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Sample records for victoria museum art

  1. Triumphs Show: What Makes Art History? Year 7 Exploit the Resources of the Victoria and Albert Museum's Medieval Gallery to Create and Curate Their Own Answer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copsey, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    What do 14 Year 7 students, an art teacher, a history teacher and the Victoria and Albert Museum have in common? They are all part of the "Stronger Together" Museum Champion project run by The Langley Academy and the River & Rowing Museum and supported by Arts Council England, designed to engage students, teachers and museum staff…

  2. Sustainability in Modern Art Museums

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campolmi, Irene

    2013-01-01

    The paper analyzes the concept of sustainability in European governmental museum policies. It takes into consideration great modern art museums, particularly Tate Modern. On the one hand, the issue of sustainability is linked to art museums inasmuch these institutions operate for the sustainable...... to their eligibility for funding and it is indeed an economic rather than a cultural issue. Though, modern art museums’ sustainability relies not only in developing economic and environmental strategies but mostly in creating cultural policies that favor art museums in accomplishing same tasks but from different...... curatorial and managerial perspectives. A long-term sustainable museum model steps beyond Foucault’s notion that art museums are “heterotopy”, i.e. spaces that present art as an alternative phenomenon outside reality. On the contrary, a sustainable model for museums acts as “archètopy”, i.e. a space (tòpos...

  3. The Rose Art Museum Crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, Paul

    2010-01-01

    On January 26, 2009, the Brandeis University Board of Trustees voted unanimously to close the Rose Art Museum (Waltham, Massachusetts). The proceeds from the subsequent auction were to be reinvested in the university to ensure its long-term financial health. The reaction to the decision by campus constituencies provides a case study to show the…

  4. ...Ready, Set, Go to the Art Museum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herberholz, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    A field trip to an art museum is a very special occasion for students, one they will long remember and that will initiate an association with museums that will endure throughout their lives. When teachers plan ahead and schedule a date and time for their class to attend, the museum will probably provide some pertinent information. Some museums may…

  5. Perceived constraints to art museum attendance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinhee Jun; Gerard Kyle; Joseph T. O' Leary

    2007-01-01

    We explored selected socio-demographic factors that influence the perception of constraints to art museum attendance among a sample of interested individuals who were currently not enjoying art museum visitation. Data from the Survey of Public Participation in the Arts (SPPA), a nationwide survey were used for this study. Using multivariate analysis of variance, we...

  6. What is Sustainability in Modern Art Museums?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campolmi, Irene

    2013-01-01

    museums have looked at sustainability inasmuch industries or commercial businesses and have adopted ‘sustainability charts’ as a tool to green-wash their policies and try to provide a different cultural offer. Their approach has been ‘three-bottom’ and has focused on the economic, environmental and social...... and contextualized within the exhibition’s narrative. Documentation processes and cultural policies based on sustainability values may assign different tasks and responsibilities to museum practitioners and may foster more democratic working environments. In a sustainable cultural policy, narratives as well...... as documentation processes may be effectively constructed through diegetic processes by all the museum workers. Such institutions embody a different museums model that I called ‘archétopy’. Modern art museums may adopt it to open the access of narratives and documentation processes to wider segments...

  7. THE INITIATIVE TO DEVELOP MUSEUM OF ISLAMIC ARTS IN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    preservation of the Alfa Alimi's mosque and the setting up of a Museum of. Islamic Arts in Ilorin, the first of its ... Keywords: Culture, Heritage, Islamic arts, Museum, Documentation,. Preservation of arts. Introduction .... conceived to have the museum of Islamic Art, which will have a library where these books can be kept for ...

  8. The art museum facing the memory challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Isabel Rocha Roque

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Museums have emerged as a representative synthesis of a reality, so a question rises about the preservation of the memories inherent to the functional and symbolic objects. In the particular case of art museums, the goal was to build a heritage repository which would contribute to the creation of a cultural identity. So, the objects were mainly evaluated in terms of aesthetic excellence of its parameters, to the detriment of other meanings. On the other hand, also the historiography of art favored formal aspects, establishing authorities and styles. These circumstances determined the decontextualization of the object in the museum. In return, from mid-twentieth century onwards, the studies of the public, as a plural and diversified entity, and the theoretical debates around the meaning of the object, contributed to a redefinition of the museological speech. The museum had to offset losses due to the musealisation through a set of procedures and tools that recontextualize the meanings of the object in their multiple valences. Between the two vectors, decontextualization and recontextualization, the museum challenges our personal and collective memory.

  9. Museum Education and Art Therapy: Exploring an Innovative Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacock, Karen

    2012-01-01

    This report describes collaborations between the disciplines of museum education and art therapy, which inspired the implementation of a pilot art therapy program at the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art in Tennessee (USA). Because relatively limited research has been conducted on this trend, the author reviewed museum exhibits and programming, as well…

  10. Art Museums in Australia: A Personal Retrospect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Thomas

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A survey of, and reflections on, the growth of art museums in Australia based on personal experience and involvement. It starts with the early art collections and state galleries and their organisation. It looks at changing patterns of leadership and governance. It considers the roles of inter-state competition, the varying patters of organisation and support and the impact of federal institutions. It reflects on factors of race, gender and ethnicity and also the situation of Australian exhibitions and collections in the Global Village. It considers the effects of popularisation, commercialisation and celebrity culture on exhibition practices. It concludes that Australia’s art museums, more perhaps than any others, have become unusually well-suited to a post-European or post-North Atlantic age.

  11. Leuconidae (Crustacea: Cumacea) from the collections of the Museum Victoria, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerken, Sarah

    2016-01-21

    The collections of the Museum Victoria have yielded six new leuconid species in five genera from Australian waters: Austroleucon adiazetos n. sp., A. dolosolevis n. sp., Eudorellopsis mykteros n. sp., Kontiloleucon australiensis n. gen., n. sp., Leucon (Alytoleucon) dolichorhinos n. sp., Ommatoleucon megalopos n. sp. as well as the new genus Kontiloleucon. Leucon (Leucon) echinolophotos n. sp. is a new species from off Enderby Land, Antarctica. Keys to the Australian leuconid genera and species are included.

  12. A Summing Up. Allen Memorial Art Museum Addition, Oberlin, Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Progressive Architecture, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Venturi and Rauch's addition to the Allen Art Museum at Oberlin College is in two separate parts: a loft that houses new facilities for the art department and a gallery for contemporary art. (Author/MLF)

  13. How Some Art Museums Can Appeal to Teenagers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striepe, Susan E.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes a case study that explores the question of how some art museums can appeal to teenagers. The significance of teenagers as the most underrepresented age demographic to visit museums is relevant to current museum practice where visitor studies have assumed increasing importance. As teenagers mature into adults, the long-term…

  14. Building the image of modern art : the rhetoric of two museums and the representation and canonization of modern art (1935-1975) : the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam and the Museum of Modern Art in New York

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leigh, Nana

    2008-01-01

    The Rhetoric of Two Museums and the Representation and Canonization of Modern Art (1935-1975): The Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam and the Museum of Modern Art in New York Museums of modern art have determined the course of modern art history. Their contributions to the representation and

  15. Babies and Art Museums: welcoming discoveries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Carvalho

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available BEBÊS E MUSEUS DE ARTE: ACOLHENDO DESCOBERTAS Resumo: a oferta de ações educativas em museus voltadas para bebês provoca a necessidade de estudos que busquem compreender tais ações, contribuindo para a constituição de práticas significativas. A partir dessas atividades, o artigo apresenta uma reflexão sobre a relação entre arte e primeira infância. O texto foi orientado por teóricos que valorizam o aspecto cultural no desenvolvimento infantil, em especial por Rinaldi e Vecchi. Foram utilizados documentos das instituições, como registros fotográficos e artigos, além de observações de algumas atividades. Buscou-se identificar caminhos que podem estimular a extensão do acolhimento ao público de zero a três anos nas instituições culturais. Palavras-chave: Arte. Educação em Museus. Bebês Abstract: The offer of educational actions focused on babies in museums causes the need for studies that seek to understand such actions, contributing to the constitution of significant practices. From these activities the article presents a reflection on the relationship between art and early childhood. The text was guided by theorists who value the cultural aspect in children's development, especially by Rinaldi and Vecchi. Institutional documents were used, such as photographic records and articles, as well as observations of some activities. It sought to identify ways that can stimulate the extension of the reception to the public from zero to three years in cultural institutions. Keywords: Art. Museum Education. Babies.

  16. Museum Education and Art Therapy: Promoting Wellness in Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblatt, Brooke

    2014-01-01

    By combining museum education with art therapy, museums can make significant contributions to healthcare. The Creative Aging program at The Phillips Collection in Washington, D.C., unites these fields, using artworks and art-making as catalysts to explore feelings, invite self-exploration, and build community. The program fosters an interest in…

  17. 77 FR 68827 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: The Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, Museum of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-16

    ... Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: The Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, Museum of New Mexico, Santa Fe, NM AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, Museum of New Mexico, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribe, has determined...

  18. Art of Local Radiance: The Teacher's Guide to the Toledo Museum of Art Glass Pavilion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erler, Carolyn

    2013-01-01

    "Exploring the Glass City: The Teacher's Guide to the Glass Pavilion", published in 2008 to celebrate the opening of the Toledo Museum of Art's Glass Pavilion, exemplifies the museum's multidisciplinary approach to public art museum education. This research narrative about the teacher's guide unfolds in three levels. The first,…

  19. The Art of Playful Mobility in Museums

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Froes, Isabel Cristina G.; Walker, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Many of us interact with other people in online games and social networks, through multiple digital devices. But harnessing playful and mobile activities for museum learning is mostly undeveloped. In this chapter we explore play as a structure to support visitor learning, drawing from internation...... research in museums and interaction design. We argue that play and mobility provide museums with ready-made structures and concepts which help them plan for visitor learning....

  20. Uncertain Spaces: Virtual Configurations in Contemporary Art and Museums

    OpenAIRE

    Barranha, Helena; Susana S. Martins; Bounia, Alexandra; Myrivili, Eleni; Dekker, Annet; Beiguelman, Giselle; Brooks, Andrew Vaas; Meschede, Sören; Kogler, Stefanie; Reitstätter, Luise; Bettel, Florian; Terracciano, Roberto; Sousa, Catarina Carneiro de; Eustáquio, Luís

    2015-01-01

    Contém artigos apresentados na International Conference “Uncertain Spaces: Virtual Configurations in Contemporary Art and Museums”, na Fundação Calouste Gulbenkian (Lisboa), 31 Outubro - 1 de Novembro de 2014) de: Helena Barranha e Susana S. Martins - Introduction: Art, Museums and Uncertainty (pp.1-12); Alexandra Bounia e Eleni Myrivili - Beyond the ‘Virtual’: Intangible Museographies and Collaborative Museum Experiences (pp.15-32); Annet Dekker - Curating in Progress. Moving Between Obje...

  1. DIORAMA ART – A POTENTIAL MEDIUM FOR MUSEUM ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    DIORAMA ART – A POTENTIAL MEDIUM FOR MUSEUM. EDUCATION. M. Enti1, G. Brako-Hiapa1, J. Adu-Agyem1, P. Osei-Poku1 and R. Steiner2. 1Department of General Art Studies, KNUST, Kumasi. 2Department of Integrated Rural Art and Industry, KNUST, Kumasi. ABSTRACT. The study recognizes the traditional role ...

  2. Curating Performance on the Edge of the Art Museum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Sanne Krogh; Schwarzbart, Judith

    Since the Intermedia and Fluxus movements a variety of timebased artforms have been contained within visual art contexts. The performative works draw often as much on the tradition of theatre, music, dance, and poetry reading as fine art. Although the institutional context plays a role...... in establishing the ‘rules of engagement’ these can also be challenged curatorially by the programming, choice of location(s), modes of communication, and a general orchestration in time and space. The paper presents some curatorial thoughts when working with performative art within and on the edge of the visual...... art institution. Our research relates specifically to a festival for performative art, ACTS 2014, which we co-curate for the Museum of Contemporary Art in Roskilde. Having grown out of a Fluxus spirit, the museum is not foreign to time-based practices like many museums are. Nevertheless, the intensive...

  3. 77 FR 25742 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    ... Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, formerly Eastern Washington State Historical Society, Spokane, WA. The... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA... paragraphs: Determinations Made by the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture Officials of The Northwest Museum...

  4. Art museum - the place of visualisation of modernity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Popczyk

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Art museum is a space of visualisation of myths and narration of modernity, combines in itself rationality with emotionality, thus provides ambivalent experiences to the audience. Critics of museums such as D. Preziosi present the negative side of the Enlightenment rationality: objectification of artworks and of the subject, building of scientific constructions acting for authorities. In turn, theoreticians who are favorably disposed towards museums such as O. Marquard or A. Huyssen convince that the museum in modern times performs a compensatory role, and its postmodern form allows a magnitude of histories and aesthetics. However, it was ultimately J.-F. Lyotard who becomes its patron, since artist choosing museum for their activities resist the established thought, realising Lyotard's idea of justice as a dispute.

  5. Creating Meaningful Art Museum Experiences for Young Children: Discussions with Future Art Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szekely, Ilona

    2014-01-01

    This article addresses concerns with museum spaces set aside for children to make interactive art, unconnected to the museum experience upstairs. Can the fun and excitement children have in making and exploring art through direct experiences in these alternative spaces take place in front of the works in the collection? The attraction of…

  6. Kids as Curators: Virtual Art at the Seattle Museum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlan, Laura Wolff

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the use of technology at the Seattle Art Museum (Washington). Includes a Web site that enables students in grades six through ten to act as curators and offers integrations of technology in the exhibition "Leonardo Lives: The Codex Leicester and Leonardo da Vinci's Legacy of Art and Science." (CMK)

  7. Acquiring and presenting Aboriginal art in art museums: my first 30 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald Radford

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Today, Aboriginal art is celebrated as one of the most popular areas in any Australian art museum. The author charts his role in presenting and acquiring Aboriginal art as art, in art museums, against the backdrop of related developments in the Australian art world. He traces developments from the late 1970s when he was director of the Ballarat Fine Art Gallery, though his 23 years at the Art Gallery of South Australia, as a curator then director, to his current position as director of the National Gallery of Australia in Canberra, which now has the largest collection and display of Australian Indigenous art. He also describes the steady progress long before his time, some of which has not been documented before, made by art museums around Australia as they gradually accepted, collected and prominently displayed Aboriginal art. He was invited to present this paper.

  8. Frames of References – Art Museums as Unique Visual Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneta Hristova

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The age old activity of collecting arts is not intrinsically dependent on the art museum as separate architectural type. How was the art museum as an independent structure conceptualized and why? What was the idea behind that concept? Was it created as a medium consciously and what kind of messages was it supposed to deliver? What kind of unique “textual” overlaps the various disciplines of archaeology, art history, politics, literature, science and architecture created in order to produce what we today recognize as art museum space? This study focuses on the crucial historical moments of the late 17th century when such questions were posed for the first time within the classical discourse of the French architectural theory which followed the consolidation of French absolutism and the foundation of the Royal academies of arts and sciences, until the mid 19th century when the answers to those questions were finally exemplified in built architecture. The study gives a comprehensive overview of the cultural context art museums as public institutions emerged from and became new spatial models for collective cultivation.

  9. Main Street as Art Museum: Metaphor and Teaching Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallance, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    A walk down Main Street can be very much like a stroll through a museum gallery--visually rich, inviting unexpected choices, aesthetically rewarding. This article explores the concept of shop windows as visually ordered compositions, much like paintings and other art objects, and suggests some approaches to applying this concept in teaching a…

  10. The Role of Evaluation in Reimagining the Art Museum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luke, Jessica J.; Ancelet, Jeanine E.

    2014-01-01

    In late 2006, the Columbus Museum of Art adopted a new framework that established creativity as the lens for learning and visitor experiences. The purpose of our article is to critically examine the role of evaluation in CMA's reinvention, and in particular to highlight three features of evaluation at CMA that we believe contributed to the…

  11. Connecting Universal Design for Learning with Gallery Tours in Art Museum Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neach, Lauren

    2017-01-01

    My research study titled, "Connecting Universal Design for Learning with Gallery Tours in Art Museum Education," establishes a relationship between gallery tours in art museum education and the principles of UDL, (CAST, 2011). Through this study I will address contemporary theories on art museum education, volunteer guide training, and…

  12. Maya Art: Classroom and Museum Activity Book.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuerst, Ann H.

    Illustrated with reproductions of Mayan art and architecture, this activity book contains readings and activities about the Maya, including bilingual lesson sheets. The materials link middle school classroom studies of Mayan culture with history, social studies, and community resources. Eight lesson units explore the central aspects of Mayan art.…

  13. Image-based online social networks in museum communication. Spanish museums of Modern and Contemporary art in Pinterest and Instagram

    OpenAIRE

    Marcelino Mercedes, Georgina; de la Morena Taboada, Marián

    2014-01-01

    This article presents an overview of Pinterest and Instagram, both image-based social media networks that have experienced the biggest growth in the last few years. The most active museums in social media around the world and specially those identified as museums of Modern and Contemporary art, use this kind of social networks in their communication strategies. For these reasons it is interesting to analyze Spanish museums of Modern and Contemporary Art with similar characteristics that are p...

  14. appropriate strategies for designing contemporary art museums

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-07-16

    Jul 16, 2016 ... Graduate student, department of architecture, Sari University of Science and Research. Published online: 16 July ... triedtotargetitsresearchtoinvestigateways toimprove the design ofthe contemporary art museumin ..... Consequently, parametric tests have been used for testing research hypotheses. Table 3: ...

  15. Communicating Art through Interactive Technology: New Approaches for Interaction Design in Art Museums

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kortbek, Karen Johanne; Grønbæk, Kaj

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses new approaches to interaction design for communication of art in the physical museum space. In contrast to the widespread utilization of interactive tech­nologies in cultural heritage and natural science museums it is generally a challenge to introduce technology in art museums...... without disturbing the domain of the art works. To explore the possibilities of communicating art through the use of technology, and to minimize disturbance of the artworks, we apply four main approaches in the communication: 1) gentle audio augmentation of art works; 2) conceptual affinity of art works...... and remote interactive installations; 3) using the body as an interaction device; 4) consistent audio-visual cues for interaction opportunities. The paper describes the application of these approaches for communication of inspira­tional material for a Mariko Mori exhibition. The installations are described...

  16. ISLAMIC ARTS MUSEUM, MALAYSIA: EDUCATIONAL TOOL FOR REVIVING ARCHITECTURAL HERITAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djamel Dilmi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Islamic art and architecture have played a significant role in the development of historic cities in the Muslim world; they were developed through time in response to socioeconomic and cultural needs of the society. The paper will focus on the experience of the Islamic Arts Museum in terms of its role in raising public awareness about Islamic art and architecture through its building that combines modernity and heritage in unique Islamic architectural style and educational programs and activities that educate people about conservation of Islamic heritage. The aim of this essay is to present the experience of IAMM in promoting Islamic art and architecture in order to share experience as a successful model. To achieve this aim the existing conditions of this museum were examined in  terms of its building, decorated element, cultural activities  and  conservation  programs using  traditional  ways and  modern technologies.  A  broad  range  of information was collected from various sources and through a field survey carried out in the selected museum from modern country leading development in the Muslim world. The collected information was analyzed with particular regard to the special character. This paper is an attempt to address the important issues of educational programs that raise public awareness about heritage through interior design and display of artifact from different regions of Muslim world matters that have been raised in many museums around the world and it is hoped that it is going to be a significant contribution to the subject of reviving Islamic architecture in the modern world. Keywords: Islamic art and architecture, museum, modernity and heritage, conservation programs, educational activities.     Abstrak Seni  dan  arsitektur  Islam  telah  memainkan  peran  yang  sangat  penting  dalam  perkembangan  kota-kota bersejarah di dunia Muslim; dibangun sepanjang masa sebagai respon terhadap

  17. Interpretation in the art museum :authority and access

    OpenAIRE

    Lahav, Sylvia

    2011-01-01

    The thesis investigates the rise of wall texts and display captions positioned alongside paintings in Tate Britain between 1987 and 2007 and considers possible reasons for this increase: the return of philanthropic attitudes of 19th century social reformers; changes in the national curriculum for art and design; partial devolution of financial responsibility from government to museum bodies; income generation, funding and sponsorship; increasing inclusion and access policy and ...

  18. TOWARDS A VIRTUAL MUSEUM OF PUBLIC ART AND URBAN DESIGN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoni Remesar

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available This article comes from the communication that the authors presented at the International Seminar on “Public Art and Urban Design” held in Almada (Portugal in 2006 and later in Barcelona, 2007. Through a series of questions, the authors raise the issues of production, management and dissemination of public art in the context of Urban Design. These questions arise from the analysis carried out on a series of manuals of “good practice” disseminated by several municipalities and public agencies devoted to the Public Art. Finally, the authors outline the open possibilities for a Virtual Museum of Public Art and Urban Design, based on the existence of Public Art Information Systems that have cities like Barcelona and Saragossa and that are being developed in Lisbon and Almada

  19. In the white cube: museum context enhances the valuation and memory of art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brieber, David; Nadal, Marcos; Leder, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    Art museum attendance is rising steadily, unchallenged by online alternatives. However, the psychological value of the real museum experience remains unclear because the experience of art in the museum and other contexts has not been compared. Here we examined the appreciation and memory of an art exhibition when viewed in a museum or as a computer simulated version in the laboratory. In line with the postulates of situated cognition, we show that the experience of art relies on organizing resources present in the environment. Specifically, artworks were found more arousing, positive, interesting and liked more in the museum than in the laboratory. Moreover, participants who saw the exhibition in the museum later recalled more artworks and used spatial layout cues for retrieval. Thus, encountering real art in the museum enhances cognitive and affective processes involved in the appreciation of art and enriches information encoded in long-term memory. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Pictures in Pictures: Art History and Art Museums in Children's Picture Books

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yohlin, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Children's picture books that recreate, parody, or fictionalize famous artworks and introduce the art museum experience, a genre to which I will refer as "children's art books," have become increasingly popular over the past decade. This essay explores the pedagogical implications of this trend through the family program "Picture Books and Picture…

  1. Art Therapy and Art Museum Education: A Visitor-Focused Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochford, Jessie Spraggins

    2017-01-01

    In this article I use a visitor-focused lens to examine ways in which art therapy and art museum education share similar goals and could join their efforts to serve people and communities in mutually beneficial ways. Benefits of such collaboration include affective and social development and education of visitors, a useful framework for exploring…

  2. Looking at Art in the Classroom: Art Investigations from the Guggenheim Museum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herz, Rebecca Shulman

    2010-01-01

    This book details the Guggenheim Museum's classroom-tested, inquiry-based approach to learning. This user-friendly guide provides teachers (grades 2-8) with strategies and resources for investigating art to enhance student learning across the curriculum. "For the classroom teacher", Art Investigation provides an exciting way to study contemporary…

  3. Improving Art Museum Accessibility for Adults With Acquired Hearing Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Susanna; Larrivee, Linda; Veneziano-Korzec, Ann; Stacy, Katrina

    2017-03-01

    Adults with hearing loss rated the accessibility of guided or docent-led art museum tours with and without hearing assistive technology (HAT). Nineteen individuals (average age 64 years, range 35-87 years) with acquired hearing loss participated. All participants had a bilateral hearing loss (mild to profound) using hearing aids (n = 12), cochlear implants (n = 5), or no technology (n = 2). Two docents who were previously trained to modify their presentations and use clear speech led the tours. Participants experienced a tour with and without the museum's HAT and rated its effectiveness using a rating scale. The study used a pre-post test design. The docent-led tours with HAT were rated significantly higher (p = .003) than the tours without HAT. Participants made several suggestions on improving museum accessibility for individuals with hearing loss. The use of HAT during a museum tour was beneficial for individuals with hearing loss. Training docents to modify their presentations, use clear speech, and HAT improved the accessibility of docent-led tours for individuals with hearing loss.

  4. Art at Second Hand: Prints after European Pictures in Victoria before 1870

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison Inglis

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the significance of the large number of European reproductive prints present in the public and private art collections of early colonial Victoria. Several factors are identified as contributing to this popularity; ranging from the suitability of the print medium for the export market to the existence of informed print connoisseurs amongst colonial collectors and artists. This article also demonstrates some of the typical features of Australian art history; in that it is concerned with the evaluation of the Australian art world through reference to European culture (the centre-periphery debate and also that it limits its discussion to the art of a particular Australian state (Victoria. The nineteenth-century division of Australia into different colonies had ramifications for Australian art history that continue to the present day – namely; the tendency to interpret colonial artistic activities from a regional perspective.

  5. The four cultures: Public engagement with science only, art only, neither, or both museums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shein, Paichi Pat; Li, Yuh-Yuh; Huang, Tai-Chu

    2015-11-01

    This study uses an art-and-science comparative lens to understand the science culture, particularly the public engagement with science museums. A representational Taiwanese sample of 1863 subjects was categorized into "four cultures," who visit science only, art only, neither, or both museums, resulting in six multivariate logistic regression models. Knowledge of science, interests in scientific and social issues, and socio-demographic variables were considered in the models. Adults with children and males prefer science museums, females prefer art museums, and the young and urban intellects show no strong preference, appearing to be open to both science and art museums. The findings show the complex decisions the public make in visiting museums. It is no longer a strictly science or art decision, as framed by Snow's "The Two Cultures" argument; rather, the possibility of visiting both museums has emerged, a phenomenon we describe as cognitive polyphasia. © The Author(s) 2015.

  6. Exploring Classical Art at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchenal, Margaret; Foote, Allison

    This resource packet is designed to help teachers incorporate the study of ancient Greek and Roman art into junior and senior high school classrooms. The packet consists of four curriculum units based upon aspects of classical life or culture. These units are: "Daily Life; Mythology"; "Images of Power"; and "Echoes of…

  7. Training Aesthetic Perception: John Dewey on the Educational Role of Art Museums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantino, Tracie E.

    2004-01-01

    In this article I examine Dewey's ambivalent attitude toward art museums criticizing their existence as repositories for the rich, while exploring their educational potential by analyzing Dewey's comments on museums in various texts, by relating his ideas to museum education theories and practice of the time, and by exploring his involvement with…

  8. Teens, New Media and Contemporary Art: Expanding Authority in the Museum Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Ryan; Douillette, Joe

    2014-01-01

    This article explores the impact of technology on contemporary art museums using case studies of teen media programs from the Hirshhorn Museum and the ICA Boston. Teens, as "digital natives," help to define the use of technology in museums. Responding to their needs opens up an institutional dialogue concerning issues of expertise,…

  9. [Review of: H. Hiiop Contemporary Art in the Museum: How to Preserve the Ephemeral? The Preservation Strategy and Methods of the Contemporary Art Collection of the Art Museum of Estonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stigter, S.

    2016-01-01

    Contemporary Art in the Museum: How to Preserve the Ephemeral? The Preservation Strategy and Methods of the Contemporary Art Collection of the Art Museum of Estonia is the full title of the doctoral thesis that Hilkka Hiiop defended at the Estonian Academy of Arts in Tallinn, December 2012. It is a

  10. The Creation of a Culture of Inquiry: Engaging Teachers in Experiences with Art Objects in Museums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Stacy

    2012-01-01

    The problem under investigation in this dissertation concerns teachers and their ability to continue to be lifelong learners through professional development initiatives in art museums. In this serial case study five teachers from elementary, middle and high schools visited the free choice learning environments of art museums and were interviewed…

  11. 75 FR 58429 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-24

    ... & Culture, aka Eastern Washington State Historical Society, Spokane, WA. The human remains and associated... venture involving the Eastern Washington State Historical Society (now Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA...

  12. Active Art Education in a University Museum: The Example of the Barber Institute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şehnaz Yalçın Wells

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Museums provide individuals with access to a variety of artworks at a quality and quantity that is not possible any other way. Museum education is of great importance to get effective benefit from museums. Nowadays museum education starts at an early age, and is simultaneously given in appropriate subjects of different lessons. Turkey has made important progresses in museum education and museum studies in recent years, but clearly there is much more to do when compared to more developed countries. These steps can be summarised (a increasing research into museum education and museology, (b staff training, (c creation of social awareness, (d development and application of new projects. Managing all these is not possible with the state’s efforts. Private entrepreneurs and civil society should take the initiative and contribute towards museum education and museology. The aim of this research is to determine the potential and function of art education, and to introduce the museum/art activities made in this context in the Barber Museum of Fine Arts Institute at Birmingham University, England. In line with these aims the answers to these questions are being sought: 1. How was Barber Institute Museum been established and developed? a What is the history of the museum’s foundation? b In the context of the development of museology and art, how can the establishment of the museum by a person/family be evaluated? 2. What are the institutional features of the Barber Institute Museum? a What are the administrative features of the museum? b What are the spatial features and importance of the museum? c What is the artistic significance of its collections? 3. How is museum/art education applied at the Barber Institute Museum? 4. How can the example of the Barber Institute be assessed in terms of museology and museum/art education? Method: This is a qualitative research study, and the case study method is used accordingly. This method foresees the portrayal

  13. Self in Art/Self As Art: Museum Selfies As Identity Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozinets, Robert; Gretzel, Ulrike; Dinhopl, Anja

    2017-01-01

    Selfies, digital images characterized by the desire to frame the self in a picture taken to be shared with an online audience, are important reflections of the contemporary self. Much extant psychological research on selfies has taken a pathologizing view of the phenomenon, focusing on its relationship to narcissism. Our investigation seeks to contribute to a holistic, contextualized and cultural perspective. We focus on the context of museums, places where art, history, education, and culture merge into the selfie taking behaviors of patrons. First, we explore theory salient to our topic of selfie taking, finding selfies to be an important way to construct ongoing series of narratives about the self. We use concepts of identity work, dramaturgy, and impression management to understand it in this light. We relate embodiment within the museum to the selfie's performative acts and expand upon notions that emphasize and distinguish the aesthetic elements present in many aspects of everyday life. We also question the ability of the museum selfie to destabilize. We also explore the contextual effects of mimicry and social norms. After describing our ethnographic and netnographic method, we investigate the museum selfie phenomenon. We begin with some observations on the extent of selfie-taking in contemporary culture as well as its evolution. Then, we consider selfies as a type of dynamic art form. Our analysis identifies a range of different types of museum selfies: art interactions, blending into art, mirror selfies, silly/clever selfies, contemplative selfies, and iconic selfies. Considered and studied in context, the museum selfie phenomenon reveals far more than the narcissism of the sort explored by past psychological research. The museum provides a stage for identity work that offers an opportunity for the selfie to be used not only for superficial performances but also in the pursuit of more profound self-reflection and its communication. Our ethnographic

  14. Self in Art/Self As Art: Museum Selfies As Identity Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozinets, Robert; Gretzel, Ulrike; Dinhopl, Anja

    2017-01-01

    Selfies, digital images characterized by the desire to frame the self in a picture taken to be shared with an online audience, are important reflections of the contemporary self. Much extant psychological research on selfies has taken a pathologizing view of the phenomenon, focusing on its relationship to narcissism. Our investigation seeks to contribute to a holistic, contextualized and cultural perspective. We focus on the context of museums, places where art, history, education, and culture merge into the selfie taking behaviors of patrons. First, we explore theory salient to our topic of selfie taking, finding selfies to be an important way to construct ongoing series of narratives about the self. We use concepts of identity work, dramaturgy, and impression management to understand it in this light. We relate embodiment within the museum to the selfie’s performative acts and expand upon notions that emphasize and distinguish the aesthetic elements present in many aspects of everyday life. We also question the ability of the museum selfie to destabilize. We also explore the contextual effects of mimicry and social norms. After describing our ethnographic and netnographic method, we investigate the museum selfie phenomenon. We begin with some observations on the extent of selfie-taking in contemporary culture as well as its evolution. Then, we consider selfies as a type of dynamic art form. Our analysis identifies a range of different types of museum selfies: art interactions, blending into art, mirror selfies, silly/clever selfies, contemplative selfies, and iconic selfies. Considered and studied in context, the museum selfie phenomenon reveals far more than the narcissism of the sort explored by past psychological research. The museum provides a stage for identity work that offers an opportunity for the selfie to be used not only for superficial performances but also in the pursuit of more profound self-reflection and its communication. Our ethnographic

  15. Self in Art/Self As Art: Museum Selfies As Identity Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Kozinets

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Selfies, digital images characterized by the desire to frame the self in a picture taken to be shared with an online audience, are important reflections of the contemporary self. Much extant psychological research on selfies has taken a pathologizing view of the phenomenon, focusing on its relationship to narcissism. Our investigation seeks to contribute to a holistic, contextualized and cultural perspective. We focus on the context of museums, places where art, history, education, and culture merge into the selfie taking behaviors of patrons. First, we explore theory salient to our topic of selfie taking, finding selfies to be an important way to construct ongoing series of narratives about the self. We use concepts of identity work, dramaturgy, and impression management to understand it in this light. We relate embodiment within the museum to the selfie’s performative acts and expand upon notions that emphasize and distinguish the aesthetic elements present in many aspects of everyday life. We also question the ability of the museum selfie to destabilize. We also explore the contextual effects of mimicry and social norms. After describing our ethnographic and netnographic method, we investigate the museum selfie phenomenon. We begin with some observations on the extent of selfie-taking in contemporary culture as well as its evolution. Then, we consider selfies as a type of dynamic art form. Our analysis identifies a range of different types of museum selfies: art interactions, blending into art, mirror selfies, silly/clever selfies, contemplative selfies, and iconic selfies. Considered and studied in context, the museum selfie phenomenon reveals far more than the narcissism of the sort explored by past psychological research. The museum provides a stage for identity work that offers an opportunity for the selfie to be used not only for superficial performances but also in the pursuit of more profound self-reflection and its communication

  16. The art of observation: impact of a family medicine and art museum partnership on student education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elder, Nancy C; Tobias, Barbara; Lucero-Criswell, Amber; Goldenhar, Linda

    2006-06-01

    Compared to verbal communication, teaching the skill of observation is often shortchanged in medical education. Through a family medicine-art museum collaboration, we developed an elective course for second-year medical students titled the "Art of Observation" (AOO). To evaluate the course's effect on clinical skills, we performed a qualitative evaluation of former students during their clinical rotations. In the spring of 2005, all students who had completed the AOO course in 2003 or 2004 were invited to take part in an online evaluation consisting of eight journaling survey questions. Students were instructed to answer the survey questions with specific examples. Question areas included the most memorable experience, the course's influence on the doctor-patient relationship, usefulness during clinical years of medical school, and skills unique to AOO. The anonymous data were analyzed qualitatively, coding the responses to categories derived from the data, leading to the formation of themes. Of the 19 students eligible, 17 participated. We found three important themes: (1) the AOO positively influenced clinical skills, (2) both art museum exercises and a clinical preceptorship were necessary to achieve those skills, and (3) the AOO led to a sense of personal development as a physician. In addition, students told us that the training in observation and description skills they learned were unique to the AOO. This collaboration between a department of family medicine and an art museum produced a course that facilitated observational skills used in successful doctor-patient relationships.

  17. Art and Museum Librarianship; A Syllabus and Bibliography. Bibliographic Studies Number One.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemke, Antje B.

    This outline of library science in the area of museology and art history provides bibliographies on various facets of art librarianship; art; architecture; museums; history; current state; journals; professional programs and organizations; relationship with government, foundations, and business; information sources; processing of art books,…

  18. The initiative to develop museum of Islamic arts in Ilorin: a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It contends that such effort will involve the preservation of the Alfa Alimi's mosque and the setting up of a Museum of Islamic Arts in Ilorin, the first of its kind inx the country to house a religious legacy. This study also examines the strategic positioning of this museum in Ilorin. In doing this, it highlights its usefulness and ...

  19. Art Perception in the Museum: How We Spend Time and Space in Art Exhibitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbon, Claus-Christian

    2017-01-01

    Aesthetics research aiming at understanding art experience is an emerging field; however, most research is conducted in labs without access to real artworks, without the social context of a museum and without the presence of other persons. The present article replicates and complements key findings of art perception in museum contexts. When observing museum visitors (N = 225; 126 female, M(age) = 43.3 years) while perceiving a series of six Gerhard Richter paintings of various sizes (0.26-3.20 sq. m) in a temporary art exhibition in January and February 2015 showing 28 paintings in total, we revealed patterns compatible to previous research. The mean time taken in viewing artworks was much longer than was mostly realized in lab contexts, here 32.9 s (Mdn = 25.4 s). We were also able to replicate visitors spending more time on viewing artworks when attending in groups of people. Additionally, we uncovered a close positive relationship (r2 = .929) between canvas size and viewing distance, ranging on average between 1.49 and 2.12 m (M = 1.72 m). We also found that more than half of the visitors returned to paintings, especially those people who had not previously paid too much attention at the initial viewing. After adding the times of returning viewers, each picture was viewed longer than had been estimated in previous research (M = 50.5 s, Mdn = 43.0 s). Results are discussed in the context of current art perception theories, focusing on the need for the ecologically valid testing of artworks in aesthetics research.

  20. 75 FR 23800 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate a Cultural Item: Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond, VA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-04

    ... National Park Service Notice of Intent to Repatriate a Cultural Item: Virginia Museum of Fine Arts... to repatriate a cultural item in the possession of the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond, VA.... 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution...

  1. The Art of Copying: Five strategies for Transforming Originals in the Art Museum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Dam Christensen

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses copies within the field of art museums by way of mapping strategies for copy practices. This mapping leans heavily towards parts of the wri-tings of Jacques Derrida (1930-2004. Against the backdrop of this theoretical premise, the article distinguishes five main strategies. Firstly, the copies which of-ten are considered to be typical museum copies, characterize the strategy for the disseminating relation between original and copy, that is, reproductions, magnets, etc. This strategy implies how copy practices are closely integrated into museum practices in general. Secondly, the supplementing relation between original and copy will be introduced. This strategy frames, for example, artists' citations of other works and forgeries. Both show that copy practices often lead to new originals, in principle, ad infinitum. Thirdly, this leads to the strategy for the displacing relation between original and copy which encompasses, for example, artistic reworkings of other artists' originals and conservatorial restorations. This approach partly ex-cludes the copy and partly displaces the original, while still, unavoidably, referring to the latter. In general, this strategy signifies the latent instability of the origi-nal. Fourthly, the strategy for the informational relation between original and copy will be discussed as it has a vital function in terms of talking about museum originals and copies. This is the strategy which grants the original artifacts their status as museum objects. An informational copy is just as unique as an original object of art, and at the same time, it defines the original and is itself defined by this opposition. Lastly, the strategy for the imagined relation between original and copy follows. This strategy is dependent upon several of the previous approaches, and, in addition, handles signs that exist without explicit originals, as the strategy covers copies referring to originals which have disappeared

  2. The Affects of Museum Architecture: Louvre-Lens and Museu de Arte de São Paulo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Annette Svaneklink

    2014-01-01

    and context. Inside, visitors are invited to co-create the museum experience by moving freely through the exhibited art works in a setting that seems to re-actualise an experimental exhibition space, which was originally designed by Lina Bo Bardi for Museu de Arte de São Paulo. Through on-site observations...... of art institutions to the museum experience. Keywords: Art Museum, Architecture, Affect...

  3. Art Appreciation as a Learned Competence: A Museum-Based Qualitative Study of Adult Art Specialist and Art Non-Specialist Visitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracun Sova, Rajka

    2015-01-01

    Since Bourdieu, it has been argued that art appreciation requires "knowledge". The focus of this qualitative study was to examine art appreciation as a learned competence by exploring two different groups of museum visitors: art specialists and art non-specialists. The research was conducted at Moderna galerija in Ljubljana. Twenty-three…

  4. AN ARCHITECTURAL ANALYSIS: THE MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART, TEHRAN, IRAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kambiz Navai

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Kamran Tabatabai Diba is one of Iranian Architects, whose works during 60’s and 70’s are well-known among architects and scholars. His works are mostly considered as examples of Modern Style, scented by Iranian Architecture. His efforts on creating public, socio-cultural centers in Iran was a result of his concern about social matters, as well as seeking for a national, contemporary Architecture. Tehran’s Museum of Contemporary Art is one of the most popular and well-known Diba’s works. In this article an effort has been made to get a better understanding of this remarkable piece of work, and to light up the Architect’s intents and the architectural methods he used to express them. The critique is concentrated mostly on two mentioned aspects of Diba’s works: “Integrating Modern Style and traditional Iranian Architecture”, and “Creating socio-cultural centers and institutions well related to society.” The Analysis is based on the most important features of every work of Architecture: “Space” and “Form”. The author seeks for the meaning by “watching” the whole complex carefully, “giving descriptive information” about it, and in the meantime “analyzing data” with the help of “basic design methods” together with the knowledge of “Modern Style”, “Characteristics of Late Modern Movement” and “Traditional Iranian Architecture.” Text is accompanied by drawings and figures, which help for better knowing the complex. The effort is made to use a simple language, understandable not only by Architects or scholars, but by every other interested non-specialist reader.

  5. Learning through Art : ESOL Program in Museum in London

    OpenAIRE

    Nagata, Shoko

    2017-01-01

    In the global age, as international mobility increases and the society faces the complexity of multicultural society, it is essential to promote and foster intercultural dialogue. The objective of this research is to investigate practices of ESOL (English for Speakers of Other Languages) programs in museums. In this study, the education program in the museum that enhances intercultural dialogue which leads to cross-cultural understanding for diverse populations will be examined.The significan...

  6. Legacy of the Ancient World: An Educational Guide. Understanding Ancient Culture through Art at the Tampa Museum of Art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitelaw, R. Lynn

    Among the many contributions made by Ancient Greeks and Romans to contemporary life, are those which influence art, architecture, literature, philosophy, mathematics and science, theater, athletics, religion, and the founding of democracy. The Tampa Museum of Art's classical collection offers a unique opportunity to learn about Ancient Greeks and…

  7. Demonstration of LED Retrofit Lamps at the Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, DC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Naomi J.; Rosenfeld, Scott M.

    2012-06-22

    This report documents observations and results obtained from a lighting demonstration project conducted under the U.S. Department of Energy GATEWAY Solid-State Lighting (SSL) Technology Demonstration Program at the Smithsonain American Art Museum in Washington, DC. LED Lamp samples were tested in the museum workshop, temporarily installed in a gallery for feedback, and ultimately replaced all traditional incandescent lamps in one gallery of modernist art at the American Art Museum and partially replacing lamps in two galleries at the Musesum's Renwick Gallery. This report describes the selection and testing process, technology challenges, perceptions, economics, energy use, and mixed results of usign LED replacement lamps in art galleries housing national treasures.

  8. Interactive spatial multimedia for communication of art in the physical museum space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kortbek, Karen Johanne; Grønbæk, Kaj

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses the application of three spatial multimedia techniques for communication of art in the physical museum space. In contrast to the widespread use of computers in cultural heritage and natural science museums, it is generally a challenge to introduce technology in art museums...... without disturbing the art works. This has usually been limited to individual audio guides. In our case we strive to achieve holistic and social experiences with seamless transitions between art experience and communication related to the artworks. To reach a holistic experience with minimal disturbance...... of the artworks we apply three spatial multimedia techniques where the only interaction device needed is the human body. The three techniques are: 1) spatially bounded audio; 2) floor-based multimedia; 3) multimedia interior. The paper describes the application of these techniques for communication of information...

  9. American Business Meets American Gothic: Professional Development in the Art Museum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Brendan; Morse, Annie

    2011-01-01

    Professional development in the art museum setting represents an opportunity for corporate and for-profit enterprises to enhance employees' skills in observation, creative thinking, teamwork, and sensitivity in diversity. Using original works of art as a point of departure for in-depth discussion of what appears as narrative content, participants…

  10. The Effects of a Museum Art Program on the Self-Concept of Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Ryan; Rinehardt, Eric; Hine, Hank; Wilkinson, Berney; Tush, Peter; Mead, Bethany; Fernandez, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Research suggests that art programs have positive therapeutic effects on children, including improved self-concept. This pretest/posttest intervention study examined changes in self-concept in children (N = 176) who participated in an art program at the Dalí Museum in St. Petersburg, Florida. Results indicated significant, positive increases in…

  11. Eternal Egypt: Masterworks of Ancient Art from the British Museum. Learning from Exhibitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Mark M.

    2001-01-01

    Introduces the exhibition "Eternal Egypt: Masterworks of Ancient Art from the British Museum" that explores the four major periods of Egyptian history. Provides background information on ancient Egypt and describes the art that was present in each of the four kingdoms. (CMK)

  12. Excuse Me, Is This a Church? Display as Content at the Metropolitan Museum of Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majeed, Risham

    2017-01-01

    This essay explores two canonical installations at the Metropolitan Museum of Art: The Cloisters and African galleries in the Rockefeller wing. After providing a brief history of the formation of these collections and their display strategies, I analyze the effect of exhibition design for a visitor's judgments and impressions of the works of art.…

  13. Diorama Art – A Potential Medium For Museum Educationm | Enti ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study recognizes the traditional role diorama plays as an effective medium for museum education and employed both descriptive and experimental methods to produce a diorama to popularize it for the Ghanaian populace. It explored the use of non-traditional modelling material (corn shucks and cobs) in the ...

  14. Museu de Artes e Ofícios, Belo Horizonte: afinal, como nascem os museus? Belo Horizonte's Museum of Arts and Trades: after all, how are museums born?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Responsável pela concepção do projeto do Museu de Artes e Ofícios de Belo Horizonte, o museólogo francês Pierre Catel discorre sobre sua experiência profissional, iniciada na década de 1970. Discute conceitos de museus, a evolução da formação neste campo multidisciplinar. Sobre o projeto de museu a ser montado no metrô da capital de Minas Gerais, ele diz que seu objetivo é promover o encontro entre a cultura das profissões e peças de uma coleção de arte popular brasileira com cerca de um milhão de pessoas a caminho de casa ou do trabalho.Responsible for the concept behind Belo Horizonte's Museum of Arts and Trades project, the French museologist Pierre Catel talks about his professional experience, which began in the 1970s. He discusses museum concepts and the evolution and shaping of this multidisciplinary field. In regard to the museum that will be installed inside the subway of Minas Gerais' state capital, Catel says his aim is to foster an encounter between the culture of professions and pieces from a collection of popular Brazilian art, where around one million people pass by on their way to work or home.

  15. Bridging contexts and interpretations: Mobile blogging on art museum field trips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palmyre Pierroux

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study of art museum field trips by high school students, we investigate the ways in which features of different social and mobile technologies, specifically blogs and mobile phones, are able to bridge and support meaning making in young people’s encounters with contemporary art. Empirical material is presented from Gidder, a web-based learning environment with a mobile blogging feature. Through close examination of students’ use of contextual resources and the writing and editing of blog entries, this study contributes a deeper understanding of the ways in which digital technologies may be designed for pedagogical use on museum field trips.

  16. When a Body Meets a Body: An Exploration of the Negative Impact of Social Interactions on Museum Experiences of Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelowski, Matthew; Liu, Tao; Palacios, Victor; Akiba, Fuminori

    2014-01-01

    We consider the phenomenon of social interactions within the art museum, arguing that even the bare possibility of meeting others or intruding into their gaze can have a profoundly detrimental effect on art experience. This is done by tracing a finding from our previous studies in which we considered three museum galleries--each with the same…

  17. Art for Whose Sake? Modern Art Museums and their Role in Transforming Societies: The Case of the Guggenheim Bilbao

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evdoxia Baniotopoulou

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available In the past two decades the industrial decline of many western economies has forced them to turn towards the tertiary sector in order to diversify their infrastructure and find new sources of income. One of the characteristics of this process was the development of urban regeneration plans, which recognised the potential of the cultural sector for economic development. Central to this approach was the use of modern art museums as magnets for tourism and inward investment. This practice has produced a number of examples, the most famous being the Guggenheim Bilbao. The phenomenal success of this museum has caused it to become a model and this is why it ought to be examined critically. The creation of the museum is initially considered in the framework of particular historical and political circumstances. It is then placed in the context of the local cultural policy, a combination of theory and local political aspirations. The involvement of the external factor – the Guggenheim Foundation – is considered next, followed by an assessment of the museum in both quantifiable and non-quantifiable terms. Lastly, the preference shown in modern art museums to play this role is discussed. It is concluded that the Guggenheim Bilbao is the outcome of special political and socioeconomic circumstances, which renders it a unique case that should not be replicated uncritically.

  18. 78 FR 45964 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Monterey Museum of Art, Monterey, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-30

    ... cultural items listed in this notice meet the definition of objects of cultural patrimony. Lineal... definition of objects of cultural patrimony under 25 U.S.C. 3001. This notice is published as part of the... Monterey Museum of Art on November 20, 1978. The 193 objects of cultural patrimony are 42 harpoon or...

  19. Demonstration of LED Retrofit Lamps at the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Naomi J.

    2011-09-01

    The Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art in Eugene, Oregon, houses a remarkable permanent collection of Asian art and antiquities, modern art, and sculpture, and also hosts traveling exhibitions. In the winter and spring of 2011, a series of digital photographs by artist Chris Jordan, titled "Running the Numbers," was exhibited in the Coeta and Donald Barker Special Exhibitions Gallery. These works graphically illustrate waste (energy, money, health, consumer objects, etc.) in contemporary culture. The Bonneville Power Administration and the Eugene Water and Electricity Board provided a set of Cree 12W light-emitting diode (LED) PAR38 replacement lamps (Cree LRP38) for the museum to test for accent lighting in lieu of their standard Sylvania 90W PAR38 130V Narrow Flood lamps (which draw 78.9W at 120V). At the same time, the museum tested LED replacement lamps from three other manufacturers, and chose the Cree lamp as the most versatile and most appropriate color product for this exhibit. The lamps were installed for the opening of the show in January 2011. This report describes the process for the demonstration, the energy and economic results, and results of a survey of the museum staff and gallery visitors on four similar clusters of art lighted separately by four PAR38 lamps.

  20. Type specimens of Mollusca described by Col. George Montagu in the Royal Albert Memorial Museum & Art Gallery, Exeter and The Natural History Museum, London

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Graham Oliver

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A complete list of new molluscan taxa introduced by Col. George Montagu (1753–1815 is presented. The available type material of these taxa are itemised and illustrated. The majority are present in the Royal Albert Memorial Museum & Art Gallery, Exeter with a smaller number in the Natural History Museum, London. The historic background of both collections is reviewed with special reference to the many non-British species spuriously introduced into Testacea Britannica and its Supplement.

  1. Integrated Conservation of the Cantonese Opera Art Museum and Intangible Cultural Heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. Guo

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Cantonese Opera, as the sole cultural heritage of Guangdong Province of China so far, which was included in the World Intangible Cultural Heritage List by the UNESCO, bears the cultural memory of the Lingnan region and as well as the overseas Chinese worldwide. Located in the core historic urban area – Enning Road of Guangzhou, the Cantonese Opera Art Museum is designed in Lingnan traditional garden manner, through going deep into the Cantonese opera culture, Lingnan traditional garden culture and Lingnan cultural spirit. The design highlights the integrated conservation of tangible and intangible cultural heritage, to protect living history and build the historical environment and place spirit for the intangible cultural heritage. The Cantonese Opera Art Museum is not only a tangible space for exhibition, study, education and display of the Cantonese Opera art, but also a cultural space with the Lingnan cultural memory, gathering the Lingnan intangible heritage and closely linked with current life of successors and ordinary people.

  2. Integrated Conservation of the Cantonese Opera Art Museum and Intangible Cultural Heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Q.; Li, X.

    2015-08-01

    Cantonese Opera, as the sole cultural heritage of Guangdong Province of China so far, which was included in the World Intangible Cultural Heritage List by the UNESCO, bears the cultural memory of the Lingnan region and as well as the overseas Chinese worldwide. Located in the core historic urban area - Enning Road of Guangzhou, the Cantonese Opera Art Museum is designed in Lingnan traditional garden manner, through going deep into the Cantonese opera culture, Lingnan traditional garden culture and Lingnan cultural spirit. The design highlights the integrated conservation of tangible and intangible cultural heritage, to protect living history and build the historical environment and place spirit for the intangible cultural heritage. The Cantonese Opera Art Museum is not only a tangible space for exhibition, study, education and display of the Cantonese Opera art, but also a cultural space with the Lingnan cultural memory, gathering the Lingnan intangible heritage and closely linked with current life of successors and ordinary people.

  3. Relational Aesthetics in Art Museum Education: Engendering Visitors' Narratives through Participatory Acts for Interpretive Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sunghee

    2013-01-01

    This article explores how to ensure visitor engagement with art objects at exhibition spaces in art museums through relational aesthetics, which focuses on the intersubjective relationship that art objects arouse in visitors. In the 1990s, Bourriaud coined the term "relational aesthetics" in reference to interactive installation art, but…

  4. The Impact of Ubiquitous Technologies on the Art Museum as Urban [Political] Space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Mogens; Søndergaard, Morten

    The Museum is part of a ubiquitous framing of cultural production and a common, urban (political) space. In later years, technology has enhanced the ubiquity, as well as challenged the foundation of, the Museum. From this enhancement and challenge, which is transforming the museum itself, new...... practices emerge. From new practices emerge new domains. And from new domains emerge new competencies and roles. This article investigates some of the new competencies and roles emerging from the trans-disciplinary practice of curators, artists, scientists, and programmers etc., which are involved in media...... and 2008, a process in which we both were involved as media artist and media art curator, respectively. Our focus in this article is to investigate further the status of these new competencies and roles, and to ask: what are these new domains that emerge with regard to the artist, the software developer...

  5. THE ROLE OF MUSEUM’S ARCHITECTURE IN ISLAMIC COMMUNITY: MUSEUM OF ISLAMIC ART, DOHA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali A. Alraouf

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available As we are heading through the second decade of the 21st century, architecture of the Islamic communities is still an unresolved dilemma. In this context, the impact of iconic buildings which claim to represent Islam or provide a contemporary approach to Islamic architecture is crucial on different levels. Therefore, a year after Museum of Islamic Art (MIA opening in Doha, Qatar, an evaluative perspective of the institution’s development story needs to be sketched. In this essay I will use MIA, Doha as a springboard for a discussion related to the museums of the 21th century. Then, I will try to exploit the findings of this discussion in the assessment and critical review of the museum itself. The assessment will include the ability of contemporary architecture to credibly represent Islamic cultural identity. This essay will analyze how and why community participation in museums is a significant factor in bridging the gap and improving relationship between the two institutions. The social inclusion leads to trust, understanding, a sense of identity, and creating a museum that is more relevant to the community. This essay also give some suggestions on how to build bridges between museums and communities, to provide an opportunity for the people living in such communities, like Gulf ones, to find out about their own heritage and to help them realize that it is through their active participation in museum activities that heritage is kept alive. Considering Qatar’s thrive into a post-oil paradigm where knowledge economy might be the generative force for development, an examination of how MIA is contributing to Qatar’s new vision becomes so relevant.

  6. Understanding how art museum visitors positively connect with artworks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Marie Émond

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Este documento trata sobre la experiencia que viven los adultos que visitan un museo de Bellas artes. En general, cuando se describe la reacción del visitante ante el arte, no hablamos en términos de conflicto o armonía, pero adoptamos la expresión de “experiencia estética”. Muchas investigaciones se han dirigido a describir la experiencia estética, por ejemplo, la investigación desarrollada por Csikszentmihalyi y Robinson (1990; Guillot (2001; Housen, 1983. Estamos conscientes de la complejidad del término y la amplitud de su significado en filosofía.

  7. Enhancing User Experience through Emotional Interaction: Determining Users' Interests in Online Art Collections Using AMARA (Affective Museum of Art Resource Agent)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, S. Joon

    2013-01-01

    The need for emotional interaction has already influenced various disciplines and industries, and online museums represent a domain where providing emotional interactions could have a significant impact. Today, online museums lack the appropriate affective and hedonic values necessary to engage art enthusiasts on an emotional level. To address…

  8. Beyond the Museum Walls : Situating Art in Virtual Space (Polemic Overlay and Three Movements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vince Dziekan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In recognition of digital communication’s profound effects on social relations and institutions, this paper explores the influence of digitisation on our notions of art through the design of its institutions. No longer can the museum, as the primary technology of art, be viewed as just a physical container. With the additional of the hidden infrastructure of electronic and multimedia technologies that are to be found “behind the walls”, as it were, the architectural issues of negotiating spaces and manipulating locative settings for displaying artworks are as much virtual as physical.As a contribution to the negotiation of a distributed aesthetics, this paper entertains the possibility that transplanting art to the virtual site of the Internet disrupts our understanding of art itself. From presence on the gallery wall to the plane of the screen, if this translation offers an alternative way of seeing, then what does the Web offer to a different apperception of art? How to position the digital in the discourse surrounding art and the role it plays within contemporary cultural practice?In an attempt to ground these concerns, I will frame the subsequent discussion by focussing my attention upon one particularly representative instance: The National Gallery of Victoria’s Ian Potter Gallery of Australian Art; recognising in this localised, site-specific experience a microexample of a much more ubiquitous phenomenon.

  9. The Effect of Active Learning Techniques on Class Teacher Candidates' Success Rates and Attitudes toward Their Museum Theory and Application Unit in Their Visual Arts Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilmac, Oguz

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the effect that using active learning techniques during museum and gallery visits has on teacher candidates' academic success rates in and attitudes toward their Visual Arts Course. In this study, the importance and requirement of education to take place in museums and art galleries is emphasized. The…

  10. Designing an Earthquake-Proof Art Museum: An Arts- and Engineering-Integrated Science Lesson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carignan, Anastasia; Hussain, Mahjabeen

    2016-01-01

    In this practical arts-integrated science and engineering lesson, an inquiry-based approach was adopted to teach a class of fourth graders in a Midwest elementary school about the scientific concepts of plate tectonics and earthquakes. Lessons were prepared following the 5 E instructional model. Next Generation Science Standards (4-ESS3-2) and the…

  11. Subjective Experiences of an Art Museum Engagement Activity for Persons with Early Alzheimer’s disease and their Family Caregivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flatt, Jason D.; Liptak, Amy; Oakley, Mary Ann; Gogan, Jessica; Varner, Tresa; Lingler, Jennifer H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe the subjective experiences of older adults with early-stage Alzheimer’s disease or related cognitive disorders (ADRD) and their family caregivers who participated in an art museum engagement activity. Methods Four focus groups were conducted with 10 persons with ADRD and 10 family caregivers following the completion one-time, three hour engagement activity. Participants also completed a brief satisfaction survey, and associations were examined using nonparametric statistics. Results Three key themes were identified: cognitive stimulation, social connections, and a sense of self. In addition, we identified programmatic issues such as activity-specific concerns and program logistics that could help improve future art program offerings. Past experience with art and perceived social cohesion were correlated with participants’ overall satisfaction with the program. Discussion Efforts aimed at improving the quality of life of those with Alzheimer’s and their family caregivers should consider the potential role of art museums. PMID:25216658

  12. Subjective experiences of an art museum engagement activity for persons with early-stage Alzheimer's disease and their family caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flatt, Jason D; Liptak, Amy; Oakley, Mary Ann; Gogan, Jessica; Varner, Tresa; Lingler, Jennifer H

    2015-06-01

    To describe the subjective experiences of older adults with early-stage Alzheimer's disease or related cognitive disorders (ADRDs) and their family caregivers who participated in an art museum engagement activity. Four focus groups were conducted with 10 persons with ADRD and 10 family caregivers following the completion of a 1-time, 3-hour engagement activity. Participants also completed a brief satisfaction survey, and associations were examined using nonparametric statistics. Three key themes were identified: cognitive stimulation, social connections, and self-esteem. In addition, we identified programmatic issues such as activity-specific concerns and program logistics that could help improve future art program offerings. Past experience with art and perceived social cohesion were correlated with participants' overall satisfaction with the program. Efforts aimed at improving the quality of life of those with Alzheimer's disease and their family caregivers should consider the potential role of art museums. © The Author(s) 2014.

  13. Harnessing Technology for Promoting Undergraduate Art Education: A Novel Model That Streamlines Learning between Classroom, Museum, and Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kali, Yael; Sagy, Ornit; Kuflik, Tsvi; Mogilevsky, Orit; Maayan-Fanar, Emma

    2015-01-01

    We report on the development and evaluation of an innovative instructional model, which harnesses advanced technologies and local resources (an in-campus museum), to support undergraduate-level art history students in developing the skills required for analyzing artwork. Theory suggests that analyzing artwork requires theoretical knowledge and…

  14. The Art of ATLAS; multimedia installation by Neal Hartman and Claudia Marcelloni at Thinktank science museum in Birmingham, UK.

    CERN Multimedia

    Claudia Marcelloni

    2010-01-01

    The Art of ATLAS is an multimedia installation, developed by Neal Hartman and Claudia Marcelloni about the physicists, engineers and technicians behind the ATLAS Experiment. The installation will been shown at Planetarium entrance of the Thinktank science museum in Birmingham, UK from October 2010 until January 2011.

  15. Picture This: The Art of Using Museum and Science Collaborations to Teach about Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiondella, F.; Fowler, R.; Davi, N. K.; Gawthrop, E.

    2015-12-01

    Connecting scientists and their research to photography galleries and museums is an effective way to promote climate literacy among a new, diverse audience. This approach requires creativity and a willingness to reach out to and work with staff unfamiliar with scientific institutions, but can result in broad exposure and understanding of the impacts of climate change. In this presentation we highlight the successful science-art collaboration among the International Center of Photography, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory and the International Research Institute for Climate and Society. The collaboration revolved around ICP's 2014-2015 exhibition of renowned photographer Sebastiao Salgado's Genesis, an eight-year worldwide survey of wildlife, landscapes, seascapes and indigenous peoples. Salgado's photographs acted as a springboard for a unique public education program based at ICP and aimed at raising awareness of the urgent issue of climate change. Over the course of six months, Lamont and IRI scientists with expertise in climatology, dendrochronology, seismology and glaciology led gallery tours for the public, making links between their research and the places and people of Salgado's photography. Lamont and IRI staff also gave talks throughout the exhibition period on topics ranging from climate change adaptation to the use of photography to help the public visualize the impacts of Earth's changing climate. The research institutions also took over ICP's Instagram feed for a week, showcasing the climate-related field work of more than a dozen scientists. All three institutions, the participating scientists and program attendees deemed the collaboration a success. We'll explain what made this collaboration successful and provide tips on how scientists and their institutes can form similar collaborations with museums and other arts-based organizations.

  16. The Dangerous Museum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    Whereas museums shunned controversy in the past, this article argues that as museums embrace the new trend of audience participation some have also opted to introduce "hot topics" into museum exhibitions. Museum professionals who have adopted this particular form of museum practice predict...... that it has the potential to reform museums as we know them and to turn museums into active agents for democratic change in society. In a bid to understand and scrutinize the implications of this development in museums, the article consults critiques raised by art critics writing about a related development...

  17. Genetic Drift. The ancient Egyptian dwarfs of the Walters Art Museum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozma, Chahira

    2010-10-01

    The ancient Egyptians left an impressive artistic legacy documenting many aspects of their society including the existence of dwarfs as highly valued members. In previous publications in the Journal, I discussed dwarfs and skeletal dysplasia in ancient Egypt. In this study, I examined the ancient Egyptian representations of dwarfs of the Walters Art Museum in Baltimore, Maryland. One of the highlights of the collection is a group of five ivory figurines from Predynastic Times (pre 3500-3100 BCE) depicting a couple, a man with a child, and two females. Representations from other periods include ordinary as well as dwarf deities. The dwarf gods, Bes and Ptah, are frequently depicted holding or biting snakes or standing on crocodiles symbolizing their ability to ward off dangers. A couple of statuettes from the Greco-Roman Period that, in contrast to earlier Egyptian Periods, depict harsh physical anomalies, twisted bodies, and facial pain. The artistic impression can be interpreted as either tragic or humorous. The grotesque depiction of dwarfs during the Greco-Roman Period in ancient Egypt is believed to be due to a greater infusion of Hellenistic influence. This study provides a microcosm of the legacy of dwarfs in ancient Egypt and supports the premise that dwarfs were accepted and integrated in the ancient Egyptian society, and with a few exceptions, their disorder was not depicted as a physical handicap. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Management of small digital collections with Omeka: the MoRE experience (A Museum of REfused and unrealised art projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Salarelli

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the main features of Omeka, a free and open source CMS (Content Management System for online digital collections developed by the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media at George Mason University. Omeka presents very interesting features: first, a remarkable ease of use that, however, does not affect its multiple functions; secondly, it provides tools to create, in an innovative way, virtual exhibitions for archives, libraries and museums in order to promote their collections on the web; thirdly, its extreme adaptability to collection size: in fact Omeka is used by large and celebrated institutions such as the New York Public Library and Europeana, but also by many small initiatives including MoRE (A Museum of REfused and unrealized art projects. Specifically, the second part of the article describes, in brief, the objectives and characteristics of this virtual museum dedicated to contemporary unrealized artworks; it is an experimental project, still under development, devised by a working group of the University of Parma (Italy, who found in Omeka the most suitable IT solution to collect and expose these unique museum materials.

  19. O desvio do olhar: dos asilos aos museus de arte The deviation of the glance: from the asylums to the art museums

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João A. Frayze-Pereira

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available A relação entre a arte e a loucura é considerada do ponto de vista da exposição em museus de arte de obras que foram produzidas nos asilos. Nessa transição, são analisadas a situação historicamente determinada da loucura no campo da visualidade e as implicações culturais, psicológicas e estéticas dessa situação, sobretudo após o advento da noção de art brut. Finalmente, é também considerado o impacto da art brut, como prática dos excluídos sociais, sobre o próprio criador marginal e sobre o olhar do espectador.The relation between art and madness is considered from the point of view of works of art produced in asylums and exhibited in art museums. In this transition, the historically situation of madness is analyzed concerning visual order and it’s cultural, psychological and aesthetic implications in art history, specially after the emergence of the notion of art brut. Finally, it’s also considered the impact of art brut on the outsider artist and on the spectator’s perception.

  20. Deployment of Mobile EEG Technology in an Art Museum Setting: Evaluation of Signal Quality and Usability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus G. Cruz-Garza

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Electroencephalography (EEG has emerged as a powerful tool for quantitatively studying the brain that enables natural and mobile experiments. Recent advances in EEG have allowed for the use of dry electrodes that do not require a conductive medium between the recording electrode and the scalp. The overall goal of this research was to gain an understanding of the overall usability and signal quality of dry EEG headsets compared to traditional gel-based systems in an unconstrained environment. EEG was used to collect Mobile Brain-body Imaging (MoBI data from 432 people as they experienced an art exhibit in a public museum. The subjects were instrumented with either one of four dry electrode EEG systems or a conventional gel electrode EEG system. Each of the systems was evaluated based on the signal quality and usability in a real-world setting. First, we describe the various artifacts that were characteristic of each of the systems. Second, we report on each system's usability and their limitations in a mobile setting. Third, to evaluate signal quality for task discrimination and characterization, we employed a data driven clustering approach on the data from 134 of the 432 subjects (those with reliable location tracking information and usable EEG data to evaluate the power spectral density (PSD content of the EEG recordings. The experiment consisted of a baseline condition in which the subjects sat quietly facing a white wall for 1 min. Subsequently, the participants were encouraged to explore the exhibit for as long as they wished (piece-viewing. No constraints were placed upon the individual in relation to action, time, or navigation of the exhibit. In this freely-behaving approach, the EEG systems varied in their capacity to record characteristic modulations in the EEG data, with the gel-based system more clearly capturing stereotypical alpha and beta-band modulations.

  1. A propos de l’exposition « L’Art de Lee Miller »

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François Brunet

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Chercheur honoraire au Victoria and AIbert Museum où il a été conservateur du département de la photographie durant trente-cinq ans, Mark Haworth-Booth enseigne aujourd’hui la photographie à la University of the Arts de Londres.Il a publié de nombreuses études et monographies (Bill Brandt, André Kertész, Paul Strand, Bruce Davidson. Il est aussi notamment l'auteur de Photography: An Independent Art (1997 qui retrace l'histoire du fonds photographique du Victoria and AIbert Museum (dont il c...

  2. Enhancing Science Literacy and Art History Engagement at Princeton Through Collaboration Between the University Art Museum and the Council on Science and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riihimaki, C. A.; White, V. M.

    2016-12-01

    The importance of innovative science education for social science and humanities students is often under-appreciated by science departments, because these students typically do not take science courses beyond general education requirements, nor do they contribute to faculty research programs. However, these students are vitally important in society—for example as business leaders or consultants, and especially as voters. In these roles, they will be confronted with decisions related to science in their professional and personal lives. The Council on Science and Technology at Princeton University aims to fill this education gap by developing and supporting innovative programs that bring science to cross-disciplinary audiences. One of our most fruitful collaborations has been with the Princeton University Art Museum, which has an encyclopedic collection of over 92,000 works of art, ranging from antiquity to the contemporary. Our work includes 1) bringing introductory environmental science courses to the Museum to explore how original works of art of different ages can serve as paleo-environmental proxies, thereby providing a means for discussing broader concepts in development of proxies and validation of reconstructions; 2) sponsoring a panel aimed at the general public and composed of science faculty and art historians who discussed the scientific and art historical contexts behind Albert Bierstadt's Mount Adams, Washington, 1875 (oil on canvas, gift of Mrs. Jacob N. Beam, accession number y1940-430), including the landscape's subjects, materials, technique, and style; and 3) collaborating on an installation of photographs relevant to a freshman GIS course, with an essay about the artwork written by the students. This first-hand study of works of art encourages critical thinking and an empathetic approach to different historical periods and cultures, as well as to the environment. Our collaboration additionally provides an opportunity to engage more students in

  3. THE MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS OF ASTURIAS AS AN EDUCATIONAL RESOURCE FROM A GENDER PERSPECTIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ángel de la Fuente Martínez

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The museum as an educational resource is a proposal to make teachers reflect on the availability of media in the near environment regardless of the distance from the school to the museum. This gallery can work the general objectives in different educational stages, knowing the enhancement of historic buildings for activities of this type, the key work skills and promote the presence of women within the museum as an icon through different themes and artist. Our goal is to recover in perspective the presence of women sharing the same space and time with the man. The analysis of the trades, real social division of labor that this prefixed men do, that women, allows us to better understand the evolution of society. On the other hand, the postponement of the woman as artist, being supplanted by other painters, see Sofonisba Anguissola, it is another area in which it affects this article. Finally, different museums in which the woman is the protagonist in our country as an initiative to regain the role that women have played throughout the spatial and temporal coordinates, which are defining the development of the actions listed beings humans.

  4. External-PIXE analysis for the study of pigments from a painting from the Museum of Contemporary Art

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rizzutto, M.A., E-mail: rizzutto@if.usp.br [Institute of Physics, University of São Paulo, SP 05508-090 (Brazil); Moro, M.V.; Silva, T.F.; Trindade, G.F.; Added, N.; Tabacniks, M.H.; Kajiya, E.M.; Campos, P.H.V. [Institute of Physics, University of São Paulo, SP 05508-090 (Brazil); Magalhães, A.G.; Barbosa, M. [Museum of Contemporary Art, University of São Paulo, SP 05508-090 (Brazil)

    2014-08-01

    External Ion Beam Analysis is a useful tool for the characterization of cultural heritage objects. During the last decade, several significant collaborations have been established between Ion Beam Analysis (IBA) scientists and art or archeology professionals, demanding in-air IBA for a variety of different cultural heritage objects. In-air Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) analyses of an oil painting by the Italian painter, Mario Sironi, from the Museum of Contemporary Art of the University of São Paulo (MAC-USP), were examined. This painting is particularly interesting due to paintings on both sides (oil on canvas on the front and oil on wood on the back side). PIXE analysis helped the identification of the pigment similarities on both sides of the painting, suggesting the same authorship.

  5. Producing access for the elderly to territories of culture: an experience of occupational therapy in an art museum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Tereza Costa Galvanese

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available From 1996 to 2009, the Laboratory for Studies and Research in Art, Body and Occupational Therapy established a cooperation with the Museum of Contemporary Art of USP (MAC USP, working in partnership with the Leisure and Art to the Elderly Program of the Education and Technical-Scientific Division of MAC USP. The program offers an introduction in contemporary artistic practice to the elderly. This paper presents the interdisciplinary experience developed in this partnership in 2006. The method adopted in the program is referenced in the Triangular Approach to Teaching Art. Therefore, the appreciation of works of art and the contextualization of selected artists formed the basis on which participants developed their own poetics. The preparatory work was developed in group dynamics, including activities of body awareness and conversation circles coordinated by occupational therapists and students. They also accompanied the participants in their demands related to the challenges of constructing access to socio-cultural territories. The relevance of this living process was evident in the topics proposed by participants in conversations, or arisen during the body work. The aesthetic quality of the participants’ production resulted in personal and collective satisfaction and provoked admiration of the public who visited the workshop and exhibition, organized from this production.

  6. Conversation as a Work of Art: Will It Hang in a Museum?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iorio, Jeanne Marie

    2008-01-01

    Arts are an expectation in early childhood classrooms--traditionally, visual art, music, drama, and movement. The variety of understandings of art and aesthetic experiences shape approaches to arts education, particularly with young children. Attempts to define the aesthetic experience refer to the presence of an object, most commonly a work of…

  7. [Museum diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano-Alcázar, Jaim

    2013-01-01

    In Mexico among physicians it is common to use the term "bus diagnosis" to mean one that can be done only by looking someone, thanks to knowledge, experience and a bit of imagination. Ophthalmologists are able to do specialty diagnosis in some pictures of famous painters, thus "museum diagnosis." An aesthetic and historical research conducted for years provided the material. We present herein some examples of portraits made by Sharaku, Georg Groz, Il Bronzino, De la Tour, Vermeer, Rembrandt, Reynolds, Remedios Varo, Toulouse-Lautrec, Picasso, Ingres and others. The "museum diagnosis" enhances interest and aesthetic pleasure. Art could be useful as a tool for teaching clinical ophthalmology.

  8. Lifelong learning for active ageing in nordic museums; archives and street art

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fristrup, Tine; Grut, Sara

    2016-01-01

    to lifelong learning as a way to conceptualise activities for older adults’ in museums, as we emphasise an approach to adult education for active ageing articulated as ‘lifelong learning for active ageing’. To illustrate this framing, we outline a number of activities taken from publications, cultural sites...... and conferences in which we have been involved over the last decade in the context of the Nordic Centre of Heritage Learning and Creativity in Östersund, Sweden. We argue that lifelong learning for active ageing in cultural heritage institutions can contribute to the development of older adults’ civic...

  9. Walking the Museum - Performing the Museum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thobo-Carlsen, M.

    2016-01-01

    The article examines the performative aspects of the exhibition Olafur Eliasson: Riverbed (2014) in order to qualify and evaluate participatory modes of curating, doing research, and learning from art in museums. The article develops a theoretical approach to exhibitions as spaces for social...... to put into operation alternative ways of knowing, connecting and being together in museums....

  10. Orientalist Imaginations and Touristification of Museums

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ooi, Can-Seng

    2005-01-01

    This paper draws inspiration from Edward Said's orientalism, and examines how the three National Museums of Singapore - the Singapore History Museum, the Singapore Art Museum and the Asian Civilizations Museums - are orientalized. The process is mediated through the museums' close links to touris...

  11. Measuring Critical Thinking: Results from an Art Museum Field Trip Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisida, Brian; Bowen, Daniel H.; Greene, Jay P.

    2016-01-01

    Research shows that participation in school-based arts education has declined over the past decade. A problem for the arts' role in education has been a lack of rigorous scholarship that demonstrates educational benefits. A component of this problem has been a lack of available data. In this study, we use original data collected through a…

  12. Arte e história: as obras de arte no Museu do Holocausto de Curitiba = Art and history: the works of art in Holocaust Museum of Curitiba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beiersdorf, Danielle da Silva Maçaneiro

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho refere-se à análise de uma série de peças de arte expostas no pátio de entrada do Museu do Holocausto de Curitiba, inaugurado em 20 de novembro de 2011. O museu é o primeiro destinado unicamente à história do Holocausto do Brasil. O objetivo do presente artigo é compreender como os museus contemporâneos utilizam em suas exposições, elementos de sensibilização como a visualidade, a estética a sensibilização emocional e cognitiva através das obras de arte. Os museus tem uma carga muito grande de signos, sentidos e significados. Seu acervo, seu patrimônio devem ser preservados, e expostos ao público dando sentido ao papel educativo que o museu se propõe a desempenhar. As obras que o presente artigo analisa, foram produzidas por dois artistas plásticos, Guita Soifer artista plástica curitibana, e Andrew Rogers artista plástico Australiano

  13. Arts and science under the sign of Leonardo. The case of the National Museum of Science and Technology ‘Leonardo da Vinci’ of Milan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Giorgione

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Drawing on the example of Leonardo da Vinci, who was able to combine arts and science in his work, the National Museum of Science and Technology of Milan has always pursued the blending and the dialogue of humanistic and scientific knowledge. It has employed this approach in all of its activities, from the set design of exhibition departments to the acquisition of collections and, more recently, in the dialogue with the public. Now more than ever, following a renewal path for the Museum, these guidelines are being subject to research to achieve a new and more up-to-date interpretation.

  14. Arts and science under the sign of Leonardo. The case of the National Museum of Science and Technology ‘Leonardo da Vinci’ of Milan (Italian original version

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Giorgione

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Drawing on the example of Leonardo da Vinci, who was able to combine arts and science in his work, the National Museum of Science and Technology of Milan has always pursued the blending and the dialogue of humanistic and scientific knowledge. It has employed this approach in all of its activities, from the set design of exhibition departments to the acquisition of collections and, more recently, in the dialogue with the public. Now more than ever, following a renewal path for the Museum, these guidelines are being subject to research to achieve a new and more up-to-date interpretation.

  15. Installation Art and the Museum. Presentation and Conservation of Changing Artworks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Saaze, V.E.J.P.

    2013-01-01

    Installation art has become mainstream in artistic practices. However, acquiring and displaying such artworks implies that curators and conservators are challenged to deal with obsolete technologies, ephemeral materials and other issues concerning care and management of these artworks. By analysing

  16. Feel the art : Creating museum involvement by tapping universal human concerns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Desmet, P.M.A.; Hekkert, P.P.M.; van Erp, J.

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports an experience-driven design project that was commissioned by the Amsterdam Rijksmuseum. The aim was to cause a shift in the relationship between visitors and the art collection from one that is experienced as ‘distant’ to one that is experienced as ‘committed’. In five steps, an

  17. The Ecology of Arts and Humanities Education: Bridging the Worlds of Universities and Museums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar-Porzio, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, colleges and universities have been talking seriously about civic learning, but other stakeholders, particularly public arts, culture, and humanities institutions, must be part of the conversation in order to create a context for learning that develops the skills of graduates in robust ways that reflect the full promise of liberal…

  18. MFA Connections: Three Themes for Teacher-Guided Visits to the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foote, Allison; And Others

    This teacher resource packet encourages exploration of history and culture through art images. The packet consists of three units: "Daily Life around the World," which explores the rituals of daily life in ancient Egypt, China, and Greece, as well as colonial and turn-of-the-century America. "Images of Power," examines the…

  19. Hvorfor Art Deco nu?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gether, Vibeke Petersen

    2015-01-01

    Udstillingen er udover Victoria & Albert Museum også inspireret af Designmuseum Danmarks udstilling i 1997-98 med titlen Dansk Design 1910-45. Art Déco & Funktionalisme. Selvom udstillingen viste fine eksempler på art deco i dansk design og arkitektur, er det dog først og fremmest funktionalismen......, der har trukket de store overskrifter op igennem det 20. århundrede herhjemme. Gl. Holtegaard efterprøver nu art deco-begrebet på dansk billedkunst i en udstillingskontekst. Fokus er først og fremmest på maleri og skulptur. Der inddrages i mindre målestok andre visuelle medier som arkitekturtegninger......, film, illustrationer, plakater og kunsthåndværk. Med udstillingen vil vi gerne synliggøre de forskellige æstetiske udtryk, som vi mener meget bedre dækkes af betegnelsen art deco i dansk kunst i perioden 1910–1940....

  20. Forgery at the Snite Museum of Art? Improving AMS Radiocarbon Dating at the University of Notre Dame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troyer, Laura; Bagwell, Connor; Anderson, Tyler; Clark, Adam; Nelson, Austin; Skulski, Michael; Collon, Philippe

    2017-09-01

    The Snite Museum of Art recently obtained several donations of artifacts. Five of the pieces lack sufficient background information to prove authenticity and require further analysis to positively determine the artwork's age. One method to determine the artwork's age is radiocarbon dating via Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) performed at the University of Notre Dame's Nuclear Science Laboratory. Samples are prepared by combustion of a small amount of material and subsequent reduction to carbon into an iron powder matrix (graphitization). The graphitization procedure affects the maximum measurement rate, and a poor graphitization can be detrimental to the AMS measurement of the sample. Previous graphitization procedures resulted in a particle current too low or inconsistent to optimize AMS measurements. Thus, there was a desire to design and refine the graphitization system. The finalized process yielded physically darker samples and increased sample currents by two orders of magnitude. Additionally, the first testing of the samples was successful, yet analysis of the dates proved inconclusive. AMS measurements will be performed again to obtain better sampling statistics in the hopes of narrowing the reported date ranges. NSF and JINA-CEE.

  1. The Interface of Art and Science in the Museum: Disclosing a 4th Dimension of Art Preservation and Connoisseurship

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casadio, Franceska [Art Institute of Chicago

    2004-11-03

    Drawing from her most recent experience at the Art Institute and past experiences in Italy, Dr. Casadio will discuss examples of applications of scientific analysis to the field of Cultural Heritage, including: 1) The use of instrumental analysis to address fundamental questions regarding artists' techniques, and as an aid to unraveling paint technology, as with the fascinating pre-Columbia pigment Maya Blue; 2) The investigation into deterioration of artifacts, the design of innovative conservation materials and the testing of their durability, expemplified with the case study of the conservation of the facade of the gothic Cathedral of Milan; 3) Development of fine-tuned conservation strategies for the cleaning of Michelangelo's David; 4) The study of the effect of environmental parameters on objects in exhibitions and storage to help design compatible display cases; 5) The role of scientific analysis in matters of authentication and dating. Future trends that increasingly see science as a tool for virtual restoration will be discussed.

  2. Helmet "tang" from the Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York City, United States. Features of Construction, Design and Operational Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonid A. Bobrov

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses iron helmet (No. 36.25.115, which is stored in the Metropolitan Museum of art (New York City, United States. For the first time this helmet was published and analyzed by American scientists G. C. Stone and D.G. Alexander. The analysis showed that the Bowl was made by Turkish masters of the XVII century and backplate and the hoop is added to the helmet in 1781–1782 D.G. Alexander speculated that the helmet belonged to the Warrior of the Crimean Khanate. Dating the helmet does not raise objections. However, the attribution of a helmet requires some clarification. Analysis of the design of the helmet and decoration revealed that backplate, hoop and Aventail from iron rings added to Bowl in 1781–1782, were manufactured by Circassian craftsmen living in the Northern Caucasus or in Crimea. For the decoration of the helmet has been used typical Circassian ornaments: "sieve", cherkessian floral pattern, geometric shapes, triangular in shape, "gear", etc. During Assembly of the helmet were applied characteristic of Circassian gunsmiths technological solutions: using as a basis the bowl old-style helmet, tapered Finial with a ring for a decorative plume, hoop with four plates, ringed with aventail lip to protect the forehead, etc. In Circassia similar headgear worn were known as tang (from the Arabic. "Taj", i.e., the "Crown". In the XVII–XVIII centuries. they willingly purchased representatives of Crimean Tatar nobility. Similar in design and system design helmets Circassian production belonged to the highest aristocracy of the Crimean Khanate, are stored in Museum and private collections in Poland, Turkey and the United States. The inscription "Bekmurun" on the hoop from the Metropolitan helmet suggests that it was manufactured on request of Kabardian Bekmur princely heir (Bekmurziny, which moved from Circassia in Crimea, 1737. The popularity of tang type helmets among the aristocracy of North Caucasus and Crimea were due not

  3. The Bands Culture in Victoria, Australia: Live Music Benefits Career Paths, Employment and Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Amanda; Forrest, David

    2012-01-01

    This study explores the career paths, employment, business opportunities and community contributions made available through the provision and development of the contemporary performance bands' culture in the State of Victoria. It is framed with the support given to live music performers by Arts Victoria, Small Business Victoria and Music Victoria.…

  4. Monuments devoted to artists in public spaces around museums: A nineteenth-century strategy to enhance the urban space of art districts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorente, J. Pedro

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Monuments to kings or military heroes have always been positioned in main squares and avenues, whilst those erected to famous cultural figures were a novelty introduced in the Enlightenment and Romanticism, placing busts or sitting monuments to writers or musicians in secluded gardens and in the surroundings of libraries, theatres, etc. During the nineteenth century, monuments to artists became also a common feature in many cities, where a most likely emplacement for them was in front of some art museum. In a way, they were a complement to the ornaments of such building, usually decorated with portraits and inscriptions glorifying great artists; but the monument to Murillo erected in 1863 by public subscription in Seville's Plaza del Museo was also an urban milestone, catching the attention of promenading public passing along a lateral street. Later, the monuments erected in the piazzas around the Prado Museum in Madrid, or in gardens outside the Louvre, became a popular prototype, emulated in many other cities up to the early 20th century. Their role as interfaces between public spaces and museum sites would thereafter be taken over by other kinds of artistic landmarks: not monuments to artists, but monumental artworks, often owned by the museum itself, thus bringing part of its collection outside, as a welcome starter to prospective cultural consumers.

  5. Nuevos hallazgos de arte parietal y mobiliar en la cueva de La Cullalvera (Ramales de la Victoria, Cantabria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda DÍAZ

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Las actuaciones arqueológicas realizadas en el vestíbulo de la cueva de La Cullalvera con motivo de los trabajos para el acondicionamiento turístico de la cavidad han posibilitado el descubrimiento de una nueva pintura rupestre, que representa una figura de caballo en rojo. También se han hallado algunas piezas de arte mueble, entre las que destaca un fragmento de plaquita decorada con motivos claviformes que presentan un paralelismo indudable con el conjunto de signos claviformes pintados en rojo en el interior de la cueva. Las características formales y estilísticas de los hallazgos apuntan a una cronología magdaleniense.

  6. 75 FR 45654 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate a Cultural Item: Taylor Museum of the Colorado Springs Fine Arts...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-03

    ... speeches about the ways of his fellow Haida people. When the Taylor Museum of the Colorado Springs Fine... group identity that can be reasonably traced between the object of cultural patrimony and the Organized...

  7. The Herbert Virtual Museum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagiotis Petridis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, virtual reality and augmented reality have emerged as areas of extreme interest as unique methods for visualising and interacting with digital museum artefacts in a different context, for example, as a virtual museum or exhibition, particularly over the Internet. Modern cultural heritage exhibitions have evolved from static to dynamic exhibitions and challenging explorations. This paper presents two different applications developed for the Herbert Museum and Art Gallery that make the user’s experience more immersive, engaging, and interactive. The first application utilizes mobile phone devices in order to enrich the visitors experience in the museum, and the second application is a serious game for cultural heritage and in particular for museum environments focusing on the younger visitors.

  8. The good field trip: How elementary students from diverse socio-economic backgrounds learn science, art, and technology at a museum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martell, Sandra Toro

    The Good Field Trip is a study that uses an ethnographic approach to answer the question of what learning looks like during a field trip to a museum. The study uses the Contextual Model of Learning (Falk & Dierking, 2000) to investigate elementary students' personal, physical, and sociocultural contexts of learning as well as how time affects students' thoughts and feelings about the experience. The author accompanied a group of eight students on a three and a half day camp-like experience to a museum that promotes environmental stewardship and the integration of art, science, and technology use and learning. The author videotaped the students' conversations and experiences and interviewed students before, during, and after the trip. Analyses of the videotapes were supplemented with student documents, including comic books, journal notes, and reflective essays about the trip. Findings include that not all experiences are marked as science, art, and technology; technology use does not occur; art is presented in a more formalized manner than science, which is composed of observation and the acquisition of knowledge about plants and animals; and conversations and activities resemble traditional modes of learning in school settings.

  9. Restoran Museum = Museum Restaurant

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2009-01-01

    Tallinnas Vana-Viru 14 asuva restorani Museum sisekujundusest. Sisearhitekt Toomas Korb, tema tähtsamate tööde loetelu. Varem paiknes nendes ruumides tuletõrjemuuseum, endiseid asukaid meenutavad raamitud mustvalged fotod. Ruumi ilmestavad Tom Dixoni loodud kuulvalgustid

  10. Museum Informatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marty, Paul F.; Rayward, W. Boyd; Twidale, Michael B.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses museum informatics that studies how information science and technology affect the museum environment. Examines digital technology; information organization and access; digitization, personal computers, and the Internet; data sharing; standards; social impacts of new technologies; collaboration; consortia; multimedia exhibits; virtual…

  11. MUSEUMS AS CULTURAL TOURISM ATTRACTIONS IN UBUD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Bagus Kade Subhiksu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently, there has been a shift in the attributes of several museums in Ubud in order to attract more tourists to visit museums as cultural tourism attractions. Some museums have expanded their collections and add other attributes to complement their main collections, which as the potential to alter the idealism, functions, and roles of museums. Another challenge faced by museum operators is the development of other tourist attractions, such as the addition of tourism destination attributes in Ubud, which was initially known as tourism destinations that offered art and culture such as dance performances and museums, and now have expanded into yoga destination, adventure destination, and so on. Based on these factors, the problem statements in this research are formulated as follows: (1 How are museums as tourist attractions in Ubud area, from the perspective of operators? (2 How are museums as tourist attractions in Ubud area, from the perspective of visitors? (3 How is the relationship between museums and other tourism components when examined from the role of museums as cultural tourism attractions in Ubud area?. This research on museums was conducted in the Ubud area because Ubud has made museums as the cultural tourism attractions in the area, which include the Blanco Museum, Museum Puri Lukisan, Agung Rai Museum of Art (ARMA, the Rudana Museum, and Neka Art Museum. This research is based on the theories of museum management, marketing, and theories on cultural tourism attraction. The research involved the participation of 82 foreign visitors and 79 domestic visitors as respondents, in addition to five museum owners and two museum professionals as informants. The conclusion of this research are as follows: (1 From the perspective of museum operators, museums function as cultural tourism attractions, as sources of historical information, as the media for cultural preservation, and the actualization of the noble objective of the museum

  12. Our museum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drotner, Kirsten

    2017-01-01

    Our Museum was initiated in 2016. It is a five-year Danish national research and development programme comprising seven university departments at five universities and eight museum partners. The project aims to facilitate new forms of citizen engagement and inclusion by developing and studying how...... museums communicate with audiences in innovative ways. In this text the background, aims, hypothesis and organization are presented....

  13. Climate Museum and Garden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, Jay; Bille, Dorthe

    2017-04-01

    The Climate Museum and Garden is conceived as a cross-disciplinary experience, where the arts and sciences link together to increase understanding of the Earth's climate and its relevance to our fate as a species. This would be a place of inspiration. The Climate Museum and Garden would merge concepts of modern art museums and modern science museums, with exhibitions, live music and theater performances, visitor interaction, unique discoveries and reflection. It would be a place where visitors are immersed in experiences, lingering indoors and out in quiet consideration and gratitude for our planet's atmosphere. The story of climate change is compelling in its own right; theories of the greenhouse effect go back over century and climate policy has stretched back a few decades. Whereas scientific researchers have been contributing to understanding the mechanisms and impacts of climate change for many decades; whereas researchers have participated in climate summits and informed policy makers; whereas researchers have taught classes of gifted students; in all of this, the public has mostly missed out. This public relations gap has been unfortunately filled by those that would seek to politicize and mislead the public, leading to an engagement gap among the general public. Now we stand on a precipice. Therefore we see a ripe opportunity to reach out and inspire the population. We build off of current pedagogic research that shows that experienced-based learning is more impactful when it engages the senses and elicits an emotional response. People understand what they experience, what they feel, and this serves as the basis for personal reflection. In this sense the visitor experience is generative, in that it promotes further personal investigation and interaction. The Climate Museum and Garden would be a start. In the future, we envisage a future network of climate museums in all major cities. It would be a flagship attraction for any city, along with their art

  14. Pinturas seleccionadas del Museo de Arte de las Américas Title: Selected Paintings from the Art Museum of the Americas

    OpenAIRE

    Inter-American Development Bank

    1994-01-01

    Twenty paintings by major Latin American artists, presented on occasion of the IDB's publication of the book Art of Latin America l900-1980, written by the late Argentine-Colombian art historian and critic Marta Traba.

  15. Visiting the cinema, concerts, museums or art exhibitions as determinant of survival: a Swedish fourteen-year cohort follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konlaan, B B; Bygren, L O; Johansson, S E

    2000-09-01

    The aim of this study was to ascertain the possible influence of attending various kinds of cultural events or visiting cultural institutions as a determinant of survival. A cohort of individuals aged 25-74 years from a random sample were interviewed by trained non-medical interviewers in 1982 and 1983. The interviews covered standard-of-living variables. Our independent variables covered visiting cultural institutions and attendance at cultural events, reading books or periodicals, and music making. The non-response rate was about 25%. The cohort was followed with respect to survival for 14 years up to 31st December 1996. The background covariates that were used for control purposes were age, sex, cash buffer, educational standard, long-term disease, smoking, and physical exercise. Our setting was the Swedish survey of living conditions among the adult Swedish population aged 25-74 years. About 10,609 individuals were interviewed in 1982 and 1983. The outcome measure was survival until 31st December 1996. In all, 916 men and 600 women died during this period. We found a higher mortality risk for those people who rarely visited the cinema, concerts, museums, or art exhibitions compared with those visiting them most often. The significant relative risks ranging between RR 1.14 (95% CI. 1.01-1.31) of attending art exhibitions, and RR 1.42 (CI. 1.25-1.60) of attending museums, when adjusting for the nine other variables. Visits to the cinema and concerts gave significant RR in between. We could not discern any beneficial effect of attending the theatre, church service or sports event as a spectator or any effect of reading or music making. Our conclusion is that attendance at certain kinds of cultural events may have a beneficial effect on longevity.

  16. A Hazard Assessment and Proposed Risk Index for Art, Architecture, Archive and Artifact Protection: Case Studies for Assorted International Museums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Clara J.

    This study proposes a hazard/risk index for environmental, technological, and social hazards that may threaten a museum or other place of cultural storage and accession. This index can be utilized and implemented to measure the risk at the locations of these storage facilities in relationship to their geologic, geographic, environmental, and social settings. A model case study of the 1966 flood of the Arno River and its impact on the city of Florence and the Uffizi Gallery was used as the index focus. From this focus an additional eleven museums and their related risk were assessed. Each index addressed a diverse range of hazards based on past frequency and magnitude. It was found that locations nearest a hazard had exceptionally high levels of risk, however more distant locations could have influences that would increase their risk to levels similar to those locations near the hazard. Locations not normally associated with a given natural hazard can be susceptible should the right conditions be met and this research identified, complied and assessed those factions found to influence natural hazard risk at these research sites.

  17. Almendralejo Wine Museum

    OpenAIRE

    Jiménez Ferrera, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    The project of the Museum of the Wine in Almendralejo (Badajoz) poses and assumes the duality that exists in the process of elaboration of the wine. Science and art, system and chance, technical and inspiration are the opposites that build, in a mysterious, magic, almost miraculous way, a fine wine.

  18. From collection to museum: the development of the Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triarico, E

    2008-07-01

    Located at the Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists (ANZCA) headquarters in Melbourne, Victoria, this internationally significant collection was founded in 1935 by renowned Australian anaesthetist Dr Geoffrey Kaye (1903 to 1986). Although it has always been referred to as a museum, it lacked the necessary management structure and infrastructure to meet museum standards. In March 2003, the first full-time professionally trained Museum Curator Ms Elizabeth Triarico, was employed by ANZCA to work with the Honorary Curator Dr Rod Westhorpe, and the Honorary Assistant Curator; Dr Christine Ball, to build on past achievements and to develop the collection into an accessible and relevant modern museum. Ms Triarico has extensive museum management experience with emphasis on management of major projects, collection management, strategic planning, marketing, interpretation and exhibition development. This paper outlines the management issues and innovative strategies involved in developing this important collection into a professionally managed museum based on best practice standards. It illustrates the benefits of introducing a clear vision and an agreed longterm management plan based on Museums Australia (Victoria) Museum Accreditation Program guidelines.

  19. The Flipped Museum: Leveraging Technology to Deepen Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrell, Michelle H.; Kotecki, Emily

    2015-01-01

    The Flipped Museum is an innovative model in which high school students engage in online learning before and after a museum experience at the North Carolina Museum of Art. This model, inspired by the "flipped classroom," inverts the delivery and application of knowledge in a museum setting. Beginning with an overview of the pedagogical…

  20. Building Staff Capacity to Evaluate in Museum Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubarek, Joy

    2015-01-01

    For years, museums of all varieties, including art museums, science centers, history museums, zoos, and aquariums, have conducted education evaluation. However, museums are all too often faced with the challenge of allocating staff time, expertise, and other resources toward conducting evaluation, particularly evaluation that moves beyond program…

  1. Innovative Arts Programs Require Innovative Partnerships: A Case Study of STEAM Partnering between an Art Gallery and a Natural History Museum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Jacqualine; Patterson, Delaney

    2016-01-01

    The arts animate learning because they are inherently experiential and because of their potential to develop creative and critical thinking skills in students. These same skills are valued in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) education, but the arts have not been consistently included in STEM lessons. We transformed our STEM…

  2. 75 FR 63516 - Institute of Museum and Library Services; Sunshine Act Meeting of the National Museum and Library...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-15

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Institute of Museum and Library Services; Sunshine Act Meeting of the National Museum and Library Services Board AGENCY: Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), NFAH. ACTION... Museum and Library Services Board. This notice also describes the function of the Board. Notice of the...

  3. 75 FR 8139 - Institute of Museum and Library Services; Sunshine Act Meeting of the National Museum and Library...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-23

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Institute of Museum and Library Services; Sunshine Act Meeting of the National Museum and Library Services Board AGENCY: Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), NFAH. ACTION... Museum and Library Services Board. This notice also describes the function of the Board. Notice of the...

  4. 75 FR 32818 - Institute of Museum and Library Services; Sunshine Act Meeting of the National Museum and Library...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-09

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Institute of Museum and Library Services; Sunshine Act Meeting of the National Museum and Library Services Board AGENCY: Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), NFAH. ACTION... Museum and Library Services Board. This notice also describes the function of the Board. Notice of the...

  5. La Gestión de la Comunicación Externa Online con los Visitantes en los Museos y Centros de Arte en Málaga / The Online External Communication Management with the Visiting Public in Museums and Art Centers in Málaga

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Soler Humanes

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available La siguiente investigación analiza la gestión de la comunicación externa online con el público visitante en los museos y centros de arte malagueños, centrándose en el uso de páginas web y plataformas 2.0 para cumplir sus objetivos. La muestra abarca a los tres museos más visitados de Málaga: Museo Picasso, Museo Carmen Thyssen y Centro de Arte Contemporáneo (CAC. Los resultados obtenidos prueban que la comunicación de los museos en internet continúa manteniendo un carácter tradicional, si bien se observan claros avances en la adaptación al entorno digital. / The following research analyses the management of the online external communication with the visiting public in museums and art centers in Málaga, focusing on the use of web pages and 2.0 platforms to attain their objectives. The sample includes the three most visited museums in Málaga: Picasso Museum, Carmen Thyssen Museum and the Contemporary Art Center (CAC. The results show that communication online of the museums keeps being traditional, although there is a clear progress in adapting to the digital environment.

  6. Museums and Health: A Case Study of Research and Practice at the Children's Museum of Manhattan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    This article will discuss how museums may serve as community anchors by catalyzing and helping to sustain significant behavioral and attitudinal changes among the public. When museums integrate research, deep community roots and trust, and a museum and arts-based pedagogy, they are uniquely positioned to effect change. The article will review a…

  7. 76 FR 54807 - Notice of Proposed Information Collection: IMLS Museum Web Database: MuseumsCount.gov

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-02

    ...Count.gov AGENCY: Institute of Museum and Library Services, National Foundation for the Arts and the..., Institute of Museum and Library Services, 1800 M St., NW., Washington, DC 20036. Telephone: 202-653-4762... difficulty at 202/653-4614. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background The Institute of Museum and Library...

  8. PROFESSOR ZDZISŁAW ŻYGULSKI JR.: AN OUTSTANDING PERSON, A GREAT PERSONALITY, A MUSEUM PROFESSIONAL, A RESEARCHER ON ANTIQUE WEAPONS, ORIENTAL ART AND EUROPEAN PAINTING (1921–2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Grzybkowska

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Professor Zdzisław Żygulski Jr. (1921–2015 was one of the most prominent Polish art historians of the second half of the 20th century. He treated the history of art as a broadly understood science of mankind and his artistic achievements. His name was recognised in global research on antique weapons, and among experts on Rembrandt and Leonardo da Vinci. He studied museums and Oriental art. He wrote 35 books, about 200 articles, and numerous essays on art; he wrote for the daily press about his artistic journeys through Europe, Japan and the United States. He illustrated his publications with his own photographs, and had a large set of slides. Żygulski created many exhibitions both at home and abroad presenting Polish art in which armour and oriental elements played an important role. He spent his youth in Lvov, and was expatriated to Cracow in 1945 together with his wife, the pottery artist and painter Eva Voelpel. He studied English philology and history of art at the Jagiellonian University (UJ, and was a student under Adam Bochnak and Vojeslav Molè. He was linked to the Czartoryski Museum in Cracow for his whole life; he worked there from 1949 until 2010, for the great majority of time as curator of the Arms and Armour Section. He devoted his whole life to the world of this museum, and wrote about its history and collections. Together with Prof. Zbigniew Bocheński, he set up the Association of Lovers of Old Armour and Flags, over which he presided from 1972 to 1998. He set up the Polish school of the study of militaria. He was a renowned and charismatic member of the circle of international researchers and lovers of militaria. He wrote the key texts in this field: Broń w dawnej Polsce na tle uzbrojenia Europy i Bliskiego Wschodu [Weapons in old Poland compared to armaments in Europe and the Near East], Stara broń w polskich zbiorach [Old weapons in Polish armouries], Polski mundur wojskowy [Polish military uniforms] (together with H

  9. Looking outside the Frame: "Demythtifying" Museum Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Melinda M.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author presents her list of top 10 museum education myths. In so doing she also hopes to "demythtify" these aspects of the field. While the focus of the list is art museum education, art educators in schools and community sites will likely find that several of the myths resonate with their practice. (Contains 1 endnote.)

  10. MOOCs and Museums: Not Such Strange Bedfellows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzola, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    In April 2013, The Museum of Modern Art entered into a partnership with MOOC (Massive Open Online Course) provider Coursera to offer professional development opportunities for K-12 teachers all over the world. Since entering into that partnership, MoMA has developed two MOOCs: "Art and Inquiry: Museum Teaching Strategies for Your…

  11. “Ma l’America è lontana”. A proposito della nascita del Modern Art Museum di New York (1929 / “Ma l’America è lontana” (But America is far-away. Notes on the opening of the Modern Art Museum of New York (1929

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Zuliani

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available L’inaugurazione del Moma nel 1929 a New York segna un passaggio cruciale, introducendo una nuova concezione del valore e dell’uso delle collezioni e proponendo una politica espositiva che accoglieva nel recinto, fino a quel momento protetto, del museo il rischio e il mutamento. Il Moma si è così posto sin dall’inizio come un modello egemone,  facendosi vetrina di un pensiero critico che coniugava la difesa del modernismo con l’affermazione del formalismo, di cui il display del museo sarà riconoscibile espressione. Una novità di cui il saggio ha inteso analizzare attraverso lo spoglio della stampa quotidiana e dei periodici dell’epoca la ricaduta in Italia, evidenziando come – fatta in parte eccezione per la mostra degli Old Master del 1939, accolta proprio dal Moma -  nel nostro Paese l’attenzione per l’istituzione statunitense si attiverà soltanto in coincidenza della mostra Twentieth-Century Italian Art (1949, peraltro producendo solo marginalmente una riflessione più ampia sulle avvenute  trasformazioni del museo e delle sue funzioni.   The opening of MoMA in 1929 in New York marks a crucial moment, because it introduces a new idea about value and use of collections and proposes a new exhibition policy, welcoming the risk and the change into the protected space of the museum. From the beginning, the MoMA became a dominant model, showing a critical thinking that joined the defence of modernism and the success of formalism; its clear expression will be the museum display. The originality of this essay is the analysis of the repercussions of the opening of MoMA in Italy, reviewing newspapers and magazines of those years. In our country the attention for MoMA – with the exception of the Old Master exhibition in 1939 in the American museum – started with the exhibition Twentieth-Century Italian Art (1949, that produced only marginally a wider reflection on happened transformation of the museum and of its functions.

  12. Art, production and market conditions: Gottfried Semper’s historical perspective on commodities and the role of museums

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Leoni

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper looks at Gottfried Semper’s notions on the commodity and capitalism. When Semper attended the Great Exhibition, he realized the enormous impact that capitalist industries and interests have had on the arts. The Crystal Palace has always been at the centre of Semper scholarship but the focus has been less on capitalism than on the arts and crafts although Semper’s comments on capitalism are apparent and illustrate that he understood that everything becomes a commodity, even architecture. As a theorist trying to principles of by which art is driven, he analyzes industries and their mass produced objects and tries to come to terms with this. At the same time, he tries to integrate capitalism into his historical and scientific models. This paper tries to unravel Semper’s ideas on capitalism and the way he tries to resolve its problems in artistic production.

  13. De España a Texas: el Meadows Museum y la formación de las colecciones de arte español en los Estados Unidos

    OpenAIRE

    Dotseth, Amanda W.

    2008-01-01

    Entre las colecciones más importantes de arte español en los Estados Unidos destaca la del Meadows Museum de la Southern Methodist University en Dallas, Texas, cuya colección fue adquirida durante la segunda mitad del siglo XX por el millonario tejano Algur H. Meadows. En este artículo se tratan sus hábitos de coleccionar dentro de un amplio contexto en el que se trata la formación de significativas colecciones de arte español en los Estados Unidos por coleccionistas de los siglos...

  14. Why Creativity? Articulating and Championing a Museum's Social Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Cindy Meyers

    2014-01-01

    In late 2006, the Columbus Museum of Art adopted a new framework that established creativity as the lens for learning and visitor experiences. When the Columbus Museum of Art committed to creativity as a focus and lens for learning, the work and nature of its education department adapted and changed. What is a museum's responsibility to its…

  15. Authentication at a small museum: the kindness of strangers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyland, Douglas K. S.

    2000-03-01

    Over the last twenty years, I have served as curator and director of several small and medium size museums including the Helen Foresman Spencer Museum of Art, University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas; the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art, Memphis, Tennessee; the Birmingham Museum of Art, Birmingham, Alabama; the San Antonio Museum of Art, San Antonio, Texas, and most recently, the Fuller Museum of Art, Brockton, Massachusetts. The largest budget approached three million dollars, minute in comparison with the Metropolitan Museum of Art of the National Gallery. Our resources were limited and the demands of building maintenance, programs, acquisitions and conservation far outstripped the amount of money available to be spent. Each museum housed between five and thirty thousand art works and generally speaking the collections were eclectic. It is not unusual at these city museums to find extraordinary oddities ranging from the finest Wedgwood collection in the world in Birmingham to the most extensive group of Latin American folk art objects to be found anywhere in San Antonio. Each year museums of comparable size are offered thousands of art works on all shapes and sizes form all periods and cultures. Only rarely does the staff have the expertise to evaluate and determine the authenticity of the eclectic group of objects both in the collection and being offered. With few curators and in many cases even fewer local experts to call upon, the museum professional must be both bold and creative.

  16. Перегородчатые эмали из собрания А.В. Звенигородского и исследование Л. Пекарской «Jewellery of Princely Kiev. The Kiev hoards in the British Museum and The Metropolitan Museum of Art and Related Material» / Cloisonné enamels from the former collection Alexander Zwenigorodsky and a new book by Ljudmila Pekarska, Jewellery of Princely Kiev. The Kiev Hoards in the British Museum and the Metropolitan Museum of Art and Related Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri Pyatnitsky

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In 2011, a monograph long anticipated by art historians with an expertise in Old Russian and Byzantine art was published by Ljudmila Pekarska. The main subject of the monograph - the history of a hoard of jewellery found in Kiev in 1906, and as luck would have it is today divided between the British Museum and the Metropolitan Museum of Art. The author, however, did not limit her study to the analysis of objects from this hoard. She used an extensive amount of comparative materials from collections in many Western, Ukrainian, and Russian museums. L. Pekarska focuses mainly on the cloisonné enamels, an impressive example of exquisite medieval luxury. Welcoming the publication of this book, and being interested in the research, as well as its author, I do not envy the hard work that it would take for a person to write a scholarly review on this publication.

  17. Virtuelt museum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Mogens Rostgaard

    2008-01-01

    I april 2008 åbnes dørene til "Virtuelt Museum". Det er et internetmuseum, som alle kan besøge ved at klikke ind på portalen www.vimu.info . På museet er der en præsentation af regionen Slesvig-Holsten - Syddanmarks historie siden 1830. Det har taget tre år at udvikle det virtuelle museum...

  18. Comparative Analysis of Visitors' Experiences and Knowledge Acquisition between a 3Dimensional Online and a Real-World Art Museum Tour

    Science.gov (United States)

    D' Alba, Adriana; Jones, Greg; Wright, Robert

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses a study conducted in the fall of 2011 and the spring of 2012 which explored the use of existing 3D virtual environment technologies by bringing a selected permanent museum exhibit displayed at a museum located in central Mexico into an online 3Dimensional experience. Using mixed methods, the research study analyzed knowledge…

  19. Integrating Socio-Cultural Contexts and Location-based Systems for Ubiquitous Language Learning in Museums: A State of the Art Review of 2009-2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong-You; Liu, Gi-Zen; Hwang, Gwo-Jen

    2017-01-01

    Context-dependent learning systems are now becoming more common in museums, as most students are equipped with mobile devices. As there has been little research into context-aware mobile applications in museums, the present study aims to investigate ubiquitous language learning in socio-cultural contexts, as well as recent trends in using…

  20. Museum profession: competences of modern museum professional

    OpenAIRE

    Kalvaitytė, Giedrė

    2009-01-01

    The object of master work – museum profession. The purpose of master work – to analyze museum profession, giving special attention to modern museum professional, his/her competences, skills. For the attainment of this purpose there are set the following goals: to analyze the conception, development and work model of public museum; to analyze the conception, development of museum profession and set the main factors, which condition the complexion of modern museum professional; to prove the imp...

  1. Análisis de los métodos más frecuentes de obtención de la victoria en las Artes Marciales Mixtas

    OpenAIRE

    García Bastida, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    [spa]Las Artes Marciales Mixtas (MMA) es uno de los deportes con mayor crecimiento a nivel social y económico en los últimos 20 años. Ya en los antiguos Juegos Olímpicos en Grecia, los deportes de combate disfrutaban de una gran popularidad, pero no fue hasta el año 1993, cuando volvió a aparecer como un deporte de espectáculo. El reglamento de este deporte sufrió diversas variaciones, aumentando el número de reglas asociadas a la competición. Finalmente en el año 2001 se estableció un reglam...

  2. Análisis de los métodos más frecuentes de obtención de la victoria en las Artes Marciales Mixtas

    OpenAIRE

    García Bastida, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Las Artes Marciales Mixtas (MMA) es uno de los deportes con mayor crecimiento a nivel social y económico en los últimos 20 años. Ya en los antiguos Juegos Olímpicos en Grecia, los deportes de combate disfrutaban de una gran popularidad, pero no fue hasta el año 1993, cuando volvió a aparecer como un deporte de espectáculo. El reglamento de este deporte sufrió diversas variaciones, aumentando el número de reglas asociadas a la competición. Finalmente en el año 2001 se estableció un reglamento...

  3. The NMC Horizon Report: 2013 Museum Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, L.; Adams Becker, S.; Freeman, A.

    2013-01-01

    The "NMC Horizon Report: 2013 Museum Edition," is a co-production with the Marcus Institute for Digital Education in the Arts (MIDEA), and examines six emerging technologies for their potential impact on and use in education and interpretation within the museum environment: BYOD (Bring Your Own Device), crowdsourcing, electronic…

  4. Art and Architectural Space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Unterrainer, Walter

    2014-01-01

    art and architectural space museums and other exhibition spaces or how artists learn to love architects Over the last two decades, innumerable new museums, art galleries and other exhibition spaces have been built and opened all over the globe. The most extreme growth happened in China, where...... the number of museums went up from 300 by 1980 to estimated 3000 museums by 2015. In urban discourses, new museums and buildings for art have been considered as drivers for ´cultural sustainability´ of cities. The notion is diffuse and the reality is more an economic centred ´city branding´ to help...... and its content. The urban and spatial question goes far beyond museums and other buildings for art: how in democratic societies should public spaces be supported by art and how can public art support ´cityness´ and meaning versus spaces of consumerism. Famous but egocentric buildings with the main...

  5. Museum Superheroes: The Role of Play in Young Children's Lives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krakowski, Pamela

    2012-01-01

    This article explores the role of play in an art museum. Reflecting upon a kindergarten field trip to the Warhol Museum in which children's play was the centerpiece of the museum experience, the author examines what early childhood theorists have written about the value of play in young children's lives. She shows how the Warhol's program for…

  6. KAZIMIERZ MALINOWSKI – MUSEUM PROFESSIONAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerard Radecki

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Year 2017 marks the 110th birthday anniversary and 40th anniversary of the death of Kazimierz Malinowski. June 2016 marked half a century since he re-took the post of Director of the National Museum in Poznań. The circumstances in question require us to remember an individual who was of great merit to Polish museology and to the National Museum in Poznań. The title of this text paraphrases the title of an article by Kazimierz Malinowski Michał Walicki - museum professional, published in the “Muzealnictwo” magazine and devoted to a renowned art historian and researcher on Gothic art in Poland. Walicki is less known as a museum professional and even less as a mentor to Malinowski himself. However, if one attempted to determine the whole range of the activity of the latter using one word only, the term “museum professional”, rather disregarded today, seems to be the most capacious and adequate. It reminds about Malinowski in some of the most significant aspects of his activity, including the one as: 1/ a museum professional in the strict sense, but also a practician working in a museum and taking part in the life of this environment in the broadest meaning, 2/ a propagator of the social role of museums as institutions open to the general public, 3/ the long-term Director of the National Museum in Poznań, a visionary and a curator of the institution’s new programme. Malinowski was one of a few of the most important figures of the post-war museology in Poland. Today, he is almost entirely forgotten. Almost total absence of this name in today’s museum circles also results from an unsatisfactory state of research into his professional biography. Nevertheless, Malinowski’s activity, even only in the field of museology, as his second major field of activity was conservation, is still to be meticulously analysed. Therefore, many opinions presented below should be treated as suggestions and hypotheses, still to be further verified, given

  7. Engaging Experiences in Interactive Museum Exhibitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borup Lynggaard, Aviaja; Langballe, Line; Geert Jensen, Birgitte

    2005-01-01

    and history museums. There is considerable potential in the development of experiences and in the communication of information customized to visitors in the museum apart from personally held information devices. The paper will present background research for developing solutions to a new media museum......The aim of the present paper is to outline possibilities for the development of combined IT and architectural concepts supported by joint engaging experiences for visitors to the room of the museum of the future. Focus is upon a joint experience, as many existing IT-systems designed for museums...... primarily appeal to a strong individualised experience where the visitor views a PDA or similar, rather than experience the atmosphere and interaction of the room. In this context, there are several examples from practice and in the research literature of IT-systems for science centres, art museums...

  8. Museum Exhibit

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    A TSP from NASA Tech Briefs provided the solution to an electrical problem at a Florida museum. When a model train would not start without a jerk, a Marshall Space Flight Center development called pulse width control was adapted. The new circuit enables the train to start smoothly and reduces construction and maintenance costs. The same technology is also used in another hands-on exhibit. Applications of other TSPs are anticipated.

  9. 78 FR 23311 - Sunshine Act Meeting of the National Museum and Library Services Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-18

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Institute of Museum and Library Services Sunshine Act Meeting of the National Museum and Library Services Board AGENCY: Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), NFAH. ACTION: Notice of Meeting. SUMMARY: The National Museum and Library Services Board, which advises the Director of...

  10. 45 CFR 1180.70 - Guidelines and standards for museum conservation projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...) NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES INSTITUTE OF MUSEUM AND LIBRARY SERVICES GRANTS REGULATIONS Museum Conservation Program § 1180.70 Guidelines and standards for museum conservation projects... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Guidelines and standards for museum conservation...

  11. 45 CFR 1180.4 - Museum eligibility and burden of proof-Who may apply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES INSTITUTE OF MUSEUM AND LIBRARY SERVICES GRANTS REGULATIONS Definitions and Eligibility § 1180.4 Museum eligibility and burden of proof—Who may apply. (a) A museum... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Museum eligibility and burden of proof-Who may...

  12. 77 FR 68851 - Sunshine Act Meeting of the National Museum and Library Services Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-16

    ... NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Institute of Museum and Library Services Sunshine Act Meeting of the National Museum and Library Services Board AGENCY: Institute of Museum and... the forthcoming meeting of the National Museum and Library Services Board. This notice also describes...

  13. 78 FR 9945 - Sunshine Act Meeting of the National Museum and Library Services Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-12

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Institute of Museum and Library Services Sunshine Act Meeting of the National Museum and Library Services Board AGENCY: Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), NFAH. ACTION: Notice of Meeting. SUMMARY: The National Museum and Library Services Board, which advises the Director of...

  14. Learning Museum: A Meeting Place for Pre-Service Teachers and Museums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seligmann, Tine

    2014-01-01

    Learning Museum 2011-13 is a nationwide multidisciplinary collaboration project involving 26 Danish museums (art, cultural and natural history) along with 13 colleges of education. The project has provided a large group of pre-service teachers with unique opportunities to participate in training courses, academic internships and bachelor's thesis…

  15. victoria cross awards warrants concerning the victoria cross (1920)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    INTRODUCTION. In the military history of both the British Empire and of the Western World, the highest British military decoration, namely the Victoria Cross, has attained con- siderable renown. The Victoria Cross was introduced in terms of the Royal Warrant of 29 January,. 1856 and by 1957 a total of 1346 had been ...

  16. Artfulness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chemi, Tatiana

    2011-01-01

    a collage of previously published materials on Artfulness, in this journal targeted teachers for dysfunctional behaviour children.......a collage of previously published materials on Artfulness, in this journal targeted teachers for dysfunctional behaviour children....

  17. Technology Museums in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Morten Karnøe

    2012-01-01

    This article presents an exhibit review of some of the major technology museums in Denmark. First comes an introduction to the Danish museum ”landscape”. Second a total of six museums and their technology focused exhibits are presented. Among the museums are the Fisheries and Maritime Museum...... in Esbjerg, housing one of the most impressive and representative exhibitions on the technology behind the strong Danish maritime sector. Another museum being mentioned is the Energy Museum, which covers the background for some of the major breakthroughs performed in Denmark within this area; particularly...... within wind power technology. Finally special attention is devoted to the Danish Technological Museum. A museum which is the oldest and most elaborate of all the technology museums. The museum covers virtually every technological breakthrough with any relevance in a Danish section, with a special focus...

  18. 76 FR 13097 - Institute of Museum and Library Services; Evaluation by Grantees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-10

    ... ARTS AND HUMANITIES 45 CFR Part 1180 Institute of Museum and Library Services; Evaluation by Grantees AGENCY: Institute of Museum and Library Services, National Foundation On the Arts and Humanities. ACTION... above. List of Subjects in 45 CFR Part 1180 Libraries, Museums, Administrative practice and procedure...

  19. Contemporary Danish book art

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Poul Steen

    the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Thomas J. Watson Library, Helge Ernst, illustrator, Poul Kristensen, printer, Ole Olsen, bookbinder, exhibition catalog......the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Thomas J. Watson Library, Helge Ernst, illustrator, Poul Kristensen, printer, Ole Olsen, bookbinder, exhibition catalog...

  20. Italy: An Open Air Museum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzorusso, Ann

    2016-04-01

    Imagine if you could see the River Styx, bathe in the Fountain of Youth, collect water which enhances fertility, wear a gem that heals bodily ailments, understand how our health is affected by geomagnetic fields, venture close to the flames of Hell on Earth and much, much, more. Know something? These things exist - on Earth - today - in Italy and you can visit them because Italy is an open air museum. Ann C. Pizzorusso, in her recent book, reveals how Italy's geology has affected its art, literature, architecture, religion, medicine and just about everything else. She explores the geologic birth of the land, describing the formation of the Alps and Apennines, romantic bays of Tuscany and Lazio, volcanoes of the south and Caribbean-like beaches of Puglia. But that's not all, from the first pages of this visually stunning book, the reader has the impression of being in an art museum, where one can wander from page to page to satisfy one's curiosity-- guided from time to time by the Etruscan priests, Virgil, Dante, Goethe or Leonardo da Vinci himself. Pizzorusso stitches together widely diverse topics - such as gemology, folk remedies, grottoes, painting, literature, physics and religion - using geology as a thread. Quoting everyone from Pliny the Elder to NASA physicist Friedemann Freund, the work is solidly backed scholarship that reads as easily as a summer novel. Wonderfully illustrated with many photos licensed from Italian museums, HRH Elizabeth II and the Ministero Beni Culturali the book highlights the best works in Italian museums and those outside in the "open air museums." This approach can be used in any other country in the world and can be used for cultural tourism (a tour following the book has been organized for cultural and university groups), an ideal way of linking museums to the surrounding landscape.

  1. Spanish Artistic Appreciation methodology in Japan : Learning own culture through Art. Going to Art Museum with kindergarten children. : A new methodology of Art teaching based on the Japanese concept of expression and the Spanish concept of appreciation.

    OpenAIRE

    Pastor Matamoros, Sofia; SUMI, Atsushi

    2017-01-01

    By the comparison of Japanese and Spanish Art Education, we found the Spanish model focused on the teaching of artistic appreciation, whereas the Japanese model is based on the children's expressive development. We support the idea of mixing both models as complementary and necessary methodological change for balance the actual visual education in its scope of instruction of the subject. For instance, through the importation of good school practices adapted to a new context, with a common ben...

  2. 78 FR 50102 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Rochester Museum & Science Center, Rochester, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-16

    ..., 1924, the Rochester Museum & Science Center (then Rochester Museum of Arts and Sciences) purchased the... on the box as an old style Tlingit design probably dating to the late 1700s. This documentary...

  3. Taking Up Space: Museum Exploration in the Twenty-First Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Tiffany

    2007-01-01

    Museums have become a crucible for questions of the role that traditional art and art history should play in contemporary art. Friedrich Nietzsche argued in the nineteenth century that museums can be no more than mausoleums for effete (fine) art. Over the course of the twentieth century, however, curators dispelled such blanket pessimism by…

  4. [The epilepsy of Guadalupe Victoria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Pérez-de-Celis, Enrique

    2008-01-01

    Guadalupe Victoria, the first President of Mexico, passed away in 1843 uictim of an ailment that, at the time, was diagnosed as epilepsy. The clinical data and the pathologic findings, however, suggest the possibility that Victoria had an underlying disease that was responsible for the seizures that affected him. In this article I propose that Guadalupe Victoria had in fact Chagas Disease, and that he was infected with this parasitic malady while he lived in the tropical jungles of Veracruz, in eastern Mexico. Even though there aren't many published works regarding seizures secondary to chronic Chagas Disease, there are good descriptions of epileptic syndromes in patients with this infection. At the same time, the cardiac findings in Victoria's autopsy support the idea that he had some kind of cardiac pathology; in this case Chagasic dilated cardiomyopathy, which ultimately led to his death.

  5. VICTORIA'S SECRET Prepares for Growth

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jordan K Speer

    2007-01-01

      After the upcoming holiday season, Victoria's Secret will take the first steps toward launching its e-commerce business on a cross-channel on-demand platform from partner n2N Commerce, a company...

  6. “It felt a little like being let into a secret–“ A community-influenced museum exhibition on Technical Art History

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wadum, Jørgen; Knap, Frederik; Haack Christensen, Anne

    2014-01-01

    with advice on how to target peer-to-peer education and communication activities aimed at young people. The team produced a dynamic exhibition that invited visitors to explore the conservators’ workshops and methods: Infrared reflectography, x-ray imaging, microanalysis, and dendrochronology were fused...... Netherlandish paintings from the 16th century. Instead of designing the exhibition based on our long experience as a national gallery, we collaborated with a group of twenty young volunteer art pilots from the Young People's Art Lab to design the show based on their interpretation and perception of the expert...... and the collaboration with the art pilots gave us a unique opportunity to target the museum’s younger visitors of ca.15-25 years old. The Young People's Art Lab is a laboratory for art interpretation and a social community for young people, set up by SMK. The art pilots are volunteers who provide the Gallery...

  7. The museum as heritage, the republic as memory:art and colleting in Belém do Pará (1890-1940

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldrin Moura de Figueiredo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article analyze the art collection of Museu de Arte de Belém as historical and cultural heritage of the city of Belém, State of Pará, Brazil. This collection also initiated in the Empire of Brazil, was strengthened during the early Republic as part of a political exercise that took the art and history as formative elements of nationality.

  8. The museum maze in oral pathology demystified-part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Shankargouda; Rao, Roopa S; Ganavi, B S

    2013-07-01

    Museum technologies provide a wide array of choice of museums to those who wish to exploit technology to attract, excite and ensure an unrivalled visitor experience, as well as capture and sustain share of mind and heart. Museum being a combination of both art and science requires skilled workmanship, meticulous planning and execution to exhibit a specimen to its optimal elegance due to its relatively smaller size and fragile nature. A well established oral pathology museum is rarely seen due to negligence of oral specimens, dearth of knowledge in this field and also available data on it. An insight on oral pathology museum, including its establishment, importance and advanced technologies to make it more simple and accessible are discussed in two parts. Part I emphasizes on basics in oral pathology museum, whereas part II highlights the specialized techniques and recent advances in museum technology. Our effort is to present this article as hands on experience for the pathologists, student population and the technicians.

  9. ARTS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahadevan, Shankar; Virk, Kashif M.; Madsen, Jan

    2007-01-01

    . We present an abstract system-level modelling and simulation framework (ARTS) which allows for cross-layer modelling and analysis covering the application layer, middleware layer, and hardware layer. ARTS allows MPSoC designers to explore and analyze the network performance under different traffic...... and load conditions, consequences of different task mappings to processors (software or hardware) including memory and power usage, and effects of RTOS selection, including scheduling, synchronization and resource allocation policies. We present the application and platform models of ARTS as well...... as their implementation in SystemC. We present the usage of the ARTS framework as seen from platform developers’ point of view, where new components may be created and integrated into the framework, and from application designers’ point of view, where existing components are used to explore possible implementations...

  10. The Ambiguity of Perception: Virtual Art Museology, Free-Choice Learning, and Children's Art Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Christine Susan

    2010-01-01

    With many art museums uploading web-based art activities for youngsters, an online phenomenon is burgeoning, and a research domain is emerging. In an effort to contribute empirical evidence to an area of educational research that I refer to as "virtual art museology," or the study of art museum's online art activities for young people, this…

  11. Communicating the Value of Cartoon Art across University Classrooms: Experiences from the Ohio State University Billy Ireland Cartoon Library and Museum

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGurk, Caitlin

    2016-01-01

    This article is an exploration of the varying applications of comics and cartoon art as primary resources and pedagogical tools within the university setting. Following some background information on cartoon art forms including early American newspaper comics, nineteenth century humor serials, political cartoons and manga, the article explores how…

  12. Communicative, information and education environment of modern museum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milovanov Konstantin Y.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The potential of the modern museum and ways of its use in modern educational practice are considered in the article. Great importance is given to the interpretation of the museum space in the context of its communicative and creative opportunities. The museum knowledge is perceived as the integration of many scientific directions: training, information, education, culture and history, art criticism through which a personality becomes familiar with new knowledge and moral values.

  13. The art of scent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenslund, Anette

    2017-01-01

    At the Museum of Art and Design in New York the The Art of Scent (1889–2012) exhibition announced its declared aim of bringing to the forefront of the arts what has long been considered the fallen angel of the senses: it would inscribe scent into fine art through a display characterised by its ex...

  14. Statistical Image Properties in Large Subsets of Traditional Art, Bad Art, and Abstract Art

    OpenAIRE

    Christoph Redies; Anselm Brachmann

    2017-01-01

    Several statistical image properties have been associated with large subsets of traditional visual artworks. Here, we investigate some of these properties in three categories of art that differ in artistic claim and prestige: (1) Traditional art of different cultural origin from established museums and art collections (oil paintings and graphic art of Western provenance, Islamic book illustration and Chinese paintings), (2) Bad Art from two museums that collect contemporary artworks of lesser...

  15. Unique post-doctoral positions in Master of Arts in Teaching Earth Science program at the American Museum of Natural History: Involving early-career research scientists in Earth science education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, K. E.; Nadeau, P. A.; Zirakparvar, N. A.; Grcevich, J.; Ustunisik, G. K.

    2012-12-01

    Post-doctoral positions in Earth science fields traditionally emphasize research within a university setting or research institute. Such positions may include a teaching component, but one which is often restricted to introductory undergraduate Earth science courses or upper-level courses within their own field of specialization. With such a specific focus, there may not be much inclination on the part of a post-doctoral fellow to involve themselves in broader education programs, such as public outreach or secondary schools. The American Museum of Natural History is now conducting a non-traditional post-doctoral position as part of its new Master of Arts in Teaching Earth Science (MAT). This pilot program involves forging a one-of-a-kind partnership between a world-class research museum and high-needs schools in New York City with the goal of addressing a critical shortage of qualified Earth Science teachers in New York State, particularly in high-needs schools with diverse populations. The program, which is part of the state's Race to the Top initiative, is approved by the NYS Board of Regents and will prepare a total of 50 candidates in two cohorts to earn a Board of Regents-awarded Masters of Arts in Teaching (MAT) degree with a specialization in Earth Science for grades 7-12. The post-doctoral fellows of the MAT program have unique 3-year positions, with more traditional research-based work comprising 65% of the tenure and non-traditional educational roles 35%. The MAT fellows are divided into two types: those with a teaching role, who are involved in the co-design and co-teaching of graduate-level Earth science courses; and those in a research/mentoring role, who design and teach a summer-long science research practicum while also providing informal support to MAT teaching candidates throughout the school year. Over the first year of the MAT program's implementation, fellows have been exposed to a range of activities outside the realm of a traditional post

  16. The British Museum: An Imperial Museum in a Post-Imperial World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Duthie

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the British Museum’s imperialist attitudes towards classical heritage. Despite considerable pressure from foreign governments, the museum has consistently refused to return art and antiquities that it acquired under the aegis of empire. It is the contention of this article that the British Museum remains an imperialist institution. The current debates over the British Museum’s collections raise profound questions about the relationship between museums and modern nation states and their nationalist claims to ancient heritage. The museum’s inflexible response to repatriation claims also encapsulates the challenges inherent in presenting empire and its legacy to contemporary, post-imperial audiences.

  17. 76 FR 10916 - Sunshine Act Meeting of the National Museum and Library Services Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-28

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Sunshine Act Meeting of the National Museum and Library Services Board AGENCY: Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), NFAH. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: This notice sets forth the agenda of the forthcoming meeting of the National Museum and Library Services Board. This...

  18. 77 FR 24741 - Sunshine Act Meeting; National Museum and Library Services Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-25

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Sunshine Act Meeting; National Museum and Library Services Board AGENCY: Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), NFAH. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: This notice sets forth the agenda of the forthcoming meeting of the National Museum and Library Services Board. This...

  19. 78 FR 34920 - Technical Amendments To Reflect the Authorizing Legislation of the Institute of Museum and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-11

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Institute of Museum and Library Services 45 CFR Part 1180 RIN 3137-AA21 Technical Amendments To Reflect the Authorizing Legislation of the Institute of Museum and Library Services AGENCY: Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), NFAH. ACTION: Technical amendment; final rule...

  20. 76 FR 71080 - Notice of Proposed Information Collection Requests: Let's Move Museums, Let's Move Gardens

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-16

    ... Move Gardens AGENCY: Institute of Museum and Library Services, National Foundation for the Arts and the... Museum and Library Services, 1800 M Street NW., 9th Floor, Washington, DC 20036. Telephone: (202) 653...) 653-4614. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background The Institute of Museum and Library Services is the...

  1. The works of Bologna’s Institution of Artistic Exhibitions (Ente Bolognese Manifestazioni Artistiche rediscovered in the archives of the Museum of Modern Art, in Bologna.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grazia Maria Restuccia

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to reconstruct and investigate the work done by the Ente Bolognese Manifestazioni Artistiche. Its activity, from 1964 to 1993, has proven to enhance the art history of the territory, with a view to framing national and international level.

  2. Carnegie Mellon's STUDIO for Creative Inquiry [and] The Interdisciplinary Teaching Network (ITeN) [and] Interactive Fiction [and] The Networked Virtual Art Museum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Lynn; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Explains the STUDIO for Creative Inquiry, an interdisciplinary center at Carnegie Mellon University that supports experimental activities in the arts, and its Interdisciplinary Teaching Network. Three STUDIO projects are described: the Ancient Egypt Prototype application of the network; an interactive fiction system based on artificial…

  3. The Loupe: tangible augmented reality for learning to look at Ancient Greek art

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damala, A.; Hornecker, E.; van der Vaart, M.; van Dijk, D.; Ruthven, I.

    2016-01-01

    With the advent of digital museum interactives as a widely available learning offer in all types of museums,including history of art and archaeology museums, an ongoing debate has been established: Do these - usually screen-based - museum interactives assist visitors in focusing on museum objects

  4. The exhibition for sale. The Austrian Museum for Art and Industry between nationalistic exploitation and self-perception as an educational institution during the Austrofascist era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria-Luise Feher

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The presented case study offers an outline of Vienna’s museum of applied arts’ history during the transitional phase from Austria’s First Republic to the authoritarian regime of Austrofascism. It covers if and to which degree external factors like political ideologies were infl uencing the institution’s exhibition policies. Especially under the intense scrutiny of the ruling regime any proactive undertaking on the part of any museum’s director holdsspecial importance. Even more so as in this case Richard Ernst, the acting director, held this post from 1932 to 1950, thereby allowing the assessment of his policies throughout several changes of government. The study suggests that the modernisation of the exhibition space that took place under his leadership is connected to an overall repositioning as a scientific institution in opposition (or at least complementation to the museum’s previous function as a promotional platform for Austrian businesses at home and abroad. Il caso di studio presenta uno spaccato della storia del Museo di Storia delle Arti Applicate di Vienna durante la transizione dall’Austria della Prima Repubblica all’affermazione del regime autoritario dell’Austrofascismo. Intende dimostrare se e in quale misura fattori esterni come le ideologie abbiano infl uenzato le politiche espositive dell’istituzione. Specialmente sotto l’intenso controllo del regime ogni attività proattiva dei direttori museali assume particolare importanza, come si evince dal caso di Richard Ernst, direttore in carica dal 1932 al 1950, che permette di effettuare una valutazione delle scelte da lui effettuate nel corso di dei diversi cambi di governo. Lo studio dimostra che la modernizzazione dello spazio espositivo, che ebbe luogo sotto la sua direzione, è connessa a una risistemazione globale del museo come istituzione scientifi ca, in opposizione (o almeno come completamento alla precedente funzione intesa come strumento di

  5. Special Issue on Lake Victoria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The diversity of benthic mollusks of Lake Victoria and Lake Burigi · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. JA Mwambungu, 21-32. http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/tjs.v30i1.18384 ...

  6. Rancang Bangun Aplikasi Augmented Reality Museum Bali Berbasis Android Studi Kasus Gedung Karangasem dan Gedung Tabanan

    OpenAIRE

    I Gede Aditya Nugraha; I Ketut Gede Darma Putra; I Made Sukarsa

    2016-01-01

    Museum Bali is one of the museum which is located in Denpasar City that established since 1910. The Museum collections consist of items such as living equipment, art, religion, handwriting, and other things that show the situation and the development of the Balinese culture. Augmented Reality is a technology which combines two-dimensional virtual objects or three-dimensional virtual objects into the real environment. Museum Bali has decreased the amount of visitors in recent years and require...

  7. Nonprint Sources About Museums: A Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucker, Barbara Fleisher

    This annotated bibliography provides a listing of 146 films, videotapes, filmstrips, slides, audiotapes, records, and kits that can be used with audiences of all ages and backgrounds who are interested in museum history, projects, and services. Its contents range from discussions on works of art to an examination of zoological collections. Each…

  8. Prague: The City Is the Museum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meilach, Dona Z.

    2001-01-01

    States that Prague, the capital of the Czech-Republic, is a virtual art museum because of the number of architectural styles and other artworks throughout the city. Explores the various architectural styles that are present in the city from the Gothic monasteries and churches to examples of contemporary styles. (CMK)

  9. Understanding the Inarticulateness of Museum Visitors' Experience ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper is based on a study of museum visitors' experience of paintings: in particular, the experience of adult non-art specialists. Phenomenology, a form of inquiry that seeks to articulate lived experience, provided the philosophical and methodological framework for the study. Descriptions and themes relating to the ...

  10. Recommendations based on semantically enriched museum collections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. Wang (Yanjing); N. Stash; L. Aroyo; P. Gorgels; L. Rutledge (Lloyd); G. Schreiber

    2008-01-01

    htmlabstractThis article presents the CHIP demonstrator1 for providing personalized access to digital museum collections. It consists of three main components: Art Recommender, Tour Wizard, and Mobile Tour Guide. Based on the semantically enriched Rijksmuseum Amsterdam2 collection, we show how

  11. Creative Inspiration for Preschoolers from Museums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rönkkö, Marja-Leena; Aerila, Juli-Anna; Grönman, Satu

    2016-01-01

    This research explores the learning outcomes of preschool children produced through visits to an historic house museum environment. The new Finnish preschool curriculum identifies the importance of arts-based approaches for children and that these approaches should be closely aligned to experiential and holistic education. The aim of the research…

  12. Det medialiserede museum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudloff, Maja

    2013-01-01

    Over the past two decades, digital technologies have gained a greater and more important role in communication and dissemination of knowledge by museums. This article argues that the digitization of museum communication can be viewed as a result of a mediatization process that is connected...... possibilities for action they facilitate for their users, contribute to a transformation of the museum as an institution. It is concluded that the relationship between museum, collection, and users has undergone a number of changes caused by the intervention of the media and that the traditional social act...... of museum visiting has been transformed and somewhat adapted to new media-created forms of communication and action. From a more general perspective, the article may be regarded as a contribution to a continuous discussion of the role museums must play in a mediatized society....

  13. Professional Organizations and the Professionalizing of Practice: The Role of MER, EdCom, and the NAEA Museum Education Division, 1969-2002

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kai-Kee, Elliott

    2012-01-01

    The establishment of the Museum Education Roundtable (MER) in 1969, the formation of the Committee on Education of the American Association of Museums (AAM) in 1973, and the creation of the Museum Education Division of the National Art Education Association (NAEA) in 1981 all represent milestones in the professionalization of museum education…

  14. The Victoria Project, Sri Lanka. Hydrological analysis for Victoria Dam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piper, B.S. [GU Projects (United Kingdom); Sutcliffe, J.V. [Gibb (Sir Alexander) and Partners (United Kingdom); Parks, Y.P. [Institute of Hydrology (United Kingdom)

    1994-03-01

    The hydrological analyses described in this paper formed an important part of the studies for the Victoria Project of which the Victoria Dam is the major component. The purpose of the hydrological studies was to provide consistent sets of river flow and climate data at the sites of the major components of the project, and to provide flood estimates for sizing the spillway and river diversion works. This paper outlines the approach used in the overall study, and then concentrates on aspects of specific relevance to the Victoria Dam. The main hydrological characteristics of the upper Mahaweli basin are presented as an introduction to the overall water balance; the humid climate made the appraisal of flow records relatively simple. Time series modelling was used to fill gaps in the observed flow records used for reservoir operation studies. The spillway design flood was based on the probable maximum precipitation (PMP) derived by maximizing a historic storm in which rainfall approaching the PMP covered most of the basin. Construction floods of moderate return period were estimated from a dimensionless analysis of regional flood records. The main lessons to be drawn are that water balance methods are of particular value in these humid monsoon conditions, while the ratio of the PMP to the maximum recorded storm is lower than would be the case in more arid regions. (author)

  15. Statistical Image Properties in Large Subsets of Traditional Art, Bad Art, and Abstract Art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Redies

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Several statistical image properties have been associated with large subsets of traditional visual artworks. Here, we investigate some of these properties in three categories of art that differ in artistic claim and prestige: (1 Traditional art of different cultural origin from established museums and art collections (oil paintings and graphic art of Western provenance, Islamic book illustration and Chinese paintings, (2 Bad Art from two museums that collect contemporary artworks of lesser importance (© Museum Of Bad Art [MOBA], Somerville, and Official Bad Art Museum of Art [OBAMA], Seattle, and (3 twentieth century abstract art of Western provenance from two prestigious museums (Tate Gallery and Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen. We measured the following four statistical image properties: the fractal dimension (a measure relating to subjective complexity; self-similarity (a measure of how much the sections of an image resemble the image as a whole, 1st-order entropy of edge orientations (a measure of how uniformly different orientations are represented in an image; and 2nd-order entropy of edge orientations (a measure of how independent edge orientations are across an image. As shown previously, traditional artworks of different styles share similar values for these measures. The values for Bad Art and twentieth century abstract art show a considerable overlap with those of traditional art, but we also identified numerous examples of Bad Art and abstract art that deviate from traditional art. By measuring statistical image properties, we quantify such differences in image composition for the first time.

  16. Statistical Image Properties in Large Subsets of Traditional Art, Bad Art, and Abstract Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redies, Christoph; Brachmann, Anselm

    2017-01-01

    Several statistical image properties have been associated with large subsets of traditional visual artworks. Here, we investigate some of these properties in three categories of art that differ in artistic claim and prestige: (1) Traditional art of different cultural origin from established museums and art collections (oil paintings and graphic art of Western provenance, Islamic book illustration and Chinese paintings), (2) Bad Art from two museums that collect contemporary artworks of lesser importance (© Museum Of Bad Art [MOBA], Somerville, and Official Bad Art Museum of Art [OBAMA], Seattle), and (3) twentieth century abstract art of Western provenance from two prestigious museums (Tate Gallery and Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen). We measured the following four statistical image properties: the fractal dimension (a measure relating to subjective complexity); self-similarity (a measure of how much the sections of an image resemble the image as a whole), 1st-order entropy of edge orientations (a measure of how uniformly different orientations are represented in an image); and 2nd-order entropy of edge orientations (a measure of how independent edge orientations are across an image). As shown previously, traditional artworks of different styles share similar values for these measures. The values for Bad Art and twentieth century abstract art show a considerable overlap with those of traditional art, but we also identified numerous examples of Bad Art and abstract art that deviate from traditional art. By measuring statistical image properties, we quantify such differences in image composition for the first time. PMID:29118692

  17. Statistical Image Properties in Large Subsets of Traditional Art, Bad Art, and Abstract Art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redies, Christoph; Brachmann, Anselm

    2017-01-01

    Several statistical image properties have been associated with large subsets of traditional visual artworks. Here, we investigate some of these properties in three categories of art that differ in artistic claim and prestige: (1) Traditional art of different cultural origin from established museums and art collections (oil paintings and graphic art of Western provenance, Islamic book illustration and Chinese paintings), (2) Bad Art from two museums that collect contemporary artworks of lesser importance (© Museum Of Bad Art [MOBA], Somerville, and Official Bad Art Museum of Art [OBAMA], Seattle), and (3) twentieth century abstract art of Western provenance from two prestigious museums (Tate Gallery and Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen). We measured the following four statistical image properties: the fractal dimension (a measure relating to subjective complexity); self-similarity (a measure of how much the sections of an image resemble the image as a whole), 1st-order entropy of edge orientations (a measure of how uniformly different orientations are represented in an image); and 2nd-order entropy of edge orientations (a measure of how independent edge orientations are across an image). As shown previously, traditional artworks of different styles share similar values for these measures. The values for Bad Art and twentieth century abstract art show a considerable overlap with those of traditional art, but we also identified numerous examples of Bad Art and abstract art that deviate from traditional art. By measuring statistical image properties, we quantify such differences in image composition for the first time.

  18. Pièces liturgiques médiévales moldaves – objets d’art au musée du Monastère de Putna / Moldavian Medieval Liturgical Pieces – Art Objects at the Museum of Putna Monastery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilian Adrian Gavrilean

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Located at 72 km from Suceava Fortress, Putna Monastery Church (1466-1469 dedicated to the,,Assumption of the Virgin” is the first and most important foundation of Stephen the Great and the Saint (1457-1504, built as a princely necropolis. Built in the Moldavian style, with Byzantine, Gothic and Renaissance architectural elements, purpose of this foundations was first of all liturgical, to celebrate The Seven Daily Prayers unto God by the hierarchy church (bishops, priests, deacons, in the center of which is until today the most important mystery of the Christianity - the Eucharist. But the Monastery of Putna was not just a spiritual center of Moldavian Christianity, it was one of the most important centers of medieval art and culture from the Romanian Principalities, here there are significant workshops for embroidery and iconography and a famous school of calligraphers and miniaturists. Most of the objects made here were destined of the religious cult of the monastery as well as Prince donations made of orthodox monasteries. As time passes many of liturgical objects from the altar of Putna have been deposited in the Thesaurus Tower (1481 and then exposed to the general public in the monastery museum which was inaugurated in 1976. Refurbished in 2004, the Putna Monastery Museum, located in the west section of the precinct is perhaps the most rich and valuable in the country, with many objects of the time Stephen the Great and from the period his direct descendants. Here are part of artistic and historical treasure of the monastery, consisting of the manuscripts (Tetraevanghelii, Psalter, educational books, Leastviţe, Psaltichii and embroidery made in the monastery workshops (epitaphs, coverings for holy vessels, procovete, dvere, waves of temples, tombs coverings, priestly vestments, religious books, religious objects (sacred vessels, crosses, icons, censers, candles, ceramics, etc. Spiritual value of liturgical of the objects the Putna

  19. Museums: Treasures or Tools?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Kenneth

    Since World War II, European museums have abandoned their laissez-faire policy and design, and have decided to actively teach or guide visitors' learning. The position of museum educator has been created to place objects in their scientific, social, or historical context, and to help members of the public to extract the maximum meaning from these…

  20. Are Museum "Educators" Necessary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Kenneth

    1993-01-01

    Contends that there has been a movement in Europe away from the concept of didactic or teaching museums to include emotional and intellectual appeals to patrons. Concludes that long-term research is necessary to determine whether people who visit museums as students continue to do so as adults. (CFR)

  1. Museum Insel Hombroich

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiesner, Thomas

    1997-01-01

    Detailed review of all buildings and landscape of Museum Insel Hombroich , near Neuss, Germany. Special emphasis on Light and Body space morphologies;......Detailed review of all buildings and landscape of Museum Insel Hombroich , near Neuss, Germany. Special emphasis on Light and Body space morphologies;...

  2. "Not a Museum Town"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ounanian, Kristen

    ) articulation of quaintness bridge the theoretical and the empirical in this paper. Empirical material from three Danish cases connects the authenticity discourse to a recurring turn of phrase used by respondents, the ‘museum town.’ A‘museum town’ epitomized a place absent of life. In this manner being...

  3. Ten years of Integrated Pest Management (IPM at the Kunsthistorisches Museum in Wien

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal Querner

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The Kunsthistorisches Museum Wien is one of the largest fine arts collections worldwide, comprising the Kunsthistorisches Museum, the Austrian Theater Museum, the Museum of Ethnology, all placed in Vienna, and Schloß Ambras in Tirol. We present results from up to 10 years of insect pest monitoring in different collections and the implementation of an Integrated Pest Management (IPM concept. The Kunsthistorisches Museum was the first museum in Vienna to introduce such a concept. We also present specific insect pest problems such as a biscuit beetle (Stegobium paniceum infestation of paintings lined with starch paste backings (linings or the webbing clothes moth (Tineola bisselliella infestation at the Museum of Carriages, both repeatedly occurring problems in the museum. With the help of the insect pest monitoring programs, these and other problems were found and the infested objects treated, usually with anoxia (nitrogen.

  4. Expansion of museums in Central Europe?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagodzińska, Katarzyna

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents reflections on the specificity of collections and museums of contemporary art in Central Europe and considers a possibility of creating a regional alternative for the West. The analysis is conducted in the context of the expansionist policy of contemporary museums – notably the Louvre, the Guggenheim Foundation, and the Hermitage – whose numerous new development projects gave rise to a number of dilemmas in the museological world. The author discusses global "museum brands" that invest in Central Europe and addresses the possible profits of the expansion of such "concerns" for culture in the region, as well as emphasises the potential of the region itself, which may be used for its development without the avail of the internationally renowned collectors' names.

  5. Knight at the Museum: Learning History with Museums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Alan S.; Levine, Thomas H.

    2011-01-01

    This article presents an approach that teachers can use to strengthen students' ability to make sense of the past at museums. Specifically, we propose a photography exercise to help students to learn from museums and to view museums critically, weighing both the objective realities and subjective interpretations offered by museums. To get the most…

  6. Museum security and the Thomas Crown Affair.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michaud, E. C. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2010-01-01

    Over the years, I've daydreamed about stealing a Vermeer, a Picasso, or Rembrandt. It tickles me, as much as watching the reboot of The Thomas Crown Affair. Why is it, do you suppose, so much fun to think about stealing a world renowned piece off the wall of a major metropolitan museum? Is it the romantic thoughts of getting away with it, walking past infrared detectors, and pressure sensors ala Indiana Jones with the sack of sand to remove the idol without triggering the security system? Is it the idea of snatching items with such fantastic prices, where the romance of possessing an item of such value is less intoxicating than selling it to a private collector for it to never be seen again? I suspect others share my daydreams as they watch theater or hear of a brazen daylight heist at museums around the world, or from private collections. Though when reality sets in, the mind of the security professional kicks in. How could one do it, why would one do it, what should you do once it's done? The main issue a thief confronts when acquiring unique goods is how to process or fence them. They become very difficult to sell because they are one-of-a-kind, easy to identify, and could lead to the people involved with the theft. The whole issue of museum security takes up an ironic twist when one considers the secretive British street artist 'Banksy'. Banksy has made a name for himself by brazenly putting up interesting pieces of art in broad daylight (though many critics don't consider his work to be art) on building walls, rooftops, or even museums. I bring him up for a interesting take on what may become a trend in museum security. In March of 2005, Banksy snuck a piece of his called 'Vandalized Oil Painting' into the Brooklyn Museum's Great Historical Painting Wing, plus 3 other pieces into major museums in New York. Within several days, 2 paintings had been torn down, but 2 stayed up much longer. In his home country of the UK, a

  7. Digital Copies and Digital Museums in a Digital Cultural Policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ole Marius Hylland

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates how a digital turn and digital copies have influenced ideas, roles and authorities within a national museum sector. It asks whether digital mu-seums and their digital reproductions expand and/or challenge a traditional cul-tural policy. Two specific cases are highlighted to inform the discussion on these questions - the Norwegian digital museum platform DigitaltMuseum and Google Art Project. The article argues that there is a certain epochalism at play when the impact of a digital turn is analysed. At the same time, some clear major changes are taking place, even if their impact on cultural policies might be less than expec-ted. I propose that one of the changes is the replacing of authenticity with accessi-bility as the primary legitimating value of museum objects.

  8. Discover the Magic of Museums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    NHSA Journal, 1996

    1996-01-01

    Notes that museums are excellent resources that provide wonderful and exciting learning opportunities for children. Provides a definition for museums and describes different kinds of activities that take place in a museum. Provides tips on finding community museum resources, and suggestions for before- and after-visit discussions for young…

  9. Museums teach evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamond, Judy; Evans, E Margaret

    2007-06-01

    Natural history museums play a significant role in educating the general public about evolution. This article describes Explore Evolution, one of the largest evolution education projects funded by the National Science Foundation. A group of regional museums from the Midwestern United States worked with leading evolutionary scientists to create multiple permanent exhibit galleries and a curriculum book for youth. This program invites the public to experience current evolutionary research on organisms that range in size from HIV to whales. Learning research is being conducted on museum visitors to understand how they reason about evolution and to determine what influences the process of conceptual change.

  10. Gombrich, Art and Psychoanalysis

    OpenAIRE

    Stefano Ferrari

    2014-01-01

    Ernst H. Gombrich has always shown particular attention to the psychology of art as psychology of representation (and enjoyment) of art. In addition, through his friendship with Ernst Kris, who had been a respected art historian in the staff of the Kunsthisthoriches Museum in Vienna before becoming an important psychoanalyst, Gombrich devoted some fundamental essays on the contribution of psychoanalysis to the study of art.The main novelty and the most original feature of his contribution to ...

  11. The effects of the Dutch museum pass on museum visits and museum revenues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Werff, S.; Koopmans, C.; Boyer, C.

    2014-01-01

    The Dutch museum pass gives unlimited access for a year to most major Dutch museums and around the half of all Dutch museums for a fixed fee. The fee revenues are distributed among participating museums in proportion to the amount of visits by pass holders and their ticket prices. In this paper, it

  12. Museums of Poland: ways of exploiting the National Heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Violeta Tipa

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Thanks to the fellowship Thesaurus Poloniae provided by the Ministry of Culture and Heritage of Poland and the International Cultural Centre Krakow I was able to visit a number of museums in the cities of Warsaw, Krakow, Lodz, and Poznan. The innovative method of using audiovisual media has especially attracted my attention. Visiting Polish museums, I concluded that the country's history, its past hasn't remained in archives, in documents hidden from the public eye and accessible only to specialists in the field. By possibilities of museums upgraded the past comes alive as a page in the life of Poles. The national heritage, studied and carefully preserved, is passed on to the younger generation through the most advanced methods. Today, digital techniques increasingly penetrate into all spheres of art and culture. Museums also look for non-trivial ways to demonstrate the most valuable objects from their collections through the latest information methods. The use of audiovisual media in various forms is an ideal opportunity to immerse visitors in the distant past, help them survive dramatic historical events in a dynamic, penetrate the spirit of patriotism. The screen (monitor has become a traditional element in Polish museums and exhibition halls equipped with touch screens allowing guests to browse and receive a variety of available information in international communication languages (English, French, German and, of course, Polish. On the screens placed in the exhibition halls, documents are displayed non-stop either completely or in fragments, a visual picture sends visitors to real museum exhibits. Museums opened after 2000 are equipped with cinema halls (National Museum, The Warsaw Rising Museum and POLIN Museum, Rynek Underground Museum and Oscar Schindler’s Enamel Factory in Krakowб etc., some of them are equipped for films in 3D, with panoramic projection. Expressive audiovisual entourage is created by playing light and shadow

  13. Projecting the future levels of Lake Victoria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderkelen, Inne; van Lipzig, Nicole; Thiery, Wim

    2017-04-01

    Lake Victoria directly sustains 30 million people living in its basin and 200 000 fishermen operating from its shores. As the one of the two sources of the Nile River, it also supports natural resources that impact the livelihood of over 300 million people living in the Nile basin. The outlet to the Nile is controlled by two hydropower dams. The water balance of Lake Victoria is controlled both by climatic conditions (precipitation and evaporation) and human management (dam outflow). Future climate simulations with a high resolution coupled lake-land-atmosphere model project decreasing mean precipitation and increasing evaporation over Lake Victoria. As these two are important factors in the water balance of Lake Victoria, these projected changes may induce a drop in future levels of Lake Victoria. Moreover, as Lake Victoria is also a relatively shallow lake, lake surface area may decrease as well. Here we present a water balance model for Lake Victoria that provides lake level and extent as output. We first force our model with observational input (new satellite products providing high quality precipitation and evaporation data) and evaluate it using measured lake levels. The skill of the model is subsequently assessed by forcing it with present-day regional climate simulations (CORDEX evaluation simulations). In a third step the future lake levels and surface area changes of Lake Victoria are simulated by forcing the model with CORDEX projections under RCP4.5 and 8.5. Finally, the role of human decisions regarding future dam outflow are investigated.

  14. Virtual museum of Japanese Buddhist temple features for intercultural communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Takashi; Takao, Hidenobu; Inoue, Tetsuri; Miyamoto, Hiroyuki; Noro, Kageyu

    1998-04-01

    This paper describes the production and presentation of an experimental virtual museum of Japanese Buddhist art. This medium can provide an easy way to introduce a cultural heritage to people of different cultures. The virtual museum consisted of a multimedia program that included stereoscopic 3D movies of Buddhist statues; binaural 3D sounds of Buddhist ceremonies and the fragrance of incense from the Buddhist temple. The aim was to reproduce both the Buddhist artifacts and atmosphere as realistically as possible.

  15. Facing Sound - Voicing Art

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lønstrup, Ansa

    2013-01-01

    This article is based on examples of contemporary audiovisual art, with a special focus on the Tony Oursler exhibition Face to Face at Aarhus Art Museum ARoS in Denmark in March-July 2012. My investigation involves a combination of qualitative interviews with visitors, observations of the audience......´s interactions with the exhibition and the artwork in the museum space and short analyses of individual works of art based on reception aesthetics and phenomenology and inspired by newer writings on sound, voice and listening....

  16. Book reviews: About the art of conveying art!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thurid Vold

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Three books about the art of convey art are reviewed: Formidling av kunst til barn og unge (Dissemination of art to children and young people by Arne Marius Samuelsen, Dialogbasert Undervisning. Kunstmuseet som læringsrom (Dialog Based Teaching. The Art museum as learning space by Olga Dysthe, Nana Bernhardt and Line Enskjønn, and Kunsten å formidle (The Art to convey by Alfred Oftedal Telhaug. The reviewer writes that all three books are great contributions to the literature on art mediation and are indispensable for all who teach children and youth in schools and museums. The books should have a prominent place on the bibliography for teacher students in Art and Crafts, Primary and Secondary Teacher Education and Early Childhood Education and for museum educators.

  17. Monitoring Of Pollutants In Museum Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Ana-Maria Budu; Ion Sandu

    2015-01-01

    Art works are affected by environmental factors as light, temperature, humidity. Air pollutants are also implicated in their degradation. The pollution in museums has two sources: the air from outside, which brings usually dust and inorganic particles, and the inside sources – the materials used for casings (sealants, textiles placed on the display cases, varnishes, wood) that emanate organic compounds. The dust is composed of particles with a diameter of approximately 2µm or higher, which co...

  18. Smart SfM: Salinas Archaeological Museum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inzerillo, L.

    2017-08-01

    In these last years, there has been an increasing use of the Structure from Motion (SfM) techniques applied to Cultural Heritage. The accessibility of SfM software can be especially advantageous to users in non-technical fields or to those with limited resources. Thanks to SfM using, everyone can make with a digital camera a 3D model applied to an object of both Cultural Heritage, and physically Environment, and work arts, etc. One very interesting and useful application can be envisioned into museum collection digitalization. In the last years, a social experiment has been conducted involving young generation to live a social museum using their own camera to take pictures and videos. Students of university of Catania and Palermo were involved into a national event #digitalinvasion (2015-2016 editions) offering their personal contribution: they realized 3D models of the museums collection through the SfM techniques. In particular at the National Archaeological Museum Salinas in Palermo, it has been conducted an organized survey to recognize the most important part of the archaeological collection. It was a success: in both #digitalinvasion National Event 2015 and 2016 the young students of Engineering classes carried out, with Photoscan Agisoft, more than one hundred 3D models some of which realized by phone camera and some other by reflex camera and some other with compact camera too. The director of the museum has been very impressed from these results and now we are going to collaborate at a National project to use the young generation crowdsourcing to realize a semi-automated monitoring system at Salinas Archaeological Museum.

  19. SMART SfM: SALINAS ARCHAEOLOGICAL MUSEUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Inzerillo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In these last years, there has been an increasing use of the Structure from Motion (SfM techniques applied to Cultural Heritage. The accessibility of SfM software can be especially advantageous to users in non-technical fields or to those with limited resources. Thanks to SfM using, everyone can make with a digital camera a 3D model applied to an object of both Cultural Heritage, and physically Environment, and work arts, etc. One very interesting and useful application can be envisioned into museum collection digitalization. In the last years, a social experiment has been conducted involving young generation to live a social museum using their own camera to take pictures and videos. Students of university of Catania and Palermo were involved into a national event #digitalinvasion (2015-2016 editions offering their personal contribution: they realized 3D models of the museums collection through the SfM techniques. In particular at the National Archaeological Museum Salinas in Palermo, it has been conducted an organized survey to recognize the most important part of the archaeological collection. It was a success: in both #digitalinvasion National Event 2015 and 2016 the young students of Engineering classes carried out, with Photoscan Agisoft, more than one hundred 3D models some of which realized by phone camera and some other by reflex camera and some other with compact camera too. The director of the museum has been very impressed from these results and now we are going to collaborate at a National project to use the young generation crowdsourcing to realize a semi-automated monitoring system at Salinas Archaeological Museum.

  20. Teaching science in museums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Lynn Uyen

    Museums are free-choice, non-threatening, non-evaluative learning and teaching environments. They enable learners to revisit contents, authentic objects, and experiences at their own leisure as they continually build an understanding and appreciation of the concepts. Schools in America have used museums as resources to supplement their curriculum since the 19 th century. Field trip research is predominantly from the teachers' and students' perspectives, and draws attention to the importance for classroom teachers and students to prepare prior to field trips, have tasks, goals, and objectives during their time at the museum, and follow up afterwards. Meanwhile, museum educators' contributions to field trip experiences have been scantily addressed. These educators develop and implement programs intended to help students' explore science concepts and make sense of their experiences, and despite their limited time with students, studies show they can be memorable. First, field trips are a break in the usual routine, and thus have curiosity and attention attracting power. Second, classroom science teaching literature suggests teachers' teaching knowledge and goals can affect their behaviors, and in turn influence student learning. Third, classroom teachers are novices at planning and implementing field trip planners, and museum educators can share this responsibility. But little is reported on how the educators teach, what guides their instruction, how classroom teachers use these lessons, and what is gained from these lessons. This study investigates two of these inquiries. The following research questions guided this investigation. (1) How do educators teaching one-hour, one-time lessons in museums adapt their instruction to the students that they teach? (2) How do time limitations affect instruction? (3) How does perceived variability in entering student knowledge affect instruction? Four educators from two museums took part in this participant observation study to

  1. Digital Museum Collections and Social Media: Ethical Considerations of Ownership and Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalliopi Fouseki

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the role of digital collections and digital information in the democratisation process of museums. The paper focuses on ethical and ownership issues regarding Wikipedia’s online encyclopaedia initiative to widen access to digital images and knowledge through digital media, for the wider public. The paper draws on three cases of national museums in the UK, namely the Victoria and Albert Museum, the British Museum and the National Portrait Gallery. The paper argues that notions of governmentality, power, authority, and control - which traditionally characterise national museums - are still dominant in digital collections. This occasionally results in tensions that revolve around the issue of ownership of digital images and digital museum objects as well as their commercial and non-commercial uses. The paper shows that recent disputes and discourse related to the use of digital images by Wikipedians (active users of Wikipedia have raised issues of authority and control not only of physical objects but also of the information and knowledge related to these objects. The paper demonstrates that the level of collaboration with Wikipedia reflects to some extent the participatory nature, philosophy, and ideology of each museum institution.

  2. The low-energy museum. Collection Brandhorst, Munich; Das Niedrigenergiemuseum. Sammlung Brandhorst, Muenchen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brensing, Christian [CBE-enterprises, Berlin (Germany)

    2010-01-15

    The Federal Republic of Germany internationally belongs to the countries with the highest rate of new buildings of museums. During the 1980ies, a regular boom in the building of museums began. Due to the collections and foundations of private patrons, new art treasures are made accessible to the public every year. The perfect image of such a generous gift to the city Munich is the museum Brandhorst which solemnly was opened in May 2009 after a construction period of three years.

  3. Una victoria pírrica en el México posrevolucionario: los finqueros alemanes, las escuelas Artículo 123 y la formación del Estado en la costa de Chiapas, 1934-1942

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewis, Stephen E.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Article 123 of Mexico’s 1917 Constitution stipulated that landowners bore the responsibility of educating the school-aged children of their workers. In 1934, the Ministry of Public Education endorsed socialist education, which required Article 123 teachers to promote agrarian and labor reforms on Chiapas’s coffee plantations. The planters, many of whom were of German origin, successfully undermined the Article 123 schools but were targeted first by the Cardenista agrarian reform of 1939 and later by the seizure of their properties during World War II. In other words, they won their battle against the SEP but ultimately lost the war to the emerging Mexican nation-state.

    Según el Artículo 123 de la Constitución de 1917, los propietarios mexicanos estaban obligados a pagar la educación de los hijos de sus trabajadores. En 1934, la adopción de la educación socialista por parte de la Secretaría de Educación Pública comprometió a los maestros a promover las reformas agraria y laboral en las fincas cafetaleras chiapanecas. Los finqueros, muchos de origen alemán, lograron ir estorbando las “escuelas Artículo 123”, pero se vieron afectados por la reforma agraria en 1939 y por el secuestro de sus fincas durante la Segunda Guerra Mundial. En otras palabras, ganaron su batalla contra la SEP, pero perdieron finalmente la guerra contra el Estado-nación mexicano emergente.

  4. Revitalization of a community site-specific art and art festivals : a case of art site Naoshima

    OpenAIRE

    Kondo, Junko

    2012-01-01

    This thesis investigates public art and art festivals in the West, and a large scale art project in Japan, Benesse Art Site Naoshima, which is yet to be defined its place in the academic world. Through the case study of Benesse Art Site Naoshima, public art, site-specific art, art festivals, and a role of art museums are discussed. There are two parts to the thesis: (1) a brief survey of public art and site-specific art (of which has roots in Land art) and, (2) the case study of Art Site ...

  5. Visual art and visual perception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koenderink, Jan J.

    2015-01-01

    Visual art and visual perception ‘Visual art’ has become a minor cul-de-sac orthogonal to THE ART of the museum directors and billionaire collectors. THE ART is conceptual, instead of visual. Among its cherished items are the tins of artist’s shit (Piero Manzoni, 1961, Merda d’Artista) “worth their

  6. The Art of Video Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Mark M.

    2012-01-01

    The Smithsonian American Art Museum has created and will tour an exhibition on a most unusual but extremely popular art form--"The Art of Video Games." As one of the largest and first of its type, this exhibition will document and explore a 40-year evolution of video games as an artistic medium, with a focus on striking visual effects and the…

  7. 77 FR 32985 - Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of the Interior, Indian Arts and Crafts Board...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-04

    ...: Notice. SUMMARY: The Museum of the Plains Indian, Indian Arts and Crafts Board, has completed an... contact the Museum of the Plains Indian, Indian Arts and Crafts Board. Disposition of the human remains to... contact the Museum of the Plains Indian, Indian Arts and Crafts Board at the address below by July 5, 2012...

  8. Analysis of an Unusual Mirror in a 16th-Century Painting: A Museum Exercise for Physics Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaminathan, Sudha; Lamelas, Frank

    2017-01-01

    Physics students at Worcester State University visit the Worcester Art Museum (WAM) at the end of a special 100- level course called Physics in Art. The students have studied geometrical optics, and they have been introduced to concepts in atomic physics. The purpose of the museum tour is to show how physics-based techniques can be used in a…

  9. Using Institute of Museum and Library Services Grants to Support Out-of-School Time Programs. Funding Note

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Shawn Stelow

    2010-01-01

    Out-of-school time programs give many youth the chance to engage in interesting and enriching opportunities in the arts. One source of funding for art and cultural activities in out-of-school time programs is The Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS). This federal agency is charged with creating strong libraries and museums that connect…

  10. Det naive og sentimentale museum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldbæk, Henning

    2012-01-01

    Uskyldens museum er et eksempel på en realisering af diskursen mellem ordene og tingene som Michel Foucault skrev om i Ordene og Tingene og som Orhan Pamuk omsatte i praksis i Istanbuls nye museum.......Uskyldens museum er et eksempel på en realisering af diskursen mellem ordene og tingene som Michel Foucault skrev om i Ordene og Tingene og som Orhan Pamuk omsatte i praksis i Istanbuls nye museum....

  11. [Medicine and its museums].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acerbi Cremades, N

    1998-11-01

    There are described in this article the historical patrimonies belonging to five museums of Cordoba city, Argentina: the Museo de anatomia, which was named after Pedro Ara, notable Spanish Anatomist; the Museo de Anatomia Patologica; the Museo de Historia de la Medicina, created by Prof. Enrique P. Aznarez; the Museo "Obispo Salguero" of the Hospital San Roque; and the Museo Historico del Hospital Nacional de Clinicas, declared national historic monument. All these museums have a rich historic hoard, reflecting one of the important cultural aspects of this province.

  12. Det usandsynlige museum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Line Hjorth

    2012-01-01

    Med afsæt i Ib Spang Olsens plakat Gå på muSEum (1978), der er optrykt på omslaget af tidsskriftet, fokuserer lederen på de synsmuligheder og bliktyper, museet mobiliserer, og polemiserer over den aktuelle tendens i museerne til ensidigt at vende blikket mod digitale formidlingsformer.......Med afsæt i Ib Spang Olsens plakat Gå på muSEum (1978), der er optrykt på omslaget af tidsskriftet, fokuserer lederen på de synsmuligheder og bliktyper, museet mobiliserer, og polemiserer over den aktuelle tendens i museerne til ensidigt at vende blikket mod digitale formidlingsformer....

  13. The Contemporary Museum as a Site for Displaying Values

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mare Kõiva

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Museums constitute an important cultural and social resource. The main objective of museums is making certain objects in the collection visible or, on the contrary, leaving them invisible. In contemporary society the institution serves many important roles, being a place for displaying historical and contemporary values, an institution for preserving and displaying personal and collective memory, cultural values, for collecting tangible and intangible values, an institution for creating identity and ethnic kudos, a work place, an educational environment, a framework for promoting ethnic handicraft and art, a place for integrating different folklore festivals, exhibitions, shows; they are connected to tourism patterns and museum business. The article reflects the changes in the development of museums in the late twentieth and early twenty-first century, focusing on the main key words being multifunctional museum, the museum as an open classroom, presentation of tangible and intangible history, the relation and mergence of permanent and temporary exhibitions. The issues of digitalization and preservation and the role of the exhibition curator and the person represented on displays have increased in the museology of the past few decades. The museums’ tradition of self-replication and an increased interest in museological anthropology indicate that museums fulfil an important role in society.

  14. Spiraal : uus Victoria & Alberti muuseum Londonis

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    1998-01-01

    Daniel Libeskindi projekt Victoria & Alberti Muuseumi laiendamiseks on põhjustanud konservatiivsete londonlaste pahameele, kuid kutsunud esile ka hulgaliselt toetusavaldusi. Muuseumi uus osa (kokkuvarisemise piiril näiva ehitisena) peaks külastajaile avatama 2004. a.

  15. Is Museum Education "Rocket Science"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragotto, Erin; Minerva, Christine; Nichols, Michelle

    2006-01-01

    The field of museum education has advanced and adapted over the years to meet the changing needs of audiences as determined by new research, national policy, and international events. Educators from Chicago's Adler Planetarium & Astronomy Museum provide insight into a (somewhat) typical museum education department, especially geared for readers…

  16. Frames as visual links between paintings and the museum environment: an analysis of statistical image properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redies, Christoph; Groß, Franziska

    2013-01-01

    Frames provide a visual link between artworks and their surround. We asked how image properties change as an observer zooms out from viewing a painting alone, to viewing the painting with its frame and, finally, the framed painting in its museum environment (museum scene). To address this question, we determined three higher-order image properties that are based on histograms of oriented luminance gradients. First, complexity was measured as the sum of the strengths of all gradients in the image. Second, we determined the self-similarity of histograms of the orientated gradients at different levels of spatial analysis. Third, we analyzed how much gradient strength varied across orientations (anisotropy). Results were obtained for three art museums that exhibited paintings from three major periods of Western art. In all three museums, the mean complexity of the frames was higher than that of the paintings or the museum scenes. Frames thus provide a barrier of complexity between the paintings and their exterior. By contrast, self-similarity and anisotropy values of images of framed paintings were intermediate between the images of the paintings and the museum scenes, i.e., the frames provided a transition between the paintings and their surround. We also observed differences between the three museums that may reflect modified frame usage in different art periods. For example, frames in the museum for 20th century art tended to be smaller and less complex than in the two other two museums that exhibit paintings from earlier art periods (13th–18th century and 19th century, respectively). Finally, we found that the three properties did not depend on the type of reproduction of the paintings (photographs in museums, scans from books or images from the Google Art Project). To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to investigate the relation between frames and paintings by measuring physically defined, higher-order image properties. PMID:24265625

  17. Bringing New Families to the Museum One Baby at a Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Alicia

    2012-01-01

    "Bring Your Baby to the Danforth Museum of Art" is a program for mothers. Unlike other museum programs that focus on the needs of children, Bring Your Baby caters to the intellectual interests of the adult parent. Parents learn about artworks, play with babies in a beautiful environment, and socialize with other families. The program is…

  18. Another New Museum?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michels, Christoph; Beyes, Timon; Steyaert, Chris

    2014-01-01

    With the transformation of urban governance into a mode of entrepreneurialism, museums have become prominent and privileged sites for reshaping cities as attractive places for cultural and artistic consumption. Using an ethnographic field study, the authors investigate how the logic of the creati...

  19. Spanish Museum Libraries Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez de Prado, Rosario

    This paper describes the creation of an automated network of museum libraries in Spain. The only way in which the specialized libraries in the world today can continue to be active and to offer valid information is to automate the service they offer, and create network libraries with cooperative plans. The network can be configured with different…

  20. An Infrastructure Museum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Harry T.

    2013-01-01

    This article invites teachers to let their students' imaginations soar as they become part of a team that will design a whole new kind of living technological museum, a facility that celebrates the world of infrastructure. In this activity, a new two-story building will be built, occupying a vacant corner parcel of land, approximately 150…

  1. Museums, Environments, Information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koutamanis, A.

    2015-01-01

    Modern digital media already permeate the physical world. The portability of information devices and the ubiquity of networks allow us to access information practically anyplace, creating digital overlays on reality. This also allows us to bring information we routinely archive in museums and

  2. FOR MUSEUM WORK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margherita Sani

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The role of museums in society has expanded significantly in the last decades: from temples of knowledge to forums for debate and discussion, from repositories of objects to people-centred institutions with social responsibilities and functions. This shift reflects an ongoing trend to democratise museums and make them more accessible to wider audiences and responsive to the public’s changing needs, in particular the interests of local communities, whose composition has changed in recent years to include migrants and people of different ethnic backgrounds. With annual migration flows to the EU as a whole projected to increase from about 1 043 000 people in 2010 to 1 332 500 by 2020, the question of how cultural institutions can contribute to effective integration and dialogue has become more relevant than ever. Funders and society at large expect museums to play their part in facilitating the integration and peaceful coexistence of newcomers, with financial resources being made available, also at the EU level, to support them in this effort. Many questions can be raised as to whether it is right and appropriate to charge museums with these responsibilities and whether this would push the boundaries of their work too far and give the social function an exceedingly prominent role over the traditional conservation and educational tasks museums already fulfil. But this discussion seems to be already obsolete in the light of the growing body of evidence on good practices available at the European level. This essay aims to illustrate some of them, as well as to discuss some underpinning theoretical issues and methodological approaches.

  3. Fashion Ave: The Museum at the Fashion Institute of Technology (mfit) in Ne w York

    OpenAIRE

    Steele, Valerie

    2010-01-01

    The Museum at the Fashion Institute of Technology (mfit) is the only museum in New York City dedicated solely to the art of fashion. Best known for its innovative and award-winning exhibitions, which have been described by Roberta Smith in The New York Times as «ravishing», the museum has a collection of more than 50,000 garments and accessories dating from the eighteenth century to the present. The Museum at fit collects, conserves, documents, exhibits, and interprets fashion. Its mission is...

  4. The Victoria Project, Sri Lanka: Victoria Power-Station. [Hydroelectric power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Creber, B. (Sir Alexander Gibb and Partners (GB))

    1991-04-01

    The Victoria Hydroelectric Power-Station forms part of the Victoria Project on the Mahaweli Ganga in Sri Lanka and it provides the country's largest single power source. The Paper describes the planning, design and construction of the civil engineering works, including problems encountered, and also describes, in outline, the electrical and mechanical works. (Author).

  5. REAL MUSEUM, IMAGINARY MUSEUM: REFLECTIONS ON THE CONCEPT OF THE MUSEUM AS A STAGE FOR METAMORPHOSIS = MUSEO REAL, MUSEO IMAGINARIO: REFLEXIONES EN TORNO AL CONCEPTO DE MUSEO COMO ESCENARIO DE METAMORFOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Marcén Guillén

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Ever since its inception as public institution in the 18th century, the museum has favoured several interpretations of the work of art, alterations that imply both a change in its semantic and a revision of the very same concept of art. These metamorphoses take place not only within the confined walls of the traditional museum but also in many wall-less museums. Approaches such as the imaginary museum, virtual and endless repertoire of pieces of art, open countless perspectives to how the museums are perceived as containers of the western memory. This paper focuses on the role of the museum as metamorphosis scenery through the thoughts of artists, writers and intellectuals that have felt attracted to this question since the dawn of the museum.Desde sus inicios como institución pública en el siglo XVIII, el museo ha propiciado diversas interpretaciones de la obra de arte, que entrañan tanto un cambio en la semántica del objeto artístico como una revisión del concepto mismo de arte. Estas metamorfosis se producen no solo en el ámbito físico del museo tradicional sino también en las múltiples variedades del museo sin muros. Planteamientos como el del museo imaginario, repertorio virtual e inacabable de obras de arte, abren innumerables perspectivas en lo que se refiere a la institución museística como receptáculo de la memoria occidental. El presente artículo plantea un recorrido por el papel del museo como escenario de metamorfosis a través de las reflexiones de artistas, literatos e intelectuales que se han sentido atraídos por esta sugerente cuestión desde los albores de la institución museística.

  6. Informational Value of Museum Web Sites

    OpenAIRE

    Kravchyna, Victoria; Hastings, Sam

    2002-01-01

    What information are virtual visitors looking for on museum Web sites? This paper is a first step in a larger investigation into the informational value of museum Web sites. Scholars, teachers, students, museums staff, and museum visitors are the main categories of visitors examined in this study. Questions were asked of these museum audiences about their use of museum Web sites, museum databases, and other aspects of virtual visits.

  7. Museum Libraries and Their Contributions to Museum Information Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Neslihan Mollaoğlu

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Museum Libraries is a kind of special library owing to the fact that it gives ser­vice to the environment of the museum and improves the collection related to the specialization of the museum that they connected to. Museums going toward the service approach based on knowledge from the service approach based on object enlarged the museum libraries' service areas. This article deals with museum libraries as one of the elements that completes the museum information area and aims to question the contributions that they could make by introducing its functions and determine the status over the selected examples. In this context, 7 museum libraries from abroad and 11 museum libraries in the  country are investigated in the field of their infrastructural conditions and services that they present to their users. It is concluded that the activity areas of the museum libraries are connected to the approach of the museology that they adopt and its conditions are determined in the direction of the management departments that they linked with

  8. Aboriginal Art: Who was interested?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Thomas

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the common assumption that Aboriginal art has been absent from Australian art histories and demonstrates how this is not so. It criticises the notion that art history should be represented by specialised art-history books and argues for the important of art museum displays as texts. It also examines the ways in which Aboriginal art has been examined in literature devoted to Australian history and anthropology. It foregrounds the idea that arts history is not necessarily best represented by official art historical texts.

  9. Education at the Dittrick Museum of Medical History, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonson, James M

    2009-01-01

    The Dittrick Museum of Medical History pursues an educational mission as being part of a major research university. While the Dittrick dates to 1899 as a historical committee of the Cleveland Medical Library Association, it first affiliated with Case Western Reserve University in 1966, and became a department of the College of Arts and Sciences of CWRU in 1998. The Dittrick maintains a museum exhibition gallery that is open to the public free of charge, and museum staff provide guided tours on appointment. Much of the teaching and instruction at the Dittrick is conducted by university professors; their classes meet in the museum and use museum resources in the form of artifacts, images, archives, and rare books. Class projects using Dittrick collections may take the form of research papers, exhibitions, and online presentations. Dittrick staff assist in these classes and are available to help researchers use museum resources.

  10. Communicative Functions of the Museum Lobby

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Christian Hviid; Rudloff, Maja; Vestergaard, Vitus

    2014-01-01

    and the last impression that they take home and share with others. This article analyzes museum lobbies as communication spaces in order to identify the different functions afforded by such spaces. In an explorative study of five Danish museum lobbies, we offer a preliminary categorization of these functions......In a time with a heightened focus on how museum architecture and exhibition design shapes the museum visit, the entrance space of museums, the museum lobby, is remarkably absent from the museum literature and research. Still, the museum lobby is the first encounter visitors have with the museum...

  11. The Democratic Horizons of the Museum : Citizenship and Culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dr. Joke Hermes; Peter Dahlgren

    2013-01-01

    This multi-volume reference work provides a state-of-the-art survey of the burgeoning field of museum studies. Showcasing the best of theory, practice, history, controversies, and the ways technology impacts the way we view, think about, and institultionalize objects, The International Handbooks of

  12. A Survey of Teen Museum Education Participants and Their Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornby, Jenny; Bobick, Bryna

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we discuss a museum program for teens located in an urban environment. The participants were high school students from public, private, religious and home schools. The program allowed learning to occur in an informal setting and united teens from one city through a common interest in visual art. Also, it was an opportunity for the…

  13. Mapping Invitations to Participate: An Investigation in Museum Interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothe, Elsa Lenz

    2016-01-01

    This a/r/tographic inquiry delves into questions about participatory art museum practice, specifically seeking to understand the nature of invitations to participate. Utilising drawings, writing and mapping of embodied participation, questions of how individuals are invited to participate in various locations and how these invitations inform the…

  14. Genomics and museum specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachman, Michael W

    2013-12-01

    Nearly 25 years ago, Allan Wilson and colleagues isolated DNA sequences from museum specimens of kangaroo rats (Dipodomys panamintinus) and compared these sequences with those from freshly collected animals (Thomas et al. 1990). The museum specimens had been collected up to 78 years earlier, so the two samples provided a direct temporal comparison of patterns of genetic variation. This was not the first time DNA sequences had been isolated from preserved material, but it was the first time it had been carried out with a population sample. Population geneticists often try to make inferences about the influence of historical processes such as selection, drift, mutation and migration on patterns of genetic variation in the present. The work of Wilson and colleagues was important in part because it suggested a way in which population geneticists could actually study genetic change in natural populations through time, much the same way that experimentalists can do with artificial populations in the laboratory. Indeed, the work of Thomas et al. (1990) spawned dozens of studies in which museum specimens were used to compare historical and present-day genetic diversity (reviewed in Wandeler et al. 2007). All of these studies, however, were limited by the same fundamental problem: old DNA is degraded into short fragments. As a consequence, these studies mostly involved PCR amplification of short templates, usually short stretches of mitochondrial DNA or microsatellites. In this issue, Bi et al. (2013) report a breakthrough that should open the door to studies of genomic variation in museum specimens. They used target enrichment (exon capture) and next-generation (Illumina) sequencing to compare patterns of genetic variation in historic and present-day population samples of alpine chipmunks (Tamias alpinus) (Fig. 1). The historic samples came from specimens collected in 1915, so the temporal span of this comparison is nearly 100 years. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Can Virtual Museums Motivate Students? Toward a Constructivist Learning Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, James E.; Halpern, Daniel

    2015-12-01

    This study aims to assess the effectiveness of immersive environments that have been implemented by museums to attract new visitors. Based on the frameworks introduced by telepresence and media richness theories, and following a constructivist-based learning approach, we argue that the greater the similarity of an online museum experience is to its physical counterpart, the more positive will be the observer's perception of the collection. We reason that the similarity would lead online visitors to develop greater cognitive involvement which in turn will produce more positive attitudes toward the collection. In support of this argument, we present the results of a comparative study in which 565 participants were exposed randomly to four different exhibitions: two-dimensional collections of art and aircraft museums and three-dimensional tours of similar museums. Results indicate that whereas 3D tours have a strong effect on users' intentions to visit the real museum, cognitive involvement and sense of presence mediate the association between these variables. In terms of managerial implications, our study shows that if educational professionals want to stimulate their students to visit museums, 3D tours appear to be more effective for engaging learners through a realistic-looking environment. By offering richer perceptual cues and multimodal feedback (e.g., users can view 3D objects from multiple viewpoints or zoom in/out the objects), the study suggests that participants may increase their reasoning process and become more interested in cultural content.

  16. Nature Museums: Tools for Learning about, Promoting, and Protecting the Natural Heritage of Europe. Proceedings of the Seminar Organised by the Council of Europe in Collaboration with The International Council of Museums (Strasbourg, September 27-29, 1989). Environmental Encounters Series, No. 9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Council of Europe, Strasbourg (France).

    The history of museology over the last century suggests that, in general, the founding of a new natural history museum is rarely the result of planning within the cultural policy field, a situation contrary to what occurs in the history of art museums. This lack of planning with respect to natural history museums has several causes, particularly…

  17. Monitoring Of Pollutants In Museum Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana-Maria Budu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Art works are affected by environmental factors as light, temperature, humidity. Air pollutants are also implicated in their degradation. The pollution in museums has two sources: the air from outside, which brings usually dust and inorganic particles, and the inside sources – the materials used for casings (sealants, textiles placed on the display cases, varnishes, wood that emanate organic compounds. The dust is composed of particles with a diameter of approximately 2µm or higher, which come from soil (silica or animal and vegetal residues (skin cells, pollen. They facilitate water condensation on objects surface and biologic attack. The inorganic compounds are a result of materials combustion (SO2, NO2, NO and in presence of water they form acidic compounds which affect the museum objects. The organic compounds are usually peroxides, acids, phthalates, formaldehyde. The effects of these pollutants are: soiling, surface discolouration, embrittlement, corrosion. Therefore, conservators are interested in monitoring the pollution degree in the display cases or in the museum air and in analyzing the effects of pollutants on the exhibited objects. They use different methods for pollutants identification, like direct reading devices based on colorimetry, that can be read after few minutes and hours (they interact with the pollutants in atmosphere, or indirect reading samples that require a laboratory. The information gathered is used for the identification of pollution source and to analyze the concentration of pollutants needed to provoke damages on the surfaces of art objects. This paper is a review of pollutants that affect the art objects and of the monitoring systems used for their identification and measuring.

  18. Innovative Sensors for Environmental Monitoring in Museums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacci, Mauro; Cucci, Costanza; Mencaglia, Andrea Azelio; Mignani, Anna Grazia

    2008-01-01

    Different physical and chemical factors, such as light, temperature, relative humidity, pollutants and so on, can affect works of art on display. Each factor does not act individually, but its effect can be enhanced or accelerated by the presence of other factors. Accordingly, an evaluation of the impact of the whole environment on art objects is recognized as an essential requirement for conservation purposes. To meet the most up-to-date guidelines on preventive conservation, in recent years several scientific projects supported by the EC were aimed at developing innovative tools that could complement the standard methods for environmental monitoring in museums. These research projects produced a new generation of passive sensors that are capable of taking into account the overall environmental effects by mimicking in some way the behaviour of real works of art. The main goal of the present paper is to provide a survey of these sensors, which represent a new frontier in the environmental control in museums. Furthermore, the use of optical fibres, as both intrinsic sensors and devices for interrogating sensors, will also be illustrated, and examples of their use in the cultural heritage field will be reported. PMID:27879807

  19. Innovative Sensors for Environmental Monitoring in Museums

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Grazia Mignani

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Different physical and chemical factors, such as light, temperature, relative humidity, pollutants and so on, can affect works of art on display. Each factor does not act individually, but its effect can be enhanced or accelerated by the presence of other factors. Accordingly, an evaluation of the impact of the whole environment on art objects is recognized as an essential requirement for conservation purposes. To meet the most up-todate guidelines on preventive conservation, in recent years several scientific projects supported by the EC were aimed at developing innovative tools that could complement the standard methods for environmental monitoring in museums. These research projects produced a new generation of passive sensors that are capable of taking into account the overall environmental effects by mimicking in some way the behaviour of real works of art. The main goal of the present paper is to provide a survey of these sensors, which represent a new frontier in the environmental control in museums. Furthermore, the use of optical fibres, as both intrinsic sensors and devices for interrogating sensors, will also be illustrated, and examples of their use in the cultural heritage field will be reported.

  20. The museum as information space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Navarrete, T.; Mackenzie Owen, J.

    2016-01-01

    Although museums vary in nature and may have been founded for all sorts of reasons, central to all museum institutions are the collected objects. These objects are information carriers organized in a catalogue system. In this chapter, the museum will be conceived as an information space, consisting...... of an information system related to different methods of reasoning. We will highlight the new possibilities offered by digital technology and the changes brought by the way in which visitors come into contact with objects. Our central claim is that the visitor moved from being onsite within the museum’s information...... space to being outside the museum in the online information space of the Internet. This has fundamental implications for the institutional role of museums, our understanding of metadata and the methods of documentation. The onsite museum institution will, eventually, not be able to function...

  1. total mercury concentration in common fish species of lake victoria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Total mercury (THg) concentration was analysed in muscles of common fish species of Lake. Victoria in the eastern and southern parts of the lake using cold vapour Atomic Absorption. Spectrophotometric ... INTRODUCTION. The Lake Victoria ...

  2. Expanding the Spanish Classroom: The "Art" in Liberal Arts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, Erin M.

    2016-01-01

    Supplementing the foreign language curriculum with the incorporation of art museum visits has benefits for students, faculty, the campus art gallery, and the institution. Such a collaborative program serves to expand the classroom and complement instruction by providing learners with a new space to engage in authentic practice in the target…

  3. Understanding Leadership through Art, History, and Arts Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, David A.

    1992-01-01

    Presents an interdisciplinary model that weaves leadership concepts into the contextual richness of history by employing the visual arts as catalysts. Links leadership concepts to activities involved in the administration of an art museum. Assesses strategy's effectiveness by examining comments from involved students. (17 references) (MLH)

  4. MUSEUM TARI DI MAKASSAR DENGAN PENDEKATAN EKSPOSE STRUKTUR PADA FASAD BANGUNAN DAN PENERAPAN TEORI FRAKTAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taufik Arfan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstrak—Pentingnya museum tari di Makassar adalah untuk memperkenalkan budaya yang dimiliki di Sulawesi Selatan yang dapat dikenal oleh seluruh manca negara, serta parawisatawan dan semua orang untuk berkunjung. Tujuan penelitian non arsitektural ini adalah menampilkan unsur kebudayaan, sejarah serta memperkenalkan Tari Tradisional yang ada di Sulawesi Selatan, sedangkan tujuan arsitekturalnya adalah menentukan lokasi yang sesuai dengan keberadaan museum tari, merancang ruang-ruang yang dibutuhkan sesuai dengan standar Museum serta kebutuhan ruang untuk Museum seni tari, merancang museum tari yang dikaitkan dengan ekspos struktur pada fasad dan penggabungannya dengan teori fraktal, merancang penggunaan fasad bangunan,struktur, utilitas, penampilan bangunan, serta tranformasi bentuk pada museum tari dan merancang tata massa pada museum tari. Hasil laporan ini adalah mendesain bangunan museum tari di Makassar dengan pendekatan ekspos pada struktur fasade bangunan dan penerapan teori fraktal yang disesuaikan dengan standar dan kebutuhan ruang. Kata Kunci :Museum tari, struktur, fasad, fractal Abstract-The importance of dance in Makassar museum is to introduce a culture held in South Sulawesi, which can be known by all foreign countries, as well as parawisatawan and everyone to visit. The research objective non architecturally it is featuring elements of culture, history and introduce Traditional Dance in South Sulawesi, while the purpose of the architectural is to determine the location that corresponds to the existence of the museum of dance, designing spaces required in accordance with the standards Museum as well as the need for space for art museum dance, design a museum of dance that is associated with exposure to the facade structure and merger with fractal theory, designing the use of facades of buildings, structures, utilities, appearance of the building, as well as the transformation of the museum forms of dance and design the masses on

  5. Instructional Resources: Is This Art?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenas, Amelia

    1990-01-01

    Provides six lesson outlines to help teachers motivate high school students to discuss basic questions about the meaning and function of art, aesthetic responses cultural context, and artistic skill. Illustrates artwork from the Museum of Modern Art by Marcel Duchamp, Pablo Picasso, Jackson Pollock, and Meret Oppenheim. (KM)

  6. The Art of John Biggers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coy, Mary

    2010-01-01

    In their 2005 exhibit of John Biggers' work, the New Orleans Museum of Art described it as being inspired by "African art and culture, the injustices of a segregated United States, the stoic women in his own family, and the heroes of everyday survival." In this article, the author describes how her students reinterpreted Biggers' work.…

  7. Youth Empowerment and Contemporary Art: Where Are We Now?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linzer, Danielle

    2014-01-01

    In the 1990s, a handful of arts institutions made an unprecedented effort to engage young people through intensive programming geared directly at adolescent audiences--teen councils and apprenticeships sprouted up across the country and sought to welcome and empower teens within the museum. The Whitney Museum of American Art is currently leading a…

  8. Words & Pictures: Literacy, Art and Common Core Together

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevalier, Juline A.

    2015-01-01

    In a two-year study, Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University education staff found that students who participated in a museum-school collaboration became more proficient in several Common Core State Standard skills than a control group. The program, Words & Pictures, directly ties to the English Language Arts Common Core State Standards and is…

  9. Seabed surveys of Victoria harbour, Mahe, Seychelles

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Hashimi, N.H.; Wagle, B.G.

    The seabed surveys in the Victoria Harbour, Mahe, Seychelles shows that the prominent feature is the navigational channel aligned in the northeast-southwest direction with a width varying from 300 to 450m. The depth in the channel ranges from 14...

  10. Geography and Geographical Education in Victoria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriewaldt, Jeana

    2006-01-01

    Victoria has just emerged from 10 years where Geography has been one of three strands in the key learning area of Studies of Society and Environment (SOSE). The overarching framework emerged from an attempt to develop a national curriculum. Whilst the national curriculum was rejected by Australian state and territories who each hold legislative…

  11. within the lake victoria basin, tanzania

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT. Levels of nitrates (NOg-N) and phosphates (PO4~P) in some satellite lakes within the Lake. Victoria basin were determined in Kagera (Lake Burigt), in Mara (River Mara) and in Mwanza region (Lake Malimbe) during August/September 2002 (dry season) and January/February 2003. (wet season).

  12. D Digital Cadastre Journey in Victoria, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shojaei, D.; Olfat, H.; Briffa, M.; Rajabifard, A.

    2017-10-01

    Land development processes today have an increasing demand to access three-dimensional (3D) spatial information. Complex land development may need to have a 3D model and require some functions which are only possible using 3D data. Accordingly, the Intergovernmental Committee on Surveying and Mapping (ICSM), as a national body in Australia provides leadership, coordination and standards for surveying, mapping and national datasets has developed the Cadastre 2034 strategy in 2014. This strategy has a vision to develop a cadastral system that enables people to readily and confidently identify the location and extent of all rights, restrictions and responsibilities related to land and real property. In 2014, the land authority in the state of Victoria, Australia, namely Land Use Victoria (LUV), has entered the challenging area of designing and implementing a 3D digital cadastre focused on providing more efficient and effective services to the land and property industry. LUV has been following the ICSM 2034 strategy which requires developing various policies, standards, infrastructures, and tools. Over the past three years, LUV has mainly focused on investigating the technical aspect of a 3D digital cadastre. This paper provides an overview of the 3D digital cadastre investigation progress in Victoria and discusses the challenges that the team faced during this journey. It also addresses the future path to develop an integrated 3D digital cadastre in Victoria.

  13. CLARIIDAE) FROM THE MWANZA GULF, LAKE VICTORIA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT. Seventeen species of parasites were recovered from 107 I Clarias gariepinus examined flom the. Mwanza Gulf of Lake Victoria. The parasite fauna comprised of four ectoparasites, a. Monogenea, Hirudinea, crustacean and a Digenea,' and fourteen endoparasites, five nematodes,. five trematodes and three ...

  14. Rancang Bangun Aplikasi Augmented Reality Museum Bali Berbasis Android Studi Kasus Gedung Karangasem dan Gedung Tabanan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Gede Aditya Nugraha

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Museum Bali is one of the museum which is located in Denpasar City that established since 1910. The Museum collections consist of items such as living equipment, art, religion, handwriting, and other things that show the situation and the development of the Balinese culture. Augmented Reality is a technology which combines two-dimensional virtual objects or three-dimensional virtual objects into the real environment. Museum Bali has decreased the amount of visitors in recent years and requires an innovation to promote Museum Bali. One innovation that is expected to promote the Museum Bali is to create an augmented reality application that called Augmented Reality Museum Bali in Android platform. Utilizing augmented reality technology that works by detecting the marker then it show up the 3D object and the information from one of the objectsin Museum Bali. Markerless method used in detection marker that make this application moreattractive and expected to be a new experience for the people who want to know more about Museum Bali.

  15. Transdisciplinary digital art: Sound, vision and the new screen.

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, Randy; Gibson, Stephen; Müller Arisona, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    This volume collects selected papers from the past two instances of Digital Art Weeks (Zurich, Switzerland) and Interactive Futures (Victoria, BC, Canada), two parallel festivals of digital media art. The work represented in Transdisciplinary Digital Art is a confirmation of the vitality and breadth of the digital arts. Collecting essays that broadly encompass the digital arts, Transdisciplinary Digital Art gives a clear overview of the ongoing strength of scientific, philosophical, aesthetic...

  16. The Materiality of Museum Politics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Peter

     As the questions posed for the 2006 ICME conference suggest, most ethnographic museums today deal with matters of ‘expanding museum boundaries', ‘community needs and interests' and ‘community dialog, projects and activities' in one way or the other. To some extend we may regard the way the conce...

  17. Museum metamorphosis à la mode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baggesen, Rikke Haller

    2014-01-01

    museum practices correspond to the logic of fashion. Where Foucault once described museums as heterochronias; places representing an ’other-time’, museums now strive to be both of their time and in time with the Zeitgeist. As a consequence, they must keep up with the speedy cycles of technological...... advancements and cultural change, and not only deliver, but also stoke the desire for, novel experiences. The paper explores the current vogue for fashion exhibitions as a case in point, arguing that this trend serves to promote the museum as fashionably current, but can also support novel formats for cultural......Museums are steadily changing. Yet analogising this development with biological or mythological metamorphosis could imply an elevation or naturalisation of events, which is potentially problematic. This paper therefore suggests a supplementary perspective, arguing that certain changes in modern day...

  18. Cultural mediation in museums

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gherghina Boda

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available If we perceive the museum not only as a place of storing and conserving the patrimony, but also of transmitting it, then we can also see it as a mediator through which cultures can become collective patrimony. Tightly connected to patrimonial appropriation, mediation appears from this perspective as a process and not an end, as it manifests itself in animation, communication and making knowledge popular in relation to a precise patrimony. That is why we can see cultural mediation as a transmission, as a transformation, as an action or social project which aims at creating social bonds, the museum thus being not only a place of meeting for the public with the objects exposed, but also as a place of meeting between different cultures. Thus, cultural mediation presents itself as the most efficient means for access to culture of all categories of the public, situated as the crossroads of culture, continuous education and entertainment and is inscribed in the field of informal education.

  19. Los monumentos funerarios hispanorromanos y su epigrafía en el Museo Nacional de Arte Romano de Mérida. Una propuesta didáctica para alumnos de Cultura Clásica y Latín de ESO y del Bachillerato / The funerary monuments in the Roman Hispania and their epigraphy in the National Museum of Roman Art of Merida. A didactic proposal addressed to students of Classical Culture and Latin in ESO and Bachillerato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abel Morcillo León

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Resumen: El mundo funerario en la Hispania romana presenta una gran variedad en sus tipos monumentales. Del estudio de los monumentos y la tipología funeraria se extrae información no sólo cultural y religiosa, sino también referente a aspectos sociológicos, demográficos, epigráficos, artísticos e iconográficos. La antigua capital de la Lusitania romana, Augusta Emerita, albergaba en su solar una nutrida, variada e interesante muestra del mejor arte funerario hispanorromano. Presentamos, por ello, un recorrido por una selección de piezas del Museo Nacional de Arte Romano de Mérida, acompañado de una propuesta de actividades didácticas, destinado a alumnos de Cultura Clásica y Latín de E.S.O. y del Bachillerato.Summary: The funerary world in the Roman Hispania showed a great deal of monumental models. Through the study of its monuments and their typology, not only can we gather religious and cultural information but we can also draw conclusions regarding sociological, demographic, epigraphic, artistic and iconographic features. Emerita Augusta, the old capital of the Roman Lusitania, housed a wide range of the best Hispano-Roman funerary artistic manifestations. That is why we are presenting a tour around several pieces from the Roman Art Museum in Mérida, together with a series of didactic activities addressed to students of Classical Culture and Latin in E. S. O. (Secondary Compulsory Education and Bachillerato (Non Compulsory Secondary Education.

  20. Factors Influencing Museum Sustainability and Indicators for Museum Sustainability Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabela Luiza Pop

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research was to identify the factors upon which museum sustainability depends and the way in which this can be measured. Methodologically, we applied a qualitative research approach, using semi-structured interviews with experts from the Romanian museum sector, complemented by an in-depth study of the literature in this field. Results indicated that any objective measuring of sustainability must take into account the size of a museum’s collections and its organizational structure. It was also found that museum type can affect sustainability via its competitive advantage. However, the sustainability of a museum is not strictly determined by these factors, but also by the management and marketing strategies applied. Based on analysis of literature- and respondent-based factors influencing sustainability, this article proposes a set of 33 indicators that can be used by museums to measure their sustainability, as well as a model that enables evaluation of the sustainability levels of various museums comparatively, regardless of their type, size or importance (e.g., national, regional and local. The results obtained are useful both from a theoretical point of view, given that there are few writings on this topic, and from a practical point of view, as they provide a basis for a clear, objective model of museum sustainability measurement.

  1. Children Ask Questions about West African Art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abercrombie, Denice; Cochran, Mathilda; Mims, Margaret

    1997-01-01

    Presents a collection of questions that fifth-grade students asked about African artwork and answers provided by staff from the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston, Texas. Observes that students' interest in important visual aspects of the art creates lead-ins to more detailed discussions of West African art and culture. (DSK)

  2. Using Formal Concept Analysis to Create Pathways through Museum Collections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wray, Tim; Eklund, Peter

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents A Place for Art - an iPad app that allows users to explore an art collection via semantically linked pathways that are generated using Formal Concept Analysis. The app embraces the information seeking approach of exploration and is based on the idea that showing context...... and relationships among objects in a museum collection augments an interpretive experience. The fundamental interaction metaphor inherent in A Place for Art relies on Formal Concept Analysis so the interface has embedded within it the semantic clustering features of machine learning in artificial intelligence....

  3. Occurrence of organic and inorganic biocides in the museum environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schieweck, A.; Delius, W.; Siwinski, N.; Vogtenrath, W.; Genning, C.; Salthammer, T.

    In the museum environment organic and inorganic chemicals can be found, which originate from both outside and inside the building. Many of the contaminants may cause adverse effects on works of art and human health, but in the past, pollution research in museums has focused on the protection of artifacts, while the risk assessment for humans has been neglected. Especially, the application of biocides leads to a conflict of interest: on the one hand cultural assets have to be protected against microorganisms, insects and rodents while on the other hand it is essential to provide healthy conditions for museum staff and visitors. It has recently been shown that the release of organic indoor pollutants from building products is one of the main reasons for deterioration of artifacts. In this work, we present the results of screening measurements on biocides in different locations of German museums. The major components that could be identified were DDT, PCP, lindane, methoxychlor, naphthalene, chlorinated naphthalenes, 1,4-dichlorobenzene, PCBs and arsenic. It is demonstrated that the application of chlorinated organic compounds and arsenic for preventive conservation is one of the prime reasons for indoor pollution in museums and provides a potential for exposure. However, the concentrations in air, dust and material are widely different and a health risk for humans has to be evaluated case by case.

  4. Mobile Technologies in Museum Exhibitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Medić

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to be up–to–date and give visitors a memorable and unique experience, museums are including usage of digital technologies in their exhibitions. Even though museums in Serbia are very important part of tourism offer, they still have traditional settings that are poorly interpreted. The majority of them have a scientific and historical review which is unattractive for various target groups of visitors and for museums it’s important to continually try out new ways in interpretation of their settings. Because technology continues to rapidly change the way we communicate, cultural institutions should adapt to new ways of communication with their visitors. This paper examines mobile technologies that can be used in museums to give visitors a different experience and transfer the knowledge innovatively. In that way it will be presented the modern concept of presentation of museum exhibitions, focusing on usage of mobile devices through mobile applications and QR codes. The paper provides the broad understanding of usage mobile technologies in museum exhibitions with its advantages and limitations. The research results can help the museums management to improve interpretation and communication with visitors and enrich the visitor experience.

  5. The Hybrid Museum: Hybrid Economies of Meaning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Vitus

    2013-01-01

    this article shows that there are two different museum mindsets where the second mindset leans towards participatory practices. It is shown how a museum can support a hybrid economy of meaning that builds on both a user generated economy of meaning and an institutional economy of meaning and adds value to both....... Such a museum is referred to as a hybrid museum....

  6. Information seeking behaviour of online museum visitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Mette

    two research projects on online museum visitors. The first case study will illustrate the information seeking and searching characteristics of online museum visitors at the National Museum of Military History in Copenhagen. Participants in this case study are characterised as special interest museum...

  7. Information Design for Visualizing History Museum Artifacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yulin; Lai, Tingsheng; Yasuda, Takami; Yokoi, Shigeki

    2011-01-01

    In the past few years, museum visualization systems have become a hot topic that attracts many researchers' interests. Several systems provide Web services for browsing museum collections through the Web. In this paper, we proposed an intelligent museum system for history museum artifacts, and described a study in which we enable access to China…

  8. Pedagogy and Practice in Museum Online Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Din, Herminia

    2015-01-01

    How best might museums harness the interactive capabilities of online environments to provide active teaching and learning experiences for diverse learners and communities? How can museums engage learners in ways that encourage them to visit the museum in person and/or further explore online resources? What should be the role of the museum in…

  9. Pedagogical Museum of Lamego

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto DE JESUS ALMEIDA

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The Pedagogical Museum of Lamego opened to the public in May 2014 and aims to be a space dedicated to the study of the school memory, because studying the past allows to know the different educational realities that have shaped the educational systems, over the times. The work of collecting, cataloging and exhibiting the collections found in other schools and donated by individuals have the particularity of being of the school culture. In this article, we intend to reflect on the particularities of the museology of education and its impact over neighbor communities and local development. Its composition, organization and dissemination represent the matrix of the history of education local and regional.

  10. Medical instruments in museums

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Söderqvist, Thomas; Arnold, Ken

    2011-01-01

    This essay proposes that our understanding of medical instruments might benefit from adding a more forthright concern with their immediate presence to the current historical focus on simply decoding their meanings and context. This approach is applied to the intriguingly tricky question of what a...... actually is meant by a "medical instrument." It is suggested that a pragmatic part of the answer might lie simply in reconsidering the holdings of medical museums, where the significance of the physical actuality of instruments comes readily to hand.......This essay proposes that our understanding of medical instruments might benefit from adding a more forthright concern with their immediate presence to the current historical focus on simply decoding their meanings and context. This approach is applied to the intriguingly tricky question of what...

  11. L’Italia e l’Europa negli anni Trenta. Musei, storia dell’arte, critica e restauro nei documenti dell’inchiesta internazionale sulla formazione dei restauratori (1932 / Italy and Europe during the 1930s. Museums, art history, art criticism and restoration in the documents of the international survey about the training of restorers (1932

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Cecchini

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Chi all’interno dell’Offi ce International des Musées (OIM, all’indomani della prima guerra mondiale, lavorava alla ridefi nizione del ruolo dei musei, ripensandoli come luoghi di dialogo interculturale e di incontro della società presente con il proprio passato, considerava il ruolo sociale del museo e la sua funzione conservativa come parte della stessa riforma culturale. In questo scenario l’inchiesta condotta nel 1932 dall’OIM è stata occasione di confronto tra paesi membri della Società delle Nazioni sulla fi gura di ‘restauratore di opere d’arte’. Se ne considerano i percorsi formativi, fi no ad arrivare alla regolamentazione della concorrenza, valutando aspetti metodologici, critici, etici. Le posizioni che emergono dai documenti dell’Archivio dell’OIM mostrano le intersezioni tra scelte culturali e processi storico-politici, rivelano signifi cative differenze sul ruolo attribuito alla diagnostica e alla critica dalle diverse culture nazionali. L’analisi di quanto emerge da quei documenti offre l’occasione per rifl ettere su alcuni percorsi storici che hanno costituito le radici dell’attuale cultura italiana del restauro, permette di soffermarsi sul rapporto dell’Italia con gli specifi ci percorsi della cultura internazionale. Ne emergono elementi utili a considerare da un punto di vista storico i processi di trasformazione ora in atto proprio nell’ambito della formazione dei restauratori di beni culturali. In the aftermath of WW1, those working in the Offi ce International des Musées (OIM to redefi ne the role of museums – rethinking them as intercultural dialogue and meeting places of the society with its own past – considered the social role of the museum and its conservative mission as part of the same cultural reform. In this scenario the survey conducted in 1932 by the OIM was an opportunity for discussion between members OIM of the League of Nations countries on the fi gure of ‘restorer of

  12. Mathematical Problems in Biology : Victoria Conference

    CERN Document Server

    1974-01-01

    A conference on "Some Mathematical Problems in Biology" was held at the University of Victoria, Victoria, B. C. , Canada, from May 7 - 10, 1973. The participants and invited speakers were mathematicians interested in problems of a biological nature, and scientists actively engaged in developing mathematical models in biological fields. One aim of the conference was to attempt to assess what the recent rapid growth of mathematical interaction with the biosciences has accomplished and may accomplish in the near future. The conference also aimed to expose the problems of communication bet~",een mathematicians and biological scientists, and in doing so to stimulate the interchange of ideas. It was recognised that the topic spans an enormous breadth, and little attempt was made to balance the very diverse areas. Widespread active interest was shown in the conference, and just over one hundred people registered. The varied departments and institutions across North America from which the participants came made it bo...

  13. Pancam Peek into 'Victoria Crater' (Stereo)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left-eye view of a stereo pair for PIA08776 [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right-eye view of a stereo pair for PIA08776 A drive of about 60 meters (about 200 feet) on the 943rd Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's exploration of Mars' Meridiani Planum region (Sept. 18, 2006) brought the NASA rover to within about 50 meters (about 160 feet) of the rim of 'Victoria Crater.' This crater has been the mission's long-term destination for the past 21 Earth months. Opportunity reached a location from which the cameras on top of the rover's mast could begin to see into the interior of Victoria. This stereo anaglyph was made from frames taken on sol 943 by the panoramic camera (Pancam) to offer a three-dimensional view when seen through red-blue glasses. It shows the upper portion of interior crater walls facing toward Opportunity from up to about 850 meters (half a mile) away. The amount of vertical relief visible at the top of the interior walls from this angle is about 15 meters (about 50 feet). The exposures were taken through a Pancam filter selecting wavelengths centered on 750 nanometers. Victoria Crater is about five times wider than 'Endurance Crater,' which Opportunity spent six months examining in 2004, and about 40 times wider than 'Eagle Crater,' where Opportunity first landed. The great lure of Victoria is the expectation that a thick stack of geological layers will be exposed in the crater walls, potentially several times the thickness that was previously studied at Endurance and therefore, potentially preserving several times the historical record.

  14. Implementation of the victoria bowel performance scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawley, Philippa; Barwich, Doris; Kirk, Lisa

    2011-12-01

    There is a lack of evidence to guide constipation management in patients receiving palliative care. Data collection requires the systematic use of validated assessment tools. The objective of this study was to assess the usefulness of the Victoria Bowel Performance Scale (BPS) as an audit tool. Charts were reviewed before and after the implementation of a program to monitor constipation through repeated use of the Victoria Bowel Scale. The program was initiated at three oncology pain and symptom management clinics, four palliative care units, and four residential hospices. An additional "control" palliative care unit introduced new nursing assessment tools without the new scale. The Victoria BPS was recorded at 86% of 192 postimplementation outpatient clinic visits and was easy to use in this setting. Documentation of bowel performance at comparable visits improved from 44% to 66% (Passessment tool, uniquely incorporating the patient's usual bowel function. Modifications to the scale have been made to improve clarity and allow for the expected drop in bowel activity seen in end-of-life care. Considerable educational effort and appropriate organization of the charts are required for optimal implementation. The proportion of revised BPS scores ranging from -1 to +1 is proposed as an indicator of satisfactory bowel management for clinical, audit, and research purposes. Copyright © 2011 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Museum libraries in Slovenia : comparative research

    OpenAIRE

    Sabina Plešnar-Kašca

    2000-01-01

    Museum library, as one of the special libraries, operates within the framework of a museum or gallery. It's basic purpose is to satisfy information needs of employees and to support it's parent organization in achieving common objectives. A questionnaire about their institution had been sent to 60 (sixty) Slovenian museums. The questionnaire was composed from three main parts: museum library staff, organization of the libray collection, museum library users and services. Data collected from 4...

  16. Emerging opportunities: the internet, marketing and museums

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richani Evdoxia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The tremendous impact of applying new technologies is obvious when it comes to museums. Internet forms an integral part of museums everyday life and decision making. Websites, online communities, social media, and mobile applications comprise elements of the modern museum’s digital self, which complements the real museum of permanent and temporary exhibitions, storage rooms, visitors’ facilities, laboratories and, most important, museum objects. This environment inevitably affects museum marketing strategies and creates relevant opportunities.

  17. Cultural minorities in Danish museums

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjørup, Søren

    2009-01-01

    Artikel om den forbløffende mangel på bevidsthed om minoriteter i danske museer, samt en diskussion af Dansk Jødisk Museum, specielt spillet mellem arkitekten Daniel Libeskinds koncept og museets egen meddelelse...

  18. Alwyne (Wyn) Cooper Wheeler (1929-2005) and the libraries of the Natural History Museum, London.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Ann

    2009-01-01

    As a senior scientist working in the Fish Section of the Department of Zoology at the Natural History Museum, Alwyne (Wyn) Wheeler was a regular library user and well-known to library staff. Always amiable and helpful, and possessing a broad general knowledge of natural history as well as expertise on fishes, Wyn interacted with library staff at all levels. A close working relationship developed where he contributed to section library management and collection building. He also published catalogues of some of the library's most important art collections. This paper celebrates the collaboration between Museum scientist Wyn Wheeler and librarians at the National History Museum.

  19. VISITING THE MUSEUM OF MADNESS: THE EXPERIENCE OF LEARNING ABOUT THE PSYCHIATRIC REFORM

    OpenAIRE

    Nadja Cristiane Lappann Botti; Eline Mascarenhas Cotta; Fabiano de Almeida Célio

    2006-01-01

    ABSTRACT: The Museum of Madness in the landscape of the Minas Gerais State is a place where art, history and memory disclose the differences about the Psychiatry approach since the beginning of the last century till nowadays. A qualitative study with 39 nursing undergraduate students was developed, aiming to identify the meaning of the visit to the Museum of Madness. The methodological referential was the Collective Subject Discourse and the theoretical the Brazilian Psychiatric Reform. The d...

  20. Fremtiden og det etnografiske museum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gabriel, Mille

    2014-01-01

    In recognition of altered global relations since colonial times, the Ethnographic Collections at the National Museum of Denmark has identified a need to redefine its role in society. The Ethnographic Collections explores new ways of activating old collections – ways, which include contemporary co......? And how do we ensure that community involvement not only challenges the authority of museums, but also informs museological practices in new and constructive ways?...

  1. ¿Señora con abrigo de visón o freaky blanquecino?. El Invisible Museum Project Desplazando el concepto pedagogías invisibles hacia los museos de artes visuales

    OpenAIRE

    Acaso, María; Antúnez, Noelia; Megías, Clara

    2011-01-01

    En este artículo se trata de explicar el significado de tres conceptos: el concepto pedagogías invisibles (y su evolución desde el concepto currículum oculto), el concepto direccionalidad y el concepto performatividad. En los tres casos, estos términos son desplazados desde otros campos de estudio hasta la pedagogía y, en concreto, a los procesos pedagógicos que se desarrollan en los museos de artes visuales. En una segunda parte, se expone el proyecto de investigación que...

  2. New Designs in the Museums

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuri Özer Erbay

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Architectural structure of the museum shall be designed in an accessible way regarding safety. In these designs special needs of visitors shall be taken into consideration according to types thereof.  Architectural structure, topography and natural presence of the museum increase visitor accessibility.  Exhibition venue, showcases and platforms, staircases providing access to upstairs, stairs, slippery rugged surfaces and entrance and exit to the exhibition venue from the same door form inaccessible areas.   It mustn't be forgotten that special disabled visitors can create an unsafe environment for others. Existing designs in museums shall be redesigned to be made accessible by disabled persons.  Museum venues must be redesigned ad made accessible by disabled persons. All characteristics of visitors in museums should be taken into consideration and universal living spaces addressing integral attitude should be designed.  Museum environment designs with regard to visitor safety must be steady.  Ramps shouldn't be unnecessarily steep and slippery.  Floor tiles, carpets or other ground coatings must be attached each other in a safe way. Gaps in ground coating shouldn't exceed the radius of13 mm. Grounds with different colors should be used for highlighting the ground odds and drawing visitors' attention. A distinctive environment requirement should be provided for visitors especially who use walking sticks, crutches and wheelchairs and warning signs shouldn't be forgotten.

  3. Translating land use science to a museum exhibit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arce-Nazario, Javier A.

    2016-01-01

    For land use science to engage the general public it must successfully translate its concepts and conclusions and make them public outside of traditional scientific venues. Here we explore science-art exhibits, which blend artistic presentations with specific scientific data or themes, as a possible effective way of communicating scientific information and disrupting misconceptions. We describe the process of producing a science-art exhibit on remote sensing and Puerto Rican landscape history from 1937 to the present, sited at a rural Puerto Rican community museum, and examine the visitor experience and educational outcomes of the museum exhibit through analysis of survey data. The exhibit project engaged undergraduate students from a variety of academic backgrounds, introduced land use science concepts to the public in an engaging format, and was effective at reshaping visitors’ misconceptions of Puerto Rico's landscape change history. PMID:28191029

  4. DIGITALISATION IN FINNISH MUSEUMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Laine-Zamojska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available W artykule omówiono generalny obraz digitalizacji w fińskim sektorze muzealnym. Przedstawiono szacunkowe liczby dotyczące digitalizacji dziedzictwa kulturowego na podstawie przeprowadzonych statystycznych badań, oraz zaprezentowano wiele projektów związanych z ucyfrowieniem fińskich muzeów.\tFiński sektor muzealny jest niezwykle zróżnicowany, podobnie jak stopień skatalogowania i zdigitalizowania kolekcji. W projektach rozwojowych aktywnie uczestniczy cały sektor muzealny. W ostatnich latach, dzięki wielu inicjatywom i badaniom udało się uzyskać szczegółowy obraz fińskiego sektora muzealnego. Największą inicjatywą jest projekt utworzenia Narodowej Biblioteki Cyfrowej, podlegający Ministerstwu Edukacji i Kultury. Celem projektu jest połączenie i udostępnienie zasobów z instytucji pamięci (bibliotek, archiwów i muzeów. Towarzyszą mu rozległe projekty digitalizacji.\tW związku z ogromną różnorodnością systemów do zarządzania kolekcją i praktykami katalogowymi w muzeach, w 2011 r. Państwowy Urząd Muzealny (Museovirasto / National Board of Antiquities, Fiński Związek Muzeów (Suomen museoliitto / Finnish Museums Association i Państwowa Galeria Sztuki (Valtion taidemuseo / Finnish National Gallery zainicjowały projekt Muzeum2015 (Museo2015 / Museum2015. Jego głównymi celami są: unifikacja procesów związanych z zarządzaniem kolekcją, stworzenie architektury korporacyjnej dla zarządzania muzealną kolekcją, stworzenie modelu zarządzania dla architektury korporacyjnej, oraz określenie i stworzenie warunków do zakupu i implementacji ogólnofińskiego systemu zarządzania kolekcją.\tRozwój cyfrowych narzędzi dla najmniejszych, prowadzonych przez wolontariuszy, muzeów lokalnych jest jednym z celów projektu badawczego ViMuseo, prowadzonego na Uniwersytecie w Jyväskylä (Jyväskylän yliopisto / University of Jyväskylä.

  5. From museums as a collection to museums as narration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Rosa

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The sensitive environments, which Studio Azzurro has been developing in an artistic context since 1994, bring an open dialogue between physical elements and intangible aspects, through interactive technology. We came to realize that these works could also be extended in educational terms and could be successfully adapted to the museums thematic paths. The concept of the sensitive environment in the museum project is considered as a place in which there is an interrelation between the virtual component and the physical presence. It is a narrative habitat where the person is supposed to play an active role and where a collective enjoyment is preferred in order that the story proceeds through the effect of more than one decision and so that as well as the human relationship with technology, there also remains a powerful interpersonal relationship. The interactive systems are natural interfaces which react without the use of technological intermediaries but through traditional methods of communication- touch, the voice, a gesture, etc.- so as to create a more natural situation. The museum becomes more a dynamic place, not just a place for collecting and exhibiting: this is a distinguishing feature in the passage from an idea of a museum as a collection to that of a museum as narration.

  6. Museums Connect: Teaching Public History through Transnational Museum Partnerships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J. W. Harker

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Museums Connect is a program funded by the US Department of State and administered by the American Alliance of Museums that sponsors transnational museum partnerships. This program provides one model for teaching public history in a transnational context, and this article analyzes the experiences of two university-museums—the Museum of History and Holocaust Education (MHHE in the United States and the Ben M’sik Community Museum (BMCM in Morocco—during two grants between 2009 and 2012. In exploring the impact of the program on the staff, faculty, and students involved and by analyzing the experiences and reflections of participants, I argue that this program can generate positive pedagogical experiences. However, in addition to the successes of the MHHE and BMCM during their two grants, the participants encountered significant power differentials that manifested themselves in both the processes and products of the grants. It is the conclusion of this article that both partners in a public history project need to address and confront potential power issues at the outset in order to achieve a more balanced, collaborative partnership.

  7. Museum libraries in Slovenia : comparative research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabina Plešnar-Kašca

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Museum library, as one of the special libraries, operates within the framework of a museum or gallery. It's basic purpose is to satisfy information needs of employees and to support it's parent organization in achieving common objectives. A questionnaire about their institution had been sent to 60 (sixty Slovenian museums. The questionnaire was composed from three main parts: museum library staff, organization of the libray collection, museum library users and services. Data collected from 46 (fourtysix received questionaries, exposed the current status of Slovenian museum libraries and allows comparison with other countries.

  8. Musei, raccolte e collezioni in Puglia / Museums and collections in Puglia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Imperiale

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Il lavoro illustra un’indagine sui musei di Puglia, come conseguenza delle lacune normative e conoscitive esistenti sul tema e della recente estensione del fenomeno a livello locale. Ci si interroga in particolare se tutte le realtà promosse come istituti museali siano dei musei secondo gli standard prevalentemente conosciuti ed applicati. In tale direzione, il lavoro, articolato in quattro paragrafi, approfondisce dapprima il significato del concetto di museo, a livello normativo e dottrinale, contrapposto a quello di raccolta o collezione. Successivamente, dopo una breve descrizione sulle origini, normativa regionale e stato dell’arte dei musei di Puglia, espone il modello di analisi sviluppato per distinguere i “veri” musei dalle “semplici” raccolte o collezione. In conclusione riporta i risultati conseguiti dall’analisi di 85 musei pugliesi ed alcune osservazioni sullo scenario emerso e sul modello di analisi sviluppato.   This paper has, as starting point, a survey about museums of Puglia. The main question is if all these museum institutions are real museums or not. With this purpose, this research deepens two main aspects. The first one is to understand the meaning of the museum concept, focusing on normative and doctrinal levels, and the differences between a museum institution and a collection. Then, after a brief description about the museum origins, the regional normative, and the museums of Puglia state of the art, the paper presents the analysis model developed in order to distinguish between “real” museums and “mere” collections. The conclusion of this research shows the analysis results of 85 museums of Puglia and some observations based on the emerging context and the analysis model.

  9. Design research into mobile museum mediation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baggesen, Rikke Haller

    2013-01-01

    community. 
The PhD research project “Mobile Mediation of Fashion by Museums” explores how aesthetic and ethnographic design methods can be used to develop mobile experiences and articulate museological matters of concern. Building on user perspectives, expressed in response to cultural probes, the project......Using mobile media, museums may transcend institutional settings to highlight the significance and meanings of cultural heritage: framing art and design in the urban sphere, shedding light on nature in the wild, or bringing historic sites to life. The possibilities are manifold...... has generated a design game to support projection and discussion of possible concept scenarios and their implications. The game format was used in a series of workshops with Designmuseum Danmark, to ideate and consider new ways to appreciate Copenhagen fashion culture via mobile media. This paper...

  10. Postmodern Exhibition Discourse: Anthropological Study of an Art Display Case.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Wieczorek

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article studies tendencies in contemporary museum exhibitions and art display trends. While analysing current status quo of art in the museum context, it discusses the limitations of curatorial impact on the audience perception of the displayed objects. The paper presents a case study of a permanent museum exhibition with an added performance element. As argued in the article, such approach allows a stratified narrative and provokes a dialogue between the audience, performers, and curators, fully reflecting postmodern polyphonic tendency. The aim of the article is to comment on postmodern trends in museology, the status of the displayed art (object, and contemporary exhibition identity.

  11. Museum education and ‘the desiring eye'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Illeris, Helene

    2008-01-01

    Abstract/Introduction: During the last 10-20 years significant changes have occurred in educational settings in art museums. Partly as a consequence of constructivist approaches to learning, the position of the ‘good learner' has turned into the position of a subject willing to participate...... in educational projects where students' ways of seeing, students' voices, and students' direct interventions have become central. The ‘desiring eye' focused on sensuous, subjective, and highly individualized forms of viewing has thereby become a central requisite in new educational settings in art galleries...

  12. DISTRIBUTION IN NON-TRAWLABLE AREAS OF LAKE VICTORIA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Victoria. Netherlands Journal of. Zoology 42'. 214 -232. Witte F, Goldschmidt PC and Wanink JH. 1995. Dynamics of the haplochromine cichlid fauna and other ecological changes in the. Mwanza gmlf of Lake Victoria. In: Pitcher TH and Hart PJB (eds):. Impact of species change in fiican lakes. Chapman & Hall, London, pp.

  13. Adaptive responses to environmental changes in Lake Victoria cichlids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijssel, Jacobus Cornelis van (Jacco)

    2014-01-01

    Lake Victoria cichlids show the fastest vertebrate adaptive radiation known which is why they function as a model organism to study evolution. In the past 40 years, Lake Victoria experienced severe environmental changes including the boom of the introduced, predatory Nile perch and eutrophication.

  14. Gender Integration in the Management of the Lake Victoria Fisheries ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The riparian governments of Lake Victoria have adopted co-management approach in fisheries management. This paper discusses gender mainstreaming in fisheries management of Lake Victoria, user rights, successes and challenges of the process. This paper has used gender-disaggregated data from several studies ...

  15. London: An Art Teacher's Inspiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guhin, Paula

    2012-01-01

    Often overshadowed in people's minds by Paris, London is truly an artist's jewel. The art and architecture, history, gardens and museums are inspiring, yes, but there's so much more to this ancient city. The performances, attractions and markets are a boon to the creative soul. London can be surprisingly inexpensive to visit. Gazing at statues,…

  16. Presidential Libraries Museum Collection Management Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Archives and Records Administration — MCMD serves as a descriptive catalog for the Presidential Libraries museum collections, and also supports a full range of museum collections management processes...

  17. Portable technologies at the museum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svabo, Connie

    2011-01-01

    A topic of interest in contemporary museum studies is how digital technologies contribute to museum visitor experiences. Building on insights from media and technology studies that new media should be understood for how they overlap with old media, the article reports an ethnographic study....... This is shown by drawing on the concept of mediation as it is developed by philosopher Michel Serres and philosopher of technology Bruno Latour. The article is based on the Ph.D. thesis entitled “Portable Objects at the Museum”, defended at Roskilde University on 22 September 2010....... of the intersections between the exhibition at a modern museum of natural history and three portable technologies – one of which is digital. Mobile phone cameras, exercise pamphlets and dress-up costumes link visitors with an exhibition, but they simultaneously shape this relation in their own specific directions...

  18. Supporting Museums--Serving Communities: An Evaluation of the Museums for America Program. Full Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apley, Alice; Frankel, Susan; Goldman, Elizabeth; Streitburger, Kim

    2011-01-01

    The Institute of Museum and Library Services is the primary source of federal support for the nation's museums. Museums for America (MFA) is the largest IMLS grant program for museums; it supports institutions by investing in high-priority, high-value activities that are clearly linked to the institution's strategic plan and enhance its value to…

  19. Museum libraries: how digitization can enhance the value of the museum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Navarrete, T.; Mackenzie Owen, J.

    2011-01-01

    It is the responsibility of the museum library to enhance the understanding of the museum collection and the role of museum objects as cultural documents. For many reasons, this role is only partially fulfilled, if at all. This is because in practice the library and its museum are insufficiently

  20. Degradation of Victoria Crater, Meridiani Planum, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, J. A.; Wilson, S. A.; Cohen, B. A.; Golombek, M. P.; Geissler, P. E.; Sullivan, R. J.

    2007-12-01

    Victoria crater (2.05N, 354.51E) is ~750 m in diameter and the largest crater on Mars observed in situ. The Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity traversed NW to SE across a broad annulus dominated by dark sand that at least partially surrounds the crater before navigating the northern crater rim. Rover observations of the crater and ejecta deposits are complemented by images with 26-52 cm/pixel scales from the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) on Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter and enable assessment of degradation state. The present depth/diameter ratio for Victoria is 0.1, less than the 0.2 expected for a pristine primary impact structure. Together with the eroded, serrated rim, this implies an originally smaller crater diameter and/or considerable infilling consistent with occurrence of a large dune field and few exposed rocks on the crater floor. The height and width of the raised rim is generally 4-5 m and 150-225 m, respectively, less than the 30 m and 500-600 m, respectively, expected for a pristine 750 m diameter crater. Ejecta thicknesses around the rim were derived using rover-based and HiRISE images and yield consistent estimates averaging ~3 m. The serrated rim plan creates a series of promontories extending up to 50 m into the crater and generally fronted by 30-60 degree slopes that are locally vertical and are separated by bays whose floors typically slope 15-25 degrees. A crater originally on order of 600-650 m in diameter and subsequently enlarged by mass wasting and aeolian erosion may yield a structure resembling Victoria today. The steep expression of the promontories and local outcroppings of rocks in the ejecta blanket points to some ongoing mass wasting, but the relative paucity of associated flanking talus indicates derived blocks of sulfate sandstone are not resistant to saltating sand and are rapidly broken down by the wind or are completely covered/filled in by aeolian drift. At Cape St. Vincent, the promontory appears undercut

  1. The Art of Copying

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Hans Dam

    2017-01-01

    This article discusses copies within the field of art museums by way of mapping strategies for copy practices. This mapping leans heavily towards parts of the writings of Jacques Derrida (1930–2004). Against the backdrop of this theoretical premise, the article distinguishes five main strategies....... An informational copy is just as unique as an original object of art, and at the same time, it defines the original and is itself defined by this opposition. Lastly, the strategy for the imagined relation between original and copy follows. This strategy is dependent upon several of the previous approaches, and...

  2. A Museum for Palle Nielsen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorborg, Christoffer

    2016-01-01

    The present project attempts to articulate architecturally the psychic content in the danish graphic artist and draftsman Palle Nielsen's oeuvre. The museum inscribes itself within the city of Copenhagen as a part of it, but simultaneously establishes a taut vacuum between the city's buildings......, thereby setting these existing, surrounding monumental buildings in relief. The interior of the museum manifests itself as a dramatic, labyrinthine course of empty spaces, within which the visitor is deprived of contact with the city, and potentially loses his or her sense of place....

  3. Institutional comunication and cultural marketing: Peculiarities in museum communication within the framework of public relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camelia BURGHELE

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cultural management theoreticians believe that the main target of museum communication is gaining knowledge on specific messages by as large a number of people as possible. Museum public relation practice – intensified and upgraded at the same time with the revolution of the new communication technologies – is both science and art which analyse certain tendences (in attitude, taste and informal of anticipating their consequences for implementing certain museum offer programs to appeal to the public.As an institution with a decisive role in guarding cultural heritage and in outlining cultural identity – as it keeps the necessary instruments for this, the specialists and also the motivation through its own purposes – the museum in its dynamic, modern, enhanced shape must provide an attractive cultural product to the public, based on a anthropological approach to cultural fact.Modern museum-ology is built upon the concept that museum is a story and modern museums stimulate to a high degree participative learning, generated by a productive dialogue.

  4. Education Partnerships: Museums as Mediators Between Science, Educators and the General Public

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, M. K.

    2007-12-01

    The Exploratorium, a museum of science, art and human perception in San Francisco, has been partnering with polar scientists to bring their work to the general public, students and teachers before and during the International Polar Year, 2007-9. Last year, Exploratorium producers connected with scientists on the ANDRILL sediment coring project out of McMurdo, Antarctica in a series of live programs and web postings that were broadcast on the museum floor and on the Internet. This work builds on an NSF-funded project in 2001 that brought four museum educators to Antarctica on a six-week Web expedition and will continue over the next two field seasons in Antarctica and the Arctic field season in summer 2008. Over the next 18 months, the Exploratorium's "Ice Stories" will partner museum media and web producers with polar scientists working in the field to bring their research to the Internet and museum audience via live Webcasts, video clips, blogs, podcasts, and other media platforms. The museum will curate polar field reports from scientists and educators into a continuously updated Web portal on the Exploratorium's award-winning Website and highlight the ongoing research in museum programming, floor demonstrations, and exhibits. There is excellent potential for these partnerships between formal and informal science to be expanded by creating additional links with formal educators in classroom and out-of-classroom settings.

  5. Painting Shades of Gray: How to Communicate the History of Communism in Museums

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Zbuchea

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Communication of sciences / arts lies at the core of a museum public activity. It is a special type of communication, meant to make the collections and the domain of the expertise of the museum accessible to a wide public in order to fulfill the special cultural and social role that museums have in the contemporary society. This cannot be achieved without the cooperation of visitors, as well as the museum stakeholders. For fruitful relationships, museums have to design their activity and public offer taking into account the characteristics as well as the interests of various segments of its audience. The present paper discusses the prerequisites for a successful museum exhibition. Special attention is given to designing an effective exhibition on the history of communism. By investigating the profile of the potential visitors for such an exhibition, the paper draws a framework to be considered when designing it. The discussion is timely, since in the last few years there are discussions and initiatives related with the establishment of a museum of communism.

  6. Towards a more sonically inclusive museum practice: a new definition of the ‘sound object’

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Kannenberg

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available As museums continue to search for new ways to attract visitors, recent trends within museum practice have focused on providing audiences with multisensory experiences. Books such as 2014’s The Multisensory Museum present preliminary strategies by which museums might help visitors engage with collections using senses beyond the visual. In this article, an overview of the multisensory roots of museum display and an exploration of the shifting definition of ‘object’ leads to a discussion of Pierre Schaeffer’s musical term objet sonore – the ‘sound object’, which has traditionally stood for recorded sounds on magnetic tape used as source material for electroacoustic musical composition. A problematic term within sound studies, this article proposes a revised definition of ‘sound object’, shifting it from experimental music into the realm of the author’s own experimental curatorial practice of establishing The Museum of Portable Sound, an institution dedicated to the collection and display of sounds as cultural objects. Utilising Brian Kane’s critique of Schaeffer, Christoph Cox and Casey O’Callaghan’s thoughts on sonic materialism, Dan Novak and Matt Sakakeeny’s anthropological approach to sound theory, and art historian Alexander Nagel’s thoughts on the origins of art forgery, this article presents a new working definition of the sound object as a museological (rather than a musical concept.

  7. Graphic Resources in the Spanish Art Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Alicia Garcia; Coso, Teresa

    The interest in graphic information has increased explosively and is explored through various communication networks like the Internet and the audiovisual media. Art libraries, museums, cultural centers, and art foundations manage and store a lot of images in several departments and in print and digital formats. This paper discusses the cataloging…

  8. Concept "Medical Museum" as a Sociocultural Phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chizh, Nina V.; Slyshkin, Gennady G.; Zheltukhina, Marina R.; Privalova, Irina V.; Kravchenko, Olga A.

    2016-01-01

    The article examines the concept "medical museum" as a sociocultural phenomenon. The register of medical museums in Russia makes the material of research. The complex methods of analysis of the concept "medical museum" are used. The philosophical, historical, cultural, structural, communicative and semantic analysis is carried…

  9. Measuring enjoyment of an interactive museum experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, Elisabeth M.A.G.; Lingnau, Andreas; Kockelkorn, Hub

    2012-01-01

    Museums are increasingly being equipped with interactive technology. The main goal of using technology is to improve the museum-going experience of visitors. In this paper, we present the results of a study with an electronic quest through a museum aimed at children in the age of 10-12. We wanted to

  10. Presencing Culture: Ethnology Museums, Objects, and Spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudelli, William; Mungur, Amy

    2014-01-01

    Ethnology museums are pedagogical. As educators attempting to make sense of how museums teach about the world, the authors of this article are especially interested in how ethnology museums curate otherness through objects, texts, and spaces, and how these combine to present a narrative of others. Ellsworth has referred to this as the…

  11. Interfaith Dialogue at Peace Museums in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gachanga, Timothy; Mutisya, Munuve

    2015-01-01

    This paper makes a case for further studies on the contribution of peace museums to interfaith dialogue debate. Based on our experiences as museum curators, teachers and peace researchers and a review of published materials, we argue that there is a lacuna in the study on the contribution of peace museums to the interfaith dialogue debate. The…

  12. Aesthetic Encounters and Learning in the Museum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, David Raymond

    2017-01-01

    This article discusses how museum settings can provide opportunities for sensory and aesthetic encounters and learning. It draws on research into museum education programmes that included examinations of curatorial construction and display, observations of teaching and open-ended interviews with museum educators. The examples selected here focus…

  13. Beyond regress: museum records management in Zimbabwe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper sought to demonstrate the need for professional museum records management practices without which the collections found in museums will become a meaningless box of material culture and the security of collections will be threatened, thereby compromising the position of museums as information centres.

  14. Museum Libraries: The More Things Change...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierbaum, Esther Green

    1996-01-01

    A survey of 152 museum libraries indicated that, while in some respects their situation is better in terms of funding, staffing, and library use, further development is needed within their parent organizations. Discussion includes the museum environment and ways that special libraries can support their museum colleagues. Ten tables show data.…

  15. A Unifying Curriculum for Museum-Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povis, Kaleen E.

    2011-01-01

    There are over two dozen schools in the United States with the word "museum" in their names. However, the philosophy and pedagogy that tie these schools together is unclear. A consistent definition, criteria for classification, and a unifying curriculum to guide museum- schools is lacking. Yet, museum-schools continue to open across the country.…

  16. Beyond regress: museum records management in Zimbabwe

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although museums are information centres, it has been observed that they do not have records manage- ment procedures, systems and programmes in place. The situation owes its existence to the absence of rec- ords managers in museums and a negative attitude towards records management issues by museum practi-.

  17. Projections on museum exhibits - engaging visitors in the museum setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basballe, Ditte Amund; Halskov, Kim

    2010-01-01

    Using animation, text, and visual effects as elements of projections on the Danish rune stone, Mejlbystenen (the Mejlby stone), we have explored approaches to engaging museum visitors. The installation positions itself in the field of previous installations and experiments exploring projection on...

  18. PEMANFAATAN MUSEUM BLAMBANGAN SEBAGAI SUMBER BELAJAR SEJARAH DI KELAS X SMA NEGERI KABUPATEN BANYUWANGI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agus Mursidi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to determine: (1 Type of Blambangan Museum collection that can be utilized as a resource for high school students learning history, (2 How to utilize Blambangan Museum collection as a source for high school students learning history, (3 Appreciation of high school students to the Museum Blambangan as a source of high school students learning history, and (4 The constraints faced by students and teachers in utilizing the Museum Blambangan as a source of learning history. Types of collections that can be used as a source to learn the history in SMA is keramologika (jar, filologika (sword, historika (clothing regent, etnografika (ax square, arkeologika (papyrus manuscript, teknologika (phonograph and the fine arts (brick berelief and miniature art infatuated, (2 In accordance with the standards of competence and basic competence as a source of how to utilize the museum to learn history, the learning process can be done is through the method of study tours and home work by teachers to students.   Key words: Blambangan Museum, Learning Resources, Learning History, high school   Tujuan penelitian ini adalah untuk mengetahui: (1 Jenis koleksi Museum Blambangan yang dapat dimanfaatkan sebagai sumber daya untuk siswa SMA belajar sejarah, (2 Bagaimana memanfaatkan koleksi Museum Blambangan sebagai sumber untuk siswa SMA belajar sejarah, (3 Apresiasi siswa sekolah tinggi ke Museum Blambangan sebagai sumber siswa SMA belajar sejarah, dan (4 kendala yang dihadapi oleh siswa dan guru dalam memanfaatkan Blambangan Museum sebagai sumber belajar sejarah. Jenis koleksi yang dapat digunakan sebagai sumber untuk belajar sejarah SMA keramologika (jar, filologika (pedang, historika (pakaian, etnografika (kapak persegi, arkeologika (naskah papirus, teknologika (phonograph dan denda seni (batu bata berelief dan seni miniatur tergila-gila, (2 Sesuai dengan Standar Kompetensi dan Kompetensi Dasar sebagai sumber bagaimana

  19. The Effectiveness of a Children's Workshop in The Creative Arts in Forwarding Personal and Intellectual Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamond, Florence Rand

    1969-01-01

    A workshop program sponsored by the Pasadena Art Museum to help overcome cultural handicaps. Results justify the use of creative art in changing the personality and learning patterns of disadvantaged children. (Author/AP)

  20. Museum libraries: how digitization can enhance the value of the museum

    OpenAIRE

    Navarrete, Trilce; Mackenzie Owen, John

    2011-01-01

    It is the responsibility of the museum library to enhance the understanding of the museum collection and the role of museum objects as cultural documents. For many reasons, this role is only partially fulfilled, if at all. This is because in practice the library and its museum are insufficiently integrated to perform effectively together. We argue that in a digital world, the library and the museum can and should be re-integrated into a single cultural information system. However, since in pr...

  1. Netherlands: archives, libraries and museums

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ketelaar, E.; Huysmans, F.; van Mensch, P.; Bates, M.J.; Maack, M.N.

    2010-01-01

    This entry provides an overview of the development and current state of archives, libraries, and museums as institutions, and the related professions and disciplines within the Netherlands. The entry describes social and political issues affecting information institutions from the early nineteenth

  2. Museums? Evidence from two Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azilah Kasim

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides evidence on Young Adults’ motivations for visiting and not visiting museums. Using purposive sampling, self-administered questionnaires were distributed to respondents in Kedah, Malaysia and Eskisehir, Turkey. Both Kedah and Eskisehir share one similarity – they both have many museums. The findings revealed that in both study contexts, young people tended to visit museums for practical reasons such as to help them prepare homework or a project. They also visit for intrinsic reasons such as to satisfy their curiosity. Both samples also illustrate Davies (2001 contention that awareness is an important precursor to potential visits. On the other hand, both samples are different in reasons for not visiting. While young people in Eskisehir cite emotional reasons for deciding not to visit, young people in Kedah offered more practical ones such as lack of time and interest, or more interested in other activities. The study findings are useful for understanding reasons behind the generally low museum visits among youth. Several managerial implications of the study were also proposed.

  3. Lightforest and the MIT Museum Holography Education Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connors, Betsy A.

    1998-02-01

    Lightforest installation is a large-scale holographic work permanently installed at the MIT Museum in Cambridge MA. Organic shapes in the rounded walls and floor of a small room (15 by 11 by 9 feet) frame the approximately 200 white- light transmission holograms of fabricated rainforest plants and light and image projections. Additional projects as a result of the Lightforest installation include the creation of a Holography Teaching Program at the MIT Museum, including a partnership with the WSNS elementary school and the creation of a holographic garden mural in the school combining real plants with reflection copies of Lightforest holograms. The combined Lightforest project makes important connections between art, technology, education, and the environment.

  4. Museums and engagement: Website quality as a basis for commitment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Martínez-Sanz

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Museums´ communication with their public through on-line platforms, such as webs, blogs or social networks, has been consolidated as an efficient strategy for strengthening the relationship with their different audiences. The current study defends the strong connection between the intangible value known as engagement and corporate communication, besides proposing certain key elements for managing this association correctly in the digital environment. Moreover, by means of content analysis and inferential statistics, this work provides an answer to three research questions which demonstrate the relation between the quality shown on the corporate sites of 21 contemporary art museums and the engagement attained. Specifically, both the study based on linear regression and Pearson´s statistical coefficient confirm the correlation between web quality, number of visits, and popularity on the Internet.

  5. Imaging Difference: The Politics of Representation in Multicultural Art Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Dipti

    2000-01-01

    Examines the notion of "accurate" and "authentic" representations of culture in multicultural art education discourses focusing on two specific areas, museums and aesthetics. Questions the view that by replacing stereotypic representations with purported accurate and authentic representations will fix misunderstandings…

  6. Young people’s own museum views

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drotner, Kirsten; Knudsen, Line Vestergaard; Mortensen, Christian Hviid

    2017-01-01

    Taking a mixed-methods, visitor-focused approach to views on museums, this article examines what views young Danes aged 13–23 years (n = 2,350) hold on museums and how these views can be categorized and articulated. Arguing that studying views of museums as socially situated meaning.......’ Their responses fall into two main types: assertive speech acts providing factual descriptions and expressive speech acts providing more evaluative judgments. In general, young Danes make sense of museums along three different routes. One group wants museums that expand and challenge prior perceptions...... and knowledge, another group prefers museums that cater to existing interests, while members of a third, smaller group take it upon themselves to make museum visits enriching experiences....

  7. Musealization without museology: national museums and fashion exhibitions between history, theory and practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Žarić

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Studies of the theory and history of fashion, which were up until recently grouped with culture studies, gender studies, communicology, art history and anthropology are, on the academic map of the 21st century being established as separate disciplines. Consolidating these contexts, the affirmation of fashion studies has been most prevalent within the museology of fashion, as it - or rather – fashion museology is becoming one of the leading tendencies within contemporary museum practices. This paper views fashion as a specific kind of system, coded through sociocultural codes, and finds the reason for the ever-increasing number of exhibitions of fashion on the international as well as the national museum scene in the codes of fashion which oscillate between the aesthetic and the commercial. By affirming fashion as an art form on the one hand and increasing the profitability of the institution on the other, fashion exhibitions enable museums to become „fashionable“ – to keep up with contemporary, more liberal exhibition concepts. Despite the fact that in this year there have been a large number of fashion exhibitions in national museums, fashion is still without its own museology, a scientific theory which would explain it as a museum phenomenon. The exhibits are interpreted historically, while explaining their utilitarian and aesthetic value, while the question of why fashion is exhibited as an art form or a kind of cultural production to the consumer of the exhibition - the visitor – remains unanswered. By analyzing historical events which conditioned the museum exhibiting of fashion as well as the different conceptions of its exhibition, the author strives to – through the juxtaposition of international and national exhibitions catch sight of the causes of the lack of a museology of fashion, and open up the issue of its affirmation within the professional academic and museum community of Serbia.

  8. Art in time and space: context modulates the relation between art experience and viewing time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brieber, David; Nadal, Marcos; Leder, Helmut; Rosenberg, Raphael

    2014-01-01

    The experience of art emerges from the interaction of various cognitive and affective processes. The unfolding of these processes in time and their relation with viewing behavior, however, is still poorly understood. Here we examined the effect of context on the relation between the experience of art and viewing time, the most basic indicator of viewing behavior. Two groups of participants viewed an art exhibition in one of two contexts: one in the museum, the other in the laboratory. In both cases viewing time was recorded with a mobile eye tracking system. After freely viewing the exhibition, participants rated each artwork on liking, interest, understanding, and ambiguity scales. Our results show that participants in the museum context liked artworks more, found them more interesting, and viewed them longer than those in the laboratory. Analyses with mixed effects models revealed that aesthetic appreciation (compounding liking and interest), understanding, and ambiguity predicted viewing time for artworks and for their corresponding labels. The effect of aesthetic appreciation and ambiguity on viewing time was modulated by context: Whereas art appreciation tended to predict viewing time better in the laboratory than in museum context, the relation between ambiguity and viewing time was positive in the museum and negative in the laboratory context. Our results suggest that art museums foster an enduring and focused aesthetic experience and demonstrate that context modulates the relation between art experience and viewing behavior.

  9. Art in time and space: context modulates the relation between art experience and viewing time.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Brieber

    Full Text Available The experience of art emerges from the interaction of various cognitive and affective processes. The unfolding of these processes in time and their relation with viewing behavior, however, is still poorly understood. Here we examined the effect of context on the relation between the experience of art and viewing time, the most basic indicator of viewing behavior. Two groups of participants viewed an art exhibition in one of two contexts: one in the museum, the other in the laboratory. In both cases viewing time was recorded with a mobile eye tracking system. After freely viewing the exhibition, participants rated each artwork on liking, interest, understanding, and ambiguity scales. Our results show that participants in the museum context liked artworks more, found them more interesting, and viewed them longer than those in the laboratory. Analyses with mixed effects models revealed that aesthetic appreciation (compounding liking and interest, understanding, and ambiguity predicted viewing time for artworks and for their corresponding labels. The effect of aesthetic appreciation and ambiguity on viewing time was modulated by context: Whereas art appreciation tended to predict viewing time better in the laboratory than in museum context, the relation between ambiguity and viewing time was positive in the museum and negative in the laboratory context. Our results suggest that art museums foster an enduring and focused aesthetic experience and demonstrate that context modulates the relation between art experience and viewing behavior.

  10. Art in Time and Space: Context Modulates the Relation between Art Experience and Viewing Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brieber, David; Nadal, Marcos; Leder, Helmut; Rosenberg, Raphael

    2014-01-01

    The experience of art emerges from the interaction of various cognitive and affective processes. The unfolding of these processes in time and their relation with viewing behavior, however, is still poorly understood. Here we examined the effect of context on the relation between the experience of art and viewing time, the most basic indicator of viewing behavior. Two groups of participants viewed an art exhibition in one of two contexts: one in the museum, the other in the laboratory. In both cases viewing time was recorded with a mobile eye tracking system. After freely viewing the exhibition, participants rated each artwork on liking, interest, understanding, and ambiguity scales. Our results show that participants in the museum context liked artworks more, found them more interesting, and viewed them longer than those in the laboratory. Analyses with mixed effects models revealed that aesthetic appreciation (compounding liking and interest), understanding, and ambiguity predicted viewing time for artworks and for their corresponding labels. The effect of aesthetic appreciation and ambiguity on viewing time was modulated by context: Whereas art appreciation tended to predict viewing time better in the laboratory than in museum context, the relation between ambiguity and viewing time was positive in the museum and negative in the laboratory context. Our results suggest that art museums foster an enduring and focused aesthetic experience and demonstrate that context modulates the relation between art experience and viewing behavior. PMID:24892829

  11. How to Modernize the Academic Museum. Exhibition Activity of the Museum Group the ARAS as a Pilot Project of the Museum of History of Russian Academy of Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korneva-Chaeva Irina A.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The article on the example of the Museum group of Archives of Russian Academy of Science is demonstrating new possibilities of representation of archival documents in the museum space. The authors focused on the potential exposure of the museum based on the principle of visualization. They explain the special role of representing scientific knowledge for education of youth. They offer a new form of interactive communication with the museum’s scientific heritage, based on the method of comprehending the reality as a “co-experience” and “re-discovery” that leads to the attainment the new generation to the new intellectual and spiritual experience. The experiment, the research paper, the science, the war, and even the modern art are the main themes of our exhibitions. The authors use the special new methods of exhibition to create the intriguing image of scientist. They use light boxes and interactive demonstrations. The main aim of the exposition is to show the documents of Archives of Russian Academy of Science, so we rely on the following materials: personal fond of academicians A.N. Nesmeyanov, V.L. Komarov, M.V. Keldysh, I.V. Kurchatov and others. Authors successfully solve the problems of the development of new theoretical principles exposing archival documents by modern methods.

  12. Indoor air quality of a museum in a subtropical climate: the Oscar Niemeyer museum in Curitiba, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godoi, Ricardo H M; Carneiro, Barbara H B; Paralovo, Sarah L; Campos, Vania P; Tavares, Tania M; Evangelista, Heitor; Van Grieken, Rene; Godoi, Ana F L

    2013-05-01

    The assessment of damage to indoor cultural heritage, in particular by pollutants, is nowadays a major and growing concern for curators and conservators. Nevertheless, although many museums have been widely investigated in Europe, the effects of particulate matter and gaseous pollutants in museums under tropical and subtropical climates and with different economic realities are still unclear. An important portion of the world's cultural heritage is currently in tropical countries where both human and financial resources for preserving museum collections are limited. Hence, our aim is to assess the damage that can be caused to the artwork by pollution in hot and humid environments, where air quality and microclimatic condition differences can cause deterioration. As a case study, particulate matter as well as gases were collected at the Oscar Niemeyer Museum (MON) in Curitiba, Brazil, where large modern and contemporary works of art are displayed. NO2, SO2, O3, Acetic Acid, Formic Acids and BTEX, in the ambient air, were sampled by means of passive diffusive sampling and their concentrations were determined by IC or GC-MS. The particulate matter was collected in bulk form and analyzed with the use of energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence and aethalometer. The chemical compositions of individual particles were quantitatively elucidated, including low-Z components like C, N and O, as well as higher-Z elements, using automated electron probe microanalysis. The gaseous and particulate matter levels were then compared with the concentrations obtained for the same pollutants in other museums, located in places with different climates, and with some reference values provided by international cultural heritage conservation centers. Results are interpreted separately and as a whole with the specific aim of identifying compounds that could contribute to the chemical reactions taking place on the surfaces of artifacts and which could potentially cause irreversible damage to the

  13. BETWEEN MUSEUM, MONUMENT AND MEMORIAL: DANIEL LIBESKIND’S JEWISH MUSEUM IN BERLIN (1999

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Željka Pješivac

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The main hypothesis of this paper is that Libeskind’s Jewish Museum in Berlin is moving between museum, monument and memorial, that is, that this musuem is ‘place of memory’ (lieu de mémoire. Using Pierre Nora’s concept lieu de mémoire as the starting point of this study and redefining this concept through the language of architecture, the main aim of this paper is to explore this architectural object in the frames of cultural studies. The central foci of this paper are not thus artistic (productional, technical, stylist, etc. prob-lems as specifics of autonomous world of arts, but prob-lems of locating architecture within culture and repre-senting procedures of culture within architecture. Through aesthetics of architecture this paper explores problems of representation and construction of cultural mechanism, relations between culture and power, rep-resentation and construction of Jewish ethnical identity. As cultural studies is a heterogeneous field, this paper connects the following: theory of reception, narratology, cultural anthropology, curator practices, ethnology, and finally theory of performativity

  14. Analisa Minat Wisata Museum Kota Bandung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ani Solihat

    2016-09-01

    ABSTRACT Museum is a collection of historical objects as evidence that should be known by the public, especially the new generation as a study of the history. In Bandung there are a number of museums including the Geology Museum, Asian-African Museum, Mandala Wangsit Siliwangi Museum, Post Museum, Sri Baduga Museum, and Barli Museum. All six of the museum managed by the government and private parties. Until now the interest of tourists who come to the city of Bandung is just shopping, dining and tours of the city, it is not significant to the interests wisatawa education at the museum in the city of Bandung. Since 2014 Bandung many improvements done in various places, such as parks, Square Bandung, street like Braga as one of the attractions of the past, Dago, including the Asian-African region serve as a place Asian-African Conference ke- 50, it is one of the magnets increase the tourists to visit the city of Bandung. Increasing the tourists should have a great potential for the government of Bandung in increasing interest in the visit to the museum as a means of travel and history education. The purpose of this study was to identify how big tourist interest in visiting Bandung museums. The method used in this research is descriptive quantitative method, while respondents in this study is that Bandung tourists, which is in the area of shopping area, culinary tours, and city tours. The results showed that the interest  Bandung tourists is very low in visiting the museum in the Bandung city.  Keyword : Tourism, Consumer Interest, Museum Tours

  15. The Otolith Group’s “Monuments to Dead Television.” Independent Cinema and the Migrant Experience in Europe between Television and the Museum

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ferrara, Beatrice

    2014-01-01

    “Monument to dead television” is the expression the British collective The Otolith Group uses to define its activity of recuperating long-lost quality films, and re-screening them in contemporary art museums and gallery spaces...

  16. How Law Manifests Itself in Australian Aboriginal Art

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.T.M. Schreiner (Agnes)

    2013-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ The article How Law Manifests Itself in Australian Aboriginal Art will discuss two events at the Aboriginal Art Museum Utrecht from the perspective of a meeting between two artistic and legal cultures. The first event, on the art and law of the Spinifex people,

  17. African Art: An Essay for Teachers, Curriculum Handbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelso, Ann B., Ed.

    In an introductory section by Michael D. Harris, this resource presents a discussion of aspects and problems in the WEstern study of African Art. This is followed by six lesson plans based on art works from the Fred and Rita Richman Collection of Sub-Saharan Art in the High Museum. The handbook follows Georgia's Quality Core Curriculum and the Ten…

  18. Aprendiendo a entender. Victoria Ocampo y su descubrimiento de los Estados Unidos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plotkin, Mariano

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the evolving relationship that Argentine intellectual and cultural entrepreneur Victoria Ocampo established with the United States. Through her trajectory the article analyzes broader topics such as the evolution of the Argentine social and intellectual élite’s project of modernization. Ocampo was at the same time a typical and a unique representative of the Argentine social élite. She was typical in the way she was educated in a cosmopolitan environment. She was unique because she occupied a central figure in the Argentine field of cultural production since the 1920 until her death in the late 1970s.

    El artículo analiza la evolución de la compleja relación que la intelectual y empresaria cultural argentina Victoria Ocampo estableció con los Estados Unidos. A través de esta trayectoria, el artículo analiza también temas mas amplios como la evolución de los proyectos modernizadores de la élite social e intelectual argentina. Ocampo era a la vez una representante típica y única de su clase social. Era típica por la manera en que fue educada en un ambiente cosmopolita. Era única por el lugar central que ocupó en el campo intelectual argentino desde la década de 1920 hasta su muerte a finales de los años 70.

  19. Alternative legacies: Artist projects in history museums & the importance of context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyndsey Boekenkamp

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The primary focus of this paper is to investigate why artists are drawn to working in history museums, and how an artist-driven critique of museum practices encourages dialogue about artistic and historical authority, and the role of the museum. Drawing from the fields of public history, art history, anthropology, and journalism, this study argues that artists play an important role in fostering multiple interpretations within traditional historical and academically informed museum practices. The primary theorists influencing this study include Art Historian, Douglas Crimp and his analysis of postmodernism; Professor of Art Education, Dipti Desai and her theory of ethnographic shift; Modern European Historian, Susan Crane and her theory of disruption or “excess of memory”; English Professor, Bettina Carbonell and her theory of “bearing witness”; and Patricia Romney’s analysis of Russian Philosopher, Mikhail Bakhtin and his theory of dialogism. As an outgrowth of this pre-existing scholarship, this study sought to prove that artists were better positioned to intervene in and manipulate traditional museum practices, not because they helped facilitate shared authority, but because they asserted their own artistic authority in the creation of alternative narratives. Through an analysis comparing Fred Wilson’s installation Liberty/Liberte—shown first in the 2006-2007 exhibition Legacies: Contemporary Artists Reflect on Slavery at the New-York Historical Society, and then in its current placement as part of the Historical Society’s official renovations—this study instead concludes that artists are more than capable of successful interventions in non-art environments – specifically, history museums. However, the context in which the artwork is placed, as well as the conversation between the artist and the institution throughout the duration of any project, has the power to make or break the success of these artist interventions.

  20. Accounting for Violence at the Victoria Industrial School

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bryan Hogeveen

    2009-01-01

    Boys who were inmates at the Victoria Industrial School (VIS) from its opening in 1887 to its closure in 1934 often suffered extreme, violent, and capricious penalties and encountered calculated psychological manipulation...

  1. Ecological Biogeography of the Terrestrial Nematodes of Victoria Land, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Byron J.; Wall, Diana H.; Virginia, Ross A.; Broos, Emma; Knox, Matthew A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The terrestrial ecosystems of Victoria Land, Antarctica are characteristically simple in terms of biological diversity and ecological functioning. Nematodes are the most commonly encountered and abundant metazoans of Victoria Land soils, yet little is known of their diversity and distribution. Herein we present a summary of the geographic distribution, habitats and ecology of the terrestrial nematodes of Victoria Land from published and unpublished sources. All Victoria Land nematodes are endemic to Antarctica, and many are common and widely distributed at landscape scales. However, at smaller spatial scales, populations can have patchy distributions, with the presence or absence of each species strongly influenced by specific habitat requirements. As the frequency of nematode introductions to Antarctica increases, and soil habitats are altered in response to climate change, our current understanding of the environmental parameters associated with the biogeography of Antarctic nematofauna will be crucial to monitoring and possibly mitigating changes to these unique soil ecosystems. PMID:25061360

  2. Artful creation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darsø, Lotte

    2013-01-01

    An introduction to the field of Arts-in-Business outlining 4 different approaches: 1) Art as decoration, 2) Art as intertainment, 3) Arts as instrumental, 4) Art as strategic......An introduction to the field of Arts-in-Business outlining 4 different approaches: 1) Art as decoration, 2) Art as intertainment, 3) Arts as instrumental, 4) Art as strategic...

  3. Victoria Land, Ross Sea, and Ross Ice Shelf, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    On December 19, 2001, MODIS acquired data that produced this image of Antarctica's Victoria Land, Ross Ice Shelf, and the Ross Sea. The coastline that runs up and down along the left side of the image denotes where Victoria Land (left) meets the Ross Ice Shelf (right). The Ross Ice Shelf is the world's largest floating body of ice, approximately the same size as France. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  4. “Contemporary Aesth-Ethics. The Ethical Turn in the 21st Century Art Institutions”

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campolmi, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In recent years, the core aesthetic domain of museums has switched from exhibiting artworks into creating social impact. Ethics has replaced aesthetics as the main focus of the art museum. Modern and contemporary art museums are using exhibitions and public programs’ initiatives as a means...... to engage with the audiences and with contemporary events that influence society. The paper defines museum curatorial ethics as a way of thinking and behaving that is engaged with and shaped by contingent events. The paper investigates Tate Liverpool’s exhibitions and public programs’ initiatives as a case...

  5. Field Studies for Key Stage 4 on Mine Water Pollution: A University and Museum Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopwood, Jeremy D.; Berry, Stuart D.; Ambrose, Jayne L.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes how a university and a museum have worked together to create a "How science works" workshop entitled "What's in our water?" The workshop teaches students about the continuing pollution from a disused coal mine, how the pollution is cleaned up using a state-of-the-art treatment works and how scientists…

  6. Can Sensory Gallery Guides for Children with Sensory Processing Challenges Improve Their Museum Experience?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Tina S.; Blake, Amanda B.; Shelffo, Kathleen E.

    2018-01-01

    Children routinely visit art museums as part of their educational experience and family time, many of them having special needs. The number of children diagnosed with autism and sensory processing disorders is increasing. These conditions may include heightened sensory "avoiding" or "seeking" behaviors that can interfere with a…

  7. Grapple with a Giant Squid at the Natural History Museum's Darwin Centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinkler, Abigail; Collins, Sally

    2009-01-01

    The Natural History Museum's new Darwin Centre fulfils three main roles. It is a state-of-the-art scientific research and collections facility, but it is also an awe-inspiring new public space that allows visitors to explore the natural world in an exciting and innovative way. With its opening, students can experience the relevance of the science…

  8. Reviews Book: The 4% Universe: Dark Matter, Dark Energy and the Race to Discover the Rest of Reality Book: Quantitative Understanding of Biosystems: An Introduction to Biophysics Book: Edison's Electric Light: The Art of Invention Book: The Edge of Physics: Dispatches from the Frontiers of Cosmology Equipment: Voicebox Equipment: Tracker 4 Books: Hands-On Introduction to NI LabVIEW with Vernier, and Engineering Projects with NI LabVIEW and Vernier Places to Visit: Discovery Museum Book: Philosophy of Science: A Very Short Introduction Web Watch

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    WE RECOMMEND Quantitative Understanding of Biosystems: An Introduction to Biophysics Text applies physics to biology concepts Edison's Electric Light: The Art of Invention Edison's light still shines brightly The Edge of Physics: Dispatches from the Frontiers of Cosmology Anecdotes explore cosmology Voicebox Voicebox kit discovers the physics and evolution of speech Tracker 4 Free software tracks motion analysis Hands-On Introduction to NI LabVIEW with Vernier, and Engineering Projects with NI LabVIEW and Vernier Books support the LabVIEW software Discovery Museum Newcastle museum offers science enjoyment for all Philosophy of Science: A Very Short Introduction Philosophy opens up science questions WORTH A LOOK The 4% Universe: Dark Matter, Dark Energy and the Race to Discover the Rest of Reality Book researches the universe WEB WATCH Superconductivity websites are popular

  9. Links between Libraries and Museums: a Case Study of Library-Museum Collaboration at the Hong Kong Maritime Museum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Lo

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Established in 2005, the Hong Kong Maritime Museum (HKMM is a relatively new private museum that aims to collect all forms of materials related to the development of boats, ships, maritime exploration and trade, and naval warfare on the South China coast, as well as its adjacent seas.  The Museum not only serves as a unique platform for teaching and learning of the local heritage in Hong Kong, it also contributes greatly to the promotion of community engagement and social connections.  The HKMM is also equipped with its own museum library, and it is called the CSSC (China State Shipbuilding Corporation Maritime Heritage Resource Centre.  In addition to supporting various research activities carried out by the Museum, this Resource Centre also serves as a central, and yet comprehensive repository for publications, and other archival documents on maritime heritage and history related to Southeastern China.  This paper aims to compare the distinctive operational practices, and user needs between museums and libraries.  It also examines the benefits and challenges of museum-library collaborations in the new knowledge-driven society.  This paper features an interview with Kitty But (Librarian, CSSC Maritime Heritage Resource Centre, The Hong Kong Maritime Museum and Robert Trio (Project Officer for Technology, The Hong Kong Maritime Museum, and in which they discussed their professional experiences in the fields of audience education; the implementation of different new technologies associated with the museum and library services; and various collaborative initiatives carried out between the Museum and the Resource Centre.  Upcoming challenges and opportunities faced by both the Museum and Resource Centre are also discussed in this paper.

  10. Museum professionals meet at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    As part of the World Year of Physics, CERN organised a day of meetings attended by professionals from French and Swiss science museums. The poster for the Einstein exhibition that will open in Bern on 16 June 2005. Around thirty professionals from science museums, as well as representatives of France's Office de Coopération et d'Information Muséographiques (OCIM) and the Suisse Romande Réseau Science et Cité, congregated at CERN on 10th February with the purpose, among other things, of exchanging ideas and information on proposed exhibitions for the World Year of Physics. "We thought that it would be a good idea to start the World Year of Physics with a meeting at CERN that could provide inspiration for future exhibitions", explains Emma Sanders, Head of the Visits Service and Microcosm. Many scientific museums are trying to improve the way they cover contemporary science, and CERN is an ideal place to observe science in the making. Other goals of the meeting were to strengthen links between French and...

  11. Museum of the Bulgar Civilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bugrov Dmitriy G.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In May, 2013, a Museum of Bulgar Civilization, a division of the Bolgar State Historical and Architectural Museum-Reserve, was inaugurated in the city of Bolgar. The museum exposition presents authentic historical and cultural monuments of the Bulgar-Tatar population of the Volga river region, answers visitors’ questions about the origin of the Bulgars, about ethnic, political and cultural aspects of the Bulgar civilization, about historical destinies of the medieval population of Volga Bulgaria, and the role of its cultural heritage in the modern world. The basic exposition consists of three parts: “History of Bulgar civilization”, “Ancient Bolgar: the life of the city” and "Discovery of ancient Bolgar.” The internal structure of the first part is organized along chronological lines, starting from the Xiongnu Empire and the Great Migration Period to the emergence of medieval Tatar states. The second part represents various aspects of material and spiritual culture of medieval Bolgar in the period of its prosperity (13th-14th centuries. The third part is devoted to the history of the study of Bolgar and its environs starting from the 17-18th centuries up to modern integrated research.

  12. Energy efficiency in new museum build: THEpUBLIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battle, G.; Yuen, C. H. N.; Zanchetta, M.; D'Cruz, P.

    2006-12-01

    The project MUSEUMS, awarded the Thermie Grant from the European Commission, has applied and tested new and innovative technologies for optimizing energy efficiency and sustainability in nine retrofitted and new museum buildings in Europe. The project will significantly contribute to the acceptance of innovative and renewable technologies in public buildings by demonstrating that retrofitted and new museum buildings can fully meet architectural, functional, comfort, control and safety requirements as well as achieve total energy savings of over 35% and reduce CO2 emissions by over 50%. THEpUBLIC will be a stunning and modern flagship building containing six storeys, with a total area of 11,000Âm2 of galleries for exhibitions, digital art and hands-on displays. In addition, there will be workspaces, creative spaces, retail opportunities, restaurant facilities, public areas, conference rooms and other multi-function spaces. Initiated by Jubilee Arts, the THEpUBLIC, designed by Alsop Architects, will introduce and engage its 400,000 expected visitors in the principles of energy and the environment through a display of art, education, technology and entertainment in the centre of West Bromwich, Sandwell. It will serve as a catalyst for urban regeneration within Sandwell.Battle McCarthy's key environmental design solutions for THEpUBLIC include natural daylighting, mixed-mode ventilation system with operable windows, low energy and maintenance cost systems, potential for integrating renewable energy collection systems, borehole water systems for cooling and water supply, an intelligent facade system with external shading and natural ventilation and night cooling systems.

  13. Young people’s own museum views

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drotner, Kirsten; Knudsen, Line Vestergaard; Mortensen, Christian Hviid

    2017-01-01

    Taking a mixed-methods, visitor-focused approach to views on museums, this article examines what views young Danes aged 13–23 years (n = 2,350) hold on museums and how these views can be categorized and articulated. Arguing that studying views of museums as socially situated meaning-making practi......Taking a mixed-methods, visitor-focused approach to views on museums, this article examines what views young Danes aged 13–23 years (n = 2,350) hold on museums and how these views can be categorized and articulated. Arguing that studying views of museums as socially situated meaning......-making practices adds theoretical and empirical depth to existing research and practice, we apply semantic categorization, speech-act theory, and cognitive linguistics as analytical tools. Our results demonstrate that respondents’ most prevalent semantic categories are ‘exciting,’ ‘educative,’ and ‘boring...

  14. The Bay of Pigs: Revisiting Two Museums

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Read

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The Museum of Playa Giron (the Bay of Pigs in the region of Cienega De Zapata, Cuba, celebrates the repulse of Brigade 2506 as the first reverse of US imperialism on the American continents. The equivalent Brigade 2506 Museum in Miami, dedicated to and maintained by the members of Brigade 2506, celebrates defeat at the Bay of Pigs as moral victory for the Cuban exiles. The forces were indeed implacable foes. Yet between the museums can be detected some curious similarities. Both present the common theme of the confrontation between forces of good and evil. Both celebrate the philosophy that dying for one’s country is the greatest good a citizen may achieve. Both museums fly the common Cuban flag. Both museums identify a common enemy: the United States of America. This article, by comparing the displays in the two museums, analyses some cultural elements of what, despite decades of separation, in some ways remains a common Cuban culture.

  15. Art, fisheries and ethnobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begossi, Alpina; Caires, Rodrigo

    2015-02-23

    Nature is perceived in a variety of forms, and the perception of nature can also be expressed in different ways. Local art may represent the perception of nature by humans. It can embody perception, imagination and wisdom. Local art, in particular, reflects how people interact with nature. For example, when studying the representation of fish by different cultures, it is possible to access information on the fish species found in the environment, on its relative importance, and on historical events, among others. In this context, art can be used to obtain information on historical events, species abundance, ecology, and behaviour, for example. It can also serve to compare baselines by examining temporal and spatial scales. This study aims to analyse art and nature from a human ecological perspective: art can understood as an indicator of fish abundance or salience. Art has a variety of dimensions and perspectives. Art can also be associated with conservation ecology, being useful to reinterpret ecological baselines. A variety of paintings on fish, as well as paintings from local art, are explored in this study. They are analyzed as representing important fish, spatially and historically. A survey regarding the fish found in different paintings was conducted using art books and museum books. Pictures were taken by visiting museums, particularly for local or traditional art (Australia and Cape Town). The fish illustrated here seem to be commonly important in terms of salience. For example, Coryphaena spp. is abundant in Greece, Nile tilapia in Egypt, Gadus morhua in the Netherlands, as well as barracuda in Australia; salience is also applied to useful, noticeable or beautiful organisms, such as Carassius auratus (China). Another aspect of salience, the diversity of a group, is also represented by the panel where Uraspis uraspis appears to be depicted. Regarding the evaluation of baselines, we should consider that art may represent abundant fish in certain historic

  16. THE IMPACT OF PROMOTION IN CREATIVE INDUSTRIES – THE CASE OF MUSEUM ATTENDANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iva Buljubašić

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In times of crises, some cultural institutions in Croatia have experienced difficulties attracting an audience, which drove them to try out creative and unconventional forms of promotion. Promotion is one of the most popular, widespread and influential parts of marketing. Promotion is also of major importance for a cultural institution because of its ability to attract a large number of visitors. Setting out from this starting point, this paper focused on conventional and unconventional forms of promotion in museums as a part of the creative industries. Creative industries are gaining importance nowadays, and museums as a part of the visual arts sector of the creative industries are gaining popularity thanks to the promotion efforts. With this in mind, a survey was carried out among the visitors of the Museum of Fine Arts in Osijek during Julije Knifer's retrospective exhibition “Uncompromising” in March and April 2015. Participants were given a questionnaire consisting of closed-ended questions about conventional and unconventional forms of promotion and their impact on visitors. The authors participated in the organization of promotional activities for the exhibition and employed certain conventional and unconventional forms of promotion to get an idea of their impact on museum attendance (or lack thereof. The results demonstrated that the promotional activities had a positive impact on museum attendance, and unconventional forms of promotion had a greater impact than the conventional ones.

  17. The effects of visual context and individual differences on perception and evaluation of modern art and graffiti art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gartus, Andreas; Klemer, Nicolas; Leder, Helmut

    2015-03-01

    Traditionally, artworks are seen as autonomous objects that stand (or should stand) on their own. However, at least since the emergence of Conceptual Art in the 1920s and Pop Art in the 1960s, art lacks any distinctive perceptual features that define it as such. Art, therefore, cannot be defined without reference to its context. Some studies have shown that context affects the evaluation of artworks, and that specific contexts (street for graffiti art, museum for modern art) elicit specific effects (Gartus & Leder, 2014). However, it is yet unclear how context changes perception and appreciation processes. In our study we measured eye-movements while participants (64 psychology undergraduates, 48% women) perceived and evaluated beauty, interest, emotional valence, as well as perceived style for modern art and graffiti art embedded into either museum or street contexts. For modern art, beauty and interest ratings were higher in a museum than in a street context, but context made no difference for the ratings of graffiti art. Importantly, we also found an interaction of context and individual interest in graffiti for beauty and interest ratings, as well as for number of fixations. Analyses of eye-movements also revealed that viewing times were in general significantly longer in museum than in street contexts. We conclude that context can have an important influence on aesthetic appreciation. However, some effects depend also on the style of the artworks and the individual art interests of the viewers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The Early (Feminist Essays of Victoria Ocampo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doris Meyer

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the essays written by Ocampo between 1920 and 1934, prior to the time when she publicly voiced her adhesion to feminism and the rights of women in Argentine society. In these works from her Testimonios in which Ocampo struggles to find her voice as a female writer, the maleable essay serves her need to engage in discursive dialogues from the margins of the literary culture of her time. Both as a woman and a member of the oligarchy, she questions cultural assumptions and gender-based binary structures common among the male writers of her time, many of whom she knew personally. Using rhetorical strategies that show the self-reflexive and subversive nature of her writing, Ocampo reads and reinterprets these works from a parenthetical feminist perspective, contesting their intellectual and aesthetic biases. The active agency of the reader as writer in these early essays shows Ocampo's awareness of her own unorthodox subject position—alienated from the conventions of her class, her gender, her national culture and language. Her autobiographical musings and her engagement with literary modernity in the 1920s and 1930s reveal a woman who accepted the liabilities of articulating an autonomous self, both in a European and a Latin American context. The influence of family bonds and patriarchal morality decisively shaped, but did not ultimately control, the way Victoria Ocampo eventually defined herself as a feminist author.

  19. Art for All

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aksinja Kermauner

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of spatial planning on the principles of “design for all” is to ensure that every individual, regardless of obstacle, can participate in the information society. It combines the principles of how as many people as possible could use products, services and systems without adjusting them. Why should we not transfer the concept of “design for all” also to other areas, such as the field of art? In this article we consider how a work of art, especially a two-dimensional one, could be adapted for blind or visually impaired visitors of a gallery or to a museum, and list what has already been done in this area. We also describe a textbook for teaching fine arts, adapted for blind and partially sighted students.

  20. Transmedial Museum Experiences: the case of Moesgaard

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pajares Tosca, Susana

    2016-01-01

    This article’s aim is to elucidate the uncertain ontological status of the transmedial museum experience, which I define as the aesthetic encounter of a user with the complex object that is the conjunction of historical artefact, informative label and fictional stories on different media platforms....... I combine a theoretical mapping of the concept of the transmedial museum experience with a case study of three transmedial exhibitions hosted by the Moesgaard Museum in Aarhus, Denmark....

  1. Awakening Objects and Indigenizing the Museum: Stephen Gilchrist in Conversation with Henry F. Skerritt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Gilchrist

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Curated by Stephen Gilchrist, Everywhen: The Eternal Present in Indigenous Art from Australia was held at Harvard Art Museums from February 5, 2016–September 18, 2016. The exhibition was a survey of contemporary Indigenous art from Australia, exploring the ways in which time is embedded within Indigenous artistic, social, historical, and philosophical life. The exhibition included more than seventy works drawn from public and private collections in Australia and the United States, and featured many works that have never been seen outside Australia. Everywhen is Gilchrist’s second major exhibition in the United States, following Crossing Cultures: The Owen and Wagner Collection of Contemporary Aboriginal Australian Art at the Hood Museum of Art in 2012. Conducted on April 22, 2016, this conversation considers the position of Indigenous art in the museum, and the active ways in which curators and institutions can work to “indigenize” their institutions. Gilchrist discusses the evolution of Everywhen, along with the curatorial strategies employed to change the status of object-viewer relations in the exhibition. The transcription has been edited for clarity.

  2. A rationale for a museum of health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzaneh Yousefi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The museum of health is a place that presents health science and human body and any other subjects that can affect human health. In this museum visitors can learn the mechanisms and functions of human body and learn how to protect and take care of their bodies. They can also learn several diseases and their consequences on human body and how to fight against them. This museum is a big step for improvement of general society health level by increasing society’s health knowledge. In this article structure, departments and also benefits of the health museum are evaluated.

  3. Cosmic Convergence: Art and Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, Elizabeth A.; Zisholtz, E.; Hilton, H.

    2010-01-01

    The I.P. Stanback Museum and Planetarium is a major educational and teaching resource for South Carolina State University, K-12 schools, other universities and the community of Orangeburg and well beyond. The concept of creating a museum with a planetarium on the campus of SC State was ahead of its time. Today scholars are writing about the unity of creative disciplines. Through its integration of the arts, humanities and sciences, the Stanback, the only art museum with a planetarium at any of the Historically Black Colleges and Universities and one of the few in the nation, stands in the forefront of modern thinking. Cosmic Convergence: Art and Science, opening at the I.P. Stanback Museum and Planetarium in February 2010, will feature the works of Mildred Thompson (1936-2003), a prominent African American artist who worked in the media of painting, drawing, print making, sculpture, and photography. Thompson’s artwork shows the strong influences of her interest in physics, astronomy, and metaphysics as well as music and spiritualism. “My work in the visual arts is, and has always been, a continuous search for understanding. It is an expression of purpose and reflects a personal interpretation of the Universe.” Cosmic Convergence will explore the meeting of Art and Science through Mildred Thompson's work and the scientific basis of that work. The paintings and sculptures of the exhibit will be combined with astronomical images showing both the reality and interpretation of the surrounding Universe. Support for this work was provided by the NSF PAARE program to South Carolina State University under award AST-0750814.

  4. Critical Culture: Environmental Adult Education in Public Museums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Lorraine; Clover, Darlene E.

    2017-01-01

    This chapter explores how museums, as educational and cultural institutions, can become agents of socioecological transformation. The ideas of critical museum studies and environmental adult education are reviewed, and three examples of environmental adult education in museums are discussed.

  5. Individual and Collaborative Personalization in a Science Museum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, Elisabeth M.A.G.; Lingnau, Andreas; Vissers, Geert; Kockelhorn, Hub; Nijholt, Antinus; Nijholt, A.

    Museums increasingly use interactive technologies to make a museum visit more rewarding. In this chapter, we present opportunities that tabletop environments offer for learning, enjoyment, motivation, collaboration and playful interaction in museums. We discuss experiments with a tabletop interface

  6. ESTUDIOS DE VISITANTES A MUSEOS (VISITOR STUDIES IN MUSEUMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodríguez Sánchez Keilyn

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Resumen:Este artículo ofrece un estudio bibliográfico en torno a las investigaciones sobre la relación entre la museografía y sus visitantes. El objetivo central de este documento consiste en elaborar una clasificación de esos estudios en programas de investigación de manera que sirva de punto de partida para la construcción de una pedagogía del Museo. Para este fin, se utiliza la propuesta de Schulman, sobre tipificación de estudios en programas de investigación y, al respecto, se plantean cuatro tipos: investigaciones centradas en lo museográfico, investigaciones centradas en el comportamiento museal, investigaciones centradas en la interacción dispositivo-visitantes y las investigaciones centradas en la evaluación museográfica. Se concluye que los resultados de investigación de estos programas, junto con el conocimiento de las técnicas de diseño y a la teoría educativa, serían la base central de un planteamiento sobre pedagogía museológica.Abstract: This article is a bibliographical research study of museography and the relationship of visitors to them. The main objective of this paper is to develop a classification system of these studies of research programs which serve as a starting point for systematizing the pedagogics of the museum. The author's fourfold typology of research programs builds on Schulman’s (1989 program research concept: museography centered research, museum behavior centered research, museum interaction (visitor-exhibition centered research, and museum evaluation centered research. The article reaches the conclusion that the research findings of these programs along with knowledge of design techniques and educational theory will serve as the primary basis for a Museology pedagogy proposal.

  7. Indoor air quality of a museum in a subtropical climate: The Oscar Niemeyer museum in Curitiba, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godoi, Ricardo H.M., E-mail: rhmgodoi@ufpr.br [Federal University of Paraná, Environmental Engineering Department, Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Carneiro, Barbara H.B. [University of Positivo, Curitiba (Brazil); Paralovo, Sarah L. [Federal University of Paraná, Environmental Engineering Department, Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Campos, Vania P.; Tavares, Tania M. [Institute of Chemistry, Federal University of Bahia, Salvador, BA (Brazil); Evangelista, Heitor [LARAMG/Department of Biophysics and Biometry, Rio de Janeiro State University, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Van Grieken, Rene [Department of Chemistry, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, B-2610 Antwerp (Belgium); Godoi, Ana F.L. [Federal University of Paraná, Environmental Engineering Department, Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2013-05-01

    The assessment of damage to indoor cultural heritage, in particular by pollutants, is nowadays a major and growing concern for curators and conservators. Nevertheless, although many museums have been widely investigated in Europe, the effects of particulate matter and gaseous pollutants in museums under tropical and subtropical climates and with different economic realities are still unclear. An important portion of the world's cultural heritage is currently in tropical countries where both human and financial resources for preserving museum collections are limited. Hence, our aim is to assess the damage that can be caused to the artwork by pollution in hot and humid environments, where air quality and microclimatic condition differences can cause deterioration. As a case study, particulate matter as well as gases were collected at the Oscar Niemeyer Museum (MON) in Curitiba, Brazil, where large modern and contemporary works of art are displayed. NO{sub 2}, SO{sub 2}, O{sub 3}, Acetic Acid, Formic Acids and BTEX, in the ambient air, were sampled by means of passive diffusive sampling and their concentrations were determined by IC or GC–MS. The particulate matter was collected in bulk form and analyzed with the use of energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence and aethalometer. The chemical compositions of individual particles were quantitatively elucidated, including low-Z components like C, N and O, as well as higher-Z elements, using automated electron probe microanalysis. The gaseous and particulate matter levels were then compared with the concentrations obtained for the same pollutants in other museums, located in places with different climates, and with some reference values provided by international cultural heritage conservation centers. Results are interpreted separately and as a whole with the specific aim of identifying compounds that could contribute to the chemical reactions taking place on the surfaces of artifacts and which could potentially cause

  8. Inclusive museums: Look and not touch?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro Mendieta Vargas

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This is a brief conceptual and theoretical paper on paradigmatic changes experienced with disability.  It is focused on the Social Model and the Universal Design, as well as the effects on the human rights to access culture and the practical actions that can be adopted to make cultural spaces and services, mostly museums and art galleries, accessible to all, mainly, elderly citizens (65 year old and older.   This paper is based on the author’s personal reflections and experiences, and is aimed at raising awareness within society in general and cultural service operators in particular, regarding the experience of those visually impaired accessing these services. Some general recommendations are offered, and several questions are raised about the role of universities in broadening opportunities for people with disabilities and the elderly to access and enjoy cultural products and services. Within this context, in order to avoid exclusion and discrimination due to the different barriers in the Costa Rican cultural environment, public policies and legislation regarding cultural rights must include the design of spaces, products and services based on the universal design and accessibility for all.  In Costa Rica this is legally binding for those programs and services financed by the State and municipalities.

  9. Self-Access Language Learning in Museums: A Materials Development Project.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Pemberton

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on a project carried out at The University of Nottingham to create and evaluate English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL materials with the aim of exploiting the self-access language learning possibilities that museums offer. A series of thematic resources were produced and trialed with ESOL learners in the Lincolnshire area. Feedback from the learners indicated that museums could have an important role to play in providing flexible language learning opportunities for ESOL students. The authors conclude by suggesting that other public facilities such as libraries, art galleries, botanical gardens and even football stadia could be exploited for this purpose.

  10. Getting from A to B to C-ollaborative Innovative Design Utopia at the Museum?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rørbæk, Anne

    The paper focuses on boundary crossing collaboration for developing digital communication technology as a means to innovate the museum experience. A qualitative longitudinal case study of the collaboration between an art museum and a digital design company in Denmark is presented. Diversity...... is conceptualized as key in the process under study, as the promoter of creative and innovative outcomes. It is argued that the acceptance of and dialogue between contrasting positions has an essential role in extending the scope of group creativity. To show this, a cartographic micro-analytical approach called...

  11. Great narratives or isolated statements? History in the Dutch national museums (1800-1887)

    OpenAIRE

    Bergvelt, E.

    2012-01-01

    This essay asks why the Dutch national museums did not offer any coherent historical narratives in the nineteenth century, but only isolated objects that were not set into the context of a coherent narrative. After some preliminary remarks, I will give a summary of how the theme of history was approached in these museums. The historical dimension appeared as an explicit element of display only at the beginning and end of the century. In the interim period (1806-c. 1870) art and the aesthetic ...

  12. Liturgy and Music in Hereford Cathedral in the Time of Queen Victoria and Beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tessa Murdoch

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The Victorian Gothic Revival and its focus on liturgical neo-medievalism inspired the 1860s restoration of the medieval Hereford Cathedral. In this restoration, the new screen played a central part. Designed by George Gilbert Scott and manufactured by the firm of Francis Skidmore in Coventry, the screen was commissioned in order to re-unite the choir with the nave. The symbolism and colours decorating the screen harmonized with the medieval and later features of the cathedral, including the high altar reredos, organ pipes, and floor tiles. Hereford Cathedral Library preserves historical accounts of the interior and original music manuscripts by Edward Elgar and Frederick Ouseley that illustrate, with the musical inserts provided, the rich tradition of choral music and liturgy which continues to this day with key liturgies and the annual Three Choirs Festival linking Gloucester, Hereford, and Worcester. Memorials and stained-glass windows dedicated to successive precentors embellish the musical vocabulary of the interior. In focusing on the musical culture connected with Hereford Cathedral, this essay seeks to enrich the interpretation of the restored Hereford Screen in its secular setting at the Victoria and Albert Museum, London.

  13. Models of time in the museum. On exposition solution in history and art museums / Mariann Raisma

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Raisma, Mariann, 1974-

    2008-01-01

    Muuseumi kui ajaloo hoidja, kui ühiskonna peegli ja aja jäädvustaja ning eksponeerija ülesannetest erinevatel aegadel, muuseumide ekspositsiooni eesmärkidest, põhimõtetest ja võimalustest vastavalt muuseumi tüübile ja ajastu nõuetele

  14. Viinistu kunstimuuseum = The Viinistu Art Museum / Triin Ojari

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Ojari, Triin, 1974-

    2004-01-01

    Kunstimuuseumi arhitektuurse ideeprojekti autor Jaan Manitski. Restoran-hotelli arhitektuurse osa autor Emil Urbel (AB Emil Urbel). Restorani sisekujundaja Toivo Raidmets on Viinistu jaoks loonud valgustid ning toolid "John" ja "Mart". Projekt 2001. Kunstimuuseum valmis 2002, restoran-hotell 2004. 3 välis- ja 4 sisevaadet, asendi- ja restorani põhiplaan

  15. The Art Museum as the Domain of the Self

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lars Jakob Bang

    2009-01-01

    Kunstmuseet i oplevelsesøkonomien diskuteret ud fra Huyssen, Adorno og med eksempler fra AROS og Tate Liverpool......Kunstmuseet i oplevelsesøkonomien diskuteret ud fra Huyssen, Adorno og med eksempler fra AROS og Tate Liverpool...

  16. Appropriate strategies for designing contemporary art museums with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    So the assumption that qualitative factors such as (aesthetic style designed for the set, easy access to the collections and availability of educational facilities) compared to individual and social factors such as (users' cultural and social conditions, visitors' economic situation, the sense of peace created by the presence of ...

  17. Fluxus Art Amusement and the Museum of Gags

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Meijden, Peter Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Fluxus-events genererer kropslig viden som en måde at modgå objektificering som kunst på, men museer udstiller tilknyttede genstande ofte alligevel som almindelige kunstgenstande. Også Fluxus' kritik af kunstinstitutionen vendes på hovedet, da Fluxus agerede mod Den hvide kube og dens forudsætnin...

  18. Collection fund of the Slovak Mining Museum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Labuda, J.

    2004-01-01

    The Slovak Mining Museum in Banská Sˇtiavnica belongs to museums of Slovak field activity and includes several exhibition departments: Natural history – collection of minerals and fossils in Berggericht building with 37,500 pieces. Historical – collections and exhibitions linked to specific

  19. Field Museum of Natural History Library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Benjamin W.; Fawcett, W. Peyton

    1986-01-01

    Founded in 1894 to support museum research, the Field Museum of Natural History Library specializes in fields of anthropology, archaeology, botany, geology, palaeontology, and zoology. A rich serials collection and numerous special collections serve both the scientific community and wider public as noncirculating reference collection and through…

  20. Comic Strips to Accompany Science Museum Exhibits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Beom Sun; Park, Eun-mi; Kim, Sang-Hee; Cho, Sook-kyoung; Chung, Min Suk

    2016-01-01

    Science museums make the effort to create exhibits with amusing explanations. However, existing explanation signs with lengthy text are not appealing, and as such, visitors do not pay attention to them. In contrast, conspicuous comic strips composed of simple drawings and humors can attract science museum visitors. This study attempted to reveal…

  1. A history of digitization: Dutch museums

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Navarrete Hernández, T.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past fifty years, a huge amount of labour and funding has been deployed for the introduction of digital technology in museums. In the course of this process, the nature of museums has been transformed. However, little is understood of the processes or the outcome because the history of the

  2. Aplikasi Museum Zoologi Berbasis Augmented Reality

    OpenAIRE

    Gonydjaja, Rosny; Mayongga, Yongki

    2014-01-01

    Museum Zoologi adalah museum yang terletak di kota Bogor, yang memilikikoleksi yang berkaitan dengan dunia satwa dari berbagai spesimen yangdiawetkan maupun fosil hewan. Pada awal pembangunannya tahun 1894,tempat ini berfungsi sebagai laboratorium zoologi yang menjadi wadahpenelitian yang berkaitan dengan pertanian dan zoologi, meliputi kegiataninventarisasi fauna Indonesia dengan nama Landbouw ZoologischLaboratorium. Augmented reality (AR) adalah sebuah lingkungan yangmenggabungkan dunia nya...

  3. Museum without Walls: Imagining New Formative Spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, Gladir; Fritzen, Celdon; Leite, Maria Isabel

    2010-01-01

    The "Museum of Childhood" is a project connected to the Post-Graduate Program in Education at Unesc (Brazil) and since 2005 has been developing interfaces with research, teaching and extension. In this paper, the authors would like to show how the museological conception of the Museum of Childhood makes imagination from one of the…

  4. Self-Directed Learning: Implications for Museums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banz, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Self-directed learning (SDL) has numerous implications for understanding adult learners and for improving their museum experiences. Through a review of the conceptual and empirical literature, the relationship between SDL and education within a museum setting is explored in this article. Discussion includes an overview of SDL, inquiry into two…

  5. The Museum of Solid Waste and Energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Energy Education Development Project, Reston, VA.

    This activity geared for grades 5-9 involves students in creating museum stations on eight solid waste and energy topics. While working in groups, students present their station topic to other students who are conducting a "museum tour." In doing so participants are encouraged to enhance their reading, writing, public speaking, and artistic skills…

  6. 2004 National Awards for Museum & Library Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Institute of Museum and Library Services, 2004

    2004-01-01

    The National Awards for Museum and Library Service give national recognition to institutions that play an integral and essential part in our learning society. The awards celebrate the efforts of libraries and museums of all sizes to connect with their increasingly diverse communities and to serve as centers of lifelong learning. As the pace of…

  7. Mentorship at the slovenian school museum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjetka Balkovec Debevec

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The article examines mentorship at the Slovenian School Museum. It argues that museums are places of value, which play an active part in the functioning of society and are incorporated in the processes of lifelong learning. Additionally, it examines how museums were included in the system of practical student training during the reform of university programmes. The general characteristics of mentorship at the Slovenian School Museum are presented under a number of headings, with special focus on the mentorship in practical student training. The characteristics of the latter are examined employing qualitative analysis of mentors’ observations, and students’ reports on practical student training completed between 2009 and 2016. By examining past mentorship experience, the article argues for the practice of collecting reports on student training in museums, for the purpose of further analysis and study. The article draws attention to the importance of work experience in museums, which represents a way for the students to supplement their theoretical knowledge, as well as learn about the functioning of museums and the mission of the curator. Finally, the article highlights the importance of the continuing education of mentors and argues that a shift in the organisation and evaluation of mentoring work in museums is required, with an aim of offering a higher quality work experience to students, and improving the implementation of practical student training programmes.

  8. Multicultural University Education and Museum Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnikova, G. F.; Gilmanshina, S. I.

    2017-09-01

    The specifics of the educational process in the museum are revealed. The experience of using the multicultural educational space of the museum for developing non-humanitarian directions of the university of general cultural competencies is expounded. The emphasis is on the formation of the ability to tolerate social, ethnic, confessional and cultural differences.

  9. Interactive Learning Units on Museum Websites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Cordelia; Smith, Diantha

    2017-01-01

    Though it is well known that museums should embrace digital learning, many museum websites have not fully utilized digital learning resources, especially in interactive ways. In fact, in a survey of 225 websites of selected U.S. cultural institutions that have informal science education at the heart of their operations, we found that just 5% of…

  10. History of Science and Science Museums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Cláudia; Guilherme, Elsa; Gaspar, Raquel; Boaventura, Diana

    2015-01-01

    The activities presented in this paper, which are addressed to elementary school, are focused on the pioneering work of the Portuguese King Carlos I in oceanography and involve the exploration of the exhibits belonging to two different science museums, the Aquarium Vasco da Gama and the Maritime Museum. Students were asked to study fish…

  11. VIRGINIA WOOLF EN LOS TESTIMONIOS DE VICTORIA OCAMPO: TENSIONES ENTRE FEMINISMO Y COLONIALISMO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia Salomone

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available En este artículo se analizan una serie de textos ensayísticos de la escritora argentina Victoria Ocampo (1890-1979, en los que ella aborda la relación que la ligó a Virginia Woolf, su principal referente en términos literarios y feministas. Desde perspectivas teóricas postcoloniales y feministas, se hace una interpretación de los textos de Ocampo, observando los límites que la cosmovisión colonialista impone no solo a sus diálogos con Woolf, sino al despliegue de su propia escrituraThis article reviews a series of essays by the Argentine writer Victoria Ocampo (1890-1979 in which she deals with the relationship that bound her to Virginia Woolf, her main referent in literary and feminist terms. From postcolonial theoretical perspectives, an interpretation of Ocampo's texts is made, while noticing the limits that the colonialist cosmic vision imposed not only on her dialogues with Woolf but on the development of her own writing

  12. Re-visitando a Federica Montseny. Una lectura de La Victoria y sus lecturas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lozano de la Pola, Ana

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available This article wants to be a close reading of La Victoria, Federica Montseny’s novel published in 1925, in order to achieve two objectives: on the one hand, to break down the clichés that normally appear in Montseny’s work –her “revolutionary melodrama”- as a perfect example of the eternal “ethic-aesthetic” paradox and, on the other hand, to point out the capability of this kind of study to dynamize the so-called “women’s literature” in the context of the XX Century Spanish literature.Este artículo pretende hacer una lectura atenta de La Victoria, novela de Federica Montseny publicada en 1925, con dos objetivos: en primer lugar, deshacer los clichés que suelen tratar la obra de esta autora como representante de la eterna “paradoja ético-estética” que suponen sus “folletines revolucionarios” y, en segundo, señalar la capacidad que tiene el estudio de este tipo de obras para dinamizar la categoría de “literatura de mujeres” con el fin de evitar su estancamiento en el ámbito de la literatura española del s. XX.

  13. Constructing museum learning at the university level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Line Hjorth

    2011-01-01

    Based on a case study of an educational project related to a Darwin exhibition at the Zoological Museum in Copenhagen (‘Evolution’), the article discusses how to integrate museum-based elements into an academic core curriculum and suggests a university-initiated learning strategy situated...... in a museum environment. How can museums be implemented at the university level and become part of a curriculum that demands high academic standards while at the same time exploiting and benefitting from the complexity and aesthetically determined learning potentials offered by museums? Following George A....... Hein’s notion of a ‘constructivist museum’ the purpose of the article is to suggest and demonstrate a learning strategy that focuses on the learner’s consideration of his or her own learning but elaborates on Hein’s general view of the physical surroundings and deals with the question of how exhibition...

  14. Litteraturen og forfatteren på museum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Niels Dichov

    2016-01-01

    The article discusses the connection between literature and museum and the role of museums for the preservation and engagement with literary heritage. Based on an overview of research in the field and a discussion of definitions, distinctions, typology, and current forms of institutions, new...... developments in literary theory, i.e. new book history and the literary studies’ theories of geographic place, but also concepts of materiality, presence, performance and literary scenes, are brought in to explain different connections between literature and the museum and the supposedly dialectic relation...... to the digital society and virtual representation. The role and strength of the author/writer and the importance of place and space in the mediation of literature are enhanced as distinctive for these kinds of museums. It is concluded that the ongoing growth of literary museums is both a result of and an answer...

  15. Museum Ullen Sentalu dalam Perspektif Seni Budaya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doro Daniwati

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Museum merupakan tempat yang sering tidak bisa dilewatkan oleh wisatawan guna memuaskan rasa ingin tahu tentang keunikan dari sebuah kota tujuan wisata. Museum juga sering dikunjungi oleh baik para ilmuwan maupun para akademisi yang melakukan studi/riset/kajian tentang hal-hal yang memiliki nilai-nilai keunikan historis, arkeologis, estetis dan termasuk semua hal yang bernuansa memorabilia dan nostalgia. Ullen Sentalu merupakan museum yang agak unik karena di samping lokasinya yang agak jauh dari hingar bingar kesibukan kota, namun keberadaannya merupakan kebutuhan seni budaya perkotaan. Keunikan dari museum ini terletak pada nilai koleksi artefak-artefaknya yang menghadirkan khusus tentang benda-benda kewanitaan yang bernuansa warisan budaya monarki Mataram Lama yang berbeda dengan koleksi museum lainnya di tanah air.   Museum is a place where tourists are unable to easily neglect for satisfying their curiousity about the uniqueness found in the tourism destination cities.The museum is also commonly visited by artists, academicians, and scientists for their research and studies of variety subjects which discuss the values of historical, archeological, and aesthetic uniqueness, and any subjects that are concerned with those of memorabilia and nostalgic evidence. Ullen Sentalu museum is rather unique when we see the location in the ’remote’ area which is far from the frenetic bustle of the city yet its existence constitutes the needs of urban culture. The uniqueness of this museum lies on the value of artefacts collections which particularly bring the feminine objects nuenced the cultural heritage of the Old Mataram monarchy which are completely different from other museum collections in the country.

  16. Reflections of the academician of AUAS Fedor Schmitt on the museum audience of 1910-1920s and the relevance of their study in the context of museum sociology in Ukraine (1990-2000s years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. O. Kutsaeva

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research is to study the origins of the actual direction of the museum activities  development in Ukraine — museum sociology, which has been described in the significant array of publications starting from the early 1990’s. Those publications are focused on different aspects of learning of needs, motivations, expectations, behaviors, a social-demographic portrait and categories of the museum audience. It has been shown that the attention of the Ukrainian museum staff to the discussed aspects is not only limited by year 1991. The scientific heritage of the academician of All-Ukrainian Academy of Sciences Fedor Schmitt (1877-1937 has been analyzed by the author of the study in order to separate aspects of his activity that can become the certain foundations of the study of the museums audience (museum sociology both in the days of the scientist and in modern Ukraine. The Soviet system not only denied his progressive views, but condemned them to death. It has been summarized by the author that most Schmitt’s papers on the issues of the museum audience were published during the scientist’s work in Kharkiv in 1912-1921. It is quite predictable that the issue of the museum audience was studied by the heritage saver and art scientist. Beginning of Ukrainian school of museology, where the leader was Mykola Bilyashivsky, the director of Kiev Museum of Antiquities and Arts (National History Museum of Ukraine, happened within the Archaeological Commission under the Ukrainian Academy of Sciences. It was led by F. Schmitt. The draft charter of commission, designed by him, pushed to the study of the theory and practice of museology in all its spheres. Schmitt’s ideas on museums that had to be built on the territory of  the Russian Empire, which suffered from the First World War, were formed under the influence of his travels to cultural centers of Europe. Although none of F. Schmitt works before the beginning of 1920s included

  17. The performative turn at Inhotim: installation art and Baudelairean modernity

    OpenAIRE

    Lauren S. Weingarden

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the participatory turn in installation art as part of a trajectory from Baudelairean modernity to twentyfirst-century postmodernity, as represented at Inhotim, the outdoor contemporary art museum and botanical gardens in Brumadinho, MG. In his 1862 essay “The Painter of ModernLife,” Charles Baudelaire defined modernity as fleeting, transitory and fragmentary. Baudelairean modernity initiated a breakdown of boundaries between art and life and between high art aesthetics a...

  18. The “Learning in order to Teach” project and mediation in museums using Brazilian sign language (Libras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daina Leyton

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This article seeks to reflect on mediation in museums based on experiences that occurred in the “Learning in order to Teach” Project. In this case, the mediation acquires specific characteristics because it deals with young deaf people learning art-related contents in order to teach other youth in their first language. The most interesting aspect of this encounter between museum and deaf culture is a mutual, immediate and highly visible influence. While museum-goers and professionals understand that the “gestures” used by the deaf are not random (rather, on the contrary, they make up a complex language, new signs are created by the students based on the contents that are worked with and discovered in the museum. These new signs thus enrich the language itself and begin to circulate within the community.

  19. Unlikely cryptfellows: hospitality, difference, and spectrality at the 9/11 Museum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay Anne Balfour

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper offers a reading of the National September 11 Memorial and Museum to suggest that the encounter with strangers or strangeness is at the core of cultural and commemorative production in the aftermath of a terrorist attack. Specifically, I engage the museum as a text that has significant implications on how we approach the philosophy of hospitality in a time of terror. I argue that the ways in which objects and artifacts exist in relation to one another in the museum act out hospitality in ways that are both unexpected and unintended. For example, while human remains are stored on site, they are only referred to through symbolic art and digital displays that act as a kind of sleight of hand. In particular, I take up the inclusion of a brick from Osama Bin Laden's Abbottabad compound in Pakistan that has been incorporated into the museum in a fashion that is carefully orchestrated and framed. The brick, however, exceeds the frame in which it is permitted to be included in the exhibit; its visuality and materiality defy—and even contradict—the expected narrative of the museum. The brick appears as juxtaposed next to a Navy SEAL uniform and is meant to draw attention toward the distinction between terrorist and national hero, yet as a physical presence in the museum, it retains a sense of both vulnerability and affect as it bears striking resemblance to the bedrock of the towers themselves. Ultimately, I suggest that while the disjunctures between artifacts may seem initially jarring—these are items, after all, that are meant to produce very different material and mediatized effects; they offer a working-through of a hospitality that is crucial to the museum and all culture produced in response to the attacks.

  20. Elemental Scanning Devices Authenticate Works of Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    To better detect aluminum compounds, Marshall Space Flight Center partnered with KeyMaster Inc. (later acquired by Madison, Wisconsin-based Bruker AXS Inc.) to develop a vacuum pump system that could be attached to X-ray fluorescence (XRF) scanners. The resulting technology greatly expanded XRF scanner capabilities, and hundreds of museums now use them to authenticate artifacts and works of art.

  1. In Dialogue with the Decorative Arts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Olivia

    2017-01-01

    How can museum educators create dialogical experiences with European decorative arts? This question frames my essay and stems from the challenges I have faced introducing objects whose original functions seem to overshadow their aesthetic and interpretive value. Repeated efforts to spark rich dialogue and collective interpretation around pieces of…

  2. The Art Institution in a Globalizing World

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gielen, Pascal

    2010-01-01

    How do oclassicalo big art institutions (museums, the ballet, the opera, symphony orchestras) react to phenomena of globalization such as migration flows, the odenationalizationo of artistic movements, the enormous growth of the number of artists, the trend of a global cultural branding of cities,

  3. iMuseumA: An Agent-Based Context-Aware Intelligent Museum System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala, Inmaculada; Amor, Mercedes; Pinto, Mónica; Fuentes, Lidia; Gámez, Nadia

    2014-01-01

    Currently, museums provide their visitors with interactive tour guide applications that can be installed in mobile devices and provide timely tailor-made multimedia information about exhibits on display. In this paper, we argue that mobile devices not only could provide help to visitors, but also to museum staff. Our goal is to integrate, within the same system, multimedia tour guides with the management facilities required by museums. In this paper, we present iMuseumA (intelligent museum with agents), a mobile-based solution to customize visits and perform context-aware management tasks. iMuseumA follows an agent-based approach, which makes it possible to interact easily with the museum environment and make decisions based on its current status. This system is currently deployed in the Museum of Informatics at the Informatics School of the University of Málaga, and its main contributions are: (i) a mobile application that provides management facilities to museum staff by means of sensing and processing environmental data; (ii) providing an integrated solution for visitors, tour guides and museum staff that allows coordination and communication enrichment among different groups of users; (iii) using and benefiting from group communication for heterogeneous groups of users that can be created on demand. PMID:25390409

  4. Inclusive Art Gallery Practices: Exploring Collaborative Processes and Pedagogy in Outreach Community Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Natasha

    2011-01-01

    Currently, many museums and galleries are attempting to create more welcoming and meaningful experiences for individuals who tend to be reluctant to enter and participate in these institutions. Art galleries and museums are examining and experimenting with ways to connect diverse publics through socially inclusive community outreach programs. This…

  5. Making medieval art modern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth den Hartog

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Janet T. Marquardt’s book ‘Zodiaque. Making medieval art modern’ discusses the historical context, history and impact of the Zodiaque publications issued by the monks from the abbey of Ste-Marie de la Pierre-qui-Vire in Burgundy between 1951 and 2001 and links the striking photogravures, the core business of these books, to the modern movement. Although Marquardt’s view that the Zodiaque series made a great impact on the study of Romanesque sculpture is somewhat overrated, her claim that the photogravures should be seen as avant-garde works of art and the books as a “museum without walls” is entirely convincing.

  6. Un paso de América: Alfonso Reyes, Victoria Ocampo y el cosmopolitismo en la década de 1930 / Un paso de América: Alfonso Reyes, Victoria Ocampo and the Cosmopolitanism in the 1930’s

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorica Majstorovic

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available El artículo trata de las construcciones americanistas del cosmopolitismo (entendido en relación a la geopolítica imperial en los textos de Victoria Ocampo y Alfonso Reyes de los años treinta. Al analizar su relación con los movimientos de inmigración y la subsiguiente revalorización de la nación, el artículo postula que en Alfonso Reyes la mediación cosmopolita es «des-jerarquizada», ubicada casi siempre en una «periferia», a diferencia de Victoria Ocampo cuyas visiones cosmopolitas son mediadas desde un «centro» —ya sea París o Buenos Aires— y relacionadas con una jerarquía de valores estéticos y políticos.The article deals with Americanist constructions of cosmopolitanism (understood in relation to the imperial geopolitics in the texts of Victoria Ocampo and Alfonso Reyes in the 1930’s. Upon analyzing its relationship with immigration movements and the subsequent revaluation of the nation, the article suggests that in Alfonso Reyes cosmopolitan mediation is «dis-hierarchized», almost always located in a periphery, unlike Victoria Ocampo whose cosmopolitan visions are mediated from a «center» —either Paris or Buenos Aires— and related to a hierarchy of aesthetic and political values.

  7. Dalla «più difforme congerie di oggetti» ad un «perfetto ambiente spirituale» per l’opera d’arte. L’allestimento del Museo Nazionale di Palermo alla fine degli anni Venti del Novecento / From the “più difforme congerie di oggetti” (most dissimilar jumble of objects to a “perfetto ambiente spirituale” (perfect spiritual environment for the work of art. The display of Palermo National Museum at the end of the 1920s

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Bruno

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Nel panorama dei musei italiani del terzo decennio del Novecento, delineato da Francesco Pellati nella Enquête internationale sur la réforme des galeries publiques, si distingue il Museo Nazionale di Palermo, dove la giovane ispettrice Maria Accascina aveva appena completato il riordinamento e l’allestimento della sezione di arte medievale e moderna. La storica dell’arte, allieva di Adolfo Venturi, aveva elaborato un progetto di restyling – da lei stessa pubblicato sul «Bollettino d’Arte del Ministero dell’Educazione Nazionale» –  che rispondeva, per molti aspetti, agli orientamenti museografi ci espressi in quegli anni dall’Offi ce International des Musées (OIM e oggetto di approfondita rifl essione nell’ambito del dibattito europeo. L’intervento di Maria Accascina cambiò il volto del Museo Nazionale di Palermo – fi no a quel momento caratterizzato da sale e corridoi occupati «dalla più difforme congerie di oggetti» – anticipando indirizzi museografi ci che trovarono una concreta e tangibile applicazione durante il secondo dopoguerra nel più noto intervento di Carlo Scarpa all’interno di Palazzo Abatellis. Il contributo intende quindi analizzare l’allestimento di fi ne anni Venti del Museo Nazionale palermitano – di cui recentemente è stato sottolineato il carattere innovativo per quel momento – alla luce sia del ricco materiale documentario e fotografi co, in gran parte inedito, sia delle posizioni della critica del tempo e dei nuovi criteri di ordinamento dei musei che si andarono affermando nel periodo tra le due guerre mondiali. Museo Nazionale di Palermo distinguishes itself in the scope of Italian museums in the 1920’s as outlined by Francesco Pellati in Enquête internationale sur la réforme des galeries publiques. The young inspector Maria Accascina had just completed the reordering and installation of the medieval and modern art section. The art historian, a pupil of Adolfo Venturi, had

  8. An assessement of the ecosystem health of Lake Victoria (East Africa)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An assessement of the ecosystem health of Lake Victoria (East Africa): Current status, trends and impacts to fishery. ... complicated the ecosystem dynamics of Lake Victoria and pose serious uncertainties about its future stability and sustainability of the fisheries resources. Lake Victoria's future sustainability requires ...

  9. United States Holocaust Museums: Pathos, Possession, Patriotism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rob Baum

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the role of United States holocaust museums in directing (American knowledge and memory of World War II, and demonstrates how signifiers of race, colour and Jewishness are played out and theatricalised. Erected in two principal U.S. cities of Los Angeles and Washington, D.C., the Holocaust Museum and Museum of Tolerance uphold very different mandates: the first dedicated to revealing European civilian tragedies during WWII; the latter dealing with Jewish persecution and the L.A. Riots of 1991, with references to other cultural catastrophes. While these projects are different, they are not opposed; both museums locate the American perspective of events and their meanings at the forefront. American holocaust museums seem to challenge spaces between memory and its direction, vision and revision. Within the gruesome context of holocaust portrayal, interrogate the valences of memory’s play and expose American holocaust museums as theatres of pornographic memory. The seduction of feeling does not invite change so much as purgation, what Aristotle identified as catharsis — an emotional and physical release, unfortunately replicating the seductive techniques used by Goebbels for the glorification of Hitler. Through manipulation of viewers as automatic audiences, these museums function as centres for pathos I question the policy and polity of presenting genocide as an entertainment leading to catharsis, recognizing that the final act of purgation is all too easily negation.

  10. The Onomastic Octopus. Museum Data Bank Research Report No. 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenhall, Robert G.

    Activities and information needs in museums and a project undertaken by the Margaret Woodbury Strong Museum to develop systematic solutions to problems in cataloging museum collections are described. Museum activities are grouped in three categories: (1) initial--acquisition, accession, registration, identification, and restoration; (2)…

  11. Museums And Young People: The Heritage Of Pride | Onyebinama ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper discusses the origin of museum, its brief history in Nigeria , its meaning, types, need for museums and the relationship between museums and libraries. It specifically addresses the issue of young people and museum which is the heritage of their pride. The paper also discusses factors/problems which may ...

  12. Using Museum Exhibits: An Innovation in Experiential Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Satarupa

    2015-01-01

    Museum exhibits can be a tool in experiential learning. While instructors have documented various methods of experiential learning, they have not sufficiently explored such learning from museum exhibits. Museum researchers, however, have long found a satisfying cognitive component to museum visits. This paper narrates the author's design to…

  13. Graduate Museum Studies Curricula: Meeting the Needs of the Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomar, William Frank

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study was to assess how graduate museum studies programs are meeting the current and anticipated future needs of the museum profession. A comprehensive assessment was conducted to determine the knowledge and skills most emphasized in graduate museum studies curricula and those most valued by leading museum practitioners. A total…

  14. 45 CFR 1180.2 - Definition of a museum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... HUMANITIES INSTITUTE OF MUSEUM AND LIBRARY SERVICES GRANTS REGULATIONS Definitions and Eligibility § 1180.2 Definition of a museum. For the purpose of this part: (a) Museum means a public or private nonprofit... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Definition of a museum. 1180.2 Section 1180.2...

  15. The Future of Museums and Libraries: A Discussion Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Institute of Museum and Library Services, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) is committed to bringing together museums and libraries across the country for conversations dedicated to developing a better understanding of the roles of libraries and museums as providers of public service to communities. The Future of Libraries and Museums in the 21st Century Planning…

  16. Learning to Think Critically: A Visual Art Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Daniel H.; Greene, Jay P.; Kisida, Brian

    2014-01-01

    This article examines whether exposure to the arts has an effect on the ability of students to engage in critical thinking. We conduct a randomized controlled trial involving 3,811 students who were assigned by lottery to participate in a School Visit Program at the newly opened Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art. Students who participated in…

  17. Commentary: Immunology and art: Using antibody-based ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2010-02-26

    Feb 26, 2010 ... Julie Arslanoglu1 Julia Schultz2 John Loike3 Karin Peterson2. Department of Scientific Research, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY 10028, USA; HAWK University of Applied Sciences and Art Hildesheim/Holzminden/Göttingen Faculty Preservation of Cultural Heritage, Hildesheim, Germany ...

  18. Historical Museums in Israel: Semiotics of Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Mayer

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Tiny by physical size, the State of Israel retains some of the world’s most important cultural treasures, along with many other great cultural institutions. Archeological treasures have yielded much information as far as biblical history and have been well adapted to a Zionist narrative by both the Jewish press and international news organizations, such as the New York Times whose archives are replete with reports of Jewish history being dug up by the Jewish people. Once the State of Israel gained independence in 1948, the course was set for the development of historical museums whose discourse would reflect the most significant events in Jewish history, most especially the Holocaust and the state of constant warfare that continues to imbue the cultural consciousness of its citizens. In this paper we outline, through categorization, the various historical museums, which are currently operating. Furthermore, this article hopes to shed some light upon the cultural sensibilities conveyed through these institutions. This paper is about Israeli culture, mythology, and collective needs, as formed by and informed through a variety of historical museums. The working assumption is that in a historical museum culture is partially formed and at the same time the culture is influencing the contents and narratives on display inside the museum. It should be clear from the start that the discussion is held about Israeli museums as viewed by a Jewish population and created by and for Jews. Notwithstanding the multifaceted collective of Israeli society, this work is confined to and circumscribed by this demarcation. In the following sections, I intend to provide an explanation for this viewpoint from a historical perspective and also provide a framework of what constitutes a historical museum and justify the methodology of its employ. This will be followed by a discussion of the main categorical types of historical museums present in Israel, and finally a

  19. Arte precolombino, arte moderno y arte latinoamericano

    OpenAIRE

    Gamboa Hinestrosa, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    ¿Cuál es la vigencia del arte precolombino? ¿Qué ha aportado ala corriente del arte universal? ¿Qué se deben mutuamente arte modernoy arte precolombino? Estos planteamientos nos sirven para establecerla vigencia del arte precolombino en Latinoamérica, buscandoantecedentes desde los tiempos de la Conquista hasta nuestros días.

  20. Developing the Model of "Pedagogical Art Communication" Using Social Phenomenological Analysis: An Introduction to a Research Method and an Example for Its Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Fabian

    2016-01-01

    Social phenomenological analysis is presented as a research method for museum and art education. After explaining its methodological background, it is shown how this method has been applied in a study of gallery talks or guided tours in art museums: Analyzing the situation by description and interpretation, a model for understanding gallery talks…

  1. Creation and typology definition of the museum on the Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svilicić, Niksa

    2010-06-01

    Through advancing new technology, perspective of museum institution and museum profession is changed. The content analysis and analyze of used terminology by online users will show us which term is the most used between frequently used terms such are: online, electronic, Web, Internet, digital, virtual and cyber museums. This scientific paper suggests that online users don't differ mentioned terms while they search for museums on Web. Using the appropriate 'prefix" in order to better describe the typology of a museum on the Web is the first step in designing the future of the museums and certainly encourages serious approach in to the study of the new museum "entities".

  2. Poética de la autotraducción: María Victoria Atencia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López Martínez, María Isabel

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Self-translation is an ancient but poorly researched practice. This article analyses an exceptional case: the reflection on self-translation as exposed in poetry. A case in point is the poem «Voz traducida», from the poetry collection De la llama en que arde (1988. Indeed, the poem selected for examination was written by M.ª Victoria Atencia (Málaga, 1931, an expert both in writing poetry and in translating literature. Her book of poems also contains an original text, «Rosas», in Galician, and its corresponding Spanish translation. Both translation and reflection are complementary in her compositions. These poetic creations attest to the fact that artfulness works as a depiction of the next creation. Furthermore, this study will deeply explore the poet’s most important literary thoughts.La autotraducción es una práctica antigua, pero poco estudiada. El presente artículo analiza un caso excepcional: la reflexión sobre la autotraducción expuesta en la lírica. Para ello, se analiza el poema de M.ª Victoria Atencia «Voz traducida», perteneciente al libro titulado De la llama en que arde (1988. Es un ejemplo de que la tarea de traducir funciona como un motivo que origina una nueva creación. Además, permite que el lector conozca facetas importantes del pensamiento literario de la escritora. M.ª Victoria Atencia, además de poeta, es una experta traductora. El libro contiene también dos versiones del poema «Rosas», en gallego y en español, pruebas de la dimensión práctica de los planteamientos teóricos de la autora y de su coherencia estética. Ambas facetas, la traducción y la reflexión, son complementarias en la obra de la autora.

  3. INTERNATIONALISATION OF BENIN ART WORKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chika Joseph Ananwa

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The artworks of Benin are all about events and achievements, actual or mythical that occurred in the past. These art works was grounded on traditional values and religious beliefs, which also displayed iconographic affinities. Until 15th century A.D, Benin art items were not known outside the ancient Benin kingdom and commanded very little monetary and aesthetic values.The internationalisation of Benin artworks first occurred by accident, because the Europeans that made it possible, were not aware of the art items before coming to the continent. The coming of the Portuguese in 1472 was the first of such event then the Benin artworks were used as exchange for Portuguese goods. The second was the looting of Benin art items, by the British soldiers, in 1897, in what was tagged Benin Punitive Expedition.Other aspects of internationalisation include the display of Benin art items at various museums across the world Benin artworks uploaded in the internet and artefacts on display at various private museums.The aim of this research is to find out why, when and how the Benin artworks became internationalised. This paper also looks at the extent, impact and significances of internationalisation of Benin artworks.

  4. Mental Representations in Art Discourse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Sudec

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper starts by examining the content included in the museum environment, where I write about the type of relations that emerge in a museum or artistic setting. This is followed by an observation of a social act (socialising and a chapter on the use of food in an artistic venue. At the end, I address art education via the format that I developed at the 6th Berlin Biennale. This is followed by an overview of the cognitive model of the fort-da game based on Freud’s theory via two discourse models. Here, I address discourse on art works in the form of a lecture or reading, where the art space is fictitiously present, and then move on to discuss discourse on art works in real, “present” art space. This is followed by a section on actions (Handlungen in German and methods supporting the fort-da model. The last part of the article examines the issue of “mental representations”, defining and explaining the function of mental representations with regard to the target audience of the blind and visually impaired.

  5. New initiatives in the Netherlands Open Air Museum: how an early open air museum keeps up with the times

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, A.

    2010-01-01

    The Netherlands Open Air Museum in Arnhem is one of the oldest open air museums of Europe. From the 1990s the staff has been engaged in an intense process of fundamentally changing the museum. The major step was to redefine the museum’s institutional identity. We believed that a good museum not only

  6. Contravention of town planning regulations in Ikoyi and Victoria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study investigated possible relationships between educational attainment, awareness of town planning regulations and contravening these regulations in Ikoyi and Victoria Island, Lagos. Both primary and secondary data were used for the study. Secondary data were obtained from both published and unpublished ...

  7. 3D DIGITAL CADASTRE JOURNEY IN VICTORIA, AUSTRALIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Shojaei

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Land development processes today have an increasing demand to access three-dimensional (3D spatial information. Complex land development may need to have a 3D model and require some functions which are only possible using 3D data. Accordingly, the Intergovernmental Committee on Surveying and Mapping (ICSM, as a national body in Australia provides leadership, coordination and standards for surveying, mapping and national datasets has developed the Cadastre 2034 strategy in 2014. This strategy has a vision to develop a cadastral system that enables people to readily and confidently identify the location and extent of all rights, restrictions and responsibilities related to land and real property. In 2014, the land authority in the state of Victoria, Australia, namely Land Use Victoria (LUV, has entered the challenging area of designing and implementing a 3D digital cadastre focused on providing more efficient and effective services to the land and property industry. LUV has been following the ICSM 2034 strategy which requires developing various policies, standards, infrastructures, and tools. Over the past three years, LUV has mainly focused on investigating the technical aspect of a 3D digital cadastre. This paper provides an overview of the 3D digital cadastre investigation progress in Victoria and discusses the challenges that the team faced during this journey. It also addresses the future path to develop an integrated 3D digital cadastre in Victoria.

  8. Research on School-Based Management in Victoria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamage, David T.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Describes a 1992-93 research project involving 66 state schools that attempted to ascertain the overall effectiveness of school-based management in Victoria, Australia. Findings of the Likert-style survey revealed substantial participant satisfaction with school councils' current composition, information provision, and overall functioning. (20…

  9. Fishing Business Arrangements and Sustainability in Lake Victoria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this article an attempt is made to analyse the existing production relations between the owners of the vessels and the crewmembers and the concern for sustainability. Our results found that the existing sharing system in Lake Victoria poses a big challenge in as far as sustainability is concerned. Some of the system such ...

  10. Implementing Co-management of Lake Victoria's Fisheries ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There are still many challenges facing the sustainable management of Lake Victoria fisheries, including; lack of compliance with regulations and rapid increase in fishing effort, environmental degradation, inadequate service provision and the high prevalence of HIV/AIDS amongst the fishing communities. Key words: Lake ...

  11. The Lake Victoria Intense Storm Early Warning System (VIEWS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiery, Wim; Gudmundsson, Lukas; Bedka, Kristopher; Semazzi, Fredrick; Lhermitte, Stef; Willems, Patrick; van Lipzig, Nicole; Seneviratne, Sonia I.

    2017-04-01

    Weather extremes have harmful impacts on communities around Lake Victoria in East Africa. Every year, intense nighttime thunderstorms cause numerous boating accidents on the lake, resulting in thousands of deaths among fishermen. Operational storm warning systems are therefore crucial. Here we complement ongoing early warning efforts based on NWP, by presenting a new satellite data-driven storm prediction system, the prototype Lake Victoria Intense storm Early Warning System (VIEWS). VIEWS derives predictability from the correlation between afternoon land storm activity and nighttime storm intensity on Lake Victoria, and relies on logistic regression techniques to forecast extreme thunderstorms from satellite observations. Evaluation of the statistical model reveals that predictive power is high and independent of the input dataset. We then optimise the configuration and show that also false alarms contain valuable information. Our results suggest that regression-based models that are motivated through process understanding have the potential to reduce the vulnerability of local fishing communities around Lake Victoria. The experimental prediction system is publicly available under the MIT licence at http://github.com/wthiery/VIEWS.

  12. Study of genetic variation in population of Bipolaris victoriae , the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Isolates of Bipolaris victoriae were analysed by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) techniques to determine the amount of intraspecific genetic variability. Seven primers were applied and DNA bands of 200-5000 bp were produced. Cluster analysis using UPGMA method gave five groups. Levels of polymorphism ...

  13. satellite lakes of lake victoria basin (tanzanian side)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Studies on phytoplankton species diversity and abundance were carried out in 8 selected satellite lakes within the Lake Victoria ... cyanobacteria occurrence and their unforeseen effects such as toxin production and oxygen depletion during nights that may ..... Species extinction and concomitant ecological changes in Lake.

  14. Governance and Welfare of Fishing Communities of Lake Victoria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... have potable water or electricity. Educational standards remain low and many communities lack proper sanitation, and are therefore at risk of disease, while most basic facilities such as hospitals, schools and clinics are not within their reach. Key Words; Co-management, Beach Management Units, Lake Victoria, Health, ...

  15. Total mercury concentration in common fish species of Lake Victoria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Total mercury (THg) concentration was analysed in muscles of common fish species of Lake Victoria in the eastern and southern parts of the lake using cold vapour Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometric technique. Mercury concentration in all fish species was generally lower than the WHO maximum allowable ...

  16. Transactional sex in the fishing communities along Lake Victoria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study describes the nature, context and implications of a unique form of transactional sexual relationships in the fishing communities along Lake Victoria in Kisumu County, Kenya. We conducted 12 focus group discussions and 17 key informant interviews among fishermen, fishmongers and fish transporters in Kisumu.

  17. Domestication of medicinal tree species in the Victoria lakeshore ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mo

    Therefore, there is high potential of marketing forest products by the subsistence farmers. Growing medicinal plants is one great opportunity for raising household incomes in this area. A survey was conducted among herbalists living around the Victoria lakeshore region. Questionnaires were administered through formal ...

  18. Catalogue Use at the State Library of Victoria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hider, Philip

    2008-01-01

    A questionnaire survey conducted at the State Library of Victoria indicates that users in general, and not just scholars, value the standard elements of bibliographic data found in the Library's catalogues, and consider all these elements useful for finding, identifying and selecting items. Rather than making do with less, users wanted more…

  19. Vocabulary Size Research at Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nation, Paul; Coxhead, Averil

    2014-01-01

    The English Language Institute (now the School of Linguistics and Applied Language Studies) at Victoria University of Wellington has a long history of corpus-based vocabulary research, especially after the arrival of the second director of the institute, H. V. George, and the appointment of Helen Barnard, whom George knew in India. George's…

  20. SEDIMENTS FROM SOUTHERN LAKE VICTORIA AND ITS BASIN

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Water, sediment and soil samples collected from Southern Lake Victoria and its basin were analysed for 76 organochlorine, organophosphorous, carbamate and pyrethroid pesticide residues. The samples were collected from sampling stations in nine districts on the Tanzanian side of the lake, namely Mwanza, Sengerema ...

  1. Early warnings of hazardous thunderstorms over Lake Victoria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thiery, Wim; Gudmundsson, Lukas; Bedka, Kristopher; Semazzi, Fredrick H.M.; Lhermitte, S.L.M.; Willems, Patrick; van Lipzig, Nicole P. M.; Seneviratne, Sonia I.

    2017-01-01

    Weather extremes have harmful impacts on communities around Lake Victoria in East Africa. Every year, intense nighttime thunderstorms cause numerous boating accidents on the lake, resulting in thousands of deaths among fishermen. Operational storm warning systems are therefore crucial. Here we

  2. Lake Victoria's Water Budget and the Potential Effects of Climate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper presents the Lake Victoria water budget for the period 1950-2004 and findings of a study on potential climate change impact on the lake's Hydrology through the 21st Century. The mass balance components are computed from measured and simulated data. A2 and B2 emission scenarios of the Special Report ...

  3. Early warnings of hazardous thunderstorms over Lake Victoria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiery, Wim; Gudmundsson, Lukas; Bedka, Kristopher; Semazzi, Fredrick H. M.; Lhermitte, Stef; Willems, Patrick; van Lipzig, Nicole P. M.; Seneviratne, Sonia I.

    2017-07-01

    Weather extremes have harmful impacts on communities around Lake Victoria in East Africa. Every year, intense nighttime thunderstorms cause numerous boating accidents on the lake, resulting in thousands of deaths among fishermen. Operational storm warning systems are therefore crucial. Here we complement ongoing early warning efforts based on numerical weather prediction, by presenting a new satellite data-driven storm prediction system, the prototype Lake Victoria Intense storm Early Warning System (VIEWS). VIEWS derives predictability from the correlation between afternoon land storm activity and nighttime storm intensity on Lake Victoria, and relies on logistic regression techniques to forecast extreme thunderstorms from satellite observations. Evaluation of the statistical model reveals that predictive power is high and independent of the type of input dataset. We then optimise the configuration and show that false alarms also contain valuable information. Our results suggest that regression-based models that are motivated through process understanding have the potential to reduce the vulnerability of local fishing communities around Lake Victoria. The experimental prediction system is publicly available under the MIT licence at http://github.com/wthiery/VIEWS.

  4. Climate Change and Fishery Sustainability in Lake Victoria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The fisheries of Lake Victoria have recently undergone rapid ecological and social change. Loss of diversity in terms of species richness and economic opportunity has increased the system's vulnerability to additional economic, ecological, and social stressors predicted with future climate change. This paper discusses the ...

  5. Museum as a space of relaying the cultural memory. Researching of Jewish modern museum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suprunchuk Oleksandra Pavlivna

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This article analyses the phenomenon of the museum as an important institution of saving and relaying the collective memory of nation, as the semantic space that has reinterpreted the historical heritage through the prism of the modern worldview foundations. This role of the museum institution and its actuality for society was visually researched through the analysis of projects of the Jewish modern museums that put the Holocaust in the centre of their attention.

  6. What are museums for? - Revisiting “Museums in a Troubled World”

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Morten Karnøe; Janes, Robert

    2012-01-01

    World”, authored by Janes, a discussion between the authors is presented which focuses on the complexities of collaboration between museums and business. Finally a “hands on” section is included, in which different types of possible collaborations are examined. In this section, the topic of value......Focusing on the present situation in the Nordic museum scene, entailing economic pressures and restructuring, this article introduces the thoughts and ideas of Canadian museum expert and author, Robert R. Janes, to put things in perspective. After revisiting the 2009 book “Museums in a Troubled...

  7. New Mexico Museums and Cultural Centers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This dataset provides an initial version of the locations of museums and cultural centers in New Mexico, in point form, with limited attributes, compiled using...

  8. 3D VISUALIZATION FOR VIRTUAL MUSEUM DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Skamantzari

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The interest in the development of virtual museums is nowadays rising rapidly. During the last decades there have been numerous efforts concerning the 3D digitization of cultural heritage and the development of virtual museums, digital libraries and serious games. The realistic result has always been the main concern and a real challenge when it comes to 3D modelling of monuments, artifacts and especially sculptures. This paper implements, investigates and evaluates the results of the photogrammetric methods and 3D surveys that were used for the development of a virtual museum. Moreover, the decisions, the actions, the methodology and the main elements that this kind of application should include and take into consideration are described and analysed. It is believed that the outcomes of this application will be useful to researchers who are planning to develop and further improve the attempts made on virtual museums and mass production of 3D models.

  9. Microbial environmental monitoring in museums: preventive conservation of graphic collections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Pasquariello

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In museums, the biological component of indoor air, called bioaerosol or biological aerosol, is a potential biodeteriogen for graphic collections. The biological particles settling on the surface of artworks find favorable nutritional and environmental conditions for their growth, and promote biodeterioration. As is well known, biological attacks depend on microclimatic conditions; for this reason their control is essential to assess contamination and estimate biological risks. This article presents the partial application of a methodological model, in the National Institute of Graphic Arts (Istituto Nazionale per la Grafica-ING, a museum of international importance in Rome, on a collection of ancient drawings in the Fondo Corsini, preserved in repository no.1. This model is based on an integrated system of biological environmental monitoring (air and surfaces in association with microclimatic monitoring (repository no.1, cabinet no.6, volumes, drawings and outdoor carried out in an interdisciplinary research project.The values of thermohygrometric parameters were stable enough during the monitored month and had no daily fluctuations. The qualitative and quantitative analysis of air contamination and that on the surfaces of drawings did not show a critical situation.This article describes a pilot study which has focused attention on the biological contamination of the graphic collections and is a contribution to standardizing a system of diagnosis-intervention for preventive conservation of organic cultural heritage preserved in museums and in other indoor environments and the protection of the health of operators and visitors.

  10. [First medical museum of Russia (150-anniversary of the Surgical museum of the Imperial Medical-Surgery Academy)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budko, A A; Gribovskaia, G A; Zhuravlev, D A

    2013-03-01

    The opening in 1863 of the Surgical museum of the Imperial Medical-Surgical Academy was the sign of a new age in the development of medical science. It became the first medical museum in our country. It was the period when similar museums appeared in Europe and America. Thus all over the world were formed the first museums that amassed their collections, the later basis of modem medical museums.

  11. Instruction and Delight: Some Observations for Museums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Margaret J.

    This paper assesses the work of artist-creator Walt Disney as a model for museum educators to draw the public into its work. Disney Land and Disney World are viewed as monuments of U.S. life and imagination, a living museum that attracts 40 million U.S. visitors per year. The paper describes what should be a partnership among the image-making,…

  12. [All-Russian hygienic exhibitions and museums].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzybaeva, M P

    2011-01-01

    The material about the popularization of hygiene and health education in Russia in the second half of the 19th century to early 20th century through exhibition and museum activities has been collected for the first time and analyzed in the paper. The role of scientists and scientific medical societies in this process is noted. The significance of museum and exhibition activities in this area for the development of medical science is defined.

  13. Leisure time and museums - motives of visits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medić Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Leisure time, as the time used to engage in a variety of activities, should provide a sense of satisfaction and relaxation. In order to satisfy the needs of the visitors and their desire to experience something new and authentic in tourist destination, it is very important to know what their choices are with regard to leisure activities. The aim of this paper is to determine how museum public usually spends its leisure time, which factors influence the motivation to visit museums, and to try to find a correlation between the two. The paper is based on the results of the study conducted between the end of May and the end of August, 2014 in the museums in Vojvodina Province (northern part of the Republic of Serbia. The main findings of this paper indicate that spending leisure time is primarily related to socialization and education, and that museums are visited mostly due to their educational role. The findings also indicate that there are differences between the choice of leisure activity and motivation for visiting museums and sociodemographic characteristics of the respondents. Significant correlation has been found between the choice of leisure activity and motivation for visiting museums.

  14. The first book museums in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea De Pasquale

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Just before the advent of Fascism, in Turin, in the nearby town of Carmagnola and in Florence were born the first Italian examples of book museums. It was early and exceptional experiments of valorizing of book history and of the ancient techniques of manufacturing manuals in a time of great innovation. The first, called the National Museum of the book, was opened in 1913 as a result of the exhibition of the history of printing held during the Universal Exhibition of 1911; the second, created in 1921, was the result of collecting a notable family that took up the typographic tradition of Carmagnola old more than 4 centuries; the third, said Museum of books and illumination, was the result of the exploitation of the extraordinary collections of the Medici library and of the policy pursued by the Director Guido Biagi. Of such museums, outlining the events that led to their creation, only the museum in Carmagnola has come to this day, while the others for various reasons, were closed and never reconstituted. The contribution also provides an opportunity to reflect on the creation of a new museum of the book in Italy at a time when libraries lack visibility into the organization of the Ministry of cultural heritage, which could be distributed and polycentric in the offices of the State libraries in Rome, with its hub at the National Central Library.

  15. MEMORY AS A MUSEUM PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tone Kregar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In the current public discourse memory is among the most common words, concepts, and contents of a multiplicity of meanings, connotations and contexts. Besides personal memory, the interpretations of our past and consequently our present often include refer-ences of collective and historical memory. This termi-nology is particularly popular with politicians and pub-licists striving for a more colourful vocabulary, who often use the fore mentioned terms as synonyms. Scien-tific and professional circles are more conscientious at differentiating these terms, as their research focuses on studying the past and, consequently, on the role of memory or on the very process of remembering. Howev-er, within this corpus certain differences in the termi-nology and different views on the types and forms of memory do exist. In this paper, rather than psychologi-cal and sociological theories (by Maurice Halbwachs and others we focus on how we, historians, look on the vari-ous forms of memory, especially those historians who study (still "alive" 20th century. And who in their work, let it be research, teaching, or, like in my case - work in a museum, rely on both, individual memories and collec-tive memory to shape the historical memory of a com-munity or society. Although greater terminological clari-ty in this regard would be more than welcome, it is most important that we correctly identify the different forms and types of memory and its components and that we use them appropriately in our work - that is in research, understanding and interpreting our past or our history. Even more so because they often intertwine with each other, overlap, complement, and transform from one to another, or, sometimes even exclude each other. There-fore it is often difficult to clearly distinguish one from another and to deal with them separately. Historians working in the Museum of Recent History Celje are faced with these issues and problems on a daily basis; many specific

  16. Foundations for College and Beyond: Looking Back on AP Art History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenbohm, Laurel

    2013-01-01

    It was years after this author's AP Art History course in high school, and two years after college. She and some friends decided to fill a day during the Thanksgiving visits appreciating fine art. Prior to that AP course her senior year of high school, touring an art museum had seemed like the equivalent of going to the dentist. But after…

  17. Re-Assessing Practice: Visual Art, Visually Impaired People and the Web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Caro; Porter, Dan

    The latest development to come out of ongoing research at Tate Modern, London's new museum of modern art, is i-Map art resources for blind and partially sighted people that are delivered online. Currently i-Map explores the work of Matisse and Picasso, their innovations, influences and personal motivations, as well as key concepts in modern art.…

  18. Nineteenth Century Origins of Saturday Morning Art Classes for Children in Halifax, Nova Scotia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearse, Harold; Soucy, Donald

    1987-01-01

    States that the history of frequently offered Saturday morning art classes in museums and university art departments is largely unknown. Traces the development of the earliest known North American example of such classes, the 1887 beginning of children's Saturday art classes in Halifax, Nova Scotia. (JDH)

  19. When science inspires art

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Vernède

    2011-01-01

    On Tuesday 18 January 2011, artist Pipilotti Rist came to CERN to find out how science could provide her with a source of inspiration for her art and perhaps to get ideas for future work. Pipilotti, who is an eclectic artist always on the lookout for an original source of inspiration, is almost as passionate about physics as she is about art.   Ever Is Over All, 1997, audio video installation by Pipilotti Rist.  View of the installation at the National Museum for Foreign Art, Sofia, Bulgaria. © Pipilotti Rist. Courtesy the artist and Hauser & Wirth. Photo by Angel Tzvetanov. Swiss video-maker Pipilotti Rist (her real name is Elisabeth Charlotte Rist), who is well-known in the international art world for her highly colourful videos and creations, visited CERN for the first time on Tuesday 18 January 2011.  Her visit represented a trip down memory lane, since she originally studied physics before becoming interested in pursuing a career as an artist and going on to de...

  20. Gombrich, Art and Psychoanalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Ferrari

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Gombrich has always shown particular attention to the psychology of art as psychology of representation (and enjoyment of art. In addition, through his friendship with Ernst Kris, who had been a respected art historian in the staff of the Kunsthisthoriches Museum in Vienna before becoming an important psychoanalyst, Gombrich devoted some fundamental essays on the contribution of psychoanalysis to the study of art. The main novelty and the most original feature of his contribution to this field (and which cannot easily be differentiated in general theoretical terms from that of Kris lies in his focus on Freud’s theories on jokes and in his adherence to the concept of ‘controlled regression in the service of the ego’, introduced by so-called ego psychology . This allowed Gombrich not only to highlight a perfect relationship between Freud’s theoretical thinking and his conservative attitude in the field of aesthetics, but also to use psychoanalysis to underline the historical and cultural character of the processes of representation and enjoyment.