB)

  13. Influenza vaccination uptake among Victorian healthcare workers: evaluating the success of a statewide program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Sandra A; Bennett, Noleen; Bull, Ann L; Richards, Michael J; Worth, Leon J

    2016-06-01

    Annual influenza vaccination is recommended for all Australian healthcare workers (HCWs). In 2014, a target vaccination uptake of 75% was set for Victorian healthcare facilities. This study aimed to determine the 2014 uptake, describe trends over time and propose an enhanced reporting framework. Annual data submitted to the Victorian Healthcare Associated Infection Surveillance System (VICNISS) regarding HCW influenza were evaluated for 2005-2014. Faculty uptake - the number of vaccinations administered divided by total number of staff employed - was reported as a statewide aggregate and stratified by facility size (number of staff employed). In 2014, 78,885 HCWs were vaccinated across 93 healthcare facilities, corresponding to an overall uptake of 72.2%. During 2005-2014, small facilities (healthcare facility size categories, the highest uptake was observed in 2014. Influenza vaccination uptake in HCWs has successfully been introduced as a performance indicator in Victorian healthcare facilities and a peak uptake was reported in 2014. Varied trends are evident when uptake is stratified by number of employed HCWs, providing a feasible and meaningful method for benchmarking. © 2015 Public Health Association of Australia.

  14. Defining the activities of publicness for Korea's public community hospitals using the Delphi method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kunsei; Kim, Hyun Joo; You, Myoungsoon; Lee, Jin-Seok; Eun, Sang Jun; Jeong, Hyoseon; Ahn, Hye Mi; Lee, Jin Yong

    2017-03-01

    This study aims to identify which activities of a public community hospital (PHC) should be included in their definition of publicness and tries to achieve a consensus among experts using the Delphi method. We conduct 2 rounds of the Delphi process with 17 panel members using a developed draft of tentative activities for publicness including 5 main categories covering 27 items. The questions remain the same in both rounds and the applicability of each of the 27 items to publicness is measured on a 9-point scale. If the participants believe government funding is needed, we ask how much they think the government should support each item on a 0% to 100% scale. After conducting 2 rounds of the Delphi process, 22 out of the 27 items reached a consensus as activities defining the publicness of the PHCs. Among the 5 major categories, in category C, activities preventing market failure, all 10 items were considered activities of publicness. Nine of these were evaluated as items that should be compensated at 100% of total financial loss by the Korean government. Throughout results, we were able to define the activities of the PCH that encompassed its publicness and confirm that there are "good deficits" in the context of the PCHs. Thus, some PCH deficits are unavoidable and not wasted as these monies support a necessary role and function in providing public health. The Korean government should therefore consider taking actions such as exempting such "good deficits" or providing additional financial aid to reimburse the PHCs for "good deficits."

  15. Provisioning of dental health in public hospitals: A case study of District Jalandhar, Punjab

    OpenAIRE

    Shaveta Menon

    2016-01-01

    Background: The Government of India is increasingly emphasizing the provisioning of dental services in public hospitals, but the rural and deprived sections are struggling to get basic dental procedures done in public hospitals. Aim: To study variations within and across public hospitals for provisioning of dental health settings in Jalandhar district of Punjab. Settings and Design: The study area consisted of four Community Health Centers (CHCs) and District Hospital situated in Jaland...

  16. EMERGING ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE IN HOSPITAL A THREAT TO PUBLIC HEALTH

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    Vichal Rastogi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Antimicrobial resistance(AMR threatens the health of many throughout the world, since both old and new infectious diseases remain a formidable public health threat. When pathogenic microorganisms can multiply beyond some critical mass in the face of invading antimicrobials, treatment outcome is compromised. This phenomenon is referred as antimicrobial resistance (AMR. Objective: This retrospective study was conducted to assess the overall antimicrobial resistance in bacterial isolates from tertiary care hospitals as majority of patients here receive empirical antibiotics therapy. Method: This retrospective study was carried out in teaching hospital, Greater Noida to determine prevalence of multidrug resistance in patients in relation to empirical antibiotic therapy in hospital. Various samples (pus,urine,blood were collected for bacterial culture and antibiotic sensitivity. Results: Total 500 bacterial strains isolated from ICU, surgery, obstetrics & gynaecology and orthopaedics and their sensitivity pattern was compared in this study. The highest number of resistant bacterias were of pseudomonas sp. i.e. 21(33.87% followed by 16(25.80% of staphylococcus aureus, 12(19.35% of Escherichia coli, Klebseilla sp & Proteus vulgaris were 05(8.06% each & Citrobacter sp. 03(4.83%. Total 62(12.4% bacterial isolates were found to be resistant to multiple drugs. The 31 (50% of these resistant bacteria were prevalent in ICU, 12(19.35% in Surgery, 11(17.74% in Gynaecology, 08(12.90% in Orthopaedics.. All the bacterial strains were resistant to common antibiotics like Penicillin, Amoxicillin, Doxycycline & Cotrimoxazole and some were even resistant to Imipenem. Conclusion: Therefore we have outlined the nature of the antimicrobial resistance problem as an important health issue for national and international community. It is advised to avoid use of empirical antibiotics therapy.

  17. Hospital Adoption of Health Information Technology to Support Public Health Infrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Daniel M; Diana, Mark L

    2016-01-01

    Health information technology (IT) has the potential to improve the nation's public health infrastructure. In support of this belief, meaningful use incentives include criteria for hospitals to electronically report to immunization registries, as well as to public health agencies for reportable laboratory results and syndromic surveillance. Electronic reporting can facilitate faster and more appropriate public health response. However, it remains unclear the extent that hospitals have adopted IT for public health efforts. To examine hospital adoption of IT for public health and to compare hospitals capable of using and not using public health IT. Cross-sectional design with data from the 2012 American Hospital Association annual survey matched with data from the 2013 American Hospital Association Information Technology Supplement. Multivariate logistic regression was used to compare hospital characteristics. Inverse probability weights were applied to adjust for selection bias because of survey nonresponse. All acute care general hospitals in the United States that matched across the surveys and had complete data available were included in the analytic sample. Three separate outcome measures were used: whether the hospital could electronically report to immunization registries, whether the hospital could send electronic laboratory results, and whether the hospital can participate in syndromic surveillance. A total of 2841 hospitals met the inclusion criteria. Weighted results show that of these hospitals, 62.7% can electronically submit to immunization registries, 56.6% can electronically report laboratory results, and 54.4% can electronically report syndromic surveillance. Adjusted and weighted results from the multivariate analyses show that small, rural hospitals and hospitals without electronic health record systems lag in the adoption of public health IT capabilities. While a majority of hospitals are using public health IT, the infrastructure still has

  18. Does Scale of Public Hospitals Affect Bargaining Power? Evidence From Japan

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    Konosuke Noto

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background Many of public hospitals in Japan have had a deficit for a long time. Japanese local governments have been encouraging public hospitals to use group purchasing of drugs to benefit from the economies of scale, and increase their bargaining power for obtaining discounts in drug purchasing, thus improving their financial situation. In this study, we empirically investigate whether or not the scale of public hospitals actually affects their bargaining power. Methods Using micro-level panel data on public hospitals, we examine the effect of the scale of public hospitals (in terms of the number of occupancy beds on drug purchasing efficiency (DPE (the average discount rate in purchasing drugs as a proxy variable of the bargaining power. Additionally, we evaluate the effect of the presence or absence of management responsibility in public hospital for economic efficiency as the proxy variable of an economic incentive and its interaction with the hospital scales on the bargaining power. In the estimations, we use the fixed effects model to control the heterogeneity of each hospital in order to estimate reliable parameters. Results The scale of public hospitals does not positively correlate with bargaining power, whereas the management responsibility for economic efficiency does. Additionally, scale does not interact with management responsibility. Conclusion Giving management responsibility for economic efficiency to public hospitals is a more reliable way of gaining bargaining power in drug purchasing, rather than promoting the increase in scale of these public hospitals.

  19. Does Scale of Public Hospitals Affect Bargaining Power? Evidence From Japan.

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    Noto, Konosuke; Kojo, Takao; Innami, Ichiro

    2017-03-07

    Many of public hospitals in Japan have had a deficit for a long time. Japanese local governments have been encouraging public hospitals to use group purchasing of drugs to benefit from the economies of scale, and increase their bargaining power for obtaining discounts in drug purchasing, thus improving their financial situation. In this study, we empirically investigate whether or not the scale of public hospitals actually affects their bargaining power. Using micro-level panel data on public hospitals, we examine the effect of the scale of public hospitals (in terms of the number of occupancy beds) on drug purchasing efficiency (DPE) (the average discount rate in purchasing drugs) as a proxy variable of the bargaining power. Additionally, we evaluate the effect of the presence or absence of management responsibility in public hospital for economic efficiency as the proxy variable of an economic incentive and its interaction with the hospital scales on the bargaining power. In the estimations, we use the fixed effects model to control the heterogeneity of each hospital in order to estimate reliable parameters. The scale of public hospitals does not positively correlate with bargaining power, whereas the management responsibility for economic efficiency does. Additionally, scale does not interact with management responsibility. Giving management responsibility for economic efficiency to public hospitals is a more reliable way of gaining bargaining power in drug purchasing, rather than promoting the increase in scale of these public hospitals.

  20. Representations of Lovesickness in Victorian Literature

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    Hatice Övgü Tüzün

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Given the central place it occupies in human life and relations, it is hardly surprising that romantic love as well as the distress caused by unrequited love is a universal phenomenon that has been explored by numerous writers over the years. Passionate love can be defined as a state of intense desire for fusion with another. When love is reciprocated and union is achieved, the lover feels a sense of fulfilment and joyful ecstasy. If the lover is rejected or scorned, however, s/he is overwhelmed with an acute sensation of emptiness, often accompanied with feelings of anxiety and despair. For the purposes of this article, I will focus on representations of lovesickness in two novels from the Victorian period: Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte and The Moonstone by Wilkie Collins. Drawing on the sociologist Eva Illouz’ Why Love Hurts? and the psychologist Dorothy Tennov’s conceptualization of love and limerence, I will examine how the emotional trauma experienced by Catherine and Heathcliff in Wuthering Heights and Rosanna Spearman in The Moonstone causes all three characters to feel intense suffering and prolonged misery, leading - eventually - to their destruction.

  1. Walking Victorian Spitalfields with Israel Zangwill

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    Nadia Valman

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses Zangwill’s Spitalfields, a mobile app with content curated, written, and produced by Nadia Valman, Soda Ltd (developer and the Jewish Museum, London (archive collaborator. The app uses Israel Zangwill’s novel 'Children of the Ghetto' (1892 as a walking guide to the Jewish immigrant subculture of Victorian Spitalfields, east London, which the novel describes at a moment of critical change. Zangwill’s Spitalfields exploits the app’s potential for bringing together a range of digital sources including archive photographs, museum objects, and oral history recordings with the user’s observations of the physical environment, to produce an experience that is both immersive and multivocal. Mobile digital technology has provided a new interpretive context for the Jewish Museum’s collection, and animated previously unmarked monuments in Spitalfields. By drawing on the user’s experience of walking in present-day Spitalfields, the app also intervenes into a historiography increasingly shaped by nostalgia.

  2. Costs for in hospital treatment of urinary lithiasis in the Brazilian public health system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkes, Fernando; Silva Ii, Jarques Lúcio da; Heilberg, Ita Pfeferman

    2011-12-01

    To estimate costs associated to hospital treatment of urinary lithiasis in the Brazilian public health system as well as to evaluate demographic and epidemiological data referred to hospital admissions in the Brazilian public health system (or unified health care system). Data from the Informatic Department of Brazilian public health system were obtained as referred to costs in hospital admissions for urinary lithiasis during 2010 and also epidemiological data from 1996 through 2010. There were 69,039 hospital admissions for urinary lithiasis, totaling 0.61% of all hospital admissions in the Brazilian public health system. The mean cost of each of these hospital admissions was US$ 240,23 or R$ 423.42 having as result an overall cost of US$ 16,240,378.00 or R$ 29.232.682,56. Hospital admissions for urinary lithiasis in the Brazilian public health system increased 69% from 1996 to 2010 (43,176 versus 69,309; p lithiasis in Brazil.

  3. INVESTIGATING THE PATIENT SATISFACTION WITHIN ROMANIAN PUBLIC AND PRIVATE HOSPITALS

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    Mihoc Florin

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Although it is not commonly accepted within healthcare services industry, the importance of marketing is more and more recognized nowadays by the organizations activating in the field. Current perception resides in a series of factors as: ethical aspects involved in the delivery process; special characteristics of the market; particular profile and behavior of the consumers of healthcare services and probably because of the inadequate understanding of the marketing role in the life of an organization. A deep analysis in the field of healthcare services will emphasize not only its complexity, but also its interdisciplinary feature under many aspects, as it is an area where many fields of interest are intersecting, both economic and social. It also reveals a particular field of study with many particular features - considered a sensitive field (Popa and Vladoi 2010: 232. Generated using the SERVQUAL model, the data presented in the paper are the result of a quantitative research designed to measure and compare the patient/client satisfaction degree for public and private medical services provided by the Romanian hospitals. The aim of the research is to identify and to measure the gap that appears between the patient/client’ expectations and perceptions regarding the delivered services; to identify the potential profile of the private Romanian hospitals’ clients regarding the demographic features and also to pin-point correlations between the image created in the mind of the Romanian patients/clients and the type of medical services (public or private they were using. We consider that the results of this research are valuable for the managers of the medical units in order to initiate series of actions aiming to improve the quality of their services and, as a result the patient/clients’ satisfaction degree. Later being one of the most important performance indicators of an organization that activates in a highly competitive business

  4. The Victorian Meme Machine: Remixing the Nineteenth-Century Archive

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    Bob Nicholson

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In summer 2014 Bob Nicholson began working with the British Library Labs on a new project that aims to find and revive Victorian jokes. It began with two key aims: to build a high-quality, open access, research database of one million Victorian jokes; and to share these jokes with modern audiences in creative new ways, including the use of images, videos, performances, and social media. This article explains the rationale behind the project and outlines the work done so far. Part one explains why Victorian jokes are worthy of academic attention and demonstrates how the most laboured of puns can reveal new insights into nineteenth-century culture and society. Part two explores the relationship between Victorian jokes and existing digital archives and considers the pros and cons of liberating them from the restrictions imposed by these collections. Finally, part three documents the progress made so far. In particular, it reflects on the development of the ‘Mechanical Comedian’ tool and attempts to release one hundred ‘remixed’ versions of Victorian jokes onto social media.

  5. Stress level of people with psoriasis at a public hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leovigildo, Érida Silva; David, Rose Ana Rios; Mendes, Andreia Santos

    2016-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic dermatosis of unknown etiology with a tendency to relapse after treatment. The disease is frequently linked to psychological stress due to the embarrassment caused by the lesions. To analyze the stress level presented by psoriasis patients followed at the Dermatology Service of a public hospital in Salvador, Bahia state, Brazil. A cross-sectional study of a consecutive convenience sample composed of 60 participants. We used Lipp's Stress Symptoms Inventory for Adults to assess stress levels. The questionnaire identifies and classifies physical and psychological symptoms according to three stages of stress: alarming, resistance, and exhaustion. We also collected socio-demographic and clinical data that could be associated with psoriasis. 85% of the participants presented stress. Lipp's questionnaire results revealed that 48% were in the resistance stage and 37% in the exhaustion stage. Women presented higher levels of stress. Of the total 28 women, 64% were in exhaustion stage, 29% in the resistance stage, and only 7% presented no stress symptoms. Of the total 32 men, 44% were in resistance stage, 34% in exhaustion stage, and 22% presented no stress symptoms. Regarding physical and psychological symptoms, psychological symptomatology was prevalent (55%). Based on the number of patients in exhaustion stage, we can conclude that stress levels of the participants were high regardless the type of psoriasis and treatment duration.

  6. Working hours and health behaviour among nurses at public hospitals

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    Juliana da Costa Fernandes

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to analyse the differences between genders in the description in the professional, domestic and total work hours and assess its association with health-related behaviour among nurses. METHODS: this is a transversal study carried out in 18 different public hospitals in the municipality of Rio de Janeiro. The data collection procedure was based on questionnaires. All nurses working with assistance were considered eligible (n=2,279. RESULTS: men and women showed significant differences in relation to working hours. The female group showed longer domestic and total work hours when compared to the group of men. In contrast, the number of hours spent on professional work was higher among men. For the women, both the professional hours and total work hours were often associated with excessive consumption of fried food and also coffee, lack of physical exercise and also the greater occurrence of overweight and obesity. CONCLUSION: both the professional hours and the domestic work hours need to be taken into account in studies about health, self-care and also the care provided within the context of nursing workers, particularly among women. The results add weight to the need for actions for health promotion in this occupational group and the importance of assessing the impact of long working hours on the health of workers.

  7. Introduction: Victorian Fiction and the Material Imagination

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    Victoria Mills

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available How should we deal with the ‘stuff' in books? This is the question addressed in the lead articles of the Spring 2008 issue of 19, all of which focus on some aspect of the material in relation to Victorian fiction. Gas, rocks, jewellery, automata and the entire contents of houses are examined in essays that explore the material imagination of Dickens, Hardy, George Eliot and Thackeray, among others. Moving forward from the previous edition, which different types of collected object, here contributors examine how the material is brought into collision with literature. The phrase 'material imagination' can be traced to the work of Gaston Bachelard who identifies two types of imagination, the formal and the material. Whereas the former focuses on surfaces and the visual perception of images, the latter consists of '…this amazing need for penetration which, going beyond the attractions of the imagination of forms, thinks matter, dreams in it, lives in it, or, in other words, materializes the imaginary'. As Bachelard suggests, the material imagination involves more than just a focus on the representation of objects and the contributions to this edition explore such wide ranging subjects as the gender politics of ownership, dispossession, the body as object, the politics of collecting and display and the dichotomy between the material and immaterial. In addition, this edition features a forum on digitisation and materiality. We are particularly pleased to be able to make use of 19's digital publishing format to further debates about digital media. In the forum, five contributors respond to a series of questions about the nature of the virtual object. All five have worked or are working on nineteenth-century digitisation projects so they are uniquely placed to consider issues surrounding representation and the nature of digital space.

  8. Corporate political strategy: incorporating the management of public policy issues into hospital strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigelow, B; Arndt, M; Stone, M M

    1997-01-01

    Hospitals engage in a variety of strategies designed to anticipate, shape, and respond to public policy issues. This article describes corporate political strategy and argues for its need throughout a public policy issue's life cycle.

  9. Comparison of organizational learning capabilities of the personnel in public and private sector hospitals of Kermanshah

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    Homayoun Abbasi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hospitals are among the most interactive organizations in which the rate of knowledge transfer and learning is considerably high. The investigation of the level of organizational learning between public and private sector hospitals can be useful for managers to select proper organizational learning strategies aiming at improving service delivery and organizational behaviour (1. This study was carried out to compare the organizational learning capabilities of the personnel in public and private sector hospitals of Kermanshah. Methods: This descriptive survey was performed on the personnel in public and private sector hospitals of Kermanshah. According to Krejcie and Morgan’s table, 175 employees were selected via stratified random sampling from 6 public and 2 private hospitals. The instrument for gathering data was Organizational Learning Capability Questionnaire (OLCQ by Gomez et al. (2005 (2. Data were analysed by inferential statistics (K-S test, Levene’s test, t-test, one-way ANOVA using SPSS software (version 20.00. Results: The level of organizational learning capabilities of personnel was higher in the private hospitals than in public hospitals, indicating a statistically significant difference between them (T (26= 11.779, P0.01، F (3, 68 = 1.859. Conclusion: With regard to the higher average of knowledge transfer and integration than the other capabilities in public and private hospitals, it seems that the managers of hospitals should make use of this component to promote the organizational knowledge of the personnel and improve other organizational learning capabilities too.

  10. Viewpoint: Transatlantic Scholarship on Victorian Literature and Culture

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    Isobel Armstrong

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available This viewpoint offers a comparison of recent British and American criticism of Victorian literature and culture, encompassing Dickens, Tennyson, the epic and ethical criticism. Discussion centres on recent studies by Sally Ledger, Rosemarie Bodenheimer, Cornelia Pearsall, Kirstie Blair, Simon Dentith, Herbert Tucker, Andrew Miller and Mike Sanders.

  11. The new Victorians: The joys of scientific correspondence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cutler, A.

    1989-01-01

    'My dear Hooker,' wrote Charles Darwin to Joseph Hooker on 6 March 1844, 'I will not lose a post in guarding you against what I am afraid is . . . labour in vain.' This urgent warning went by post, because Darwin had no option: he had no telephone. What the Victorians did have, however, was a

  12. ALCOHOL DEPENDENCE IN GASTROENTEROLOG YOUTPATIENT ON A PUBLIC HOSPITAL

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    Mariana de Andrade PRANKE

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: Alcoholism and alcoholic liver disease are both considered worldwide health problems. OBJECTIVE: The prevalence of alcohol dependence, the associated risk factors and the concordance between the prevalence found and the data collected during the medical visit were evaluated. METHODS: A prospective study evaluating gastroenterology outpatients at a public tertiary hospital was conducted. Two specific questionnaires to assess alcohol dependence were applied: Cut down, Annoyed by criticism, Guilty, Eye-opener (CAGE and The Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test (AUDIT. Data on comorbidities, clinical diagnosis and assessment of alcohol consumption by the attending physician were collected through medical records. RESULTS: One hundred and seventy eight patients were interviewed, of which 119 (66.9% were women and 59 (33.1% were men, with mean age of 57 years. Thirty-three (18.5% of the 178 patients were considered alcohol-dependent by the CAGE questionnaire. Thirteen (7.3% patients scored 8 points or more on the AUDIT questionnaire. The agreement (kappa between these questionnaires was 0.37 (P<0.001. The most consumed drink was beer. The median daily consumption of dependent patients was 64 g. None of the patients were undergoing treatment in a specific treatment center, and 14/33 (42.4% patients considered themselves alcoholics. Only in 17/33 (51.5% there was information about alcoholism in their respective medical records. In the bivariate analysis, male gender (P<0.001, onset of alcohol consumption before the age of 15 (P=0.003, daily alcohol consumption in the last 12 months (P<0.001 and smoking (P<0.001 were identified as risk factors. After multivariate analysis, only male gender (P=0.009 and smoking (P=0.001 were associated with alcoholism. CONCLUSION: The present study demonstrated a high prevalence of alcohol dependence in the gastroenterology outpatient clinic, being predominantly associated with male gender and

  13. Environmental management in public hospitals: Environmental management in Colombia

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    Juan Pablo Rodríguez-Miranda

    2016-10-01

    Conclusions: Hospitals can apply broader environmental management instruments, including life cycle analysis of their products and services and monitoring of the carbon footprint; they may also take into account the different areas of environmental impact of their operation.

  14. Development of South Australian-Victorian Prostate Cancer Health Outcomes Research Dataset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruseckaite, Rasa; Beckmann, Kerri; O'Callaghan, Michael; Roder, David; Moretti, Kim; Zalcberg, John; Millar, Jeremy; Evans, Sue

    2016-01-22

    Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed and prevalent malignancy reported to Australian cancer registries, with numerous studies from single institutions summarizing patient outcomes at individual hospitals or States. In order to provide an overview of patterns of care of men with prostate cancer across multiple institutions in Australia, a specialized dataset was developed. This dataset, containing amalgamated data from South Australian and Victorian prostate cancer registries, is called the South Australian-Victorian Prostate Cancer Health Outcomes Research Dataset (SA-VIC PCHORD). A total of 13,598 de-identified records of men with prostate cancer diagnosed and consented between 2008 and 2013 in South Australia and Victoria were merged into the SA-VIC PCHORD. SA-VIC PCHORD contains detailed information about socio-demographic, diagnostic and treatment characteristics of patients with prostate cancer in South Australia and Victoria. Data from individual registries are available to researchers and can be accessed under individual data access policies in each State. The SA-VIC PCHORD will be used for numerous studies summarizing trends in diagnostic characteristics, survival and patterns of care in men with prostate cancer in Victoria and South Australia. It is expected that in the future the SA-VIC PCHORD will become a principal component of the recently developed bi-national Australian and New Zealand Prostate Cancer Outcomes Registry to collect and report patterns of care and standardised patient reported outcome measures of men nation-wide in Australia and New Zealand.

  15. Bootstrapping data envelopment analysis of efficiency and productivity of county public hospitals in Eastern, Central, and Western China after the public hospital reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Man-Li; Fang, Hai-Qing; Tao, Hong-Bing; Cheng, Zhao-Hui; Lin, Xiao-Jun; Cai, Miao; Xu, Chang; Jiang, Shuai

    2017-10-01

    China implemented the public hospital reform in 2012. This study utilized bootstrapping data envelopment analysis (DEA) to evaluate the technical efficiency (TE) and productivity of county public hospitals in Eastern, Central, and Western China after the 2012 public hospital reform. Data from 127 county public hospitals (39, 45, and 43 in Eastern, Central, and Western China, respectively) were collected during 2012-2015. Changes of TE and productivity over time were estimated by bootstrapping DEA and bootstrapping Malmquist. The disparities in TE and productivity among public hospitals in the three regions of China were compared by Kruskal-Wallis H test and Mann-Whitney U test. The average bias-corrected TE values for the four-year period were 0.6442, 0.5785, 0.6099, and 0.6094 in Eastern, Central, and Western China, and the entire country respectively, with average non-technical efficiency, low pure technical efficiency (PTE), and high scale efficiency found. Productivity increased by 8.12%, 0.25%, 12.11%, and 11.58% in China and its three regions during 2012-2015, and such increase in productivity resulted from progressive technological changes by 16.42%, 6.32%, 21.08%, and 21.42%, respectively. The TE and PTE of the county hospitals significantly differed among the three regions of China. Eastern and Western China showed significantly higher TE and PTE than Central China. More than 60% of county public hospitals in China and its three areas operated at decreasing return scales. There was a considerable space for TE improvement in county hospitals in China and its three regions. During 2012-2015, the hospitals experienced progressive productivity; however, the PTE changed adversely. Moreover, Central China continuously achieved a significantly lower efficiency score than Eastern and Western China. Decision makers and administrators in China should identify the causes of the observed inefficiencies and take appropriate measures to increase the efficiency of county

  16. Humanization and volunteering: a qualitative study in public hospitals.

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    Nogueira-Martins, Maria Cezira Fantini; Bersusa, Ana Aparecida Sanches; Siqueira, Siomara Roberta

    2010-10-01

    To analyze the profile of volunteers and their work process in hospital humanization. The following instruments were used: a sociodemographic questionnaire and a semi-structured interview, applied to 26 volunteer coordinators and 26 volunteers, who belong to 25 hospitals in the metropolitan area of São Paulo, Southeastern Brazil, between 2008 and 2009. Interviews were analyzed according to thematic analysis principles. Five main themes were identified: volunteer profile (age, sex, level of income); volunteer work organization (volunteer agreement, training); volunteer-hospital relationship (relationship with hospital management and employees); motivation (solidarity, previous experience with family members' or one's own diseases, personal satisfaction, conflict resolution) and benefits (individual, dual, collective); and humanization and volunteer activities (patient care, logistic support, emotional support, development of patients' abilities, leisure, organization of commemorative events). In the activity developed by volunteers, there are positive aspects (such as the contribution to hospital humanization) and negative aspects (such as volunteers performing activities assigned to employees). Attention should be paid to the regulation of volunteer activities, especially patient care, and actions that value volunteer work in hospitals and volunteer integration into humanization work groups.

  17. On nurses moving from public to private hospitals in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Zenobia C Y; Tam, W S; Lung, Maggie K Y; Wong, W Y; Chau, C W

    2013-05-01

    To explore the reasons why nurses leave public hospitals for the private sector. While the global shortage of nurses is aggravating, this problem in public hospitals in Hong Kong is worsened by the trend of nurses moving to private hospitals. Thus, it is important to understand from the perspective of nurses the reasons affecting their decision to stay or leave a hospital. Qualitative approach using narrative analysis. Data were collected using individual semistructured interviews. Twelve participants who had moved to a private hospital from a public hospital were encouraged to explain why they had made the move. Crossley's analytic method was adopted to analyse the collected data. The nurses' stories were categorised into five sections: 'life in public hospitals', 'decision-making', 'life in the private hospitals', 'future plans' and 'values and beliefs'. The results are consistent with those of previous studies showing that job satisfaction and demographic factors play significant roles in the decision of nurses to switch to another hospital. This study revealed specific reasons why the nurses made the move, such as the fairness of the remuneration policy, significant people and stressors. The results have relevance for hospital management with regard to strategies to consider when addressing the issues of staff retention and recruitment. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Cost estimate of hospital stays for premature newborns in a public tertiary hospital in Brazil

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    Claudia Maria Desgualdo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To estimate the direct costs of hospital stays for premature newborns in the Interlagos Hospital and Maternity Center in São Paulo, Brazil and to assess the difference between the amount reimbursed to the hospital by the Unified Health System and the real cost of care for each premature newborn. METHODS: A cost-estimate study in which hospital and professional costs were estimated for premature infants born at 22 to 36 weeks gestation during the calendar year of 2004 and surviving beyond one hour of age. Direct costs included hospital services, professional care, diagnoses and therapy, orthotics, prosthetics, special materials, and blood products. Costs were estimated using tables published by the Unified Health System and the Brasindice as well as the list of medical procedures provided by the Brazilian Classification of Medical Procedures. RESULTS: The average direct cost of care for initial hospitalization of a premature newborn in 2004 was $2,386 USD. Total hospital expenses and professional services for all premature infants in this hospital were $227,000 and $69,500 USD, respectively. The costs for diagnostic testing and blood products for all premature infants totaled $22,440 and $1,833 USD. The daily average cost of a premature newborn weighing less than 1,000 g was $115 USD, and the daily average cost of a premature newborn weighing more than 2,500 g was $89 USD. Amounts reimbursed to the hospital by the Unified Health System corresponded to only 27.42% of the real cost of care. CONCLUSIONS: The cost of hospital stays for premature newborns was much greater than the amount reimbursed to the hospital by the Unified Health System. The highest costs corresponded to newborns with lower birth weight. Hospital costs progressively and discretely decreased as the newborns' weight increased.

  19. [Quality management and quality assurance in the hospital with special reference to hospital public health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonntag, H G; Möller, J

    1996-12-01

    Due to the law of health reform and health structure the hospitals in the Federal Republic of Germany are asked to not only think about cost reduction but at the same time to also face the requirements of quality management (QM) and quality assurance (QA). For the field of medical and care taking treatment of patients in the hospital the term "quality" can be described as the total of characteristics of the medical services necessary for the realization of all requirements which lead to an optimal patient treatment. Hospital hygiene as part of hygiene in the broader sense deals with the bases of disease prevention of all persons actively or passively connected with the institution hospital as well as with the natural and social hospital environment and, thus, in every respect proves to be a guide discipline for the realization of QM and QA in the hospital. For the realization of an overall concept for QM and QA in the hospital three categories of quality have proved to be worthwhile, namely the structure quality which deals with the quality related arrangement of the frame conditions of hospital productivity the process quality which comprises the improvement of diagnostic, therapeutic, care taking and medical activities in the hospital as well as interactions between the hospital staff and the patient or his relatives, and the outcome quality, which judges the changes in the patient's condition by means of predefined target values. Furthermore, QM in the hospital needs detailed informative activities (initial stage of information) as well as motivating measures (initial stage of conduct) whereas latter has to be considered as an essential basis for a staff-related realization of quality assurance measures in the hospital. Possibilities for a practical realization of QM and QA are shown by means of the modular concept established in the Clinics of the University of Heidelberg. Thereby, one could experience that a successful QM in the hospital requires the declared

  20. [Technical efficiency of traditional hospitals and public enterprises in Andalusia (Spain)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero Tabanera, Luis; Martín Martín, José Jesús; López del Amo González, Ma del Puerto

    2015-01-01

    To assess the technical efficiency of traditional public hospitals without their own legal identity and subject to administrative law, and that of public enterprise hospitals, with their own legal identities and partly governed by private law, all of them belonging to the taxypayer-funded health system of Andalusia during the period 2005 -2008. The study included the 32 publicly-owned hospitals in Andalusia during the period 2005-2008. The method consisted of two stages. In the first stage, the indices of technical efficiency of the hospitals were calculated using Data Envelopment Analysis, and the change in total factor productivity was estimated using the Malmquist index. The results were compared according to perceived quality, and a sensitivity analysis was conducted through an auxiliary model and bootstrapping. In the second stage, a bivariate analysis was performed between hospital efficiency and organization type. Public enterprises were more efficient than traditional hospitals (on average by over 10%) in each of the study years. Nevertheless, a process of convergence was observed between the two types of organizations because, while the efficiency of traditional hospitals increased slightly (by 0.50%) over the study period, the performance of public enterprises declined by over 2%. The possible reasons for the greater efficiency of public enterprises include their greater budgetary and employment flexibility. However, the convergence process observed points to a process of mutual learning that is not necessarily efficient. Copyright © 2014 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  1. Balance between education- and research-oriented publications from a Brazilian University Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mendonça de Araujo K.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed the trends of scientific output of the University Hospital, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro. A total of 1420 publications were classified according to pattern and visibility. Most were non-research publications with domestic visibility. With time, there was a tendency to shift from non-research (or education-oriented publications with domestic visibility to research publications with international visibility. This change may reflect new academic attitudes within the institution concerning the objectives of the hospital and the establishment of scientific research activities. The emphasis of this University Hospital had been on the training of new physicians. However, more recently, the production of new knowledge has been incorporated as a new objective. The analysis of the scientific production of the most productive sectors of the hospital also showed that most are developing non-research studies devoted to the local public while a few of the sectors are carrying out research studies published in journals with international status. The dilemma of quality versus quantity and of education versus research-oriented publication seems, however, to continue to exist within the specialized sectors. The methodology described here to analyze the scientific production of a university hospital can be used as a tool to better understand the evolution of medical research in Brazil and also to help formulate public policies and new strategies to include research among the major objectives of University Hospitals.

  2. Stakeholder influence in public sector information systems strategy implementation-The case of public hospitals in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwabamungu, Boroto; Brown, Irwin; Williams, Quentin

    2018-01-01

    Recent literature on organisational strategy has called for greater emphasis on individuals (stakeholders) and what they do in the process of strategizing. Public sector organisations have to engage with an array of heterogeneous stakeholders in fulfilling their mandate. The public health sector in particular needs to engage with a diversity of stakeholders at local, regional and national levels when strategising. The purpose of this study is to investigate the influence of stakeholder relations on the implementation of Information Systems (IS) strategy in public hospitals in South Africa. An interpretive approach using two provinces was employed. The Activity Analysis and Development (ActAD) framework, an enhanced form of activity theory, was used as the theoretical framework. Data was collected using semi-structured interviews, meetings, documents analysis, physical artefacts and observation. The collected data was analysed using thematic analysis. Findings reveal that IS strategy implementation in public hospitals involves a large and complex network of stakeholder groups at different levels, and over different time periods. These stakeholder groups act in accordance with formal and informal roles, rules and modalities. Various contextual conditions together with the actions of, and interactions between stakeholder groups give rise to the situationality of stakeholder relations dynamics and strategy implementation. The multiple actions and interactions over time lead to the realisation of some aspects of the IS strategy in public hospitals. Given the complexity and dynamism of the context there are also certain unplanned implementations as well. These relationships are captured in a Stakeholder Relations Influence (SRI) framework. The SRI framework can be assistive in the assessment and mapping of stakeholders and stakeholder relations, and the assessment of the implications of these relations for effective IS strategy implementation in public hospitals. The

  3. [User violence towards nursing staff in public hospitals: Murcia, Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galián Muñoz, Inmaculada; Llor Esteban, Bartolomé; Ruiz Hernández, José Antonio

    2012-01-01

    The workplace violence has special relevance for the health care workers. Nursing staff is one of the professions most affected by this risk. Our objective is to determine the prevalence during the past year of diverse hostile manifestations by users towards professional hospital nursing staff who depend on the "Servicio Murciano de Salud" [Health Service of Murcia] (SMS), as well as to detect the sociodemographic and occupational workers characteristics associated with higher exposure. A cross-sectional study carried out during the year 2010 of a random sample of nursing personnel from all the hospitals of SMS, through a self-administered and anonymous survey (Ecoh-U scale). The sample was stratified by hospitals and services (30% of the workers) and finally we got a sample of 1.489 workers (confidence level 99%; sampling error 1,75%). We compared the punctuation average obtained in the scale according to variables sociodemographics and laborables. We used the test t of student in variables dichotomous and ANOVA and Tukey in variables multi-response. The 21,8% of the surveyed people reported that they suffered from "anger due to assistential delay" at least once a month. The workers who obtained punctuations significantly larger were psychiatric hospital workers (19,7), emergency workers (20,60), temporary (16,38) and with old 6-10 years in the profession (17,20). Although nursing staff is one of the professions most exposed to violence, the risk distribution is not homogeneous. Significant differences were found according to marital status, age, hospital, service, profession, contract type, shift and seniority in the profession.

  4. "Fourteen dollars for one beer!" Pre-drinking is associated with high-risk drinking among Victorian young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLean, Sarah; Callinan, Sarah

    2013-12-01

    Pre-drinking entails consuming alcohol before attending licensed venues. We examined the relationship between pre-drinking, intention to get drunk and high-risk drinking among Victorians aged 18-24 years, to consider whether reducing pre-drinking might ameliorate alcohol-related harm. Variables within the 2009 Victorian Youth Alcohol and Drugs Survey (VYADS) dataset were analysed and compared with a thematic interpretation of research interviews involving 60 young adults living in Melbourne. High-risk drinking was defined as consuming 11 or more standard drinks in a session at least monthly. VYADS data show that pre-drinking was a significant predictor of high-risk drinking, even after intention to get drunk was controlled for. The most common explanation provided by interviewees for pre-drinking was because it is cheaper to purchase alcohol at bottle shops than at bars and clubs. This was particularly emphasised by those who drank at a high-risk level. The study suggests that people pre-drink because they desire to be intoxicated, but also that pre-drinking patterns and product choices exacerbate the likelihood of high-risk drinking. Reducing availability of cheap packaged alcohol has potential to limit both pre-drinking and high-risk drinking among Victorian young adults. The study adds weight to calls to implement minimum alcohol pricing in Australia. © 2013 The Authors. ANZJPH © 2013 Public Health Association of Australia.

  5. APPLICATION OF VSM IN A PUBLIC BRAZILIAN HOSPITAL

    OpenAIRE

    Guilherme Luz Tortorella; Flávio Fogliatto, Michel Anzanello; Rafael Esteves, Mayara Garcia; Daniela Schneider

    2015-01-01

    During the last decade, there has been a demand for public services to enhance management practices and attain results comparable to those experienced in the private sector. The need for achieving higher quality standards in public services has highlighted the importance of exploring new management techniques to account for the obsolescence in those organizations’ administrative models, with particular emphasis on healthcare services. This paper reports the application of one s...

  6. Risk of malnutrition of hospitalized children in a university public hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Esparza, Nelly Carolina; Vásquez-Garibay, Edgar Manuel; Romero-Velarde, Enrique; Troyo-Sanromán, Rogelio

    2017-02-01

    The study aimed to demonstrate that the duration of hospitalization has a significant effect on the nutritional status of children treated in a university hospital. A longitudinal study was conducted during 2014, with a non-random sampling site concentration in children from birth to 19 years who were admitted to the hospital in the past 24 hours and who met the inclusion criteria and had signed informed consent. Upon entering, at 7 days, and at discharge, anthropometric indices, including weight/age, height/age, weight/height, BMI/age, head circumference/age, triceps and subscapular skin folds, and fat percentage, were obtained. Student's t-test, U Mann-Whitney, ANOVA, chi square, Wilcoxon, and odds ratios were used to analyze the data. In total, 206 patients were included: 40% infants, 25% preschoolers, 15% schoolchildren, and 20% teenagers. Infants had a significant improvement from admission to discharge in the indices weight/length (p = 0.042) and BMI (p = 0.002); adolescents showed decreased BMI from admission to discharge from the hospital (p = 0.05). Patients with longer hospitalization (more than 10 days) had an increased deficit in anthropometric indices at admission (p child was critical at admission, the child remained hospitalized significantly longer. Infants come under the age group most vulnerable to malnutrition and require greater monitoring of nutritional status during hospitalization.

  7. Maintenance of tobacco cessation programmes in public hospitals in Catalonia, Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballbè, Montse; Martínez, Cristina; Saltó, Esteve; Cabezas, Carmen; Riccobene, Anna; Valverde, Araceli; Gual, Antoni; Fernández, Esteve

    2015-03-01

    The provision of smoking cessation interventions in hospitals has been strongly recommended. The aim of this study is to determine the maintenance of smoking cessation programmes for inpatients and hospital workers in hospitals of Catalonia (Spain) seven years after the implementation of a Tobacco Cessation Programme. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in all hospitals that offer public service in Catalonia, Spain (n=73). An online questionnaire was sent to all coordinators of the smoke-free hospital project or managers of each hospital. The survey included questions about the type of hospital, type of programmes implemented and availability and source of smoking cessation drugs. Responses to the questionnaire were submitted by 58 hospitals (79.5%). 74% and 93.1% of the hospitals had smoking cessation programmes for inpatients and workers, respectively. Most of the hospitals maintained the programmes and started routinely buying smoking cessation drugs after a period of receiving them free-of-charge. However, 17.2% of the hospitals refused to buy these drugs and 24% never had these drugs available. Through a supportive Tobacco Cessation Programme, most hospitals have smoking cessation programmes for both patients and workers. Most of them have incorporated smoking cessation drugs as a regular resource in their services' portfolio. The lack of these resources may jeopardise the maintenance of well-established programmes in hospitals. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Burnout syndrome and associated factors among health professionals of a public hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Ebling,Márcia; Carlotto,Mary Sandra

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify the prevalence of burnout syndrome (BS) dimensions and their relationship with sociodemographic data, working variables, psychosocial variables, job satisfaction, hardiness, self-efficacy, and common mental disorders among health professionals of a public hospital. METHOD: This cross-sectional study assessed 234 health professionals working at a public hospital in southern Brazil. Participants answered the Maslach Burnout Inventory, the Job Satisfaction Questionnaire, t...

  9. The future of public hospitals in a globalized world: corporate governance, corporatization or privatization?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordelet, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    This paper contributes to research in health systems and hospitals governance by examining the reasons and expected outcomes of the generalization of corporate governance rules in both public and private non-profit hospitals, all over the world, in order to achieve its clinical, quality and financial objectives.

  10. The development of hospital-based palliative care services in public ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    With the recent approval of a South African (SA) National Policy Framework and Strategy for Palliative Care by the National Health Council, it is pertinent to reflect on initiatives to develop palliative care services in public hospitals. This article reviews the development of hospital-based palliative care services in the Western ...

  11. Behavioural Indicators of Perceived Managerial and Leadership Effectiveness within Romanian and British Public Sector Hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamlin, Robert G.; Patel, Taran

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to report the results of a replication study of perceived managerial and leadership effectiveness within a Romanian public sector hospital, and to discuss the extent to which they are similar to and different from findings from equivalent studies carried out in two British NHS Trust hospitals. Design/methodology/approach:…

  12. Kodamaea (Pichia) ohmeri fungemia in a pediatric patient admitted in a public hospital

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Barros, J.D.; Do Nascimento, S.M.; de Araujo, F.J.; Braz Rde, F.; Andrade, V.S.; Theelen, B.J.F.; Boekhout, T.; Illnait-Zaragozi, M.T.; Gouveia, M.N.; Fernandes, M.C.; Monteiro, M.G.; De Oliveira, M.T.

    2009-01-01

    Kodamaea (Pichia) ohmeri is a yeast species that has not been reported to be a frequent cause of human infections. The current report describes a case of fungemia caused by K. ohmeri in a 3-year-old female patient hospitalized in the public hospital Maria Alice Fernandes, Natal, RN, Brazil. The

  13. Perceptions of patient-centred care at public hospitals in Nelson ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reports in the media indicate that public hospitals in the Eastern Cape Province are on the brink of collapse, with many patients being treated in condemned hospitals which lacked piped water, electricity and essential medical equipment. Receiving quality care, and principally patient-centred care, in the face of such ...

  14. Tax-Exempt Hospitals' Investments in Community Health and Local Public Health Spending: Patterns and Relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Simone R; Young, Gary J

    2017-12-01

    To investigate whether tax-exempt hospitals' investments in community health are associated with patterns of governmental public health spending focusing specifically on the relationship between hospitals' community benefit expenditures and the spending patterns of local health departments (LHDs). We combined data on tax-exempt hospitals' community benefit spending with data on spending by the corresponding LHD that served the county in which a hospital was located. Data were available for 2 years, 2009 and 2013. Generalized linear regressions were estimated with indicators of hospital community benefit spending as the dependent variable and LHD spending as the key independent variable. Hospital community benefit spending was unrelated to how much local public health agencies spent, per capita, on public health in their communities. Patterns of local public health spending do not appear to impact the investments of tax-exempt hospitals in community health activities. Opportunities may, however, exist for a more active engagement between the public and private sector to ensure that the expenditures of all stakeholders involved in community health improvement efforts complement one another. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  15. Management practices in Australian healthcare: can NSW public hospitals do better?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Renu; Green, Roy; Agarwal, Neeru; Randhawa, Krithika

    2016-05-16

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to investigate the determinants of best management practices in an Australian state-run healthcare system, namely New South Wales (NSW), and studies the impact of a range of hospital factors in driving best management practices as a means of enhancing healthcare delivery. Design/methodology/approach - This study adapts a unique survey instrument globally tested to quantify the multi-dimensional nature of hospital management practices in 42 acute care public hospitals of NSW. The authors then analysed the role of hospital-specific characteristics in driving best management practices, namely hospital size (measured by the number of hospital beds, employees and doctors), level of skill and education, degree of hospital manager autonomy and organisational hierarchy. Findings - The findings of this study show the areas of strength and potential areas of improvement in NSW hospitals. The authors find a positive association between the adoption of better management practices and hospital size (measured by the number of hospital beds and employees), level of skills and education, degree of hospital manager autonomy and organisational hierarchy. However, hospital size as measured by the number of doctors did not have a statistically significant relationship. Practical implications - This paper is of interest to both hospital administrators, clinical doctors and healthcare policy-makers who want to improve and develop strategies for better management in the healthcare sector. Originality/value - This study provides an internationally comparable robust measure of management capability in public hospitals, and contributes to the evidence-base of management practices and performance in hospitals.

  16. Implementation of Total Hospital Information System (THIS In Malaysian Public Hospitals: Challenges and Future Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roshidi Hassan

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Total Hospital Information System (THIS is a project by the Ministry of Health (MOH of Malaysia that provide a complete and comprehensive Hospital Information System (HIS by establishing integrated electronic information handling and processing in a hospital by means of Information and Communications Technology (ICT. Implementation of such rigorous system in a complex organization such as health services involves many challenges, and if they are not tackled appropriately, the system may fail and reject by the user. This paper analyzed and discussed on a few major challenges faced by the MOH on their implementation of THIS at 13 government hospitals nationwide. The challenges include digital gap, knowledge and skills, system quality, redundancy and data abundance. Initiatives taken to address the challenges were explained and some suggestions were also introduced. Furthermore, the article look into the future prospective of the system, on how the system could benefit further which eventually may go beyond its initial objective.

  17. [Nutritional status in hospitalized patients in a public hospital in Mexico City].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, V; Mostkoff, D; Salmeán, G Gutiérrez; Amancio, O

    2008-01-01

    To determine the frequency of malnutrition among hospitalized patients and to relate nutrition status with body mass index, fasting time, adequacy intake of protein and energy during hospitalization and length of stay. METHODS (STUDY POPULATION, SUBJECTS, INTERVENTION): We evaluated weight loss in the last 6 months prior to admission, body mass index (BMI), ideal and usual body weight percentages, days of hospitalization, energy and protein intake adequacy, fasting days and cause in hospitalized patients at different wards at Hospital General de Mexico. Patients were divided into groups according to their nutritional status (at risk/with malnutrition or normal) and data was assessed descriptively and comparatively by t-tests to determine mean differences. We assessed 561 hospitalized patients. We found different frequencies of malnutrition according to various indicators: 21.17% according to BMI, 38.07% and 19.57% by percentages of habitual and ideal weights--respectively-- and a weight loss in 69.57% of the patients. Mean daily energy intake was found to be of 1,061+/-432.7 kcal, while mean protein intake was 42.1 + 22.7 g, representing only the 69.4% and 54.9% of the energy and protein requirements. We found statically significant differences among malnourished and normal patients in relation to BMI (p Malnutrition is common in hospitalized patients. An important factor in hospital malnutrition is the lack of compliance in the patient's requirements, preventing a fast recovery and increasing their length of stay. Thus, it is important to make changes and improvements in the institutional health system so that there is trained personnel in order to provide and adequate nutrition care attention to the critically ill patient, improving their condition and general prognosis.

  18. Darwin and Reductionisms: Victorian, Neo-Darwinian and Postgenomic Biologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelique Richardson

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This article compares the open-ended Darwinism of Charles Darwin, George Lewes, George Eliot and Thomas Hardy with reductive post-Weismann and early eugenist views and more recent neo-Darwinian ideas including literary Darwinism. It argues that some Victorians had a clear sense of the complexities of the natural world, and of the centrality of environment to life. This awareness contrasts with the processes of divorce and isolation that underpin neo-Darwinian understandings of evolutionary development. But biologists and philosophers of biology are now emphasising the complex and dynamic relations between organism and environment in ways that would have appealed to Darwin’s contemporaries. The article establishes that there are significant parallels between mid-Victorian and postgenomic thought.

  19. Savage numbers and the evolution of civilization in Victorian prehistory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barany, Michael J

    2014-06-01

    This paper identifies 'savage numbers'--number-like or number-replacing concepts and practices attributed to peoples viewed as civilizationally inferior--as a crucial and hitherto unrecognized body of evidence in the first two decades of the Victorian science of prehistory. It traces the changing and often ambivalent status of savage numbers in the period after the 1858-1859 'time revolution' in the human sciences by following successive reappropriations of an iconic 1853 story from Francis Galton's African travels. In response to a fundamental lack of physical evidence concerning prehistoric men, savage numbers offered a readily available body of data that helped scholars envisage great extremes of civilizational lowliness in a way that was at once analysable and comparable, and anecdotes like Galton's made those data vivid and compelling. Moreover, they provided a simple and direct means of conceiving of the progressive scale of civilizational development, uniting societies and races past and present, at the heart of Victorian scientific racism.

  20. APPLICATION OF VSM IN A PUBLIC BRAZILIAN HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Luz Tortorella

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available During the last decade, there has been a demand for public services to enhance management practices and attain results comparable to those experienced in the private sector. The need for achieving higher quality standards in public services has highlighted the importance of exploring new management techniques to account for the obsolescence in those organizations’ administrative models, with particular emphasis on healthcare services. This paper reports the application of one such new management technique, named Value Stream Mapping (VSM, in the sterilized unit of a public healthcare organization. We present here the benefits of analyzing healthcare processes using VSM, contributing to the existing body of knowledge on Lean management by examining the validity of applying its principles and practices in contexts other than manufacturing.

  1. Performance evaluation of hospitals that provide care in the public health system, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Cristiano de Azevedo Ramos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To analyze if size, administrative level, legal status, type of unit and educational activity influence the hospital network performance in providing services to the Brazilian Unified Health System.METHODS This cross-sectional study evaluated data from the Hospital Information System and the Cadastro Nacional de Estabelecimentos de Saúde (National Registry of Health Facilities, 2012, in Sao Paulo, Southeastern Brazil. We calculated performance indicators, such as: the ratio of hospital employees per bed; mean amount paid for admission; bed occupancy rate; average length of stay; bed turnover index and hospital mortality rate. Data were expressed as mean and standard deviation. The groups were compared using analysis of variance (ANOVA and Bonferroni correction.RESULTS The hospital occupancy rate in small hospitals was lower than in medium, big and special-sized hospitals. Higher hospital occupancy rate and bed turnover index were observed in hospitals that include education in their activities. The hospital mortality rate was lower in specialized hospitals compared to general ones, despite their higher proportion of highly complex admissions. We found no differences between hospitals in the direct and indirect administration for most of the indicators analyzed.CONCLUSIONS The study indicated the importance of the scale effect on efficiency, and larger hospitals had a higher performance. Hospitals that include education in their activities had a higher operating performance, albeit with associated importance of using human resources and highly complex structures. Specialized hospitals had a significantly lower rate of mortality than general hospitals, indicating the positive effect of the volume of procedures and technology used on clinical outcomes. The analysis related to the administrative level and legal status did not show any significant performance differences between the categories of public hospitals.

  2. Women Doctors and Lady Nurses: Class, Education, and the Professional Victorian Woman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heggie, Vanessa

    2015-01-01

    The lives of the first women doctors in Britain have been well studied by historians, as have the many debates about the right of women to train and practice as doctors. Yet the relationship between these women and their most obvious comparators and competitors-the newly professionalized hospital nurses-has not been explored. This article makes use of a wide range of sources to explore the ways in which the first lady doctors created "clear water" between themselves and the nurses with whom they worked and trained. In doing so, it reveals an identity that may seem at odds with some of the clichés of Victorian femininity, namely that of the intelligent and ambitious lady doctor.

  3. W. Henry Robinson: Popularising astronomy in Victorian Walsall and Birmingham

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, S.

    William Henry Robinson was one of the most prominent citizens of Walsall, then part of Staffordshire, in the Victorian and Edwardian periods. An influential businessman, he managed to combine printing, publishing, editing a newspaper, writing books and poetry, maintaining a library and retail trading with founding the town's literary institute, and bringing the scientists, explorers, authors and cultural pursuits of the day to his home town. An amateur astronomer in his own right, Robinson was instrumental in setting up the BAA's Midland Branch.

  4. Blast furnace coke substitutes from Victorian brown coal

    OpenAIRE

    Mollah, Mamun

    2017-01-01

    Iron is usually produced from its ores using coke in a blast furnace (BF). Coke, a hard and macroporous carbon material, is produced from special coals (coking coals) and acts as fuel, smelting agent, and the permeable support for the charge to the BF. No material can completely replace coke in a BF. Coking coals are becoming harder (and more expensive) to obtain. Victorian brown coal (VBC) is accessible, cheap, with low mineral concentrations, which is favourable for iron production in a BF....

  5. Medusa as the story of Victorian feminine identity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Catrinel Avarvarei

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Medusa as the story of Victorian feminine identity Abstract  This paper scans the meandering paths of a quest through the realms of womanly self and its articulateness in (robust constructs of individuality. We have departed from a paradigm of interpretation related to a mythological figure, dual in itself, namely the Medusa, perceived as either mask, or face – which has always fascinated with her tragic beauty. It is within the semantics of the word fascinum – charm, evil spirit but also virile member – where the attributes of an age, the Victorian time, that was equally fascinating, as it was whirling and powerful, lie hidden. This paper focuses on artistic reflections of Victorian femininity in an effort to examine how it contributed to the ever-changing definition and search of female gender identities at times of hegemonic masculinities. Art and fiction articulate some of the more powerful challenges. If philosophy encapsulates phallogocentrism, as Derrida points out, fiction, he claims, is an invagination, namely a creation of differences where no term spells self-sufficiency.

  6. [The challenges and opportunities of implementing outsourcing in private and public hospitals in Israel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Benny; Mizrahi, Ronit; Magnezi, Racheli

    2011-01-01

    Outsourcing is a method that enables an organization to focus on its expertise by transferring its other services to professionals who can fulfill them. In recent years, research has repeatedly shown that health services use a variety of outsourcing companies. To describe the experience acquired using outsourcing in public and private hospitals in Israel, and to present the factors, budgetary parameters, opportunities and problems affecting outsourcing. The questionnaire was sent to 36 hospitals in Israel, constituting 88.2% of all hospitals in Israel--private, public, H.M.O ("Clalit") and governmental. The response to the questionnaire reached 97.2% and revealed the following: 94% of the hospitals use outsourcing services in the following fields: security, cleaning, Laundry service, cafeterias, and I.T.; 42% of the hospitals assign 0-5% of their annual budget for outsourcing contracts. Private hospitals use more outsourcing services than public hospitals. The factors driving outsourcing are: cost restrictions (82.8%), operational flexibility (77%), and focus on the core business (74.2%). The potential advantages of outsourcing are: improvement in services 180.5%), customer satisfaction (72.2%), and cost reduction (69.4%). Difficulties affecting outsourcing are: dependence on external resources (83.3%] and internal organizational resistance (69.4%). The results of the outsourcing are lower costs, reduced number of personnel by 1-10% and high level of satisfaction. It seems that in recent years outsourcing is being used in hospitals and is central to the areas of infrastructure and logistics, as well as legal and medical services. Using outsourcing in hospitals provides opportunities for improved customer satisfaction, better focus for the hospital on its core activities and cost reduction. HospitaLs that succeed in synergetically integrating the external and the internal service providers will flourish. INNOVATION/VALUE: This research exposes, for the first time

  7. Initiation of effective postpartum contraceptive use in public hospitals in Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kestler, Edgar; Orozco, Maria Del Rosario; Palma, Silvia; Flores, Roberto

    2011-02-01

    Low frequency of effective contraceptive use remains a challenging problem. This article examines the frequency of effective postpartum contraception and the methods used before discharge in public hospitals in Guatemala. It also discusses the need to implement best practices in providing family-planning and contraceptive services. In March 2006, a surveillance system was implemented to collect data on the initiation of effective contraceptive methods. Postpartum women were monitored in 34 public hospitals. Univariate and bivariate analyses were performed, and a chi-square test for linear trends was used to compare female surgical sterilization rates after vaginal delivery and cesarean section. Between 1 March 2006 and 31 December 2008, of the 218 656 women who had a postpartum event, 31% received an effective contraceptive method before hospital discharge. The frequency of initiation of effective postpartum methods varied across hospitals. Hospital results were consistent with national data on women of reproductive age. Among women who underwent surgical sterilization, differences between those who had delivered vaginally and those who had a cesarean section were statistically significant. The overall frequency of initiation of effective postpartum contraceptive use is low in public hospitals in Guatemala. It is higher, however, in hospitals at lower health care levels with strong community ties. Routine data collection revealed specific areas for improvement, particularly the need to enhance health providers' knowledge of medical eligibility criteria for effective contraceptive use postpartum. The priority is to promote the provision of high-quality family-planning and contraceptive services in Guatemala's public health system.

  8. Exploring the responsiveness of public and private hospitals in Lagos, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomilola Adesanya

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available According to the World Health Report 2000, health system responsiveness is proposed as one of the three key objectives of any health system. This multi-domain concept describes how well a health system responds to the expectations of their users concerning the non-health enhancing aspects of care. In this study we aim to compare the levels of responsiveness experienced by users of private and publicly managed hospitals in Nigeria, and through these insights, to propose recommendations on how to improve performance on this measure. This quantitative, cross-sectional study uses a questionnaire that is adapted from two responsiveness surveys designed by the World Health Organization (WHO. Researchers collected responses from 520 respondents from four hospitals in Lagos, Nigeria. Analysis of the data using statistical techniques found that significant differences exist between the performance of public and private hospitals on certain domains of responsiveness, with privately operated hospitals performing better where differences exist. Users of private hospitals also reported a higher level of overall satisfaction. Private hospitals were found to perform particularly better on the domains of dignity, waiting times, and travel times. These findings have implications for the management of public hospitals in focusing their efforts on improving their performance in low scoring domains. Performance in these hospitals can be improved by emphasis on staff training and demand management.

  9. Exploring the responsiveness of public and private hospitals in lagos, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adesanya, Tomilola; Gbolahan, Olayinka; Ghannam, Obadah; Miraldo, Marisa; Patel, Bhavesh; Verma, Rishi; Wong, Heather

    2012-02-17

    According to the World Health Report 2000, health system responsiveness is proposed as one of the three key objectives of any health system. This multi-domain concept describes how well a health system responds to the expectations of their users concerning the non-health enhancing aspects of care. In this study we aim to compare the levels of responsiveness experienced by users of private and publicly managed hospitals in Nigeria, and through these insights, to propose recommendations on how to improve performance on this measure. This quantitative, cross-sectional study uses a questionnaire that is adapted from two responsiveness surveys designed by the World Health Organization (WHO). Researchers collected responses from 520 respondents from four hospitals in Lagos, Nigeria. Analysis of the data using statistical techniques found that significant differences exist between the performance of public and private hospitals on certain domains of responsiveness, with privately operated hospitals performing better where differences exist. Users of private hospitals also reported a higher level of overall satisfaction. Private hospitals were found to perform particularly better on the domains of dignity, waiting times, and travel times. These findings have implications for the management of public hospitals in focusing their efforts on improving their performance in low scoring domains. Performance in these hospitals can be improved by emphasis on staff training and demand management.

  10. 38 CFR 17.53 - Limitations on use of public or private hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... applicant's medical condition, the relative distance of the travel involved, or the nature of the treatment... VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Use of Public Or Private Hospitals § 17.53 Limitations on use of public or private... expense will only be authorized if a Department of Veterans Affairs medical center or other Federal...

  11. Stakeholder influence in public sector information systems strategy implementation—The case of public hospitals in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Hwabamungu, B

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available on the implementation of Information Systems (IS) strategy in public hospitals in South Africa. An interpretive approach using two provinces was employed. The Activity Analysis and Development (ActAD) framework, an enhanced form of activity theory, was used...

  12. Eminent Victorian dentistry. 1. John Ruskin and the patient experience of Victorian dentistry. Ruskin's dentist, Alfred James Woodhouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, M G H

    2011-02-26

    This paper describes the relationship between John Ruskin [1819-1900] the Victorian artist, writer, and critic, and Alfred James Woodhouse [1824-1906], the dentist who cared for him from 1866 to 1883. Although Ruskin was perhaps not quite as eccentric as a recent television series has portrayed him, he was certainly not conventional, and the relationship with his dentist was also not entirely conventional.

  13. Public hospital management in times of crisis: lessons learned from Cienfuegos, Cuba (1996-2008).

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vos, Pol; Orduñez-García, Pedro; Santos-Peña, Moisés; Van der Stuyft, Patrick

    2010-06-01

    Cuba's public health system is well known for its integrated first line services based on family medicine. Less publicized is the country's experience in public hospital management. After a harsh economic crisis in the first half of the 1990s had brought the Cienfuegos hospital near to collapse, from 1996 onwards the hospital management team took advantage of the incipient economic recovery to launch an ambitious recovery process. This article reconstructs this endeavor, based on annual hospital reports, scientific publications by the hospital staff, and interviews with key decision-makers. First the endless waiting list for elective surgery was tackled through a more efficient use of the surgery department, and an increase of ambulatory surgery. Next, overall hospital efficiency was improved in the aim to drastically reduce the average length of stay, reaching a decrease from an average stay of 12 days to a little more than 6 days in 1999. Also the emergency department was reorganized, setting up a triage system based on a color code, linked to specific emergency protocols. Attention for improving the clinical efficiency for AMI and stroke coincided with a drop in their intrahospital lethality. Clinical guidelines for the most important diagnoses were collectively developed, adapting international evidence to the local setting. An individual and collective performance evaluation system was elaborated in a participatory way, and further evolved into a 'total quality management' process. This experience of Cienfuegos hospital provides an interesting example on how a public hospital--embedded in a well developed national public health system--can be effective and efficient, even in circumstances of limited resources. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Gearing service quality into public and private hospitals in small islands: empirical evidence from Cyprus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arasli, Huseyin; Ekiz, Erdogan Haktan; Katircioglu, Salih Turan

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop and compare some determinants of service quality in both the public and private hospitals of Northern Cyprus. There is considerable lack of literature with respect to service quality in public and private hospitals. Randomly, 454 respondents, who have recently benefited from hospital services in Famagusta, were selected to answer a modified version of the SERVQUAL Instrument. The instrument contained both service expectations and perceptions questions. This study identifies six factors regarding the service quality as perceived in both public and private Northern Cyprus hospitals. These are: empathy, giving priority to the inpatients needs, relationships between staff and patients, professionalism of staff, food and the physical environment. Research results revealed that the various expectations of inpatients have not been met in either the public or the private hospitals At the micro level, the lack of management commitment to service quality in both hospital settings leads doctors and nurses to expend less effort increasing or improving inpatient satisfaction. Hospital managers should also satisfy their employees, since job satisfaction leads to customer satisfaction and loyalty. Additionally, hospital administrations need to gather systematic feedback from their inpatients, establish visible and transparent complaint procedures so that inpatients' complaints can be addressed effectively and efficiently. The hospitals need to organize training sessions based on the critical importance of service quality and the crucial role of inpatient satisfaction in the health care industry. Future studies should include the remaining regions in Cyprus in order to increase research findings' generalizability. Additionally, including other dimensions such as hospital processes and discharge management and co-ordination may provide further insights into understanding inpatients' perceptions and intentions.

  15. Closure of a local public hospital in Korea: focusing on the organizational life cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeo YH

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Young Hyun Yeo,1 Keon-Hyung Lee,2 Hye Jeong Kim3 1Department of Public Administration, Sunmoon University, Asan, ChungNam, South Korea; 2Askew School of Public Administration and Policy, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL, USA; 3Department of Public Administration, Sunmoon University, Asan, ChungNam, South Korea Abstract: Just as living organisms have a creation-maintenance-extinction life cycle, organizations also have a life cycle. Private organizations will not survive if they fail to acquire necessary resources through market competition. Public organizations, however, continue to survive because the government has provided financial support in order to enhance public interest. Only a few public organizations in Korea have closed. With the introduction of new public management since the economic crisis in 1997, however, public organizations have had to compete with private organizations. Public hospitals are not free to open or close their business. They are also controlled by the government in terms of their prices, management, budgets, and operations. As they pursue public interest by fulfilling the government’s order such as providing free or lower-priced care to the vulnerable population, they tend to provide a lower quality of care and suffer a financial burden. Employing a case study analysis, this study attempts to understand the external environment that local public hospitals face. The fundamental problem of local public hospitals in Korea is the value conflict between public interest and profitability. Local public hospitals are required to pursue public interest by assignment of a public mission including building a medical safety net for low-income patients and managing nonprofitable medical facilities and emergent health care situations. At the same time, they are required to pursue profitability by achieving high-quality care through competition and the operation of an independent, self-supporting system according to

  16. Control costs, enhance quality, and increase revenue in three top general public hospitals in Beijing, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lue-Ping Zhao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: With market-oriented economic and health-care reform, public hospitals in China have received unprecedented pressures from governmental regulations, public opinions, and financial demands. To adapt the changing environment and keep pace of modernizing healthcare delivery system, public hospitals in China are expanding clinical services and improving delivery efficiency, while controlling costs. Recent experiences are valuable lessons for guiding future healthcare reform. Here we carefully study three teaching hospitals, to exemplify their experiences during this period. METHODS: We performed a systematic analysis on hospitalization costs, health-care quality and delivery efficiencies from 2006 to 2010 in three teaching hospitals in Beijing, China. The analysis measured temporal changes of inpatient cost per stay (CPS, cost per day (CPD, inpatient mortality rate (IMR, and length of stay (LOS, using a generalized additive model. FINDINGS: There were 651,559 hospitalizations during the period analyzed. Averaged CPS was stable over time, while averaged CPD steadily increased by 41.7% (P<0.001, from CNY 1,531 in 2006 to CNY 2,169 in 2010. The increasing CPD seemed synchronous with the steady rising of the national annual income per capita. Surgical cost was the main contributor to the temporal change of CPD, while medicine and examination costs tended to be stable over time. From 2006 and 2010, IMR decreased by 36%, while LOS reduced by 25%. Increasing hospitalizations with higher costs, along with an overall stable CPS, reduced IMR, and shorter LOS, appear to be the major characteristics of these three hospitals at present. INTERPRETATIONS: These three teaching hospitals have gained some success in controlling costs, improving cares, adopting modern medical technologies, and increasing hospital revenues. Effective hospital governance and physicians' professional capacity plus government regulations and supervisions may have played a role

  17. [Hospital food: perceptions of patients in a public hospital with a proposal of humanized care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demário, Renata Léia; Sousa, Anete Araújo de; Salles, Raquel Kuerten de

    2010-06-01

    The objective of the study was to know the perception of patients about feeding in a reference hospital for the National Humanization Politics. It is a qualitative research with twenty-six in depth and half-structuralized interviews had been carried through. The interviews were applied to internee patients (adults and elders) with four or more days in health clinic. The study revealed that the patients approved the good attendance and the humanized health team care. The feeding is perceived as part of the institution rules, relating it with the disease and the health recovery. Also, the companion presence, the hospital environment, medicines and sensorial aspects are considered to influence the feeding acceptance. The meal time was considered a model to be followed. The patients had demonstrated difficulty in revealing opinions about changes in the feeding or routines. The meal time is an interaction moment among the patients, companions and health team. The study concluded that in order to eat well in a hospital depends on what the patients is allowed to because of their diseases, showing that, there is no hospital food identification with their feeding history, preferences or habits in life.

  18. Scientific production from public hospitals of the City of Buenos Aires, 2017

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariano Ibarra

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The number of publications in the scientific literature coming from an institution is an indicator of its scientific production. The scientific production of the hospitals of the Government of the City of Buenos Aires (GCBA has been evaluated previously, but without discriminating how much of that production corresponded to other academic institutions settled there (University of Buenos Aires, UBA, National Council of Scientific Research and Techniques, CONICET. Our objective was to evaluate the publications included in PubMed that correspond to hospitals of the GCBA, describe their main characteristics, and discriminate the contribution of other academic institutions (UBA and CONICET. It is a cross-sectional study based on a PubMed search, using the name of each of the 34 GCBA hospitals, CONICET and UBA in the "affiliation" field. In total, 2727 publications from GCBA hospitals were identified (4.6% of Argentine publications; 73.9% in English, 78.9% in relation to humans, 37.2% in the last 5 years; 6.4% with high level of evidence (clinical trials and meta-analysis, and 28.4% including children. Compared to the national total, the GCBA publications include fewer works in English, more research in humans, more clinical trials and more research in children. Of the publications corresponding to hospitals of the GCBA, 90.4% did not share the affiliation with CONICET or with UBA. In conclusion, the GCBA hospitals generated 4.6% of the total Argentine publications in PubMed; and 90% of these was not shared with UBA or CONICET. Publications from GCBA institutions include more clinical trials and research in children.

  19. [Scientific production from public hospitals of the City of Buenos Aires, 2017].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibarra, Mariano; Torrents, Milagros; Ossorio, María Fabiana; Ferrero, Fernando

    2018-01-01

    The number of publications in the scientific literature coming from an institution is an indicator of its scientific production. The scientific production of the hospitals of the Government of the City of Buenos Aires (GCBA) has been evaluated previously, but without discriminating how much of that production corresponded to other academic institutions settled there (University of Buenos Aires, UBA, National Council of Scientific Research and Techniques, CONICET). Our objective was to evaluate the publications included in PubMed that correspond to hospitals of the GCBA, describe their main characteristics, and discriminate the contribution of other academic institutions (UBA and CONICET). It is a cross-sectional study based on a PubMed search, using the name of each of the 34 GCBA hospitals, CONICET and UBA in the "affiliation" field. In total, 2727 publications from GCBA hospitals were identified (4.6% of Argentine publications); 73.9% in English, 78.9% in relation to humans, 37.2% in the last 5 years; 6.4% with high level of evidence (clinical trials and meta-analysis), and 28.4% including children. Compared to the national total, the GCBA publications include fewer works in English, more research in humans, more clinical trials and more research in children. Of the publications corresponding to hospitals of the GCBA, 90.4% did not share the affiliation with CONICET or with UBA. In conclusion, the GCBA hospitals generated 4.6% of the total Argentine publications in PubMed; and 90% of these was not shared with UBA or CONICET. Publications from GCBA institutions include more clinical trials and research in children.

  20. How patients think about social responsibility of public hospitals in China?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenbin; Shi, Lizheng; Pong, Raymond W; Chen, Yingyao

    2016-08-11

    Hospital social responsibility is receiving increasing attention, especially in China where major changes to the healthcare system have taken place. This study examines how patients viewed hospital social responsibility in China and explore the factors that influenced patients' perception of hospital social responsibility. A cross-sectional survey was conducted, using a structured questionnaire, on a sample of 5385 patients from 48 public hospitals in three regions of China: Shanghai, Hainan, and Shaanxi. A multilevel regression model was employed to examine factors influencing patients' assessments of hospital social responsibility. Intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) were calculated to estimate the proportion of variance in the dependent variables determined at the hospital level. The scores for service quality, appropriateness, accessibility and professional ethics were positively associated with patients' assessments of hospital social responsibility. Older outpatients tended to give lower assessments, while inpatients in larger hospitals scored higher. After adjusted for the independent variables, the ICC rose from 0.182 to 0.313 for inpatients and from 0.162 to 0.263 for outpatients. The variance at the patient level was reduced by 51.5 and 48.6 %, respectively, for inpatients and outpatients. And the variance at the hospital level was reduced by 16.7 % for both groups. Some hospital and patient characteristics and their perceptions of service quality, appropriateness, accessibility and professional ethics were associated with their assessments of public hospital social responsibility. The differences were mainly determined at the patient level. More attention to law-abiding behaviors, cost-effective health services, and charitable works could improve perceptions of hospitals' adherence to social responsibility.

  1. Public Perception of the Concentration of Cardiac and Cerebrovascular Surgery to Metropolitan Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Hoon Lee

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study investigates the perception of the general public regarding the concentration to metropolitan, hospitals of cardiac and cerebrovascular surgeries, and the perceived public need for government policies to resolve this issue. Methods: A total of 800 participants were recruited for our telephone interview survey. Quota sampling was performed, adjusting for age and sex, to select by various geographic regions. Sampling with random digit dialing was performed; we called the randomly generated telephone numbers and made three attempts for non-responders before moving on to a different telephone number. Results: Our sample population was 818 participants, 401 men (49.0% and 417 women (51.0%. Our data showed that 85.5% of participants thought that cardiac surgery and neurosurgery patients are concentrated in large hospitals in Seoul. The principle reason for regional patients to want to receive surgery at major hospitals in Seoul was because of poor medical standards associated with regional hospitals (87.7%. We found that a vast majority of participants (97.5% felt that government policies are needed to even out the clustering of cardiac surgery and neurosurgery patients, and that this clustering may be alleviated if policies that can specifically enhance the quality and the capacity of regional hospitals to carry out surgeries are adopted (98.3%. Conclusion: Government policy making must reflect public desiderata, and we suggest that these public health needs may be partially resolved through government-designated cardiac and neurosurgery specialist hospitals in regional areas.

  2. Vivisecting Major: a Victorian gentleman scientist defends animal experimentation, 1876-1885.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boddice, Rob

    2011-06-01

    Through an investigation of the public, professional, and private life of the Darwinian disciple George John Romanes, this essay seeks a better understanding of the scientific motivations for defending the practice of vivisection at the height of the controversy in late Victorian Britain. Setting aside a historiography that has tended to focus on the arguments of antivivisectionists, it reconstructs the viewpoint of the scientific community through an examination of Romanes's work to help orchestrate the defense of animal experimentation. By embedding his life in three complicatedly overlapping networks-the world of print, interpersonal communications among an increasingly professionalized body of scientific men, and the intimacies of private life-the essay uses Romanes as a lens with which to focus the physiological apprehension of the antivivisection movement. It is a story of reputation, self-interest, and affection.

  3. Economies of scale and optimal size of hospitals: Empirical results for Danish public hospitals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Troels

    the current configuration of Danish hospitals is subject to scale economies that may justify such plans and to estimate an optimal hospital size. Methods: We estimate cost functions using panel data on total costs, DRG-weighted casemix, and number : We estimate cost functions using panel data on total costs......, DRG-weighted casemix, and number of beds for three years from 2004-2006. A short-run cost function is used to derive estimates of long-run scale economies by applying the envelope condition. Results: We identify moderate to significant long-run economies of scale when applying two alternative We...... identify moderate to significant long-run economies of scale when applying two alternative translog cost functions. However, using a quadratic functional form we identify constant economies of scale for the medium-sized sub-groups and decreasing economies of scale for the largest sub-groups. The optimal...

  4. To what extent does employer-paid health insurance reduce the use of public hospitals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Søgaard, Rikke; Pedersen, Morten Saaby; Bech, Mickael

    2013-11-01

    This study examines the extent to which employer-paid health insurance has led to substitution of public with private hospital use in Denmark. Individual-person-level data for the entire Danish privately employed, full-time working population is used in an observational design. The effect of having employer-paid health insurance on the utilisation of public hospitals is estimated using propensity score matching in order to control for risk selection, based on a number of individual- and company-level characteristics. The outcome is defined as the total consumption of health care services provided by public hospitals. The effect of employer-paid health insurance is estimated to correspond to a significant 10% reduction in the total use of public hospitals. The effect appears to be robust to alternative methodological specifications and is supported from the analysis of alternative outcome measures. The rise in the number of individuals with employer-paid health insurance seems to have alleviated the pressure on public hospitals in Denmark. Future studies should confirm the magnitude of this effect, preferably based on empirical data with repeated measurements of insurance status. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Cost Accounting as a Possible Solution for Financial Sustainability of Croatian Public Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Dražić Lutilsky

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to present the current usage of cost accounting methodology in Croatian public hospitals through conducted empirical research and to provide opinions of accountants and financial officers regarding possible implementation of cost accounting methodology in public hospitals. In the paper, the authors analyze the accounting system in Croatian public hospitals, identifying the flaws of the current accounting system with regard to the recording and allocation of costs. National healthcare systems of different European countries provide a theoretical background for the usage of accrual accounting basis and cost accounting methodologies, showing better governance and financial sustainability of public hospitals which have introduced cost accounting methodology. The conducted empirical research shows that accountants and financial officers believe that the healthcare system in Croatia is ready for a change in the current accounting system based on the modified accrual basis through the implementation of accrual accounting basis and full costing approach to cost allocation. Full costing approach is also known as activity-based accounting method for cost allocation. The authors also recommend some initial steps for implementation of the new cost accounting system in Croatian public hospitals.

  6. Microbial contamination of nonsterile pharmaceuticals in public hospital settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica Mugoyela

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Veronica Mugoyela1, Kennedy D Mwambete21Department of Medicinal Chemistry, 2Department of Pharmaceutical Microbiology, University of Health and Allied Sciences, Dar es Salaam, TanzaniaPurpose: Contamination of pharmaceuticals with microorganisms irrespective whether they are harmful or nonpathogenic can bring about changes in physicochemical characteristics of the medicines. Although sterility is not a requirement in official compendia for nonsterile pharmaceuticals, bioburdens need to be within acceptable limits. Therefore, this study investigated microbial contamination of 10 nonsterile pharmaceuticals frequently delivered to outpatients by identifying and quantifying microbial contaminants and susceptibility pattern testing on the microbes isolated.Methods: The study was carried out at Amana Municipal Hospital in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. The protocol for the study involved structured selection of representative tablets, syrups, and capsules from the hospital’s outpatient pharmacy. Constitutive microorganisms were elaborated and enumerated using standard microbiologic procedures.Results: Results showed that 50% of all tested products were heavily contaminated, and the predominant contaminants comprised Klebsiella, Bacillus, and Candida species. Furthermore, the results showed that the isolated Bacillus and Klebsiella species were resistant to Augmentin® and cloxacillin. The differences in means for cfu/mL and zones of inhibition among the microorganisms isolated were considered significant at P < 0.05.Conclusion: The nonsterile pharmaceuticals were presumably microbiologically contaminated due to poor handling during dispensing, repackaging, and/or nonadherence to good manufacturing practice. Therefore, training and educating the dispensers, as well as patients, on the proper handling and use of medicines cannot be overemphasized, because these are key aspects in controlling cross-contamination of medicines.Keywords: microorganisms

  7. Clinical manifestation of HIV/AIDS patients: differences between public and private hospitals in Jakarta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herdiman T. Pohan

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study is to determine the demographic data, risk factors, clinical presentations, opportunistic/co-infections and its difference between public and private hospitals. A retrospective -descriptive study was conducted in Dr. Cipto Mangunkusumo National General Hospital (public hospital and Medistra Hospital (private hospital, Jakarta. The inclusion criteria were new HIV/AIDS cases admitted in year 2002-2003 and positive HIV serology (Elisa method. Secondary data were collected form medical record. Sixty-six subjects were enrolled in this study (public hospital 30 subjects and private hospital 36 subjects, consist of 59 male (89.4% and 7 female (10.6%. Thirty-seven percent subjects were defined as HIV and 62% AIDS. Risk factors obtained include drug user (59.1%, homosexual (13.6%, heterosexual (21.1%, transfusion (1.5% and maternal-child (perinatal (1.5%. The clinical symptoms mainly present as acute fever (56.2%, weight loss (39.4%, cough (38.8%, shortness of breath (27.2%, chronic diarrhea (22.8%, prolong fever (19.7%, loss of conciousness (15.3%, anorexia (15.3%. Significant differences between public and private hospitals were seen in fever and cough symptoms. Clinical presentation of HIV/AIDS patients during admission were : pneumonia (56%, oral trush (22.6%, anemia (56.5%, leucopenia (32.3%, lymphopenia (55.9%, elevated AST/ALT (66.1%, hypoalbuminemia (46.9%, limphadenopathy (10.6%, brain space occuping lesion (7.6%, encephalopathy (6.0%, pulmonary tb and pleural effusion (10.6%. The opportunistic and co-infections present were candidiasis (25.8%, chronic hepatitis C (24.2%, chronic hepatitis B and C (4.5%, pulmonary tb, lymphadenitis and miliary tb. Candidiasis and pulmonary tb were frequently found in public hospital. In conclusion from this study that clinical manifestation of HIV/AIDS were young man or woman, with one or more possible risk factor, had fever, respiratory complain, loss of body weight, chronic diarrhea

  8. The influence of a local, media covered hospital incident on public trust in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Schee, Evelien; de Jong, Judith D; Groenewegen, Peter P

    2012-08-01

    Incidents in health care happen every now and then. Incidents are often extensively covered by the news media. In this study, we investigated the impact of an incident in a Dutch hospital on public trust in health care in the population living in the vicinity of where the incident took place and in the national population. News media coverage of the incident started in Fall 2008. We collected data in three samples, using a postal questionnaire on public trust in health care. Two samples were a cross-section of the Dutch population; one was questioned in October 2006 and the other in October 2008. The third sample, also questioned in October 2008, consisted of 1000 people living in the surrounding area of the hospital where the incident occurred. The cross-sectional sample of October 2006 was a reference group, and at that time no incidents in health care were covered in the media. In the local population, the incident had a strong impact on public trust in the hospital and among the specialists working there. Also, in the local population, the impact of the incident was generalized to trust in hospitals and specialists in general. In the national population, no impact of the incident on the public's trust was found, despite national news media coverage. Local incidents have an impact on public trust in health care in the local population. However, these incidents do not influence public trust in health care in the national population.

  9. The paradox of public holidays: Hospital-treated self-harm and associated factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Eve; Dillon, Christina B; O'Regan, Grace; Corcoran, Paul; Perry, Ivan J; Arensman, Ella

    2017-08-15

    Recent research on the patterns of self-harm around public holidays is lacking. This study used national data to examine the patterns of hospital-treated self-harm during public holidays, and to examine associated factors. Data on self-harm presentations to all emergency departments were obtained from the National Self-Harm Registry Ireland. The association between self-harm presentations and public holidays was examined using univariate and multivariate Poisson regression analyses. A total of 104,371 presentations of self-harm were recorded between 2007 and 2015. The mean number of self-harm presentations was 32 on public holidays. St. Patrick's Day had the highest number of presentations compared to all other public holidays, with a daily mean of 44 presentations. Across all years, self-harm presentations during public holidays had a 24% increased risk of involving alcohol consumption compared to all other days and this effect was most pronounced during the Christmas period. The association with alcohol remained significant at a multivariate level. Presentations on public holidays were more likely to attend out of normal working hours. An increase in male presentations involving self-cutting was observed on public holidays and there was an over-representation of males presenting for the first time. It is likely that extent of alcohol involvement in self-harm presentations reported here is an underestimate, as it was dependent on the information being recorded by the attending clinician. Public holidays are associated with an elevated number of self-harm presentations to hospital, with presentations to hospital involving alcohol significantly increased on these days. Hospital resources should be targeted to address increases during public holidays, including during out-of-hours. Involvement of alcohol may delay delivery of care to these patients in emergency settings. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Residential segregation and the survival of U.S. urban public hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Michelle; Needleman, Jack; Derose, Kathryn Pitkin; Laugesen, Miriam J; Ponce, Ninez A

    2014-06-01

    Residential segregation is associated geographic disparities in access to care, but its impact on local health care policy, including public hospitals, is unknown. We examined the effects of racial residential segregation on U.S. urban public hospital closures from 1987 to 2007, controlling for hospital, market, and policy characteristics. We found that a high level of residential segregation moderated the protective effects of Black population composition, such that a high level of residential segregation, in combination with a high percentage of poor residents, conferred a higher likelihood of hospital closure. More segregated and poorer communities face disadvantages in access to care that may be compounded as a result of instability in the health care safety net. Policy makers should consider the influence of social factors such as residential segregation on the allocation of the safety net resources.

  11. Efficiency indicators versus forntier methods: an empirical investigation of italian public hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Clementi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Efficiency has a key-role in the measurement of the impact of the National Health Service (NHS reforms. We investigate the issue of inefficiency in health sector and provide empirical evidence derived from Italian public hospitals. Despite the importance of efficiency measurement in health care services, only recently advanced econometric methods have been applied to hospital data. We provide a synoptic survey of few empirical analyses of efficiency measurement in health care services. An estimate of the cost efficiency level in Italian public hospitals during 2001-2003 is obtained through a sample. We propose an efficiency indicator and provide cost frontiers for such hospitals, using stochastic frontier analysis (SFA for longitudinal data.

  12. Comparison of patient perceived primary care quality in public clinics, public hospitals and private clinics in rural China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenhua; Maitland, Elizabeth; Nicholas, Stephen; Loban, Ekaterina; Haggerty, Jeannie

    2017-10-03

    In rural China, patients have free choice of health facilities for outpatient services. Comparison studies exploring the attributes of different health facilities can help identify optimal primary care service models. Using a representative sample of Chinese provinces, this study aimed to compare patients' rating of three primary care service models used by rural residents (public clinics, public hospitals and private clinics) on a range of health care attributes related to responsiveness. This was a secondary analysis using the household survey data from World Health Organization (WHO) Study on global AGEing and adult health (SAGE). Using a multistage cluster sampling strategy, eight provinces were selected and finally 3435 overall respondents reporting they had visited public clinics, public hospitals or private clinics during the last year, were included in our analysis. Five items were used to measure patient perceived quality in five domains including prompt attention, communication and autonomy, dignity and confidentiality. ANOVA and Turkey's post hoc tests were used to conduct comparative analysis of five domains. Separate multivariate linear regression models were estimated to examine the association of primary care service models with each domain after controlling for patient characteristics. The distribution of last health facilities visited was: 29.5% public clinics; 31.2% public hospitals and; 39.3% private clinics. Public clinics perform best in all five domains: prompt attention (4.15), dignity (4.17), communication (4.07), autonomy (4.05) and confidentiality (4.02). Public hospitals perform better than private clinics in dignity (4.03 vs 3.94), communication (3.97 vs 3.82), autonomy (3.92 vs 3.74) and confidentiality (3.94 vs 3.73), but equivalently in prompt attention (3.92 vs 3.93). Rural residents who are older, wealthier, and with higher self-rated health status have significantly higher patient perceived quality of care in all domains. Rural

  13. Potentially preventable admissions to New Zealand public hospitals for dental care: a 20-year review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whyman, Robin A; Mahoney, Erin K; Morrison, David; Stanley, James

    2014-06-01

    To describe the prevalence of admissions to New Zealand public hospitals for dental care and associated time trends for people of all ages during the 20-year period 1990-2009. The New Zealand Ministry of Health National Minimum Data Set (NMDS), a collection that covers all publicly funded hospital discharges, was the primary data source for this study. Data over a 20-year period from 1 January 1990 to 31 December 2009 were included, and a subset of ICD 10 codes (K02-K09 and K12 and K13) were selected to identify potentially preventable or ambulatory care sensitive conditions (ACSC) leading to admission to hospital. Volumes, proportions and rates of admission are presented to describe the patterns of admission to hospital. There were 120,046 admissions to public hospitals in New Zealand between 1990 and 2009 for which the provision of dental care was the primary reason for admission. The rate of admission to hospital for dental care increased from 0.92 per 1000 population in the period 1990-1994 to 2.15 per 1000 population in 2005-2009. Dental admission rates were greatest in the 3- to 4-year-old age group, for Maori and Pacific people and for people in the most deprived quintile of the NZDep 2006 index. Almost one-third of people aged 18-34 years who were admitted to hospital primarily for dental care were acute admissions. Both the volume and the rate of admission to New Zealand public hospitals for dental care have increased over the period of this study. A continued focus on strategies to reduce the impact of dental disease, particularly in the early childhood population and on ensuring accessible primary dental care for the adult population, is required. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Using technology for bed management in public hospitals - A strategic analysis and change management plan

    OpenAIRE

    Brayan, Daniel Joseph

    2005-01-01

    As healthcare organisations in New South Wales, Australia, are facing the increased demands of an aging population, new approaches to improving access to services are being sought. This project explores the potential of applying information technology to the management of beds in a large Sydney public hospital. More specifically, this project addresses the cultural and organizational aspects of hospital environments and factors them into a change management plan for implementing bed managemen...

  15. How could health information be improved? Recommended actions from the Victorian Consultation on Health Literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Sophie J; Sofra, Tanya A

    2017-03-07

    governments have taken a critical interest in improving health literacy. What does this paper add? This article presents the findings of the Victorian Consultation on Health Literacy as they relate to needs, priorities and potential actions for improving health information. In the context of the National Statement for Health Literacy, health information should be a priority, given its centrality to the public's management of its own health and effective, standards-based, patient-centred clinical care. A framework to improve health information would underpin the efforts of government, services and consumer organisations to meet literacy needs in a more consistent way, improving standards and ultimately increasing the participation by consumers and carers in health decision making and self-management. What are the implications for practitioners? The development and provision of health information materials needs to be systematised and supported by infrastructure, requiring leadership, cultural change, standards and skills development.

  16. Does autonomy for public hospitals in developing countries increase performance? Evidence-based case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Geyndt, Willy

    2017-04-01

    Governments in middle and low income countries have sought ways for the past decades to make their public hospitals more performing. The objectives of this assessment are to: (a) synthesize the experience of eleven countries at granting autonomy to their public hospitals and the obstacles encountered; (b) deduce which autonomy policies have or have not been effective documenting successes and failures; and (c) propose evidence-based recommendations to policy makers. Data for five countries are derived from the author's participation in the autonomy process augmented by current updates provided by national colleagues. Data for the other six countries are derived from publications available in the literature. Policies granting autonomy to public hospitals have had limited success. In all cases Boards of Directors have been created. Governance of autonomized hospitals by Boards however is obstructed by the resistance of central level entities to have their authority diminished. The Ministry of Finance tends to maintain control over revenues and expenditures. The Public Service Commission resists abdicating its role to hire, promote, transfer and dismiss government employees. The Ministry of Health attempts to keep its authority to appoint hospital staff, procure medical supplies and equipment; it may do so directly or indirectly by selecting and appointing Board members. Management information systems continue to collect activity measures to be aggregated at the national level for statistical purposes and do not provide financial and clinical data useful for decision making by the Boards and by senior management. Decentralizing decision making to the operational level has had limited success. Stakeholders at the central level devise strategies to maintain their power. Two main obstacles are delegating authority over human resources and finances that are sine qua non conditions for governing and increasing the performance of public hospitals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier

  17. Farming suicides during the Victorian drought: 2001-2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiney, Robyn

    2012-02-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether farming suicides increased in Victoria during the prolonged drought in south eastern Australia and gain an understanding of Victorian farming suicides during the period. Intentional self-harm deaths of farmers and primary producers notified to the Victorian State Coroner from 2001 to 2007 were examined to identify characteristics and determine whether the annual number of farming suicides increased. Farming suicides accounted for just over 3% of Victorian suicides. The total number of farming suicides was 110 for the period and ranged between 11 and 19 deaths per year, rising and falling inconsistently from year to year. Males accounted for nearly 95% of farming suicides, with firearms and hanging the most frequently used methods, and most deaths occurring between 30 and 59 years of age. The small number of relevant cases and fluctuations in the annual number of deaths provides no evidence of a pattern of increasing farming suicides during the drought years, when there was approximately one suicide every 3 weeks. Given the elevated suicide risk in male farmers and association with multiple psychosocial and environmental factors, it cannot be concluded, however, that suicide risk itself did not increase during this period of heightened uncertainty and stress. Drought should not be dismissed among the many risk factors, and it is possible that increased mental health awareness and community support programs targeting drought-affected areas contributed to improved management of stress and suicide risk in regional and rural Victoria over the past decade. © 2012 The Author. Australian Journal of Rural Health © National Rural Health Alliance Inc.

  18. Waste management in three public hospitals of Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keila Tivirolli

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To assess the management of health service waste generated in three public hospitals of Mato Grosso do Sul (Brazil, including qualitative and quantitative parameters. Methods: This was an observational and descriptive study. We assessed the waste management in two large public hospitals (HG1, 240 hospital beds and HG2, 343 beds and in a small sized one (HP, 35 hospital beds. The data were collected in situ, by direct observation of the procedures for waste management and by quantifying the mass of waste generated by working sector in the three hospitals. Results: The study revealed that the internal management of waste generated in the three health care unities was not adequate, and that their workers were not trained on the proper management of waste and the use of personal protective equipment. The average rates of waste generation determined in HG1, HG2 and HP were, respectively, 4.7, 4.8 and 2.4 Kg.hospital bed-1.day-1, that fit the range of values reported in the literature. Conclusion: The detected inadequacies directly put at risk the health of workers and others who attend the three assessed hospitals and the outside comunity, which may be exposed to pathogens or toxic agents present in such waste

  19. Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis: epidemiological and clinical outcomes analysis in public hospitals*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arantes, Luana Bernardes; Reis, Carmélia Santiago; Novaes, Alice Garbi; de Carvalho, Marta Rodrigues; Göttems, Leila Bernarda Donato; Novaes, Maria Rita Carvalho Garbi

    2017-01-01

    Background Adverse drug reactions are harmful and involuntary responses to drugs that occur at doses normally used for a given condition. Among them are Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis, both rare and potentially fatal conditions. Objectives To analyze the epidemiological and clinical characteristics related to patients diagnosed with Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis in public hospitals in the Federal District - Brazil. Methods Retrospective, cross-sectional and descriptive study, in which data were collected referring to patients hospitalized in the public healthcare system of the Federal District from 1999 to 2014. Results: Between 1999 and 2014, 86 cases of hospitalized patients with diagnosis of Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis in the Federal District were reported. The majority of patients were women; the most affected age group was 0 to 10 years. Patients older than 60 years (elderly) represent 6.98% of the cases. Most patients admitted to the referral hospital were discharged. However, occurrence of deaths exceeded that of discharge in elderly patients. Limitations of the study There is fragility in the registry of hospitalization of patients, both in the hospital information system and in the medical records of the reference hospital. Conclusion There is a need for greater production and better dissemination of information on the incidence of adverse drug reactions. PMID:29166503

  20. Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis: epidemiological and clinical outcomes analysis in public hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arantes, Luana Bernardes; Reis, Carmélia Santiago; Novaes, Alice Garbi; Carvalho, Marta Rodrigues de; Göttems, Leila Bernarda Donato; Novaes, Maria Rita Carvalho Garbi

    2017-01-01

    Adverse drug reactions are harmful and involuntary responses to drugs that occur at doses normally used for a given condition. Among them are Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis, both rare and potentially fatal conditions. To analyze the epidemiological and clinical characteristics related to patients diagnosed with Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis in public hospitals in the Federal District - Brazil. Retrospective, cross-sectional and descriptive study, in which data were collected referring to patients hospitalized in the public healthcare system of the Federal District from 1999 to 2014. Results: Between 1999 and 2014, 86 cases of hospitalized patients with diagnosis of Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis in the Federal District were reported. The majority of patients were women; the most affected age group was 0 to 10 years. Patients older than 60 years (elderly) represent 6.98% of the cases. Most patients admitted to the referral hospital were discharged. However, occurrence of deaths exceeded that of discharge in elderly patients. There is fragility in the registry of hospitalization of patients, both in the hospital information system and in the medical records of the reference hospital. There is a need for greater production and better dissemination of information on the incidence of adverse drug reactions.

  1. Predictors of Publication Productivity Among Hospital Pharmacists in France and Quebec

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelièvre, Joachim; Lebel, Denis; Prot-Labarthe, Sonia

    2011-01-01

    Objective To describe publications by hospital pharmacists in France and Quebec and evaluate factors predictive of publication productivity. Method Variables related to scientific publication productivity were identified through a search of the literature and organized into 4 themes (ie, personal and professional characteristics, hospital activities, research and publishing activities, publication-related motivations and perceptions). A questionnaire was developed that included short-answer items and 58 multiple-choice questions to determine respondents' level of agreement with statements about their motivations and perceptions surrounding publishing. Results Four hundred twenty-two hospital pharmacists (218 respondents from France and 204 from Quebec) were recruited. Respondents from France were more prolific than those from Quebec, even when considering factors such as time worked and gender. Furthermore, the percentage of respondents working in a university health center was lower in France than Quebec (46% vs. 70%, p = 0.001), as was the percentage of respondents indicating a mastery of English (43% vs. 88%, p = 0.001). Conclusion Seven factors were predictive of the number of publications per respondent in France and Quebec: practicing hospital pharmacy in France, being male, having academic duties or a PhD, having participated in a clinical trial, having secured funding in one's own name for a research project, and allocating a greater number of hours per week to research. PMID:21451771

  2. Perceptions of mothers and hospital staff of paediatric care in 13 public hospitals in northern Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mwangi, Rose; Chandler, Clare; Nasuwa, Fortunata

    2008-01-01

    interviewed to explore their opinions and experience of the admission process and conditions on the ward. Overcrowding, unsanitary conditions and lack of food were major concerns for mothers on the ward, who were deterred from seeking treatment earlier due to fears that hospital admission posed a significant...... risk of exposure to infection. While most staff were seen as being sympathetic and supportive to mothers, a minority were reported to be judgemental and authoritarian. Health workers identified lack of trained staff, overwork and low pay as major concerns. Staff shortages, lack of effective training...... and equipment are established problems but our findings also highlight a need for wards to become more parent-friendly, particularly with regard to food, hygiene and space. Training programmes focused on professional conduct and awareness of the problems that mothers face in seeking and receiving care may...

  3. Compliance with clinical pathways for inpatient care in Chinese public hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiao Yan; Bundorf, M Kate; Gu, Jian Jun; Zhou, Ping; Xue, Di

    2015-10-06

    The National Health and Family Planning Commission of China has issued more than 400 clinical pathways to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of medical care delivered by public hospitals in China. The aim of our study is to determine whether patient care is compliant with national clinical pathways in public general hospitals of Pudong New Area in Shanghai. We identified the clinical pathways established by the National Health and Family Planning Commission of China for 5 common conditions (community-acquired pneumonia, acute myocardial infarction (AMI), heart failure, cesarean section, type-2 diabetes). We randomly selected patients with each condition admitted to one of 7 public general hospitals in Pudong New Area in China in January, 2013. We identified key process indicators (KPIs) for each pathway and, based on chart review for each patient, determined whether the patient's care was compliant for each indicator. We calculated the proportion of care which was compliant with clinical pathways for each indicator, the average proportion of indicators that were met for each patient, and the proportion of patients whose care was compliant for all measures. For selected indicators, we compared compliance rates among hospitals in our study with those from other countries. Average compliance rates across the KPIs for each condition ranged from 61 % for AMI to 89 % for pneumonia. The percent of patient receiving fully compliant care ranged from 0 for AMI and heart failure to 39 % for pneumonia. Compared to the compliance rate for process indicators in the hospitals of other countries, some rates in the hospitals that we audited were higher, but some were lower. Few patients received care that complied with all the pathways for each condition. The reasons for low compliance with national clinical pathways and how to improve clinical quality in public hospitals of China need to be further explored.

  4. Organizational decision to adopt hospital information system: an empirical investigation in the case of Malaysian public hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Hossein; Nilashi, Mehrbakhsh; Ibrahim, Othman

    2015-03-01

    This study mainly integrates the mature Technology-Organization-Environment (TOE) framework and recently developed Human-Organization-Technology (HOT) fit model to identify factors that affect the hospital decision in adopting Hospital Information System (HIS). Accordingly, a hybrid Multi-Criteria-Decision-Making (MCDM) model is used to address the dependence relationships of factors with the aid of Analytic Network Processes (ANP) and Decision Making Trial and Evaluation Laboratory (DEMATEL) approaches. The initial model of the study is designed by considering four main dimensions with 13 variables as organizational innovation adoption factors with respect to HIS. By using DEMATEL, the interdependencies strength among the dimensions and variables are tested. The ANP method is then adopted in order to determine the relative importance of the adoption factors, and is used to identify how these factors are weighted and prioritized by the public hospital professionals, who are wholly familiar with the HIS and have years of experience in decision making in hospitals' Information System (IS) department. The results of this study indicate that from the experts' viewpoint "Perceived Technical Competence" is the most important factor in the Human dimension. In the Technology dimension, the experts agree that the "Relative Advantage" is more important in relation to the other factors. In the Organization dimension, "Hospital Size" is considered more important rather than others. And, in the Environment dimension, according to the experts judgment, "Government Policy" is the most important factor. The results of ANP survey from experts also reveal that the experts in the HIS field believed that these factors should not be overlooked by managers of hospitals and the adoption of HIS is more related to more consideration of these factors. In addition, from the results, it is found that the experts are more concerned about Environment and Technology for the adoption HIS. The

  5. Patient and public understanding and knowledge of antimicrobial resistance and stewardship in a UK hospital: should public campaigns change focus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micallef, Christianne; Kildonaviciute, Kornelija; Castro-Sánchez, Enrique; Scibor-Stepien, Aleksandra; Santos, Reem; Aliyu, Sani H; Cooke, Fiona J; Pacey, Sarah; Holmes, Alison H; Enoch, David A

    2017-01-01

    The rising global tide of antimicrobial resistance is a well-described phenomenon. Employing effective and innovative antimicrobial stewardship strategies is an essential approach to combat this public health threat. Education of the public and patients is paramount to enable the success of such strategies. A panel of hospital multidisciplinary healthcare professionals was set up and a short quiz containing true/false statements around antimicrobial stewardship and resistance was designed and piloted. An educational leaflet with the correct replies and supporting information was also produced and disseminated. Participants were recruited on a single day (18 November 2015) from the hospital outpatient clinics and the hospital outpatient pharmacy waiting room. One hundred and forty-five completed quizzes were returned, providing a total of 1450 answers. Overall, 934 of 1450 (64%) statements were scored correctly whilst 481 (33%) were scored incorrectly; 35 (3%) statements were left unscored. We speculate that these results may demonstrate that respondents understood the statements, as only a small proportion of statements were left unanswered. The question dealing with the definition of antimicrobial resistance and the question dealing with the definition of antimicrobial stewardship obtained the most incorrect replies (85% and 72%, respectively). However, a specific factual recall question regarding only one microorganism (MRSA) received the most correct responses (99%). We describe a simple, innovative method of engagement with patients and the general public to help educate and disseminate important public health messages around antimicrobial resistance and stewardship. We also identified the need for public health campaigns to address the knowledge gaps found around this topic. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. [Public control and equity of access to hospitals under non-State public administration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro Junior, Nivaldo; Elias, Paulo Eduardo

    2006-10-01

    To analyze social health organizations in the light of public control and the guarantee of equity of access to health services. Utilizing the case study technique, two social health organizations in the metropolitan region of São Paulo were selected. The analytical categories were equity of access and public control, and these were based on interviews with key informants and technical-administrative reports. It was observed that the overall funding and administrative control of the social health organizations are functions of the state administrator. The presence of a local administrator is important for ensuring equity of access. Public control is expressed through supervisory actions, by means of accounting and financial procedures. Equity of access and public control are not taken into consideration in the administration of these organizations. The central question lies in the capacity of the public authorities to have a presence in implementing this model at the local level, thereby ensuring equity of access and taking public control into consideration.

  7. [Hospital governance: between crisis management and implementation of public health policy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bréchat, Pierre-Henri; Antoine, Leenhardt; Mathieu-Grenouilleau, Marie-Christine; Rymer, Roland; Matisse, François; Baraille, Denis; Beaufils, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    The implementation of the recent act to amend the law on hospitals, patient health and territories (HPST Law) completes the reform of the organization and governance of health facilities, which was announced in 2002 by the "Hospital 2007" plan. What kind of assessments and perspectives can be considered and envisaged for these Hospital Activity Poles? We compared our experience with a review of the professional and scientific literature in order to stimulate answers to these questions for advocacy purposes prior to the Act's implementation. The hospital's cluster of activities should reinforce--not call into question the core activities and the financial stability of the facility, while respecting the contract on agreed objectives and the necessary means and resources to meet the health needs of the catchment population as well as national priorities. Although significant, but limited, successes exist, five obstacles to hospital reorganization can be identified. These include, for example: lack of delegation of management and centralization of decisions, the heterogeneity of numerous Hospital Activity Poles or problems related to timing. These obstacles may cause strain, or put the Hospital Activity Poles and the health facilities in a difficult situation with respect to their dynamics. This may show that the State and social health insurance should steer and direct public health policy and that the delegation of management roles and responsibilities to the Hospital Activity Poles should be addressed.

  8. Public Expectations of Hospitals to Provide Resources and Services to the Uninjured During Disasters: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charney, Rachel L; Rebmann, Terri; Dalawari, Preeti; Endrizal, Amy

    Hospitals are perceived as stable sources of support and assistance for the community during disasters. Expectations may outstrip hospital plans or ability to provide for the public. The purpose of this project was to explore racial disparities found in prior research and general perceptions related to the public's expectations of hospitals during disasters. Qualitative interviews were conducted with members of the general public. Content analysis was used to analyze the data and identify themes that describe racial differences related to public expectations of hospitals. A total of 28 interviews were conducted. Half of the participants (n = 14) were black, 57% (n = 16) female, with a mean age of 49 years. No racial differences in terms of the general public's expectations of hospitals were identified. Participants believed that hospitals have a service role and responsibility during disaster response to provide both tangible and intangible supplies and resources to the uninjured public. Hospitals were perceived as able to provide these resources, in terms of having sufficient funds and supplies to share with the uninjured public. In addition, hospitals are perceived as being caring organizations that have compassion toward the public and thus as welcoming places to seek assistance following a disaster. Hospitals need to be prepared to manage the general public's expectations both before and during disasters.

  9. Epidemiology of 411 140 cataract operations performed in public hospitals and private hospitals/clinics in Denmark between 2004 and 2012

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solborg Bjerrum, Søren; Mikkelsen, Kim Lyngby; la Cour, Morten

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To study the epidemiology and mortality in patients who had cataract surgery in public hospitals and private hospitals/clinics in Denmark between 2004 and 2012 and to assess the validity of the Danish cataract registries. METHODS: Register- and chart-based study. RESULTS: A total of 411...... 140 cataract operations were performed in 243 856 patients. Patients who had cataract surgery in public hospitals had an overall statistically significantly 62% higher mortality compared to patients who had cataract surgery in private hospitals/clinics. The decrease in mean age at first eye cataract...... surgery in private hospitals/clinics was statistically significantly greater compared to the decrease in mean age at first eye cataract surgery in public hospitals (p cataract surgery decreased statistically significantly during the study...

  10. Tobacco industry manipulation of the hospitality industry to maintain smoking in public places.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dearlove, J V; Bialous, S A; Glantz, S A

    2002-06-01

    To describe how the tobacco industry used the "accommodation" message to mount an aggressive and effective worldwide campaign to recruit hospitality associations, such as restaurant associations, to serve as the tobacco industry's surrogate in fighting against smoke-free environments. We analysed tobacco industry documents publicly available on the internet as a result of litigation in the USA. Documents were accessed between January and November 2001. The tobacco industry, led by Philip Morris, made financial contributions to existing hospitality associations or, when it did not find an association willing to work for tobacco interests, created its own "association" in order to prevent the growth of smoke-free environments. The industry also used hospitality associations as a vehicle for programmes promoting "accommodation" of smokers and non-smokers, which ignore the health risks of second hand smoke for employees and patrons of hospitality venues. Through the myth of lost profits, the tobacco industry has fooled the hospitality industry into embracing expensive ventilation equipment, while in reality 100% smoke-free laws have been shown to have no effect on business revenues, or even to improve them. The tobacco industry has effectively turned the hospitality industry into its de facto lobbying arm on clean indoor air. Public health advocates need to understand that, with rare exceptions, when they talk to organised restaurant associations they are effectively talking to the tobacco industry and must act accordingly.

  11. Assessment of postgraduate educational environment in public and private hospitals of Karachi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, Shiraz; Kumari, Bhavita; Obaid, Munazza; Khalid, Noman

    2017-02-01

    To assess the environment of postgraduate fellowship training in teaching hospitals of an urban centre. The cross-sectional study was conducted at one public-sector and two private-sector teaching hospitals in Karachi from December 2014 to June 2015. Data was collected by using a modified version of Postgraduate Hospital Educational Environment Measure, a validated questionnaire, for which clinical residents were selected through convenience sampling. Data was analyzed using SPSS 16. Of the 302 participants, 168(55.6%) were males and 134(44.4%) were females. The overall mean age of the respondents was 28.46±3.03 years. The internal reliability of the questionnaire was good with a Cronbach's alpha of 0.92. The overall mean score of 93.96±20.79suggested more positive than negative perception with room for improvement. After adjusting for all important socio-demographic and residency co-variates, residency in a private hospital was positively associated with Postgraduate Hospital Educational Environment Measure score (ppostgraduate training in terms of teaching, autonomy and social support in public and private hospitals of Karachi.

  12. Catholics, science and civic culture in Victorian Belfast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnegan, Diarmid A; Wright, Jonathan Jeffrey

    2015-06-01

    The connections between science and civic culture in the Victorian period have been extensively, and intensively, investigated over the past several decades. Limited attention, however, has been paid to Irish urban contexts. Roman Catholic attitudes towards science in the nineteenth century have also been neglected beyond a rather restricted set of thinkers and topics. This paper is offered as a contribution to addressing these lacunae, and examines in detail the complexities involved in Catholic engagement with science in Victorian Belfast. The political and civic geographies of Catholic involvement in scientific discussions in a divided town are uncovered through an examination of five episodes in the unfolding history of Belfast's intellectual culture. The paper stresses the importance of attending to the particularities of local politics and scientific debate for understanding the complex realities of Catholic appropriations of science in a period and urban context profoundly shaped by competing political and religious factions. It also reflects more generally on how the Belfast story supplements and challenges scholarship on the historical relations between Catholicism and science.

  13. Can soil change be assessed for the Victorian dairy industry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarons, Sharon R.; Crawford, Douglas; Imhof, Mark; Gourley, Cameron

    2015-07-01

    Meeting the increased demand for dairy products will require careful management of soils to minimise land degradation and sustain increased production. Key to providing farmers with the tools to manage their soils sustainably, is firstly understanding the soil types currently managed by dairy farmers, and secondly quantifying changes in soil properties in response to management. The Victorian Land Use Information System was interrogated to identify dairy land parcels and these data overlaid on soil survey information to identify the dominant soil orders managed by dairy farmers in the three dairy regions of Victoria. Of the approximately 590,000 hectares of dairy land identified across the state, Sodosols (33%), Chromosols (20%), Dermosols (16%), and Vertosols (11%) are the major soil Orders represented, although the dominant soil Orders vary for each region. Legacy data from research and extension activities undertaken between 1995 and 2010 were collated to understand regional differences in dairy soil properties. All soil properties were significantly and positively skewed with higher median pH, EC and available K in northern Victorian soils. Further analysis compared the 1995 to 2010 data with data from samples analysed by the government analytical laboratory between 1973 and 1980 to assess any differences over 38 years. The older soil chemical data were also positively skewed but had lower median soil pH, Olsen P and available K, consistent with the greater use of inputs by the industry in more recent years.

  14. Factors affecting turnover intentions among public hospital doctors in a middle-level city in central China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fengfan; Luo, Zhenni; Chen, Ting; Min, Rui; Fang, Pengqian

    2017-05-01

    Objective The aim of the present study was to explore prominent factors affecting turnover intentions among public hospital doctors in urban areas, particularly in Xiangyang City, Hubei Province, a middle-level city in central China. Methods Questionnaires were used to collect data from 284 public hospital doctors. Pearson's Chi-squared was used to assess whether sociodemographic and other factors were related to the turnover intentions of public hospital doctors. Binary logistic regression was performed to determine the significant factors that influence turnover intentions. Results The analysis revealed that 28.2% of public hospital doctors intended to leave the hospital where they were currently employed. Dissatisfaction with working conditions and hospital management processes, as well as work pressures, were significant factors contributing to the turnover intentions of public hospital doctors. Conclusion Research into turnover intentions indicates that public hospital doctors surveyed in urban China give greater weight to their professional environment and career development rather than salary in their employment decisions. What is known about the topic? Turnover of medical staff is a concern to hospital administrators because it is costly and detrimental to organisational performance and quality of care. Most studies have focused on the effects of individual and organisational factors on nurses' intentions to leave their employment. Income dissatisfaction was one of the determining factors of turnover intentions in previous studies. What does this paper add? The satisfaction of public hospital doctors with regard to income is not a determining factor of turnover intentions. In contrast with findings of previous studies, the doctors in public hospitals in urban China in the present study gave greater weight to their professional environment and career development in their employment decisions. What are the implications for practitioners? The findings suggest

  15. Selected aspects of the logistics network of public hospitals in the competitive market of health services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justyna Majchrzak-Lepczyk

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The below considerations provide an overview of the issues of sustainable development, logistics, to financial engineering instruments and the role of intellectual capital in the process of transformation of public hospitals. The aim of this research was to assess the competitiveness of the network of public hospitals in the market of health services based on literature studies, as well as empirical research. Methods: Empirical study using a questionnaire survey was conducted in the period from January 2007 to December 2011, in the area of Warmia and Mazury, Pomerania and Wielkopolska. The goal of this questionnaire survey was to know the medical staff reviews issues related to adaptation to the nature of the network of public hospitals methods and logistics tools, sustainable development, corporate social responsibility - CSR. The study was carried out in 104 public hospitals, on a sample of 8975 respondents. Results and conclusions: Analysis of the completed study showed that the logistic processes and their improvement in the health sector play a significant role. The surveyed entities explicitly draw attention to the need for information systems,  pro-environment activities, access to information, or the use of GS1 global standards. These tools allow you to increase the efficiency of supply chains, ensuring not only tracking and tracing of products from the manufacturer to the patient, but also enabling better protection against making a mistake or counterfeit products.

  16. Caesarian section rates in private and public hospitals in Eritrea in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Caesarian section is one of the skilled delivery attendance interventions that have proven to be a life saver. There are standard indications for its use in delivery. The practice of cesarean section in public and private hospitals has not been studied in Eritrea. Objective: The purpose of this retrospective ...

  17. Mammography in public hospitals at Rio de Janeiro: a quality assurance program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briquet, C.; Coutinho, C.M.C.; Mota, H.C.; Tavares, E. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria/ Commisao Nacional de Energia Nuclear. Av. Salvador Allende, s/n CEP: 22780-160. Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    1998-12-31

    This paper presents the preliminary results and the methodology followed by the implementation of a Quality Assurance Program in public hospitals at Rio de Janeiro. We observed that the main problems of image are due to the processing. None facility has a dedicated processor and the processor daily quality control is a concern not yet adopted. (Author)

  18. The influence of a local, media covered hospital incident on public trust in health care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schee, E. van der; Jong, J.D. de; Groenewegen, P.P.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Incidents in health care happen every now and then. Incidents are often extensively covered by the news media. In this study, we investigated the impact of an incident in a Dutch hospital on public trust in health care in the population living in the vicinity of where the incident took

  19. The Milwaukee story: a public hospital's resistance to the Supreme Court abortion rulings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrose, L

    1975-08-01

    A pregnancy was terminated at Milwaukee County General Hospital on March 12, 1975, 2 years after the Supreme Court decision on abortion and almost 8 months after a federal judge directly ordered the hospital to provide abortion services. In order for that abortion to be performed, there had to be Supreme Court action, extensive litigation in lower corts, related actions in state courts, supplementary court orders, and threatened fines and citations for contempt of court for principal hospital and county officials. Yet, the basic issues of this controversy continue. The test of a public hospital's responsibility to provide abortion services offers a case study of the way in which leadership decisions, community pressures, personal beliefs, and professional predispositions can intefere with implementation of the Supreme Court's standards on abortion rights. The hospital's rule 26(b) allows abortion only when pregnancy continuation is life-threatening to the mother. Following the Supreme Court decision, the medical staff of Milwaukee County General supported changing this aborion policy, but the director of the obstetrics and gynecology department strongly opposed any policy change. Among the tactics used to maintian the policy was the claim that there was no doctor at the hospital willing to perform an abortion along with the prohibition of payment of county funds for abortions at either the public hospital or at private hospitals by the County Board of Supervisors. It also appears that religious principles might be at work in influencing public policy decisions. Until 1967 the hospital was part of Marquette University, a private Catholic institution, and the corporation counsel representing the county is known for his opposition to abortion. To a certain extent the obstructionist attitudes that are prevalent reveal the "right to life" element at work in Milwaukee. There is no indication that Milwaukee citizens are uniformly opposed to abortion despite the rhetoric

  20. Power and trust in organizational relations: an empirical study in Turkish public hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozaykut, Tuba; Gurbuz, F Gulruh

    2015-01-01

    Given the salience of the interplay between trust and power relations in organizational settings, this paper examines the perceptions of social power and its effects on trust in supervisors within the context of public hospitals. Following the theoretical background from which the study model is developed, the recent situation of hospitals within Turkish healthcare system is discussed to further elucidate the working conditions of physicians. Sample data were collected employing a structured questionnaire that was distributed to physicians working at seven different public hospitals. The statistical analyses indicate that perceptions of supervisors' social power affect subordinates' trust in supervisors. Although coercive power is found to have the greatest impact on trust in supervisors, the influence of the power base is weak. In addition, the results show that perceptions of social power differ between genders. However, the results do not support any of the hypotheses regarding the relations between trust in supervisors and the examined demographic variables. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. A generic discrete-event simulation model for outpatient clinics in a large public hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weerawat, Waressara; Pichitlamken, Juta; Subsombat, Peerapong

    2013-01-01

    The orthopedic outpatient department (OPD) ward in a large Thai public hospital is modeled using Discrete-Event Stochastic (DES) simulation. Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) are used to measure effects across various clinical operations during different shifts throughout the day. By considering various KPIs such as wait times to see doctors, percentage of patients who can see a doctor within a target time frame, and the time that the last patient completes their doctor consultation, bottlenecks are identified and resource-critical clinics can be prioritized. The simulation model quantifies the chronic, high patient congestion that is prevalent amongst Thai public hospitals with very high patient-to-doctor ratios. Our model can be applied across five different OPD wards by modifying the model parameters. Throughout this work, we show how DES models can be used as decision-support tools for hospital management.

  2. A Generic Discrete-Event Simulation Model for Outpatient Clinics in a Large Public Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waressara Weerawat

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The orthopedic outpatient department (OPD ward in a large Thai public hospital is modeled using Discrete-Event Stochastic (DES simulation. Key Performance Indicators (KPIs are used to measure effects across various clinical operations during different shifts throughout the day. By considering various KPIs such as wait times to see doctors, percentage of patients who can see a doctor within a target time frame, and the time that the last patient completes their doctor consultation, bottlenecks are identified and resource-critical clinics can be prioritized. The simulation model quantifies the chronic, high patient congestion that is prevalent amongst Thai public hospitals with very high patient-to-doctor ratios. Our model can be applied across five different OPD wards by modifying the model parameters. Throughout this work, we show how DES models can be used as decision-support tools for hospital management.

  3. Author! author!: creating a digital archive of publications in a hospital library setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rourke, Diane; Samsundar, Devica Ramjit; Shalini, Channapatna

    2005-01-01

    Baptist Hospital of Miami has been honoring its staff authors annually during National Library Week since 1979, at the time the library was relocated. Upon "doing the math" and realizing that twenty-five years had passed, a special event was planned to celebrate the occasion in 2004. A merger of four hospitals in 1995 to form Baptist Health South Florida, and an addition of a fifth hospital in 2003 added into the complexity of these publications. Organizing the event led to the conclusion that there had to be a "better way" to manage the publication archive. This paper will include a look back at the event's past, present efforts to develop an archival database, and future plans to make articles available electronically to users, copyright permitting.

  4. Quality of inpatient care in public and private hospitals in Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rannan-Eliya, Ravindra P; Wijemanne, Nilmini; Liyanage, Isurujith K; Dalpatadu, Shanti; de Alwis, Sanil; Amarasinghe, Sarasi; Shanthikumar, Shivanthan

    2015-03-01

    To compare the quality of inpatient clinical care in public and private hospitals in Sri Lanka. A retrospective, cross-sectional comparison was done of inpatient quality, in a sample of 11 public and 10 private hospitals in three of 25 districts. Data were collected for 55 quality indicators from medical records of 2523 public and 1815 private inpatient admissions. These covered treatment of asthma, acute myocardial infarction (AMI), childbirth and five other conditions, along with outcome indicators, and medicine prescribing indicators. Overall quality scores were better in the public sector than the private sector (77 vs 69%). Performance was similar for management of AMI and childbirth and somewhat better in the private sector for management of asthma. The public sector performed better in those indicators that are not constrained by resources (94 vs 81%), but worse in indicators that are highly resource intensive (10 vs 31%). Quality was comparable in assessment and investigation, but the public sector performed better in treatment and management (70 vs 62%) and drug prescribing (68 vs 60%), and modestly worse in terms of outcomes (92 vs 97%). For a range of indicators where comparisons were possible, quality of inpatient clinical care in Sri Lanka was comparable to levels reported from upper-middle income Asian countries, and often approaches that in developed countries, although the findings cannot be generalized. Quality in the public sector is better than in the private sector in many areas, despite spending being substantially less. Quality in public hospitals is resource constrained, and needs greater government investment for improvement, but when resource limitations are not critical, the public sector appears able to deliver equal or better quality than the private sector. Overall similarities in quality between the two sectors suggest the importance of physician training and other factors. Published by Oxford University Press in association with The

  5. Implementation of quality of care indicators for third-level public hospitals in Mexico

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    Pedro Jesús Saturno-Hernández

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To select, pilot test and implement a set of indi­cators for tertiary public hospitals. Materials and meth­ods. Quali-quantitative study in four stages: identification of indicators used internationally; selection and prioritization by utility, feasibility and reliability; exploration of the quality of sources of information in six hospitals; pilot feasibility and reliability, and follow-up measurement. Results. From 143 indicators, 64 were selected and eight were prioritized. The scan revealed sources of information deficient. In the pilot, three indicators were feasible with reliability limited. Has conducted workshops to improve records and sources of information; nine hospitals reported measurements of a quarter. Conclusions. Eight priority indicators could not be measured immediately due to limitations in the data sources for its construction. It is necessary to improve mechanisms of registration and processing of data in this group of hospital.

  6. Post-abortion and induced abortion services in two public hospitals in Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darney, Blair G; Simancas-Mendoza, Willis; Edelman, Alison B; Guerra-Palacio, Camilo; Tolosa, Jorge E; Rodriguez, Maria I

    2014-07-01

    Until 2006, legal induced abortion was completely banned in Colombia. Few facilities are equipped or willing to offer abortion services; often adolescents experience even greater barriers of access in this context. We examined post abortion care (PAC) and legal induced abortion in two large public hospitals. We tested the association of hospital site, procedure type (manual vacuum aspiration vs. sharp curettage), and age (adolescents vs. women 20 years and over) with service type (PAC or legal induced abortion). Retrospective cohort study using 2010 billing data routinely collected for reimbursement (N=1353 procedures). We utilized descriptive statistics, multivariable logistic regression and predicted probabilities. Adolescents made up 22% of the overall sample (300/1353). Manual vacuum aspiration was used in one-third of cases (vs. sharp curettage). Adolescents had lower odds of documented PAC (vs. induced abortion) compared with women over age 20 (OR=0.42; 95% CI=0.21-0.86). The absolute difference of service type by age, however, is very small, controlling for hospital site and procedure type (.97 probability of PAC for adolescents compared with .99 for women 20 and over). Regardless of age, PAC via sharp curettage is the current standard in these two public hospitals. Both adolescents and women over 20 are in need of access to legal abortion services utilizing modern technologies in the public sector in Colombia. Documentation of abortion care is an essential first step to determining barriers to access and opportunities for quality improvement and better health outcomes for women. Following partial decriminalization of abortion in Colombia, in public hospitals nearly all abortion services are post-abortion care, not induced abortion. Sharp curettage is the dominant treatment for both adolescents and women over 20. Women seek care in the public sector for abortion, and must have access to safe, quality services. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Pharmacy services at admission and discharge in adult, acute, public hospitals in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Grimes, Tamasine

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVES: to describe hospital pharmacy involvement in medication management in Ireland, both generally and at points of transfer of care, and to gain a broad perspective of the hospital pharmacy workforce. METHODS: a survey of all adult, acute, public hospitals with an accident and emergency (A&E) department (n = 36), using a semi-structured telephone interview. KEY FINDINGS: there was a 97% (n = 35) response rate. The majority (n = 25, 71.4%) of hospitals reported delivery of a clinical pharmacy service. On admission, pharmacists were involved in taking or verifying medication histories in a minority (n = 15, 42.9%) of hospitals, while few (n = 6,17.1%) deployed staff to the A&E\\/acute medical admissions unit. On discharge, the majority (n = 30,85.7%) did not supply any take-out medication, a minority (n =5,14.3%) checked the discharge prescription, 51.4% (n = 18) counselled patients, 42.9% (n = 15) provided medication compliance charts and one hospital (2.9%) communicated with the patient\\'s community pharmacy. The number of staff employed in the pharmacy department in each hospital was not proportionate to the number of inpatient beds, nor the volume of admissions from A&E. There were differences identified in service delivery between hospitals of different type: urban hospitals with a high volume of admissions from A&E were more likely to deliver clinical pharmacy. CONCLUSIONS: the frequency and consistency of delivering pharmacy services to facilitate medication reconciliation at admission and discharge could be improved. Workforce constraints may inhibit service expansion. Development of national standards of practice may help to eliminate variation between hospitals and support service development.

  8. Patient satisfaction questionnaire and quality achievement in hospital care: the case of a Greek public university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matis, Georgios K; Birbilis, Theodossios A; Chrysou, Olga I

    2009-11-01

    The scope of this research has been to investigate the satisfaction of Greek patients hospitalized in a tertiary care university public hospital in Alexandroupolis, Greece, in order to improve medical, nursing and organizational/administrative services. It is a cross-sectional study involving 200 patients hospitalized for at least 24 h. We administered a satisfaction questionnaire previously approved by the Greek Health Ministry. Four aspects of satisfaction were employed (medical, hotel facilities/organizational, nursing, global). Using principal component analysis, summated scales were formed and tested for internal consistency with the aid of Cronbach's alpha coefficient. The non-parametric Spearman rank correlation coefficient was also used. The results reveal a relatively high degree of global satisfaction (75.125%), yet satisfaction is higher for the medical (89.721%) and nursing (86.432%) services. Moreover, satisfaction derived from the hotel facilities and the general organization was found to be more limited (76.536%). Statistically significant differences in participant satisfaction were observed (depending on age, gender, citizenship, education, number of previous admissions and self-assessment of health status at the first and last day of patients' stay) for the medical, nursing and hotel facilities/organizational dimension, but not for global satisfaction. The present study confirms the results of previously published Greek surveys.

  9. Institutional conditions and coping strategies of precarious work conditions for occupational therapists in public hospitals

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    Kaline Kelly Rodrigues Farias

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Health policy in Brazil since the 1970 preceded several transformations, passing the conquest of the National Health System in 1988 to the implementation of new management models that in the context of neoliberal policy may impair public health services, resulting in losses to public hospitals and their professionals, including the occupational therapist. Objective: This research aimed to reveal the precariousness of the impacts of the Brazilian health policy in the professional practice of occupational therapists in public hospitals in Maceió-AL. Method: This is a qualitative field study, with data collected with semi-structured interview, and analyzed based on the content analysis technique. Results: The analysis raised two themes: ‘Difficulties in daily work’ and ‘Professional coping strategies of precarious work conditions’. It was found that the precariousness affects both work relations and conditions, thus constituting a continuity process between the different precariousness, impairing interdisciplinary work and the satisfaction of user’s demands. On the other hand, professionals adopt coping strategies including resource requests to the institution, buying and getting materials through donation, using adaptation, establishing limit imposition to the institutions, even though they don’t always solve the problem. Conclusion: Therefore this study has revealed that the precarious work conditions in public hospital in the city of Maceió has reverberated directly in the occupational therapists, thus resulting in losses for the users of the public health system, mobilizing strategies of professional coping.

  10. Opening the Black Box: The Experiences and Lessons From the Public Hospitals Autonomy Policy in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doshmangir, Leila; Rashidian, Arash; Jafari, Mehdi; Takian, Amirhossein; Ravaghi, Hamid

    2015-07-01

    Policy formulation and adoption often happen in a black box. Implementation challenges affect and modify the nature of a policy. We analyzed hospitals' autonomy policy in Iran that was intended to reduce hospitals' financial burden on government and improve their efficiency. We followed a retrospective case-study methodology, involving inductive and deductive analyses of parliamentary proceedings, policy documents, gray literature, published papers and interview transcripts. We analyzed data to develop a policy map that included important dates and events leading to the policy process milestones. We identified four time-periods with distinctive features: 'moving toward the policy' (1989 - 1994), disorganized implementation' (1995 - 1997), 'continuing challenges and indecisiveness in hospitals financing' (1998 - 2003), and 'other structural and financial policies in public hospitals' (2004 to date). We found that stakeholders required different and conflicting objectives, which certainly resulted in an unsatisfactory implementation process. The policy led to long-lasting and often negative changes in the hospital sector and the entire Iranian health system. Hospital autonomy appeared to be an ill-advised policy to remedy the inefficiency problems in low socioeconomic areas of the country. The assumption that hospital autonomy reforms would necessarily result in a better health system, may be a false assumption as their success relies on many contextual, structural and policy implementation factors.

  11. [Hospital San Juan de Dios: actor and victim of the public policies in Colombia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinilla, María Y; Abadía, César E

    2017-01-01

    In this article, we narrate and analyze the historical configuration that a group of female workers and a collective of social organizations made about the Hospital San Juan de Dios (HSJD) and Instituto Materno Infantil (IMI) in Bogotá, Colombia, within the neoliberal crisis in health. Our ethnographic research intersects the Latinamerican traditions of collaborative ethnography and historic anthropology. The research was conducted in two sites. In the first one, from 2005 until 2015, we had informal conversations and conducted workshops and semi-structured interviews with IMI workers. The second site corresponds to our participation in the deliberations of the Mesa Jurídica por el San Juan de Dios (2008-2009), which aimed to elevate a class action to defend the hospitals. We found that workers and social organizations made use of the colonial origin of the hospitals and their institutionalization as center of welfare policies in the country as a way to highlight their patrimonial, historical, educational and social importance. This historical construction critiques efforts that negate or transform the public character of the hospitals and helped them carry on different actions to denounce the neoliberal health care reform as the cause of the hospitals most important crisis and closing. The different actors denounce the change in the hospitals-state relationship, which transited from being central for the development of social policies to reflecting a symbolic and material elimination of the hospitals. Such transition benefits the market interests established by the neoliberal model.

  12. Public-Access Defibrillation and Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Tetsuhisa; Kiyohara, Kosuke; Sakai, Tomohiko; Matsuyama, Tasuku; Hatakeyama, Toshihiro; Shimamoto, Tomonari; Izawa, Junichi; Fujii, Tomoko; Nishiyama, Chika; Kawamura, Takashi; Iwami, Taku

    2016-10-27

    Early defibrillation plays a key role in improving survival in patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrests due to ventricular fibrillation (ventricular-fibrillation cardiac arrests), and the use of publicly accessible automated external defibrillators (AEDs) can help to reduce the time to defibrillation for such patients. However, the effect of dissemination of public-access AEDs for ventricular-fibrillation cardiac arrest at the population level has not been extensively investigated. From a nationwide, prospective, population-based registry of patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in Japan, we identified patients from 2005 through 2013 with bystander-witnessed ventricular-fibrillation arrests of presumed cardiac origin in whom resuscitation was attempted. The primary outcome measure was survival at 1 month with a favorable neurologic outcome (Cerebral Performance Category of 1 or 2, on a scale from 1 [good cerebral performance] to 5 [death or brain death]). The number of patients in whom survival with a favorable neurologic outcome was attributable to public-access defibrillation was estimated. Of 43,762 patients with bystander-witnessed ventricular-fibrillation arrests of cardiac origin, 4499 (10.3%) received public-access defibrillation. The percentage of patients receiving public-access defibrillation increased from 1.1% in 2005 to 16.5% in 2013 (PThe percentage of patients who were alive at 1 month with a favorable neurologic outcome was significantly higher with public-access defibrillation than without public-access defibrillation (38.5% vs. 18.2%; adjusted odds ratio after propensity-score matching, 1.99; 95% confidence interval, 1.80 to 2.19). The estimated number of survivors in whom survival with a favorable neurologic outcome was attributed to public-access defibrillation increased from 6 in 2005 to 201 in 2013 (Pbystanders was associated with an increase in the number of survivors with a favorable neurologic outcome after out-of-hospital

  13. Motivation of health workers and associated factors in public hospitals of West Amhara, Northwest Ethiopia

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    Weldegebriel Z

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Zemichael Weldegebriel,1 Yohannes Ejigu,2 Fitsum Weldegebreal,3 Mirkuzie Woldie2 1Public Planning Department, Debark Hospital, Debark, North Gondar, Amhara Region, 2Department of Health Services Management, College of Public Health and Medical Sciences, Jimma University, Jimma, Ethiopia; 3Department of Medical Laboratory Science, College of Health and Medical Science, Haramaya University, Harar, Ethiopia Background: Health professionals’ motivation reflects the interaction between health professionals and their work environment. It can potentially affect the provision of health services; however, this important attribute of the workplace climate in public hospitals is not usually given serious attention to the desired level. For this reason, the authors of this study have assessed the level of motivation of health professionals and associated factors in public hospitals of West Amhara, Northwest Ethiopia.  Methods: A facility based cross-sectional study was conducted in eight public hospitals of West Amhara from June 1 to July 30, 2013. A total of 304 health professionals were included in this study. The collected data were analyzed using SPSS software version 20. The reliability of the instrument was assessed through Cronbach’s α. Factor scores were generated for the items found to represent the scales (eigenvalue greater than one in varimax rotation used in the measurement of the variables. The scores were further analyzed using one-way analysis of variance, t-tests, Pearson’s correlation, and hierarchical multiple linear regression analyses. The cut-off point for the regression analysis to determine significance was set at β (95% confidence interval, P<0.05.  Results: Mean motivation scores (as the percentage of maximum scale scores were 58.6% for the overall motivation score, 71.0% for the conscientiousness scale, 52.8% for the organizational commitment scale, 58.3% for the intrinsic motivation scale, and 64.0% for organizational

  14. Hospital Smoke-Free Policy: Compliance, Enforcement, and Practices. A Staff Survey in Two Large Public Hospitals in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrabb, Sam; Baker, Amanda L; Attia, John; Balogh, Zsolt J; Lott, Natalie; Palazzi, Kerrin; Naylor, Justine; Harris, Ian A; Doran, Christopher M; George, Johnson; Wolfenden, Luke; Skelton, Eliza; Bonevski, Billie

    2017-11-08

    Background: Smoke-free hospital policies are becoming increasingly common to promote good health and quit attempts among patients who smoke. This study aims to assess: staff perceived enforcement and compliance with smoke-free policy; the current provision of smoking cessation care; and the characteristics of staff most likely to report provision of care to patients. Methods: An online cross-sectional survey of medical, nursing, and allied staff from two Australian public hospitals was conducted. Staff report of: patient and staff compliance with smoke-free policy; perceived policy enforcement; the provision of the 5As for smoking cessation (Ask, Assess, Advise, Assist, and Arrange follow-up); and the provision of stop-smoking medication are described. Logistic regressions were used to determine respondent characteristics related to the provision of the 5As and stop-smoking medication use during hospital admission. Results: A total of 805 respondents participated. Self-reported enforcement of smoke-free policy was low (60.9%), together with compliance for both patients (12.9%) and staff (23.6%). The provision of smoking cessation care was variable, with the delivery of the 5As ranging from 74.7% (ask) to 18.1% (arrange follow-up). Medical staff (odds ratio (OR) = 2.09, CI = 1.13, 3.85, p = 0.018) and full time employees (OR = 2.03, CI = 1.06, 3.89, p = 0.033) were more likely to provide smoking cessation care always/most of the time. Stop-smoking medication provision decreased with increasing age of staff (OR = 0.98, CI = 0.96, 0.99, p = 0.008). Conclusions: Smoke-free policy enforcement and compliance and the provision of smoking cessation care remains low in hospitals. Efforts to improve smoking cessation delivery by clinical staff are warranted.

  15. Bacterial contamination on touch surfaces in the public transport system and in public areas of a hospital in London.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otter, J A; French, G L

    2009-12-01

    To investigate bacterial contamination on hand-touch surfaces in the public transport system and in public areas of a hospital in central London. Dipslides were used to sample 118 hand-touch surfaces in buses, trains, stations, hotels and public areas of a hospital in central London. Total aerobic counts were determined, and Staphylococcus aureus isolates were identified and characterized. Bacteria were cultured from 112 (95%) of sites at a median concentration of 12 CFU cm(-2). Methicillin-susceptible Staph. aureus (MSSA) was cultured from nine (8%) of sites; no sites grew methicillin-resistant Staph. aureus (MRSA). Hand-touch sites in London are frequently contaminated with bacteria and can harbour MSSA, but none of the sites tested were contaminated with MRSA. Hand-touch sites can become contaminated with staphylococci and may be fomites for the transmission of bacteria between humans. Such sites could provide a reservoir for community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA) in high prevalence areas but were not present in London, a geographical area with a low incidence of CA-MRSA.

  16. Workplace Stressors and Coping Strategies Among Public Hospital Nurses in Medan, Indonesia

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    Achmad Fathi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nursing is considered as a stressful job when compared with other jobs. Prolonged stress without effective coping strategies affects not only nurses’ occupational life but also their nursing competencies. Medan is the biggest city in Sumatera Island of Indonesia. Two tertiary public hospital nurses in this city hold the responsibility in providing excellent care to their patients. Objective: To investigate the relationships between the nurse’s workplace stressors and the coping strategies used. Method: The descriptive correlational study was conducted to examine the relationships between workplace stressors and the coping strategies used in nurses of two public hospitals in Medan. The sample size of 126 nurses was drawn from selected in-patient units. Data were collected by using self-report questionnaires and focus group interview. The majority of subjects experienced low workplace stressors, where death/dying was the most commonly reported workplace stressor followed by workload. Religion was the most commonly used coping strategy. Result: Significant correlations were found between subscales of workplace stressors and coping strategies. Most of subjects used emotion-focused and dysfunctional coping strategies rather than problem-focused coping strategies. Conclusion: The nurse administrators in the hospitals need to advocate their in order to use problem-focused coping strategies more frequent than emotion-focused and dysfunctional coping strategies when dealing with workplace stressors. Keywords: workplace stressor, coping strategy, public hospital nurses

  17. [Continuity of care: the concordance of discharge planning between public and private hospitals and district].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirio, Franco

    2015-01-01

    A good post hospital discharge planning facilitates the discharge, improves patients' health conditions and decreases the social costs. To assess the agreement of the discharge settings suggested by the public or private hospitals and by the district. A random sample of 318 over 1152 discharge reports send in 2013 by Hospitals to the District service of ASLTO2 - Piedmont Region was selected. The agreement for discharge planning between public hospitals and District was 57.4% (50% for private hospitals), with differences according to the discharge setting: 75.3% for Home care, 61.3% for Nursing Homes, 44.4% long term rehabilitation, 42.9% for the Hospice and only 7.4% for specialized Nursing Homes. Reasons for lack of agreement were an inappropriate assessment of patients or family resources and of discharge settings. The District is in a better position for assessing the range services to be offered the to patients, their living and family conditions and thus, to identify the most suitable post discharge settings.

  18. California Public Hospitals Improved Quality of Care Under Medicaid Waiver Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourat, Nederah

    2017-06-01

    California has 12 county-owned and operated hospital systems and 5 University of California hospitals designated as public hospitals. These organizations deliver the majority of inpatient care and a significant amount of outpatient care to Medicaid patients in the state. In 2010, California was the first state in the nation to implement a five-year Delivery System Reform Incentive Payment (DSRIP) program under the Section §1115 Medicaid "Bridge to Reform" waiver to improve the capacity of these hospitals to deliver high quality and more efficient care. The California DSRIP was the first program in a continuing national initiative to reform the Medicaid delivery system while remaining budget neutral. An extensive evaluation revealed major advances in infrastructure development, delivery of health care, and patient outcomes during the program. The results highlight the importance of joint federal and state investments in bolstering the capacity of safety net providers to deliver high-quality care, and they emphasize the need for continued investment in the safety net. The California DSRIP was followed by a program called Public Hospital Redesign and Incentives in Medi-Cal (PRIME), which incentivizes improvements in expanded and new areas of care not addressed by DSRIP

  19. Waiting times for surgical and diagnostic procedures in public hospitals in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras-Loya, David; Gómez-Dantés, Octavio; Puentes, Esteban; Garrido-Latorre, Francisco; Castro-Tinoco, Manuel; Fajardo-Dolci, Germán

    2015-01-01

    A retrospective evaluation of waiting times for elective procedures was conducted in a sample of Mexican public hospitals from the following institutions: the Mexican Institute for Social Security (IMSS), the Institute for Social Security and Social Services for Civil Servants (ISSSTE) and the Ministry of Health (MoH). Our aim was to describe current waiting times and identify opportunities to redistribute service demand among public institutions. We examined current waiting times and productivity for seven elective surgical and four diagnostic imaging procedures, selected on the basis of their relative frequency and comparability with other national health systems. Mean waiting time for the seven surgical procedures in the three institutions was 14 weeks. IMSS and ISSSTE hospitals showed better performance (12 and 13 weeks) than the MoH hospitals (15 weeks). Mean waiting time for the four diagnostic procedures was 11 weeks. IMSS hospitals (10 weeks) showed better average waiting times than ISSSTE (12 weeks) and MoH hospitals (11 weeks). Substantial variations were revealed, not only among institutions but also within the same institution. These variations need to be addressed in order to improve patient satisfaction.

  20. Waiting times for surgical and diagnostic procedures in public hospitals in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Contreras-Loya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. A retrospective evaluation of waiting times for elective procedures was conducted in a sample of Mexican public hospitals from the following institutions: the Mexican Institute for Social Security (IMSS, the Institute for Social Security and Social Services for Civil Servants (ISSSTE and the Ministry of Health (MoH. Our aim was to describe current waiting times and identify opportunities to redistribute service demand among public institutions. Materials and methods. We examined current waiting times and productivity for seven elective surgical and four diagnostic imaging procedures, selected on the basis of their relative frequency and comparability with other national health systems. Results. Mean waiting time for the seven surgical procedures in the three institutions was 14 weeks. IMSS and ISSSTE hospitals showed better performance (12 and 13 weeks than the MoH hospitals (15 weeks. Mean waiting time for the four diagnostic procedures was 11 weeks. IMSS hospitals (10 weeks showed better average waiting times than ISSSTE (12 weeks and MoH hospitals (11 weeks. Conclusion. Substantial variations were revealed, not only among institutions but also within the same institution. These variations need to be addressed in order to improve patient satisfaction.

  1. Free does not mean affordable: maternity patient expenditures in a public hospital in Bangladesh

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    Khan Suhaila H

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective This study investigated a the amount and types of out-of-pocket expenditures by patients for nominally free services in a large public hospital in Bangladesh, b the factors influencing these expenses, and c the impact of these expenses on household income. Methods Eighty-one maternity patients were interviewed during their hospitalization in the Dhaka Medical College Hospital. Patients were selected by quota sample to match the distribution of maternity patient categories in the hospital. Patients were interviewed with a semi-structured, in-depth questionnaire. Results All interviewees incurred substantial out-of-pocket expenditures for travel, hospital admission fees, medicine, tests, food, and tips. Only two of the expenditures, travel expenses and admission fees, were not supposed to be provided free of charge by the hospital. The median total per-patient expenditure was $65 (range $2–$350, equivalent to 7% (range 0.04%–225% of annual household income. Half of all patients reported that their families had to borrow to pay for care at interest rates of 5%–30% per month. A third of these families reported selling jewelry, land or household items to moneylenders. The rural patients reported more difficulty in paying for care than the urban patients. Factors increasing the expenditures were duration of hospitalization, rural residence, and necessary (e.g. C-section, hysterectomy and unnecessary (e.g. episiotomy medical procedures. Conclusion Free maternity services in Bangladesh impose large out-of-pocket expenditures on patients. Authorities could reduce the burden by reducing the duration of hospital stays, limiting use of medical procedures, eliminating tips, and moving routine services closer to potential users. Fee for service could reduce unofficial expenditures if the fee were lower than and replaced typical unofficial expenditures, otherwise adding service fees without reform of current hospital practices would

  2. Emergency department physician training in Jamaica: a national public hospital survey

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    Williams Eric W

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Emergency Department (ED medical officers are often the first medical responders to emergencies in Jamaica because pre-hospital emergency response services are not universally available. Over the past decade, several new ED training opportunities have been introduced locally. Their precise impact on the health care system in Jamaica has not yet been evaluated. We sought to determine the level of training, qualifications and experience of medical officers employed in public hospital EDs across the nation. Methods A database of all medical officers employed in public hospital EDs was created from records maintained by the Ministry of Health in Jamaica. A specially designed questionnaire was administered to all medical officers in this database. Data was analyzed using SPSS Version 10.0. Results There were 160 ED medical officers across Jamaica, of which 47.5% were males and the mean age was 32.3 years (SD +/- 7.1; Range 23–57. These physicians were employed in the EDs for a mean of 2.2 years (SD +/- 2.5; Range 0–15; Median 2.5 and were recent graduates of medical schools (Mean 5.1; SD +/- 5.9; Median 3 years. Only 5.5% of the medical officers had specialist qualifications (grade III/IV, 12.8% were grade II medical officers and 80.5% were grade I house officers or interns. The majority of medical officers had no additional training qualifications: 20.9% were exposed to post-graduate training, 27.9% had current ACLS certification and 10.3% had current ATLS certification. Conclusion The majority of medical officers in public hospital EDs across Jamaica are relatively inexperienced and inadequately trained. Consultant supervision is not available in most public hospital EDs. With the injury epidemic that exists in Jamaica, it is logical that increased training opportunities and resources are required to meet the needs of the population.

  3. Public health safety and environment in inadequate hospital and healthcare settings: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baguma, D

    2017-03-01

    Public health safety and environmental management are concerns that pose challenges worldwide. This paper briefly assesses a selected impact of the environment on public health. The study used an assessment of environmental mechanism to analyse the underlying different pathways in which the health sector is affected in inadequate hospital and health care settings. We reviewed the limited available evidence of the association between the health sector and the environment, and the likely pathways through which the environment influences health. The paper also models the use of private health care as a function of costs and benefits relative to public care and no care. The need to enhancing policies to improve the administration of health services, strengthening interventions on environment using international agreements, like Rio Conventions, including measures to control hospital-related infection, planning for human resources and infrastructure construction development have linkage to improve environment care and public health. The present study findings partly also demonstrate the influence of demand for health on the environment. The list of possible interventions includes enhancing policies to improve the administration of health services, strengthening Rio Conventions implementation on environmental concerns, control of environmental hazards and public health. Copyright © 2016 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Community Priorities for Hospital-Based Prevention Initiatives: Results From a Deliberating Public.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Marthe R; Realmuto, Lindsey; Scherer, Maya; Kamler, Alexandra; Weiss, Linda

    2017-06-21

    Internal revenue service provisions require not-for-profit hospitals to provide "community benefit." In addition, the Affordable Care Act requires these hospitals to conduct community health needs assessments that involve appropriate stakeholders. These requirements signal government interest in creating opportunities for developing programs that are well tailored and responsive to the needs of the communities served. Gaining meaningful input from residents is a critical aspect of these processes. To implement public deliberations that explore local resident priorities for use of a hospital's community benefit resources to prevent chronic disease. Public deliberation is a method of community engagement that can provide guidance to decision makers on value-laden issues when technical solutions alone are inadequate to provide direction or set priorities. Three deliberations featuring presentations by experts and discussions among participants were convened with a cross section of residents in Brooklyn, New York. Participants were asked whether new hospital initiatives should prioritize: clinical prevention, community-based interventions, or action on broader policies affecting population health. Pre- and postsurveys, as well as qualitative methods, were used to assess knowledge and attitudes. Postdeliberation, participants had significant changes in knowledge, particularly on the impact of education on health. Participants prioritized community-based and policy interventions over expanding clinical prevention capacity. Public deliberation offers a method to probe informed constituent views of how a hospital can best promote its community's health. Informed local residents felt that hospitals should frame health-promoting activities more broadly than is current practice. Not-for-profit hospitals gain significant tax advantages. Increased insurance rates suggest that some hospitals will experience savings in uncompensated care that can be used to promote health more

  5. Medical indigency and inner city hospital care: patient dumping, emergency care and public policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, M F

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses the growing lack of private for-profit hospital care for the medically indigent. The issues of patient dumping and emergency care are examined from both judicial and public policy perspectives. The paper concludes by noting that dumping may be viewed as a most serious form of neglect and more comprehensive laws and court decisions are needed to require all hospitals, regardless of ownership, to treat all patients who arrive at their doors if they have the appropriate medical staff and facilities.

  6. [Nurses of large public hospitals in Rio de Janeiro: socio demographic and work related characteristics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griep, Rosane Härter; da Fonseca, Maria de Jesus Mendes; Melo, Enirtes Caetano Prates; Portela, Luciana Fernandes; Rotenberg, Lucia

    2013-09-01

    The study aimed at analyzing socio-demographic and working characteristics of nurses from public hospitals. It was carried out a cross-sectional study, involving 3.229 nurses from the eighteen largest public hospitals of the city of Rio de Janeiro. It was observed a feminine predominance (87.3%), with mean age of 39.9 ± 10 years. Around 7% referred having master or doctorate degree, 58.5% got their degree from public institutions and 24.5% used to work at the health sector before becoming nurses. Half the group has thought of abandoning their career, and almost a quarter is unsatisfied with their profession. Around 10% searched for a job outside nursing area in the previous month and 30% searched for a job in the same working area. Night work, engagement in more than one job and long professional work hours were more frequently found among men. The study has pointed challengeable aspects of nurses' profession. Results can subsidize support strategies to improve the working conditions in public hospitals due to their comprehensiveness.

  7. Patient's perceptions about the service quality of public hospitals located at District Kohat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aman, Bakhtiar; Abbas, Faisal

    2016-01-01

    To determine patients' perception regarding service and quality of healthcare at public-sector institutions. The descriptive quantitative study was conducted in Kohat district, Pakistan, between July and December 2014, and focussed on 30 variables to assess the participants' perceptions of the actual healthcare service quality delivered. SERVQUAL instrument was used to measure the reliability and cronbach alpha was calculated to measure the reliability and validity of the instrument. A total of 200 questionnaires were distributed and 157(78.5%) were received back fully filled. Of them, 105(67%) were men and 52(33%) were women.The mean value of Assurance parameter was 3.05±0.88, indicating trust in public hospitals was high as they had experienced and capable doctors. On the other hand, the lowest mean value of 2.61±0.84 was for Empathy, highlighting the fact that public hospitals lacked the ability to handle patients' problem properly, services were not offered in time and they were short of staff. Public hospitals were largely seen as failing to deliver quality service.

  8. [State of food and nutritional care in public hospitals of Ecuador].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos Espinosa, Sylvia; Nicolalde Cifuentes, Marcelo; Santana Porbén, Sergio

    2014-10-03

    The ELAN Ecuadorian Study of Hospital Malnutrition returned a malnutrition rate of 37.1% in public hospitals of Ecuador [Gallegos Espinosa S, Nicolalde Cifuentes M, Santana Porbén S; para el Grupo Ecuatoriano de Estudio de la Desnutrición Hospitalaria. State of malnutrition in hospitals of Ecuador. Nutr Hosp (España) 2014;30:425-35]. Hospital malnutrition could be the result of institutional cultural practices affecting the patient's nutritional status. To present the current state of food and nutritional care provided to patients assisted in public hospitals of Ecuador. The state of food and nutritional care provided to 5,355 patients assisted in 36 hospitals of 23 provinces of the country was documented by means of the Hospital Nutrition Survey (HNS), conducted as part of the ELAN Study. HNS recorded the completion of nutritional assessment exercises, the use of food-bymouth, fasting, use of oral nutritional supplements, and implementation and conduction of Artificial nutritional schemes (Enteral/Parenteral); respectively. Less than 0.1% of clinical charts had a diagnosis of malnutrition included in the list of the patient's health problems. Less than half of the patients had been measured and weighted on admission. Serum Albumin values and Total Lymphocytes Counts were annotated on admission in only 13.5% and 59.2% of the instances, respectively. Current weight value was registered in only 59.4% of the patients with length of stay ³ 15 days. An oral nutritional supplement was prescribed in just 3.5% of non-malnourished patients in which significant metabolic stress and/or reduced food intakes concurred. Although up to 10 different indications for use of Artificial nutrition were identified in the sample study, any of these techniques was administered to just 2.5% (median of observed percentages; range: 1.3 - 11.9%) of surveyed patients. Currently, nutritional status of hospitalized patient is not included within therapeutic goals, nutritional assessment

  9. The European politics of animal experimentation: From Victorian Britain to 'Stop Vivisection'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germain, Pierre-Luc; Chiapperino, Luca; Testa, Giuseppe

    2017-08-01

    This paper identifies a common political struggle behind debates on the validity and permissibility of animal experimentation, through an analysis of two recent European case studies: the Italian implementation of the European Directive 2010/63/EC regulating the use of animals in science, and the recent European Citizens' Initiative (ECI) 'Stop Vivisection'. Drawing from a historical parallel with Victorian antivivisectionism, we highlight important threads in our case studies that mark the often neglected specificities of debates on animal experimentation. From the representation of the sadistic scientist in the XIX century, to his/her claimed capture by vested interests and evasion of public scrutiny in the contemporary cases, we show that animals are not simply the focus of the debate, but also a privileged locus at which much broader issues are being raised about science, its authority, accountability and potential misalignment with public interest. By highlighting this common socio-political conflict underlying public controversies around animal experimentation, our work prompts the exploration of modes of authority and argumentation that, in establishing the usefulness of animals in science, avoid reenacting the traditional divide between epistemic and political fora. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. Methods of recording theatre activity across publicly funded hospitals in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, J; Healy, O; Hegarty, H; Murray, D

    2014-09-01

    A review of theatre activity in all Health Service Executive (HSE) hospitals in Cork and Kerry in 2008 required a manual extraction of theatre activity data from largely paper-based log books. A key data management recommendation suggested that "a standardised computerised theatre log book system be developed in all hospitals in the region". HSE (2010) Reconfiguration of health services for Cork and Kerry—theatre utilisation review. ISBN 978-1-906218-54-6. In 2010, a computerised minimum dataset project group conducted a telephone survey of theatre managers nationally to determine the methods of recording theatre activity across publicly funded hospital theatres in Ireland. Sixty-one percent of acute hospitals nationally did not have a computerised theatre register. Of those who did, 15 % had a fully electronic system, 13 % had a dual paper-based and electronic system and 7 % had a single surgical specialty system. The HSE South region was significantly deprived of an electronic operating system in comparison to other HSE regions. While the total number of fully computerised hospital theatres remained small,they still dealt with the greater number of hospital discharges nationally. The roll-out of the productive operating theatre programme is facilitating the implementation of operating room management systems on a phased basis nationally. This will greatly facilitate audit, research,patient care and theatre efficiencies.

  11. Relative efficiency and productivity: a preliminary exploration of public hospitals in Beijing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hao; Dong, Siping; Liu, Tingfang

    2014-04-06

    Third-grade hospitals in Beijing have been rapidly developing in capacity and scale for many years. These hospitals receive a large number of patients, and ensuring their efficient operation is crucial in meeting people's healthcare needs. In this context, a study of their relative efficiency and productivity would be helpful to identify the driving factors and further improve their performance. After a review of literature, the current numbers of open beds and employees were selected as input variables. The number of outpatient and emergency visits and the number of discharged patients were selected as output variables. A total of 12 third-grade Class A general public hospitals in Beijing were selected for a preliminary study. The panel data from 2006-2009 were collected by the National Institute of Hospital Administration, Ministry of Health of P.R. China. Descriptive analysis and data envelopment analysis were used to analyze the data using Stata 10.0 and DEAP(V2.1) software. In the 2006-2009 period, descriptive results show that sample hospitals continuously expanded their capacity and scale, with growth rate of total revenue being the highest among all variables. The DEA results show that the average annual growth rate of productivity was 26.7%, and the rates were 47.3%, 21.3% and 13.8% respectively for two consecutive years. The average annual growth rate of technological change was 28.3%, and the rates were 49.4%, 21.5% and 16.4% respectively for two consecutive years. The average annual growth rate of technical efficiency change was -1.3%, and the rates were -1.4%, -0.02% and -2.2% respectively for two consecutive years. The sample hospitals in Beijing experienced substantial productivity growth, but annual growth rates were declining. Substantial technological change was the main contributor to the growth. Although some hospitals exhibited improvements in technical efficiency, there was a slight decline in general. To improve overall efficiency and

  12. Efficiency and productivity assessment of public hospitals in Greece during the crisis period 2009-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xenos, P; Yfantopoulos, J; Nektarios, M; Polyzos, N; Tinios, P; Constantopoulos, A

    2017-01-01

    This study is an initial effort to examine the dynamics of efficiency and productivity in Greek public hospitals during the first phase of the crisis 2009-2012. Data were collected by the Ministry of Health after several quality controls ensuring comparability and validity of hospital inputs and outputs. Productivity is estimated using the Malmquist Indicator, decomposing the estimated values into efficiency and technological change. Hospital efficiency and productivity growth are calculated by bootstrapping the non-parametric Malmquist analysis. The advantage of this method is the estimation efficiency and productivity through the corresponding confidence intervals. Additionally, a Random-effects Tobit model is explored to investigate the impact of contextual factors on the magnitude of efficiency. Findings reveal substantial variations in hospital productivity over the period from 2009 to 2012. The economic crisis of 2009 had a negative impact in productivity. The average Malmquist Productivity Indicator (MPI) score is 0.72 with unity signifying stable production. Approximately 91% of the hospitals score lower than unity. Substantial increase is observed between 2010 and 2011, as indicated by the average MPI score which fluctuates to 1.52. Moreover, technology change scored more than unity in more than 75% of hospitals. The last period (2011-2012) has shown stabilization in the expansionary process of productivity. The main factors contributing to overall productivity gains are increases in occupancy rates, type and size of the hospital. This paper attempts to offer insights in efficiency and productivity growth for public hospitals in Greece. The results suggest that the average hospital experienced substantial productivity growth between 2009 and 2012 as indicated by variations in MPI. Almost all of the productivity increase was due to technology change which could be explained by the concurrent managerial and financing healthcare reforms. Hospitals operating

  13. The indirect costs of agency nurses in South Africa: a case study in two public sector hospitals

    OpenAIRE

    Rispel, Laetitia C.; Moorman, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Background: Globally, flexible work arrangements – through the use of temporary nursing staff – are an important strategy for dealing with nursing shortages in hospitals.Objective: The objective of the study was to determine the direct and indirect costs of agency nurses, as well as the advantages and the problems associated with agency nurse utilisation in two public sector hospitals in South Africa.Methods: Following ethical approval, two South African public sector hospitals were selected ...

  14. Sexual violence, marital guidance, and Victorian bodies: an aesthesiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourke, Joanna

    2008-01-01

    This essay examines some of the emotional rules, encoded in grammars of representation and framed within law and prescriptive marital advice literature, regarding the expression of male sexual aggressivity within the bedroom. Despite the general Victorian idealization of marriage, many wives suffered physical and sexual abuse at the hands of their husbands, marital rape drawing particular attention from early feminists, psychologists, physicians, and evolutionary physiologists. In the 1870s, a belief that unrestrained sexual license was a symptom of degeneration led these commentators to consider marital rape particularly harmful to husbands. By the turn of the century, however, the focus of this harm had nominally shifted to women, who might become frigid if forced to submit to sex--a problem for wives but for husbands as well. As sexology and psychology gained greater influence, couples came to rely on the emotion-talk of commentators to negotiate mutually agreeable bedroom activity.

  15. Costs of vaginal delivery and Caesarean section at a tertiary level public hospital in Islamabad, Pakistan

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    Zaman Shakila

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Public hospitals in developing countries, rather than the preventive and primary healthcare sectors, are the major consumers of healthcare resources. Imbalances in rational, equitable and efficient allocation of scarce resources lie in the scarcity of research & information on economic aspects of health care. The objective of this study was to determine the average cost of a spontaneous vaginal delivery and Caesarean section in a tertiary level government hospital in Islamabad, Pakistan and to estimate the out of pocket expenditures to households using these services. Methods This hospital based cost accounting cross sectional study determines the average cost of vaginal delivery and Caesarean section from two perspectives, the patient's and the hospital. From the patient's perspective direct and indirect expenditures of 133 post-partum mothers (65 delivered by Caesarean section & 68 by spontaneous vaginal delivery admitted in the maternity general ward were determined. From the hospital perspective the step down methodology was adopted, capital and recurrent costs were determined from inputs and cost centers. Results The average cost for a spontaneous vaginal delivery from the hospital's side was 40 US$ (2688 rupees and from the patient's perspective was 79 US$ (5278 rupees. The average cost for a Caesarean section from the hospital side was 162 US$ (10868 rupees and 204 US$ (13678 rupees from the patient's side. Average monthly household income was 141 ± 87 US$ for spontaneous vaginal delivery and 168 ± 97 US$ for Caesarean section. Three fourth (74% of households had a monthly income of less than 149 US$ (10000 rupees. Conclusion The apparently "free" maternity care at government hospitals involves substantial hidden and unpredicted costs. The anticipated fear of these unpredicted costs may be major factor for many poor households to seek cheaper alternate maternity healthcare.

  16. Costs of reusable and disposable aprons in a public teaching hospital

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    Paloma de Souza Cavalcante Pissinati

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To analyze the direct cost of reusable and disposable aprons in a public teaching hospital. Method Cross-sectional study of quantitative approach, focusing on the direct cost of reusable and disposable aprons at a teaching hospital in northern Paraná. The study population consisted of secondary data collected in reports of the cost of services, laundry, materials and supplies division of the institution for the year 2012 Results We identified a lower average cost of using disposable apron when compared to the reusable apron. The direct cost of reusable apron was R$ 3.06, and the steps of preparation and washing were mainly responsible for the high cost, and disposable apron cost was R$ 0.94. Conclusion The results presented are important for hospital managers properly allocate resources and manage costs in hospitals
.

  17. Race, Apology, and Public Memory at Maryland's Hospital for the 'Negro' Insane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zosha Stuckey

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available To respond to a recent demand of the ACLU of Maryland, and to augment theories from Disability Incarcerated (2014 about the convergence of race, disability, and due process (or lack thereof, this essay analyzes the extent to which racism informed the creation of Maryland's Hospital for the 'Negro' Insane (Crownsville Hospital. In order to understand the extent of racism in Crownsville's earlier years, I will take into account 14 categories within conditions of confinement from 1921-1928 and compare them to the nearby, white asylum. Ultimately, the hospital joins the ranks of separate and unequal (Plessy vs. Ferguson institutions founded alongside a rhetoric of fear that the Baltimore Sun daily paper deemed "a Black invasion" of the city of Baltimore. Even more, I add to public memory of this racialized space invoking the rhetorical frame, as Kendall Phillips advises, of responsibility and apology (versus absolution within the context of present-day racial justice movements.

  18. Evaluation of the risk of misidentification of women in a public maternity hospital

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    Terezinha Hideco Tase

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To determine the frequency of similar names and hospital records of women in a public teaching maternity hospital and the risk of misidentification resulting from the similarity in spelling and pronunciation of the names and in records. Method: Quantitative, documental and case study of 5,975 admissions that occurred between 2011 and 2014. The data name, admission and discharge date, date of birth, hospital record and bed number were collected from an electronic information system. Analysis encompassed descriptive statistics and design of an algorithm for comparison of text and sound. Results: Examination of the names revealed that 86% of the misidentification cases resulted from identical surnames and 96.5% from a sound similarity in the first names. There were patients with identical first and last names at least one day a week. Conclusion: The risk of misidentification of patients is a reality, which stresses the importance of checking and pronouncing the complete names correctly.

  19. Assessing Accrual Accounting Reform in Greek Public Hospitals: An Empirical Investigation

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    Dimitrios Vasiliou

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available During the last decades, several countries worldwide have introduced financial management reforms, as an important part of the New Public Management (NPM initiative at one or more levels of government sector, by either replacing or transforming their traditional budgetary cash accounting systems towards a business-like accrual accounting concept. Following the example of this upcoming managerial trend, the Greek government introduced in 2003 the accrual basis accounting into public hospitals, as the hospital sector is one of the areas where NPM reforms have been introduced in search of higher efficiency, effectiveness and economy in service production.The purpose of this paper is twofold. The first goal is to provide an overview of the government sector reform initiatives in Greece and to present empirical evidence regarding the adoption level of the accrual basis accounting standards in the Greek public Health sector. The second goal of the research is to investigate the impact of a range of potentially contingent factors on hospitals compliance with the accrual financial and cost accounting reform.The present analysis is based on the results of an empirical survey that took place during 2009. For the purposes of this survey, a structured questionnaire was prepared and sent to the Chief Financial Officers (CFOs of 132 Greek public hospitals. In particular, alinear regression model analysis was used to examine the cross-sectional differences on a number of explanatory and implementation factors of the accounting reform adoption level.The empirical evidence reveals that the level of accrual and especially cost accounting adoption in Greek public hospitals is realized only to a limited extent. In particular, results show that the level of reform adoption is positively related to IT quality, reform related training, education level of accounting staff, and professional consultants’ support. However, no significant relationship was found between

  20. [Validation of a scale to assess the labour quality of life in public hospitals from Tlaxcala].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Vicente, Irma Alejandra; Lumbreras-Guzmán, Marivel; Méndez-Hernández, Pablo; Rojas-Lima, Elodia; Cervantes-Rodríguez, Margarita; Juárez-Flores, Clara Arlina

    2017-01-01

    To validate a scale for assessing the labour quality of life in public hospitals (LQL-PH) from Tlaxcala, Mexico. The instrument was validated among 669 health workers from six hospitals from the Ministry of Health of Tlaxcala, Mexico. Content validity was by inquiry to experts, construct validity by factor analysis, criterion validity by comparing with other scales, and reliability with Cronbach's Alpha. The factor analysis uncovered four dimensions: "individual welfare", "conditions and labour environment", "organization", and "well-being accomplished by the work"; reliability was 0.921. Workers who perceibed better LQL-PH were: under 50 years old, with temporary contract, with less seniority in job, with work schedule at daytime of weekends, and those with academic degree. LQL-PH showed to be an instrument phsycometrically valid and reliable. It's recommendable to prove this scale in other public and private health institutions, as well as its relationship with key health care indicators of labour performance and management.

  1. [Caring for illegal immigrants within the public hospital: the need for an urgent solution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meltzer, Eyal; Elkayam, Ori

    2003-06-01

    There are a quarter of a million or more foreign laborers that work in Israel. Most of these foreign laborers lack a work permit and medical insurance. Hence, this population has low access to ambulatory medical care, with obvious consequences. When being treated in the public hospital, these illegal immigrants and the doctors caring for them face many problems, both practical and ethical. We review a number of cases illustrating some of these problems, and the danger they present to the work ethics and integrity of the public medical facility.

  2. Technical and scale efficiency of public community hospitals in Eritrea: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirigia, Joses M; Asbu, Eyob Z

    2013-03-16

    Eritrean gross national income of Int$610 per capita is lower than the average for Africa (Int$1620) and considerably lower than the global average (Int$6977). It is therefore imperative that the country's resources, including those specifically allocated to the health sector, are put to optimal use. The objectives of this study were (a) to estimate the relative technical and scale efficiency of public secondary level community hospitals in Eritrea, based on data generated in 2007, (b) to estimate the magnitudes of output increases and/or input reductions that would have been required to make relatively inefficient hospitals more efficient, and (c) to estimate using Tobit regression analysis the impact of institutional and contextual/environmental variables on hospital inefficiencies. A two-stage Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) method is used to estimate efficiency of hospitals and to explain the inefficiencies. In the first stage, the efficient frontier and the hospital-level efficiency scores are first estimated using DEA. In the second stage, the estimated DEA efficiency scores are regressed on some institutional and contextual/environmental variables using a Tobit model. In 2007 there were a total of 20 secondary public community hospitals in Eritrea, nineteen of which generated data that could be included in the study. The input and output data were obtained from the Ministry of Health (MOH) annual health service activity report of 2007. Since our study employs data that are five years old, the results are not meant to uncritically inform current decision-making processes, but rather to illustrate the potential value of such efficiency analyses. The key findings were as follows: (i) the average constant returns to scale technical efficiency score was 90.3%; (ii) the average variable returns to scale technical efficiency score was 96.9%; and (iii) the average scale efficiency score was 93.3%. In 2007, the inefficient hospitals could have become more efficient

  3. Cost analysis for efficient management: diabetes treatment at a public district hospital in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riewpaiboon, Arthorn; Chatterjee, Susmita; Piyauthakit, Piyanuch

    2011-10-01

    OBJECTIVE  The study estimated cost of illness from the provider's perspective for diabetic patients who received treatment during the fiscal year 2008 at Waritchaphum Hospital, a 30-bed public district hospital in Sakhon Nakhon province in northeastern Thailand. METHODS  This retrospective, prevalence-based cost-of-illness study looked at 475 randomly selected diabetic patients, identified by the World Health Organization's International Classification of Diseases, 10th revision, codes E10-E14. Data were collected from the hospital financial records and medical records of each participant and were analysed with a stepwise multiple regression. KEY FINDINGS  The study found that the average public treatment cost per patient per year was US$94.71 at 2008 prices. Drug cost was the highest cost component (25% of total cost), followed by inpatient cost (24%) and outpatient visit cost (17%). A cost forecasting model showed that length of stay, hospitalization, visits to the provincial hospital, duration of disease and presence of diabetic complications (e.g. diabetic foot complications and nephropathy) were the significant predictor variables (adjusted R(2) = 0.689). CONCLUSIONS  According to the fitted model, avoiding nephropathy and foot complications would save US$19 386 and US$39 134 respectively per year. However, these savings are missed savings for the study year and the study hospital only and not projected savings, as that would depend on the number of diabetic patients managed in the year, the ratio of complicated to non-complicated cases and effectiveness of the prevention programmes. Nonetheless, given the high avoidable cost associated with complications of diabetes, healthcare providers in Thailand should focus on initiatives that delay the progression of complications in diabetic patients. © 2011 The Authors. IJPP © 2011 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  4. Technical efficiency of public district hospitals and health centres in Ghana: a pilot study

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    Kirigia Joses M

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Government of Ghana has been implementing various health sector reforms (e.g. user fees in public health facilities, decentralization, sector-wide approaches to donor coordination in a bid to improve efficiency in health care. However, to date, except for the pilot study reported in this paper, no attempt has been made to make an estimate of the efficiency of hospitals and/or health centres in Ghana. The objectives of this study, based on data collected in 2000, were: (i to estimate the relative technical efficiency (TE and scale efficiency (SE of a sample of public hospitals and health centres in Ghana; and (ii to demonstrate policy implications for health sector policy-makers. Methods The Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA approach was used to estimate the efficiency of 17 district hospitals and 17 health centres. This was an exploratory study. Results Eight (47% hospitals were technically inefficient, with an average TE score of 61% and a standard deviation (STD of 12%. Ten (59% hospitals were scale inefficient, manifesting an average SE of 81% (STD = 25%. Out of the 17 health centres, 3 (18% were technically inefficient, with a mean TE score of 49% (STD = 27%. Eight health centres (47% were scale inefficient, with an average SE score of 84% (STD = 16%. Conclusion This pilot study demonstrated to policy-makers the versatility of DEA in measuring inefficiencies among individual facilities and inputs. There is a need for the Planning and Budgeting Unit of the Ghana Health Services to continually monitor the productivity growth, allocative efficiency and technical efficiency of all its health facilities (hospitals and health centres in the course of the implementation of health sector reforms.

  5. Factors associated with cesarean sections in a public hospital in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    d'Orsi,Eleonora; Chor, Dora; Giffin,Karen; Angulo-Tuesta, Antonia; Barbosa,Gisele Peixoto; Gama, Andréa de Sousa; Reis,Ana Cristina

    2006-01-01

    Brazil has one of the world's highest cesarean section rates. Contributing factors include the organization of obstetric practice, physicians' attitudes, and women's preferences and decisions. This study aimed to identify factors associated with cesarean sections in a public maternity hospital in Rio de Janeiro. A case-control study was conducted with 231 cesarean sections (cases) and 230 vaginal deliveries (controls). Hierarchical logistic regression analysis was performed, based on a concep...

  6. National injury-related hospitalizations in children: public versus private expenditures across preventable injury mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressley, Joyce C; Trieu, Lisa; Kendig, Tiffany; Barlow, Barbara

    2007-09-01

    Examination of expenditures in areas where more universal application of effective injury prevention approaches is indicated could identify specific mechanisms and age groups where effective intervention may impact public injury-related expenditures. The Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project 2003 (KID-HCUP) contains acute care hospitalization data for U.S. children and adolescents residing in 36 states. The study population includes 240,248 unweighted (397,943 weighted) injury-related hospital discharges for ages 0 to 19 years. Injury severity was assessed using ICDMAP-90 and International Classification of Injury Severity Scores (ICISS). SUDAAN was employed to adjust variances for stratified sampling. Expenditures were weighted to represent the U.S. population. Injury-related hospitalizations (mean $28,137 +/- 64,420, median $10,808) were more costly than non-injury discharges, accounting for approximately 10% of all persons hospitalized (unweighted), but more than one-fifth of expenditures. Public sources were the primary payor for 37.7% of injured persons. Incidence and cost per case variations across specific injury mechanisms heavily influenced total mechanism specific expenditures. Motor vehicle crashes were the largest expenditures for private and public payors with two thirds of expenditures in teenagers - more than 40% for drivers. Medicaid covered 45.6% ($192 million) of burn expenditures and 59.2% in 0-4 year olds. Expenditures per case (mean +/- SD, median) were: firearm ($36,196 +/- 58,052, $19,020), motor vehicle driver ($33,731 +/- 50,583, $18,431), pedestrian ($31,414 +/- 57,103, $16,552); burns ($29,242 +/- 64,271, $10,739); falls ($13,069 +/- 20,225, $8,610); and poisoning ($8,290 +/- $15,462, $5,208). More universal application of proven injury prevention has the potential to decrease both the public and private health expenditure burden among several modifiable injury mechanisms.

  7. Implementation of a trauma registry in a brazilian public hospital: the first 1,000 patients

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    Paulo Roberto Lima Carreiro

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Show the steps of a Trauma Registry (TR implementation in a Brazilian public hospital and evaluate the initial data from the database.METHODS: Descriptive study of the a TR implementation in João XXIII Hospital (Hospital Foundation of the state of Minas Gerais and analysis of the initial results of the first 1,000 patients.RESULTS: The project was initiated in 2011 and from January 2013 we began collecting data for the TR. In January 2014 the registration of the first 1000 patients was completed. The greatest difficulties in the TR implementation were obtaining funds to finance the project and the lack of information within the medical records. The variables with the lowest completion percentage on the physiological conditions were: pulse, blood pressure, respiratory rate and Glasgow coma scale. Consequently, the Revised Trauma Score (RTS could be calculated in only 31% of cases and the TRISS methodology applied to 30.3% of patients. The main epidemiological characteristics showed a predominance of young male victims (84.7% and the importance of aggression as a cause of injuries in our environment (47.5%, surpassing traffic accidents. The average length of stay was 6 days, and mortality 13.7%.CONCLUSION: Trauma registries are invaluable tools in improving the care of trauma victims. It is necessary to improve the quality of data recorded in medical records. The involvement of public authorities is critical for the successful implementation and maintenance of trauma registries in Brazilian hospitals.

  8. Implementation of a trauma registry in a Brazilian public hospital: the first 1,000 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreiro, Paulo Roberto Lima; Drumond, Domingos André Fernandes; Starling, Sizenando Vieira; Moritz, Mônica; Ladeira, Roberto Marini

    2014-01-01

    Show the steps of a Trauma Registry (TR) implementation in a Brazilian public hospital and evaluate the initial data from the database. Descriptive study of the a TR implementation in João XXIII Hospital (Hospital Foundation of the state of Minas Gerais) and analysis of the initial results of the first 1,000 patients. The project was initiated in 2011 and from January 2013 we began collecting data for the TR. In January 2014 the registration of the first 1000 patients was completed. The greatest difficulties in the TR implementation were obtaining funds to finance the project and the lack of information within the medical records. The variables with the lowest completion percentage on the physiological conditions were: pulse, blood pressure, respiratory rate and Glasgow coma scale. Consequently, the Revised Trauma Score (RTS) could be calculated in only 31% of cases and the TRISS methodology applied to 30.3% of patients. The main epidemiological characteristics showed a predominance of young male victims (84.7%) and the importance of aggression as a cause of injuries in our environment (47.5%), surpassing traffic accidents. The average length of stay was 6 days, and mortality 13.7%. Trauma registries are invaluable tools in improving the care of trauma victims. It is necessary to improve the quality of data recorded in medical records. The involvement of public authorities is critical for the successful implementation and maintenance of trauma registries in Brazilian hospitals.

  9. The fall and rise of TQM at a public mental health hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowanec, G D

    1996-01-01

    Public mental health care is undergoing a period of fundamental change as it attempts to adapt to an environment characterized by increasing fiscal constraints, the need to demonstrate effectiveness of services, and consumer empowerment. Total quality management (TQM) provides a framework that enables mental health care to meet these demands. The author provides his perspective on a public, multipurpose psychiatric hospital's (Georgia Regional Hospital at Augusta) experience in making the transition from quality assurance to TQM. Successful implementation of TQM rests on clinical staff's viewing TQM as a useful mechanism for achieving agreed-on patient/customer goals. Staff cannot simply do what they have been doing, but now do it better; there needs to be an understanding of what "better" means. TQM'S INTRODUCTION AND REINTRODUCTION: When first introduced in 1992, TQM was viewed by staff as the latest variant of quality assurance--and was therefore unsuccessful. When reintroduced in 1993, TQM contributed to the development of a psychosocial rehabilitation program. The staff's active involvement in establishing patient-specific goals was critical to the program's success. The hospital's Performance Improvement Committee has spearheaded the monitoring of treatment programs and the development of critical paths. In developing critical paths, the treatment team sets goals for patients' improvement both within the hospital and postdischarge and for treatment processes. The keys to a successful TQM program are effective leadership, a clear organizational mission, customer-oriented performance goals, staff empowerment, and the application of the scientific method to the workings of the organization.

  10. A Public-Private Partnership Improves Clinical Performance In A Hospital Network In Lesotho.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Nathalie; Grabowski, Aria; Jack, Brian; Nkabane-Nkholongo, Elizabeth Limakatso; Vian, Taryn

    2015-06-01

    Health care public-private partnerships (PPPs) between a government and the private sector are based on a business model that aims to leverage private-sector expertise to improve clinical performance in hospitals and other health facilities. Although the financial implications of such partnerships have been analyzed, few studies have examined the partnerships' impact on clinical performance outcomes. Using quantitative measures that reflected capacity, utilization, clinical quality, and patient outcomes, we compared a government-managed hospital network in Lesotho, Africa, and the new PPP-managed hospital network that replaced it. In addition, we used key informant interviews to help explain differences in performance. We found that the PPP-managed network delivered more and higher-quality services and achieved significant gains in clinical outcomes, compared to the government-managed network. We conclude that health care public-private partnerships may improve hospital performance in developing countries and that changes in management and leadership practices might account for differences in clinical outcomes. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  11. Hospital volunteerism as human resource solution: Motivation for both volunteers and the public health sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guinevere M. Lourens

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A volunteer programme with 50 registered volunteers was established in 2007 at a secondary-level public, semi-rural regional hospital in the Cape Winelands, South Africa. This was a rapid response to the extensive renovations and system changes brought about by the hospital revitalisation initiated in 2006 and the resultant expanded services, which required additional human resources. This study describes the hospital volunteer programme and provides hospital administrators with practical planning guidance for hospital volunteer programme implementation.Purpose: The purpose of this study is to (1 describe the outcomes of the hospital volunteer programme implementation intervention and (2 to make sound recommendations for volunteer programme implementation.Methodology and approach: A qualitative case-study methodology was employed using purposive sampling as a technique. Participants were recruited from a public hospital in the Western Cape. A case-study design was applied to explore the hospital volunteer programme implementation. In-depth interviews and a focus group discussion with thematic content analysis of transcripts as well as document reviews were conducted to conclude the study during 2015. The key participants were individually interviewed and included two members of the hospital management, two volunteers and one volunteer coordinator. A focus group discussion consisting of three volunteers was also conducted.Findings: The findings of this study indicate that a volunteer programme can meet needs and be a motivational force for both the individual volunteer and the organisation. However, it requires co-ordination and some secure funding to remain sustainable. Such a programme holds huge benefits in terms of human resource supplementation, organisational development, as well as the possibility of gainful employment for the previously unemployed.Practical implications: In practice, a health service contemplating a volunteer

  12. Public and private hospital nurses' perceptions of the ethical climate in their work settings, sari city, 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbani, Ali Asghar; Hesamzadeh, Ali; Khademloo, Mohammad; Khalili, Salimeh; Hesamzadeh, Shamim; Berger, Valerie

    2014-04-01

    Nurses' perceptions of ethical climate patterns have certain undeniable effects on hospitals. There is little evidence of possible differences in this element between public and private hospitals and contributing factors. This study investigated whether the perceptions of the ethical climate in nurses' working in public hospitals differ from that of nurses in private hospitals, and which factors may affect nurses' perceptions. A cross-sectional study of randomly selected registered nurses (n = 235), working in four public hospitals affiliated to Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, and three private hospitals, was conducted in Sari City, Iran. A self-administered questionnaire, containing demographic characteristics and the Hospital Ethical Climate Survey (HECS), were used to assess registered nurses' perceptions of public and private hospitals ethical climate. An independent t-test and one-way ANOVA were used to analyze the data. Across the five factors of HECS, the highest and lowest mean scores pertained to managers and physicians, respectively, in both public and private hospitals. Nurses who had a conditional employment situation and those working in pediatric intensive care units showed significantly more positive perceptions of the ethical work climate when compared to their peers (P work climate in private hospitals (3.82 ± 0.61) was higher than that in public hospitals (3.76 ± 0.54), no significant difference was found (P = 0.44). Hospital managers need to discover better ways to promote safety and health programs for their staff according to nurses' area of work and their type of units. They should also encourage greater levels of participation in safety-enhancing initiatives in the hospital's ethical climate, especially in the areas of nurses' perceptions of their physician colleagues, and for nurses with a conditional employment situation.

  13. Identifying the barriers to affirmative action training: Perceptions of affirmative action appointees in Mpumalanga public hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Rankhumise

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Since the advent of democracy in 1994 numerous policies and programmes were put in place to address the imbalances of race and gender in the South African labour force.Research purpose: The aim of this study is to gauge the perceptions about existing barriers in the implementation of affirmative action (AA training interventions at public hospitals in the Mpumalanga Province.Motivations for the study: The research conducted in this study provides valuable information which would enable the Mpumalanga health department and public hospital management to develop improved interventions associated with AA training interventions.Research design, approach and method: The population of the study consists of two groups of participants which are AA appointees and AA mentors. The study mixed qualitative and quantitative research methodological processes.Main findings: Results of this study show that there are differences in perceptions between Black respondents who believe that mentors should be held liable for the failure of the mentees and White respondents who disagreed. The findings suggest that employees are of the opinion that internal policy guidelines on the implementation of AA are not communicated to all employees.Practical implications: Public hospital management should articulate the purpose of AA interventions and its targets to both mentors and mentees and continuously review the implementation thereof.Contribution: The study contributes towards explaining the importance of training interventions that are useful for the success of AA appointees in their respective duties and also give account of barriers that are experienced by these appointees.

  14. Profile of Patients Presenting for Cataract Surgery in a Public Hospital: A 15 Year Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Adir; Belkin, Avner; Ofir, Shay; Assia, Ehud

    2017-02-01

    In recent decades cataract surgery has shifted slowly from public hospitals to ambulatory surgery centers, demonstrating changes in the profile of patients presenting to public hospitals for cataract surgery. These changes may potentially affect the complexity of surgeries, their volume, resident training, and perhaps also visual outcomes and patient satisfaction. To assess the changes in the medical and demographic characteristics of patients undergoing cataract surgery in a public hospital over a period of 15 years. We retrospectively reviewed the records of patients undergoing preoperative assessment before cataract surgery. Records for the period October 2000 to January 2001 (100 patients), October 2006 to January 2007 (100 patients), and October 2013 to January 2014 (150 patients) were assessed for demographic, systemic and ocular related parameters. There was a significant increase in the average age of patients (70.4, 72.4, 73.9 years, P = 0.026), with a significant increase in the percentage of patients of Arab ethnicity (17%, 11%, 28.7%, P = 0.002), and concomitant systemic co-morbidities (38%, 46%, 64.7%, P cataract (38%, 34.4%, 56.9%, P = 0.001), and a significant increase in the percentage of patients taking alpha-blocking medications (0%, 8%, 10.7 %, P = 0.004). Patients presenting for cataract surgery in 2013 compared to those in earlier periods are older, sicker and have more ocular conditions potentially affecting cataract surgery outcomes, patient satisfaction and residents' training.

  15. CAVE MEN: STONE TOOLS, VICTORIAN SCIENCE, AND THE 'PRIMITIVE MIND' OF DEEP TIME

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Paul B. Pettitt; Mark J. White

    2011-01-01

    ... 1880s authors had constructed a basic paradigm of what 'primitive' human life was like. Here we examine the development of Victorian palaeoanthropology for what it reveals of the development of notions of cognitive evolution...

  16. Sympathetic science: Charles Darwin, Joseph Hooker, and the passions of Victorian naturalists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endersby, Jim

    2009-01-01

    This essay examines the complex tangle of emotional and scientific attachments that linked Darwin and botanist Joseph Dalton Hooker. Analyzing their roles as husbands, fathers, and novel readers demonstrates that possessing and expressing sympathy was as important for Victorian naturalists as it was for Victorian husbands. Sympathy was a scientific skill that Victorian naturalists regarded as necessary to fully understand the living world; although sympathy became increasingly gendered as feminine over the course of the century, its importance to male naturalists requires us to rethink the ways gender roles were negotiated in Victorian Britain. Botany was, for men like Darwin and Hooker, an acceptably masculine pursuit that nevertheless allowed--and even required--them to be sensitive and sympathetic.

  17. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN MARKETING MIX AND PATIENT LOYALTY IN INTENSIVE CARE UNIT, ANUTAPURA PUBLIC HOSPITAL PALU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muh. Ryman Napirah

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The problem generally faced by hospital is unable to provide something really needed by the customers. One of the main factors is the poor marketing mix of hospital that impacts to low quality and influences the patients loyality. Objective: The research aims to investigate the relationship between marketing mix and patient loyalty in intensive care unit at Anutapura Public Hospital Palu. Methods: This was a cross sectional study involving 97 persons who were randomly selected without considering the level of population. The data were analyzed thought univariat and bivariat on the significance level 95% (p<0,05. The marketing mix concept of 7P (product, price, place, promotion, people, process, dan physical evidence. Was used to guide this study. Results: The result of chi-square test indicated that there was a relationship of marketing mix product (p= 0,01, price (p= 0,00, promotion (p= 0,04, people (p= 0,00; and no relationship of marketing mix place (p= 0,21, process (p= 1,00, dan physical evidence (p= 1,00 with patient loyalty. Conclusion: It is expected tht the hospital of Anutapura Palu could increase the strategy of marketing mix for the sake of keeping the patients loyalty as the profit value of the hospital, especially for marketing place, process, and physical evidence.

  18. The productivity and its barriers in public hospitals: case study of Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabilou, Bahram; Yusefzadeh, Hassan; Rezapour, Aziz; Ebadi Fard Azar, Farbod; Salem Safi, Parviz; Sarabi Asiabar, Ali; Ahmadzadeh, Nahal

    2016-01-01

    Background: Due to the increasing health care costs, the issue of productivity in hospitals must be taken into great consideration in order to provide, preserve and promote public health services. Thus, increasing the level of productivity must become the main aim of any hospital. Objective of this study is to determine the total factor productivity and its components over the period under the study. Methods: In this cross sectional study, total factor productivity changes of hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences were measured according to Malmquist index over the period 2009-2014. To estimate total productivity changes using Data Envelopment Analysis method, inputoriented and variable return to scale assumptions were applied and Deap2.1 software was used. Results: The mean value of total productivity changes was 1.013. It means that during the study period the productivity experienced a 1.3% decrease. Technological efficiency changes have the greatest influence on productivity decrease than the other factors. Scale efficiency, managerial efficiency and technical efficiency changes were ranked. Conclusion: Lack of knowledge of hospital personnel on proper application of technology in patient treatment is the main factor leading to productivity decrease resulting from technological changes in the studied hospitals. Therefore, holding courses for personnel in order to teach them the proper use of technology in diagnosis and patient care can be helpful. PMID:27390686

  19. The productivity and its barriers in public hospitals: case study of ran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabilou, Bahram; Yusefzadeh, Hassan; Rezapour, Aziz; Ebadi Fard Azar, Farbod; Salem Safi, Parviz; Sarabi Asiabar, Ali; Ahmadzadeh, Nahal

    2016-01-01

    Due to the increasing health care costs, the issue of productivity in hospitals must be taken into great consideration in order to provide, preserve and promote public health services. Thus, increasing the level of productivity must become the main aim of any hospital. Objective of this study is to determine the total factor productivity and its components over the period under the study. In this cross sectional study, total factor productivity changes of hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences were measured according to Malmquist index over the period 2009-2014. To estimate total productivity changes using Data Envelopment Analysis method, inputoriented and variable return to scale assumptions were applied and Deap2.1 software was used. The mean value of total productivity changes was 1.013. It means that during the study period the productivity experienced a 1.3% decrease. Technological efficiency changes have the greatest influence on productivity decrease than the other factors. Scale efficiency, managerial efficiency and technical efficiency changes were ranked. Lack of knowledge of hospital personnel on proper application of technology in patient treatment is the main factor leading to productivity decrease resulting from technological changes in the studied hospitals. Therefore, holding courses for personnel in order to teach them the proper use of technology in diagnosis and patient care can be helpful.

  20. A safety culture assessment by mixed methods at a public maternity and infant hospital in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Listyowardojo, Tita Alissa; Yan, Xiaoling; Leyshon, Stephen; Ray-Sannerud, Bobbie; Yu, Xin Yan; Zheng, Kai; Duan, Tao

    2017-01-01

    Objective To assess safety culture at a public maternity hospital in Shanghai, China, using a sequential mixed methods approach. The study was part of a bigger study looking at the application of the mixed methods approach to assess safety culture in health care in different organizations and countries. Methodology A mixed methods approach was utilized by first distributing the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire measuring six safety culture dimensions and five independent items to all hospital staff (n=1482) working in 18 departments at a single hospital. Afterward, semistructured interviews were conducted using convenience sampling, where 48 hospital staff from nine departments at the same hospital were individually interviewed. Results The survey received a response rate of 96%. The survey findings show significant differences between the hospital departments in almost all safety culture dimensions and independent items. Similarly, the interview findings revealed that there were different, competing priorities between departments perceived to result in a reduced quality of collaboration and bottlenecks in care delivery. Another major finding was that staff who worked more hours per week would perceive working conditions significantly more negatively. Issues related to working conditions were also the most common concerns discussed in the interviews, especially the issue on high workload. High workload was also reflected in the fact that 91.45% of survey respondents reported that they worked 40 hours or longer per week. Finally, interview findings complemented survey findings, thus providing a more complete and accurate picture of safety culture. Conclusion Hospital leaders need to prioritize interventions focused on improving the quality of cross-department collaboration and reducing workload. A mixed methods assessment of safety culture provides more meaningful, targeted results, enabling leaders to prioritize and tailor improvement efforts to increase the impact of

  1. [A guide to successful public relations for hospitals and emergency medical services].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ausserer, J; Schwamberger, J; Preloznik, R; Klimek, M; Paal, P; Wenzel, V

    2014-04-01

    Tragic accidents, e.g. involving celebrity patients or severe incidents in hospital occur suddenly without any advance warning, often produce substantial interest by the media and quickly overburden management personnel involved in both hospitals and emergency medical services. While doctors, hospitals and emergency medical services desire objective media reports, the media promote emotionalized and dramatized reports to ensure maximum attention and circulation. When briefing the media, the scales may quickly tilt from professional, well-deliberated information to unfortunate, often unintended disinformation. Such phenomena may result in continuing exaggerated reports in the tabloid press, which in the presence of aggressive lawyers and a competitive hospital environment can turn into image and legal problems. In this article, several aspects are discussed in order to achieve successful public relations.Interviews should be given only after consultation with the responsible press officer and the director of the respective department or hospital director. Requests for information by the media should always be answered as otherwise one-sided, unintentional publications can result that are extremely difficult to correct later. One should be available to be contacted easily by journalists, regular press conferences should be held and critics should be taken seriously and not be brushed off. Questions by journalists should be answered in a timely manner as journalists are continuously under time pressure and do not understand unnecessary delays. Information for the media should always be provided at the same time, no publication should be given preference and an absolutely current list of E-mail contacts is required. When facing big events a press conference is preferred as many questions can be answered at once. Always be well prepared for an interview or even for just a statement. Each interview should be regarded as an opportunity to put a story forward which you

  2. Transactional versus transformational style of leadership--employee perception of leadership efficacy in public and private hospitals in Kuwait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mailam, Faten Fahad

    2004-01-01

    To determine whether employees working for a transformational leader perceive their leader as more effective than do those working for a transactional leader. To assess whether employees in private hospitals are more likely to perceive their leaders as transformational than are employees in public hospitals. A questionnaire study of a random sample of employees working at 4 hospitals (private and public) in Kuwait; 266 respondents included. Analysis of varience and regression analysis showed that the transformational style of leadership was linked to high level of employee perception of leadership efficacy. Also, the employees in private hospitals were more likely to perceive their leaders as transformational than were employees in public hospitals. Hospitals in Kuwait may benefit by recruiting leaders with a transformational style, as it is directly related to quality, employee satisfaction, increased productivity, and employee perception of leadership efficacy.

  3. [Home parenteral nutrition (HPN): feasibility of its implementation from a public hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabeiro, M; Dalieri, M; Martínez, M; Galarraga, M; Prozzi, M; Barcellandi, P; Hernández, J; Alberti, M J; Fernández, A

    2011-01-01

    The intensive care of patients at home had probed important beneficialness for the patient and the Health System. There are very few experiences of this kind of care from the Public Hospitals. To develop a social-sanitary analysis of the feasibility of the implementation of HPN on patients with short bowel syndrome (SBS) from a Public Hospital. Patients hospitalized between 1985-2009 were included. We analyzed: age, residual intestine length (RIL), time between de indication and the beginning of HPN, HPN duration, treatment modality and clinical outcome. Social determinants: home place, habitat conditions, employment conditions, educational level, social security and Low Socioeconomic Status (LSS). The group were divided in two: 1- patients with feasibility of HPN when it was prescribed; 2- patients without feasibility of HPN. 61 patients were included, RIL x: 21.7 ± 11.6 cm. The HPN was feasible (G1) in 32 patients (52.4%) and no feasible (G2) in 29 (47.6%). The home treatment modality was in self-caring 25 (81%) and with nurses support 7 (19 %). The social determinants associated with the HPN feasibility were: more than one takecare (p 0.03), educational level (p 0.01), adequate habitat conditions (p 0.02) and Low Socioeconomis Status (LSS) (p 0.07). 17 patients reached intestinal adaptation (28%), 6 (10%) were transplanted, 19 (31%) died and 19 (31%) are actually on HPN. The HPN realized from the Public Hospital is feasible. Different social determinants were observed. The care of this group of patients must be done by an interdisciplinary group including general aspects of the child and the family.

  4. Communication with the public in the health-care system: a descriptive study of the use of social media in Local Health Authorities and public hospitals in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Vanzetta

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION. In 2010 the Italian Ministry of Health set out recommendations for the use of social technology and Web 2.0, inviting organisations within the Italian national health service (Servizio Sanitario Nazionale, SSN to equip themselves with instruments. Objectives. 1. to ascertain how many local health authorities (Aziende Sanitarie Locali, ASL and public hospitals have a presence on the most widely used social media websites in Italy: Facebook, Twitter and YouTube; 2. to find out how well the Facebook, Twitter and YouTube pages of ASLs and public hospitals are known among the general population; 3. to find out how ASLs and public hospitals engage with the general public on social media sites. MATERIALS AND METHODS. The websites of all ASLs and public hospitals across the country were visited to look for the icons of the social media sites under examination. The data considered were publicly available upon access. RESULTS. A total of 245 websites were analysed. 7.34% ASLs and hospitals had social media accounts. 8 organisations had an account on all three of the social media sites considered in the study. CONCLUSIONS. The results show a low presence of ASLs and hospitals on social media. Other studies are needed in this field.

  5. Communication with the public in the health-care system: a descriptive study of the use of social media in local health authorities and public hospitals in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanzetta, Marina; Vellone, Ercole; Dal Molin, Alberto; Rocco, Gennaro; De Marinis, Maria Grazia; Rosaria, Alvaro

    2014-01-01

    In 2010 the Italian Ministry of Health set out recommendations for the use of social technology and Web 2.0, inviting organisations within the Italian national health service (Servizio Sanitario Nazionale, SSN) to equip themselves with instruments. 1. to ascertain how many local health authorities (Aziende Sanitarie Locali, ASL) and public hospitals have a presence on the most widely used social media websites in Italy: Facebook, Twitter and YouTube; 2. to find out how well the Facebook, Twitter and YouTube pages of ASLs and public hospitals are known among the general population; 3. to find out how ASLs and public hospitals engage with the general public on social media sites. The websites of all ASLs and public hospitals across the country were visited to look for the icons of the social media sites under examination. The data considered were publicly available upon access. A total of 245 websites were analysed. 7.34% ASLs and hospitals had social media accounts. 8 organisations had an account on all three of the social media sites considered in the study. The results show a low presence of ASLs and hospitals on social media. Other studies are needed in this field.

  6. Optimal administrative scale for planning public services: a social cost model applied to Flemish hospital care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, Jos L T; van Hulst, Bart

    2015-01-01

    In choosing the scale of public services, such as hospitals, both economic and public administrative considerations play important roles. The scale and the corresponding spatial distribution of public institutions have consequences for social costs, defined as the institutions' operating costs and the users' travel costs (which include the money and time costs). Insight into the relationship between scale and spatial distribution and social costs provides a practical guide for the best possible administrative planning level. This article presents a purely economic model that is suitable for deriving the optimal scale for public services. The model also reveals the corresponding optimal administrative planning level from an economic perspective. We applied this model to hospital care in Flanders for three different types of care. For its application, we examined the social costs of hospital services at different levels of administrative planning. The outcomes show that the social costs of rehabilitation in Flanders with planning at the urban level (38 areas) are 11% higher than those at the provincial level (five provinces). At the regional level (18 areas), the social costs of rehabilitation are virtually equal to those at the provincial level. For radiotherapy, there is a difference of 88% in the social costs between the urban and the provincial level. For general care, there are hardly any cost differences between the three administrative levels. Thus, purely from the perspective of social costs, rehabilitation should preferably be planned at the regional level, general services at the urban level and radiotherapy at the provincial level. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Motivation and Factors Affecting It among Health Professionals in the Public Hospitals, Central Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagne, Tesfaye; Beyene, Waju; Berhanu, Negalign

    2015-07-01

    Motivation is an individual's degree of willingness to exert and maintain an effort towards organizational goals. This study assessed motivational status and factors affecting it among health professionals in public hospitals of West Shoa Zone, Oromia Region. Facility based cross-sectional survey was employed. All health professionals who served at least for 6 months in Ambo, Gedo and Gindeberet hospitals were included. Self-administered Likert scale type questionnaire was used. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 20. Mean motivation calculated as percentage of maximum scale score was used. Bivariate and multiple linear regression analyses were done to see the independent effects of explanatory variables. The overall motivation level of health professionals was 63.63%. Motivation level of health professionals varied among the hospitals. Gindeberet Hospital had lower motivation score as compared to Ambo Hospital (B = -0.54 and 95% CI; -0.08,-0.27). The mean motivation score of health professionals who got monthly financial benefit was significantly higher than those who did not (B = 0.71 and 95% CI; 0.32, 1.10). Environmental factors had higher impact on doctors' motivation compared to nurses' (B = 0.51 and 95% CI; 0.10, 0.92). Supervisor-related factors highly varied in motivation relative to other variables. Motivation of health professionals was affected by factors related to supervisor, financial benefits, job content and hospital location. Efforts should be made to provide financial benefits to health professionals as appropriate especially, to those who did not get any such benefits. Officially recognizing best performance is also suggested.

  8. Factors affecting performance of public hospital nurses in Addis Ababa region, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negussie, Nebiat; Berehe, Costantinos

    2016-03-01

    Nurses have a major role to play in providing timely, quality health services in hospitals. It is important to identify factors influencing the performance of nurses to improve the quality of healthcare delivered in healthcare organizations. The objective of this study was to identify factors influencing job performance of nurses in public hospitals in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. A cross-sectional survey was conducted from June 2010 to December 2010 in five public hospitals in Addis Ababa. Among 658 nurses meeting the inclusion criteria, the estimated sample size of 290 nurses was selected using a simple random sampling technique. Data were collected using self-administered questionnaire. A total of 230 (80%) questionnaires were returned of the 290 questionnaires distributed to respondents. The results of the study indicated that nurses have rated the following as below average: job performance (mean=2.71, SD=0.48), job satisfaction (mean=2.55, SD=0.39), and organizational commitment (mean=2.45, SD=0.36). Organizational commitment (β=0.69, Pcareer development (β=0.39, Pfactors that contribute to job satisfaction and organizational commitments to improve nurses' job performance.

  9. Predictors of Women’s Satisfaction with Hospital-Based Intrapartum Care in Asmara Public Hospitals, Eritrea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meron Mehari Kifle

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Exploring patient satisfaction contributes to provide quality maternity care, but there is paucity of epidemiologic data in Eritrea. Objectives. To determine the predictors of women's satisfaction with intrapartum care in Asmara public maternity hospitals in Eritrea. Methods. A cross-sectional study among 771 mothers who gave birth in three public Hospitals. Chi-square tests were done to analyze the difference in proportion and logistic regression to assess the predictors of satisfaction with intrapartum care. Results. Overall, only 20.8% of the participants were satisfied with intrapartum service. The key predictors of satisfaction with intrapartum care were provision of clean bed and beddings (AOR = 18.87, 2.33–15.75, privacy during examinations (AOR = 10.22, 4.86–21.48, using understandable language (AOR = 8.72, 3.57–21.27, showing how to summon for help (AOR = 8.16, 4.30–15.48, showing baby immediately after birth (AOR = 8.14, 2.87–23.07, control of the delivery room (AOR = 6.86, 2.65–17.75, receiving back massage (AOR = 6.43, 3.23–12.81, toilet access and cleanliness (AOR = 6.09, 3.25–11.42, availability of chairs for relatives (AOR = 5.96, 3.14–11.30, allowing parents to stay during labour (AOR = 3.52, 1.299–9.56, and request for permission before any procedure (AOR = 2.39, 1.28–4.46. Conclusion. To increase satisfaction with intrapartum care, maternity service providers need to address the general maternity ward cleanliness, improve the quality of physical facilities, and sensitize health providers for better communication with clients. Policy makers need to adopt strategies that ensure more women involvement in decision making and consideration of privacy and reassurance needs during the whole delivery process.

  10. Assessing performance of Botswana's public hospital system: the use of the World Health Organization Health System Performance Assessment Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitio-Kgokgwe, Onalenna; Gauld, Robin Dc; Hill, Philip C; Barnett, Pauline

    2014-09-01

    Very few studies have assessed performance of Botswana public hospitals. We draw from a large research study assessing performance of the Botswana Ministry of Health (MoH) to evaluate the performance of public hospital system using the World Health Organization Health Systems Performance Assessment Framework (WHO HSPAF). We aimed to evaluate performance of Botswana public hospital system; relate findings of the assessment to the potential for improvements in hospital performance; and determine the usefulness of the WHO HSPAF in assessing performance of hospital systems in a developing country. This article is based on data collected from document analysis, 54 key informants comprising senior managers and staff of the MoH (N= 40) and senior officers from stakeholder organizations (N= 14), and surveys of 42 hospital managers and 389 health workers. Data from documents and transcripts were analyzed using content and thematic analysis while data analysis for surveys was descriptive determining proportions and percentages. The organizational structure of the Botswana's public hospital system, authority and decision-making are highly centralized. Overall physical access to health services is high. However, challenges in the distribution of facilities and inpatient beds create inequities and inefficiencies. Capacity of the hospitals to deliver services is limited by inadequate resources. There are significant challenges with the quality of care. While Botswana invested considerably in building hospitals around the country resulting in high physical access to services, the organization and governance of the hospital system, and inadequate resources limit service delivery. The ongoing efforts to decentralize management of hospitals to district level entities should be expedited. The WHO HSPAF enabled us to conduct a comprehensive assessment of the public hospital system. Though relatively new, this approach proved useful in this study.

  11. Assessing the roles of brokerage: an evaluation of a hospital-based Public Health epidemiologist program in North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevc, Christine A; Markiewicz, Milissa L; Hegle, Jennifer; Horney, Jennifer A; MacDonald, Pia D M

    2012-11-01

    The North Carolina Division of Public Health established an innovative program in 2003 that placed public health epidemiologists (PHEs) in hospitals around the state to improve communication between hospitals and local public health departments (LHDs) and bolster public health surveillance and response. To use social network analysis to assess how the hospital-based PHE program in North Carolina facilitates the exchange of public health surveillance information. Using a Gould-Fernandez brokerage analysis, this study examines communication among organizational actors and their dependence on third parties to broker information and knowledge. Survey and interview data were collected to identify the interorganizational network among 220 organizational actors and their public health surveillance-related activities, including 11 PHEs, 100 county-level offices of North Carolina's 85 LHDs, and 109 hospitals. Social network analysis is used to calculate the frequency with which an actor serves as an intermediary in each of the 5 brokerage roles as well as total brokerage equal to the sum of the number of times an actor occupies each role. Results identify a frequent tendency for PHEs to serve as an intermediary between LHDs and hospitals. Interactions between these entities are frequently facilitated by PHEs, with a high measure of degree centrality by LHDs and a low frequency of brokerage among hospitals. Results validate PHEs' mission to enhance communication between LHDs and hospitals around communicable disease surveillance, reporting, and management.

  12. Technical and organisational aspects in enterprise resource planning systems implementation: lessons from a Spanish public hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar-Rodriguez, Tomas; Escobar-Pérez, Bernabe; Monge-Lozano, Pedro

    2014-09-01

    Public resources should always be managed efficiently, more so in times of crisis. Due to the specific characteristics of the healthcare sector, there is a need for special attention, especially in regards to hospitals. Administrators need useful tools to be able to efficiently manage available resources, such as enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems. Therefore, an analysis of the effects of their implementation and use in hospitals is valuable. This study has two purposes. One is to analyse the role ERP systems play in aiding the integration of hospital data, with focus on user satisfaction as well as possible resistance to change. The other purpose is to analyse the effects of implanting and using ERP systems in the hospital environment and identifying how certain variables influence the process, especially the existence of different organisational cultures. Results indicate that clinical information has become notably more integrated, despite the lack of flow in the economic-financial area. The heterogeneous nature of the different groups, clinical (Medical, Nursing) and non-clinical (Economic-Financial, Accounting), had a negative influence on the implementation process, and limited the integration of information as well as the system's performance.

  13. System-level factors affecting clinicians' perceptions and use of interpreter services in California public hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baurer, Danielle; Yonek, Julie C; Cohen, Alan B; Restuccia, Joseph D; Hasnain-Wynia, Romana

    2014-04-01

    Professional language interpreters are skilled in the nuances of interpretation and are less likely to make errors of clinical significance but clinicians infrequently use them. We examine system-level factors that may shape clinicians' perceptions and use of professional interpreters. Exploratory qualitative study in 12 California public hospitals. We conducted in-person key informant interviews with hospital leadership, clinical staff, and administrative staff. Five emergent themes highlight system-level factors that may influence clinicians' perceptions and use of professional interpreters in hospitals: (1) organization-wide commitment to improving language access for LEP patients; (2) organizational investment in remote interpreter technologies to increase language access; (3)training clinicians on how to access and work with interpreters; (4) hospital supports the training and certification of bilingual staff to serve as interpreters to expand in-person, on-site, interpreter capacity; and (5)organizational investment in readily accessible telephonic interpretation. Multiple system-level factors underlie clinicians' use of professional interpreters. Interventions that target these factors could improve language services for patients with limited English proficiency.

  14. [Empirical analysis of relationship between scales and outputs of inpatient services of public comprehensive hospitals in Beijing area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Wei-yan; Tang, Shu-nv; Hu, Mu

    2011-06-18

    To analyze the relationship between scale and outputs of inpatient services of public general hospitals. Data on hospital scales and outputs were drawn from Beijing Health Statistics Annuals and the Database of Inpatient Record administered by Beijing Health Bureau. The outputs of inpatient services were measured, risk-adjusted by Beijing Diagnosis Related Groups (BJ-DRGs). Based on the Cobb-Douglas production function, regression analysis was used to evaluate the contribution of manpower and material resources to the changes in outputs of hospitals on different scales, respectively. Public general hospitals with 200-800 beds were at the stage of economical scale. In the 200-500-bed hospitals, investment of both human and material resources contributed to output changes. In the 501-800-bed hospitals, output changes were positively correlated with manpower input, but not with material resources. In the specific environment in Beijing, medium-sized hospitals are appropriate when the government plan to build hospitals mainly focused on inpatient services. The larger the scale of hospitals is, the more important is the manpower imput. The personnel system reform for public hospitals is urgent.

  15. Health-related behaviour among managers of Slovenian hospitals and institutes of public health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerneja Farkas

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Behavioural risk factors have a significant impact on health. We aimed to assess health-related behaviour, health status, and use of healthcare services among managers of Slovenian hospitals and institutes of public health. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study which included management (directors, scientific directors, directors’ deputies of Slovenian hospitals and institutes of public health (63 respondents; 57% women; overall mean age: 51±7 years; response rate: 74%. Data were obtained using an anonymous self-administered questionnaire. Results: About 35% of respondents were directors. More than half of the respondents were overweight or obese (52%, the majority were not sufficiently physically active (59% and overloaded with stress (87%. Hypercholesterolemia (36%, spinal disease (17%, and arterial hypertension (16% were most common chronic diseases. Whilst only few participants visited their general practitioner due their health complaints, blood pressure (76%, cholesterol (51%, and glucose (54% were measured within last year in most of the respondents. Conclusion: Our findings point to a high prevalence of overweight and obesity as well as workplace-related stress among Slovenian public health managers. Therefore, effective preventive strategies should be focused on stress management along with promotion of healthy behavioural patterns.

  16. Comparing Some Production Functions for Inpatient Health Services in Selected Public Hospitals in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antelo, Manel; Reyes-Santiás, Francisco; Cadarso-Suárez, Carmen; Rodríguez-Álvarez, María Xosé

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the adequacy of the widely used Cobb-Douglas and transcendental logarithmic (translog) models of the production functions of hospital inpatient services, the authors fitted these and additive models to data for the four most productive health services of 10 public hospitals in Galicia, Spain (the same four in each). Production, measured as admissions weighted in accordance with their diagnosis-related groups (DRGs), was treated as a function of physician full-time equivalents as surrogate labor factor and number of beds as surrogate capital factor. The results suggest that while the Cobb-Douglas and translog models suffice to represent the production functions of services with low average DRG weight, the greater flexibility of additive models is required for services with higher average DRG weight when only these two inputs are considered.

  17. Impact of cultural factors on attitude toward using ERP systems in public hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomás Escobar-Rodríguez

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The main problems that arise in adopting most enterprise resources planning (ERP strategies come from organizational, rather than technical, issues, for example, social and cultural barriers, and user resistance. This paper analyzes the impact of cultural factors on user attitudes toward ERP use in public hospitals and identifying influencing factors. The theoretical grounding for this research is the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM. The proposed model has six constructs (“resistance to be controlled”, “resistance to change”, “perceived risks”, “perceived usefulness”, “perceived ease of use”, and “attitude toward using”, and nine hypotheses have been generated from the connections between these six constructs. Results suggest important practical implications for attitude toward using ERP and to develop an understanding about how to improve this attitude in hospitals.

  18. A safety culture assessment by mixed methods at a public maternity and infant hospital in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Listyowardojo TA

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Tita Alissa Listyowardojo,1 Xiaoling Yan,2,3 Stephen Leyshon,1 Bobbie Ray-Sannerud,1 Xin Yan Yu,4 Kai Zheng,4 Tao Duan2,3 1Life Sciences Program, Group Technology and Research, DNV GL, Hovik, Norway; 2Quality and Safety Department, Shanghai First Maternity and Infant Hospital, 3Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai, 4Healthcare Department, Business Assurance, DNV GL, Beijing, China Objective: To assess safety culture at a public maternity hospital in Shanghai, China, using a sequential mixed methods approach. The study was part of a bigger study looking at the application of the mixed methods approach to assess safety culture in health care in different organizations and countries.Methodology: A mixed methods approach was utilized by first distributing the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire measuring six safety culture dimensions and five independent items to all hospital staff (n=1482 working in 18 departments at a single hospital. Afterward, semistructured interviews were conducted using convenience sampling, where 48 hospital staff from nine departments at the same hospital were individually interviewed.Results: The survey received a response rate of 96%. The survey findings show significant differences between the hospital departments in almost all safety culture dimensions and independent items. Similarly, the interview findings revealed that there were different, competing priorities between departments perceived to result in a reduced quality of collaboration and bottlenecks in care delivery. Another major finding was that staff who worked more hours per week would perceive working conditions significantly more negatively. Issues related to working conditions were also the most common concerns discussed in the interviews, especially the issue on high workload. High workload was also reflected in the fact that 91.45% of survey respondents reported that they worked 40 hours or longer per week. Finally, interview findings complemented

  19. Estimated costs of advanced lung cancer care in a public reference hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Erthal Knust

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To estimate the direct medical costs of advanced non-small cell lung cancer care. METHODS We assessed a cohort of 277 patients treated in the Brazilian National Cancer Institute in 2011. The costs were estimated from the perspective of the hospital as a service provider of reference for the Brazilian Unified Health System. The materials and procedures used were identified and quantified, per patient, and we assigned to them monetary values, consolidated in phases of the assistance defined. The analyses had a descriptive character with costs in Real (R$. RESULTS Overall, the cohort represented a cost of R$2,473,559.91, being 71.5% related to outpatient care and 28.5% to hospitalizations. In the outpatient care, costs with radiotherapy (34% and chemotherapy (22% predominated. The results pointed to lower costs in the initial phase of treatment (7.2% and very high costs in the maintenance phase (61.6%. Finally, we identified statistically significant differences of average cost by age groups, education levels, physical performance, and histological type. CONCLUSIONS This study provides a current, useful, and relevant picture of the costs of patients with non-small cell lung cancer treated in a public hospital of reference and it provides information on the magnitude of the problem of cancer in the context of public health. The results confirm the importance of radiation treatment and hospitalizations as the main components of the cost of treatment. Despite some losses of follow-up, we assess that, for approximately 80% of the patients included in the study, the estimates presented herein are satisfactory for the care of the disease, from the perspective of a service provider of reference of the Brazilian Unified Health System, as it provides elements for the management of the service, as well as for studies that result in more rational forms of resource allocation.

  20. Key Performance Indicators for Maintenance Management Effectiveness of Public Hospital Building

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhana Omar Mardhiah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Effectiveness of management in maintenance aspect holds the key element in influencing the performance of overall maintenance management. Similarly, public hospital building needs an effective maintenance management as this type of building in nature is one of the most complex issues in the field of maintenance. Improper building maintenance management adopted by the organization significantly will interrupt the overall operation of the building. Therefore, this paper is aim to identifying the key performance indicator (KPI of effectiveness of maintenance management for the public hospital building. A total of 32 set of questionnaires were distributed to the maintenance manager for each hospital in the northern region of peninsular Malaysia by using self-administration strategy. The survey answer was analyzed by performing descriptive analysis in SPSS. Overall, the result of descriptive analysis shows that all the ten factors of effectiveness of maintenance management are accepted as KPI since the mean value is at least 3.93 which classified as important and significant. The most significant factor of effectiveness of maintenance management is task planning and scheduling with the mean score of 4.35. While less significant factor is identify as maintenance approach with the value of mean score is 3.93. The both results indicates that the management need to have well-structured planning for the maintenance works and also need to embrace the exact strategy of maintenance approach in order to achieved better overall performance of maintenance management. This study may draw a standard practice for the government in assessing the performance of public facilities in terms of maintenance management.

  1. Patients’ perception of quality service delivery of public hospitals in Nigeria using analytical hierarchy process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Olateju Oyatoye

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Patients are recently more aware and conscious. This is because of the belief that a high level of quality can translate into patient satisfaction. This is critical for healthcare providers as they deal with life. This recognition by both the service provider and service receivers made the government to establish units of service commission (SERVICOM in each of the governmental agencies including hospitals in Nigeria to monitor the level of quality of service delivery. However, to what extent do patients’ perceptions about health services seem to have been largely recognized remain unclear by health care providers, despite the (SERVICOM units in public institutions in Nigeria? Method: A cross-sectional analytical study using convenient sample method, based on the fact that not every patient of the selected hospitals can be chosen, was performed on 400 patients who received health services at four different public hospitals in Ogun state Nigeria. The selection of these hospitals was based on the zones in the state (Egba, Ijebu, Remo and Yewa area of Ogun-state. The instrument was a valid and reliable analytical hierarchy process based questionnaire containing five service quality dimensions. Data were analyzed using SPSS, Expert choice and Microsoft Excel software to determine the perception of patients towards service quality delivery in pairwise comparison of judgment consistent at less than 10%. Results:The results showed the composite priorities of the patients’ perception with respect to determinants of the patients’ perception towards quality of services delivered in the public hospitals in Nigeria. The most important factor to patients was the reliability dimension with composite priority 0.24 or 24% followed by the responsiveness dimension with 0.22 assurance dimension 0.21, tangibility dimension with 0.21, and the least determinant factor was the empathy dimension with 0.1101. Conclusion: Based on the results, the

  2. Depression in teenager pregnant women in a public hospital in a northern mexican city: prevalence and correlates

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Alvarado-Esquivel, Cosme; Sifuentes-Alvarez, Antonio; Salas-Martinez, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Very little is known about prenatal depression in teenagers in Mexico. We determined the prevalence and correlates of prenatal depression in teenager women attending a public hospital in Durango City, Mexico...

  3. Incorporation of public hospitals: a "silver bullet" against overcapacity, managerial bottlenecks and resource constraints? Case studies from Austria and Estonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidler, Armin H; Haslinger, Reinhard R; Hofmarcher, Maria M; Jesse, Maris; Palu, Toomas

    2007-05-01

    This paper presents a new approach for incorporating public hospitals by contrasting the experience from an "old" EU country (Austria) with a new EU member state (Estonia). In the EU (including the new member states) hospital overcapacity is a serious problem, from a technical, fiscal and political perspective. Few countries have succeeded in establishing an appropriate framework for resource management and for guaranteeing long-term financial viability of their hospital network. Many countries are in search of effective policies for improved hospital management and more cost-effective resource use in the health sector. Over the past decade, experiences in Austria and Estonia have emerged as innovative examples which may provide lessons for other EU countries and beyond. This paper describes the evolution of public hospitals from public budgetary units and public management to incorporated autonomous organizations under private corporate law, resulting in a contractual relationship between (public) owners and private hospital management. Outdated and inefficient public sector structures were replaced by more agile corporate management. The arrangement allows for investments, operating costs and budgeting according to strategic business goals as opposed to political "fiat". Shielding hospitals from local political influence is an important aspect of this concept. Horizontal integration through networking of public hospitals and introducing private management helps create a new corporate culture, allowing for more flexibility to achieve efficiencies through downsizing and economies of scale. Based on contracts the new balance between ownership and managerial functions create strong incentives for a more business-like, results-oriented and consumer-friendly management. This was achieved both in Austria and Estonia in a politically sensitive way, adopting a long-term vision and by protecting the interests of hospital owners and staff.

  4. Keratinophilic fungi isolated from hospital dust and soils of public places at Gulbarga, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidyasagar, G M; Hosmani, Narayan; Shivkumar, D

    2005-01-01

    Keratinophilic fungi were isolated from corridor dust of 11 hospitals and soils of 21 public places using a hair baiting technique. A total of 41 species belonging to 24 genera were recovered. Among the dermatophytes and related species, Microsporum gypseum was predominant, followed by Chrysosporium keratinophilum, Trichophyton mentagrophytes, M. nanum and Ch. tropicum. Other species were represented by 32 species belonging to 21 genera. Most of the species isolated are known to be agents of human and animal infection or have been isolated from human and animal lesions. The fungi observed here are discussed in relation to their global distribution.

  5. [Public health education integrated in hospital. An internship proposal, "Medical information and pharmacology"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulay, F; Chevallier, T; Staccini, P; Chichmanian, R M

    1997-06-01

    According to a recent circular reforming french medical studies, we propose a teaching of medical information and pharmacology in situ within hospital instructions. Students could acquire an investigation methodology on the medicine economy. It will cover in four sessions the succeeding stages of medical information processing and be subject to an assessment: case studies and appreciation on student's, instruction record. By combining public health teaching with clinical practice, our project promotes its development in contact with other learnings and activities such as clinical research.

  6. Problems with rabies postexposure management: a survey of 499 public hospitals in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kositprapa, C; Wimalratna, O; Chomchey, P; Chareonwai, S; Benjavongkulchai, M; Khawplod, P; Wilde, H

    1998-03-01

    Rabies is still a major public health problem in Asia. The incidence of known annual human cases in India alone has recently been revised from 20,000 to 30,000, and over 500,000 patients are given some form of postexposure rabies treatment. Only China, Peninsular Malaysia, Singapore, and Thailand are reporting a significant decrease in the prevalence of this disease in humans. Over 150,000 courses of postexposure treatment (PET) are given in Thailand every year. To determine remaining barriers to further reduction of the number of human rabies deaths, we carried out a questionnaire study of government hospitals throughout the Kingdom.

  7. Purchasing of medical equipment in public hospitals: the mini-HTA tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govender, Moreshnee; Mueller, Debjani B; Basu, Debashis

    2011-11-01

    The mini-health technology assessment (HTA) tool is valuable in assessing the quality of decisions regarding health technology management in South African public hospitals. The tool demonstrates the needs for improved decision-making and for developing an appropriate, customised instrument to support decision makers regarding medical device management. Health technology in South Africa has changed rapidly over the past two decades. Current challenges include the introduction of rapidly developing diagnostic technologies such as point-of-care testing (POCT) devices and national health insurance. The mini-HTA tool can play an important role in effective and efficient management of health technology in this setting.

  8. Efficiency Analysis of Integrated Public Hospital Networks in Outpatient Internal Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortíz-Barrios, Miguel Angel; Escorcia-Caballero, Juan P; Sánchez-Sánchez, Fabián; De Felice, Fabio; Petrillo, Antonella

    2017-09-07

    Healthcare systems are evolving towards a complex network of interconnected services due to the increasing costs and the increasing expectations for high service levels. It is evidenced in the literature the importance of implementing management techniques and sophisticated methods to improve the efficiency of healthcare systems, especially in emerging economies. This paper proposes an integrated collaboration model between two public hospitals to reach the reduction of weighted average lead time in outpatient internal medicine department. A strategic framework based on value stream mapping and collaborative practices has been developed in real case study settled in Colombia.

  9. Hospitals

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This database contains locations of Hospitals for 50 states and Washington D.C. , Puerto Rico and US territories. The dataset only includes hospital facilities and...

  10. The Gentleman Artist-Surgeon in Late Victorian Group Portraiture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerschlag, Keren Rosa

    2016-01-01

    In this article I consider the ways in which group portraits of surgeons, a genre associated with inscriptions of corporate membership and institutional authority, reflected the complex and at times contradictory status of surgeons during the late Victorian period. Group portraits from this period offer a diverse range of representations of surgeons – from middle-class professional to hygiene reformer, scientist to cultured gentleman – all of which worked against the popular conception of the surgeon as manual labourer and bloody carpenter. In particular, the emergence during the period of the gentleman artist-surgeon, exemplified by the celebrity surgeon and amateur artist Henry Thompson (1820–1904), signalled a new incarnation of the surgeon and offered an alternative to both the stereotypes of the surgeon as manual labourer and the surgeon or middle-class professional. But there were complexities and contradictions that beset the identity of the gentleman artist-surgeon, and these will be considered with reference to Thompson’s own novel, Charley Kingston’s Aunt (1885). PMID:27904434

  11. Patient experience with outpatient encounters at public hospitals in Shanghai: Examining different aspects of physician services and implications of overcrowding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhua Bao

    Full Text Available Over 90% of outpatient care in China was delivered at public hospitals, making outpatient experience in this setting an important aspect of quality of care.To assess outpatient experience with different aspects of physician services at China's public hospitals and its association with overcrowding of the hospital outpatient departments.Retrospective analysis of a large survey of outpatient experience in Shanghai, China. We tested the hypotheses that patient experience was poorer with physician-patient communication, education, and shared decision-making and where and when there was greater overcrowding of the hospital outpatient departments. Ordered logistic models were estimated separately for general and specialty hospitals.7,147 outpatients at 40 public hospitals in Shanghai, China, in 2014.Patient experience with physician services were self-reported based on 12 questions as part of a validated instrument. Indicators of overcrowding included time of visit (morning vs. afternoon, Monday vs. rest of the week and hospital outpatient volume in the first half of 2014.Overall, patients reported very favorable experience with physician services. Two out of the 12 questions pertaining to both communication and shared decision-making consistently received lower ratings. Hospitals whose outpatient volumes were in the top two quartiles received lower patient ratings, but the relationship achieved statistical significance among specialty hospitals only.Inadequate physician-patient communication and shared decision-making and hospital overcrowding compromise outpatient experience with physician services at Chinese public hospitals. Effective diversion of patients with chronic and less complex conditions to community health centers will be critical to alleviate the extreme workloads at hospitals with high patient volumes and, in turn, improve patient experience.

  12. Depression in Teenager Pregnant Women in a Public Hospital in a Northern Mexican City: Prevalence and Correlates

    OpenAIRE

    Alvarado-Esquivel, Cosme; Sifuentes-Alvarez, Antonio; Salas-Martinez, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Background Very little is known about prenatal depression in teenagers in Mexico. We determined the prevalence and correlates of prenatal depression in teenager women attending a public hospital in Durango City, Mexico. Methods We performed a cross-sectional study to assess depression in 181 teenager pregnant women who attended a public hospital for prenatal care. We used a validated Mexican version of the Edinburg postnatal depression scale (EPDS) to screen depression. Women with EPDS scores...

  13. The Difference in the Online Medical Information Searching Behaviors of Hospital Patients and Their Relatives versus the General Public

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hung-Yuan; Liang, Jyh-Chong; Tsai, Chin-Chung

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is two-fold: to explore the differences in online medical information searching behaviors, including evaluative standards and search strategies, of the general public (general group) and those of hospital patients and their relatives (hospital group); and to compare the predictive relationship between the evaluative…

  14. Patterns of mortality in public and private hospitals of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misganaw Awoke

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ethiopia is encountering a growing burden of non-communicable diseases along with infectious diseases, perinatal and nutritional problems that have long been considered major problems of public health importance. This retrospective analysis was carried out to examine the mortality patterns from communicable diseases and non communicable diseases in public and private hospitals of Addis Ababa. Methods Approximately 47,153 deaths were captured over eight years (2002–2010 in forty three public and private hospitals of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Data collectors (43 hospital clerks and coordinators (3 nurses had been extensively trained on how to review hospital death records. Information obtained included: dates of admission and death, age, sex, address, and principal cause of death. Only the diseases responsible for deaths are taken as the cause of death. Cause of death was coded using International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10 and data were double entered. Diseases were classified into: Group I (communicable diseases, maternal conditions and nutritional deficiencies; Group II (non-communicable causes; and Group III (injuries. Percentages, proportional mortality ratios, 95% confidence intervals (CI and Adjusted odd ratios (OR were calculated. Results Overall, 59% of the deaths were attributed to Group I diseases, and 31% to Group II diseases and 12% to injuries. Nearly 56% of the males and 68% of the females deaths were due to five leading causes (conditions arising during perinatal period, HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, cardiovascular diseases and respiratory infections. Significantly larger proportions of females died from Group I (67% and Group II diseases (32% compared with males (where the respective proportions were 52% and 30%. Significantly higher proportion of males (17% than females (6% were dying from Group III diseases. Deaths due to Group I diseases decreased while those due to Group II diseases increased with age

  15. The Effects of Public Access Defibrillation on Survival After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bækgaard, Josefine S; Viereck, Søren; Møller, Thea Palsgaard

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite recent advances, the average survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) remains defibrillation by an automated external defibrillator is the most important intervention for patients with OHCA, showing survival proportions >50%. Accordingly, placement...... of automated external defibrillators in the community as part of a public access defibrillation program (PAD) is recommended by international guidelines. However, different strategies have been proposed on how exactly to increase and make use of publicly available automated external defibrillators...... an automated external defibrillator had been used by nonemergency medical services. PAD was divided into 3 groups according to who applied the defibrillator: nondispatched lay first responders, professional first responders (firefighters/police) dispatched by the Emergency Medical Dispatch Center (EMDC...

  16. Reported intimate partner violence amongst women attending a public hospital in Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindiwe I. Zungu

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Intimate partner violence (IPV is common worldwide and occurs across social, economic, religious and cultural groups. This makes it an important public health issue for health care providers. In South Africa, the problem of violence against women is complex and it has social and public health consequences. The paucity of data on IPV is related to underreporting and a lack of screening of this form of violence in health care settings.Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of IPV and explore the risk factors associated with this type of violence against women who visited a public hospital in Botswana.Method: A descriptive, cross-sectional survey was conducted among randomly sampled adult women aged 21 years and older, during their hospital visits in 2007. Data were obtained by means of structured interviews, after obtaining written and signed, informed consent from each participant.Results: A total of 320 women participated in this study. Almost half (49.7% reported having had an experience of IPV in one form or another at some point in their lifetime, while 68 (21.2% reported a recent incident of abuse by their partners in the past year. Experiences of IPV were predominantly reported by women aged 21 – 30 years (122; 38%. Most of the allegedly abused participants were single (173; 54% and unemployed (140; 44%. Significant associations were found between alcohol use by participants’ male intimate partners (χ2 = 17.318; p = 0.001 and IPV, as well as cigarette smoking (χ2 = 17.318; p = 0.001 and IPV.Conclusion: The prevalence of alleged IPV in Botswana is relatively high (49.7%, especially among young adult women, but the prevalence of reported IPV is low (13.2%. It is essential that women are screened regularly in the country’s public and private health care settings for IPV.

  17. The skills gap in hospital management in the South African public health sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillay, Rubin

    2008-01-01

    A lack of management capacity has been identified as the key stumbling block to the transformation and reconceptualization of the public sector in South Africa into a more effective, efficient, and responsive system of health delivery. As part of the overall management development process, this research aimed to identify the skills important for public sector health management and to evaluate managers' self-assessed proficiency in each of these skills. A cross-sectional survey using a self-administered questionnaire was conducted among hospital managers in the South African public health sector. Respondents were asked to rate the level of importance that each proposed competency had in their job and to indicate their proficiency in each skill. Self-assessment of levels of competency showed that managers felt most competent in strategic planning, people management, and self-management, and relatively less competent in the task-related skills and their ability to deliver healthcare. People management, self-management, and task-related skills were rated as being most important, followed by strategic management and health delivery skills, respectively. The largest differences between mean importance rating and mean skill rating were for people management skills, task-related and self-management skills. These findings reflect the reality of the local health service environment and the needs of health managers and will be useful in the conceptualization, design, and delivery of health management programs aimed at enhancing current and future management and leadership capacity in the public health sector in South Africa.

  18. Public hospital quality report awareness: evidence from National and Californian Internet searches and social media mentions, 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huesch, Marco D; Currid-Halkett, Elizabeth; Doctor, Jason N

    2014-03-11

    Publicly available hospital quality reports seek to inform consumers of important healthcare quality and affordability attributes, and may inform consumer decision-making. To understand how much consumers search for such information online on one Internet search engine, whether they mention such information in social media and how positively they view this information. A leading Internet search engine (Google) was the main focus of the study. Google Trends and Google Adwords keyword analyses were performed for national and Californian searches between 1 August 2012 and 31 July 2013 for keywords related to 'top hospital', best hospital', and 'hospital quality', as well as for six specific hospital quality reports. Separately, a proprietary social media monitoring tool was used to investigate blog, forum, social media and traditional media mentions of, and sentiment towards, major public reports of hospital quality in California in 2012. (1) Counts of searches for keywords performed on Google; (2) counts of and (3) sentiment of mentions of public reports on social media. National Google search volume for 75 hospital quality-related terms averaged 610 700 searches per month with strong variation by keyword and by state. A commercial report (Healthgrades) was more commonly searched for nationally on Google than the federal government's Hospital Compare, which otherwise dominated quality-related search terms. Social media references in California to quality reports were generally few, and commercially produced hospital quality reports were more widely mentioned than state (Office of Statewide Healthcare Planning and Development (OSHPD)), or non-profit (CalHospitalCompare) reports. Consumers are somewhat aware of hospital quality based on Internet search activity and social media disclosures. Public stakeholders may be able to broaden their quality dissemination initiatives by advertising on Google or Twitter and using social media interactively with consumers looking

  19. Looking Through the Patients' Eyes: Measuring Patient Satisfaction in a Public Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carretta, Elisa; Bond, Trevor G; Cappiello, Giuseppe; Fantini, Maria Pia

    2017-09-01

    Patient satisfaction is a personal evaluation of health-care services that is often used as an indicator of quality of care. The aim of this study was to identify aspects of hospital care that affect patient satisfaction by examining the structural and convergent validity of an in-house questionnaire. The sample consisted of 3320 patients discharged from an Italian public hospital. The questionnaire included items exploring communication with nurses and physicians, pain management, quality of accommodation, and discharge information. Data were analyzed using the Rasch model. From the patients' perspective, the number of response options was excessive and the questionnaire proved to have both medical and accommodation dimensions. Patients, on average, gave higher satisfaction scores to the medical dimension over the accommodation dimension. Higher satisfaction was associated with kindness and courtesy of the nursing staff, doctors' courtesy, and the quality of bed linen. The results support the administration of the questionnaire but suggest change in the hospital's analytical procedures in order to match the drivers of satisfaction as seen by the patients.

  20. [The use of the balanced scorecard and the budget in the strategic management of public hospitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naranjo Gil, David

    2010-01-01

    To analyze the relationship between hospital managers' characteristics and the use of the balanced scorecard and the budget. A further aim was to analyze how these two techniques influence strategic goals aimed at cost reduction and enhancing service flexibility. Data were collected through a questionnaire sent to 884 members of top management teams in 218 public hospitals in Spain. The response rate was 53.51% with 473 useful questionnaires. Structural equation techniques were used to validate the metric scales and the model used. Younger managers and less tenured managers were more likely to use the balanced scorecard than the budget. Diversity in the top management team was related to the use of distinct management control techniques. The use of the balanced scorecard was positively associated with the implementation of healthcare strategies focused on enhancing service flexibility and reducing healthcare cost. The adoption of management control systems is not only a function of the outcome of a rational decision-making process and institutional pressures but also crucially depends on the characteristics of the individuals ultimately responsible for such decisions. The use of the balanced scorecard facilitates hospitals' implementation of plans with multiple strategic goals. Copyright 2009 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  1. Species distribution and susceptibility profile of Candida species in a Brazilian public tertiary hospital

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    Montelli Augusto

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Species identification and antifungal susceptibility tests were carried out on 212 Candida isolates obtained from bloodstream infections, urinary tract infections and dialysis-associated peritonitis, from cases attended at a Brazilian public tertiary hospital from January 1998 to January 2005. Findings Candida albicans represented 33% of the isolates, Candida parapsilosis 31.1%, Candida tropicalis 17.9%,Candida glabrata 11.8%, and others species 6.2%. In blood culture, C. parapsilosis was the most frequently encountered species (48%. The resistance levels to the antifungal azoles were relatively low for the several species, except for C. tropicalis and C. glabrata. Amphotericin B resistance was observed in 1 isolate of C. parapsilosis. Conclusions The species distribution and antifungal susceptibility herein observed presented several epidemiological features common to other tertiary hospitals in Latin American countries. It also exhibited some peculiarity, such as a very high frequency of C. parapsilosis both in bloodstream infections and dialysis-associated peritonitis. C. albicans also occurred in an important number of case infections, in all evaluated clinical sources. C. glabrata presented a high proportion of resistant isolates. The data emphasize the necessity to carry out the correct species identification accompanied by the susceptibility tests in all tertiary hospitals.

  2. Hydatid Disease in Yemeni Patients attending Public and Private Hospitals in Sana’a City, Yemen

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    Abdulbasit Alghoury

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Hydatid disease is endemic and represents a major health problem in Yemen. The aim of this study is to determine the magnitude of the problem of hydatidosis in patients attending Public and Private Hospitals at Sana’a city, Yemen.Methods:66 patients with hydatid disease were identified during the period from August 2006 to February 2007. Complete medical history for all CE patients were collected and analyzed.Results: Among the 66 CE patients, 67% were females and 33% males. Liver was the most common involved organ. Single cyst was more frequently detected than multiple cysts and approximately 94% of the cysts were ≥5 cm. Moreover, Public hospitals were the main source of patients with CE disease.Conclusion: Hydatidosis is still an endemic disease and an important health problem in Yemen which needs to be studied further. Therefore, accurate information on the distribution of the disease is the first step for the control and prevention of the disease. Moreover, it is crucial to investigate the role of different intermediate hosts and genotypes of E. granulosus in humans and animals.

  3. Eliciting Patients’ Health Concerns in Consulting Rooms and Wards in Vietnamese Public Hospitals

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    Huong Thi Linh Nguyen

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the doctor’s elicitation of the patient’s presenting health concern in two clinical settings in the Vietnamese public hospital system: the consulting room and the ward. The data were taken from 66 audio-recorded consultations. Our analysis shows that the elicitors used by the doctor in the consulting room often communicate a weak epistemic stance towards the patient’s health issue, while those used in the ward tend to signal a strong epistemic stance. In addition, this contrast between the elicitors employed in the consulting room and the ward is evident in our data regardless of whether the consultation is a first visit or a same follow-up (in which the doctor is the same one that treated the patient on their last visit, though the contrast is less clear for different follow-ups (in which the doctor has not treated the patient before. An additional finding is that the clinical setting has some bearing on the use of inappropriate elicitation formats (in which the doctor opens the visit with an elicitor which is more appropriate for another type of visit. The precise way in which each of the consulting room and the ward operates is, of course, a feature of the Vietnamese public hospital system itself. Hence, the overall contrast between the elicitors and elicitation formats used in these two settings illustrates how, on a more general level, the institutional context can have an impact on doctor-patient communication.

  4. Feasibility of accelerated partial breast irradiation in a large inner-city public hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Miral; Gabram, Sheryl; Bumpers, Harvey; Landry, Jerome; Jani, Ashesh B; Diaz, Roberto; Rizzo, Monica

    2012-12-01

    Breast conserving therapy (BCT) that include breast conserving surgery followed by adjuvant radiation therapy has revolutioned medicine by allowing women to avoid mastectomy. Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) has emerged as a valid alternative to whole-breast irradiation that requires a shorter time commitment. We report our novel experience with APBI at a large public hospital that serves low-income and potentially noncompliant patients. A retrospective chart review was conducted of women who underwent BCT for stage 0-IIA breast cancer from August 2007 to August 2010 treated with APBI with a brachytherapy catheter. Twenty-four patients (20 African American) were considered for APBI. Average age was 61 years. Four patients could not undergo APBI for technical reasons and completed whole-breast irradiation over a 5 week period. Median follow-up was 19 months. Nine patients (37.5 %) had ductal carcinoma-in-situ, and 15 patients (62.5 %) had invasive ductal carcinoma with an average tumor size of 1.1 cm. All patients had negative margins of >2 mm. Two patients (8 %) treated with the brachytherapy catheter had in-breast tumor recurrence. Thus, all 24 patients initially identified for APBI successfully completed adjuvant radiotherapy. Patient compliance with postoperative irradiation is key to minimize local recurrence after BCT for breast cancer. This success with a brachytherapy catheter in underserved women in a U.S. public hospital setting indicates that outcomes of compliance and complications are comparable to nationally published results.

  5. Local diagnostic reference levels for intraoral dental radiography in the public hospitals of Cyprus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christofides, Stelios; Pitri, Elina; Lampaskis, Marios; Papaefstathiou, Christos

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine local DRLs for children and adults undergoing intraoral dental examinations at the intraoral radiology units of the public hospitals in Cyprus. Measurements were made on all the twenty intraoral X-ray units of the public hospitals in Cyprus with the intention to establish the local DRLs for all the possible intraoral X-ray examinations for children and adults. All units are film based. The measurements were made by a Dose Area Product (DAP) meter (GAMMEX RMI 841-RD) placed at the surface of the dental unit's X-ray shaping cone (FSD 20cm). A diagnostic radiology dosimeter (Dosimax Plus A) was also placed at an FSD of 100cm to compare the dose reading between the two dosimeters. DRLs were established at the 3rd quartile for 7 exposure settings corresponding to 12 types of teeth (Adult and children mandibular and maxillary incisor, premolar and molar) with values of 197, 163, 128, 102, 81, 65 and 49mGycm-2 and 7.23, 5.94, 4.75, 3.68, 3.10, 2.41 and 1.88mGy for benchmark nominal exposure times of 1000, 800, 640, 500, 400, 320 and 250ms respectively, at a nominal exposure voltage of 70kVp. The local DRLs of the present study compare well with other similar published DRLs. Copyright © 2016 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Children's voices in public hospital healthcare delivery: intention as opposed to practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, Annette; Wrapson, Wendy; Water, Tineke

    2014-11-07

    To determine the extent to which children have the opportunity to provide feedback on public hospital care in New Zealand. A scan of the web sites of the Ministry of Health and the Health Quality and Safety Commission New Zealand (HQSC) together with a search of core District Health Board publications was conducted to identify existing or planned processes to capture the hospital experience of patients under 18 years. The importance of gathering patient feedback was recognised but, currently, ad hoc strategies are being used to put these good intentions into practice. Although some DHBs are introducing novel methods of gathering patient feedback, details of data collection methods and characteristics of participants are often not publicised. The HQSC has developed an adult Inpatient survey to provide a coherent means of assessing patient experience nationally but there is currently no children's survey available. Our analysis suggests a lack of opportunity for children's perspectives to be taken into account in secondary health service delivery. The current 'paternalistic' approach, based upon children being a vulnerable population, is contrary to the emerging recognition that children are individuals who can contribute to their own care and well-being.

  7. Patient expectations and their satisfaction in the context of public hospitals

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    Berhane A

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Adugnaw Berhane,1 Fikre Enquselassie2 1College of Health Sciences, Debre Berhan University, Debre Berhan, Ethiopia; 2School of Public Health, Addis Ababa University, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia Background: Patient expectations have been recognized as a factor for patient satisfaction in medical consultations. Although various studies explored the relationship between patient expectations and patient satisfaction in developed countries, there is a lack of research evidence in Ethiopia where the meeting of patient expectations could relate to satisfaction.Objective: To assess the relationship between patients’ expectations and their satisfaction in the consultation of patients at the outpatient department.Study design: Data were collected regarding preconsultation expectations and postconsultation experiences of adult patients attending nine public hospitals. A systematic random sampling method was used where every fifth patient attending an outpatient department was selected. The patients were interviewed before consultation and after consulta­tion to assess whether their pre-consultation expectations were met and to assess how satisfied they were with the consultation. Cronbach’s alpha statistic was used to assess the reliability of the expectation questionnaires, and paired t-test was used to assess any differences between previsit expectations and postvisit experiences. Logistic regression techniques were used to assess variables considered as independent factors for patient satisfaction.Results: A total of 776 patients were interviewed, giving a response rate of 92.3%. About 93.7% mentioned a diagnosis for their condition as a reason for their current hospital visits. There is a significant difference between preconsultation expectation and postconsultation expectation. Postconsultation expectation, perceived health status, and perceived control on health were factors identified as increasing patient satisfaction. In addition, the presence of

  8. VICTORIAN FEMME FATALE IN MARY ELIZABETH BRADDON‟S NOVEL ENTITLED LADY AUDLEY‟S SECRET

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    Ratna Asmarani

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper entitled ―Victorian Femme Fatale in Mary Elizabeth Braddon‘s Novel Entitled Lady Audley‟s Secret‖ is to analyze the intricate life of the female main character as a representation of Victorian femme fatale. Feminist criticism and gynocritics are used as a frame of analysis supported by the concepts of femme fatale, fatalism, and Victorian femininity. The result indicates that although femme fatale is fatal to men, she leads a fatalistic life in a patriarchal Victorian society. Her success to pursue a wealthy life using her femininity is short-lived followed by years of exile in a private and luxurious asylum. Through her portrayal of the female main character‘s life as a femme fatale, the female writer launches two-edged criticism. She criticizes the woman who exploits her femininity to get excessive material gain and at the same time she criticizes the Victorian society which prevents a single (-parent woman to have a decent life using her skills not her femininity.

  9. Users' experiences of physiotherapy treatment in a semi-urban public hospital in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gona, Joseph K; Newton, Charles R; Geere, Jo-Anne; Hartley, Sally

    2013-01-01

    Physiotherapy practice in Africa faces a number of challenges, one of which is the limited number of therapists in most public hospitals. In Africa, physiotherapy is still mainly institution based with very little community-based practice, leading to lack of access to services for a large part of the population. This study explores users' perceptions of physiotherapy, challenges faced by users, possible options for management, and determines whether current physiotherapy practice in a rural Kilifi District general hospital in Kenya facilitates future self-management of chronic conditions. Eight in-depth interviews, 3 focus groups discussions and 4 participant observations were conducted for data collection. All interviews and focus group discussions were recorded using a digital recorder, transcribed into the Swahili language and then translated into English. The transcriptions were imported to NVivo 9 (www.qsrinternational.com) for management and storage. Inductive data analysis was used to generate themes from the rich-text data of the transcriptions. Many of the users perceived physiotherapy as being effective. Challenges included distance from health facilities, negative experiences with some therapists, and lack of staff and equipment. Rehabilitation options included community- and home-based programs fostering self-management of chronic conditions. Current hospital practice lacks emphasis on self-management skills for patients with chronic conditions who can do their physiotherapy at home. Users' experiences of physiotherapy treatment in this rural hospital indicate that a host of challenges exist. In the face of these challenges, the needs of the users seemed to be compromised, especially those with chronic conditions. Rehabilitation services that are accessible and affordable would be better options in rural and low-resource settings. There is therefore need for community-based services that place emphasis on self-management of chronic conditions for

  10. [Public health impact of a remote diagnosis system implemented in regional and district hospitals in Paraguay].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galván, Pedro; Velázquez, Miguel; Benítez, Gualberto; Ortellado, José; Rivas, Ronald; Barrios, Antonio; Hilario, Enrique

    2017-06-08

    Determine the viability of a remote diagnosis system implemented to provide health care to remote and scattered populations in Paraguay. The study was conducted in all regional and general hospitals in Paraguay, and in the main district hospitals in the country's 18 health regions. Clinical data, tomographic images, sonography, and electrocardiograms (ECGs) of patients who needed a diagnosis by a specialized physician were entered into the system. This information was sent to specialists in diagnostic imaging and in cardiology for remote diagnosis and the report was then forwarded to the hospitals connected to the system. The cost-benefit and impact of the remote diagnosis tool was analyzed from the perspective of the National Health System. Between January 2014 and May 2015, a total of 34 096 remote diagnoses were made in 25 hospitals in the Ministry of Health's telemedicine system. The average unit cost of remote diagnosis was US$2.6 per ECG, tomography, and sonography, while the unit cost of "face-to-face" diagnosis was US$11.8 per ECG, US$68.6 per tomography, and US$21.5 per sonography. As a result of remote diagnosis, unit costs were 4.5 times lower for ECGs; 26.4 times lower for tomography, and 8.3 times lower for sonography. In monetary terms, implementation of the remote diagnosis system during the 16 months of the study led to average savings of US$2 420 037. Paraguay has a remote diagnosis system for electrocardiography, tomography, and sonography, using low-cost information and communications technologies (ICTs) based on free software that is scalable to other types of remote diagnostic studies of interest for public health. Implementation of remote diagnosis helped to strengthen the integrated network of health services and programs, enabling professionals to optimize their time and productivity, while improving quality, increasing access and equity, and reducing costs.

  11. Bacterial, fungal and parasitic contamination of cockroaches in public hospitals of Hamadan, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehzadeh, A; Tavacol, P; Mahjub, H

    2007-06-01

    To determine the possible role of cockroaches in dissemination of medically important microorganisms, a study was carried out in public hospitals and residential areas of Hamadan city, west of Iran. Bacteria, fungi and parasites of medical importance were isolated and identified. The total number of Blattella germanica collected from hospitals were 133 as the case group. The cockroaches collected from residential areas were 45 as the control group. A total of 178 cockroaches were collected, over a period of two years (133 from hospitals; and 45 from residential areas) in Hamadan. Medically important microorganisms were isolated from external and internal surfaces using standard methods. In the case group, 130 out of 133 (98%) Blattella germanica showed contamination with high bacterial load (more than 1 x 10(3)) whereas only 2 out of 45 (4.45%) cockroaches of the control group were carrying medically important bacteria with high bacterial load. Bacteriological examinations revealed that almost all test cockroaches had at least one of the following microorganisms either in their body surface or digestive tract. Enterobacter (22.6%), Klebsiela (21%), Enterococcus (17.3%), Staphylococcus (16.5%), Esherichia coli and Streptococcus (8.3%), Pseudomonas (3%), and also Shigella, Haemophilus and group A beta-hemolytic Streptococcus each less than 1%. In addition the results showed (74.4.%) of test cockroaches harboured fungi-Candida (48.9%), Mucor (10.5%), Aspergillus niger (7.5%), Rhizopus (4.5) and also Penicillium and Aspergillus fumigans each 1.5%. Some parasitic worms of medical importance were also isolated from the test cockroaches, but carriage rates were low. The data from this study emphasise the importance of cockroaches as potential vectors of medically important microorganisms such as pathogenic bacteria and fungi in hospital environments.

  12. Employees’ Commitment to the Organization of a Public District Hospital: a Case Study

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    Eyaggelia Tsolaki

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The employees' satisfaction from their job and their commitment to the organization appears to be one of the most determinants factors of organizational effectiveness.Aim: The aim of this study was the research of commitment to the organization of employees' working at Sparta General Hospital, as well as the correlation between job satisfaction and social, economic, demographic or other factors.Methodology: The research’s sample included 121 employees from all departments of a public district hospital. For research purposes, the Organizational Commitment Questionnaire was used. Data specially designed for the research’s purposes.Results: The largest sample’s proportion, declared moderate to very satisfy by their job at that Hospital. The particular job demands, exhausting timetables, stress and organizational weaknesses of the Greek Health System seem to have been key components of the problem. Also, for a large sample proportion, the job demands affect negatively the time and energy that Sparta General Hospital employees’ dedicate to themselves and to their families. Almost half of the participants replied that they are not at all satisfied with their payroll. Regarding the rates of emotional, standing and exemplary commitment, showed that gender, education level, marital status, age and total years of professional seniority correlated with the level of emotional commitment. To higher affective commitment is positively correlated with age of employees and years of service.Conclusions: The research of commitment to the organization can contribute substantially in improving the hospital’s and health system’s effectiveness, the increment of job’s satisfaction, the employees’ efficiency.

  13. Costs of Dengue Control Activities and Hospitalizations in the Public Health Sector during an Epidemic Year in Urban Sri Lanka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thalagala, Neil; Tissera, Hasitha; Palihawadana, Paba; Amarasinghe, Ananda; Ambagahawita, Anuradha; Wilder-Smith, Annelies; Shepard, Donald S.; Tozan, Yeşim

    2016-01-01

    Background Reported as a public health problem since the 1960s in Sri Lanka, dengue has become a high priority disease for public health authorities. The Ministry of Health is responsible for controlling dengue and other disease outbreaks and associated health care. The involvement of large numbers of public health staff in dengue control activities year-round and the provision of free medical care to dengue patients at secondary care hospitals place a formidable financial burden on the public health sector. Methods We estimated the public sector costs of dengue control activities and the direct costs of hospitalizations in Colombo, the most heavily urbanized district in Sri Lanka, during the epidemic year of 2012 from the Ministry of Health’s perspective. The financial costs borne by public health agencies and hospitals are collected using cost extraction tools designed specifically for the study and analysed retrospectively using a combination of activity-based and gross costing approaches. Results The total cost of dengue control and reported hospitalizations was estimated at US$3.45 million (US$1.50 per capita) in Colombo district in 2012. Personnel costs accounted for the largest shares of the total costs of dengue control activities (79%) and hospitalizations (46%). The results indicated a per capita cost of US$0.42 for dengue control activities. The average costs per hospitalization ranged between US$216–609 for pediatric cases and between US$196–866 for adult cases according to disease severity and treatment setting. Conclusions This analysis is a first attempt to assess the economic burden of dengue response in the public health sector in Sri Lanka. Country-specific evidence is needed for setting public health priorities and deciding about the deployment of existing or new technologies. Our results suggest that dengue poses a major economic burden on the public health sector in Sri Lanka. PMID:26910907

  14. Costs of Dengue Control Activities and Hospitalizations in the Public Health Sector during an Epidemic Year in Urban Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thalagala, Neil; Tissera, Hasitha; Palihawadana, Paba; Amarasinghe, Ananda; Ambagahawita, Anuradha; Wilder-Smith, Annelies; Shepard, Donald S; Tozan, Yeşim

    2016-02-01

    Reported as a public health problem since the 1960s in Sri Lanka, dengue has become a high priority disease for public health authorities. The Ministry of Health is responsible for controlling dengue and other disease outbreaks and associated health care. The involvement of large numbers of public health staff in dengue control activities year-round and the provision of free medical care to dengue patients at secondary care hospitals place a formidable financial burden on the public health sector. We estimated the public sector costs of dengue control activities and the direct costs of hospitalizations in Colombo, the most heavily urbanized district in Sri Lanka, during the epidemic year of 2012 from the Ministry of Health's perspective. The financial costs borne by public health agencies and hospitals are collected using cost extraction tools designed specifically for the study and analysed retrospectively using a combination of activity-based and gross costing approaches. The total cost of dengue control and reported hospitalizations was estimated at US$3.45 million (US$1.50 per capita) in Colombo district in 2012. Personnel costs accounted for the largest shares of the total costs of dengue control activities (79%) and hospitalizations (46%). The results indicated a per capita cost of US$0.42 for dengue control activities. The average costs per hospitalization ranged between US$216-609 for pediatric cases and between US$196-866 for adult cases according to disease severity and treatment setting. This analysis is a first attempt to assess the economic burden of dengue response in the public health sector in Sri Lanka. Country-specific evidence is needed for setting public health priorities and deciding about the deployment of existing or new technologies. Our results suggest that dengue poses a major economic burden on the public health sector in Sri Lanka.

  15. Determinants of patient satisfaction with outpatient health services at public and private hospitals in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

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    Tayue Tateke

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients have explicit desires or requests for services when they visit hospitals. However, inadequate discovery of their needs may result in patient dissatisfaction. This study aimed to determine the levels and determinants of patient satisfaction with outpatient health services provided at public and private hospitals in Addis Ababa, Central Ethiopia.Methods: A comparative cross-sectional study was conducted from 27 March to 30 April 2010. The study included 5 private and 5 public hospitals. Participants were selected using systematic random sampling. A pre-tested and contextually prepared structured questionnaire was used to conduct interviews. Descriptive statistics, analysis of variance, factor analysis and multiple linear regressions were performed using computer software (SPSS 16.0.Results: About 18.0% of the patients at the public hospitals were very satisfied whilst 47.9% were just satisfied with the corresponding proportions a bit higher at private hospitals. Selfjudged health status, expectation about the services, perceived adequacy of consultation duration, perceived providers’ technical competency, perceived welcoming approach and perceived body signalling were determinants of satisfaction at both public and private hospitals.Conclusions: Although patients at the private hospitals were more satisfied than those at the public hospitals with the health care they received, five of the predictors of patient satisfaction in this study were common to both settings. Thus, hospitals in both categories should work to improve the competencies of their employees, particularly health professionals, to win the interests of the clients and have a physical structure that better fits the expectations of the patients.

  16. Opportunities for the improvement of cost accounting systems in public hospitals in Italy and Croatia: A case study

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    Michele Bertoni

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to highlight similarities and differences between one Croatian and one Italian public hospital regarding the implementation of cost accounting and full costing method in their accounting systems. Moving from the theoretical background, it is evident that cost accounting methods introduced in healthcare sector bring benefits to the whole society through an increased efficiency of the healthcare services provided. It primarily ensures better governing of hospital’s resources allowing more transparency in spending public funds. The main topic is that with the introduction of cost accounting system for internal purposes in public hospitals, the management would be able to govern them in a more efficient and effective way while reducing costs. The research for this paper was conducted through the interview of accounting officers in one Croatian and one Italian public hospital. The main results show that there are differences in legislation background regarding how they record costs, but also how they allocate costs to the cost objects and in how they use cost information in their decision-making process. In order to successfully manage public hospitals, it is crucial that true, timely and valid information are obtained as a base for the decision-making process. The cost accounting methodology is therefore essential to the management of public hospitals. It must provide information on the type and amount of resources spent, and thus enable the preconditions for control, management and potential reduction of costs.

  17. Continuing education programme - Victorian Institute of Forensic Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gall, J A; Ranson, D L

    1998-09-01

    With the increasing requirement of the courts for forensic experts to engage in ongoing education, a continuing education programme (CEP) was developed in the field of clinical forensic medicine at the Victorian Institute of Forensic Medicine in 1996. This programme has been described and was initially established to provide a means of education for the contracted forensic medical officers who provide forensic services to the police via the Institute throughout the State of Victoria. Owing to the sparsity of the population and the considerable distances between forensic practitioners, the CEP was designed to cater for individuals who are working alone: in effect, a distance education programme. Forensic pathologists expressed interest in the programme and it was subsequently modified to include forensic pathology cases. Currently, the programme caters for both clinicians and pathologists, and takes the form of four to five cases with related questions which are circulated several times per year. The cases include a mixture of both challenging and ordinary procedural types that may present to practitioners working in either clinical forensic medicine or forensic pathology, or both. The areas covered include: * injury interpretation * procedural matters in relation to adult and child sexual and physical assault * pharmacology/toxicology interpretation of findings * medico-legal issues (e.g. confidentiality, consent, etc.) * issues relating to alcohol and drugs * traffic medicine * clinical and legal aspects of sudden natural death * suspicious deaths * suicide * interpretation of findings at autopsy * fitness for interview * fitness to plead * psychiatric issues * general clinical medical issues. The presentation of each case includes relevant and appropriate details/findings and may include photographs. A series of questions follow which are answered in either short answer or multiple-choice format. The answers are returned and are correlated by a review panel of

  18. Recording and Management of CCT in a Public Hospital in the Region of Laconia in Greece

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    Georgia Gkiouzeli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cranium-cerebral traumas in today’s era are a serious public health problem with bothsocial and economic dimensions. They are characterized as an ‘epidemic’, due to the increase in car accidents and they particularly affect the productive population.The objective of this study was to investigate the occurrence and allocation of Cranium-cerebral traumas among the population in the Prefecture of Laconia, in order to determine the explanatory factors or risk factors, the record of how they are managed (diagnosis, therapy, and outcome and their correlation with demographics and other factors.Methodology: This study was conducted with the collection of data from hospital archives and Emergency Department logbooks from the General Hospital of Sparta. Specifically designed record forms were used which included patient demographics, means of arrival to the hospital, the clinical pictures, the gravity of the injury, possible accompanying injuries, diagnostic tests, treatment and outcome, as well as evidence related to the causes of the injury.Results: 2352 cases of children and adults with Cranium-cerebral traumas were included in this study who came to the Emergency Department from 1st of January 2005 to 31st of December 2010. The cause of Cranium-cerebral traumas in adults is affected by gender, nationality and place of residence, while in children it is affected by place of residence and the means of arrival to the Emergency Department. Respectively, the outcome of Cranium–cerebral traumas in adults is affected by place of residence and their means of arrival to the hospital while in children it is affected by nationality and place of residence.Conclusions: This study has revealed the magnitude of the problem and the epidemiological characteristics of Cranium-cerebral traumas in the Prefecture of Laconia, with the ultimate need for intervention at a level of prevention. Proposals regard the improvement in road networks, informative

  19. Depictions of females and males in Mozambican and Victorian (Australia primary mathematics textbooks

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    Adelino Evaristo Murimo

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The depiction of females and males in Mozambican Primary Mathematics textbooks for grades 6 and 7 were examined, and comparisons made with Victorian  (Australia textbooks for years 5 and 6. It was found that mathematics learning was portrayed as a  male domain in the Mozambican textbooks, reflecting what used to be the case with Australian texts of the 1970s, although there are some differences between the two countries that may be culturally based. The Victorian textbooks depicted mathematics learning as a domain for all children, and in the majority of categories examined, females and males were distributed fairly evenly. Compared to earlier reported findings, there was a general improvement in the portrayal of females in Victorian textbooks.

  20. Using path analysis to examine causal relationships among balanced scorecard performance indicators for general hospitals: the case of a public hospital system in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ming-Chin; Tung, Yu-Chi

    2006-01-01

    Examining whether the causal relationships among the performance indicators of the balanced scorecard (BSC) framework exist in hospitals is the aim of this article. Data were collected from all twenty-one general hospitals in a public hospital system and their supervising agency for the 3-year period, 2000-2002. The results of the path analyses identified significant causal relationships among four perspectives in the BSC model. We also verified the relationships among indicators within each perspective, some of which varied as time changed. We conclude that hospital administrators can use path analysis to help them identify and manage leading indicators when adopting the BSC model. However, they should also validate causal relationships between leading and lagging indicators periodically because the management environment changes constantly.

  1. Estimating the costs of psychiatric hospital services at a public health facility in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezenduka, Charles; Ichoku, Hyacinth; Ochonma, Ogbonnia

    2012-09-01

    Information on the cost of mental health services in Africa is very limited even though mental health disorders represent a significant public health concern, in terms of health and economic impact. Cost analysis is important for planning and for efficiency in the provision of hospital services. The study estimated the total and unit costs of psychiatric hospital services to guide policy and psychiatric hospital management efficiency in Nigeria. The study was exploratory and analytical, examining 2008 data. A standard costing methodology based on ingredient approach was adopted combining top-down method with step-down approach to allocate resources (overhead and indirect costs) to the final cost centers. Total and unit cost items related to the treatment of psychiatric patients (including the costs of personnel, overhead and annualised costs of capital items) were identified and measured on the basis of outpatients' visits, inpatients' days and inpatients' admissions. The exercise reflected the input-output process of hospital services where inputs were measured in terms of resource utilisation and output measured by activities carried out at both the outpatient and inpatient departments. In the estimation process total costs were calculated at every cost center/department and divided by a measure of corresponding patient output to produce the average cost per output. This followed a stepwise process of first allocating the direct costs of overhead to the intermediate and final cost centers and from intermediate cost centers to final cost centers for the calculation of total and unit costs. Costs were calculated from the perspective of the healthcare facility, and converted to the US Dollars at the 2008 exchange rate. Personnel constituted the greatest resource input in all departments, averaging 80% of total hospital cost, reflecting the mix of capital and recurrent inputs. Cost per inpatient day, at $56 was equivalent to 1.4 times the cost per outpatient visit at

  2. Disparities in initial presentation and treatment outcomes of diabetic foot ulcers in a public, private, and Veterans Administration hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumberg, Sheila N; Warren, Stephen M

    2014-01-01

    Disparities in diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) treatment outcomes are well described, although few studies identify risk factors contributing to disparate healing and amputation rates. In a unique academic center serving urban public, private, and veteran patients, we investigated amputation and healing rates and specific risk factors for disparate treatment outcomes. A retrospective chart review of diabetic patients with a new diagnosis of a foot ulcer at geographically adjacent, but independent public, private, and Veterans Administration (VA) hospitals was conducted. Healing and lower extremity amputation outcomes were assessed. Across the three hospitals, 234 patients met the inclusion criteria. Patients at the VA hospital were older (mean 72.5 years; P race (OR 2.42; P = 0.004) increased the risk of amputation on multivariate analysis. Osteomyelitis (P = 0.0371) and gangrene (P < 0.001) are independent risk factors for amputation. Across all three hospitals, 42.3% of patients were treated by amputation (6.8% private, 12% public and 23.5% VA; P < 0.001). In a single triumvirate health care system where the patient population is stratified primarily by insurance, VA patients have significantly higher amputation rates compared with patients at adjacent private and public hospitals. The VA patients are largely racial minorities with advanced DFU progression to gangrenous ulcers. © 2013 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  3. A comparative study of congenital toxoplasmosis between public and private hospitals from Uberlândia, MG, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Segundo Gesmar Rodrigues Silva

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of the present study was to examine if there is difference in terms of incidence rates of congenital toxoplasmosis among populations assisted in public and private hospitals from Uberlândia, state of Minas Gerais, Brazil. A total of 805 serum samples from cord blood were collected, being 500 from public hospital and 305 from private hospital, and all patients answered a questionnaire about pregnancy and newborns. An indirect enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA was performed to detect IgG antibodies to Toxoplasma gondii and the positive samples were retested to verify the presence of specific IgM and IgA antibodies in a capture ELISA. We found significant differences among data from both hospitals with respect to maternal age, origin city, gestational age, number of visits to physicians during pregnancy, type of delivery, and birth weight. Seroprevalence of IgG antibodies against T. gondii for patients from public and private hospitals was 57.6% and 41.9% respectively, and this difference was statistically significant (P < 0.0001. In addition, the frequency of congenital toxoplasmosis measured by the presence of IgM and/or IgA antibodies toward T. gondii was exclusively located in samples from public hospital (0.8%, and no positive sample was seen in private hospital (0%. Considering that almost all babies suffering from congenital toxoplasmosis, if undiagnosed and untreated, will develop visual or neurological impairments by adulthood, the results presented herein emphasized the importance to accomplish screening programs for toxoplasmosis during pregnancy, particularly in the public hospitals, due to the expressive rate of congenital disease showed in the patients attended at these centers.

  4. A comparative study of congenital toxoplasmosis between public and private hospitals from Uberlândia, MG, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segundo, Gesmar Rodrigues Silva; Silva, Deise Aparecida Oliveira; Mineo, José Roberto; Ferreira, Marcelo Simão

    2004-02-01

    The main purpose of the present study was to examine if there is difference in terms of incidence rates of congenital toxoplasmosis among populations assisted in public and private hospitals from Uberlândia, state of Minas Gerais, Brazil. A total of 805 serum samples from cord blood were collected, being 500 from public hospital and 305 from private hospital, and all patients answered a questionnaire about pregnancy and newborns. An indirect enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was performed to detect IgG antibodies to Toxoplasma gondii and the positive samples were retested to verify the presence of specific IgM and IgA antibodies in a capture ELISA. We found significant differences among data from both hospitals with respect to maternal age, origin city, gestational age, number of visits to physicians during pregnancy, type of delivery, and birth weight. Seroprevalence of IgG antibodies against T. gondii for patients from public and private hospitals was 57.6% and 41.9% respectively, and this difference was statistically significant (P congenital toxoplasmosis measured by the presence of IgM and/or IgA antibodies toward T. gondii was exclusively located in samples from public hospital (0.8%), and no positive sample was seen in private hospital (0%). Considering that almost all babies suffering from congenital toxoplasmosis, if undiagnosed and untreated, will develop visual or neurological impairments by adulthood, the results presented herein emphasized the importance to accomplish screening programs for toxoplasmosis during pregnancy, particularly in the public hospitals, due to the expressive rate of congenital disease showed in the patients attended at these centers.

  5. Sick at work: presenteeism among nurses in a Portuguese public hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Luis F; Ferreira, Aristides I

    2012-10-01

    Presenteeism refers to attending work despite being ill. This article focuses on this innovative organizational concept. Data from nurses at a major Portuguese public hospital (N=296) reported some major causes of presenteeism, namely lower-back pain, breath infections, migraines and stress. Although females revealed higher prevalence levels for most of the presenteeism causes, no gender differences were found regarding the number of hours people were affected by presenteeism. Moreover, other work variables were correlated-age, perceived health state, number of working hours, income and seniority-with a presenteeism scale (SPS-6) and a Health Condition Index. Most importantly, a negative correlation was found between perceived health status and presenteeism. Additionally, more experienced and highly paid nurses tended to be less affected by presenteeism. Finally, the limitations of this study-as well as some implications of presenteeism on productivity loss-are discussed. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Prevalence of sleep disorders in children of a public hospital in São Paulo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potasz, Clarisse; Juliano, Maria Ligia; Varela, Maria José; Ferraz, Patrícia Gouveia; Carvalho, Luciane Bizari de; Prado, Lucila Fernandes do; Prado, Gilmar Fernandes do

    2010-04-01

    To investigate the prevalence of sleep disorders in a sample of children from a public hospital in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. 330 children, who came to the clinical laboratory, were consecutively investigated for sleep disorders, using the sleep disturbance scale for children. Gender, age, and social/economical classification were considered. Sleep disordered breathing (SDB) showed higher prevalence in our sample (55%) than in data found in the literature. Prevalence of sleep hyperhydrosis (SHY) was 27% considering the whole sample. Boys and children in age range 7.1 to 11 years old showed higher prevalence for SDB as well as children belonging to lower social/economic classifications who were also more prevalent for disorders in the transition of sleep-wakefulness. Sleep disorders were highly prevailing in our study, mostly SDB and SHY which were exceedingly more prevalent in boys in relation to international literature.

  7. The Conditions of Organization Adaptive Capabilities. Case of Polish Public Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariola Ciszewska-Mlinaric

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available In each phase of adaptation organizations need different capabilities that allow them to adapt to their environment. In the previous article the model of adaptive capabilities was presented and differences in adaptive capabilities between high and low performers were discussed. The primary objective of the study is to identify and examine the key factors influencing the adaptive capabilities of Polish public hospitals that had to respond to a revolutionary environmental change (a redesign of healthcare system. Research indicates that following factors are significant: owners policy, environment uncertainty, access to resources, leadership capabilities, interorganizational links, change process (pace and sequence, intraorganizational relations, ideology, strategy, decentralization, employees trust in management and their attitude toward change.

  8. [Environmental impact of a public hospital in the city of Lima, Peru].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bambarén-Alatrista, Celso; Alatrista-Gutiérrez de Bambarén, María del Socorro

    2014-01-01

    The operation of hospitals produces negative effects on the environment which contributes to air pollution and climate change. The institution in this study is a category III health care facility located in the city of Lima. It generates 4.89 kg/bed/day of solid waste, and consumes 1.36 m3/bed/day of water; 25.22 kWh/bed/day of electricity, and 2.76 liters/bed/day of fuel. The level of PM10 and measured parameters of disposal to the public network are within legal limits, while mobile source noise exceeds the maximum allowable limit. The institution releases into the atmosphere 2,291 tons of CO2 equivalents per year. In conclusion, the institution studied generates a negative impact on the environment.

  9. Leadership in surgery for public sector hospitals in Jamaica: strategies for the operating room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawich, Shamir O; Harding, Hyacinth E; Crandon, Ivor W; McGaw, Clarence D; Barnett, Alan T; Tennant, Ingrid; Evans, Necia R; Martin, Allie C; Simpson, Lindberg K; Johnson, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The barriers to health care delivery in developing nations are many: underfunding, limited support services, scarce resources, suboptimal health care worker attitudes, and deficient health care policies are some of the challenges. The literature contains little information about health care leadership in developing nations. This discursive paper examines the impact of leadership on the delivery of operating room (OR) services in public sector hospitals in Jamaica.Delivery of OR services in Jamaica is hindered by many unique cultural, financial, political, and environmental barriers. We identify six leadership goals adapted to this environment to achieve change. Effective leadership must adapt to the environment. Delivery of OR services in Jamaica may be improved by addressing leadership training, workplace safety, interpersonal communication, and work environment and by revising existing policies. Additionally, there should be regular practice audits and quality control surveys.

  10. Bystander defibrillation for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in Public vs Residential Locations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Steen Møller; Hansen, Carolina Malta; Folke, Fredrik

    2017-01-01

    Importance: Bystander-delivered defibrillation (hereinafter referred to as bystander defibrillation) of patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCAs) remains limited despite the widespread dissemination of automated external defibrillators (AEDs). Objective: To examine calendar changes...... in bystander defibrillation and subsequent survival according to a public or a residential location of the cardiac arrest after nationwide initiatives in Denmark to facilitate bystander-mediated resuscitative efforts, including bystander defibrillation. Design, Setting, and Participants: This nationwide study......, 2016. Exposures: Nationwide initiatives to facilitate bystander resuscitative efforts, including bystander defibrillation, consisted of resuscitation training of Danish citizens, dissemination of on-site AEDs, foundation of an AED registry linked to emergency medical dispatch centers, and dispatcher...

  11. Collective and decentralized management model in public hospitals: perspective of the nursing team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardes, Andrea; Cecilio, Luiz Carlos de Oliveira; Evora, Yolanda Dora Martinez; Gabriel, Carmen Silvia; Carvalho, Mariana Bernardes de

    2011-01-01

    This research aims to present the implementation of the collective and decentralized management model in functional units of a public hospital in the city of Ribeirão Preto, state of São Paulo, according to the view of the nursing staff and the health technical assistant. This historical and organizational case study used qualitative thematic content analysis proposed by Bardin for data analysis. The institution started the decentralization of its administrative structure in 1999, through collective management, which permitted several internal improvements, with positive repercussion for the care delivered to users. The top-down implementation of the process seems to have jeopardized workers adherence, although collective management has intensified communication and the sharing of power and decision. The study shows that there is still much work to be done to concretize this innovative management proposal, despite the advances regarding the quality of care.

  12. A discourse analysis of giftedness education policy in Victorian state education 1975-1994

    OpenAIRE

    Glover, Carol Ann

    2016-01-01

    The development of giftedness education in Victorian state schools reflects a history of its support and resistance. Using an approach to discourse analysis based on Dant’s (1991) method of the ‘exchange of meaning’ this study focusses on the elements of power and resistance in discourse that are involved in the ideological construction of giftedness policy in the Victorian state education system. A wide selection of policy documents, dating from 1975-1994, are analysed to desc...

  13. [Evaluation of the Andalusia Public Health System hospital websites in the period 2010-2012].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Torre Barbero, M J; Estepa Luna, M J; López-Pardo Martínez, M; León Márquez, M; Sánchez Laguna, F; Toledano Redondo, S

    2014-01-01

    Evaluate the quality, accessibility and presence of Web 2.0 tools in the Andalusia Public Health System hospitals websites Observational, descriptive study carried out between 2010 and 2012. The variables analyzed were: quality, accessibility and innovation. The quality was evaluated using a Bermudez-Tamayo questionnaire. Accessibility was measured using the Web Accessibility Test (TAW) tool. Web 2.0 tools were identified by direct observation. A total of 31 of the 45 hospitals (68.9%) had a website in the year 2010, increasing to 34 (75.5%) in 2012. The average score+standard deviation (SD) of the Bermudez-Tamayo quality questionnaire was 11.1+3.8 points in 2010, and 12.3+3.9 points in 2012, observing a statistically significant difference of 0.25 being observed between the means (P=.007), 95% CI; 0.00 to 0.50) In the accessibility evaluation only 7 websites (n=31) in 2010, and 10 (n=34) in 2012, fulfilled the legal criteria for accessibility. The use of Web 2.0 tools has increased throughout the study. In 2010, 19.4% (n=6) of the hospital websites had this type of tool, in comparison to 58.8% (n=20) in 2012. In general, the quality of the websites studied is good. However, current legislation regarding accessibility is not fulfilled and must be revised and adapted to the current legal rules. There is an incipient use of Web 2.0 resources as education and communication strategies with regard to health. Copyright © 2013 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  14. The role and impact of formal strategic planning in public hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denis, J L; Langley, A; Lozeau, D

    1995-05-01

    In recent years, formal strategic planning methods originally developed for private business have been increasingly adopted by health care institutions, including publicly funded hospitals. Yet, as a technocratic management process, formal planning may seem at first sight to run counter to the natural mode of strategy formation in these organizations where negotiation and mutual adjustment between powerful groups of professionals, managers and government agencies traditionally control decision-making. This article describes an exploratory study aimed at understanding how formal strategic planning has become integrated and adapted into the management practices of a group of 23 Canadian hospitals. The context, processes and impact of planning are first examined over the entire sample of hospitals (descriptive analysis), and an attempt is then made to explain different planning outcomes in terms of a variety of contextual and process design characteristics (comparative analysis). The descriptive analysis shows that in practice formal strategic planning is easily absorbed into the political process: political and symbolic motives often drive the initiation of planning, the processes themselves are highly participative and the resulting plans often reflect the difficulties of obtaining consensus on goals in these complex organizations. The comparative analysis suggests that in general, contextual factors (eg, stimuli behind planning) appear to be more significant than process design factors (eg, extent of participation) in determining outcomes. In conclusion, it is noted that the confrontation between technocratic rationality and professional bureaucracy gives rise to a number of paradoxes that make both the use and the subsequent evaluation of formal strategic planning a difficult task in these organizations.

  15. Medication prescribing errors in a public teaching hospital in India: A prospective study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pote S

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: To prevent medication errors in prescribing, one needs to know their types and relative occurrence. Such errors are a great cause of concern as they have the potential to cause patient harm. The aim of this study was to determine the nature and types of medication prescribing errors in an Indian setting.Methods: The medication errors were analyzed in a prospective observational study conducted in 3 medical wards of a public teaching hospital in India. The medication errors were analyzed by means of Micromedex Drug-Reax database.Results: Out of 312 patients, only 304 were included in the study. Of the 304 cases, 103 (34% cases had at least one error. The total number of errors found was 157. The drug-drug interactions were the most frequently (68.2% occurring type of error, which was followed by incorrect dosing interval (12% and dosing errors (9.5%. The medication classes involved most were antimicrobial agents (29.4%, cardiovascular agents (15.4%, GI agents (8.6% and CNS agents (8.2%. The moderate errors contributed maximum (61.8% to the total errors when compared to the major (25.5% and minor (12.7% errors. The results showed that the number of errors increases with age and number of medicines prescribed.Conclusion: The results point to the establishment of medication error reporting at each hospital and to share the data with other hospitals. The role of clinical pharmacist in this situation appears to be a strong intervention; and the clinical pharmacist, initially, could confine to identification of the medication errors.

  16. Association between follicular gastritis and Helicobacter pylori in children seen at a public hospital in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejia, C R; Vera, C A; Huiza-Espinoza, L

    2016-01-01

    For the last 15 years, infection from Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) has been recognized in gastritis pathogenesis, and is known to trigger an important inflammatory response in these patients. To determine the association between follicular gastritis and H. pylori infection in children seen at a public hospital in Peru. An analytic, cross-sectional study was conducted on all the children treated at the Hospital Nacional Docente Madre "Niño San Bartolomé" in Lima, Peru, within the time frame of 2011-2012. All the personal data from the patients' medical histories and endoscopic procedures were collected. The crude prevalence ratios (PR) were obtained and adjusted (aPR) with their 95% confidence intervals (95%CI), using generalized linear models with the binomial family and log link function. A total of 123 children met the study criteria. Forty-eight (39%) of the study sample were girls and the mean age of the children was 12 years. H. pylori was present in 44% of the sample and 9% presented with more than 100 bacteria per field (classified as +++). Thirty-five percent of the children had esophagitis due to concomitant reflux. The presence of H. pylori was associated with follicular gastritis (Pgastritis had a greater likelihood of having H. pylori than those that did not present with gastritis. These results can be extrapolated to other similar populations and should be evaluated in each setting so that this does not become a public health problem within the next few years. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  17. The Prevalence of Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome Among Regular Marijuana Smokers in an Urban Public Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habboushe, Joseph; Rubin, Ada; Liu, Haoming; Hoffman, Robert S

    2018-01-12

    Epidemiological data, including prevalence, for cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome (CHS) remain largely unknown. Without these data, clinicians often describe CHS as "rare" or "very rare" without supporting information. We seek to estimate the prevalence of CHS in a population of patients presenting to a socioeconomically and racially diverse urban Emergency Department of a public hospital. This study consisted of a questionnaire administered to a convenience sample of patients presenting to the ED of the oldest public hospital in the United States. Trained Research Associates (RAs) administered the questionnaire to patients between the ages of 18-49 years who reported smoking marijuana at least 20 days per month. The survey included questions related to CHS symptoms (nausea and vomiting) and Likert scale rankings on eleven symptom relief methods, including "hot showers." Patients were classified as experiencing a phenomenon consistent with CHS if they reported smoking marijuana at least 20 days per month and also rated "hot showers" as five or more on the ten-point symptom relief method Likert scale for nausea and vomiting. Among 2,127 patients approached for participation, 155 met inclusion criteria as smoking 20 or more days per month. Among those surveyed, 32.9% (95% CI, 25.5% - 40.3%) met our criteria for having experienced CHS. If this is extractable to the general population, approximately 2.75 million (2.13 - 3.38 million) Americans may have suffered from a phenomenon similar to CHS. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  18. USE OF EXTEMPORANEOUS MAGISTRAL PREPARATIONS IN PEDIATRIC PATIENTS OF A PUBLIC HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josneri Flores Britto

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This is a descriptive study of retrospective evaluating medical prescriptions containing extemporaneous compounding formulations of a maternal and child public hospital from June 2011 to June 2012. We analyzed 82 prescriptions containing extemporaneous compounding preparations involving 19 therapeutic classes. The results indicated that (64.6% prescriptions presented use restriction considering the age. Sildenafil and caffeine were the most used formulations with inappropriate doses and restricted use by age group. In addition, in no prescription have been described the excipients recommended for masterful preparation. The most prevalent diagnosis was prematurity (45.1% and preterm infants less than 37 weeks (54.9% were those who used more preparations that are extemporaneous in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU. It concluded that health professionals should be aware of the risks of the use of extemporaneous preparations for children in hospitals, given that some drugs are inappropriate, untested or presentations not suitable for children and with great possibility of causing Adverse Drug Reactions (ADR.

  19. [Social disability and public hospitals: towards a model of resource allocation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castiel, Didier; Bréchat, Pierre-Henri; Mathieu-Grenouilleau, Marie-Christine; Rymer, Roland

    2009-01-01

    A recent study to measure social disability used the results of a questionnaire administered to 696 patients between March 14th and April 7th 2007 which showed that three-quarters of the population surveyed have a social disability. Major determinants of social disadvantage are found using three specific indicators: income, assets and home-interior comfort. A greater deterioration of poor health status was not particularly noted within the most socially disadvantage group of patients, and social disability did not lead to actual over-consumption of medical products or services. People with social disabilities remained hospitalised more than 1.5 days over the average length of hospital stay which accounts for an inferred additional costs to hospital budgets equivalent to 10.3 million ?. The article proposes a model for measuring social disability that can be used routinely upon patient admission to identify socially disadvantaged cases in order to offer those patients specific and tailored assistance and reduce the length of their stay. This model may also support public health policy monitoring.

  20. Postmortem findings and opportunistic infections in HIV-positive patients from a public hospital in Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eza, Dominique; Cerrillo, Gustavo; Moore, David A.J.; Castro, Cecilia; Ticona, Eduardo; Morales, Domingo; Cabanillas, Jose; Barrantes, Fernando; Alfaro, Alejandro; Benavides, Alejandro; Rafael, Arturo; Valladares, Gilberto; Arevalo, Fernando; Evans, Carlton A.; Gilman, Robert H.

    2010-01-01

    There is a paucity of HIV autopsy data from South America and none that document the postmortem findings in patients with HIV/AIDS in Peru. The purpose of this autopsy study was to determine the spectrum of opportunistic infections and the causes of mortality in HIV-positive patients at a public hospital in Lima. Clinico-epidemiological information regarding HIV infection in Peru is also reviewed. Sixteen HIV-related hospital postmortems, performed between 1999 and 2004, were included in this retrospective analysis. The primary cause of death was established in 12 patients: one died of neoplasia and 11 of infectious diseases, including 3 from pulmonary infection, 7 from disseminated infection, and 2 from central nervous system infection (one case had dual pathology). Opportunistic infections were identified in 14 cases, comprising cytomegalovirus, histoplasmosis, cryptococcosis, toxoplasmosis, Pneumocystis pneumonia, aspergillosis, tuberculosis, varicella zoster virus, and cryptosporidiosis. Fourteen patients had at least one AIDS-related disease that had been neither clinically suspected nor diagnosed premortem. Moreover, 82% of the diagnoses considered to be of important clinical significance had not been suspected antemortem. The spectrum and frequency of certain opportunistic infections differed from other South American autopsy studies, highlighting the importance of performing HIV/AIDS postmortems in resource-limited countries where locally specific disease patterns may be observed. PMID:16979302

  1. Team nursing: Accidents at work with biological material in a public hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andressa Baleeiro da Silva

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Safety in the workplace is very important in the social sciences, and economic health. In the context of health care, the nurse is among the health professionals most affected by accidents with biological material, which reveals the need for studies and discussions on this subject. This study was conducted in a public hospital located in Bahia. Objective: To analyze the occurrence of work accidents with nursing professionals related to biological hazards. Methodology: This is a documentary study, conducted in the period from June to December of 2010. Results and discussion: The study population was predominantly female, 87% of nursing. The perforating was the major cause of accidents, among registered. This study highlighted the characteristics of professional nursing that is more exposed to accidents involving biological material and the need for inclusion of vocational training activities. Conclusion: With this study was to analyze the exposure to the professional nursing accidents with biological material, and highlight how this issue is troubling in the context of hospital care.

  2. TEAM NURSING: ACCIDENTS AT WORK WITH BIOLOGICAL MATERIAL IN A PUBLIC HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andressa Baleeiro da Silva

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Safety in the workplace is very important in the social sciences, and economic health. In the context of health care, the nurse is among the health professionals most affected by accidents with biological material, which reveals the need for studies and discussions on this subject. This study was conducted in a public hospital located in Bahia. Objective: To analyze the occurrence of work accidents with nursing professionals related to biological hazards. Methodology: This is a documentary study, conducted in the period from June to December of 2010. Results and discussion: The study population was predominantly female, 87% of nursing. The perforating was the major cause of accidents, among registered. This study highlighted the characteristics of professional nursing that is more exposed to accidents involving biological material and the need for inclusion of vocational training activities. Conclusion: With this study was to analyze the exposure to the professional nursing accidents with biological material, and highlight how this issue is troubling in the context of hospital care.

  3. Quality of life of women submitted to myocardial revascularization surgery in a public hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafaela Melo de Oliveira

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the sociodemografic profile, risck factors and the quality of life of women submitted to myocardial revascularization surgery. Methods: We conducted a qualitative study by applying a questionnaire on lifestyle and risk factors and an interview with four guiding questions to 15 revascularized inpatients of cardiology units of a referral public hospital and who had no manifestations of depression prior to surgery. Results: The patients profile showed that 9 (60% were Caucasian, 8 (54% had incomplete primary education, 4(27% were housewives, 9 (60% lived in urban area, 10 (67% were married, all had a family income lower than three minimum wages and 4(27% had only two kids. From the content analysis of the interviews, the following categories aroused: religiosity, disruption with everyday life, family and quality of life. Conclusion: We found out that the knowledge about the psychosocial structure of each patient helps in the treatment of the individual submitted to myocardial revascularization. By identifying the lifestyle and risk factors, women promote self-knowledge, which can avoid habits that lead to cardiovascular diseases. We suggest the development of strategies for prevention and health promotion involving the patients and their families so that there is an extension of hospital care at home and a betteradaptation to the new condition.

  4. Affordability of emergency obstetric and neonatal care at public hospitals in Madagascar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Ayako; Randaoharison, Pierana Gabriel; Matsui, Mitsuaki

    2011-05-01

    Timely access to emergency obstetric care is necessary to save the lives of women experiencing complications at delivery, and for newborn babies. Out-of-pocket costs are one of the critical factors hindering access to such services in low- and middle-income countries. This study measured out-of-pocket costs for caesarean section and neonatal care at an urban tertiary public hospital in Madagascar, assessed affordability in relation to household expenditure and investigated where families found the money to cover these costs. Data were collected for 103 women and 73 newborns at the Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Mahajanga in the Boeny region of Madagascar between September 2007 and January 2008. Out-of-pocket costs for caesarean section were catastrophic for middle and lower socio-economic households, and treatment for neonatal complications also created a big financial burden, with geographical and other financial barriers further limiting access to hospital care. This study identified 12 possible cases where the mother required an emergency caesarean section and her newborn required emergency care, placing a double burden on the household. In an effort to make emergency obstetric and neonatal care affordable and available to all, including those living in rural areas and those of medium and lower socio-economic status, well-designed financial risk protection mechanisms and a strong commitment by the government to mobilise resources to finance the country's health system are necessary. Copyright © 2011 Reproductive Health Matters. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. [Psychosocial stress environment and health workers in public health: Differences between primary and hospital care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Rodríguez, Antonio; Gutiérrez-Bedmar, Mario; Bellón-Saameño, Juan Ángel; Muñoz-Bravo, Carlos; Fernández-Crehuet Navajas, Joaquín

    2015-01-01

    To describe the psychosocial environment of health professionals in public health in primary and hospital care, and compare it with that of the general Spanish working population, as well as to evaluate the effect of psychosocial risk factors on symptoms related to perceived stress. Cross-sectional study with stratified random sampling. Health care workers in the province of Granada, distributed in 5 hospitals and 4 health districts. A total of 738 employees (medical and nursing staff) of the Andalusian Health Service (SAS) were invited to take part. CopSoQ/Istas21 questionnaire developed for the multidimensional analysis of the psychosocial work environment. Stress symptoms were measured with the Stress Profile questionnaire. The response rate was 67.5%. Compared with the Spanish workforce, our sample showed high cognitive, emotional, and sensory psychological demands, possibilities for development and sense of direction in their work. Primary care physicians were the group with a worse psychosocial work environment. All the groups studied showed high levels of stress symptoms. Multivariate analysis showed that variables associated with high levels of stress symptom were younger and with possibilities for social relations, role conflict, and higher emotional demands, and insecurity at work. Our findings support that the psychosocial work environment of health workers differs from that of the Spanish working population, being more unfavorable in general practitioners. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Prediction of hospital acute myocardial infarction and heart failure 30-day mortality rates using publicly reported performance measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaronson, David S; Bardach, Naomi S; Lin, Grace A; Chattopadhyay, Arpita; Goldman, L Elizabeth; Dudley, R Adams

    2013-01-01

    To identify an approach to summarizing publicly reported hospital performance data for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) or heart failure (HF) that best predicts current year hospital mortality rates. A total of 1,868 U.S. hospitals reporting process and outcome measures for AMI and HF to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) from July 2005 to June 2006 (Year 0) and July 2006 to June 2007 (Year 1). Observational cohort study measuring the percentage variation in Year 1 hospital 30-day risk-adjusted mortality rate explained by denominator-based weighted composite scores summarizing hospital Year 0 performance. Data were prospectively collected from hospitalcompare.gov. Percentage variation in Year 1 mortality was best explained by mortality rate alone in Year 0 over other composites including process performance. If only Year 0 mortality rates were reported, and consumers using hospitals in the highest decile of mortality instead chose hospitals in the lowest decile of mortality rate, the number of deaths at 30 days that potentially could have been avoided was 1.31 per 100 patients for AMI and 2.12 for HF (p < .001). Public reports focused on 30-day risk-adjusted mortality rate may more directly address policymakers' goals of facilitating consumer identification of hospitals with better outcomes. © 2011 National Association for Healthcare Quality.

  7. Beyond NIMBYs and NOOMBYs: what can wind farm controversies teach us about public involvement in hospital closures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Ellen; Aitken, Mhairi

    2015-12-01

    Many policymakers, researchers and commentators argue that hospital closures are necessary as health systems adapt to new technological and financial contexts, and as population health needs in developed countries shift. However closures are often unpopular with local communities. Previous research has characterised public opposition as an obstacle to change. Public opposition to the siting of wind farms, often described as NIMBYism (Not In My Back Yard), is a useful comparator issue to the perceived NOOMBYism (Not Out Of My Back Yard) of hospital closure protestors. The analysis of public attitudes to wind farms has moved from a fairly crude characterisation of the 'attitude-behaviour gap' between publics who support the idea of wind energy, but oppose local wind farms, to empirical, often qualitative, studies of public perspectives. These have emphasised the complexity of public attitudes, and revealed some of the 'rational' concerns which lie beneath protests. Research has also explored processes of community engagement within the wind farm decision-making process, and the crucial role of trust between communities, authorities, and developers. Drawing on what has been learnt from studies of opposition to wind farms, we suggest a range of questions and approaches to explore public perspectives on hospital closure more thoroughly. Understanding the range of public responses to service change is an important first step in resolving the practical dilemma of effecting health system transformation in a democratic fashion.

  8. Outsourcing and benchmarking in a rural public hospital: does economic theory provide the complete answer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, S H

    2003-01-01

    The ideology and pronouncements of the Australian Government in introducing 'competitive neutrality' to the public sector has improved efficiency and resource usage. In the health sector, the Human Services Department directed that non-clinical and clinical areas be market tested through benchmarking services against the private sector, with the possibility of outsourcing. These services included car parking, computing, laundry, engineering, cleaning, catering, medical imaging (radiology), pathology, pharmacy, allied health and general practice. Managers, when they choose between outsourcing, and internal servicing and production, would thus ideally base their decision on economic principles. Williamson's transaction cost theory studies the governance mechanisms that can be used to achieve economic efficiency and proposes that the optimal organisation structure is that which minimises transaction costs or the costs of exchange. Williamson proposes that four variables will affect such costs, namely: (i) frequency of exchange; (ii) asset specificity; (iii) environmental uncertainty; and (iv) threat of opportunism. This paper provides evidence from a rural public hospital and examines whether Williamson's transaction cost theory is applicable. Case study research operates within the interpretivism paradigm and is used in this research to uncover why the outsourcing decision was made. Such research aims to study real-life experiences by examining the way people think and act and, in contrast to positivism, allows the interviewer to participate to better understand the details and features of the experiences. In the present research, individual interviews were conducted with managers of the hospital and owners and staff of the vendor organisations using semi- and unstructured questions to ascertain the extent of, and processes used in, outsourcing specific functional areas, and areas that were not outsourced. Pathology, radiology, dental technician services and lawn

  9. Something in the Air: Dr Carter Moffat’s Ammoniaphone and the Victorian Science of Singing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr Melissa Dickson

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In January 1885, the Glaswegian Professor of Chemistry Dr Robert Carter Moffat organised a special operatic concert at St James’s Hall, London, to which he invited around two thousand scientists and musicians. The point of this invitation concert was that all the singers used bottled air. Moffat himself appeared between the various performances, wielding his mysterious Ammoniaphone, or bottled-air machine, a long silver tube which he flourished in the faces of his audience while describing its virtues with considerable animation. The premise of the Ammoniaphone was that since Italian opera singers were known throughout the world for the beauty of their voices, it stood to reason that this must have something to do with the quality of the air they breathed. The Ammoniaphone, Moffat claimed, contained the precise chemical formula of the air in Southern Italy, and inhaling from this instrument effectively resulted in the ‘Italianization of the voice’. Drawing on representations of the Ammoniaphone across nineteenth-century advertising and the medical and musical press, and situating these representations within the broader Victorian fascination with the supremacy of Italian opera singers, this essay offers new insight into the emergent corporeal anxieties betrayed by late nineteenth-century consumer culture, and the various methods by which the body might be continually fashioned and re-fashioned in order to produce a high-functioning social subject in a fast-paced modern society. Aggressively (not to say unscrupulously advertised, the Ammoniaphone was marketed to vocalists, clergymen, public speakers, choirmasters, schoolmasters, parliamentarians, and enthusiastic amateurs of these vocations, with claims that it would conserve and preserve the voice, expand its range upwards and downwards, and lend it an otherwise unobtainable purity, beauty and richness. This, I will argue, was symptomatic of a broader cultural need to counter the stresses

  10. What are the career planning and development practices for nurses in hospitals? Is there a difference between private and public hospitals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonmez, Betul; Yildirim, Aytolan

    2009-12-01

    The aim was to determine the opinions of nurse managers about career planning and development for nurses in hospitals. Career planning and development are defined as an important and necessary tool in the development of nurses as professionals and in retaining nurses in a facility. A descriptive survey. The research population comprised nurse managers in 200+ bed hospitals on the European side of Istanbul province (n = 668). The entire population was targeted and 373 nurse managers were included in the study (55.8% return rate). Data were collected with a 32-item survey form that had three sections to determine the nurse managers' demographic characteristics, the career development practices at the facility where they worked, the nurse managers' responsibilities for career development and their expected competencies and recommendations. The findings of this study suggest that the most common technique used for nurses for career development was education programs, the career development practices of private hospitals were more developed than public hospitals and the nurse managers' perceptions about career development were different according to their management level, age group and educational level (p career development practices identified and the nurse managers did not have agreement on the subject of career development. Hospitals which provide opportunity for horizontal and vertical promotion and have clear development policies will be successful hospitals which are preferred by high quality nurses. This study draws attention to the importance of career planning in nursing and the need for nurse managers to take an active role in career planning and development.

  11. Optimal Decision Model for Sustainable Hospital Building Renovation-A Case Study of a Vacant School Building Converting into a Community Public Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juan, Yi-Kai; Cheng, Yu-Ching; Perng, Yeng-Horng; Castro-Lacouture, Daniel

    2016-06-24

    Much attention has been paid to hospitals environments since modern pandemics have emerged. The building sector is considered to be the largest world energy consumer, so many global organizations are attempting to create a sustainable environment in building construction by reducing energy consumption. Therefore, maintaining high standards of hygiene while reducing energy consumption has become a major task for hospitals. This study develops a decision model based on genetic algorithms and A* graph search algorithms to evaluate existing hospital environmental conditions and to recommend an optimal scheme of sustainable renovation strategies, considering trade-offs among minimal renovation cost, maximum quality improvement, and low environmental impact. Reusing vacant buildings is a global and sustainable trend. In Taiwan, for example, more and more school space will be unoccupied due to a rapidly declining birth rate. Integrating medical care with local community elder-care efforts becomes important because of the aging population. This research introduces a model that converts a simulated vacant school building into a community public hospital renovation project in order to validate the solutions made by hospital managers and suggested by the system. The result reveals that the system performs well and its solutions are more successful than the actions undertaken by decision-makers. This system can improve traditional hospital building condition assessment while making it more effective and efficient.

  12. The impact of the financial crisis and austerity policies on the service quality of public hospitals in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keramidou, Ioanna; Triantafyllopoulos, Loukas

    2017-12-24

    The influence of the financial crisis on the efficiency of Greek public hospitals has been widely debated. Despite this increasing interest in such research, the question of to what extent the recent reforms in the Greek National health care system were effective in establishing a health care structure and process that provide better results for patients has yet to be fully investigated. As a step in this direction, the paper focuses on patient's experience with public hospital care quality before and during the economic crisis. A questionnaire survey was carried out among 1872 patients discharged from 110 out of the total of 124 Greek public hospitals. Patients' perceptions were analysed using a structural equation modelling approach. The findings reveal that public hospital service quality is at a medium level (66.2 on a scale from 1 to 100) over 2007-2014, presenting a decreasing trend during the recession. Policies to address the crisis may have contributed to a reduction in hospital expenditures, but at the same time patients were increasingly dissatisfied with the technical care. Consequently, there is a need for reforms aimed at the achievement of productivity gains, responsibility, and transparency in the management of productive resources, by enabling health organisations to reduce their costs without a deterioration in the quality of care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Waste management in three public hospitals of Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil - doi:10.5020/18061230.2010.p221

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keila Tivirolli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To assess the management of health service waste generated in three public hospitals of Mato Grosso do Sul (Brazil, including qualitative and quantitative parameters. Methods: This was an observational and descriptive study. We assessed the waste management in two large public hospitals (HG1, 240 hospital beds and HG2, 343 beds and in a small sized one (HP, 35 hospital beds. The data were collected in situ, by direct observation of the procedures for waste management and by quantifying the mass of waste generated by working sector in the three hospitals. Results: The study revealed that the internal management of waste generated in the three health care unities was not adequate, and that their workers were not trained on the proper management of waste and the use of personal protective equipment. The average rates of waste generation determined in HG1, HG2 and HP were, respectively, 4.7, 4.8 and 2.4 Kg.hospital bed-1.day-1, that fit the range of values reported in the literature. Conclusion: The detected inadequacies directly put at risk the health of workers and others who attend the three assessed hospitals and the outside comunity, which may be exposed to pathogens or toxic agents present in such waste.

  14. Validity and reliability of Turkish version of "Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture" and perception of patient safety in public hospitals in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filiz Emel

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPS is used to assess safety culture in many countries. Accordingly, the questionnaire has been translated into Turkish for the study of patient safety culture in Turkish hospitals. The aim of this study is threefold: to determine the validity and reliability of the translated form of HSOPS, to evaluate physicians' and nurses' perceptions of patient safety in Turkish public hospitals, and to compare finding with U.S. hospital settings. Methods Physicians and nurses working in all public hospitals in Konya, a large city in Turkey, were asked to complete a self-administrated patient safety culture survey (n = 309. Data collection was carried out using the Turkish version of HSOPS, developed by Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ. Data were summarized as percentages, means, and SD values. Factor analysis, correlation coefficient, Cronbach's alpha, ANOVA, and t tests were employed in statistical analyses. Items on patient safety were categorized into 10 factors. Factor loadings and internal consistencies of dimension items were high. Results Most of the scores related to dimensions, and the overall patient safety score (44% were lower than the benchmark score. "Teamwork within hospital units" received the highest score (70%, and the lowest score belonged to the "frequency of events reported" (15%. The study revealed that more than three quarters of the physicians and nurses were not reporting errors. Conclusion The Turkish version of HSOPS was found to be valid and reliable in determining patient safety culture. This tool will be helpful in tracking improvements and in heightening awareness on patient safety culture in Turkey.

  15. Validity and reliability of Turkish version of "Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture" and perception of patient safety in public hospitals in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background The Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPS) is used to assess safety culture in many countries. Accordingly, the questionnaire has been translated into Turkish for the study of patient safety culture in Turkish hospitals. The aim of this study is threefold: to determine the validity and reliability of the translated form of HSOPS, to evaluate physicians' and nurses' perceptions of patient safety in Turkish public hospitals, and to compare finding with U.S. hospital settings. Methods Physicians and nurses working in all public hospitals in Konya, a large city in Turkey, were asked to complete a self-administrated patient safety culture survey (n = 309). Data collection was carried out using the Turkish version of HSOPS, developed by Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). Data were summarized as percentages, means, and SD values. Factor analysis, correlation coefficient, Cronbach's alpha, ANOVA, and t tests were employed in statistical analyses. Items on patient safety were categorized into 10 factors. Factor loadings and internal consistencies of dimension items were high. Results Most of the scores related to dimensions, and the overall patient safety score (44%) were lower than the benchmark score. "Teamwork within hospital units" received the highest score (70%), and the lowest score belonged to the "frequency of events reported" (15%). The study revealed that more than three quarters of the physicians and nurses were not reporting errors. Conclusion The Turkish version of HSOPS was found to be valid and reliable in determining patient safety culture. This tool will be helpful in tracking improvements and in heightening awareness on patient safety culture in Turkey. PMID:20109186

  16. Risk factors for low birthweight in the public-hospitals at Peshawar, NWFP-Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payne Roger

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low birthweight is a widely used indicator of newborn health. This study investigates the association of birthweight Methods Data on geo-demographics, maternal health indicators, pregnancy history and outcome scores for newborn babies and their families (n = 1039 were collected prospectively between August and November 2003 in a cross-sectional survey of four public hospitals in Peshawar, NWFP-Pakistan. Crude and adjusted odds ratios were used to investigate the factors affecting incidence of LBW, by multivariate logistic regression. Gestational age was included as an explanatory variable therefore the additional covariates identified by model selection are expected to account for SGA. Results The main geo-demographic risk factors for SGA identified in this study, controlling for gestational age of less than 37 weeks, are maternal age, nationality and consanguinity. Presentation with anaemia and the history of previous abortion/miscarriage were also found to be significant independent factors. The adjusted odds ratio for gestational age showed the largest effect in explaining the incidence of LBW. The next highest odds ratio was for maternal age below 20 years. The explanatory model included two pairwise interactions, for which the predicted incidence figures for LBW show an increase among the Tribal area with presentation of anaemia, and among full term babies with their mothers having a previous history of abortion/miscarriage. Conclusion In addition to gestational age, specific factors related to geo-demographics (maternal age, consanguinity and nationality, maternal health (anaemia and pregnancy history (abortion/miscarriage were significantly associated with the incidence of LBW observed at the four hospitals surveyed in Peshawar. These results indicate that cultural factors can adversely affect the incidence of SGA in this area of Pakistan.

  17. Knowledge, Attitudes and Practice about Pap Smear among Women Reffering to A Public Hospital

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    Sedighe Rezaie-Chamani

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The Pap smear is a reliable, inexpensive and effective screening test for cervical cancer; thesecond most common cancer among women worldwide. We aimed to determine women’s knowledge,attitudes and practice towards Pap smear and barriers for the screening in a public hospital.Materials and methods: This study, was carried out on 350 outpatient married women reffering for avisit at the clinics of the Alzahra educational hospital, Rasht- Iran, 2011. A questionnaire includingdemographic characteristics (24 questions, knowledge (14 questions, attitudes (11 statments andpractice (10 questions towards Pap smear was completed by interview with the women. The data wereanalyzed using SPSS ver.13.Results: Mean age of participants was 32 (SD 12 years. Of the respondents, only 44.3% were aware ofthe Pap smear and 27.1% had had it at least once in their life. The most common reason for having thetest was physicians’ or other health workers’ advise and for not having the test was no recommendationby health providers and lack of knowledge about Pap smear. Embarrassing, fear of the test result oreconomic problems mentioned by only 12 (4.2% as the main barrier. Mean (±SD knowledge score ofthe women who had heard about the Pap smear was 59.4 (24.3 and attitudes score of all participantswas 48.5 (11.6 from possible range score of 0-100. Women with a history of Pap smear had had higherawareness and attitudes score.Conclusion: The knowledge and practice of the women was inadequate and need to be promoted.Considering the main reason mentioned by the participants for not having the test, all health providersshould educate and encourage women to do regular Pap smear.

  18. Trauma case review: A quality and safety feature of the Victorian State Trauma System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Carolyn; Cameron, Peter A; Gabbe, Belinda; McLellan, Susan; Walker, Tony

    2017-11-07

    The aim of the present study was to describe the trauma case review process and its role in a regionalised trauma system. Victoria has a population of 5.9 million people, accounting for 26% of Australia's population. Victoria has been serviced by an inclusive, organised trauma system since 2000 comprising 138 health services with trauma designations and three major trauma services. Pre- and interhospital guidelines prescribe the timely transport of patients to the appropriate level of trauma service. A review of the role and contribution of 10 years of operation of the trauma case review group (CRG) was undertaken to describe the aims, processes and governance surrounding the implementation of an individual case review for specified major trauma patients. Specified patients were those identified by the Victorian State Trauma Registry as being managed outside of established Victorian State Trauma System prehospital and interhospital guidelines. A state-wide trauma case review process was implemented across the trauma system using data-informed detection flags and screening criteria. Using data from the Victorian State Trauma Registry, detection flags were correlated with patients at risk of a poorer outcome, thereby ensuring that all patients managed outside of the requirements of established trauma triage and transfer guidelines were subject to review. The CRG provides an individual review process as a technique for assessing and monitoring major trauma patient care and compliance with trauma system triage and transfer guidelines. The process has been effective as a quality and safety strategy by improving clinician knowledge of major trauma triage and transfer guidelines and facilitating improved compliance, particularly with interhospital transfers. Strong compliance has been achieved from health services with the requirement to internally review and respond to CRG concerns regarding 'high-risk' trauma cases. Anecdotal feedback from health services regarding

  19. Electronic signature for medical documents--integration and evaluation of a public key infrastructure in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandner, R; van der Haak, M; Hartmann, M; Haux, R; Schmücker, P

    2002-01-01

    Our objectives were to determine the user-oriented and legal requirements for a Public Key Infrastructure (PKI) for electronic signatures for medical documents, and to translate these requirements into a general model for a signature system. A prototype of this model was then implemented and evaluated in clinical routine use. Analyses of documents, processes, interviews, observations, and of the available literature supplied the foundations for the development of the signature system model. Eight participants of the Department of Dermatology of the Heidelberg University Medical Center evaluated the implemented prototype from December 2000 to January 2001, during the course of an intervention study. By means of questionnaires, interviews, observations and database analyses, the usefulness and user acceptance of the electronic signature and its integration into electronic discharge letters were established. Since the major part of medical documents generated in a hospital are signature-relevant, they will require electronic signatures in the future. A PKI must meet the multitude of responsibilities and security needs required in a hospital. Also, the signature functionality must be integrated directly into the workflow surrounding document creation. A developed signature model, fulfilling user-oriented and legal requirements, was implemented using hard and software components that conform to the German Signature Law. It was integrated into the existing hospital information system of the Heidelberg University Medical Center. At the end of the intervention study, the average acceptance scores achieved were mean = 3.90; SD = 0.42 on a scale of 1 (very negative attitude) to 5 (very positive attitude) for the electronic signature procedure. Acceptance of the integration into computer-supported discharge letter writing reached mean = 3.91; SD = 0.47. On average, the discharge letters were completed 7.18 days earlier. The electronic signature is indispensable for the

  20. Hospital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    treatment modality. Design: It is a retrospective study of all confirmed. Burkitt's lymphoma of the head and neck region seen at the Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospital Ile. Ife (OAUTHC) between 1986 and 2002. Patients and methods: The medical records of all the patients with the histopathologically confirmed ...

  1. Occurrence of medication errors and comparison of manual and computerized prescription systems in public sector hospitals in Lahore, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riaz, Muhammad Kashif; Hashmi, Furqan Khurshid; Bukhari, Nadeem Irfan; Riaz, Mohammad; Hussain, Khalid

    2014-01-01

    The knowledge of medication errors is an essential prerequisite for better healthcare delivery. The present study investigated prescribing errors in prescriptions from outpatient departments (OPDs) and emergency wards of two public sector hospitals in Lahore, Pakistan. A manual prescription system was followed in Hospital A. Hospital B was running a semi-computerised prescription system in the OPD and a fully computerised prescription system in the emergency ward. A total of 510 prescriptions from both departments of these two hospitals were evaluated for patient characteristics, demographics and medication errors. The data was analysed using a chi square test for comparison of errors between both the hospitals. The medical departments in OPDs of both hospitals were the highest prescribers at 45%-60%. The age group receiving the most treatment in emergency wards of both the hospitals was 21-30 years (21%-24%). A trend of omitting patient addresses and diagnoses was observed in almost all prescriptions from both of the hospitals. Nevertheless, patient information such as name, age, gender and legibility of the prescriber's signature were found in almost 100% of the electronic-prescriptions. In addition, no prescribing error was found pertaining to drug concentrations, quantity and rate of administration in e-prescriptions. The total prescribing errors in the OPD and emergency ward of Hospital A were found to be 44% and 60%, respectively. In hospital B, the OPD had 39% medication errors and the emergency department had 73.5% errors; this unexpected difference between the emergency ward and OPD of hospital B was mainly due to the inclusion of 69.4% omissions of route of administration in the prescriptions. The incidence of prescription overdose was approximately 7%-19% in the manual system and approximately 8% in semi and fully electronic system. The omission of information and incomplete information are contributors of prescribing errors in both manual and electronic

  2. Occurrence of medication errors and comparison of manual and computerized prescription systems in public sector hospitals in Lahore, Pakistan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Kashif Riaz

    Full Text Available The knowledge of medication errors is an essential prerequisite for better healthcare delivery. The present study investigated prescribing errors in prescriptions from outpatient departments (OPDs and emergency wards of two public sector hospitals in Lahore, Pakistan. A manual prescription system was followed in Hospital A. Hospital B was running a semi-computerised prescription system in the OPD and a fully computerised prescription system in the emergency ward. A total of 510 prescriptions from both departments of these two hospitals were evaluated for patient characteristics, demographics and medication errors. The data was analysed using a chi square test for comparison of errors between both the hospitals. The medical departments in OPDs of both hospitals were the highest prescribers at 45%-60%. The age group receiving the most treatment in emergency wards of both the hospitals was 21-30 years (21%-24%. A trend of omitting patient addresses and diagnoses was observed in almost all prescriptions from both of the hospitals. Nevertheless, patient information such as name, age, gender and legibility of the prescriber's signature were found in almost 100% of the electronic-prescriptions. In addition, no prescribing error was found pertaining to drug concentrations, quantity and rate of administration in e-prescriptions. The total prescribing errors in the OPD and emergency ward of Hospital A were found to be 44% and 60%, respectively. In hospital B, the OPD had 39% medication errors and the emergency department had 73.5% errors; this unexpected difference between the emergency ward and OPD of hospital B was mainly due to the inclusion of 69.4% omissions of route of administration in the prescriptions. The incidence of prescription overdose was approximately 7%-19% in the manual system and approximately 8% in semi and fully electronic system. The omission of information and incomplete information are contributors of prescribing errors in both

  3. Prevalence of Legionella pneumophila in water distribution systems in hospitals and public buildings of the Lublin region of eastern Poland

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    Agnieszka Sikora

    2015-05-01

    The water samples collected form the hot water supply system of hospitals and public buildings showed exceeded counts of L. pneumophila, indicating the risk of infection. The constant monitoring of water distribution systems is an important element of the control of infections caused by these organisms.

  4. Training Needs of Nurses in Public Hospitals in Australia: Review of Current Practices and Future Research Agenda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlisle, Joanna; Bhanugopan, Ramudu; Fish, Alan

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This paper seeks to provide an overview of the concept of training needs analysis (TNA), current practice, models and the impact that training needs analysis currently has on nurses in public hospitals in Australia. Thus, the paper should aid future research in the area of TNA of nurses through helping researchers to clarify the…

  5. The indirect costs of agency nurses in South Africa: a case study in two public sector hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rispel, Laetitia C.; Moorman, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Background Globally, flexible work arrangements – through the use of temporary nursing staff – are an important strategy for dealing with nursing shortages in hospitals. Objective The objective of the study was to determine the direct and indirect costs of agency nurses, as well as the advantages and the problems associated with agency nurse utilisation in two public sector hospitals in South Africa. Methods Following ethical approval, two South African public sector hospitals were selected purposively. Direct costs were determined through an analysis of hospital expenditure information for a 5-year period from 2005 until 2010, obtained from the national transversal Basic Accounting System database. At each hospital, semi-structured interviews were conducted with the chief executive officer, executive nursing services manager, the maternity or critical care unit nursing manager, the human resource manager, and the finance manager. Indirect costs measured were the time spent on pre-employment checks, and nurse recruitment, orientation, and supervision. All expenditure is expressed in South African Rands (R: 1 USD=R7, 2010 prices). Results In the 2009/10 financial year, Hospital 1 spent R38.86 million (US$5.55 million) on nursing agencies, whereas Hospital 2 spent R10.40 million (US$1.49 million). The total estimated time spent per week on indirect cost activities at Hospital 1 was 51.5 hours, and 60 hours at Hospital 2. The estimated monetary value of this time at Hospital 1 was R962,267 (US$137,467) and at Hospital 2 the value was R300,121 (US$42,874), thus exceeding the weekly direct costs of nursing agencies. Agency nurses assisted the selected hospitals in dealing with problems of nurse recruitment, absenteeism, shortages, and skills gaps in specialised clinical areas. The problems experienced with agency nurses included their perceived lack of commitment, unreliability, and providing sub-optimal quality of patient care. Conclusion Hospital managers and

  6. The indirect costs of agency nurses in South Africa: a case study in two public sector hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rispel, Laetitia C; Moorman, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Globally, flexible work arrangements - through the use of temporary nursing staff - are an important strategy for dealing with nursing shortages in hospitals. The objective of the study was to determine the direct and indirect costs of agency nurses, as well as the advantages and the problems associated with agency nurse utilisation in two public sector hospitals in South Africa. Following ethical approval, two South African public sector hospitals were selected purposively. Direct costs were determined through an analysis of hospital expenditure information for a 5-year period from 2005 until 2010, obtained from the national transversal Basic Accounting System database. At each hospital, semi-structured interviews were conducted with the chief executive officer, executive nursing services manager, the maternity or critical care unit nursing manager, the human resource manager, and the finance manager. Indirect costs measured were the time spent on pre-employment checks, and nurse recruitment, orientation, and supervision. All expenditure is expressed in South African Rands (R: 1 USD=R7, 2010 prices). In the 2009/10 financial year, Hospital 1 spent R38.86 million (US$5.55 million) on nursing agencies, whereas Hospital 2 spent R10.40 million (US$1.49 million). The total estimated time spent per week on indirect cost activities at Hospital 1 was 51.5 hours, and 60 hours at Hospital 2. The estimated monetary value of this time at Hospital 1 was R962,267 (US$137,467) and at Hospital 2 the value was R300,121 (US$42,874), thus exceeding the weekly direct costs of nursing agencies. Agency nurses assisted the selected hospitals in dealing with problems of nurse recruitment, absenteeism, shortages, and skills gaps in specialised clinical areas. The problems experienced with agency nurses included their perceived lack of commitment, unreliability, and providing sub-optimal quality of patient care. Hospital managers and policy-makers need to address the effective

  7. The indirect costs of agency nurses in South Africa: a case study in two public sector hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laetitia C. Rispel

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Globally, flexible work arrangements – through the use of temporary nursing staff – are an important strategy for dealing with nursing shortages in hospitals. Objective: The objective of the study was to determine the direct and indirect costs of agency nurses, as well as the advantages and the problems associated with agency nurse utilisation in two public sector hospitals in South Africa. Methods: Following ethical approval, two South African public sector hospitals were selected purposively. Direct costs were determined through an analysis of hospital expenditure information for a 5-year period from 2005 until 2010, obtained from the national transversal Basic Accounting System database. At each hospital, semi-structured interviews were conducted with the chief executive officer, executive nursing services manager, the maternity or critical care unit nursing manager, the human resource manager, and the finance manager. Indirect costs measured were the time spent on pre-employment checks, and nurse recruitment, orientation, and supervision. All expenditure is expressed in South African Rands (R: 1 USD=R7, 2010 prices. Results: In the 2009/10 financial year, Hospital 1 spent R38.86 million (US$5.55 million on nursing agencies, whereas Hospital 2 spent R10.40 million (US$1.49 million. The total estimated time spent per week on indirect cost activities at Hospital 1 was 51.5 hours, and 60 hours at Hospital 2. The estimated monetary value of this time at Hospital 1 was R962,267 (US$137,467 and at Hospital 2 the value was R300,121 (US$42,874, thus exceeding the weekly direct costs of nursing agencies. Agency nurses assisted the selected hospitals in dealing with problems of nurse recruitment, absenteeism, shortages, and skills gaps in specialised clinical areas. The problems experienced with agency nurses included their perceived lack of commitment, unreliability, and providing sub-optimal quality of patient care. Conclusion

  8. Discussion on a Public Hospital's Practice in Culture Shaping and Innovative Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peiying

    2015-05-01

    Culture shaping is an important part of a hospital's quality management to enhance its medical service, improve doctor-patient relations, and cement its brand image (Jianping and Hong in Chinese Hospital Management 29(1):36-37, 2009). First built in 1953, Xuzhou Central Hospital is a tertiary general hospital in the Huaihai Economic Zone and has won a series of honorary titles for its reforms, innovations, and the level of medical services provided. In recent years, the hospital has increased its efforts in culture shaping through the construction of special departments, medical services, hospital culture, and professional ethics. This has resulted in substantial progress in the hospital's medical capabilities and service quality, and laid a solid foundation to achieve its ambitious goal of becoming a nationally prestigious hospital, among the best in Jiangsu and a regional healthcare center in the Huaihai Economic Zone.

  9. Medical directors' perspectives on strengthening hospital quality and safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canaway, Rachel; Bismark, Marie; Dunt, David; Kelaher, Margaret

    2017-10-09

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to understand the concerns and factors that impact on hospital quality and safety, particularly related to use of performance data, within a setting of devolved governance. Design/methodology/approach This qualitative study used thematic analysis of interviews with public hospital medical directors. For additional context, findings were framed by themes from a review of hospital safety and quality in the same jurisdiction. Findings Varying approaches and levels of complexity were described about what and how performance data are reviewed, prioritised, and quality improvements implemented. Although no consistent narrative emerged, facilitators of improvement were suggested relating to organisational culture, governance, resources, education, and technologies. These hospital-level perspectives articulate with and expand on the system-level themes in a state-wide review of hospital safety and quality. Research limitations/implications The findings are not generalisable, but point to an underlying absence of system-wide agreement on how to perceive, retrieve, analyse, prioritise and action hospital performance data. Practical implications Lack of electronic medical records and an inefficient incident reporting system limits the extent to which performance and incident data can be analysed, linked and shared, thus limiting hospital performance improvement, oversight and learning. Social implications Variable approaches to quality and safety, standards of care, and hospital record keeping and reporting, mean that healthcare consumers might expect inconsistency across Victorian hospitals. Originality/value The views of medical directors have been little researched. This work uses their voice to better understand contextual factors that situate and impact on hospital quality and safety towards understanding the mixed effectiveness of hospital quality improvement strategies.

  10. Managerial competencies of hospital managers in South Africa: a survey of managers in the public and private sectors

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    Pillay Rubin

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background South Africa has large public and private sectors and there is a common perception that public sector hospitals are inefficient and ineffective while the privately owned and managed hospitals provide superior care and are more sustainable. The underlying assumption is that there is a potential gap in management capacity between the two sectors. This study aims to ascertain the skills and competency levels of hospital managers in South Africa and to determine whether there are any significant differences in competency levels between managers in the different sectors. Methods A survey using a self administered questionnaire was conducted among hospital managers in South Africa. Respondents were asked to rate their proficiency with seven key functions that they perform. These included delivery of health care, planning, organizing, leading, controlling, legal and ethical, and self-management. Ratings were based on a five point Likert scale ranging from very low skill level to very high skill level. Results The results show that managers in the private sector perceived themselves to be significantly more competent than their public sector colleagues in most of the management facets. Public sector managers were also more likely than their private sector colleagues to report that they required further development and training. Conclusion The findings confirm our supposition that there is a lack of management capacity within the public sector in South Africa and that there is a significant gap between private and public sectors. It provides evidence that there is a great need for further development of managers, especially those in the public sector. The onus is therefore on administrators and those responsible for management education and training to identify managers in need of development and to make available training that is contextually relevant in terms of design and delivery.

  11. Estimated costs of advanced lung cancer care in a public reference hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knust, Renata Erthal; Portela, Margareth Crisóstomo; Pereira, Claudia Cristina de Aguiar; Fortes, Guilherme Bastos

    2017-08-17

    To estimate the direct medical costs of advanced non-small cell lung cancer care. We assessed a cohort of 277 patients treated in the Brazilian National Cancer Institute in 2011. The costs were estimated from the perspective of the hospital as a service provider of reference for the Brazilian Unified Health System. The materials and procedures used were identified and quantified, per patient, and we assigned to them monetary values, consolidated in phases of the assistance defined. The analyses had a descriptive character with costs in Real (R$). Overall, the cohort represented a cost of R$2,473,559.91, being 71.5% related to outpatient care and 28.5% to hospitalizations. In the outpatient care, costs with radiotherapy (34%) and chemotherapy (22%) predominated. The results pointed to lower costs in the initial phase of treatment (7.2%) and very high costs in the maintenance phase (61.6%). Finally, we identified statistically significant differences of average cost by age groups, education levels, physical performance, and histological type. This study provides a current, useful, and relevant picture of the costs of patients with non-small cell lung cancer treated in a public hospital of reference and it provides information on the magnitude of the problem of cancer in the context of public health. The results confirm the importance of radiation treatment and hospitalizations as the main components of the cost of treatment. Despite some losses of follow-up, we assess that, for approximately 80% of the patients included in the study, the estimates presented herein are satisfactory for the care of the disease, from the perspective of a service provider of reference of the Brazilian Unified Health System, as it provides elements for the management of the service, as well as for studies that result in more rational forms of resource allocation. Estimar os custos médicos diretos da assistência ao câncer de pulmão não pequenas células avançado. Foi avaliada uma

  12. Knowledge about breast cancer and hereditary breast cancer among nurses in a public hospital 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prolla, Carmen Maria Dornelles; da Silva, Patrícia Santos; Netto, Cristina Brinckmann Oliveira; Goldim, José Roberto; Ashton-Prolla, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the knowledge of nurses involved in the care of oncology patients in a public university hospital, regarding breast cancer and hereditary breast cancer, and to verify the use of such knowledge in their daily practice. METHODS: This is a descriptive cross-sectional study. Data were obtained through a structured, self-administered questionnaire. Out of 154 nurses, 137 (88.9%) agreed to participate in the study. Two questionnaires were excluded such that 135 questionnaires were analyzed. RESULTS: The global percentage of correct answers was not associated with age (p=0.173) or degree/specialization (p=0.815). Questions were classified into categories. In categories involving knowledge of established breast cancer risk factors and indicators of hereditary breast cancer, the rate of correct answers was 65.8% and 66.4%, respectively. On the practice of genetic counseling, 40.7% of those interviewed were not sure about the definition of genetic counseling and 78.5% reported never having identified or referred a patient at genetic risk for specialized risk assessment. Practice of educational actions regarding this subject was reported by 48.5% of those interviewed. CONCLUSION: This study reinforces the need to develop qualifying actions for nurses, so that strategies to control breast cancer become effective in their health care practice. PMID:25806636

  13. [High frequency of dyslipidemia in VIH-infected patients in aa peruvian public hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondan, Paola L; Flores-Flores, Oscar; Doria, Nicole A; Valencia-Mesias, Gustavo; Chávez-Pérez, Víctor; Soria, Jaime

    2017-01-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the frequency and characteristics of dyslipidemia in patients with HIV in highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in a Peruvian public hospital. A cross-sectional study was carried out in patients with complete lipid profile after receiving at least six months of HAART. Dyslipidemia was defined according to the criteria of the NCEP-ATP III. We reviewed 2 975 clinical histories, and included 538 (18.1%) in the analysis. The frequency of dyslipidemia was 74.7%. HAART regimens which include protease inhibitors (PI) (odds ratio [OR]: 1.22; confidence interval at 95% [CI 95%]: 1.11-1.33) and to be older than 40 years (OR: 1.17; CI 95%: 1.05-1.28) were associated with dyslipidemia, adjusted by viral load, CD4 lymphocyte level and gender. In conclusion, dyslipidemia was very common in our sample and was mainly associated with the use of PI. It is necessary to promote the dyslipidemia control as part of the comprehensive care of the patient with HIV.

  14. Knowledge about breast cancer and hereditary breast cancer among nurses in a public hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Maria Dornelles Prolla

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the knowledge of nurses involved in the care of oncology patients in a public university hospital, regarding breast cancer and hereditary breast cancer, and to verify the use of such knowledge in their daily practice.METHODS: This is a descriptive cross-sectional study. Data were obtained through a structured, self-administered questionnaire. Out of 154 nurses, 137 (88.9% agreed to participate in the study. Two questionnaires were excluded such that 135 questionnaires were analyzed.RESULTS: The global percentage of correct answers was not associated with age (p=0.173 or degree/specialization (p=0.815. Questions were classified into categories. In categories involving knowledge of established breast cancer risk factors and indicators of hereditary breast cancer, the rate of correct answers was 65.8% and 66.4%, respectively. On the practice of genetic counseling, 40.7% of those interviewed were not sure about the definition of genetic counseling and 78.5% reported never having identified or referred a patient at genetic risk for specialized risk assessment. Practice of educational actions regarding this subject was reported by 48.5% of those interviewed.CONCLUSION: This study reinforces the need to develop qualifying actions for nurses, so that strategies to control breast cancer become effective in their health care practice.

  15. Implementing chronic disease management in the public healthcare sector in Singapore: the role of hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheah, J; Heng, B H

    2001-01-01

    The public health care delivery system in Singapore faces the challenges of a rapidly ageing population, an increasing chronic disease burden, increasing healthcare cost, rising expectations and demand for better health services, and shortage of resources. It is also fragmented, resulting in duplication and lack of coordination between institutions. A disease management approach has been adopted by the National Healthcare Group (NHG) as a critical strategy to provide holistic, cost-effective, seamless and well-coordinated care across the continuum. The framework in the development of the disease management plan included identifying the diseases and defining the target population, organizing a multi-disciplinary team lead by a clinician champion, defining the core components, treatment protocols and evaluation methods, defining the goals, and measuring and managing the outcomes. As disease management and case management for chronic diseases are new approaches adopted in the healthcare delivery system, there is a lack of understanding by healthcare professionals. The leadership and participation of hospital physicians was sought in the planning, design and outcomes monitoring to ensure their 'buy-in' and the successful implementation and effectiveness of the program. The episodic diagnosis related group (DRG)-based framework of funding and subvention for healthcare, and the shortage of step-care care facilities, have been recognized by the Ministry of Health as an impediments to the implementation, and these are currently being addressed.

  16. [Prevalence of postnatal depression in women attending public hospitals in Durango, Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado-Esquivel, Cosme; Sifuentes-Alvarez, Antonio; Estrada-Martínez, Sergio; Salas-Martínez, Carlos; Hernández-Alvarado, Ana Berthina; Ortiz-Rocha, Sara Guadalupe; García-López, Claudia Rosalba; Torres-Castorena, Alejandro; Sandoval-Herrera, Francisco

    2010-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of postnatal depression and associated epidemiological features in a population of women from Durango, Mexico. Applying a cross-sectional design in public hospitals from Durango, we studied 178 women during their 1 to 13 weeks postpartum. The Edinburg Postnatal Depression Scale was applied and depression was evaluated by using the DSM-IV criteria. In addition, socio-demographic, clinical, and psychosocial data from participants were obtained. Of the 178 women, 58 were depressed (32.6%). The prevalence of depression was significantly higher in women with low level of education, with more than 3 years of living with her partner, and in rural, non-insured women. Multivariate analysis showed that postnatal depression was significantly associated with previous depression, history of postnatal depression, depression, anxiety and stress during pregnancy, stress after pregnancy, trauma, bad relationship with partner, abandonment by partner, unwanted pregnancy, family problems, and living without partner. The prevalence of postnatal depression in women living in Durango, Mexico, is high. Several socio-demographic, clinical, and psychosocial factors appear to contribute to this condition.

  17. [Managing the quality of attention in public hospitals' clinical laboratories in Maracaibo, Venezuela].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molero, Tania; Panunzio, Amelia; Cruz, Solbellys; Núñez, Milagros; Zambrano, Mariana; Parra, Irene; Sánchez, Jesús

    2010-08-01

    Evaluating how clinical laboratories' quality was being managed according to the view of external users, thereby determining the dimensions of quality related to their satisfaction and sociodemographic characteristics. The study was descriptive; the sample consisted of 1,875 outpatients attending the laboratories of type 3 and 4 care level public hospitals located in the metropolitan area of Zulia State in Venezuela between October and December 2008. A previously validated survey was applied. Frequency allocation, multivariate analysis and variance analysis were used for analysing data. The results showed that the most users were female (72.7 %), of local origin (87.9 %), aged between 15 and 45 (65.7 %) and had received primary and secondary education (70.5 %). Multivariate analysis showed that quality management could be evaluated in terms of accessibility, tangible elements, response ability, safety and professional competence. There were highly significant differences (pquality. Weaknesses were revealed concerning time spent waiting in reception, waiting room comfort and safety measures used by technical staff. The results should lead to establishing action aimed at evaluating the degree of improvement in service and proposed targets for improving the quality of attention; such measures will form part of a quality assurance programme in accordance with international standards.

  18. [Risk factors associated with neurocysticercosis in a public hospital in Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Trejo, Juan Manuel; Correa-Chacón, Arnulfo Joel; Sctelo-Ham, Elma Ivonne; Torres-Valenzuela, Alejandro; Alvarado-Esquivel, Cosme

    2006-01-01

    A case-control study was carried out to determine risk factors associated with neurocysticercosis in a public hospital in Mexico. The following factors were analyzed: Socioeconomic, sociodemographic, hygiene, eating habits, and family history of neurocysticercosis in 85 cases and 170 controls. Cases were patients with cranial computed tomography images compatible with neurocysticercosis. The densitometric analysis (Hounsfield units) allowed us to distinguish normal tissue from physiological and pathological calcifications, and other types of lesions. Controls were admitted for neurocysticercosis but findings were not compatible with initial diagnosis. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS and Epi-info 2002. The most common clinical manifestation in patients was epileptic seizures OR=4.2 (IC 95% 2.40-9.67). With regards to risk factors, consumption of street food OR=2.33 (IC 95% 1.25-4.38), and family history of neurocysticercosis OR= 2.37 (IC 95% 1.11-5.04) were found to be associated with neurocysticercosis. In the north central region of Mexico where this study was performed, the disease was more frequent among urban populations.

  19. An Early Detection Method of Type-2 Diabetes Mellitus in Public Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermansyah Hermansyah

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is a chronic disease and major problem of morbidity and mortality in developing countries. The International Diabetes Federation estimates that 285 million people around the world have diabetes. This total is expected to rise to 438 million within 20 years. Type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM is the most common type of diabetes and accounts for 90-95% of all diabetes. Detection of T2DM from various factors or symptoms became an issue which was not free from false presumptions accompanied by unpredictable effects. According to this context, data mining and machine learning could be used as an alternative way help us in knowledge discovery from data. We applied several learning methods, such as instance based learners, naive bayes, decision tree, support vector machines, and boosted algorithm acquire information from historical data of patients medical records of Mohammad Hoesin public hospital in Southern Sumatera. Rules are extracted from Decision tree to offer decision-making support through early detection of T2DM for clinicians.

  20. [Gestational syphilis and associated factors in public hospitals of Peru during 2000-2010].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Gustavo F; Tapia, Vilma; Serruya, Suzanne J

    2014-04-01

    To determine the epidemiological profile of gestational syphilis and associated factors in a Peruvian population. The study is a secondary analysis of data obtained from public hospitals in Peru for the 2000-2010 period. 652,636 pregnant women were included from 37 cities and 45 health centers in Peru. The prevalence of gestational syphilis was 0.7%, while 80.7% reported screening for gestational syphilis. The highest prevalence of maternal syphilis is found in the lowland rainforest followed by the highland rainforest. In the three regions of Peru decreased prevalence of gestational syphilis has been seen throughout the years. The prevalence for 2010 are 0.2% on the coast, in the highlands 0.23% and 0.47% in the jungle. The lack of education and prenatal care, high parity, cohabiting or single, and living in the jungle, are associated with having a positive syphilis test. The results suggests that prevalence of gestational syphilis has declined over the decade 2000-2010.

  1. Assessment of the culture of safety in public hospitals in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Rhanna Emanuela Fontenele Lima de; Arruda, Lidyane Parente; Nascimento, Nayanne Karen Pinheiro do; Sampaio, Renata Lopes; Cavalcante, Maria Lígia Silva Nunes; Costa, Ana Carolina Pinto

    2017-03-02

    to assess the culture of safety in three public hospitals. transversal study undertaken in three Brazilian public hospitals, with health professionals through applying the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ). Scores greater than or equal to 75 were considered positive. a total of 573 professionals participated in the study, including nurse technicians and auxiliary nurses 292 (51%), nurses 105 (18.3%), physicians 59 (10.3%), and other professionals 117 (20.4%). The mean of the SAQ varied between 65 and 69 in the three hospitals. Among the domains, however, 'Job satisfaction' presented a higher score, and the opposite was observed for the domain 'Perceptions of management'. The outsourced professionals presented a better perception of the culture of safety than did the statutory professionals. The professionals with higher education presented a better perception of the stressing factors than did the professionals educated to senior high school level. the level of the culture of safety found is below the ideal. The managerial actions are considered the main contributing factor to the culture's weakness; however, the professionals demonstrated themselves to be satisfied with the work. evaluar la cultura de seguridad en tres hospitales públicos. estudio transversal realizado en tres hospitales públicos brasileños, desarrollado con profesionales de la salud aplicando el Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ). Fueron considerados positivos puntajes mayores o iguales a 75. participaron del estudio 573 profesionales, incluyendo técnicos y auxiliares de enfermería 292 (51%), enfermeros 105 (18,3%), médicos 59 (10,3%), y otros profesionales 117 (20,4%). El promedio del SAQ varió entre 65 a 69 en los tres hospitales. Sin embargo, en los dominios, Satisfacción en el Trabajo presentó mayor puntaje y lo opuesto fue observado en el dominio Percepción de la Administración. Los profesionales tercerizados presentaron mejor percepción de la cultura de seguridad que los

  2. High genetic diversity among Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. isolated in a public hospital in Brazil

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    Vera Lúcia Dias Siqueira

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In Brazil and other regions of the world, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. have emerged as important agents of nosocomial infection and are commonly involved in outbreaks. The main objective of the present study was to evaluate the genetic relationship among P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. isolated from patients in a public university hospital in northwestern Paraná, Brazil, and report their antimicrobial resistance profile. A total of 75 P. aeruginosa and 94 Acinetobacter spp. isolates were phenotypically identified and tested for antibiotic susceptibility using automated methodology. Polymyxin B was tested by disk diffusion for P. aeruginosa. Metallo-β-lactamase (MBL was detected using a disk approximation test. Genotyping was performed using enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus polymerase chain reaction (ERIC-PCR. Approximately 55% of the P. aeruginosa isolates and 92% of the Acinetobacter spp. isolates were multiresistant, but none were MBL-producers. ERIC-PCR revealed the presence of small clusters of carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter spp., most likely OXA-type carbapenemase producers. Furthermore, high genetic diversity in P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. clinical isolates was observed, suggesting that cross-transmission is not very frequent in the studied hospital.No Brasil, bem como em outras regiões do mundo, Pseudomonas aeruginosa e Acinetobacter spp. surgiram como importantes agentes de infecção nosocomial e são comumente envolvidos em surtos. O objetivo principal deste estudo foi descrever a relação genética de P. aeruginosa e Acinetobacter spp. isoladas de pacientes internados em hospital universitário público do noroeste do Paraná - Brasil e reportar o perfil de resistência dessas bactérias. Um total de 75 P. aeruginosa e 94 Acinetobacter spp. isolados foi fenotipicamente identificado e testado para a suscetibilidade aos antibióticos por metodologia automatizada. A polimixina B foi

  3. Differences between out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in residential and public locations and implications for public-access defibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folke, Fredrik; Gislason, Gunnar H; Lippert, Freddy

    2010-01-01

    The majority of out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCAs) occur in residential locations, but knowledge about strategic placement of automated external defibrillators in residential areas is lacking. We examined whether residential OHCA areas suitable for placement of automated external defibrillat......The majority of out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCAs) occur in residential locations, but knowledge about strategic placement of automated external defibrillators in residential areas is lacking. We examined whether residential OHCA areas suitable for placement of automated external...... defibrillators could be identified on the basis of demographic characteristics and characterized individuals with OHCA in residential locations....

  4. Investigating Public Facility Characteristics from a Spatial Interaction Perspective: A Case Study of Beijing Hospitals Using Taxi Data

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    Xiaoqing Kong

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Services provided by public facilities are essential to people’s lives and are closely associated with human mobility. Traditionally, public facility access characteristics, such as accessibility, equity issues and service areas, are investigated mainly based on static data (census data, travel surveys and particular records, such as medical records. Currently, the advent of big data offers an unprecedented opportunity to obtain large-scale human mobility data, which can be used to study the characteristics of public facilities from the spatial interaction perspective. Intuitively, spatial interaction characteristics and service areas of different types and sizes of public facilities are different, but how different remains an open question, so we, in turn, examine this question. Based on spatial interaction, we classify public facilities and explore the differences in facilities. In the research, based on spatial interaction extracted from taxi data, we introduce an unsupervised classification method to classify 78 hospitals in 6 districts of Beijing, and the results better reflect the type of hospital. The findings are of great significance for optimizing the spatial configuration of medical facilities or other types of public facilities, allocating public resources reasonably and relieving traffic pressure.

  5. Direct variable cost of the topical treatment of stages III and IV pressure injuries incurred in a public university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacon, Julieta M F; Blanes, Leila; Borba, Luis G; Rocha, Luis R M; Ferreira, Lydia M

    2017-05-01

    to estimate the direct variable costs of the topical treatment of stages III and IV pressure injuries of hospitalized patients in a public university hospital, and assess the correlation between these costs and hospitalization time. Forty patients of both sexes who had been admitted to the São Paulo Hospital, São Paulo, SP, Brazil, from 2011 to 2012, with pressure injuries in the sacral, ischial or trochanteric region were included. The patients had a total of 57 pressure injuries in the selected regions, and the lesions were monitored daily until patient release, transfer or death. The quantities and types of materials, as well as the amount of professional labor time spent on each procedure and each patient were recorded. The unit costs of the materials and the hourly costs of the professional labor were obtained from the hospital's purchasing and human resources departments, respectively. Spearman's correlation coefficient and the Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used for the statistical analyses. The mean topical treatment costs for stages III and IV PIs were significantly different (US$ 854.82 versus US$ 1785.35; p = 0.004). The mean topical treatment cost of stages III and IV pressure injuries per patient was US$ 1426.37. The mean daily topical treatment cost per patient was US$ 40.83. There was a significant correlation between hospitalization time and the total costs of labor and materials (p < 0.05). There was no significant difference between hospitalization time periods for stages III and IV pressure injuries (40.80 days and 45.01 days, respectively; p = 0.834). The mean direct variable cost of the topical treatment for stages III and IV pressure injuries per patient in this public university hospital was US$ 1426.37. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Influence of Public Service Quality in Citizen Satisfaction (Study in Private Hospital Y in Padang, West Sumatra Province

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    Aldri Frinaldi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The main problem in public service particularly health care service is the public’s increasing demand for better quality of service. Therefore, hospitals as one of the means of health care providers should be able to increase public satisfaction. This is important to win the trust of patients and/or families of patients who come for treatment. The lack of patients’ satisfaction in the quality of service in hospitals in Indonesia contributes to the Indonesians’ choice of medical treatment abroad. Therefore, the study aims to determine the influence of quality of services provided by the hospital toward patients’ satisfaction. This quantitative research surveyed patients in Hospital Y in Padang city using questionnaire as a research instrument. The population is all the patients and/or families of patients who are served in the hospital during the data collection in the month of May to August 2014. A sample of 100 people was selected using accidental sampling. The collected data were analyzed using frequencies, percentages and averages using SPSS version16 for windows. Simple linear regression analysis technique was used for data analysis. Location of the study was a private hospital located in the city of Padang, West Sumatra Province, which in this research is referred as private hospital Y. The results of this study indicates that there is a significant relation between the quality of service to the citizen satisfaction with the regression equation Y = 44.967 + 2.612 X with value of correlation (r = 0.760, and the influence of quality of service to the public satisfaction in 57.8%. Then the results Achievement Level Respondents (TCR in the quality of public services obtained a value of 74.8% with quite good category and to the satisfaction of the public to the TCR value of 75.3%with quite good category. It shows the quality of care in hospitals Y must be improved in order to obtain an increase in user satisfaction of the people who

  7. The change in capacity and service delivery at public and private hospitals in Turkey: A closer look at regional differences

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    Ergin Işıl

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Substantial regional health inequalities have been shown to exist in Turkey for major health indicators. Turkish data on hospitals deserves a closer examination with a special emphasis on the regional differences in the context of the rapid privatization of the secondary or tertiary level health services. This study aims to evaluate the change in capacity and service delivery at public and private hospitals in Turkey between 2001-2006 and to determine the regional differences. Methods Data for this retrospective study was provided from Statistical Almanacs of Inpatient Services (2001-2006. Hospitals in each of the 81 provinces were grouped into two categories: public and private. Provinces were grouped into six regions according to a development index composed by the State Planning Organisation. The number of facilities, hospital beds, outpatient admissions, inpatient admissions (per 100 000, number of deliveries and surgical operations (per 10 000 were calculated for public and private hospitals in each province and region. Regional comparisons were based on calculation of ratios for Region 1(R1 to Region 6(R6. Results Public facilities had a fundamental role in service delivery. However, private sector grew rapidly in Turkey between 2001-2006 in capacity and service delivery. In public sector, there were 2.3 fold increase in the number of beds in R1 to R6 in 2001. This ratio was 69.9 fold for private sector. The substantial regional inequalities in public and private sector decreased for the private sector enormously while a little decrease was observed for the public sector. In 2001 in R1, big surgical operations were performed six times more than R6 at the public sector whereas the difference was 117.7 fold for the same operations in the same regions for the private sector. These ratios decreased to 3.6 for the public sector and 13.9 for the private sector in 2006. Conclusions The private health sector has grown

  8. Hospitals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mullins, Michael

    2013-01-01

    . Documentation exists in; well-being of patients and staff, sleep disorders, pain distraction, confidentiality and privacy, levels of errors in hospitals. Art and the use of color: Art can be context related so one should be aware whether it is in a private ward or the foyer and related to the experience...... in treating disease can be supported by architecture which is sensitive to the contextual conditions of healing in health facilities. It is not the intention to supplant technology, but a question of supplementing the incredible advances that have been made in medicine in recent decades. The central premise......- sick-leave and work-related injuries....

  9. The effect of internal marketing on job satisfaction in health services: a pilot study in public hospitals in Northern Greece

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    Priporas Constantinos-Vasilios

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to explore the effect of internal marketing on job satisfaction in health services, particularly in public hospitals in Northern Greece. Methods A questionnaire with three sections was used. The first one referred to internal marketing by using Foreman and Money's scale, while the second one contained questions on job satisfaction based on Stamps and Piermonte's work. The last section included demographic questions. Three categories of health care professionals, nurses, doctors and paramedic personnel working in public hospitals have participated. Results Doctors tend to be more satisfied with their job than nurses in the same hospitals. Male personnel also tend to be more satisfied with their job than female. Time-defined work contract personnel have a greater level of job satisfaction than permanent personnel. Marital status, position, and educational level have no statistically significant impact on job satisfaction. A slight decline in job satisfaction occurs as the personnel age. Conclusions Internal marketing has a positive effect on the job satisfaction of hospital staff in Northern Greece. Also, doctors and male personnel seem to have greater levels of job satisfaction. Staff with time-defined work contracts with the hospital are more satisfied than permanent staff, and as the staff age, there is a slight decline in job satisfaction.

  10. Measuring and Benchmarking Technical Efficiency of Public Hospitals in Tianjin, China: A Bootstrap-Data Envelopment Analysis Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hao; Dong, Siping

    2015-01-01

    China has long been stuck in applying traditional data envelopment analysis (DEA) models to measure technical efficiency of public hospitals without bias correction of efficiency scores. In this article, we have introduced the Bootstrap-DEA approach from the international literature to analyze the technical efficiency of public hospitals in Tianjin (China) and tried to improve the application of this method for benchmarking and inter-organizational learning. It is found that the bias corrected efficiency scores of Bootstrap-DEA differ significantly from those of the traditional Banker, Charnes, and Cooper (BCC) model, which means that Chinese researchers need to update their DEA models for more scientific calculation of hospital efficiency scores. Our research has helped shorten the gap between China and the international world in relative efficiency measurement and improvement of hospitals. It is suggested that Bootstrap-DEA be widely applied into afterward research to measure relative efficiency and productivity of Chinese hospitals so as to better serve for efficiency improvement and related decision making. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. The effect of internal marketing on job satisfaction in health services: a pilot study in public hospitals in Northern Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to explore the effect of internal marketing on job satisfaction in health services, particularly in public hospitals in Northern Greece. Methods A questionnaire with three sections was used. The first one referred to internal marketing by using Foreman and Money's scale, while the second one contained questions on job satisfaction based on Stamps and Piermonte's work. The last section included demographic questions. Three categories of health care professionals, nurses, doctors and paramedic personnel working in public hospitals have participated. Results Doctors tend to be more satisfied with their job than nurses in the same hospitals. Male personnel also tend to be more satisfied with their job than female. Time-defined work contract personnel have a greater level of job satisfaction than permanent personnel. Marital status, position, and educational level have no statistically significant impact on job satisfaction. A slight decline in job satisfaction occurs as the personnel age. Conclusions Internal marketing has a positive effect on the job satisfaction of hospital staff in Northern Greece. Also, doctors and male personnel seem to have greater levels of job satisfaction. Staff with time-defined work contracts with the hospital are more satisfied than permanent staff, and as the staff age, there is a slight decline in job satisfaction. PMID:21981753

  12. The effect of internal marketing on job satisfaction in health services: a pilot study in public hospitals in Northern Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliopoulos, Efthymios; Priporas, Constantinos-Vasilios

    2011-10-09

    The purpose of this study was to explore the effect of internal marketing on job satisfaction in health services, particularly in public hospitals in Northern Greece. A questionnaire with three sections was used. The first one referred to internal marketing by using Foreman and Money's scale, while the second one contained questions on job satisfaction based on Stamps and Piermonte's work. The last section included demographic questions. Three categories of health care professionals, nurses, doctors and paramedic personnel working in public hospitals have participated. Doctors tend to be more satisfied with their job than nurses in the same hospitals. Male personnel also tend to be more satisfied with their job than female. Time-defined work contract personnel have a greater level of job satisfaction than permanent personnel. Marital status, position, and educational level have no statistically significant impact on job satisfaction. A slight decline in job satisfaction occurs as the personnel age. Internal marketing has a positive effect on the job satisfaction of hospital staff in Northern Greece. Also, doctors and male personnel seem to have greater levels of job satisfaction. Staff with time-defined work contracts with the hospital are more satisfied than permanent staff, and as the staff age, there is a slight decline in job satisfaction.

  13. Paleontology in parts: Richard Owen, William John Broderip, and the serialization of science in early Victorian Britain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Gowan

    2012-12-01

    While a great deal of scholarly attention has been given to the publication of serialized novels in early Victorian Britain, there has been hardly any consideration of the no less widespread practice of issuing scientific works in parts and numbers. What scholarship there has been has insisted that scientific part-works operated on entirely different principles from the strategies for maintaining readerly interest that were being developed by serial novelists like Charles Dickens. Deploying the methods of book history, this essay examines the reporting of Richard Owen's celebrated paleontological reconstructions from the 1830s and 1840s in the serialized formats of the Proceedings of the Zoological Society, his own History of British Fossil Mammals, and, in particular, the Penny Cyclopaedia. It argues that Owen, along with his close friend William John Broderip, clearly recognized the affective possibilities of the serial format and that they exploited the Penny Cyclopaedia's sequential mode of publication to evoke suspense and expectation in their anonymous but collaboratively authored accounts of Owen's paleontological researches.

  14. Evaluating the outcomes of a podiatry-led assessment service in a public hospital orthopaedic unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonanno, Daniel R; Medica, Virginia G; Tan, Daphne S; Spring, Anita A; Bird, Adam R; Gazarek, Jana

    2014-01-01

    In Australia, the demand for foot and ankle orthopaedic services in public health settings currently outweighs capacity. Introducing experienced allied health professionals into orthopaedic units to initiate the triage, assessment and management of patients has been proposed to help meet demand. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of introducing a podiatry-led assessment service in a public hospital orthopaedic unit. The outcomes of interest were determining: the proportion of patients discharged without requiring an orthopaedic appointment, agreement in diagnosis between the patient referral and the assessing podiatrist, the proportion of foot and ankle conditions presenting to the service, and the proportion of each condition to require an orthopaedic appointment. This study audited the first 100 patients to receive an appointment at a new podiatry-led assessment service. The podiatrist triaged 'Category 3' referrals consisting of musculoskeletal foot and ankle conditions and appointments were provided for those considered likely to benefit from non-surgical management. Following assessment, patients were referred to an appropriate healthcare professional or were discharged. At the initial appointment or following a period of care, patients were discharged if non-surgical management was successful, surgery was not indicated, patients did not want surgery, and if patient's failed to attend their appointments. All other patients were referred for an orthopaedic consultation as indicated. Ninety-five of the 100 patients (69 females and 31 males; mean age 51.9, SD 16.4 years) attended their appointment at the podiatry-led assessment service. The 95 referrals contained a total of 107 diagnoses, of which the podiatrist agreed with the diagnosis stated on the referral in 56 cases (Kappa =0.49, SE = 0.05). Overall, 34 of the 100 patients were referred to an orthopaedic surgeon and the remaining 66 patients were discharged from the orthopaedic waiting

  15. A cross sectional study of maternal 'near-miss' cases in major public hospitals in Egypt, Lebanon, Palestine and Syria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashour, Hyam; Saad-Haddad, Ghada; DeJong, Jocelyn; Ramadan, Mohammed Cherine; Hassan, Sahar; Breebaart, Miral; Wick, Laura; Hassanein, Nevine; Kharouf, Mayada

    2015-11-13

    The maternal near-miss approach has been increasingly used as a tool to evaluate and improve the quality of care in maternal health. We report findings from the formative stage of a World Health Organization (WHO) funded implementation research study that was undertaken to collect primary data at the facility level on the prevalence, characteristics, and management of maternal near-miss cases in four major public referral hospitals - one each in Egypt, Lebanon, Palestine and Syria. We conducted a cross sectional study of maternal near-miss cases in the four contexts beginning in 2011, where we collected data on severe maternal morbidity in the four study hospitals, using the WHO form (Individual Form HRP A65661). In each hospital, a research team including trained hospital healthcare providers carried out the data collection. A total of 9,063 live birth deliveries were reported during the data collection period across the four settings, with a total of 77 cases of severe maternal outcomes (71 maternal near-miss cases and 6 maternal deaths). Higher indices for the maternal mortality index were found in both Al Galaa hospital, in Egypt (8.6%) and Dar Al Tawleed hospital in Syria (14.3%), being large referral hospitals, compared to Ramallah hospital in Palestine and Rafik Hariri University hospital in Lebanon. Compared to the WHO's Multicountry Survey using the same data collection tool, our study's mortality indices are higher than the index of 5.6% among countries with a moderate maternal mortality ratio in the WHO Survey. Overall, haemorrhage-related complications were the most frequent conditions among maternal near-miss cases across the four study hospitals. In all hospitals, coagulation dysfunctions (76.1%) were the most prevalent dysfunction among maternal near-miss cases, followed by cardiovascular dysfunctions. The coverage of key evidence-based interventions among women experiencing a near-miss was either universal or very high in the study hospitals

  16. [Global analysis of the readability of the informed consent forms used in public hospitals of Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariscal-Crespo, M I; Coronado-Vázquez, M V; Ramirez-Durán, M V

    To analyse the readability of informed consent forms (ICF) used in Public Hospitals throughout Spain, with the aim of checking their function of providing comprehensive information to people who are making any health decision no matter where they are in Spain. A descriptive study was performed on a total of 11,339 ICF received from all over Spanish territory, of which 1617 ICF were collected from 4 web pages of Health Portal and the rest (9722) were received through email and/or telephone contact from March 2012 to February 2013. The readability level was studied using the Inflesz tool. A total of 372 ICF were selected and analysed using simple random sampling. The Inflesz scale and the Flesch-Szigriszt index were used to analyse the readability. The readability results showed that 62.4% of the ICF were rated as a "little difficult", the 23.4% as "normal", and the 13.4% were rated as "very difficult". The highest readability means using the Flesch index were scored in Andalusia with a mean of 56.99 (95% CI; 55.42-58.57) and Valencia with a mean of 51.93 (95% CI; 48.4-55.52). The lowest readability means were in Galicia with a mean of 40.77 (95% CI; 9.83-71.71) and Melilla, mean=41.82 (95% CI; 35.5-48.14). The readability level of Spanish informed consent forms must be improved because their scores using readability tools could not be classified in normal scales. Furthermore, there was very wide variability among Spanish ICF, which showed a lack of equity in information access among Spanish citizens. Copyright © 2017 SECA. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Gestational trophoblastic disease: a 21-year review of the clinical experience at an Argentinean public hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianconi, Maria Inés; Otero, Silvina; Moscheni, Oriana; Alvarez, Lucia; Storino, Claudio; Jankilevich, Gustavo

    2012-01-01

    To analyze the clinical trends of gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD) in a public hospital of Buenos Aires, Argentina. A review of the clinical records of 358 patients with a diagnosis of GTD admitted to Durand Trophoblastic Disease Center between 1990 and February 2011 was performed. Features of diagnosis, treatment and follow-up were analyzed. A total of 358 cases of GTD were reviewed. Hydatidiform mole was diagnosed in 340 patients; of those 223 (66%) experienced spontaneous remission after evacuation. Of the 135 patients with persistent gestational trophoblastic neoplasia (GTN), 99 (73%) had low-risk GTN, 32 (26%) had high-risk GTN and 4 had either placental site trophoblastic disease or epithelioid trophoblastic tumor. In the low-risk group the first-line treatment was methotrexate and the second-line treatment was actinomycin D, etoposide, cytoxan, and oncovin (EMA/CO), with a complete response rate of 100%. High-risk patients whose WHO prognostic scores were 7-13 were treated initially with EMA/CO. Patients whose scores were >13 were treated with EMA/PE, where platinum and etoposide replaced oncovin and cytoxan. Salvage therapy in patients with relapse or resistant disease were treated with a wide variety of chemotherapy regimens. The complete response rate was 98.2%. Compliance was 100%. Three patients died. In all cases the outcome was related with inadequate initial treatment. This protocol is in agreement with international consensus. It was useful, safe and feasible in our population. The compliance with international guidelines allows reach a successful treatment and follow-up in one Latin-American population.

  18. Mothers’ expectations of midwives’ care during labour in a public hospital in Gauteng

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malmsey Sengane

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mothers develop expectations regarding midwives’ care during labour and when these are not met mothers become dissatisfied and eventually have negative experiences of their labour. It is only when mothers’ voices are heard by midwives in the labour ward that efficient and quality care will be provided. To ensure mothers have a positive experience of labour, midwives should include mothers’ expectations when caring for them.Objective: The purpose of the study on which this article is based was to determine mothers’ expectations of midwives’ care during labour. To achieve this purpose the researcher sought to explore and describe mothers’ expectations of midwives’ care during labour in a specific public hospital in Gauteng.Method: A qualitative, exploratory, descriptive and contextual study design was used. Face-to-face, in-depth individual interviews were conducted with mothers about their expectations of midwives’ care during labour. Data were then analysed with an open descriptive method of coding (Tesch’s eight steps that is appropriate for qualitative research to identify categories. The data was also analysed by an independent coder. The categories were subsequently placed within a holistic health promotive nursing theory that encompasses body, mind and spirit.Results: The findings revealed the provision of comfort and support as the two main aspects that the mothers expected from the midwives’ care. The mothers expected midwives to improve their communication skills with them (mothers as well as with fathers or partners if they were available. The mothers expected midwives to facilitate bonding between mother, father and baby, and also encouraged the midwives to improve their (midwives’ knowledge, skills and morale. Conclusion: The results of this study should assist midwives in providing holistic quality care to mothers during labour, thus providing satisfaction and positive experiences of the mothers

  19. Public knowledge of how to use an automatic external defibrillator in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, K L; Leung, L P; Poon, H T; Chiu, H Y; Liu, H L; Tang, W Y

    2016-12-01

    The survival rate of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in Hong Kong is low. A long delay between collapse and defibrillation is a contributing factor. Public access to defibrillation may shorten this delay. It is unknown, however, whether Hong Kong's public is willing or able to use an automatic external defibrillator. This study aimed to evaluate public knowledge of how to use an automatic external defibrillator in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. A face-to-face semi-structured questionnaire survey of the public was conducted in six locations with a high pedestrian flow in Hong Kong. In this study, 401 members of the public were interviewed. Most had no training in first aid (65.8%) or in use of an automatic external defibrillator (85.3%). Nearly all (96.5%) would call for help for a victim of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest but only 18.0% would use an automatic external defibrillator. Public knowledge of automatic external defibrillator use was low: 77.6% did not know the location of an automatic external defibrillator in the vicinity of their home or workplace. People who had ever been trained in both first aid and use of an automatic external defibrillator were more likely to respond to and help a victim of cardiac arrest, and to use an automatic external defibrillator. Public knowledge of automatic external defibrillator use is low in Hong Kong. A combination of training in first aid and in the use of an automatic external defibrillator is better than either one alone.

  20. Hospital respiratory protection practices in 6 U.S. states: a public health evaluation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Kristina; Novak, Debra; Stradtman, Lindsay; Wilson, David; Couzens, Lance

    2015-01-01

    Lessons learned from the influenza A (H1N1) virus revealed a need to better understand hospitals' respiratory protection programmatic practice gaps. This article reports findings from a multistate assessment of hospitals' adherence to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's respiratory protection program (RPP) requirements and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's infection control guidance. Onsite surveys were conducted in 98 acute care hospitals in 6 U.S. states, including >1,500 hospital managers, unit managers, and health care workers. Descriptive statistics were used to assess hospital adherence. Most acute care hospitals adhere to requirements for initial medical evaluations, fit testing, training, and recommended respiratory protection when in close contact with patients who have suspected or confirmed seasonal influenza. Low hospital adherence was found for respiratory protection with infectious diseases requiring airborne precautions, aerosol-generating procedures with seasonal influenza, and checking of the respirator's user seal. Hospitals' adherence was also low with follow-up program evaluations, medical re-evaluations, and respirator maintenance. Efforts should be made to closely examine ways of strengthening hospitals' RPPs to ensure the program's ongoing effectiveness and workers' proper selection and use of respiratory protection. Implications for improved RPPs and practice are discussed. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Tobacco industry manipulation of the hospitality industry to maintain smoking in public places

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    J V Dearlove; S A Bialous; S A Glantz

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To describe how the tobacco industry used the "accommodation" message to mount an aggressive and effective worldwide campaign to recruit hospitality associations, such as restaurant associations...

  2. [Myasthenia gravis in adults of institutions pertaining to the Mexican public health system: an analysis of hospital discharges during 2010].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolosa-Tort, Paulina; Chiquete, Erwin; Domínguez-Moreno, Rogelio; Vega-Boada, Felipe; Reyes-Melo, Isael; Flores-Silva, Fernando; Sentíes-Madrid, Horacio; Estañol-Vidal, Bruno; García-Ramos, Guillermo; Herrera-Hernández, Miguel; Ruiz-Sandoval, José L; Cantú-Brito, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies on myasthenia gravis (MG) in Mexico is mainly derived from experiences in referral centers. To describe the epidemiological characteristics of hospital discharges during 2010 with the diagnosis of MG in adults hospitalized in the Mexican public health system. We consulted the database of hospital discharges during 2010 of the National Health Information System (Ministry of Health, IMSS, IMSS oportunidades, ISSSTE, PEMEX, and the Ministry of Defense). The MG records were identified by the code G70.0 of the International Classification of Diseases 10th revision. During 2010 there were 5,314,132 hospital discharges (4,254,312 adults). Among them, 587 (0.01%) were adults with MG (median age: 47 years, 60% women). Women with MG were significantly younger than men (median age: 37 vs. 54 years, respectively; p < 0.001). The median hospital stay was six days. The case fatality rate was 3.4%, without gender differences. Age was associated with the probability of death. We confirmed the bimodal age-gender distribution in MG. The in-hospital case fatality rate in Mexico is consistent with recent reports around the world.

  3. Death and the dead-house in Victorian asylums: necroscopy versus mourning at the Royal Edinburgh Asylum, C. 1832-1901.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Jonathan

    2012-03-01

    This article examines the management and meaning of post-mortem examinations, and the spatial ordering of patients' death, dissection and burial at the Victorian asylum, referencing a range of institutional contexts and exploiting a case study of the Royal Edinburgh Asylum. The routinizing of dissection and the development of the dead-house from a more marginal asylum sector to a lynchpin of laboratory medicine is stressed. External and internal pressure to modernize pathological research facilities is assessed alongside governmental, public and professional critiques of variable necroscopy practices. This is contextualized against wider issues and attitudes surrounding consent and funereal rituals. Onus is placed on tendencies in anatomizing insanity towards the conversion of deceased lunatics--pauper lunatics especially--into mere pathological specimens. On the other hand, significant but compromised resistance on the part of a minority of practitioners, relatives and the wider public is also identified.

  4. Variations in the Quality of Care at Large Public Hospitals in Beijing, China: A Condition-Based Outcome Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Xu

    Full Text Available Public hospitals deliver over ninety percent of all outpatient and inpatient services in China. Their quality is graded into three levels (A, B, and C largely based on structural resources, but empirical evidence on the quality of process and outcome of care is extremely scarce. As expectations for quality care rise with higher living standards and cost of care, such evidence is urgently needed and vital to improve care and to inform future health reforms.We compiled and analyzed a multicenter database of over 4 million inpatient discharge summary records to provide a comprehensive assessment of the level and variations in clinical outcomes of hospitalization at 39 tertiary hospitals in Beijing. We assessed six outcome measures of clinical quality: in-hospital mortality rates (RSMR for AMI, stroke, pneumonia and CABG, post-procedural complication rate (RS-CR, and failure-to-rescue rate (RS-FTR. The measures were adjusted for pre-admission patient case-mix using indirect standardization method with hierarchical linear mixed models.We found good overall quality with large variations by hospital and condition (mean/range, in %: RSMR-AMI: 6.23 (2.37-14.48, RSMR-stroke: 4.18 (3.58-4.44, RSMR-pneumonia: 7.78 (7.20-8.59, RSMR-CABG: 1.93 (1.55-2.23, RS-CR: 11.38 (9.9-12.88, and RS-FTR: 6.41 (5.17-7.58. Hospital grade was not significantly associated with any risk-adjusted outcome measures.Going to a higher grade public hospital does not always lead to better patient outcome because hospital grade only contains information about hospital structural resources. A hospital report card with some outcome measures of quality would provide valuable information to patients in choosing providers, and for regulators to identify gaps in health care quality. Reducing the variations in clinical practice and patient outcome should be a focus for policy makers in the next round of health sector reforms in China.

  5. Little Dorrit’s Fourth Volume. Twenty-first Century Remediation of a Victorian Classic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simonetta Falchi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The current interest in the Victorian period is particularly evident in the multitude of successful period dramas and cinema productions deriving their inspiration from Victorian history and culture. Dickens’s Little Dorrit, generated by the difficulties of understanding a ‘new’ world dominated by more and more complicated machines, and markets, is possibly the ideal paradigm to explore this ‘Victorianomania’ because this novel strikes us “no less forcefully today in its indictment of society's ability to destroy through greed and crushing self-interest” (Kirschner 2009.This study carries out a threefold analysis of Little Dorrit's remediation in the twenty-first century: visual remediation – Xue’s 2012 Little Dorrit; audio-visual remediation – the BBC series; and web remediation – fan fiction – in order to investigate Dickens’s appeal and longevity in contemporary media.

  6. Cave men: stone tools, Victorian science, and the 'primitive mind' of deep time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettitt, Paul B; White, Mark J

    2011-03-20

    Palaeoanthropology, the study of the evolution of humanity, arose in the nineteenth century. Excavations in Europe uncovered a series of archaeological sediments which provided proof that the antiquity of human life on Earth was far longer than the biblical six thousand years, and by the 1880s authors had constructed a basic paradigm of what 'primitive' human life was like. Here we examine the development of Victorian palaeoanthropology for what it reveals of the development of notions of cognitive evolution. It seems that Victorian specialists rarely addressed cognitive evolution explicitly, although several assumptions were generally made that arose from preconceptions derived from contemporary 'primitive' peoples. We identify three main phases of development of notions of the primitive mind in the period.

  7. Reflexivity, the role of history, and the case of mesmerism in early Victorian Britain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamont, Peter

    2010-11-01

    As part of a wider argument that history is essential to psychological understanding because of the reflexive nature of psychological knowledge, this article examines the case of mesmerism in early Victorian Britain as an example of how psychological knowledge is both constructive and constructed. It is argued that the shift from "mesmerism" to "hypnotism" was a change in understanding that created a new kind of psychological experience. It is also argued that demonstrations of mesmerism, far from being self-evident facts, could be framed as evidence either for or against the central claims of mesmerism. It is concluded that the case of mesmerism in early Victorian Britain provides a further example of the need for historical understanding within Psychology.

  8. Estimate of physical sequelae in victims of road traffic accidents hospitalized in the Public Health System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Silvânia Suely Caribé de Araújo; Jorge, Maria Helena Prado de Mello

    2016-03-01

    To describe the profile of the victims of road accidents presenting physical sequelae, according to the criteria established by researchers and analyze the trends in hospitalization for this cause in Brazil, from 2000 to 2013. An ecological time-series study was performed using the data from the Hospital Information System of the National Health System (SUS). Trends in hospitalization were estimated using Prais-Winstein regression. During this period, a total of 1,747,191 hospitalizations for traffic accidents were registered; 410,448 were victims with physical sequelae. About 77.7% of them were male subjects, 26.5% belonged to the age group of 20 - 29 years, 46.4% lived in Southeast Brazil, 44.0% were pedestrians, and 31.1% were motorcyclists. In total, 51,189 cases were "confirmed" sequelae (12.5%), and pedestrians accounted for 43.8% of cases. There were 359,259 hospitalizations for the diagnosis of "possible" sequelae, and motorcyclists accounted for 43.3% of these cases. There was a trend of stability for all the patients with confirmed and possible sequelae, but there was a significant rise in hospitalization rates owing to confirmed sequelae among the men in North and Central-West regions. The hospitalizations associated with physical sequelae were responsible for about one-fourth of the hospitalizations in the Hospital Information System in the studied period. Most events involved men, young adults, residents in Southeast Brazil, and pedestrians. Hospitalization rates for traffic accidents associated with physical sequelae were stable in Brazil and regions, but a significant increase was observed for confirmed sequelae among men in the North and Central-West regions.

  9. The inclusion of aural comprehension in the Victorian Certificate of Education music performance study design

    OpenAIRE

    Jacob, Robert

    2017-01-01

    This research is principally concerned with the introduction of the Victorian Certificate of Education (VCE). This curriculum was trialed in 1987 and was fully implemented in 1992. The political and educational context of this change as well as the role of aural comprehension in this music curriculum compared with the dominant Higher School Certificate (HSC) (Group 1) it immediately replaced will also be investigated. An examination of the teaching of aural comprehension skills in the VCE mus...

  10. Dogs and Domesticity Reading the Dog in Victorian British Visual Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Robson, Amy

    2017-01-01

    Edited version embargoed until 26.10.2018 Full version: Access restricted permanently due to 3rd party copyright restrictions. Restriction set on 26.10.2017 by SE, Doctoral College The central aim of this thesis is to critically examine the values associated with dogs in Victorian British art and visual culture. It studies the redefining and restructuring of the domestic dog as it was conceptualized in visual culture and the art market. It proposes that the dog was strongly associated w...

  11. Sleep duration and risk of obesity among a sample of Victorian school children

    OpenAIRE

    Bridget Morrissey; Mary Malakellis; Jill Whelan; Lynne Millar; Boyd Swinburn; Steven Allender; Claudia Strugnell

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Insufficient sleep is potentially an important modifiable risk factor for obesity and poor physical activity and sedentary behaviours among children. However, inconsistencies across studies highlight the need for more objective measures. This paper examines the relationship between sleep duration and objectively measured physical activity, sedentary time and weight status, among a sample of Victorian Primary School children. Methods A sub-sample of 298 grades four (n = 157...

  12. Sleep duration and risk of obesity among a sample of Victorian school children

    OpenAIRE

    Morrissey, Bridget; Malakellis, Mary; Whelan, Jill; Millar, Lynne; Swinburn, Boyd; Allender, Steven; Strugnell, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Background Insufficient sleep is potentially an important modifiable risk factor for obesity and poor physical activity and sedentary behaviours among children. However, inconsistencies across studies highlight the need for more objective measures. This paper examines the relationship between sleep duration and objectively measured physical activity, sedentary time and weight status, among a sample of Victorian Primary School children. Methods A sub-sample of 298 grades four (n?=?157) and six...

  13. The new Victorians? Celebrity charity and the demise of the welfare state

    OpenAIRE

    Littler, J.

    2015-01-01

    This article asks whether the expansion of celebrity involvement in charitable and humanitarian issues in Northern Europe and the US might be a comparable historical phenomenon with the philanthropic endeavours of prominent nineteenth-century persons. The article notes that the conspicuous nature of star philanthropy in both Victorian times and the present is fairly dramatic in comparison with that of the mid twentieth century, when the welfare state and the New Deal were at their peak: a wel...

  14. Incidence of skin conditions in neonates born at a public hospital associated with some variables in pregnant women at risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Roberto Paes de Almeida

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To verify the incidence of skin diseases in newborns of pregnant women at risk of a public hospital in the city of Santos, Brazil (Hospital Guilherme Alvaro, determining the potential relation between these dermatoses and diseases presented by the mothers. Methods: A total of 1,000 neonates were examined in the first 36 hours of life. The examination was repeated daily in each child up to hospital discharge. The paternal and newborn variables were submitted to analysis to detect statistically significant associations. Results: The most frequent skin disorders were: Mongolian spot (69.8%, erythema toxicum neonatorum (19.7%, Port-wine stain (angiomatous naevi (13.9%, and hypertrichosis lanuginose (10.3%. Conclusions: Minipuberty had a low incidence in neonates of diabetic mothers. The incidence of Mongolian spot was very low among newborns classified as caucasian.

  15. The dilemma of a practice: experiences of abortion in a public maternity hospital in the city of Salvador, Bahia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCallum, Cecilia; Menezes, Greice; Reis, Ana Paula Dos

    2016-01-01

    The article discusses abortion and miscarriage from the perspective of women admitted to a public maternity hospital in Salvador (BA), Brazil. Based on qualitative and quantitative research, it draws on participant observation of everyday hospital life. Taking an ethnographic approach, it addresses the hospital experiences of women who had miscarriages or induced abortions, also presenting the views of health professionals. It argues that the way the institution structures care for abortion and miscarriage involves symbolic processes that profoundly affect women's experiences. The discrimination against women who have had abortions/miscarriages is an integral part of the structure, organization and culture of these institutions, and does not derive solely from the individual actions of healthcare personnel.

  16. Perceived barriers to effective implementation of public reporting of hospital performance data in Australia: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canaway, Rachel; Bismark, Marie; Dunt, David; Kelaher, Margaret

    2017-06-07

    Public reporting of government funded (public) hospital performance data was mandated in Australia in 2011. Studies suggest some benefit associated with such public reporting, but also considerable scope to improve reporting systems. In 2015, a purposive sample of 41 expert informants were interviewed, representing consumer, provider and purchasers perspectives across Australia's public and private health sectors, to ascertain expert opinion on the utility and impact of public reporting of health service performance. Qualitative data was thematically analysed with a focus on reporting perceived strengths and barriers to public reporting of hospital performance data (PR). Many more weaknesses and barriers to PR were identified than strengths. Barriers were: conceptual (unclear objective, audience and reporting framework); systems-level (including lack of consumer choice, lack of consumer and clinician involvement, jurisdictional barriers, lack of mandate for private sector reporting); technical and resource related (including data complexity, lack of data relevance consistency, rigour); and socio-cultural (including provider resistance to public reporting, poor consumer health literacy, lack of consumer empowerment). Perceptions of the Australian experience of PR highlight important issues in its implementation that can provide lessons for Australia and elsewhere. A considerable weakness of PR in Australia is that the public are often not considered its major audience, resulting in information ineffectually framed to meet the objective of PR informing consumer decision-making about treatment options. Greater alignment is needed between the primary objective of PR, its audience and audience needs; more than one system of PR might be necessary to meet different audience needs and objectives. Further research is required to assess objectively the potency of the barriers to PR suggested by our panel of informants.

  17. Geographically weighted regression for modelling the accessibility to the public hospital network in Concepción Metropolitan Area, Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Bascuñán, Marcela; Rojas Quezada, Carolina

    2016-11-22

    Accessibility models in transport geography based on geographic information systems have proven to be an effective method in determining spatial inequalities associated with public health. This work aims to model the spatial accessibility from populated areas within the Concepción metropolitan area (CMA), the second largest city in Chile. The city's public hospital network is taken into consideration with special reference to socio-regional inequalities. The use of geographically weighted regression (GWR) and ordinary least squares (OLS) for modelling accessibility with socioeconomic and transport variables is proposed. The explanatory variables investigated are: illiterate population, rural housing, alternative housing, homes with a motorised vehicle, public transport routes, and connectivity. Our results identify that approximately 4.1% of the population have unfavourable or very unfavourable accessibility to public hospitals, which correspond to rural areas located south of CMA. Application of a local GWR model (0.87 R2 adjusted) helped to improve the settings over the use of traditional OLS methods (multiple regression) (0.67 R2 adjusted) and to find the spatial distribution of both coefficients of the explanatory variables, demonstrating the local significance of the model. Thus, accessibility studies have enormous potential to contribute to the development of public health and transport policies in turn to achieve equality in spatial accessibility to specialised health care.

  18. Geographically weighted regression for modelling the accessibility to the public hospital network in Concepción Metropolitan Area, Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Martínez Bascuñán

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Accessibility models in transport geography based on geographic information systems have proven to be an effective method in determining spatial inequalities associated with public health. This work aims to model the spatial accessibility from populated areas within the Concepción metropolitan area (CMA, the second largest city in Chile. The city’s public hospital network is taken into consideration with special reference to socio-regional inequalities. The use of geographically weighted regression (GWR and ordinary least squares (OLS for modelling accessibility with socioeconomic and transport variables is proposed. The explanatory variables investigated are: illiterate population, rural housing, alternative housing, homes with a motorised vehicle, public transport routes, and connectivity. Our results identify that approximately 4.1% of the population have unfavourable or very unfavourable accessibility to public hospitals, which correspond to rural areas located south of CMA. Application of a local GWR model (0.87 R2 adjusted helped to improve the settings over the use of traditional OLS methods (multiple regression (0.67 R2 adjusted and to find the spatial distribution of both coefficients of the explanatory variables, demonstrating the local significance of the model. Thus, accessibility studies have enormous potential to contribute to the development of public health and transport policies in turn to achieve equality in spatial accessibility to specialised health care.

  19. Frequency and evaluation of the perceptions towards caesarean section among pregnant women attending public hospitals in Pakistan and the implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishaq, Rabia; Baloch, Nosheen Sikander; Iqbal, Qaiser; Saleem, Fahad; Hassali, Mohamed Azmi; Iqbal, Javeid; Ahmed, Fiaz Ud Din; Anwar, Mohammad; Haider, Sajjad; Godman, Brian

    2017-08-01

    There is increasing prevalence of caesarean sections (CS) worldwide; however, there are concerns about their rates in some countries, including potential fears among mothers. Consequently, we aimed to determine the frequency of CS, and explore patient's perception towards CS attending public hospitals in Pakistan, to provide future guidance. A two-phased study design (retrospective and cross sectional) was adopted. A retrospective study was conducted to assess the frequency of CS over one year among four public hospitals. A cross sectional study was subsequently conducted to determine patients' perception towards CS attending the four tertiary care public hospitals in Quetta city, Pakistan, which is where most births take place. Overall prevalence of CS was 13.1% across the four hospitals. 728 patients were approached and 717 responded to the survey. Although 78.8% perceived CS as dangerous, influenced by education (p = 0.004), locality (p = 0.001) and employment status (p = 0.001), 74.5% of patients were in agreement that this is the best approach to save mother's and baby's lives if needed. 62% of respondents reported they would like to avoid CS if they could due to post-operative pain, and 58.9% preferred a normal delivery. There was also a significant association with education (p = 0.001) and locality (p = 0.001) where respondents considered normal vaginal delivery as painful. The overall frequency of CS approximates to WHO recommendations, although there is appreciable variation among the four hospitals. When it comes to perception towards CS, women had limited information. There is a need to provide mothers with education during the antenatal period, especially those with limited education, to accept CS where needed.

  20. Reforming hospital nursing: the experiences of Maria Machin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmstadter, Carol

    2006-12-01

    The reform of hospital nursing in the last quarter of the nineteenth century brought nursing leaders into conflict with the gendered and class bound structure of Victorian society. The experiences of Maria Machin are used in this article as an example of the barriers nursing leaders had to overcome in order to establish a competent nursing service. While Machin was eminently successful in improving patient care and expanding the knowledge base of her nurses, she could not change the perceptions of nursing which the public at large held. At the beginning of the nineteenth century hospital nurses had been essentially cleaning women who gave some of the less important nursing care. They formed a cheap service which many hospital governors considered a relatively low priority in the overall operation of the hospital. This view of nursing persisted long after the reformers had made nursing into something quite different. Machin's nursing career also illustrates how nursing participated in a major aspect of British imperialism, the export of professional expertise and administrative skills as well as the way nursing fitted into the rise of the new professionalism.

  1. Assessment of operative times of multiple surgical specialties in a public university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Altair da Silva

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the indicators duration of anesthesia, operative time and time patients stay in the operating rooms of different surgical specialties at a public university hospital. It was done by a descriptive cross-sectional study based on the operating room database. The following stages were measured: duration of anesthesia, procedure time and patient length of stay in the room of the various specialties. We included surgeries carried out in sequence in the same room, between 7:00 a.m. and 5 p.m., either elective or emergency. We calculated the 80th percentile of the stages, where 80% of procedures were below this value. The study measured 8,337 operations of 12 surgical specialties performed within one year. The overall mean duration of anesthesia of all specialties was 178.12±110.46 minutes, and the 80th percentile was 252 minutes. The mean operative time was 130.45±97.23 minutes, and the 80th percentile was 195 minutes. The mean total time of the patient in the operating room was 197.30±113.71 minutes, and the 80th percentile was 285 minutes. Thus, the variation of the overall mean compared to the 80th percentile was 41% for anesthesia, 49% for surgeries and 44% for operating room time. In average, anesthesia took up 88% of the operating room period, and surgery, 61%. This study identified patterns in the duration of surgery stages. The mean values of the specialties can assist with operating room planning and reduce delays. Avaliar os indicadores de tempo da anestesia, da operação e da permanência do paciente em sala de diversas especialidades do centro cirúrgico de um hospital universitário. Foi realizado em estudo descritivo transversal a partir da base de dados do centro cirúrgico e mensuradas as seguintes etapas: duração de anestesia, tempo do procedimento e tempo de permanência do paciente em sala das diversas especialidades. Foram incluídas as operações realizadas em sequência na mesma sala, das 7h às 17h, eletivas ou de urg

  2. The Victorian Gambling Screen: reliability and validation in a clinical population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolchard, B; Battersby, M W

    2010-12-01

    There is a need to establish reliability and the various forms of validity in all measures in order to feel confident in the use of such tools across a wide diversity of settings. The aim of this study is to describe the reliability and validity of the Victorian Gambling Screen (VGS) and in particular one of the sub-scales (Harm to Self-HS) in a specialist problem gambling treatment service in Adelaide, Australia. Sixty-seven consecutive gamblers were assessed using a previously validated clinical interview and the VGS (Ben-Tovim et al., The Victorian Gambling Screen: project report. Victorian Research Panel, Melbourne, 2001). The internal consistency of the combined VGS scales had a Cronbach's alpha of .85 with the HS scale .89. There was satisfactory evidence of convergent validity which included moderate correlations with another measure of gambling-the South Oaks Gambling Screen. There were also moderate correlations with other measures of psychopathology. Finally, how the VGS may best be used in clinical settings is discussed.

  3. Curing "moral disability": brain trauma and self-control in Victorian science and fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schillace, Brandy L

    2013-12-01

    While, historically, the disabled body has appeared in literature as "monstrous," burgeoning psychological theories of the Victorian period predicated an unusual shift. In a culture of sexual anxiety and fears of devolution and moral decay, the physically disabled and "weak" are portrayed as strangely free from moral corruption. Unlike the cultural link between deviance and disability witnessed in the medical literature and eugenic approach to generation, authors of narrative fiction-particularly Charles Dickens, but Wilkie Collins, Charlotte Yonge, and others as well-portray disabled characters as "purified," and trauma itself as potentially sanitizing. This present paper argues that such constructions were made possible by developments in the treatment of insanity. "Curing 'Moral Disability': Brain Trauma and Self-Control in Victorian Fiction," examines the concept of trauma-as-cure. Throughout the Victorian period, case studies on brain trauma appeared in widely circulated journals like the Lancet, concurrently with burgeoning theories about psychological disturbance and "moral insanity." While not widely practiced until the early twentieth century, attempts at surgical "cures" aroused curiosity and speculation-the traumatic event that could free sufferers from deviance. This work provides a unique perspective on representations of disability as cure in the nineteenth century as a means of giving voice to the marginalized, disabled, and disempowered.

  4. Out of hospital cardiac arrest outside home in Sweden, change in characteristics, outcome and availability for public access defibrillation

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenqvist Mårten; Hollenberg Jacob; Herlitz Johan; Ringh Mattias; Svensson Leif

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background A large proportion of patients who suffer from out of hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) outside home are theoretically candidates for public access defibrillation (PAD). We describe the change in characteristics and outcome among these candidates in a 14 years perspective in Sweden. Methods All patients who suffered an OHCA in whom cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was attempted between 1992 and 2005 and who were included in the Swedish Cardiac Arrest Register (SCAR). We in...

  5. Risky sexual practices and related factors among ART attendees in Addis Ababa Public Hospitals, Ethiopia: a cross-sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Dessie, Yadeta; Gerbaba, Mulusew; Bedru, Abdo; Davey, Gail

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Many HIV-positive persons avoid risky sexual practices after testing HIV sero-positive. However, a substantial number continue to engage in risky sexual practices that may further transmit the virus, put them at risk of contracting secondary sexually transmitted infections and lead to problems with drug resistance. Thus, this study was intended to assess risky sexual practices and related factors among HIV- positive ART attendees in public hospitals of Addis Ababa. Methods...

  6. [Application of marketing strategies for the management of public hospitals from the viewpoint of the staff members].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riveros S, Jorge; Berné M, Carmen

    2006-03-01

    The implementation of the marketing strategies in public hospitals provides management advantages and improves the relationship between customers and staff. To analyze the application of marketing strategies in a public hospital, from the perspective of the staff. A structured survey that asked about perceptions in 50 items about communication between personnel and customers/users, customer satisfaction, participation in the development of new policies and incentives for efficiency was applied to a stratified sample of the staff. Factorial and regression analyses were performed to define the impact of marketing strategies on the degree of preoccupation and orientation of the organization towards the satisfaction of customer needs. The survey was applied to 74 males and 122 females. The survey showed that the orientation of the hospital towards the satisfaction of its beneficiaries basically depends on the generation of an organizational culture oriented towards them and the implementation of adequate policies in staff management and quality of service. These basic aspects can be accompanied with practices associated to the new marketing approaches such as a market orientation, customer orientation and relational marketing. All these factors presented positive and significant relations. New marketing strategies should be applied, to achieve an efficient and customer oriented hospital management.

  7. Public-access AED pad application and outcomes for out-of-hospital cardiac arrests in Osaka, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyohara, Kosuke; Kitamura, Tetsuhisa; Sakai, Tomohiko; Nishiyama, Chika; Nishiuchi, Tatsuya; Hayashi, Yasuyuki; Sakamoto, Tetsuya; Marukawa, Seishiro; Iwami, Taku

    2016-09-01

    Actual application of public-access automated external defibrillator (AED) pads to patients with an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) by the public has been poorly investigated. AED applications, prehospital characteristics, and one-month outcomes of OHCAs occurring in Osaka Prefecture from 2011 to 2012 were obtained from the Utstein Osaka Project registry. Patients with a non-traumatic OHCA occurring before emergency medical service attendance were enrolled. The proportion of AED pads that were applied to the patients' chests by the public and one-month outcomes were analysed according to the location of OHCA. In total, public-access AED pads were applied to 3.5% of OHCA patients (351/9978) during the study period. In the multivariate analyses, OHCAs that occurred in public places and received bystander-initiated cardiopulmonary resuscitation were associated with significantly higher application of public-access AEDs. Among the patients for whom public-access AED pads were applied, 29.6% (104/351) received public-access defibrillation. One-month survival with a favourable neurological outcome was significantly higher among patients who had an AED applied compared to those who did not (19.4% vs. 3.0%; OR: 2.76 [95% CI: 1.92-3.97]). The application of public-access AEDs leads to favourable outcomes after an OHCA, but utilisation of available equipment remains insufficient, and varies considerably according to the location of the OHCA event. Alongside disseminating public-access AEDs, further strategic approaches for the deployment of AEDs at the scene, as well as basic life support training for the public are required to improve survival rates after OHCAs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. An analysis of hospital preparedness capacity for public health emergency in four regions of China: Beijing, Shandong, Guangxi, and Hainan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xingming; Huang, Jianshi; Zhang, Hui

    2008-09-20

    Hospital preparedness is critical for the early detection and management of public health emergency (PHE). Understanding the current status of PHE preparedness is the first step in planning to enhance hospitals' capacities for emergency response. The objective of this study is to understand the current status of hospital PHE preparedness in China. Four hundred hospitals in four city and provinces of China were surveyed using a standardized questionnaire. Data related to hospital demographic data; PHE preparation; response to PHE in community; stockpiles of drugs and materials; detection and identification of PHE; procedures for medical treatment; laboratory diagnosis and management; staff training; and risk communication were collected and analyzed. Valid responses were received from 318 (79.5%) of the 400 hospitals surveyed. Of the valid responses, 264 (85.2%) hospitals had emergency plans; 93.3% had command centres and personnel for PHE; 22.9% included community organisations during the training for PHE; 97.4% could transport needed medical staff to a PHE; 53.1% had evaluated stockpiles of drugs; 61.5% had evaluated their supply systems; 55.5% had developed surveillance systems; and 74.6% could monitor the abnormity(See in appendix). Physicians in 80.2% of the analyzed hospitals reported up-to-date knowledge of their institution's PHE protocol. Of the 318 respondents, 97.4% followed strict laboratory regulations, however, only about 33.5% had protocols for suspected samples. Furthermore, only 59.0% could isolate and identify salmonella and staphylococcus and less than 5% could isolate and identify human H5N1 avian flu and SARS. Staff training or drill programs were reported in 94.5% of the institutions; 50.3% periodically assessed the efficacy of staff training; 45% had experts to provide psychological counselling; 12.1% had provided training for their medical staff to assess PHE-related stress. All of the above capacities related to the demographic

  9. An analysis of hospital preparedness capacity for public health emergency in four regions of China: Beijing, Shandong, Guangxi, and Hainan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Jianshi

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hospital preparedness is critical for the early detection and management of public health emergency (PHE. Understanding the current status of PHE preparedness is the first step in planning to enhance hospitals' capacities for emergency response. The objective of this study is to understand the current status of hospital PHE preparedness in China. Methods Four hundred hospitals in four city and provinces of China were surveyed using a standardized questionnaire. Data related to hospital demographic data; PHE preparation; response to PHE in community; stockpiles of drugs and materials; detection and identification of PHE; procedures for medical treatment; laboratory diagnosis and management; staff training; and risk communication were collected and analyzed. Results Valid responses were received from 318 (79.5% of the 400 hospitals surveyed. Of the valid responses, 264 (85.2% hospitals had emergency plans; 93.3% had command centres and personnel for PHE; 22.9% included community organisations during the training for PHE; 97.4% could transport needed medical staff to a PHE; 53.1% had evaluated stockpiles of drugs; 61.5% had evaluated their supply systems; 55.5% had developed surveillance systems; and 74.6% could monitor the abnormity(See in appendix. Physicians in 80.2% of the analyzed hospitals reported up-to-date knowledge of their institution's PHE protocol. Of the 318 respondents, 97.4% followed strict laboratory regulations, however, only about 33.5% had protocols for suspected samples. Furthermore, only 59.0% could isolate and identify salmonella and staphylococcus and less than 5% could isolate and identify human H5N1 avian flu and SARS. Staff training or drill programs were reported in 94.5% of the institutions; 50.3% periodically assessed the efficacy of staff training; 45% had experts to provide psychological counselling; 12.1% had provided training for their medical staff to assess PHE-related stress. All of the above

  10. TORCH seroprevalence among patients attending Obstetric Care Clinic of Haydarpasa Training and Research Hospital affiliated to Association of Istanbul Northern Anatolia Public Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numan, Onur; Vural, Fisun; Aka, Nurettin; Alpay, Murat; Coskun, Ayse Deniz Erturk

    2015-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii, Rubella, Cytomegalovirus and Herpes simplex viruses are microorganisms that cause congenital infections and they are called briefly as TORCH. There is an ongoing argument for the screening of reproductive age women due to the high cost of tests. For a test to be used in screening, prevalence of disease in this population should be known. The aim of this study was to investigate TORCH seroprevalence among women attending a teaching hospital in Istanbul. A total of 1101 patients attending outpatient clinic of Obstetric Care Clinic of Haydarpasa Training and Research Hospital affiliated to Association of Istanbul Northern Anatolia Public Hospitals between September 2013 to January 2015 and their laboratory data were evaluated retrospectively. We investigated Ig G and M seropositivity rates against TORCH. The age of the patients ranged between 17-47 years with a mean age of 30.3±5.8 years. Pregnant population had 99.5% anti-CMV Ig G (+), 94.2% anti-Rubella Ig G (+), 31% anti-Toxoplasma Ig G (+). Seroprevalence for Anti IgM was 0.5% for CMV, 0.2% for rubella. The screening for Toxoplasma gondii may be suggested since the prevalence is not high in our population. The screening of CMV is not meaningful, due to high seroprevalence. Although seroprevalence of rubella is also high, it may be suggested for preconception vaccination especially in women above 20 years of age born prior to National Vaccination Programme.

  11. Predictors of job satisfaction among nurses working in Ethiopian public hospitals, 2014: institution-based cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semachew, Ayele; Belachew, Tefera; Tesfaye, Temamen; Adinew, Yohannes Mehretie

    2017-04-24

    Nurses play a pivotal role in determining the efficiency, effectiveness, and sustainability of health care systems. Nurses' job satisfaction plays an important role in the delivery of quality health care. There is paucity of studies addressing job satisfaction among nurses in the public hospital setting in Ethiopia. Thus, this study aimed to assess job satisfaction and factors influencing it among nurses in Jimma zone public hospitals, southwestern Ethiopia. An institution-based census was conducted among 316 nurses working in Jimma zone public hospitals from March to April, 2014. A structured self-administered questionnaire based on a modified version of the McCloskey/Mueller Satisfaction Scale was used. Data were entered using Epi Info version 3.5.3 statistical software and analyzed using SPSS version 20 statistical package. Mean satisfaction scores were compared by independent variables using an independent sample t test and ANOVA. Bivariate and multivariable linear regressions were done. A total of 316 nurses were included, yielding a response rate of 92.67%. The overall mean job satisfaction was (67.43 ± 13.85). One third (33.5%) of the study participants had a low level of job satisfaction. Mutual understandings at work and professional commitment showed significant and positive relationship with overall job satisfaction, while working at an inpatient unit and work load were negatively associated. One third of nurses had a low level of job satisfaction. Professional commitment, workload, working unit, and mutual understanding at work predicted the outcome variable.

  12. Physicians’ engagement in dual practices and the effects on labor supply in public hospitals: results from a register-based study

    OpenAIRE

    Johannessen, Karl-Arne; Hagen, Terje P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Physician dual practice, a combination of public and private practice, has attracted attention due to fear of reduced work supply and a lack of key personnel in the public system, increase in low priority treatments, and conflicts of interest for physicians who may be competing for their own patients when working for private suppliers. In this article, we analyze both choice of dual practice among hospital physicians and the dual practices’ effect on work supply in public hospitals...

  13. Survey of the Information-Seeking Behaviour of Hospital Professionals at a Public Cancer Hospital in Greece Proves the Value of Hospital Libraries. A Review of: Kostagiolas, P. A., Ziavrou, K., Alexias, G., & Niakas, D. (2012. Studying the information-seeking behavior of hospital professionals: The case of METAXA Cancer Hospital in Greece. Journal of Hospital Librarianship, 12(1, 33-45.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio DeRosa

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective – To study the information-seeking practices of hospital staff and weigh the impact of hospital libraries on effective information-seeking.Design – Survey questionnaire.Setting – Large public cancer hospital in Greece.Subjects – The authors surveyed 49 physicians, 43 nursing staff members, 25 administrative staff members, 23 paramedical staff members, and 5 technical staff members, totaling 145 health professionals.Methods – Participants were given a questionnaire comprised of five parts: general information (including gender, age, education, position, and professional experience; questions on computer and Internet accessibility; questions regarding individual information needs; questions on information-seeking obstacles; and a question regarding the satisfaction with the current degree of information availability in the hospital. The last question was ranked using a 5-point Likert scale. Each questionnaire was distributed with a cover letter explaining the anonymity and consent of the respondent. Hospital members were randomly selected using a number generator and respondents returned completed surveys to the hospital personnel office in a sealed envelope within a specified time frame. The sampled group was representative of the overall population of the hospital.Main Results – The authors discuss demographic data of respondents: 65.7% were women; 56.7% were over 40 years old; 29.0% were graduates of higher technological institutes; 28.3% were university graduates; 9.7% held a postgraduate degree; 8.3% had a PhD; and 1.4% had only secondary education. As for the remainder of the survey questions: 64% of respondents had access to the Internet both at home and at work, while only 8.2% had no access to the Internet at all; most respondents noted using the Internet for seeking scientific information (83.0% and e-mail communication (65.3%; the main obstacle respondents noted experiencing when seeking information was the lack of

  14. Hospital planning for acts of terrorism and other public health emergencies involving children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, S; Shannon, M

    2005-12-01

    In today's world the increased potential of terrorist attacks places unique burdens and consequences on health care workers. Hospitals and hospital personnel must now be prepared to react immediately to such events. They must also implement, in advance, policies to protect their own health care personnel while providing care to victims. In this review, we discuss the four major forms of mass casualty terrorism (biological, chemical, nuclear, and thermomechanical) including clinical signs and symptoms for each, the impact on health care personnel, and special considerations for children. We will then outline key principles of hospital preparation with regard to paediatrics in anticipation of such emergencies.

  15. 'The ones that got away': implementing an exit policy for nurses in a public hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Cheryl-Ann; O'Connor, Louise; Potter, Sharee

    2003-08-01

    The shortage of registered nurses in Victoria led a Melbourne metropolitan hospital to analyse their recent staff attrition rate. This analysis highlighted the importance of having an exiting policy in place for all departing staff. An exit policy can provide unique opportunities for hospitals to collect information that may help reduce future employee turnover through the identification of the causes of employee dissatisfaction. This paper will discuss the literature and outline the project that aided in the analysis of the hospital's attrition rate and development of a practical exit policy.

  16. Association of public health initiatives with outcomes for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest at home and in public locations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christopher B., Fordyce; Carolina M., Hansen; Kragholm, Kristian

    2017-01-01

    cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and first-responder defibrillation for OHCAs stratified by home vs public location and their association with survival and neurological outcomes.Design, Setting, and Participants  This observational study reviewed 8269 patients with OHCAs (5602 [67.7%] at home and 2667 [32...... to improve bystander and first-responder interventions included training members of the general population in CPR and in the use of automated external defibrillators, teaching first responders about team-based CPR (eg, automated external defibrillator use and high-performance CPR), and instructing dispatch......), the median age was 68 years, and 61.5% were male. After comprehensive public health initiatives, the proportion of patients receiving bystander CPR increased at home (from 28.3% [275 of 973] to 41.3% [498 of 1206], P 

  17. Sustained reduction in antibiotic consumption in a South African public sector hospital; Four year outcomes from the Groote Schuur Hospital antibiotic stewardship program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyles, T H; Naicker, V; Rawoot, N; Raubenheimer, P J; Eick, B; Mendelson, M

    2017-01-30

    Overuse of antibiotics has driven global bacterial resistance to the extent that we have entered a post-antibiotic era, where infections that were once easily treatable are now becoming untreatable. Efforts to control consumption have focused on antibiotic stewardship programmes (ASPs), aimed at optimising use. To report antibiotic consumption and cost over 4 years from a public hospital ASP in South Africa (SA). A comprehensive ASP comprising online education, a dedicated antibiotic prescription chart and weekly dedicated ward rounds was introduced at Groote Schuur Hospital, Cape Town, in 2012. Electronic records were used to collect data on volume and cost of antibiotics and related laboratory tests, and to determine inpatient mortality and 30-day readmission rates. These data were compared with a control period before the intervention. Total antibiotic consumption fell from 1 046 defined daily doses/1 000 patient days in 2011 (control period) to 868 by 2013 and remained at similar levels for the next 2 years. This was driven by reductions in intravenous antibiotic use, particularly ceftriaxone. Inflation-adjusted cost savings on antibiotics were ZAR3.2 million over 4 years. Laboratory tests increased over the same period with a total increased cost of ZAR0.4 million. There was no significant change in mortality or 30-day readmission rates. The effects of a comprehensive ASP on medical inpatients at a public sector hospital in SA were durable over 4 years, leading to a reduction in total antibiotic consumption without adverse effect. When increased laboratory costs were offset there was a net cost saving of ZAR2.8 million.

  18. [Orthogeriatric activity in public hospitals of Castilla y León: description and review of the literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáez López, Pilar; Martín Perez, Encarnación; González Ramírez, Alfonso; Pablos Hernández, Carmen; Jiménez Mola, Sonia; Vuelta Calzada, Esther; Cerón Fernández, Ana; Guerrero Díaz, Maria Teresa; del Pozo Tagarro, Pilar; Andrés Sáinz, Ana Isabel; Pereira de Castro Juez, Nieves; Cervera Díaz, Carmen; Muñoz Pascual, Angélica; Idoate Gil, Javier; Collado Díaz, Teresa; Perez-Jara Carrera, Javier; Vazquez Pedrezuela, Carmen; Prado Esteban, Florentino

    2014-01-01

    The benefits of the collaboration between orthopaedics and geriatrics in the management and care of elderly patients admitted with hip fracture have been widely demonstrated. A questionnaire was sent to all hospital geriatricians of Castilla y León in order to determine the characteristics this collaboration between orthopaedics and geriatrics in the public hospitals of Castilla y León. They were asked about the type of collaboration with orthopaedics in the care of the elderly patient admitted with hip fracture and details of the treatment of the complications. Most of the hospitals maintain a high level of orthogeriatric collaboration with geriatricians, and the geriatrician attends to most of the medical complications of these patients. The average hospital stay is 10 days, with a surgical delay of 3 days. Management of the most frequent clinical problems in hospitals of Castilla y León are detailed in this article, comparing them with the latest articles and current recommendations from clinical practice guides. Copyright © 2013 SEGG. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. Preventing mismanagement of community-acquired pneumonia at an urban public hospital: implications for institution-specific practice guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, D N; Furumoto-Dawson, A; Itokazu, G S; Chinikamwala, M; Levasseur, S; Weinstein, R A

    1998-03-01

    To assess institutional performance of key diagnostic and therapeutic interventions and to identify areas amenable to improvement in the management of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). A chart-based retrospective study. Cook County Hospital, a large, urban, public teaching hospital. Adult inpatients with a hospital discharge diagnosis of CAP. None. Fifty hospital admissions were reviewed. Only 25 patients (50%) had two specimens obtained for blood culture, and sputum was sent for Gram's stain and culture for only 11 patients (22%). Approximately one third of the patients had portable anterior-posterior instead of standard posterior-anterior and lateral chest radiographs performed. Physicians in the emergency department (ED) tended to be less likely to note the presence of multilobar infiltrates or pleural effusions than the attending radiologists. The antibiotic regimens employed in the ED and on the inpatient wards were widely variable. The mean time from hospital entry until administration of the first dose of antibiotics was 5.5 h for the 18 patients for whom treatment was initiated in the ED vs 16.1 h for the 27 patients admitted through the ED for whom therapy was deferred until ward admission (p < 0.001, Student's t test). Institutional variations in the performance of basic diagnostic and therapeutic interventions for patients with CAP may be substantial. The local performance of these key processes of care should be assessed to help direct the formulation of institutional practice guidelines for the management of CAP.

  20. Structure and activities of pharmacy and therapeutics committees among public hospitals in South Africa; findings and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matlala, Moliehi; Gous, Andries Gs; Godman, Brian; Meyer, Johanna C

    2017-11-01

    The WHO identified Pharmacy and Therapeutics Committees (PTCs) as a pivotal model to promote rational medicine use in hospitals. This matches a key South African (SA) government objective to establish PTCs in all hospitals to ensure rational, efficient and cost-effective use of medicines. However, documentation on the functionality of PTCs in public hospitals in SA is limited. Areas covered: This study aimed to address this. A 3-phased mixed methods approach involving questionnaires, observations of PTC meetings and semi-structured interviews was used. The findings were converged during the interpretation phase. Expert commentary: Most professionals were represented in the PTCs, with variations across hospitals. Membership of PTCs included a pharmacist, who in the majority of cases was the secretary. PTC activities included dissemination of decisions (100%) and formulary management (89.5%). However, reporting of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and medication errors was typically poor at all hospital levels. Lack of expertise of pharmacoeconomic analysis and evidence-based decision-making in formulary management was identified as a key challenge in formulary management. In conclusion, future programmes should strengthen PTCs in specialised aspects of formulary management. Further training in the principles of pharmacovigilance is needed to enhance ADR reporting, as well as to ensure compliance with both WHO and provincial guidelines.

  1. Benchmarking Non Public Hospitals in Puerto Rico: A Key Component in the Financial Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arisbel Ramos Martin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Benchmarking is considered a key component of the organizational performance measurement system. This study examines a sample of 53 profit and nonprofit hospitals registered in the American Hospital Directory, through four financial dimensions: liquidity, efficiency, profitability and capital structure. The purpose of the study is to validate whether the financial industry benchmark differs or not from a group of 17 selected financial ratios of profit and nonprofit hospitals, to determine if their financial performance is efficient or inefficient in the Puerto Rico health care system. The findings from the research show that 53% or more of the 17 selected financial ratios, compared globally, suggest being efficient in both types of hospitals. This means that these financial ratios were greater than or equal to the industry benchmark.

  2. Motivation and job satisfaction among medical and nursing staff in a Cyprus public general hospital

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lambrou, Persefoni; Kontodimopoulos, Nick; Niakas, Dimitris

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate how medical and nursing staff of the Nicosia General Hospital is affected by specific motivation factors, and the association between job satisfaction and motivation...

  3. Linkage of traffic crash and hospitalization records with limited identifiers for enhanced public health surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conderino, Sarah; Fung, Lawrence; Sedlar, Slavenka; Norton, Jennifer M

    2017-04-01

    Motor vehicle traffic (MVT) crashes kill or seriously injure approximately 4250 people in New York City (NYC) each year. Traditionally, NYC surveillance practices use hospitalization and crash data separately to monitor trends in MVT-related injuries, but key information linking crash circumstances to health outcomes is lost when analyzing these data sources in isolation. Our objective was to match crash reports to hospitalization records to create a traffic injury surveillance dataset that can be used to describe crash circumstances and related injury outcomes. The linkage of the two systems presents a unique challenge since the system tracking crashes and the system tracking hospitalizations and emergency department (ED) visits lack key identifying data such as names and dates of birth. NYC Department of Transportation provided electronic records based on reports of motor vehicle crashes submitted to the New York State Department of Motor Vehicles for all crashes occurring in NYC from 2009 to 2013. New York Statewide Planning and Research Cooperative System (SPARCS) ED and hospitalization administrative data from NYC hospitals were used to identify unintentional MVT-related injuries using external cause of injury codes. Since the two systems do not share unique individual identifiers, probabilistic record linkage was conducted using LinkSolv9.0. Sensitivity/specificity calculations and chi-square analyses of linkage rates were conducted to assess linkage results. From 2009-2013, there were 1,054,344 individuals involved in MVT crashes in NYC and 280,340 ED visits and hospitalizations from MVT-related injuries. There were 145,003 linked pairs, giving a linkage rate of 52% of the total MVT-related hospital records. This linkage had a sensitivity of 74% and a specificity of 93%. Linkage rates were comparable by age, sex, crash role, collision type, hospital county, injury location, hospital type, and hospital status, indicating no apparent biases in the match by

  4. A substantial number of scientific publications originate from non-university hospitals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fedder, Jens; Nielsen, Gunnar Lauge; Petersen, Lars Michael Jelstrup

    2011-01-01

    As we found no recent published reports on the amount and kind of research published from Danish hospitals without university affiliation, we have found it relevant to conduct a bibliometric survey disclosing these research activities.......As we found no recent published reports on the amount and kind of research published from Danish hospitals without university affiliation, we have found it relevant to conduct a bibliometric survey disclosing these research activities....

  5. Understanding Australian healthcare workers’ uptake of influenza vaccination: examination of public hospital policies and procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seale Holly

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Australia, whether to provide free influenza vaccine to health care workers (HCWs is a policy decision for each hospital or jurisdiction, and is therefore not uniform across the country. This study explored hospital policies and practices regarding occupational influenza vaccination of HCWs in Australia. Methods A study using qualitative methodology, which included semi-structured interviews, was undertaken with hospital staff involved with the delivery of occupational influenza vaccination from three states in Australia. Results The 29 participants were responsible for vaccinating staff in 82 hospitals. Major themes in the responses were the lack of resources and the difficulties participants faced in procuring any additional support or funding from their institutions. All study sites provided vaccine free of charge to employees via on-site clinics or mobile carts, and used multiple strategies to inform and educate their staff. In some instances, declination forms had been adopted, however their use was associated with resourcing issues, animosity, and other problems. Participants who were responsible for multiple sites were more likely to recount lower vaccination coverage figures at their hospitals. Conclusions From these interviews, it is clear that hospitals are implementing multiple strategies to educate, promote, and deliver the vaccine to staff. However, resources and support are not always available to assist with the vaccination campaign. The reality for many hospitals is that there is limited capacity to implement the vaccination campaigns at the levels high enough to raise compliance rates. Further research needs to be conducted to quantify the factors contributing to higher uptake in the Australian hospital setting.

  6. Methods of recording theatre activity across publicly funded hospitals in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cronin, J

    2013-10-13

    A review of theatre activity in all Health Service Executive (HSE) hospitals in Cork and Kerry in 2008 required a manual extraction of theatre activity data from largely paper-based logbooks. A key data management recommendation suggested that "a standardised computerised theatre logbook system be developed in all hospitals in the region". HSE (2010) Reconfiguration of health services for Cork and Kerry-theatre utilisation review. ISBN 978-1-906218-54-6.

  7. Success or failure of hospital information systems of public hospitals affiliated with Zahedan University of Medical Sciences: A cross sectional study in the Southeast of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alipour, Jahanpour; Karimi, Afsaneh; Ebrahimi, Saeid; Ansari, Fatemeh; Mehdipour, Yousef

    2017-12-01

    After implementation, evaluation of hospital information systems (HISs) is critical to ensure the fulfillment of the system goals. This study aimed to assess the success or failure of HISs in public hospitals affiliated with Zahedan University of Medical Sciences. A cross-sectional descriptive and analytic study was performed in 2016. The study population comprised IT and HIS authorities and hospital information system users. The sample consisted of 468 participants. The data were collected using two questionnaires and analyzed with the SPSS software using descriptive and analytical statistics. The mean score of functional, behavioral, ethical, organizational, cultural and educational factors from the users' perspective was 3.14±0.66, 2.97± 0.60, 3.39±0.70, 2.96±0.642, 3.09±0.63, and 2.95±0.74, respectively. The mean score of organizational, behavioral, cultural, technological, educational and legal factors from IT and HIS authorities' perspective was 3.51±0.54, 3.35±0.45, 2.75±0.61, 3.58±0.32, and 3.96±0.59, respectively. The evaluated hospital information systems were considered relatively successful in terms of functional, ethical, and cultural factors but were considered as a relative failure in terms of behavioral, organizational, and educational factors form the users' perspective. Only the legal factor showed success, while organizational, behavioral, technical and educational factors showed relative success and the cultural factor showed relative failure from HIS and IT authorities' perspective. Therefore, assessing the users' needs before implementing the system, involving them in various stages of implementation, training them, and improving their computer skills seem to be necessary to achieve a better level of system success. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Cross-sectional study comparing public and private hospitals in Catalonia: is the practice of routine episiotomy changing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escuriet, Ramón; Pueyo, María J; Perez-Botella, Mercedes; Espada, Xavi; Salgado, Isabel; Gómez, Analía; Biescas, Herminia; Espiga, Isabel; White, Joanna; Fernandez, Rosa; Fusté, Josep; Ortún, Vicente

    2015-03-11

    In Spain, the Strategy for Assistance in Normal Childbirth (SANC) promoted a model of care, which respects the physiological birth process and discards unnecessary routine interventions, such as episiotomies. We evaluated the rate of episiotomy use and perineal trauma as indicators of how selective introduction of the SANC initiative has impacted childbirth outcomes in hospitals of Catalonia. Cross-sectional study of all singleton vaginal term deliveries without instrument registered in the Minimum Basic Data Set (MBDS) of Catalonia in 2007, 2010 and 2012. Hospitals were divided into types according to funding (public or private), and four strata were differentiated according to volume of births attended. Episiotomies and perineal injury were considered dependent variables. The relationship between qualitative variables was analysed using the chi-squared test, and Student's t-test was used for quantitative variables. Comparison of proportions was performed on the two hospital groups between 2007 and 2012 using a Z-test. Logistic regression models were used to analyse the relationship between episiotomy or severe perineal damage and maternal age, volume of births and hospital type, obtaining odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). The majority of normal singleton term deliveries were attended in public hospitals, where maternal age was lower than for women attended in private hospitals. Analysis revealed a statistically significant (P Catalonia for both hospital types. Private hospitals appeared to be associated with increased episiotomy rate in 2007 (OR = 1.099, CI: 1,057-1,142), 2010 (OR = 1.528, CI: 1,472-1,587) and 2012 (OR = 1.459, CI: 1,383-1,540), and a lower rate of severe perineal trauma in 2007 (OR = 0.164, CI: 0.095-0.283), 2010 (OR = 0.16, CI: 0.110-0.232) and 2012 (OR = 0.19, CI: 0.107-0.336). Regarding severe perineal injury, when independent variables were adjusted, maternal age ceased to have a significant

  9. Public-private settlement and hospital mortality per sources of payment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Juliana Pires; Martins, Mônica; Leite, Iuri da Costa

    2016-07-21

    To analyze if the adjusted hospital mortality varies according to source of payment of hospital admissions, legal nature, and financing settlement of hospitals. Cros-ssectional study with information source in administrative databases. Specific hospital admission reasons were selected considering the volume of hospital admissions and the list of quality indicators proposed by the North-American Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). Were analyzed 852,864 hospital admissions of adults, occurred in 789 hospitals between 2008 and 2010, in Sao Paulo and Rio Grande do Sul, applying multilevel logistic regression. At hospital admission level, showed higher chances of death male patients in more advanced age groups, with comorbidity, who used intensive care unit, and had the Brazilian Unified Health System as source of payment. At the level of hospitals, in those located in the mean of the distribution, the adjusted probability of death in hospital admissions financed by plan or private was 5.0%, against 9.0% when reimbursed by the Brazilian Unified Health System. This probability increased in hospital admissions financed by the Brazilian Unified Health System in hospitals to two standard deviations above the mean, reaching 29.0%. In addition to structural characteristics of the hospitals and the profile of the patients, interventions aimed at improving care should also consider the coverage of the population by health plans, the network shared between beneficiaries of plans and users of the Brazilian Unified Health System, the standard of care to the various sources of payment by hospitals and, most importantly, how these factors influence the clinical performance. Analisar se a mortalidade hospitalar ajustada varia segundo fonte de pagamento das internações, natureza jurídica e arranjo de financiamento dos hospitais. Estudo observacional transversal com fonte de informações em bases de dados administrativos. Motivos de internação específicos foram

  10. Non-invasive ventilation in emergency departments in public hospitals in Catalonia. The VENUR-CAT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, J; Zorrilla, J; Gené, E; Alonso, G; Rimbau, P; Casarramona, F; Netto, C; Sánchez, P; Hernández, R; Escalada, X; Miró, Ò

    2017-06-15

    To know the implementation and characteristics of non-invasive ventilation (NIV) in the Emergency Departments (EDs) of public hospitals in Catalonia (Spain) and analyze possible differences based on the typology, degree of activity and the availability of an Intensive Care Unit (ICU) in the hospital. A non-interventional, descriptive study was carried out, using a structured questionnaire divided into 3sections: 1) professional experience and training; 2) devices used; and 3) clinical scenarios and the use of NIV. Persons responsible for public EDs in Catalonia. Fifty-two of the 54 public EDs in Catalonia responded (96.3%). Fifty-one perform NIV, which is mainly initiated by emergency care physicians (78.5%); 66.7% maintain the patient in the ED until discharge; and in 43.1% of the cases the length of stay is>24h. Of the EDs, 39.2% have their own protocol, 35.3% of which are established by consensus with other departments (more frequently in non-county hospitals [P=.012], and centers with an ICU [P=.014]), while 25.5% have no protocol, and 43.1% register the activity. Training represents the greatest difficulty for the implementation of NIV, but 19.6% do not provide specific training. When support is needed, the main physician of reference is the intensivist (35.3%) (more frequently in non-county hospitals [P=.012], and centers with an ICU [P=.002]). In most EDs in Catalonia, NIV is performed by emergency care physicians. Areas needing improvement include drainage of patients once NIV has been started, the promotion of protocols, registry of activity, and training of the healthcare professionals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  11. The difficulties of abating smoke in late Victorian York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowler, Catherine; Brimblecombe, Peter

    Historical railway documents and council minutes for the city of York reveal an active interest in abating smoke. As early as the mid-nineteenth century the public became less willing to accept pollution as a necessary part of economic progress. The Sanitary Committee of the council, while diligent in the latter part of the century, seemed unable to use the Public Health Act (1875) effectively. It undertook studies of smoke control devices and their use, but could not identify a workable method of smoke control. Industry, under continual pressure from the Town Clerk's office usually took steps to control smoke emissions. However the improvements in air quality, even when control procedures were adopted by many of the city's major factories, seem disappointing. Weak laws and limited technology hampered a very clear enthusiasm to abate smoke.

  12. Knowledge on Alzheimer's Disease among Public Hospitals and Health Clinics Pharmacists in the State of Selangor, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thimarul Huda Mat Nuri

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of Alzheimer's disease (AD has increased with the fast growing of aging population, thereby posing great challenges to provision of care for AD patients. Pharmacists play a vital role in the management of AD; this includes recognizing early symptoms of AD, providing medication counseling to AD patients and their caretakers, and identifying potential adverse drug reactions. A comprehensive understanding of the disease progression, as well as the pharmacological therapy, is essential to provide effective care to AD patients. The level of knowledge about AD among the pharmacists, however, remains unknown. Hence, this study aimed to assess the knowledge on AD among the pharmacists in public hospitals and health clinics and its correlates. A clear picture of the characteristics associated with different levels of knowledge could facilitate the targeted re-training of pharmacists. The 30-item validated Alzheimer disease knowledge scale (ADKS tool was pilot-tested and used in this cross-sectional study. All pharmacists, from nine public hospitals and seven public health clinics in the State of Selangor, Malaysia, were invited to participate in this cross-sectional survey. The ADKS score was computed and compared across demographics characteristics. A total of 445 pharmacists responded to the survey. These pharmacists had a moderate overall score in ADKS; nevertheless, high scores were recorded in the domains of treatment management and care giving. No difference in AD knowledge was found among pharmacists worked in public hospitals and health clinics, except for the domain of care giving (p = 0.033. Ethnicity and age group were independent predictors of ADKS score in the current study. The pharmacists in the current study had moderate AD knowledge. On-going education and training programme on AD, in particular the domains other than treatment management and care giving, should be provided to the pharmacists to ensure delivery of quality

  13. Equitable Distribution of Public Hospitals According to Health Needs in Malaysia: Does It Exist or Not?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saw Chien, Gan; Chee-Khoon, Chan; Wai, Victor Hoe Chee; Ng, Chiu Wan

    2015-11-01

    The goal of ensuring geographic equity of health care can be achieved if the geographic distribution of health care services is according to the health needs. This study aims to examine whether acute Ministry of Health hospital beds are distributed according to population health needs in various states within Peninsular Malaysia. The health needs of each state are indicated by the crude death rate. Comparisons of the share of hospital beds to that of population with differential health needs were assessed using concentration curve and index. In most years between 1995 and 2010, the distribution of hospital beds in Peninsular Malaysia were concentrated among states with higher health needs. This is in line with the principle of vertical equity and could be one advantage of a central federal government that can allocate health care resources to prioritize states with higher health care needs. © 2015 APJPH.

  14. Implementation of the Garling recommendations can offer real hope for rescuing the New South Wales public hospital system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Graeme J; Dwyer, John M

    2009-01-19

    Public hospital clinicians across Australia will relate to the problems described in the Garling report and endorse most of the recommendations to bring the system "back from the brink". Implementation is feasible but requires substantial culture change, which must re-engage clinicians and stem the flow of desertion to the private sector. It must also address the fundamental causes of the current crisis. Key recommendations involve a substantial change in governance, with a transfer of many areas of the New South Wales Department of Health's responsibility into four board-governed statutory authorities, where equal partnership between clinicians and managers will exist. Of Garling's "four pillars of reform", the greatly expanded role for the current clinician-led Greater Metropolitan Clinical Taskforce is a strong indication of the seriousness with which the Commissioner viewed the clinician-manager divide (which he likened to the Great Schism of 1054). The major omission in implementation is a failure to adequately address the loss of local accountability in hospitals since the abolition of area health service boards. Major change can occur without additional funding, but without substantial new money from the Australian Government, the public hospital system will not be pulled back from the brink. A better opportunity for true partnership of such importance between state and federal governments may not come again before it is too late.

  15. Diagnostic and Therapeutic Knowledge and Practices in the Management of Congenital Syphilis by Pediatricians in Public Maternity Hospitals in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Raquel Rodrigues; Niquini, Roberta Pereira; Bastos, Francisco Inácio; Domingues, Rosa Maria Soares Madeira

    2017-01-01

    The study aimed to assess conformity with Brazil's standard protocol for diagnostic and therapeutic practices in the management of congenital syphilis by pediatricians in public maternity hospitals. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 2015 with 41 pediatricians working in all the public maternity hospitals in Teresina, the capital of Piauí State, Northeast Brazil, through self-completed questionnaires. The study assessed the conformity of knowledge and practices according to the Brazilian Ministry of Health protocols. The study has made evident low access to training courses (54%) and insufficient knowledge of the case definition of congenital syphilis (42%) and rapid tests for syphilis (39%). Flaws were observed in the diagnostic workup and treatment of newborns. Requesting VDRL (88%) and correct treatment of neurosyphilis (88%) were the practices that showed the highest conformity with standard protocols. Low conformity with protocols leads to missed opportunities for identifying and adequately treating congenital syphilis. Based on the barriers identified in the study, better access to diagnostic and treatment protocols, improved recording on prenatal cards and hospital patient charts, availability of tests and medicines, and educational work with pregnant women should be urgently implemented, aiming to reverse the currently inadequate management of congenital syphilis and to curb its spread.

  16. Public management of urban hospitality: a case study of Agua Branca Park, São Paulo city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Carla Sagi

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available This article is a qualitative study about the public management of Água Branca Park in São Paulo city and its impacts on the hospitality of this area. The research began in 2005 in master's degree in Hospitality at Anhembi Morumbi University and was pursuing independent until 2008. It is examined the three major dimensions of management: administrative and institutional, socio-political and economic-financial. It was possible to see how aspects related to human resources training, political projects of greater magnitude, physical resources, planning systematic and relationships with the various social actors ultimately result in the hospitality that the park offers to its visitors. Água Branca Park is having a good performance in that sense, since the various components of public management appear to be moving towards the park to be an area full of leisure, which includes the 3 D's of Dumazedier (1980: rest, fun and development, minimizing the pressures that affect Sao Paulo metropolis.

  17. Antibiotic resistance and therapeutic management of sepsis in a Malaysian public Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forouzan Bayat Nejad

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to document the microbial profile and pattern of use of antibiotics in the government hospital of Penang state, Malaysia. An audit was conducted in 2007 in the general medical ward of Hospital Pulau Pinang, Malaysia. The mortality rate was 54.22% with severesepsis or septicaemia. Mithicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus caused 37% of deaths, while 33% of deaths involved Klebsiella Spp. Commonly prescribed antibiotics included; cloxacillin 500mg (qid 20%, tazocin 2gm (bid1.1%, and vancomycin 1gm (od 27%. We report the useof high doses of antibiotics in the six months prior to anotable rise in resistant infections.

  18. Kenya Hospices and Palliative Care Association: integrating palliative care in public hospitals in Kenya

    OpenAIRE

    Ali, Zipporah

    2016-01-01

    Background In Kenya, cancers as a disease group rank third as a cause of death after infectious and cardiovascular diseases. It is estimated that the annual incidence of cancer is about 37,000 new cases with an annual mortality of 28,000 cases (Kenya National Cancer Control Strategy 2010). The incidence of non-communicable diseases accounts for more than 50% of total hospital admissions and over 55% of hospital deaths (Kenya National Strategy for the Prevention and Control of Non Communicable...

  19. Does Restriction of Public Health Care Dental Benefits Affect the Volume, Severity, or Cost of Dental-Related Hospital Visits?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomon, David; Heidel, R Eric; Kolokythas, Antonia; Miloro, Michael; Schlieve, Thomas

    2017-03-01

    On July 1, 2012, the Illinois legislature passed the Save Medicaid Access and Resources Together (SMART) Act, which restricts adult public dental insurance coverage to emergency-only treatment. The purpose of this study was to measure the effect of this restriction on the volume, severity, and treatment costs of odontogenic infections in an urban hospital. A retrospective cohort study of patients presenting for odontogenic pain or infection at the University of Illinois Hospital was performed. Data were collected using related International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision codes from January 1, 2011 through December 31, 2013 and divided into 2 cohorts over consecutive 18-month periods. Outcome variables included age, gender, insurance status, oral and maxillofacial surgery (OMS) consultation, imaging, treatment, treatment location, number of hospital admission days, and inpatient care level. Severity was determined by the presence of OMS consultation, incision and drainage, hospital admission, and cost per encounter. Hospital charges were used to compare the cost of care between cohorts. Between-patients statistics were used to compare risk factors and outcomes between cohorts. Of 5,192 encounters identified, 1,405 met the inclusion criteria. There were no significant differences between cohorts for age (P = .28) or gender (P = .43). After passage of the SMART Act, emergency department visits increased 48%, surgical intervention increased 100%, and hospital admission days increased 128%. Patients were more likely to have an OMS consult (odds ratio [OR] = 1.42; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.11-1.81), an incision and drainage (OR = 1.48; 95% CI, 1.13-1.94), and a longer hospital admission (P = .04). The average cost per encounter increased by 20% and the total cost of care increased by $1.6 million. After limitation of dental benefits, there was an increase in the volume and severity of odontogenic infections. In addition, there was an escalated

  20. Efficiency and Productivity of County-level Public Hospitals Based on the Data Envelopment Analysis Model and Malmquist Index in Anhui, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Nian-Nian; Wang, Cun-Hui; Ni, Hong; Wang, Heng

    2017-12-05

    China began to implement the national medical and health system and public hospital reforms in 2009 and 2012, respectively. Anhui Province is one of the four pilot provinces, and the medical reform measures received wide attention nationwide. The effectiveness of the above reform needs to get attention. This study aimed to master the efficiency and productivity of county-level public hospitals based on the data envelopment analysis (DEA) model and Malmquist index in Anhui, China, and then provide improvement measures for the future hospital development. We chose 12 country-level hospitals based on geographical distribution and the economic development level in Anhui Province. Relevant data that were collected in the field and then sorted were provided by the administrative departments of the hospitals. DEA models were used to calculate the dynamic efficiency and Malmquist index factors for the 12 institutions. During 2010-2015, the overall average relative service efficiency of 12 county-level public hospitals was 0.926, and the number of hospitals achieved an effective DEA for each year from 2010 to 2015 was 4, 6, 7, 7, 6, and 8, respectively, as measured using DEA. During this same period, the average overall production efficiency was 0.983, and the total productivity factor had declined. The overall production efficiency of five hospitals was >1, and the rest are productivity has not been effecti