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Sample records for victoria family life

  1. Family Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Family and Friends > Family Life Request Permissions Family Life Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 11/ ... treatment become as overwhelming for others in your life as they are for you. Understanding the potential ...

  2. End‐of‐life decisions in medical practice: a survey of doctors in Victoria (Australia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neil, D A; Coady, C A J; Thompson, J; Kuhse, H

    2007-01-01

    Objectives To discover the current state of opinion and practice among doctors in Victoria, Australia, regarding end‐of‐life decisions and the legalisation of voluntary euthanasia. Longitudinal comparison with similar 1987 and 1993 studies. Design and participants Cross‐sectional postal survey of doctors in Victoria. Results 53% of doctors in Victoria support the legalisation of voluntary euthanasia. Of doctors who have experienced requests from patients to hasten death, 35% have administered drugs with the intention of hastening death. There is substantial disagreement among doctors concerning the definition of euthanasia. Conclusions Disagreement among doctors concerning the meaning of the term euthanasia may contribute to misunderstanding in the debate over voluntary euthanasia. Among doctors in Victoria, support for the legalisation of voluntary euthanasia appears to have weakened slightly over the past 17 years. Opinion on this issue is sharply polarised. PMID:18055904

  3. Disrupted Refugee Family Life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shapiro, Ditte Krogh

    2017-01-01

    of family members in social historical contexts. Studying the multiple perspectives of family members shows how social support conceptualized as care practises is conflictual in the changing everyday family practices that are transformed by policy. The purpose of studying how families manage to flee civil......Fleeing civil war involves managing life threatening events and multiple disruptions of everyday life. The theoretical potentials of analysing the recreation of everyday family life among Syrian refugees in Denmark is explored based on conceptualizations that emphasize the collective agency...

  4. Maternal and Child Health Nurses work with refugee families: Perspectives from regional Victoria, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willey, Suzanne M; Cant, Robyn P; Williams, Allison; McIntyre, Meredith

    2018-01-21

    This study aimed to explore service provision for Victorian regional refugee families from the perspective of Maternal and Child Health nurses. Increasingly, more families from a refugee background are resettling in regional Victoria. The refugee journey has significant effect on families. Refugee families with infants and young children can be provided with support by Maternal and Child Health services; however, many families experience barriers to ongoing engagement with this service. This descriptive study used focus group and questionnaire. A purposive sample of 26 Maternal and Child Health Nurses was drawn from six municipalities throughout regional Victoria, where higher numbers of people from a refugee background resettle. Six focus groups were held in 2014. Audio-recorded narratives were transcribed, prior to inductive thematic analysis. Participating nurses were experienced nurses, averaging 12 years in the service. Four major themes emerged: 'How to identify women from a refugee background'; 'The Maternal and Child Health nurse role when working with families from a refugee background'; 'Interpreting issues', and 'Access to other referral agencies'. Nurses worked to develop a relationship with families, attending to a complex mix of issues which were complicated by language barriers. Nurses found their role in supporting refugee families required additional time and more home visits. To provide best practice, Maternal and Child Health nurses need (i) ongoing professional development; (ii) time, flexibility, and creativity to build relationships with refugee families and (iii) better access to services that enhance communication, such as interpreting services and translated resources. Nurses require ongoing professional development to help them address the multifaceted needs of families of refugee background. With limited resources available in regional areas, accessing further education can be challenging. Distance education models and organisational

  5. Everyday Family Life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westerling, Allan

    2010-01-01

    What are the implications of ongoing processes of modernization and individualization for social relations in everyday life? This overall research question is the pivotal point in empirical studies at the Centre of Childhood-, Youth- and Family Life Research at Roskilde University. One research...... project takes a social psychological approach, combining quantitative and qualitative methods in a longitudinal study of family life. The knowledge interest of the project is the constitution of communality and individuality in everyday family life. This article presents the theoretical framework...... and the conceptualization of everyday family life of the social psychological research agenda in this field. The main line of argument is that ongoing modernization is synonymous with accelerated processes of detraditionalization and individualization. This calls for a re-conceptualisation of ‘the family’ which enables...

  6. Family Presence During Resuscitation (FPDR): Observational case studies of emergency personnel in Victoria, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Joanne E; Miller, Nareeda; Giannis, Anita; Coombs, Nicole

    2017-07-01

    Family Presence During Resuscitation (FPDR), although not a new concept, remains inconsistently implemented by emergency personnel. Many larger metropolitan emergency departments (ED) have instigated a care coordinator role, however these personnel are often from a non-nursing background and have therefore limited knowledge about the clinical aspects of the resuscitation. In rural emergency departments there are simply not enough staff to allocate an independent role. A separate care coordinator role, who is assigned to care for the family and not take part in the resuscitation has been well documented as essential to the successful implementation of FPDR. One rural and one metropolitan emergency department in the state of Victoria, Australia were observed and data was collected on FPDR events. The participants consisted of resuscitation team members, including; emergency trained nurses, senior medical officers, general nurses and doctors. The participants were not told that the data would be recorded around interactions with family members or team discussions regarding family involvement in the resuscitation, following ethical approval involving limited disclosure of the aims of the study. Seventeen adult presentations (Metro n=9, Rural n=8) were included in this study and will be presented as resuscitation case studies. The key themes identified included ambiguity around resuscitation status, keeping the family informed, family isolation and inter-professional communication. During 17 adult resuscitation cases, staff were witnessed communicating with family, which was often limited and isolation resulted. Family were often uninformed or separated from their family member, however when a family liaison person was available it was found to be beneficial. This research indicated that staff could benefit from a designated family liaison role, formal policy and further education. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Contemporary family life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viala, Eva Silberschmidt

    2011-01-01

    Based on a longitudinal interview-study of ten heterosexual couples and first-time parents, in Denmark the author argues that addressing contemporary everyday family life as a joint venture with contradictions contribute new insights into the complexities, contradictions, and ambiguities linked...... of complementary gender roles as well as in new understandings of gender equality based on ideals of mutual trust, respect and support. As a result, it is important to investigate how parenthood, family life and parental roles are constantly reflected upon and reproduced, negotiated and transformed through...

  8. Family Counseling as Assistance In Solving Family Life Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    URSZULA GAŁĘSKA

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Theoreticians and practitioners of family counseling are carefully observing, analyzing and explaining a dramatically growing need for indirect help sought by problem families. The rich Internet offer of the help which is placed at the end of the article is the proof of that demand. In this situation in the of family guidance some questions are becoming especially controversial: What are the reasons for using of such a for of psychological, pedagogical legal or medical help? Is it possible that Internet advice will soon dominate or even take over the traditional help? Does the access to free and anonymous advice at any time and in any place without any barriers decide on the growing number of users. The contents of the article are a certain trial to answer the above questions. In great part they correspond to thinking und utterances of the families experiencing difficulties in solving their life problems. In the article helplessness of a family raising a handicapped child is especially emphasized. The feeling of being vulnerable in the face of disability and at the same time seeking help is fully visible in the character of the mother of little handicapped Victoria. It is an example of combining the Internet aid with direct counseling. In conclusion, having considered the points made by author, it should be admitted that the Internet family guidance may be successfully combined with a traditional direct meeting of the subjects – a counselor and a person seeking advice.

  9. Use of Modern Family Planning Methods in Fishing Communities of Lake Victoria, Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanvubya, Annet; Ssempiira, Julius; Mpendo, Juliet; Ssetaala, Ali; Nalutaaya, Annet; Wambuzi, Mathias; Kitandwe, Paul; Bagaya, Bernard S; Welsh, Sabrina; Asiimwe, Stephen; Nielsen, Leslie; Makumbi, Fredrick; Kiwanuka, Noah

    2015-01-01

    Fishing communities (FCs) in Uganda have high HIV infection rates but poor access to health services including family planning (FP). Although FP is a cost-effective public health intervention, there is a paucity of data on knowledge and use of modern FP in FCs. This study determined knowledge and use of modern FP methods in FCs of Uganda. Data were accrued from a 12-month follow up of 1,688 HIV-uninfected individuals, 18-49 years from 8 FCs along Lake Victoria, between September 2011 and March 2013. Data on knowledge and use of modern FP were collected through a semi-structured questionnaire. Prevalence Risk Ratios with corresponding 95% CIs were used to determine factors associated with Modern FP knowledge and use. The mean age was 31.4 years, with nearly half (48.8%) being females while more than half (58.6%) had attained up to primary education level. Knowledge of modern FP was high, 87.5% (1477/1688); significantly higher among females [adj. PRR = 4.84 (95% CI; 3.08, 7.61)], among older respondents (25-29 years) [adj. PRR = 1.83 (95% CI; 1.12, 2.99)] compared to younger ones (18-24 years) and among those conducting business [adj. PRR = 2.42(95% CI; 1.02, 5.74)] relative to those primarily in fishing. Just over a third (35.2%, 595/1688) reported use of at least one modern FP method. Use of modern FP methods was significantly higher among females [adj. PRR = 2.04 (95% CI; 1.56, 2.65, and among those reporting multiple sexual partnerships [adj. PRR = 2.12, 95% CI; 1.63, 2.76)]. Nonuse of modern methods was mostly due to desire for more children (30.6%), fear of side effects (12.2%) and partner refusal (5.2%). Despite their high knowledge of FP, FCs have low use of modern FP methods. Key barriers to use of modern FP methods were high fertility desires, fear of perceived side effects and partner refusal of methods.

  10. Reconciling Work and Family Life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holt, Helle

    to shed some light on questions such as: How can compagnies become more family friendly? What are the barriers and how can they be overcome? What is the social outcome when companies are playing an active role in employees’ possiblities for combining family life and work life? How are the solutions...

  11. Semi-legal family life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rytter, Mikkel

    2012-01-01

    In 2002, the Danish government introduced new legislation on family reunification to restrict the transnational arranged marriages that were occurring among some immigrant groups. Since then, thousands of people have emigrated from Denmark to Sweden where, as citizens of the European Union....... The married couples subjected to this mobile lifestyle are always in a process of becoming illegal, which is the consequence of ‘overstaying’ in Denmark or ‘understaying’ in Sweden. Besides its legal aspects, a semi-legal status also has significant moral implications that not only restructure marriage...... patterns and family life among Pakistani immigrants but also have long- lasting effects on the relationship between minorities and majorities in Denmark....

  12. Four Essays on Family Life Events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loft, Lisbeth Trille Gylling

    As demographic and social trends continue to change the institution of the family, a need to reconsider the study family life events as they unfold over the life course has emerged. To advance current knowledge of social dynamics associated with this new complexity, the point of departure....... In addition, the present thesis underlines the need for an improved understanding of the role of health and caregiving as fundamental aspects of family life, and in doing so allocates increased attention to how children’s characteristics are central to family-level outcomes. Just as the lives of family...... members are lived interdependently, so too are events in one life domain interconnected with the absence or presence of events and transitions in other life domains. Thus, in order advance knowledge on family life and behavior, multiple family life events must be considered simultaneously, in a dynamic...

  13. Contraception matters: indicators of poor usage of contraception in sexually active women attending family planning clinics in Victoria, Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ong Jason

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Unintended pregnancy (mistimed or unwanted remains an important health issue for women. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of and factors associated with risk of unintended pregnancy in a sample of Victorian women attending family planning clinics. Methods This cross-sectional survey of three Family Planning Victoria Clinics from April to July 2011 recruited women aged 16-50 years with a male sexual partner in the last 3 months, and not intending to conceive. The questionnaire asked about contraceptive behaviours and important factors that influence contraception use (identified from a systematic literature review. Univariate analysis was calculated for the variables of interest for associations with contraceptive use. An overall multivariate model for being at risk for unintended pregnancy (due to inconsistent or ineffective contraceptive use or non-use was calculated through backward elimination with statistical significance set at Results 1006 surveys were analyzed with 96% of women reporting contraception use in the last 3 months. 37% of women were at risk for unintended pregnancy due to imperfect use (61% inconsistent users; 31% ineffective methods or never using contraception (8%. On multivariate analysis, women at risk for unintended pregnancy compared with women not at risk were 1 partner in the last 3 months (OR 3.2, 95% CI 2.3-4.6. These women were dissatisfied with current contraception (OR 2.5, 95% 1.8-3.5; felt “vulnerable” to pregnancy (OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.6-3.0; were not confident in contraceptive knowledge (OR 2.6, 95% CI 1.5-4.8; were unable to stop to use contraception when aroused (OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.5-2.9 but were comfortable in speaking to a doctor about contraception (OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.1-4.1. Conclusion Despite reported high contraceptive usage, nearly 40% of women were at risk for unintended pregnancy primarily due to inconsistent contraceptive use and use of ineffective

  14. Contraception matters: indicators of poor usage of contraception in sexually active women attending family planning clinics in Victoria, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Jason; Temple-Smith, Meredith; Wong, William C W; McNamee, Kathleen; Fairley, Christopher

    2012-12-23

    Unintended pregnancy (mistimed or unwanted) remains an important health issue for women. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of and factors associated with risk of unintended pregnancy in a sample of Victorian women attending family planning clinics. This cross-sectional survey of three Family Planning Victoria Clinics from April to July 2011 recruited women aged 16-50 years with a male sexual partner in the last 3 months, and not intending to conceive. The questionnaire asked about contraceptive behaviours and important factors that influence contraception use (identified from a systematic literature review). Univariate analysis was calculated for the variables of interest for associations with contraceptive use. An overall multivariate model for being at risk for unintended pregnancy (due to inconsistent or ineffective contraceptive use or non-use) was calculated through backward elimination with statistical significance set at women reporting contraception use in the last 3 months. 37% of women were at risk for unintended pregnancy due to imperfect use (61% inconsistent users; 31% ineffective methods) or never using contraception (8%). On multivariate analysis, women at risk for unintended pregnancy compared with women not at risk were 1 partner in the last 3 months (OR 3.2, 95% CI 2.3-4.6). These women were dissatisfied with current contraception (OR 2.5, 95% 1.8-3.5); felt "vulnerable" to pregnancy (OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.6-3.0); were not confident in contraceptive knowledge (OR 2.6, 95% CI 1.5-4.8); were unable to stop to use contraception when aroused (OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.5-2.9) but were comfortable in speaking to a doctor about contraception (OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.1-4.1). Despite reported high contraceptive usage, nearly 40% of women were at risk for unintended pregnancy primarily due to inconsistent contraceptive use and use of ineffective contraception. Strategies for improving consistency of effective contraception use or greater emphasis on long

  15. Four Essays on Family Life Events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loft, Lisbeth Trille Gylling

    . In addition, the present thesis underlines the need for an improved understanding of the role of health and caregiving as fundamental aspects of family life, and in doing so allocates increased attention to how children’s characteristics are central to family-level outcomes. Just as the lives of family......As demographic and social trends continue to change the institution of the family, a need to reconsider the study family life events as they unfold over the life course has emerged. To advance current knowledge of social dynamics associated with this new complexity, the point of departure...... of the present thesis is the way in which individual, social, and institutional contexts shape family life events. The main objective of the present thesis is twofold: to highlight the importance of how family life events are theoretically understood and methodologically approached, and to examine why social...

  16. Four Essays on Family Life Events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loft, Lisbeth Trille Gylling

    As demographic and social trends continue to change the institution of the family, a need to reconsider the study family life events as they unfold over the life course has emerged. To advance current knowledge of social dynamics associated with this new complexity, the point of departure...... of the present thesis is the way in which individual, social, and institutional contexts shape family life events. The main objective of the present thesis is twofold: to highlight the importance of how family life events are theoretically understood and methodologically approached, and to examine why social...... differentiation in family life events persists across institutional settings and over time. Specifically, from a life course perspective and by means of dynamic quantitative methods, three central themes are investigated: a) the importance of children’s characteristics, b) the need to link family contexts...

  17. Four Essays on Family Life Events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loft, Lisbeth Trille Gylling

    differentiation in family life events persists across institutional settings and over time. Specifically, from a life course perspective and by means of dynamic quantitative methods, three central themes are investigated: a) the importance of children’s characteristics, b) the need to link family contexts......As demographic and social trends continue to change the institution of the family, a need to reconsider the study family life events as they unfold over the life course has emerged. To advance current knowledge of social dynamics associated with this new complexity, the point of departure...... of the present thesis is the way in which individual, social, and institutional contexts shape family life events. The main objective of the present thesis is twofold: to highlight the importance of how family life events are theoretically understood and methodologically approached, and to examine why social...

  18. Family Violence in Domestic Homicides: A Case Study of Women Who Killed Intimate Partners Post-Legislative Reform in Victoria, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyson, Danielle; Kirkwood, Deborah; Mckenzie, Mandy

    2016-05-18

    This article examines the impact of legislative reforms enacted in 2005 in Victoria, Australia, on legal responses to women charged with murder for killing their intimate partner. The reforms provided for a broader understanding of the context of family violence to be considered in such cases, but we found little evidence of this in practice. This is partly attributable to persistent misconceptions among the legal profession about family violence and why women may believe it necessary to kill a partner. We recommend specialized training for legal professionals and increased use of family violence evidence to help ensure women's claims of self-defense receive appropriate responses from Victorian courts. © The Author(s) 2016.

  19. Four Essays on Family Life Events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loft, Lisbeth Trille Gylling

    of the present thesis is the way in which individual, social, and institutional contexts shape family life events. The main objective of the present thesis is twofold: to highlight the importance of how family life events are theoretically understood and methodologically approached, and to examine why social...

  20. Stabilizing family life after gastric bypass surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bylund, Ami; Benzein, Eva; Sandgren, Anna

    2017-12-01

    Weight-loss surgery requires lifelong lifestyle modifications for the maintenance of weight loss and health effects, and can affect both the individual and family. Earlier research indicates that the quality of social relationships has positive and negative influences on wellbeing and health. There is little research on family-life after a member has undergone gastric bypass (GBP) against obesity. Thus, this study aimed to develop a classic grounded theory about families with a member treated with GBP against obesity. The study design used classic grounded theory and included data from 16 interviews. Families' shared a main concern of unexpected changes after GBP, resulting in the theory Stabilizing family life, explained as a social process to decrease uncertainty and find stability and well-being in family interactions. The social process develops differently which entail families: attaining unity, returning to old patterns, or disconnecting to find stability, depending on the discrepancy in expectations and knowledge. This is affected by the overall life situation, life-stage and relationship quality. The theory highlights unexpected change as a potential challenge for the family, as well as how they resolve this. Hence, the theory can be applied in care strategies for families. Identification of families needing support to stabilize family life after GBP requires further research.

  1. Family influences on the career life cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Beauregard, T. Alexandra

    2007-01-01

    This chapter examines the myriad ways in which one’s family and personal life can impact an individual’s career. A review of some of the key research literature reveals that career choice is influenced by an individual’s values, attitudes, and expectations concerning how work should be balanced with the rest of life. Individuals are also susceptible to influence from their families of origin with regard to occupational choice and prioritizing work over family, or vice versa. Career opportunit...

  2. "Connected Presence" in Distributed Family Life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Toke Haunstrup

    2009-01-01

    also analyses families’ use of the mobile phone in context of modern family life, emphasizing the importance of the temporal and spatial dispersion of family members in explaining the form and content of intra-familial mediated communication. Finally, the dual role of media technologies (including......Concurrently with the recent years’ explosive pervasion of information- and communication technologies, mediated communication has gained a strong position in the daily interaction between family members. Based on the results of qualitative interviews with families in Denmark, this article shows...... the mobile phone) in both integrating and dispersing families is discussed....

  3. End of Life: A Family Narrative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen K. Black

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is based on ethnographic research that examines family reaction to an elderly husband and father's end of life. From a group of 30 families in our study (family defined as a widow aged 70 and over and two adult biological children between the ages of 40 and 60, we offer an extreme case example of family bereavement. We report our findings through the open-ended responses of a widow and two children who were interviewed ten months after the death of the husband and father. Three general themes emerged: (1 how the family imputes meaning to the end of life, (2 changes in the roles of family members, and (3 the family's ways of coping with the death, particularly through their belief system. A key finding is that the meaning family members find in their loved one's death is tied to the context of his death (how and where he died, their perception of his quality of life as a whole, and their philosophical, religious, and spiritual beliefs about life, death, and the afterlife that are already in place.

  4. End of Life: A Family Narrative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Helen K.; Moss, Miriam S.; Rubinstein, Robert L.; Moss, Sidney Z.

    2011-01-01

    This paper is based on ethnographic research that examines family reaction to an elderly husband and father's end of life. From a group of 30 families in our study (family defined as a widow aged 70 and over and two adult biological children between the ages of 40 and 60), we offer an extreme case example of family bereavement. We report our findings through the open-ended responses of a widow and two children who were interviewed ten months after the death of the husband and father. Three general themes emerged: (1) how the family imputes meaning to the end of life, (2) changes in the roles of family members, and (3) the family's ways of coping with the death, particularly through their belief system. A key finding is that the meaning family members find in their loved one's death is tied to the context of his death (how and where he died), their perception of his quality of life as a whole, and their philosophical, religious, and spiritual beliefs about life, death, and the afterlife that are already in place. PMID:21629740

  5. Woman's harmony at work and family life

    OpenAIRE

    Trnková, Dagmar

    2009-01-01

    The subject of this bachelor's essay is problem of Work Life Balance from the woman's perspective. The study describes woman's position in the Czech society and labour market, using relevant sociological and statistical data. Author reveals the immediate link between maternity and disadvantaging of woman in the work. The text deals with the family life and its public support and employers' policies in detail.

  6. Families as Life Span Experts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brendtro, Larry K.; Mitchell, Martin L.

    2011-01-01

    Professionals dealing with challenging behavior frequently operate detached from the other relationships in the child's life. This narrow approach has been called the unilateral strategy based on the belief that the child's outside world can be ignored and behavior can be changed by administering specific corrective interventions. In contrast,…

  7. 'Connected presence' in distributed family life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Toke Haunstrup

    2009-01-01

    ' use of the mobile phone in the context of modern family life, emphasizing the importance of the temporal and spatial dispersion of family members in explaining the form and content of intra-familial mediated communication. Finally, the dual role of media technologies (including the mobile phone......Concurrent with the explosive pervasion of information and communication technologies in recent years, mediated communication has gained a strong position in the daily interaction between family members. Based on the results of qualitative interviews with families in Denmark, this article shows how...... the mobile phone is used by parents and children to mediate a feeling of closeness while they are physically separated. This practice of `connected presence' is based on frequent calls and text messages between parents and children as well as between parents themselves. The article also analyses families...

  8. Tradução para o Português de Queen Victoria in Her Letters and Journals de Christopher Hibbert

    OpenAIRE

    Monteiro, Caroline Feital

    2014-01-01

    A presente dissertação de mestrado tem como um dos objetivos produzir a tradução para o português de quatro seções da obra Queen Victoria in her letters and journals/ A Rainha Victoria em suas cartas e diários de Christopher Hibbert, publicada pela editora Sutton Publishing Limited na Inglaterra em 2000. Nas seções Queen regnant, Family life, Monarchs and ministers e ‘Frequent difficulties’, as anotações e as cartas da Rainha Victoria (1819-1901) da Inglaterra apresentam um pouco de história ...

  9. NERDC: implementing population family life education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oroge, S A

    1993-01-01

    Nigeria's National Population Policy was implemented in 1988 with an emphasis on the important role of youth and intersectoral approaches. Section 5.5.1 and 5.5.5 recommend that youth programs be implemented, because of the sizable share of youth in the total population. There is a need for youth to have access to adequate resources for social and economic life. Population and Family Life Education is a means of assisting youth in preparing for responsible parenthood and shall be included in formal and vocational training. Current efforts are underway to incorporate Family Life Education into primary school curriculum. The English, science, social studies, and agricultural science courses for 5th and 6th graders already have some component of Population/Family Life Education, and some subjects also include AIDS education concepts. The program of research, monitoring and evaluation, curriculum development, instructional materials development, teacher's training and other personnel, population awareness, and documentation and information was instituted about 10 years ago. Secondary school curriculum was developed for integration into English, mathematics, social studies, home economics, integrated science, biology, and geography courses on a pilot basis. The basic messages emphasize family size and family welfare, delayed marriage and responsible parenthood, population change and resource development, and population-related beliefs and values. Among the accomplishments of the program were: several research studies on population, family life, and AIDS education; curriculum development for junior secondary and senior secondary schools; a sourcebook on population education; development of a logo and cultural plays; production of informational brochures; teacher training; production of teacher guides; production of self-learning modules; participation in the draft of a population policy; and establishment of a Population Department.

  10. Rural School Children Picturing Family Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lange, Naydene; Olivier, Tilla; Geldenhuys, Johanna; Mitchell, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    Rurality is an active agent and central to the lived experiences of children growing up on a farm and attending a farm school. It is a key to their everyday experiences, and influences family life, schooling and their future. Previous studies elsewhere in the world have explored the notion of childhood in rural contexts, but there is a dearth of…

  11. 76 FR 17720 - American Family Life Insurance Company, et al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-30

    ... COMMISSION American Family Life Insurance Company, et al. March 24, 2011. AGENCY: Securities and Exchange... Company Act of 1940, as amended (the ``1940 Act''). Applicants: American Family Life Insurance Company (the ``Company''), American Family Variable Account I (the ``Life Account''), and American Family...

  12. 78 FR 38413 - American Family Life Insurance Company, et al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-26

    ... COMMISSION American Family Life Insurance Company, et al. June 20, 2013. AGENCY: Securities and Exchange...''). Applicants: American Family Life Insurance Company (the ``Company''), American Family Variable Account I (the ``Life Account''), and American Family Variable Account II (the ``Annuity Account'') (together, the...

  13. Called home: The creation of family life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutch, R A

    1992-09-01

    Engendering family life is a spiritual process (theosis) based on human ethological constants of gender difference and generational turnover. Recent studies on ethnicity suggest that such a process retrieves a primordial sense of the human species as a whole, "humankind." Families, especially in this broad sense, link together the living and the dead and, at their best, morally empower individuals who link their destinies to such a vision of creation and human health. Reference is made to work on human strengths and speciation by Erik Erikson and to that on maternal thinking by Sara Ruddick. A political program by which an ideology of "familism" can be made is offered.

  14. Reconceptualizing the Domain and Boundaries of Family Life Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers-Walls, Judith A.; Ballard, Sharon M.; Darling, Carol Anderson; Myers-Bowman, Karen S.

    2011-01-01

    Many scholars have defined family life education (FLE), and some have differentiated it from other family-related fields. For example, Doherty (1995) provided a definition of the boundaries between FLE and family therapy; however, we believe those criteria can be improved. We explore the professions of family life education, family therapy, and…

  15. Linking Family Life and Health Professionals, Volunteers, and Family Life Students in a Community Hospice Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruit, Dorothy

    This paper describes the Portage County, Ohio community hospice program, emphasizing the linkages between family life specialists, health professionals, volunteers, and students. Hospice service is defined as a specialized, home-based program for the management of pain and other symptoms of terminal illness, with the family as the unit of care.…

  16. Avicins, a family of triterpenoid saponins from Acacia victoriae (Bentham), suppress H-ras mutations and aneuploidy in a murine skin carcinogenesis model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanausek, Malgorzata; Ganesh, Pattabhiraman; Walaszek, Zbigniew; Arntzen, Charles J.; Slaga, Thomas J.; Gutterman, Jordan U.

    2001-01-01

    We tested the ability of avicins, a family of triterpenoid saponins obtained from Acacia victoriae (Bentham) (Leguminosae: Mimosoideae), to inhibit chemically induced mouse skin carcinogenesis. Varying doses of avicins were applied to shaved dorsal skin of SENCAR mice 15 min before application of 100 nmol of 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) twice a week for 4 weeks (complete carcinogenesis model). The dorsal skin of a second group of mice was treated with one dose of 10 nmol of DMBA. Avicins were then applied 15 min before repetitive doses of 2 μg of phorbol 12-tetradecanoate 13-acetate (TPA) twice a week for 8 weeks (initiation/promotion model). At 12 weeks, avicins produced a 70% decrease in the number of mice with papillomas and a greater than 90% reduction in the number of papillomas per mouse in both protocols. We also observed a 62% and 74% reduction by avicins in H-ras mutations at codon 61 in the DMBA and DMBA/TPA models, respectively, as well as a significant inhibition of the modified DNA base formation (8-OH-dG) in both protocols. Marked suppression of aneuploidy occurred with treatment at 16 weeks in the initiation/promotion experiment. These findings, when combined with the proapoptotic property of these compounds and their ability to inhibit hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) generation, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) induction reported elsewhere, suggest that avicins could prove exciting in reducing oxidative and nitrosative stress and thereby suppressing the development of human skin cancer and other epithelial malignancies. PMID:11572997

  17. Life Satisfaction and Family Structure among Adolescents in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Ying-Keung

    2008-01-01

    Relationships between family structure and perceived life satisfaction in overall life and five domains of the Brief Multidimensional Students' Life Satisfaction Scale, family life, friendships, school experience, myself, and where I live were examined among 4,502 Chinese adolescent secondary school students in Hong Kong. Bivariate analyses showed…

  18. Family survivorship and quality of life following a cancer diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellon, S; Northouse, L L

    2001-12-01

    The objectives of this study were: (a) to examine the quality of life of the family as a unit during the long-term survivor phase of illness and (b) to test a family model of factors that may influence family quality of life. The family survivorship model, which includes illness survival stressors (family stressors, fear of recurrence, and patient somatic concerns), resources (family hardiness and family social support), appraisal (family meaning of the illness), and the outcome, family quality of life, was used to guide this exploratory cross-sectional study. A random, stratified sample of 123 families (N = 246 individuals) was interviewed 1-5 years after treatment ended. The model explained 63% of the variance in family quality of life, with the strongest predictors being concurrent family stressors, family social support, family member fear of recurrence, family meaning of the illness, and patient employment status. The study findings suggest the importance of addressing cancer-related stressors, family resources, and family meaning as key factors related to family quality of life. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  19. Parent and Child Perspectives of Family Leisure Involvement and Satisfaction with Family Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabriskie, Ramon B.; McCormick, Bryan P.

    2003-01-01

    Examined relationships between family leisure involvement and satisfaction with family life. Data on families recruited through middle schools indicated that parents, but not children, considered family leisure involvement the strongest predictor of satisfaction. At the family level, only the block including core and balance family leisure…

  20. Family life in transition – a longitudinal study of family life in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westerling, Allan; Dencik, Lars; Andersen, Hans H. K.

    This paper is an outline of the background for the study and it’s methodological and theoretical framework. The study, Family Forms and Cohabitation in the Modern Welfare State (FAMOSTAT), was originally funded by the National Danish Research Council for the Human Sciences. Its focus is on the tr......This paper is an outline of the background for the study and it’s methodological and theoretical framework. The study, Family Forms and Cohabitation in the Modern Welfare State (FAMOSTAT), was originally funded by the National Danish Research Council for the Human Sciences. Its focus...... is on the transformations of family life as a consequence of societal modernization in Denmark. The project was informed by Dencik’s (1996) social psychological perspective on family life, arguing that the impact of modernization should be studied through empirical investigations of everyday family life. Following Asplund......, living in Denmark in 2003, a statistical representative number were included in the panel (n=989). The panel has participated in two waves of data collection. One in 2003, collected via Computer Assisted Telephone Interviews, and one in 2014, based on a web-based survey (n=457). The original...

  1. Professionalization of Family Life Education: Defining the Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darling, Carol A.; Fleming, Wm. Michael; Cassidy, Dawn

    2009-01-01

    An online professional practice analysis of family life educators was conducted resulting in responses from 522 Certified Family Life Educators (CFLEs) and a comparison group of 369 noncertified family practitioners. This survey included questions about the characteristics of CFLEs, their work environments, and practice-related tasks within 10…

  2. Parental Stress, Family-Professional Partnerships, and Family Quality of Life: Families of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Yun-Ju

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship among the quality of life of families that have at least one child with autism spectrum disorder, parental stress level, and partnerships between the family and professionals. Also, parent perceptions of parental stress, family quality of life, and family-professional partnerships were…

  3. Predictors of healthy living and stabilized family life among married ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Family Assessment Device, a subscale of McMaster Family Functioning Scales and Predictors of Family Stability Questionnaire (PFSQ, 2007) were used to measure healthy living, stabilized family life, communication, and marital suspicion. Three null hypotheses were raised and tested using regression analysis. Results ...

  4. The Pluralisation of Family Life: Implications for Preschool Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šebart, Mojca Kovac; Kuhar, Roman

    2017-01-01

    The article takes as its starting point the public debate about the newly proposed Family Code in Slovenia in 2009. Inter alia, the Code introduced a new, inclusive definition of the family in accordance with the contemporary pluralisation of family life. This raised a number of questions about how--if at all--various families are addressed in the…

  5. South African Families Raising Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: Relationship between Family Routines, Cognitive Appraisal and Family Quality of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlebusch, L.; Samuels, A. E.; Dada, S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between family routines, cognitive appraisal of the impact of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) on the family and family quality of life (FQOL) in families raising children with ASD in South Africa. Methods: A sample of 180 families of young children with ASD who were…

  6. Intergenerational caring in professional and family life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacPhail, J

    1993-01-01

    My physician husband and I, as a gerontologic nurse, are committed to intergenerational home visiting because it contributes in a positive way to the social, emotional, and physical well-being of elderly persons that are care for in the home. Informal feedback from the patients has been encouraging, with many requests for return visits. Our children like the party atmosphere, cuddling, and inclusion in their father's work. I enjoy socializing and what this experience teaches the children (e.g., empathy and a glimpse of their mother in her professional role). We have discovered that opportunities for intergenerational visiting are plentiful. The children also make visits to their father's office, and that usually includes lots of interaction with elderly patients in the waiting room. On Saturday morning, which is my time off, my husband will often take the children on his supportive care visits to his "in-hospital" patients. After discharge from the hospital, one woman recalled the positive effects these visits had on her recovery. These visits appear to have an energizing effect not only on patients, but also on the nurses. Perhaps the exuberance of a child instills vitality in others. Simply from observing the reactions of patients during intergenerational home visits, there is no doubt that juniors and seniors benefit from one another's company. The middle generation also finds more satisfaction and integration as they blend family and professional life.

  7. A Family Quality of Life Study of Families with Children with Disabilities in Hawai'i

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranges, Phaedra E.

    2011-01-01

    Research indicates that families of children with disabilities are at risk for a lower quality of life than families of typically developing children, as the impact that a child with a disability has on a family's quality of life (FQOL) is both substantial and complex (Zuna, Selig, Summers, & Turnbull, 2009b; Zuna, Summers, Turnbull, Hu &…

  8. Gender and the Work-Family Interface: Exploring Differences across the Family Life Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinengo, Giuseppe; Jacob, Jenet I.; Hill, E. Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    This study examines gender differences in the work-family interface across six family life stages using a global sample of IBM employees in 79 countries (N = 41,813). Family life stage was constructed using the age of respondent and age of youngest child. Results revealed that having young children at home was the critical catalyst for gender…

  9. Jesus and cultural values: Family life as an example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn Osiek

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available 'Family values' is a set of traditional images that most cultures collect, images drawn mostly from an idealized picture of family life in the recent past. For Christians, the popular image of Jesus gets included: the Holy Family as a nuclear family unit, Jesus blessing children, Jesus as advocate of traditional family life. A closer reading of both contemporary family life and the Gospels reveals that things are not what they seem. Contemporary family life in Western societies is structured quite differently than the ideal. Jesus' family life was spent in a peasant village surrounded by relatives and neighbors, with little privacy and strong social pressure towards conformity. The gospel records indicate that he did not conform, and paid the price: rejection and misunderstanding by his extended family. The Synoptic Gospels consistently ponray not only an estrangement between Jesus and his family, but Jesus' encouragement of his disciples to break family ties in favor of the surrogate family of the circle of disciples. In a culture in which kinship loyalty was essential, this  message caused deep problems for early Christians which the authors of the household codes of Ephesians, Colossians, the  Pastoral Epistles, and 1 Peter tried to alleviate.

  10. Jesus and cultural values: Family life as an example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn Osiek

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available 'Family values' is a set of traditional images that most cultures collect, images drawn mostly from an idealized picture of family life in the recent past. For Christians, the popular image of Jesus gets included: the Holy Family as a nuclear family unit, Jesus blessing children, Jesus as advocate of traditional family life. A closer reading of both contemporary family life and the Gospels reveals that things are not what they seem. Contemporary family life in Western societies is structured quite differently than the ideal. Jesus' family life was spent in a peasant village surrounded by relatives and neighbors, with little privacy and strong social pressure towards conformity. The gospel records indicate that he did not conform, and paid the price: rejection and misunderstanding by his extended family. The Synoptic Gospels consistently ponray not only an estrangement between Jesus and his family, but Jesus' encouragement of his disciples to break family ties in favor of the surrogate family of the circle of disciples. In a culture in which kinship loyalty was essential, this  message caused deep problems for early Christians which the authors of the household codes of Ephesians, Colossians, the  Pastoral Epistles, and 1 Peter tried to alleviate.

  11. Juggling Higher Education Study and Family Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Louise

    2017-01-01

    Women with families face particular challenges when they undertake Higher Education. Questions arise about coping with the demands of study, new family routines, and the changed identity when mother becomes student: Can I manage it all? How will my family react? Will they give me the time and support I need? The author, herself a mother and…

  12. Family Trajectories and Health : A Life Course Perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barban, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates the role of family trajectory, i.e., the whole sequence of family events during the life course of early adults in shaping their health outcomes. Union formation and childbearing are jointly considered, since the two life domains are highly connected and their intersections

  13. Family Life Education Needs of Mentally Disabled Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Jerelyn B.; Adams, Donna U.

    1987-01-01

    Administered 50 needs statements to 134 minimally and mildly mentally disabled adolescent students to identify their family life education needs as a basis for curriculum development. Identified six clusters or groups of family life education needs: Basic Nutrition, Teenage Pregnancy, Sex Education, Developmental Tasks of Adolescents, Marriage and…

  14. Developing Online Family Life Prevention and Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Robert, Jr.; Bowers, Jill R.; Mitchell, Elissa Thomann; Curtiss, Sarah; Ebata, Aaron T.

    2012-01-01

    Although numerous online family life education programs have been developed over the past few years, there has been little discussion about best practices in the development of these programs. This article presents a framework to assist family life educators in the development and improvement of online programs from the initial problem analysis…

  15. Validity of the Family Quality of Life Survey-2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Adrienne; Isaacs, Barry

    2015-01-01

    Background: Family Quality of Life (FQOL) is an important construct in the Intellectual Disabilities field. Several measures exist, including one developed by an international group, the Family Quality of Life Survey-2006 (FQOLS-2006; Brown et al.2006). However, the psychometric properties of this measure have yet to be fully investigated. This…

  16. Military Families under Stress: Implications for Family Life Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummet, Amy Reinkober; Coleman, Marilyn; Cable, Susan

    2003-01-01

    Provides a summary of the limited research on three uniquely stressful experiences of military families: relocation, separation, and reunion. Using the insights derived from this literature, identifies and discusses interventions to assist and guide military families through these unique events. (Contains 64 references.) (GCP)

  17. Global Family Concerns and the Role of Family Life Education: An Ecosystemic Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darling, Carol A.; Turkki, Kaija

    2009-01-01

    We surveyed colleagues from 4 international professional organizations involved with families in order to examine global family concerns and the role of family life education from an ecosystemic perspective. Our sample represented 6 continents and 50 countries. Survey results indicated that family education and related coursework were available in…

  18. Late-Life Divorce: Its Impact on Family Rituals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pett, Marjorie A.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Examined perceived changes in specific family celebrations, traditions, important life cycle events, and day-to-day family contact that occurred for 115 adult children whose parents had divorced after long-term marriage. Found strong positive correlation between perceived disruptiveness of parental divorce and changes in family rituals,…

  19. Families in Later Life: A Burgeoning Research Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brubaker, Timothy H.

    1990-01-01

    Reviews research from 1980s focusing on families who are beyond child-rearing years. Sees later-life families as characterized by continuity and changes as they experience marriage, divorce, widowhood, remarriage, childlessness, grandparenthood, sibling relationships, and family caregiving. Suggests areas for future research focusing on…

  20. Family Quality of Life Following Early Identification of Deafness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Carla W.; Wegner, Jane R.; Turnbull, Ann P.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Family members' perceptions of their quality of life were examined following early identification of deafness in children. Method: A questionnaire was used to solicit ratings of satisfaction from the family members of 207 children who were deaf and younger than 6 years of age. Results: Results indicated that families were generally…

  1. Family Life in Europe in the Twentieth Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARIE MAREČKOVÁ

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Family life in Europe has undergone many changes in the twentieth century. Th ese include the lifestyle of women, their legal freedom, family relations, relations with partners, relations with the older generation, and relations with children. Th e position of women in society has also undergone many transformations. Problems remain, however, in the social and family policy of the state, as women engaged in the working process give preference to their own plans and their need for self-fulfi lment. Th e main goal of state family policy in the twenty-fi rst century is, then, to ensure a harmonious balance between professional activity and family life

  2. Families of Children with Intellectual Disabilities and Quality of Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majda Schmidt Krajnc

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The main part of the article presents the results of most recent empirical study about the qualify of life for families in Slovenia that have a child with intellectual disabilities and other developmental disabilities. Using the FQOLS-2006 we analysed nine quality of life domains (Health, Financial Well-Being, Family Relationships, Support from Others, Support Services, Influence of Values, Careers, Leisure, Community Interaction from the perspective of six measurement dimensions. The study also examines the differences among the measurement dimensions in the nine domains. The sample consisted of 44 families. We used descriptive statistics and inferential statistics (Friedman test. The Family Relationships domain had the highest average rating of all measured domains regarding the quality of family life.The results in the domain of Support from Others are not encouraging, in particular the domain of Support from Services. Families require powerful support programs of qualified professional teams as well as societal and political attention.

  3. Chronic illness and family: impact of schizophrenia and Crohn's disease on the family quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loga, Slobodan; Sošić, Bojan; Kulenović, Alma Džubur; Svraka, Emira; Bosankić, Nina; Kučukalić, Abdulah; Cemalović, Omer; Hadžić, Alma

    2012-12-01

    Quality of life assessments are increasingly present in health research. Chronic and progressive illness of a family member unavoidably affects quality of life of a family as a whole. The goals of this study were to gain insight into the family burden of chronic disorders, especially possible differences in family quality of life (FQOL) in families that have members suffering from either schizophrenia or Crohn's disease, and families in which none of the members have chronic somatic or mental illness, as well as to pilot an instrument for this purpose. The sample consisted of 53 families with a member suffering from schizophrenia, 50 families with a member suffering from Crohn's disease, and 45 families with no identifiable chronic illnesses. An informant from each family underwent a structured face to face interview, using a questionnaire specially adapted from Family Quality of Life Survey, an instrument widely used to assess FQOL in families with members with disabilities, and which addresses nine areas of family life. In the domain of health, both groups of families with chronic illnesses believe they have significantly different conditions when compared to members of the Control group. In the Crohn's disease group, families had a great deal more of challenges in accessing healthcare services; and see themselves at a disadvantage when compared to both other groups in the domain of finances. Control group offered lowest rating in the domain of support from others. Overall measures of FQOL show significant variation among the three groups, Crohn's disease group offering lowest ratings, followed by families of mental health service users. Overall, FQOL seems to be lower in families that have members diagnosed with Crohn's disease than in families with members suffering from schizophrenia. Illness-specific studies are required, as well as instruments with stronger psychometric properties and studies of determinants of FQOL. Qualitative approach should be emphasised

  4. Young Pioneers: Cohabitation and Family Life Pathways in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loft, Lisbeth Trille Gylling

    2011-01-01

    Using a life course perspective, I examine cohabitation in a cohort of Danish women and menborn in 1954, whom formed families as cohabitation became normative in the Danish context. Inaddition, this cohort was among the first cohorts to come of age in a well-established Danishwelfare state, which...... logistic regression and latent class clusteranalysis to examine the likelihood of ever forming a cohabiting union, to situate cohabitation inthe larger context of family life pathways, and to explore social circumstances as well aspersonal aspirations as determinants of the identified family life pathways...

  5. Heritability Estimates of Endophenotypes of Long and Health Life: The Long Life Family Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matteini, Amy M; Fallin, M Daniele; Kammerer, Candace M

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Identification of gene variants that contribute to exceptional survival may provide critical biologic information that informs optimal health across the life span. METHODS: As part of phenotype development efforts for the Long Life Family Study, endophenotypes that represent exceptional...

  6. Exceptional memory performance in the Long Life Family Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barral, Sandra; Cosentino, Stephanie; Costa, Rosann

    2013-01-01

    Research to understand variability at the highest end of the cognitive performance distribution has been scarce. Our aim was to define a cognitive endophenotype based on exceptional episodic memory (EM) performance and to investigate familial aggregation of EM in families from the Long Life Family...... Study (LLFS). Using a sample of 1911 nondemented offspring of long-lived probands, we created a quantitative phenotype, EM (memory z ≥ 1.5), and classified LLFS families as EM and non-EM families based on the number of EM offspring. We then assessed differences in memory performance between LLFS...... relatives in the parental generation of EM families and those in non-EM families using multivariate analysis adjusted for APOE Apolipoprotein E genotype. LLFS relatives in the proband generation from EM families showed better EM performance than those from non-EM families (β = 0.74, standard error = 0.19, p...

  7. Family Quality of Life of Chinese Families of Children with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, X.; Wang, M.; Fei, X.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The concepts of quality of life and family quality of life (FQOL) are increasingly being studied in the field of intellectual disabilities (ID) in China as important frameworks for: (1) assessing families' need for supports and services; (2) guiding organisational and service delivery system changes; and (3) evaluating quality family…

  8. Family boundary characteristics, work-family conflict and life satisfaction: A moderated mediation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Lin; Fan, Jinyan

    2015-10-01

    Although work-family border and boundary theory suggest individuals' boundary characteristics influence their work-family relationship, it is largely unknown how boundary flexibility and permeability mutually influence work-family conflict and subsequent employee outcomes. Moreover, the existing work-family conflict research has been mainly conducted in the United States and other Western countries. To address these gaps in the work-family literature, the present study examines a moderated mediation model regarding how family boundary characteristics may influence individuals' work-family conflict and life satisfaction with a sample of 278 Chinese full-time employees. Results showed that employees' family flexibility negatively related to their perceived work interference with family (WIF) and family interference with work (FIW), and both these two relationships were augmented by individuals' family permeability. In addition, WIF mediated the relationship between family flexibility and life satisfaction; the indirect effect of family flexibility on life satisfaction via WIF was stronger for individuals with higher family permeability. The theoretical and managerial implications of these findings are discussed. © 2014 International Union of Psychological Science.

  9. Family Quality of Life: Adaptation to Spanish Population of Several Family Support Questionnaires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcells-Balcells, A.; Gine, C.; Guardia-Olmos, J.; Summers, J. A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The concept of family quality of life has emerged as a decisive construct in the last decades to improve the capabilities of families and to assess the outcomes of the services and supports they get. The goal of this research is to adapt three instruments to the Spanish population: the "Beach Center Family Quality of Life…

  10. Family Quality of Life of South African Families Raising Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlebusch, Liezl; Dada, Shakila; Samuels, Alecia E.

    2017-01-01

    This article describes the family quality of life among families who are raising a young child with autism spectrum disorder. Survey research was conducted with 180 families of children with autism spectrum disorder who were receiving disability-related services in the Gauteng province of South Africa. The principle measure used was the Beach…

  11. Family Quality of Life of Turkish Families Who Have Children with Intellectual Disabilities and Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meral, Bekir Fatih; Cavkaytar, Atilla; Turnbull, Ann P.; Wang, Mian

    2013-01-01

    This study examined family quality of life (FQOL) of Turkish families who have children with intellectual disabilities (ID) and autism. To research the perceptions of FQOL and relevant predictive relationships, data were gathered from 3,009 families who have children with ID and autism. The data were collected by using a Socio-demographic Family…

  12. Family Quality of Life from the Perspectives of Individual Family Members: A Korean-American Family and Deafness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Joo Young; Turnbull, Ann

    2013-01-01

    Beginning in the mid-to-late 1980s, the focus on individual quality of life expanded to family quality of life (FQOL) in the field of intellectual disabilities. However, few studies examined FQOL for families who have children with hearing loss. Furthermore, most studies focused on mothers' perceptions of FQOL. The purpose of this study is to…

  13. Diet Quality and Satisfaction with Life, Family Life, and Food-Related Life across Families: A Cross-Sectional Pilot Study with Mother-Father-Adolescent Triads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berta Schnettler

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Family is a major determinant of children’s and adolescents’ eating behavior. The objectives of the present study were to assess diet quality, eating habits, satisfaction with life, family life, and food-related life in mother–father–adolescent triads, and to identify profiles of families according to family members’ diet quality. Questionnaires were administered to a sample of 300 two-parent families with one child over the age of 10 in the city of Temuco (Chile, including the Adapted Healthy Eating Index (AHEI, Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS, Satisfaction with Food-related Life (SWFoL scale, Satisfaction with Family Life (SWFaL scales, and questions relating to their eating habits. Positive relationships were found between the diet quality of the family members, particularly between mothers and adolescents. Three family profiles with different diet qualities were identified: “families with an unhealthy diet” (39.3%, “families in which mothers and adolescents have healthy diets, but the fathers’ diets require changes” (14.3%, and “families that require changes in their diet” (46.4%. These findings stress the key role of mothers in determining family diet quality and suggest a positive relationship between diet quality and satisfaction with life.

  14. Diet Quality and Satisfaction with Life, Family Life, and Food-Related Life across Families: A Cross-Sectional Pilot Study with Mother-Father-Adolescent Triads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnettler, Berta; Lobos, Germán; Miranda-Zapata, Edgardo; Denegri, Marianela; Ares, Gastón; Hueche, Clementina

    2017-10-29

    Family is a major determinant of children's and adolescents' eating behavior. The objectives of the present study were to assess diet quality, eating habits, satisfaction with life, family life, and food-related life in mother-father-adolescent triads, and to identify profiles of families according to family members' diet quality. Questionnaires were administered to a sample of 300 two-parent families with one child over the age of 10 in the city of Temuco (Chile), including the Adapted Healthy Eating Index (AHEI), Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS), Satisfaction with Food-related Life (SWFoL) scale, Satisfaction with Family Life (SWFaL) scales, and questions relating to their eating habits. Positive relationships were found between the diet quality of the family members, particularly between mothers and adolescents. Three family profiles with different diet qualities were identified: "families with an unhealthy diet" (39.3%), "families in which mothers and adolescents have healthy diets, but the fathers' diets require changes" (14.3%), and "families that require changes in their diet" (46.4%). These findings stress the key role of mothers in determining family diet quality and suggest a positive relationship between diet quality and satisfaction with life.

  15. Diet Quality and Satisfaction with Life, Family Life, and Food-Related Life across Families: A Cross-Sectional Pilot Study with Mother-Father-Adolescent Triads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobos, Germán; Miranda-Zapata, Edgardo; Denegri, Marianela; Ares, Gastón; Hueche, Clementina

    2017-01-01

    Family is a major determinant of children’s and adolescents’ eating behavior. The objectives of the present study were to assess diet quality, eating habits, satisfaction with life, family life, and food-related life in mother–father–adolescent triads, and to identify profiles of families according to family members’ diet quality. Questionnaires were administered to a sample of 300 two-parent families with one child over the age of 10 in the city of Temuco (Chile), including the Adapted Healthy Eating Index (AHEI), Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS), Satisfaction with Food-related Life (SWFoL) scale, Satisfaction with Family Life (SWFaL) scales, and questions relating to their eating habits. Positive relationships were found between the diet quality of the family members, particularly between mothers and adolescents. Three family profiles with different diet qualities were identified: “families with an unhealthy diet” (39.3%), “families in which mothers and adolescents have healthy diets, but the fathers’ diets require changes” (14.3%), and “families that require changes in their diet” (46.4%). These findings stress the key role of mothers in determining family diet quality and suggest a positive relationship between diet quality and satisfaction with life. PMID:29109387

  16. Life forms of succulent representatives of the family Asclepiadaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Gaidarzhy

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The life forms of succulent’s representatives of the family Asclepiadaceae of the tropical and subtropical plants from the collection of O.V. Fomin Botanical garden according to author classification are characterized.

  17. Family Needs and Family Quality of Life for Taiwanese Families of Children with Intellectual Disability and Developmental Delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Chun-Yu

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation consists of four related chapters including an introductory overview of all four chapters, a report on family needs, a report on family quality of life, and a summary of implications for the conceptual framework. Chapter 1, the introductory overview, presents background information of Taiwan and describes the family quality of…

  18. Relationship between body mass index and family functioning, family communication, family type and parenting style among African migrant parents and children in Victoria, Australia: a parent-child dyad study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cyril, S; Halliday, J; Green, J; Renzaho, A M N

    2015-01-01

    .... The aim of this study was to examine the difference between children and parental perception of family functioning, family communication, family type and parenting styles and their relationship with body mass index...

  19. Relationship between body mass index and family functioning, family communication, family type and parenting style among African migrant parents and children in Victoria, Australia: a parent-child dyad study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cyril, S; Halliday, J; Green, J; Renzaho, A.M.N

    2016-01-01

    .... The aim of this study was to examine the difference between children and parental perception of family functioning, family communication, family type and parenting styles and their relationship with body mass index...

  20. Online discussions mirroring family life during pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pirkko Kouri

    2006-03-01

    Conclusions Today, the relationship between clients and professionals is inevitably changing. More online services and advocacy are needed if families are to have access to online health services. The role of professionals is diversifying from being authorities to supporting and facilitating clients' individual self-care. Based on direct client feedback, the quality of maternity care can be improved.

  1. Family Life Students Praise the Computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesser, Barbara Jo; Parkhurst, Anne M.

    1977-01-01

    Reports an experimental study of student and teacher reactions to a computerized version of a standard personality inventory used as part of marriage and family relations classes. Results indicated that the computerized version offered more advantages than the manual version. (TA)

  2. Development and Psychometric Properties of the Family Life Interview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llewellyn, Gwynnyth; Bundy, Anita; Mayes, Rachel; McConnell, David; Emerson, Eric; Brentnall, Jennie

    2010-01-01

    Background: This study describes the development and trialling of the Family Life Interview (FLI), a clinical tool designed to examine sustainability of family routines. Materials and Methods: The FLI, a self-report instrument completed by a parent within a semi-structured practitioner--parent interview, was administered to 118 parents, with…

  3. Accommodating family life: mentoring future female faculty members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodish, Harvey F

    2015-03-01

    The demands of family life are crucial factors in successfully retaining women in science. Retention efforts should focus on creating a family-friendly environment within the laboratory and the institute. Based on my own experiences, I suggest ways to attract top young scientists and support their development into leading researchers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Professional Support for Families in Difficult Life Situations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakirova, Venera G.; Gaysina, Guzel I.; Raykova, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Relevance of the problem stated in the article is determined by the presence of a significant number of families in difficult life situations who need in professional support and socio-psychological assistance. The article aims to substantiate the effectiveness of the structural-functional model of professional supporting for families in difficult…

  5. Life Journey through Autism: A Guide for Military Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Katie C.; Clemens, Erin M.; Gilbert, Marilyn; McBreen, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Autism presents parents and families with many challenges under normal circumstances. Autism in a military family magnifies many of those challenges and adds a few more that are unique to the demands of military life and service, further complicating an already complex neurobiological disorder. Military sources indicate that more than 13,000…

  6. The importance of life long learning | Gibbs | South African Family ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, are these terms so frighteningly divorced from the reality of standard family practice? Are practitioners life long learners by default, driven by an ability to maintain general health care? Or is life long learning something that practitioners must develop post graduation? In an attempt to answer these questions, this ...

  7. victoria cross awards warrants concerning the victoria cross (1920)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    INTRODUCTION. In the military history of both the British Empire and of the Western World, the highest British military decoration, namely the Victoria Cross, has attained con- siderable renown. The Victoria Cross was introduced in terms of the Royal Warrant of 29 January,. 1856 and by 1957 a total of 1346 had been ...

  8. Family quality of life of Chinese families of children with intellectual disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, X; Wang, M; Fei, X

    2012-01-01

    The concepts of quality of life and family quality of life (FQOL) are increasingly being studied in the field of intellectual disabilities (ID) in China as important frameworks for: (1) assessing families' need for supports and services; (2) guiding organisational and service delivery system changes; and (3) evaluating quality family outcomes. The present study focused on exploring the perceptions of Chinese families who have a child with an ID regarding FQOL as well as examining the factor structure of FQOL concept from Chinese families. The Chinese version of the Family Quality of Life Scale was used to survey Chinese families living in the urban and suburban areas of Beijing who have a child with ID. A total of 442 families participated in this study. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to test the factor structure of FQOL. Multivariate analysis was also used to examine group differences among families in terms of family demographic variables. A five-factor structure of the FQOL construct was found in the Chinese sample, suggesting a similar factor structure found from US families in the literature. Different living conditions (e.g. housing and transportation) tended to affect significantly families' satisfaction ratings of their FQOL. It is also found that family income and severity of disability of the child are predictors of families' satisfaction ratings of FQOL. The preliminary findings of this study suggest a cross-cultural factor structure comparability of FQOL between samples in the USA and China. Results call for further examination of the family-centred service and support as a mediator on the interactive relationship between family characteristics, family needs and FQOL outcomes. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. THE PROFESSIONAL ROLE OF TEACHER OF EDUCATION FOR FAMILY LIFE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Zellma

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Teachers of education for family life take all sorts of forms of professional activity in school. The activities are an important component of teachers’ professional role. They arise, among others, from applicable laws, professional obligations, curriculum assumptions in particular types of schools and social expectations. However, personal characteristics as well as professional qualifications and competence are of great importance. These factors determine the quality of professional activity of the teacher of education for family life. By analyzing the issue mentioned in the title of this thesis, attention was drawn to the rights and obligations of teachers of education for life in the family that relate to teaching, upbringing, prevention and care. Reference is made at the same time to the existing educational documents and curriculum assumptions. This made it possible to indicate what the proper fulfillment of teaching, educational-preventive and caring tasks of the teacher of education for life in the family depends on. It has been proved that regardless of the changes taking place in the socio-cultural realities, the needs and interests of students and the expectations of parents, teachers of education for life in the family is required to take fair and responsible participation in the issues relating to marriage and family. He also has to support his students in the integral development and shape social and moral attitudes based on universal moral and social values.

  10. Family sense of coherence and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngai, Fei-Wan; Ngu, Siew-Fei

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between family sense of coherence, social support, stress, quality of life and depressive symptoms among Chinese pregnant women. A cross-sectional design was used. A convenience sample of 267 Chinese pregnant women was recruited at the antenatal clinic and completed the Family Sense of Coherence Scale, Medical Outcomes Study Social Support Survey, Social Readjustment Rating Scale, Medical Outcome Study Short Form 12-Item Health Survey and General Health Questionnaire. Path analysis was employed. Family sense of coherence and social support had a direct impact on the mental health component of quality of life and depressive symptoms during pregnancy. Family sense of coherence also mediated the effect of stress on quality of life and depressive symptoms. The study provides evidence that family sense of coherence and social support play a significant role in promoting quality of life and reducing depressive symptoms during the transition to motherhood. Culturally competent healthcare should be developed to strengthen women's family sense of coherence and foster social support to combat the stress of new motherhood, thereby promoting quality of life during that period of their lives.

  11. Involvement of family members in life with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grabowski, Dan; Andersen, Tue Helms; Varming, Annemarie

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Family involvement plays a key role in diabetes management. Problems and challenges related to type 2-diabetes often affect the whole family, and relatives are at increased risk of developing diabetes themselves. We highlight these issues in our objectives: (1) to uncover specific...... family problems associated with mutual involvement in life with type 2-diabetes and (2) to analytically look at ways of approaching these problems in healthcare settings. METHODS: Qualitative data were gathered in participatory problem assessment workshops. The data were analysed in three rounds using...... in healthcare settings. CONCLUSION: The study generated important knowledge about problems associated with family involvement in life with type 2 diabetes and about how family involvement can be supported in healthcare practice....

  12. Family Life Quality and Emotional Quality of Life in Chinese Adolescents with and without Economic Disadvantage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shek, Daniel T. L.; Lee, T. Y.

    2007-01-01

    Chinese secondary school students (N = 2758) responded to measures of perceived family life quality (parenting quality and parent-child relational quality) and emotional quality of life (hopelessness, mastery, life satisfaction and self-esteem). Parenting quality included different aspects of parental behavioral control (parental knowledge,…

  13. The Pluralisation of Family Life: Implications for Preschool Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojca Kovač Šebart

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The article takes as its starting point the public debate about the newly proposed Family Code in Slovenia in 2009. Inter alia, the Code introduced a new, inclusive definition of the family in accordance with the contemporary pluralisation of family life. This raised a number of questions about how – if at all – various families are addressed in the process of preschool education in public preschools in Slovenia. We maintain that the family is the child’s most important frame of reference. It is therefore necessary for the preschool community to respect family plurality and treat it as such in everyday life and work. In addition, preschool teachers and preschool teacher assistants are bound by the formal framework and the current curriculum, which specifies that children in preschools must be acquainted with various forms of families and family communities. This also implies that parents – despite their right to educate their children in accordance with their religious and philosophical convictions – have no right to interfere in the educational process and insist on their particular values, such as the demand that some family forms remain unmentioned.

  14. Effect of malocclusion among adolescents on family quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, L G; Melgaço, C A; Abreu, M H N G; Lages, E M B; Paiva, S M

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the effect of malocclusion among adolescents on their families' oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL). A consecutive sample of 125 parents/caregivers of Brazilian adolescents was chosen. Participants were asked to answer the Brazilian version of the Family Impact Scale (FIS). The main independent variable was adolescents' malocclusion, which was measured with the Dental Aesthetic Index. Gender, age, and family monthly income were the other independent variables. Data analysis involved descriptive statistics, Mann-Whitney test, and univariate and multiple logistic regression. Among the 125 participants initially admitted to the present study, two were excluded so that 123 parents/caregivers participated providing a response rate of 98.4 %. The overall FIS score revealed a more frequent effect for families of adolescents who presented malocclusion (P = 0.005). Significant findings were also observed for parental emotions (P = 0.022), family conflict (P = 0.010), and financial burden (P = 0.010) subscales. When the independent variables family monthly income and malocclusion were inserted together in the regression model, families with a monthly income of life than those families whose adolescents did not present malocclusion. Families of adolescents with malocclusion were more likely to report a worse OHRQoL.

  15. Health, family strains, dependency, and life satisfaction of older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chokkanathan, Srinivasan; Mohanty, Jayashree

    2017-07-01

    Using stress process theory and structural equation modelling, this study investigated the complex relationship between health status, family strain, dependency, and the life satisfaction of rural older adults with reported functional impairments in India. Data were extracted from a large-scale study of 903 randomly selected adults aged 61 years and older from 30 rural clusters of India. The sample for this study was confined to 653 older adults who reported functional impairments. Structural equation modelling showed that poor health status indirectly lowered the life satisfaction of older adults through family strains. Moreover, poor health status also indirectly influenced life satisfaction through dependency and family strain (poor health→dependency→family strains→life satisfaction). The findings indicate that for professionals who deal with the health of older adults, exploring relationship strains and dependency is vital to the assessment and intervention of subjective wellbeing. Inter-sectoral coordination and communication between healthcare and social service agencies might facilitate effective management of health problems among older adults. Moreover, taking family strains and dependency into account when caring for older adults with health problems is critical to help improve their quality of life and maintain their wellbeing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Nota biobibliográfica + poética + creaciones («Campo de girasoles», «Hierápolis I», «La diosa fortuna», «One life», «Acción por la paz (Washington DC 2012» y «Encruzcijada» + cuestionario (Victoria Pineda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Peralto

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Nota biobibliográfica + poética + creaciones («Campo de girasoles», «Hierápolis I», «La diosa fortuna», «One life», «Acción por la paz (Washington DC 2012» y «Encruzcijada» + cuestionario (Victoria Pineda

  17. Familialization in Welfare State Arrangements: Foster Families in the Life Course of Foster Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Götzö

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Currently enforced discourses on the significance of familial resources as a precondition for education, employability and social mobility reveal aspects of the interplay between state and families in terms of social integration. Foster families are of special interest when studying the drifts in discourses toward a familialization of life course regimes. The research on foster family care highlights the ambiguous negotiations on responsibilities, competencies, expertise and professionalisation, as well as the call to not colonise the intimate familial context. The authors analyse the interplay of the involved persons in the everyday practices, such as local authorities, legal guardians, therapists, parents of origin, foster parents and foster children. In the article, the beginning and the end of the child protection measure is discussed to see how trajectories and transitions are shaped by those involved, and how their acting can be interpreted in terms of life course regimes

  18. Family Quality of Life for Families in Early Intervention in Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mas, Joana M.; Baqués, Natasha; Balcells-Balcells, Anna; Dalmau, Mariona; Giné, Climent; Gràcia, Marta; Vilaseca, Rosa

    2016-01-01

    Early intervention (EI) has been shown to be an essential resource for meeting the needs and priorities of children with intellectual and developmental disability and their families. The objective of this study was to examine (a) the perceived quality of life of families attending EI centers in Spain and (b) its relationship with characteristics…

  19. Relationship between body mass index and family functioning, family communication, family type and parenting style among African migrant parents and children in Victoria, Australia: a parent-child dyad study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Cyril

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although childhood obesity prevalence is stabilised in developed countries including Australia, it is continuing to rise among migrants and socially disadvantaged groups in these countries. African migrants and refugees in particular, are at high risk of obesity due to changes in their family dynamics. The aim of this study was to examine the difference between children and parental perception of family functioning, family communication, family type and parenting styles and their relationship with body mass index. Methods A cross-sectional parent-child dyad study was conducted among 284 African families from migrant and refugee backgrounds living in metropolitan Melbourne, Australia. Bilingual workers were trained to collect demographic, anthropometric and questionnaire data on family functioning, parenting, family type and family communication. Results Parents and children reported different levels of family dynamics. Children reported a higher prevalence of poor family functioning (61.5 %, 95 % CI: 55.6, 67.2 versus 56.8 %, 95 % CI: 49.7, 61.6 and protective family type (29 %, 95 % CI: 23.9, 34.5 vs. 13.4 %, 95 % CI: 9.9, 17.9, but a lower prevalence of authoritative parenting style (51.6 %, 95 % CI: 45.7, 57.5 vs. 63 %, 95 % CI: 57.5, 68.8 than parents. There was a positive relationship between poor family functioning and child BMI both before (β = 1.28; 95 % CI: 0.14, 2.41; p < 0.05 and after (β = 1.73; 95 % CI: 0.53, 2.94; p < 0.001 controlling for confounders, and an inverse relationship between consensual family type and child BMI after adjustment (β = −1.92; 95 % CI: −3.59, −0.24; p < 0.05. There was no significant relationship between parental BMI and family functioning, communication, family type or parenting style. Conclusion Children’s perception of poor family functioning was associated with childhood obesity. Family interventions to reduce childhood obesity need

  20. Relationship between body mass index and family functioning, family communication, family type and parenting style among African migrant parents and children in Victoria, Australia: a parent-child dyad study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyril, S; Halliday, J; Green, J; Renzaho, A M N

    2016-08-03

    Although childhood obesity prevalence is stabilised in developed countries including Australia, it is continuing to rise among migrants and socially disadvantaged groups in these countries. African migrants and refugees in particular, are at high risk of obesity due to changes in their family dynamics. The aim of this study was to examine the difference between children and parental perception of family functioning, family communication, family type and parenting styles and their relationship with body mass index. A cross-sectional parent-child dyad study was conducted among 284 African families from migrant and refugee backgrounds living in metropolitan Melbourne, Australia. Bilingual workers were trained to collect demographic, anthropometric and questionnaire data on family functioning, parenting, family type and family communication. Parents and children reported different levels of family dynamics. Children reported a higher prevalence of poor family functioning (61.5 %, 95 % CI: 55.6, 67.2 versus 56.8 %, 95 % CI: 49.7, 61.6) and protective family type (29 %, 95 % CI: 23.9, 34.5 vs. 13.4 %, 95 % CI: 9.9, 17.9), but a lower prevalence of authoritative parenting style (51.6 %, 95 % CI: 45.7, 57.5 vs. 63 %, 95 % CI: 57.5, 68.8) than parents. There was a positive relationship between poor family functioning and child BMI both before (β = 1.28; 95 % CI: 0.14, 2.41; p parental BMI and family functioning, communication, family type or parenting style. Children's perception of poor family functioning was associated with childhood obesity. Family interventions to reduce childhood obesity need to adopt an intergenerational approach to promote a clear understanding of family dynamics between children and parents. Unless these intergenerational challenges associated with family dynamics are clearly addressed in obesity interventions, current obesity prevention initiatives will continue to widen the childhood obesity gap in Australia.

  1. Empirical research of Social and age norms in family life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasija Aleksandrovna Zmievskaja

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The results of quantitative and qualitative stages of the research of social and age norms in family life of modern Russian are presented in the article. The purpose of the research is to examine the content of major social and age norms in family scope and its age-related specifics. The research had two stages: quantitative (methods: interviews and focus-group discussions, the net thematic analysis of the data and qualitative (methods: the author questionnaire, mathematical methods of data processing. The survey is based on a representative sample included people of three age groups (20-40 years; 40-60 years; after 60 years. The list of major social and age norms in family scope is identified. Its significance was various in the whole sample and in different age groups. The most significant was such norms as the necessity to take care about children and parents, the aspiration to grow worthy children and the necessity to assign roles between husband and wife in family life. The least significant norm is to stop childbearing at the age of 40. It’s detected that subjective significance of the norm depends on the relevance of life event/situation regulated by this norm. It’s shown that older generation (after 60 years has much more normative representations about family life than younger people.

  2. Family and sexual life in people with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mameniškienė, Rūta; Guk, Jevgenija; Jatužis, Dalius

    2017-01-01

    Having epilepsy is much more than having seizures. Epilepsy can have a severe negative effect on quality of life, affecting social relationships, academic achievement, housing, employment, and the ability to live and function independently. We undertook a cross-sectional study in a tertiary epilepsy center in Lithuania, aiming to assess the influence of epilepsy and aspects relating to epilepsy (employment, stigma, anxiety) on patients and their families, and to estimate their quality of family life and sexual functioning. We asked patients to complete a questionnaire about their socio-demographic situation, their seizure types and antiepileptic medications, and their quality of family and sexual life. Our results confirmed that epilepsy seriously influences family life. One third of our patients are lonely and half are childless. Epilepsy leads to difficulty in finding a job, especially for men, and unemployment affects their status in the family. People with epilepsy are uncomfortable interacting with those of the opposite sex and tend to conceal their medical condition from their partner. One third have sexual dysfunction, yet only a quarter of them seek professional help. There is a clear need to improve self-confidence and to reduce social stigma in people with epilepsy, and to encourage them to discuss their problems with specialists. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Family, money, and health: Regional differences in the determinants of life satisfaction over the life course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, Rachel; Myrskylä, Mikko

    2013-01-01

    We examine how family, money, and health explain variation in life satisfaction over the life cycle across seven global regions using data from the World Values Survey. With a life domain approach, we study whether the importance of the life domains varies by region and age groups and whether the variation explained by each factor is due to the magnitude or prevalence of each factor. Globally, family, money, and health explain a substantial fraction of life satisfaction, increasing from 12 percent in young adulthood to 15 percent in mature adulthood. Health is the most important factor, and its importance increases with age. Income is unimportant above age 50. Remarkably, the contribution of family is small across ages. Across regions health is most important in the wealthier, and income in the poorer regions of the world. Family explains a substantial fraction of life satisfaction only in Western Europe and Anglophone countries. Findings highlight that the population-level importance of family, money, and health in explaining variation in life satisfaction across regions is mainly attributable to the individual-level life satisfaction differences between people of different statuses rather than differences in the distribution of various states such as poor health across regions. PMID:24796263

  4. Cancer Communication and Family Caregiver Quality of Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine Wittenberg

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Family caregivers have enormous communication responsibilities tied to caregiving, such as sharing the patient’s medical history with providers, relaying diagnosis and prognosis to other family members, and making decisions about care with the patient. While caregiver stress and burden has been widely documented in the caregiving literature, little is known about how communication burden, real or perceived communication challenges, impacts caregiver quality of life. In family caregiving, the City of Hope (COH Quality of Life model proposes that the caregiving experience is reciprocal to the patient experience, impacting physical, social, psychological, and spiritual quality of life. We used data from a pilot study testing a communication coaching call intervention with family caregivers of lung cancer patients to analyze caregiver reported communication burden and quality of life. We found variances in each quality of life domain, suggesting that caregiver interventions should range from self-care skill building for physical care to psycho-educational interventions that support caregiver coping and communication skill building. These findings demonstrate the importance of caregiver assessment and attention to communication burden in quality cancer care.

  5. Development and Examination of a Family Triadic Measure to Examine Quality of Life Family Congruence in Nursing Home Residents and Two Family Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aalgaard Kelly, Gina

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The overall purpose of this study was to propose and test a conceptual model and apply family analyses methods to understand quality of life family congruence in the nursing home setting. Method: Secondary data for this study were from a larger study, titled Measurement, Indicators and Improvement of the Quality of Life (QOL) in Nursing Homes. Research literature, family systems theory and human ecological assumptions, fostered the conceptual model empirically testing quality of life family congruence. Results: The study results supported a model examining nursing home residents and two family members on quality of life family congruence. Specifically, family intergenerational dynamic factors, resident personal and social-psychological factors, and nursing home family input factors were examined to identify differences in quality of life family congruence among triad families. Discussion: Formal family involvement and resident cognitive functioning were found as the two most influential factors to quality of life family congruence (QOLFC). PMID:28138474

  6. Delimiting family in syntheses of research on childhood chronic conditions and family life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knafl, Kathleen; Leeman, Jennifer; Havill, Nancy; Crandell, Jamie; Sandelowski, Margarete

    2015-03-01

    Synthesis of family research presents unique challenges to investigators who must delimit what will be included as a family study in the proposed review. In this paper, the authors discuss the conceptual and pragmatic challenges of conducting systematic reviews of the literature on the intersection between family life and childhood chronic conditions. A proposed framework for delimiting the family domain of interest is presented. The framework addresses both topical salience and level of relevance and provides direction to future researchers, with the goal of supporting the overall quality of family research synthesis efforts. For users of synthesis studies, knowledge of how investigators conceptualize the boundaries of family research is important contextual information for understanding the limits and applicability of the results. © 2014 Family Process Institute.

  7. Concurrent Validity of the International Family Quality of Life Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, Preethy S; Pociask, Fredrick D; DiZazzo-Miller, Rosanne; Carrellas, Ann; LeRoy, Barbara W

    2016-01-01

    The measurement of the social construct of Family Quality of Life (FQOL) is a parsimonious alternative to the current approach of measuring familial outcomes using a battery of tools related to individual-level outcomes. The purpose of this study was to examine the internal consistency and concurrent validity of the International FQOL Survey (FQOLS-2006), using cross-sectional data collected from 65 family caregivers of children with developmental disabilities. It shows a moderate correlation between the total FQOL scores of the FQOLS-2006 and the Beach Center's FQOL scale. The validity of five FQOLS-2006 domains was supported by the correlations between conceptually related domains.

  8. The Child's right to protection of private life and Family life

    OpenAIRE

    Stang, Elisabeth Gording

    2015-01-01

    In Child-friendly Justice, world-leading experts on children’s rights analyse how the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child has strengthened children’s status in civil, administrative and criminal justice systems.This paper aims at analysing and discussing the child’s right to family and family life on the one hand, and to privacy and private life on the other; and the tension between these rights. draft

  9. Family involvement in end-of-life hospital care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschann, Jeanne M; Kaufman, Sharon R; Micco, Guy P

    2003-06-01

    To examine whether the end-of-life treatment provided to hospitalized patients differed for those who had a family member present at death and those who did not. A retrospective cohort analysis. An urban community hospital. All 370 inpatients who died during a 1-year period. Medical records were examined for whether life-support treatments were provided or withdrawn, occurrence and timing of do-not-resuscitate (DNR) orders, and use of comfort measures such as narcotics and sedation. DNR orders were written for 85% of patients. For patients who had a DNR order written, the average time from the DNR order to death was 4.8 days. Only 26% of patients had one or more treatments withdrawn. Sixty-seven percent of patients received narcotics before death, and 22% received sedatives. Patients aged 75 and older and African Americans were less likely to have a family member present at death. After adjusting for age and ethnicity, patients who had a family member present at death were more likely to have DNR orders written, to have treatments withdrawn, and to receive narcotics before death. Patients with a family member present at death also had a shorter time to death after DNR orders were written. The presence of a family member at death appears to be an indirect measure of family involvement during patients' hospitalization. Family involvement before death may reduce the use of technology and increase the use of comfort care as patients die.

  10. Family (Dis)Advantage and Life Course Expectations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Monica Kirkpatrick; Hitlin, Steven

    2017-03-01

    Optimistic assessments of life chances can positively influence life outcomes, but conflicting theories suggest these assessments either reflect structural privilege or develop as a result of childhood hardship. In addition, competing hypotheses suggest that these assessments may matter differently depending on who holds them. We examine whether family socioeconomic status shapes adolescents' expectations about how successful their lives will turn out. We distinguish generalized life expectations (GLE), capturing anticipated success in life across multiple domains, from intergenerational comparative expectations (ICE), which register expectations about improvement relative to observed success within the respondent's family lineage. We find that adolescents from higher socioeconomic status families are simultaneously more optimistic about their likely success in life (GLE) but less likely to anticipate relative improvement in life success across generations (ICE). Holding high GLE in combination with low ICE predicted doing better in adulthood across a range of health, attainment, and well-being outcomes, though in most cases high GLE, regardless of ICE, was the key. These beneficial patterns are, for the most part, at least as beneficial for socioeconomically disadvantaged youth as they are for advantaged youth.

  11. Implementation of the victoria bowel performance scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawley, Philippa; Barwich, Doris; Kirk, Lisa

    2011-12-01

    There is a lack of evidence to guide constipation management in patients receiving palliative care. Data collection requires the systematic use of validated assessment tools. The objective of this study was to assess the usefulness of the Victoria Bowel Performance Scale (BPS) as an audit tool. Charts were reviewed before and after the implementation of a program to monitor constipation through repeated use of the Victoria Bowel Scale. The program was initiated at three oncology pain and symptom management clinics, four palliative care units, and four residential hospices. An additional "control" palliative care unit introduced new nursing assessment tools without the new scale. The Victoria BPS was recorded at 86% of 192 postimplementation outpatient clinic visits and was easy to use in this setting. Documentation of bowel performance at comparable visits improved from 44% to 66% (Passessment tool, uniquely incorporating the patient's usual bowel function. Modifications to the scale have been made to improve clarity and allow for the expected drop in bowel activity seen in end-of-life care. Considerable educational effort and appropriate organization of the charts are required for optimal implementation. The proportion of revised BPS scores ranging from -1 to +1 is proposed as an indicator of satisfactory bowel management for clinical, audit, and research purposes. Copyright © 2011 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Parental stress, family quality of life, and family-teacher partnerships: Families of children with autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Yun-Ju; Higgins, Kyle; Pierce, Tom; Whitby, Peggy J Schaefer; Tandy, Richard D

    2017-11-01

    Reducing parental stress and improving family quality of Life (FQOL) are continuing concerns for families of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Family-teacher partnerships have been identified as a positive factor to help parents reduce their stress and improve their FQOL. However, the interrelations among parental stress, FQOL, and family-teacher partnerships need to be further examined so as to identify the possible paths to help parents reduce their stress and improve their FQOL. The purpose of this study was to examine the interrelations among these three variables. A total of 236 parents of school children with ASD completed questionnaires, which included three measures: (a) the Beach Center Family Quality of Life Scale, (b) the Parental Stress Scale, and (c) the Beach Center Family-Professional Partnerships Scale. The structural equation modeling was used to analyze the interrelations among these three variables. Perceived parental stress had a direct effect on parental satisfaction concerning FQOL and vice versa. Perceived family-teacher partnerships had a direct effect on FQOL, but did not have a direct effect on parental stress. However, family-teacher partnerships had an indirect effect on parental stress through FQOL. Reducing parental stress could improve FQOL for families of children with ASD and vice versa. Strong family-teacher partnerships could help parents of children with ASD improve their FQOL and indirectly reduce their stress. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Factors associated with work, social life and family life disability in bipolar disorder patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Rojas, Luis; Jurado, Dolores; Gurpegui, Manuel

    2011-04-30

    We analyzed the presence of work, social life and family life disability in 108 outpatients with a Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders IV (DSM-IV) diagnosis of bipolar disorder and their association with previous course-of-illness variables and current psychopathology. Work disability was pragmatically defined as being on a disability pension or in the process of obtaining it; social life or family life disability was defined by a score ≥ 7 in the respective subscales of the Sheehan Disability Scale. At least one type of disability (for work, social life or family life) affected 52-54% of the patients; and two types, 37%. By logistic regression and multiple linear regression analyses we determined the variables independently associated with each type of disability: 1) Work disability was significantly associated with previous repeated manic episodes, three or more hospitalizations, with current depressive symptoms and inversely with the educational attainment. 2) Social life disability significantly increased with the number of hospitalizations and was associated with previous repeated depressive episodes and current depressive symptoms. In alternative models, nicotine dependence and lack of social support were significantly associated with work and social life disability respectively. And 3) family life disability significantly increased with number of hospitalizations, CAGE questionnaire score and age; and was associated with previous repeated manic episodes and current depressive symptoms. In conclusion, previous course-of-illness variables, particularly a high number of manic episodes, and current psychopathology - as indicated by the presence of nicotine dependence or depressive symptoms - may be indicators of disability; previous manic episodes appear to affect disability at work or at family life whereas previous depressive episodes seem to be related with social life disability. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Preparing Professionals for Family Life and Human Sexuality Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamermesh, Frances W.; And Others

    This handbook offers several models for inservice or preservice classroom sessions in the teaching of family life and human sexuality education. Each training session presents: model instructional goals and objectives; a syllabus; background information and sources for further information; and suggestions for a variety of individual and group…

  15. Evolutionary aspects of life forms in angiosperm families

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kremer, P; VanAndel, J

    1995-01-01

    The distribution patterns of life forms among extant families, subclasses and classes are described with the aim of detecting evolutionary trends. The explosive diversification of angiosperms constrains the possibilities for detecting such trends. Moreover, the extant groups of seed plants are only

  16. The family and the ontogenesis of human life: An appraisal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article examines critically the role of the family, in a man's journey on earth beginning from his origins through his developmental stages, and earlier states of his history to ageing, dying and death which is the greatest limit situation that terminates man's life here on this planet earth and brings him face to face with His ...

  17. Involving the chruch in the provision of family life education ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Involving the chruch in the provision of family life education: Evaluation report of a training workshop. Evans Jonathan-Ibeagha, Adebola Adedimeji, Promise Okpala, Peace Ibeagha. Abstract. No Abstract Available African Journal for the Psychological Study of Social Issues Vol.4(1) 1999: 35-47. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT ...

  18. Rural school children picturing family life | de Lange | Perspectives ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rurality is an active agent and central to the lived experiences of children growing up on a farm and attending a farm school. It is a key to their everyday experiences, and influences family life, schooling and their future. Previous studies elsewhere in the world have explored the notion of childhood in rural contexts, but there ...

  19. Web-Based Family Life Education: Spotlight on User Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doty, Jennifer; Doty, Matthew; Dwrokin, Jodi

    2011-01-01

    Family Life Education (FLE) websites can benefit from the field of user experience, which makes technology easy to use. A heuristic evaluation of five FLE sites was performed using Neilson's heuristics, guidelines for making sites user friendly. Greater site complexity resulted in more potential user problems. Sites most frequently had problems…

  20. Family, housing and well-being in later life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herbers, Daniël Johannes

    2016-01-01

    The ageing of many western populations calls for a better understanding of the factors related to well-being in later life. Family and housing are two domains that become increasingly important at older ages. At older ages people generally spend more time in and around the home, and social networks

  1. Public secondary school teachers' attitude to family life education in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: This qualitative study was conducted to assess and compare the attitude of teachers in two geopolitical zones of Nigeria to family life education. Methods: Multi stage sample selection was used to pick 6 public secondary schools (3 junior, 3 senior) in each zone. All teachers (221) in the selected schools were ...

  2. Family Life Education Needs of School Children: A Study in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Research on children's Family Life Education needs has resulted in changes in the structure and contents of Ghana's basic education for children and the development of policies for youth on their sexual and reproductive health. Since the 1990s there has been a growing amount of information and education from various ...

  3. Expressed Attitudes of Adolescents toward Marriage and Family Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Paige D.; Specter, Gerald; Martin, Don; Martin, Maggie

    2003-01-01

    Study examined attitudes of adolescents toward aspects of marriage and family life. The majority expressed negative attitudes toward divorce and viewed marriage as a lifelong commitment. While about one third expressed positive attitudes toward premarital sex, a majority indicated they would engage or had engaged in sex. The adolescents…

  4. Evaluation of the Implementation of Family Life and HIV Education ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Family Life and HIV Education (FLHE) programme was introduced nationwide in Nigeria in 2003. Since then little is known about the patterns of its implementation across the states in the six geo-political zones in Nigeria. This study represents an attempt to fill this lacuna in the FLHE literature in Nigeria. Quantitative data ...

  5. The Adolescent Family Life Program and Adoption Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kring, Thomas C.

    1998-01-01

    Describes the Adolescent Family Life Program, which develops and tests approaches that encourage adoption as an alternative to abortion for pregnant teens. Notes that both abortion and adoption rates have dropped since the program was instituted in 1981; maintains that additional research is needed into factors associated with adoption. Discusses…

  6. Family change and migration in the life course: An introduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadja Milewski

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This article is an introduction to Special Collection 6 of Demographic Research whose articles investigate the interrelations between the family and migration behaviour of individuals in industrialised countries. We first review the life-course approach and previous research on the interplay between family change and migration. We then describe the contribution of the articles in the collection. This is followed by a discussion of selected issues raised in the papers and an outline of future research avenues. We argue that the life-course approach and event-history analysis offer a fruitful framework to examine how individuals simultaneously structure their family lives and residential trajectories, and thus shape demographic change in society.

  7. Personality factors in the Long Life Family Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Stacy L; Sun, Jenny X; Sebastiani, Paola

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate personality profiles of Long Life Family Study participants relative to population norms and offspring of centenarians from the New England Centenarian Study.Method. Personality domains of agreeableness, conscientiousness, extraversion, neuroticism, and openness were...... assessed with the NEO Five-Factor Inventory in 4,937 participants from the Long Life Family Study (mean age 70 years). A linear mixed model of age and gender was implemented adjusting for other covariates. RESULTS: A significant age trend was found in all five personality domains. On average, the offspring...... generation of long-lived families scored low in neuroticism, high in extraversion, and within average values for the other three domains. Older participants tended to score higher in neuroticism and lower in the other domains compared with younger participants, but the estimated scores generally remained...

  8. [The epilepsy of Guadalupe Victoria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Pérez-de-Celis, Enrique

    2008-01-01

    Guadalupe Victoria, the first President of Mexico, passed away in 1843 uictim of an ailment that, at the time, was diagnosed as epilepsy. The clinical data and the pathologic findings, however, suggest the possibility that Victoria had an underlying disease that was responsible for the seizures that affected him. In this article I propose that Guadalupe Victoria had in fact Chagas Disease, and that he was infected with this parasitic malady while he lived in the tropical jungles of Veracruz, in eastern Mexico. Even though there aren't many published works regarding seizures secondary to chronic Chagas Disease, there are good descriptions of epileptic syndromes in patients with this infection. At the same time, the cardiac findings in Victoria's autopsy support the idea that he had some kind of cardiac pathology; in this case Chagasic dilated cardiomyopathy, which ultimately led to his death.

  9. VICTORIA'S SECRET Prepares for Growth

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jordan K Speer

    2007-01-01

      After the upcoming holiday season, Victoria's Secret will take the first steps toward launching its e-commerce business on a cross-channel on-demand platform from partner n2N Commerce, a company...

  10. Parental self-work: governing enactments in family life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liselott Aarsand

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Discourses on lifelong and lifewide learning portray everyday life as a pedagogical space where requirements for how to preferably improve oneself through learning are highly significant. Drawing upon the notion of governmentality, it could be argued that techniques operate within a range of practices to shape, foster and stabilize the assumed adequate ways to perform. Using that particular lens, the case of parenting was investigated to accentuate selves and self-work in narrations on family life in Norway. The analysis illustrates how the techniques of activation and comparison are at work to define, fashion and develop the responsible, involved and attentive parental self, thereby signifying pedagogical claims one should aspire to. However, how this is accomplished differs slightly within the social contexts of family life. Parenting, then, may be discussed as a powerful educative practice for fabricating capable and wellbehaved citizens of contemporary times.

  11. Allowing Family to be Family: End-of-Life Care in Veterans Affairs Medical Foster Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manheim, Chelsea E; Haverhals, Leah M; Jones, Jacqueline; Levy, Cari R

    2016-01-01

    The Medical Foster Home program is a unique long-term care program coordinated by the Veterans Health Administration. The program pairs Veterans with private, 24-hour a day community-based caregivers who often care for Veterans until the end of life. This qualitative study explored the experiences of care coordination for Medical Foster Home Veterans at the end of life with eight Veterans' family members, five Medical Foster Home caregivers, and seven Veterans Health Administration Home-Based Primary Care team members. A case study, qualitative content analysis identified these themes addressing care coordination and impact of the Medical Foster Home model on those involved: (a) Medical Foster Home program supports Veterans' families; (b) Medical Foster Home program supports the caregiver as family; (c) Veterans' needs are met socially and culturally at the end of life; and (d) the changing needs of Veterans, families, and caregivers at Veterans' end of life are addressed. Insights into how to best support Medical Foster Home caregivers caring for Veterans at the end of life were gained including the need for more and better respite options and how caregivers are compensated in the month of the Veteran's death, as well as suggestions to navigate end-of-life care coordination with multiple stakeholders involved.

  12. The influence of family functioning on the consumption of unhealthy foods and beverages among 1- to 12-y-old children in Victoria, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renzaho, Andre M N; Dau, Atemthi; Cyril, Sheila; Ayala, Guadalupe X

    2014-09-01

    Family functioning, which reflects how well family members communicate and interact with each other, is associated with childhood overweight and obesity, but its association with children's eating behaviors remains unclear. The aim of this study was to examine the association between family functioning and unhealthy food and beverage consumption among children ages 1 to 12 y old. As part of the Victorian Child Health and Wellbeing study, a random sample of 4602 caregivers of children completed an interview during a single telephone interview in 2006. Caregivers reported on their child's consumption of three types of unhealthy foods and beverages, and responses were recoded into weekly consumption of potato crisps and chips, monthly consumption of takeaway foods, and daily consumption of sweet beverages. Family functioning included general functioning (α = 0.89) and parental psychological distress (α = 0.78). Consumption of potato crisps and chips occurred, on average, twice a week, while takeaway foods were consumed an average of three times per month. Consistently and controlling for other covariates, male caregivers had children who consumed takeaway foods more frequently and who drank more daily cups of sweet beverages. Caregiver education and living in a single-parent household were consistently associated with poorer eating habits. In all models, general family functioning and parental psychological distress were associated with poorer eating habits. In addition to traditional methods for improving diet, family-based interventions need to target more general aspects of the family's and caregiver's functioning to improve dietary intake. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Life stories of families with a terminally ill child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Hechter

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Family units with a terminally ill child have a tendency to withdraw and this isolation may lead to problems in their mental health. A tendency with psychologists, clergy and helpers from other professions is to act as ideal experts on the lives of saddened people. From painful personal experience, this does not seem to enable acquiescence. Therefore, the aim of research on families with terminally ill children, was to explore and describe their lives and to develop an approach to facilitate their families to obtain acquiescence. In this article however, attention will be given to the life-world of families with terminally ill children. The research consists of two phases. In phase one the experiences of four families with terminally ill children are explored and described by means of phenomenological, unstructured, in-depth interviews. In phase two an acquiescence approach, which was designed for educational psychologists to facilitate families with terminally ill children to achieve acquiscence, is described. This approach is based on results from phase one. This article focuses on phase one. In this phase four families were interviewed individually, in the privacy of their homes. The interviews were audiotaped, and were transcribed for the purpose of data gathering. The data was analysed according to Tesch’s method and a literature control was performed to verify the results. Guba’s model for the validity of qualitative research was used.

  14. Family quality of life of Australian families with a member with an intellectual/developmental disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rillotta, F; Kirby, N; Shearer, J; Nettelbeck, T

    2012-01-01

    Family quality of life (FQOL) is a recent concept in intellectual/developmental disability research. Outcomes for the family are important to the provision of services because families, rather than institutions, are increasingly considered the primary support unit. This article presents Australian findings using the international Family Quality of Life Survey: Main Caregivers of People with Intellectual or Developmental Disabilities (FQOLS-2006). Forty-two South Australian main caregivers of people with an intellectual/developmental disability were interviewed using the FQOLS-2006. The FQOL domains assessed were Health of the Family, Financial Well-being, Family Relationships, Support from Other People, Support from Disability-Related Services, Influence of Values, Careers, Leisure and Recreation, and Community Interaction. Domains were measured in terms of Importance, Opportunities, Attainment, Initiative, Stability and Satisfaction. The FQOLS-2006 asked about the family's practical and emotional Support from Other People together, whereas the current study separated the constructs of practical and emotional support. Questions pertaining to FQOL in the past were also added, in order to gain a broader picture of present FQOL. Results indicated that families considered all the FQOL domains to be important. However, Health, Family Relationships and Financial Well-being were regarded as slightly more important than Practical and Emotional Support from Others. The attainment of Family Relationships, Health, Values, and Leisure and Recreation were rated as quite a bit, but Practical Support from Other People was only rated as a little. Families were generally satisfied with all FQOL domains, but they were satisfied with their Family Relationships and they were neither satisfied or dissatisfied with their Financial Well-being. Results also indicated that there was a need to distinguish between the provision of practical and emotional support from others, because the

  15. Parental unemployment and youth life satisfaction : the moderating roles of satisfaction with family life

    OpenAIRE

    Frasquilho, Diana; Matos, Margarida Gaspar de; Neville, Fergus; Gaspar, Tânia; Almeida, J. M. Caldas

    2016-01-01

    © Springer Science+Business Media New York 2016 While Europe is slowly recovering from the economic recession, its effects on labour markets are still visible. The number of jobless families has increased and previous research has shown that unemployment can affect the well-being of both parents and their children. In this study we explored the links between parental unemployment and youth life satisfaction by considering the potential moderating roles played by satisfaction with family l...

  16. Pheromones involved in insect parental care and family life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiger, Sandra; Stökl, Johannes

    2017-12-01

    Effective parental care requires recognition and communication processes. Whereas chemical communication has been studied intensively in eusocial organisms, in which the workers (siblings) predominantly provide brood care, insect groups in which parents engage in care have been largely neglected. However, the study of communication in insect families might complement and enhance our understanding not only of the evolution of signaling process involved in social insects, but also of those involved in vertebrate families. In this review, we synthesize the existing information about the pheromones and chemical cues that regulate and affect insect parental care and family life. We will present research dealing with pre-hatching as well as post-hatching parental care and cover interactions between parents and offspring, between male and female parents, and among siblings. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Communication with Family and Friends across the Life Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David-Barrett, Tamas; Kertesz, Janos; Rotkirch, Anna; Ghosh, Asim; Bhattacharya, Kunal; Monsivais, Daniel; Kaski, Kimmo

    2016-01-01

    Each stage of the human life course is characterised by a distinctive pattern of social relations. We study how the intensity and importance of the closest social contacts vary across the life course, using a large database of mobile communication from a European country. We first determine the most likely social relationship type from these mobile phone records by relating the age and gender of the caller and recipient to the frequency, length, and direction of calls. We then show how communication patterns between parents and children, romantic partner, and friends vary across the six main stages of the adult family life course. Young adulthood is dominated by a gradual shift of call activity from parents to close friends, and then to a romantic partner, culminating in the period of early family formation during which the focus is on the romantic partner. During middle adulthood call patterns suggest a high dependence on the parents of the ego, who, presumably often provide alloparental care, while at this stage female same-gender friendship also peaks. During post-reproductive adulthood, individuals and especially women balance close social contacts among three generations. The age of grandparenthood brings the children entering adulthood and family formation into the focus, and is associated with a realignment of close social contacts especially among women, while the old age is dominated by dependence on their children.

  18. Communication with Family and Friends across the Life Course.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamas David-Barrett

    Full Text Available Each stage of the human life course is characterised by a distinctive pattern of social relations. We study how the intensity and importance of the closest social contacts vary across the life course, using a large database of mobile communication from a European country. We first determine the most likely social relationship type from these mobile phone records by relating the age and gender of the caller and recipient to the frequency, length, and direction of calls. We then show how communication patterns between parents and children, romantic partner, and friends vary across the six main stages of the adult family life course. Young adulthood is dominated by a gradual shift of call activity from parents to close friends, and then to a romantic partner, culminating in the period of early family formation during which the focus is on the romantic partner. During middle adulthood call patterns suggest a high dependence on the parents of the ego, who, presumably often provide alloparental care, while at this stage female same-gender friendship also peaks. During post-reproductive adulthood, individuals and especially women balance close social contacts among three generations. The age of grandparenthood brings the children entering adulthood and family formation into the focus, and is associated with a realignment of close social contacts especially among women, while the old age is dominated by dependence on their children.

  19. Family quality of life among families of children with atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hae Ji; Hwang, Seonyeong; Ahn, Youngmee; Lim, Dae Hyun; Sohn, Min; Kim, Jeong Hee

    2016-10-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) may cause emotional distress and impairs the quality of life (QoL) in children and their families. We examined family QoL of children with AD and explored associated factors such as disease severity and psychosocial factors among parents of children with AD. Study participants were 78 children (1 month to 16 years old) diagnosed with AD and their parents visiting an outpatient clinic of the Department of Pediatrics in Inha University Hospital. Data were collected using structured questionnaires and medical record review. Parents completed the Dermatitis Family Impact questionnaire (DFI), the Positive Affect and Negative Affect Schedule, the Satisfaction with Life Scale, and the Korean Parenting Stress Index. For children aged below 6-year-old, parents were asked to complete the Infants' Dermatologic Quality of Life. SCOring Atopic Dermatitis (SCORAD), Children's Dermatology Life Quality Index, and the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory version 4.0 Generic Core Scale were also completed. The mean age of parents and children were 37.4 ± 5.3 years and 65.1 ± 45.7 months, respectively. Among them, 87.2% of parents were mothers and 60.3% of children were boys. The mean score of DFI was 11.2 ± 6.0. The mean SCORAD score was 28.3 ± 16.1. Family who experienced strong negative emotionality had a 3.8 times higher probability of experiencing a lower QoL than parents who did not (odds ratio [OR], 3.82; p = 0.041). Family of children with higher severity of AD had a 6.6 times (OR, 6.55; p = 0.018) higher probability of experiencing a low family QoL than their less-severe counterparts. Families of girls with AD had a lower QoL (OR, 8.40; p = 0.003) than families of boys. Family QoL among parents of children with AD was low and associated with parent's psychosocial characteristics as well as disease severity of the children. Considering parental involvement in AD management for children, emotional support for parents can be helpful in long journey of

  20. The Relationship of Perceptions of Service and Support Adequacy to Family Quality of Life for Families of Children with Deafblindness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyzar, Kathleen

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between families' perceptions of supports and services and family quality of life (FQOL) for families of children with deafblindness, and the potential of satisfaction with family-professional partnerships and child age as moderators of this relationship. The study was guided by the Unified Theory of Family…

  1. GAY RELATIONSHIPS AS ALTERNATIVE FORMS OF FAMILY-MARRIAGE LIFE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Perlińska

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available My research and deliberation made in this study show that homosexuality is only one of the signs of human diversity - one from innumerable number of personality features. Therefore, one cannot talk about "gay identity", "homosexual personality", because, as far as I am concerned, it doesn't exist. Artificially generted gay population is only a group of peple being much different from one another and having only one common feature - their sexual orientation. Besides they differ from one another as much as one man from another. Gay relationships take on countless forms, but all of them, as the results of my research indicate, fulfil the majority of family in traditional point of view functions. The deliberation points out at one more conclusion - one cannot examine gay relationships as a separate model of family-marriage life. It should be forgotten about their different psyhosexual orientation and treat their trlationships, together with other interpersonal relationships, equally. Only from such position one can discern in their specific alternative models of family-marriage life.

  2. Family Life Education in the English-speaking Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epps, R P; Corona, E; Kodagoda, N; Simonen, M

    1986-01-01

    Unique experience has accumulated in the English-speaking Caribbean in the field of family life education for youth. Although birth rates are relatively low, the increase in adolescent pregnancy and births is becoming more visible. Mother-centered homes are frequent, and support from the father is often lacking. A series of family life education (FLE) programs funded by the United National Fund for Population Activities is aimed at providing help to the various groups in the Caribbean in an acceptable and non-threatening manner. These out-of-school FLE techniques include several approaches: integration of the proposed program into an already established place (a factory, youth center, or community center); education in human growth, food and nutrition, environmental health, mental health, safety and first-aid, dental health and human relations, including human sexuality, rights and responsibilities, and decision making; and the use of specially trained personnel who understand the conditions of the particular community. In some countries adolescent pregnancy is viewed as a problem. In others it may not be so considered. It is vital for the staff and community leaders to review proposals for the FLE program and bring into the centers all subjects that are free of controversy. Family planning, contraceptive delivery and even human sexuality may be acceptable subjects in some quarters, and not in others. Efforts must be continued to find innovative approaches to assure that the benefits of these learning activities continue to be provided, and expanded in response to growing acceptance.

  3. Communication with family and friends across the life course

    CERN Document Server

    David-Barrett, Tamas; Rotkirch, Anna; Ghosh, Asim; Bhattacharya, Kunal; Monsivais, Daniel; Kaski, Kimmo

    2015-01-01

    Each stage of the human life course is characterized by a distinctive pattern of social relations. We study how the intensity and importance of the closest social contacts vary across the life course, using a large database of mobile communication from a European country. We first determine the most likely social relationship type from these mobile phone records by relating the age and gender of the caller and recipient to the frequency, length, and direction of calls. We then show how communication patterns between parents and children, romantic partner, and friends vary across the six main stages of the adult family life course. Young adulthood is dominated by a gradual shift of call activity from parents to close friends, and then to a romantic partner, culminating in the period of early family formation during which the focus is on the romantic partner. During middle adulthood call patterns suggest a high dependence on the parents of the ego, who, presumably often provide alloparental care, while at this ...

  4. Parents' struggles to rebuild family life after Hurricane Andrew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffman, S

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological study was to gain a deeper understanding of the meaning of parents' everyday experiences after a major natural disaster. In-depth interviews were conducted with 13 parents who lived in the hurricane-damaged area. The essence of being a parent emerged as "struggling to rebuild family life." The struggles were superimposed on top of ongoing issues such as divorce and job responsibilities. Parents described feelings of being thankful to be alive, being overwhelmed, being limited by environmental aftereffects, being responsible for children, balancing needs and roles, constantly changing amidst uncertainty, and finding meaning in the disaster. Study findings support the need for nursing interventions that address family needs, support strengths, and involve parents as active decision makers.

  5. Special Issue on Lake Victoria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The diversity of benthic mollusks of Lake Victoria and Lake Burigi · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. JA Mwambungu, 21-32. http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/tjs.v30i1.18384 ...

  6. Intergenerational Similarity of Religiosity Over the Family Life Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Joohong; Silverstein, Merril; Gruenewald, Tara L

    2017-01-01

    Research consistently shows that parents influence children's religiosity. However, few studies acknowledge that there is within-group variation in the intergenerational transmission of religiosity. In this article, we examine whether and how congruence in religiosity between generations changes over the family life course and identifies unique parent-child trajectory classes. We used eight waves of data from the Longitudinal Study of Generations, including 1,084 parent-child dyads beginning in 1971 when the children were adolescents and young adults, followed up to 2005. Growth mixture models (GMM) were tested. GMM revealed four temporal patterns: stable similar, child weakens, child strengthens, and child returns. Results showed that children who were married were more likely to be members of the child-returns class than members of the stable-similar class. Results are discussed in terms of the utility of the separation-individuation process and the life-course framework for understanding intergenerational differences and their stability over time.

  7. Family discussions on life-sustaining interventions in neurocritical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adil, M M; Larriviere, D

    2017-01-01

    Approximately 20% of all deaths in the USA occur in the intensive care unit (ICU) and the majority of ICU deaths involves decision of de-escalation of life-sustaining interventions. Life-sustaining interventions may include intubation and mechanical ventilation, artificial nutrition and hydration, antibiotic treatment, brain surgery, or vasoactive support. Decision making about goals of care can be defined as an end-of-life communication and the decision-making process between a clinician and a patient (or a surrogate decision maker if the patient is incapable) in an institutional setting to establish a plan of care. This process includes deciding whether to use life-sustaining treatments. Therefore, family discussion is a critical element in the decision-making process throughout the patient's stay in the neurocritical care unit. A large part of care in the neurosciences intensive care unit is discussion of proportionality of care. This chapter provides a stepwise approach to hold these conferences and discusses ways to do it effectively. © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Entry into the Postparental Phase of the Family Life Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Wawrzyniak

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Der Originalbeitrag in deutscher Sprache ist verfügbar unter: Bd. 40 (2015: Ausgewählte deutsche BeiträgeThe article examines entry into the postparental phase of the family life cycle, which is the familial situation when all children have moved out of the parental household. We position this event chronologically within the life course and examine the probability of occurrence. Using panel data (3 survey waves covering a period of 40 years of a cohort of former North-Rhine Westphalian grammar school pupils, event history models (Cox regression are employed to analyse what factors accelerate or decelerate the transition. This revealed that the parent’s individual biography (in particular the age at the own move out, age at the birth of the first child and the number of children has a major impact on the time of occurrence, while the occupational history has no effect. In addition, sons delay the transition, while children’s academic studies and occupation accelerate it.

  9. Different Aspects of Involving Family in School Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blândul Valentin-Cosmin

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The school has come to not have a huge credibility even, sometimes being abandoned, primarily because, nowadays, no matter hierarchy and is not perceived as a value. The actual society no longer has trust in the educational establishment, the values acquired and ranked by the amount of learning embedded in it. Such an attitude is reflected by the relationship between “parent - teacher” and “student - teacher”. Based on these findings, the present study aims to investigate the main features of the relationship that is established between school and family, concerned how parents can get involved in school life effectively. The lot of subjects was represented by 212 teachers from secondary schools in Bihor, Romania and the instrument used in the research was a questionnaire consisting of 46 objective and subjective items. The results are very interesting and shows that many respondents argue that parents show indifference to the formal education of their children, not involved in the didactic or extracurricular activities and in school life, not take part in parent meetings or when called for, is difficult to communicate with parents etc. There are some cases when, because of the family economic situation is poor, parents send their children to work, offering less time and interest in their education and instruction.

  10. Evaluation of anxiety, depression, and quality of life in patients with acne vulgaris, and quality of life in their families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatice Duman

    2016-03-01

    Conclusion: Acne vulgaris does not have an effect on quality of life and the risk of anxiety or depression. In the cases of acne, when the quality of life decreases, the risk of depression as well as anxiety increases and the quality of life of the family members is negatively affected. Acne vulgaris negatively affects the quality of life of the family members of the patients.

  11. Families and Futures 2000. A Resource for Planning Comprehensive Home and Family Life Education Programs. Working Papers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington Office of the State Superintendent of Public Instruction, Olympia.

    This curriculum guide is the first step in a total home and family life curriculum revision in the state of Washington aimed at helping students solve problems and study issues that have an impact on home and family life. The guide contains two model, nonsequential, comprehensive courses that may be adopted or adapted by school districts. The…

  12. Spanish Family Quality of Life Scales: Under and over 18 Years Old

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gine, Climent; Vilaseca, Rosa; Gracia, Marta; Mora, Joaquin; Orcasitas, Jose Ramon; Simon, Cecilia; Torrecillas, Ana Maria; Beltran, Francesc S.; Dalmau, Mariona; Pro, Maria Teresa; Balcells-Balcells, Anna; Mas, Joana Maria; Adam-Alcocer, Ana Luisa; Simo-Pinatella, David

    2013-01-01

    Background: Researchers, professionals, and families have shown increasing concern with the family quality of life (FQoL) of people with intellectual disability (ID) and their families. The goals of this research were (a) to explore how Spanish families understand FQoL by developing 2 different measurement tools for families with a member with ID…

  13. Relationship between family quality of life and day occupations of young people with Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Kitty-Rose; Girdler, Sonya; Downs, Jenny; Jacoby, Peter; Bourke, Jenny; Lennox, Nick; Einfeld, Stewart; Llewellyn, Gwynnyth; Parmenter, Trevor R; Leonard, Helen

    2014-09-01

    To explore relationships between family quality of life, day occupations and activities of daily living (ADL) of young persons with Down syndrome. Data were collected from 150 families with a young person with Down syndrome aged 16-30 years participating in the Down syndrome "Needs Opinions Wishes" database. Data described the young person's characteristics (including functional abilities, behaviour and day occupations) and family characteristics (including income, family and community supports and quality of life). Compared to families of young people attending open employment, families of young people participating in sheltered employment tended to report poorer family quality of life, after adjusting for personal characteristics, behaviour and income (coeff -6.78, 95 % CI -14.38, 0.81). Family supports reduced this relationship (coeff -6.00, 95 % CI -12.76, 0.76). Families of young people with greater functioning in ADL reported better family quality of life regardless of personal and environmental factors (coeff 0.45, 95 % CI 0.05, 0.85) and inclusion of family factors such as family supports reduced this association (coeff 0.29, 95 % CI -0.10, 0.67). Participation of young people with Down syndrome in open employment may positively influence family quality of life. Services that facilitate functioning in ADL and assist the families in accessing suitable family supports have the potential to positively influence family quality of life.

  14. Family life under pressure? Parents' paid work and the quantity and quality of parent-child and family time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roeters, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304837865

    2010-01-01

    Even though family life and paid work are often considered as difficult to reconcile, prior research found that family time is relatively unaffected by the demands paid work imposes upon employed parents. This dissertation investigates this puzzling finding by exploring how parents protect family

  15. The Victoria Project, Sri Lanka. Hydrological analysis for Victoria Dam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piper, B.S. [GU Projects (United Kingdom); Sutcliffe, J.V. [Gibb (Sir Alexander) and Partners (United Kingdom); Parks, Y.P. [Institute of Hydrology (United Kingdom)

    1994-03-01

    The hydrological analyses described in this paper formed an important part of the studies for the Victoria Project of which the Victoria Dam is the major component. The purpose of the hydrological studies was to provide consistent sets of river flow and climate data at the sites of the major components of the project, and to provide flood estimates for sizing the spillway and river diversion works. This paper outlines the approach used in the overall study, and then concentrates on aspects of specific relevance to the Victoria Dam. The main hydrological characteristics of the upper Mahaweli basin are presented as an introduction to the overall water balance; the humid climate made the appraisal of flow records relatively simple. Time series modelling was used to fill gaps in the observed flow records used for reservoir operation studies. The spillway design flood was based on the probable maximum precipitation (PMP) derived by maximizing a historic storm in which rainfall approaching the PMP covered most of the basin. Construction floods of moderate return period were estimated from a dimensionless analysis of regional flood records. The main lessons to be drawn are that water balance methods are of particular value in these humid monsoon conditions, while the ratio of the PMP to the maximum recorded storm is lower than would be the case in more arid regions. (author)

  16. Prospective Association Between Negative Life Events and Initiation of Sexual Intercourse: The Influence of Family Structure and Family Income

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oman, Roy F.; Vesely, Sara K.; Aspy, Cheryl B.; Tolma, Eleni L.; John, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We examined the prospective association between negative life events and time to initiation of sexual intercourse and the influence of family structure and family income on this association. Methods. We followed up a randomly selected sample (n = 649) of ethnically diverse parents and their children aged 12 to 17 years over a 5-year period. We conducted Cox proportional hazards regression analysis to examine the relation between negative life events and time to initiation of sexual intercourse. Family structure and family income were assessed as confounders. Results. Negative life events were significant predictors of time to initiation of sexual intercourse in adolescents. After controlling for demographic variables, youths reporting 1 negative life event had a hazard of initiation of sexual intercourse 1.40 times greater and youths reporting 2 or more negative life events had a hazard of initiation of sexual intercourse 1.61 times greater compared with youths reporting no negative life events. Family structure and family income were not significant confounders of the relation between initiation of sexual intercourse and negative life events. Conclusions. Interventions to prevent initiation of sexual intercourse should focus on youths with recent negative life events, regardless of family income and structure. PMID:25602885

  17. Comparing subjective well-being and health-related quality of life of Australian drug users in treatment in regional and rural Victoria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Peter G; Hyder, Shannon; Zinkiewicz, Lucy; Droste, Nicolas; Harris, Jane B

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the self-reported subjective well-being and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of alcohol and other drug users and to examine whether subjective well-being in this sample would be predicted by either HRQOL and/or severity of dependence. A cross-sectional survey was conducted of 201 Victorian substance users in individual targeted outpatient treatment for a variety of types of substance use. Participants were administered an interview, including the personal well-being index, the SF-8 health survey and the severity of dependence scale, in order to assess subjective well-being, the mental health component of HRQOL and severity of drug dependence respectively. Subjective well-being was predicted by mental health aspects of HRQOL (sr(2)  = 0.03) and by employment (sr(2)  = 0.05), rather than by severity of dependence [F(5, 146) = 5.60, P well-being than do the general population. Subjective well-being was predicted by mental aspects of HRQOL and not by severity of drug dependence or by physical aspects of HRQOL. Treatment which aims to improve substance users' well-being should include mental health interventions and pathways to employment. © 2014 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  18. Spanish Adaptation and Validation of the Family Quality of Life Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdugo, M. A.; Cordoba, L.; Gomez, J.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Assessing the quality of life (QOL) for families that include a person with a disability have recently become a major emphasis in cross-cultural QOL studies. The present study examined the reliability and validity of the Family Quality of Life Survey (FQOL) on a Spanish sample. Method and Results: The sample comprised 385 families who…

  19. Family quality of life in families affected by HIV: the perspective of HIV-positive mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blais, Martin; Fernet, Mylène; Proulx-Boucher, Karène; Lapointe, Normand; Samson, Johanne; Otis, Joanne; Racicot, Caroline; Rodrigue, Carl; Lebouché, Bertrand

    2014-01-01

    The HIV infection of a family member can impact family quality of life (FQoL). The objectives of this study are to (1) describe patterns of FQoL among mothers living with HIV (MLHIV) and (2) identify key factors associated with FQoL in families affected by HIV. Recruitment took place in HIV-specialized clinics and community organizations. A 100 MLHIV and 67 of their children participated in this study. Mothers were on average 40.8 years old and reported having an average of two dependent children at home (M = 2.1, SD = 1.0). Participating children were 16.2 years old, on average. Half of the children were boys (50.8%). More than half were aware of their mother's positive HIV status (68.2%) and 19.7% were diagnosed with HIV. All HIV-positive children were aware of their status. A latent profile analysis was performed on the five continuous indicators of FQoL, and three main profiles of self-reported FQoL among MLHIV were established: high FQoL (33%), moderate FQoL (58%), and low FQoL (9%). Among the mothers' characteristics, education, physical functioning, social support, and resilience increased FQoL, while anxiety and irritability decreased FQoL. Among the children's characteristics, resilience followed the FQoL profile. A trend was observed toward children's greater awareness of the mother's HIV status in high and low FQoL profiles. Additionally, irritability tended to be higher within the lower FQoL profile. FQoL profiles can be used to identify families needing special care, particularly for family interventions with both parents and children. Other relevant indicators must be studied (e.g., closeness and support between family members, availability and accessibility of care, family structure, father-child relationships, and medical condition of the mother) and longitudinal research conducted to estimate the direction of causality between FQoL profile and individual family member characteristics.

  20. Relationship between family support and quality of life of type-2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: The level of family support was significantly associated with quality of life at p-value less than 0.001. Majority [n = 104 (59.8%)] of the respondents who reported having strong family support had fair quality of life. Also, a significant percentage (85.7%) of all respondents who had good quality of life were found to have ...

  1. Individual and community correlates of young people's high-risk drinking in Victoria, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingston, Michael; Laslett, Anne-Marie; Dietze, Paul

    2008-12-01

    To examine key individual- and community-level correlates of regular very high-risk drinking (more than 20 drinks at least 12 times a year for males and more than 11 drinks at least 12 times a year for females) among young (16-24) drinkers in Victoria. CATI survey of 10,879 young Victorian drinkers. Multi-level modelling of correlates of proportion drinking at very high-risk levels at both individual (e.g. age, gender) and community levels (e.g. alcohol outlet density, remoteness). One-fifth of the sample reported regular (at least monthly) very high-risk drinking. Significant individual-level correlates of very high-risk drinking included age, gender, cultural background, recreational spending money, life stage, living situation, family conflict and age at first drink. Significant community-level correlates included remoteness (living in a rural area) and packaged liquor outlet density. The study highlights a range of important factors relating to regular drinking of dangerous amounts of alcohol by youth. Interventions aimed at preventing early initiation or managing recreational spending should be explored. Further, regulatory management of packaged liquor outlets and or remote rural communities in Victoria with high levels of dangerous drinking should be a priority.

  2. The Interaction of Gender with Health and Illness Patterns in the Family Life Cycle: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulry, Gregg

    This document contends that gender has a significant impact on individual health status within the family. The Carter and McGoldrick (1989) family stage model is used to illustrate how gender and health interact within the family developmental process. The model of the traditional middle-class family life cycle is described as involving the…

  3. The Quantitative Measurement of Family Quality of Life: A Review of Available Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, X.; Summers, J. A.; Turnbull, A.; Zuna, N.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Family quality of life (FQOL) has emerged as an important outcome of service delivery for individuals with disabilities and their families. The purpose of this review was to explore the disparity of scale development approaches between families with children with disabilities and families from other populations and identify strengths…

  4. A Framework for Studying Family Socialization over the Life Cycle: The Case of Family Violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalmuss, Debra; Seltzer, Judith A.

    1989-01-01

    Uses lifetime perspective on family socialization as framework for understanding effects of divorce and remarriage on family violence. Identifies three family socialization experiences (family of origin, family in transition, and current family) that shape behavior. Recommends extending framework to investigate other family transitions and…

  5. Transformations of Family Norms : Parents' Expectations of their Children's Family Life Style

    OpenAIRE

    渡辺, 秀樹

    1997-01-01

    I. Trends of Family ChangeII. An International Comparison of Family NormsIII. The Structure of Family NormsIV. Family Norms and GenderV. Intensity of Family NormsVI. The Family : Post-Institutionalization and Re-InstitutionalizationVII. Family as an Incomplete Institution

  6. The Deployment Life Study: Longitudinal Analysis of Military Families Across the Deployment Cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Meadows, Sarah O.; Tanielian, Terri; Karney, Benjamin; Schell, Terry; Griffin, Beth Ann; Jaycox, Lisa H.; Friedman, Esther M.; Trail, Thomas E.; Beckman, Robin; Ramchand, Rajeev; Hengstebeck, Natalie; Troxel, Wendy M.; Ayer, Lynsay; Vaughan, Christine Anne

    2017-01-01

    In 2009, RAND launched the Deployment Life Study to study military family readiness. This article presents analyses on marital relationships, family environment, psychological and behavioral health, child well-being, and military integration.

  7. Empowering family members in end-of-life care decision making in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, Annette M

    2009-01-01

    Critical care nurses are often faced with working with families during the end-of-life care of a loved one. Often there is indecisiveness in family members of critically ill patients when faced with making these difficult decisions. The purpose of this manuscript is to describe origins of indecisiveness in family members of critically ill patients who are faced with end-of-life care decisions. Strategies to empower family members during this crucial time are also discussed.

  8. Understanding quality of life in children with asthma and their parents: Family resources and challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Crespo, Carla; Carona, Carlos; Silva, Neuza; Canavarro, Maria Cristina; Dattilio, Frank

    2011-01-01

    The present research investigated the links between caregiver burden, family environment, and quality of life in 97 pairs of children with asthma and one of their parents (the primary family caregiver). Using structured equation modelling, within-participant analyses showed that family environment was positively linked to quality of life for both children and parents respectively. Across-participant analyses demonstrated that parents’ positive perceptions of family environment were associated...

  9. Estimating life cycle cost for a product family design: The challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suteja, T. J.; Karim, A.; Yarlagadda, P. K. D. V.; Yan, C.

    2017-11-01

    A cost estimation system is required to assist in designing a product family. The aim of this paper is to identify the requirements and the problems in estimating the life cycle cost of a product family. Then, this paper also presents the state-of-the-art and the research challenges in developing a life cycle cost estimation system for a product family design. As the conclusion, the life cycle cost estimation process for a product family still needs to face the challenges to determine the end of life strategy of each sub module of a product family, to integrate the end of life strategy to estimate the life cycle cost of a product family, to estimate the life cycle cost of each component level of a product family for design purposes and for different technologies and approaches, to reduce the required time and effort for updating process in estimating the life cycle cost for different structures of different product families, and to transform the available information into the required information in order to estimate the life cycle cost of a product family at the early stage of product development.

  10. Immigrant Families over the Life Course: Research Directions and Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Rebecca L.; Glick, Jennifer E.; Bures, Regina M.

    2009-01-01

    Family researchers and policy makers are giving increasing attention to the consequences of immigration for families. Immigration affects the lives of family members who migrate as well as those who remain behind and has important consequences for family formation, kinship ties, living arrangements, and children's outcomes. We present a selective…

  11. La Familia: Curriculum Unit. Latino Family Life Education Curriculum Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matiella, Ana Consuelo

    This teaching guide comprises eight lessons designed to enhance the self-esteem of Latino students, grades 5 through 8, through the exploration of family, family traditions and values, and the affirmation of family strengths. Student objectives include the following: (1) define family; (2) describe similarities and differences among Latino…

  12. Processing and Testing the Quality of Life in Families with Mentally Retarded Children

    OpenAIRE

    S Askari Shahed; K Karimzadeh Shirazi; SA Mousavizadeh

    2016-01-01

    Background & aim: Mentally retarded children need more care on quality of life, therefore the family plays an important role, but the results indicate low levels of quality of life for these children and their families. The present study aimed to measure the quality of life in mothers of educable mentally retarded daughter motivated provide a model to measure quality of life and understanding of issues affecting the design. An attempt to investigate and describe the factors affecting the qual...

  13. Quality of Life of Women Heading Family: the Role of Resiliency, and Family Functioning Based on Mc Master Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    زهرا سادات رضایی

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Single mothers who head the families face many problems; and multiple roles for women cause negative effects on their health, satisfaction and quality of life in these women. In this study, quality of life and family functioning and the mediating role of resiliency in these families were investigated. All households headed by woman in Tehran were our statistical population. Due to the type of research, the inventory and its subscales, the sample size was determined as 160 individuals who were selected through the available sampling method. Family Assessment Scale, Quality of Life Inventory and Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale were given as a battery of scales. Results showed that there is a significant positive relationship between resiliency with physical health, mental health, environmental health and social relations. There was a significant negative correlation between aspects of quality of life and resiliency with all subscales of the Family Function Device scales. Also mediating role of resiliency in the suggested relationships between general family functioning and physical health, roles with mental health, roles and general functioning with environmental health, and between general functioning and the roles with social relationship were significant. It can be resiliency might be recognized as an effective variable in the relationship between quality of life and family function levels.

  14. Long and atypical working hours and the impact on intimate family life social activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Hans H. K.

    An increasing number of families has to meet the challenges of working in a 24-7 society and at the same time striving to take part in everyday family life. Research is not conclusive with respect to what degree atypical working hours has an impact on, for example, work-family balance, instable...... participate in together with their children (e.g. enjoying breakfasts together). On the other hand other research shows that factors like both parents having atypical working hours and small children in the home suggests a negative impact on family life. In addition, not much research has scrutinized...... through our longitudinal survey study of everyday family and work-life. So in short, this paper will present and discuss an analysis of the relationship between work life and intimate family life social activities as they evolve over time and across households....

  15. Family Quality of Life before and after Out-of-Home Placement of a Family Member with an Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Shirli; Edwards, Meaghan; Baum, Nehama T.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of out-of-home residential placement on families has been previously studied. However, no study has examined this issue through the lens of "family quality of life" (FQoL). The aim of this study was to produce a picture of FQoL among families with a member with an intellectual disability (ID) who has multiple diagnoses (i.e., an…

  16. Work-family life courses and metabolic markers in mid-life: evidence from the British National Child Development Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMunn, Anne; Lacey, Rebecca E; Kumari, Meena; Worts, Diana; McDonough, Peggy; Sacker, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    Background Previous studies have found generally better health among those who combine employment and family responsibilities; however, most research excludes men, and relies on subjective measures of health and information on work and family activities from only 1 or 2 time points in the life course. This study investigated associations between work-family life course types (LCTs) and markers of metabolic risk in a British birth cohort study. Methods Multichannel sequence analysis was used to generate work-family LCTs, combining annual information on work, partnership and parenthood between 16 and 42 years for men and women in the British National Child Development Study (NCDS, followed since their birth in 1958). Associations between work-family LCTs and metabolic risk factors in mid-life (age 44–45) were tested using multivariate linear regression in multiply imputed data. Results Life courses characterised by earlier transitions into parenthood were associated with significantly increased metabolic risk, regardless of attachment to paid work or marital stability over the life course. These associations were only partially attenuated by educational qualifications, early life circumstances and adult mediators. The positive association between weak labour markets ties and metabolic risk was weaker than might be expected from previous studies. Associations between work-family LCTs and metabolic risk factors did not differ significantly by gender. Conclusions Earlier transitions to parenthood are linked to metabolic risk in mid-life. PMID:26659761

  17. Quality of life, treatment adherence, and locus of control: multiple family groups for chronic medical illnesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Larrosa, Silvia

    2013-12-01

    The Multiple Family Groups (MFGs) approach for patients with a chronic medical illness and their families is a structured psychoeducational program that unfolds in six weekly 90-minute sessions. In the MFGs, patients and family members explore new ways to balance illness and nonillness priorities in family life (Steinglass, 1998; Steinglass, 2000 Cuadernos de Terapia Familiar, 44-45, 11; Steinglass, Ostroff, & Steinglass, 2011 Family Process, 50, 393). © FPI, Inc.

  18. Projecting the future levels of Lake Victoria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderkelen, Inne; van Lipzig, Nicole; Thiery, Wim

    2017-04-01

    Lake Victoria directly sustains 30 million people living in its basin and 200 000 fishermen operating from its shores. As the one of the two sources of the Nile River, it also supports natural resources that impact the livelihood of over 300 million people living in the Nile basin. The outlet to the Nile is controlled by two hydropower dams. The water balance of Lake Victoria is controlled both by climatic conditions (precipitation and evaporation) and human management (dam outflow). Future climate simulations with a high resolution coupled lake-land-atmosphere model project decreasing mean precipitation and increasing evaporation over Lake Victoria. As these two are important factors in the water balance of Lake Victoria, these projected changes may induce a drop in future levels of Lake Victoria. Moreover, as Lake Victoria is also a relatively shallow lake, lake surface area may decrease as well. Here we present a water balance model for Lake Victoria that provides lake level and extent as output. We first force our model with observational input (new satellite products providing high quality precipitation and evaporation data) and evaluate it using measured lake levels. The skill of the model is subsequently assessed by forcing it with present-day regional climate simulations (CORDEX evaluation simulations). In a third step the future lake levels and surface area changes of Lake Victoria are simulated by forcing the model with CORDEX projections under RCP4.5 and 8.5. Finally, the role of human decisions regarding future dam outflow are investigated.

  19. The Association between Adolescent Life Satisfaction, Family Structure, Family Affluence and Gender Differences in Parent-Child Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Kate Ann; Dallago, Lorenza; Currie, Candace

    2012-01-01

    The study sought to examine young people's life satisfaction in the context of the family environment, using data from the 2006 HBSC: WHO-collaborative Study in Scotland (N = 5,126). Multilevel linear regression analyses were carried out for 11-, 13- and 15-year old boys and girls, with outcome measure ridit-transformed life satisfaction. The…

  20. The Effect of Providing Life Support on Nurses' Decision Making Regarding Life Support for Themselves and Family Members in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaku, Fumio; Tsutsumi, Madoka

    2016-12-01

    Decision making in terminal illness has recently received increased attention. In Japan, patients and their families typically make decisions without understanding either the severity of illness or the efficacy of life-supporting treatments at the end of life. Japanese culture traditionally directs the family to make decisions for the patient. This descriptive study examined the influence of the experiences of 391 Japanese nurses caring for dying patients and family members and how that experience changed their decision making for themselves and their family members. The results were mixed but generally supported the idea that the more experience nurses have in caring for the dying, the less likely they would choose to institute lifesupport measures for themselves and family members. The results have implications for discussions on end-of-life care. © The Author(s) 2016.

  1. Genomewide Association Scan of a Mortality Associated Endophenotype for a Long and Healthy Life in the Long Life Family Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Jatinder; Minster, Ryan L; Schupf, Nicole

    2017-01-01

    Background: Identification of genes or fundamental biological pathways that regulate aging phenotypes and longevity could lead to possible interventions to increase healthy longevity. Methods: Using data from the Long Life Family Study, we performed genomewide association analyses...

  2. Digital inequalities of family life information seeking and family well-being among Chinese adults in Hong Kong: a population survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Man Ping; Wang, Xin; Viswanath, Kasisomayajula; Wan, Alice; Lam, Tai Hing; Chan, Sophia S

    2014-10-03

    Inequalities in Internet use and health information seeking are well documented, but less is known about information for family life activities. We investigated the social determinants of online family life information seeking behaviors and its associations with family well-being among Chinese adults in Hong Kong. A probability-based telephone survey was conducted in 2012 to record family life information seeking behaviors, including frequency of seeking and paying attention to family life information, levels of trust, and perceived usefulness of family life information. Family well-being was assessed using 3 single items on perceived family harmony, happiness, and health, with higher scores indicating greater well-being. Adjusted odds ratios for family life information seeking behaviors by socioeconomic characteristics and lifestyle behaviors, and adjusted beta coefficients for family well-being by family life information seeking behaviors were calculated. Of 1537 respondents, 57.57% (855/1537) had ever and 26.45% (407/1537) sought monthly family life information through the Internet. Lower educational attainment and household income, smoking, and physical inactivity were associated with less frequent seeking and paying attention (all Pinequalities of online family life information seeking behaviors. The association between family life information seeking behavior and family well-being needs to be confirmed in prospective studies.

  3. Familia Ludens: Reinforcing the Leisure Component in Family Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orthner, Dennis K.

    1975-01-01

    Leisure is examined as a normal and potentially vital component in the contemporary family. Consideration is given to the interplay between work and leisure and the means by which leisure facilitates companionship and family interaction. (Author)

  4. The European Portuguese WHOQOL-OLD module and the new facet Family/Family life: reliability and validity studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilar, Manuela; Sousa, Liliana B; Simões, Mário R

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the psychometric properties of the European Portuguese version of the World Health Organization Quality of Life-Older Adults Module (WHOQOL-OLD). The European Portuguese WHOQOL-OLD includes a new identified facet, Family/Family life. A convenience sample of older adults was recruited (N = 921). The assessment protocol included demographics, self-perceived health, depressive symptoms (GDS-30), cognitive function (ACE-R), daily life activities (IAFAI), health status (SF-12) and QoL (WHOQOL-Bref, EUROHIS-QOL-8 and WHOQOL-OLD). The internal consistency was excellent for the total 24-item WHOQOL-OLD original version and also for the final 28-item European Portuguese WHOQOL-OLD version. The test-retest reliability for total scores was good. The construct validity of the European Portuguese WHOQOL-OLD was supported in the correlation matrix analysis. The results indicated good convergent/divergent validity. The WHOQOL-OLD scores differentiated groups of older adults who were healthy/unhealthy and without/mild/severe depressive symptoms. The new facet, Family/Family life, presented evidence of good reliability and validity parameters. Comparatively to international studies, the European Portuguese WHOQOL-OLD version showed similar and/or better psychometric properties. The new facet, Family/Family life, introduces cross-cultural specificity to the study of QoL of older adults and generally improves the psychometric robustness of the WHOQOL-OLD.

  5. Family Member Satisfaction with End-of-Life Decision-making in the Intensive Care Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gries, Cynthia J.; Curtis, J. Randall; Wall, Richard J.; Engelberg, Ruth A.

    2009-01-01

    Rationale Families of ICU patients may be at risk for increased psychological morbidity due to end-of-life decision-making. Identification of chart-based quality indicators of palliative care that predict family satisfaction with decision-making may help guide interventions to improve decision-making and family outcomes. Objective To determine patient and family characteristics and chart documentation of processes of care that are associated with increased family satisfaction with end-of-life decision-making for ICU patients. Methods We conducted a cohort study of ICU patients dying in 10 Seattle-Tacoma area medical centers. Measurement Outcomes from family surveys included summary scores for family satisfaction with decision-making and a single item score that indicated feeling supported during decision-making. Predictor variables were obtained from surveys and chart abstraction. Main Results Survey response rate was 41% (442/1074). Analyses were conducted on 356 families with questionnaire and chart abstraction data. Family satisfaction with decision-making was associated with withdrawal of life-support and chart documentation of: physician recommendations to withdraw life-support; discussions of patients’ wishes; and discussions of families’ spiritual needs. Feeling supported during decision-making was associated with withdrawal of life-support, spiritual care involvement and chart documentation of: physician recommendations to withdraw life-support; expressions of families’ wishes to withdraw life-support; and discussions of families’ spiritual needs. Conclusions Increased family satisfaction with decision-making is associated with withdrawing life-support and documentation of palliative care indicators including: physician recommendations to withdraw life-support, expressions of patients’ wishes and discussions of families’ spiritual needs. These findings provide direction for future intervention studies to improve family satisfaction in end-of-life

  6. Promoting School and Life Success through Early Childhood Family Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swick, Kevin J.

    2009-01-01

    Early childhood family literacy programs have great potential to positively influence children and families. This article presents the core values and key components of high quality early childhood family literacy programs. The benefits and cost effectiveness of these programs are also discussed.

  7. La Familia: Student Workbook. Latino Family Life Education Curriculum Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matiella, Ana Consuelo

    This workbook comprises eight lessons designed to enhance the self-esteem of Latino students, grades 5 through 8, through the exploration of family, family traditions and values, and the affirmation of family strengths. Each lesson begins with an illustration that reflects the content of the lesson and an introductory page. Each introductory page…

  8. The Family in the Life of the Individual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govako, Boris Ivanovich

    1990-01-01

    Describes marriage and family in the Soviet Union today. Urges families to have three or more children despite a present trend toward two children per family. Encourages men to make an effort to share housekeeping chores with their wives. Discusses housing shortages, leisure activities, and divorce patterns. Suggests intermarriage as a social and…

  9. Selection bias in family reports on end of life with dementia in nursing homes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Steen, J.T.; Deliens, L.; Ribbe, M.W.; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, B.D.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Selective participation in retrospective studies of families recruited after the patient's death may threaten generalizability of reports on end-of-life experiences. Objectives: To assess possible selection bias in retrospective study of dementia at the end of life using family reports.

  10. Family Quality of Life: Adult School Children with Intellectual Disabilities in Bosnia and Herzegovina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svraka, E.; Loga, S.; Brown, I.

    2011-01-01

    Aims: This study endeavours to provide initial data on quality of life for families with adult children who have intellectual disabilities (ID) in the Canton of Sarajevo. Methods: The principal measure used was the "Family Quality of life Survey 2006-main caregivers of people with intellectual or developmental disabilities." The sample…

  11. Post-separation families: Residential arrangements and everyday life of separated parents and their children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, W.

    2015-01-01

    This dissertation is about post-separation families, their residential arrangements and the organization and practising of their everyday post-separation (family) life. Divorce and separation are common life events in most Western countries. In the Netherlands, 30% of all children under age 18

  12. Family Quality of Life: A Key Outcome in Early Childhood Intervention Services--A Scoping Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhopti, Anoo; Brown, Ted; Lentin, Primrose

    2016-01-01

    A scoping review was conducted to identify factors influencing the quality of life of families of children with disability. The review also explored the scales used to measure family quality of life (FQOL) as an outcome in early childhood intervention services (ECIS). Multiple databases were searched from 2000 to 2013 to include studies pertinent…

  13. Family Life Education For Non-School Based Youths In Kogi State ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Family life education symposia were organized for youths involved in vocational professions in ten Local Government Areas (LGA) of Kogi State in order to effect positive family life behaviours. The 10 Local Government Areas were divided into five zones in order to facilitate coverage. A work mobilization team was first ...

  14. 78 FR 38996 - Proposed Collection; 60-Day Comment Request; Family Life, Activity, Sun, Health, and Eating...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Proposed Collection; 60-Day Comment Request; Family Life... days of the date of this publication. Proposed Collection: Family Life, Activity, Sun, Health, and...

  15. Grandmothers Raising Grandchildren with Disabilities: Sources of Support and Family Quality of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kresak, Karen E.; Gallagher, Peggy A.; Kelley, Susan J.

    2014-01-01

    Sources of support and quality of life of 50 grandmother-headed families raising grandchildren with and without disabilities were examined. Comparative analyses revealed significant differences between grandmothers raising grandchildren with and without disabilities in regard to sources of support and family quality of life. Informal support was…

  16. An Initial Look at the Quality of Life of Malaysian Families That Include Children with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, M.; Brown, R.; Karrapaya, R.

    2012-01-01

    Background: While there is a growing body of literature in the quality of life of families that include children with disabilities, the majority of research has been conducted in western countries. The present study provides an initial exploration of the quality of life of Malaysian families that include children with developmental/intellectual…

  17. Depressive Symptoms, Family Functioning and Quality of Life in Chinese Patients with Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jikun; He, Ming; Zhao, Xudong

    2015-12-01

    Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus often have depression or depressive symptoms, impaired family functioning and poor quality of life. This study aimed to examine relationships among psychological variables, including depressive symptoms, family functioning and quality of life, for Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes and to explore the influencing factors on quality of life for these patients. In this cross-sectional study, 257 patients with type 2 diabetes and 259 nondiabetic community controls completed the Beck Depression Inventory, the Family Assessment Device, and the Quality of Life Enjoyment and Satisfaction Questionnaire-Short Form. Patients with type 2 diabetes reported significant family impairment in the dimension of affective involvement compared with nondiabetic community controls (pFamily Assessment Device scores were negatively associated with quality of life scores among patients with type 2 diabetes. Age, depressive symptoms, duration of diabetes, communication, affective involvement and behavioural control were associated with quality of life in patients with type 2 diabetes. The results indicate that having type 2 diabetes was associated with some difficulties with family functioning and that poor family functioning was associated with a poorer quality of life. Additional factors, including older age, depressive symptoms, duration of diabetes, and some dimensions of family functioning, were found to be associated with quality of life in Chinese individuals with type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2015 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Improvements in staff quality of work life and family satisfaction following the move to single-family room NICU design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Jo; DeLand, Marion; Gibbins, Sharyn; MacMillan York, Elizabeth; Robson, Kate

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether there were differences in staff quality of work life and parent satisfaction when a neonatal intensive care unit moved from an open-bay design to a single-room model of care. This descriptive study measured staff quality of work life and family satisfaction before and at 2 time periods after the relocation of a perinatal centre and the introduction of single-family room care. Differences in work life quality and satisfaction were determined using 2-sample t-tests. There were improvements in staff quality of work life and family satisfaction at both time periods following the move. Lessons learned may be of value to other units considering such a move. A neonatal intensive care unit designed to contribute to parental and staff well-being is a model to be considered for future neonatal designs.

  19. Verbal communication of families with cancer patients at end of life: A questionnaire survey with bereaved family members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakazato, Kazuhiro; Shiozaki, Mariko; Hirai, Kei; Morita, Tatsuya; Tatara, Ryuhei; Ichihara, Kaori; Sato, Shinichi; Simizu, Megumi; Tsuneto, Satoru; Shima, Yasuo; Miyasita, Mitsunori

    2018-01-01

    To clarify the verbal communication of feelings between families and patients in Japanese palliative care units from the perspective of bereaved family members by examining (1) proportions of families' and patients' verbalization of six feelings (gratitude, love, seeking forgiveness, giving forgiveness, wishes after death, and continuing bonds), (2) recognition of receiving these feelings through verbalization from the family's perspective, and (3) the specific attitudes of family members that influence their verbalizations. In 2010, a cross-sectional survey was conducted with 968 bereaved families of cancer patients in palliative care units across Japan. Five hundred thirty-seven responses were analyzed. (1) "Gratitude" was verbalized most often (families: 47%; patients: 61%), and "expressing forgiveness" least often (families: 16%; patients: 11%). (2) Even if the words were not used, 81.2% to 88.2% of families answered that they had received the patient's feelings, and 71.8% to 85.4% of families felt the patient had received their feelings. (3) Multiple logistic regression analyses indicated that the strongest attitudes determining verbalizing were "not wanting to say farewell without conveying feelings," "a daily basis of expressing," and "heart-to-heart communication" (ishin-denshin). For both families and patients, verbalizing feelings was difficult. Our results showed that families' and patients' verbalizing and receiving of feelings must be aligned to understand their communication at the end of life in Japan. Future research is needed to verify how attitude helps promote or inhibit verbalization. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Depression and quality of life for women in single-parent and nuclear families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landero Hernández, René; Estrada Aranda, Benito; González Ramírez, Mónica Teresa

    2009-05-01

    This is a cross-sectional study which objectives are 1) to determine the predictors for perceived quality of life and 2) to analyze the differences between women from single-parent families and bi-parent families, about their quality of life, depression and familiar income. We worked with a non-probabilistic sample of 140 women from Monterrey, N.L, Mexico, 107 are from bi-parent families and 33 from single parent families. Some of the results show that women from single-parent families have lower quality of life (Z = -2.224, p = .026), lower income (Z = -2.727, p = .006) and greater depression (Z = -6.143, p = .001) than women from bi-parental families. The perceived quality of life's predictors, using a multiple regression model (n = 140) were depression, income and number of children, those variables explaining 25.4% of variance.

  1. The Family Life Course and Health: Partnership, Fertility Histories, and Later-Life Physical Health Trajectories in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Flaherty, Martin; Baxter, Janeen; Haynes, Michele; Turrell, Gavin

    2016-06-01

    Life course perspectives suggest that later-life health reflects long-term social patterns over an individual's life: in particular, the occurrence and timing of key roles and transitions. Such social patterns have been demonstrated empirically for multiple aspects of fertility and partnership histories, including timing of births and marriage, parity, and the presence and timing of a marital disruption. Most previous studies have, however, addressed particular aspects of fertility or partnership histories singly. We build on this research by examining how a holistic classification of family life course trajectories from ages 18 to 50, incorporating both fertility and partnership histories, is linked to later-life physical health for a sample of Australian residents. Our results indicate that long-term family life course trajectories are strongly linked to later-life health for men but only minimally for women. For men, family trajectories characterized by early family formation, no family formation, an early marital disruption, or high fertility are associated with poorer physical health. Among women, only those who experienced both a disrupted marital history and a high level of fertility were found to be in poorer health.

  2. The Everyday Life of Children Across Early Childhood Institution and The Family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kousholt, Dorte

    2008-01-01

    This article focuses on the everyday life of Danish children across different social practices and explores what this outset can tell us about the life of children and families. Building on the critique of classical approaches in developmental psychology (e.g. Burman 1994; James, Jenks, & Prout...... 1998) and family research (e.g. Leira 1993; Thorne & Yalom 1982) the article puts forward a decentred approach to family life. The aim is to show how the institutional context and family context sets conditions for each other - and that interplay sets conditions for the development of the children....... The article argues that the social practice in which the children participate outside the family, in important ways shapes the life of children as well as their parents. The parents' insight and knowledge of their children's everyday life in early childhood institution and the co-operation between parents...

  3. Human dignity and ethical treatment: Remarks on family concepts and family life in the era of the Reformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans-Martin Kirn

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available

    family: Calibri;">family: Calibri;">

    Martin Luther and the Reformation movement placed the household family anew at the centre of Christian life and ethics. In the wider sphere this religious “upgrading” cannot be overestimated in view of its effect on the process of confessionalization 

    family: Calibri-Italic;">family: Calibri-Italic;">family: Calibri-Italic;">and family: Calibri-Italic;">family: Calibri-Italic;">Human beings, believe me, family: Calibri-Italic;">are not born, but formed. family: Calibri;">family: Calibri;">Steven Ozment once maintained, that the family of the 16th century was a nurturing institution, characterized by love, respect and mutual dependence among the members of the family family: Calibri;">family: Calibri;">modernization in European history. The education of children held a prominent place within the responsibilities of the household family; it was regarded as a divine task. Through this the Reformation movement intensified and specified humanist family: Calibri;">endeavours, which Erasmus summarized with the words:  family: Calibri-Italic;">family: Calibri-Italic;">Human beings, believe me, family: Calibri-Italic;">are not born, but formed. family: Calibri

  4. Forgotten Streams in the Family Life Course: Utilization of Qualitative Retrospective Interviews in the Analysis of Lifelong Single Women's Family Careers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Katherine R.; Pickett, Robert S.

    1987-01-01

    Combined life course perspective with life history interviewing to compare 15 lifelong unmarried, childless women and 15 ever-married mothers from the 1910 birth cohort. Results suggest that linear progression from family of origin to family of procreation reveals one stream in family life course; experiences of lifelong single women revealed…

  5. Life Planning Resource Guide. A Resource for Teaching the Life Planning Core Course Area of Ohio's Work and Family Life Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kister, Joanna; And Others

    This guide is designed to assist vocational home economics teachers in implementing the life planning course that is one of the six core course areas of Ohio's Work and Family Life program. Included in the guide are an introduction providing an overview of the practical problems proposed in the life planning core course area, four process modules,…

  6. Meaning in Life, Emotion-Oriented Coping, Generalized Self-Efficacy, and Family Cohesion as Predictors of Family Satisfaction among Mothers of Children with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightsey, Owen Richard, Jr.; Sweeney, James

    2008-01-01

    The authors tested whether self-efficacy, coping styles, family cohesion, and meaning in life predicted family satisfaction among 64 mothers of children with disabilities. They also examined whether meaning in life mediated the relationship between cohesion and family satisfaction or served as a resource whose effects on family satisfaction were…

  7. Family Experiences During the Dying Process After Withdrawal of Life-Sustaining Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegand, Debra L

    2016-01-01

    Life-sustaining therapy is commonly withdrawn in intensive care units, yet little is known about the perceptions of families when a critically ill patient dies after life-sustaining therapy is withdrawn. The purpose of this investigation was to understand the experience of families when a family member had an unexpected life-threatening illness or injury and who died after life-sustaining therapy was withdrawn. This investigation used a hermeneutic phenomenological approach. Interviews were conducted with family members after the patient's death. All interviews were transcribed with units of meaning and clusters, and then categories inductively determined. Methodological rigor was established. A purposive sample of family members was recruited into the study from 3 intensive care units. Twenty-two family members participated in the study. Six categories evolved from the analysis: preparing for the dying process, the dying environment, perceptions of patient comfort, the death vigil, essential aspects of care, and together as a family. Families described the death vigil as extremely difficult. Family members described several aspects of care as very meaningful to them during the dying process. Families described how important it was for the family to be together as a family during the dying process.

  8. Impact of Vietnam War Service on Veterans' Perceptions of Family Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrix, Charles C.; Anelli, Lisa M.

    1993-01-01

    Surveyed Vietnam veterans' (n=131 males, 4 females) perceptions of impact of their wartime experiences on their current family life. Found direct effects of war service on psychological impact and direct effects of psychological impact on family satisfaction and functioning. Found no direct effects between war service and family satisfaction and…

  9. Family Life and Child Development: A Selective, Annotated Bibliography Cumulative Through June 1979.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewish Board of Family and Children's Services, New York, NY.

    This annotated bibliography includes a list of 362 books and pamphlets which relate to seven areas of child development and family life. These areas are marriage and the family, human development, sex education, disabilities, schools and learning, mental health education, and social problems and the family. Within these areas, entries are…

  10. Gender, life role importance, and work-family conflict in Indonesia: A non-western perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuntari, I.S.R.; Janssens, J.M.A.M.; Ginting, H.

    2017-01-01

    This study examined gender differences among profiles based on life role importance on work-family conflict. The sample consisted of 404 Indonesia working couples with children. We found four profiles based on their work and family role importance that is a Family, Work, Dual and a Low profile. More

  11. Services and Supports, Partnership, and Family Quality of Life: Focus on Deaf-Blindness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyzar, Kathleen B.; Brady, Sara E.; Summers, Jean Ann; Haines, Shana J.; Turnbull, Ann P.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the authors examined the moderating effects of partnership on the relationship between services and supports adequacy and family quality of life (FQOL) for families of children with deaf-blindness ages birth to 21. A social-ecological approach enabled examining the impact of disability on the family system. A survey, consisting of…

  12. 40 CFR 91.120 - Compliance with Family Emission Limits over useful life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Standards and Certification Provisions § 91.120 Compliance with Family Emission Limits over useful life. (a...)(1) The engine Family Emission Limits (FELs) apply to the emissions of engines for their useful lives... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compliance with Family Emission Limits...

  13. Duration of Withdrawal of Life Support in the Intensive Care Unit and Association with Family Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerstel, Eric; Engelberg, Ruth A.; Koepsell, Thomas; Curtis, J. Randall

    2008-01-01

    Rationale: Most deaths in the intensive care unit (ICU) involve withholding or withdrawing multiple life-sustaining therapies, but little is known about how to proceed practically and how this process affects family satisfaction. Objectives: To examine the duration of life-support withdrawal and its association with overall family satisfaction with care in the ICU. Methods: We studied family members of 584 patients who died in an ICU at 1 of 14 hospitals after withdrawal of life support and for whom complete medical chart and family questionnaires were available. Measurements and Main Results: Data concerning six life-sustaining interventions administered during the last 5 days of life were collected. Families were asked to rate their satisfaction with care using the Family Satisfaction in the ICU questionnaire. For nearly half of the patients (271/584), withdrawal of all life-sustaining interventions took more than 1 day. Patients with a prolonged (>1 d) life-support withdrawal were younger, stayed longer in the ICU, had more life-sustaining interventions, had less often a diagnosis of cancer, and had more decision makers involved. Among patients with longer ICU stays, a longer duration in life-support withdrawal was associated with an increase in family satisfaction with care (P = 0.037). Extubation before death was associated with higher family satisfaction with care (P = 0.009). Conclusions: Withdrawal of life support is a complex process that depends on patient and family characteristics. Stuttering withdrawal is a frequent phenomenon that seems to be associated with family satisfaction. Extubation before death should be encouraged if possible. PMID:18703787

  14. Family functioning, social support, and quality of life for patients with anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jikun; Chen, Yuhao; Tan, Cuicui; Zhao, Xudong

    2016-02-01

    Few studies have examined the relationship between family functioning, social support and quality of life in patients with anxiety disorder. There is a paucity of research on anxiety disorders and their predictors in China. This study aimed to explore family functioning, social support and quality of life for patients with anxiety disorder and examine the relationship between these elements. A total of 107 patients who met Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed.; DSM-IV) criteria for anxiety disorder and 80 healthy controls completed the McMaster Family Assessment Device, the Perceived Social Support Scale and the short form of the Quality of Life Enjoyment and Satisfaction Questionnaire. The findings indicate that patients with anxiety disorder in China tend to have poor family functioning and quality of life, as well as a higher subjective perception of social support. There were strong correlations between family functioning, social support and quality of life. Affective involvement and not living with parents were identified as risk factors for anxiety disorders, while a high family income was a protective factor. Anxiety disorder is associated with reduced family functioning and poorer quality of life for Chinese patients. In addition, the Family Assessment Device is a suitable instrument for evaluating family functioning in Chinese patients with anxiety disorder. © The Author(s) 2015.

  15. Life Satisfaction of University Students in Relation to Family and Food in a Developing Country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnettler, Berta; Miranda-Zapata, Edgardo; Grunert, Klaus G; Lobos, Germán; Denegri, Marianela; Hueche, Clementina; Poblete, Héctor

    2017-01-01

    Life satisfaction and satisfaction with food-related life (SWFoL) are associated with healthy eating habits, family interaction around eating and family support. The present study evaluates the relationship between SWFoL and satisfaction with family life (SWFaL), and their relationship with life satisfaction in university students. We identify the relationship of two different types of family support and student SWFaL and explore a moderator effect of gender. A questionnaire was applied to a non-probabilistic sample of 370 students of both genders (mean age 21 years) in Chile, including Satisfaction with Life Scale, SWFoL scale, SWFaL scale, and the Family Resources Scale. Using structural equation modeling, we found that students' life satisfaction was related to SWFaL and food-related life. A high positive relationship was identified between intangible family support and students' SWFaL, which would have a mediating role between intangible support and life satisfaction. Using multi-group analysis, a moderator effect of gender was not found. These findings suggest that improving SWFoL, SWFaL and intangible family support is important for both female and male students.

  16. Processing and Testing the Quality of Life in Families with Mentally Retarded Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Askari Shahed

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: Mentally retarded children need more care on quality of life, therefore the family plays an important role, but the results indicate low levels of quality of life for these children and their families. The present study aimed to measure the quality of life in mothers of educable mentally retarded daughter motivated provide a model to measure quality of life and understanding of issues affecting the design. An attempt to investigate and describe the factors affecting the quality of family life with a disability and the relationship between these indicators and how to measure them families with children with mental retardation.   Methods: The research method was descriptive-analytic. The sample consisted of 75 mothers with a mentally retarded daughter who were participated in this study through census sampling. By studying literature, the related texts criteria of quality of life were extracted. All study information of participants was obtained by standard questionnaires. Using correlation analysis techniques, univariate regression, logistic regression analysis were analyzed through structural equations.   Results: The results indicated that the performance of family (family interactions, parenting, mental health and physical capabilities mother (resilience and aggression, personal beliefs and quality of life of families with disabled children influenced it. Personal beliefs are an important determinant of quality of life.   Conclusion: The results of structural equation modeling and corresponding indexes indicated that the proposed model based on experimental data fitting was good and desirable product was in compliance with the conceptual model.    

  17. Life Satisfaction of University Students in Relation to Family and Food in a Developing Country

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnettler, Berta; Miranda-Zapata, Edgardo; Grunert, Klaus G.; Lobos, Germán; Denegri, Marianela; Hueche, Clementina; Poblete, Héctor

    2017-01-01

    Life satisfaction and satisfaction with food-related life (SWFoL) are associated with healthy eating habits, family interaction around eating and family support. The present study evaluates the relationship between SWFoL and satisfaction with family life (SWFaL), and their relationship with life satisfaction in university students. We identify the relationship of two different types of family support and student SWFaL and explore a moderator effect of gender. A questionnaire was applied to a non-probabilistic sample of 370 students of both genders (mean age 21 years) in Chile, including Satisfaction with Life Scale, SWFoL scale, SWFaL scale, and the Family Resources Scale. Using structural equation modeling, we found that students’ life satisfaction was related to SWFaL and food-related life. A high positive relationship was identified between intangible family support and students’ SWFaL, which would have a mediating role between intangible support and life satisfaction. Using multi-group analysis, a moderator effect of gender was not found. These findings suggest that improving SWFoL, SWFaL and intangible family support is important for both female and male students. PMID:28932203

  18. Life Satisfaction of University Students in Relation to Family and Food in a Developing Country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berta Schnettler

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Life satisfaction and satisfaction with food-related life (SWFoL are associated with healthy eating habits, family interaction around eating and family support. The present study evaluates the relationship between SWFoL and satisfaction with family life (SWFaL, and their relationship with life satisfaction in university students. We identify the relationship of two different types of family support and student SWFaL and explore a moderator effect of gender. A questionnaire was applied to a non-probabilistic sample of 370 students of both genders (mean age 21 years in Chile, including Satisfaction with Life Scale, SWFoL scale, SWFaL scale, and the Family Resources Scale. Using structural equation modeling, we found that students’ life satisfaction was related to SWFaL and food-related life. A high positive relationship was identified between intangible family support and students’ SWFaL, which would have a mediating role between intangible support and life satisfaction. Using multi-group analysis, a moderator effect of gender was not found. These findings suggest that improving SWFoL, SWFaL and intangible family support is important for both female and male students.

  19. Assessment of Quality of Life of Family Members of Inpatients with End-Stage Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bužgová, Radka; Kozáková, Radka; Sikorová, Lucie

    2015-01-01

    An important aim of palliative care is to ensure the highest possible quality of life (QoL) for the family members of patients. We aimed to determine the QoL of family members of hospitalized patients with end-stage disease, as well as differences in QoL based on socio-demographic characteristics and the patient's functional status, psychological distress, and QoL. Study participants were 292 family members of terminally ill patients at University Hospital, Ostrava, Czech Republic. To evaluate family members' QoL, we used the Quality of Life in Life-Threatening Illness--Family Carer Version (QOLLTI-F). We used the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and the Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) Scale to assess patients' functional status and psychological distress. A statistically significant difference was found in QoL evaluation based on family members' socio-demographic characteristics in education, employment, and age. A significantly lower QoL score was observed for patients' life partners in six domains. A correlation was found between patients' poorer functional status and family members' lower QoL. We found lower global QoL in family members of patients with depression. Family support is a cornerstone of palliative care. Palliative care professionals should focus on at-risk family members--the life partners of patients, the unemployed, younger people, and those whose ill loved one has a poor functional status.

  20. The Family Adaptation Model: A Life Course Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-02-01

    L. (1986). Intergenerational occupational inheritance in the military: A reexamination. Adolescence , 21, 623-629. Bowen, G. L. (1987a). An ecosystem...Family Action Plans (1984-1989) by developing a con- ceptual model of factors that influence the adaptation of service members and their families to...conceptual model of factors that influence the adaptation of service members and their families to the multiplicity of role demands they face from occupy

  1. Coming home revisited: family life and military deployment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Steven L; Smith, Donald G

    2012-07-01

    The war in Iraq and Afghanistan has involved the deployment of hundreds of thousands of American soldiers, many of whom are married and have children. The experience of one military family living through a deployment in Iraq in 2011 is discussed and interpreted in light of Parse's humanbecoming family model. The model provides a useful way for nurses, and others, to understand families, in a way that honors their values and struggles in an everchanging and unpredictable world. Included is a brief discussion on how communication technologies are changing the experience of military deployment for families.

  2. Family Life and Developmental Idealism in Yazd, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Jalal Abbasi-Shavazi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND This paper is motivated by the theory that developmental idealism has been disseminated globally and has become an international force for family and demographic change. Developmental idealism is a set of cultural beliefs and values about development and how development relates to family and demographic behavior. It holds that modern societies are causal forces producing modern families, that modern families help to produce modern societies, and that modern family change is to be expected. OBJECTIVE We examine the extent to which developmental idealism has been disseminated in Iran. We also investigate predictors of the dissemination of developmental idealism. METHODS We use survey data collected in 2007 from a sample of women in Yazd, a city in Iran. We examine the distribution of developmental idealism in the sample and the multivariate predictors of developmental idealism. RESULTS We find considerable support for the expectation that many elements of developmental idealism have been widely disseminated. Statistically significant majorities associate development with particular family attributes, believe that development causes change in families, believe that fertility reductions and age-at-marriage increases help foster development, and perceive family trends in Iran headed toward modernity. As predicted, parental education, respondent education, and income affect adherence to developmental idealism. CONCLUSIONS Developmental idealism has been widely disseminated in Yazd, Iran and is related to social and demographic factors in predicted ways. COMMENTS Although our data come from only one city, we expect that developmental idealism has been widely distributed in Iran, with important implications for family and demographic behavior.

  3. Family Life and Developmental Idealism in Yazd, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi-Shavazi, Mohammad Jalal; Askari-Nodoushan, Abbas

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This paper is motivated by the theory that developmental idealism has been disseminated globally and has become an international force for family and demographic change. Developmental idealism is a set of cultural beliefs and values about development and how development relates to family and demographic behavior. It holds that modern societies are causal forces producing modern families, that modern families help to produce modern societies, and that modern family change is to be expected. OBJECTIVE: We examine the extent to which developmental idealism has been disseminated in Iran. We also investigate predictors of the dissemination of developmental idealism. METHODS: We use survey data collected in 2007 from a sample of women in Yazd, a city in Iran. We examine the distribution of developmental idealism in the sample and the multivariate predictors of developmental idealism. RESULTS: We find considerable support for the expectation that many elements of developmental idealism have been widely disseminated. Statistically significant majorities associate development with particular family attributes, believe that development causes change in families, believe that fertility reductions and age-at-marriage increases help foster development, and perceive family trends in Iran headed toward modernity. As predicted, parental education, respondent education, and income affect adherence to developmental idealism. CONCLUSIONS: Developmental idealism has been widely disseminated in Yazd, Iran and is related to social and demographic factors in predicted ways. COMMENTS: Although our data come from only one city, we expect that developmental idealism has been widely distributed in Iran, with important implications for family and demographic behavior.

  4. The relationship between family social support and quality of life in diabetic female patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Mousavi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Life quality of diabetic patients is always affected by psychosocial problems, physical disorders, and life style changes. It seems that the perceived social support could intervene in improving the life quality of these patients. The present study was carried out aiming to examine the relation between family social support and life quality of female patients with diabetes. This was a cross-sectional study. The statistical population included 173 diabetic females who were randomly selected from patients referred to Kermanshah diabetes research center. Data were collected using life quality questionnaire (Short Form-36 as well as perceived social support scale. The data analysis indicated that there is a significant correlation between family support and life quality of patients. Furthermore, concerning the components of life quality, there is a significant correlation between family social support and physical performance, physical limitation, tiredness, emotional health, social performance, pain, and general health of patients. However, no significant relation was found between family support and limitation of patients. Results showed that there is a direct relation between family support and the life quality in females with diabetes. Hence, it can be concluded that giving the family support to the female diabetic patients can increase their quality of life.

  5. Construction of a Family Quality of Life Support Program for families of young and adults with intellectual disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natxo MARTÍNEZ RUEDA

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper is grounded on current conceptions on Family Quality of Life (FQoL and family-centered intervention. It describes a part of the building process of a ‘Program for Supporting Family Quality of Life’, within the SAIOA-BBK frame a Gorabide’s information, guidance and support service for people with intellectual disability and their families. A major goal of this project is making proposals for professionals to fit the link between FQoL assessment and its improvement. The program was developed, constructed and tested through collaborative methods between professionals and university researchers, aiming to an increase of FQoL of families with sons or daughters among the youth and adulthood period. Program features, and how it was experimented in a pilot sample of families (n = 5 is presented.

  6. Association of family stressful life-change events and health-related quality of life in fifth-grade children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coker, Tumaini R; Elliott, Marc N; Wallander, Jan L; Cuccaro, Paula; Grunbaum, Jo Anne; Corona, Rosalie; Saunders, Ann E; Schuster, Mark A

    2011-04-01

    To examine the association of recent family-related stressful life-change events (SLEs) with health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in fifth graders. Population-based, cross-sectional survey. Three US metropolitan areas; 2004-2006. A total of 5147 fifth graders and their parents. Nine recent family-related SLEs: a parent's death, another family member's death, a family member's injury/illness, a family member's alcohol/drug problems, loss of a pet, recent change of residence, addition of a new baby or child to the household, parental separation, and parental divorce. The HRQOL measured using the 23-item Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory. Twenty-four percent of children had no reported recent SLEs; 33% had 1, 25% had 2, 12% had 3, and 6% had 4 or more. Mean HRQOL scores (total, physical, and psychosocial scales) were lower for children with more SLEs. The mean total HRQOL score was 80.4 (95% confidence interval, 79.4-81.3) for children with no recent SLEs and 71.8 (70.2-73.5) for children with 4 or more SLEs (P positive HRQOL. By incorporating the needs of families as part of comprehensive, high-quality care, health care professionals can identify these types of family-level needs and assist families in accessing community resources for support.

  7. Enhancing National Unity Through Family-Life Education ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Family is the most basic social unit in today's society. Despite it's small size, it plays important roles in stabilizing and enhancing the growth of the adult members of the society and provide a context for the growth and development of the children. The changing nature of the role of the family, in recent time, demands for a ...

  8. Everyday Life in Distance Education: One Family's Home Schooling Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Nicole C.

    2006-01-01

    This article offers a narrative portrait of one family enrolled in a school of distance education in Queensland, Australia. Most of the families own or manage sheep and/or beef grazing properties, and their children receive their education by correspondence papers and daily UHF radio lessons. The students complete their school work at home with a…

  9. Disability in the Family: A Life Span Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Martha E.

    2003-01-01

    Provides an overview of disability in families. The goal of the article is to raise awareness of the status of people with disabilities and their families to develop culturally relevant psychological support. An international literature review is provided with consideration of cultural meanings of disability, preparation for dealing with…

  10. Christian ethical perspectives on marriage and family life in modern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    p1243322

    The biblical idea of marriage and family along the revelation-historical way of reasoning has the creational order as its ..... Each of these usages influences the other deeply. On the one hand, the family concept is ..... serve God in politics, culture and economics, on the field of sport and recreation and in business and their ...

  11. Work and Family Life: Middle School Content Competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Div. of Career-Technical and Adult Education.

    This document, which lists the middle school content competencies for the Work and Family Studies curriculum within Family and Consumer Sciences in Ohio, is intended to help middle school students develop self-responsibility and competence dealing with the practical problems of early adolescence. (Career awareness and career choice options are…

  12. Effects of a family intervention on the quality of life of women with recurrent breast cancer and their family caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northouse, Laurel; Kershaw, Trace; Mood, Darlene; Schafenacker, Ann

    2005-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if patients with advanced breast cancer and their family caregivers, who participated in a family based intervention, report better quality of life and other psychosocial outcomes than dyads who received standard care alone. Using a randomized clinical trial, 134 patients and their family caregivers were assigned to usual care (control) or to usual care plus the family intervention (experimental condition). Dyads were assessed at baseline, three- and six-months later. The intervention consisted of five sessions and addressed family involvement, optimistic attitude, coping effectiveness, uncertainty reduction, and symptom management. Patients in the family intervention reported significantly less hopelessness and less negative appraisal of illness than controls; their family caregivers reported significantly less negative appraisal of caregiving. Intervention effects were evident at three-months, but were not sustained at six-months. No difference was found in the quality of life of dyads in experimental or control conditions. Although the family intervention had positive effects initially, these effects were not sustained over time. Future studies need to consider program dose and duration of effect, outcome measures that are more sensitive to change, and realistic end-points for patients with advanced cancer.

  13. Felt obligation and the family life cycle: a study on intergenerational relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Corso, Annalisa Rossi; Lanz, Margherita

    2013-01-01

    Since the 1990s researchers have considered as the dominant view on family obligation a set of responsibilities, duties, and obligation of care and assistance,that adult children should assume when parents are old or infirm. This concept is limited, because it assumes that family obligation is salient only in one period of life: when parents reach old age and are infirm. In contrast, a relational approach to family obligation considers family relationships as central to understanding children's duties and responsibilities. Following Stein, family obligation can be defined as felt obligation: expectations for appropriate and negotiated behaviour, perceived within the context of specific personal relationships with kin across life course. Felt obligation is conceptualized in five dimensions: a duty to maintain contact, assistance, avoidance of conflict, personal sharing, and self-sufficiency. The purpose of the present study was to analyze perceptions of felt obligation in intergenerational relationships (parent-child and family of origin) in different phases of the family life cycle in a specific cultural context (Italy). The sample was composed of 92 parents with children of different ages (infants, school-aged children, and young adults).The measure addressed the five dimensions of felt obligation, all assessed in various phases of family life. Results indicated differences in dimensions of felt obligation between intergenerational relationships (both parent-child and with family of origin). Some of these differences, such as self-sufficiency and personal sharing, assumed more importance and salience in some periods of the life cycle than in others.

  14. Family Rituals and Quality of Life in Children With Cancer and Their Parents: The Role of Family Cohesion and Hope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Susana; Crespo, Carla; Canavarro, M Cristina; Kazak, Anne E

    2015-08-01

    Family rituals are associated with adaptive functioning in pediatric illness, including quality of life (QoL). This article explores the role of family cohesion and hope as mediators of this association in children with cancer and their parents. Portuguese children with cancer (N = 389), on- and off-treatment, and one of their parents completed self-report measures. Structural equation modeling was used to examine direct and indirect links between family rituals and QoL. When children and parents reported higher levels of family rituals, they also reported more family cohesion and hope, which were linked to better QoL. At the dyadic level, children's QoL was related to parents' family rituals through the child's family cohesion. This model was valid across child's age-group, treatment status, and socioeconomic status. Family rituals are important in promoting QoL in pediatric cancer via family cohesion and hope individually and via family cohesion in terms of parent-child interactions. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Family Rituals and Quality of Life in Children With Cancer and Their Parents: The Role of Family Cohesion and Hope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo, Carla; Canavarro, M. Cristina; Kazak, Anne E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Family rituals are associated with adaptive functioning in pediatric illness, including quality of life (QoL). This article explores the role of family cohesion and hope as mediators of this association in children with cancer and their parents. Methods Portuguese children with cancer (N = 389), on- and off-treatment, and one of their parents completed self-report measures. Structural equation modeling was used to examine direct and indirect links between family rituals and QoL. Results When children and parents reported higher levels of family rituals, they also reported more family cohesion and hope, which were linked to better QoL. At the dyadic level, children’s QoL was related to parents’ family rituals through the child’s family cohesion. This model was valid across child’s age-group, treatment status, and socioeconomic status. Conclusions Family rituals are important in promoting QoL in pediatric cancer via family cohesion and hope individually and via family cohesion in terms of parent–child interactions. PMID:25775914

  16. The Early (Feminist Essays of Victoria Ocampo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doris Meyer

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the essays written by Ocampo between 1920 and 1934, prior to the time when she publicly voiced her adhesion to feminism and the rights of women in Argentine society. In these works from her Testimonios in which Ocampo struggles to find her voice as a female writer, the maleable essay serves her need to engage in discursive dialogues from the margins of the literary culture of her time. Both as a woman and a member of the oligarchy, she questions cultural assumptions and gender-based binary structures common among the male writers of her time, many of whom she knew personally. Using rhetorical strategies that show the self-reflexive and subversive nature of her writing, Ocampo reads and reinterprets these works from a parenthetical feminist perspective, contesting their intellectual and aesthetic biases. The active agency of the reader as writer in these early essays shows Ocampo's awareness of her own unorthodox subject position—alienated from the conventions of her class, her gender, her national culture and language. Her autobiographical musings and her engagement with literary modernity in the 1920s and 1930s reveal a woman who accepted the liabilities of articulating an autonomous self, both in a European and a Latin American context. The influence of family bonds and patriarchal morality decisively shaped, but did not ultimately control, the way Victoria Ocampo eventually defined herself as a feminist author.

  17. Quality of life of women with recurrent breast cancer and their family members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northouse, Laurel L; Mood, Darlene; Kershaw, Trace; Schafenacker, Ann; Mellon, Suzanne; Walker, Julie; Galvin, Elizabeth; Decker, Veronica

    2002-10-01

    Little information is available about the effects of recurrent breast cancer on the quality of life of women and their family members. The present study assessed patients' and family members' quality of life within 1 month after recurrence, and effects of multiple factors on quality-of-life scores. Patient/family member dyads (N = 189) participated in this study. A stress-appraisal model guided selection of person factors, social/family factors, illness-related factors, appraisal factors, and quality of life, measured with psychometrically sound instruments. Quality of life was measured with both generic (Medical Outcomes Study SF-36) and cancer-specific (Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy) scales. Patients reported significant impairments in physical, functional, and emotional well-being. Family members reported significant impairments in their own emotional well-being. Structural equation modeling revealed that self-efficacy, social support, and family hardiness had positive effects on quality of life, whereas symptom distress, concerns, hopelessness, and negative appraisal of illness or caregiving had detrimental effects. Study variables accounted for a sizable amount of variance in patients' and family members' physical and mental dimensions of quality of life (72% to 81%). Contrary to findings observed in studies of newly diagnosed breast cancer patients and spouses, little relationship was found between recurrent patients' and family members' quality of life. Women with recurrent breast cancer are in need of programs to assist them with the severe effects of the disease on their quality of life. Programs need to include family members to help counteract the negative effects of the recurrent disease on their mental health, and to enable them to continue as effective caregivers.

  18. Work-life balance and family friendly policies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janine Chapman

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents Australian and international research on work-life interaction. We review the work-life policies and practices that are likely to have the greatest impact on work-life outcomes, specifically reducing the negative impact of work on other life domains (work-life interference, and enhancing the positive effect (work-life facilitation. The review addresses four policy areas common in work-life studies of the general workforce: employee-centered flexible work practices; working hours (e.g. access to part-time work; paid and unpaid leave (e.g. parental leave; and access to childcare. It then considers the work-life literature related to two specific industries – the Australian public sector, and health and social services – to identify work-life issues and practices specific to each industry. We then conclude with a general discussion of challenges associated with the policy-practice gap, focusing particularly on work intensification and the role of organisational culture as the catalyst for policy uptake and effectiveness.

  19. Efficiency of single-family houses and harmonisation of their life cycle participants’ interests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nerija Kvederyte

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available An efficient single-family house is the main purpose of the life cycle. It determines the necessity to evaluate various decisions of the life cycle of single-family houses and possibilities to satisfy objectives and requirements of the participants of that process. To design and achieve an effective process of the life cycle of a single-family house, it is necessary to take care of its efficiency starting from the determination of needs and objectives and ending with the usage of a building.

  20. Does family structure matter? Comparing the life goals and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    associated with greater well-being, happiness and life satisfaction (Hofer & Chasiotis,. 2003; Ryan, Chirkov ... under psychological 'threat', such as unemployment or the possibility of dying, they may pursue extrinsic ..... intrinsic life goals and aspirations have a greater chance of happiness and well-being than individuals ...

  1. Healthy Weight for Life: Actions for Communities, Individuals, and Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Providers Resources Contact Us Healthy Weight for Life Download These Healthy Weight Guides and Take Action A Vision for Healthy ... innovative nutrition, physical activity, and weight management programs. Download the two-page flyer about Healthy Weight for Life [PDF - 278 KB] . Indian Health Service ( ...

  2. The importance of life long learning | Gibbs | South African Family ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ? In an attempt to answer these questions, this paper briefly discusses the historical development of life long learning and poses questions as to its applicability into daily practice. Life well spent is long \\"Leonardo da Vinci\\" SA Fam Pract 2005 ...

  3. Spiraal : uus Victoria & Alberti muuseum Londonis

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    1998-01-01

    Daniel Libeskindi projekt Victoria & Alberti Muuseumi laiendamiseks on põhjustanud konservatiivsete londonlaste pahameele, kuid kutsunud esile ka hulgaliselt toetusavaldusi. Muuseumi uus osa (kokkuvarisemise piiril näiva ehitisena) peaks külastajaile avatama 2004. a.

  4. Family ties and depression across the life course: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nienke Moor

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Family ties in Europe are affected by demographic trends associated with parenting and partnering, such as a decline in fertility, an increase in childlessness, postponement of parenthood and of partnership formation, the rise of "new" relationship forms and divorce rates. It is unclear how the contemporary family structure and composition are associated with people's mental wellbeing. OBJECTIVE This article examines how ties with parents, siblings, a partner and children are associated with depressive mood of men and women in seven Eastern and Western European countries. METHODS To test our hypotheses we made use of data from the Generations and Gender Surveys. We performed logistic regression analyses to study the associations between people's family ties and depressive mood. RESULTS Our research findings show that family ties can diminish people's depressive feelings. Although we find some gender differences in these associations, we do not find support for the argument that family ties are more important for the mental wellbeing of women than of men. Moreover, our findings support the hierarchical model of family relations in which new ties with partner and children in adulthood gain precedence over the original primary ties with parents and siblings. Finally, we find that the association between family ties and depressive mood is quite similar in Eastern and Western Europe, but being married or having a partner more strongly reduces depressive feelings in Eastern than in Western Europe. CONCLUSIONS Although we did not dispose of longitudinal data, our research results do provide some indications about how demographic changes, for instance, those affecting family size -- the number of children or siblings -- might be associated with mental wellbeing. Our findings also suggest that the demographic trend of increasing partnership dissolution may have larger consequences for people's mental wellbeing in Eastern

  5. Family influence on life-course selection among female university students

    OpenAIRE

    手塚, 紀子; 古屋, 健

    2017-01-01

     National Institute of Population and Social Security Research defines women’s 5 life courses as follows; Full-time housewife,Return-to-work, Managing both work and family, DINKS, Single and working. For female university students, whichlife course is the ideal course and which life course they plan to lead? This study examines following three hypotheses asfactors influencing their choice. The first hypothesis is that mother’s life course selection tends to influence the life courseselection ...

  6. The Dynamics of Transmitting the Faith: A Family Life Story

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Joan B. Matheu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available - This is a qualitative case study of a Christian Living Awardee and her family about the dynamics of living and transmitting the Catholic faith within their family and beyond. The researchers conducted this study during the academic year 2016-2017 in St. Joseph’s School of Mactan, Lapu-Lapu City, Cebu, Philippines. They asked permission from the proper authorities for the conduct of the study. They also asked for the informed consent of the parents of the chosen family. Once they were granted, they conducted a focus group discussion with the chosen family. Some of the themes extracted are: Faith considered as the “best gift” of parents to their children; Faith as “North Star”; Parents come from families with deep faith; Spiritual activities done as a family: Going to Holy Mass together, Holy Rosary; Practicing Faith, Nurturing the Faith; Good Example of Parents; Sharing the faith with peers by example; Being friendly. The researchers recommend the offering of continuing education in the faith for parents, educators, catechists and other formators in coordination with the parish priests, sharing of books and references like the Catechism of the Catholic Church, Compendium, teaching of Catechism especially in the public schools.

  7. Cultural Adaptation Quality of Family Life Scale for the Brazilian Portuguese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorge, Bianca Miguel; Levy, Cilmara Cristina Alves da Costa; Granato, Lídio

    2015-01-01

    To culturally adapt the Family Quality of Life Scale to the Brazilian Portuguese version and evaluate the instrument reliability and family quality of life of those who have children with hearing loss. The process of cultural adaptation of the scale followed the steps of the Guidelines for the Process of Cross-Cultural Adaptation of Self-Report Measure. It was conducted in three stages: translation, back translation, and application in a pilot sample, as a way to check the comprehension difficulties of the items. After it had been completed, it was administered to 41 families who have children with hearing loss and, with their results, the quality of life and reliability were analyzed based on the Cronbach's alpha statistical test. In the first version (translation), among the 25 items, there were differences between the translators only in four items; after the corrections, the second version was done (back translation), in which other four more differences were found. Finally, after the final corrections, the last version was developed and used in the pilot sample without differences. Thus, it was applied to families with deaf children, who believe to be satisfied as to their quality of life. The Cronbach's alpha test found that the scale shows a satisfactory reliability. The Brazilian Portuguese version of the Family Quality of Life Scale is a tool of easy use and satisfactory reliability. The families are satisfied with their family quality of life.

  8. Potential for response bias in family surveys about end-of-life care in the ICU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kross, Erin K; Engelberg, Ruth A; Shannon, Sarah E; Curtis, J Randall

    2009-12-01

    After-death surveys are an important source of information about the quality of end-of-life care, but response rates generally are low. Our goal was to understand the potential for nonresponse bias in survey studies of family members after a patient's death in the hospital ICU by identifying differences in patient demographics and delivery of palliative care between patients whose families respond to a survey about end-of-life care and those whose families do not. We performed a cohort study of patients who died in the ICU at 14 hospitals. Surveys were mailed to family members 1 to 2 months after the patient's death. Chart abstraction was completed on all patients, assessing demographic characteristics and previously validated indicators of palliative care. Of the 2,016 surveys sent to families, 760 were returned, for a response rate of 38%. Patients whose family members returned the surveys were more likely to be white (88% vs 74%, respectively; p care, including medical record documentation of family present at death, involvement of spiritual care, and dying after a decision to limit life-sustaining therapies (p family members responded to a survey about end-of-life care were more likely to be white, older, and have indicators of palliative care documented in the medical record. Because these patients likely received higher quality palliative care, these findings suggest that the response bias in end-of-life care research is toward overestimating the quality of palliative care. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00685893.

  9. The development and implementation of family and child welfare system legislation in the frameworks of contemporary family life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grbić Ana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The demographic picture of Serbia over the last few decades has featured a negative trend, particularly fueled by the negative aspects of the transition process and adjustment to the new models of life functioning, and therefore the harmonization of family relationships is seriously undermined by the increased number of divorces, single-parent families and delayed parenthood. The research has confirmed that the parents opted for a larger number of children under the changed circumstances should relate to the government to take greater responsibility in this area. Programs do not necessarily have to be of material nature. They may include a variety of content-creative measures aimed at increasing the birth rate and the quality of family life by activating various discussions in the local community. National measures that would contribute to a harmonious family life are associated with an increased level of security, extended work of preschool institutions in order to harmonize work and family life and the introduction of discounts on equipment and clothing for the preschool children. In addition to reproductive functions, other functions of the family are: psychological, educational and socializing over the last decade (particularly after the introduction of compulsory pre-school program, which has led to the transformation of active strategies of the state and legislation in this regard and acceptance of the principle of lifelong learning in which preschool foundation plays a crucial role in the adaptation of compulsory education by providing equal starting conditions for all children. The existence of new forms of institutions such as family centers with a differentiated system of services (consulting, information, educational should compensate deficiencies of the existing system only on the basis of social protection embodied in the social welfare centers, which are available mostly in cases of pre-existing problems.

  10. Hospice family members’ perceptions and experiences with end-of-life care in the nursing home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington, Karla; Kruse, Robin L.; Albright, David L; Lewis, Alexandria; Demiris, George

    2014-01-01

    Objective Despite the fact that more than 25% of Americans die in nursing homes, end-of-life care has consistently been found to be less than adequate in this setting. Even for those residents on hospice, end-of-life care has been found to be problematic. This study had two research questions; 1) How do family members of hospice nursing home residents differ in their anxiety, depression, quality of life, social networks, perceptions of pain medication, and health compared to family members of community dwelling hospice patients? 2) What are family members’ perceptions of and experiences with end-of-life care in the nursing home setting? Methods This study is a secondary mixed methods analysis of interviews with family members of hospice nursing home residents and a comparative statistical analysis of standard outcome measures between family members of hospice patients in the nursing home and family member of hospice patients residing in the community. Results Outcome measures for family members of nursing home residents were compared (n=176) with family members of community dwelling hospice patients (n=267). The family members of nursing home residents reported higher quality of life however, levels of anxiety, depression, perceptions of pain medicine, and health were similar for hospice family members in the nursing home and in the community. Lending an understanding to the stress for hospice family members of nursing home residents concerns were found with collaboration between the nursing home and the hospice, nursing home care that did not meet family expectations, communication problems, and resident care concerns including pain management. Some family members reported positive end-of-life care experiences in the nursing home setting. Conclusion These interviews identify a multitude of barriers to quality end-of-life care in the nursing home setting, and demonstrate that support for family members is an essential part of quality end-of-life care for

  11. [Family life strategies and their relation with malnutrition in children under 2 years old].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval-Priego, Araceli Amada; Reyes-Morales, Hortensia; Pérez-Cuevas, Ricardo; Abrego-Blas, Rebeca; Orrico-Torres, Efrén Samuel

    2002-01-01

    To identify the role of family life strategies on malnutrition in children aged 6-23 months of age. This case-control study was conducted in 1998 in the municipality of Teolocholco, State of Tlaxcala, Mexico, among families with children aged 6-23 months of age. The sample was conformed by 105 cases and 210 controls. Family life strategies were grouped into five types: family composition, means and distribution of family income, family and social networks, and life preservation strategies. Malnutrition was classified according to height for age. Data were analyzed using logistic regression to obtain odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Data were collected from 605 families, for a total of 445 controls and 160 cases. The predictive model included mother's schooling, overcrowding, time elapsed between childbirths, per capita monthly income, and time devoted to child-rearing activities. Family life strategies determine children's nutritional status; understanding the influence of the family on the children's health status is necessary to develop effective programs aimed at improving the nutritional status of children.

  12. Relationship between individual quality of life and family quality of life for people with intellectual disability living in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertelli, M; Bianco, A; Rossi, M; Scuticchio, D; Brown, I

    2011-12-01

    There is substantial literature investigating quality of life (QoL) of individuals with intellectual disability (ID). QoL of families of people with ID is emerging as an important field of research. Despite this, there is a lack of studies regarding their relationship. The present paper aimed to study the relationship between QoL scores of individuals with ID and members of their families. Twenty-seven parents or relatives of 27 adults with ID were recruited by four different research centres across Tuscany (Italy) to be interviewed through the Italian adaptation of the Family Quality of Life Survey - 2006 (FQoLS-2006), a tool developed for use in a multiple-country study on family QoL. The FQoLS-2006 was translated and adapted to Italian through three revisions. The last was submitted to the authors of the original version, who also maintain an electronic data file and data archive for statistical evaluations in various countries. QoL of persons with ID was assessed through the administration of the Quality of Life - Instrument Package. QoL scores were analysed to describe population characteristics and to examine the relationships among measures of individual and family QoL using correlations (Pearson and Spearman). Findings showed that family ratings of QoL were generally low. Families interviewed reported a low level of QoL in 'Support from Others' and 'Community Interaction', while 'Family Relationships' and 'Health of the Family' rated higher. For individual QoL, individuals had the lowest scores in the area of 'Spiritual being' and higher scores in the area of 'Physical being'. Correlations examining possible relationships among Importance, Satisfaction and Opportunities found some statistically significant correlation coefficients between some aspects of the three main areas of individual QoL (Being, Belonging and Becoming) and the nine family domains. Most of these correlations regarded family 'Financial Well-Being', 'Family Relationships, 'Support from

  13. Assessment of the Quality of Life in Families with Children Who Have Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities in Slovenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagran, B.; Schmidt, M.; Brown, I.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Research was conducted, within the framework of the International Family Quality of Life Project, on the quality of life of families with a member who has a disability. We concentrated on the nine specific domains that the family life measure used, and recorded data from five of its six measurement dimensions: "Importance,…

  14. Work family-life balance and social investment strategies in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Bent

    2014-01-01

    This article analyses and discusses the options and possibilities of combining work and family life in a universal welfare state, e. g. Denmark. Related to the ability to combine work and family life is the welfare states investment in affordable and high quality day care and a perspective...... on caring for elderly citizens. The theoretical underpinnings of universal welfare states is given and also the reason why it has been important to ensure and be able to combine work and family life. The article shows how Denmark, Sweden and Finland compare with countries from other and different types...... of welfare states in Europe with regard to the caring for children, female participation rates and support to the elderly. Support to families in cash is also discussed including the size of the state budget to family policy. Besides presenting central quantitative indicators the article also gives a short...

  15. Technostress and its relationships with career, life satisfaction, and work-family interaction: A gender analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mary Sandra Carlotto; Guilherme Welter Wendt

    2016-01-01

      This study aimed to evaluate the differences between males and females on technostress dimensions, as well as possible associations with life and career satisfaction, and with work-family interaction...

  16. Factors Affecting Family Satisfaction with Inpatient End-of-Life Care: e110860

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Erin Sadler; Brigette Hales; Blair Henry; Wei Xiong; Jeff Myers; Lesia Wynnychuk; Ru Taggar; Daren Heyland; Robert Fowler

    2014-01-01

      Background Little data exists addressing satisfaction with end-of-life care among hospitalized patients, as they and their family members are systematically excluded from routine satisfaction surveys...

  17. Quality of life in Chinese family caregivers for elderly people with chronic diseases

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xie, Hui; Cheng, Cheng; Tao, Yisheng; Zhang, Jie; Robert, Delprino; Jia, Jihui; Su, Yonggang

    2016-01-01

    .... Quality of life in family caregivers for elderly people with chronic diseases was evaluated, and the demographic and characteristic factors of both elderly people and their caregivers were explored...

  18. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of a Family Quality of Life Scale for Taiwanese Families of Children with Intellectual Disability/Developmental Delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Chun-Yu; Seo, Hyojeong; Turnbull, Ann P.; Summer, Jean Ann

    2017-01-01

    The Beach Center Family Quality of Life Scale is an internationally validated instrument for measuring family outcomes. To revise the scale for better alignment with the Family Quality of Life theory, the authors excluded non-outcome items in this revision. In this study, we examined reliability and validity of the revised scale (i.e., the FQoL…

  19. Family dynamics in pre- and post-transition Romania: a life-table description

    OpenAIRE

    Cornelia Muresan

    2007-01-01

    This study presents a life-table decription of a wide range of events concerning family formation and fertility in Romania, by contrasting two different periods in Romanian history: a period of authoritarian regime and centrally planned economy (1980-1989) and a period of democratic political regime and market-oriented economy (1996-2005). A large number of single- and multi-decrement life tables deals with leaving home, separating from the parental family, forming first union, direct marriag...

  20. Family Involvement at the End-of-Life and Receipt of Quality Care

    OpenAIRE

    Sudore, RL; Casarett, D; Smith, D.; Richardson, DM; Ersek, M

    2014-01-01

    © 2014 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. Context Most patients will lose decision-making capacity at the end of life. Little is known about the quality of care received by patients who have family involved in their care. Objectives To evaluate differences in the receipt of quality end-of-life care for patients who died with and without family involvement. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 34,290 decedents from ...

  1. End-of-life decision making and emotional burden: placing family meetings in context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radwany, Steven; Albanese, Terry; Clough, Lynn; Sims, Linda; Mason, Hallie; Jahangiri, Sudy

    2009-01-01

    Helping families make end-of-life care decisions can be challenging for health care providers in an intensive care unit (ICU). Family meetings facilitated by palliative care consult services (PCCS) have been recommended and found effective for improving support for families in these difficult situations. These services can be improved with a deeper understanding of factors associated with emotional burden in the aftermath of end-of-life decision making. This qualitative study seeks to provide a better understanding of family experiences and emotional burden surrounding end-of-life decision making. We conducted in-depth, semistructured interviews with 23 family members following the death of a loved one in the ICU. All participants had been involved in a PCCS-led family meeting concerning end-of-life decisions about their loved one. Methodology from grounded theory was used to analyze the content of transcripts and to build a theoretical model. From the perspective of the family, decision making at the end of life is described within a theoretical model of salient experiences that are relevant to families' emotional burdens. Three temporal stages were evident: (1) the illness experience, (2) decision making in the family meeting, and (3) the dying process. However, emotional burden in the form of lingering questions and resentment was more common when families reported having negative experiences during the final hospital stay. Supportive responsiveness from the PCCS for families who have experienced critical incidents or who have unanswered questions or resentment about treatment may be an important consideration to alleviate later emotional burden.

  2. An observational study of family caregivers' quality of life caring for patients with a stoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, Elisabetta; Simonetti, Valentina; Franchelli, Pasquale; Pavone, Daniele; Cicolini, Giancarlo

    2012-01-01

    The management of stomas following surgical resection often falls to family caregivers. The purpose of this observational survey was to investigate the family caregivers' quality of life caring for a patient with ostomy. Between August 2008 and July 2009, 144 eligible Italian family members caring for a patient with ostomy were evaluated using two questionnaires: the Caregiver Quality of Life Cancer survey and the Caregiver Burden Inventory. Both questionnaires have similar capabilities to explore the burden of caregiving. The Caregiver Quality of Life Cancer reported a total Quality of Life score of 97.11 (SD = 14.36), whereas the Caregiver Burden Inventory score for the sample was 51.95 (SD = 10.72). Variables of interest included health, self-perception, nationality, society and territory in which the person lives, education, job, standard of living, house, family, relations with partner, and friendship. Only those who provided complete data (n = 123) were included in the analyses. Data show that generally the family caregiver is married (92%), female (97%), and aged 55.15 years (SD = 16.5). The burden of assistance is higher in younger single caregivers, whereas those with children or who are aged have economic concerns. Loss of spirituality is reported in people aged 30-49 and 71-90 years. Family Caregivers' Quality of Life is poor. Further research is needed to determine the effectiveness of social and economic interventions to help family caregivers in the management of long-term assistance.

  3. Making Ethics a Habit in Your Family Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terkel, Susan Neiburg

    1993-01-01

    Suggests family activities related to moral values: (1) instilling the giving habit; (2) using stories and games to trigger moral reflection; (3) encouraging earth ethics; (4) developing the moral opinion habit; (5) making moral reminders part of the home decor; (6) using every opportunity to teach; and (7) sharing holidays with others. (GLR)

  4. 2012 Military Family Life Project (MFLP): Tabulations of Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-31

    274 b. Counseling through some other source .............................................. 276 c. Extracurricular activities (e.g...of the war ................................. 288 i. Stable household routine (e.g., regular family meals, continued participation in extracurricular ...coping, and adaptation – inventories for research and practice. (pp. 357-389). Madison, WI: University of Wisconsin Publishers. Research Triangle

  5. Christian ethical perspectives on marriage and family life in modern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The past four decades witnessed a tremendous and wide-ranging change in family patterns in Western societies. Amongst these changes are phenomena such as growing number of divorces, births out-of-wedlock, and the absence of fathers because of globalisation, same-sex marriages and cohabitation of people without ...

  6. The Family Life Cycle and Critical Transitions: Utilizing Cinematherapy to Facilitate Understanding and Increase Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Mary B.

    2012-01-01

    Transitioning successfully from one stage of development to the next in the family life cycle requires the accomplishment of certain developmental tasks. Couples and families who fail to accomplish these tasks often become "stuck" and unable to move forward. This impasse frequently leads to heightened stress reactions and crippled channels of…

  7. Health and function of participants in the Long Life Family Study: A comparison with other cohorts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Newman, Anne B; Glynn, Nancy W; Taylor, Christopher A

    2011-01-01

    Individuals from families recruited for the Long Life Family Study (LLFS) (n= 4559) were examined and compared to individuals from other cohorts to determine whether the recruitment targeting longevity resulted in a cohort of individuals with better health and function. Other cohorts with similar...

  8. Integration Processes of a Romanian Group in a Huelva Village through Family Life Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Reales, Antonia-María; Aguaded-Gómez, Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the integration of Romanian immigrants in Lucena del Puerto (Huelva, Spain) through the life stories of two families of Romanian origin. The experiences of the groups presented in this study were analyzed. Both families were in the town for work, to grow and harvest strawberries. We observed a contrast between idealistic views…

  9. The Victoria Project, Sri Lanka: Victoria Power-Station. [Hydroelectric power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Creber, B. (Sir Alexander Gibb and Partners (GB))

    1991-04-01

    The Victoria Hydroelectric Power-Station forms part of the Victoria Project on the Mahaweli Ganga in Sri Lanka and it provides the country's largest single power source. The Paper describes the planning, design and construction of the civil engineering works, including problems encountered, and also describes, in outline, the electrical and mechanical works. (Author).

  10. Life without plastic: A family experiment and biomonitoring study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutter, Hans-Peter; Kundi, Michael; Hohenblum, Philipp; Scharf, Sigrid; Shelton, Janie F; Piegler, Kathrin; Wallner, Peter

    2016-10-01

    Exposure to bisphenol-A (BPA) and phthalates has been associated with negative health outcomes in animal and human studies, and human bio-monitoring studies demonstrate widespread exposure in the US and Europe. Out of concern for the environment and health, individuals may attempt to modify their environment, diet, and consumer choices to avoid such exposures, but these natural experiments are rarely if ever quantitatively evaluated. The aim of the study was to evaluate the difference in urinary concentrations of BPA and phthalate metabolites following an exposure reduction intervention among an Austrian family of five. Urine samples were taken shortly after the family had removed all plastic kitchenware, toys, and bathroom products, and started a concerted effort to eat less food packaged in plastic. Two-months later, urine samples were collected at a follow-up visit, and concentrations of BPA and phthalate metabolites were compared. Shortly after removal of plastic urinary concentrations of BPA were below limit of quantification in all samples. Phthalate concentrations were low, however, 10 of 14 investigated metabolites could be found above limit of quantification. After the two-month intervention, phthalate urinary concentrations had declined in some but not all family members. In the mother most phthalate metabolites increased. The low levels might be partly due to the environmentally conscious lifestyle of the family and partly due to the fact that body levels had dropped already because of the delay of four days between finishing removal and first measurement. Further two months avoidance of dietary exposure and exposure to environmental plastics reduced urinary concentrations for all but one metabolite in the oldest son only, but decreased somewhat in all family members except the mother. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Impact of Ego-resilience and Family Function on Quality of Life in Childhood Leukemia Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHO, Ok-Hee; YOO, Yang-Sook; HWANG, Kyung-Hye

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to examine the impact of ego-resilience and family function on quality of life in childhood leukemia survivors. Methods: This study targeted 100 pediatric leukemia survivors, who visited the Pediatric Hemato-Oncology Center in South Korea from Aug to Dec 2011. A structured questionnaire of ego-resilience, family function and quality of life used to collect data through direct interview with the pediatric patients and their parents. The correlation between the study variables analyzed using the Pearson’s correlation coefficient, and the impact on quality of life analyzed using a stepwise multiple regression. Results: Ego-resilience (r = 0.69, PEgo-resilience was a major factor affecting quality of life in childhood leukemia survivors, with an explanatory power of 48%. The explanatory power for quality of life increased to 53% when age and family function were included. Conclusion: Ego-resilience, age, and family function affect quality of life in childhood leukemia survivors. Hence, strategies are required to construct age-matched programs to improve quality of life, in order to help restore the necessary ego-resilience and to strengthen family function in childhood leukemia survivors. PMID:28032062

  12. Now And Then - Life Trajectories, Family Relationships and Diasporic Identities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singla, Rashmi

    . New interviews have been conducted within a multilingual framework according to the young adults’ preference - in their mother tongue (Punjabi, Urdu), Danish or English in a variety of settings. The data has been analysed at various levels involving meaning condensation and categorisation...... identities. The qualitative method in-depth interviews/ life mode interview aiming to anchor life transitions and events in contexts has been used. New interviews have been conducted within a multilingual framework according to the young adults’ preference - in their mother tongue (Punjabi, Urdu), Danish...

  13. Interview with Elisabeth Beck-Gernsheim – family structures and family life in second modernity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Tine; Sørensen, Mads P.

    2013-01-01

    In this interview with Tine Ravn and Mads P. Sørensen, Elisabeth Beck-Gernsheim discusses family structures, reproductive technologies and individualization in second modernity.......In this interview with Tine Ravn and Mads P. Sørensen, Elisabeth Beck-Gernsheim discusses family structures, reproductive technologies and individualization in second modernity....

  14. The Impact of Child, Family, and Professional Support Characteristics on the Quality of Life in Families of Young Children with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Kate; Gavidia-Payne, Susana

    2009-01-01

    Background: Families of young children with disabilities are faced with ongoing challenges that impact various aspects of family life. Given the increasing emphasis on promoting positive outcomes in these families, the overall aim of the current study was to examine the contribution of child, family, and support characteristics to the quality of…

  15. The Role of Character Strengths and Family Importance on Mexican American College Students' Life Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vela, Javier C.; Sparrow, Gregory Scott; Ikonomopoulos, James; Gonzalez, Stacey L.; Rodriguez, Basilio

    2017-01-01

    We examined how character strengths and family importance influenced Mexican American college students' life satisfaction. Using multiple regression analysis, findings indicated that optimism, grit, and gratitude were significant predictors of life satisfaction. We provide a discussion regarding the importance of these findings as well as…

  16. Life Satisfaction among Children in Different Family Structures: A Comparative Study of 36 Western Societies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjarnason, Thoroddur; Bendtsen, Pernille; Arnarsson, Arsaell M.; Borup, Ina; Iannotti, Ronald J.; Lofstedt, Petra; Haapasalo, Ilona; Niclasen, Birgit

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines differences in life satisfaction among children in different family structures in 36 western, industrialised countries (n = 184 496). Children living with both biological parents reported higher levels of life satisfaction than children living with a single parent or parent-step-parent. Children in joint physical custody…

  17. Smokers’ sexual behavior and their satisfaction with family life

    OpenAIRE

    YAMAMURA, Eiji

    2012-01-01

    It has been recently recognized that there is difference of preference between smokers and non-smokers. That is, smokers tend to be more impatient and prefer immediate benefits compared with non-smokers. If people follow their primitive instincts they will engage in sexual behavior. Hence, impatient people are more likely to have sex because it is difficult for them to control their instincts. However, for married people, having sex with a spouse is considered to be an investment in family li...

  18. Early Life Family Conflict, Social Interactions, and Carotid Artery Intima-Media Thickness in Adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John-Henderson, Neha A; Kamarck, Thomas W; Muldoon, Matthew F; Manuck, Stephen B

    2016-04-01

    Conflict in early life family environments is known to affect psychosocial functioning and coping styles into adulthood and is reported to negatively affect access to psychosocial resources that are critical to the management of stress. However, it remains unknown whether early life family conflict similarly affects subclinical cardiovascular disease (CVD) in adulthood. We predicted that family conflict in early life would be associated with greater mean intima-media thickness (IMT), a subclinical marker of CVD risk, in adulthood. Data were collected in a community sample of 503 adults (47.4 % male, mean [standard deviation] age = 42.8 [7.3] years). Associations between family conflict in early life with IMT (assessed using B-mode ultrasound) in adulthood were examined using regression analysis. We also tested for indirect effects of early life family conflict on mean IMT through ecological momentary assessment reports of social interactions, diversity of social roles, and perceived social support. Linear regression analyses adjusted for demographics and physiological risk factors showed conflict in early life associated with greater mean IMT (β = 0.08, t(447) = 2.13, p = .034, R = 0.46). Early life conflict was significantly related to diversity of social roles, perceived social support, and ecological momentary assessment reports of pleasant and social conflict interactions. Significant indirect effects of early life conflict on mean IMT were observed through fewer pleasant social interactions and more frequent social conflict interactions in adulthood (β = 0.001 [95% confidence interval = 0.0001-0.0014] and β = 0.001 [95% confidence interval = 0.0002-0.0015], respectively). These findings provide initial evidence that family conflict in early life heightens CVD risk in adulthood, in part by shaping the quality of adulthood social interactions.

  19. Life events may contribute to family communication about cancer risk following BRCA1/2 testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapointe, Julie; Côté, Claudia; Bouchard, Karine; Godard, Béatrice; Simard, Jacques; Dorval, Michel

    2013-04-01

    We assessed whether certain life events contributed to the communication about cancer risk within families who have undergone BRCA1/2 testing. We also explored what type of resources participants would have valued to help in supporting family communication about genetic information. Two hundred and forty-six individuals (218 women, 28 men) who received a BRCA1/2 genetic test result 3 to 10 years earlier (mean of 6.4 years) participated in a telephone interview. Participants were asked about the occurrence of a number of life events (cancer diagnosis, death, uptake of prophylactic surgery, and providing care to a family member with cancer) in their family since their BRCA1/2 test result disclosure and, for each occurrence, whether it fostered family communication about cancer risk. A total of 182 participants (74 %) reported that they or one of their relatives received a cancer diagnosis, 176 (72 %) reported that someone died in their family, and 73 (30 %) stated that they or one of their relatives undertook a prophylactic surgery. During this period, 109 participants (44 %) also provided care for a family member who had cancer. Among participants who reported these life events, family communication was fostered by these events in proportions varying from 50 % (death) to 69 % (cancer diagnosis). Our results indicate that life events may contribute to family communication about cancer risk. Further research is needed to determine whether these events provide a "window of opportunity" to reach family members, address their needs and concerns about cancer, update family cancer history, and introduce genetic counseling and risk assessment.

  20. Stressful life events, family support and successful ageing in the Biafran War generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chukwuorji, JohnBosco Chika; Nwoke, Mary Basil; Ebere, Magnus Okechukwu

    2017-01-01

    Although the developing countries contribute substantially to the population of the elderly, little is known about ageing in populous countries like Nigeria, particularly the Biafran War generation (BWG). Some of those who witnessed the Biafran War (also known as Nigerian Civil War) as children are well into late adulthood, while the majority of this pre-war/wartime cohort who are in their golden years will enter into later life in less than a decade from now. The aim of the present research was to examine the role of stressful life events and family support in successful ageing of the BWG. Data were collected using a self-administered survey completed by 453 members of the BWG who were ≥45 years. The survey included measures such as the Successful Ageing Inventory, Life Events Inventory, and family support subscale of Family Dynamics Scale. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses were conducted to test the hypotheses of the study. The three dimensions of stressful life events (health events, interpersonal events and work-related/financial events) had moderate negative relationships with successful ageing. Family support was moderately and positively associated with successful ageing. For the moderation hypotheses, family support was a significant moderator of only the relationship between work-related stressful life events and successful ageing, especially for the Family support provides social protection for older people, in the face of difficult socio-economic circumstances.

  1. Rejection attitudes, poor parental bonding, and stressful life events in heroin addicts' families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomini, Valeria; Gournellis, Rossetos; Kokkevi, Anna; Tomaras, Vlassis; Papadimitriou, George; Liappas, John

    2014-12-01

    The influence of family factors on the development and/or on maintenance of heroin addiction still remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate family factors, which might be associated with heroin addiction in a sample of male individuals. A group of 40 heroin addicts' families was compared with a group of 17 families with a member presenting schizophrenia and a group of 27 families with mentally healthy members in regard to (1) parents' rejection attitudes toward their adult child, (2) quality of parental bond, as perceived by the adult child, and (3) stressful life events in the nuclear family. The main findings showed that the degree of rejection by the fathers in the heroin addicts' families as well as in the subjects with schizophrenia was significantly higher compared to the fathers' degree of rejection in the control group. Moreover, the degree of rejection by mothers in the heroin addicts' families was significantly higher compared to the mothers' degree of rejection in the control group. Heroin addicts reported that they had perceived less care from their fathers than healthy controls. The total number of stressful life events in the nuclear family was higher in the patients with schizophrenia in comparison to the healthy controls. Also, in the heroin addicts' group, a significantly higher number of fathers presented a current or past psychiatric disorder. The findings of this study showed the importance of negative family factors in the course of heroin addiction.

  2. Communication Matters: Exploring the Intersection of Family and Practitioner End of Life Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leah M. Omilion-Hodges

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available After establishing a baseline understanding of some of the factors that influence and shape family end of life communication, empirical research centered on the communication tendencies of nationally-recognized palliative care clinicians is presented. Because death is no longer confined to the bedroom and individuals are increasingly turning to hospitals and health care institutes to assist with end of life, the role of palliative care practitioners is vital. To that end, common communication-rooted issues that may transpire among various medical personnel are explored. Focus on a shared underlying tension—care vs. cure—links the findings between family and palliative care clinician communication regarding end of life. Practical communication solutions and suggestions are offered to facilitate productive and mindful end of life communication between and among family members and health care practitioners.

  3. Neurocognitive and Family Functioning and Quality of Life Among Young Adult Survivors of Childhood Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocking, Matthew C.; Hobbie, Wendy L.; Deatrick, Janet A.; Lucas, Matthew S.; Szabo, Margo M.; Volpe, Ellen M.; Barakat, Lamia P.

    2012-01-01

    Many childhood brain tumor survivors experience significant neurocognitive late effects across multiple domains that negatively affect quality of life. A theoretical model of survivorship suggests that family functioning and survivor neurocognitive functioning interact to affect survivor and family outcomes. This paper reviews the types of neurocognitive late effects experienced by survivors of pediatric brain tumors. Quantitative and qualitative data from three case reports of young adult survivors and their mothers are analyzed according to the theoretical model and presented in this paper to illustrate the importance of key factors presented in the model. The influence of age at brain tumor diagnosis, family functioning, and family adaptation to illness on survivor quality of life and family outcomes are highlighted. Future directions for research and clinical care for this vulnerable group of survivors are discussed. PMID:21722062

  4. Quality of life in home-ventilated children and their families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Rafael; Bustinza, Amaya; Fernandez, Sarah N; García, Miriam; Rodriguez, Silvia; García-Teresa, Ma Ángeles; Gaboli, Mirella; García, Silvia; Sardón, Olaia; García, Diego; Salcedo, Antonio; Rodríguez, Antonio; Luna, Ma Carmen; Hernández, Arturo; González, Catalina; Medina, Alberto; Pérez, Estela; Callejón, Alicia; Toledo, Juan D; Herranz, Mercedes; López-Herce, Jesús

    2017-10-01

    HMV (home mechanical ventilation) in children has increased over the last years. The aim of the study was to assess perceived quality of life (QOL) of these children and their families as well as the problems they face in their daily life.We performed a multicentric cross-sectional study using a semi-structured interview about the impact of HMV on families and an evaluation questionnaire about perceived QOL by the patient and their families (pediatric quality of life questionnaire (PedsQL4.0)). We studied 41 subjects (mean age 8.2 years). Global scores in PedsQL questionnaire for subjects (median 61.4), and their parents (median 52.2) were below those of healthy children. 24.4% received medical follow-up at home and 71.8% attended school. Mothers were the main caregivers (75.6%), 48.8% of which were fully dedicated to the care of their child. 71.1% consider economic and healthcare resources insufficient. All families were satisfied with the care they provide to their children, even though it was considered emotionally overwhelming (65.9%). Marital conflict and neglect of siblings appeared in 42.1 and 36% of families, respectively. Perceived QOL by children with HMV and their families is lower than that of healthy children. Parents are happy to care for their children at home, even though it negatively affects family life. What is Known: • The use of home mechanical ventilation (HMV) in children has increased over the last years. • Normal family functioning is usually disrupted by HMV. What is New: • The aim of HMV is to provide a lifestyle similar to that of healthy children, but perceived quality of life by these patients and their parents is low. • Most of the families caring for children on HMV agree that support and resources provided by national health institutions is insufficient.

  5. Changes in Family Life and Challenges in Primary Care: The advent of the postmodern family

    OpenAIRE

    Shorter, Edward

    1991-01-01

    Fragmentation of the postmodern family affects several aspects of primary care. In prevention, the physician-patient relationship is most important in forestalling abuse. In morbidity and diagnosis, single or socially isolated patients are more vulnerable to diseases, such as total allergy syndrome. In acute care, fragmentation increases the number of elderly patients in hospital. And in rehabilitation, the two-career family is no longer able to supplement hospital nursing care as it once did.

  6. Living ordinary family life with an allergic child-the mother's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alanne, Soili; Laitinen, Kirsi; Paavilainen, Eija

    2014-01-01

    Ecocultural theory considering family as an entity may serve as a new point of view instead of "impact of disease"-perspective. Aims were to reveal ecocultural themes and activities of daily routines in the treatment of a child's food allergy and eczema. Interviews (N=24) were held with mothers with allergic children aged 12 months and mothers repeat interviews at 24 months. The theme; "living an ordinary family life", was implemented across the family activities of routines essential for treating the child's allergy. New or altered treatment regimens can be tailored to families on the basis of existing activities. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Family communication and decision making at the end of life: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Cara L

    2015-06-01

    Patients and families coping with a terminal illness are faced with a number of decisions over the course of their disease. The role that family communication plays in the process of decision making is an important one. The objectives for this review are to examine the current state of empirical literature on the relationship between family communication and decision making about end-of-life care, to identify gaps, and to discuss implications for policy, practice, and future research. Articles were identified using systematic keyword searches within the following relevant databases: Academic Search Complete, CINAHL Plus, Communications and Mass Media Complete, ERIC, PsychINFO, MEDLINE, SocINDEX, and ProQuest. The three bodies of relevant literature that emerged during this review include: (1) the importance of family communication at the end of life (EoL); (2) family decision making at the EoL; and (3) the interrelationship of communication (both within the family and with healthcare professionals) and decision making at the EoL. While the literature highlights the role of communication between medical professionals and the patient or family members, there is very little focus on the process of how family communication among the family members themselves contributes to decision making at the end of life. Barriers to end-of-life care are important considerations for helping patients to access timely and appropriate services. Understanding the pertinent role of family communication as it relates to the decision for EoL care is the first step in working to provide another avenue for overcoming these barriers.

  8. Literatura y vida. Una lectura de Victoria Ocampo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Celia Vázquez

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The relation of literature, writer and life, particularly, the way life is understood within this relation constitutes a key element to define the peculiar way of reading literature that Victoria Ocampo had. This can be seen in her essay on Emily Brontë; though she gives priority to biography over aesthetics, Ocampo does not adopt a biographical approach nor identifies the meaning of life with that of the writer's biography since she searches the key for interpretation in natural forces such as "character" and "fate" (instead of the positivistic interaction of social and historical environment. Thus, she identifies the vital experience of nature (the moors as the key for the writer's personality as well as her novel's, Wuthering Heights.

  9. A novel healthy blood pressure phenotype in the Long Life Family Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marron, Megan M; Singh, Jatinder; Boudreau, Robert M; Christensen, Kaare; Cosentino, Stephanie; Feitosa, Mary F; Minster, Ryan L; Perls, Thomas; Schupf, Nicole; Sebastiani, Paola; Ukraintseva, Svetlana; Wojczynski, Mary K; Newman, Anne B

    2017-08-23

    Hypertension tends to run in families and has both genetic and environmental determinants. We assessed the hypothesis that a novel healthy blood pressure (BP) phenotype is also familial and sought to identify its associated factors. We developed a healthy BP phenotype in the Long Life Family Study, a cohort of two-generation families selected for longevity. Participants from the offspring generation (n = 2211, ages 32-88) were classified as having healthy BP if their age-adjusted and sex-adjusted SBP z-score was between -1.5 and -0.5. Offspring on antihypertensive medications were classified as not having healthy BP. Families with at least two offspring (n = 419 families) were defined as meeting the healthy BP phenotype if at least two and at least 50% of their offspring had healthy BP. Among 2211 offspring, 476 (21.5%) met the healthy BP phenotype. When examining the 419 families, only 44 (10.5%) families met the criteria for the healthy BP phenotype. Both offspring and probands from families with healthy BP performed better on neuropsychological tests that place demands on complex attention and executive function when compared with offspring and probands from remaining families. Among families with the healthy BP phenotype compared with families without, a higher proportion of offspring met the American Heart Association definition of ideal cardiovascular health (10.8 versus 3.8%, respectively; driven by BP, smoking status, and BMI components). In this cohort of familial longevity, few families had a novel healthy BP phenotype in multiple members. Families with this healthy BP phenotype may represent a specific pathway to familial longevity.

  10. The use of the life course paradigm and life course charts to explore referral for family history of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, Caroline; Flynn, Maria; Hallett, Christine; Ellis, Ian; Booth, Katie

    2008-01-01

    Life course research methodologies are used extensively in historical and social science research. In 1998 the life course paradigm was introduced to provide a way of tracing the interplay of person and setting. The method has had a very limited use in nursing research, but in this study it was utilized as a way of capturing dynamic change by placing the individual within a context of four domains; location in time and place, linked lives, human agency and timing of lives. To describe the paradigm, review its use in healthcare research and provide a specific example of its use in healthcare. This paper discusses a novel method of creating life course charts for a qualitative study exploring the differing experiences of women referred from primary care to specialist services due to a family history of breast cancer. A nurse-led breast cancer family history clinic in the UK. Twenty-two women. Life charts were used in conjunction with a grounded theory approach to analyse data collected from semi-structured interviews. Twenty-two life charts were created and the ability to layer the charts of multiple women to visualise similarities and differences aided the analysis. The life charts were a useful tool in the development of theoretical understandings and the psychosocial process of realisation of risk emerged as central to the initiation of referral. This was often apparent when approaching the age of an affected relative (anticipated onset) or when current circumstances emulate past experience (generational transference). This approach to charting complex psychological, social and contextual factors throughout the life course was methodologically beneficial and could have a wider utility in nursing and healthcare research. As a research tool it enhanced a holistic approach to patient care issues and was helpful as an aid to understanding health behaviours linked to familial risk.

  11. Autism spectrum disorder: family quality of life while waiting for intervention services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Sean; Bremer, Emily; Lloyd, Meghann

    2017-02-01

    Families of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) often experience high levels of stress; it is important to investigate the family quality of life (FQOL) to understand how to serve the entire family, not just the child. The purpose of this investigation was to determine: (a) how families with a child with ASD view their overall FQOL and (b) what aspects of everyday life have the greatest influence on the FQOL? A survey designed to asses FQOL was mailed to all families (n = 454) of children with ASD (0-18 years) waiting for government-funded services. Results from 151 surveys were examined (31 % response rate). Descriptive on all variables, ordinal logistic regression, and t tests were used to analyze the data. The most influential factors on FQOL were whether the child with ASD had a major health concern, whether the family's needs were met by disability-related services, and whether there were opportunities to engage in leisure and recreation activities. Families on waitlists experience challenges in FQOL influenced by the health of the family members; this is implicitly important for service agencies and providers. Future research should continue to explore how access to disability-related services impacts FQOL; and how these associations may be moderated by contextual factors such as socioeconomic status, health of child and family members, access and engagement in recreation, and severity of the child's needs.

  12. Selection bias in family reports on end of life with dementia in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Steen, Jenny T; Deliens, Luc; Ribbe, Miel W; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, Bregje D

    2012-12-01

    Selective participation in retrospective studies of families recruited after the patient's death may threaten generalizability of reports on end-of-life experiences. To assess possible selection bias in retrospective study of dementia at the end of life using family reports. Two physician teams covering six nursing home facilities in the Netherlands reported on 117 of 119 consecutive decedents within two weeks after death unaware of after-death family participation in the study. They reported on characteristics; treatment and care; overall patient outcomes such as comfort, nursing care, and outcomes; and their own perspectives on the experience. We compared results between decedents with and without family participation. The family response rate was 55%. There were no significant differences based on participation versus nonparticipation in demographics and other nursing home resident characteristics, treatment and care, or overall resident outcome. However, among participating families, physicians perceived higher-quality aspects of nursing care and outcome, better consensus between staff and family on treatment, and a more peaceful death. Participation was less likely with involvement of a new family member in the last month. Families may be more likely to participate in research with more harmonious teamwork in end-of-life caregiving. Where family participation is an enrollment criterion, comparing demographics alone may not capture possible selection bias, especially in more subjective measures. Selection bias toward more positive experiences, which may include the physician's and probably also the family's experiences, should be considered if representativeness is aimed for. Future work should address selection bias in other palliative settings and countries, and with prospective recruitment.

  13. total mercury concentration in common fish species of lake victoria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Total mercury (THg) concentration was analysed in muscles of common fish species of Lake. Victoria in the eastern and southern parts of the lake using cold vapour Atomic Absorption. Spectrophotometric ... INTRODUCTION. The Lake Victoria ...

  14. Music therapy in pediatric palliative care: family-centered care to enhance quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindenfelser, Kathryn J; Hense, Cherry; McFerran, Katrina

    2012-05-01

    Research into the value of music therapy in pediatric palliative care (PPC) has identified quality of life as one area of improvement for families caring for a child in the terminal stages of a life-threatening illness. This small-scale investigation collected data in a multisite, international study including Minnesota, USA, and Melbourne, Australia. An exploratory mixed method design used the qualitative data collected through interviews with parents to interpret results from the PedsQL Family Impact Module of overall parental quality of life. Parents described music therapy as resulting in physical improvements of their child by providing comfort and stimulation. They also valued the positive experiences shared by the family in music therapy sessions that were strength oriented and family centered. This highlighted the physical and communication scales within the PedsQL Family Impact Module, where minimal improvements were achieved in contrast to some strong results suggesting diminished quality of life in cognitive and daily activity domains. Despite the significant challenges faced by parents during this difficult time, parents described many positive experiences in music therapy, and the overall score for half of the parents in the study did not diminish. The value of music therapy as a service that addresses the family-centered agenda of PPC is endorsed by this study.

  15. A Comparative Study on the Meaning in Life of Patients with Cancer and Their Family Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassankhani, Hadi; Soheili, Amin; Hosseinpour, Issa; Eivazi Ziaei, Jamal; Nahamin, Mina

    2017-12-01

    Introduction: The overwhelming effects of cancer could be catastrophic for the patients and their family members, putting them at risk of experiencing uncertainty, loss, and an interruption in life. Also, it can influence their sense of meaning, a fundamental need equated with the purpose in life. Accordingly, this study aimed to compare the meaning in life (MiL) of patients with cancer and their family members. Methods: This descriptive comparative study was conducted on 400 patients with cancer and their family members admitted to university hospitals in Tabriz and Ardebil provinces, Iran. The participants were sampled conveniently and the Life Evaluation Questionnaire (LEQ) were used for collecting data analyzed through descriptive and inferential statistics in SPSS ver. 13 Software. Results: The mean score for the MiL of the patients with cancer and their family members was 119 (16.92) and 146.2 (17.07), respectively. There was a significant difference between patients with cancer and their family members in terms of MiL. Conclusion: The MiL of patients with cancer is lower than that of their family members, which indicates the need for further attention to the psychological processes and their modification in Iranian healthcare systems.

  16. Food neophobia, life satisfaction and family eating habits in university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berta Schnettler

    Full Text Available Abstract: The aim of this study was to categorize university students based on their association between food neophobia and levels of subjective well-being, in general and in the food domain, and their perception of their family's eating habits. A survey was conducted among 372 university students from southern Chile. The questionnaire included the Food Neophobia Scale (FNS, Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS, Satisfaction with Food-related Life (SWFL, Health-related Quality of Life Index (HRQOL-4, and Family Eating Habits Questionnaire (FEHQ. Three student types were distinguished by cluster analysis: Group 1 (26.9% had the highest scores on the FNS, SWLS and SWFL. Group 2 (40.8% had a high score on the FNS but the lowest scores on the SWLS and SWFL. Group 3 (32.3% had the lowest FNS score and high scores on the SWLS and SWFL. Group 2 stood out in having a low score on the FEHQ's component for cohesiveness of family eating. These results suggest that both neophobic and non-neophobic students have positive levels of satisfaction with life and food-related life, and that satisfaction among neophobic students is related to family eating patterns, especially cohesiveness in family eating.

  17. Food neophobia, life satisfaction and family eating habits in university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnettler, Berta; Höger, Yesli; Orellana, Ligia; Miranda, Horacio; Lobos, Germán; Sepúlveda, José; Sanchez, Mercedes; Miranda-Zapata, Edgardo; Denegri, Marianela; Grunert, Klaus G; Salinas-Oñate, Natalia

    2017-04-03

    The aim of this study was to categorize university students based on their association between food neophobia and levels of subjective well-being, in general and in the food domain, and their perception of their family's eating habits. A survey was conducted among 372 university students from southern Chile. The questionnaire included the Food Neophobia Scale (FNS), Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS), Satisfaction with Food-related Life (SWFL), Health-related Quality of Life Index (HRQOL-4), and Family Eating Habits Questionnaire (FEHQ). Three student types were distinguished by cluster analysis: Group 1 (26.9%) had the highest scores on the FNS, SWLS and SWFL. Group 2 (40.8%) had a high score on the FNS but the lowest scores on the SWLS and SWFL. Group 3 (32.3%) had the lowest FNS score and high scores on the SWLS and SWFL. Group 2 stood out in having a low score on the FEHQ's component for cohesiveness of family eating. These results suggest that both neophobic and non-neophobic students have positive levels of satisfaction with life and food-related life, and that satisfaction among neophobic students is related to family eating patterns, especially cohesiveness in family eating.

  18. The balance of intergenerational family transfers: a life-cycle perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudrazija, Stipica

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the likelihood and net amount of parent-child transfers over the adult life cycle across European welfare regimes. The study introduces an economic life-cycle model of family transfers to describe the evolution of family exchanges across generations over time, which reveals a nonlinear relationship of age and net family transfers. Furthermore, it refines the method of estimating parent-child net transfers. Data come from the Survey of Health, Ageing, and Retirement in Europe, and include 36,095 parent-child dyads from 11 European countries representing social democratic, conservative, and traditional welfare-state regimes. The findings reveal net value of family intergenerational support follows a nonlinear pattern across the adult life cycle, with positive transfers from parents to adult children decreasing modestly until advanced old age when the decrease intensifies. Net family support benefits individuals and generations with larger relative need. The transition in the net family support pattern starts later and is less pronounced across social democratic welfare-regime countries while the opposite is true in traditional welfare-regime countries. These findings might be interpreted as being linked to differences in the public policies guaranteeing different levels of provision for dependent populations across different welfare regimes. They are consistent with a comparatively smaller role of family support in the intergenerational redistribution of resources in societies with larger public intergenerational support to dependent populations.

  19. Quality of life in Greek family members living with leg ulcer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouris, Anargyros; Christodoulou, Christos; Efstathiou, Vasiliki; Chatzimichail, Iakovoula; Zakopoulou, Nikoletta; Zouridaki, Eftychia

    2015-09-01

    Leg ulcers have been shown to have a significant impact on a patient's quality of life (QoL). Little is known, however, about the secondary impact of the disease on the QoL of the relatives and partners of patients with leg ulcers. The aim of this study was to explore the impact of chronic leg ulcers on the lives of both patients and their family members. Two hundred sixteen patients with leg ulcers and their family members were recruited. All patients entered were evaluated for QoL using the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) scale, and family members were similarly evaluated using the Family Dermatology Life Quality Index (FDLQI).The study included 56 female and 52 male patients, and 50 female and 58 male family members. The FDLQI score for the latter group was 14.37 ± 2.46 with over 96% of family members reporting a large effect on their QoL due to their relative's disease. The DLQI score in patients with leg ulcers was 13.18 ± 2.88. A significant positive and high correlation between DLQI and FDLQI scores (r = 0.71, p family was also affected by the patient's condition of chronic leg ulcers and clearly associated with that of the patients. © 2015 by the Wound Healing Society.

  20. A novel healthy blood pressure phenotype in the Long Life Family Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marron, Megan M; Singh, Jatinder; Boudreau, Robert M

    2018-01-01

    in the Long Life Family Study, a cohort of two-generation families selected for longevity. Participants from the offspring generation (n = 2211, ages 32-88) were classified as having healthy BP if their age-adjusted and sex-adjusted SBP z-score was between -1.5 and -0.5. Offspring on antihypertensive......BACKGROUND: Hypertension tends to run in families and has both genetic and environmental determinants. We assessed the hypothesis that a novel healthy blood pressure (BP) phenotype is also familial and sought to identify its associated factors. METHODS: We developed a healthy BP phenotype...... medications were classified as not having healthy BP. Families with at least two offspring (n = 419 families) were defined as meeting the healthy BP phenotype if at least two and at least 50% of their offspring had healthy BP. RESULTS: Among 2211 offspring, 476 (21.5%) met the healthy BP phenotype. When...

  1. Quality of life in adult patients with epilepsy and their family members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahrer-Imhof, Romy; Jaggi, Sabina; Bonomo, Armanda; Hediger, Hannele; Eggenschwiler, Priska; Krämer, Günther; Oberholzer, Erich

    2013-03-01

    Epilepsy is not only a neurological disorder but may also have negative psychosocial consequences on people with epilepsy (PWE) and their relatives. Epilepsy has a major impact on quality of life (QoL) in PWE and family members. However, less is known about the impact of family support and family functioning on quality of life for PWE and family members and their interaction. Therefore, the study aimed to investigate factors that influence QoL in hospitalized adult patients with epilepsy and their relatives. An explorative cross-sectional study has been conducted in a tertiary clinic in Switzerland. Hospitalized adult patients with epilepsy and their relatives were enrolled in the study. Subjective QoL as well as family support and family functioning were measured with patients and family members. Patients and their relatives assessed the patients' support need and their satisfaction with the care provided. In addition, patients were administered a disease-related HRQoL measure (QoLIED-36, Version 2). Backward stepwise multivariate linear regression analysis was used to explain variances in patients and relatives' subjective QoL. One hundred and four dyads of patient and family member participated. Subjective QoL in patients and family members differed significantly, as did satisfaction with care delivery. In both groups family support contributed significantly to QoL. In the models 40% of the variance in QoL in patients and relatives could be explained. While the quality of life of the family members was affected by the patients' knowledge about the disease and the reason for their current hospitalization, patient QoL scores had no influence on the QoL of family members. The patients' QoL, however, depended significantly on the QoL of the family members. Interventions should address both PWE and family members and focus on the self-care improvement of PWE and the well-being and coping of family members. A patient-centred approach needs to include both the PWE and

  2. Links between Autism Spectrum Disorder Diagnostic Status and Family Quality of Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew G. McKechanie

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Quality of life is often relatively lowered in families of children with additional needs, and this may be particularly the case where additional needs are accompanied by an autism spectrum disorder (ASD. Here we explore the effects of diagnostic status specifically, comparing families with children with an ASD diagnosis with others who a have additional needs but no signs of ASD; and b have additional needs and signs of ASD but no diagnosis. Mothers (n = 76 of children with additional needs completed standardised questionnaires about quality of life, stress, service provision, child behaviour and presence and severity of ASD traits. In addition, a group of mothers of typically developing young people (n = 17 completed standardised questionnaires on individual and family quality of life and on the behaviour of their son or daughter. Mothers of typically developing young people had significantly higher individual and family quality of life scores than each of the three other groups. Increased severity of ASD was associated with increased maternal stress, which in turn was associated with decreased family and maternal quality of life. The group reporting the lowest quality of life and the highest stress were the mothers of individuals with signs of ASD but no diagnosis. This pattern did not seem to be explained by lack of access to services, or rates of intellectual disability or challenging behaviour in this sub‐group. The finding that poor quality of life and high stress was most apparent in the sub‐group of mothers with children who had signs of ASD but did not have a diagnosis of ASD suggests that an interesting topic for further investigation is whether receipt of a diagnosis itself can positively influence quality of life and levels of maternal stress.

  3. Quality of life among the family caregivers of patients with terminal cancer at home in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Eriko; Tadaka, Etsuko

    2017-10-01

    To identify the associated factors of quality of life (QOL) among the family caregivers of patients with terminal cancer at home. The design was an epidemiological study with self-administered questionnaires by mail. Date collection was carried out in the Tokyo Metropolitan, Tochigi, Ibaraki, Saitama, Chiba, Kanagawa, Nara, Hyogo, Kagawa, Ehime, and Saga prefectures in Japan. The participants who met the criteria for the present study were 262 family caregivers. Their QOL was assessed by the Japanese version of the Caregiver Quality of Life Index-Cancer. The potential factors that are associated with family caregivers' QOL included three factors: patient factors, including demographic characteristics and disease-related factors, family caregiver factors, including demographic characteristics, health conditions, and self-efficacy of family caregiving, and environmental factors, including instrumental, emotional, informational support, and satisfaction with the home care service. A multiple regression analysis was conducted in order to identify the associated factors with family caregivers' QOL. A total of 74 family caregivers participated in this study (response rate: 33.2%). The mean age of the family caregivers was 63.6 years and 79.7% was female. The multiple regression analysis indicated that depression, self-efficacy of family caregiving, the subcaregiver, and satisfaction with the home care service were associated with family caregivers' QOL. It is recommended that health practitioners should develop interventions for family caregivers in order to enhance the competence of the individual and home care system in order to achieve the sustainability of high-quality home care for patients with terminal cancer and the family caregivers' QOL. © 2017 Japan Academy of Nursing Science.

  4. Social support in later life: family, friends and community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Josefina Arias

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to carry out an analysis of the importance of social support and participation in old age. Contributions are presented first that various international agencies concerned with old age and aging have been made to strengthen this support and increased participation of older people. Different sources of social support are described: formal and informal interventions that can be made with varied promotion and preventive-wellness-care objectives and action at various levels-individual, group, family, organizational and community-and is made an analysis of the impact on the well-being have the resources of social support available to older people. Finally we reflect on Certain negative assumptions about the availability of support and social participation of older people in relation to recent research findings on the subject. Problematize the importance of these negative stereotypes about aging in general and on the participation and the availability of social support in particular in order to achieve more supportive environments that promote the development of the potential of older persons is concluded.

  5. Altruism within the Family: A Comparison of Father and Mother Using Life Happiness and Life Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Qiyan; Ho, Kong Weng; Ho, Kong Chong

    2013-01-01

    Studies on intra-household allocation of resources show that exogenous increase in mothers' income has larger effect on children's outcomes than the same increase in fathers' income, suggesting gender differences may exist in parents' altruism towards their children. Using self-reported life happiness and life satisfaction, we investigate the…

  6. A formative evaluation of a family-based walking intervention-Furness Families Walk4Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milton, Karen; Kelly, Paul; Bull, Fiona; Foster, Charlie

    2011-08-02

    The family unit may be an important mechanism for increasing physical activity levels, yet little is known about what types of family-based interventions are effective. This study involved a formative evaluation of a 12 week intervention to encourage walking as a family based activity. The intervention consisted of several key elements including led walks and tailored resources, as well as remote support provided via the telephone. The project aimed to explore factors associated with successful delivery of the programme and to identify areas of improvement for future implementation. A total of nine interviews were undertaken with programme staff who were involved in either the set up or delivery of the intervention. In addition, four interviews and two focus groups were undertaken with participants to explore their experiences of the programme. The analysis involved both deductive and inductive reasoning. In total, 114 people participated in the programme, which included 36 adults, 10 adolescents and 68 children (≤ 10 years of age). Adult participants reported several barriers to walking including concerns over their children's behaviour and their ability to maintain 'control' of their children. Walking in a group with other families gave parents confidence to go out walking with their children and provided a valuable opportunity for social interaction for parents and children alike. The most successful walks incorporated specific destinations and an activity to undertake upon reaching the destination. Incorporating other activities along the way also helped to keep the children engaged. The results of this study have highlighted the important contribution that formative research can make in informing and refining a programme to increase appropriateness and effectiveness. The study has helped to highlight the key characteristics associated with delivering a successful walking intervention to young families. It is recommended that practitioners undertake formative

  7. "Don't lock me out": life-story interviews of family business owners facing succession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Alexandra; Breunlin, Douglas; Panattoni, Katherine; Gustafson, Mara; Ransburg, David; Ryan, Carol; Hammerman, Thomas; Terrien, Jean

    2011-06-01

    This qualitative study used a grounded theory methodology to analyze life-story interviews obtained from 10 family business owners regarding their experiences in their businesses with the goal of understanding the complexities of family business succession. The grounded theory that emerged from this study is best understood as a potential web of constraints that can bear on the succession process. Coding of these interviews revealed four key influences, which seem to have the potential to facilitate or constrain the family business owner's approach to succession. Influence 1, "The business within," captures intrapsychic dynamics of differentiation and control. Influence 2, "The marriage," addresses how traditional gender roles shape succession. Influence 3, "The adult children," examines the role of having a natural (accidental, organic, passively groomed) successor. Influence 4, "The vision of retirement," captures the impact of owners' notions of life post-succession. Family therapists frequently encounter family systems in which the family business is facing succession. Even if succession is not the presenting problem, and even if the business owner is in the indirect (rather than direct) system, this research reminds clinicians of the importance of the family's story about the family business. Therefore, clinical implications and recommendations are included. 2011 © FPI, Inc.

  8. Quality of life of adolescents with cancer: family risks and resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marmer Paige L

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose The goal of this study was to evaluate the relative contribution of treatment intensity, family sociodemographic risk, and family resources to health-related quality of life (QOL of 102 adolescents in treatment for cancer. Methods Adolescents and parents completed self-report measures of teen QOL, family functioning, and parent-child bonding. Based on parent report of family sociodemographic variables, an additive risk index was computed. A pediatric oncologist rated treatment intensity. Results Simultaneous regression analyses demonstrated the significant contribution of roles in family functioning and quality of parent-child relationship to prediction of psychosocial QOL (parent and teen-reported as well as parent-reported teen physical QOL over and above the contribution of treatment intensity. Family sociodemographic risk did not contribute to QOL in these regression analyses. In additional analyses, specific diagnosis, types of treatment and individual sociodemographic risk variables were not associated with QOL. Parent and teen ratings of family functioning and quality of life were concordant. Conclusions Family functioning, including quality of parent-child relationship, are central and potentially modifiable resistance factors in teen QOL while under treatment for cancer. Even more important than relying on diagnosis or treatment, screening for roles and relationships early in treatment may be an important aspect of determining risk for poor QOL outcomes.

  9. The (re)modernization of family life and the (re)configuration of social networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westerling, Allan; Sønderstrup-Andersen, Hans H. K.; Dencik, Lars

    What does processes of reflexive modernization mean for communality in everyday family life? This paper analyzes the change and stability in social networks and family relationship of adults during the period from 2003 to 2014 in Denmark. Based on longitudinal survey data with a panel...... was collected during November and December 2014 (n=467) using a web-based adaptation of the original survey. We call this survey SONEFAL, Social Networks and FAmily Life (in Danish IFUSOFF) (Dencik & Westerling 2004). Analysis of the data from wave 1 documents how the 35year old mainly oriented towards...... of individuals, borne in 1968 and living in Denmark, this paper analyzes how the centrality of household members and kin relations in the everyday life of adults, have changed during 2003-2014. The first wave of data was collected in 2003 (n=1003) using Computer Assisted Telephone Interview. The second wave...

  10. Latino Families in the United States. A Resourcebook for Family Life Education = Las Familias Latinas en los Estados Unidos. Recursos para la Capacitacion Familiar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Sally J., Ed.

    The primary objectives of this resource book are to increase family life educators' knowledge and understanding of Latinos and to encourage advocacy by Latinos for appropriate family life programs in their communities. English and Spanish versions of the same text are included. There are six chapters. Chapter 1 outlines the book's objectives and…

  11. Burden for family carers at the end of life; a mixed-method study of the perspectives of family carers and GPs.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korte-Verhoef, M.C. de; Pasman, H.R.W.; Schweitzer, B.P.M.; Francke, A.L.; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, B.D.; Deliens, L.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Since many patients spend most of the time at home at the end of life, this may affect the burden for family carers and constitute a risk factor for the patients’ hospitalisation. This study aimed to explore family carers’ burden in the final three months of the patient’s life, from the

  12. Burden for family carers at the end of life; a mixed-method study of the perspectives of family carers and GPs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Korte-Verhoef, M.C.; Pasman, H.R.W.; Schweitzer, B.P.M.; Francke, A.L.; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, B.D.; Deliens, L.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Since many patients spend most of the time at home at the end of life, this may affect the burden for family carers and constitute a risk factor for the patients' hospitalisation. This study aimed to explore family carers' burden in the final three months of the patient's life, from the

  13. Like Father, like Child: Early Life Family Adversity and Children's Bullying Behaviors in Elementary School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Else E; Verlinden, Marina; Rijlaarsdam, Jolien; Jaddoe, Vincent W V; Verhulst, Frank C; Arseneault, Louise; Tiemeier, Henning

    2017-12-19

    Family adversity has been associated with children's bullying behaviors. The evidence is, however, dominated by mothers' perceptions of the family environment and a focus on mothers' behaviors. This prospective population-based study examined whether children's bullying behaviors were associated with mother- and father-reported family adversity, assessed before and after child birth. Peer-nominations were used to assess bullying behaviors of 1298 children in elementary school (mean age 7.5 years). The following paternal risk factors were prospectively associated with children's bullying behaviors: (1) father-reported prenatal family distress, (2) fathers' hostility at preschool age, and (3) fathers' harsh disciplinary practices at preschool age, but effect sizes were relatively small. The effect of maternal risk factors was less consistent, only mother-reported family distress in childhood was associated with children's bullying behaviors. The associations were independent of background family risk factors (i.e., life stress, contextual factors, and other background factors such as parental education and risk taking record) and early childhood externalizing problems. Moreover, our results indicated that father-reported family adversity predicted children's bullying behaviors over and above the background family risk factors, early childhood externalizing problems and mother-reported family adversity. We also demonstrated that the association of fathers' prenatal hostility and family distress with subsequent bullying behavior of their child at school was partly mediated by fathers' harsh disciplinary practices at preschool age. Our findings highlight the importance of fathers' behaviors in the development of children's bullying behaviors.

  14. Family Life Cycle Transitions and the Onset of Eating Disorders: A Retrospective Grounded Theory Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berge, Jerica M.; Loth, Katie; Hanson, Carrie; Croll, Jillian; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

    2011-01-01

    Aims and Objective The aim of this retrospective qualitative study is to understand how transitions in the family life cycle and responses to these events may relate to the onset of eating disorders in an attempt to generate new theoretical insights and inform future research in the area of eating disorder prevention. Background Little is known about the contextual factors that occur throughout the family life cycle that may be risk factors for the development of eating disorders. Design and Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 27 individuals of varied ages (age range =17–64; Median = 27; SD 13.7) currently receiving treatment for eating disorders in an outpatient clinic specialising in eating disorder treatment. Data were analysed using grounded theory methods. Results Six themes were identified as family life cycle transitional events that preceded the onset of participants’ eating disorders: (a) School Transitions, (b) Death of a Family Member, (c) Relationship Changes, (d) Home and Job Transitions (e) Illness/Hospitalisation and (f) Abuse, Sexual Assault, or Incest. Conclusions Results indicated that transitional events in the family life cycle followed by a lack of needed support during these transitions may precipitate the onset of eating disorders. Thus, future research should use these findings to inform the creation of interventions that reduce the intensity of the stress brought about by these transitional periods and increase the adaptability and coping skills of individuals and family members to prevent eating disorders. Relevance to Clinical Practice Nurses and other healthcare professionals should be aware of the importance of transitional events occurring in the family life cycle of adolescents and young adults. Helping parents to be aware and supportive of difficult transitional events may be more important than trying to solve or fix the problem. PMID:21749510

  15. ‘Publish or perish’: Family life and academic research productivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris W. Callaghan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Research purpose: The influence of work-to-family and family-to-work spillovers is well documented in the human resources literature. However, little is known of the relationships between the pressures faced by academics to publish and the potential family life consequences of being a highly productive academic.Research design, approach and method: This research sought to investigate these relationships within the context of a large South African university by testing associations between family life variables such as marriage and dependent children against measures of the following specific types of research publication: (1 South African Department of Higher Education and Training–accredited journal publications; (2 Thompson Reuters Institute for Scientific Information (ISI and ProQuest’s International Bibliography of the Social Sciences (IBSS– indexed journal article publications; (3 conference proceedings publications; (4 conference paper presentations; (5 book chapter publications; (6 book publications; and (7 gross research productivity, reflecting a volume or quantity measure of research publication.Main findings: ISI and/or IBSS journal article publication is found to be negatively associated with dependent children, but only for male academics, and to be negatively associated with female gender over and above the effect of family life variables in testing.Practical/managerial implications: Human resources managers in universities need to be cognisant of the specific pressures faced by staff that are required to produce ever more research publications, in order to help them achieve work–life balance.Contribution: In a global context of increasing pressures for research publication, and for higher and higher numbers of publications, it is necessary to identify the potential costs involved for high-volume–producing academics, particularly in terms of family versus work.Keywords: research productivity; family-work life balance

  16. Family Member Deaths in Childhood Predict Systemic Inflammation in Late Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Maria C; Hatch, Daniel J; Munger, Ronald G; Smith, Ken R

    2017-01-01

    Biological and epidemiological evidence has linked early-life psychosocial stress with late-life health, with inflammation as a potential mechanism. We report here the association between familial death in childhood and adulthood and increased levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker of systemic inflammation. The Cache County Memory Study is a prospective study of persons initially aged 65 and older in 1995. In 2002, there were 1,955 persons in the study with data on CRP (42.3 percent male, mean [SD] age = 81.2 [5.8] years), linked with objective data on family member deaths. Using logistic regression, high (> 10 mg/L) versus low (≤ 10 mg/L) CRP was regressed on cumulative parental, sibling, spouse, and offspring deaths during childhood and during early adulthood, adjusted for family size in each period (percentage family depletion; PFD). Findings revealed PFD during childhood to be significantly associated with CRP (OR = 1.02, 95% CI [1.01, 1.04]). Individuals with two or more family deaths were 79 percent more likely to have elevated CRP than those with zero family deaths (OR = 1.79, 95% CI [1.07, 2.99]). Early adulthood PFD was not related to CRP. This study demonstrates a link between significant psychosocial stress in early life and immune-inflammatory functioning in late life, and suggests a mechanism explaining the link between early-life adversity and late-life health.

  17. Family Matters: Dyadic Agreement in End-of-Life Medical Decision Making

    OpenAIRE

    Schmid, Bettina; Allen, Rebecca S.; Haley, Philip P.; DeCoster, Jamie

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: We examined race/ethnicity and cultural context within hypothetical end-of-life medical decision scenarios and its influence on patient–proxy agreement. Design and Methods: Family dyads consisting of an older adult and 1 family member, typically an adult child, responded to questions regarding the older adult’s preferences for cardiopulmonary resuscitation, artificial feeding and fluids, and palliative care in hypothetical illness scenarios. The responses of 34 Caucasian dyads and 30...

  18. Moral Distress in Family Health Strategy: experiences expressed by daily life

    OpenAIRE

    Cardoso, Cecília Maria Lima; Pereira, Maria Odete; Moreira, Danielle de Araújo; Tibães, Hanna Beatriz Bacelar; Ramos, Flávia Regina Souza; Brito, Maria José Menezes

    2016-01-01

    Objective Understanding the Moral Suffering experiences expressed in the daily life of the Family Health Strategy. Method This is a case study with a qualitative approach, conducted between August and October 2014 in a municipality of Minas Gerais. The sample was represented by 28 professionals of family health teams. Data were collected through interviews with semi-structured questionnaires, observation, projective technique and submitted to thematic content analysis. Results The results i...

  19. Quality of life in family members of vitiligo patients: a questionnaire study in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bin Saif, Ghada A; Al-Balbeesi, Amal O; Binshabaib, Rawan; Alsaad, Deema; Kwatra, Shawn G; Alzolibani, Abdullateef A; Yosipovitch, Gil

    2013-12-01

    Many dermatologic disorders are known to adversely affect quality of life (QoL) in close relatives or partners of patients; however, it is unknown whether vitiligo impacts the QoL of family members. The aim of this study was to identify the level and domains in which the QoL of partners/relatives of patients with vitiligo are affected by the disease. A total of 141 patients with vitiligo, along with their family members, were recruited to complete validated QoL questionnaires, including the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) and the Family Dermatology Life Quality Index (FDLQI). Family member QoL was affected in 129 (91.5 %) of subjects. Mean FDLQI score was 10.3 ± 6.4 standard deviation. Higher FDLQI score (greater impairment in QoL) was significantly associated with male patients, a shorter duration of disease, and higher educational levels in family members. The most affected FDLQI items in order of decreasing incidence were emotional impact, burden of care, impact on the physical well-being of the family member, problems due to the reaction of others in response to the patient's skin appearance and effect on social life. Overall FDLQI score and the number of items affected correlated with overall patient DLQI score (p family members of patients and often significantly impairs many aspects of their lives. Educational and supportive programs are recommended for family members of vitiligo patients who are at an increased risk for QoL impairments.

  20. The Bonds and Burdens of Family Life: Using Narrative Analysis to Understand Difficult Relationships

    OpenAIRE

    Mary Breheny; Christine Stephens

    2011-01-01

    Attempts to understand difficult family relationships have ignored the inextricable links between positive and negative relationships. Narrative analysis provides insight into complex relationships within social context. We analysed interviews with older people in New Zealand using levels of narrativity to reveal the negotiations required to manage personal identity at the intersection of competing public narratives. Participants and interviewers used public narratives of family life that rei...

  1. Giving Life Gives Me Life: An Action Research Experience with Families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eilyn Arce-Chavarría

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is the result of a participatory action research project.  It expresses my experiences with nine of the fourteen families of students attending the special education school where I work.  Students are in Early Intervention (0-3 years old, Kinder Garden (3-6 and a half years old and the first cycle of elementary school (6 years and 6 months to 9 years old. Six of the participating families included a father and a mother, while the other three only included the mother. I met six times with the families for afternoon coffee over the course of a year.  These gatherings evidenced the need for synchronizing the work done at home with the work offered in the occupational therapy service of which I am in charge, in order to support families in developing their children’s every day skills.  This involves a process of analysis and reflection, which leads to the transformation of those of us who lived this experience.  The paper also presents the families’ reality first from their individual standpoint and later in synchronization with the group, change that was exhibited after sharing with the other families.  Important findings include the need for having a stronger relationship between the school and the families, creating a space for emotional growth for parents, finding similarities between families that would motivate them to be more involved, taking advantage of time, creating personal space for reflection and, last but not least, daring to change.

  2. Family food practices: relationships, materiality and the everyday at the end of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Julie

    2018-02-01

    This article draws on data from a research project that combined participant observation with in-depth interviews to explore family relationships and experiences of everyday life during life-threatening illness. In it I suggest that death has often been theorised in ways that make its 'mundane' practices less discernible. As a means to foreground the everyday, and to demonstrate its importance to the study of dying, this article explores the (re)negotiation of food and eating in families facing the end of life. Three themes that emerged from the study's broader focus on family life are discussed: 'food talk' and making sense of illness; food, family and identity; and food 'fights'. Together the findings illustrate the material, social and symbolic ways in which food acts relationally in the context of dying, extending conceptual work on materiality in death studies in novel directions. The article also contributes new empirical insights to a limited sociological literature on food, families and terminal illness, building on work that theorises the entanglements of materiality, food, bodies and care. The article concludes by highlighting the analytical value of everyday materialities such as food practices for future research on dying as a relational experience. © 2018 The Author. Sociology of Health & Illness published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Foundation for SHIL.

  3. Quality of life and family functioning in caregivers of relatives with mood disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heru, Alison M; Ryan, Christine E; Vlastos, Kim

    2004-01-01

    This study examines the quality of life of caregivers of hospitalized relatives with mood disorders. Caregivers reported poor social, physical and emotional functioning. Family functioning was poor in the areas of roles, communication and affective involvement. It is significant that problem-solving, affective responsiveness and behavior control are within the normal range, indicating that these families do have strengths. Subjective burden but not objective burden was correlated with a poorer quality of life. Less than 30% of caregivers received help from other relatives and less than 5% sought help from outside organizations like NAMI, MDDA or VNA.

  4. School Victimization: Family Environment, Self-esteem, and Life Satisfaction from a Gender Perspetive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amapola Povedano

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzed from a gender perspective relationships between perceived family climate, self-esteem, life satisfaction, and adolescent victimization by peers in school. The associations between variables were analyzed with a sample of 1,884 adolescents (52% boys and 48% girls, aged 11 through 17 years (M = 13.7, DT = 1.4. Results structural equation modeling analysis showed that family environment, self-esteem, and life satisfaction were significantly and negatively related to school victimization. Multigroup analyses showed that relationships between variables were not different for boys and girls. We discuss the implications of these results.

  5. THE LIFE QUALITY OF FAMILIES WITH A MEMBER WITH A MENTAL DISABILITY

    OpenAIRE

    Kozakova, Zdenka

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on the quality of life of a family taking care of a mentally disabled member. In order to be able to provide families taking care of a disabled member with high-quality special-education care and support, it is at first necessary to learn about their needs in as complex a way as possible. This paper presents a selected summary of the results of a survey carried out by means of a questionnaire and a standardized questionnaire SEIQoL, in order to compare the quality of life o...

  6. Quality of life, coping strategies, and family routines in children with headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frare, Mara; Axia, Giovanna; Battistella, Pier Antonio

    2002-01-01

    To identify the relationship between headache severity, child coping, and quality of life (QoL) in the context of everyday family life. In the pediatric headache research only 3 studies have examined children's coping strategies and only 4 studies considered QoL. A sample of 48 Italian families with children seeking treatment for primary headaches was interviewed using an adaptation of the Ecocultural Family Interview (EFI). The EFI is a parent interview that explores the daily routines of family life in which the child and parent participate and the main concerns regarding how that routine is organized. As expected the Lisrel analyses consistently showed that QoL is affected by a child's coping abilities in a causal direction. Headache frequency and duration have a significant impact on a child's QoL. The family daily routine influences significantly both the child's coping ability and QoL. Surprisingly enough, children's coping strategies are not related to headache severity. More research is needed on the causal factors influencing child's ability to cope with pain, and in particular more attention should be devoted to the contextual and family factors related to pediatric headache.

  7. Work-Family Conflict and Oral and General Health-Related Quality of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kiran A; Spencer, A John; Roberts-Thomson, Kaye F; Brennan, David S

    2015-08-01

    The characteristics of the work environment and relationships with family roles may impact on health and be of public health significance. The aims were to investigate the cross-sectional association of work-family conflict with oral- and general health-related quality of life, and well-being. A random sample of 45-54-year olds from Adelaide, South Australia, was surveyed by self-complete questionnaire in 2004-2005 (n = 879, response rate = 43.8%). Health-related quality of life was measured with the OHIP-14 and EQ-VAS instruments, and well-being by the Satisfaction With Life Scale. In adjusted analyses controlling for sex, income, education, tooth brushing frequency and social support, the higher Family Interferes with Work (FIW) tertile and the middle tertile of Work Interferes with Family (WIF) were associated with more oral health-related impacts as measured by OHIP-14 in relation to problems with teeth, mouth or dentures (Beta = 1.64, P health (Beta = -4.20 and -5.71, P family conflict was associated with more oral health impacts and lower general health and well-being among employed middle-aged adults. This supports the view of work-family conflict as a psychosocial risk factor for health outcomes spanning function, health perceptions and well-being, and encompassing both oral health and general health.

  8. A study on family communication pattern and parenting styles with quality of life in adolescent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanavi, Fariba Shahhraki; Baghbanian, Abdolvahab; Shovey, Mehdi Faraji; Ansari-Moghaddam, Alireza

    2013-11-01

    To investigate the relationship between parenting styles and family communication patterns with adolescent's quality of life. The cross-sectional study was carried out on 439 randomly selected adolescents in the city of Zahedan, Iran, from January to July 2011.The subjects were asked to complete the KIDSCREEN-52 health-related quality of life questionnaire, while their parents were asked to complete the Diana Brinder's Test to show their parenting styles. SPSS 15 was used to analyse data. Most parents had 'authoritative' parenting style (n = 380; 86.6%). Pluralistic (n = 170; 38.7%) and consensual (n = 152; 34.6%) patterns were the most frequent styles of communication in families. Data suggested a significant relationship between parenting style and some dimensions of quality of life, including physical well-being, psychological well-being, social support and peers, and autonomy (p family communication patterns and parent relation and home life (p Families play a critical role in increasing adolescents' health-related quality-of-life. Effort should be made to address problems facing parents while raising their children.

  9. Work-family interface from a life and career stage perspective: the role of demands and resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demerouti, Evangelia; Peeters, Maria C W; van der Heijden, Beatrice I J M

    2012-01-01

    Work-family conflict and enrichment are experiences that occur daily and have substantial consequences for employees, their families, and the organizations that employ them. The aim of the current review is to make a link between life and career stage, work and family conditions, and the work-family interface. The basic proposition is that life stages partly determine career development, and consequently the specific working conditions (job demands and job resources) and family conditions (family demands and family resources) that individuals are exposed to. As a result, the specific demands and resources in the work and family domains determine to what extent individuals experience that work and family are conflicting or enriching life domains. In this review we suggest that individuals in early adulthood will experience high inter-role conflict and low facilitation due to high demands and low resources in both life domains, while individuals in late adulthood will experience the opposite pattern; that is, low conflict and high facilitation due to low demands and high resources in both domains. Individuals in middle adulthood will experience high work-family conflict but also high family-work facilitation due to the presence of high job demands and resources in both life domains. Integrating life and career stage perspectives and the experience of work-family interface is of notable practical utility because it provides a mechanism to make more informed decisions about the relative need for and corresponding benefits of work-family programs.

  10. Work-family interface from a life and career stage perspective: The role of demands and resources.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demerouti, E.; Peeters, M.C.W.; van der Heijden, Beatrice

    2012-01-01

    Work–family conflict and enrichment are experiences that occur daily and have substantial consequences for employees, their families, and the organizations that employ them. The aim of the current review is to make a link between life and career stage, work and family conditions, and the work–family

  11. The Effects of a Family Support Program Including Respite Care on Parenting Stress and Family Quality of Life Perceived by Primary Caregivers of Children with Disabilities in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Minjung; Park, Jiyeon

    2012-01-01

    In this study, a family support program was carried out for primary caregivers of children with disabilities. The program included respite care, recreation programs, counseling, and social support coordination based on individual needs of each family. In order to verify the intervention effects, parenting stress and family quality of life were…

  12. The impact of child, family, and professional support characteristics on the quality of life in families of young children with disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Kate; Gavidia-Payne, Susana

    2009-06-01

    Families of young children with disabilities are faced with ongoing challenges that impact various aspects of family life. Given the increasing emphasis on promoting positive outcomes in these families, the overall aim of the current study was to examine the contribution of child, family, and support characteristics to the quality of life in families of young children with disabilities. The sample was recruited from several early childhood intervention programs within metropolitan Melbourne, Australia, and consisted of 64 families of children aged between 3 and 5 years with a developmental delay or disability. As a whole, parental perceptions and experiences of family-centred professional support was one of the strongest predictors of family quality of life. The perceived intensity of child behavioural problems as well as support from extended family members also accounted for a significant proportion of unique variance in predicting quality of family life. The current findings provide further evidence for the importance of a family-focused approach to intervention that acknowledges and provides support that is tailored to the unique needs of each individual family. The practical implications of these results as well as directions for future research are discussed.

  13. Psychometric Properties of the Beach Center Family Quality of Life in French-Speaking Families with a Preschool-Aged Child Diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivard, Mélina; Mercier, Céline; Mestari, Zakaria; Terroux, Amélie; Mello, Catherine; Bégin, Jean

    2017-01-01

    The Beach Center Family Quality of Life Scale (Beach Center FQOL) is used to evaluate and develop family-centered intervention services. However, its use with families of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and in non-English speaking populations requires further investigation. The present study sought to assess the psychometric…

  14. The Interactive Effects of Stressful Family Life Events and Cortisol Reactivity on Adolescent Externalizing and Internalizing Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steeger, Christine M; Cook, Emily C; Connell, Christian M

    2017-04-01

    This study investigated the associations between stressful family life events and adolescent externalizing and internalizing behaviors, and the interactive effects of family life events and cortisol reactivity on problem behaviors. In a sample of 100 mothers and their adolescents (M age = 15.09; SD age = .98; 68 % girls), adolescent cortisol reactivity was measured in response to a mother-adolescent conflict interaction task designed to elicit a stress response. Mothers reported on measures of family life events and adolescent problem behaviors. Results indicated that a heightened adolescent cortisol response moderated the relations between stressful family life events and both externalizing and internalizing behaviors. Results support context-dependent theoretical models, suggesting that for adolescents with higher cortisol reactivity (compared to those with lower cortisol reactivity), higher levels of stressful family life events were associated with greater problem behaviors, whereas lower levels of stressful family life events were related to fewer problem behaviors.

  15. Seabed surveys of Victoria harbour, Mahe, Seychelles

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Hashimi, N.H.; Wagle, B.G.

    The seabed surveys in the Victoria Harbour, Mahe, Seychelles shows that the prominent feature is the navigational channel aligned in the northeast-southwest direction with a width varying from 300 to 450m. The depth in the channel ranges from 14...

  16. Geography and Geographical Education in Victoria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriewaldt, Jeana

    2006-01-01

    Victoria has just emerged from 10 years where Geography has been one of three strands in the key learning area of Studies of Society and Environment (SOSE). The overarching framework emerged from an attempt to develop a national curriculum. Whilst the national curriculum was rejected by Australian state and territories who each hold legislative…

  17. within the lake victoria basin, tanzania

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT. Levels of nitrates (NOg-N) and phosphates (PO4~P) in some satellite lakes within the Lake. Victoria basin were determined in Kagera (Lake Burigt), in Mara (River Mara) and in Mwanza region (Lake Malimbe) during August/September 2002 (dry season) and January/February 2003. (wet season).

  18. D Digital Cadastre Journey in Victoria, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shojaei, D.; Olfat, H.; Briffa, M.; Rajabifard, A.

    2017-10-01

    Land development processes today have an increasing demand to access three-dimensional (3D) spatial information. Complex land development may need to have a 3D model and require some functions which are only possible using 3D data. Accordingly, the Intergovernmental Committee on Surveying and Mapping (ICSM), as a national body in Australia provides leadership, coordination and standards for surveying, mapping and national datasets has developed the Cadastre 2034 strategy in 2014. This strategy has a vision to develop a cadastral system that enables people to readily and confidently identify the location and extent of all rights, restrictions and responsibilities related to land and real property. In 2014, the land authority in the state of Victoria, Australia, namely Land Use Victoria (LUV), has entered the challenging area of designing and implementing a 3D digital cadastre focused on providing more efficient and effective services to the land and property industry. LUV has been following the ICSM 2034 strategy which requires developing various policies, standards, infrastructures, and tools. Over the past three years, LUV has mainly focused on investigating the technical aspect of a 3D digital cadastre. This paper provides an overview of the 3D digital cadastre investigation progress in Victoria and discusses the challenges that the team faced during this journey. It also addresses the future path to develop an integrated 3D digital cadastre in Victoria.

  19. CLARIIDAE) FROM THE MWANZA GULF, LAKE VICTORIA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT. Seventeen species of parasites were recovered from 107 I Clarias gariepinus examined flom the. Mwanza Gulf of Lake Victoria. The parasite fauna comprised of four ectoparasites, a. Monogenea, Hirudinea, crustacean and a Digenea,' and fourteen endoparasites, five nematodes,. five trematodes and three ...

  20. victoria cross awards warrants concerning the victoria cross (1920)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gazette" of that date. The Royal Warrant of 21 October, 1911. The Royal Warrant of 22 May, 1920. Scientia Militaria, South African Journal of Military Studies, Vol 3 ... shall prove the act to the satisfaction of the captain or officer commanding .... which, through the courage and devotion displayed, life or public property might.

  1. Family quality of life among families with a child who has a severe neurodevelopmental disability: Impact of family and child socio-demographic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schertz, Mitchell; Karni-Visel, Yael; Tamir, Ada; Genizi, Jacob; Roth, Dana

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to examine family quality of life (FQOL) of Northern Israeli families having a child with a severe neurodevelopmental disability and its relation to socio-demographics. The cohort included caregivers of 70 children ages (mean ± standard deviation) 5.36 ± 3.53 years. Families were two-parent (85.7%), lived in the periphery (67.1%) and included Jews (60%), Muslims (18.6%), Druze (14.3%) and Christians (7.1%). Religiosity included: secular (38.6%), traditional (31.4%), religious (30%). Children's diagnosis included autistic spectrum disorder (41.4%), intellectual disability (21.4%), cerebral palsy (17.1%), genetic syndromes (17.1%) and sensorineural hearing loss (2.9%). Degree of support (1-minimal,5-greatest) required by the child was 3.67 ± 1.28 for physical and 3.49 ± 1.36 for communication. Primary caregivers completed the FQOL Survey. Domain scores were highest for family relations and lowest for financial well-being. Dimension scores were highest for importance and lowest for opportunities. Overall FQOL approximated average. Jewish families and residents of a major urban area reported higher and more religious families reported lower overall FQOL. Regression analysis found ethnicity contributing to overall FQOL and domain scores with residence contributing to support from services. Ethnicity and child dependence contributed to dimension scores. Northern Israeli families having a child with a severe neurodevelopmental disability report average FQOL scores. However, family and child dependence characteristics affect FQOL scores. Professionals working with these families should consider FQOL information when making recommendations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Experiences and needs of family members in the end of life care at a nursinghome

    OpenAIRE

    Lena, Sallstrom-Olsson

    2005-01-01

    Background: There might be a risk that family members experience limited possibilities to act, participate and influence the end of life care for the elderly in the nursing home. For family members it could be the first time they face death which can imply a lot of questions and existential needs. Aim: The aim of this study was to examine the needs of family members in the patient terminal care in a nursing home. Research methods: The study implemented a qualitative approach and data was coll...

  3. Families enriched for exceptional longevity also have increased health span: Findings from the Long Life Family Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola eSebastiani

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Hypothesizing that members of families enriched for longevity delay morbidity compared to population controls and approximate the health-span of centenarians, we compared the health spans of older generation subjects of the Long Life Family Study (LLFS to controls without family history of longevity and to centenarians of the New England Centenarian Study (NECS using Bayesian parametric survival analysis. We estimated hazard ratios, the ages at which specific percentiles of subjects had onsets of diseases, and the gain of years of disease-free survival in the different cohorts compared to referent controls. Compared to controls, LLFS subjects had lower hazards for cancer, cardiovascular disease, severe dementia, diabetes, hypertension, osteoporosis and stroke. The age at which 20% of the LLFS siblings and probands had one or more age-related diseases was approximately 10 years later than NECS controls. While female NECS controls generally delayed the onset of age-related diseases compared with males controls, these gender differences became much less in the older generation of the LLFS and disappeared amongst the centenarians of the NECS. The analyses demonstrate extended health-span in the older subjects of the LLFS and suggest that this aging cohort provides an important resource to discover genetic and environmental factors that promote prolonged health-span in addition to longer life-span.

  4. Family's difficulty scale in end-of-life home care: a new measure of the family's difficulties in caring for patients with cancer at the end of life at home from bereaved family's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Yoko; Miyashita, Mitsunori; Sato, Kazuki; Ozawa, Taketoshi

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a tool to measure the family's difficulties in caring for cancer patients at the end of life at home: Family's Difficulty Scale in end-of-life home care (FDS). The draft of the FDS was derived from a pilot interview survey and literature reviews. The questionnaires were sent to 395 bereaved family caregivers whose family members were patients with terminal cancer receiving home service. We obtained 306 responses (response rate, 81%). Factor analysis resulted in 29 items and 8 factors: Burden of Care, Concerns about Home Care Doctor, Balance of Work and Care, Patient's Pain and Condition, Concerns about Visiting Nurse, Concerns about Home Care Service, Relationship between Family Caregivers and their Families, and Funeral Preparations. The cumulative rate of contribution was 71.8%. Cronbach coefficient α for the FDS was 0.73-0.75; the intraclass correlation coefficient in the test-retest examination was 0.75-0.85. Evidence for construct validity was confirmed by convergent and divergent validity. Concurrent validity was confirmed by significant correlations between identified factors and concurrent measures. The validity and reliability of this new instrument were confirmed. This scale should help home care providers to assess and focus on family difficulties and provide individualized care for the family who cares for a patient with terminal cancer at home.

  5. Children with disability and complex health needs: the impact on family life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiting, Mark

    2014-04-01

    To identify consistency and differences in parental perceptions of impact, need for support and 'sense making' in children with a disability, children with a life-threatening or life-limiting illness and children who are technology dependent. A series of in-depth semi-structured interviews were undertaken with parents from 33 families that included one or more child with disabilities. The data arising from these interviews were subjected to a systematic comparative analysis based on three discrete subgroups of children: those with a disability, those with a life-limiting or life-threatening illness, and those with a technology dependence. There were major areas of consistency in parental experience of impact as related in three categories that emerged from the data: time, multiple roles and the disabled family. There are many effects of childhood disability on the family. In large part, the effects cannot simply be defined or described in the context of a particular 'medical' diagnosis or prognosis. Many elements of impact do not appear to be related to whether or not a child has a life-threatening or life-limiting illness or by whether or not a child is dependent on specific medical devices or ongoing nursing care.

  6. Quality of Life, Family Support, and Comorbidities in Institutionalized Elders With and Without Symptoms of Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araújo, Aurigena Antunes; Rebouças Barbosa, Rosa Angélica Silveira; de Menezes, Marília Stefani Souza; de Medeiros, Ingrid Iana Fernandes; de Araújo, Raimundo Fernandes; de Medeiros, Caroline Addison Carvalho Xavier

    2016-06-01

    The institutionalization of elders can decrease the health status and quality of life in this population. The aim of this study was to analyze the socio-demographic, quality of life, family support, and comorbidities variables in institutionalized elders with and without symptoms of depression. This was a cross-sectional study in institutions for long permanence for the elderly in the State of Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil. Two institutionalized elderly groups were compared (138 elders: 69 with and 69 without depressive symptoms). The instruments used were: mini-mental state examination, geriatric depression scale in the reduced version, socio-demographic questionnaire, quality of life (World Health Organization Quality of Life abbreviated-WHOQOL-bref), and inventory of perception of family support. Elders with depressive symptoms had inferior quality of life than those without depressive symptoms. Other factors that negatively influenced the quality of life in this population include: low economic conditions, occurrence of comorbidities, and deficient family assistance. These results have important implications in the decision making process with regard to strategies for improving the health status of institutionalized elders.

  7. Age validation in the long life family study through a linkage to early-life census records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elo, Irma T; Mykyta, Laryssa; Sebastiani, Paola; Christensen, Kaare; Glynn, Nancy W; Perls, Thomas

    2013-07-01

    Studies of health and longevity require accurate age reporting. Age misreporting among older adults in the United States is common. Participants in the Long Life Family Study (LLFS) were matched to early-life census records. Age recorded in the census was used to evaluate age reporting in the LLFS. The study population was 99% non-Hispanic white. About 88% of the participants were matched to 1910, 1920, or 1930 U.S. censuses. Match success depended on the participant's education, place of birth, and the number of censuses available to be searched. Age at the time of the interview based on the reported date of birth and early-life census age were consistent for about 89% of the participants, and age consistency within 1 year was found for about 99% of the participants. It is possible to match a high fraction of older study participants to their early-life census records when detailed information is available on participants' family of origin. Such record linkage can provide an important source of information for evaluating age reporting among the oldest old participants. Our results are consistent with recent studies suggesting that age reporting among older whites in the United States appears to be quite good.

  8. The relationships between fatigue, quality of life, and family impact among children with special health care needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, I-Chan; Anderson, Mary; Gandhi, Pranav; Tuli, Sanjeev; Krull, Kevin; Lai, Jin-Shei; Nackashi, John; Shenkman, Elizabeth

    2013-08-01

    To examine the relationships among pediatric fatigue, health-related quality of life (HRQOL), and family impact among children with special health care needs (CSHCNs), specifically whether HRQOL mediates the influence of fatigue on family impact. 266 caregivers of CSHCNs were studied. The Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory Multidimensional Fatigue Scale, Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory Generic Scale, and Impact on Family Scale were used to measure fatigue, HRQOL, and family impact, respectively. Linear regressions were used to analyze the designated relationships; path analyses were performed to quantify the mediating effects of HRQOL on fatigue-family impact relationship. Although greater fatigue was associated with family impact (p family impact was not significant (p > .05), whereas physical and emotional functioning significantly mediated the fatigue-family impact relationship (p family impact among CSHCNs, acting through the impairment in HRQOL.

  9. Family involvement at the end-of-life and receipt of quality care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudore, Rebecca L; Casarett, David; Smith, Dawn; Richardson, Diane M; Ersek, Mary

    2014-12-01

    Most patients will lose decision-making capacity at the end of life. Little is known about the quality of care received by patients who have family involved in their care. To evaluate differences in the receipt of quality end-of-life care for patients who died with and without family involvement. We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 34,290 decedents from 146 acute and long-term care Veterans Affairs facilities between 2010 and 2011. Outcomes included: (1) palliative care consult, (2) chaplain visit, and 3) death in an inpatient hospice or palliative care unit. We also assessed "do not resuscitate" (DNR) orders. Family involvement was defined as documented discussions with the health care team in the last month of life. We used logistic regression adjusted for demographics, comorbidity, and clustered by facility. For chaplain visit, hospice or palliative care unit death, and DNR, we additionally adjusted for palliative care consults. Mean (SD) age was 74 (±12) years, 98% were men, and 19% were nonwhite. Most decedents (94.2%) had involved family. Veterans with involved family were more likely to have had a palliative care consult, adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 4.31 (95% CI 3.90-4.76); a chaplain visit, AOR 1.18 (95% CI 1.07-1.31); and a DNR order, AOR 4.59 (95% CI 4.08-5.16) but not more likely to die in a hospice or palliative care unit. Family involvement at the end of life is associated with receipt of palliative care consultation and a chaplain visit and a higher likelihood of a DNR order. Clinicians should support early advance care planning for vulnerable patients who may lack family or friends. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Sharing Family Life Information Through Video Calls and Other Information and Communication Technologies and the Association With Family Well-Being: Population-Based Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chen; Wang, Man Ping; Chu, Joanna Tw; Wan, Alice; Viswanath, Kasisomayajula; Chan, Sophia Siu Chee; Lam, Tai Hing

    2017-11-23

    The use of information and communication technologies (ICTs) for information sharing among family members is increasing dramatically. However, little is known about the associated factors and the influence on family well-being. The authors investigated the pattern and social determinants of family life information sharing with family and the associations of different methods of sharing with perceived family health, happiness, and harmony (3Hs) in Hong Kong, where mobile phone ownership and Internet access are among the most prevalent, easiest, and fastest in the world. A territory-wide population-based telephone survey was conducted from January to August 2016 on different methods of family life information (ie, information related to family communication, relationships with family members, emotion and stress management) sharing with family members, including face-to-face, phone, instant messaging (IM), social media sites, video calls, and email. Family well-being was assessed by three single items on perceived family health, happiness, and harmony, with higher scores indicating better family well-being. Adjusted prevalence ratios were used to assess the associations of sociodemographic factors with family life information sharing, and adjusted beta coefficients for family well-being. Of 2017 respondents, face-to-face was the most common method to share family life information (74.45%, 1502/2017), followed by IM (40.86%, 824/2017), phone (28.10%, 567/2017), social media sites (11.91%, 240/2017), video calls (5.89%, 119/2017), and email (5.48%, 111/2017). Younger age and higher education were associated with the use of any (at least one) method, face-to-face, IM, and social media sites for sharing family life information (all P for trend information was associated with a higher level of perceived family well-being (beta=0.56, 95% CI 0.37-0.75), especially by face-to-face (beta=0.62, 95% CI 0.45-0.80) and video calls (beta=0.34, 95% CI 0.04-0.65). The combination of

  11. The association of poor economic condition and family relations in childhood with late-life depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krsteska, Roza; Pejoska, Vesna Gerazova

    2013-09-01

    Late-life depression encompasses both patients with late-life onset of depression (>60 years) and older adults with a prior and current history of depression. The aim of the study was to analyze the impact of the economic condition and family relations in childhood as risk factors for late-life depression. This was an analytical cross-sectional study comprising 120 subjects, 60 patients with unipolar depression and 60 subjects without depressive disorders, diagnosed in accordance with the 10-th International Classification of Mental and Behavioural Disorders. All participants in the study were above the age of 60 and there was no significant statistical difference in the sex proportion in both groups (p>0.05). Data for the examination were taken from a self-reported questionnaire designed for our aim. The Geriatric Depression Scale was used to measure depressive symptoms. Our results have shown that severe financial difficulties are important events in childhood and are risk factors for depression in the elderly (Chi-square=12.68, df=2, p=0.0018). Our investigation has found the association of family relations with late-life depression. In fact, conflictual relations in the family were more common in the experimental group than in the control group (Chi-square=14.32, df=3, p=0.0025). Furthermore, father's addiction to alcohol in childhood was associated with depression in later life (p=0.013). The difference in childhood emotional neglect and unequal treatment between siblings in both groups was insufficient to be confirmed statistically, but the examinees with this trauma had a threefold higher chance of having depression later in life (Odds ratio=3.04, 95% CL0.92 family conflicts during childhood are associated with late-life depression. Father's addiction to alcohol and parents' negative personal character traits are associated with depression in the elderly.

  12. QUALITY OF LIFE OF ADOLESCENTS FROM FAMILIES IN UDMURTIYA AT THE TIME OF CHEMOPROPHYLAXIS OF TUBERCULOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.V. Moiseeva

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the analysis of quality of life of adolescents from Udmurtiya, undergoing prophylaxis of tuberculosis. Author used PedsQL 4.0 questionnaire. 50 adolescents and equal quantity of parents took part in the study. It was shown that the prophylaxis of tuberculosis was performed in adolescents from families with low education level and with low earnings of parents. They have statistically significantly low level of quality of life compared to healty children.Key words: adolescents, tuberculosis, chemoprophylaxis, quality of life.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. 2009;8(6:12-13

  13. How Family Status and Social Security Claiming Options Shape Optimal Life Cycle Portfolios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubener, Andreas; Maurer, Raimond; Mitchell, Olivia S.

    2017-01-01

    We show how optimal household decisions regarding work, retirement, saving, portfolio allocations, and life insurance are shaped by the complex financial options embedded in U.S. Social Security rules and uncertain family transitions. Our life cycle model predicts sharp consumption drops on retirement, an age-62 peak in claiming rates, and earlier claiming by wives versus husbands and single women. Moreover, life insurance is mainly purchased on men’s lives. Our model, which takes Social Security rules seriously, generates wealth and retirement outcomes that are more consistent with the data, in contrast to earlier and less realistic models. PMID:28659659

  14. How Family Status and Social Security Claiming Options Shape Optimal Life Cycle Portfolios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubener, Andreas; Maurer, Raimond; Mitchell, Olivia S

    2016-04-01

    We show how optimal household decisions regarding work, retirement, saving, portfolio allocations, and life insurance are shaped by the complex financial options embedded in U.S. Social Security rules and uncertain family transitions. Our life cycle model predicts sharp consumption drops on retirement, an age-62 peak in claiming rates, and earlier claiming by wives versus husbands and single women. Moreover, life insurance is mainly purchased on men's lives. Our model, which takes Social Security rules seriously, generates wealth and retirement outcomes that are more consistent with the data, in contrast to earlier and less realistic models.

  15. Exploring quality of life in families of children living with and without a severe food allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, Althea Z; Knibb, Rebecca C

    2011-10-01

    This study aimed to explore the impact of food allergy on quality of life in children with food allergy and their primary caregivers, compared to a healthy non-food allergy comparison group. Food allergy children (n=34) and control children (n=15), aged 8-12, and their respective primary caregivers (n=30/n=13), completed generic quality of life scales (PedsQL™ and WHOQOLBREF) and were asked to take photographs and keep a diary about factors that they believed enhanced and/or limited their quality of life, over a one-week period. Questionnaire analysis showed that parents of children with food allergy had significantly lower quality of life in the social relationships domain and lower overall quality of life than the comparison parents. In contrast, children with food allergy had similar or higher quality of life scores compared to comparison children. Content analysis of photograph and diary data identified ten themes that influenced both child and parental quality of life. It was concluded that although food allergy influenced quality of life for some children, their parent's quality of life was hindered to a greater extent. The variability in findings highlights the importance of assessing quality of life in individual families, considering both children with allergies and their primary caregivers. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Understanding bereaved family members' dissatisfaction with end-of-life care in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Genevieve N; McClement, Susan E; Menec, Verena H; Chochinov, Harvey M

    2012-10-01

    With increasing numbers of older adults identifying a nursing home (NH) as their final place of care, it is important to assess the quality of dying in this setting and understand factors that impact family members' dissatisfaction with end-of-life care. A retrospective bereaved family member survey (N = 208) was conducted in 21 NHs located in urban areas of central Canada. Bereaved family members who were dissatisfied with care identified significantly more concerns in all domains assessed and were more likely to have problems with: (a) receiving confusing information from nursing staff about the resident's care, including medical treatments; (b) receiving inadequate information from nursing staff; and (c) feeling that end-of-life care was different than they had expected. Since the quality of communication between nurses, residents, and family members is the main factor that determines families' dissatisfaction with care, strategies and interventions aimed at reducing unmet information needs will be vital to improving end-of-life care in NHs. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  17. Impact of traumatic dental injury on quality of life among Brazilian preschool children and their families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viegas, Cláudia Marina; Scarpelli, Ana Carolina; Carvalho, Anita Cruz; Ferreira, Fernanda de Morais; Pordeus, Isabela Alameida; Paiva, Saul Martins

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of traumatic dental injury (TDI) on the quality of life of preschool children and their families. This cross-sectional study was carried out with 388 60- to 71-month-old children. Data on oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) were collected using the Brazilian version of the Early Childhood Oral Health Impact Scale (ECOHIS). Oral examinations of the children were performed to determine the prevalence of TDI. Data analysis involved the chi-square test and multiple Poisson regression analysis. The prevalence of OHRQoL of the children and their families was approximately 49% and 35%, respectively. The adjusted Poisson regression model revealed that the OHRQoL of the children and their families was significantly related to parents'/caregivers' report of the occurrence of TDI (PR =1.54, 95% confidence interval=1.22-1.93; and PR=1.63, 95% CI=1.21-2.19, respectively). The nonadjusted Poisson regression analysis, the OHRQofL of the children and their families was not related to TDI, as determined by the clinical examination (PR=1.15, 95% CI=0.92-1.42; and PR=1.28, 95% CI=0.95-1.71, respectively). The families and children who had traumatic dental injury, perceived by the parents/caregivers, had a greater chance of reporting an impact on quality of life.

  18. Family Perspectives on End-of-Life Care Experiences in Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetle, Terrie; Shield, Renee; Teno, Joan; Miller, Susan C.; Welch, Lisa

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to expand knowledge regarding end-of-life care received in nursing homes through the use of narrative interviews with family members close to the decedents. Design and Methods: We conducted follow-up qualitative interviews with 54 respondents who had participated in an earlier national survey of 1,578…

  19. Familial hypercholesterolaemia in children and adolescents: gaining decades of life by optimizing detection and treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegman, A.; Gidding, S.S.; Watts, G.F.; Chapman, M.J.; Ginsberg, H.N.; Cuchel, M.; Ose, L.; Averna, M.; Boileau, C.; Boren, J.; Bruckert, E.; Catapano, A.L.; Defesche, J.C.; Descamps, O.S.; Hegele, R.A.; Hovingh, G.K.; Humphries, S.E.; Kovanen, P.T.; Kuivenhoven, J.A.; Masana, L.; Nordestgaard, B.G.; Pajukanta, P.; Parhofer, K.G.; Raal, F.J.; Ray, K.K.; Santos, R.D.; Stalenhoef, A.F.H.; Steinhagen-Thiessen, E.; Stroes, E.S.; Taskinen, M.R.; Tybjaerg-Hansen, A.; Wiklund, O.

    2015-01-01

    Familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH) is a common genetic cause of premature coronary heart disease (CHD). Globally, one baby is born with FH every minute. If diagnosed and treated early in childhood, individuals with FH can have normal life expectancy. This consensus paper aims to improve awareness

  20. Family Life and Human Development (Sex Education): The Prince George's County Public Schools Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffer, Michael J.

    1981-01-01

    The Prince George's County schools' sex education program for grades K-12 was developed and implemented in the late 1960s and has three focus areas: family life and interpersonal relationships; the physiological and personality changes during puberty; and advanced physiology and psychology of human sexual behavior. The program augments what the…

  1. Investigation of the Construct Validity of the Family Life Space Diagram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Sandra B.; Barker, Randolph T.

    1990-01-01

    Investigated construct validity of the Family Life Space Diagram (FLSD) in which physical distance was equated with emotional distance. Participants (n=122), who were dog owners, described each relationship that they drew on the FLSD and the descriptors were rated to closeness by two independent raters. Results provided evidence for the construct…

  2. The effects of nutrition rehabilitation at three Family Life Training Centres in Central Province, Kenya

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoorweg, J.C.; Niemeijer, R.

    1982-01-01

    During the course of 1978, the three Family Life Training Centres studied admitted 273 women accompanied by 674 children. Women with malnourished children (and their siblings) are admitted to these centres for a 3-week course consisting primarily of nutrition and health education, but also covering

  3. Chronic pain and its impact on quality of life in adolescents and their families

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A.M. Hunfeld (Joke); C.W. Perquin (Christel); H.J. Duivenvoorden (Hugo); A.A.J.M. Hazebroek-Kampschreur (Alice); J. Passchier (Jan); L.W.A. van Suijlekom-Smit (Lisette); J.C. van der Wouden (Hans)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: To study chronic pain not caused by somatic disease in adolescents and the effect of pain on the quality of life of the adolescents and their families. METHODS: One hundred twenty-eight youngsters (12-18 years) who had reported chronic pain kept a

  4. Moral landscapes and everyday life in families with Huntington´s Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huniche, Lotte

    2011-01-01

    This article is concerned with understanding moral aspects of everyday life in families with Huntington’s Disease (HD). It draws on findings from an empirical research project in Denmark in 1998e2002 involving multi-sited ethnography to argue that medical genetics provides a particular framework...

  5. Familial hypercholesterolaemia in children and adolescents : gaining decades of life by optimizing detection and treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegman, Albert; Gidding, Samuel S.; Watts, Gerald F.; Chapman, M. John; Ginsberg, Henry N.; Cuchel, Marina; Ose, Leiv; Averna, Maurizio; Boileau, Catherine; Boren, Jan; Bruckert, Eric; Catapano, Alberico L.; Defesche, Joep C.; Descamps, Olivier S.; Hegele, Robert A.; Hovingh, G. Kees; Humphries, Steve E.; Kovanen, Petri T.; Kuivenhoven, Jan Albert; Masana, Luis; Nordestgaard, Borge G.; Pajukanta, Paevi; Parhofer, Klaus G.; Raal, Frederick J.; Ray, Kausik K.; Santos, Raul D.; Stalenhoef, Anton F. H.; Steinhagen-Thiessen, Elisabeth; Stroes, Erik S.; Taskinen, Marja-Riitta; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Wiklund, Olov

    2015-01-01

    Familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH) is a common genetic cause of premature coronary heart disease (CHD). Globally, one baby is born with FH every minute. If diagnosed and treated early in childhood, individuals with FH can have normal life expectancy. This consensus paper aims to improve awareness

  6. Modern Teenage Problems: Report of Family Life Education Survey of Ohio Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojemann, Ralph H.; And Others

    The needs of Ohio schools were assessed in relation to the area of Family Life Education, including education in sexual behavior, the prevention of alcohol, drug, and smoking abuse, and related social problems. The study was carried out in two phases. The first phase developed the methods for assessing the needs of Ohio schools, which involved…

  7. An extended family suddenly confronted with a life-threatening hereditary arrhythmia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, K.S.W.H.; Van Langen, I.M.; Van Tintelen, J.P.; Grosfeld, F.J.M.; Wilde, A.A.M.; Ten Kroode, H.F.J.

    2005-01-01

    Objective. This exploratory study serves to illustrate the psychological impact on an extended family in the process of genetic counselling and testing for a potentially life-threatening arrhythmia, the long-QT syndrome (LQTS). Method. All members of the third generation and their partners (n=11)

  8. An extended family suddenly confronted with a life-threatening hereditary arrhythmia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, K. S. W. H.; van Langen, I. M.; van Tintelen, J. P.; Grosfeld, F. J. M.; Wilde, A. A. M.; ten Kroode, H. F. J.

    2005-01-01

    This exploratory study serves to illustrate the psychological impact on an extended family in the process of genetic counselling and testing for a potentially life-threatening arrhythmia, the long-QT syndrome (LQTS). All members of the third generation and their partners (n=11) were interviewed, the

  9. The Impact of Japanese Corporate Transnationalism on Men's Involvement in Family Life and Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuike, Akiko

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the ways in which Japanese corporate transnationalism affects husbands' involvement in family life and marital relationships primarily from a perspective of wives. It is based on interviews with 22 Japanese wives and 4 husbands. Studies of Japanese corporate transnationalism treat men as mere supervisors to local workers or…

  10. Scaling up Sexuality Education in Senegal: Integrating Family Life Education into the National Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau, Katie; Traoré Seck, Aminata; Chandra-Mouli, Venkatraman; Svanemyr, Joar

    2016-01-01

    In Senegal, school-based sexuality education has evolved over 20 years from family life education (FLE) pilot projects into cross-curricular subjects located within the national curriculum of primary and secondary schools. We conducted a literature review and semi-structured interviews to gather information regarding the scale and nature of FLE…

  11. Family Life and HIV/AIDS Education (FLHE) in Schools in Enugu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We studied the sexual and reproductive health (SRH) knowledge and practices among junior secondary school grades 1 and 3 students Enugu State, preparatory to incorporating family life and HIV/AIDS education (FLHE) into the school curricula in the state. Results show that over 90% of the respondents were regularly ...

  12. Family Forest Owner Characteristics Shaped by Life Cycle, Cohort, and Period Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarah M. Butler; Brett J. Butler; Marla Markowski-Lindsay

    2017-01-01

    Understanding differences and similarities among family forest owners is important in the context of forest land conservation. This study assesses similarities and differences in landowners by analyzing life cycle effects, cohort differences, and period-specific events that shape people's attitudes and behaviors towards their forestland over time. Using data...

  13. "I Am-We Are": Personal and Social Pathways to Further Study, Work and Family Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornholt, L. J.; Maras, P. M.; Robinson, R. A.

    2009-01-01

    This project explores the apparent layers in motivation for young people's plans in order to extend Pathways Theory. We bring together personal, relational and group motivation to explain the planned pathways to study, work and family life. Location was an Australian town, close to the national socio-economic average, to control broad social…

  14. Family Life Education: A Problem-Solving Curriculum for Adolescents (Ages 15-19).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feibelman, Barbara; Hamrick, Michael

    The rising incidence of teenage sexual activity and the subsequent growth in numbers of teenage parents provide the rationale for this problem-solving curriculum guide on family life education. This model curriculum for adolescents aged 15-19 is designed to promote problem-solving skills, self-confidence, self-awareness, self-control, and…

  15. Relationships between Parental Attachment, Work and Family Roles, and Life Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrone, Kristin M.; Webb, L. Kay; Jackson, Z. Vance

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between parental attachment and satisfaction with work and family roles, as well as the relationship of these variables to life satisfaction. Results from a multiple regression analysis indicated that satisfaction with work and marriage, but not parenting satisfaction or parental…

  16. Infertility: Towards an Awareness of a Need among Family Life Practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Nancy L.; Christopher, F. Scott

    1984-01-01

    Discusses emotional problems related to infertility investigation and treatment. Reviews causes and treatment of infertility, coping patterns, and the role of counselors and family life educators in easing the crises of infertility and facilitating successful resolution of associated emotional problems. (JAC)

  17. Early Childhood Education Teachers: Life History, Life Course, and the Problem of Family-Work Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullough, Robert V., Jr.

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to the wider education literature, rather little is known about the lives of early childhood education (ECE) teachers and the impact of those lives on their practice. Drawing on surveys completed by Head Start assistant and lead teachers, teacher lifelines, and interviews, and through the lens of life-course theory, the author portrays…

  18. This Harlem life: black families and everyday life in the 1920s and 1930s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Stephen; White, Shane; Garton, Stephen; White, Graham

    2010-01-01

    This article uses Probation Department files to reconstruct the lives of five ordinary residents of Harlem. It highlights what that black metropolis offered those outside the political and cultural elite, who have dominated historical scholarship, showing how ordinary blacks negotiated the challenges of life in northern neighborhoods, and drew on institutions and organizations, to establish and sustain new lives. We offer the kind of individualized perspective on everyday life that other scholars have provided for high culture, but which does not exist for other realms of existence in Harlem, even in early twentieth century sociological studies of black life. Where scholars seeking to distinguish the neighborhood from a slum have pointed to the prevailing pride and self-confidence of its residents, this article directs attention to more immediate, concrete supports that sustained and enriched life in Harlem. Relationships with spouses, children, siblings and cousins sustained individuals faced with the social reality of living in overcrowded, deteriorating, disease infested housing, subject to the racism of white police, politicians and employers; so too did friendships made in nightclubs, speakeasies, dances and movie theatres, and membership of churches, fraternal organizations, social clubs, and sports clubs and teams.

  19. Relationship between current quality of life and family of origin dynamics for college students with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenwald-Mayes, Gloria

    2002-03-01

    This study examines the relationship between current quality of life, family of origin relationship dynamics, and the presence of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in college students. Participants were 37 ADHD undergraduate college students and 59 non-ADHD undergraduate students. Participants completed a background information questionnaire, Quality of Life Questionnaire, Family Environment Scale, and the Family Adaption and Cohesion Scale II. In comparison to the control group, the ADHD group reported lower quality of life. The ADHD and non-ADHD groups did not differ significantly in reported family of origin relationship dynamics. Family of origin dynamics were highly predictive of current overall quality of life for the ADHD group, but less so for the non-ADHD group. The results of this study suggest that family of origin relationship dynamics deserve further study with respect to how they impact adult quality of life for individuals with ADHD.

  20. Population aging in Albanian post-socialist society: Implications for care and family life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meçe Merita

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Population aging is becoming an inevitable phenomenon in Albanian post-socialist society, posing multi-faceted challenges to its individuals, families and society as a whole. Since 1991, the Albanian population has been exposed to intensive demographic changes caused by unintended aspects of socio-economic transition from a planned socialist economy to a market-oriented capitalist one (Hoff, 2008. Ongoing processes of re-organization of social institutions increased its socio-economic insecurity leading to the application of various coping mechanisms. While adjusting themselves to other aspects of life, people changed their decisions of having children and leaving the country (Hoff, 2008. On the other hand, replacement of former traditional extended family forms with diverse living arrangements and family structures has been the outcome of the combination of three factors: falling fertility, increasing life expectancy and increasing migration (INSTAT, 2014.

  1. Quality of life in families with peanut/egg/hazelnut allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stensgaard, Anette

    2013-01-01

    and for their family members. Methods: The cohort comprises an existing database with 394 Danish children, teenagers and adults diagnosed with peanut/egg/hazelnut allergy in accordance with EAACI guidelines. We use the validated Food Allergy Quality of Life Questionnaires (FAQLQ). The questionnaires have been......). The siblings receive an age-adjusted questionnaire. The parents to children from 8 years and above also receive a Parent Form. Mothers and fathers receive separate questionnaires. The patients and their relatives are invited by letter with a link to the homepage www.datafabrikken.dk and a code for each family......Quality of life in families with peanut/egg/hazelnut allergy Anette Stensgaard, Audrey DunnGalvin, Dorthe Nielsen, Carsten Bindslev-Jensen (Department of Dermatology and Allergy Centre, ORCA (Odense Research Centre for Anaphylaxis), Odense University Hospital, DK-5000 Odense C, Denmark) Aim...

  2. Family quality of life and ASD: the role of child adaptive functioning and behavior problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emily, Gardiner; Grace, Iarocci

    2015-04-01

    The family is the key support network for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), in many cases into adulthood. The Family Quality of Life (FQOL) construct encompasses family satisfaction with both internal and external dynamics, as well as support availability. Therefore, although these families face considerable risk in raising a child with a disability, the FQOL outcome is conceptualized as representative of a continuum of family adaptation. This study examined the role of child characteristics, including adaptive functioning and behaviour problems, in relation to FQOL. Eighty-four caregivers of children and adolescents (range = 6-18 years) with ASD participated, completing questionnaires online and by telephone. Adaptive functioning, and specifically daily living skills, emerged as a significant predictor of FQOL satisfaction, after accounting for behavioural and demographic characteristics, including child age, gender, perceived disability severity, and behavioural problems, as well as family income. Furthermore, there were significant differences across each domain of FQOL when groups were separated by daily living skill functioning level ('low,' 'moderately low,' and 'adequate'). The results suggest that intervention strategies targeting daily living skills will likely have beneficial effects for both individual and family well-being, and may reduce family support demands. © 2015 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Family Perspectives on Aggressive Cancer Care Near the End of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Alexi A; Keating, Nancy L; Ayanian, John Z; Chrischilles, Elizabeth A; Kahn, Katherine L; Ritchie, Christine S; Weeks, Jane C; Earle, Craig C; Landrum, Mary B

    2016-01-19

    Patients with advanced-stage cancer are receiving increasingly aggressive medical care near death, despite growing concerns that this reflects poor-quality care. To assess the association of aggressive end-of-life care with bereaved family members' perceptions of the quality of end-of-life care and patients' goal attainment. Interviews with 1146 family members of Medicare patients with advanced-stage lung or colorectal cancer in the Cancer Care Outcomes Research and Surveillance study (a multiregional, prospective, observational study) who died by the end of 2011 (median, 144.5 days after death; interquartile range, 85.0-551.0 days). Claims-based quality measures of aggressive end-of-life care (ie, intensive care unit [ICU] admission or repeated hospitalizations or emergency department visits during the last month of life; chemotherapy ≤2 weeks of death; no hospice or ≤3 days of hospice services; and deaths occurring in the hospital). Family member-reported quality rating of "excellent" for end-of-life care. Secondary outcomes included patients' goal attainment (ie, end-of-life care congruent with patients' wishes and location of death occurred in preferred place). Of 1146 patients with cancer (median age, 76.0 years [interquartile range, 65.0-87.0 years]; 55.8% male), bereaved family members reported excellent end-of-life care for 51.3%. Family members reported excellent end-of-life care more often for patients who received hospice care for longer than 3 days (58.8% [352/599]) than those who did not receive hospice care or received 3 or fewer days (43.1% [236/547]) (adjusted difference, 16.5 percentage points [95% CI, 10.7 to 22.4 percentage points]). In contrast, family members of patients admitted to an ICU within 30 days of death reported excellent end-of-life care less often (45.0% [68/151]) than those who were not admitted to an ICU within 30 days of death (52.3% [520/995]) (adjusted difference, -9.4 percentage points [95% CI, -18.2 to -0.6 percentage

  4. End-of-life care in intensive care unit: Family experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisorio, Leah C; Langley, Gayle C

    2016-08-01

    To elicit family members' experiences of end-of-life care in adult intensive care units. A descriptive, exploratory, qualitative design was utilised. A purposive sampling method was used to select a sample of seventeen family members who had relatives receiving end-of-life care in the intensive care units at three academic affiliated, tertiary/quaternary specialist hospitals in the Johannesburg and Pretoria regions, South Africa. An interview guide was used to facilitate individual, semi-structured interviews with the selected participants. Data collection and analysis took place simultaneously as interviews were transcribed verbatim immediately after the interview. Tesch's (1990) steps of analysis were used to establish the major themes that arose from the data. Lincoln and Guba's (1985) criteria for ensuring trustworthiness of qualitative research were applied. Five major themes emerged: "most of the time we are in darkness", "emotional support", "involvement", "family presence" and "spiritual support". The findings reflect inadequate care to the families who had dying relatives in the intensive care unit. Negative experiences expressed by the families outweighed their positive experiences, as most families were not happy with the care observed or personally received while their relatives were in the intensive care unit. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Rural Women Family Physicians: Strategies for Successful Work-Life Balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Julie; Hustedde, Carol; Bjorkman, Sarah; Prasad, Rupa; Sola, Orlando; Wendling, Andrea; Bjorkman, Kurt; Paladine, Heather

    2016-05-01

    Women family physicians experience challenges in maintaining work-life balance while practicing in rural communities. We sought to better understand the personal and professional strategies that enable women in rural family medicine to balance work and personal demands and achieve long-term career satisfaction. Women family physicians practicing in rural communities in the United States were interviewed using a semistructured format. Interviews were recorded, professionally transcribed, and analyzed using an immersion and crystallization approach, followed by detailed coding of emergent themes. The 25 participants described a set of strategies that facilitated successful work-life balance. First, they used reduced or flexible work hours to help achieve balance with personal roles. Second, many had supportive relationships with spouses and partners, parents, or other members of the community, which facilitated their ability to be readily available to their patients. Third, participants maintained clear boundaries around their work lives, which helped them to have adequate time for parenting, recreation, and rest. Women family physicians can build successful careers in rural communities, but supportive employers, relationships, and patient approaches provide a foundation for this success. Educators, employers, communities, and policymakers can adapt their practices to help women family physicians thrive in rural communities. © 2016 Annals of Family Medicine, Inc.

  6. Financial Strain, Major Family Life Events, and Parental Academic Involvement During Adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho-Thompson, Daisy E; Gillen-O'Neel, Cari; Gonzales, Nancy A; Fuligni, Andrew J

    2016-06-01

    Parental academic involvement-whether through school participation and communication, or supervision and assistance at home-often has been cited as a way to enhance academic achievement. Yet, little is known about how the financial and life pressures faced by families can compromise parents' ability to become involved in their adolescents' education. In the current study, these dynamics were examined among Mexican-origin families, who often may face challenging financial and familial circumstances, and whose students may have more difficulty in secondary school. Parents of Mexican-origin ninth and tenth grade students from two high schools in Los Angeles (N = 428; 50 % female) completed quantitative interviews. The results revealed that financial strain predicted less involvement at school, and major family life events predicted less involvement at home, even after controlling for potentially confounding factors. Moreover, both of the associations between parental stress and parental academic involvement were mediated by lower levels of relationship quality between parents and adolescents, but not by conflict within the parent-adolescent dyad or parental depressive and somatic symptoms. The findings suggest that stress may limit parents' ability to become involved their adolescents' education, and highlight the importance of understanding family dynamics when examining parental academic involvement among Mexican-origin families.

  7. A population-based study of the quality of life of cancer survivors and their family caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellon, Suzanne; Northouse, Laurel L; Weiss, Linda K

    2006-01-01

    Although survival rates for all cancers continue to increase, few studies have examined the quality of life of both cancer survivors and family caregivers during the survivorship period after treatment has ended. Information is lacking on the stressors, resources, meaning, and quality of life reported by survivors and family caregivers and the interrelationship between survivors' and family caregivers' quality of life. A stratified, random sample of 123 cancer survivors and 123 family caregivers (N = 246) were interviewed in an exploratory, cross-sectional design 1-6 years after cancer treatment had ended. Approximately half (N = 62) of the dyads were white and half (N = 61) were African American. Results indicated that cancer survivors reported significantly higher quality of life, less fear of cancer recurrence, and more support than their family caregivers. The strongest predictors for cancer survivors' quality of life were family stressors, social support, meaning of the illness, and employment status, whereas the strongest predictors for family caregivers' quality of life were fear of recurrence and social support. Both the survivor's and family caregiver's quality of life independently contributed to the other's quality of life. Findings from this study suggest the importance of including both survivors and family caregivers in programs of care.

  8. Quality of life in Chinese family caregivers for elderly people with chronic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hui; Cheng, Cheng; Tao, Yisheng; Zhang, Jie; Robert, Delprino; Jia, Jihui; Su, Yonggang

    2016-07-06

    Inadequate studies have been conducted in China to examine quality of life in family caregivers. Quality of life in family caregivers for elderly people with chronic diseases was evaluated, and the demographic and characteristic factors of both elderly people and their caregivers were explored. The 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) was used to assess health-related quality of life in 407 family caregivers caring for elderly people with chronic diseases in six communities on the Mainland China. The explanatory variables included family caregivers' demographic and other caregiving variables related to eldercare. Descriptive statistics and multiple linear regression analysis were used in the data analysis, performed via SPSS 17.0. Mean SF-36 and physical and mental component scores were 66.14 ± 17.50, 70.06 ± 16.49, and 62.22 ± 18.51, respectively. The scores of caregivers' physical function and bodily pain were significantly higher, while the scores of caregivers' role limitations due to physical problems, general health, vitality, social function, mental health and role limitations due to emotional problems were significantly lower. Caregivers' ages, comorbidity, the perceived effects of caregiving on caregivers' social lives and elderly individuals' ages, marital status and Activities of Daily Living scores were significantly associated with the physical component score. In addition, caregivers' age, the affordability of the elderly person's healthcare expenses, the perceived effects of caregiving on caregivers' social lives, and elderly people's marital status and ADL scores were significantly associated with the mental component score. Family caregivers for elderly people with chronic diseases showed poorer mental and better physical well-being. Factors of both elderly people and their caregivers impact the caregivers' quality of life. These findings highlight the importance of addressing mental health of family caregivers, and of providing

  9. Communicating prognostic uncertainty in potential end-of-life contexts: experiences of family members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczyk, Marian; Gallagher, Romayne

    2016-07-12

    This article reports on the concept of "communicating prognostic uncertainty" which emerged from a mixed methods survey asking family members to rank their satisfaction in seven domains of hospital end-of-life care. Open-ended questions were embedded within a previously validated survey asking family members about satisfaction with end-of-life care. The purpose was to understand, in the participants' own words, the connection between their numerical rankings of satisfaction and the experience of care. Our study found that nearly half of all family members wanted more information about possible outcomes of care, including knowledge that the patient was "sick enough to die". Prognostic uncertainty was often poorly communicated, if at all. Inappropriate techniques included information being cloaked in confusing euphemisms, providing unwanted false hope, and incongruence between message and the aggressive level of care being provided. In extreme cases, these techniques left a legacy of uncertainty and suspicion. Family members expressed an awareness of both the challenges and benefits of communicating prognostic uncertainty. Most importantly, respondents who acknowledged that they would have resisted (or did) knowing that the patient was sick enough to die also expressed a retrospective understanding that they would have liked, and benefitted, from more prognostic information that death was a possible or probable outcome of the patient's admission. Family members who reported discussion of prognostic uncertainty also reported high levels of effective communication and satisfaction with care. They also reported long-term benefits of knowing the patient was sick enough to die. While a patient who is sick enough to die may survive to discharge, foretelling with family members in potential end of life contexts facilitates the development of a shared and desired prognostic awareness that the patient is nearing end of life.

  10. Factors influencing life satisfaction of Korean older adults living with family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sok, Sohyune R

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the factors influencing life satisfaction of Korean older adults living with family. Participants included 267 adults age 65 and older who met eligibility criteria. Analyses showed that the prediction model of the life satisfaction of older adults who are living with their family was significant (F=24.429, plife satisfaction was depression (beta=0.090), monthly pocket money (beta=0.060), and age (beta=0.040). It is possible that older adults' life satisfaction increases when they are provided with nursing interventions and are able to effectively manage their health. Nursing interventions must strive to improve their self-esteem and address their depression.

  11. Relations between life satisfaction, family and friendship satisfaction and religiosity in adolescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doralúcia Gil da Silva

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This work aimed to discuss relations between life satisfaction, family and friendship satisfaction and religiosity in a sample of adolescents. A record of sociodemographic data, a Multidimensional Scale of Life Satisfaction and a Positive and Negative Affect Scale were applied in 420 students (M= 14.91 years old; SD=1.65 from public schools of Porto Alegre. The results indicated that adolescents who reported having religion had higher life satisfaction, subjective well-being, and family and friendship satisfaction, all with significant differences. Religiosity and interpersonal relationships are factors that can act in a positive way and increase well-being perception by the adolescent. Implications about the form of to assess subjective well-being, as well as religiosity, are discussed.

  12. Childhood abuse affects emotional closeness with family in mid- and later life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savla, J Tina; Roberto, Karen A; Jaramillo-Sierra, Ana L; Gambrel, Laura Eubanks; Karimi, Hassan; Butner, L Michelle

    2013-06-01

    Knowledge about the effects of early life adversity on kin relationships in later years is sparse. The purpose of this study was to examine if childhood abuse and adversity negatively influences emotional closeness with family in mid- and later life. A second goal was to determine the role of psychosocial resources and personality traits in buffering the effects of early adversities. Gender and cohort differences were explored to see if men were differentially affected than women and whether middle-aged adults (35-49 years old) were differentially affected than older adults (50-74 years old) by the effects of childhood abuse and adversity. Using retrospective accounts of early family abuse and adversities of 1,266 middle aged adults and 1,219 older adults from a large population-based survey, the National Survey of Midlife Development in United States (MIDUS), separate multiple regression analyses were conducted for the two cohorts to examine the effects of childhood emotional and physical abuse and family adversities on perceived emotional closeness with family. Interaction effects between childhood abuse and adversity (e.g., being expelled from school, death of sibling, parental divorce, losing a home to a natural disaster) with psychosocial resources (perceived control and self acceptance), personality characteristics (extraversion and neuroticism), and gender were examined. Results of OLS regressions suggest emotional and physical abuse predicted family closeness in middle-aged adults. Conversely, only emotional abuse predicted family closeness in older adults. Moderation models revealed that high levels of self acceptance were associated with better maintenance of emotional closeness among middle-aged adults who were emotionally and physically abused as children. Older adults with lower extraversion who experienced emotional abuse or reported greater number of adversities in childhood were found to be at higher risk for lower emotional closeness with family

  13. Assessment of the quality of life in families with children who have intellectual and developmental disabilities in Slovenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagran, B; Schmidt, M; Brown, I

    2011-12-01

    Research was conducted, within the framework of the International Family Quality of Life Project, on the quality of life of families with a member who has a disability. We concentrated on the nine specific domains that the family life measure used, and recorded data from five of its six measurement dimensions: Importance, Opportunities, Initiative, Attainment and Satisfaction. The sample consisted of 20 families from Slovenia with children who have intellectual or developmental disabilities. The data were collected using the Family Quality of Life Survey-2006. Except for Community Interaction, the other domains (Health, Financial Well-Being, Family Relations, Support from Others, Support Services, Influence of Values, Careers, Leisure and Recreation) show statistically significant differences among the five dimensions measured. Importance was rated highest, and Attainment and Opportunities were rated lowest, while Initiative and Satisfaction were evaluated lower than Importance but higher than Attainment and Opportunities. Among the domains of family life, Family Relations was evaluated the highest from the perspective of all five dimensions. The family members rated Importance high for all of the quality of family life domains, but it appears from the lower Opportunities scores that their opportunities are limited; this may result in fewer possibilities for attaining a better quality of life. The results of our research are useful to Slovene researchers who work in the areas of special pedagogy and rehabilitation, politicians, non-governmental organisations and social services. The quality of life of families with children with disabilities, their empowerment and their inclusion into community life should be significantly enhanced when consideration is given to all the family members' support and service needs. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Mathematical Problems in Biology : Victoria Conference

    CERN Document Server

    1974-01-01

    A conference on "Some Mathematical Problems in Biology" was held at the University of Victoria, Victoria, B. C. , Canada, from May 7 - 10, 1973. The participants and invited speakers were mathematicians interested in problems of a biological nature, and scientists actively engaged in developing mathematical models in biological fields. One aim of the conference was to attempt to assess what the recent rapid growth of mathematical interaction with the biosciences has accomplished and may accomplish in the near future. The conference also aimed to expose the problems of communication bet~",een mathematicians and biological scientists, and in doing so to stimulate the interchange of ideas. It was recognised that the topic spans an enormous breadth, and little attempt was made to balance the very diverse areas. Widespread active interest was shown in the conference, and just over one hundred people registered. The varied departments and institutions across North America from which the participants came made it bo...

  15. Consistency of prediction across generation: explaining quality of life by family functioning and health-promoting behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Sehrish; Malik, Jamil A

    2015-09-01

    The study aimed to investigate the consistency of relationship between family functioning, health-promoting behaviors, and quality of life across generations in joint families. The sample comprises of 79 joint families (N = 316 members, n = 79 grandparents (grandfathers = 27, grandmothers = 52) n = 158 parents (fathers = 79, mothers = 79), and n = 79 grandchildren (girls = 61, boys = 18)). Data were collected on Self-Report Family Inventory, SFI, Health-Promoting Lifestyle Profile II, HPLP-II, and World Health Organization Quality of Life Scale BREF WHO QOL BREF. All three variables, i.e., family functioning, health-promoting behaviors, and quality of life, were modeled as latent variables. Analyses were conducted separately for each group. Results showed that in grandparents, family functioning predicted (β = .44, p life (R (2) = .85). Family functioning appears to have significant indirect effects (β = .34, p life. The model fit indices showed a good fit (IFI = .917, CFI = .910, RMSEA = .078) of the model of the data. For all other groups, i.e., fathers, mothers, and grandchildren, family functioning and health-promoting behaviors independently predicted quality of life (R (2) = .55, .67, and .54, respectively). Our results showed that family functioning and health-promoting behaviors are consistent predictors of quality of life across generations.

  16. The Deployment Life Study: Longitudinal Analysis of Military Families Across the Deployment Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadows, Sarah O; Tanielian, Terri; Karney, Benjamin; Schell, Terry; Griffin, Beth Ann; Jaycox, Lisa H; Friedman, Esther M; Trail, Thomas E; Beckman, Robin; Ramchand, Rajeev; Hengstebeck, Natalie; Troxel, Wendy M; Ayer, Lynsay; Vaughan, Christine Anne

    2017-01-01

    In 2009, RAND launched the Deployment Life Study, a longitudinal study of military families across a deployment cycle in order to assess family readiness. Family readiness refers to the state of being prepared to effectively navigate the challenges of daily living experienced in the unique context of military service. The study surveyed families at frequent intervals throughout a complete deployment cycle---before a service member deploys (sometimes months before), during the actual deployment, and after the service member returns (possibly a year or more after she or he redeployed). It assessed a number of outcomes over time, including: the quality of marital and parental relationshipsthe psychological, behavioral, and physical health of family memberschild and teen well-being (e.g., emotional, behavioral, social, and academic)military integration (e.g., attitudes toward military service, retention intentions).This culminating paper briefly reviews the study design and data collection procedures, presents results from analyses of the longitudinal data collected from some 2,700 military families, and offers recommendations for programs and future research related to military families. The research was jointly sponsored by the Office of the Surgeon General, U.S. Army, and by the Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury.

  17. Christian ethical perspectives on marriage and family life in modern Western culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.M. Vorster

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The past four decades witnessed a tremendous and wide-ranging change in family patterns in Western societies. Amongst these changes are phenomena such as growing number of divorces, births out-of-wedlock, and the absence of fathers because of globalisation, same-sex marriages and cohabitation of people without a marriage contract. Western societies are typified as “highdivorce societies”. Furthermore, in the United States the number of couples cohabiting has increased eightfold since 1970 and it is fair to conclude that the situation is similar in other Western societies. The purpose of the article is to deal with these patterns from a Reformed perspective. The central theoretical argument is that these developments can be perceived as a crisis in view of the Biblical perspectives on marriage and family life. However, the Biblical perspectives not only offer a clear indication of healthy marriage and family life entail, but also indicate that a Christian attitude in marriage and family life can serve as a remedy for the damage caused by the new trends.

  18. Concordance of Family and Staff Member Reports about End of Life in Assisted Living and Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Shayna E.; Williams, Christianna S.; Zimmerman, Sheryl

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To identify differences in perspectives that may complicate the process of joint decision making at the end of life, this study determined the agreement of family and staff perspectives about end-of-life experiences in nursing homes and residential care/assisted living communities and whether family and staff roles, involvement in care,…

  19. Pancam Peek into 'Victoria Crater' (Stereo)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left-eye view of a stereo pair for PIA08776 [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right-eye view of a stereo pair for PIA08776 A drive of about 60 meters (about 200 feet) on the 943rd Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's exploration of Mars' Meridiani Planum region (Sept. 18, 2006) brought the NASA rover to within about 50 meters (about 160 feet) of the rim of 'Victoria Crater.' This crater has been the mission's long-term destination for the past 21 Earth months. Opportunity reached a location from which the cameras on top of the rover's mast could begin to see into the interior of Victoria. This stereo anaglyph was made from frames taken on sol 943 by the panoramic camera (Pancam) to offer a three-dimensional view when seen through red-blue glasses. It shows the upper portion of interior crater walls facing toward Opportunity from up to about 850 meters (half a mile) away. The amount of vertical relief visible at the top of the interior walls from this angle is about 15 meters (about 50 feet). The exposures were taken through a Pancam filter selecting wavelengths centered on 750 nanometers. Victoria Crater is about five times wider than 'Endurance Crater,' which Opportunity spent six months examining in 2004, and about 40 times wider than 'Eagle Crater,' where Opportunity first landed. The great lure of Victoria is the expectation that a thick stack of geological layers will be exposed in the crater walls, potentially several times the thickness that was previously studied at Endurance and therefore, potentially preserving several times the historical record.

  20. Family asthma management routines: connections to medical adherence and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiese, Barbara H; Wamboldt, Frederick S; Anbar, Ran D

    2005-02-01

    To develop a reliable measure of asthma management routines and examine its association with health care utilization, medical adherence, and quality of life. Families (n = 153) with a child with asthma, drawn from two sites, participated in the study. Parents completed the Asthma Routines Questionnaire, Adherence to Clinical Trials interview, Functional Severity of Asthma Questionnaire, and Caregiver Quality of Life. Children completed the Pediatric Quality of Life. Electronic monitoring of medication use over a period of 12 months was available for children at one study site. A principal component factor analysis revealed two dimensions to the Asthma Routines Questionnaire: Medication Routines and Routine Burden. Medication Routines were related to medical adherence and to health care utilization. Routine Burden was related to caregiver and child quality of life. The Asthma Routine Questionnaire holds promise as a reliable assessment of family practices related to medication use. The emotional burden of daily care can be distinguished from medication use, which is more closely linked to adherence issues. Targeted questions during regular care may reveal family routine practices amenable to intervention.

  1. Impact of cleft lip and/or palate in children on family quality of life before and after reconstructive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macho, P; Bohac, M; Fedeles, J; Fekiacova, D; Fedeles, J

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of cleft lip/palate children together with consequent treatment on quality of family life using standardized questionnaire. Different to previous studies the evaluation of quality of family life by questionnaire was realized twice in the same group of families (before the reconstructive surgery and several months after palatoplasty). The study was conducted in 40 families divided in two groups: 20 families with children with cleft lip (CL), 20 families with children with cleft lip and palate (CLP). The questionnaire of the Impact on Family Scale was used for evaluation of the influence of orofacial clefts on parent´s quality of life. Evaluations were made at the second month of child´s life and at one year of child´s life with reciprocally comparison. The higher impact of children with CLP on quality of family life was noted at 2 months and 1 year of child's age as compared to the impact of children with CL. The reduction of impact on quality of life after surgical correction was observed in families of children with CL at one year of child's age. This decrease of influence on family quality of life was due to significantly lower impact in strain and economic dimensions in families with CL children after operation. However, in the group of families with CLP children no significant changes in the impact on family quality of life were noted when compared to the values before and shortly after the reconstructive surgery. This study showed that orofacial clefts in children influence markedly the quality of their family life. The higher impact of children with CLP on quality of family life as compared to children with CL was noted and this impact in CLP group was not influenced shortly after reconstructive surgery. It is suggested that appropriate medical care in Cleft Centre with special psychological support may lead to improvement in quality of life for families with cleft lip and palate children (Tab. 2, Fig. 2, Ref

  2. Communication with Residents and Families in Nursing Homes at the End of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Samantha; Bott, Marjorie J

    2016-04-01

    Communication with residents and their families is important to ensure that the end-of-life experience is in accordance with resident's wishes. A secondary analysis was conducted to determine: (a) who should communicate with the resident/family about death and dying; (b) when communication should occur around death and dying, obtaining a "DNR" order, and obtaining a hospice referral; and (c) what differences exist in communication about death and dying between Registered Nurses (RNs), Licensed Practical Nurses (LPNs), and unlicensed staff. Greater than 90% of staff (N=2,191) reported that the physician or social worker should communicate about death and dying with residents/families, but only 53% thought that direct care staff should talk with them. Weighted scores for "When communication should occur about death and dying and obtaining a 'DNR' Order" revealed significantly (p care-planning meeting, or when the resident's family requested it. No differences were found between staff on communication about obtaining a hospice referral. The identified gaps in perception about who should be communicating can assist in developing appropriate interventions that need future testing. The potential for training regarding communication strategies and techniques could lead to higher satisfaction with end-of-life care for residents and their families.

  3. Parental antagonism and parent-offspring co-adaptation interact to shape family life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meunier, Joël; Kölliker, Mathias

    2012-10-07

    The family is an arena for conflicts between offspring, mothers and fathers that need resolving to promote the evolution of parental care and the maintenance of family life. Co-adaptation is known to contribute to the resolution of parent-offspring conflict over parental care by selecting for combinations of offspring demand and parental supply that match to maximize the fitness of family members. However, multiple paternity and differences in the level of care provided by mothers and fathers can generate antagonistic selection on offspring demand (mediated, for example, by genomic imprinting) and possibly hamper co-adaptation. While parent-offspring co-adaptation and parental antagonism are commonly considered two major processes in the evolution of family life, their co-occurrence and the evolutionary consequences of their joint action are poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate the simultaneous and entangled effects of these two processes on outcomes of family interactions, using a series of breeding experiments in the European earwig, Forficula auricularia, an insect species with uniparental female care. As predicted from parental antagonism, we show that paternally inherited effects expressed in offspring influence both maternal care and maternal investment in future reproduction. However, and as expected from the entangled effects of parental antagonism and co-adaptation, these effects critically depended on postnatal interactions with caring females and maternally inherited effects expressed in offspring. Our results demonstrate that parent-offspring co-adaptation and parental antagonism are entangled key drivers in the evolution of family life that cannot be fully understood in isolation.

  4. Upbringing with a TV set in the background. Of television in everyday family life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PATRYCJA HANYGA-JANCZAK

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Contemporarily, television is the most popular of all mass media and watching it is the most frequent way of spending leisure time. It seems that no one argues for a positive role of television in family life anymore, with complete lack of contact with television being disadvantageous to the family, as well. The opportunity to use television increases self-esteem and allows for participation in what is going on in the country and in the world; it is, therefore, worth it to make use of its benefits reasonably

  5. Parent Perceived Impact of Spaniard Boys' and Girls' Inattention, Hyperactivity, and Oppositional Defiant Behaviors on Family Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauermeister, Jose J.; Puente, Anibal; Martinez, Jose V.; Cumba, Eduardo; Scandar, Ruben O.; Bauermeister, Jose A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This study examined the impact of inattention, hyperactivity, and oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) behaviors and gender on family life. Method: We created scales for the Family Experiences Inventory (FEI) in a nonclinical sample of Spaniard families with children ages 6 to 12 years (N = 369) and analyzed the perceived impact of these…

  6. Quality of Life of Families with Children Who Have Severe Developmental Disabilities: A Comparison Based on Child Residence

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFelea, Joni Taylor; Raver, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    This study measured the quality of life of two groups of families with children who had severe developmental disabilities-families whose child lived at home and families whose child lived in a residential facility. Participants were 54 primary caregivers of children who had severe intellectual disabilities and who lacked the ability to both…

  7. The interaction of family background and personal education on depressive symptoms in later life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaan, Barbara

    2014-02-01

    This study assesses the interaction between personal education and family background during childhood on depressive symptoms in later life by applying Ross & Mirowsky's resource substitution and structural amplification theory of health and education. OLS regression models are estimated using data from the "Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe" (SHARE), which covers information on current social and health status as well as retrospective life histories from 20,716 respondents aged 50 or older from thirteen European countries. Higher education helps to overcome the negative consequences of a poor family background. Since people from poor families are less likely to attain higher educational levels, they lack exactly the resource they need in order to overcome the negative consequences their non-prosperous background has on depressive symptoms. Thus, low family background and low personal education amplify each other. Examining the processes described by theory of resource substitution and structural amplification over different age groups from midlife to old-age suggests that the moderating effect of education remains constant over age among people coming from a poor family background. However, there is some evidence for a decrease with age in the buffering effect of a well-off family background on depressive symptoms among the low educated group. Furthermore, the educational gap in depression diverges with age among individuals originating from a well-off family background. Taken together the results cautiously allude to the conclusion that three processes - cumulative (dis-)advantage, age-as-leveler, and persistent inequalities - might take place. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Impact of psoriasis severity on family income and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawro, T; Zalewska, A; Hawro, M; Kaszuba, A; Królikowska, M; Maurer, M

    2015-03-01

    Psoriasis is a common disease and the costs of its therapy, medical care and loss of productivity are a major financial burden for patients and society. The financial status of psoriasis patients and its relationship with disease severity and quality of life (QoL) remains ill characterized. The aim of this study was to assess the economic status of psoriasis patients and to investigate its correlation with disease severity and its impact on QoL. A total of 83 (45 male) psoriasis patients, treated at a Polish specialty clinic, were assessed for their financial and employment status. QoL was measured with a generic (WHOQOL-BREF) and a skin disease-related QoL instrument (dermatology life quality index--DLQI). The effects of demographic and clinical variables, including disease severity measured by Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI), on the family income of patients were analyzed by multiple logistic regression. The mediating effect of family income between PASI and QoL was assessed by using the Baron and Kenny's procedure. Patients' family income correlate negatively with psoriasis severity (Spearman's rho = -0.356; P family income below the social minimum was significantly higher (PASI: 20.5 ± 12.2) than in patients with a higher family income (PASI: 11.7 ± 7.7, P family income (P Family income was found to link disease severity to global QoL impairment (P < 0.05). Disease severity negatively affects the financial status of psoriasis patients, which in turn, is a mediator of global QoL impairment. Our findings are alarming and call for long-term solutions that equalize employment opportunities for patients with psoriasis. © 2014 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  9. [Quality of life of family caregivers of adults with spinal cord injury: a systematic review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prudente, Cejane Oliveira Martins; Ribeiro, Maysa Ferreira Martins; Porto, Celmo Celeno

    2017-01-01

    The scope of this study was to analyze the quality of life of family caregivers of adults with spinal cord injury. Two researchers conducted a systematic review independently, based on articles published between 2000 to 2014, using the key words quality of life and caregivers or family and spinal cord, in Portuguese, English and Spanish. The search was conducted in the Virtual Health Library (BVS) and the United States National Library of Medicine (PubMED) databases. Caregivers of tetraplegics have a worse quality of life than caregivers of paraplegics. Changes in the quality of life for the caregivers were not significant over time. Different results were observed when comparing caregivers of adults with spinal cord injury and healthy subjects. Factors that negatively influence the quality of life of caregivers were the presence of chronic disease; greater care time, age and number of children; and lower schooling level of caregivers. There is a need for public health policy development and preparation of more comprehensive intervention strategies that include not only the patient but also the caregiver.

  10. Effects of depressive symptoms and family satisfaction on health related quality of life: the Hong Kong FAMILY study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hairong Nan

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To examine the effect of depressive symptoms and satisfaction with family support (FS on physical and mental Health Related Quality of Life (HRQoL. METHODS: Data were obtained from the Hong Kong FAMILY Project baseline survey in 2009-2011, which included 16,039 community residents (age ≥ 20. The FS was measured using the Family Adaptation, Partnership, Growth, Affection, Resolve (APGAR, range 0-10 Questionnaire. HRQoL were assessed using the SF-12 version 2. Depressive symptoms were recorded using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9. Demographic and lifestyle variables, stressful life events, perceived neighborhood cohesion were also assessed. RESULTS: In a multilevel regression model, socio-demographic and behavioral variables explained 21% and 19% of the variance in physical and mental HRQoL. The presence of depressive symptoms (PHQ-9 score ≥ 10, standardized coefficients, β of -1.73 and high FS (APGAR score 7-10, 1.15 were associated with mental HRQoL, after adjustment for age, education, household monthly income, drinking status, physical activity, chronic conditions, life stress and neighborhood cohesion. Not FS but the presence of depressive symptoms (β of -0.88 was associated with physical HRQoL. The presence of depressive symptoms in women than men were more associated with a poorer physical HRQoL (p<0.01 while depressive symptoms in men were associated with a decrease in mental HRQoL (p<0.001. The interaction between FS and depressive symptoms was nonsignificant in relation to HRQoL. Among those with depressive symptoms, high FS was associated with a better mental HRQoL (41.1 vs. 37.9, p<0.001 in women but not contribute to variance in men. CONCLUSIONS: Higher FS and presence of depressive symptoms were significantly associated with HRQoL in general population in Hong Kong. Among those with depressive symptoms, high FS was associated with a favorable mental HRQoL in women but not men.

  11. Assessment of Family Functioning and Its Relationship to Quality of Life in Diabetic and Non-Diabetic Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azmoude, Elham; Tafazoli, Mahin; Parnan, Azam

    2016-09-01

    Introduction: One of the most important components and health indicators, especially among people with chronic diseases is quality of life. One of the possible factors which may impact on quality of life of diabetic patients is family functioning. This study aimed to determine the relationship between family functioning and quality of life of diabetic and non-diabetic women. Methods: In this correlational cross-sectional study, 180 women (diabetics and non-diabetics) who referred to health centers in Mashhad in 2014-2015 were studied. Data were collected using SF-36 questionnaire and Mc Master Family Assessment Device (FAD). Data were analyzed using descriptive and statistical tests by SPSS ver.13 software. Results: The result showed that diabetic women reported family impairment compared with none diabetic women. There was a significant relationship between the family functioning and quality of life in diabetics and non-diabetic women. Based on the results of the stepwise regression model, among factors of family function only the factor of behavioral control was able to predict the quality of life in diabetic women. Conclusion: Regarding the study findings, good family function associated with better quality of life in diabetics and healthy women. Therefore, due to disturbed family function in diabetic's women implementation of training programs and consulting services could improve their quality of life.

  12. Assessment of Family Functioning and Its Relationship to Quality of Life in Diabetic and Non-Diabetic Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Azmoude

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: One of the most important components and health indicators, especially among people with chronic diseases is quality of life. One of the possible factors which may impact on quality of life of diabetic patients is family functioning. This study aimed to determine the relationship between family functioning and quality of life of diabetic and non-diabetic women. Methods: In this correlational cross-sectional study, 180 women (diabetics and non-diabetics who referred to health centers in Mashhad in 2014-2015 were studied. Data were collected using SF-36 questionnaire and Mc Master Family Assessment Device (FAD. Data were analyzed using descriptive and statistical tests by SPSS ver.13 software. Results: The result showed that diabetic women reported family impairment compared with none diabetic women. There was a significant relationship between the family functioning and quality of life in diabetics and non-diabetic women. Based on the results of the stepwise regression model, among factors of family function only the factor of behavioral control was able to predict the quality of life in diabetic women. Conclusion: Regarding the study findings, good family function associated with better quality of life in diabetics and healthy women. Therefore, due to disturbed family function in diabetic’s women implementation of training programs and consulting services could improve their quality of life.

  13. Assessment of Family Functioning and Its Relationship to Quality of Life in Diabetic and Non-Diabetic Women

    OpenAIRE

    Elham Azmoude; Mahin Tafazoli; Azam Parnan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: One of the most important components and health indicators, especially among people with chronic diseases is quality of life. One of the possible factors which may impact on quality of life of diabetic patients is family functioning. This study aimed to determine the relationship between family functioning and quality of life of diabetic and non-diabetic women. Methods: In this correlational cross-sectional study, 180 women (diabetics...

  14. Psychological Well-Being and Family Environment of Siblings of Children with Life Threatening Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphrey, Lisa M; Hill, Douglas L; Carroll, Karen W; Rourke, Mary; Kang, Tammy I; Feudtner, Chris

    2015-11-01

    The psychological well-being of siblings of children with life threatening illness remains largely uncharted. Pediatric cancer research suggests that a supportive family environment may protect the psychological well-being of siblings. We hypothesized that (1) siblings of pediatric palliative care patients would show clinical/behavioral scores that were elevated but that rates of serious psychopathology would be comparable to the general population of children their age; and (2) higher family functioning scores would be associated with lower clinical scores and higher adaptive scores for these siblings. We conducted an observational study with families in which a patient receiving palliative care had one or more siblings between the ages of 6 and 11. Parents completed the Behavioral Assessment System for Children, Second Edition (BASC-2) to assess the siblings' psychological well-being and the Family Assessment Device (FAD) to assess the family environment. Twenty-four parents reported data for 30 siblings. Only three siblings scored in the clinical range on a BASC-2 composite clinical scale, and 11 siblings scored in the at-risk range on one or more composite scales. Higher FAD scores predicted significantly higher externalization composite clinical scores (7.54, 95% CI: 1.12, 13.97, p family environment would be associated with higher levels of psychological health was supported.

  15. Depression and resilience mediates the effect of family function on quality of life of the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Canjie; Yuan, Lexin; Lin, Weiquan; Zhou, Ying; Pan, Shengmao

    2017-07-01

    Family function, which improves individual resilience and strongly link to quality of life (QOL) among the elderly, increases the risk of depression. Because of these demonstrated relationships, it can be hypothesized that both depression and resilience are mediators of the association between family function and QOL. To test this hypothesis, the structural equation model (SEM) constructed by Amos 21.0 was employed to assess the indirect effect of depression (Geriatric Depression Scale, GDS) and resilience (Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale, CD-RISC) on the relationship between family function (Family APGAR Score, APGAR) and QOL (12-item Short Form health survey, SF-12) in 474 elderly adults from three communities in Guangzhou, China. Correlation matrix showed that depression is significantly negatively correlated with family functioning (r=-0.54, Pfamily functioning (r=0.35, PFamily functioning appeared to have significant indirect effects through resilience (β=0.089) and depression (β=0.307; combined β=0.056) on QOL (R 2 =0.55). The model fit indices showed a good fit of the model of the data (χ 2 /df=1.362, P>0.05, SRMR=0.023, RMSEA=0.028, GFI=0.985, NFI=0.987, TLI=0.993, CFI=0.996). The finding supports the assumption that depression and resilience are consistent intermediary factors of the relationship between family function and QOL among the elderly. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Family Cohesion, Stigma, and Quality of Life in Dyads of Children With Epilepsy and Their Parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Teresa P; Crespo, Carla A; Austin, Joan K

    2017-07-01

    To examine the mediating role of stigma on the links between family cohesion and quality of life (QoL) in children with epilepsy and their parents. Participants were 192 families attending three Portuguese public hospitals. Children and parents completed self-report measures of family cohesion, stigma, QoL, and health-related QoL (HRQoL). Neurologists assessed clinical variables. Structural equation modeling within the framework of the actor-partner interdependence model was used. The final model showed a good fit to the data, explaining 43% and 35% of the QoL outcomes of children and parents, respectively. Family cohesion was positively linked to QoL outcomes, directly for children and parents, and indirectly for children only, by way of negative links with perceived stigma. At the dyadic level, parents' perceptions of family cohesion were positively associated with children's HRQoL. A routine screening of those patients experiencing poorer HRQoL should include the assessment of family relationships and stigma.

  17. Anterior Urethral Stricture Disease Negatively Impacts the Quality of Life of Family Members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan R. Weese

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To quantify the quality of life (QoL distress experienced by immediate family members of patients with urethral stricture via a questionnaire given prior to definitive urethroplasty. The emotional, social, and physical effects of urethral stricture disease on the QoL of family members have not been previously described. Materials and Methods. A questionnaire was administered prospectively to an immediate family member of 51 patients undergoing anterior urethroplasty by a single surgeon (SBB. The survey was comprised of twelve questions that addressed the emotional, social, and physical consequences experienced as a result of their loved one. Results. Of the 51 surveyed family members, most were female (92.2%, lived in the same household (86.3%, and slept in the same room as the patient (70.6%. Respondents experienced sleep disturbances (56.9% and diminished social lives (43.1%. 82.4% felt stressed by the patient’s surgical treatment, and 83.9% (26/31 felt that their intimacy was negatively impacted. Conclusions. Urethral stricture disease has a significant impact on the family members of those affected. These effects may last decades and include sleep disturbance, decreased social interactions, emotional stress, and impaired sexual intimacy. Treatment of urethral stricture disease should attempt to mitigate the impact of the disease on family members as well as the patient.

  18. 'Being a presence': The ways in which family support workers encompass, embrace, befriend, accompany and endure with families of life-limited children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Bernie; Edwards, Maria; Hunt, Anne

    2015-09-01

    Children with life-limiting and disabling conditions are surviving longer than previously, and many require palliative and supportive care, usually at home. Home-based care can put family life under considerable strain, as parents care for their child's complex, often unpredictable, continuing care needs. Rainbow Trust Children's Charity aims to bridge gaps in services for children with life-threatening or terminal conditions by providing family support workers (FSWs). The study used a range of methods (surveys, interviews and ethnographic observation) approach to explore key aspects of the work of the FSWs. The target population for the surveys was families with a child having complex, life-threatening or terminal conditions receiving care from FSWs. The participants included 55 families (12 bereaved) and 39 children aged 2-18 years. Thematic analysis revealed how the FSWs became a presence in families' lives in three main ways: (1) encompassing and embracing families through supporting needs and promoting resilience; (2) befriending and bonding through developing knowledge, trusting relationships and a sense of closeness; and (3) accompanying and enduring by 'being with' families in different settings, situations and crises and by enduring alongside the families. The study demonstrated the fundamental importance of workers who are able to provide aspects of support that is usually not provided by other services. © The Author(s) 2013.

  19. Repercussions of child cancer in the daily life of a family caregiver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduarda Gayoso Meira Suassuna de Medeiros

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available It aims at investigating the effects of cancer diagnosis in the everyday life of families whose children have neoplasm. This is a qualitative study with exploratory-descriptive focus, with semi-structured interview as a tool for gathering information. The research was conducted at the University Hospital and the Institute of Paraiba Against Cancer, both located in Campina Grande/Paraíba, Brazil, between July and September 2012. The empirical material was analyzed following proposed content analysis. Results showed that the quality of social life, psychological symptoms and personal growth were affected. We concluded that caring for a relative with neoplasm, especially if this is a child, it is a challenge for the family. However, it is possible to build good experiences living with the sick child and face the disease as an opportunity for personal growth.

  20. Exploring midwifery students' views and experiences of caseload midwifery: A cross-sectional survey conducted in Victoria, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Kate; Newton, Michelle; Forster, Della; McLachlan, Helen

    2015-02-01

    in Australia, models of maternity care that offer women continuity of care with a known midwife have been promoted. Little is known about the intentions of the future midwifery workforce to work in such models. This study aimed to explore midwifery students' views and experiences of caseload midwifery and their work intentions in relation to the caseload model following graduation. cross-sectional survey. Victoria, Australia. 129 midwifery students representing all midwifery course pathways (Post Graduate Diploma, Bachelor of Midwifery, Bachelor of Nursing/Bachelor of Midwifery) in Victoria. midwifery students from all course pathways considered that continuity of care is important to women and indicated that exposure to continuity models during their course was very positive. Two-thirds of the students (67%) considered that the continuity experiences made them want to work in a caseload model; only 5% reported that their experiences had discouraged them from continuity of care work in the future. Most wanted a period of consolidation to gain experience as a midwife prior to commencing in the caseload model. Perceived barriers to caseload work were being on-call, and challenges in regard to work/life balance and family commitments. midwifery students in this study were very positive about caseload midwifery and most would consider working in caseload after a period of consolidation. Continuity of care experiences during students' midwifery education programmes appeared to provide students with insight and understanding of continuity of care for both women and midwives. Further research should explore what factors influence students' future midwifery work, whether or not their plans are fulfilled, and whether or not the caseload midwifery workforce can be sustained. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. [Compatibility of Work and Family Life: Survey of Physicians in the Munich Metropolitan Area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauchart, Meike; Ascher, Philipp; Kesel, Karin; Weber, Sabine; Grabein, Beatrice; Schneeweiss, Bertram; Fischer-Truestedt, Cordula; Schoenberg, Michael; Rogler, Gudrun; Borelli, Claudia

    2017-05-15

    Aim Investigation of the compatibility of work and family life for physicians in the Munich metropolitan area. Methods Survey of a representative sample of 1,800 physicians using a questionnaire. Results Men were less satisfied (7% very satisfied vs. 21%) with compatibility between work and family life than women. The group least satisfied overall was hospital-based physicians (p=0.000, chi-square=122.75). Women rather than men cut back their career due to children, perceived their professional advancement as impaired, desisted from establishing private practice or quit hospital employment altogether. Respondents strove for flexible childcare and makeshift solution if the established service failed. Most did not have that at their disposal. Hospital-based physicians wished for predictable working hours, and would like to have a say in the structure of their schedule. For the majority this was not the case. While for 80% it would be important to participate in the definition of their working hours, this was only possible in 17%. 86% found the opportunity to work part-time important, but many doctors (more than 30%) did not have that option. The biggest help for office-based physicians would be an expedited procedure by the Bavarian Association of Statutory Health Insurance Physicians (KVB) when applying for a proxy. The second most important would be the ability to hand over on-call duties. 36% of respondents felt that compatibility of work and family life was best achieved outside of patient care, during residency 42% believed this to be the case. Only 6% of physicians felt the best compatibility to be achieved in a hospital. Among the physician owners of practices, 34% considered their model to be the best way to reconcile both aspects of life. Conclusion More flexible options for childcare and more influence on the definition of working hours are necessary in order to better reconcile work and family life. For office-based physicians it must be made easier to

  2. Maintaining everyday life in a family with a dying parent: Teenagers' experiences of adapting to responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melcher, Ulrica; Sandell, Rolf; Henriksson, Anette

    2015-12-01

    Teenagers are living through a turbulent period in their development, when they are breaking away from the family to form their own identities, and so they are particularly vulnerable to the stressful situation of having a parent affected by a progressive and incurable illness. The current study sought to gain more knowledge about the ways that teenagers themselves describe living in a family with a seriously ill and dying parent. More specifically, the aims were to describe how teenagers are emotionally affected by everyday life in a family with a dying parent and to determine how they attempt to adapt to this situation. The study employed a descriptive and interpretive design using qualitative content analysis. A total of 10 teenagers (aged 14-19 years, 7 boys and 3 girls) participated through repeated, individual, informal interviews that were carried out as free-ranging conversations. While contending with their own vulnerable developmental period of life, the teenagers were greatly affected by their parent's illness and took on great responsibility for supporting their parents and siblings, and for maintaining family life. Lacking sufficient information and support left them rather unprepared, having to guess and to interpret the vague signs of failing health on their own, with feelings of uncertainty and loneliness as a consequence. Support from healthcare professionals should be designed to help and encourage parents to have open communications about their illness with their teenaged children. Our results add further support to the literature, reinforcing the need for an approach that uses a systemic perspective and considers the family to be the appropriate unit of care and offers a suitable support system.

  3. The 1993 Indonesian Family Life Survey: Appendix B, Community-Facility Questionnaires and Interviewer Manual. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-04-01

    student parents in school to discuss problems related with students and school. h. Make comparative study School principal, in order to increase ...contains information on the First and Second Malaysian Family Life Surveys conducted in 1976-1977 and in 1988-1989. Subsequent information about the...pressure ? 2. History of diabetes ? 3. History of heart disease ? 4. Any hereditary disease ? 5. Do you smoke

  4. RELIGIOUS LIFE OF THE DOSTOEVSKY FAMILY (1867—1881 IN THE MEMOIRS BY A. G. DOSTOEVSKY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yarysheva I. S.

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The article touches upon the theme of religious beliefs of F. M. Dostoevsky which has been widely discussed since the late 19th century till now. Religious life of the family of Dostoevsky is revealed through the memoirs (Diary and Memoirs of the person F. M. Dostoevsky was closest to during the period from 1867 to 1881, i. e. his wife A. G. Dostoevsky.

  5. The Impact of Economic Migration on Children's Cognitive Development: Evidence from the Mexican Family Life Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Elizabeth T. Powers

    2011-01-01

    This paper uses data from the Mexican Family Life Survey to estimate the impact of a household member's migration to the United States on the cognitive development of children remaining in Mexico. While there is no developmental effect of a child's sibling migrating to the United States, there is an adverse effect when another household member-typically the child's parent- migrates. This is particularly true for pre-school to early-school-age children with older siblings, for whom the effect ...

  6. The quality of life of family caregivers of cancer patients in the east of Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacialioglu, Nazli; Ozer, Nadiye; Yilmaz Karabulutlu, Elanur; Erdem, Neşe; Erci, Behice

    2010-07-01

    In this study, the aim was to examine the quality of life of family caregivers of cancer patients in the east of Turkey. The study design was descriptive. Data were collected by the researcher in Oncology-Hematology policlinic and Chemotherapy unit of Yakutiye Research Hospital of Atatürk University. Participants were 18 years old and older. The sample included 106 family caregivers who were living in the same flat with the patients during caregiving. Data were collected using a questionnaire that included sociodemographic questions for family caregivers and the World Health Organization Quality of Life-Short Form, Turkish Version (WHOQOL-BREF TR). The mean domain scores of WHOQOL-BREF(TR) were 70.12 (SD=19.24) for social, 68.26 (SD=20.10) for physical, 59.70 (SD=18.07) for psychological, 56.32 (SD=15.12) for national environment, and 53.87 (SD=16.99) for environment domains. About 71.7% of caregivers shared the caregiving process with someone else. Environmental domain scores of those who shared the caregiving process with someone else were higher. The environment domain scores of men (49.6, SD=17.1) were lower than those of women. As the income lowers, lowered, so did the quality of life score in every domain. The quality of life scores of those feeling unhealthy during the last two weeks were low in every domain. Physical and psychological health of family caregivers in assisted living facilities should be comprehensively supported by professionals.

  7. Small Science: Infants and Toddlers Experiencing Science in Everyday Family Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikder, Shukla; Fleer, Marilyn

    2015-06-01

    Vygotsky (1987) stated that the restructured form of everyday concepts learned at home and in the community interact with scientific concepts introduced in formal school settings, leading to a higher level of scientific thinking for school-aged children. But, what does this mean for the scientific learning of infants and toddlers? What kinds of science learning are afforded at home during this early period of life? The study reported in this paper sought to investigate the scientific development of infants-toddlers (10 to 36 months) growing up in Bangladeshi families living in Australia and Singapore. Four families were studied over 2 years. Digital video observations were made of everyday family life and analysed using Vygotsky's theoretical framework of everyday concepts and scientific concepts (51 h of digital observations). While there are many possibilities for developing scientific concepts in infants-toddlers' everyday life, our study found four categories of what we have called small science: multiple possibilities for science; discrete science; embedded science and counter intuitive science. The findings of this study contribute to the almost non-existent literature into infants and toddlers' scientific development and advance new understandings of early childhood science education.

  8. Social stigma and compounded losses: quality-of-life issues for multiple-birth families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellison, Marcia A; Hall, Janet E

    2003-08-01

    To determine the quality-of-life domains most impacted by multiple births. Focus groups, qualitative research. Human volunteers in a medical research environment.Forty-three mothers, 29 raising multiple-birth children, 13 raising singletons, identified from random and convenience samples. None. Maternal self-reports of the psychosocial sequelae of multiple or singleton births, based on qualitative data analysis of transcribed group discussions. The quality-of-life domains that were most impacted by raising multiple birth children were social stigma, pregnancy loss, marital satisfaction, children's health, unmet family needs, parenting stress, maternal depression, and the infertility experience. Qualitative methods identified two novel quality-of-life domains in iatrogenic multiple birth families: social stigma and compounded losses. An unexpected finding was the potential for increased marital solidification as parents coped with the inordinate stresses of multiple births. As anticipated, children's health, unmet family needs, maternal depression, and parental stress were key areas of concern. In addition, the infertility experience had a lasting impact. These findings are significant, given that at least 38% of all assisted conceptions result in a multiple birth. This study lays the groundwork for further research on the impact of iatrogenic multiple births.

  9. End-of-life care in intensive care units: family routines and environmental factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridh, Isabell; Forsberg, Anna; Bergbom, Ingegerd

    2007-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe family care routines and to explore environmental factors when patients die in Swedish intensive care units (ICUs). The main research questions were: what are the physical environmental circumstances and facilities when caring for patients in end-of-life and are there any routines or guidelines when caring for dying patients and their families? A questionnaire was sent to 79 eligible Swedish ICUs in December 2003, addressed to the unit managers. The response rate was 94% (n = 74 units). The findings show that, despite recommendations highlighting the importance of privacy for dying ICU patients and their families, only 11% of the respondents stated that patients never died in shared rooms in their ICU. If a patient dies in a shared room, nurses strive to ensure a dignified goodbye by moving the body to an empty room or to one specially designated for this purpose. The majority (76%) of the units had waiting rooms within the ICU. The study also revealed that there is a need for improvements in the follow-up routines for bereaved families. Many units reported (51%) that they often or almost always offer a follow-up visit, although in most cases the bereaved family had to initiate the follow-up by contacting the ICU. Guidelines in the area of end-of-life care were used by 25% of the ICUs. Further research is necessary to acquire a deeper knowledge of the circumstances under which patients die in ICUs and what impact the ICU environment has on bereaved families.

  10. A possibility for strengthening family life and health: Family members' lived experience when a sick child receives home care in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castor, Charlotte; Landgren, Kajsa; Hansson, Helena; Kristensson Hallström, Inger

    2018-03-01

    Families often prefer home care to hospital care, and home-care services for ill children are increasing worldwide with limited knowledge of families' needs during curative and palliative home care. The aim of this study was to elucidate family members' lived experience when a sick child received home care from county-based primary healthcare services. A descriptive qualitative design was chosen and 12 families including sick children receiving home care and their mothers, fathers and siblings in the south of Sweden were interviewed between December 2015 and January 2017. The transcribed interviews were analysed using a hermeneutic phenomenological approach. The family members' lived experience was described in three essential themes: "Strengthening family life" relates to how home care induced freedom and luxury in a strained period of life and supported the families' everyday life. Usual social activities and relations were maintained as time and energy was saved when receiving home care. "Promoting health" relates to how the family members' burden of illness decreased as the child's signs of illness alleviated and the well-being of the whole family increased when the child received care in the home. This provided a peaceful respite for family members' psychosocial recovery. The third theme, "Creating alliances," relates to the importance of creating trustful alliances for communicating participation in care. If trustful alliances were not created, parents felt an overwhelming responsibility and family members became anxious. The findings suggest that care in the family's home is a useful complement to hospital care. Home care should be given with close attention to family members' needs and conditions, as positive effects of home care might be jeopardised when expectations and possibilities are not successfully shared. © 2017 The Authors. Health and Social Care in the Community Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Dementia and its influence on quality of life and what it means to be valued: family members' perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyle, Wendy; Murfield, Jenny; Venturto, Lorraine; Griffiths, Susan; Grimbeek, Peter; McAllister, Margaret; Marshall, Jenni

    2014-05-01

    This pragmatic, exploratory qualitative study, as part of a larger funded research project, sought to explore families' perspectives on what it means to value a person with dementia and how this value might influence the quality of life of people with dementia. In-depth interviews were conducted with 20 family members who used one long-term care service provider in Australia. Families described the factors influencing a positive quality of life for the person with dementia as being related to the environment and, in particular, to the resident's room, supportive staff and individualised care that valued the person's life experience. Family also reported a negative impact on quality of life when staff and the care facility neglected to provide an individualised approach. This study highlights the importance of demonstrating the value of the person with dementia, the family role and partnerships of care.

  12. Nationwide veterans affairs quality measure for cancer: the family assessment of treatment at end of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlay, Esme; Shreve, Scott; Casarett, David

    2008-08-10

    The Veterans Affairs (VA) health care system has created a national initiative to measure quality of care at the end of life. This article describes the first phase of this national initiative, the Family Assessment of Treatment at End of Life (FATE), in evaluating the quality of end-of-life care for veterans dying with cancer. In the initial phase, next of kin of patients from five VA Medical Centers were contacted 6 weeks after patients' deaths and invited to participate in a telephone interview, and surrogates for 262 cancer patients completed FATE interviews. Decedents were 98% male with an average age of 72 years. There was substantial variation among sites. Higher FATE scores, consistent with family reports of higher satisfaction with care, were associated with palliative care consultation and hospice referral and having a Do Not Resuscitate order at the time of death, whereas an intensive care unit death was associated with lower scores. Early experience with FATE suggests that it will be a helpful tool to characterize end-of-life cancer care and to identify targets for quality improvement.

  13. Does early-life family income influence later dental pain experience? A prospective 14-year study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbani, Z; Peres, M A; Liu, P; Mejia, G C; Armfield, J M; Peres, K G

    2017-05-30

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association between early-life family income and dental pain experience from childhood to early adulthood. Data came from a 14-year prospective study (1991/1992-2005/2006) carried out in South Australia, which included children and adolescents aged 4-17 years (N = 9875) at baseline. The outcome was dental pain experience obtained at baseline, 14 years later in adulthood and at a middle point of time. The main explanatory variable was early-life family income collected at baseline. The prevalence of dental pain was 22.8% at baseline, 19.3% at 'middle time' and 39.3% at follow up. The proportion of people classified as 'poor' at baseline was 27.7%. Being poor early in life was significantly associated with dental pain at 14-year follow up (odds ratio = 1.45; 95% confidence interval = 1.27-1.66). Early-life relative poverty is associated with more frequent dental pain across the 14-year follow up and may be a key exposure variable for later dental conditions. © 2017 Australian Dental Association.

  14. Work-family life courses and markers of stress and inflammation in mid-life: evidence from the National Child Development Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacey, Rebecca E; Sacker, Amanda; Kumari, Meena; Worts, Diana; McDonough, Peggy; Booker, Cara; McMunn, Anne

    2016-08-01

    This study investigated associations between work-family life courses and biomarkers of inflammation and stress in mid-life among British men and women. Gender differences in these associations were also explored. A novel statistical method-multi-channel sequence analysis-defined work-family life courses between the ages of 16 and 42 years, combining annual information on work, partnership and parenthood. Associations between work-family life courses and inflammation [C-reactive protein (CRP), fibrinogen and von Willebrand factor] and cortisol at age 44/45 years were tested using multivariate linear regression using multiply-imputed data on almost 6500 participants from the National Child Development Study 1958 British birth cohort. Compared with those who combined strong ties to paid work with later transitions to stable family lives ('Work, later family' group), 'Teen parents' had higher CRP [40.6% higher, 95% confidence interval (CI): 5.6, 87.0] and fibrinogen (7.8% higher, 95% CI: 2.3, 13.5) levels, and homemakers ('No paid work, early family') had raised fibrinogen levels (4.7% higher, 95% CI: 0.7, 9.0), independent of childhood health and socioeconomic position, adult socioeconomic position, health behaviours and body mass index (BMI). Those who combined later transitions to stable family ties with a career break for childrearing had higher post-waking cortisol than the 'Work, later family' group; however, no associations were seen for other work-family types, therefore suggesting a null finding with cortisol. No statistically significant gender interactions in associations between work-family types and inflammatory or cortisol outcomes were found. Work-family life courses characterised by early parenthood or weak work ties were associated with a raised risk profile in relation to chronic inflammation. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Epidemiological Association.

  15. [Study on the correlation among adolescents' family function, negative life events stress amount and suicide ideation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongdong; Chen, Ling; Yin, Dan; Miao, Jinping; Sun, Yehuan

    2014-07-01

    To explore the correlation between suicide ideation and family function & negative life events, as well as other influential factors in adolescents, thus present a theoretical base for clinicians and school staff to develop intervention for those problems. By adopting current situation random sampling method, Self-Rating Idea of Suicide Scale, Adolescent Self-Rating Life Events Check List and Family APGAR Index were used to assess adolescents at random in a hygiene vocational school in Changzhou City, Jiangsu Province and a collage in Wuhu City, Anhui Province. 3700 questionnaires were granted, 3675 questionnaires were collected, among which 3620 were valid. Chi-square test, t-test, and univariate logistic regression were employed in univariate analysis, multivariate logistic regression was used in multivariate analysis. The detection rate of suicide ideation is 7.0%, and the top five suicide ideation characteristics were: poor academic performance (33.6%), serious family functional impairment (25.8%), lower-middle academic performance (11.7%), bad economic conditions (10.8%) and study in Grade Three (9.9%). Multiple logistic regression showed that the following three high-level stress amount in negative life events are most crucial for suicide ideation. They are "relationships" (OR = 1.135, 95% CI 1.071 - 1. 202), "academic pressure" (OR = 1.169, 95% CI 1.101 - 1.241), and "external events" (OR = 1.278, 95% CI 1.187 - 1.376). What' s more, the stress of attending higher grades (OR = 1.980, 95% CI 1.302 - 3.008), poor academic performance (OR = 7.206, 95% CI 1.745 - 9.789), moderate family functional impairment (OR = 2.562, 95% CI 1.527 - 2.892) and its serious level (OR = 8.287, 95% CI 3.154 - 6.917) are also influential factors for suicide ideation. Severe family functional impairment and high-level stress amount of negative life events produced the main factors of suicide ideation. Therefore, necessary and sufficient support should be given to adolescents by

  16. Life satisfaction in early adolescence: personal, neighborhood, school, family, and peer influences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberle, Eva; Schonert-Reichl, Kimberly A; Zumbo, Bruno D

    2011-07-01

    Drawing from an ecological assets framework as well as research and theory on positive youth development, this study examined the relationship of early adolescents' satisfaction with life to trait optimism and assets representing the social contexts in which early adolescents spend most of their time. Self-reports of satisfaction with life, optimism, and ecological assets in the school (school connectedness), neighborhood (perceived neighborhood support), family (perceived parental support), and peer group (positive peer relationships) were assessed in a sample of 1,402 4th to 7th graders (47% female) from 25 public elementary schools. Multilevel modeling (MLM) was conducted to analyze the variability in life satisfaction both at the individual and the school level. As hypothesized, adding optimism and the dimensions representing the ecology of early adolescence to the model significantly reduced the variability in life satisfaction at both levels of analysis. Both personal (optimism) and all of the ecological assets significantly and positively predicted early adolescents' life satisfaction. The results suggest the theoretical and practical utility of an assets approach for understanding life satisfaction in early adolescence.

  17. The value of life story work for staff, people with dementia and family members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinney, Aidín

    2017-05-31

    Dementia is a term used to describe a collection of symptoms that include problems with memory, self-care, reasoning and communication. Care interventions that focus on preserving people's dignity and identity are therefore essential. Using Driscoll's reflective model to guide critical thinking, this article reflects on the use of one intervention, namely life story work, to promote person-centred care for people with dementia. It explores the value or effect of life story work for healthcare staff, the person with dementia and family members. It also highlights best practice guidelines that are useful to consider to promote its optimal success as an intervention in dementia care, for example, instigating it early in the dementia journey and embedding it in a supportive culture. It is important to highlight to nursing students the many positive aspects of incorporating life story work into practice.

  18. Pathways from earlier marijuana use in the familial and non-familial environments to self-marijuana use in the fourth decade of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brook, Judith S; Zhang, Chenshu; Koppel, Jonathan; Brook, David W

    2008-01-01

    We examined the longitudinal pathways from marijuana use in the familial environment (parents and siblings) and non-familial environment (peers and significant other), throughout adolescence and young adulthood, to the participants' own marijuana use in their fourth decade of life (n = 586). Longitudinal pathways to marijuana use were assessed using structural equation modeling. Familial factors were mediated by non-familial factors; sibling marijuana use also had a direct effect on the participants' marijuana use. In the non-familial environment, significant other marijuana use had only a direct effect, while peer marijuana use had direct as well as indirect effects on the participants' marijuana use. Results illustrate the importance of both modeling and selection effects in contributing to marijuana use. Regarding prevention and treatment, this study suggests the need to consider aspects of familial and non-familial social environments.

  19. Receiving or believing in family support? Contributors to the life quality of Latino and non-Latino families of children with intellectual disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, S R; Holloway, S D; Domínguez-Pareto, I; Kuppermann, M

    2014-04-01

    Previous studies have identified the role of family support in mitigating the stress of parents caring for a child with intellectual disability. Less is known about families whose members are willing but unable to support each other because of geographical, structural and economic barriers. Our study examined the contribution to family quality of life (FQL) of family support beliefs, actual assistance from family members, as well as the moderating effects of ethnicity and household income. We conducted telephone interviews with 84 Latino and 61 non-Latino mothers. Mothers who received more emotional support from partners and other family members reported a higher FQL, controlling for family characteristics. Familism beliefs were also associated with FQL, particularly for Latino mothers. Income was not a significant moderator. These findings suggest that some predictors of FQL are partially moderated by ethnicity, while others may be powerful across diverse communities. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd, MENCAP & IASSIDD.

  20. Exploring family experiences of nursing aspects of end-of-life care in the ICU: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noome, Marijke; Dijkstra, Boukje M; van Leeuwen, Evert; Vloet, Lilian C M

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the experience(s) of family with the nursing aspects of End-of-life care in the intensive care unit after a decision to end life-sustaining treatment, and to describe what nursing care was most appreciated and what was lacking. A phenomenological approach including inductive thematic analysis was used. Twenty-six family members of deceased critically ill-patients were interviewed within two months after the patient's death about their experiences with nursing aspects of end-of-life care in the intensive care unit. Most family members experienced nursing contribution to end-of-life care of the patient and themselves, especially supportive care. Families mentioned the following topics: Communication between intensive care nurses, critically ill patients and family; Nursing care for critically ill patients; Nursing care for families of critically ill patients; Pre-conditions. Families appreciated that intensive care nurses were available at any time and willing to answer questions. But care was lacking because families had for example, a sense of responsibility for obtaining information, they had problems to understand their role in the decision-making process, and were not invited by nurses to participate in the care. Most family appreciated the nursing EOLC they received, specifically the nursing care given to the patient and themselves. Some topics needed more attention, like information and support for the family. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Stress of home life and gender role socializations, family cohesion, and symptoms of anxiety and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anyan, Frederick; Hjemdal, Odin

    2017-04-05

    This cross-sectional study investigated the relation of sociocultural prescriptions of gender role socializations to differences in stress at home and to anxiety and depressive symptoms for adolescent girls and boys, with family cohesion as a mediator. A total of 244 boys and 285 girls aged 13-17 years recruited from Accra, Ghana completed the Short Mood Feeling Questionnaire, Spielberger State Anxiety Inventory, Stress of Home Life and Family Cohesion self-report scales in April 2015. In each sample, two mediation analyses were conducted using Structural Equation Modelling. Exposure to stress at home that was perceived to result from sociocultural prescriptions of gender role norms largely accounted for anxiety and depressive symptoms among girls, whereas this relation was non-significant among boys. Significant indirect relations through low family cohesion to anxiety symptoms were observed for girls and boys but not to depressive symptoms for boys. These findings suggest that differences in gender role socializations at home may account for individual differences in associations between exposure to stress at home and anxiety and depressive symptoms as well as explain the differential indirect relations through low family cohesion. Improving family cohesion while reducing stress at home may contribute to reducing stress and thus anxiety and depressive symptoms.

  2. Pediatric intensive care unit family conferences: one mode of communication for discussing end-of-life care decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelson, Kelly Nicole; Emanuel, Linda; Carter, Andrea; Brinkman, Priscilla; Clayman, Marla L; Frader, Joel

    2011-11-01

    To examine clinicians' and parents' reflections on pediatric intensive care unit family conferences in the context of discussion about end-of-life care decision making. Retrospective qualitative study. A university-based hospital. Eighteen parents of children who died in the pediatric intensive care unit and 48 pediatric intensive care unit clinicians (physicians, nurses, social workers, child-life specialists, chaplains, and case managers). In-depth, semistructured focus groups and one-on-one interviews designed to explore experiences in end-of-life care decision making. We identified comments about family conferences in all clinician focus groups/interviews, except one individual nurse interview, and in 13 of the 18 parent interviews. Comments from parents were sparse compared with those from clinicians. Four topics emerged: purpose, structural aspects, challenges, and suggestions for improvement. We identified three purposes for family conferences: communication between clinicians and parents; communication among clinicians; and support of families. Described structural aspects of family conferences included: preconference planning, communication during conferences, and postconference processing. Challenges noted involved communicating with parents during family conferences, such as: difficulties associated with having multiple services involved; balancing messages of hope and realism; using understandable language; and communicating with non-English-speakers. Participants described additional challenges related to the logistics of organizing family conferences. Suggestions focused on methods to improve communication in, organization of, and preparation for family conferences. Pediatric intensive care unit clinicians in this study perceive family conferences as having an important role in end-of-life care decision making. The paucity of data from parents, an important finding itself, limits our ability to comment on parents' perceptions of family conferences

  3. Family centred care before and during life-sustaining treatment withdrawal in intensive care: A survey of information provided to families by Australasian critical care nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranse, Kristen; Bloomer, Melissa; Coombs, Maureen; Endacott, Ruth

    2016-11-01

    A core component of family-centred nursing care during the provision of end-of-life care in intensive care settings is information sharing with families. Yet little is known about information provided in these circumstances. To identify information most frequently given by critical care nurses to families in preparation for and during withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment. An online cross-sectional survey. During May 2015, critical care nurses in Australia and New Zealand were invited to complete the Preparing Families for Treatment Withdrawal questionnaire. Data analysis included descriptive statistics to identify areas of information most and least frequently shared with families. Cross tabulations with demographic data were used to explore any associations in the data. From the responses of 159 critical care nurses, information related to the emotional care and support of the family was most frequently provided to families in preparation for and during withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment. Variation was noted in the frequency of provision of information across body systems and their associated physical changes during the dying process. Significant associations (pnursing experience and critical care experiences and some of the information items most and least frequently provided. The provision of information during end-of-life care reflects a family-centred care approach by critical care nurses with information pertaining to emotional care and support of the family paramount. The findings of this study provide a useful framework for the development of interventions to improve practice and support nurses in communicating with families at this time. Copyright © 2016 Australian College of Critical Care Nurses Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Translating psychosocial insight into ethical discussions supportive of families in end-of-life decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Larry W; McLellan, Linda J

    2002-01-01

    A large number of Americans would rather rely on family and friends more than their physicians about end-of-life care and decisions. Moving beyond traditional clinical ethics and its dyadic focus on the physician-patient relationship, this article presents an approach to ethical decision-making at the end of life that is more inclusive of the patient's family and has the potential to advance social work practice in end-of-life care. Initial attention is given to how psychosocial and bioethical perspectives and practices interact to shape understanding of moral issues in end-of-life decisions. Morally relevant principles are then adapted from contextual therapy as being useful for including more of a family focus and viewing ethical decision-making at the end of life as a family process. Specifically, focus is on exploring the ethical dynamics of family systems that impact the decision-making process and translating psychosocial insight into ethical discussions that are supportive of families. The case of a patient with sudden and unexpected brain death and without advance directives demonstrates one family's unresolved grief and illustrates how its members were helped to reason morally about end-of-life choices. Contributions of a social worker and bioethicist are illustrated.

  5. The family physician's perceived role in preventing and guiding hospital admissions at the end of life: a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyniers, Thijs; Houttekier, Dirk; Pasman, H Roeline; Stichele, Robert Vander; Cohen, Joachim; Deliens, Luc

    2014-01-01

    Family physicians play a pivotal role in providing end-of-life care and in enabling terminally ill patients to die in familiar surroundings. The purpose of this study was to explore the family physicians' perceptions of their role and the difficulties they have in preventing and guiding hospital admissions at the end of life. Five focus groups were held with family physicians (N= 39) in Belgium. Discussions were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using a constant comparative approach. Five key roles in preventing and guiding hospital admissions at the end of life were identified: as a care planner, anticipating future scenarios; as an initiator of decisions in acute situations, mostly in an advisory manner; as a provider of end-of-life care, in which competency and attitude is considered important; as a provider of support, particularly by being available during acute situations; and as a decision maker, taking overall responsibility. Family physicians face many different and complex roles and difficulties in preventing and guiding hospital admissions at the end of life. Enhancing the family physician's role as a gatekeeper to hospital services, offering the physicians more end-of-life care training, and developing or expanding initiatives to support them could contribute to a lower proportion of hospital admissions at the end of life. © 2014 Annals of Family Medicine, Inc.

  6. Nursing home resident quality of life: testing for measurement equivalence across resident, family, and staff perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin, Judith; Keefe, Janice; Kelloway, E Kevin; Hirdes, John P

    2015-10-01

    This study explores the factor structure of the interRAI self-report nursing home quality of life survey and develops a measure that will allow researchers to compare predictors of quality of life (QOL) across resident, family, and staff perspectives. Nursing home residents (N = 319), family members (N = 397), and staff (N = 862) were surveyed about their perceptions of resident QOL. Exploratory factor analyses were conducted on a random half of the staff data. Subsequently, confirmatory factor analysis was used to test for measurement equivalence across the three perspectives. The final model had a four-factor structure (i.e., care and support, food, autonomy, and activities) across all three perspectives. Each factor had at least two items that were equivalent across all three perspectives, which suggests at least partial measurement equivalence. The finding of partial measurement equivalence acknowledges there are important differences between perspectives and provides a tool that researchers can use to compare predictors of QOL, but not levels of agreement across perspectives. Targeting these four aspects is likely to have the additional benefit of improving family and staff perceptions of resident QOL in addition to the resident's own QOL.

  7. Factors affecting teachers' attitudes and practice of family life education in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olukoya, A A; Oyedeji, S O; Johnson, T O

    1992-01-01

    Questionnaires completed by 700 secondary school teachers in Nigeria's Lagos, Kaduna, and Cross-River States revealed a generally positive attitude toward family life education. 53.56% of respondents were female and 31.5%% were or had been married. Their average age was 28.3 years. One third of the teachers were not parents, and only 15.5% had children as old as their students. The teachers expressed agreement with the importance of school-based sex education (71.6%), the potential for family planning to improve health (82.9%), concern with rapid population growth (68.7%), and awareness that teenage pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases are major social problems in Nigeria (84.7% and 74.9%, respectively). Most identified ages 10-14 years as the ideal time to talk to children about sex. Half considered it the mother's responsibility to provide sex education, and most felt it is easier to talk to a female child. 45% of teachers agreed that contraceptive services should be available to adolescents. The factors associated with a positive attitude toward family life education were female sex, single marital status, Christian religion, and teaching in a coeducational school.

  8. Hospice family members' perceptions of and experiences with end-of-life care in the nursing home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Debra Parker; Washington, Karla; Kruse, Robin L; Albright, David L; Lewis, Alexandria; Demiris, George

    2014-10-01

    Even though more than 25% of Americans die in nursing homes, end-of-life care has consistently been found to be less than adequate in this setting. Even for those residents on hospice, end-of-life care has been found to be problematic. This study had 2 research questions; (1) How do family members of hospice nursing home residents differ in their anxiety, depression, quality of life, social networks, perceptions of pain medication, and health compared with family members of community dwelling hospice patients? (2) What are family members' perceptions of and experiences with end-of-life care in the nursing home setting? This study is a secondary mixed methods analysis of interviews with family members of hospice nursing home residents and a comparative statistical analysis of standard outcome measures between family members of hospice patients in the nursing home and family members of hospice patients residing in the community. Outcome measures for family members of nursing home residents were compared (n = 176) with family members of community-dwelling hospice patients (n = 267). The family members of nursing home residents reported higher quality of life; however, levels of anxiety, depression, perceptions of pain medicine, and health were similar for hospice family members in the nursing home and in the community. Lending an understanding to the stress for hospice family members of nursing home residents, concerns were found with collaboration between the nursing home and the hospice, nursing home care that did not meet family expectations, communication problems, and resident care concerns including pain management. Some family members reported positive end-of-life care experiences in the nursing home setting. These interviews identify a multitude of barriers to quality end-of-life care in the nursing home setting, and demonstrate that support for family members is an essential part of quality end-of-life care for residents. This study suggests that nursing

  9. The influence of family context on life, educational and occupational ideal among middle school students in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Benxian; Zhang, Ling; Zhen, Rui; Zhou, Xiao

    2016-06-01

    This study examined the relationship between family context of middle school students on their educational and occupational ideals. Middle school students (N = 2000) responded to questions assessing family location, family structure, parental educational level and family economic status, as well as to the Middle School Students' Ideals Questionnaire. Multivariate analysis of variance indicated that life, educational and occupational ideals of female students and students in lower grades were higher than that of male students and students in higher grades. Regression analysis indicated that paternal education level have a positive association with educational and occupational ideals, but not life ideals, and family economic status have a positive relation to life ideals, but not educational and occupational ideals. Moreover, the interaction between family economic status and family location has a negative association with students' life, educational and occupational ideals. These results suggest that different factors predicted different ideals of adolescents, and that family economic status had a negative moderating effect on the relationship between family location and ideals of students. © 2015 International Union of Psychological Science.

  10. DISTRIBUTION IN NON-TRAWLABLE AREAS OF LAKE VICTORIA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Victoria. Netherlands Journal of. Zoology 42'. 214 -232. Witte F, Goldschmidt PC and Wanink JH. 1995. Dynamics of the haplochromine cichlid fauna and other ecological changes in the. Mwanza gmlf of Lake Victoria. In: Pitcher TH and Hart PJB (eds):. Impact of species change in fiican lakes. Chapman & Hall, London, pp.

  11. Adaptive responses to environmental changes in Lake Victoria cichlids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijssel, Jacobus Cornelis van (Jacco)

    2014-01-01

    Lake Victoria cichlids show the fastest vertebrate adaptive radiation known which is why they function as a model organism to study evolution. In the past 40 years, Lake Victoria experienced severe environmental changes including the boom of the introduced, predatory Nile perch and eutrophication.

  12. Gender Integration in the Management of the Lake Victoria Fisheries ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The riparian governments of Lake Victoria have adopted co-management approach in fisheries management. This paper discusses gender mainstreaming in fisheries management of Lake Victoria, user rights, successes and challenges of the process. This paper has used gender-disaggregated data from several studies ...

  13. The Relation of Work, Family Balance, and Life Quality of Nurses Working at Teaching Hospitals of Kerman-Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeynab Sedoughi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Work and family are the source of tranquility and if the balance between these two is not provided, pleasure, happiness and peace of human being would be lost, which will cause unreturnable loss for him. Regarding the importance of nurses’ role in health system, the present study aimed to study the relation of work-family balance and quality of life of nurses working at selected Iranian teaching hospitals. Methods: Present study is a cross sectional, descriptive-analytical study which was carried out on 306 nurses working at three teaching hospitals of Iran. The sampling method was stratified sampling and questionnaire was the data collection instrument. Data analysis was carried out using inferential statistics through SPSS Ver18. Findings: nurses spent more time to work than family and they had more satisfaction of their family life than their work. This suggests the imbalance of nurses in two dimension of time balance and satisfaction balance, which has resulted a decrease in quality of life of studied nurses. Nurse’s involvement in work and life as the third component of work-life balance concept, was balanced and it did not indicate significant correlation with quality of life. Nurses experiencing less work-family conflict and more stress in their life, had higher level of quality of life. Conclusion: Nurses will be more exposed to the negative outcomes of work-life imbalance than other groups of employees, so paying attention to managing the demands of work and family aimed at improving the nurses’ quality of life, has specific importance. Hence, designing a plan which defines main components of work-family balance among various groups of hospital staff including nurses, should be put at the top agenda of Iran’s health system policy makers. 

  14. Hybrid Life Cycle Assessment of Low, Mid and High-Rise Multi-Family Dwellings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly Bawden

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We undertake Life Cycle Assessment (LCA of the cumulative energy demand (CED and global warming potential (GWP for a portfolio of 10 multi-family residences in the U.S. We argue that prior LCA studies of buildings use an inconsistent boundary for processes to be included in the supply chain: The operational phase includes all energy use in a building, but supply chains for the production of appliances, equipment and consumables associated with activities done in the building are neglected. We correct this by starting the analysis with an explicit definition of a functional unit, providing climate controlled space, and including processes associated with this functional unit. Using a hybrid LCA approach, the CED for low, mid and high-rise multi-family residences is found to increase from 30, 34, to 39 GJ/m2, respectively. This increase is due to the need for energy-intensive structural materials such as concrete and steel in taller buildings. With our approach, the share of materials and construction of total life cycle energy doubles to 26%, compared with a 13% share that would be obtained with inconsistent system boundaries used in prior studies. We thus argue that explicit definition of functional unit leads to an increase in the contribution of supply chains to building energy life cycles.

  15. Can family risk-factors moderate the link between psychopathy and life-history strategy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Međedović Janko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Life History Theory is an explanatory evolutionary framework which explains differences in fitness-relevant outcomes using the characteristics of the environment and individual organisms. Basically, individuals can be positioned somewhere on the r/K continuum of the Life History Strategy (LHS: a K or slow strategy represents later maturity and reproduction, a smaller number of offspring with higher investment in them, while the r (or fast strategy follows the opposite pattern. Previous research offered evidence that psychopathy can represent a trait associated with fast LHS. In the present research we examined the relations between the family risk-factors, a four-factor model of psychopathy and the LHS in a sample of male convicts (N=181. The results have shown that a manipulative and deceitful interpersonal style is associated with slow LHS while shallow affect and antisocial tendencies are related to fast LHS. The interactions between psychopathy and family risk-factors revealed that parental criminal behaviour enhances the relation between fast LHS and psychopathic traits, including the manipulative interpersonal style. The findings are in accordance with the Life History Theory and provide a deeper understanding of the preservation of psychopathy in contemporary populations.

  16. Family empowerment and quality of life of parents raising children with Developmental Disabilities in 78 Japanese families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rie Wakimizu

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: We revealed that family empowerment and QoL of parents rearing children with DDs in Japan were affected by various subscales of family function and other family attributes. Effective interventions for improving family empowerment and QoL should be researched in the future.

  17. Family nursing – a way to improve family function and quality of life? Presentation of a protocol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacoby Petersen, Julie; Østergaard, Birte; Jais Rosenstock, Steffen

    Titel i program: Protocol to Evaluate Effect of Family Nursing Intervention in Elderly, Fragile Patients and Their Families After Emergency Gastrointestinal Surgery......Titel i program: Protocol to Evaluate Effect of Family Nursing Intervention in Elderly, Fragile Patients and Their Families After Emergency Gastrointestinal Surgery...

  18. Evolution of protein families: is it possible to distinguish between domains of life?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sales-Pardo, Marta; Chan, Albert O B; Amaral, Luís A N; Guimerà, Roger

    2007-11-01

    Understanding evolutionary relationships between species can shed new light into the rooting of the tree of life and the origin of eukaryotes, thus, resulting in a long standing interest in accurately assessing evolutionary parameters at time scales on the order of a billion of years. Prior work suggests large variability in molecular substitution rates, however, we still do not know whether such variability is due to species-specific trends at a genomic scale, or whether it can be attributed to the fluctuations inherent in any stochastic process. Here, we study the statistical properties of gene and protein-family sizes in order to quantify the long time scale evolutionary differences and similarities across species. We first determine the protein families of 209 species of bacteria and 20 species of archaea. We find that we are unable to reject the null hypothesis that the protein-family sizes of these species are drawn from the same distribution. In addition, we find that for species classified in the same phylogenetic branch or in the same lifestyle group, family size distributions are not significantly more similar than for species in different branches. These two findings can be accounted for in terms of a dynamical birth, death, and innovation model that assumes identical protein-family evolutionary rates for all species. Our theoretical and empirical results thus strongly suggest that the variability empirically observed in protein-family size distributions is compatible with the expected stochastic fluctuations for an evolutionary process with identical genomic evolutionary rates. Our findings hold special importance for the plausibility of some theories of the origin of eukaryotes which require drastic changes in evolutionary rates for some period during the last 2 billion years.

  19. Quality of life and mental health in the bereaved family members of patients with terminal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jong Im; Shin, Dong Wook; Choi, Jin-Young; Kang, Jina; Baek, Young-Ji; Mo, Ha-Na; Seo, Min-Jeong; Hwang, Yun Hee; Lim, Yeun-Keun; Lee, Ok Kyoung

    2012-11-01

    This study specifically aimed to compare quality of life (QOL) and mental health in bereaved family members of patients with cancer with that of the general population and to examine factors associated with QOL and mental health in this population. A nationwide multicenter, cross-sectional survey was administered to the bereaved family members of patients with terminal cancer. Thirty-three palliative care centers designated by the Ministry of Health and Welfare participated in this study. The participants in this study were 501 bereaved family members of patients with terminal cancer and matched control individuals from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. EQ-5D and several questions used in Korean National Health And Nutrition Examination Survey were used in to measure health-related QOL and mental health. Health-related QOL, as determined by EQ-5D, was significantly lower in bereaved family members than in controls (0.88 ± 0.20 vs 0.93 ± 0.13, p = 0.002). Bereaved family members experienced more frequent episodes of depression (33.1% vs 12.5%, p health-related QOL. Younger age and higher mental burden of caregiving were associated with a higher risk of impaired mental health. Our results confirm that bereaved family members of patients with cancer have lower health-related QOL and mental health than the general population. Healthcare providers should focus more attention on this vulnerable group, and various support programs should be developed to improve their health-related QOL. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. The Relation of Work, Family Balance, and Life Quality of Nurses Working at Teaching Hospitals of Kerman-Iran

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sedoughi, Zeynab; Sadeghi, Masoumeh; Shahraki, Sedigheh Khodabaneh; Anari, Seyed Hossein Saberi; Amiresmaili, Mohammadreza

    2016-01-01

    .... Regarding the importance of nurses’ role in health system, the present study aimed to study the relation of work-family balance and quality of life of nurses working at selected Iranian teaching hospitals. Methods...

  1. Self-reports of differentiation of self and marital compatibility as related to family functioning in the third and fourth stages of the family life cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, E

    1989-01-01

    Using Bowen's, Olson's, and general systems frameworks, this investigator tested relationships among individual, marital, and family functioning in the stressed childrearing stages of the family life cycle. Sixty volunteer married couples completed the Level of Differentiation of Self Scale (LDSS), Locke-Wallace Marital Adjustment Test (MAT), and Family Adaptability and Cohesion Evaluation Scales (FACES) III. A significant canonical correlation was found among differentiation of self and marital compatibility as they both relate to family functioning. Subsequent canonical correlations were significant for wives but not for husbands, indicating gender differences in relationships among perceived individual, marital, and family phenomena. The concept of adaptability as proposed by Olson's Circumplex Model of Marital and Family Functioning was not supported. A revised model is proposed.

  2. Schizophrenia in Malaysian families: A study on factors associated with quality of life of primary family caregivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Eng J

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Schizophrenia is a chronic illness which brings detrimental effects in the caregivers' health. This study was aimed at highlighting the socio-demographic, clinical and psychosocial factors associated with the subjective Quality of Life (QOL of Malaysian of primary family caregivers of subjects with schizophrenia attending an urban tertiary care outpatient clinic in Malaysia. Methods A cross-sectional study was performed to study patient, caregiver and illness factors associated with the QOL among 117 individuals involved with caregiving for schizophrenia patients. The study used WHOQOL-BREF to assess caregivers' QOL and Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS to assess the severity of patients' symptoms. Social Readjustment Rating Scale (SRRS assessed the stress level due to life events. Results The mean scores of WHOQOL-BREF in physical, psychological, social and environmental domains were 66.62 (14.36, 61.32 (15.52, 62.77 (17.33, 64.02 (14.86 consecutively. From multiple regression analysis, factors found to be significantly associated with higher QOL were higher educational level among caregivers in social and environmental domains; caregivers not having medical problem/s in physical and psychological domains; later onset and longer illness duration of illness in social domains; patients not attending day care program in environmental domain; lower BPRS score in physical and environmental domains. SRRS score of caregivers was also found to have a significant negative correlation with QOL in environmental and psychological domains. Other factors were not significantly associated with QOL. Conclusion Caregivers with more social advantages such as higher educational level and physically healthier and dealing with less severe illness had significantly higher QOL in various aspects. Supporting the caregivers in some of these modifiable factors in clinical practice is important to achieve their higher level QOL.

  3. Degradation of Victoria Crater, Meridiani Planum, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, J. A.; Wilson, S. A.; Cohen, B. A.; Golombek, M. P.; Geissler, P. E.; Sullivan, R. J.

    2007-12-01

    Victoria crater (2.05N, 354.51E) is ~750 m in diameter and the largest crater on Mars observed in situ. The Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity traversed NW to SE across a broad annulus dominated by dark sand that at least partially surrounds the crater before navigating the northern crater rim. Rover observations of the crater and ejecta deposits are complemented by images with 26-52 cm/pixel scales from the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) on Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter and enable assessment of degradation state. The present depth/diameter ratio for Victoria is 0.1, less than the 0.2 expected for a pristine primary impact structure. Together with the eroded, serrated rim, this implies an originally smaller crater diameter and/or considerable infilling consistent with occurrence of a large dune field and few exposed rocks on the crater floor. The height and width of the raised rim is generally 4-5 m and 150-225 m, respectively, less than the 30 m and 500-600 m, respectively, expected for a pristine 750 m diameter crater. Ejecta thicknesses around the rim were derived using rover-based and HiRISE images and yield consistent estimates averaging ~3 m. The serrated rim plan creates a series of promontories extending up to 50 m into the crater and generally fronted by 30-60 degree slopes that are locally vertical and are separated by bays whose floors typically slope 15-25 degrees. A crater originally on order of 600-650 m in diameter and subsequently enlarged by mass wasting and aeolian erosion may yield a structure resembling Victoria today. The steep expression of the promontories and local outcroppings of rocks in the ejecta blanket points to some ongoing mass wasting, but the relative paucity of associated flanking talus indicates derived blocks of sulfate sandstone are not resistant to saltating sand and are rapidly broken down by the wind or are completely covered/filled in by aeolian drift. At Cape St. Vincent, the promontory appears undercut

  4. Family relations and health over the life course. A Lebanese perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajrouch, Kristine J; Abdulrahim, Sawsan; Antonucci, Toni C

    2015-01-01

    The link between family relations and well-being in old age has received ample attention in the international literature, but remains least examined in the Arab region where cultural ideals assume positive intergenerational relations within families as the norm. In this paper, we employ survey data collected in Greater Beirut in 2009 to explore associations between family relations and health. over the life course. We tested (1) the extent to which age and social relation characteristics predict health; and (2) whether the association between age and health is stronger for those who report: smaller social networks and poorer relationship quality. We employed self-rated health and self-reported chronic illness as the health outcome measures and:social network size, positive quality and negative quality with family members as the social relations measures. Our findings suggest that social relations are differentially important depending on the health status indicator examined. The single dimension that influenced both self-rated health and the probability of reporting a chronic illness was positive relationship quality with spouse. Further, social relations, particularly having a negative relationship quality with spouse and adult child, exert stronger effects on both self-rated health and chronic illness for older compared to younger adults. The findings of the present study are important for clinical practitioners who often consider the role and importance of available social resources as they address the health needs of older adults.

  5. The impact of dental caries and trauma in children on family quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abanto, Jenny; Paiva, Saul Martins; Raggio, Daniela Prócida; Celiberti, Paula; Aldrigui, Janaína Merli; Bönecker, Marcelo

    2012-08-01

    To assess the impact of children's dental caries (DC) and traumatic dental injuries (TDI) on parents' quality of life (QoL), adjusted by family income. Parents of 219 children aged 5 and 6 years answered the Family Impact Scale (FIS) on their perception of QoL and data about income. Three calibrated dentists examined the severity of DC according to decayed, missing and filled permanent teeth index, and children were categorized into: 0 = caries free; 1-5 = low severity; and ≥ 6 = high severity. TDI were classified into uncomplicated and complicated injuries. QoL was measured through FIS items and total score, and Poisson regression was used to associate the variables with the outcome. Severity of DC showed a negative impact on the total score and subscales on parental/family activities, parental emotions and financial burden (P children's DC (RR = 3.19; 95% CI = 2.36, 4.31; P children's DC has a negative impact on parents' QoL, whereas TDI do not. A lower family income might have a negative impact on parents' QoL. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  6. Destructive Divorce in the Family Life Cycle and its Implications: Criticisms of Parental Alienation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josimar Antônio de Alcântara Mendes

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Some difficulties may arise during the divorce process, taking the family into “destructive divorce”. In such cases, some authors can see the rising of Parental Alienation (PA. This article aims to criticize PA, reflecting about the Family Life Cycle and divorce. Regarding this, a qualitative study was conducted with legal actors (judges, prosecutors, psychologists, social workers, lawyers on the issues of divorce and PA and the results were built using the conceptions of Zones of Sense by Gonzalez Rey. The summary results are: (a PA does not contextualize the conflict; (b it does not consider the history of the relationships; (c it pathologizes, medicates and criminalizes the phenomena of post-divorce and (d PA underestimates the child in the conflict.

  7. Family Satisfaction With End-of-Life Care in the Intensive Care Unit: A Systematic Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSanto-Madeya, Susan; Safizadeh, Parissa

    Assessment of family satisfaction after the death of a loved one in the intensive care unit (ICU) provides a way to determine whether quality end-of-life care was received by the patient and family. The purpose of this systematic review was to explore the factors associated with family satisfaction with end-of-life care in the ICU. A systematic literature review was conducted using electronic databases CINAHL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and PsychINFO. Databases were searched using a combination of search terms: "family satisfaction," "end of life," "intensive care unit," and "family." Results were limited to English-language reports of empirical studies published from January 2000 to January 2016. Studies describing adult family members' satisfaction with end-of-life care of patients admitted or transferred to an ICU were included in the review. The search yielded 466 articles. Review of the titles and abstracts resulted in 122 articles that underwent full review; 30 articles met study inclusion and were included in the final analysis. Major themes identified from the literature reviewed included communication, decision making, nursing care, ICU environment, and spiritual care. Families can provide valuable insight and information on the quality of care provided in the ICU at end of life. Their perceptions of communication, decision making, nursing care, the ICU environment, and spiritual support strongly influence their satisfaction or dissatisfaction with end-of-life care in the ICU. Personalized and frequent communication; assistance in the decision-making process; compassionate nursing care; a warm, family-friendly environment; and spiritual support can help alleviate the sequelae and enhance family satisfaction with end-of-life care in the ICU.

  8. LIFE VALUES OF PERSONS IN CROSS-CULTURAL (ARAB - RUSSIAN AND MONOCULTURAL MARRIAGES AND THEIR REPRESENTATION IN FAMILY SPHERE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Y Chebotareva

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of the empirical study, which has been conducted with the aim to analyze the differences in life and family values and their interactions between the spouses from cross-cultural and monocultural couples. The sample of the study consists of 330 persons, including 85 cross-cultural Arab - Russian couples (170 persons, living in Russia, and 80 monocultural couples (160 persons.The main methods were S. Schwartz’ “Value Survey”, “Test of Attitudes to Family Life” by Yu. Alyoshina, L. Gozman, & E. Dubovskaya, «Marital Role Expectations and Aspirations” by A.N. Volkova, “Marital Satisfaction Test” by V. Stolin, T. Romanova, & G. Butenko.It was revealed that the persons from cross-cultural and monocultural marriages have different life and family values hierarchies, besides, they realize their life values in family life differently. In cross-cultural marriages the spouses see the opportunities for their normative life goals realizing in the family, especially in its psychotherapeutic and parental spheres, as well as in social activity outside the family. But in their real day-to-day activities, they do not always manage to realize their life goals in the family sphere, probably because of the difficulties in interacting with their social environment, which can come from the fact that their families are more enclosed, which in turn leads to a decrease of marital satisfaction. In the cross-cultural spouses’ representations, the collectivist values are more related to family functioning, but individualistic values such as hedonism and power are perceived as incompatible with the successful functioning of the family.

  9. What constitutes quality of family experience at the end of life? Perspectives from family members of patients who died in the hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhauser, Karen E; Voils, Corrine I; Bosworth, Hayden; Tulsky, James A

    2015-08-01

    Most palliative care efforts focus on assessing and improving the quality of life and quality of care for patients. Palliative care views the family as the unit of care; therefore, excellent comprehensive palliative care should also address the needs of the family and the caregiver(s). While the recent literature has offered detailed descriptions of caregiving needs in the home setting, it is crucial to describe the needs of family members who provide care for patients with advanced illness in an inpatient setting, where family members serve as the key intermediaries and decision makers. Therefore, we sought to define the relevant aspects of quality of experience for families of hospitalized patients. We convened a series of focus groups to identify the domains important for the quality of experience of dying patients' family members. Participants included bereaved family members of patients who had died at a Veterans Administration (VA) or private academic medical center. We conducted four in-depth follow-up interviews to probe for additional details and validate our interpretation of the focus group findings. Participants (n = 14) ranged in age from 46 to 83, with a mean of 62. All were female; 64% were Caucasian, 21% African American, and 14% did not report their ethnicity. Content analysis yielded 64 attributes of quality of family experience constituting eight domains: completion, symptom impact, decision making, preparation, relationship with healthcare providers, affirmation of the whole person, post-death care, and supportive services. Our data have implications for clinical guidance in assisting family members in the inpatient palliative setting, which often includes patient incapacity for communication and decision making. They suggest the importance of developing corresponding methods to assist families with the tasks involved with life completion, being prepared for a crisis and imminent death, and post-death care. Provider communications and

  10. Effect of psychosocial stressors on patients with Crohn's disease: threatening life experiences and family relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slonim-Nevo, Vered; Sarid, Orly; Friger, Michael; Schwartz, Doron; Chernin, Elena; Shahar, Ilana; Sergienko, Ruslan; Vardi, Hillel; Rosenthal, Alexander; Mushkalo, Alexander; Dizengof, Vitaly; Ben-Yakov, Gil; Abu-Freha, Naim; Munteanu, Daniella; Gaspar, Nava; Eidelman, Leslie; Segal, Arik; Fich, Alexander; Greenberg, Dan; Odes, Shmuel

    2016-09-01

    Threatening life experiences and adverse family relations are major psychosocial stressors affecting mental and physical health in chronic illnesses, but their influence in Crohn's disease (CD) is unclear. We assessed whether these stressors would predict the psychological and medical condition of CD patients. Consecutive adult CD patients completed a series of instruments including demography, Patient Harvey-Bradshaw Index (P-HBI), Short Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire (SIBDQ), short-form survey instrument (SF-36), brief symptom inventory (BSI), family assessment device (FAD), and list of threatening life experiences (LTE). Associations of FAD and LTE with P-HBI, SIBDQ, SF-36, and BSI were examined by multiple linear and quantile regression analyses. The cohort included 391 patients, mean age 38.38±13.95 years, 59.6% women, with intermediate economic status. The median scores were as follows: P-HBI 4 (2-8), FAD 1.67 (1.3-2.1), LTE 1 (0-3), SF-36 physical health 43.75 (33.7-51.0), SF-36 mental health 42.99 (34.1-51.9), and BSI-Global Severity Index 0.81 (0.4-1.4). The SIBDQ was 47.27±13.9. LTE was associated with increased P-HBI in all quantiles and FAD in the 50% quantile. FAD and LTE were associated with reduced SIBDQ (Pfamily relations were less healthy both physically and mentally. Physicians offering patients sociopsychological therapy should relate to threatening life experiences and family relations.

  11. Quality of life, family burden and associated factors in relatives with obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicek, Erdinc; Cicek, Ismet Esra; Kayhan, Fatih; Uguz, Faruk; Kaya, Nazmiye

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the quality of life (QoL), family burden and psychiatric disorders in first-degree relatives of patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and to compare them with healthy controls and their relatives. Forty patients with OCD and 47 of their first-degree relatives as well as 40 healthy subjects and 45 of their first-degree relatives were recruited in this study. OCD and comorbid anxiety or mood disorders were determined by means of the Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. Comorbid Axis II disorders were diagnosed with the Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Revised Third Edition Personality Disorders. Type and severity of obsessive-compulsive symptoms were assessed with the Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale, and the disability of patients with OCD was evaluated with the WHO DAS II. Family burden and QoL in the relatives were evaluated with the Zarit Burden Interview (ZBI) protocol and the World Health Organization Quality of Life Assessment-Brief, respectively. The mean ZBI score of family members of OCD patients was higher than the control relatives. Linear regression analysis indicated that the independent factors associated with ZBI were duration of OCD, comorbid major depressive disorder and poorer insight. Compared with those of control relatives, the QoL of relatives of patients with OCD was significantly lower in all domains. While the diagnosis of major depressive disorder in relatives of OCD patients was significantly higher than the control relatives, the diagnosis of any anxiety disorder did not differ. Our study provides evidence that OCD not only affects the lives of patients but also their family members. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. TO STUDY THE ADOLESCENT ATTITUDE AND RELEVANCE TO FAMILY LIFE EDUCATION PROGRAMME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preeti

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Family life education is a comprehensive program to educate the growing children, regarding the various aspects of living in a society and interacting with other individuals at different levels and in different ways along with imparting age appropriate knowledge of biological and sexual development. Lack of awareness, ignorance, or inappropriate knowledge among youth made us take up this study. Sexual knowledge is sought from peers and magazines, menstrual hygiene, masturbation issues are never dealt by health authorities, educators or parents. Risk taking behavior, substance abuse, violence are very common in teens these problems are to highlighted. And interactive sessions are needed to enhance the learning experience.

  13. Perceived Impact of Dental Pain on the Quality of Life of Preschool Children and Their Families

    OpenAIRE

    Clementino, Marayza Alves; Gomes, Monalisa Cesarino; Pinto-Sarmento, T?ssia Cristina de Almeida; Martins, Carolina Castro; Granville-Garcia, Ana Fl?via; Paiva, Saul Martins

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the perceived impact of dental caries and dental pain on oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) among preschool children and their families. A cross-sectional study was conduct with 843 preschool children in Campina Grande, Brazil. Parents/caregivers answered a questionnaire on socio-demographic information, their child's general/oral health and history of dental pain. The Brazilian version of the Early Childhood Oral Health Impact Scale was ...

  14. Familial hypercholesterolaemia reduces the quality of life of patients not reaching treatment targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Gitte Lee; Madsen, Ivan Bredbjerg; Kruse, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH) is the most common monogenic disorder associated with premature cardiovascular disease. If untreated, life expectancy in heterozygous FH patients is shortened by 20-30 years compared with the general population. Nevertheless, treatment goals...... for their children, in particular. The women had issues with stigma and self-efficacy. CONCLUSIONS: The QoL impact of FH is related to treatment efficacy. These findings need to be addressed in the management of FH patients. Particular attention should be paid to those who are not presently reaching the target...

  15. Family caregivers' conceptualisation of quality end-of-life care for people with dementia: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Nathan; Rait, Greta; Maio, Laura; Iliffe, Steve

    2017-09-01

    People with dementia have been described as the 'disadvantaged dying' with poor end-of-life care. Towards the end of life, people with dementia cannot report on the care they receive. It is therefore important to talk to caregivers; however, few have explored the views about end-of-life care from the caregivers' perspective. The majority of research on family caregivers has focussed on the burden and psychological impact of caring for a relative with dementia. This study aimed to explore the views of family caregivers about quality end-of-life care for people with dementia. Qualitative study using in-depth interviews and analysed using thematic analysis. Purposive sampling from a third sector organisation's caregiver network was used to recruit 47 caregivers in England (2012-2013), consisting of (1) family caregivers of someone who had recently received a diagnosis of dementia, (2) family caregivers currently caring for someone with dementia and (3) bereaved family caregivers. Three over-arching themes were derived from the interviewees' discourse, including maintaining the person within, fostering respect and dignity and showing compassion and kindness. End-of-life care for people with dementia does not differ from care throughout the dementia trajectory. Throughout the findings, there is an implicit underlying theme of conflict: conflict between family caregivers and an increasingly systematised service of care and conflict between family caregivers and professionals. This study has in particular demonstrated the importance of the psycho-social aspects of care, aligning with the holistic definition of palliative care.

  16. Family Functioning and Quality of Life among Families in Eating Disorders: A Comparison with Substance-related Disorders and Healthy Controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasiadou, Dimitra; Sepulveda, Ana R; Sánchez, Julio César; Parks, Melissa; Álvarez, Tamara; Graell, Montserrat

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the family functioning of Spanish parents of patients with an eating disorder (ED) with that of carers of patients with substance-related disorders (SRDs) and families of healthy controls (HC). This cross-sectional study included 48 mothers and 45 fathers of 48 adolescent patients with an ED, 47 mothers and 37 fathers of 47 patients with an SRD and 66 mothers and 50 fathers of 68 HCs. Families of ED patients reported lower levels of criticism, symptom accommodation and negative caregiving experience than families of SRD patients. However, relatives of both ED and SRD patients reported similar levels of quality of life related to their mental health. Furthermore, families of HCs generally exhibited better scores on all scales assessing their caregiving experiences. Regarding gender differences, there was a tendency in mothers, primarily those from the ED group, to report more adverse experiences as caregivers compared with fathers. Symptoms characteristic to each disorder may be associated with differential patterns of family functioning and may require specifically tailored family interventions. Early family intervention in adolescence is crucial, as relatives' quality of life does not seem to have been badly affected at this point in the course of the illness. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  17. The Comparison of Family Functioning Dimensions and Quality of Life and their Relationships among Addicted and Non-Addicted Persons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ghamari

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this study was the comparison of family functioning and quality of life and their relationships among addicted and non-addicted persons. Method: The research method of study was ex-post factor. The sample of study was 107 addicts and 107 non-addicts. Sampling of addicts was clustering random sampling. Non-addicts were matched in terms of demographical characteristics and were selected of normal population. Measuring instruments were family assessment device and quality of life scale (SF-36. Statistical methods were Pearson correlation coefficient, stepwise regression analysis and independent samples t test. Results: The results showed that the dysfunction in family function among addicts was more than non-addicts counterparts. Addicts have had lower quality of life than non-addicts. Also, there was significant relationship between dimensions of family functioning and quality of life among addicts and non-addicts. The results of regression analysis showed that almost 17 percent of quality of life variance among addicts could be explained by dimensions of family functioning namely: roles and communication. Among non-addicts about 17 percent of quality of life variance could be explained by behavior control dimension of family functioning. Conclusion: The study may have useful practical implications for executors of addiction prevention also addiction therapists.

  18. Factors affecting family satisfaction with inpatient end-of-life care.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin Sadler

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Little data exists addressing satisfaction with end-of-life care among hospitalized patients, as they and their family members are systematically excluded from routine satisfaction surveys. It is imperative that we closely examine patient and institution factors associated with quality end-of-life care and determine high-priority target areas for quality improvement. METHODS: Between September 1, 2010 and January 1, 2012 the Canadian Health care Evaluation Project (CANHELP Bereavement Questionnaire was mailed to the next-of-kin of recently deceased inpatients to seek factors associated with satisfaction with end-of-life care. The primary outcome was the global rating of satisfaction. Secondary outcomes included rates of actual versus preferred location of death, associations between demographic factors and global satisfaction, and identification of targets for quality improvement. RESULTS: Response rate was 33% among 275 valid addresses. Overall, 67.4% of respondents were very or completely satisfied with the overall quality of care their relative received. However, 71.4% of respondents who thought their relative did not die in their preferred location favoured an out-of-hospital location of death. A common location of death was the intensive care unit (45.7%; however, this was not the preferred location of death for 47.6% of such patients. Multivariate Poisson regression analysis showed respondents who believed their relative died in their preferred location were 1.7 times more likely to be satisfied with the end-of-life care that was provided (p = 0.001. Items identified as high-priority targets for improvement included: relationships with, and characteristics of health care professionals; illness management; communication; and end-of-life decision-making. INTERPRETATION: Nearly three-quarters of recently deceased inpatients would have preferred an out-of-hospital death. Intensive care units were a common, but not preferred

  19. Factors affecting family satisfaction with inpatient end-of-life care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadler, Erin; Hales, Brigette; Henry, Blair; Xiong, Wei; Myers, Jeff; Wynnychuk, Lesia; Taggar, Ru; Heyland, Daren; Fowler, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Little data exists addressing satisfaction with end-of-life care among hospitalized patients, as they and their family members are systematically excluded from routine satisfaction surveys. It is imperative that we closely examine patient and institution factors associated with quality end-of-life care and determine high-priority target areas for quality improvement. Between September 1, 2010 and January 1, 2012 the Canadian Health care Evaluation Project (CANHELP) Bereavement Questionnaire was mailed to the next-of-kin of recently deceased inpatients to seek factors associated with satisfaction with end-of-life care. The primary outcome was the global rating of satisfaction. Secondary outcomes included rates of actual versus preferred location of death, associations between demographic factors and global satisfaction, and identification of targets for quality improvement. Response rate was 33% among 275 valid addresses. Overall, 67.4% of respondents were very or completely satisfied with the overall quality of care their relative received. However, 71.4% of respondents who thought their relative did not die in their preferred location favoured an out-of-hospital location of death. A common location of death was the intensive care unit (45.7%); however, this was not the preferred location of death for 47.6% of such patients. Multivariate Poisson regression analysis showed respondents who believed their relative died in their preferred location were 1.7 times more likely to be satisfied with the end-of-life care that was provided (p = 0.001). Items identified as high-priority targets for improvement included: relationships with, and characteristics of health care professionals; illness management; communication; and end-of-life decision-making. Nearly three-quarters of recently deceased inpatients would have preferred an out-of-hospital death. Intensive care units were a common, but not preferred, location of in-hospital deaths. Family satisfaction with end-of-life

  20. Familial hypercholesterolaemia reduces the quality of life of patients not reaching treatment targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Gitte Lee; Madsen, Ivan Bredbjerg; Kruse, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    are only met in approximately 50% of patients. This comparative study examined the quality of life (QoL) impact of FH in patients who had and had not reached the target of treatment. METHODS: Two qualitative focus group interviews were carried out with a total of ten FH patients. A semi......INTRODUCTION: Familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH) is the most common monogenic disorder associated with premature cardiovascular disease. If untreated, life expectancy in heterozygous FH patients is shortened by 20-30 years compared with the general population. Nevertheless, treatment goals...... for their children, in particular. The women had issues with stigma and self-efficacy. CONCLUSIONS: The QoL impact of FH is related to treatment efficacy. These findings need to be addressed in the management of FH patients. Particular attention should be paid to those who are not presently reaching the target...

  1. Familial hypercholesterolaemia reduces the quality of life of patients not reaching treatment targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Gitte Lee; Madsen, Ivan Bredbjerg; Kruse, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    are only met in approximately 50% of patients. This comparative study examined the quality of life (QoL) impact of FH in patients who had and had not reached the target of treatment. METHODS: Two qualitative focus group interviews were carried out with a total of ten FH patients. A semi......INTRODUCTION: Familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH) is the most common monogenic disorder associated with premature cardiovascular disease. If untreated, life expectancy in heterozygous FH patients is shortened by 20-30 years compared with the general population. Nevertheless, treatment goals....... They had experienced severe side-effects and worried about their own and their relatives' health. They were concerned about the long-term impact of not being effectively treated including the risk that coronary heart disease could cause their premature death or disability and inability to care...

  2. The Relationship between Organizational Support, Work-Family Conflict, and the Job-Life Satisfaction of University Coaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Marlene A.; Sagas, Michael

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between organizational support, work-family conflict, and job and life satisfaction among coaches. Data from collegiate head coaches with families (N = 253) were gathered through a mailed questionnaire. Results from a series of covariance structure models indicated that a partially mediated model was the best…

  3. Family Structure Experiences and Child Socioemotional Development During the First Nine Years of Life: Examining Heterogeneity by Family Structure at Birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bzostek, Sharon H; Berger, Lawrence M

    2017-04-01

    A vast amount of literature has documented negative associations between family instability and child development, with the largest associations being in the socioemotional (behavioral) domain. Yet, prior work has paid limited attention to differentiating the role of the number, types, and sequencing of family transitions that children experience, as well as to understanding potential heterogeneity in these associations by family structure at birth. We use data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study and hierarchical linear models to examine associations of family structure states and transitions with children's socioemotional development during the first nine years of life. We pay close attention to the type and number of family structure transitions experienced and examine whether associations differ depending on family structure at birth. For children born to cohabiting or noncoresident parents, we find little evidence that subsequent family structure experiences are associated with socioemotional development. For children born to married parents, we find associations between family instability and poorer socioemotional development. However, this largely reflects the influence of parental breakup; we find little evidence that socioemotional trajectories differ for children with various family structure experiences subsequent to their parents' breakup.

  4. Correlates of partner and family violence among older Canadians: a life-course approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miszkurka, M.; Steensma, C.; Phillips, S. P.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Knowledge about individual and interpersonal correlates of violence in Canadian seniors is limited. This study identifies correlates of current and past violence by intimate partner and family member(s) in community-dwelling Canadian seniors, while accounting for childhood adverse circumstances. Methods: We performed logistic regression analysis of baseline data from a longitudinal study of community-dwelling individuals aged 65 to 74 years and living in Kingston (Ontario) and Saint-Hyacinthe (Quebec). Domestic violence was assessed using the Hurt-Insult-Threaten-Scream (HITS) screening tool. Odds ratios (ORs) are reported with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results: Current violence of a psychological nature was reported by 18% of the sample. Women were at greater risk of current and lifetime violence perpetrated by a family member (current violence: adjusted OR  =  1.83; 95% CI: 1.02–3.30) as well as experiencing violence from their intimate partner in their lifetime than were men (adjusted OR  =  2.48; 95% CI: 1.40–4.37). Risk factors have accumulated over the life course that were found to be consistently associated with both current and lifetime violence included having witnessed violence at home in childhood (lifetime violence by family member: adjusted OR  =  9.46; 95% CI: 5.11–17.52), as well as poor quality of relationships with intimate partners, family and friends. Conclusion: Our research documents the ongoing impact of early adversity on subsequent partner and family violence in Canada. Findings identify some preventable factors associated with current psychological violence and past violence among community-dwelling Canadian seniors. PMID:26959723

  5. Exploring family experiences of nursing aspects of end-of-life care in the ICU: A qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noome, M; Dijkstra, B.M.; Leeuwen, E. van; Vloet, L.C.M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to examine the experience(s) of family with the nursing aspects of End-of-life care in the intensive care unit after a decision to end life-sustaining treatment, and to describe what nursing care was most appreciated and what was lacking. Method: A

  6. Exploring family experiences of nursing aspects of end-of-life care in the ICU: A qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noome, M.; Dijkstra, B.M.; Leeuwen, E. van; Vloet, L.C.M.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to examine the experience(s) of family with the nursing aspects of End-of-life care in the intensive care unit after a decision to end life-sustaining treatment, and to describe what nursing care was most appreciated and what was lacking. METHOD: A

  7. Developments in working long and unsocial hours in a Danish prospective cohort study on family and work life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Hans H. K.; Westerling, Allan

    , medical professionals and food processing workers. Several of the studies included pointed at life style behavior, well-being, fatigue and dys-functional sleep patterns as mediating factors while none of the studies had looked at work-family life interaction. The panel study is based on a randomized...

  8. IMPACT OF DIABETES MELLITUS LIFE IN JOB: INFLUENCE IN SOCIAL PREVIDÊNCIA LOCO-REGIONAL (MANAGEMENT OF VICTORIA DA CONQUISTA-BA THE PERIOD OF 2003 TO AUGUST 2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaias Viana de Andrade Júnior

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes Mellitus is a universal disease with involvement in the growing world population, and cause of many complications that entail loss in quality of life and ability laborativa of people. The objective of this work was to raise social welfare data (management of Vitória da Conquista-BA, on the impact of customers and their diabetic complications in the generation of benefits and assistance in the period from 2003 to August 2007. Survey was conducted in the database management of the INSS Vitória da Conquista, Bahia. Data were collected from the Single Information System program of Benefits (SUIBE, available from internal computer network (Intranet. Aiming to restrict the cases to only those that would have been consedido benefit as a result of diabetes and its complications or, the search was given, as the International Classification of Diseases, tenth version (ICD-10, the Pan American Health Organization and World Organization Health (WHO. The results showed that the universe of searchable 50798 concerning the management of Vitoria da Conquista, only 334 were found benefits related to diabetes and its complications. In all the benefits studied a marked impact, regardless of sex, with varying degrees of disability generators of various types of benefits with age 40,07- 56,00 years. It can be concluded with the attainment of this that the low incidence (0,65% of benefits arising from diabetes and its complications, it is probably due to underreporting.

  9. Effect of Family Empowerment Modified Model to a Family???s Ability in Controlling Life Style and Physical Activity of Children with Overweight and Obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Kadek Ayu Erika, Elly Nurachmah Yeni Rustina, Suryani As`ad and Werna Nontji

    2016-01-01

    - Overeating and physical inactivity has led to an increase in the prevalence of overweight and obese children in developing countries which lead to Non Communicable Disease (NCD). Family???s role is important in controlling children lifestyle by developing and implementing a Family Empowerment Modified Model (FEMM) through the health promotion and family maintenance. This study aims to determine differences in the family???s ability controlling the lifestyle and physical activity of obesi...

  10. Subjective quality of life of outpatients with diabetes: comparison with family caregivers' impressions and control group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awadalla, Abdel W; Ohaeri, Jude U; Tawfiq, Adel M; Al-Awadi, Shafika A

    2006-05-01

    There is a paucity of studies on comparison of quality of life (QOL) of type-1 and type-2 diabetes patients, and the impact of family caregivers' impressions on the QOL of patients. To assess the subjective QOL of Sudanese diabetics using the WHOQOL-Bref, compared with a general population sample; examine caregiver-patient concordance; and assess the variables that impact on QOL. The responses of 105 outpatients with type-1 diabetes and 136 with type-2 diabetes were compared with their family caregivers' impressions and 139 general population subjects. Patients were predominantly dissatisfied with their life circumstances. Type-1 diabetics had significantly lowest QOL scores, while the control group had highest scores. Having additional medical problems; having diminished sexual desire; and being young, unemployed and single were associated with poor QOL, but illness duration was not. Type-2 diabetics had lesser concordance with caregivers. The only predictor of patients' QOL was the caregivers' impression of patients' QOL. Caregivers' impression of patients' QOL impacted on outcome. Caregiver education is, therefore, important. The factors associated with QOL indicate a group that needs focused attention. The good QOL for type-2 and nonsignificance of illness duration encourage therapeutic optimism.

  11. The universal basic education programme and the family life HIV education in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland Clement Abah

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The study assessed the capacity of the Universal Basic Education Programme in Nigeria to effectively implement the Family Life HIV Education Curriculum. Using descriptive statistics, the study has analysed and presented graphs and tables of various national and regional public primary school data from 2004 to 2008 to showcase trends of available capacity in the UBE programme. Pupil enrolment is gradually on the increase in Nigeria and even though the pupil/teacher ratio is inadequate, most of the teachers in the UBE programme are qualified. The total number of existing public primary schools, classrooms and qualified teachers are not equitably distributed in the various regions of the country. The study however concludes that the implementation of the FLHE curriculum through the UBE programme would have an impact on the fight against HIV based on the total number of primary schools, quality of teachers, and number of pupils. Family Life HIV Education is critical to the reversal of the HIV epidemic in Nigeria and should be implemented fully in all primary schools in the country.

  12. Caring for persons with schizophrenia at home:examining the link between family caregivers’ role distress and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quah, Stella

    2014-05-01

    This article re-examines the link between role distress and quality of life of family caregivers of a loved one with schizophrenia by exploring the impact of role overload (defined as spending 7 or more hours daily looking after the care recipient). Role theory and symbolic interactionism provide the conceptual background to this study. The research question is: under what conditions does role distress reduce quality of life? The answer helps us identify circumstances under which caregivers may be able to carry out their stressful caregiving role while minimising a decline in their quality of life. The data are from a purposive sample of 47 family caregivers in Singapore who were interviewed in person using a semi-structured questionnaire. The data analysis includes non-parametric tests,exploratory factor analysis and relative risks estimates. The findings show that the inverse association between role distress and quality of life found in most studies of family caregivers changes when hours of care are taken into consideration.While role distress is found among all family caregivers it only reduces the family caregiver’s quality of life in situations of role overload. The implications for the situation of family caregivers are discussed.

  13. Family Quality of Life During the Transition to Adulthood for Individuals With Intellectual Disability and/or Autism Spectrum Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, Thomas L; Carter, Erik W; Taylor, Julie Lounds

    2015-09-01

    Recognizing the prominent role of parents in supporting their children with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD), improving quality of life for these families is an essential endeavor. While much attention has focused on the experiences of families with younger children with IDD, little is known about the family quality of life (FQOL) among families with transition-age youth and young adults. We examined the FQOL ratings of 425 parents with a child between 13-21 years of age with intellectual disability or autism to understand FQOL and the factors that may shape it. Overall satisfaction with FQOL was somewhat high for this sample, with some variability across domains. Higher FQOL ratings were predicted by lower frequency of challenging behaviors, lower support needs, and higher strength of parental religious faith. We present recommendations for research and practice focused on promoting quality of life during the transition period.

  14. Family functioning in severe brain injuries: correlations with caregivers' burden, perceived social support and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tramonti, Francesco; Bonfiglio, Luca; Di Bernardo, Carolina; Ulivi, Chiara; Virgillito, Alessandra; Rossi, Bruno; Carboncini, Maria Chiara

    2015-01-01

    Severe brain injuries have long-term consequences on functional status and psychosocial functioning. Family life can be greatly influenced as well, and features of high caregiver burden can emerge. Although the data on caregivers' distress are constantly increasing, less information is available about the role of family functioning. Thirty caregivers of hospitalised patients with severe brain injuries received questionnaires for the evaluation of caregiver burden, family functioning and perceived social support. A semi-structured interview was performed for the evaluation of quality of life. Family cohesion and adaptability positively correlated with caregivers' quality of life and perceived social support. Partner caregivers' scores were significantly higher on the time-dependent burden than those of sons and daughters, whereas the latter scored higher on the emotional burden.

  15. Family and professionals underestimate quality of life across diverse cultures and health conditions: systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crocker, Thomas F; Smith, Jaime K; Skevington, Suzanne M

    2015-05-01

    To examine how accurately proxies evaluate quality of life (QoL) in people they know, using cross-cultural data from the multidimensional, multilingual World Health Organization Quality of Life assessment short-form (the WHOQOL-BREF) and whether accuracy varies by health condition or proxy type (eg, family/professional). Systematic review with meta-analysis: We searched five databases for reports of proxy-completed WHOQOL-BREF scores and aggregated results using a random-effects model. Minimal clinically important difference values were calculated. Analyses included nine studies (1980 dyads) of physical (n = 762) or mental (n = 604) health conditions, or intellectual disability (n = 614), in 10 countries. Mean person-proxy correlations ranged from 0.28 (social QoL) to 0.44 (physical QoL). Proxy measures were underestimates (ie, significantly lower than persons reported for themselves) for social [mean difference (MD) = 4.7, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.8, 7.6], psychological (MD = 3.7, 95% CI: 0.6, 6.8), and physical (MD = 3.1, 95% CI: 0.6, 5.6) QoL. Underestimates varied significantly between health conditions for social (P Family members assessed psychological and environmental QoL better than professionals. Proxies tend to be imprecise, underestimating QoL, and should be aware of this tendency. Where health care is decided for others, family members' views about QoL should be prioritized. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The Dyadic Effects of Family Cohesion and Communication on Health-Related Quality of Life: The Moderating Role of Sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jung-Won; Shon, En-Jung

    2017-01-20

    Spouses' ability to care for survivors can be particularly challenging because patients and spouses are interdependent and mutually influence one another. Family functioning such as family cohesion and communication may play a primary role in improving the health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of couples, given that cancer can influence family dynamics. The aims of this study were to investigate the mediating effect of family communication on the relationship between family cohesion and HRQOL and examine the moderating effect of sex on this relationship among cancer survivor-spouse dyads. A total of 91 cancer survivors with a diagnosis of breast, colorectal, or prostate cancer and their spouses were recruited from the University Hospital Registry in Cleveland, Ohio. The dyadic data were analyzed using structural equation modeling with the actor-partner interdependence mediation model. Findings demonstrated that the spouses' own perceived family communication mediated the associations between their own family cohesion and physical HRQOL and between the survivors' family cohesion and physical HRQOL. The spouse actor effects between family communication and HRQOL significantly differed by sex. Enhancing family cohesion and communication within the family can improve the spouses' HRQOL. Findings regarding sex differences serve as a rationale for gender-based approaches to improving HRQOL in survivorship care in the family context. Couple- and/or family-based interventions should be designed to enhance family cohesion and improve family communication skills for effective adjustments within couples and families. Supportive care within the family context can be promoted to address the diverse challenges of survivorship care.

  17. Tetralogy of Fallot in men: quality of life, family, education, and employment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bygstad, Elisabeth; Pedersen, Lia C V M; Pedersen, Thais A L; Hjortdal, Vibeke E

    2012-08-01

    Little is known about the quality of life, health, family, education, and employment status among adult men with repaired tetralogy of Fallot. A total of 68 men who underwent repair of tetralogy of Fallot between 1971 and 1991 were studied. Fifty-three patients answered the SF-36 health survey and additional questions regarding offspring, education, and employment status. The men with repaired tetralogy of Fallot were compared with 32 healthy men and 40 women who also underwent repair of tetralogy of Fallot in the same period. The patients scored lower than healthy men in the SF-36 categories physical functioning, general health, and physical component summary. There were no statistically significant differences in the scores from male and female patients except a lower score in bodily pain among women. Educational level for men operated for tetralogy of Fallot was similar to the general male population, whereas fewer were employed and more were retired, undergoing rehabilitation or receiving social benefits. The reproduction rate was lower compared with the general population (0.65 versus 1.02 children per man) but relatively higher than the rate among women with tetralogy of Fallot (0.88 versus 1.84 children per woman). The risk of having a child with congenital heart disease was 8.3%. Men operated for tetralogy of Fallot have good quality of life and educational status. They start a family, although their reproduction rate is two-thirds that of the general population. The risk of having a child with congenital heart disease is higher compared with the background population. The overall quality of life is similar for men and women operated for tetralogy of Fallot.

  18. Quality-of-life assessment in Chinese families with food-allergic children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, T F; Yung, E; Wong, Y S; Li, C Y; Wong, G W K

    2009-06-01

    Caucasian families with food-allergic children have a compromised quality of life (QoL) for fear of life-threatening food reactions. Such data are limited in Asian children. Based on our recent questionnaire-based survey, 8.1% of young children recruited from local nurseries and kindergartens had parent-reported adverse food reactions (AFRs). This study tested the robustness of the Chinese Food Allergy Quality of Life-Parental Burden questionnaire (FAQL-PB) and assessed QoL in families with childhood AFR. The correlations among FAQL-PB items were evaluated by factor analysis. Two hundred and ninety-eight of 3677 children aged 2-7 years had parent-reported AFR, and 197 (66.1%) of them completed the 17 items of our self-administered FAQL-PB. Six hundred and thirty-nine (18.9%) children without AFR returned this questionnaire. Factor analysis was used to delineate the inter-relationship among the FAQL-PB items. Cronbach alpha for our Chinese FAQL-PB was 0.976, and the median (interquartile range) FAQL-PB scores of children with and without parent-reported AFR were 0.10 (0.02-0.32) and 0 (0-0.18), respectively (P foods that caused AFRs (P or = 0.5. Impaired QoL was associated with AFR that was caused by >3 foods (P = 0.001), current food avoidance (P = 0.005) and AFR caused by peanut (P = 0.003), egg (P = 0.011) and cow's milk (P = 0.028), and current flexural dermatitis (P = 0.011). FAQL-PB is a robust measure of AFR-specific parental QoL, which is impaired in Chinese children with parent-reported AFR. Flexural dermatitis, current food avoidance and AFR caused by multiple foods are independent risk factors for lower parental QoL.

  19. The Bands Culture in Victoria, Australia: Live Music Benefits Career Paths, Employment and Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Amanda; Forrest, David

    2012-01-01

    This study explores the career paths, employment, business opportunities and community contributions made available through the provision and development of the contemporary performance bands' culture in the State of Victoria. It is framed with the support given to live music performers by Arts Victoria, Small Business Victoria and Music Victoria.…

  20. The Evaluation of Family Quality of Life of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder and Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roxana ŞIPOŞ

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The Quality of Life (QoL represents a dimension of the overall status and of the wellbeing that might be influenced by various factors. Researchers suggest that the parents of children with disabilities may be more vulnerable in developing physical or mental issues and that these families have a lower quality of life. Primary objective of the study was to evaluate the QoL of families with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD children as compared with that of families with Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder (ADHD children. The data were collected from 65 children with age ranging between 2 and 14 years, diagnosed with ASD and 49 children diagnosed with ADHD. The Family Quality of Life Survey (FQoL was used to evaluate the family QoL. The multidimensional model of quality of life explains 48% of the variance of the global evaluation of the family’s quality of life, proportion statistically significant (F (9, 103 = 12.71 p<0.01. Under statistical control of other factors the most important predictors remain family (beta = 0.43, p < 0.001, support from others (beta =- 0.26, p < 0.001, career (beta = 0.23, p < 0.001 and financial status (beta = 0.15, p = 0.04. Parents of children from the ADHD sample believe that family relationships are less important for the family quality of life, have fewer opportunities to improve these relations, a lower initiative which can derive also from the reduced importance they place on this domain.