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Sample records for vicki baker commentaries

  1. Commentary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skytte, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    Commentary on a case about child abuse discussing the dilemma between recognition of professional discretion and the decire for further democratic development of society.......Commentary on a case about child abuse discussing the dilemma between recognition of professional discretion and the decire for further democratic development of society....

  2. Commentary

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2016-02-01

    Feb 1, 2016 ... 2. Commentary. The dental education came to light for the first time in India in 1920 ... rise in dental colleges has led to a higher number of dental graduates [6]. ... practice is not easy due to already saturated market and competition [4]. .... health in India: need for skill mix in the dental workforce. J. Fam Med ...

  3. Commentary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marchuk, Iryna

    2016-01-01

    This commentary addresses a number of important evidentiary issues that arose during cross-examination of Charles Taylor, the former President of Liberia, who who stood trial and was convicted of crimes against humanity and war crimes committed during Sierra Leone’s brutal civil war before the UN......-backed Special Court for Sierra Leone (SCSL). At the core of cross-examination was the Prosecution’s strategy to challenge Taylor’s self-portrayal as a peacemaker and to demonstrate a pattern of conduct of the accused in Liberia similar to the one pursued by war-mongering leaders of various rebel groups...

  4. Commentary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Otrel-Cass, Kathrin

    2015-01-01

    ’s lives. However there has been primarily focus on its life accelerating attributes. Slowing down the process of production may open up possibilities for sustainable ICT development. The commentary combined with Patrignani and Whitehouse's article may provide a resource for those responsible in training...... technology. Connecting resource production, use and disposal and its affect on climate change will require those who are in the position to make changes to come up with solutions that consider also values, beliefs and norms that lead to particular types of behaviour. ICT has had an enormous impact on people...

  5. Entropy of Baker's Transformation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    栾长福

    2003-01-01

    Four theorems about four different kinds of entropies for Baker's transformation are presented. The Kolmogorov entropy of Baker's transformation is sensitive to the initial flips by the time. The topological entropy of Baker's transformation is found to be log k. The conditions for the state of Baker's transformation to be forbidden are also derived. The relations among the Shanonn, Kolmogorov, topological and Boltzmann entropies are discussed in details.

  6. Interview to Bobby Baker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aisling Foster

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Bobby Baker es una mujer, y una artista londinense con una carrera que abarca casi cuatro décadas. Ha trabajado fundamentalmente en el ámbito de la performance haciendo frecuente uso de material personal. Entre sus obras encontramos una versión comestible de su familia a tamaño natural, una protesta callejera de guisantes humanos que reclaman los derechos de los pacientes en el ámbito de la salud mental o una serie de performances que de modo irónico representan su vida doméstica. Su exposición itinerante «Diary Drawings: Mental Illness and Me 1997 - 2008» se estrenó en la Wellcome Collection en 2009, y el libro que la acompaña fue galardonado con el Mind Book of the Year 2011. Sus obras más recientes Mad Gyms & Kitchens y Drawing On A (Grand Mother’s Experience han sido encargadas como parte de la Cultural Olympiad de Londres en 2012 y del Women of the World Festival en 2015 respectivamente. Bobby Baker recibió el Doctorado Honorífico en 2011 tras su participación en la AHRC Creative Fellowship de Queen Mary University de Londres y es la directora artística de la asociación Daily Life Ltd.http://dailylifeltd.co.uk Grabación y edición sonora: Andrea ZarzaTraducción y transcripción: Celia Terradillos, Zara Rodríguez 

  7. COCA Commentary

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    COCA Commentary podcasts are designed to be an educational resource for healthcare providers. This podcast series provides current information on emerging health threats, emergency preparedness and response topics, and CDC clinical guidance.

  8. Continuing Commentary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, R. M.; von Eye, A.

    1993-01-01

    Rebuts the Burgess and Molenaar commentary in this issue on the authors' paper concerning sociobiology and human development, maintaining that genes (nature) cannot usefully be construed as independent of the coactional developmental system of which they are a part. (BB)

  9. The Baker's cyst - a diagnostic problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meydam, K.

    1981-01-01

    Precise definition of Baker's cyst has been prevented by variety of synonyms. Following anatomical description, Baker's determination, and investigations of myself one should differentiate between the rupture of capsule, bursa semimembranos-gastrocnemia, and Baker's cyst because thea are clearly independent from the pathologic-anatomical point of view. Clinical importance of Baker's cyst in connection with further diseases of the knee joint and therapeutical possibilities are discussed. (orig.) [de

  10. Obituary: Dr. Richard Roland Baker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thornton R

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Richard Baker died at Easter 2007 after a very short illness. It is sad that he died so soon after his retirement from the British American Tobacco Company at the end of 2005, and just as he was beginning to enjoy his new life, even though tobacco science still had a part to play.

  11. Baker's asthma in a child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, E; Ausín, A; Elices, A; Moreno-Escobosa, M; Ibáñez, M; Laso, M

    2001-01-01

    baker's asthma is a well-known occupational lung disease which usually develops in adults. We report the case of a two years old boy who suffered from asthma, urticaria and atopic dermatitis for twelve months, whose symptoms were associated to visits to his grandfather's bakery. skin prick tests (SPT) were made to dust mites, moulds, flours, alfa-amylase and egg. It was also determined total IgE and specific IgE antibodies to alfa-amylase and flours. Subsequently, a challenge test was carried out with wheat flour. The SPTs were positive to flours, alfa-amylase and egg. The determination of specific IgE antibodies showed 2.64 kU/L to wheat, 0.79 kU/L to glyadin and 2.98 kU/L to alfa-amylase. The patient developed asthma and rhinitis after manipulating wheat flour for 10 min. we demonstrated a type I hypersensitivity to wheat flour and alfa-amylase in a two years old child by SPT, specific IgE antibodies and challenge test. This case in the childhood equivalent of occupational baker's asthma.

  12. 21 CFR 172.898 - Bakers yeast glycan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Bakers yeast glycan. 172.898 Section 172.898 Food... Multipurpose Additives § 172.898 Bakers yeast glycan. Bakers yeast glycan may be safely used in food in accordance with the following conditions: (a) Bakers yeast glycan is the comminuted, washed, pasteurized, and...

  13. Pühendusega isadele - Baker Street

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2009-01-01

    Üritusest 7. novembril Kuressaares Arensburg lounge-restoranis Muusa toimuvast isadepäevahõngulisest üritusest, esinevad Virgo Veldi & Band kavaga "Baker Street", erikülalisena Villu Veski. Saksofonistist Virgo Veldist

  14. CRED REA Algal Assessments, Baker Island 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Twelve quadrats were sampled along 2 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 8 sites at Baker Island in the US...

  15. Performance of baker's yeast produced using date syrup substrate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Baker's yeast was produced from three selected baker's yeast strains using date syrup as a substrate at low and high flow rate compared to those produced using molasses substrates. Performance of the produced baker's yeasts on Arabic bread quality was investigated. Baking tests showed a positive relationship between ...

  16. 21 CFR 184.1983 - Bakers yeast extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Bakers yeast extract. 184.1983 Section 184.1983... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1983 Bakers yeast extract. (a) Bakers yeast extract... a selected strain of yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It may be concentrated or dried. (b) The...

  17. Steroids isolated from Millettia versicolor Baker (Fabaceae)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-06-03

    Jun 3, 2008 ... African Journal of Biotechnology Vol. 7 (11), pp. ... Full Length Research Paper ... of Millettia versicolor Baker, a medicinal plant used in the traditional ... The spectral analysis enabled us to identify 4 known .... evidence for participation of protein kinase C and protein kinase A ... Neoplasma 51(6): 407-414.

  18. Water-quality effects on Baker Lake of recent volcanic activity at Mount Baker, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortleson, Gilbert Carl; Wilson, Reed T.; Foxworthy, B.L.

    1976-01-01

    Increased volcanic activity on Mount Baker, which began in March 1975, represents the greatest known activity of a Cascade Range volcano since eruptions at Lassen Peak, Calif. during 1914-17. Emissions of dust and increased emanations of steam, other gases, and heat from the Sherman Crater area of the mountain focused attention on the possibility of hazardous events, including lava flows, pyroclastic eruptions, avalanches, and mudflows. However, the greatest undesirable natural results that have been observed after one year of the increased activity are an increase in local atmospheric pollution and a decrease in the quality of some local water resources, including Baker Lake. Baker Lake, a hydropower reservoir behind Upper Baker Dam, supports a valuable fishery resource and also is used for recreation. The lake's feedwater is from Baker River and many smaller streams, some of which, like Boulder Creek, drain parts of Mount Baker. Boulder Creek receives water from Sherman Crater, and its channel is a likely route for avalanches or mudflows that might originate in the crater area. Boulder Creek drains only about 5 percent of the total drainage area of Baker Lake, but during 1975 carried sizeable but variable loads of acid and dissolved minerals into the lake. Sulfurous gases and the fumarole dust from Sherman Crater are the main sources for these materials, which are brought into upper Boulder Creek by meltwater from the crater. In September 1973, before the increased volcanic activity, Boulder Creek near the lake had a pH of 6.0-6.6; after the increase the pH ranged as low as about 3.5. Most nearby streams had pH values near 7. On April 29, in Boulder Creek the dissolved sulfate concentration was 6 to 29 times greater than in nearby creeks or in Baker River; total iron was 18-53 times greater than in nearby creeks; and other major dissolved constituents generally 2 to 7 times greater than in the other streams. The short-term effects on Baker Lake of the acidic

  19. Obituary: James Gilbert Baker, 1914-2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Neal Kenton

    2005-12-01

    Dr. James Gilbert Baker, renowned astronomer and optical physicist, died 29 June 2005 at his home in Bedford, New Hampshire at the age of 90. Although his scientific interest was astronomy, his extraordinary ability in optical design led to the creation of hundreds of optical systems that supported astronomy, aerial reconnaissance, instant photography (Polaroid SX70 camera), and the US space programs. He was the recipient of numerous awards for his creative work. He was born in Louisville, Kentucky, on 11 November 1914, the fourth child of Jesse B. Baker and Hattie M. Stallard. After graduating from Louisville DuPont Manual High, he went on to attend the University of Louisville majoring in Mathematics. He became very close to an Astronomy Professor, Dr. Moore, and many times used his telescopes to do nightly observations. While at the university, he built mirrors for his own telescopes and helped form the Louisville Astronomical Society in 1933. At the University of Louisville, he also met his future wife, Elizabeth Katherine Breitenstein of Jefferson County, Kentucky. He received his BA in 1935 at the height of the Depression. He began his graduate work in astronomy at the Harvard College Observatory. After his MA (1936), he was appointed a Junior Fellow (1937-1943) in the Prestigious Harvard Society of Fellows. He received his PhD in 1942 from Harvard in rather an unusual fashion, which is worth retelling. During an Astronomy Department dinner, Dr. Harlow Shapley (the director) asked him to give a talk. According to the "Courier-Journal Magazine", "Dr. Shapley stood up and proclaimed an on-the-spot departmental meeting and asked for a vote on recommending Baker for a Ph.D. on the basis of the 'oral exam' he had just finished. The vote was unanimous." It was at Harvard College Observatory during this first stage of his career that he collaborated with Donald H. Menzel, Lawrence H. Aller, and George H. Shortley on a landmark set of papers on the physical processes

  20. Performance of baker's yeast produced using date syrup substrate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-05-24

    May 24, 2010 ... evaluate the effect of using Baker's yeast produced using date syrup as .... Gas production power (ml/20g dough) for baker's yeasts (LSD Test*). Incubation ... Brain (2005) indicated that a falling number value of 350 s or longer ...

  1. 21 CFR 172.325 - Bakers yeast protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.325 Bakers yeast protein. Bakers yeast protein may be...

  2. Commentary: Warring ants

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 27; Issue 2. Commentary: Warring ants: Lessons from Lanchester's laws of combat? Renee M Borges. Volume 27 Issue 2 March 2002 pp 75-78. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/jbsc/027/02/0075-0078 ...

  3. Commentary on the Papers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Christine; Mercer, Neil

    2017-01-01

    This commentary discusses the four papers that comprise the special issue on dialogic teaching and learning, while making general observations that apply across the field as a whole. Similarities and differences are identified over the concepts of "dialogue" and "dialogic pedagogy". The possibility is raised that some aspects…

  4. Prevalence of sensitization to 'improver' enzymes in UK supermarket bakers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, M; Welch, J; Turvey, J; Cannon, J; Clark, P; Szram, J; Cullinan, P

    2016-07-01

    Supermarket bakers are exposed not only to flour and alpha-amylase but also to other 'improver' enzymes, the nature of which is usually shrouded by commercial sensitivity. We aimed to determine the prevalence of sensitization to 'improver' enzymes in UK supermarket bakers. We examined the prevalence of sensitization to enzymes in 300 bakers, employed by one of two large supermarket bakeries, who had declared work-related respiratory symptoms during routine health surveillance. Sensitization was determined using radioallergosorbent assay to eight individual enzymes contained in the specific 'improver' mix used by each supermarket. The prevalence of sensitization to 'improver' enzymes ranged from 5% to 15%. Sensitization was far more likely if the baker was sensitized also to either flour or alpha-amylase. The prevalence of sensitization to an 'improver' enzyme did not appear to be related to the concentration of that enzyme in the mix. We report substantial rates of sensitization to enzymes other than alpha-amylase in UK supermarket bakers; in only a small proportion of bakers was there evidence of sensitization to 'improver mix' enzymes without sensitization to either alpha-amylase or flour. The clinical significance of these findings needs further investigation, but our findings indicate that specific sensitization in symptomatic bakers may not be identified without consideration of a wide range of workplace antigens. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Phenolics from Kalanchoe marmorata Baker, Family Crassulaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel Nasser Badawy Singab

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In search of plants rich in phenolics in Egypt, Kalanchoe marmorata Baker was subjected to phytochemical study. The preliminary phytochemical screening revealed its richness in phenolics. Fractionation of the lyophilized aqueous extract of the leaves of K. marmorata by different organic solvents successively resulted in the isolation and purification of five compounds from the ethyl acetate soluble fraction. These compounds namely; E1 isorhamnetin-3-O-α-l-1C4-rhamnopyranoside; E2 quercitin; E3 4′-methoxy-myricetin-3-O-α-l-1C4-rhamnopyranoside; E4 Quercitin-3-O-β-d-4C1-glucopyranoside and E5 protocatechuic-4′-O-β-d-4C1-glucopyranoside, were identified by analysis of their spectral data including 1H NMR and 13C NMR.

  6. S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase from baker's yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pösö, H; Sinervirta, R; Jänne, J

    1975-01-01

    1. S-Adenosyl-L-methionine decarboxylase (S-adenosyl-L-methionine carboxy-lyase, EC 4.1.1.50) was purified more than 1100-fold from extracts of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by affinity chromatography on columns of Sepharose containing covalently bound methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) (1,1'[(methylethanediylidene)dinitrilo]diguanidine) [Pegg, (1974) Biochem J. 141, 581-583]. The final preparation appeared to be homogeneous on polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis at pH 8.4. 2. S-Adenosylmethionine decarboxylase activity was completely separated from spermidine synthase activity [5'-deoxyadenosyl-(5'),3-aminopropyl-(1),methylsulphonium-salt-putrescine 3-aminopropyltransferase, EC 2.5.1.16] during the purification procedure. 3. Adenosylmethionine decarboxylase activity from crude extracts of baker's yeast was stimulated by putrescine, 1,3-diamino-propane, cadaverine (1,5-diaminopentane) and spermidine; however, the purified enzyme, although still stimulated by the diamines, was completely insensitive to spermidine. 4. Adenosylmethionine decarboxylase has an apparent Km value of 0.09 mM for adenosylmethionine in the presence of saturating concentrations of putrescine. The omission of putrescine resulted in a five-fold increase in the apparent Km value for adenosylmethionine. 5. The apparent Ka value for putrescine, as the activator of the reaction, was 0.012 mM. 6. Methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) and S-methyladenosylhomocysteamine (decarboxylated adenosylmethionine) were powerful inhibitors of the enzyme. 7. Adenosylmethionine decarboxylase from baker's yeast was inhibited by a number of conventional carbonyl reagents, but in no case could the inhibition be reversed with exogenous pyridoxal 5'-phosphate. PMID:1108876

  7. 78 FR 27215 - Baker County Oregon; Notice of Application Tendered for Filing With the Commission and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-09

    ...: Baker County, Oregon (Baker County). e. Name of Project: Mason Dam Hydroelectric Project. f. Location...'s (Reclamation) Mason Dam, near Baker City, in Baker County, Oregon. The project would occupy 6.4... facilities. The proposed project's generation would not change the current day- to-day operation of Mason dam...

  8. Posterior tibial neuropathy by a Baker's cyst: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J H; Jun, J B; Lee, H S; Yun, H R; Choi, C H; Park, S B; Hong, E K; Yoo, D H; Kim, S Y

    2000-01-01

    Baker's cysts are rare cause of peripheral nerve entrapment and only a few cases of tibial nerve entrapment resulting from the popliteal cyst in the calf muscle have been reported in the literature. We present a case of rheumatoid arthritis complicated by a Baker's cyst with a tibial nerve entrapment. It is important to diagnose a Baker's cyst early and to differentiate it from thrombophlebitis, a popliteal aneurysm, tumor or muscle tear to effect optimal therapy and to obviate a potential neuropathy. Prompt recognition of these cases may save the patients unnecessary procedures and delay in treatment.

  9. Disturbance and Celebration of Josephine Baker in Copenhagen 1928

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spanger, Marlene

    2015-01-01

    Marlene Spanger analyses reactions to the internationally recognised dancer and singer Josephine Baker (1906–1975), whose performances in Copenhagen gave rise to a heated emotional debate in Danish newspapers; these reactions mirror contemporary dominant religious, biological and colonial discour...

  10. CRED REA Coral Population Parameters at Baker, Phoenix Islands, 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Belt transects along 2 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 3 sites at Baker in the Phoenix...

  11. CRED REA Algal Assessments, Baker Island 2004 (NODC Accession 0010352)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Twelve quadrats were sampled along 2 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 6 sites at Baker Island in the US...

  12. Baker's yeast: production of D- and L-3-hydroxy esters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Allan Carsten; Madsen, Jørgen Øgaard

    1998-01-01

    harvested while growing. In contrast, the stereoselectivity was shifted towards L-hydroxy esters when the oxo esters were added slowly to ordinary baker's yeast supplied with gluconolactone as co-substrate. The reduction rate with gluconolactone was increased by active aeration. Ethyl L-(S)-3......Baker's yeast grown under oxygen limited conditions and used in the reduction of 3-oxo esters results in a shift of the stereoselectivity of the yeast towards D-hydroxy esters as compared with ordinary baker's yeast. The highest degree of stereoselectivity was obtained with growing yeast or yeast......-hydroxybutanoate was afforded in >99% ee. Both enantiomers of ethyl 3-hydroxypentanoate, D-(R) in 96% ee and L-(S) in 93% ee, and of ethyl 4-chloro-3-hydroxybutanoate, D-(S) in 98% ee and L-(R) in 94% ee, were obtained. The results demonstrate that the stereoselectivity of baker's yeast can be controlled...

  13. Intramuscular dissection of Baker's cysts: report on three cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, Christopher S.J.; McCarthy, Catherine L.; McNally, Eugene G.

    2004-01-01

    Baker's cysts are fluid distensions of the gastrocnemius-semimembranosus bursa and are the most common cystic lesion around the knee. Typically cysts enlarge along intermuscular planes around the knee. We report three cases in which the expanding cyst did not respect these planes and dissected along an intramuscular route as confirmed by MR imaging. Such behaviour by Baker's cysts is hitherto unreported in the literature. Possible mechanisms to account for this phenomenon are discussed. (orig.)

  14. Heuristic Sensitivity Analysis for Baker's Yeast Model Parameters

    OpenAIRE

    Leão, Celina P.; Soares, Filomena O.

    2004-01-01

    The baker's yeast, essentially composed by living cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, used in the bread making and beer industries as a microorganism, has an important industrial role. The simulation procedure represents then a necessary tool to understand clearly the baker's yeast fermentation process. The use of mathematical models based on mass balance equations requires the knowledge of the reaction kinetics, thermodynamics, and transport and physical properties. Models may be more or less...

  15. Production of baker's yeast using date juice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beiroti, A; Hosseini, S N

    2007-07-01

    Baker's yeast is an important additive among the products which improves bread quality and for present time is being produced in different countries by batch, fed batch or continuous cultures. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is used in fermentation of starch in dough, giving a favourable taste and produces a variety of vitamins and proteins. The main ingredient in yeast production is carbon source such as beet molasses, cane molasses, and so on. Since beet molasses has other major function as in high yield alcohol production and also due to the bioenvironmental issues and related wastewater treatment, the use of other carbohydrate sources may be considered. One of these carbohydrate sources is date which is wasted a great deal annually in this country (Iran) . In this study, the capability of date to act as a suitable carbon sources was investigated. The waste date turned into juice and consequently production and growth rate of Sacchromyces cervisiae were studied with this juice. A maximum possible yield of 50% was obtained by the optimum medium (P3), at pH 3.4, 30 degrees C, 1.4 vvm aeration rate and agitation of 500 r/min.

  16. Optimization of the flux values in multichannel ceramic membrane microfiltration of Baker`s yeast suspension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milović Nemanja R.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to estimate the effects of the operating parameters on the baker's yeast microfiltration through multichannel ceramic membrane. The selected parameters were transmembrane pressure, suspension feed flow, and initial suspension concentration. In order to investigate the influence and interaction effects of these parameters on the microfiltration operation, two responses have been chosen: average permeate flux and flux decline. The Box-Behnken experimental design and response surface methodology was used for result processing and process optimization. According to the obtained results, the most important parameter influencing permeate flux during microfiltration is the initial suspension concentration. The maximum average flux value was achieved at an initial concentration of 0.1 g/L, pressure around 1.25 bars and a flow rate at 16 L/h. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR 31002

  17. Shuffling cards, factoring numbers and the quantum baker's map

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakshminarayan, Arul

    2005-01-01

    It is pointed out that an exactly solvable permutation operator, viewed as the quantization of cyclic shifts, is useful in constructing a basis in which to study the quantum baker's map, a paradigm system of quantum chaos. In the basis of this operator the eigenfunctions of the quantum baker's map are compressed by factors of around five or more. We show explicitly its connection to an operator that is closely related to the usual quantum baker's map. This permutation operator has interesting connections to the art of shuffling cards as well as to the quantum factoring algorithm of Shor via the quantum order finding one. Hence we point out that this well-known quantum algorithm makes crucial use of a quantum chaotic operator, or at least one that is close to the quantization of the left-shift, a closeness that we also explore quantitatively. (letter to the editor)

  18. Malignant pleural mesothelioma in bakers and pastry cooks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascoli, V; Calisti, R; Carnovale-Scalzo, C; Nardi, F

    2001-10-01

    The occurrence of malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) among bakers and pastry cooks has never been documented. We detected eight cases of MPM in bakers, pastry cooks, and biscuit cooks engaged in making, baking/cooking, and selling pastry/bread in two hospital-based series (Rome and Orbassano/Turin, Italy; period 1990-1997; 222 cases). Field-investigations revealed asbestos-containing material (ACM) in ovens for baking bread, that were manufactured prior to the 1980s. It is suggested that there is a possible new association of the risk of having worked as a baker or pastry cook and MPM. Presumptive source of exposure to asbestos was the use of asbestos-insulated ovens. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Quantum baker maps with controlled-not coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vallejos, Raul O; Santoro, Pedro R del; Almeida, Alfredo M Ozorio de

    2006-01-01

    The characteristic stretching and squeezing of chaotic motion is linearized within the finite number of phase space domains which subdivide a classical baker map. Tensor products of such maps are also chaotic, but a more interesting generalized baker map arises if the stacking orders for the factor maps are allowed to interact. These maps are readily quantized, in such a way that the stacking interaction is entirely attributed to primary qubits in each map, if each jth subsystem has Hilbert space dimension D j 2 n j . We here study the particular example of two baker maps that interact via a controlled-not interaction, which is a universal gate for quantum computation. Numerical evidence indicates that the control subspace becomes an ideal Markovian environment for the target map in the limit of large Hilbert space dimension

  20. USA sender Able og Baker en tur i rummet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alstrup, Aage Kristian Olsen

    2014-01-01

    DETTE ER DEN TREDJE ARTIKEL I SERIEN OM DYRENES ROLLE I RUMFORSKNINGEN. VI SKAL MØDE DE TO PRIMATER ABLE OG BAKER, SOM NASA SUCCESFULDT SENDTE EN TUR I RUMMET I MAJ 1959 – HALVANDET ÅR EFTER, AT SOVJETUNIONEN HAVDE SENDT HUNDEN LAIKA DERUD.......DETTE ER DEN TREDJE ARTIKEL I SERIEN OM DYRENES ROLLE I RUMFORSKNINGEN. VI SKAL MØDE DE TO PRIMATER ABLE OG BAKER, SOM NASA SUCCESFULDT SENDTE EN TUR I RUMMET I MAJ 1959 – HALVANDET ÅR EFTER, AT SOVJETUNIONEN HAVDE SENDT HUNDEN LAIKA DERUD....

  1. 76 FR 72718 - Notice of Availability of the Draft Baker Resource Management Plan and Environmental Impact...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-25

    ... following methods: Web site: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/vale/plans/bakerrmp/contact.php . Email: Baker... above address or may be viewed at: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/vale/plans/bakerrmp/index.php . FOR... will revise the existing Baker RMP of 1989 and provide the Baker Field Office with an updated framework...

  2. Bakers yeast-mediated transformations of alpha-keto epoxides

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Meth-Cohn, O

    1994-06-07

    Full Text Available Alpha beta-Epoxy ketones on treatment with baker's yeast yield different types of products depending on their substitution. Small groups such as H or Me attached at the epoxy end protect that end from attack. Thus, 1-acyl epoxides with H, methyl...

  3. Quality evaluation of some commercial baker's yeasts in Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    55.8 to161.6mlh g , respectively. Bread baked from different baker's yeasts were not significantly different (p>0.05) in their crumb structure and texture. However, significant differences were found in terms of crust color, loaf symmetry and overall acceptability. The staling rate of bread samples correlated positively with yeast's ...

  4. Framework for Sustaining Innovation at Baker Library, Harvard Business School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, Meghan; Hemment, Michael; Oliver, Stephanie

    2017-01-01

    Baker Library at Harvard Business School is increasingly asked by the school's faculty to create custom digital information products to enhance course assignments and to find novel ways of electronically disseminating faculty research. In order to prioritize these requests, as well as facilitate, manage, and track the resulting projects, the…

  5. Isolation of a tyrosine-activating enzyme from baker's yeast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ven, A.M. van de; Koningsberger, V.V.; Overbeek, J.Th.G.

    1958-01-01

    The extracts of ether-CO2-frozen baker's yeast contain enzymes that catalyze the ATP-linked amino acid activation by way of pyrophosphate elimination. From the extract a tyrosine-activating enzyme could be isolated, which, judging from ultracentrifugation and electrophoretic data, was about 70% pure

  6. Senecio grisebachii Baker: Pyrrolizidine alkaloids and experimental poisoning in calves

    Science.gov (United States)

    The main objectives of this study were to determine the 1,2-dehydropyrrolizidine alkaloid (DHPA) content in Senecio grisebachii Baker (Compositae), to experimentally demonstrate its toxicity in calves and to describe the main clinical and pathological findings of this toxicity. S. grisebachii plants...

  7. A “pessoa” de Rudder Baker é realmente incorporada?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Gonçalves Coelho

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Some philosophers materialists think, against the dualism of substance, that an embodied mind is only a mind that depends on a body to exist, that is, that the mind doesn’t exist independently of a body. I will take as representative of this very limited point of view about embodiment the ideas of Lynne Baker and her Constitution View. Baker says that she prefers to face the problem of the relationship between persons and bodies than the problem of the relationship between mind and body because this last formulation of the problem implies the idea of a mind distinct and separated of the body while the first is more according of her view of an embodied and situated mind. But the problem is that Baker forgets it when she defines persons in terms of first-person perspective or self-consciousness. Although, Baker says that the self-consciousness depends on structural – a body – and environmental – the situation – conditions, what becomes a self-conscious human person an entity ontologically distinct of the body that constitutes it and of other animals are their realizations like arts, philosophy, science, moral, etc. It looks like that for Baker the self-consciousness is not only a necessary condition but also a sufficient one for that human realizations, while the body fulfill only an indirect role. Against these ideas we can ask: the great realizations that distinguish the human persons of other animals would be possible independently of the biological constitution of our body and its needs?

  8. Defining Functions of Danish Political Commentary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bengtsson, Mette

    2011-01-01

    In Denmark political commentary is still a relatively new phenomenon. This paper analyzes the metadiscourse in relation to political commentary to identify the different understandings that have coalesced around political commentary as a genre. I argue that people in different positions (e.......g. citizens, politicians, journalists, political editors, chief editors and political commentators themselves) emphasize different explanations for the rise of the genre and thereby functions of political commentary as part of an argumentative strategy favouring their own interests...

  9. Commentary: Biochemistry Re-Natured

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Harold B.

    2010-01-01

    In his last commentary on "Biochemistry Denatured," this author dealt with his perception that college students today have spent too little of their childhood years playing outside in nature and as a consequence have not learned basic things about the world from personal experience. This "nature-deficit disorder" removes many opportunities for…

  10. National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Baker Quadrangle, Oregon and Idaho

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernardi, M.L.; Robins, J.W.

    1982-05-01

    The Baker Quadrangle, Oregon, and Idaho, was evaluated to identify areas containing geologic environments favorable for uranium deposits. The criteria used was developed for the National Uranium Resource Evaluation program. Stream-sediment reconnaissance and detailed surface studies were augmented by subsurface-data interpretion and an aerial radiometric survey. Results indicate that lower Pliocene sedimentary rocks in the Lower Powder River Valley-Virtue Flat basin are favorable characteristics, they remain unevaluated because of lack of subsurface data. Tertiary sandstones, possibly present at depth in the Long and Cascade Valleys, also remain unevaluated due to lack of subsurface data. All remaining environments in the Baker Quadrangle are unfavorable for all classes of uranium deposits

  11. Ross E. Baker, DC: A Canadian chiropractic survivor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Douglas M

    2014-03-01

    This paper is an historical biography of a fortunate man. It begins with a glimpse of Ross E. Baker's origins in south-western Ontario, watches him going to school and working in Hamilton before joining the Canadian Army and shipping off to Europe to fight in the Second World War. At War's end, the article picks up Dr. Baker as he comes home, starts a family, becomes a chiropractor and sustains a viable practice. Now in the twilight of life, the good doctor is last seen content with his retirement, spending days at his cottage property, reviewing his memoirs and reflecting on the tumult, terror and eventual triumph of the D-Day landing at Normandy.

  12. Allergic airway disease in Italian bakers and pastry makers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Zotti, R; Larese, F; Bovenzi, M; Negro, C; Molinari, S

    1994-08-01

    A survey was carried out on respiratory symptoms and skin prick test response to common allergens (atopy), storage mites, and occupational allergens among 226 bakers and pastry makers from 105 small businesses in northern Italy. Atopy was present in 54 workers (23.4%); 40 workers (17.7%) were skin positive to at least one storage mite, 27 (11.9%) to wheat flour and 17 (7.5%) to alpha-amylase. Work related asthma was reported by 11 (4.9%) workers and rhinoconjunctivitis by 31 (17.7%); 22 workers (10.2%) complained of chronic bronchitis. The distribution of skin prick test results among bakers and among 119 white collar workers did not indicate (by logistic analysis) an increased risk for bakers to skin sensitisation to common allergens, storage mite, or to a group of five flours. Sensitisation to wheat flour, on the other hand, was present only among exposed workers. Skin sensitisation to occupational allergens was significantly associated with atopy (p < 0.001), smoking habit (p = 0.015), and work seniority (p = 0.027). The risk of work related symptoms was associated with sensitisation to wheat or alpha-amylase, and with atopy, but not with sensitisation to storage mites, work seniority, or smoking habit. The results of the study indicate that there is still a significant risk of allergic respiratory disease among Italian bakers. Not only wheat allergens, but also alpha-amylase must be considered as causative agents, although sensitisation to storage mites is not important in the occupational allergic response. Atopy must be regarded as an important predisposing factor for skin sensitisation to occupational allergens and for the onset of symptoms at work. The data confirm that for effective prevention, greater care should be taken not only in limiting environmental exposure, but also in identifying susceptible people.

  13. Maximal reductions in the Baker-Hausdorff formula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolsrud, M.

    1992-05-01

    A preliminary expression for the Baker-Hausdorff formula is found up to ninth order, i.e. a series expansion of z in terms of multiple commutators, where e x =e x e y with x and y non-commuting, up to ninth degree in x,y. By means of complete sets of linear relations between multiple commutators, maximal reduction of the number of different multiple commutators in the series is obtained. 4 refs

  14. Improved vanillin production in baker's yeast through in silico design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brochado, Ana Rita; Matos, Cláudia; Møller, Birger L.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Vanillin is one of the most widely used flavouring agents, originally obtained from cured seed pods of the vanilla orchid Vanilla planifolia. Currently vanillin is mostly produced via chemical synthesis. A de novo synthetic pathway for heterologous vanillin production from glucose has...... recently been implemented in baker's yeast, Saccharamyces cerevisiae. In this study we aimed at engineering this vanillin cell factory towards improved productivity and thereby at developing an attractive alternative to chemical synthesis. Results: Expression of a glycosyltransferase from Arabidopsis...

  15. Respiratory symptoms and sensitization in bread and cake bakers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, T A; Smith, P W

    1998-07-01

    This purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between exposure to wheat flour, soya flour and fungal amylase and the development of work-related symptoms and sensitization in bread and cake bakery employees who have regular exposure to these substances. The study populations consisted of 394 bread bakery workers and 77 cake bakery workers whose normal jobs involved the sieving, weighing and mixing of ingredients. The groups were interviewed with the aim of identifying the prevalence, nature and pattern of any work-related respiratory symptoms. They were also skin-prick tested against the common bakery sensitizing agents, i.e., wheat flour, soya flour, rice flour and fungal amylase. The results of personal sampling for sieving, weighing and mixing operations at the bakeries from which the study groups were taken were collated in order to determine typical exposures to total inhalable dust from the ingredients, expressed as 8 hour time-weighted average exposures. Data from the health surveillance and collated dust measurements were compared with the aim of establishing an exposure-response relationship for sensitization. The prevalence of work-related symptoms in bread bakery and cake bakery ingredient handlers was 20.4% and 10.4% respectively. However, in a large proportion of those reporting symptoms in connection with work, the symptoms were intermittent and of short duration. It is considered that the aetiology of such symptoms is likely to be due to a non-specific irritant effect of high total dust levels, rather than allergy. None of the cake bakers and only 3.1% of the bread bakers had symptoms which were thought to be due to allergy to baking ingredients. Using skin-prick testing as a marker of sensitization, the prevalence of positive tests to wheat flour was 6% for the bread bakers and 3% for the cake bakers. Comparable prevalences for soya flour were 7% and 1% respectively. However, the prevalence of positive skin-prick tests to fungal amylase

  16. Removal of heavy metal from industrial effluents using Baker's yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferdous, Anika; Maisha, Nuzhat; Sultana, Nayer; Ahmed, Shoeb

    2016-07-01

    Bioremediation of wastewater containing heavy metals is one of the major challenges in environmental biotechnology. Heavy metals are not degraded and as a result they remain in the ecosystem, and pose serious health hazards as it comes in contact with human due to anthropogenic activities. Biological treatment with various microorganisms has been practiced widely in recent past, however, accessing and maintaining the microorganisms have always been a challenge. Microorganisms like Baker's yeast can be very promising biosorbents as they offer high surface to volume ratio, large availability, rapid kinetics of adsorption and desorption and low cost. The main aim of this study is to evaluate the applicability of the biosorption process using baker's yeast. Here we present an experimental investigation of biosorption of Chromium (Cr) from water using commercial Baker's Yeast. It was envisaged that yeast, dead or alive, would adsorb heavy metals, however, operating parameters could play vital roles in determining the removal efficiency. Parameters, such as incubation time, pH, amount of biosorbent and heavy metal concentration were varied to investigate the impacts of those parameters on removal efficiency. Rate of removal was found to be inversely proportional to the initial Cr (+6) concentrations but the removal rate per unit biomass was a weakly dependent on initial Cr(+6) concentrations. Biosorption process was found to be more efficient at lower pH and it exhibited lower removal with the increase in solution pH. The optimum incubation time was found to be between 6-8 hours and optimum pH for the metal ion solution was 2. The effluents produced in leather industries are the major source of chromium pollution in Bangladesh and this study has presented a very cost effective yet efficient heavy metal removal approach that can be adopted for such kind of wastewater.

  17. Novel baker's yeast catalysed hydride reduction of an epoxide moiety

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Horak, RM

    1995-02-27

    Full Text Available 8. This was successfully prepared by the coupling 4 of valeric acid chloride to Meldrum' s acid to yield the C-acyl derivative 6. Compound 6 was treated with SO2Ci 2 yielding the chloro acyl derivative of Meldrum...) O D (8) (v) + O2 N/~/CHO Reagents: (i) SOCI2, 70%, (ii) Meldrum's acid, pyridine, 80%, (iii) SO2C12, 65%, (iv) D20, Ac20, 20%, (v) K-t-butoxide, 20%, (vi) Baker's yeast, 12%. Scheme 3 The deuterium labelled...

  18. Mount Baker lahars and debris flows, ancient, modern, and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, David S; Scott, Kevin M.; Grossman, Eric E.; Linneman, Scott

    2014-01-01

    The Middle Fork Nooksack River drains the southwestern slopes of the active Mount Baker stratovolcano in northwest Washington State. The river enters Bellingham Bay at a growing delta 98 km to the west. Various types of debris flows have descended the river, generated by volcano collapse or eruption (lahars), glacial outburst floods, and moraine landslides. Initial deposition of sediment during debris flows occurs on the order of minutes to a few hours. Long-lasting, down-valley transport of sediment, all the way to the delta, occurs over a period of decades, and affects fish habitat, flood risk, gravel mining, and drinking water.

  19. Breaking an encryption scheme based on chaotic baker map

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, Gonzalo; Li, Shujun

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, a growing number of cryptosystems based on chaos have been proposed, many of them fundamentally flawed by a lack of robustness and security. This Letter describes the security weaknesses of a recently proposed cryptographic algorithm with chaos at the physical level based on the baker map. It is shown that the security is trivially compromised for practical implementations of the cryptosystem with finite computing precision and for the use of the iteration number n as the secret key. Some possible countermeasures to enhance the security of the chaos-based cryptographic algorithm are also discussed

  20. Accumulation of gold using Baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, Kamalika; Lahiri, Susanta; Sinha, P.

    2006-01-01

    Authors have reported preconcentration of 152 Eu, a long-lived fission product, by yeast cells, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Gold being a precious metal is used in electroplating, hydrogenation catalyst, etc. Heterogeneous composition of samples and low concentration offers renewed interest in its selective extraction of gold using various extractants. Gold can be recovered from different solutions using various chemical reagents like amines, organophosphorus compounds, and extractants containing sulphur as donor atom, etc. In the present work, two different strains of baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been used to study the preconcentration of gold at various experimental conditions

  1. Building Abelian Functions with Generalised Baker-Hirota Operators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew England

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We present a new systematic method to construct Abelian functions on Jacobian varieties of plane, algebraic curves. The main tool used is a symmetric generalisation of the bilinear operator defined in the work of Baker and Hirota. We give explicit formulae for the multiple applications of the operators, use them to define infinite sequences of Abelian functions of a prescribed pole structure and deduce the key properties of these functions. We apply the theory on the two canonical curves of genus three, presenting new explicit examples of vector space bases of Abelian functions. These reveal previously unseen similarities between the theories of functions associated to curves of the same genus.

  2. The Archives of the History of American Psychology: An Interview with David B. Baker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, Loreto R.

    2001-01-01

    Presents an interview with David B. Baker, Director of the Archives of the History of American Psychology. Covers topics such as: Baker's interest in the history of psychology, his work at the Archives of the History of American Psychology, and recommendations for teachers when addressing history in non-history courses. (CMK)

  3. Commentary: Toward Convergence in Creativity Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Ai-Girl; Wong, Meng-Ee

    2015-01-01

    This commentary is about reflection in the new language of creativity and the meanings of inquiry into creative life. The authors of the commentary adopt the cultural paradigm of psychology of creativity. They praise effortful creativity of the authors who submitted the articles to this special issue. Their studies employed diverse methods of…

  4. Selected papers 1945-1980 - with commentary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Ning Yang.

    1983-01-01

    This volume consists of a collection of papers written by C. N. Yang and commentaries on them. Previously unpublished papers or those that appeared in journals which are not readily available are included. The commentaries are intended to trace his development as a scientist rather than evaluate the work

  5. Ultrasound guided percutaneous treatment and follow-up of Baker's cyst in knee osteoarthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Köroğlu, Mert; Çallıoğlu, Mehmet; Eriş, Hüseyin Naim; Kayan, Mustafa; Çetin, Meltem; Yener, Mahmut; Gürses, Cemil; Erol, Bekir; Türkbey, Barış; Parlak, Ayşe Eda; Akhan, Okan

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Purpose of this study is to assess sonographic changes and clinical response in different subgroups of Baker's cyst patients with knee osteoarthritis after a single session of ultrasound-guided percutaneous aspiration and corticosteroid injection. Materials and methods: Thirty-two knee osteoarthritis patients (46–85 years, mean 58.97 ± 9.88) with symptomatic Baker's cyst diagnosed at ultrasonography were included in the study. To determine the grade of the symptoms, Visual Analogue Scale was applied. The patients were grouped in two, as simple (n = 24) and complex (n = 8) Baker's cyst. Thirty-two ultrasound-guided cyst aspirations concomitant 1 ml betamethasone injection (24 simple, 8 complex subgroups) were performed. Patients were followed clinically as well as via ultrasonography for 6 months after procedures. Results: A significant decrease in volume of the Baker's cysts after percutaneous treatment was accompanied by a significant clinical improvement. Moreover, the volume reduction of Baker's cyst after the treatment was significantly correlated with the clinical improvement (Pearson correlation coefficient = 0.542, p = 0.001). All 6 Baker's cysts relapsed at ultrasonography were complex type. Furthermore, a comparison of patients with simple Baker's cysts and those with complex Baker's cysts demonstrated no significant change in Visual Analogue Scale scores between two groups (p = 0.061, Mann–Whitney U). No complications (minor or major) occurred secondary to percutaneous treatment. Conclusion: Baker's cysts can be grouped as simple and complex groups via ultrasonography prior to the treatment. Cyst aspiration with ultrasound-guided corticosteroid injection yields clinical improvement and cyst volume reduction in all subgroups of patients with Baker's cyst secondary to knee osteoarthritis.

  6. Neoglacial fluctuations of Deming Glacier, Mt. Baker, Washington USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, G.; Menounos, B.; Scott, K.; Clague, J. J.; Tucker, D.; Riedel, J.; Davis, P.

    2007-12-01

    Deming Glacier flows from the upper west slopes of Mt. Baker, a stratovolcano in the Cascade Range of Washington, USA. The north and south lateral moraines of Deming Glacier are composed of at least four tills separated by layers of detrital wood and sheared stumps in growth position. The stratigraphy records fluctuations of the glacier during the Holocene. The outer ten rings of an in situ stump from the middle wood layer, which is about 40 m below the north lateral moraine crest and 1.2 km downvalley from the present glacier terminus, yielded an age of 1750 ± 50~~ 14C yr BP [1810-1550 cal yr BP]. The stump revealed at least 300 rings and thus records a period of landscape stability and relatively restricted glaciation for several hundred years prior to ca. 1750 14C yr BP . Samples from the lowest wood layer also have been submitted for radiocarbon dating. Outer rings of detrital wood samples collected from two wood mats exposed in the south lateral moraine, 2.3 km downvalley of the glacier terminus, returned radiocarbon ages of 1600 ± 30~~ 14C yr BP [1550- 1410 cal yr BP] and 430 ± 30~~ 14C yr BP [AD 1420-1620]. These data indicate that Deming Glacier advanced over a vegetated moraine sometime after 1810 cal yr BP to a position less extensive that it achieved at the peak of the Little Ice Age. The glacier then receded before it began its final and most extensive Holocene advance after AD 1420. The older advance is correlative with the 'First Millennium AD' advance, recently recognized throughout western North America. The younger advance coincides with an advance of Mt. Baker's Easton Glacier [AD 1430-1630], and advances of many alpine glaciers elsewhere in western North America. Our data suggest that glaciers on Mt. Baker fluctuated in a similar manner to alpine glaciers in the Coast Mountains of British Columbia and in other mountain ranges of northwest North America during Neoglaciation.

  7. Commentary

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhu

    2006-07-18

    Jul 18, 2006 ... effective viscosity comparable to that of light oil (Edidin 2003). In addition, membranes exhibit a considerable degree of anisotropy along the ... and amide moieties of the peptide backbone, a feature shared with the selectivity filter of the bacterial. KcsA potassium channel (Chattopadhyay and Kelkar 2005).

  8. Commentary

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    educated public with his vision of the broader significance of his empirical ... groundbreaking, his enduring popular fame remains firmly tied to the highest ... student at Columbia University and the American Museum of Natural History, the.

  9. Commentary

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Later in the same year he joined The Natural History Museum at ... Germany. He was also offered a full-time, lucrative job at CSIRO in Canberra later in 1983. ..... Bouček Z and Rasplus J-Y 1991 Illustrated key to West-Palaearctic genera of ...

  10. Commentary

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhu

    2006-07-18

    Jul 18, 2006 ... Importantly, the role of aromatic amino acid residues in maintaining the structure ... the organization, dynamics and function of membrane spanning channels ... L- and D-chirality renders gramicidin sensitive to the environment.

  11. Commentary

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-05-10

    May 10, 2012 ... use such characterized antibodies as fine probes to study hormone action in great detail. ... Moudgal supervised work of Greep's group at Harvard University, ... over 250 papers and reviews and numerous chapters in books.

  12. Commentary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langsted, Lars Bo

    2013-01-01

    Konkluderer at Højesteret har accepteret at Cyberspace har sin egen jurisdiktion - men samtidig er en del af dansk efterforskninsgmæssig jurisdiktion: Accept af at politiet ved hjælp af brugernavn og password skaffer sig adgang til Facebook og Messenger-profiler, der fysisk befinder sig på server...

  13. Commentary

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ebutamanya

    2015-10-12

    Oct 12, 2015 ... Swine influenza is a highly contagious acute respiratory disease of pigs [2]. Human transmission occurs by inhalation or ingestion of droplets .... B et al. Human case of swine influenza A (H1N1) triple reassortant virus infection, Wisconsin. Emerg Infect Dis. 2008;14:1470-2. PubMed | Google Scholar. 6.

  14. Commentary

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ebutamanya

    2016-06-30

    Jun 30, 2016 ... When a patient survives a first heart attack, the heart may be so badly damaged that the patient will develop mechanical pump failure. A heart attack may also lead to irregularities in the heart rhythm because of heart muscle damage. Heart attack survivors who develop one or both of these two complications ...

  15. Commentary

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    ... increasing travel and communication between under-developed and developed nations is ... transmitted to a fresh human host during the next blood meal. .... increasing our understanding about parasite development in the mosquito such ...

  16. Commentary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason W. Moore

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Alf Hornborg says many useful things in his article, “Ecosystems and World Systems: Accumulation as an Ecological Process.” His effort to “ground the notion of capital accumulation in the physical realities of ecology and thermodynamics” is a much-needed corrective to nature-blind studies of capitalism. At a more paradigmatic level, his dismay at the “analytical disjuncture of ecology and economics” in modern social science is right on target (1998: 169. Yet, despite the article’s laudable intent, Hornborg goes astray by imputing to Marx a focus on labor that excludes the “physical realities” of labor reproduction, world trade, or imperialism. Hornborg is right to urge a synthesis of ecological and economic studies, but wrong in his call to “supplement” the labor theory of value with a “resource-oriented…concept of exploitation” (1998: 173. Even if Marx did not grapple with a global ecological crisis of contemporary standards, he was remarkably sensitive to ecological processes as they shaped, and were shaped by, capital accumulation; indeed, Marx studied intensively the works of the leading soil chemists of his day, foremost among them Justus von Liebig. Particularly in the ?rst and third volumes of Capital, Marx provides a compelling framework for comprehending the nature-society dialectic under capitalism.

  17. Commentary

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... growth factor betas (TGFβs) are multifunctional peptides thought to be involved in ... (alpha 2M), which scavenges excess TGFβs and limits its local action .... growth factor-beta 3 is required for secondary palate fusion; Nature Genet. 11 409– ...

  18. Commentary

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Mother, I really think the flowers go to school underground.” ... ecotypes to new and distant locales, thereby obfuscating its natural, global patterns of .... In Drosophila, PcG proteins generally act by remodelling chromatin ... tions in genomic DNA methylation and local chromatin structure (Meyer 2000; Habu et al 2001).

  19. Commentary

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    pain (Progress in Pain Research and Management, vol. ... North R A 1993 Opioid actions on membrane ion channels; in Handbook of experimental ... J K and Han J S 1999 Accelerated release and production of Orphanin FQ in the brain of.

  20. Commentary

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR

    2007-04-04

    Apr 4, 2007 ... ... shown to undergo phenotypic changes possibly due to cellular de- ... hyperproliferation or abnormal differentiation, such as psoriasis and .... expression precede histological changes in epithelia of vitamin A-deficient rats; ...

  1. Commentary

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR

    gene silencing, DNA microarray data and completion of whole genome sequences of ... Evading this mid-gut barrier is one of the big hurdles for the parasite and is a ... studied in such screens, a small set of genes having a drastic effect on the ...

  2. Commentary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wertsch, James V.

    1993-01-01

    Agrees with the distinction, made by Lawrence and Valsiner in the previous article, between theoretical approaches concerning internalization that view internalization as cultural transmission and internalization as constructive transformation. Concurs with criticisms of these approaches, and questions the need for the notion of internalization in…

  3. Commentary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Robert L.; Molenaar, Peter C. M.

    1995-01-01

    Supports Gottlieb's conclusion that developmental behavior genetics is unsuitable for analyzing developmental coactional processes because it does not concern itself with mechanisms through which genotypes are transformed into phenotypes. But maintains that modern behavior genetics provides an indispensable tool to analyze nonlinear epigenetic…

  4. Commentary

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ebutamanya

    2015-03-10

    Mar 10, 2015 ... Foreign aid or foreign investments: call for a paradigm shift in mentality and ... supports for health care and health care services have been ongoing for more than 60 years. As long as ... This has gone on for more than 60 years since the first ... through the US President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief.

  5. Commentary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cullen, Miriam

    2017-01-01

    Amending the legal characterization of the facts at trial stage in the International Criminal Court and the defendant's right to a fair trial. Judgment on the appeals of Mr Lubanga Dyilo and the Prosecutor against the Decision of Trial Chamber I of 14 July 2009 entitled “Decision giving notice.......Ch., 8 December 2009. Regulation 55 of the Regulations of the International Criminal Court draws on a civil law tradition which allows the legal characterization of the facts to be amended while criminal proceedings are on foot. Great care must be taken in its implementation. Our due process alarm bells...... should start to ring the moment the purpose of putting an end to impunity begins to override fundamental human rights. No matter how commendable the goal of ending impunity, the consequence of ignoring fundamental fair trial guarantees in the process, paradoxically, undermines the validity of that very...

  6. Commentary

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2015-08-07

    Aug 7, 2015 ... Abstract. The recent Ebola Virus Outbreak had a devastating effect on West Africa's already feeble national health systems. We suggest that such an impact turned out to be catastrophic because it hit particularly hard human resources for health and the delivery of primary healthcare services, which are.

  7. Commentary

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhsudhan

    a much larger centre of creation–Darwin was too good a naturalist not to ..... exploration, gardeners' magazines, and numerous other sources of scientific ... The real problem with this doctrine, however, is that numerous straightforward tests have ... Fawcett in 1861: “About thirty years ago there was much talk that geologists ...

  8. Commentary

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ramakantb

    is most likely a tip of iceberg, as several cases of stroke in Africa rarely get to hospital before death. Plausible explanations for this include poor transportation system, limited access to healthcare, limited neurodiagnostic facility, deficient acute interventional therapy, dearth of medical experts, poor recognition of symptoms of ...

  9. Commentary

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    2004-11-29

    Nov 29, 2004 ... Crick's and Wilkins' reactions were not at all unusual at the time – in fact, book reviews of The Double ... As a youngish man in his mid-thirties at the time when Watson met him, Crick was ... moved into the field of biology instead. .... recent realization that the action is in the proteome rather than the genome ...

  10. Commentary

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    the possible restoration of function across formerly severed spinal nerves. .... biologists, conservation biologists, and public health biologists. ... medicine”, we can expect the market to play a larger role in deciding which areas of science need.

  11. Commentary

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH

    all known Neurospora mutants, chromosome rearrangements, wild and .... Robert Metzenberg and colleagues, including David's associate N B Raju, ... tetrasperma was Dodge's favorite species and he tried (without success) to get his visitors interested in ... They are survived by their daughter Susan and her husband John.

  12. Commentary

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ebutamanya

    2015-05-29

    May 29, 2015 ... As the scientific community enviably awaits an HIV and TB vaccine or cure, safe - guarding effectiveness of available proven treatment options could be more realistic and cost saving. We argue that the emphasis on training and employment of clinical psychologists, counselors and social workers has been ...

  13. Commentary

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and Natural Selection) now shifted the focus from the individual organism to ... One of the important dividing lines between the two camps in the controversy had to do with ... But these concerns were not addressed in an explicit manner. .... of problem in gaining attention and understanding for alternatives to adaptation.

  14. COMMENTARY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Using a variety of strategies, producers of alcohol target young people and women with aspirational messages and other exhortations in an unprecedented ... Key words: Alcohol marketing, alcohol promotion, Africa, alcohol advertising.

  15. Commentary

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    will roll along a surface by making incremental changes in its position of contact. ... no causal means for accounting for the macroevolutionary phenomena that ... Gould S J 1999c Dorothy, it's really Oz. A pro-creationist decision in Kansas is ...

  16. Commentary

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    form of consciousness may have generated in relatively recent times. I suggest that memes may ... Studies of animals in their natural environments and innovative experiments by comparative psychologists in the labora- tory, particularly on ...

  17. Commentary

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    ... Coronary artery disease/Stroke Genetics, diabetes, HBP, obesity, cholesterol, CMV ... association of aspirin with this syndrome during the febrile prodrome led to a marked ... official or reflecting the views of the Food and Drug Administration.

  18. Commentary

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Raoul

    2009-10-20

    Oct 20, 2009 ... Inauguration of the Cameroonian Society of Human Genetics. Ambroise ... opportunity to get together in synergy the entire Cameroonian “DNA/RNA scientists” . ... of the state-of-knowledge of Human Origin and Genetic Diversity. ... This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative.

  19. Commentary

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    architects of the Modern Synthesis, who aimed at putting evolutionary .... opposition to the majority of 'planters', traditional scientists who believed that the ... For instance, in an interview in Times Higher Education Supplement June 2000 he.

  20. Commentary

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    genetic maps with specific segments of polytene chromosomes provided the first evidence of ... tion in Drosophila and other organisms identified the heterochromatin ... such modifications seem to provide a “histone code” in the context of gene ...

  1. Commentary

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhu

    2006-04-24

    Apr 24, 2006 ... 5,200 meters, we showed that the control of breathing of subjects born .... ent fall in ventilation which has been termed ventilatory roll-off or hypoxic ... from a balance between the inhibition of the arterial chemoreceptors and ...

  2. Commentary

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    2010-04-23

    Apr 23, 2010 ... the simple antibiotic doxycycline rather than far more toxic anti-nematode ... Do Wolbachia have role in the production of these peptides? The ... V and Ranjith Sing A J A 2004 Traditional therapeutic use of animals among.

  3. COMMENTARY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    A brief review of the draft human resources for health strategic plan, Ethiopia;. 2009-2020 ... also constitute a critical block of health systems as they affect the .... of medical doctors; .... need for the development of a HRH policy to guide all.

  4. Commentary

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ebutamanya

    2015-05-25

    May 25, 2015 ... Abstract. Morocco's health system remains weak in spite of the improvement of other development indicators in the last ten years. Health remains one of the major challenges to lower the social disparities that are the priority for the authorities. Despite the goodwill of all stakeholders, significant.

  5. Commentary

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    You want to write a check for twenty dollars, but now anyone who wants ... political process to decide about the uses of science, Gould pursued a .... evolutionary biology had been well on its way towards a pluralist conception of evolution.

  6. Commentary

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ebutamanya

    2015-05-04

    May 4, 2015 ... Ebola virus disease control in West Africa: an ecological, one health approach. Clement .... where wild animals providing opportunity for zoonotic pathogen .... infectious diseases such as water fowl that support avian influenza.

  7. Commentary

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Emergence of new infectious diseases has been observed and documented in the 20th ... thinking of the possible implications of new theories in this young field to our ... and assumed more control over the growth of foodgrains, they also began to .... therapy; the latter is often seen in hospitals where, via plasmid exchange, ...

  8. Commentary

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhu

    community can be structured on the basis of specific belief-systems rooted in ... While this is but a cursory sketch, it is enough to give an idea of recent changes in .... entity existing in time, it especially clearly has the possibility of being harmed ...

  9. Genetic and phenotypic characteristics of baker's yeast: relevance to baking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randez-Gil, Francisca; Córcoles-Sáez, Isaac; Prieto, José A

    2013-01-01

    Yeasts rarely encounter ideal physiological conditions during their industrial life span; therefore, their ability to adapt to changing conditions determines their usefulness and applicability. This is especially true for baking strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The success of this yeast in the ancient art of bread making is based on its capacity to rapidly transform carbohydrates into CO2 rather than its unusual resistance to environmental stresses. Moreover, baker's yeast must exhibit efficient respiratory metabolism during yeast manufacturing, which determines biomass yield. However, optimal growth conditions often have negative consequences in other commercially important aspects, such as fermentative power or stress tolerance. This article reviews the genetic and physiological characteristics of baking yeast strains, emphasizing the activation of regulatory mechanisms in response to carbon source and stress signaling and their importance in defining targets for strain selection and improvement.

  10. The vertebrate fauna of Ichauway, Baker County, GA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L.L.; Steen, D.A.; Stober, J.M.; Freeman, Mary C.; Golladay, S.W.; Conner, L.M.; Cochrane, J.

    2006-01-01

    Less than 4% of the once extensive Pinus palustris (longleaf pine) ecosystem remains today. Although longleaf pine habitats are recognized for their high species diversity, few published accounts document the vertebrate faunas of remaining tracts. Here we report on the vertebrate species richness of lchauway, an 11,300-ha property in Baker County, GA. The property includes ca. 7300 ha of longleaf pine with native ground cover, along with more than 30 seasonal wetlands and ca. 45 km of riparian habitat associated with Ichawaynochaway Creek, Big Cypress Creek, and the Flint River. The fauna includes 61 species of fish, 31 amphibians, 53 reptiles, 191 birds, and 41 mammals. Despite the relative isolation of the property from other natural ecosystems, the vertebrate fauna of lchauway is remarkably diverse and may offer an example of reference conditions to guide restoration of longleaf pine forests, associated seasonal wetlands, and riparian areas elsewhere in the southeastern U S.

  11. The scholarly rebellion of the early Baker Street Irregulars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Mills

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This work provides and analyzes an early institutional history of the pioneering Sherlock Holmes American fan club, the Baker Street Irregulars (BSI. Using the publications and records of these devoted Sherlockians, I track the BSI's development from a speakeasy gathering in 1934 to a national organization by the mid-1940s. This growth was built on a foundation of Victorian nostalgia and playful humor. Yet at the same time the members of the Irregulars took their fandom seriously, producing Sherlockian scholarship and creating an infrastructure of journals, conferences, and credentialing that directly mimicked the academy. They positioned themselves in contrast to prevailing scholarly practices of the period, such as New Criticism. I trace both how their fan practices developed over time and how this conflict with the academy led to many of the BSI's defining characteristics.

  12. Leaf Epidermis of the Rheophyte Dyckia brevifolia Baker (Bromeliaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghislaine Maria Lobo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Some species of Dyckia Schult. f., including Dyckia brevifolia Baker, are rheophytes that live in the fast-moving water currents of streams and rivers which are subject to frequent flooding, but also period of low water. This study aimed to analyze the leaf epidermis of D. brevifolia in the context of epidermal adaptation to this aquatic plant’s rheophytic habitat. The epidermis is uniseriate, and the cuticle is thickened. The inner periclinal and anticlinal walls of the epidermal cells are thickened and lignified. Stomata are tetracytic, located in the depressions in relation to the surrounding epidermal cells, and covered by peltate trichomes. While the epidermal characteristics of D. brevifolia are similar to those of Bromeliaceae species, this species has made particular adaptations of leaf epidermis in response to its rheophytic environment.

  13. Improved vanillin production in baker's yeast through in silico design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brochado, Ana Rita; Matos, Claudia; Møller, Birger L; Hansen, Jørgen; Mortensen, Uffe H; Patil, Kiran Raosaheb

    2010-11-08

    Vanillin is one of the most widely used flavouring agents, originally obtained from cured seed pods of the vanilla orchid Vanilla planifolia. Currently vanillin is mostly produced via chemical synthesis. A de novo synthetic pathway for heterologous vanillin production from glucose has recently been implemented in baker's yeast, Saccharamyces cerevisiae. In this study we aimed at engineering this vanillin cell factory towards improved productivity and thereby at developing an attractive alternative to chemical synthesis. Expression of a glycosyltransferase from Arabidopsis thaliana in the vanillin producing S. cerevisiae strain served to decrease product toxicity. An in silico metabolic engineering strategy of this vanillin glucoside producing strain was designed using a set of stoichiometric modelling tools applied to the yeast genome-scale metabolic network. Two targets (PDC1 and GDH1) were selected for experimental verification resulting in four engineered strains. Three of the mutants showed up to 1.5 fold higher vanillin β-D-glucoside yield in batch mode, while continuous culture of the Δpdc1 mutant showed a 2-fold productivity improvement. This mutant presented a 5-fold improvement in free vanillin production compared to the previous work on de novo vanillin biosynthesis in baker's yeast. Use of constraints corresponding to different physiological states was found to greatly influence the target predictions given minimization of metabolic adjustment (MOMA) as biological objective function. In vivo verification of the targets, selected based on their predicted metabolic adjustment, successfully led to overproducing strains. Overall, we propose and demonstrate a framework for in silico design and target selection for improving microbial cell factories.

  14. Improved vanillin production in baker's yeast through in silico design

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Vanillin is one of the most widely used flavouring agents, originally obtained from cured seed pods of the vanilla orchid Vanilla planifolia. Currently vanillin is mostly produced via chemical synthesis. A de novo synthetic pathway for heterologous vanillin production from glucose has recently been implemented in baker's yeast, Saccharamyces cerevisiae. In this study we aimed at engineering this vanillin cell factory towards improved productivity and thereby at developing an attractive alternative to chemical synthesis. Results Expression of a glycosyltransferase from Arabidopsis thaliana in the vanillin producing S. cerevisiae strain served to decrease product toxicity. An in silico metabolic engineering strategy of this vanillin glucoside producing strain was designed using a set of stoichiometric modelling tools applied to the yeast genome-scale metabolic network. Two targets (PDC1 and GDH1) were selected for experimental verification resulting in four engineered strains. Three of the mutants showed up to 1.5 fold higher vanillin β-D-glucoside yield in batch mode, while continuous culture of the Δpdc1 mutant showed a 2-fold productivity improvement. This mutant presented a 5-fold improvement in free vanillin production compared to the previous work on de novo vanillin biosynthesis in baker's yeast. Conclusion Use of constraints corresponding to different physiological states was found to greatly influence the target predictions given minimization of metabolic adjustment (MOMA) as biological objective function. In vivo verification of the targets, selected based on their predicted metabolic adjustment, successfully led to overproducing strains. Overall, we propose and demonstrate a framework for in silico design and target selection for improving microbial cell factories. PMID:21059201

  15. Improved vanillin production in baker's yeast through in silico design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hansen Jørgen

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vanillin is one of the most widely used flavouring agents, originally obtained from cured seed pods of the vanilla orchid Vanilla planifolia. Currently vanillin is mostly produced via chemical synthesis. A de novo synthetic pathway for heterologous vanillin production from glucose has recently been implemented in baker's yeast, Saccharamyces cerevisiae. In this study we aimed at engineering this vanillin cell factory towards improved productivity and thereby at developing an attractive alternative to chemical synthesis. Results Expression of a glycosyltransferase from Arabidopsis thaliana in the vanillin producing S. cerevisiae strain served to decrease product toxicity. An in silico metabolic engineering strategy of this vanillin glucoside producing strain was designed using a set of stoichiometric modelling tools applied to the yeast genome-scale metabolic network. Two targets (PDC1 and GDH1 were selected for experimental verification resulting in four engineered strains. Three of the mutants showed up to 1.5 fold higher vanillin β-D-glucoside yield in batch mode, while continuous culture of the Δpdc1 mutant showed a 2-fold productivity improvement. This mutant presented a 5-fold improvement in free vanillin production compared to the previous work on de novo vanillin biosynthesis in baker's yeast. Conclusion Use of constraints corresponding to different physiological states was found to greatly influence the target predictions given minimization of metabolic adjustment (MOMA as biological objective function. In vivo verification of the targets, selected based on their predicted metabolic adjustment, successfully led to overproducing strains. Overall, we propose and demonstrate a framework for in silico design and target selection for improving microbial cell factories.

  16. Commentary on Huron and Trevor (2016

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Müllensiefen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This commentary offers a review of Huron and Trevor's article on the relationship between the likelihood of a composition and performance using stopped strings, and its overall sadness.

  17. Marketing research among small and medium-sized business enterprises - a VDEW field investigation with baker`s shops; Marktforschung bei Gewerbebetrieben - VDEW-Baeckereibefragung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, A. [Isar-Amperwerke AG, Muenchen (Germany); Nickel, M. [VDEW-Hauptgeschaeftsstelle, Frankfurt am Main (Germany). Gruppe ``Energiewirtschaft und Statistik``

    1998-12-14

    The baker`s trade is a business of interest to electric utilities, as bakers have a high demand for process heat and their supply requirements are characterized by simple load histories. Hence competing electric utilities in the competitive market target this customer group with increasing efforts. The authors summarize the information obtained from the field investigation and the conclusions drawn. (orig./CB) [Deutsch] Die Baeckereien sind wegen ihres hohen Prozesswaermebedarfs und des guenstigen Lastverlaufs eine interessante Kundengruppe fuer die Stromversorger. Der Beratung und Betreuung dieser Kunden muss deshalb hohe Aufmerksamkeit gewidmet werden. Nicht zuletzt wegen des Wettbewerbs auf dem Energiemarkt muessen die Stromversorger die Kundenorientierung noch intensivieren. Auch dadurch entstehen neue Anforderungen an die Kundenberatung und -betreuung. Die Verfasser erlaeutern die wichtigsten Ergebnisse und Schlussfolgerungen aus einer Befragung von Baeckereibetrieben. (orig.)

  18. Gridded multibeam bathymetry of Baker Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded bathymetry at 40m resolution surrounding Baker Island, within the Pacific Remote Island Areas - Central Pacific Ocean. Bottom coverage was achieved in depths...

  19. A Survey of Hygiene Practices of Bakers in Amuwo Odofin Local ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A Survey of Hygiene Practices of Bakers in Amuwo Odofin Local Government ... pest control, hygiene of personnel, storage and waste management. Important as this strategy is in the food industry, little has been reported on the practice of ...

  20. CRED REA Algal Assessments at Baker Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Twelve quadrats were sampled along 2 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines, as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments, conducted at 1 site at Baker in the Pacific...

  1. CRED REA Fish Team Belt Transect Survey at Baker, Pacific Remote Island Areas, 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Belt transects along 3 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 9 sites at Baker in the Pacific...

  2. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2011 Digital Orthophotos - Baker County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This dataset is a collection of GeoTIFF natural color orthophotos covering Baker, Bradford, and Union counties within Florida. An orthophoto is remotely sensed image...

  3. Coupled skinny baker's maps and the Kaplan-Yorke conjecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gröger, Maik; Hunt, Brian R.

    2013-09-01

    The Kaplan-Yorke conjecture states that for ‘typical’ dynamical systems with a physical measure, the information dimension and the Lyapunov dimension coincide. We explore this conjecture in a neighborhood of a system for which the two dimensions do not coincide because the system consists of two uncoupled subsystems. We are interested in whether coupling ‘typically’ restores the equality of the dimensions. The particular subsystems we consider are skinny baker's maps, and we consider uni-directional coupling. For coupling in one of the possible directions, we prove that the dimensions coincide for a prevalent set of coupling functions, but for coupling in the other direction we show that the dimensions remain unequal for all coupling functions. We conjecture that the dimensions prevalently coincide for bi-directional coupling. On the other hand, we conjecture that the phenomenon we observe for a particular class of systems with uni-directional coupling, where the information and Lyapunov dimensions differ robustly, occurs more generally for many classes of uni-directionally coupled systems (also called skew-product systems) in higher dimensions.

  4. Coupled skinny baker's maps and the Kaplan–Yorke conjecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gröger, Maik; Hunt, Brian R

    2013-01-01

    The Kaplan–Yorke conjecture states that for ‘typical’ dynamical systems with a physical measure, the information dimension and the Lyapunov dimension coincide. We explore this conjecture in a neighborhood of a system for which the two dimensions do not coincide because the system consists of two uncoupled subsystems. We are interested in whether coupling ‘typically’ restores the equality of the dimensions. The particular subsystems we consider are skinny baker's maps, and we consider uni-directional coupling. For coupling in one of the possible directions, we prove that the dimensions coincide for a prevalent set of coupling functions, but for coupling in the other direction we show that the dimensions remain unequal for all coupling functions. We conjecture that the dimensions prevalently coincide for bi-directional coupling. On the other hand, we conjecture that the phenomenon we observe for a particular class of systems with uni-directional coupling, where the information and Lyapunov dimensions differ robustly, occurs more generally for many classes of uni-directionally coupled systems (also called skew-product systems) in higher dimensions. (paper)

  5. Effect of inhibitors on acid production by baker's yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigler, K; Knotková, A; Kotyk, A

    1978-01-01

    Glucose-induced acid extrusion, respiration and anaerobic fermentation in baker's yeast was studied with the aid of sixteen inhibitors. Uranyl(2+) nitrate affected the acid extrusion more anaerobically than aerobically; the complexing of Mg2+ and Ca2+ by EDTA at the membrane had no effect. Inhibitors of glycolysis (iodoacetamide, N-ethylmaleimide, fluoride) suppressed acid production markedly, and so did the phosphorylation-blocking arsenate. Fluoroacetate, inhibiting the citric-acid cycle, had no effect. Inhibition by uncouplers depended on their pKa values: 2,4,6-trinitrophenol (pKa 0.4) less than 2,4-dinitrophenol (4.1) less than azide (4.7) less than 3-chlorophenylhydrazonomalononitrile (6.0). Inhibition by trinitrophenol was only slightly increased by its acetylation. Cyanide and nonpermeant oligomycin showed practically no effect; inhibition by dicyclohexylcarbodiimide was delayed but potent. The concentration profiles of inhibition of acid production differed from those of respiration and fermentation. Thus, though the acid production is a metabolically dependent process, it does not reflect the intensity of metabolism, except partly in the first half of glycolysis.

  6. Obituary: Norman Hodgson Baker, Jr., 1931-2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfand, David J.

    2005-12-01

    Norman H. Baker, a key contributor to the foundation of modern stellar pulsation theory and former editor of the "Astronomical Journal", died on 11 October 2005 in Watertown, New York near his beloved summer home in Natural Bridge. He succumbed to complications of Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia, a bone marrow lymphoma that he had successfully surmounted for twenty-two years. Norm, as he was known to all, was born 23 October 1931 in Fergus Falls, Minnesota to Norman Hodgson and Jeannette (née Lieber) Baker. He attended the University of Minnesota where he met the first of many lifelong astronomical friends, Bill Erickson. He received his BA in 1952. He went on to do his PhD, "Radiation from Particle Interactions which Create Current," at Cornell University under Phil Morrison. He then moved to a postdoctoral position at the Max Planck Institut für Physik und Astrophysik in München with the intent of pursuing his work in plasma physics with Ludwig Biermann and Arnulf Schlüter. However, Rudolf (Rudi) Kippenhan snatched him away to pursue what became his lifelong interest, stellar physics. This was the dawn of the era in which electronic computers were becoming practical for scientific calculations, and Norm immediately adopted this new tool. Indeed, he remained at the forefront of computing technology throughout his life: He was certainly the first member of the Astronomy Department at Columbia to buy a Mac, and was undoubtedly one of the few emeritus professors in the world known by all the administrative staff as the first person to turn to when stumped by a computer problem. Following his first paper with Kippenhan on stellar rotation, Norm turned his attention to stellar pulsations, a topic he would pursue throughout his career. His 1962 paper in "Zeitschrift für Astrophysik" on pulsational models of Cepheids (Baker and Kippenhan 1962, 54, 155) is a classic in the field. The first figure displays the three dimensional model of the atmospheric absorption

  7. Treatment of the baker's yeast wastewater by electrocoagulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobya, M.; Delipinar, S.

    2008-01-01

    In the laboratory-scale experiments, treatment of baker's yeast production wastewater has been investigated by electrocoagulation (EC) using a batch reactor. Effects of the process variables such as pH, electrode material (Fe and Al), current density, and operating time are investigated in terms of removal efficiencies of chemical oxygen demand (COD), total organic carbon (TOC), turbidity, and operating cost, respectively. The maximum removal efficiencies of COD, TOC and turbidity under optimal operating conditions, i.e., pH 6.5 for Al electrode and pH 7 for Fe electrode, current density of 70 A/m 2 and operating time of 50 min were 71, 53 and 90% for Al electrode and 69, 52 and 56% for Fe electrode, respectively. Al electrode gave 4.4 times higher removal efficiency of turbidity than Fe electrode due to interference from color of dissolved iron. The operating costs for Al and Fe electrodes in terms of $/m 3 or $/kg COD were 1.54 and 0.82, 0.51 and 0.27, respectively

  8. Kenneth Frank Baker--pioneer leader in plant pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, R James

    2005-01-01

    Kenneth F. Baker (1908-1996) made major contributions to understanding diseases of ornamental plants, seed pathology, soil-borne plant pathogens, biological control, and history of plant pathology. His work set the stage for the success of today's ornamentals and nursery industries. His leadership and writings created the scientific framework for research and teaching on soil-borne plant pathogens and biological control. After B.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees from Washington State University in 1930 and 1934, respectively, and one year as a National Research Council Fellow with B.M. Dugger at Wisconsin, he took jobs in 1935 with the U.S. Department of Agriculture in Nebraska on establishment of shelter belts and 1936-39 with the Pineapple Producers Cooperative Association in Hawaii. He worked on diseases of ornamental plants at the University of California, Los Angeles, starting in 1939, moving to Berkeley in 1961 when the UCLA program closed. He retired in 1975 and moved to Corvallis, OR, as Emeritus Professor, Oregon State University, and Collaborator, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service. He spent four sabbatical leaves in Australia, and was elected fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 1950, fellow of the American Phytopathological Society in 1969, and the Horticultural Hall of Fame in 1976.

  9. Vernonia condensata Baker (Asteraceae): A Promising Source of Antioxidants

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Jucélia Barbosa; Temponi, Vanessa dos Santos; Gasparetto, Carolina Miranda; Fabri, Rodrigo Luiz; Aragão, Danielle Maria de Oliveira; Pinto, Nícolas de Castro Campos; Ribeiro, Antônia; Scio, Elita; Del-Vechio-Vieira, Glauciemar; de Sousa, Orlando Vieira

    2013-01-01

    The present study evaluated the antioxidant potential of Vernonia condensata Baker (Asteraceae). Dried and powdered leaves were exhaustively extracted with ethanol by static maceration followed by partition to obtain the hexane, dichloromethane, ethyl acetate, and butanol fractions. Total phenols and flavonoids contents were determined through spectrophotometry and flavonoids were identified by HPLC-DAD system. The antioxidant activity was assessed by DPPH radical scavenging activity, TLC-bioautography, reducing power of Fe+3, phosphomolybdenum, and TBA assays. The total phenolic content and total flavonoids ranged from 0.19 to 23.11 g/100 g and from 0.13 to 4.10 g/100 g, respectively. The flavonoids apigenin and luteolin were identified in the ethyl acetate fraction. The IC50 of DPPH assay varied from 4.28 to 75.10 µg/mL and TLC-bioautography detected the antioxidant compounds. The reducing power of Fe+3 was 19.98 to 336.48 μg/mL, while the reaction with phosphomolybdenum ranged from 13.54% to 32.63% and 56.02% to 135.00% considering ascorbic acid and rutin as reference, respectively. At 30 mg/mL, the ethanolic extract and fractions revealed significant effect against lipid peroxidation. All these data sustain that V. condensata is an important and promising source of bioactive substances with antioxidant activity. PMID:24489987

  10. An algorithm for the Baker-Campbell-Hausdorff formula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matone, Marco [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia “G. Galilei”, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Università di Padova, Via Marzolo, 8-35131 Padova (Italy)

    2015-05-21

    A simple algorithm, which exploits the associativity of the BCH formula, and that can be generalized by iteration, extends the remarkable simplification of the Baker-Campbell-Hausdorff (BCH) formula, recently derived by Van-Brunt and Visser. We show that if [X,Y]=uX+vY+cI, [Y,Z]=wY+zZ+dI, and, consistently with the Jacobi identity, [X,Z]=mX+nY+pZ+eI, then exp (X)exp (Y)exp (Z)=exp (aX+bY+cZ+dI) where a, b, c and d are solutions of four equations. In particular, the Van-Brunt and Visser formula exp (X)exp (Z)=exp (aX+bZ+c[X,Z]+dI) extends to cases when [X,Z] contains also elements different from X and Z. Such a closed form of the BCH formula may have interesting applications both in mathematics and physics. As an application, we provide the closed form of the BCH formula in the case of the exponentiation of the Virasoro algebra, with SL{sub 2}(ℂ) following as a subcase. We also determine three-dimensional subalgebras of the Virasoro algebra satisfying the Van-Brunt and Visser condition. It turns out that the exponential form of SL{sub 2}(ℂ) has a nice representation in terms of its eigenvalues and of the fixed points of the corresponding Möbius transformation. This may have applications in Uniformization theory and Conformal Field Theories.

  11. Migration, Immigration, and Community: A Commentary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Landis

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper comments on six papers that deal with aspects of migration in different countries. While each of the papers provides important and interesting facets of the issue of migration and are very welcome, they also use different methodologies, sometimes within the same article, as might be expected in a rather new field. Generally, this commentary focuses on methodological issues since those will lie at the heart of any assessment of the credibility and usefulness of the various findings. After the six articles are described and strengths and concerns outlined, the commentary concludes with some thoughts on implementations.

  12. A novel bread making process using salt-stressed Baker's yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Lien-Te; Charles, Albert Linton; Ho, Chi-Tang; Huang, Tzou-Chi

    2009-01-01

    By adjusting the mixing order of ingredients in traditional formula, an innovative bread making process was developed. The effect of salt-stressed Baker's yeast on bread dough of different sugar levels was investigated. Baker's yeast was stressed in 7% salt solution then mixed into dough, which was then evaluated for fermentation time, dough fermentation producing gas, dough expansion, bread specific volumes, and sensory and physical properties. The results of this study indicated that salt-stressed Baker's yeast shortened fermentation time in 16% and 24% sugar dough. Forty minutes of salt stress produced significant amount of gas and increased bread specific volumes. The bread was softer and significantly improved sensory properties for aroma, taste, and overall acceptability were obtained.

  13. A Double Perturbation Method for Reducing Dynamical Degradation of the Digital Baker Map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lingfeng; Lin, Jun; Miao, Suoxia; Liu, Bocheng

    2017-06-01

    The digital Baker map is widely used in different kinds of cryptosystems, especially for image encryption. However, any chaotic map which is realized on the finite precision device (e.g. computer) will suffer from dynamical degradation, which refers to short cycle lengths, low complexity and strong correlations. In this paper, a novel double perturbation method is proposed for reducing the dynamical degradation of the digital Baker map. Both state variables and system parameters are perturbed by the digital logistic map. Numerical experiments show that the perturbed Baker map can achieve good statistical and cryptographic properties. Furthermore, a new image encryption algorithm is provided as a simple application. With a rather simple algorithm, the encrypted image can achieve high security, which is competitive to the recently proposed image encryption algorithms.

  14. Commentary Improving child outcomes through maternal mental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This commentary will provide a general overview of the public health considerations of maternal mental illness, both from a global perspective as well as from the South African context. The paper will outline the consequences of maternal mental illness for mothers as well as their offspring, through the life stages from ...

  15. Commentary: Cultural Adaptation, Collaboration, and Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palinkas, Lawrence Albert

    2010-01-01

    This commentary reviews three articles linked together by two themes (a) the use of cultural adaptation of evidence-based practices to reduce disparities in health and services delivery and (b) the importance of collaboration involving intervention developers, practitioners, and consumers when delivering services. Both themes illustrate a process…

  16. Critical Data and Rhetorical Theory (Commentary).

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacAloon, John J.

    1989-01-01

    Argues that, in terms of demography of attention, broadcast economics, the excitation of wide public commentary, and First and Third World media dependency issues, American Olympic television is a worthwhile object of scrutiny for mass communication researchers. Appraises two studies by Thomas Farrell and Eric Rothenbuhler (same issue). (SR)

  17. A Response to Andrea R. Halpern's Commentary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freya Bailes

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The author responds to points raised in Andrea Halpern’s commentary, which appeared in Vol. 2, No. 1 of Empirical Musicology Review. Discussion focuses on the apparent contradiction between self-reports of veridical mental imagery of musical timbre, and cognitive constraints on temporal memory for multidimensional sound.

  18. A generalization of Baker's quadratic formulae for hyperelliptic p-functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Athorne, Chris

    2011-01-01

    We present a generalization of a compact form, due to Baker, for quadratic identities satisfied by the three-index p-functions on curves of genus g=2, and a further generalization of a new result in genus g=3. The compact forms involve a bordered determinant containing 2(g-1)(g+1) free parameters. -- Highlights: → Properties of Weierstrass P-functions for hyperelliptic curves. → Generalization of result of H.F. Baker for genus two case. → Compact formulae with maximal number of parameters in genus two and three cases.

  19. Ultrasound guided percutaneous treatment and follow-up of Baker's cyst in knee osteoarthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koeroglu, Mert, E-mail: mertkoroglu@hotmail.com [Antalya Education and Research Hospital, Department of Radiology, Antalya (Turkey); Call Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I oglu, Mehmet, E-mail: mehmetcallioglu@hotmail.com [Sueleyman Demirel University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Isparta (Turkey); Eris, Hueseyin Naim, E-mail: drhneris@hotmail.com [Sueleyman Demirel University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Isparta (Turkey); Kayan, Mustafa, E-mail: drkayan32@hotmail.com [Sueleyman Demirel University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Isparta (Turkey); Cetin, Meltem, E-mail: meltemcetin2011@yahoo.com [Sueleyman Demirel University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Isparta (Turkey); Yener, Mahmut, E-mail: bahtiyaryener@yahoo.com [Sueleyman Demirel University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Isparta (Turkey); Guerses, Cemil, E-mail: cemilgurses@gmail.com [Antalya Education and Research Hospital, Department of Radiology, Antalya (Turkey); Erol, Bekir, E-mail: mertkoroglu@hotmail.com [Antalya Education and Research Hospital, Department of Radiology, Antalya (Turkey); Tuerkbey, Bar Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I s, E-mail: bturkbey@yahoo.com [Hacettepe University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Ankara (Turkey); Parlak, Ayse Eda, E-mail: drteda@yahoo.com [Antalya Education and Research Hospital, Department of Radiology, Antalya (Turkey); Akhan, Okan, E-mail: akhano@tr.net [Hacettepe University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Ankara (Turkey)

    2012-11-15

    Objective: Purpose of this study is to assess sonographic changes and clinical response in different subgroups of Baker's cyst patients with knee osteoarthritis after a single session of ultrasound-guided percutaneous aspiration and corticosteroid injection. Materials and methods: Thirty-two knee osteoarthritis patients (46-85 years, mean 58.97 {+-} 9.88) with symptomatic Baker's cyst diagnosed at ultrasonography were included in the study. To determine the grade of the symptoms, Visual Analogue Scale was applied. The patients were grouped in two, as simple (n = 24) and complex (n = 8) Baker's cyst. Thirty-two ultrasound-guided cyst aspirations concomitant 1 ml betamethasone injection (24 simple, 8 complex subgroups) were performed. Patients were followed clinically as well as via ultrasonography for 6 months after procedures. Results: A significant decrease in volume of the Baker's cysts after percutaneous treatment was accompanied by a significant clinical improvement. Moreover, the volume reduction of Baker's cyst after the treatment was significantly correlated with the clinical improvement (Pearson correlation coefficient = 0.542, p = 0.001). All 6 Baker's cysts relapsed at ultrasonography were complex type. Furthermore, a comparison of patients with simple Baker's cysts and those with complex Baker's cysts demonstrated no significant change in Visual Analogue Scale scores between two groups (p = 0.061, Mann-Whitney U). No complications (minor or major) occurred secondary to percutaneous treatment. Conclusion: Baker's cysts can be grouped as simple and complex groups via ultrasonography prior to the treatment. Cyst aspiration with ultrasound-guided corticosteroid injection yields clinical improvement and cyst volume reduction in all subgroups of patients with Baker's cyst secondary to knee osteoarthritis.

  20. Erisipelóide de Baker-Rosenbach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aureo Guimarães de Macedo

    1970-10-01

    Full Text Available O erisipelóide de Baker-Rosenbach, embora assinalado no Brasil há 23, anos, por Sebastião Sampaio, seguido de nove casos estudados em 1951 por Lacaz e Ancona Lopes, não tem sido motivo de publicações posteriores. O A. teve ocasião de estudar seis casos, senão que três foram motivo de trabalho anterior e foram observados em 1953. Os três restantes, um de 1965 e dois de 1967, são aqui relatados. Assinala o A. a ubiquidade do germe, o Erysipelotrix rhusiopathiae e a variedade de condições em que o homem pode infectar-se, especialmente no exercício de determinadas profissões, o que dá à doença, caráter típico de doença profissional. São os operários de fábricas de botões ou em geral os que lidam com ossos, especialmente de porco ou carneiro, os açougueiros, magarefes, salsicheiros etc. São particularmente vulneráveis os que tratam com produtos do mar, pescadores, mercadores de siris, camarões, crustáceos, peixes em geral, pela facilidade com que se podem ferir e adquirir a infecção por picada ocasional. A doença atinge numerosos animais domésticos ou não, com formas clínicas bem definidas no porco (erisipela dos porcos, no carneiro (poliartrite dos carneiros, em animais de corte e de tração, em aves domésticas ou de rapina, ratos e camundongos, além de outros numerosos roedores. Moscas hematófagas e outros insetos têm sido encontrados infectados. Nunca é demais frisar que os produtos do mar são grande fonte de infecção humana. No homem, tem a dcença em geral, caráter benigno e localizado (erisipelóide, podendo em certas circunstâncias assumir característica septicêmica como no porco, produzir endocardite, como no carneiro além de outras formas clínicas e complicações. São resumidos no texto os três casos anteriormente apresentados e bem descritos os três inéditos, que têm história clínica e evolução típicas de erisipelóide. Tratando-se de doença com características tipicamente

  1. Yang--Mills gauge theories and Baker--Johnson quantum electrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemmon, J.; Mahanthappa, K.T.

    1976-01-01

    We show that the physical mass of a fermion in a symmetric asymptotically free non-Abelian vector gauge theory is dynamical in origin. We comment on the close analogy that exists between such a theory and the Baker--Johnson finite quantum electrodynamics. Comments are also made when there is spontaneous symmetry breaking

  2. Kazachstania gamospora and Wickerhamomyces subpelliculosus: Two alternative baker's yeasts in the modern bakery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Nerve; Schifferdecker, Anna Judith; Gamero, Amparo; Compagno, Concetta; Boekhout, Teun; Piškur, Jure; Knecht, Wolfgang

    2017-06-05

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the conventional baker's yeast, remains the most domesticated yeast monopolizing the baking industry. Its rapid consumption of sugars and production of CO 2 are the most important attributes required to leaven the dough. New research attempts highlight that these attributes are not unique to S. cerevisiae, but also found in several non-conventional yeast species. A small number of these yeast species with similar properties have been described, but remain poorly studied. They present a vast untapped potential for the use as leavening agents and flavor producers due to their genetic and phylogenetic diversity. We assessed the potential of several non-conventional yeasts as leavening agents and flavor producers in dough-like conditions in the presence of high sugar concentrations and stressful environments mimicking conditions found in flour dough. We tested the capabilities of bread leavening and aroma formation in a microbread platform as well as in a bakery setup. Bread leavened with Kazachstania gamospora and Wickerhamomyces subpelliculosus had better overall results compared to control baker's yeast. In addition, both displayed higher stress tolerance and broader aroma profiles than the control baker's yeast. These attributes are important in bread and other farinaceous products, making K. gamospora and W. subpelliculosus highly applicable as alternative baker's yeasts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Kazachstania gamospora and Wickerhamomyces subpelliculosus : Two alternative baker's yeasts in the modern bakery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, Nerve; Judith Schifferdecker, Anna; Gamero Lluna, Amparo; Compagno, Concetta; Boekhout, Teun; Piškur, Jure; Knecht, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the conventional baker's yeast, remains the most domesticated yeast monopolizing the baking industry. Its rapid consumption of sugars and production of CO2 are the most important attributes required to leaven the dough. New research attempts highlight that these attributes

  4. Astragalus kongrensis Benth. Ex Baker (Fabaceae, a New Record for Central and North-West Himalayas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lal Babu Chaudhary

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Astragalus kongrensis Benth. Ex Baker is reported for the first time from Central (Nepal and North-West Himalayas (India. Earlier the species was known from East Himalaya (Sikkim-India, Bhutan and China. The description and illustrations of the species are provided.

  5. On a parametrization of Baker-Campbell-Hausdorf formula for bosonic superfields in Lie algebra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabeskiria, M.A.

    1984-01-01

    A compact form for the Baker-Cambell-Hausdorf formula has been obtained. Here the dependence of bosonic superfields, with their values on the Crassmann hull G(LAMBDA 2 ) of Lie algebra G, on the generators LAMBDA 2 has been factorized as a single exponent

  6. Electronically Transmitted Threats and Higher Education: Oppression, Free Speech, and Jake Baker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Jared C.

    2013-01-01

    When Jake Baker wrote a violent, sexually themed story about one of his classmates and emailed it to a friend, the case that ensued highlighted how new technologies have created fresh ways for students to harass, oppress, or be oppressed by others. This article examines concepts of violence and cultural imperialism oppression, primarily as defined…

  7. 77 FR 39675 - Wallowa-Whitman National Forest, Baker County, OR; North Fork Burnt River Mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-05

    ...-Whitman National Forest, Baker County, OR; North Fork Burnt River Mining AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA... North Fork Burnt River Mining Record of Decision will replace and supercede the 2004 North Fork Burnt River Mining Record of Decision only where necessary to address the inadequacies identified by the court...

  8. Reconstructing streamflow variation of the Baker River from tree-rings in Northern Patagonia since 1765

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, Antonio; Bahamondez, Alejandra; González-Reyes, Alvaro; Muñoz, Ariel A.; Cuq, Emilio; Ruiz-Gómez, Carolina

    2015-10-01

    The understanding of the long-term variation of large rivers streamflow with a high economic and social relevance is necessary in order to improve the planning and management of water resources in different regions of the world. The Baker River has the highest mean discharge of those draining both slopes of the Andes South of 20°S and it is among the six rivers with the highest mean streamflow in the Pacific domain of South America (1100 m3 s-1 at its outlet). It drains an international basin of 29,000 km2 shared by Chile and Argentina and has a high ecologic and economic value including conservation, tourism, recreational fishing, and projected hydropower. This study reconstructs the austral summer - early fall (January-April) streamflow for the Baker River from Nothofagus pumilio tree-rings for the period 1765-2004. Summer streamflow represents 45.2% of the annual discharge. The regression model for the period (1961-2004) explains 54% of the variance of the Baker River streamflow (R2adj = 0.54). The most significant temporal pattern in the record is the sustained decline since the 1980s (τ = -0.633, p = 1.0144 ∗ 10-5 for the 1985-2004 period), which is unprecedented since 1765. The Correlation of the Baker streamflow with the November-April observed Southern Annular Mode (SAM) is significant (1961-2004, r = -0.55, p < 0.001). The Baker record is also correlated with the available SAM tree-ring reconstruction based on other species when both series are filtered with a 25-year spline and detrended (1765-2004, r = -0.41, p < 0.01), emphasizing SAM as the main climatic forcing of the Baker streamflow. Three of the five summers with the highest streamflow in the entire reconstructed record occurred after the 1950s (1977, 1958 and 1959). The causes of this high streamflow events are not yet clear and cannot be associated with the reported recent increase in the frequency of glacial-lake outburst floods (GLOFs). The decreasing trend in the observed and reconstructed

  9. Commentary: Pursuing justice in death penalty trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Clarence; Eth, Spencer; Leong, Gregory B

    2012-01-01

    The capital trial, by its nature, is fraught with emotionally disturbing elements that jurors must face when deciding the ultimate fate of a guilty defendant. A confluence of mitigating and aggravating factors influences a capital jury's decision to impose a sentence of death. The presence or absence of defendant remorse in these cases may make all the difference in whether a capital defendant's life is spared. This commentary examines the onerous emotional toll encountered by capital jurors in light of the findings of Corwin and colleagues regarding defendant remorse and juror's need for affect. The commentary also presents practical and ethics-related considerations that should be kept in mind when reflecting on their study.

  10. Commentary: a sociologist's view on community genetics

    OpenAIRE

    Raz, Aviad E.

    2010-01-01

    This commentary illustrates and discusses potential research directions for sociologists and anthropologists interested in the field of community genetics and its emerging networks of individuals genetically at risk. Community genetics—the application of medical genetics in community settings for the benefit of individuals—also involves social issues of lay-professional misunderstandings (and more recently also the different perspectives of various expert communities), stigmatization, discrim...

  11. Migration, Immigration, and Community: A Commentary

    OpenAIRE

    Dan Landis

    2011-01-01

    This paper comments on six papers that deal with aspects of migration in different countries. While each of the papers provides important and interesting facets of the issue of migration and are very welcome, they also use different methodologies, sometimes within the same article, as might be expected in a rather new field. Generally, this commentary focuses on methodological issues since those will lie at the heart of any assessment of the credibility and usefulness of the various findings....

  12. Some contrasting biostratigraphic links between the Baker and Olds Ferry Terranes, eastern Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestell, Merlynd K.; Blome, Charles D.

    2016-01-01

    New stratigraphic and paleontologic data indicate that ophiolitic melange windows in the Olds Ferry terrane of eastern Oregon contain limestone blocks and chert that are somewhat different in age than those present in the adjacent Baker terrane melange. The melange windows in the Olds Ferry terrane occur as inliers in the flyschoid Early and Middle Jurassic age Weatherby Formation, which depositionally overlies the contact between the melange-rich Devonian to Upper Triassic rocks of the Baker terrane on the north, and Upper Triassic and Early Jurassic volcanic arc rocks of the Huntington Formation on the south. The Baker terrane and Huntington Formation represent fragments of a subduction complex and related volcanic island arc, whereas the Weatherby Formation consists of forearc basin sedimentary deposits. The tectonic blocks in the melange windows of the Weatherby Formation (in the Olds Ferry terrane) are dated by scarce biostratigraphic evidence as Upper Pennsylvanian to Lower Permian and Upper Triassic. In contrast, tectonic blocks of limestone in theBaker terrane yield mostly fusulinids and small foraminifers of Middle Pennsylvanian Moscovian age at one locality.Middle Permian (Guadalupian) Tethyan fusulinids and smaller foraminifers (neoschwagerinids and other Middle Permian genera) are present at a few other localities. Late Triassic conodonts and bryozoans are also present in a few of the Baker terrane tectonic blocks. These limestone blocks are generally embedded in Permian and Triassic radiolarian bearing chert or argillite. Based on conodont, radiolarian and fusulinid data, the age limits of the meange blocks in the Weatherby Formation range from Pennsylvanian to Late Triassic.

  13. Allergy in bakers' apprentices and factors associated to non-participation in a cohort study of allergic sensitization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjold, Tina; Nielsen, Sven C; Adolf, Katja

    2006-01-01

    Objective  To describe the prevalence of atopy and respiratory symptoms among baker apprentices at the start of the education and factors associated with non-participation in the study. Methods  A total of 346 students, 22.1(0.6) years of age, mean (SD), from the food production programme...... of atopy in bakers' apprentices was of the same magnitude in the general Danish population. Significantly, more male bakers' apprentices had atopy. This finding has major impact on the diagnostic procedures of occupational allergy in bakery workers emphasizing the need for standardization of the clinical...

  14. An enquiry into the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders and ergonomic risk factors among Hamadan-based bakers in 2017

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Motamedzade Torghabeh

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion: Musculoskeletal disorders of the knees, the middle and lower back, shoulders and wrists are of a high prevalence among bakers of traditional bread. Therefore, both engineering and management interventions are recommended to eliminate musculoskeletal disorders.

  15. CRED 5 m Gridded bathymetry of Baker Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific (Arc ASCII Format)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded (5 m cell size) bathymetry of the shelf and slope environments of Baker Island, Pacific Remote Isand Areas, Central Pacific. Almost complete bottom coverage...

  16. Racial science in social context: John R. Baker on eugenics, race, and the public role of the scientist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Michael G

    2004-09-01

    In 1974 a British biologist, John Randal Baker (1900-1984), published a large and controversial book simply entitled Race that reiterated persistent eugenicist themes concerning the relation between race, intelligence, and progress. The history of Baker's book is a case study in the politics of scientific publishing, and his ideas influenced scholars associated with later works such as The Bell Curve. Baker, a student of Julian Huxley, was a longtime participant in the British eugenics movement and opponent of what he took to be a facile belief in human equality. In 1942, together with Michael Polanyi, he founded the Society for Freedom in Science to oppose those who advocated the central planning of scientific research. Baker's eugenics, political activities, and views on race express an elitist individualism, associated with the conservative wing of the eugenics movement, that this paper explores in the context of his career as a whole.

  17. CRED 40 m Gridded bathymetry of Baker Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific (Arc ASCII Format)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded (40 m cell size) bathymetry of the shelf and slope environments of Baker Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific. Almost complete bottom...

  18. Overproduction of 2-phenylethanol by industrial yeasts to improve organoleptic properties of bakers' products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dueñas-Sánchez, Rafael; Pérez, Ana G; Codón, Antonio C; Benítez, Tahía; Rincón, Ana María

    2014-06-16

    2-Phenylethanol (PEA), an important alcohol derived from phenylalanine, is involved in aroma and flavour of bakers' products. Four spontaneous mutants of an industrial bakers' yeast, V1 strain, were isolated for their resistance to p-fluoro-DL-phenylalanine (PFP), a toxic analogue of L-phenylalanine. Mutants overproduced this amino acid and showed variations in their internal pool for several other amino acids. Moreover, a rise in PEA production after growth in industrial medium (MAB) was observed in three of the mutants, although their growth and fermentative capacities were slightly impaired. However, concentration of PEA remained higher during dough fermentation and also after baking, thus improving taste and aroma in bread. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Topics in noncommutative algebra the theorem of Campbell, Baker, Hausdorff and Dynkin

    CERN Document Server

    Bonfiglioli, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Motivated by the importance of the Campbell, Baker, Hausdorff, Dynkin Theorem in many different branches of Mathematics and Physics (Lie group-Lie algebra theory, linear PDEs, Quantum and Statistical Mechanics, Numerical Analysis, Theoretical Physics, Control Theory, sub-Riemannian Geometry), this monograph is intended to: 1) fully enable readers (graduates or specialists, mathematicians, physicists or applied scientists, acquainted with Algebra or not) to understand and apply the statements and numerous corollaries of the main result; 2) provide a wide spectrum of proofs from the modern literature, comparing different techniques and furnishing a unifying point of view and notation; 3) provide a thorough historical background of the results, together with unknown facts about the effective early contributions by Schur, Poincaré, Pascal, Campbell, Baker, Hausdorff and Dynkin; 4) give an outlook on the applications, especially in Differential Geometry (Lie group theory) and Analysis (PDEs of subelliptic type); ...

  20. Assessment of increased thermal activity at Mount Baker, Washington, March 1975-March 1976

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, David; Meier, Mark Frederick; Swanson, Donald A.; with contributions by Babcock, James W.; Fretwell, Marvin O.; Malone, Stephen D.; Rosenfeld, Charles L.; Shreve, Ronald L.; Wilcox, Ray E.

    1977-01-01

    In March 1975 Mount Baker showed a large increase in thermal emission, which has persisted for more than 1 year. Fumarole ejecta accompanied the thermal activity from March to September, but the ejecta had no constituents that suggest a magmatic source. Estimates of that part of the total heat flux that would account for the observed snow and ice loss show that the heat-flow increase was roughly one order of magnitude, from about 2 megawatts at 10 watts per square meter, averaged over Sherman Crater before 1975, to about 30 megawatts at 180 watts per square meter, during 1975. Almost half of the glacier that occupied the basin of Sherman Crater was melted in 1975. The new activity generated great concern among the public and the government agencies responsible for geological evaluation of potential hazards and for protection of life and property. The past geologic history, current topography, rock alteration, and location of major fumarolic activity indicate that large rock avalanches and mudflows on the east slope in Boulder Creek valley are the potential hazards of most significance related to present conditions. The most probable types of large mass movements would be mudflows, having speeds of as much as 50 kilometers per hour, that would originate from mixtures of snow, ice, and melt water and avalanches of structurally weak clay-rich rocks that make up the rim of Sherman Crater. Similar mudflows from the volcano have traveled at least 12 kilometers 8 times during the past 10,000 years. A possible worst case event, however, might be a larger, air-cushioned avalanche of as much as 20 to 30 million cubic meters that could hit Baker Lake at speeds of more than 300 kilometers per hour and generate a wave of water large enough to overtop Upper Baker Dam. At least 30 million cubic meters of potentially unstable material occurs as hydrothermally altered remnants of the rim of Sherman Crater and could provide the required volume for the estimated worst case event or

  1. A commentary on the taxation aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, P.A.

    1992-01-01

    A commentary is given on taxation aspects of the expenditure incurred in the abandonment and reclamation of oil and gas fields. Reference is made to the taxation regime in Australia, Canada, the Netherlands, Norway, the United Kingdom and the USA. The issues addressed include: specific provisions existing within the tax code covering abandonment; the definition of abandonment costs; the year in which deduction, if available, falls; the setting of deductions against any form of income; the allowance of deductions for costs which, under general principles, are capital costs; 'claw back' from reimbursements; the precision of a deduction for abandonment costs where a country has a secondary petroleum regime. (UK)

  2. A commentary on Adolf Eichmann's Rorschach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCully, R S

    1980-06-01

    A Rorschach was administered to Adolf Eichmann in Jerusalem in 1961 at the time of his trial for war crimes. The recent publication of this protocol offers an opportunity to compare his personal world against opinions formed about him by observers at his trial. Various professionals certified Eichmann as a banal, ordinary man, and a societal theory was proposed about Nazism based in part on impressions of Eichmann as an uncomplicated man. This commentary examines Eichmann's protocol and provides an opinion that in several important respects his record includes features uncharacteristic of an ordinary, banal mind.

  3. Commentary: Corporate philanthropy and conflicts of interest in public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krimsky, Sheldon

    2013-01-01

    This commentary discusses how ethicists view the responsibilities of corporations, of their philanthropic spin-offs, and of not-for-profit organizations with regard to use of monies from corporate philanthropies for public health. Article JPHP.2012.60 available at www.palgrave-journals.com/jphp/, relates to this commentary.

  4. Uranium uptake by baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) - development of a biological ion exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oost, T.; Schoening, K.U.

    1991-01-01

    The use of micro-organisms for decontamination of, and heavy metal recovery from industrial waste water is a modern, low-cost, and environmentally friendly alternative to the conventional chemical and physical methods. The uptake of uranium by baker's yeast is investigated under the aspect of application in biotechnology. A novel, regenerable biological ion exchanger was produced by immobilisation of the yeast in agar gel. (orig.) [de

  5. Furoquinoline Alkaloids and Methoxyflavones from the Stem Bark of Melicope madagascariensis (Baker T.G. Hartley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent E. Rasamison

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Melicope madagascariensis (Rutaceae is an endemic plant species of Madagascar that was first classified as a member of the genus Euodia J. R. & G. Forst (Rutaceae under the scientific name Euodia madagascariensis Baker. Based on morphological characteristics, Thomas Gordon Hartley taxonomically revised E. madagascariensis Baker to be M. madagascariensis (Baker T.G. Hartley. Chemotaxonomical studies have long been used to help the identification and confirmation of taxonomical classification of plant species and botanicals. Aiming to find more evidences to support the taxonomical revision performed on E. madagascariensis, we carried out phytochemical investigation of two samples of the plant. Fractionation of the ethanol extracts prepared from two stem bark samples of M. madagascariensis (Baker T.G. Hartley led to the isolation of seven known furoquinoline alkaloids 1–7 and two known methoxyflavones 8 and 9. The presence of furoquinoline alkaloids and methoxyflavones in the title species is in agreement with its taxonomic transfer from Euodia to Melicope. Antiprotozoal evaluation of the isolated compounds showed that 6-methoxy-7-hydroxydictamnine (heliparvifoline, 3 showed weak antimalarial activity (IC50 = 35 µM against the chloroquine-resistant strain Dd2 of Plasmodium falciparum. Skimmianine (4 displayed moderate cytotoxicity with IC50 value of 1.5 µM against HT-29 colon cancer cell line whereas 3,5-dihydroxy-3′,4′,7-trimethoxyflavone (9 was weakly active in the same assay (IC50 = 13.9 µM. Graphical Abstract

  6. A new term in the recursive expansion of the inverse Baker-Campbell-Hausdorff formula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riccardi, A.

    1984-01-01

    A recursive algorithm is derived, allowing the expansion in lambda of z=exp(x+lambda y) for noncommuting x and y, written as ordered product of exponentials. Such an expansion is the inverse of the usual Baker-Campbell-Hausdorff formula. The explicit form of the terms, up to third order in lambda is also given. The same method provides the explicit expansion to any order for the matrix elements of z

  7. Lung cancer risk among bakers, pastry cooks and confectionary makers: the SYNERGY study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, Thomas; Kendzia, Benjamin; Treppmann, Tabea; Olsson, Ann; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Gustavsson, Per; Pohlabeln, Hermann; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Brüske, Irene; Wichmann, Hans-Erich; Merletti, Franco; Mirabelli, Dario; Richiardi, Lorenzo; Simonato, Lorenzo; Zaridze, David; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Rudnai, Peter; Lissowska, Jolanta; Fabianova, Eleonora; Tardón, Adonina; Field, John; Stanescu Dumitru, Rodica; Bencko, Vladimir; Foretova, Lenka; Janout, Vladimir; Siemiatycki, Jack; Parent, Marie-Elise; McLaughlin, John; Demers, Paul; Landi, Maria Teresa; Caporaso, Neil; Kromhout, Hans; Vermeulen, Roel; Peters, Susan; Benhamou, Simone; Stücker, Isabelle; Guida, Florence; Consonni, Dario; Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas; 't Mannetje, Andrea; Pearce, Neil; Tse, Lap Ah; Yu, Ignatius Tak-sun; Plato, Nils; Boffetta, Paolo; Straif, Kurt; Schüz, Joachim; Pesch, Beate; Brüning, Thomas

    2013-11-01

    Some studies have suggested increased lung cancer risks among bakers, however the results overall were inconsistent. The authors studied lung cancer risks among bakers and baking-related occupations in the SYNERGY pooled case-control database from 16 countries. Occupation in a baking-related job was identified from the subjects' job histories. ORs adjusted for log(age), study centre, smoking behaviour and ever employment in a job with known exposure to occupational lung carcinogens were calculated by unconditional logistic regression. Findings were stratified by sex, histological subtype of lung cancer and smoking status. 19 366 cases (15 606 men) and 23 670 control subjects (18 528 men) were included. 473 cases (415 men, 58 women) and 501 controls (437 men, 64 women) had ever worked in baking or a related job. We did not observe an increased risk for men in baking (OR 1.01; 95% CI 0.86 to 1.18). No linear trends were observed for duration of employment. Some results suggested increased lung cancer risks for women, for example, for working as a baker for >30 years and in never-smokers, but after exclusion of one study these increased risks disappeared. The findings from this study do not suggest increased lung cancer risks in baking-related professions.

  8. Looking for immunotolerance: a case of allergy to baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajno, G B; Passalacqua, G; Salpietro, C; Vita, D; Caminiti, L; Barberio, G

    2005-09-01

    We describe one case of baker's yeast true allergy in a boy with previously diagnosed mite-allergy and atopic dermatitis. At the age of 6, being atopic dermatitis and rhinitis well controlled by drugs, he began to experience generalized urticaria and asthma after eating pizza and bread, but only fresh from the oven. The diagnostic workup revealed single sensitization to baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), and a severe systemic reaction also occurred during the prick-by-prick procedure. After discussing with parents, no special dietary restriction was suggested but the use of autoinjectable adrenaline and on demand salbutamol. A diary of symptoms was recorded by means of a visual-analog scale. During the subsequent 2 years, the severity of symptoms was progressively reduced, and presently urticaria has disappeared. Only cough persists, invariantly after eating just-baked and yeast-containing foods. If bread, pizza and cakes are ate more than one hour after preparation, no symptom occur at all. Baker's yeast is a common component of everyday diet and it usually acts as an allergen only by the inhalatory route. We speculate that the continuous exposure to saccharomyces in foods may have lead to an immunotolerance with a progressive reduction of symptoms, whereas why the allergens is active only in ready-baked foods remains unexplained.

  9. Selection and Characterization of Potential Baker's Yeast from Indigenous Resources of Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karki, Tika B; Timilsina, Parash Mani; Yadav, Archana; Pandey, Gyanu Raj; Joshi, Yogesh; Bhujel, Sahansila; Adhikari, Rojina; Neupane, Katyayanee

    2017-01-01

    The study aims to isolate the yeast strains that could be used effectively as baker's yeast and compare them with the commercial baker's yeast available in the market of Nepal. A total of 10 samples including locally available sources like fruits, Murcha, and a local tree "Dar" were collected from different localities of Bhaktapur, Kavre, and Syangja districts of Nepal, respectively. Following enrichment and fermentation of the samples, 26 yeast strains were isolated using selective medium Wallerstein Laboratory Nutrient Agar. From the differential tests which included morphological and microscopic observation and physiological and biochemical characterization such as nitrate reduction and lactose utilization tests, 8 strains were selected as possible Saccharomyces strain. The selected strains were further assessed for their efficient leavening ability by tests such as ethanol tolerance, osmotolerance, invertase test, and stress exclusion test. The three most potent strains ENG, MUR3B, and SUG1 isolated from grape, Murcha, and sugarcane, respectively, were used in the fermentation and baking of dough. These strains also carried a possibility of being used as industrial baker's yeast.

  10. Development of intra-strain self-cloning procedure for breeding baker's yeast strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Youji; Ogihara, Hiroyuki; Mochizuki, Chisato; Yamamura, Hideki; Iimura, Yuzuru; Hayakawa, Masayuki

    2017-03-01

    Previously reported self-cloning procedures for breeding of industrial yeast strains require DNA from other strains, plasmid DNA, or mutagenesis. Therefore, we aimed to construct a self-cloning baker's yeast strain that exhibits freeze tolerance via an improved self-cloning procedure. We first disrupted the URA3 gene of a prototrophic baker's yeast strain without the use of any marker gene, resulting in a Δura3 homozygous disruptant. Then, the URA3 gene of the parental baker's yeast strain was used as a selection marker to introduce the constitutive TDH3 promoter upstream of the PDE2 gene encoding high-affinity cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase. This self-cloning procedure was performed without using DNA from other Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, plasmid DNA, or mutagenesis and was therefore designated an intra-strain self-cloning procedure. Using this self-cloning procedure, we succeeded in producing self-cloning baker's yeast strains that harbor the TDH3p-PDE2 gene heterozygously and homozygously, designated TDH3p-PDE2 hetero and TDH3p-PDE2 homo strains, respectively. These self-cloning strains expressed much higher levels of PDE2 mRNA than the parental strain and exhibited higher viability after freeze stress, as well as higher fermentation ability in frozen dough, when compared with the parental strain. The TDH3p-PDE2 homo strain was genetically more stable than the TDH3p-PDE2 hetero strain. These results indicate that both heterozygous and homozygous strains of self-cloning PDE2-overexpressing freeze-tolerant strains of industrial baker's yeast can be prepared using the intra-strain self-cloning procedure, and, from a practical viewpoint, the TDH3p-PDE2 homo strain constructed in this study is preferable to the TDH3p-PDE2 hetero strain for frozen dough baking. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Commentary on a framework for multicultural education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerich, Karin F

    2014-09-01

    Today's changing demographics require that multicultural factors be considered in the delivery of quality patient-centred health care in chiropractic. Yet minimal training in cultural competency in chiropractic education leaves graduates ill-equipped to treat a diverse population. This commentary examines cultural competency training in current literature, demonstrates frameworks for curriculum integration, and suggests how cultural competency might be included in a chiropractic college curriculum. A database search yielded little evidence that cultural competency is integrated into curricula of chiropractic schools. Some journal articles note that promoting multicultural education and cultural sensitivity is an important goal. However, they provide no mechanisms as to how this can be achieved within training programs. Thus, although an undeniable need exists for all healthcare practitioners to develop cultural competency in the face of an increasingly diverse population, cultural competency education has not kept pace. Chiropractic schools must review their curricula to develop the cultural competencies of their graduates and a basic framework is suggested.

  12. Invited commentary: Physical activity, mortality, and genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankinen, Tuomo; Bouchard, Claude

    2007-08-01

    The importance of regular physical activity to human health has been recognized for a long time, and a physically active lifestyle is now defined as a major component of public health policies. The independent contribution of regular physical activity to lower morbidity and mortality rates is generally accepted, and the biologic mechanisms mediating these health effects are actively investigated. A few years ago, data from the Finnish Twin Registry suggested that genetic selection may account for some of the physical-activity-related benefits on mortality rates. However, results from the Swedish Twin Registry study reported by Carlsson et al. in the current issue of the Journal (Am J Epidemiol 2007;166:255-259) do not support the genetic selection hypothesis. In this commentary, the authors review the nature of the associations among physical activity level, fitness, and longevity, with special reference to the role of human genetic variation, and discuss potential reasons for different outcomes of these large twin studies.

  13. Modeling Musical Complexity: Commentary on Eerola (2016

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Albrecht

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In his paper, "Expectancy violation and information-theoretic models of melodic complexity," Eerola compares a number of models that correlate musical features of monophonic melodies with participant ratings of perceived melodic complexity. He finds that fairly strong results can be achieved using several different approaches to modeling perceived melodic complexity. The data used in this study are gathered from several previously published studies that use widely different types of melodies, including isochronous folk melodies, isochronous 12-tone rows, and rhythmically complex African folk melodies. This commentary first briefly reviews the article's method and main findings, then suggests a rethinking of the theoretical framework of the study. Finally, some of the methodological issues of the study are discussed.

  14. Flatland an edition with notes and commentary

    CERN Document Server

    Abbott, Edwin A; Banchoff, Thomas F

    2010-01-01

    Flatland, Edwin Abbott Abbott's story of a two-dimensional universe, as told by one of its inhabitants who is introduced to the mysteries of three-dimensional space, has enjoyed an enduring popularity from the time of its publication in 1884. This fully annotated edition enables the modern-day reader to understand and appreciate the many "dimensions" of this classic satire. Mathematical notes and illustrations enhance the usefulness of Flatland as an elementary introduction to higher-dimensional geometry. Historical notes show connections to late-Victorian England and to classical Greece. Citations from Abbott's other writings as well as the works of Plato and Aristotle serve to interpret the text. Commentary on language and literary style includes numerous definitions of obscure words. An appendix gives a comprehensive account of the life and work of Flatland's remarkable author.

  15. Commentary on Huovinen's "Varieties of Musical Empiricism"

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    Eric F. Clarke

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Erkki Huovinen’s “Varieties of Musicological Empiricism” provides a valuable analysis of some of the theoretical predicaments raised by pursuing an empirical musicology. But in this commentary, I argue for a less programmatic, and more pragmatic, approach to the term than he does. Empirical approaches in musicology have been around in one form or another for a long time, and the purpose of the label is less to identify a new ‘brand’ of musicology than to bring together a diversity of approaches that in different ways capitalise on the opportunities that data collection (in the broadest sense of the term may provide. If programme is set aside in favour of pragmatism, and a looser relationship between theory and observation accepted, then empirical musicology can be a productive way to rub ideas up against a stimulatingly resistant world.

  16. Helicopter magnetic and electromagnetic surveys at Mounts Adams, Baker and Rainier, Washington: implications for debris flow hazards and volcano hydrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Carol A.; Deszcz-Pan, Maria

    2011-01-01

    High‐resolution helicopter magnetic and electromagnetic (HEM) data flown over the rugged, ice‐covered Mt. Adams, Mt. Baker and Mt. Rainier volcanoes (Washington), reveal the distribution of alteration, water and ice thickness essential to evaluating volcanic landslide hazards. These data, combined with geological mapping and rock property measurements, indicate the presence of appreciable thicknesses (>500 m) of water‐saturated hydrothermally altered rock west of the modern summit of Mount Rainier in the Sunset Amphitheater region and in the central core of Mount Adams north of the summit. Alteration at Mount Baker is restricted to thinner (<300 m) zones beneath Sherman Crater and the Dorr Fumarole Fields. The EM data identified water‐saturated rocks from the surface to the detection limit (100–200 m) in discreet zones at Mt. Rainier and Mt Adams and over the entire summit region at Mt. Baker. The best estimates for ice thickness are obtained over relatively low resistivity (<800 ohm‐m) ground for the main ice cap on Mt. Adams and over most of the summit of Mt. Baker. The modeled distribution of alteration, pore fluids and partial ice volumes on the volcanoes helps identify likely sources for future alteration‐related debris flows, including the Sunset Amphitheater region at Mt. Rainier, steep cliffs at the western edge of the central altered zone at Mount Adams and eastern flanks of Mt. Baker.

  17. Commentary: PhDs in Biochemistry Education--5 Years Later

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offerdahl, Erika G.; Momsen, Jennifer L.; Osgood, Marcy

    2014-01-01

    In this commentary, the discussion of PhDs in biochemistry education research is expanded to explore a number of diverse pathways leading to a competitive research program in biochemistry education research.

  18. Commentary on "Sonata Form in the Nineteenth-Century Symphony"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Duane

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This commentary compares observational corpus analysis and hypothesis-driven analytical methods, and discusses the methods used in Cannon's "Sonata Form in the Nineteenth-Century Symphony" article.

  19. Active site - a site of binding of affinity inhibitors in baker's yeast inorganic pyrophosphatase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svyato, I.E.; Sklyankina, V.A.; Avaeva, S.M.

    1986-01-01

    The interaction of the enzyme-substrate complex with methyl phosphate, O-phosphoethanolamine, O-phosphopropanolamine, N-acetylphosphoserine, and phosphoglyolic acid, as well as pyrophosphatase, modified by monoesters of phosphoric acid, with pyrophosphate and tripolyphosphate, was investigated. It was shown that the enzyme containing the substrate in the active site does not react with monophosphates, but modified pyrophosphatase entirely retains the ability to bind polyanions to the regulatory site. It is concluded that the inactivation of baker's yeast inorganic pyrophosphatase by monoesters of phosphoric acid, which are affinity inhibitors of it, is the result of modification of the active site of the enzyme

  20. W. Ritchie Russell, A.B. Baker, and Fred Plum: Pioneers of ventilatory management in poliomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijdicks, Eelco F M

    2016-09-13

    Historically, neurologists were not involved in the day-to-day management of critically ill patients with bulbar poliomyelitis, but some were. The major contributions of 3 neurologists-W. Ritchie Russell, A.B. Baker, and Fred Plum-in the respiratory management of poliomyelitis have not been recognized. Russell's work was instrumental in identifying multiple types of poliomyelitis defined by their respiratory needs, and he advised treatment that varied from simple postural drainage to use of respirators. He participated in the development of the Radcliffe respiratory pump. Baker recognized the essential involvement of the vagal nerve in respiratory distress, but also observed that involvement of vital centers without cranial nerve involvement would lead to irregular and shallow respiration in some patients and in others with marked dysautonomic features. A similar finding of central involvement of respiration was noted by Plum, who also stressed the importance of hypercapnia. Plum emphasized measurements of vital capacity and techniques to minimize trauma with suctioning after tracheostomy. These 3 neurologists understood the importance of airway and ventilator management, which is currently one of the many pillars of neurocritical care. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  1. [Respiratory allergies among symptomatic bakers and pastry cooks: initial results of a prevalence study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bataille, A; Anton, M; Mollat, F; Bobe, M; Bonneau, C; Caramaniam, M N; Géraut, C; Dupas, D

    1995-01-01

    A survey was carried out on respiratory symptoms and skin prick response to common allergens, storage mite and occupational allergens. Among 178 symptomatics bakers and pastry workers from small businesses in western France, only 65 people underwent skin prick and specific-IgE. 12 (18%) workers were skin positive to at least one common or occupational allergens. The more often skin positive were D. Ptero. mite 36 (57%); Alpha amylase 23 (35%); wheat flour 17 (26%); saccharomyces cerevisiae 16 (25%); Ephestia 15 (24%). The sensitivity of skin test was better than specific IgE for D. Ptero. Mite 36 (57%); and Alpha amylase 23 (35%). The sensitivity of specific IgE was better than skin test for wheat flour 26 (45%) and rye flour 23 (40%). Occurrence of skin positive to occupational allergen among symptomatics with rhinitis and asthma is much more frequent in workers with skin positive to common allergens (40/36) than in workers with skin negative (8/20). Atopy must be regarded as an important predisposing factor for skin sensitisation to occupational allergens. We conclude in the necessity of a standardised allergologic exploration to be done in symptomatics bakers.

  2. Quality parameters and RAPD-PCR differentiation of commercial baker's yeast and hybrid strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Fiky, Zaki A; Hassan, Gamal M; Emam, Ahmed M

    2012-06-01

    Baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is a key component in bread baking. Total of 12 commercial baker's yeast and 2 hybrid strains were compared using traditional quality parameters. Total of 5 strains with high leavening power and the 2 hybrid strains were selected and evaluated for their alpha-amylase, maltase, glucoamylase enzymes, and compared using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD). The results revealed that all selected yeast strains have a low level of alpha-amylase and a high level of maltase and glucoamylase enzymes. Meanwhile, the Egyptian yeast strain (EY) had the highest content of alpha-amylase and maltase enzymes followed by the hybrid YH strain. The EY and YH strains have the highest content of glucoamylase enzyme almost with the same level. The RAPD banding patterns showed a wide variation among commercial yeast and hybrid strains. The closely related Egyptian yeast strains (EY and AL) demonstrated close similarity of their genotypes. The 2 hybrid strains were clustered to Turkish and European strains in 1 group. The authors conclude that the identification of strains and hybrids using RAPD technique was useful in determining their genetic relationship. These results can be useful not only for the basic research, but also for the quality control in baking factories. © 2012 Institute of Food Technologists®

  3. A novel image encryption scheme based on the ergodicity of baker map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Ruisong; Chen, Yonghong

    2012-01-01

    Thanks to the exceptionally good properties in chaotic systems, such as sensitivity to initial conditions and control parameters, pseudo-randomness and ergodicity, chaos-based image encryption algorithms have been widely studied and developed in recent years. A novel digital image encryption scheme based on the chaotic ergodicity of Baker map is proposed in this paper. Different from traditional encryption schemes based on Baker map, we permute the pixel positions by their corresponding order numbers deriving from the approximating points in one chaotic orbit. To enhance the resistance to statistical and differential attacks, a diffusion process is suggested as well in the proposed scheme. The proposed scheme enlarges the key space significantly to resist brute-force attack. Additionally, the distribution of gray values in the cipher-image has a random-like behavior to resist statistical analysis. The proposed scheme is robust against cropping, tampering and noising attacks as well. It therefore suggests a high secure and efficient way for real-time image encryption and transmission in practice.

  4. Magma at depth: A retrospective analysis of the 1975 unrest at Mount Baker, Washington, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crider, Juliet G.; Frank, David; Malone, Stephen D.; Poland, Michael P.; Werner, Cynthia; Caplan-Auerbach, Jacqueline

    2011-01-01

    Mount Baker volcano displayed a short interval of seismically-quiescent thermal unrest in 1975, with high emissions of magmatic gas that slowly waned during the following three decades. The area of snow-free ground in the active crater has not returned to pre-unrest levels, and fumarole gas geochemistry shows a decreasing magmatic signature over that same interval. A relative microgravity survey revealed a substantial gravity increase in the ~30 years since the unrest, while deformation measurements suggest slight deflation of the edifice between 1981-83 and 2006-07. The volcano remains seismically quiet with regard to impulsive volcano-tectonic events, but experiences shallow (10 km) long-period earthquakes. Reviewing the observations from the 1975 unrest in combination with geophysical and geochemical data collected in the decades that followed, we infer that elevated gas and thermal emissions at Mount Baker in 1975 resulted from magmatic activity beneath the volcano: either the emplacement of magma at mid-crustal levels, or opening of a conduit to a deep existing source of magmatic volatiles. Decadal-timescale, multi-parameter observations were essential to this assessment of magmatic activity.

  5. Apoptosis and pro-death autophagy induced by a spirostanol saponin isolated from Rohdea chinensis (Baker) N. Tanaka (synonym Tupistra chinensis Baker) on HL-60 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Xiaomin; Xiang, Limin; Huang, Yuying; Wang, Yihai; He, Xiangjiu

    2018-03-15

    Our previous study has revealed that the spirostanol saponins isolated from the rhizomes of Rohdea chinensis (Baker) N. Tanaka (synonym Tupistra chinensis Baker) (Convallariaceae) (a reputed folk medicine) exhibited potent antiproliferative activity. However, the underlying mechanism of purified saponins remains unclear. More studies are necessary to assess the apoptosis and autophagy activities of the saponins from R. chinensis and clarify their antiproliferative mechanisms. The present study certificated the potential antiproliferative activity and mechanism of 5β-spirost-25(27)-en-1β,3β-diol-1-O-α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→2)- β-D-xylopyranosyl-3-O-α-L-rhamnopyranoside (SPD), a spirostanol saponin from R. chinensis, against human acute promyelocytic leukemia cells (HL-60). The antiproliferative activity of SPD in vitro was evaluated by MTT assay compared with cis-dichlorodiammineplatinum (II). The autophagic activity was assessed using MDC staining and western blot, cell apoptosis inspection was detected by Annexin V-FITC/PI double staining and the mitochondrial membrane potential was detected by JC-1 fluorescence dye combined with flow cytometry. The potential mechanisms for protein levels of apoptosis and autophagy were evaluated by western blot. Treatment of HL-60 cells with SPD resulted in growth inhibition (IC 50 value of 2.0 ± 0.2 µM, after 48 h treatment) and induction of apoptosis and autophagy. Results from Annexin V-FITC/PI double-staining assay and mitochondrial membrane potential detection showed that apoptosis was happened after SPD treatment. The regulation of caspase-3, Bax, Bcl-2, PARP following SPD treatment contributed to the induction of mitochondria-dependent apoptosis. Meanwhile, SPD induced autophagy related with Akt/mTOR/p70S6K signaling and activated of AMPK signaling pathway. Furthermore, blocking autophagy with bafilomycin A1 reduced the cytotoxicity of SPD in HL-60 cells. The antiproliferative, apoptosis and pro

  6. 75 FR 65263 - Virginia Graeme Baker Pool and Spa Safety Act; Public Accommodation; Withdrawal of Proposed Rule

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-22

    ...'' or ``Act'') as ``an inn, hotel, motel, or other place of lodging, except for an establishment located... interpretive rule to interpret ``public accommodations facility'' in the VGB Act as ``an inn, hotel, motel, or... CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION 16 CFR Part 1450 Virginia Graeme Baker Pool and Spa Safety Act...

  7. ERGONOMIC CONSIDERATION OF THE EFFECT OF FLOUR DUST ON PEAK EXPIRATORY FLOW RATE OF BAKERS IN ABEOKUTA, OGUN STATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adekunle Ibrahim MUSA

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Flour dusts are one of the most harmful chemicals in the bakery industries which could lead to serious heart and lung diseases. This study investigated the effect of flour dust on Peak Expiratory Flow Rate of male bakers in Abeokuta, Ogun State, Nigeria with the relationship to the anthropometrical parameters. A total of One hundred Eighty (180 male participants were investigated, where ninety (90 participants were bakers and ninety (90 individuals as control group. The Peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR and anthropometrical parameters of the participant were measured using mini-Wright peak flow meter (PFM 20, OMRON and Detecto PD300MDHR (Cardinal Scale manufacturing company, USA column scale with digital height rod was used to measure body mass [kg] and height (cm respectively. The PEFR and anthropometrical parameters of the bakers and control groups were analysed using descriptive statistics and T-test with SPSS. The results showed that lower PEFR, 182.67 ± 16.34 L/min existed in bakers compared to 287.67 ± 17.02 L/min in the control study. The result also showed that a significant correlation exist between body mass, height and age (P < 0.01, PEFR, height (P < 0.05 and years of exposure (P < 0.01 of the bakers respectively. Furthermore, the results also showed that workers in the dusting and mixing of flour are at a risk of developing related pulmonary function impairment such as asthma. The study concluded that there is need to develop an effective intervention strategy, treatment seeking behaviour through awareness programs to prevent lung impairment diseases among the bakery workers.

  8. Isolation of baker's yeast mutants with proline accumulation that showed enhanced tolerance to baking-associated stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsolmonbaatar, Ariunzaya; Hashida, Keisuke; Sugimoto, Yukiko; Watanabe, Daisuke; Furukawa, Shuhei; Takagi, Hiroshi

    2016-12-05

    During bread-making processes, yeast cells are exposed to baking-associated stresses such as freeze-thaw, air-drying, and high-sucrose concentrations. Previously, we reported that self-cloning diploid baker's yeast strains that accumulate proline retained higher-level fermentation abilities in both frozen and sweet doughs than the wild-type strain. Although self-cloning yeasts do not have to be treated as genetically modified yeasts, the conventional methods for breeding baker's yeasts are more acceptable to consumers than the use of self-cloning yeasts. In this study, we isolated mutants resistant to the proline analogue azetidine-2-carboxylate (AZC) derived from diploid baker's yeast of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Some of the mutants accumulated a greater amount of intracellular proline, and among them, 5 mutants showed higher cell viability than that observed in the parent wild-type strain under freezing or high-sucrose stress conditions. Two of them carried novel mutations in the PRO1 gene encoding the Pro247Ser or Glu415Lys variant of γ-glutamyl kinase (GK), which is a key enzyme in proline biosynthesis in S. cerevisiae. Interestingly, we found that these mutations resulted in AZC resistance of yeast cells and desensitization to proline feedback inhibition of GK, leading to intracellular proline accumulation. Moreover, baker's yeast cells expressing the PRO1 P247S and PRO1 E415K gene were more tolerant to freezing stress than cells expressing the wild-type PRO1 gene. The approach described here could be a practical method for the breeding of proline-accumulating baker's yeasts with higher tolerance to baking-associated stresses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. High-performance mesoporous LiFePO₄ from Baker's yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xudong; Zhang, Xueguang; He, Wen; Sun, Caiyun; Ma, Jingyun; Yuan, Junling; Du, Xiaoyong

    2013-03-01

    Based on the biomineralization assembly concept, a simple and inexpensive biomimetic sol-gel method is found to synthesize high-performance mesoporous LiFePO(4) (HPM-LFP). The key step of this approach is to apply Baker's yeast cells as both a structural template and a biocarbon source. The formation mechanism of ordered hierarchical mesoporous network structure is revealed by characterizing its morphology and microstructure. The HPM-LFP exhibits outstanding electrochemical performances. The HPM-LFP has a high discharge capacity (about 153 mAh g(-1) at a 0.1 C rate), only 2% capacity loss from the initial value after 100 cycles at a current density of 0.1 C. This simple and potentially universal design strategy is currently being pursued in the synthesis of an ideal cathode-active material for high power applications. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The interaction of uranyl ions with inorganic pyrophosphatase from baker's yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bienwald, B.; Heitmann, P.

    1978-01-01

    The interaction of uranyl ions with inorganic pyrophosphatase from baker's yeast was investigated by measurement of their effect on the protein fluorescence. Fluorescence titrations of the native enzyme with uranyl nitrate show that there is a specific binding of uranyl ions to the enzyme. It was deduced that each subunit of the enzyme binds one uranyl ion. The binding constant was estimated to be in the order of 10 7 M -1 . The enzyme which contains a small number of chemically modified carboxyl groups was not able to bind uranyl ions specifically. The modification of carboxyl groups was carried out by use of a water soluble carbodiimide and the nucleophilic reagent N-(2,4-dinitro-phenyl)-hexamethylenediamine. The substrate analogue calcium pyrophosphate displaced the uranyl ions from their binding sites at the enzyme From the results it is concluded that carboxyl groups of the active site are the ligands for the binding of uranyl ions. (author)

  11. I Teoremi di Campbell, Baker, Hausdorff e Dynkin. Storia, Prove, Problemi Aperti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Bonfiglioli

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this lecture is to provide an overview of facts and references about past and recent results on the Theorem of Campbell, Baker, Hausdorff and Dynkin (shortcut as the CBHD Theorem, following the recent preprint monograph [13]. In particular, we shall give sketches of the following facts: A historical précis of the early proofs (see also [1]; the statement of the CBHD Theorem as usually given in Algebra and that employed in the Analysis of linear PDE's; a review of proofs of the CBHD Theorem (as given by: Bourbaki; Hausdorff; Dynkin; Varadarajan together with a unifying demonstrational approach; an application to the Third Theorem of Lie (in local form. Some new results will be also commented: The intertwinement of the CBHD Theorem with the Theorem of Poincaré-Birkhoff-Witt and with the free Lie algebras (see [12]; recent results on optimal domains of convergence.

  12. Gordon Baker, Wittgensteinian Philosophical Conceptions and Perspicuous Representation: the Possibility of Multidimensional Logical Descriptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oskari Kuusela

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses Gordon Baker’s interpretation of the later Wittgenstein, in particular his interpretation of the notion of Wittgensteinian philosophical conceptions (Auffassungen and the notions of non-exclusivity, local incompatibility, non-additivity and global pluralism which Baker uses to characterize Wittgensteinian conceptions. On the basis of this discussion, and a critique of certain features of Baker’s interpretation of Wittgensteinian conceptions, I introduce the notion of a multidimensional logical description of language use, explaining how this notion, which Baker’s interpretation excludes, constitutes and important element of the later Wittgenstein’s philosophical method of clarification and perspicuous representation. I conclude by explaining how Baker’s problematic notions of local incompatibility and non-additivity, if they are seen in the light of Wittgenstein’s criticisms of certain views of the completeness of philosophical or logical accounts, nevertheless point in the right direction.

  13. Painful swollen leg – think beyond deep vein thrombosis or Baker's cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babu Vinayagam

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The diagnosis of deep vein thrombosis of leg is very common in clinical practice. Not infrequently a range of pathologies are diagnosed after excluding a thrombosis, often after a period of anticoagulation. Case presentation This is a report of three patients who presented with a painful swollen leg and were initially treated as a deep vein thrombosis or a baker's cyst, but later diagnosed as a pleomorphic sarcoma, a malignant giant cell tumor of the muscle and a myxoid liposarcoma. A brief review of such similar reports and the relevant literature is presented. Conclusion A painful swollen leg is a common clinical scenario and though rare, tumors must be thought of without any delay, in a duplex negative, low risk deep vein thrombosis situation.

  14. Post-fermentative production of glutathione by baker's yeast (S. cerevisiae) in compressed and dried forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musatti, Alida; Manzoni, Matilde; Rollini, Manuela

    2013-01-25

    The study was aimed at investigating the best biotransformation conditions to increase intracellular glutathione (GSH) levels in samples of baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) employing either the commercially available compressed and dried forms. Glucose, GSH precursors amino acids, as well as other cofactors, were dissolved in a biotransformation solution and yeast cells were added (5%dcw). Two response surface central composite designs (RSCCDs) were performed in sequence: in the first step the influence of amino acid composition (cysteine, glycine, glutamic acid and serine) on GSH accumulation was investigated; once their formulation was set up, the influence of other components was studied. Initial GSH content was found 0.53 and 0.47%dcw for compressed and dried forms. GSH accumulation ability of baker's yeast in compressed form was higher at the beginning of shelf life, that is, in the first week, and a maximum of 2.04%dcw was obtained. Performance of yeast in dried form was not found satisfactory, as the maximum GSH level was 1.18%dcw. When cysteine lacks from the reaction solution, yeast cells do not accumulate GSH. With dried yeast, the highest GSH yields occurred when cysteine was set at 3 g/L, glycine and glutamic acid at least at 4 g/L, without serine. Employing compressed yeast, the highest GSH yields occurred when cysteine and glutamic acid were set at 2-3 g/L, while glycine and serine higher than 2 g/L. Results allowed to set up an optimal and feasible procedure to obtain GSH-enriched yeast biomass, with up to threefold increase with respect to initial content. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Uranium geology of the eastern Baker Lake basin, District of Keewatin, Northwest Territories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, A.R.

    1980-01-01

    Proterozoic sequences associated with major unconformities are potential uranium metallogenic provinces. Late Aphebian to Paleohelikian Dubawnt Group contintental clastic sedimentary and subaerial alkaline volcanic rocks and underlying Archean gneisses, District of Keewatin, Northwest Territories, represent one such uraniferous metallogenic province. Three types of uranium mineralization are present in the eastern Baker Lake basin, which extends from Christopher Island at the eastern end of Baker Lake southwestwards to the western limit of Thirty Mile Lake. The three uranium associations are: 1) fracture controlled mineralization in the Dubawnt Group and basement gneisses (U-Cu-Ag-Au-Se or U-Cu-Pb-Mo-Zn), 2)diatreme breccia mineralization in basement gneisses (U-Cu-Zn), and 3) impregnation and microfracture mineralization in altered arkose peripheral to lamprophyre dykes(U-Cu-Ag). Hydrothermal fracture related mineralization is controlled by northwest- and east-northeast-trending fault-fracture zones. Diatreme breccia mineralization results from the channelling of groundwaters through highly permeable brecciated gneiss. Mineralization within the altered Kazan arkose peripheral to alkaline dyke complexes formed by a two stage process. Iron and copper sulphides and silver were deposited within the outer portions of the thermal aureole in response to a temperature and Eh gradient across a convective cell created by the thermal anomaly of the dyke complex. The epigenetic sulphide mineralization subsequently provided the reducing environment for precipitation of uranium from groundwater. All three uranium associations show a close spatial distribution to the basal Dubawnt unconformity. The lithological and structural relationships of the Dubawnt Group rocks, types of mineralization and associated alteration assemblages are strikingly similar to the Beaverlodge district, Saskatchewan. (author)

  16. Sustainable business models and the automotive industry: A commentary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Wells

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This commentary reviews the position articulated in an article published in 2004 that the business model prevalent in the automotive industry was inadequate to meeting the challenge of sustainability, and reviews the key developments since then. The most noticeable developments the commentary traces are the growth in academic interest in business models, a more responsive government policy particularly in respect of new technologies, and the practical application of the concepts and ideas mooted in the original paper, notably with respect to electric vehicles.

  17. Response to Commentaries on Bystander Training as Leadership Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Jackson

    2018-03-01

    In this article, the author responds to three commentaries about his article "Bystander Training as Leadership Training: Notes on the Origins, Philosophy, and Pedagogy of the Mentors in Violence Prevention Model," published in this volume. Topics covered in the commentaries and response include questions about evaluation and evidence for program effectiveness; the necessity for gender violence prevention education to be gender transformative and part of a comprehensive, multilevel prevention approach, especially for adolescents; and the degree to which Mentors in Violence Prevention (MVP), as a "social justice"-oriented program, incorporates intersectional and anti-oppression frameworks and perspectives.

  18. Avoiding mandatory hospital nurse staffing ratios: an economic commentary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buerhaus, Peter I

    2009-01-01

    The imposition of mandatory hospital nurse staffing ratios is among the more visible public policy initiatives affecting the nursing profession. Although the practice is intended to address problems in hospital nurse staffing and quality of patient care, this commentary argues that staffing ratios will lead to negative consequences for nurses involving the equity, efficiency, and costs of producing nursing care in hospitals. Rather than spend time and effort attempting to regulate nurse staffing, this commentary offers alternatives strategies that are directed at fixing the problems that motivate the advocates of staffing ratios.

  19. Commentary--Culture and Attachment during Middle Childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bin-Bin

    2015-01-01

    Culture has an important impact on attachment. This commentary highlights three aspects about culture and attachment in middle childhood: (1) the need to have a more sophisticated consideration of the implication of cultural values, (2) the need to incorporate the role of societal or political ecological contexts, and (3) the need to solve the…

  20. A Commentary on Literacy Narratives as Sponsors of Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    This brief commentary first clarifies Brandt's concept of sponsors of literacy in light of the way the concept has been taken up in writing studies. Then it treats Brandt's methods for handling accounts of literacy learning in comparison with other ways of analyzing biographical material. Finally it takes up Lawrence's argument about literacy…

  1. Commentary: Using Potential Outcomes to Understand Causal Mediation Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Kosuke; Jo, Booil; Stuart, Elizabeth A.

    2011-01-01

    In this commentary, we demonstrate how the potential outcomes framework can help understand the key identification assumptions underlying causal mediation analysis. We show that this framework can lead to the development of alternative research design and statistical analysis strategies applicable to the longitudinal data settings considered by…

  2. A Vygotskian Commentary on the Reggio Emilia Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Jake E.

    2012-01-01

    This article provides a commentary on the Reggio Emilia approach from a Vygotskian perspective. In particular, the article considers how Vygotskian rationalism and Vygotsky's theory of concept development cohere with the Reggio Emilia approach. The article argues that these aspects of Vygotskian theory are applicable to, and can strengthen the…

  3. Multiple perspectives on lexical word production [Reply to commentaries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levelt, W.J.M.; Roelofs, A.P.A.; Meyer, A.S.

    1999-01-01

    The commentaries provide a multitude of perspectives on the theory of lexical access presented in our target aticle. We respond on the one hand to criticisms that concern the embeddings of our model in the larger theoretical frameworks of human performance and of a speaker's multiword sentence and

  4. Behavioral Theory and Culture Special Issue: Authors' Response to Commentaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasick, Rena J.; Burke, Nancy J.; Joseph, Galen

    2009-01-01

    This article presents the authors' response to commentaries that focus on the "Behavioral Constructs and Culture in Cancer Screening" (3Cs) study. The 3Cs study had an unremarkable beginning, with two colleagues discussing their frustration over the narrow range of behavioral theories and the limited guidance the theories offered for a study…

  5. Commentary: PhDs in biochemistry education-5 years later.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offerdahl, Erika G; Momsen, Jennifer L; Osgood, Marcy

    2014-01-01

    In this commentary, the discussion of PhDs in biochemistry education research is expanded to explore a number of diverse pathways leading to a competitive research program in biochemistry education research. © 2013 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  6. RTI Confusion in the Case Law and the Legal Commentary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirkel, Perry A.

    2011-01-01

    This article expresses the position that the current legal commentary and cases do not sufficiently differentiate response to intervention (RTI) from the various forms of general education interventions that preceded it, thus compounding confusion in professional practice as to legally defensible procedures for identifying children as having a…

  7. Praxial Music education: A Critical Analysis of Critical Commentaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Marissa; Davis, Susan A.; Elliott, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Since its publication in 1995, a significant literature has developed around David J. Elliott's praxial philosophy of music education, as explained in "Music Matters: A New Philosophy of Music Education." This literature includes a range of commentaries in journals, books, edited books, and dissertations. Although Elliott has…

  8. Invited commentary … On poverty, politics and psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, Glenys; McCrone, Paul

    2016-11-01

    Associations between deprivation and mental health have long been known. This commentary discusses recent work examining this in relation to the uptake, delivery and outcomes of psychological therapies in England. These associations are complex but it is clear that implementation of evidence-based interventions should consider area-level characteristics. © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2016.

  9. Improving the image of student-recruited samples : a commentary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demerouti, E.; Rispens, S.

    2014-01-01

    This commentary argues that the quality and usefulness of student-recruited data can be evaluated by examining the external validity and generalization issues related to this sampling method. Therefore, we discuss how the sampling methods of student- and non-student-recruited samples can enhance or

  10. Commentary to Adam Oliver's 'Incentivising improvements in health care delivery'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vrangbaek, Karsten

    2015-01-01

    The commentary discusses key issues for assessment of performance management within health care. It supports the ambition to develop more realistic understandings of performance management based on insights from behavioral economics as suggested by Adam Oliver. However, it also points to several ...

  11. Commentary on A General Curriculum in Mathematics for Colleges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Committee on the Undergraduate Program in Mathematics, Berkeley, CA.

    This document constitutes a complete revision of the report of the same name first published in 1965. A new list of basic courses is described, consisting of Calculus I, Calculus II, Elementary Linear Algebra, Multivariable Calculus I, Linear Algebra, and Introductory Modern Algebra. Commentaries outline the content and spirit of these courses in…

  12. Kant’s Doctrine of Right. A Commentary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Mertens

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1677-2954.2013v12n2p355 Review of: B. Sharon Byrd and Joachim Hruschka, Kant’s Doctrine of Right. A Commentary (Cambridge University Press, Cambridge 2010 336 p.

  13. Commentary: Status of road safety in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wismans, Jac; Skogsmo, Ingrid; Nilsson-Ehle, Anna; Lie, Anders; Thynell, Marie; Lindberg, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    hand, lack of good high-quality accident data should not be an excuse to postpone interventions. There are many opportunities for evidence-based transport safety improvements, including measures concerning the 5 key risk factors: speed, drunk driving, not wearing motorcycle helmets, not wearing seat belts, and not using child restraints in cars, as specified in the Decade of Action for Road Safety 2011-2020. In this commentary, a number of additional measures are proposed that are not covered in the Decade of Action Plan. These new measures include separate roads or lanes for pedestrians and cyclists; helmet wearing for e-bike riders; special attention to elderly persons in public transportation; introduction of emerging collision avoidance technologies, in particular automatic emergency braking (AEB) and alcohol locks; improved truck safety focusing on the other road user (including blind spot detection technology; underride protection at the front, rear, and side; and energy-absorbing fronts); and improvements in motorcycle safety concerning protective clothing, requirements for advanced braking systems, improved visibility of motorcycles by using daytime running lights, and better guardrails.

  14. Understanding the Effects of Genotype, Growing Year, and Breeding on Tunisian Durum Wheat Allergenicity. 1. The Baker's Asthma Case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukid, Fatma; Prandi, Barbara; Sforza, Stefano; Sayar, Rhouma; Seo, Yong Weon; Mejri, Mondher; Yacoubi, Ines

    2017-07-19

    Baker's asthma is a serious airway disease triggered by wheat protein CM3 α-amylase/trypsin inhibitor. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the impact of genotype and crop year on allergen CM3 α-amylase/trypsin inhibitor associated with baker's asthma. A historical series of Tunisian durum wheat (100 accessions), derived from three crop years, was used to compare the amount of CM3 from landraces to advanced cultivars. CM3 protein quantification was assessed after an enzymatic cleavage of the soluble protein extracts on a UPLC/ESI-MS system, using a marker peptide for its quantification. Combined data analysis of variance revealed an important effect of genotype, crop year, and their interaction. The CM3 allergenic proteins were found to significantly vary among studied genotypes, as confirmed by genetic variability, coefficient of variance, heritability, and genetic advance.

  15. Prevalence of IgE against neuromuscular blocking agents in hairdressers and bakers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, S; Acouetey, D S; Guéant-Rodriguez, R-M; Zmirou-Navier, D; Rémen, T; Blanca, M; Mertes, P M; Guéant, J-L

    2013-11-01

    Allergic IgE-mediated reactions to neuromuscular blocking agents (NMBAs) are the main cause of immediate hypersensitivity reactions in anaesthesia; their predominant occurrence in the absence of previous exposure to NMBAs suggests a risk related to environmental exposure. To investigate the prevalence of specific IgE to quaternary ammonium ions in two populations professionally exposed to quaternary ammonium compounds, in the north-eastern France. The study had a retrospective follow-up design whereby apprentices were assessed after their 2-year training period as apprentices. The professionally exposed hairdresser populations (n = 128) were compared with baker/pastry makers (n = 108) and 'non-exposed' matched control subjects (n = 379). We observed a 4.6-fold higher frequency of positive IgE against quaternary ammonium ions in hairdressers (HD), compared with baker/pastry makers (BP) and control (C) groups. The competitive inhibition of quaternary ammonium Sepharose radioimmunoassay (QAS-IgE RIA) with succinylcholine was significantly higher in HD, compared with BP and C groups, with inhibition percentage of 66.2 ± 7.4, 39.7 ± 6.0 and 43.8 ± 9.9, respectively (P  100 kU/L were the two significant predictors of IgE-sensitization against quaternary ammonium ions in the multivariate analysis of a model that included age, sex, professional exposure, increased concentration of total IgE (IgE > 100 kU/L) and positive IgE against prevalent allergens (Phadiatop(®) ; P = 0.019 and P = 0.001, respectively). The exposure to hairdressing professional occupational factors increases IgE-sensitization to NMBAs and quaternary ammonium ion compounds used in hairdressing. Besides the pholcodine hypothesis, our study suggests that repetitive exposure to quaternary ammonium compounds used in hairdressing is a risk factor for NMBAs sensitization. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Geochemical results of a hydrothermally altered area at Baker Creek, Blaine County, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdman, James A.; Moye, Falma J.; Theobald, Paul K.; McCafferty, Anne E.; Larsen, Richard K.

    2001-01-01

    The area immediately east of Baker Creek, Blaine County, Idaho, is underlain by a thick section of mafic to intermediate lava flows of the Eocene Challis Volcanic Group. Widespread propylitic alteration surrounds a zone of argillic alteration and an inner core of phyllic alteration. Silicified breccia is present along an east-trending fault within the zone of phyllic alteration. As part of a reconnaissance geochemical survey, soils and plants were sampled. Several species of plants (Douglas-fir [ Pseudotsuga menziesii ], mountain big sagebrush [ Artemisia tridentata ssp. vaseyana ], and elk sedge [ Carex geyerii ]) were collected from 10 upland localities and stream sediments, panned concentrates, and aquatic mosses were collected from 16 drainage basin localities all of which were generally within the area of alteration. Geochemical results yielded anomalous concentrations of molybenum, zinc, silver, and lead in at least half of the seven different sample media and of gold, thallium, arsenic, antimony, manganese, boron, cadmium, bismuth, copper, and beryllium in from one to four of the various media. Part of this suite of elements? silver, gold, arsenic, antimony, thallium, and manganese? suggests that the mineralization in the area is epithermal. Barite and pyrite (commonly botryoidal-framboidal) are widespread throughout the area sampled. Visible gold and pyromorphite (a secondary lead mineral) were identified in only one small drainage basin, but high levels of gold were detected in aquatic mosses over a larger area. Data from the upland and stream sampling indicate two possible mineralized areas. The first mineralized area was identified by a grab sample from an outcrop of quartz stockwork that contained 50 ppb Au, 1.5 ppm Ag, and 50 ppm Mo. Although the soil and plant species that were sampled in the area indicated mineralized bedrock, the Douglas-fir samples were the best indicators of the silver anomaly. The second possible mineralized area centers on the

  17. Simplifying the Reinsch algorithm for the Baker-Campbell-Hausdorff series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van-Brunt, Alexander; Visser, Matt

    2016-02-01

    The Goldberg version of the Baker-Campbell-Hausdorff series computes the quantity Z ( X , Y ) = ln (" separators=" e X e Y ) = ∑ w g ( w ) w ( X , Y ) , where X and Y are not necessarily commuting in terms of "words" constructed from the {X, Y} "alphabet." The so-called Goldberg coefficients g(w) are the central topic of this article. This Baker-Campbell-Hausdorff series is a general purpose tool of very wide applicability in mathematical physics, quantum physics, and many other fields. The Reinsch algorithm for the truncated series permits one to calculate the Goldberg coefficients up to some fixed word length |w| by using nilpotent (|w| + 1) × (|w| + 1) matrices. We shall show how to further simplify the Reinsch algorithm, making its implementation (in principle) utterly straightforward using "off the shelf" symbolic manipulation software. Specific computations provide examples which help to provide a deeper understanding of the Goldberg coefficients and their properties. For instance, we shall establish some strict bounds (and some equalities) on the number of non-zero Goldberg coefficients. Unfortunately, we shall see that the number of nonzero Goldberg coefficients often grows very rapidly (in fact exponentially) with the word length |w|. Furthermore, the simplified Reinsch algorithm readily generalizes to many closely related but still quite distinct problems—we shall also present closely related results for the symmetric product S ( X , Y ) = ln (" separators=" e X / 2 e Y e X / 2 ) = ∑ w g S ( w ) w ( X , Y ) . Variations on such themes are straightforward. For instance, one can just as easily consider the "loop" product L ( X , Y ) = ln (" separators=" e X e Y e - X e - Y ) = ∑ w g L ( w ) w ( X , Y ) . This "loop" type of series is of interest, for instance, when considering either differential geometric parallel transport around a closed curve, non-Abelian versions of Stokes' theorem, or even Wigner rotation/Thomas precession in special

  18. Improvement of stress tolerance and leavening ability under multiple baking-associated stress conditions by overexpression of the SNR84 gene in baker's yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xue; Zhang, Cui-Ying; Bai, Xiao-Wen; Feng, Bing; Xiao, Dong-Guang

    2015-03-16

    During the bread-making process, industrial baker's yeast cells are exposed to multiple baking-associated stresses, such as elevated high-temperature, high-sucrose and freeze-thaw stresses. There is a high demand for baker's yeast strains that could withstand these stresses with high leavening ability. The SNR84 gene encodes H/ACA snoRNA (small nucleolar RNA), which is known to be involved in pseudouridylation of the large subunit rRNA. However, the function of the SNR84 gene in baker's yeast coping with baking-associated stresses remains unclear. In this study, we explored the effect of SNR84 overexpression on baker's yeast which was exposed to high-temperature, high-sucrose and freeze-thaw stresses. These results suggest that overexpression of the SNR84 gene conferred tolerance of baker's yeast cells to high-temperature, high-sucrose and freeze-thaw stresses and enhanced their leavening ability in high-sucrose and freeze-thaw dough. These findings could provide a valuable insight for breeding of novel stress-resistant baker's yeast strains that are useful for baking. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Commentary: Thinking outside the box about children's sleep--a commentary on Gregory and Sadeh (2016).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stores, Gregory

    2016-03-01

    This commentary is intended to supplement the accompanying review of sleep problems in childhood psychiatric disorders by Gregory and Sadeh. A number of considerations are outlined because of their relevance to both clinical practice and research concerning assessment and treatment of sleep disturbance in children in general and especially those with psychiatric and/or neurological conditions. These considerations (which illustrate the importance of combined medical and psychological involvement) are as follows: the importance of screening for sleep disturbance which otherwise may well be overlooked; the need to specify sleep disorders rather than simply nonspecific sleep problems as this will guide choice of appropriate advice and treatment; the risk of sleep disorders being misdiagnosed because of clinicians' unfamiliarity with the sleep disorders field; the possibility that a child's sleep disturbance is of multiple aetiology; a wide range of treatments for disturbed sleep is now described from which a choice is possible given an accurate diagnosis; sleep problems may be intensified if a child's condition is complicated by intellectual disability but the same principles of assessment and management apply as in other children in the expectation that treatment can be effective. © 2016 Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health.

  20. De novo biosynthesis of vanillin in fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) and baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Esben H; Møller, Birger Lindberg; Kock, Gertrud R; Bünner, Camilla M; Kristensen, Charlotte; Jensen, Ole R; Okkels, Finn T; Olsen, Carl E; Motawia, Mohammed S; Hansen, Jørgen

    2009-05-01

    Vanillin is one of the world's most important flavor compounds, with a global market of 180 million dollars. Natural vanillin is derived from the cured seed pods of the vanilla orchid (Vanilla planifolia), but most of the world's vanillin is synthesized from petrochemicals or wood pulp lignins. We have established a true de novo biosynthetic pathway for vanillin production from glucose in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, also known as fission yeast or African beer yeast, as well as in baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Productivities were 65 and 45 mg/liter, after introduction of three and four heterologous genes, respectively. The engineered pathways involve incorporation of 3-dehydroshikimate dehydratase from the dung mold Podospora pauciseta, an aromatic carboxylic acid reductase (ACAR) from a bacterium of the Nocardia genus, and an O-methyltransferase from Homo sapiens. In S. cerevisiae, the ACAR enzyme required activation by phosphopantetheinylation, and this was achieved by coexpression of a Corynebacterium glutamicum phosphopantetheinyl transferase. Prevention of reduction of vanillin to vanillyl alcohol was achieved by knockout of the host alcohol dehydrogenase ADH6. In S. pombe, the biosynthesis was further improved by introduction of an Arabidopsis thaliana family 1 UDP-glycosyltransferase, converting vanillin into vanillin beta-D-glucoside, which is not toxic to the yeast cells and thus may be accumulated in larger amounts. These de novo pathways represent the first examples of one-cell microbial generation of these valuable compounds from glucose. S. pombe yeast has not previously been metabolically engineered to produce any valuable, industrially scalable, white biotech commodity.

  1. Prevention of GABA reduction during dough fermentation using a baker's yeast dal81 mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Akira; Nakamura, Toshihide

    2016-10-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is consumed by yeasts during fermentation. To prevent GABA reduction in bread dough, a baker's yeast mutant AY77 deficient in GABA assimilation was characterized and utilized for wheat dough fermentation. An amber mutation in the DAL81 gene, which codes for a positive regulator of multiple nitrogen degradation pathways, was found in the AY77 strain. The qPCR analyses of genes involved in nitrogen utilization showed that transcriptional levels of the UGA1 and DUR3 genes encoding GABA transaminase and urea transporter, respectively, are severely decreased in the AY77 cells. The AY77 strain cultivated by fed-batch culture using cane molasses exhibited inferior gas production during dough fermentation compared to that of wild-type strain AY13. However, when fed with molasses containing 0.5% ammonium sulfate, the mutant strain exhibited gas production comparable to that of the AY13 strain. In contrast to the AY13 strain, which completely consumed GABA in dough within 5 h, the AY77 strain consumed no GABA under either culture condition. Dough fermentation with the dal81 mutant strain should be useful for suppression of GABA reduction in breads. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Chemical constituents of the essential oil, antioxidant and antibacterial activities from Elettariopsis curtisii Baker.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanida Chairgulprasert

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Elettariopsis curtisii Baker, the culinary and medicinal herb, was investigated to elucidate its chemical constituents and determine antioxidant and antibacterial activities. The essential oil of E. curtisii was obtained by steam distillation of fresh rhizomes in a maximum yield of 0.63%. GC-MS data indicated the presence of six compounds, of which trans-2-decenal (78.03% was the principal constituent. The essential oils and also the hexane, dichloromethane and methanol extracts from the rhizomes and leaves were assessed for antioxidant and antibacterial activities. In an evaluation of antioxidant activity, the crude dichloromethane extract of the leaves exhibited the highest scavenging effect on the DPPH radicalwith an EC50 of 0.28+0.01 mg/mL. The leaf dichloromethane extract also had the highest total phenol concentration, (73.4+2.80 mg GA/g of extract whereas the crude methanol extract from the rhizomes had the highest reducing power with an EC50 of 2.07+0.06 mg/mL. In terms of antibacterial activity, the essential oil (distilled from either the leaves or the rhizomesdisplayed the highest inhibitory activity, with the same MID value of 1 mg/disc against 5 strains of bacteria, Bacillus subtilis,Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Sarcina sp. and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

  3. Treatment of the baker's yeast wastewater by electrocoagulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobya, M. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Gebze Institute of Technology, 41400 Gebze (Turkey)], E-mail: kobya@gyte.edu.tr; Delipinar, S. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Gebze Institute of Technology, 41400 Gebze (Turkey)

    2008-06-15

    In the laboratory-scale experiments, treatment of baker's yeast production wastewater has been investigated by electrocoagulation (EC) using a batch reactor. Effects of the process variables such as pH, electrode material (Fe and Al), current density, and operating time are investigated in terms of removal efficiencies of chemical oxygen demand (COD), total organic carbon (TOC), turbidity, and operating cost, respectively. The maximum removal efficiencies of COD, TOC and turbidity under optimal operating conditions, i.e., pH 6.5 for Al electrode and pH 7 for Fe electrode, current density of 70 A/m{sup 2} and operating time of 50 min were 71, 53 and 90% for Al electrode and 69, 52 and 56% for Fe electrode, respectively. Al electrode gave 4.4 times higher removal efficiency of turbidity than Fe electrode due to interference from color of dissolved iron. The operating costs for Al and Fe electrodes in terms of $/m{sup 3} or $/kg COD were 1.54 and 0.82, 0.51 and 0.27, respectively.

  4. An improved, bias-reduced probabilistic functional gene network of baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Insuk Lee

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Probabilistic functional gene networks are powerful theoretical frameworks for integrating heterogeneous functional genomics and proteomics data into objective models of cellular systems. Such networks provide syntheses of millions of discrete experimental observations, spanning DNA microarray experiments, physical protein interactions, genetic interactions, and comparative genomics; the resulting networks can then be easily applied to generate testable hypotheses regarding specific gene functions and associations.We report a significantly improved version (v. 2 of a probabilistic functional gene network of the baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We describe our optimization methods and illustrate their effects in three major areas: the reduction of functional bias in network training reference sets, the application of a probabilistic model for calculating confidences in pair-wise protein physical or genetic interactions, and the introduction of simple thresholds that eliminate many false positive mRNA co-expression relationships. Using the network, we predict and experimentally verify the function of the yeast RNA binding protein Puf6 in 60S ribosomal subunit biogenesis.YeastNet v. 2, constructed using these optimizations together with additional data, shows significant reduction in bias and improvements in precision and recall, in total covering 102,803 linkages among 5,483 yeast proteins (95% of the validated proteome. YeastNet is available from http://www.yeastnet.org.

  5. Thermodynamic analysis of fermentation and anaerobic growth of baker's yeast for ethanol production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teh, Kwee-Yan; Lutz, Andrew E

    2010-05-17

    Thermodynamic concepts have been used in the past to predict microbial growth yield. This may be the key consideration in many industrial biotechnology applications. It is not the case, however, in the context of ethanol fuel production. In this paper, we examine the thermodynamics of fermentation and concomitant growth of baker's yeast in continuous culture experiments under anaerobic, glucose-limited conditions, with emphasis on the yield and efficiency of bio-ethanol production. We find that anaerobic metabolism of yeast is very efficient; the process retains more than 90% of the maximum work that could be extracted from the growth medium supplied to the chemostat reactor. Yeast cells and other metabolic by-products are also formed, which reduces the glucose-to-ethanol conversion efficiency to less than 75%. Varying the specific ATP consumption rate, which is the fundamental parameter in this paper for modeling the energy demands of cell growth, shows the usual trade-off between ethanol production and biomass yield. The minimum ATP consumption rate required for synthesizing cell materials leads to biomass yield and Gibbs energy dissipation limits that are much more severe than those imposed by mass balance and thermodynamic equilibrium constraints. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Sugar utilization patterns and respiro-fermentative metabolism in the baker's yeast Torulaspora delbrueckii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves-Araújo, C; Pacheco, A; Almeida, M J; Spencer-Martins, I; Leão, C; Sousa, M J

    2007-03-01

    The highly osmo- and cryotolerant yeast species Torulaspora delbrueckii is an important case study among the non-Saccharomyces yeast species. The strain T. delbrueckii PYCC 5321, isolated from traditional corn and rye bread dough in northern Portugal, is considered particularly interesting for the baking industry. This paper reports the sugar utilization patterns of this strain, using media with glucose, maltose and sucrose, alone or in mixtures. Kinetics of growth, biomass and ethanol yields, fermentation and respiration rates, hydrolase activities and sugar uptake rates were used to infer the potential applied relevance of this yeast in comparison to a conventional baker's strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The results showed that both maltase and maltose transport in T. delbrueckii were subject to glucose repression and maltose induction, whereas invertase was subject to glucose control but not dependent on sucrose induction. A comparative analysis of specific sugar consumption rates and transport capacities suggests that the transport step limits both glucose and maltose metabolism. Specific rates of CO(2) production and O(2) consumption showed a significantly higher contribution of respiration to the overall metabolism in T. delbrueckii than in S. cerevisiae. This was reflected in the biomass yields from batch cultures and could represent an asset for the large-scale production of the former species. This work contributes to a better understanding of the physiology of a non-conventional yeast species, with a view to the full exploitation of T. delbrueckii by the baking industry.

  7. Effects of distraction on memory and cognition: A commentary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fergus I. M Craik

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This commentary is a review of the findings and ideas reported in the preceding nine articles on the effects of distraction on aspects of cognitive performance. The articles themselves deal with the disruptive effects of distraction on recall of words, objects and events, also on visual processing, category formation and other cognitive tasks. The commentary assesses the part played by domain-general suppression of distracting information and the domain-specific competition arising when tasks and distraction involve very similar material. Some forms of distraction are meaningfully relevant to the ongoing task, and Treisman’s (1964 model of selective attention is invoked to provide an account of findings in this area. Finally, individual differences to vulnerability to distraction are discussed; older adults are particularly affected by distracting stimuli although the failure to repress distraction can sometimes prove beneficial to later cognitive performance.

  8. Some notes on writing a commentary: Isaiah 1-12

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Groenewald

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available I was requested by the editors of the �Historical Commentary on the Old Testament� (HCOT to contribute two volumes on Isaiah in this series. This present article, however, focuses only on volume I: Isaiah 1-12. The aim of this article can be summarised in six points. Some introductory remarks are made with regard to the genre of commentary writing. Secondly, the viewpoint of the HCOT series is outlined; in other words its methodological and epistemological viewpoint. Thirdly, recent developments in the study of the book of Isaiah are discussed. Fourthly, my own objectives and hypothesis with regard to this project are outlined. Fifthly, a short overview of Isaiah 1-12 on a synchronic level is given. Sixthly, my research methodology is defined as a �diachronically reflected synchronic� reading of the Isaianic text. In the last section some concluding remarks are made.

  9. Effects of distraction on memory and cognition: a commentary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craik, Fergus I M

    2014-01-01

    This commentary is a review of the findings and ideas reported in the preceding nine articles on the effects of distraction on aspects of cognitive performance. The articles themselves deal with the disruptive effects of distraction on recall of words, objects and events, also on visual processing, category formation and other cognitive tasks. The commentary assesses the part played by "domain-general" suppression of distracting information and the "domain-specific" competition arising when tasks and distraction involve very similar material. Some forms of distraction are meaningfully relevant to the ongoing task, and Treisman's (1964) model of selective attention is invoked to provide an account of findings in this area. Finally, individual differences to vulnerability to distraction are discussed; older adults are particularly affected by distracting stimuli although the failure to repress distraction can sometimes prove beneficial to later cognitive performance.

  10. Commentary: On regulation and medical education: sociology, learning, and accountability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durning, Steven J; Artino, Anthony R; Holmboe, Eric

    2009-05-01

    The topic of regulation is commonplace in society, yet it seems to receive little explicit consideration in discussions on undergraduate medical education. The accompanying articles by Hauer and colleagues, White and colleagues, and Bloodgood and colleagues approach the topic of regulation from several different viewpoints. In this commentary, we too approach the topic of regulation from several different viewpoints: sociology, learning (self-regulated learning), and accountability. In this commentary, we present both theoretical and practical issues with the aim of initiating an open, scholarly discussion in the field of medical education. Ultimately, we hope other medical educators will seriously contemplate the questions raised and, more importantly, will consider employing these theoretical perspectives into future research efforts.

  11. Ontology matters: a commentary on contribution to cultural historical activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jenny

    2017-10-01

    This commentary promotes discussion on the imaginary provided by Sanaz Farhangi in her article entitled, Contribution to activity: a lens for understanding students' potential and agency in physics education. The commentary is concerned with aligning ontological assumptions in research accounts of learning and development with transformative aims. A broad definition of ontology as the theory of existence is preferred. Sociocultural approaches share relational ontology as a common foundation. I agree with scholars elaborating Vygotsky's Transformative Activist Stance that a relational ontology does not imply activism. However, I argue that relational ontology provides a necessary and sufficient theoretical grounding for intentional transformation. I draw upon positioning theory to elaborate the moral aspects of language use and to illustrate that a theory of being as relational already eliminates the transcendental position. I draw on Farhangi's article to further the discussion on the necessity and sufficiency of relational ontology and associated grammars in accounting for activism.

  12. When four principles are too many: a commentary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillon, Raanan

    2012-04-01

    This commentary briefly argues that the four prima facie principles of beneficence, non-maleficence, respect for autonomy and justice enable a clinician (and anybody else) to make ethical sense of the author's proposed reliance on professional guidance and rules, on law, on professional integrity and on best interests, and to subject them all to ethical analysis and criticism based on widely acceptable basic prima facie moral obligations; and also to confront new situations in the light of those acceptable principles.

  13. Commentary: Competency restoration research--complicating an already complex process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotter, Merrill; Greenspan, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Predicting restorability in individuals found not competent to stand trial is an enduring focus of interest among forensic clinicians and academicians. In our commentary, we suggest that to understand this area even more comprehensively, we must look further. We must build on existing research on fitness to stand trial, move beyond diagnosis and a binary competence variable, and include the complex interplay between symptoms and fitness-related capacities that may be associated with lack of adjudicative competence and challenges to restorability.

  14. Sports metaphors in Polish written commentaries on politics

    OpenAIRE

    Jarosław Wiliński

    2015-01-01

    This paper seeks to investigate what sports metaphors are used in Polish written commentaries on politics and what special purpose they serve. In particular, the paper examines structural metaphors that come from the lexicon of popular sports, such as boxing, racing, track and field athletics, sailing, etc. The language data, derived from English Internet websites, has been grouped and discussed according to source domains. Applying George Lakoff and Mark Johnson’s approach to metaphor, the p...

  15. Commentary on Community Mental Health and the Common Good.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrigo, Bruce; Davidson, Larry

    2017-07-01

    This article comments on the core question addressed by this Special Issue: "What's good about public sector mental health?" Theoretical, empirical, and programmatic insights derived from the Issue's six article contributions guide the overall commentary. Several points of thematic overlap are featured in these preliminary observations, and these themes are suggestive for directing future research (e.g., citizenship studies) in the field of community mental health. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Diet, occupational exposure and early asthma incidence among bakers, pastry makers and hairdressers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rémen Thomas

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The natural history of occupational asthma (OA is influenced by many determinants. This study aims to assess the combined roles of personal characteristics, including occupational exposure and nutritional habits, on the incidence of OA during the first years at work. Methods A nested case–control study was conducted within a retrospective cohort of young workers in the bakery, pastry-making and hairdressing sectors. Cases were subjects diagnosed as ‘confirmed’ or ‘probable’ OA consecutively to a medical visit (N = 31. Controls were subjects without OA (N = 196. Atopy was defined after blood specific IgE analysis, based on the PhadiatopTM test. Occupational exposure was characterized by standardized questionnaires and diet patterns by a food frequency questionnaire. Results Among bakers and pastry-makers, only atopy is an independent risk factor of OA (OR = 10.07 95%CI [2.76 – 36.65]. Among hairdressers, several variables are associated with OA. Body mass index (unit OR = 1.24 [1.03 – 1.48] and the score of exposure intensity (unit OR = 1.79 [1.05 – 3.05] are independent predictors of OA, but the role of atopy is weak (OR = 4.94 [0.66 – 36.75]. Intake of vitamin A is higher among hairdressers cases (crude p = 0.002, adjusted p = 0.01 after control for body mass index and atopy; the same observation is made for vitamin D (crude p = 0.004, adjusted p = 0.01. Conclusion This study suggests that the influence of several factors on the incidence of OA, including dietary vitamins, might vary across exposure settings.

  17. Diet, occupational exposure and early asthma incidence among bakers, pastry makers and hairdressers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rémen, Thomas; Acouetey, Dovi-Stéphanie; Paris, Christophe; Zmirou-Navier, Denis

    2012-05-29

    The natural history of occupational asthma (OA) is influenced by many determinants. This study aims to assess the combined roles of personal characteristics, including occupational exposure and nutritional habits, on the incidence of OA during the first years at work. A nested case-control study was conducted within a retrospective cohort of young workers in the bakery, pastry-making and hairdressing sectors. Cases were subjects diagnosed as 'confirmed' or 'probable' OA consecutively to a medical visit (N = 31). Controls were subjects without OA (N = 196). Atopy was defined after blood specific IgE analysis, based on the PhadiatopTM test. Occupational exposure was characterized by standardized questionnaires and diet patterns by a food frequency questionnaire. Among bakers and pastry-makers, only atopy is an independent risk factor of OA (OR = 10.07 95%CI [2.76 - 36.65]). Among hairdressers, several variables are associated with OA. Body mass index (unit OR = 1.24 [1.03 - 1.48]) and the score of exposure intensity (unit OR = 1.79 [1.05 - 3.05]) are independent predictors of OA, but the role of atopy is weak (OR = 4.94 [0.66 - 36.75]). Intake of vitamin A is higher among hairdressers cases (crude p = 0.002, adjusted p = 0.01 after control for body mass index and atopy); the same observation is made for vitamin D (crude p = 0.004, adjusted p = 0.01). This study suggests that the influence of several factors on the incidence of OA, including dietary vitamins, might vary across exposure settings.

  18. Intermolecular hydrogen transfer catalyzed by a flavodehydrogenase, bakers' yeast flavocytochrome b2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urban, P.; Lederer, F.

    1985-01-01

    Bakers yeast flavocytochrome b2 is a flavin-dependent L-2-hydroxy acid dehydrogenase which also exhibits transhydrogenase activity. When a reaction takes place between [2- 3 H]lactate and a halogenopyruvate, tritium is found in water and at the halogenolactate C2 position. When the halogenopyruvate undergoes halide ion elimination, tritium is also found at the C3 position of the resulting pyruvate. The amount tau of this intermolecular tritium transfer depends on the initial keto acid-acceptor concentration. At infinite acceptor concentration, extrapolation yields a maximal transfer of 97 +/- 11%. This indicates that the hydroxy acid-derived hydrogen resides transiently on enzyme monoprotic heteroatoms and that exchange with bulk solvent occurs only at the level of free reduced enzyme. Using a minimal kinetic scheme, the rate constant for hydrogen exchange between Ered and solvent is calculated to be on the order of 10(2) M-1 S-1, which leads to an estimated pK approximately equal to 15 for the ionization of the substrate-derived proton while on the enzyme. It is suggested that this hydrogen could be shared between the active site base and Flred N5 anion. It is furthermore shown that some tritium is incorporated into the products when the transhydrogenation is carried out in tritiated water. Finally, with [2-2H]lactate-reduced enzyme, a deuterium isotope effect is observed on the rate of bromopyruvate disappearance. Extrapolation to infinite bromopyruvate concentration yields DV = 4.4. An apparent inverse isotope effect is determined for bromide ion elimination. These results strengthen the idea that oxidoreduction and elimination pathways involve a common carbanionic intermediate

  19. Climate change impacts on the Lehman-Baker Creek drainage in the Great Basin National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volk, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    Global climate models (GCMs) forced by increased CO2 emissions forecast anomalously dry and warm trends over the southwestern U.S. for the 21st century. The effect of warmer conditions may result in decreased surface water resources within the Great Basin physiographic region critical for ecology, irrigation and municipal water supply. Here we use downscaled GCM output from the A2 and B1 greenhouse gas emission scenarios to force a Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System (PRMS) watershed model developed for the Lehman and Baker Creeks Drainage (LBCD) in the Great Basin National Park, NV for a century long time period. The goal is to quantify the effects of rising temperature to the water budget in the LBCD at monthly and annual timescales. Dynamically downscaled GCM projections are attained from the NSF EPSCoR Nevada Infrastructure for Climate Change Science, Education, and Outreach project and statistically downscaled output is retrieved from the "U.S. Bias Corrected and Downscaled WCRP CMIP3 Climate Projections". Historical daily climate and streamflow data have been collected simultaneously for periods extending 20 years or longer. Mann-Kendal trend test results showed a statistically significant (α= 0.05) long-term rising trend from 1895 to 2012 in annual and monthly average temperatures for the study area. A grid-based, PRMS watershed model of the LBCD has been created within ArcGIS 10, and physical parameters have been estimated at a spatial resolution of 100m. Simulation results will be available soon. Snow cover is expected to decrease and peak runoff to occur earlier in the spring, resulting in increased runoff, decreased infiltration/recharge, decreased baseflows, and decreased evapo-transpiration.

  20. De Novo Biosynthesis of Vanillin in Fission Yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) and Baker's Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Esben H.; Møller, Birger Lindberg; Kock, Gertrud R.; Bünner, Camilla M.; Kristensen, Charlotte; Jensen, Ole R.; Okkels, Finn T.; Olsen, Carl E.; Motawia, Mohammed S.; Hansen, Jørgen

    2009-01-01

    Vanillin is one of the world's most important flavor compounds, with a global market of 180 million dollars. Natural vanillin is derived from the cured seed pods of the vanilla orchid (Vanilla planifolia), but most of the world's vanillin is synthesized from petrochemicals or wood pulp lignins. We have established a true de novo biosynthetic pathway for vanillin production from glucose in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, also known as fission yeast or African beer yeast, as well as in baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Productivities were 65 and 45 mg/liter, after introduction of three and four heterologous genes, respectively. The engineered pathways involve incorporation of 3-dehydroshikimate dehydratase from the dung mold Podospora pauciseta, an aromatic carboxylic acid reductase (ACAR) from a bacterium of the Nocardia genus, and an O-methyltransferase from Homo sapiens. In S. cerevisiae, the ACAR enzyme required activation by phosphopantetheinylation, and this was achieved by coexpression of a Corynebacterium glutamicum phosphopantetheinyl transferase. Prevention of reduction of vanillin to vanillyl alcohol was achieved by knockout of the host alcohol dehydrogenase ADH6. In S. pombe, the biosynthesis was further improved by introduction of an Arabidopsis thaliana family 1 UDP-glycosyltransferase, converting vanillin into vanillin β-d-glucoside, which is not toxic to the yeast cells and thus may be accumulated in larger amounts. These de novo pathways represent the first examples of one-cell microbial generation of these valuable compounds from glucose. S. pombe yeast has not previously been metabolically engineered to produce any valuable, industrially scalable, white biotech commodity. PMID:19286778

  1. Effect of yeast storage temperature and flour composition on fermentative activities of baker's yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pejin Dušanka J.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Baker's yeast is a set of living cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It contains around 70-72% of water, 42-45% of proteins, around 40% of carbohydrates, around 7.5% of lipids (based on dry matter, and vitamin B-complex. On the basis of yeast cell analysis it can be concluded that yeast is a complex biological system which changes in time. The intensity of the changes depends on temperature. Yeast sample was stored at 4°C i 24°C for 12 days. During storage at 4°C, the content of total carbohydrates decreased from 48.81% to 37.50% (dry matter, whereas carbohydrate loss ranged from 40.81% to 29.28% at 24°C. The content of trehalose was 12.33% in the yeast sample stored at 4°C and 0.24% at 24°C. Loss of fermentative activity was 81.76% in the sample stored at 24°C for 12 days. The composition of five samples of 1st category flour was investigated. It was found that flours containing more reducing sugars and maltose enable higher fermentation activities. The flours with higher ash content (in the range 0.5-0.94% had higher contents of phytic acid. Higher ash and phytic contents in flour increased the yeast fermentative efficiency. In bakery industry, a range of ingredients has been applied to improve the product's quality such as surface active substances (emulsifiers, enzymes, sugars and fats. In the paper, the effect of some ingredients added to dough (margarine, saccharose, sodium chloride and malted barley on the yeast fermentative activity was studied. The mentioned ingredients were added to dough at different doses: 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0%, flour basis. It was found that the investigated ingredients affected the fermentative activity of yeast and improved the bread quality.

  2. Exploration of potential baker's yeast from sugarcane juice: optimization and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamun-Or-rashid, A N M; Dash, Biplab Kumar; Chowdhury, Md Nurul Abadin; Waheed, Momtaz Fatima; Pramanik, Md Kamruzzaman

    2013-07-01

    The present study was carried out to explore baker's yeasts strains from sugarcane juice to assess its potential in laboratory scale production of breads. Collected juice samples were processed for isolation and identification of yeast strains based on standard cultural, morphological and biochemical characteristics. Among the six isolated strains, four (designated as S1, S2, S5 and S6) were identified as Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the rests (designated S3 and S4) were as S. rouxii. When assessing their CO2 production rates as a measure of their baking potential, S6 was found to produce maximum amount of gas (226.67 mm3 mL(-1)) in sucrose broth, whereas gas produced by S2, S1 and S5 were relatively insignificant (170, 136.67 and 86.67 mm3 mL(-1), respectively). No strain was found to produce undesirable H2S gas responsible for off-flavor. Besides, effects of different physicochemical parameters (e.g., pH, temperature, substrate concentration, incubation period, agitation etc.) on the production of yeast cell-mass were studied. Yield of cell mass was indirectly measured by spectrophotometric method at 550 nm. All the test isolates were found to produce maximum cell mass at a pH range of 4.0 to 5.0 in 2 to 4% molasses broth at 30 degrees C after 4 days of incubation. In the laboratory scale production of bread using composite flour, Isolate-S6 formed significant characteristic texture. Considering overall characteristics, Isolate- S6 was found to be satisfactorily potent for baking purpose.

  3. Baker 10 x 20 NTMS area, Oregon and Idaho: data report (abbreviated)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, J.R.

    1981-05-01

    Surface sediment samples were collected at 1426 sites, at a target sampling density of one site per 13 square kilometers. Ground water samples were collected at 460 sites. Neutron activation analysis results are given for uranium and 16 other elements in sediments, and for uranium and 9 other elements in ground water and surface water. Mass spectrometry results are given for helium in ground water. Field measurements and observations are reported for each site. Analytical data and field measurements are presented in tables and maps. Data from ground water and surface water sites include: (1) water chemistry measurements (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity), (2) physical measurements, where applicable (water temperature, well description, and scintillometer reading), and (3) elemental analyses (U, Al, Br, Cl, Dy, F, Mg, Mn, Na, and V). Helium analyses are given for ground water. Data from sediment sites include: (1) stream water chemistry measurements from sites where water was available, and (2) elemental analyses for sediment samples (U, Th, Hf, Al, Ce, Dy, Eu, Fe, La, Lu, Mn, Sc, Sm, Na, Ti, V, and Yb). Sample site descriptors (stream characteristics, vegetation, etc.) are also tabulated. Areal distribution maps, histograms, and cumulative frequency plots for these elements; U/Th, U/Hf, U/(Th + Hf), and U/La ratios; and scintillometer readings at sediment sample sites are included on the microfiche. The maximum uranium concentration found in sediments in the Baker quadrangle was 21.1 ppM. The mean of the logarithms of the uranium concentrations was 0.77. Concentrations of uranium and the rare-earth elements were high along the eastern edge of the quadrangle

  4. When is Deceptive Message Production More Effortful than Truth-Telling? A Baker's Dozen of Moderators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgoon, Judee K

    2015-01-01

    Deception is thought to be more effortful than telling the truth. Empirical evidence from many quarters supports this general proposition. However, there are many factors that qualify and even reverse this pattern. Guided by a communication perspective, I present a baker's dozen of moderators that may alter the degree of cognitive difficulty associated with producing deceptive messages. Among sender-related factors are memory processes, motivation, incentives, and consequences. Lying increases activation of a network of brain regions related to executive memory, suppression of unwanted behaviors, and task switching that is not observed with truth-telling. High motivation coupled with strong incentives or the risk of adverse consequences also prompts more cognitive exertion-for truth-tellers and deceivers alike-to appear credible, with associated effects on performance and message production effort, depending on the magnitude of effort, communicator skill, and experience. Factors related to message and communication context include discourse genre, type of prevarication, expected response length, communication medium, preparation, and recency of target event/issue. These factors can attenuate the degree of cognitive taxation on senders so that truth-telling and deceiving are similarly effortful. Factors related to the interpersonal relationship among interlocutors include whether sender and receiver are cooperative or adversarial and how well-acquainted they are with one another. A final consideration is whether the unit of analysis is the utterance, turn at talk, episode, entire interaction, or series of interactions. Taking these factors into account should produce a more nuanced answer to the question of when deception is more difficult than truth-telling.

  5. Enhancement of the proline and nitric oxide synthetic pathway improves fermentation ability under multiple baking-associated stress conditions in industrial baker's yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasano Yu

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the bread-making process, industrial baker's yeast, mostly Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is exposed to baking-associated stresses, such as air-drying and freeze-thaw stress. These baking-associated stresses exert severe injury to yeast cells, mainly due to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS, leading to cell death and reduced fermentation ability. Thus, there is a great need for a baker's yeast strain with higher tolerance to baking-associated stresses. Recently, we revealed a novel antioxidative mechanism in a laboratory yeast strain that is involved in stress-induced nitric oxide (NO synthesis from proline via proline oxidase Put1 and N-acetyltransferase Mpr1. We also found that expression of the proline-feedback inhibition-less sensitive mutant γ-glutamyl kinase (Pro1-I150T and the thermostable mutant Mpr1-F65L resulted in an enhanced fermentation ability of baker's yeast in bread dough after freeze-thaw stress and air-drying stress, respectively. However, baker's yeast strains with high fermentation ability under multiple baking-associated stresses have not yet been developed. Results We constructed a self-cloned diploid baker's yeast strain with enhanced proline and NO synthesis by expressing Pro1-I150T and Mpr1-F65L in the presence of functional Put1. The engineered strain increased the intracellular NO level in response to air-drying stress, and the strain was tolerant not only to oxidative stress but also to both air-drying and freeze-thaw stresses probably due to the reduced intracellular ROS level. We also showed that the resultant strain retained higher leavening activity in bread dough after air-drying and freeze-thaw stress than that of the wild-type strain. On the other hand, enhanced stress tolerance and fermentation ability did not occur in the put1-deficient strain. This result suggests that NO is synthesized in baker's yeast from proline in response to oxidative stresses that induce ROS

  6. Enhancement of the proline and nitric oxide synthetic pathway improves fermentation ability under multiple baking-associated stress conditions in industrial baker's yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasano, Yu; Haitani, Yutaka; Hashida, Keisuke; Ohtsu, Iwao; Shima, Jun; Takagi, Hiroshi

    2012-04-01

    During the bread-making process, industrial baker's yeast, mostly Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is exposed to baking-associated stresses, such as air-drying and freeze-thaw stress. These baking-associated stresses exert severe injury to yeast cells, mainly due to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), leading to cell death and reduced fermentation ability. Thus, there is a great need for a baker's yeast strain with higher tolerance to baking-associated stresses. Recently, we revealed a novel antioxidative mechanism in a laboratory yeast strain that is involved in stress-induced nitric oxide (NO) synthesis from proline via proline oxidase Put1 and N-acetyltransferase Mpr1. We also found that expression of the proline-feedback inhibition-less sensitive mutant γ-glutamyl kinase (Pro1-I150T) and the thermostable mutant Mpr1-F65L resulted in an enhanced fermentation ability of baker's yeast in bread dough after freeze-thaw stress and air-drying stress, respectively. However, baker's yeast strains with high fermentation ability under multiple baking-associated stresses have not yet been developed. We constructed a self-cloned diploid baker's yeast strain with enhanced proline and NO synthesis by expressing Pro1-I150T and Mpr1-F65L in the presence of functional Put1. The engineered strain increased the intracellular NO level in response to air-drying stress, and the strain was tolerant not only to oxidative stress but also to both air-drying and freeze-thaw stresses probably due to the reduced intracellular ROS level. We also showed that the resultant strain retained higher leavening activity in bread dough after air-drying and freeze-thaw stress than that of the wild-type strain. On the other hand, enhanced stress tolerance and fermentation ability did not occur in the put1-deficient strain. This result suggests that NO is synthesized in baker's yeast from proline in response to oxidative stresses that induce ROS generation and that increased NO plays an important

  7. Enhancement of the proline and nitric oxide synthetic pathway improves fermentation ability under multiple baking-associated stress conditions in industrial baker's yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background During the bread-making process, industrial baker's yeast, mostly Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is exposed to baking-associated stresses, such as air-drying and freeze-thaw stress. These baking-associated stresses exert severe injury to yeast cells, mainly due to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), leading to cell death and reduced fermentation ability. Thus, there is a great need for a baker's yeast strain with higher tolerance to baking-associated stresses. Recently, we revealed a novel antioxidative mechanism in a laboratory yeast strain that is involved in stress-induced nitric oxide (NO) synthesis from proline via proline oxidase Put1 and N-acetyltransferase Mpr1. We also found that expression of the proline-feedback inhibition-less sensitive mutant γ-glutamyl kinase (Pro1-I150T) and the thermostable mutant Mpr1-F65L resulted in an enhanced fermentation ability of baker's yeast in bread dough after freeze-thaw stress and air-drying stress, respectively. However, baker's yeast strains with high fermentation ability under multiple baking-associated stresses have not yet been developed. Results We constructed a self-cloned diploid baker's yeast strain with enhanced proline and NO synthesis by expressing Pro1-I150T and Mpr1-F65L in the presence of functional Put1. The engineered strain increased the intracellular NO level in response to air-drying stress, and the strain was tolerant not only to oxidative stress but also to both air-drying and freeze-thaw stresses probably due to the reduced intracellular ROS level. We also showed that the resultant strain retained higher leavening activity in bread dough after air-drying and freeze-thaw stress than that of the wild-type strain. On the other hand, enhanced stress tolerance and fermentation ability did not occur in the put1-deficient strain. This result suggests that NO is synthesized in baker's yeast from proline in response to oxidative stresses that induce ROS generation and that increased NO

  8. Antioxidant N-acetyltransferase Mpr1/2 of industrial baker's yeast enhances fermentation ability after air-drying stress in bread dough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasano, Yu; Takahashi, Shunsuke; Shima, Jun; Takagi, Hiroshi

    2010-03-31

    During bread-making processes, yeast cells are exposed to multiple stresses. Air-drying stress is one of the most harmful stresses by generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Previously, we discovered that the novel N-acetyltransferase Mpr1/2 confers oxidative stress tolerance by reducing intracellular ROS level in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Sigma1278b strain. In this study, we revealed that Japanese industrial baker's yeast possesses one MPR gene. The nucleotide sequence of the MPR gene in industrial baker's yeast was identical to the MPR2 gene in Sigma1278b strain. Gene disruption analysis showed that the MPR2 gene in industrial baker's yeast is involved in air-drying stress tolerance by reducing the intracellular oxidation levels. We also found that expression of the Lys63Arg and Phe65Leu variants with enhanced enzymatic activity and stability, respectively, increased the fermentation ability of bread dough after exposure to air-drying stress compared with the wild-type Mpr1. In addition, our recent study showed that industrial baker's yeast cells accumulating proline exhibited enhanced freeze tolerance in bread dough. Proline accumulation also enhanced the fermentation ability after air-drying stress treatment in industrial baker's yeast. Hence, the antioxidant enzyme Mpr1/2 could be promising for breeding novel yeast strains that are tolerant to air-drying stress. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of the gamma radiation on the chemical, rheological, baker and microbiological properties in wheat flour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agundez A, Z.; Fernandez R, M.V.; Arce C, M.E.; Cruz Z, E.; Chernov, V.; Barboza F, M.

    2002-01-01

    The gamma radiation has been used in several places of the World as a sterilization method, preservation and pasteurization of foodstuffs, effect which is achieved due to diminishing or elimination of the microorganisms, reaching every time more acceptance, moreover eliminates the uses of toxic and carcinogenic substances, of general use, but at the present, being in the process of being totally prohibited, due to the higher risk in the human health. In this work the related results with the effects of the gamma radiation are presented, coming from a 60 Co source, in commercial wheat flour exposed to a dose of 1.0 KGy. The used dose is that allowed according to the NOM-033-SSA1-1993 standard. It was determined that the chemical characteristics of humidity, protein and ashes were not affected by radiation. The rheological properties neither suffer severe effects as consequence of radiation; the pharynographic and alveographic parameters were lightly affected by the treatment. Significant changes were detected in the percentage of water absorption and in the tolerance index to mixing. However a diminish of 10% in the development time and an increase of 13% in the stability was observed, for the irradiated samples respect to the those samples not irradiated. In relation to the alveograph parameters it was only detected a diminish of 7% in the force parameter (w) without changes in the tenacity/blowing up index ratio (P/L). The fall number diminish 11% indicating a small diminution in viscosity. The bakering properties do not turn out modified by the irradiation treatment finding a specific weight of 4.6 and 4.5 (cm 3 /g) for the control and irradiated samples, respectively. In the mesophyll analysis it was found a diminish of 96% from the original charge in control samples, observing a diminution of 74 and 25% in yeasts and mushrooms respectively. Microbiologically it was determined absence of total coliforms bacteria and faecal coliforms in the control samples and of

  10. On the validation of risk analysis-A commentary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosqvist, Tony

    2010-01-01

    Aven and Heide (2009) [1] provided interesting views on the reliability and validation of risk analysis. The four validation criteria presented are contrasted with modelling features related to the relative frequency-based and Bayesian approaches to risk analysis. In this commentary I would like to bring forth some issues on validation that partly confirm and partly suggest changes in the interpretation of the introduced validation criteria-especially, in the context of low probability-high consequence systems. The mental model of an expert in assessing probabilities is argued to be a key notion in understanding the validation of a risk analysis.

  11. Commentary: civil commitment statutes--40 years of circumvention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, William H; Grisso, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    There is a longstanding body of literature that describes how states' civil commitment statutes have been stretched or circumvented to accommodate institutional and systemic needs. The paper by Levitt and colleagues provides yet another example of this phenomenon: Arizona's use of its civil commitment statutes to detain unrestorable, incompetent criminal defendants for whom other provisions have not been developed. This commentary provides a brief overview of other examples of the stretching of commitment laws, providing a broader context for viewing the findings of Levitt and colleagues.

  12. Commentary: cognitive-affective mechanisms and processes in autobiographical memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Martin A

    2003-03-01

    This commentary highlights some of the interesting points to emerge from the preceding papers about the self, social, and directive functions of autobiographical memory. Additionally some cognitive functions are also considered and especially the way in which autobiographical memory supports, constrains, and maintains the goals of the self. Directions for future research into the self, social, directive, and cognitive-affective functions and processes of autobiographical memory are reviewed. Emphasis is placed on future research into the function of autobiographical memory in representations of attachment.

  13. Selected papers, with commentary, of Tony Hilton Royle Skyrme

    CERN Document Server

    Skyrme, T H R

    1994-01-01

    The most important papers of Tony Hilton Royle Skyrme are collected in this volume which also includes commentaries by G Brown and other articles relating to the life and work of Tony Skryme, R Dalitz, E Witten and others. Skyrme's work was brilliant, profound and surprisingly useful. He provided an original solution to the problem of constructing fermions from bosons, formulating the topological soliton model of the nucleon. His two-parameter model of effective interactions in nuclei has yielded a remarkably accurate description of nuclear structure. His a-particle model of nuclei gave deep i

  14. Commentary: Pediatric Epilepsy: A Good Fit for Pediatric Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, Avani; Smith, Gigi

    2011-01-01

    While there are an abundance of pediatric neuropsychologists working with youth with epilepsy (YWE), other subspecialty psychologists have played minimal roles in clinical and research endeavors in pediatric epilepsy. Thus, the purpose of this commentary was to describe (a) the needs of YWE due to the intermittent nature of seizures and difficulties with disease management, (b) increased risk for psychosocial comorbidities, (c) limited access to care, and (d) provide recommendations for how pediatric psychologists can become involved in the clinical care and research activities for YWE. PMID:21148174

  15. Aristotle's "De Caelo" III introduction, translation and commentary

    CERN Document Server

    Kouremenos, Theokritos

    2013-01-01

    This is the first full-scale commentary on Aristotle's de Caelo III to appear in recent decades. de Caelo III can serve as a good introduction to Aristotle's physics and its character. In it he answers some very general questions about the elements of all material things except celestial objects: how many these elements are, why they cannot be infinitely many but must be more than one, whether they are eternal or can be generated and decay, and, if the second, how. His discussion is often framed as a critique of rival theories, and he argues systematically against the geometri

  16. Commentary on Becoming a Daughter: Trauma is a powerful teacher.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veach, Patricia McCarthy

    2006-06-01

    Personal life crises profoundly impact genetic counselor practice. In this commentary, themes from Matloff's (in press) article, Becoming a Daughter are highlighted and expanded upon. These themes include: personal impact of a life crisis, and professional impact vis a vis empathy countertransference, self-disclosure, nondirectiveness, and self-confidence. Strategies that help genetic counselors manage personal life crises within their clinical practice and also promote their professional development are emphasized, including normalization of life crises, self-reflection, boundary-setting, and use of peer supervision and consultation.

  17. Studying Musical Savants: A Commentary on Grundy and Ockelford

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bénédicte Poulin-Charronnat

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of the "zygonic" theory of musical understanding (Ockelford, 2006, Grundy and Ockelford (2014 investigated musical expectations evoked during the course of hearing a piece for the first time in a prodigious musical savant (Derek Paravicini. Overall, the results provided by Derek support the principles of the zygonic theory, especially that the higher the implication factor of a note, the more likely Derek would predict its occurrence. In my commentary, I first raise the question of the use of such individuals as musical savants to generalize findings to the general population, and second I address the issue of the task and the stimuli used.

  18. A Commentary on Perceived Need from Indian Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankur Joshi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The current Indian health –care scenario is overwhelmed not only with burden of diseases but also with quality of care and expenditures.  The structure of this paper is interwoven around a storyline about a patient and narrations of the active actors involved in the journey of illness including patient himself. The narrations are followed by a commentary as an attempt to decipher the deeper meaning of narration from the population perspectives. The essential aim of this exercise is to establish the necessity of generalist care from a qualitative view-point in Indian context.

  19. The narcissism epidemic: commentary on modernity and narcissistic personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twenge, Jean M; Miller, Joshua D; Campbell, W Keith

    2014-04-01

    Comments on the original article by Paris (see record 2012-18549-001) regarding narcissistic personality disorder. The current authors agree with Paris that modern life is making people more narcissistic. In fact, the authors demonstrate with this commentary, the case for increasing narcissism is even stronger than presented in his article. An explain that expressing individualism and lack of social support play key roles in this increase. However, the current authors question the idea that therapy is building narcissism. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved

  20. Reduções enantiosseletivas de cetonas utilizando-se fermento de pão Enantioselective reductions of ketones using baker's yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Augusto R. Rodrigues

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Baker's yeast has been successful employed to reduce carbonyl compounds carrying appropriated substituents at distances under the electronic influence of the keto group. High yields and enantiomeric excess (ee were obtained with 1,2-alkanedione, 1,2-alkanedione (2-O-methyloxime and 1,3-alkanedione. Potential chiral building blocks were obtained and applied for stereoselective synthesis of valuable compounds. Evidence for a free radical chain process was obtained with baker's yeast reduction of a-iodoacetophenone using radical inhibitors.

  1. Morfoanatomia, tricomas glandulares e fitoquímica de Lomatozona artemisiifolia Baker (ASTERACEAE - EUPATORIEAE) - uma planta endêmica do Cerrado de Goiás

    OpenAIRE

    Trindade, Luma Mota Palmeira

    2013-01-01

    Morfoanatomia, tricomas glandulares e fitoquímica de Lomatozona artemisiifolia Baker (Asteraceae - Eupatorieae) – Uma planta endêmica do cerrado de Goiás - A família Asteraceae é amplamente distribuída, possuindo 24.000 espécies e 1.600 a 1700 gêneros, constituindo uma das maiores famílias de fanerógamas. No Cerrado, dentre as fanerógamas, é a segunda maior família em quantidade de espécies. Dentre as inúmeras espécies de Asteraceae está presente Lomatozona artemisiifolia Baker, pertence à tr...

  2. Commentary on: Muscle dysmorphia: could it be classified as an addiction to body image?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Jon E

    2015-03-01

    This commentary addresses a recent article on the characterization of muscle dysmorphia as an addiction. The commentary examines the larger issue of the possible relationship of compulsions to addictions. It also questions whether understanding the heterogeneity within disorders may be a useful tactic to develop more targeted treatment approaches.

  3. Teaching Human Rights in Turkey: Commentaries on a Single Lesson from Multiple Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesten, Alper; Schur, Joan Brodsky; Gürsoy, Kudret

    2014-01-01

    This group of commentaries on teaching human rights in Turkey includes: (1) Reflection on Turkish Human Rights Lesson from Turkey (Alper Kesten)--A lesson on human rights in Turkey is analyzed for its representativity and methodology within the Turkish teaching culture from the viewpoint of a Turkish researcher; (2) Commentary on a Turkish Lesson…

  4. The Effect of Extraversion and Presentation Order on Learning from Picture-Commentary Sequences by Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riding, R. J.; Wicks, B. J.

    1978-01-01

    Groups of extrovert, ambivert, and introvert children, aged 8, saw pictures with a taped commentary about each. On an immediate recall test, extroverts recalled most if given the commentary before the picture, introverts did best when the picture came first, and ambiverts performed similarly in both conditions. (Author/SJL)

  5. The Commentary on Aristotle's De Anima by Alphonsus Vargas Toletanus, OESA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, P.J.J.M.; Bercken, J.H.L. van den

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the commentary on Aristotle’s De anima by Alphonsus Vargas Toletanus, OESA († 1366). The commentary has been preserved in one manuscript, Cremona, Biblioteca Statale, Ms. 113 (Nl-12193), written in Bologna in 1475, and in at least five editions printed between 1477 and 1609.

  6. Rejoinder to Rogosa's Commentary on "A Manifesto on Psychology as Idiographic Science"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molenaar, Peter C. M.

    2005-01-01

    This article presents a rejoinder to Rogosa's (2004) commentary on the author's (Molenaar, 2004) focus article titled, "A Manifesto on Psychology as Idiographic Science." The expert commentary of Rogosa brings up some central issues that require careful evaluation. The basic message of the author's focus article was straightforward: In general,…

  7. Effects of Network Commentary on Viewers' Reactions to 1984 Reagan Campaign Film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhard, Mike; Loving, Jim

    A study was conducted to examine the effects of NBC television's critical commentary on a 12-minute 1984 Reagan campaign film on audience perceptions of gratifications received from the film. It was predicted that exposure to the critical NBC commentary would result in lower evaluations of the film's helpfulness (gratifications received), and that…

  8. 11 CFR 100.73 - News story, commentary, or editorial by the media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false News story, commentary, or editorial by the media. 100.73 Section 100.73 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION GENERAL SCOPE AND DEFINITIONS (2 U.S.C. 431) Exceptions to Contributions § 100.73 News story, commentary, or editorial by the media...

  9. 11 CFR 100.132 - News story, commentary, or editorial by the media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... media. Any cost incurred in covering or carrying a news story, commentary, or editorial by any... 11 Federal Elections 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false News story, commentary, or editorial by the media. 100.132 Section 100.132 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION GENERAL SCOPE AND...

  10. Let Lakatos Be! A Commentary on "Would the Real Lakatos Please Stand Up"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriraman, Bharath

    2008-01-01

    In this commentary, some remarks are offered on David Pimm, Mary Beisiegel, and Irene Meglis' article "Would the Real Lakatos Please Stand up." The commentary focuses on relatively recent developments in the philosophy of mathematics based on the work of Lakatos; on theory development in mathematics education; and offers critique on whether…

  11. Improvement of fermentation ability under baking-associated stress conditions by altering the POG1 gene expression in baker's yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasano, Yu; Haitani, Yutaka; Hashida, Keisuke; Oshiro, Satoshi; Shima, Jun; Takagi, Hiroshi

    2013-08-01

    During the bread-making process, yeast cells are exposed to many types of baking-associated stress. There is thus a demand within the baking industry for yeast strains with high fermentation abilities under these stress conditions. The POG1 gene, encoding a putative transcription factor involved in cell cycle regulation, is a multicopy suppressor of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae E3 ubiquitin ligase Rsp5 mutant. The pog1 mutant is sensitive to various stresses. Our results suggested that the POG1 gene is involved in stress tolerance in yeast cells. In this study, we showed that overexpression of the POG1 gene in baker's yeast conferred increased fermentation ability in high-sucrose-containing dough, which is used for sweet dough baking. Furthermore, deletion of the POG1 gene drastically increased the fermentation ability in bread dough after freeze-thaw stress, which would be a useful characteristic for frozen dough baking. Thus, the engineering of yeast strains to control the POG1 gene expression level would be a novel method for molecular breeding of baker's yeast. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Three-dimensional geophysical mapping of shallow water saturated altered rocks at Mount Baker, Washington: Implications for slope stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Carol A.; Deszcz-Pan, Maryla; Ball, Jessica L.; Bloss, Benjamin J.; Minsley, Burke J.

    2018-05-01

    Water-saturated hydrothermal alteration reduces the strength of volcanic edifices, increasing the potential for catastrophic sector collapses that can lead to far traveled and destructive debris flows. Intense hydrothermal alteration significantly lowers the resistivity and magnetization of volcanic rock and therefore hydrothermally altered rocks can be identified with helicopter electromagnetic and magnetic measurements. Geophysical models constrained by rock properties and geologic mapping show that intensely altered rock is restricted to two small (500 m diameter), >150 m thick regions around Sherman Crater and Dorr Fumarole Field at Mount Baker, Washington. This distribution of alteration contrasts with much thicker and widespread alteration encompassing the summits of Mounts Adams and Rainier prior to the 5600 year old Osceola collapse, which is most likely due to extreme erosion and the limited duration of summit magmatism at Mount Baker. In addition, the models suggest that the upper 300 m of rock contains water which could help to lubricate potential debris flows. Slope stability modeling incorporating the geophysically modeled distribution of alteration and water indicates that the most likely and largest ( 0.1 km3) collapses are from the east side of Sherman Crater. Alteration at Dorr Fumarole Field raises the collapse hazard there, but not significantly because of its lower slope angles. Geochemistry and analogs from other volcanoes suggest a model for the edifice hydrothermal system.

  13. Three-dimensional geophysical mapping of shallow water saturated altered rocks at Mount Baker, Washington: Implications for slope stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Carol A.; Deszcz-Pan, Maria; Ball, Jessica L.; Bloss, Benjamin J.; Minsley, Burke J.

    2018-01-01

    Water-saturated hydrothermal alteration reduces the strength of volcanic edifices, increasing the potential for catastrophic sector collapses that can lead to far traveled and destructive debris flows. Intense hydrothermal alteration significantly lowers the resistivity and magnetization of volcanic rock and therefore hydrothermally altered rocks can be identified with helicopter electromagnetic and magnetic measurements. Geophysical models constrained by rock properties and geologic mapping show that intensely altered rock is restricted to two small (500 m diameter), >150 m thick regions around Sherman Crater and Dorr Fumarole Field at Mount Baker, Washington. This distribution of alteration contrasts with much thicker and widespread alteration encompassing the summits of Mounts Adams and Rainier prior to the 5600 year old Osceola collapse, which is most likely due to extreme erosion and the limited duration of summit magmatism at Mount Baker. In addition, the models suggest that the upper ~300 m of rock contains water which could help to lubricate potential debris flows. Slope stability modeling incorporating the geophysically modeled distribution of alteration and water indicates that the most likely and largest (~0.1 km3) collapses are from the east side of Sherman Crater. Alteration at Dorr Fumarole Field raises the collapse hazard there, but not significantly because of its lower slope angles. Geochemistry and analogs from other volcanoes suggest a model for the edifice hydrothermal system.

  14. Commentary Variations: Level of Verbalization, Personal Reference, and Phase Relations in Instructional Films on Perceptual-Motor Tasks. Technical Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckerman, John V.

    In an experiment to determine the most efficient design for the commentary of an instructional film, special consideration was given to three variables concerned with the construction of commentaries: the level of verbalization (the amount of talk), the personal reference of the narrator, and the phase relationship between the commentary and the…

  15. Sports metaphors in Polish written commentaries on politics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarosław Wiliński

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper seeks to investigate what sports metaphors are used in Polish written commentaries on politics and what special purpose they serve. In particular, the paper examines structural metaphors that come from the lexicon of popular sports, such as boxing, racing, track and field athletics, sailing, etc. The language data, derived from English Internet websites, has been grouped and discussed according to source domains. Applying George Lakoff and Mark Johnson’s approach to metaphor, the paper attempts to determine both the kind of source domains from which common metaphors are drawn and to what degree structural metaphors are used. The data suggests that many structural metaphors can be found in the language of politics. They are drawn from a wide variety of sports source domains, although the domains of boxing, racing, sailing, and soccer are of particular prominence. It seems that the primary function of structural metaphors in written commentaries is to facilitate the interpretation of facts in a way that is enormously appealing to the reader.

  16. Gauge theories of gravitation a reader with commentaries

    CERN Document Server

    Blagojevic, Milutin

    2013-01-01

    In the last five decades, the gauge approach to gravity has represented a research area of increasing importance for our understanding of the physics of fundamental interactions. A full clarification of the gauge dynamics of gravity is expected to be the last missing link to the hidden structure of a consistent unification of all the fundamental interactions, based on the gauge principle. The aim of the present reprint volume, with commentaries by Milutin Blagojevi & 263; and Friedrich W Hehl, is to introduce graduate and advanced undergraduate students of theoretical or mathematical physics, or any other interested researcher, to the field of classical gauge theories of gravity. This is not just an ordinary reprint volume; it is a guide to the literature on gauge theories of gravity. The reader is encouraged first to study the introductory commentaries and to become familiar with the basic content of the reprints and related ideas, then he/she can choose to read a specific reprint or reprints, and after ...

  17. [Respiratory allergies among bakers and pastry cooks: epidemiologic survey done in 1991 by the occupational physicians of the Loire-Atlantique].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anton, M; Bataille, A; Mollat, F; Bobe, M; Bonneau, C; Caramaniam, M N; Géraut, C; Dupas, D

    1995-01-01

    The aim was to study the prevalence of respiratory allergy (rhinitis and asthma) in a population of bakers and pastrycooks. In 1991, 485 bakers and pastry cooks were examined by 27 work-physicians of Loire-Atlantic. The investigation was composed of a standardised questionnaire (signs of respiratory function, atopic history, smoking of tobacco ...), a clinical examination, and tests of respiratory function. An allergy assessment was made of all subjects with symptoms. 14.4% of subjects had rhinitis and 6.4% asthma. Development of these pathologies was clearly job-related for 2/3 of those with rhinitis and more than half of the asthmatics (55%). Occupational rhinitis and asthma were significantly more frequent in bakers than in pastrycooks and were linked to atopic history. Occupational asthma was associated with length of exposure to flour and with occupational rhinitis. In conclusion, these findings are comparable with or a little less than those that have been reported in occupational literature. They under-estimate the importance of the problem because of the occupational selection effect that is associated with these pathologies. Rhinitis and asthma are 1.5 to 3 time more common in bakers than in pastrycooks.

  18. In vivo evaluation of antipyretic effects of homoeopathic ultrahigh dilutions of Typhoidinum on baker's yeast-induced fever in comparison with Paracetamol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Ahmad

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Homoeopathy is a widely used, controversial alternative system of medicine. It is assumed that homoeopathic medicines are slower in action and does not work in acute conditions such as ‘fever’. The study aims to estimate the effectiveness of some homoeopathic remedies in fever and to compare their effects with Paracetamol. Materials and Methods: Baker's yeast fever model of rabbits was used in the study. Rabbits were divided into four different groups (n = 6. Rectal temperature was measured before and after fever induction hourly. After fever induction, medicines were administered orally. Paracetamol and Typhoidinum in 200C and 1M potencies were given orally. ANOVA followed by post hoc test was used for statistical analysis of results. The results were considered statistically significant at P ≤ 0.05. Results: Fever was induced in all the rabbits after 4 h of baker's yeast administration. The results of the study revealed the significant effectiveness of Typhoidinum in 200C and 1M potencies in baker's yeast-induced fever (P = 0.05. Typhoidinum in both potencies showed less significant results as compared to Paracetamol. However, all the medicines’ effects were significant compared to the negative control. Conclusion: Typhoidinum 200C and 1M worked against baker's yeast-induced fever. However, the results were slower and less significant than Paracetamol that might be due to lack of similarity of remedy picture and disease picture.

  19. A Reassessment of George Pierce Baker's "The Principles of Argumentation": Minimizing the Use of Formal Logic in Favor of Practical Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordelon, Suzanne

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author demonstrated how recent histories relied primarily on previous accounts and one textbook to characterize George Pierce Baker's work. This narrow assessment of "The Principles of Argumentation" limits one's understanding of his contribution to argumentation theory and pedagogy. Similarly, one has seen the need for care…

  20. Cryptanalysis and improvement of an optical image encryption scheme using a chaotic Baker map and double random phase encoding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Jun-Xin; Fu, Chong; Zhu, Zhi-Liang; Zhang, Li-Bo; Zhang, Yushu

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we evaluate the security of an enhanced double random phase encoding (DRPE) image encryption scheme (2013 J. Lightwave Technol. 31 2533). The original system employs a chaotic Baker map prior to DRPE to provide more protection to the plain image and hence promote the security level of DRPE, as claimed. However, cryptanalysis shows that this scheme is vulnerable to a chosen-plaintext attack, and the ciphertext can be precisely recovered. The corresponding improvement is subsequently reported upon the basic premise that no extra equipment or computational complexity is required. The simulation results and security analyses prove its effectiveness and security. The proposed achievements are suitable for all cryptosystems under permutation and, following that, the DRPE architecture, and we hope that our work can motivate the further research on optical image encryption. (paper)

  1. Cryptanalysis and improvement of an optical image encryption scheme using a chaotic Baker map and double random phase encoding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun-Xin; Zhu, Zhi-Liang; Fu, Chong; Zhang, Li-Bo; Zhang, Yushu

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we evaluate the security of an enhanced double random phase encoding (DRPE) image encryption scheme (2013 J. Lightwave Technol. 31 2533). The original system employs a chaotic Baker map prior to DRPE to provide more protection to the plain image and hence promote the security level of DRPE, as claimed. However, cryptanalysis shows that this scheme is vulnerable to a chosen-plaintext attack, and the ciphertext can be precisely recovered. The corresponding improvement is subsequently reported upon the basic premise that no extra equipment or computational complexity is required. The simulation results and security analyses prove its effectiveness and security. The proposed achievements are suitable for all cryptosystems under permutation and, following that, the DRPE architecture, and we hope that our work can motivate the further research on optical image encryption.

  2. Heat recovery and energy saving using a Baker Perkins Simplex 2000 bread baking oven. A demonstration at Mothers Pride Bakery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-02-01

    A report is given of a new bread oven, a Baker Perkins Simplex 2000, installed at British Bakeries' Watnall plant under the Energy Efficiency Demonstration Scheme. The energy saving features include 1) a new design of heating system, 2) combustion air pre-heated with burner flue gases, 3) heat recovery from oven chamber to heat hot water and 4) an in-line lidding system. Results are presented for an independent monitoring of both the new oven and one of a conventional design to compare energy consumption and performance. It is shown that the simplex 2000 reduced energy costs at the Watnall plant by Pound 45,900/year. Additional benefits of the new oven include reduced production labour requirements and an increase in productivity of 100% compared with previous models. (UK).

  3. Determinação de metais em água e folha de AECHMEA BLANCHETIANA (BAKER L.B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaline R. Ribeiro

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to determine the concentrations of calcium, iron, manganese, zinc, potassium and sodium in the water and leaves of Aechmea blanchetiana (Baker L.B species collected between the cities of Ilhéus and Itacaré, Bahia, Brazil and verify if the metals found in the water can be absorbed by the leaves. Flame atomic absorption spectrometry (F AAS and flame photometry were used for the determination of metals. pH measurements, dissolved oxygen and water temperature were also made. The results obtained were used in an exploratory analysis. Principal component analysis (PCA showed clearly the distinct formation of two clusters and the correlation analysis indicated that the leaves of A. blanchetiana seem to absorb iron, calcium, manganese and zinc from the water tank.

  4. “Show Us Your God”: Marilla Baker Ingalls and the Power of Religious Objects in Nineteenth-Century Burma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Kaloyanides

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This essay examines the unusual evangelical work of Marilla Baker Ingalls, an American Baptist missionary to Burma from 1851–1902. By the time of her death in Burma at the age of 75, Ingalls was known as one of the most successful Baptist evangelists among Burmese Buddhists. To understand the extraordinary dynamic of Ingalls’ expanding Christian community, this essay focuses on two prominent objects at the Baptist mission: A life-sized dog statue that Ingalls kept chained at the edge of her property and a massive banyan tree covered with biblical illustrations and revered by locals as an abode of divine beings. This essay argues that these objects transformed Ingalls’ American Baptist Christianity into a kind of Burmese religion that revolved around revered objects. Through an examination of the particular shrine practices that pulled people into the Baptist mission, this essay reflects on the larger context of religious encounter, conflict, and representation in modernizing Burma.

  5. Body Talk: Body Image Commentary on Queerty.com.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Joseph; Grimm, Josh

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we conducted a content analysis of 243 photographic images of men published on the gay male-oriented blog Queerty.com. We also analyzed 435 user-generated comments from a randomly selected 1-year sample. Focusing on images' body types, we found that the range of body types featured on the blog was quite narrow-the vast majority of images had very low levels of body fat and very high levels of muscularity. Users' body image-related comments typically endorsed and celebrated images; critiques of images were comparatively rare. Perspectives from objectification theory and social comparison theory suggest that the images and commentary found on the blog likely reinforce unhealthy body image in gay male communities.

  6. Selected Works Of Hans A Bethe (With Commentary)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bethe, Hans A.

    1997-01-01

    Hans A Bethe received the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1967 for his work on the production of energy in stars. A living legend among the physics community, he helped to shape classical physics into quantum physics and increased the understanding of the atomic processes responsible for the properties of matter and of the forces governing the structures of atomic nuclei. This collection of papers by Prof Bethe dates from 1928, when he received his PhD, to now. It covers several areas and reflects the many contributions in research and discovery made by one of the most important and eminent physicists of all time. Special commentaries have been written by Prof Bethe to complement the selected papers

  7. Machine learning, medical diagnosis, and biomedical engineering research - commentary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Kenneth R; Koprowski, Robert; Skufca, Joseph D

    2014-07-05

    A large number of papers are appearing in the biomedical engineering literature that describe the use of machine learning techniques to develop classifiers for detection or diagnosis of disease. However, the usefulness of this approach in developing clinically validated diagnostic techniques so far has been limited and the methods are prone to overfitting and other problems which may not be immediately apparent to the investigators. This commentary is intended to help sensitize investigators as well as readers and reviewers of papers to some potential pitfalls in the development of classifiers, and suggests steps that researchers can take to help avoid these problems. Building classifiers should be viewed not simply as an add-on statistical analysis, but as part and parcel of the experimental process. Validation of classifiers for diagnostic applications should be considered as part of a much larger process of establishing the clinical validity of the diagnostic technique.

  8. Machine learning and medicine: book review and commentary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koprowski, Robert; Foster, Kenneth R

    2018-02-01

    This article is a review of the book "Master machine learning algorithms, discover how they work and implement them from scratch" (ISBN: not available, 37 USD, 163 pages) edited by Jason Brownlee published by the Author, edition, v1.10 http://MachineLearningMastery.com . An accompanying commentary discusses some of the issues that are involved with use of machine learning and data mining techniques to develop predictive models for diagnosis or prognosis of disease, and to call attention to additional requirements for developing diagnostic and prognostic algorithms that are generally useful in medicine. Appendix provides examples that illustrate potential problems with machine learning that are not addressed in the reviewed book.

  9. Commentary: An Asian Americanist Perspective on Child Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Richard M; Y J Kim, Adam; Zhou, Xiang

    2016-07-01

    In this commentary, we put forth an Asian Americanist perspective on child development that frames, expands upon, and at times challenges the contextual, conceptual, and methodological ideas put forward by Kiang et al., Mistry et al., and Yoshikawa et al. (this volume). This Asian Americanist perspective draws upon scholarship in Asian American Studies and critical race theory to bridge the historical, conceptual, and methodological contributions of the three articles. We also aim to challenge current and future generations of scholars studying Asian American child development to look at Asian American youth and families as autonomous, self-determining agents who are capable of challenging, resisting, and affecting change in a racialized society. © 2016 The Authors. Child Development © 2016 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

  10. Probing the interface theory of perception: Reply to commentaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Donald D; Singh, Manish; Prakash, Chetan

    2015-12-01

    We propose that selection favors nonveridical perceptions that are tuned to fitness. Current textbooks assert, to the contrary, that perception is useful because, in the normal case, it is veridical. Intuition, both lay and expert, clearly sides with the textbooks. We thus expected that some commentators would reject our proposal and provide counterarguments that could stimulate a productive debate. We are pleased that several commentators did indeed rise to the occasion and have argued against our proposal. We are also pleased that several others found our proposal worth exploring and have offered ways to test it, develop it, and link it more deeply to the history of ideas in the science and philosophy of perception. To both groups of commentators: thank you. Point and counterpoint, backed by data and theory, is the essence of science. We hope that the exchange recorded here will advance the scientific understanding of perception and its evolution. In what follows, we respond to the commentaries in alphabetical order.

  11. Commentary: Polycystic ovarian disease (PCOD): a misnomer, looking for a new name.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karoshi, Mahantesh; Okolo, S O

    2004-01-01

    This commentary highlights controversies associated with the nomenclature of polycystic ovarian disease (PCOD). It also deals with the authors' suggestion for the new name of polyfollicular ovarian disease (PFOD).

  12. Technology 2.0: A Commentary on Progress, Challenges, and Next Steps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Deborah J

    2017-11-01

    This commentary highlights the importance and promise of the innovative strategies described in the Child Maltreatment special issue on "Technology 2.0: A Focus on the Newest Technological Advances in Child Maltreatment Research." The commentary first highlights the collective advancements reflected in the articles in the special issue, with a primary focus on how the authors' work addresses a general challenge in services research that is perhaps nowhere more problematic than in the field of maltreatment. Next, the commentary extends the discussion of these articles to raise remaining gaps in our knowledge, theory, and methodology, which must be the focus of ongoing research if the true potential of technology as a service delivery vehicle is to be realized. Finally, the commentary concludes with a call for subsequent research which will be inspired by the articles in this special issue.

  13. LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT, READING COMPREHENSION AND IDIOM COMREHENSION TRILOGY: PEER COMMENTARY ON LEVORATO ET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huseyin UYSAL

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a peer commentary on Levorato, M. C., Nesi, B. & Cacciari, C. (2004. Reading comprehension and understanding idiomatic expressions: A developmental study. Brain and Language, 91(3, 303-314.

  14. Biological cycle of Tenuipalpus heveae Baker (Acari, Tenuipalpidae on leaflets of three rubber tree clones Ciclo de vida de Tenuipalpus heveae Baker (Acari, Tenuipalpidae em folíolos de três clones de seringueira

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinaldo José Fazzio Feres

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Life cycle of Tenuipalpus heveae Baker (Acari, Tenuipalpidae on leaflets from three rubber tree clones. The biological cycle of Tenuipalpus heveae Baker, 1945 (Tenuipalpidae, a potential rubber tree pest mite, was studied by the observation of individuals reared on leaflets of the clones GT 1, PB 235 and RRIM 600, in controlled environmental conditions. Three daily observations were done of 60 eggs on leaflets from each clone in order to verify the development of immature stages and the female oviposition. The fertility life table was constructed based in the collected data. Mites reared on PB 235 had faster rate of development, requiring less time in days, to double its population in number (TD, and had the highest values for egg production, female longevity, net reproductive rate (Ro, intrinsic rate of natural increase (r m and finite rate of increase (λ. Lower reproductive values and the longest time necessary to reach adult stage were recorded for the mites on GT 1. In all studied clones, the deutonymphal phase had the highest viability, while the larval phase had the lowest, highlighted by the survivorship curve that indicated high mortality during this life stage. The clone PB 235 allowed the most suitable conditions for the development of T. heveae, followed by RRIM 600, while GT 1 was the less suitable substratum to rear this mite species.O ciclo de vida de Tenuipalpus heveae Baker, 1945 (Tenuipalpidae, um potencial ácaro-praga da seringueira, foi estudado a partir de indivíduos criados sobre folíolos destacados dos clones GT 1, PB 235 e RRIM 600, em condições controladas. Três observações diárias foram realizadas, acompanhando-se o desenvolvimento de 60 ovos e de sua prole em folíolos de cada um dos clones, para verificação da oviposição das fêmeas e dos estágios de desenvolvimento. A partir dos dados obtidos, foi elaborada uma tabela de vida de fertilidade. Os ácaros criados sobre folíolos de PB 235 apresentaram r

  15. 28 June 2012 - Members of the European Brain Council led by President Mary Baker visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 5 with Technology Department Group Leader L. Bottura and CMS experimental area with Run Coordinator M. Chamizo-Llatas.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2012-01-01

    28 June 2012 - Members of the European Brain Council led by President Mary Baker visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 5 with Technology Department Group Leader L. Bottura and CMS experimental area with Run Coordinator M. Chamizo-Llatas.

  16. Baker's yeast beta glucan supplementation increases salivary IgA and decreases cold/flu symptomatic days after intense exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarlin, Brian K; Carpenter, Katie C; Davidson, Tiffany; McFarlin, Meredith A

    2013-09-01

    Strenuous exercise, such as running a marathon, is known to suppress mucosal immunity for up to 24 hr, which can increase the risk of developing an upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) and reduced performance capacity (Allgrove JE, Geneen L, Latif S, Gleeson M. Influence of a fed or fasted state on the s-IgA response to prolonged cycling in active men and women. Int J Sport Nutr Exerc Metab. 2009;19(3):209-221; Barrett B, Locken K, Maberry R, Schwamman J, Brown R, Bobula J, Stauffacher EA. The Wisconsin Upper Respiratory Symptom Survey (WURSS): a new research instrument for assessing the common cold. J Fam Pract. 2002;51(3):265; Carpenter KC, Breslin WL, Davidson T, Adams A, McFarlin BK. Baker's yeast beta glucan supplementation increases monocytes and cytokines post-exercise: implications for infection risk? Br J Nutr. 2012;1-9). While many dietary interventions have been used to combat postexercise immune suppression, most have been ineffective. The key purpose of this study was to determine if baker's yeast β-glucan (BG) could positively affect the immune system of individuals undergoing intense exercise stress using two experiments. In the first (E1; N = 182 men and women), BG was compared to placebo supplementation for the incidence of URTI symptoms for 28 days postmarathon. In the second (E2; N = 60 men and women) changes in salivary immunoglobulin A (IgA) were evaluated after 50-min of strenuous cycling when participants had been supplemented for 10 days with either BG (250 mg/day) or placebo (rice flour). For E1, subjects reported URTI symptoms using a daily health log. For E2, saliva was collected prior to, immediately, and 2-hr postexercise using a salivette. Data for E1 and E2 were analyzed using separate analyses of variance (ANOVAs) with repeated measures (p flu symptom days postmarathon compared to placebo (p = .026). In E2, BG was associated with a 32% increase in salivary IgA (p = .048) at 2 hr after exercise compared to placebo. In summary

  17. Estudios sobre semilla de Hypochaeris variegata L. (Baker: aceite seminal y harina residual de extracción

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    Nolasco, S. M.

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available Seeds from Hypochaeris variegata L. (Baker harvested at Olavarría (Buenos Aires, Argentine were defatted with hexane and the raw oil obtained with a yield of 24,7% dry basis. The crude oil was examined in their physicochemical characteristics had refractive index of 1,4637 (at 25ºC, iodine value of 125,2, saponification index of 188,4, unsaponifiable matter of 8,5 % and free fatty acid content of 9,7 (mg KOH/g. Gas chromatographic analysis of the oil revealed high levels of linoleic acid (66,2%, appreciable amount of linolenic and erucic acids. The residual seed meal contained 35,49% of crude protein and 35,1% of crude fiber. Total and phytic acid phosphorous, calcium, ash, sugar and polisaccharides (non presence of starch contents are reported.Semillas de Hypochaeris variegata L. (Baker cosechadas en Olavarría (prov. de Buenos Aires, Argentina se extrajeron con hexano (soxhlet obteniéndose el aceite crudo con un rendimiento del 24,7 % (b.s. y la harina residual de extracción. El aceite crudo se examinó en sus características fisicoquímicas (Indice de refracción: 1.4637 (a 25ºC, Indice de iodo: 125,2, Indice de saponificación: 188,4, insaponificable: 8,5%, Indice de acidez: 9,7 (mgKOH/g y composición acídica. El análisis por cromatografía gaseosa de los ésteres metílicos revela un alto porcentaje de ácido linoleico (66,2%, cantidades apreciables de ácido linolénico y erúcico. La harina residual de extracción presentó un 35,49% b.s. de proteína cruda y 35,1% b.s. de fibra cruda. Se informan valores de fósforo total y de ácido fítico, cenizas, calcio e hidratos de carbono.

  18. Utilization of baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae for the production of yeast extract: effects of different enzymatic treatments on solid, protein and carbohydrate recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TATJANA VUKASINOVIC MILIC

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Yeast extract (YE was produced from commercial pressed baker's yeast (active and inactivated using two enzymes: papain and lyticase. The effects of enzyme concentration and hydrolysis time on the recovery of solid, protein and carbohydrate were investigated. Autolysis, as a basic method for cell lysis was also used and the results compared. The optimal extraction conditions were investigated. The optimal concentrations of papain and lyticase were found to be 2.5 % and 0.025 %, respectively.

  19. The Baker system for nuclear access authorization screening: a psychologically developed system for access screening of vendor and owner applicants at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, E.G.; Crouter, F.L.

    1985-01-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive screening program for unescorted access which has proven to be highly effective in determining the intergrity, trustworthiness, socialibility, behaviors and tendencies of an employee applicant--past, present and future. This procedure, designed specifically for the nuclear industry, can be used with owner or vendor applicants, and meets or exceeds all of the NRC's requirements. The Baker system has been used for nuclear selection since 1979

  20. Commentary: Diversity 3.0: a necessary systems upgrade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nivet, Marc A

    2011-12-01

    This is a defining moment for health and health care in the United States, and medical schools and teaching hospitals have a critical role to play. The combined forces of health care reform, demographic shifts, continued economic woes, and the projected worsening of physician shortages portend major challenges for the health care enterprise in the near future. In this commentary, the author employs a diversity framework implemented by IBM and argues that this framework should be adapted to an academic medicine setting to meet the challenges to the health care enterprise. Using IBM's diversity framework, the author explores three distinct phases in the evolution of diversity thinking within the academic medicine community. The first phase included isolated efforts aimed at removing social and legal barriers to access and equality, with institutional excellence and diversity as competing ends. The second phase kept diversity on the periphery but raised awareness about how increasing diversity benefits everyone, allowing excellence and diversity to exist as parallel ends. In the third phase, which is emerging today and reflects a growing understanding of diversity's broader relevance to institutions and systems, diversity and inclusion are integrated into the core workings of the institution and framed as integral for achieving excellence. The Association of American Medical Colleges, a leading voice and advocate for increased student and faculty diversity, is set to play a more active role in building the capacity of the nation's medical schools and teaching hospitals to move diversity from a periphery to a core strategy.

  1. Commentary: research on the mechanisms of the occupational lung diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rom, W.N.

    1984-01-01

    In this commentary, the pathogenesis of alveolitis is examined and elucidated by animal models. The use of broncho alveolar lavage (BAL) and Ga-67 citrate whole-body scanning as a measure of the activity of alveolar inflammation in workers is discussed. Gallium scan indices have been reported to be elevated in asbestosis, silicosis, and coal workers' pneumoconiosis; diseases which may now be evaluated at earlier, potentially reversible stages. Research in emphysema and other lung diseases associated with α 1 antitrypsin deficiency may help explain why coal miners develop focal emphysema. Furthermore, investigation of genetic factors may reveal why workers with similar exposures have a different susceptibility for the development of pneumoconiosis or lung cancer. Occupational asthma may not respond to removal of the worker from exposure because reactive airways may be a predisposing factor for chronic ashthma and chronic obstructive lung disease. A continuing challenge will be disease risk in new industries such as electronics and alternate energy industries and new diseases in worker groups not previously studied, such as the variety of pneumoconioses among dental laboratory technicians who work with exotic metal alloys. 52 references

  2. Advising the public about radiation emergences. NCRP Commentary No. 10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    Technologies that use or produce radiation or radioactive materials, like many other complex technologies, have the inherent potential to cause emergency situations in which public safety may be jeopardized. Professionals engaged with such technologies are trained to minimize risk and potential harm, even in emergencies, but there can be no question that emergencies are public events and that, as such, the public must be informed. The degree of the public's involvement in an emergency will, of course, depend on the type and scale of the event but the need for information is present in all cases. This Commentary reviews salient features involved in the provision of information to the public relating to radiation emergencies. Section 2 outlines sources of information available to the public for a broad understanding of technology and science in general, and radiation matters in particular. Section 3 addresses the vital matter of credibility. In Section 4, matters of perception and their influence on the usability of information are assessed. Section 5 directs attention to the role of information sources during the emergency itself. Section 6 presents a survey of the types of information that can prove helpful to the public in connection with a radiation emergency and exhibits a proposed index for helping people comprehend the magnitude of radiation levels and their impacts. Means for improving the dissemination of information and the public's capacity to use it are outlined in Section 7. Finally, appendices provide information about emergency response organizations and additional information about the proposed radiation index

  3. Cities and Health: A Response to the Recent Commentaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael K. Gusmano

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available We are grateful to our many colleagues who took the time to respond to our analysis of Shanghai’s declining “avoidable mortality.”1 The range of their perspectives across 5 recent commentaries reassures us that the topic is worthy of sustained study. Indeed, the presumption behind our comparative research on healthcare in world cities 2 is that the city is a strategic unit of analysis for understanding the health sector and that world cities share a host of important characteristics. Contrary to Cheng’s 3 comment that we compared“disparate cities whose only common characteristic is that they are of mega-size,” we have relied on a “most similar systems” approach to comparative analysis.4 World cities are characterized by high population size and density, similar commuting patterns between their outer rings and urban cores, and similar functions in the realms of international finance, culture, media, and provision of tertiary and quaternary medical care. Likewise, they exhibit flagrant socioeconomic inequalities, share many of the same strengths and weaknesses, but exist within nations with strikingly different health policies.

  4. Psychotherapy integration in the treatment of personality disorders: a commentary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Dana L; Beutler, Larry E; Castonguay, Louis G

    2012-02-01

    Whereas research on the treatment of personality disorders over the past several decades has focused primarily on comparing the efficacy of various treatment packages associated with different theoretical models, there is increasing evidence that the field would benefit from focusing more attention on developing integrative treatments that are both informed by research and capable of scientific verification. The articles assembled for this special section each propose a different approach to integrative treatment for personality disorders. In this commentary, we outline a number of reasons for making such a shift to more integrative treatments, consider some of the potential challenges to integration, and discuss the different approaches to integration illustrated in these articles. We highlight some of the difficult tradeoffs that must be made in developing an integrative approach and discuss similarities and differences in the response to such challenges by the contributors to this special section. Finally, we point to several areas for future research that we believe will contribute to the development of increasingly effective treatments for individuals with personality disorders.

  5. Commentary: You're Not Studying, You're Just...

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Purushotma

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available As often as language teachers lecture about the importance of continual practice to adolescent learners, the dullness of homework exercises designed primarily to be educational has difficulty competing with popular media designed solely to be entertaining. Recently, numerous attempts have been made to develop "edutainment" titles that seek to merge educational goals with entertainment content; oftentimes, however, they fail to achieve either goal and fall instead into niche markets. Rather than seeing entertainment-focused media forms as adversarial to educational content, educators should instead embrace them. This commentary examines how content originally designed for entertainment purposes can be modified to provide natural and context rich language learning environments, without sacrificing its entertainment value. First, I examine a modification to the number one selling video game The Simsthat intelligently combines game data from the English edition with data from editions of other languages to form a bilingual gaming environment. This exposes learners to abundant L2 vocabulary, yet still provides enough L1 support not to detract from the game. This principle is then extended to other applications such as music videos, typing tutors, and voice-navigated games. Finally, areas of otherwise wasted time are identified, such as waiting for Web pages to load or walking to class, with suggestions of how technology can facilitate language learning during these times.

  6. Mozart Effect in Musical Fit? A Commentary on Yeoh & North

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    Emery Schubert

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Musical fit, the congruence between music and product leading to improved response, is presented as an explanation of differences in recall of food items from two cultures. Musical fit predicts that, in this case, more Indian food items would be recalled when Indian music was playing, and more Malay food items would be recalled when Malay music was played. The underlining premise of this prediction is priming (the music primes memories of associated food items, facilitating recall. The testing was performed using three ethnic groups of participants, Indian, Malay, and Chinese. The priming effects were only identified among the Chinese group. A reanalysis of the data presented here indicates that the overall recall of food items is best facilitated by Indian music, regardless of whether the food item is Indian or Malay, and further, each ethnicity reported more items in the Indian music condition. The Mozart effect was also based on the premise of priming activation and was later debunked in favor of an arousal-mood hypothesis. This commentary discusses whether arousal-mood, a more generalized activation leading to improved performance than priming, might better explain the results. While priming and congruence more plausibly explains musical fit than the Mozart effect, the possibility of testing other hypotheses are considered worthwhile.

  7. Invited commentary: (Mass) Imprisonment and (Inequities in) Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildeman, Christopher

    2011-03-01

    The US imprisonment rate has increased dramatically since the mid-1970s, precipitating tremendous interest in the consequences of having ever been imprisoned for the marginal men for whom contact with prisons and jails has become commonplace. The article by Spaulding et al. in this issue of the Journal (Am J Epidemiol. 2011;173(5):479-487) makes a substantial contribution to research in this area by demonstrating for the first time that the small short-term benefits of imprisonment with regard to mortality risk are far outweighed by the much larger long-term mortality costs of having ever been imprisoned. Yet it remains unclear whether contact with the penal system causes the associations therein. In this commentary, the author addresses some of the obstacles to causal inference that exist in this research area and highlights one way to overcome them. He then suggests that future research might focus on 1) the consequences of mass imprisonment for health inequities among adult men and 2) the spillover effects of mass imprisonment for persons who are also affected by the penal system-the families, friends, and communities prisoners leave behind.

  8. Closed form of the Baker-Campbell-Hausdorff formula for the generators of semisimple complex Lie algebras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matone, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Recently it has been introduced an algorithm for the Baker-Campbell-Hausdorff (BCH) formula, which extends the Van-Brunt and Visser recent results, leading to new closed forms of BCH formula. More recently, it has been shown that there are 13 types of such commutator algebras. We show, by providing the explicit solutions, that these include the generators of the semisimple complex Lie algebras. More precisely, for any pair, X, Y of the Cartan-Weyl basis, we find W, linear combination of X, Y, such that exp(X) exp(Y) = exp(W). The derivation of such closed forms follows, in part, by using the above mentioned recent results. The complete derivation is provided by considering the structure of the root system. Furthermore, if X, Y, and Z are three generators of the Cartan-Weyl basis, we find, for a wide class of cases, W, a linear combination of X, Y and Z, such that exp(X) exp(Y) exp(Z) = exp(W). It turns out that the relevant commutator algebras are type 1c-i, type 4 and type 5. A key result concerns an iterative application of the algorithm leading to relevant extensions of the cases admitting closed forms of the BCH formula. Here we provide the main steps of such an iteration that will be developed in a forthcoming paper. (orig.)

  9. Identificación de fructooligosacáridos e inulinas en residuos de hojas de fique - Furcraea macrophylla Baker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Sofia Guevara Apraez

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Colombia es un importante productor de cabuya, fibra natural extraída de fique (Furcraea macrophylla Baker. La explotación de esta planta se caracteriza por productos y procesos tradicionales, poco tecnificados, de bajo valor agregado y con un aprovechamiento limitado de la planta de fique, lo que se traduce en baja rentabilidad. No obstante, en los residuos de este proceso agroindustrial se encuentran muchas sustancias de interés, aun sin explorar, entre ellas los carbohidratos, específicamente los fructanos, como la inulina y los fructooligosacaridos (FOS que son polímeros de fructosa considerados fibra dietaría y que por sus características se clasifican como prebióticos. En esta investigación se evidenció la presencia de FOS e inulinas en los residuos obtenidos durante el proceso de desfibrado de las hojas de fique a través de técnicas enzimáticas y espectro-fotométricas. Debido a las amplias aplicaciones en el sector alimentario se recomienda su cuantificación, extracción y caracterización con el fin de proporcionar valor agregado a través de la explotación de estos compuestos.

  10. Closed form of the Baker-Campbell-Hausdorff formula for the generators of semisimple complex Lie algebras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matone, Marco [Universita di Padova, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia ' ' G. Galilei' ' , Padua (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Padova, Padua (Italy)

    2016-11-15

    Recently it has been introduced an algorithm for the Baker-Campbell-Hausdorff (BCH) formula, which extends the Van-Brunt and Visser recent results, leading to new closed forms of BCH formula. More recently, it has been shown that there are 13 types of such commutator algebras. We show, by providing the explicit solutions, that these include the generators of the semisimple complex Lie algebras. More precisely, for any pair, X, Y of the Cartan-Weyl basis, we find W, linear combination of X, Y, such that exp(X) exp(Y) = exp(W). The derivation of such closed forms follows, in part, by using the above mentioned recent results. The complete derivation is provided by considering the structure of the root system. Furthermore, if X, Y, and Z are three generators of the Cartan-Weyl basis, we find, for a wide class of cases, W, a linear combination of X, Y and Z, such that exp(X) exp(Y) exp(Z) = exp(W). It turns out that the relevant commutator algebras are type 1c-i, type 4 and type 5. A key result concerns an iterative application of the algorithm leading to relevant extensions of the cases admitting closed forms of the BCH formula. Here we provide the main steps of such an iteration that will be developed in a forthcoming paper. (orig.)

  11. A CONTRASTIVE RHETORICAL ANALYSIS OF PHILIPPINE AND SRI LANKAN ENGLISH NEWS COMMENTARIES

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    Romualdo Atibagos Mabuan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Newspaper commentaries constitute a part of media discourse, which is a significant area of inquiry in intercultural rhetoric analysis. Through conducting a contrastive textual analysis of newspaper commentaries culled from the English newspapers in the Philippines and Sri Lanka, this paper explored the notions of genre and micro-genre on the 2015 papal visit in the two countries. To set a tertium comparationisin examining the genre-newspaper commentaries on the papal visit, the timeframe was set during the two-week duration of the visit. To investigate the micro-genres employed by the writers, two sets of 15 newspaper commentaries on the visit respectively in the Philippines and Sri Lanka were selected and analyzed. Findings revealed that both Filipino and Sinhalese writers in English newspaper commentaries tended to employ the micro-genre of “media explanatory exposition” more often than other micro-genres, and in terms of rhetorical structures, both of these writers tended to show variation, dynamism, and individuality. Implications for ESL (English as a second language and EFL (English as a foreign language teaching are provided in the light of these findings.

  12. The Masoretic Notes in Three Commentaries Attributed to Rashi

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    Himmelfarb, Lea

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Using the Mikra ̓ot Gedolot ‘Haketer’ version of Rashi’s commentary on three Biblical passages (Deuteronomy 33:23, Isaiah 14:11 and Ezekiel 17:9 the author reviews the textual version of the commentaries’ transmission from medieval manuscripts to print editions. Addressing their meaning and adducing the masoretic notes that the Meyuḥas may have used in making additions, the author demonstrates that these later additions have generated erroneous attributions to Rashi’s original commentaries. In the first two cases, the commentator employs the Masorah note as an interpretive tool. Firstly, he cites the Masorah Magna to support his claim that this unusual form of ירְָשָֽׁה (Deut 33:23 is indeed in the imperative. Secondly, the commentator adduces from a masoretic note that the word נבְָלֶ֑יך (Isa 14:11, which occurs twice in the Bible in this form has two meanings. In the third case, the Masorah note had no interpretive agenda; it merely pointed out that all the letters of the Hebrew alphabet appear in Ezekiel 17:9.

    Partiendo de la versión del comentario de Raší a tres pasajes bíblicos (De 33:23, Is 14:11 y Ez 17:9 contenida en las Mikra ̓ot Gedolot ‘Haketer’, la autora revisa la transmisión del texto de dichos comentarios desde los manuscritos medievales a las ediciones impresas. Mediante el análisis de su significado y aduciendo las notas masoréticas contenidas en las adiciones, y que había sido atribuido (Meyuḥas a Raší, la autora demuestra que dicha atribución puede ser errónea y no corresponde a los comentarios originales de este autor. En los dos primeros pasajes estudiados, se muestra cómo el comentarista había empleado la nota de la masora como instrumento de interpretación. En primer lugar, cita la Masora Magna para apoyar su afirmación de que la forma inusual de ירְָשָֽׁה (De 33:23 estuviera en imperativo. En segundo lugar, partiendo de una

  13. Preliminary geochemical assessment of water in selected streams, springs, and caves in the Upper Baker and Snake Creek drainages in Great Basin National Park, Nevada, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Angela P.; Thodal, Carl E.; Baker, Gretchen M.; Lico, Michael S.; Prudic, David E.

    2014-01-01

    Water in caves, discharging from springs, and flowing in streams in the upper Baker and Snake Creek drainages are important natural resources in Great Basin National Park, Nevada. Water and rock samples were collected from 15 sites during February 2009 as part of a series of investigations evaluating the potential for water resource depletion in the park resulting from the current and proposed groundwater withdrawals. This report summarizes general geochemical characteristics of water samples collected from the upper Baker and Snake Creek drainages for eventual use in evaluating possible hydrologic connections between the streams and selected caves and springs discharging in limestone terrain within each watershed.Generally, water discharging from selected springs in the upper Baker and Snake Creek watersheds is relatively young and, in some cases, has similar chemical characteristics to water collected from associated streams. In the upper Baker Creek drainage, geochemical data suggest possible hydrologic connections between Baker Creek and selected springs and caves along it. The analytical results for water samples collected from Wheelers Deep and Model Caves show characteristics similar to those from Baker Creek, suggesting a hydrologic connection between the creek and caves, a finding previously documented by other researchers. Generally, geochemical evidence does not support a connection between water flowing in Pole Canyon Creek to that in Model Cave, at least not to any appreciable extent. The water sample collected from Rosethorn Spring had relatively high concentrations of many of the constituents sampled as part of this study. This finding was expected as the water from the spring travelled through alluvium prior to being discharged at the surface and, as a result, was provided the opportunity to interact with soil minerals with which it came into contact. Isotopic evidence does not preclude a connection between Baker Creek and the water discharging from

  14. Gender Differences in Child and Adolescent Social Withdrawal: A Commentary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Kenneth H; Barstead, Matthew G

    2014-04-01

    In a manuscript entitled, "Bashful boys and coy girls: A review of gender differences in childhood shyness" Doey et al. (2013) suggest that shyness and its related constructs pose a greater developmental risk for boys compared to girls. They support this claim by citing empirical evidence suggesting that shy and anxiously withdrawn boys are responded to more negatively by important others (i.e., parents, peers, and teachers) and that the relationship between internalizing problems and anxious withdrawal is stronger for boys compared to girls. The principal aim of our commentary is to provide a critical examination of Doey et al.'s conclusions vis-à-vis gender differences in child and adolescent shyness. In this response, we begin by providing important theoretical background regarding shyness and its related constructs. Next, we critically examine the two main arguments the authors use in support of their conclusion through a review of existing empirical and theoretical work as well as the presentation of data from The Friendship Project . These data were analyzed with the specific purpose of providing an empirical test of the hypotheses implicit in Doey et al.'s primary arguments: 1) shy and anxiously withdrawn boys are responded to more negatively than girls and 2) the association between anxious withdrawal and internalizing problems is stronger for boys compared to girls. Our results indicate mixed support for these two claims. Finally, we conclude by suggesting new directions for future researchers interested in clarifying the relationship between gender and both the correlates and outcomes of childhood shyness.

  15. The boundaries of business: commentaries from the experts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmae, K; Hewlett, S A; Austin, J E; Crozier, M

    1991-01-01

    The World Leadership Survey, which began a worldwide dialogue on a set of important issues facing managers in the 1990s, continues with commentaries from four recognized experts, each of whom addresses the survey results from a different perspective. Kenichi Ohmae, chairman of McKinsey and Company in Tokyo, addresses "The Perils of Protectionism." Ohmae argues that the old definitions of national boundaries and corporate interests reflect obsolete economic theories. The real test of national well-being, Ohmae suggests, should be the economic welfare of a nation's citizens. Sylvia Ann Hewlett, economist and former director of the Economic Policy Council in New York, analyzes the survey in terms of "The Human Resource Deficit." According to Hewlett, four principles should guide corporate strategies in the 1990s: human resource development should move up the scale of corporate priorities; a family-friendly workplace will attract and keep talented workers; companies will take limited direct responsibility for training and education; the private sector will promote public investment in social issues. James E. Austin, the Richard P. Chapman Professor of Business at the Harvard Business School, writes about "The Developing-Country Difference." In developing countries, Austin observes, managers display attitudes and follow practices that diverge from those in developed nations. In particular, the role of government, investments in education and technology, and environmental concerns set these nations apart. Michel Crozier, president of the Centre de Sociologie des Organisations in Paris, writes about "The Changing Organization." In the 1990s, Crozier argues, managers need to break from old management theories and practice, questioning hierarchy, control, distance, access to information-the whole managerial system.

  16. Communication, interventions, and scientific advances in autism: a commentary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llaneza, Danielle C; DeLuke, Susan V; Batista, Myra; Crawley, Jacqueline N; Christodulu, Kristin V; Frye, Cheryl A

    2010-06-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) affect approximately 1 in 150 children across the U.S., and are characterized by abnormal social actions, language difficulties, repetitive or restrictive behaviors, and special interests. ASD include autism (autistic disorder), Asperger Syndrome, and Pervasive Developmental Disorder not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS or atypical autism). High-functioning individuals may communicate with moderate-to-high language skills, although difficulties in social skills may result in communication deficits. Low-functioning individuals may have severe deficiencies in language, resulting in poor communication between the individual and others. Behavioral intervention programs have been developed for ASD, and are frequently adjusted to accommodate specific individual needs. Many of these programs are school-based and aim to support the child in the development of their skills, for use outside the classroom with family and friends. Strides are being made in understanding the factors contributing to the development of ASD, particularly the genetic contributions that may underlie these disorders. Mutant mouse models provide powerful research tools to investigate the genetic factors associated with ASD and its co-morbid disorders. In support, the BTBR T+tf/J mouse strain incorporates ASD-like social and communication deficits and high levels of repetitive behaviors. This commentary briefly reviews the reciprocal relationship between observations made during evidence-based behavioral interventions of high- versus low-functioning children with ASD and the accumulating body of research in autism, including animal studies and basic research models. This reciprocity is one of the hallmarks of the scientific method, such that research may inform behavioral treatments, and observations made during treatment may inform subsequent research. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Variações na morfoanatomia foliar de Aechmea lindenii (E. Morren Baker var. lindenii (Bromeliaceae sob distintas condições ambientais Leaf morphoanatomy variation in Aechmea lindenii (E. Morren Baker var. lindenii (Bromeliaceae under distinct environmental conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Heinig Voltolini

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Aechmea lindenii (E. Morren Baker var. lindenii (Bromeliaceae-Bromelioideae ocorre em restingas e Floresta Pluvial de Encosta Atlântica em Santa Catarina e Nordeste do Rio Grande do Sul, BR. Pode ser encontrada total ou parcialmente exposta à irradiação solar e em distintas formas de vida - terrícola, rupícola e epifítica. O objetivo deste trabalho foi comparar morfoanatomicamente às características de folhas de A. lindenii var. lindenii em distintas condições ambientais. Foram coletadas, na Ilha de Santa Catarina (Florianópolis, SC, folhas de plantas terrícolas em restinga herbácea (alta irradiação solar, rupícolas de costões rochosos (alta irradiação solar, terrícolas e epifíticas de sub-bosques (baixa irradiação solar de restinga arbórea e rupícolas de sub-bosque (baixa irradiação solar de Floresta Pluvial de Encosta Atlântica. Foram mensurados comprimento, largura, área da lâmina e bainha foliar, densidade estomática, comprimento e largura das células-guarda, espessura total e das estruturas constituintes na lâmina foliar. As características anatômicas qualitativas são semelhantes nas distintas condições analisadas. A baixa irradiação solar determina maior expansão da área foliar, decorrente do alongamento da lâmina. Lâmina e bainha foliares têm maior largura sob alta irradiação. A densidade estomática foi maior em folhas de plantas sob alta irradiação solar. A espessura total da lâmina foliar foi menor em plantas terrícolas sob alta irradiação, porém não mostrou diferenças estatísticas significativas entre as outras condições.Aechmea lindenii (E. Morren Baker var. lindenii (Bromeliaceae-Bromelioideae occurs in restingas and hillside Atlantic rain forest in Santa Catarina and northeastern Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. It is found totally or partially exposed to solar radiation and in different life forms - terricolous, rupicolous and epiphytes. The aim of this work was to compare

  18. Produção de frutanos em calos e plântulas clonadas in vitro de Viguiera discolor Baker (Asteraceae Fructan production in callus and in vitro cloned seedlings of Viguiera discolor Baker (Asteraceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nair Massumi Itaya

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Viguiera discolor Baker é uma espécie nativa do cerrado, cuja sobrevivência está ameaçada pela invasão de espécies exóticas. Considerando sua elevada produção e a vasta aplicação de frutanos, o presente trabalho foi conduzido visando à obtenção in vitro dessa espécie e à prospecção desses carboidratos nessas condições. Sementes foram germinadas in vitro, em meio MS modificado, e após cinco semanas de incubação, nós caulinares foram isolados e incubados no mesmo meio adicionado de 0,5 mg L-1 de ANA, regenerando plantas uniformes, raízesnão espessadas, raízes tuberosas e estruturas semelhantes a calo (calo tipo1, formadas na região caulinar basal. Análise desse material evidenciou a presença de frutanos do tipo inulina nas raízes tuberosas e nos calos tipo 1. Na presença de 2,4-D obteve-se a formação de calos friáveis (calo tipo 2, nos quais também foram detectados frutanos e suas enzimas de síntese sacarose: sacarose 1-frutosiltransferase (SST e frutano: frutano 1-frutosiltransferase (FFT. Embora em concentrações menores às observadas nas plantas cultivadas sob condições naturais, o material produzido in vitro apresentou frutanos do mesmo tipo e razão SST/FFT menor do que um. Em meio de cultura sem hormônios, foi verificada a regeneração de 50% de plantas a partir dos nós caulinares. A propagação de V. discolor in vitro pode viabilizar a multiplicação e a preservação da espécie, bem como a produção de frutanos nessas condições.Viguiera discolor Baker is a herbaceous species, native to cerrado and its survival has been threatened by the invasion of exotic species. Considering its high production and the wide application of fructans, the present work has aimed to establish in vitro culture of this species and to investigate the presence of fructans under these conditions. Seeds were germinated in vitro on modified MS medium and after plant growth, stem nodes were isolated and incubated on

  19. The Body Divine: Tantric Śaivite Ritual Practices in the Svacchandatantra and Its Commentary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone McCarter

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This work examines ritual, cosmology, and divinization as articulated in select passages of the Svacchandatantra and its commentary by the late tenth century non-dual theologian, Kṣemarāja. Both the Svacchandatantra and its commentary prescribe the worship of the deity Svacchandabhairava, a form of Śiva, and his consort Aghoreśvarī. Drawing on Gavin Flood’s notion of entextualization, I examine how the rituals described seek to inscribe the corporeal body so that the practitioner is made part of the larger Tantric body and tradition. This present study serves to illustrate the formulation of a Tantric body in the rituals prescribed in the Svacchandatantra and commentary and to extend the theory of entextualization to include the ritual environment. I argue that a Tantric Śaivite religious identity is formulated through rituals which seek to create linkages between the cosmos, the body, and by extension, the ritual environment.

  20. Learning from the Pros: Influence of Web-Based Expert Commentary on Vicarious Learning about Financial Markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Matthew W.; Kent, Daniel W.; Devoto, Steven

    2007-01-01

    Web-based financial commentary, in which experts routinely express market-related thought processes, is proposed as a means for college students to learn vicariously about financial markets. Undergraduate business school students from a regional university were exposed to expert market commentary from a single financial Web site for a 6-week…

  1. Enhancing the role of faith-based organizations to improve health: a commentary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenberg, Nancy E

    2017-09-01

    Researchers, policymakers, and community members increasingly recognize the potential to leverage faith-based organizations (FBOs) to improve health. This commentary complements Leyva and colleagues' article on whether and how members of FBOs view such a role. The commentary draws on our 13+ years operating a faith-based and community-based research organization, Faith Moves Mountains, in the Appalachian context. Issues to be addressed in the further development of faith-based health promotion include sustainability; adherence to the evidence-based operations of interventions, training, and privacy and protection protocols; and understanding the changing landscape of American public life.

  2. Volcanic Risk Perception and Preparedness in Communities within the Mount Baker and Glacier Peak Lahar Hazard Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corwin, K.; Brand, B. D.

    2014-12-01

    A community's ability to effectively respond to and recover from natural hazards depends on both the physical characteristics of the hazard and the community's inherent resilience. Resilience is shaped by a number of factors including the residents' perception of and preparedness for a natural hazard as well as the level of institutional preparedness. This study examines perception of and preparedness for lahar hazards from Mount Baker and Glacier Peak in Washington's Skagit Valley. Through an online survey, this study isolates the influence of specific variables (e.g., knowledge, past experience, scientific background, trust in various information sources, occupation, self-efficacy, sense of community) on risk perception and explores reasons behind the frequent disconnect between perception and preparedness. We anticipate that individuals with more extensive education in the sciences, especially geology or earth science, foster greater trust in scientists and a more accurate knowledge, understanding, and perception of the volcanic hazards in their community. Additionally, little research exists examining the extent to which first responders and leaders in response-related institutions prepare on a personal level. Since these individuals work toward community preparedness professionally, we hypothesize that they will be more prepared at home than members of the general public. Finally, the Skagit Valley has a significant history of flooding. We expect that the need to respond to and recover from frequent flooding creates a community with an inherently higher level of preparedness for other hazards such as lahars. The results of this study will contribute to the understanding of what controls risk perception and the interplay between perception and preparedness. At a broader level, this study provides local and state-level emergency managers information to evaluate and improve response capabilities and communication with the public and key institutions in order to

  3. mlh3 mutations in baker's yeast alter meiotic recombination outcomes by increasing noncrossover events genome-wide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najla Al-Sweel

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Mlh1-Mlh3 is an endonuclease hypothesized to act in meiosis to resolve double Holliday junctions into crossovers. It also plays a minor role in eukaryotic DNA mismatch repair (MMR. To understand how Mlh1-Mlh3 functions in both meiosis and MMR, we analyzed in baker's yeast 60 new mlh3 alleles. Five alleles specifically disrupted MMR, whereas one (mlh3-32 specifically disrupted meiotic crossing over. Mlh1-mlh3 representatives for each class were purified and characterized. Both Mlh1-mlh3-32 (MMR+, crossover- and Mlh1-mlh3-45 (MMR-, crossover+ displayed wild-type endonuclease activities in vitro. Msh2-Msh3, an MSH complex that acts with Mlh1-Mlh3 in MMR, stimulated the endonuclease activity of Mlh1-mlh3-32 but not Mlh1-mlh3-45, suggesting that Mlh1-mlh3-45 is defective in MSH interactions. Whole genome recombination maps were constructed for wild-type and MMR+ crossover-, MMR- crossover+, endonuclease defective and null mlh3 mutants in an S288c/YJM789 hybrid background. Compared to wild-type, all of the mlh3 mutants showed increases in the number of noncrossover events, consistent with recombination intermediates being resolved through alternative recombination pathways. Our observations provide a structure-function map for Mlh3 that reveals the importance of protein-protein interactions in regulating Mlh1-Mlh3's enzymatic activity. They also illustrate how defective meiotic components can alter the fate of meiotic recombination intermediates, providing new insights for how meiotic recombination pathways are regulated.

  4. Preparing for Volcanic Hazards: An Examination of Lahar Knowledge, Risk Perception, and Preparedness around Mount Baker and Glacier Peak, WA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corwin, K.; Brand, B. D.

    2015-12-01

    As the number of people living at risk from volcanic hazards in the U.S. Pacific Northwest continues to rise, so does the need for improved hazard science, mitigation, and response planning. The effectiveness of these efforts relies not only on scientists and policymakers, but on individuals and their risk perception and preparedness levels. This study examines the individual knowledge, perception, and preparedness of over 500 survey respondents living or working within the lahar zones of Mount Baker and Glacier Peak volcanoes. We (1) explore the common disconnect between accurate risk perception and adequate preparedness; (2) determine how participation in hazard response planning influences knowledge, risk perception, and preparedness; and (3) assess the effectiveness of current lahar hazard maps for public risk communication. Results indicate that a disconnect exists between perception and preparedness for the majority of respondents. While 82% of respondents accurately anticipate that future volcanic hazards will impact the Skagit Valley, this knowledge fails to motivate increased preparedness. A majority of respondents also feel "very responsible" for their own protection and provision of resources during a hazardous event (83%) and believe they have the knowledge and skills necessary to respond effectively to such an event (56%); however, many of these individuals still do not adequately prepare. When asked what barriers prevent them from preparing, respondents primarily cite a lack of knowledge about relevant local hazards. Results show that participation in response-related activities—a commonly recommended solution to this disconnect—minimally influences preparedness. Additionally, although local hazard maps successfully communicate the primary hazard—97% of respondents recognize the lahar hazard—many individuals incorrectly interpret other important facets of the maps. Those who participate in response-related activities fail to understand these

  5. Diversity and genetic structure of the Mexican endemic epiphyte Tillandsia achyrostachys E. Morr. ex Baker var. achyrostachys (Bromeliaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Astorga, Jorge; Cruz-Angón, Andrea; Flores-Palacios, Alejandro; Vovides, Andrew P

    2004-10-01

    The monoecious, bird-pollinated epiphytic Tillandsia achyrostachys E. Morr. ex Baker var. achyrostachys is an endemic bromeliad of the tropical dry forests of Mexico with clonal growth. In the Sierra de Huautla Natural Reserve this species shows a host preference for Bursera copallifera (Sessé & Moc ex. DC) Bullock. As a result of deforestation in the study area, B. copallifera has become a rare tree species in the remaining forest patches. This human-induced disturbance has directly affected the population densities of T. achyrostachys. In this study the genetic consequences of habitat fragmentation were assessed by comparing the genetic diversity, gene flow and genetic differentiation in six populations of T. achyrostachys in the Sierra de Huautla Natural Reserve, Mexico. Allozyme electrophoresis of sixteen loci (eleven polymorphic and five monomorphic) were used. The data were analysed with standard statistical approximations for obtaining diversity, genetic structure and gene flow. Genetic diversity and allelic richness were: HE = 0.21 +/- 0.02, A = 1.86 +/- 0.08, respectively. F-statistics revealed a deficiency of heterozygous plants in all populations (Fit = 0.65 +/- 0.02 and Fis = 0.43 +/- 0.06). Significant genetic differentiation between populations was detected (Fst = 0.39 +/- 0.07). Average gene flow between pairs of populations was relatively low and had high variation (Nm = 0.46 +/- 0.21), which denotes a pattern of isolation by distance. The genetic structure of populations of T. achyrostachys suggests that habitat fragmentation has reduced allelic richness and genetic diversity, and increased significant genetic differentiation (by approx. 40 %) between populations. The F-statistic values (>0) and the level of gene flow found suggest that habitat fragmentation has broken up the former population structure. In this context, it is proposed that the host trees of T. achyrostachys should be considered as a conservation priority, since they represent the

  6. Commentary: Are alpha-2 agonist really effective in children with tics with comorbid ADHD? A commentary on Whittington et al. (2016).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloch, Michael H

    2016-09-01

    In this issue, Whittington et al. (2016) present a systematic review that reports the efficacy of three primary treatments for children with Tourette syndrome (TS) - (a) α2-adrenergic receptor agonists; (b) antipsychotic medications; and (c) habit reversal training/comprehensive behavioral intervention. In this commentary, we highlight the large degree of heterogeneity observed in the meta-analysis of trials involving alpha-2 agonist medications and present possible explanations for the observed heterogeneity. Among these possible explanations is the possibility that presence of comorbid ADHD may moderate the efficacy of alpha-2 agonists in the treatment of tic disorder with the medications being more effective in patients with both conditions. The commentary reviews the evidence supporting this possible moderating effect of ADHD and discusses the implications for such a relationship. © 2016 Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health.

  7. Scientific and Practical Commentary on Specialists’ Professional Standards in Thermal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Yu. Semenov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The professional standards for heat treatment specialists such as "Specialist in thermal equipment installation and tests", "Specialist in analysis and diagnosis of heat treatment process systems", "Specialist in automation and mechanization of heat treatment process systems" were developed according to the Rules for the Development, Approval, and Application of Professional Standards adopted by a Decree of the Government of the Russian Federation dated 01.22.2013 № 23.The article objective is to find a way that allows directors of machine-building plants to understand the provisions of abovementioned professional standards.This commentary was developed with participation of experts, who were in charge of the professional standards.When developing the professional standards it was taken into consideration that, presently, the most promising are vacuum and ion processes of heat and thermo-chemical treatment.In this connection a new classification of the thermal equipment and manufacturing processes has been realized according to criterion of technical complexity. This classification puts the thermal equipment and manufacturing processes into simple, complex, and specifically complex.As proposed, the specifically complex thermal equipment is a multi-zone thermal one with each zone being under precise temperature control, and a vacuum or ion equipment for thermal and thermochemical treatment with integrated cooling system. The complex thermal equipment is an equipment for heat and thermochemical treatment in controlled atmosphere, and a multichamber or continuous heat treatment furnaces, as well as vacuum and ion-plasma equipment, except for specifically complex thermal equipment. The simple thermal equipment is a heat treatment one except for complex and specifically complex thermal equipment.The article gives concrete examples of simple, complex and specifically complex thermal equipment.The criteria to classify the heat treatment technological

  8. Ethanol yield and volatile compound content in fermentation of agave must by Kluyveromyces marxianus UMPe-1 comparing with Saccharomyces cerevisiae baker's yeast used in tequila production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Alvarez, Arnoldo; Díaz-Pérez, Alma Laura; Sosa-Aguirre, Carlos; Macías-Rodríguez, Lourdes; Campos-García, Jesús

    2012-05-01

    In tequila production, fermentation is an important step. Fermentation determines the ethanol productivity and organoleptic properties of the beverage. In this study, a yeast isolated from native residual agave must was identified as Kluyveromyces marxianus UMPe-1 by 26S rRNA sequencing. This yeast was compared with the baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae Pan1. Our findings demonstrate that the UMPe-1 yeast was able to support the sugar content of agave must and glucose up to 22% (w/v) and tolerated 10% (v/v) ethanol concentration in the medium with 50% cells survival. Pilot and industrial fermentation of agave must tests showed that the K. marxianus UMPe-1 yeast produced ethanol with yields of 94% and 96% with respect to fermentable sugar content (glucose and fructose, constituting 98%). The S. cerevisiae Pan1 baker's yeast, however, which is commonly used in some tequila factories, showed 76% and 70% yield. At the industrial level, UMPe-1 yeast shows a maximum velocity of fermentable sugar consumption of 2.27g·L(-1)·h(-1) and ethanol production of 1.38g·L(-1)·h(-1), providing 58.78g ethanol·L(-1) at 72h fermentation, which corresponds to 96% yield. In addition, the major and minor volatile compounds in the tequila beverage obtained from UMPe-1 yeast were increased. Importantly, 29 volatile compounds were identified, while the beverage obtained from Pan1-yeast contained fewer compounds and in lower concentrations. The results suggest that the K. marxianus UMPe-1 is a suitable yeast for agave must fermentation, showing high ethanol productivity and increased volatile compound content comparing with a S. cerevisiae baker's yeast used in tequila production. Copyright © 2012 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The Morphing of America's Liberal Arts Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiMaria, Frank

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the paper, "Where Are They Now? Revisiting Breneman's Study of Liberal Arts Colleges" by Vicki L. Baker, assistant professor at Albion College and Roger G. Baldwin, professor at University of Michigan. Their paper takes a look back at David W. Breneman's study "Are We Losing Our Liberal Arts Colleges?" and it…

  10. Commentary: Potential Neurobiologic Mechanisms through Which Metabolic Disorders Could Relate to Autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Michael V.

    2000-01-01

    To illustrate the possible relationships between metabolic disorders and autism, this commentary reviews findings from studies on the characteristics of individuals with Rett syndrome that indicate the genetic mechanism of transcriptional dysregulation can produce pathologic phenotypes which resemble metabolic disorders that stunt axonodendritic…

  11. A Commentary on "The Role of the Unit in Physics and Psychometrics" by Stephen Humphry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrich, David

    2011-01-01

    This commentary examines the role of the unit from the perspective of the definition of measurement in physics as the ratio of two magnitudes, one of which is defined as the unit; it is an important and timely contribution to measurement in the social sciences. There are many different points that could be commented upon, but the author will…

  12. A Provisional list of Tibetan Commentaries on the Ratnagotravibhâga

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burchardi, Anne

    2006-01-01

    The article presents information on Tibetan commentaries based on Ratnagotravibhâga (RGV) text, which is a major source text for interpretations of Buddha Nature. A chronological list of authors along with an account of their major works is also given. It is viewed that the study...

  13. A Commentary on Cultural Influences Impacting the Education of Korean American Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Adrian Woo; Stang, Kristin; Ferko, Doreen; Han, Shin-Il

    2011-01-01

    Korean American adolescents may find themselves caught between traditional Korean culture and demands for Americanization. Subsequently this population of students and parents may have very distinct needs in our schools as they are a growing population of students. This commentary discusses important considerations for teachers and administrators…

  14. A Commentary on "Integrated Reporting: A Review of Developments and Their Implications for the Accounting Curriculum"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa Ruiz, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    In this commentary, Correa Ruiz notes that from his analysis, Owen (2013) identified the essential elements to be included in a modern professional accounting curriculum, described how Association of Chartered Certified Accountants (ACCA) has embedded "Integrated Reporting" in its curriculum, and discussed future curriculum development,…

  15. Commentary--Attachment in Middle Childhood: Looking Back, Forward, and Within

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Howard

    2015-01-01

    This commentary discusses the articles that comprise this special issue on attachment in middle childhood. Central to this discussion is the distinction between verbal, strategic, and conscious responses to questionnaires as compared to verbal and nonverbal, automatic and largely unconscious responses to interviews. Both methods have been…

  16. Ethics and the Marketing of Technology for Training and Performance Improvement: A Commentary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carliner, Saul

    2003-01-01

    This commentary is intended to start a conversation on ethical behavior in the marketing of our work, with a special focus on the issues that arise when marketing technology and related services. The general literature on marketing ethics suggests that marketers have more relaxed ethical values than the general public. Therefore, ethics should be…

  17. Neoliberalism as Nihilism? A Commentary on Educational Accountability, Teacher Education, and School Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuck, Eve

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses neoliberalism as an extension of settler colonialism. The article provides commentary on five recent articles on teacher education and the neoliberal agenda. The article presents an analysis of neoliberalism as despair, and as a form of nihilism. The author discusses an indigenous model of school reform and…

  18. Hear Us Out: Commentary by Youth on School and Society. Speaking Out.

    Science.gov (United States)

    What Kids Can Do, Inc., Providence, RI.

    This publication presents essays written by seven young, urban, minority students participating in an intensive writing workshop given by What Kids Can Do in collaboration with the Margins to Mainstream project. The goal of the workshop was to coach students to create short essays suitable for use as a newspaper column, radio commentary, or…

  19. Psychological and Ethical Considerations Concerning the Debreather and Assisted Suicide: A Commentary on Ogden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleespies, Phillip M.

    2010-01-01

    This article offers a commentary on the report by Russel Ogden (2010/this issue) on the use of the "debreather" for suicide assistance by the NuTech (or New Technologies for Self-Deliverance) program. The emergence of NuTech is set within its historical and political context. Nu Tech is criticized for its anarchic and extreme advocacy of…

  20. A Commentary on "Corporate Responsibility to Respect Human Rights and Business Schools' Responsibility to Teach It"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    In this commentary on "Corporate Responsibility to Respect Human Rights and Business Schools' Responsibility to Teach It" (McPhail 2013), the author discusses how McPhail's paper examines human rights teaching principles, the question of why corporations and business schools should respect and teach human rights, and how business…

  1. Commentary on “Co-creating Stakeholder and Brand Identities: A Cross-cultural Consumer Perspective”

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Csaba, Fabian

    2017-01-01

    This commentary raises awareness for the relevance of other cultural dimensions- besides individualism and collectivism - and alternative approaches to cross-cultural research for exploring cultural variations in stakeholders' co-construction of brand identity and their own identities. The author...... influence of various cultures on each other can provide additional, relevant insights into reciprocal identity co-construction processes between brands and stakeholders....

  2. Aging: commentary. Change in perceptions of personality disorder in late life: the view from socioemotional aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaacowitz, Derek M

    2014-02-01

    Cooper, Balsis, and Oltmanns (2014) present evidence that older adults view changes in their own levels of personality disorders, but that their informants do not report such positive changes. In this commentary, the author considers these provocative findings in light of current theory and research from socioemotional aging on emotion-cognition links and how they might vary as a function of age.

  3. A Response to Commentaries on "Music Matters: A Philosophy of Music Education," Second Edition (2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, David J.; Silverman, Marissa

    2015-01-01

    This essay responds to five commentaries on "Music Matters: A Philosophy of Music Education," 2nd edition (2015). Because each author provides a substantial discussion of different aspects of the book, this essay does not attempt to address all points. Instead, we reflect on selected aspects of each scholar's critique.

  4. Yes, we really do need more entry mode studies! : A commentary on Shaver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hennart, J.M.A.; Slangen, A.H.L.

    2015-01-01

    In a recent commentary published in this journal, Shaver raises the provocative question of whether we need more entry mode studies. After assessing the reasons for Shaver’s doubts and further developing his broad research suggestions, we conclude that this question should be answered affirmatively.

  5. Commentary: Outreach, Engagement, and the Changing Culture of the University--1998

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, John V.

    2016-01-01

    In this commentary, author John Byrne reflects on his 1998 "Journal of Public Service & Outreach" article, "Outreach, Engagement, and the Changing Culture of the University" reprinted in this 20th anniversary issue of "Journal of Higher Education Outreach and Engagement." Byrne's 1998 article was a call to modify…

  6. A Commentary on "Integrated Reporting: A Review of Developments and Their Implications for the Accounting Curriculum"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamp-Roelands, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    In this commentary, Kamp-Roelands states that it was very encouraging to observe that the Association of Chartered Certified Accountants (ACCA) recognises that responding to "Integrated Reporting" initiatives requires an "integrated approach" to accounting education. That change in financial reporting standards put pressure on…

  7. "Utopia" and "Passion": A Commentary on "Sustainability and Accounting Education: The Elephant in the Classroom"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contrafatto, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    In this commentary, Massimo Contrafatto explains his understanding of Gray's interpretation of accounting education for sustainability (AE4S), and contributes some personal insights to the future development of AE4S. Gray reflected on an educational engagement experiment where the complex issues surrounding sustainability were dealt with in an…

  8. Non-Formal Education in Poland and Canada--Compared: A Brief Commentary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Norman L.; Griffith, Kimberly Grantham; Kritsonis, William Allan

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this brief note is to compare non-formal education in Poland and Canada in terms of accessibility, and it is motivated by the fact that learning is a lifelong process because of rapid advances in technology. The theoretical framework for this commentary is supplied by the general idea that non-formal learning provides a social…

  9. Commentary: Differentiated Measures of Temperament and Multiple Pathways to Childhood Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothbart, Mary K.

    2004-01-01

    Provided is a commentary on articles written for a special section on temperament and childhood disorders. Temperament's contributions to the development of childhood disorders are considered both generally and specifically. Questions are raised about the use of terminology in the field, particularly the term difficult. Differentiation of outcomes…

  10. Commentary: Latina Literacies in "Convivencia": Communal Spaces of Teaching and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villenas, Sofia A.

    2005-01-01

    Inspired by Delgado-Gaitan's work with Latina mothers' stories of transformation, this commentary engages scholarship on the communal "mujer-" or womanist-oriented spaces of teaching and learning. The author explores themes of "convivencia" (communalism) centered on faith, spirituality, and humor central to creating compassionate spaces of…

  11. Who Is the Building Leader?: Commentary on Educational Leadership Preparation Programs for the Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Debbie K.

    2016-01-01

    In this commentary, the Dean of the Kansas State University College of Education states that the job of a school leader is more complex and more demanding than ever before. As institutions of higher education contemplate the question "Who is the Building Leader?," defining the roles and responsibilities of the school building leader is…

  12. A Commentary on"'Sustainability and Accounting Education: The Elephant in the Classroom"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laine, Matias

    2013-01-01

    In this commentary Matias Laine reviews the vivid paper written by Rob Gray (2013) who discusses his view of how sustainability is positioned within accounting education and how accounting educators can directly approach sustainability in their teaching. Laine notes many of the aspects that Gray considers important reflect the starting point of…

  13. Transformative Role of Epigenetics in Child Development Research: Commentary on the Special Section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, Daniel P.

    2016-01-01

    Lester, Conradt, and Marsit (2016) have assembled a set of articles that bring to readers of "Child Development" the scope and impact of the exponentially growing research on epigenetics and child development. This commentary aims to place this work in a broader context of theory and research by (a) providing a conceptual framework for…

  14. Recognizing the Centrality of Emotion in Diversity Courses: Commentary on "Gender in the Management Education Classroom"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spelman, Duncan

    2010-01-01

    This commentary adds to the analysis and recommendations presented in "Gender in the Management Education Classroom" concerning a very challenging incident focused on powerful gender/diversity dynamics. It discusses the centrality of emotion in students' experiences of diversity discussions and calls for teachers to explicitly help students…

  15. Adaptive Treatment Strategies in Youth Mental Health: A Commentary on Advantages, Challenges, and Potential Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrill, Joel T

    2016-01-01

    This commentary underscores the importance and potential of the research approaches and intervention strategies described in the JCCAP special issue on the Science of Adaptive Treatment Strategies in Child and Adolescent Mental Health for addressing the widely observed heterogeneity in response to even our most promising research-informed interventions. First, the commentary briefly summarizes the advantages of these approaches and highlights how these programs of research are responsive to widely agreed-upon calls for more personalized, prescriptive interventions. Next, the commentary briefly discusses key common challenges and gaps in our knowledge that might be addressed to advance the development, testing, and implementation of adaptive intervention strategies. For example, research to identify robust moderators that might serve as potential tailoring variables for initial assignment and sequencing of interventions, efforts to operationalize surrogate endpoints for early identification of individuals who are unlikely to respond to first-line interventions, and research that helps define what constitutes an adequate exposure (i.e., dose) or response threshold (e.g., response that suggests the need to intensify, switch, or augment interventions) would inform decision rules for adaptive algorithms. The commentary concludes with a discussion of potential strategies and current initiatives that might ultimately help facilitate research on more targeted, prescriptive approaches to intervening, including efforts to encourage investigators to use common data elements, to share and integrate data across trials, and to employ a more mechanism-based approach to intervention development and testing.

  16. Commentary: Leapfrogging as a Principle for Research on Children and Youth in Majority World Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Simon

    2013-01-01

    This commentary was written while the author was visiting the 30th International Congress of Psychology in Cape Town, South Africa. Looking at the program, he could see that psychological research on non-Western populations and internationally comparative research seems to be much "en vogue"! However, much of the research he has seen…

  17. Toward A Better Understanding of Perceived Complexity in Music: A Commentary on Eerola (2016

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Hellmuth Margulis

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Eerola (2016 evaluates models of musical complexity based on expectancy violation and information theory. This commentary notes the deep relationship between these two phenomena, and argues for a more active partnership between computational and psychological approaches in understanding perceptions of musical complexity.

  18. The Two Hands of Thomas Aquinas : The Reportationes of the Commentary on Matthew

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Klooster, Anton

    2014-01-01

    The gospel of Matthew is more important to the theology of Thomas Aquinas than most scholars have realised. Access to his commentary on this gospel is impeded by the lack of a critical edition. Moreover, we have only two reportationes of the text. In order to establish the value of these texts, I

  19. Commentary: School Psychologists as Advocates for Racial Justice and Social Justice: Some Proposed Steps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shriberg, David

    2016-01-01

    In this commentary, Shriberg acknowledges that social justice and racial justice are critical frameworks from which to view school psychology. Individually and collectively, the works in this special issue of "School Psychology Forum" have added a tremendous service to the field. In addition to advancing research, the articles challenge…

  20. Commentary on factors affecting transverse vibration using an idealized theoretical equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph F. Murphy

    2000-01-01

    An idealized theoretical equation to calculate flexural stiffness using transverse vibration of a simply end-supported beam is being considered by the American Society of Testing and Materials (ASTM) Wood Committee D07 to determine lumber modulus of elasticity. This commentary provides the user a quantitative view of six factors that affect the accuracy of using the...

  1. Commentary: How Readily Can Findings from Basic Cognitive Psychology Research Be Applied in the Classroom?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efklides, Anastasia

    2012-01-01

    The commentary discusses phenomena highlighted in the studies of the special issue such as the hypercorrection effect, overconfidence, and the efficiency of interventions designed to increase monitoring accuracy. The discussion is based on a broader theoretical framework of self-regulation of learning that stresses the inferential character of…

  2. When Social Identities Collide: Commentary on "Gender in the Management Education Classroom"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Eric

    2010-01-01

    This commentary to "Gender in the Management Education Classroom" (Bilimoria, O'Neil, Hopkins, & Murphy, 2010) employs social identity and self-categorization theory to analyze the incident described in the article. In any MBA classroom, students are dealing with multiple group memberships. Similar to workplace settings, when the focus is on…

  3. In vivo antihypertensive and antidyslipidemic effects of the crude extracts and fractions of Moringa stenopetala (Baker f. Cufod. leaves in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bekesho eGeleta

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Moringa stenopetala (Baker f. Cufod. is a medicinal plant that has been used in Ethiopian traditional medicine as a remedy for treatment of hypertension and diabetes. The aim of this study was to evaluate antihypertensive and antihyperlipidemic effect in fructose induced hypertensive rats.Rats were randomly divided into control and treatment groups (n=6. Treatment groups were given daily extracts (250, 500, and 1000 mg/kg orally with fructose. Whereas, positive, negative and normal control groups were received captopril (20 mg/kg/day with fructose, only fructose (66% w/v ad libitum and distilled water ad libitum for 15 days, respectively. The blood pressure was measured every 5th day using tail cuff blood pressure analyzer, and on the 16th day the blood was sampled to evaluate antihyperlipidemic effect using clinical chemistry analyzer. The study showed that aqueous and 70% ethanol extracts significantly prevented blood pressure increment in a dose dependent manner comparable to that of the standard drug. Similarly, the extracts suppressed increment in lipid profile (cholesterol, glucose and triglycerides compared with negative control. The biochemical test revealed that extracts produced a rise in liver but no effect on kidney function indicators compared with normal control.These findings revealed that both crude extracts of Moringa stenopetala (Baker f. Cufod. possess antihypertensive and antihyperlipidemic effect.

  4. Matemaatiline juhtimine / Stephen Baker

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Baker, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    Autori raamat "Numeraadid" tutvustab matemaatikavõlureid, kes tuhnivad meie andmetes. Numeraatide üks paljutõotavamaid laboreid on töökohad, kus saab uurida iga klahvivajutust, hiireklõpsu ja meilisõnumit. Peatükis "Töötajad" vaatleb autor IBMi, kus matemaatikud loovad omaenda kolleegide käitumist prognoosivaid mudeleid. Lisa: Juhtimise teadus. Stopperist matemaatiliste mudeliteni; Viited

  5. MATERNAL AND INFANT HEALTH SECTION OF THE DEMOGRAPHIC AND HEALTH SURVEY REPORT OF GHANA, 2008: A COMMENTARY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Adu-gyamfi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This article is basically a commentary on some sections on infant and maternalhealthcare of the 2008 demographic and health survey of Ghana. The attention of bothpolicy makers and academics are drawn to the need to ensure the expansion of thematernal and infant healthcare in Ghana. In same commentary, attention of readershave been drawn to the proclivity of the free maternal health policy to positively shapematernal and infant care in Ghana.

  6. Commentary for Special Issue of Prevention Science "Using Genetics in Prevention: Science Fiction or Science Fact?"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, Danielle M

    2018-01-01

    A growing number of prevention studies have incorporated genetic information. In this commentary, I discuss likely reasons for growing interest in this line of research and reflect on the current state of the literature. I review challenges associated with the incorporation of genotypic information into prevention studies, as well as ethical considerations associated with this line of research. I discuss areas where developmental psychologists and prevention scientists can make substantive contributions to the study of genetic predispositions, as well as areas that could benefit from closer collaborations between prevention scientists and geneticists to advance this area of study. In short, this commentary tackles the complex questions associated with what we hope to achieve by adding genetic components to prevention research and where this research is likely to lead in the future.

  7. Top 10 Responses to the Commentaries on Dixon, Reed, Smith et al. (2015).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Mark R; Reed, Derek D; Smith, Tristram; Belisle, Jordan; Jackson, Rachel E

    2015-10-01

    In a previous article (Dixon et al. Behavior Analysis in Practice, 8 (1), 7-15, 2015), we put forward data suggesting that most behavior analytic faculty do not publish in major behavior analytic journals, and in only about 50 % of behavior analysis programs have faculty combined to produce ten or more empirical articles. Several commentaries followed the release of our article, with content that ranged from supporting our endeavors and confirming the dangerous position our field may be in to highlighting the need for further refinement in procedures used to rank the quality of behavior analysis graduate training programs. Presented in the present article are our "top 10" responses to these commentaries.

  8. Treatises “On Virtues and Vices”: Translation from the Greek into Russian and commentary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Sanzhenakov

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper is divided into three sections: an introduction, a translation of Pseudo-Aristotelian treatise “On Virtues and Vices” (De virtutibus et vitiis, and a commentary to this text. In the introduction, the author briefly describes textual tradition, critical editions and available translations of the treatise in European languages. The major issue, discussed in the introduction, concerns the question of authenticity and authorship of the treatise. Arguments by E. Zeller, C. Schuchhardt, F. Susemihl, E. Schmidt, who seriously questioned the authenticity of the text, are contrasted with the opinion of P. Simpson, who insisted on its authenticity. The author of the present work is inclined to think that the treatise is a later composition. Respective arguments are presented in length in the commentary, where the author attempts to place the treatise in the context of the ethical works of the Corpus Aristotelicum, on the one hand, and this of the later Hellenistic developments, on the other.

  9. Hypochondria, or, the awareness of death that goes against the cure. Commentary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffo, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    Fifteen years after the publication of G. Braddock's paper "Epicureanism, death, and the good life" in Philosophical inquiry the time has come to think of what actually prevents Epicureanism from taking root in Western societies, thereby facilitating our relationship with disease and care: hypochondria. In this commentary I analyse the philosophical problem of hypochondria overturning Heidegger's idea that awareness of death is positive and calling for medical therapies that, through the help of psychology, would act on the causes and elimination of hypochondria.

  10. Brain Musics: History , Precedents , and Commentary on Whalley , Mavros and Furniss

    OpenAIRE

    Ortiz, Miguel; Grierson, Mick; Tanaka, Atau

    2014-01-01

    Whalley, Mavros and Furniss explore questions of agency, control and interaction, as well as the embodied nature of musical performance in relation to the use of human-computer interaction through the work Clasp Together (beta) for small ensemble and live electronics. The underlying concept of the piece focuses on direct mapping of a human neural network (embodied by a performer within the ensemble) to an artificial neural network running on a computer. With our commentary, we contextualize t...

  11. [Freud's abstract of "A contribution to the option of neurosis" (1913). Publication and commentary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Ulrike

    2011-01-01

    The text, which is published here for the first time, summarizes the paper Freud presented to the IPA congress in Munich. A short commentary highlights the circumstances under which the paper was written and the reasons why the abstract remained unpublished. It also sketches the historical significance of the paper in terms of the problem of the option of neurosis, in particular obsessional neurosis, of the development of Freud's sexual theory and of the relation of his views to those of Ernest Jones.

  12. CCR 20th Anniversary Commentary: Prospects and Challenges of Therapeutic Nanoparticles in Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Mohammad Aminur; Shin, Dong M

    2015-10-15

    In their review article published in the March 1, 2008, issue of Clinical Cancer Research, Cho and colleagues presented the strong potential of nanotechnology in cancer. This commentary discusses the latest advances in nanotechnology, which provide novel approaches for cancer diagnosis, imaging, drug delivery, and personalized therapy; highlights the perspectives for therapeutic nanoparticles; and describes the advantages and challenges of their multifunctionalities. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  13. The effect of institutional setting on attributional content in management commentary reports

    OpenAIRE

    AERTS, Walter; TARCA, Ann

    2008-01-01

    We study the effect of expected regulatory and litigation costs embedded in a country’s institutional environment on the explanatory content of management commentary reports. Using a behavioural accountability lens, we argue that regulatory control and expected litigation risk affect the attributional framing of financial performance. We also investigate whether differential attributional properties have economic relevance by considering the relationship between content profiles and analyst f...

  14. Understanding the Neurobiology of Fear Conditioning and Emergence of PTSD Psychobiology: Commentary on Blanchard et al

    OpenAIRE

    Boscarino, Joseph A.; Figley, Charles R.

    2012-01-01

    In this article we discuss the historical evolution of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) following the Vietnam War with a focus on a article by Blanchard et al. published in the Journal in 1991, entitled: “Changes in plasma norepinephrine to combat-related stimuli among Vietnam veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder” (Blanchard et al., 1991). In this commentary, we discuss the significance of this brief article and developments in the PTSD field before, during, and after the Blanchard...

  15. OWNERSHIP STRUCTURE AND INTERACTION EFFECTS OF FIRM PERFORMANCE ON MANAGEMENT COMMENTARY DISCLOSURES

    OpenAIRE

    Roshayani Arshad; Rohaya Md Nor; Nur Adura Ahmad Noruddin

    2011-01-01

    A rich empirical research suggests that corporate disclosures are important means for management to communicate firm performance and governance to outside investors. (e.g. Chau & Gray, 2002; Mohd Ghazali & Weetman, 2006). In the last few years, there is an increasing attention regarding non-financial information disclosure in companies' annual reports. An important development in relation to this is the discussion paper and subsequently statement practice on Management Commentary (MC) issued ...

  16. The Flipped Classroom for pre-clinical dental skills teaching - a reflective commentary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crothers, A J; Bagg, J; McKerlie, R

    2017-05-12

    A Flipped Classroom method for teaching of adult practical pre-clinical dental skills was introduced to the BDS curriculum in Glasgow during the 2015/2016 academic session. This report provides a commentary of the first year of employing this method - from the identification of the need to optimise teaching resources, through the planning, implementation and development of the method, with an early indication of performance.

  17. Pattern and Variation in the Timing of Aksak Meter: Commentary on Goldberg

    OpenAIRE

    Rainer Polak

    2016-01-01

    Daniel Goldberg (2015, this issue) explores relations between timing variations, grouping structure, and musical form in the percussive accompaniment of Balkan folk dance music. A chronometric re-analysis of one of the target article’s two audio samples finds a regular metric timing pattern to consistently underlie the variations Goldberg uncovered. Read together, the target article and this commentary demonstrate the complex interplay of a regular timing pattern with several levels of nuance...

  18. Commentary on: Are we overpathologizing everyday life? A tenable blueprint for behavioral addiction research

    OpenAIRE

    De Timary, Philippe; Philippot, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Background: This paper is a commentary to the article entitled: "Are we overpathologizing everyday life? A tenable blueprint for behavioral addiction research", by Billieux, Schimmenti, Khazaal, Maurage and Heeren (2015). Methods and Aims: In this manuscript, we commented on two aspects developed by the authors. Billieux et al. (2015) propose that the recent development of propositions of behavioral addiction is driven by an unwise application of an addiction model to excessive behavi...

  19. Response to A Different Vantage Point Commentary: Psychotherapeutic Genetic Counseling, Is it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biesecker, Barbara; Austin, Jehannine; Caleshu, Colleen

    2017-04-01

    Whether genetic counseling is a form of psychotherapy is open for debate. Early practicioners in genetic counseling described it as such, and this claim has been replicated in recent publications. This commentary is a rebuttal to the claim that genetic counseling is distinct from psychotherapty. We argue that it is a a form of psychoterapy that aims to help clients manage a health threat that affects their psychological wellbeing, paralleling the goals of psychotherapy.

  20. Response to A Different Vantage Point Commentary: Psychotherapeutic Genetic Counseling, Is it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Jehannine; Caleshu, Colleen

    2016-01-01

    Whether genetic counseling is a form of psychotherapy is open for debate. Early practicioners in genetic counseling described it as such, and this claim has been replicated in recent publications. This commentary is a rebuttal to the claim that genetic counseling is distinct from psychotherapty. We argue that it is a a form of psychoterapy that aims to help clients manage a health threat that affects their psychological wellbeing, paralleling the goals of psychotherapy. PMID:27804046

  1. Towards a Global Social Support System: A Response to the Recent Commentaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin McKee

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available When we invoked the example of the US National Basketball Association’s (NBA’s scheme for redistribution of new talent as a model offering lessons for a possible future global social support system we hoped that we would stimulate debate. Consequently, we are very grateful to Goldblatt1 and Labonté2 for their insightful commentaries that explore some of the issues that arise from our suggestion

  2. Presencia de Circulifer tenellus Baker y Beet mild curly top virus en maleza durante el invierno en el centro norte de México Circulifer tenellus Baker and Beet mild curly top virus presence in weeds during the winter in north-central Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Rodolfo Velásquez-Valle; Luis Roberto Reveles-Torres; Mario Domingo Amador-Ramírez; María Mercedes Medina-Aguilar; Guillermo Medina-García

    2012-01-01

    Una de las enfermedades más importantes del chile para secado en el norte centro de México es la denominada amarillamientos del chile. Existe poca información acerca de la interacción entre el vector (Circulifer tenellus Baker), el Beet mild curly top virus y la maleza durante el invierno en esta región, consecuentemente el objetivo del trabajo fue identificar maleza de invierno que sirve como refugio para el vector y hospedero del virus en esta región. Entre enero y marzo de 2011 se muestrea...

  3. Improving data discovery and usability through commentary and user feedback: the CHARMe project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alegre, R.; Blower, J. D.

    2014-12-01

    Earth science datasets are highly diverse. Users of these datasets are similarly varied, ranging from research scientists through industrial users to government decision- and policy-makers. It is very important for these users to understand the applicability of any dataset to their particular problem so that they can select the most appropriate data sources for their needs. Although data providers often provide rich supporting information in the form of metadata, typically this information does not include community usage information that can help other users judge fitness-for-purpose.The CHARMe project (http://www.charme.org.uk) is filling this gap by developing a system for sharing "commentary metadata". These are annotations that are generated and shared by the user community and include: Links between publications and datasets. The CHARMe system can record information about why a particular dataset was used (e.g. the paper may describe the dataset, it may use the dataset as a source, or it may be publishing results of a dataset assessment). These publications may appear in the peer-reviewed literature, or may be technical reports, websites or blog posts. Free-text comments supplied by the user. Provenance information, including links between datasets and descriptions of processing algorithms and sensors. External events that may affect data quality (e.g. large volcanic eruptions or El Niño events); we call these "significant events". Data quality information, e.g. system maturity indices. Commentary information can be linked to anything that can be uniquely identified (e.g. a dataset with a DOI or a persistent web address). It is also possible to associate commentary with particular subsets of datasets, for example to highlight an issue that is confined to a particular geographic region. We will demonstrate tools that show these capabilities in action, showing how users can apply commentary information during data discovery, visualization and analysis. The

  4. Commentary on "Studying eyewitness investigations in the field": a look forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steblay, Nancy Kay

    2008-02-01

    Schacter et al. (2007, this issue) address the controversy surrounding an Illinois pilot project that attempted to compare sequential versus simultaneous police lineup formats. The statement by these experts will guide the design and execution of future field lineup experiments. This commentary discusses three aspects of field studies that pose challenges as lineup experiments are interpreted: the imprecise meaning of the dependent measure (eyewitness decisions), the limitations of single studies, and the necessity to devise public policy from incomplete knowledge. A combination of laboratory and field information provides the means to determine best practices in eyewitness identification procedures.

  5. The Pill Really Can Be Mightier Than the Sword: A Response to Recent Commentaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malcolm Potts

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We appreciate the four commentaries that add new material and fresh perspectives to our article “The pill is mightier than the sword.” In emphasizing the role of voluntary family planning and girls’ education as achievable strategies with a potential to make the world a more peaceable place, we did not mean to oversimplify or disregard the intrinsic complexity of human conflict. On the whole, the commentators support and add to our thesis, although we question Pillai and Ya-Chien Wang’s suggestion that we may have overstated the unique human predisposition to kill our own species. We present additional data on male team aggression.

  6. Case Commentary on Concurrent Remedies in Pamesa v. Mendelson

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lookofsky, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    The Commentary relates to the decision of Israel Supreme Court (Pamesa Ceramica v. Yisrael Mendelson Ltd) decided on 17 March 2009. Although the law directly applied was the 1964 Hague Sales Convention (ULIS), the court discussed Articles 38, 39 and 40 of the United Nations Convention on Contracts...... for the International Sale of Goods (CISG), regarding their interpretation as relevant to the interpretation of Articles 38, 39 and 40 of ULIS. The court also discussed concurrent coverage in the context of Article 4 of the CISG, relying on similarity between it and Article 8 of ULIS....

  7. Commentary: Plastic ocean and the cancer connection: 7 questions and answers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benno Meyer-Rochow, V; Valérie Gross, J; Steffany, Frank; Zeuss, Dominique; Erren, Thomas C

    2015-10-01

    A plethora of recent scientific reports testifies to challenges the world is facing from an ever-increasing marine plastic pollution. Toxicological concerns have been put forward, but possible links between the now ubiquitous synthetic polymers and human as well as wildlife cancers remain to be investigated. Hence, this commentary which addresses seven questions. Given numerous uncertainties on the factual impacts of plastics, we should embark on empirical studies into the validity of biologically plausible links between plastic residues and cancers and concomitantly consider ways to reduce plastics in the world within and around us. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The mythology of the divine in P. Beroaldo's Commentaries on Book 11 of Apuleius' Metamorphoses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja Weiss

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The article investigates Beroaldo's approach to the theological themes of Book 11 of Apuleius' Metamorphoses focusing on his interpretation of the figure of Isis, represented by Apuleius as the Moon goddess of many names. A symbol of Nature, Fortune and Fate, at the same time changeable and motionless, Isis is no less than the transcendent deity ruling the universe. In Beroaldo's commentaries, Antiquity not only coexists with Christianity but actually stimulates it, and their symbiosis is an edifying model proposed by Beroaldo to the audience of his readers and students.

  9. Commentary: The Hmong and their Perceptions about Physical Disabilities: An Overview and Review of Selected Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Connie Cha

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The Hmong are one of the fastest growing populations in Central California. Hmong refugee families arrived in Fresno in the late 1970s facing a variety of challenges regarding their traditional health beliefs and the customs of mainstream Western biomedicine. Differing and sometimes conflicting perceptions about physical disabilities have resulted in painful misunderstandings between Hmong families and Western health care providers. The aim of this paper is to present a review of some of the Hmong health belief literature concerning physical disabilities in children. It also includes commentaries from those who work with the Hmong families of physically disabled children.

  10. Methodological vs. strategic control in artificial grammar learning: A commentary on Norman, Price and Jones (2011).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Luis

    2011-12-01

    Norman et al. (2011) reported that participants exposed in succession to two artificial grammars could be able to learn implicitly about them, and could apply their knowledge strategically to select which string corresponds to one of these two grammars. In this commentary, I identify an artifact that could account for the learning obtained not only in this study, but also in some previous studies using the same procedures. I claim that more methodological control is needed before jumping to conclusions on the kind of strategic control that could be achieved unconsciously. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Johann Joseph on Geometrical-Optical Illusions: A Translation and Commentary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Nicholas J; Todorović, Dejan; Phillips, David; Lingelbach, Bernd

    2017-01-01

    The term geometrical-optical illusions was coined by Johann Joseph Oppel (1815-1894) in 1855 in order to distinguish spatial distortions of size and orientation from the broader illusions of the senses. We present a translation of Oppel's article and a commentary on the material described in it. Oppel did much more than give a name to a class of visual spatial distortions. He examined a variety of figures and phenomena that were precursors of later, named illusions, and attempted to quantify and interpret them.

  12. Johann Joseph Oppel (1855) on Geometrical–Optical Illusions: A Translation and Commentary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorović, Dejan; Phillips, David; Lingelbach, Bernd

    2017-01-01

    The term geometrical–optical illusions was coined by Johann Joseph Oppel (1815–1894) in 1855 in order to distinguish spatial distortions of size and orientation from the broader illusions of the senses. We present a translation of Oppel’s article and a commentary on the material described in it. Oppel did much more than give a name to a class of visual spatial distortions. He examined a variety of figures and phenomena that were precursors of later, named illusions, and attempted to quantify and interpret them. PMID:28694957

  13. Applying Organization Theory to Understanding the Adoption and Implementation of Accountable Care Organizations: Commentary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shortell, Stephen M

    2016-12-01

    This commentary highights the key arguments and contributions of institutional thoery, transaction cost economics (TCE) theory, high reliability theory, and organizational learning theory to understanding the development and evolution of Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs). Institutional theory and TCE theory primarily emphasize the external influences shaping ACOs while high reliability theory and organizational learning theory underscore the internal fctors influencing ACO perfromance. A framework based on Implementation Science is proposed to conside the multiple perspectives on ACOs and, in particular, their abiity to innovate to achieve desired cost, quality, and population health goals. © The Author(s) 2016.

  14. Music, Empathy, and Affiliation: Commentary on Greenberg, Rentfrow, and Baron-Cohen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonna K Vuoskoski

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Empathy and social cognition arguably play a crucial role in our engagement with music. In response to the account offered by Greenberg, Rentfrow, and Baron-Cohen, this commentary considers an alternative—yet complementary—explanation for how music making and music listening might be able to evoke empathy and affiliation. This alternative explanation stems from the perception—action model of empathy, and the affiliation-evoking effects of mimicking and synchronized actions. In light of this alternative account, I will also explore the potential contribution of dispositional empathy to music preferences and music perception as suggested by Greenberg and colleagues.

  15. Article Commentary: Computer-Aided Detection of Breast Cancer — Have All Bases Been Covered?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gautam S. Muralidhar

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of computer-aided detection (CAD systems in mammography has been the subject of intense research for many years. These systems have been developed with the aim of helping radiologists to detect signs of breast cancer. However, the effectiveness of CAD systems in practice has sparked recent debate. In this commentary, we argue that computer-aided detection will become an increasingly important tool for radiologists in the early detection of breast cancer, but there are some important issues that need to be given greater focus in designing CAD systems if they are to reach their full potential.

  16. Commentary on "Theory-Led Design of Instruments and Representations in Learning Analytics: Developing a Novel Tool for Orchestration of Online Collaborative Learning"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teplovs, Chris

    2015-01-01

    This commentary reflects on the contributions to learning analytics and theory by a paper that describes how multiple theoretical frameworks were woven together to inform the creation of a new, automated discourse analysis tool. The commentary highlights the contributions of the original paper, provides some alternative approaches, and touches on…

  17. An interview with Arthur M. "Buzz" Brown, M.D., Ph.D. by Vicki Glaser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Arthur M

    2008-12-01

    Dr. Arthur M. "Buzz" Brown is the founder and CEO of ChanTest Corporation, an ion channel company specializing in drug discovery and safety services. He is Adjunct Professor of Physiology and Biophysics, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University. Dr. Brown has more than 30 years of experience in ion channel structure-function relationships and their associations with human health. He established world-leading ion channel departments at University of Texas Medical Branch, Baylor College of Medicine, and Case Western Reserve University. His lab first applied liquid ion exchanger ion-selective microelectrodes to single cells, introduced the concept of membrane delimited action of G proteins on ion channels, identified the ion channel conduction pathway or pore of voltage-gated channels and inwardly rectifying potassium channels, showed that the human ether-à-go-go-related gene potassium channel was the molecular target for lethal arrhythmias associated with noncardiac drugs, and established that noncardiac drugs could also produce lethal arrhythmias by inhibiting ion channel trafficking. Dr. Brown holds eight patents on ion channel methodology and application of ion channel pharmacology to therapeutics.

  18. Investigator profile. An interview with Salvador Contreras Balderas, Ph.D. Interview by Vicki Glaser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras Balderas, Salvador

    2006-01-01

    Dr. Contreras Balderas is Professor Emeritus in the Department of Biology at Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon (Monterrey, Mexico). He received a Master's degree and Ph.D. in Biological Sciences from Tulane University (New Orleans, LA) and wrote his dissertation on Ichthyology. He was awarded the President's Excellence Award of the American Fisheries Society. Dr. Contreras Balderas is Founder, President, and Honorary Member of the Mexican Society of Zoology, the Ichthyological Society of Mexico, and the Desert Fishes Council, is an ex-officio member of the Coalition for the Sustainable Development of the Rio Grande/Rio Bravo, U.S. & Mexico, and is a member of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife's Rio Grande Fishes Recovery Team. Dr. Contreras Balderas's areas of expertise include fish faunas, fishes at risk, exotic species, aquatic restoration, environmental impacts as detected by fishes, integral conservation, integral basin/ecosystem management, and ecological evaluation of integrity in basins.

  19. Personal profile: interview with Alexandra Stolzing, Ph.D. Interview by Vicki Glaser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolzig, Alexandra

    2011-06-01

    The interview series in Rejuvenation Research is a unique and, I believe, highly valuable feature of the journal, giving readers insights into the thinking and motivation of some of the most influential movers and shakers in the many disciplines-not only scientific(1-5) but also political,(6) sociological,(7,8) ethical,(9,10) and more-that impinge on the crusade to defeat aging. This issue's interview features one of the world's most respected and admired researchers in the biology of aging as a result of her incisive evaluations of the work of others as well as the quality of her own research. Her clarity of thought and expression, to the general public as well as to colleagues, has contributed immensely to the process of communication between the field of biomedical gerontology and the many constituencies that will be affected by progress against aging-a dialogue that, as I(11-19) and others(20-26) have noted recently, is essential if we are to develop effective interventions against aging with all possible speed.

  20. Commentary on Muscle dysmorphia as an addiction: a response to Grant (2015) and Nieuwoudt (2015).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Mark D; Foster, Andrew C; Shorter, Gillian W

    2015-03-01

    Following the publication of our paper ‘Muscle Dysmorphia: Could it be classified as an addiction to body image?’ in the Journal of Behavioral Addictions, two commentaries by Jon Grant and Johanna Nieuwoudt were published in response to our paper. Using the ‘addiction components model’, our main contention is that muscle dysmorphia (MD) actually comprises a number of different actions and behaviors and that the actual addictive activity is the maintaining of body image via a number of different activities such as bodybuilding, exercise, eating certain foods, taking specific drugs (e.g., anabolic steroids), shopping for certain foods, food supplements, and purchase or use of physical exercise accessories. This paper briefly responds to these two commentaries. While our hypothesized specifics relating to each addiction component sometimes lack empirical support (as noted explicitly by both Nieuwoudt and Grant), we still believe that our main thesis (that almost all the thoughts and behaviors of those with MD revolve around the maintenance of body image) is something that could be empirically tested in future research by those who already work in the area. We hope that the ‘Addiction to Body Image’ model we proposed provides a new framework for carrying out work in both empirical and clinical settings. The idea that MD could potentially be classed as an addiction cannot be negated on theoretical grounds as many people in the addiction field are turning their attention to research in new areas of behavioral addiction.

  1. Mending the gap: Introduction to the invited commentaries on Dinger, Strack, Sachsse, and Schauenburg (2009).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samstag, Lisa Wallner

    2009-09-01

    Introduces several commentaries on an article by U. Dinger et al (see record 200913603-002) entitled "Therapists' attachment, patients' interpersonal problems and alliance development over time in inpatient psychotherapy." This article represents an ambitious effort on the part of the researchers to map a number of interrelated relational variables, over the course of treatment, in a relatively understudied patient population. "Attachment," "interpersonal problems," and "alliance" are variables that capture core components of the therapeutic relationship and psychotherapy process that have been reliably linked to patient improvement in many previous studies of mostly outpatient psychotherapy. Jeremy Holmes (see record 2009-13603-003) and George Silbershatz (see record 2009-13603-004) were invited to comment on this study while wearing their clinical hats. They were asked about how they made sense of the research results as practicing psychotherapists, the ways in which the findings were useful to them as clinicians, and where they considered the research to be of more limited value from a clinical point of view. Following the commentaries is a final word from the authors of the study (see record 2009-13603-005). It is hoped that this format of dialogue will have an impact on how clinical research is presented in the future. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. Commentary on: Are we overpathologizing everyday life? A tenable blueprint for behavioral addiction research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kardefelt-Winther, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims This commentary is written in response to a paper by Billieux, Schimmenti, Khazaal, Maurage and Hereen (2015) published in the Journal of Behavioral Addictions. Methods It supports and extends the arguments by Billieux, Schimmenti et al. (2015): that the study of behavioral addictions too often rests on atheoretical and confirmatory research approaches. This tends to lead to theories that lack specificity and a neglect of the underlying processes that might explain why repetitive problem behaviors occur. Results In this commentary I extend the arguments by Billieux, Schimmenti et al. (2015) and argue that such research approaches might take us further away from conceptualizing psychiatric diagnoses that can be properly validated, which is already a problem in the field. Furthermore, I discuss whether the empirical support for conceptualizing repetitive problem behaviors as addictions might rest on research practices that have been methodologically biased to produce a result congruent with the proposal that substance addictions and behavioral addictions share similar traits. Conclusions I conclude by presenting a number of ways of going forward, chief of which is the proposal that we might wish to go beyond a priori assumptions of addiction in favor of identifying the essential problem manifestations for each new potential behavioral addiction. PMID:26551896

  3. Intraperitoneal chemotherapy for advanced ovarian and peritoneal cancers in patients following interval debulking surgery or primary cytoreductive surgery: Tom Baker Cancer Centre experience from 2006 to 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Gregory; Lucero, Carlos Aspe; Chu, Pamela; Nation, Jill; Ghatage, Prafull

    2010-03-01

    To describe our experience with cisplatin- and paclitaxel-based IP chemotherapy in patients treated initially with either neoadjuvant chemotherapy and interval debulking surgery (IDS) or primary cytoreductive surgery (PCRS). We performed a retrospective review of the records of 67 patients (38 IDS, 29 PCRS) enrolled in the intraperitoneal (IP) chemotherapy program at the Tom Baker Cancer Centre between 2006 and 2009. Information pertaining to patient demographics, IP chemotherapy toxicity, and catheter complications was extracted, and the median time to recurrence was calculated. Most patients in the study were aged 50 to 70 years and had a diagnosis of stage III serous ovarian cancer. Overall, 295/393 IP cycles (75%) were successfully administered. The proportion of patients completing six cycles of chemotherapy in the IDS and PCRS groups was 53% and 59%, respectively. Frequent (> 25%) Grade 1 to 2 chemotherapy toxicities included fatigue, peripheral neuropathy, and nausea. Catheter complications were observed in 34% of patients (23/67). The recurrence rates for patients completing four or more cycles of IP chemotherapy in the IDS and PCRS groups were 58% and 35%, respectively, with the median time to recurrence approximately one year. Although IP chemotherapy is well tolerated in both IDS and PCRS patients, the median time to recurrence is shorter than expected.

  4. Heat recovery and energy saving using a Baker Perkins Simplex 2000 bread baking oven. A demonstration at Mothers Pride Bakery. (Nottingham)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-02-01

    The first installation of a new type of British bread oven capable of producing 6,800 loaves/hour has reduced energy costs at British Bakeries' Watnall plant by Pound 45,900/year, including Pound 23,500/year due to the inclusion of heat recovery equipment on the oven. Additional benefits of this new oven include reduced production labour requirements - a reduction of one man per shift due to automatic handling of the bread-tin lids - and an increase in productivity of 100% compared with previous models. The new oven - a Baker Perkins Simplex 2000 - is indirect-fired which means that the burners can use either gas or oil without fear of contamination of the product. A new layout of the burners gives a better heat distribution than in previous models, thus requiring less fuel to achieve a given temperature in each zone. In addition there is heat recovery from both the combustion flue products and the oven chamber exhaust. The prover is heated by means of hot water coils using recovered heat from the oven exhaust. The combustion flue products are used to provide some pre-heating of the combustion air. (author).

  5. Chemoselective biohydrogenation of chalcone (2Ε)-3-(1,3-benzodioxole-5-yl)-1-phenyl-2-propen-1-one mediated by baker yeasts immobilized in polymeric supports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mundstock, Flavia L.S.; Silva, Vanessa D.; Nascimento, Maria da G.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, baker's yeast (BY) was immobilized in poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO), poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA), sodium caseinate (SC), gelatin (G) films and in agar (A) and gelatin (G) gels, and used as a biocatalyst in the biohydrogenation reaction of (2Ε)-3-(1,3-benzodioxyl-5-yl)-1-phenyl-2-propen-1-one (1). The transformation of (1) into the corresponding dehydro chalcone (2) through biohydrogenation reactions was carried out in n-hexane at 25 or 35 deg C, for 4-48 h reaction. The product conversion, under different experimental conditions, was evaluated by hydrogen nuclear magnetic resonance, 1 H NMR.The highest conversion degrees were achieved using BY immobilized in agar gel, (29-47%), depending also on the temperature. Using BY immobilized in PEO, PVA, SC and G films, the conversion into (2) was lower (0-21%). The results show the feasibility of the use of BY immobilized in polymeric materials to reduce a,b-unsaturated carbonyl compounds. (author)

  6. Inhibitory Effects of Urginea maritima (L. Baker, Zhumeria majdae Rech. F. and Wendelbo and Physalis divaricata D. Don Ethanolic Extracts on Mushroom Tyrosinase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foroogh Namjoyan, Alireza Jahangiri, Mohammad Ebrahim Azemi, Hamideh Mousavi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tyrosinase is a key enzyme in melanin synthesis from tyrosine. To prevent or treat pigmentation disorders, tyrosinase inhibitors have been used increasingly for medicinal and cosmetic products. The aim of this study is to evaluate inhibitory effects of Urginea maritima (L. Baker, Zhumeria majdae Rech.f. & Wendelbo and Physalis divaricata D.Don on mushroom tyrosinase. Methods: The inhibitory activities of the hydroalcoholic extracts of plants against oxidation of L-DOPA (as a substrate by mushroom tyrosinase were investigated. The amount of formed DOPAchrome was determined at 475 nm as optical density. Results: The extracts showed anti-tyrosinase activity weaker than positive control (Kojic acid. The inhibitory activity of tested plants: U.maritima, Z.majdae and P.divaricata against mushroom tyrosinase were 38.61, 29.70 and 25.74 % at 1.67 mg/mL, respectively. Conclusion: The most tyrosinase inhibitory activity was seen for U.maritima. However more investigations on human tyrosinase, toxicological and clinical studies are needed to confirm its activity.

  7. Unsupported inferences of high-severity fire in historical dry forests of the western United States: Response to Williams and Baker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulé, Peter Z.; Swetnam, Thomas W.; Brown, Peter M.; Falk, Donald A.; Peterson, David L.; Allen, Craig D.; Aplet, Gregory H.; Battaglia, Mike A.; Binkley, Dan; Farris, Calvin; Keane, Robert E.; Margolis, Ellis Q.; Grissino-Mayer, Henri; Miller, Carol; Sieg, Carolyn Hull; Skinner, Carl; Stephens, Scott L.; Taylor, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Reconstructions of dry western US forests in the late 19th century in Arizona, Colorado and Oregon based on General Land Office records were used by Williams & Baker (2012; Global Ecology and Biogeography, 21, 1042–1052; hereafter W&B) to infer past fire regimes with substantial moderate and high-severity burning. The authors concluded that present-day large, high-severity fires are not distinguishable from historical patterns. We present evidence of important errors in their study. First, the use of tree size distributions to reconstruct past fire severity and extent is not supported by empirical age–size relationships nor by studies that directly quantified disturbance history in these forests. Second, the fire severity classification of W&B is qualitatively different from most modern classification schemes, and is based on different types of data, leading to an inappropriate comparison. Third, we note that while W&B asserted ‘surprising’ heterogeneity in their reconstructions of stand density and species composition, their data are not substantially different from many previous studies which reached very different conclusions about subsequent forest and fire behaviour changes. Contrary to the conclusions of W&B, the preponderance of scientific evidence indicates that conservation of dry forest ecosystems in the western United States and their ecological, social and economic value is not consistent with a present-day disturbance regime of large, high-severity fires, especially under changing climate

  8. Using nuclear magnetic resonance and transient electromagnetics to characterise water distribution beneath an ice covered volcanic crater: the case of Sherman Crater Mt. Baker Washington.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irons, Trevor P.; Martin, Kathryn; Finn, Carol A.; Bloss, Benjamin; Horton, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Surface and laboratory Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) measurements combined with transient electromagnetic (TEM) data are powerful tools for subsurface water detection. Surface NMR (sNMR) and TEM soundings, laboratory NMR, complex resistivity, and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) analysis were all conducted to characterise the distribution of water within Sherman Crater on Mt. Baker, WA. Clay rich rocks, particularly if water saturated, can weaken volcanoes, thereby increasing the potential for catastrophic sector collapses that can lead to far-travelled, destructive debris flows. Detecting the presence and volume of shallow groundwater is critical for evaluating these landslide hazards. The TEM data identified a low resistivity layer (conditions which would allow for sNMR detection of the clay layer are investigated. Using current instrumentation the combined analysis of the TEM and sNMR data allow for valuable characterisation of the groundwater system in the crater. The sNMR is able to reduce the uncertainty of the TEM in regards to the presence of a bulk water layer, a valuable piece of information in hazard assessment.

  9. An automatic driving system for a Baker's garlic [Allium chinense] planter: Development of the infrared beam guidance system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, H.; Iwasaki, M.; Takeda, H.

    2002-01-01

    We have developed a tractor attachment type semi-automatic Baker's garlic (shallot) planter to save hard labor requirement during planting. The velocity of the tractor in operation is so slow (2 to 3m/min) that the tractor driver is forced to tie his hands for a long time. This is an obstacle to its diffusion, because farm managers have to drive their own tractors by themselves in most Japanese farmhouses, yet they have to do other jobs during the planting season. We designed a new automatic driving system that consists of one infrared beam radiator and two infrared beam receivers to solve this problem. The infrared radiator is located in front of the tractor and shows the infrared guideline of tractor path. The infrared receivers are equipped on the front of the tractor and detect the infrared from the radiator. The receivers are arranged symmetrically at 4.5 degree from the center of the tractor. So the misalignment of the tractor creates a difference in sensitivity and it is possible to distinguish the tractor direction against the infrared beam. This system was tested under the sand dune field conditions with the tractor that was converted to automatic driving. The results show the system can effectively steer about 80 m automatically with an almost straight path, and the error from the starting point is within 0.1 m

  10. Forum Commentary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanno, Yasuko

    2014-01-01

    Social class has been underresearched in the field of applied linguistics. The central goal of this forum was to stimulate more conversation about social class as it impacts language learning and teaching. In this article, I comment on 3 salient themes that have emerged in the 5 articles: (1) agency and structure in language learning and teaching,…

  11. Invited commentary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baker, Jennifer Lyn

    2012-01-01

    Mothers and fathers influence the risk of obesity in their children through genetic, environmental, and behavioral factors. Unique to the mother, however, is the intrauterine environment in which the fetus develops, and it is during this time in the uterus that the risk of later obesity...... in the child may develop. In this issue of the Journal, Fleten et al. (Am J Epidemiol. 2012;176(2):83-92) investigate whether the intrauterine environment plays a role in the development of adiposity by comparing the association between maternal prepregnancy body mass index (BMI; measured as weight...... in kilograms divided by height in meters squared) and offspring BMI at 3 years of age with the paternal-offspring association at the same age in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study. In that large study of stable, relatively healthy and well-educated families, significant differences in maternal...

  12. Commentary: Considerations on the Pharmacological Treatment of Compulsions and Stereotypies with Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors in Pervasive Developmental Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, C. T.

    2000-01-01

    This commentary discusses study results that indicate the nonselective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SRI) clomipramine is more efficacious than the relatively selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor desipramine and placebo in treating repetitive or ritualized behaviors in children with autism. The need for concurrent genetic and biochemical…

  13. Commentary: Wild psychometrics: Evidence for ‘general’ cognitive performance in wild New Zealand robins, Petroica longipes

    OpenAIRE

    Hackett, Paul M. W.

    2017-01-01

    A commentary on\\ud Wild psychometrics: Evidence for ‘general’ cognitive performance in wild New Zealand robins, Petroica longipes\\ud \\ud by Shaw, R. C., Boogert, N. J., Clayton, N. S., and Burns, K. C. (2015). Anim. Behav. 109, 101–111. doi: 10.1016/j.anbehav.2015.08.001

  14. Commentary on "Aesthetic Experience Explained by the Affect-Space Framework" by E. Schubert, A. C. North, & D. J. Hargreaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvira Brattico

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This commentary discusses the paper by Schubert and colleagues in the context of the recent proposals in the field of empirical aesthetics and neuroaesthetics, emphasizing the need for inclusion of the time variable for accounting for the dynamic nature of a musical experience. At the same time, the efforts of the authors for systematizing the concepts in the field are praised.

  15. On Conceptual Metaphor and the Flora and Fauna of Mind: Commentary on Brookes and Etkina; and Jeppsson, Haglund, and Amin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherin, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    In this commentary, the author presents his thoughts on two papers appearing in this special issue. The first, "The Importance of Language in Students' Reasoning about Heat in Thermodynamic Processes," by David T. Brookes and Eugenia Etkina (See: EJ1060728), and the second, "Varying Use of Conceptual Metaphors Across Levels of…

  16. A Different Curriculum of Preparation for Work: Commentary on Mike Rose, Sara Goldrick-Rab, Kris Gutierrez and Norton Grubb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthen, Helena Harlow

    2012-01-01

    The January 2012 issue of "Mind, Culture, and Activity" published the Invited Presidential Address "Rethinking Remedial Education and the Academic-Vocational Divide," given by Mike Rose at the 2011 meeting of the American Educational Research Association in New Orleans, along with responses and commentary by Sara Goldrick-Rab, Kris Gutierrez, and…

  17. Commentary on "Childhood Leukemia Survivors and Their Return to School: A Literature Review, Case Study, and Recommendations"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Lori A.

    2011-01-01

    This is a commentary on the article, "Childhood Leukemia Survivors and Their Return to School: A Literature Review, Case Study, and Recommendations" by D. Scott Hermann, Jill R. Thurber, Kenneth Miles, and Gloria Gilbert in this issue (2011). This article addresses issues related to the compatibility of the suggested practices with contemporary…

  18. Author's Response to Commentaries on: "An Interpretation of Part of Gilbert Gottlieb's Legacy: Developmental Systems Theory Contra Developmental Behavior Genetics"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molenaar, Peter C. M.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, Peter Molenaar responds to three commentaries (this issue) on his article, "An Interpretation of Part of Gilbert Gottlieb's Legacy: Developmental Systems Theory Contra Developmental Behavior Genetics." He addresses aspects of relational developmental systems (RDS) mentioned and questions raised in each of the…

  19. A Call for Mathematics Education Colleagues and Stakeholders to Collaboratively Engage with NCTM: In Response to Martin's Commentary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briars, Diane J.; Larson, Matt; Strutchens, Marilyn E.; Barnes, David

    2015-01-01

    In his commentary "The Collective Black and 'Principles to Actions,'" Martin (2015) offers a thought-provoking critique of "Principles to Actions: Ensuring Mathematical Success for All" (National Council of Teachers of Mathematics [NCTM], 2014). Martin (2015) states that the mathematics education community, in general, and the…

  20. Koplin, Titmuss and the social tail that wags the dog: Commentary on Koplin, "From blood donation to kidney sales".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearmur, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    This paper is a commentary on Koplin's "From Blood Donation to Kidney Sales". While appreciative of his paper, it argues that an argument from social solidarity to a Titmussian donor system is problematic. It reviews weaknesses in Titmuss, discusses problems about Titmussian blood donation as a vehicle for solidarity, and explores problems about extending a Titmussian approach to organs.

  1. Commentary on: "Toward Computer-Based Support of Metacognitive Skills: A Computational Framework to Coach Self Explanation"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conati, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    This paper is a commentary on "Toward Computer-Based Support of Meta-Cognitive Skills: a Computational Framework to Coach Self-Explanation", by Cristina Conati and Kurt Vanlehn, published in the "IJAED" in 2000 (Conati and VanLehn 2010). This work was one of the first examples of Intelligent Learning Environments (ILE) that…

  2. From Theory Use to Theory Building in Learning Analytics: A Commentary on "Learning Analytics to Support Teachers during Synchronous CSCL"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bodong

    2015-01-01

    In this commentary on Van Leeuwen (2015, this issue), I explore the relation between theory and practice in learning analytics. Specifically, I caution against adhering to one specific theoretical doctrine while ignoring others, suggest deeper applications of cognitive load theory to understanding teaching with analytics tools, and comment on…

  3. Appraising Loftus and Palmer (1974) post-event information versus concurrent commentary in the context of sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldschmied, Nadav; Sheptock, Mark; Kim, Kacey; Galily, Yair

    2017-11-01

    Two experiments were conducted to examine framing effects in sport. In Experiment 1, a conceptual replication [Loftus, E. F., & Palmer, J. C. (1974). Reconstruction of automobile destruction: An example of the interaction between language and memory. Journal of Verbal Learning and Verbal Behavior, 13(5), 585-589], participants watched a hockey collision, with the hit described later in a written format as a "contact", "bump", or "smash". This manipulation resulted in no differences in participants' report of how fast the players were skating, their intentions, and the outcome of the hit. In Experiment 2, participants watched the same video clip with ongoing commentary. Those who heard the announcer describing the event as "contact" estimated a higher skating speed than participants who were exposed to the "smash" commentary. Participants who were exposed to the "bump" commentary rated the repercussions of the collision as less severe than did those exposed to the other commentaries. These findings show that the perception of magnitude hierarchy may be domain specific and suggest future avenues for exploring framing effects when one is exposed to visual stimuli.

  4. Intelligent Testing with Wechsler’s Fourth Editions: Perspectives on the Weiss et al. Studies and the Eight Commentaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Alan S.

    2013-01-01

    The two featured articles and eight commentaries on the WISC-IV (Wechsler, 2003) and WAIS-IV (Wechsler, 2008) in this special issue of "Journal of Psychoeducational Assessment" are of exceptional quality. As a collective, this special issue greatly advances the field of cognitive assessment by intelligently synthesizing the best of…

  5. Connecting Informal and Formal Learning Experiences in the Age of Participatory Media: Commentary on Bull et al. (2008)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhow, Christine

    2008-01-01

    The recent editorial in this journal by Bull et al. ("Connecting Informal and Formal Learning Experiences in the Age of Participatory Media" Vol 8, Iss 2) discussed the challenges of bridging formal learning practices and informal learning opportunities within the context of today's Web-enhanced world. In this commentary, Christine…

  6. Commentary on "Lessons Learned from Leading an Anger Management Group Using the "Seeing Red" Curriculum in an Elementary School"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Sally

    2010-01-01

    This commentary responds to "Lessons Learned From Leading an Anger Management Group Using the "Seeing Red" Curriculum in an Elementary School," E. L. Sportsman, J. S. Carlson, and K. M. Guthrie's (2010/this issue) account of an anger control intervention's implementation and effectiveness in an elementary school setting. The accompanying article…

  7. Progress on nature and nurture: Commentary on Granqvist and Nkara's 'Nature meets nurture in religious and spiritual development'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyatzis, Chris J

    2017-03-01

    This commentary addresses several key ideas in the Granqvist and Nkara (this issue) conceptual piece on the need for a more sophisticated understanding of how nature and nurture interact to influence religious and spiritual development. Cultural and genetic factors are explored. © 2017 The British Psychological Society.

  8. Commentary on "How Task Features Impact Evidence from Assessments Embedded in Simulations and Games" by Almond et al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timms, Mike

    2014-01-01

    In his commentary on "How Task Features Impact Evidence from Assessments Embedded in Simulations and Games" by Almond et al., Mike Timms writes that his own research has involved the use of embedded assessments using simulations in interactive learning environments, and the Evidence Centered Design (ECD) approach has provided a solid…

  9. An Indigenous Knowledges Perspective on Valid Meaning Making: A Commentary on Research with the EDI and Aboriginal Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sam, Michele A.

    2011-01-01

    Offering an Indigenous perspective, this commentary discusses collaborative research, shared meaning making, and knowledge building specific to child development, and reflects on social, cultural, and historical aspects that influence these processes. Drawing upon experiences of developing a collaborative research approach with which to engage…

  10. The Meaning of Goodness-of-Fit Tests: Commentary on "Goodness-of-Fit Assessment of Item Response Theory Models"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thissen, David

    2013-01-01

    In this commentary, David Thissen states that "Goodness-of-fit assessment for IRT models is maturing; it has come a long way from zero." Thissen then references prior works on "goodness of fit" in the index of Lord and Novick's (1968) classic text; Yen (1984); Drasgow, Levine, Tsien, Williams, and Mead (1995); Chen and…

  11. Valid Issues but Limited Scope: A Response to Kitchen and Berk's Research Commentary on Educational Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clements, Douglas H.; Sarama, Julie

    2017-01-01

    In their Research Commentary, Kitchen and Berk (2016) argue that educational technology may focus only on skills for low-income students and students of color, further limiting their opportunities to learn mathematical reasoning, and thus pose a challenge to realizing standards-based reforms. Although we share the concern about equity and about…

  12. Causality, selectivity or artefacts? Why socioeconomic inequalities in health are not smallest in the Nordic countries : Commentaries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijts, T.; Eikemo, T.A

    2009-01-01

    Commentaries: The Nordic welfare states aim at providing equality of the highest standards for all their citizens. However, numerous studies have demonstrated that socioeconomic inequalities in morbidity and mortality are not among the smallest in these countries as compared with other European

  13. When brain regions talk to each other during speech processing, what are they talking about? Commentary on Gow and Olson

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McQueen, J.M.; Eisner, F.; Norris, D.

    2016-01-01

    This commentary on Gow and Olson [2015. Sentential influences on acoustic-phonetic processing: A Granger causality analysis of multimodal imaging data. Language, Cognition and Neuroscience. Advance online publication. doi:10.1080/23273798.2015.1029498] questions in three ways their conclusion that

  14. A Commentary on "Updating the Duplex Design for Test-Based Accountability in the Twenty-First Century"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Steffen

    2010-01-01

    This article presents the author's commentary on "Updating the Duplex Design for Test-Based Accountability in the Twenty-First Century," in which Isaac I. Bejar and E. Aurora Graf propose the application of a test design--the duplex design (which was proposed in 1988 by Bock and Mislevy) for application in current accountability assessments.…

  15. CHARMe Commentary metadata for Climate Science: collecting, linking and sharing user feedback on climate datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blower, Jon; Lawrence, Bryan; Kershaw, Philip; Nagni, Maurizio

    2014-05-01

    The research process can be thought of as an iterative activity, initiated based on prior domain knowledge, as well on a number of external inputs, and producing a range of outputs including datasets, studies and peer reviewed publications. These outputs may describe the problem under study, the methodology used, the results obtained, etc. In any new publication, the author may cite or comment other papers or datasets in order to support their research hypothesis. However, as their work progresses, the researcher may draw from many other latent channels of information. These could include for example, a private conversation following a lecture or during a social dinner; an opinion expressed concerning some significant event such as an earthquake or for example a satellite failure. In addition, other sources of information of grey literature are important public such as informal papers such as the arxiv deposit, reports and studies. The climate science community is not an exception to this pattern; the CHARMe project, funded under the European FP7 framework, is developing an online system for collecting and sharing user feedback on climate datasets. This is to help users judge how suitable such climate data are for an intended application. The user feedback could be comments about assessments, citations, or provenance of the dataset, or other information such as descriptions of uncertainty or data quality. We define this as a distinct category of metadata called Commentary or C-metadata. We link C-metadata with target climate datasets using a Linked Data approach via the Open Annotation data model. In the context of Linked Data, C-metadata plays the role of a resource which, depending on its nature, may be accessed as simple text or as more structured content. The project is implementing a range of software tools to create, search or visualize C-metadata including a JavaScript plugin enabling this functionality to be integrated in situ with data provider portals

  16. Developmental commentary: individual and contextual influences on student-teacher relationships and children's early problem behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Sonya S; Pianta, Robert C

    2008-07-01

    Understanding factors associated with children's early behavioral difficulties is of vital importance to children's school success, and to the prevention of future behavior problems. Although biological factors can influence the expression of certain behaviors, the probability of children exhibiting classroom behavior problems is intensified when they are exposed to multiple risk factors, particularly negative student-teacher interactions. Children who exhibit behavior problems during early childhood and the transition to kindergarten, without intervention, can be placed on a developmental trajectory for serious behavior problems in later grades. Using a developmental systems model, this commentary provides a conceptual framework for understanding the contributions of individual and contextual factors to the development of early student-teacher relationships. Parent, teacher, and student characteristics are discussed as they are related to shaping student-teacher interactions and children's adjustment to school.

  17. Commentary on Cross-Cultural Perspectives on Positive Youth Development With Implications for Intervention Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koller, Silvia H; Verma, Suman

    2017-07-01

    There is a growing focus on youth positive development issues among researchers and practitioners around the world. In this special issue of Child Development, each of the international authors provides new perspectives and understanding about youth developmental assets in different cultural settings. The present commentary (a) examines some of the cross-cultural themes that emerge from the four articles by international authors in this issue with implications for positive youth development (PYD) and (b) how intervention science can benefit by incorporating a PYD approach. As evident, youth involved in contexts that provide positive resources from significant others not only were less likely to exhibit negative outcomes, but also were more likely to show evidence of positive development. © 2017 The Authors. Child Development © 2017 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

  18. Commentary on Fiester's "Ill-placed democracy: ethics consultations and the moral status of voting".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubler, Nancy Neveloff

    2011-01-01

    Autumn Fiester identifies an important element in clinical ethics consultation (CEC) that she labels, from the Greek, aporia, "state of perplexity," evidenced in CEC as ethical ambiguity. Fiester argues that the inherent difficulties of cases so characterized render them inappropriate for voting and more amenable to mediation and the search for consensus. This commentary supports Fiester's analysis and adds additional reasons for rejecting voting as a process for resolving disputes in CEC including: it distorts the analysis by empowering individual voters preferences and biases rather than focusing on the interests and wishes of the patient and family; it offers an insufficiently sensitive model for resolving the awesome, nuanced, conflicted, and ethically complex issues surrounding life and death; it marginalizes minority opinions that may have moral validity.

  19. Commentary: restarting NTD programme activities after the Ebola outbreak in Liberia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Brent C; Kollie, Karsor; Koudou, Benjamin; Mackenzie, Charles

    2017-05-01

    It is widely known that the recent Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) in West Africa caused a serious disruption to the national health system, with many of ongoing disease focused programmes, such as mass drug administration (MDA) for onchocerciasis (ONC), lymphatic filariasis (LF) and schistosomiasis (SCH), being suspended or scaled-down. As these MDA programmes attempt to restart post-EVD it is important to understand the challenges that may be encountered. This commentary addresses the opinions of the major health sectors involved, as well as those of community members, regarding logistic needs and challenges faced as these important public health programmes consider restarting. There appears to be a strong desire by the communities to resume NTD programme activities, although it is clear that some important challenges remain, the most prominent being those resulting from the severe loss of trained staff.

  20. Unraveling Health Disparities Among Sexual and Gender Minorities: A Commentary on the Persistent Impact of Stigma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdiserri, Ronald O; Holtgrave, David R; Poteat, Tonia C; Beyrer, Chris

    2018-01-03

    LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender) populations experience disparities in health outcomes, both physical and mental, compared to their heterosexual and cisgender peers. This commentary confronts the view held by some researchers that the disparate rates of mental health problems reported among LGBT populations are the consequences of pursuing a particular life trajectory, rather than resulting from the corrosive and persistent impact of stigma. Suggesting that mental health disparities among LGBT populations arise internally, de novo, when individuals express non-heterosexual and non-conforming gender identities ignores the vast body of evidence documenting the destructive impact of socially mediated stigma and systemic discrimination on health outcomes for a number of minorities, including sexual and gender minorities. Furthermore, such thinking is antithetical to widely accepted standards of health and wellbeing because it implies that LGBT persons should adopt and live out identities that contradict or deny their innermost feelings of self.

  1. Commentary (Pre-Trial Detention in the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia )

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marchuk, Iryna

    2015-01-01

    Most international criminal courts and tribunals find provisional detention absolutely necessary to ensure the swift delivery of justice. A decision on pre-trial detention must be in conformity with well-recognized human rights standards, thus respecting the person’s right to a fair trial...... and upholding the presumption of evidence. Although the general assumption in criminal law is that pre-trial detention is the exception and not the rule, a number of factors, such as the gravity of the crimes, as well as heightened flight risk of the accused, appear to have reversed the test employed...... in international criminal courts and tribunals. To date, all provisional detention orders against former members of the inner circle of Pol Pot, except for one, have been re-affirmed on appeal in the ECCC. This commentary appraises the ECCC case law on pre-trial detention from the standpoint of its conformity...

  2. Brain Musics: History, Precedents, and Commentary on Whalley, Mavros and Furniss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Ortiz

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Whalley, Mavros and Furniss explore questions of agency, control and interaction, as well as the embodied nature of musical performance in relation to the use of human-computer interaction through the work Clasp Together (beta for small ensemble and live electronics. The underlying concept of the piece focuses on direct mapping of a human neural network (embodied by a performer within the ensemble to an artificial neural network running on a computer. With our commentary, we contextualize the work within the field of Music Neuroscience. Specifically, we point at precedents in EEG-based musical practice as well as ongoing research in the field. We hope to more clearly situate Clasp Together (beta in the broad area of Brain Computer Musical Interfaces and discuss the challenges and opportunities that these technologies offer for composers.

  3. Report of the Parliamentary Standing Committee on the Surrogacy (Regulation) Bill, 2016: A commentary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timms, Olinda

    2018-01-01

    Soon after the Surrogacy (Regulation) Bill, 2016 was approved by the Cabinet for introduction into Parliament in 2016, it was submitted for review to a Parliamentary Standing Committee on Health and Family Welfare. The report of this committee, The 102nd Report on the Surrogacy (Regulation) Bill, 2016 was laid on the table of the Lok Sabha and presented to the Rajya Sabha on August 10, 2017. It contains hearings with stakeholders and witnesses and a review of relevant documents and related legislation. The comments of the Parliamentary Standing Committee are wide ranging and pertinent, seeking to fill the gaps and explain and rationalise the statute and includes responses from the Department of Health Research. This commentary seeks to analyse the recommendations of the Committee, exploring some of the ethical, legal, and social implications of surrogacy arrangements in our country, where diverse viewpoints and strong sentiments can encounter difficult ground realities.

  4. A commentary on the role of molecular technology and automation in clinical diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Ciara; Fitzgibbon, Marie; Powell, James; Barron, Denis; O'Mahony, Jim; Power, Lorraine; O'Connell, Nuala H; Dunne, Colum

    2014-01-01

    Historically, the identification of bacterial or yeast isolates has been based on phenotypic characteristics such as growth on defined media, colony morphology, Gram stain, and various biochemical reactions, with significant delay in diagnosis. Clinical microbiology as a medical specialty has embraced advances in molecular technology for rapid species identification with broad-range 16S rDNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and matrix-assisted laser desorption and/or ionization time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry demonstrated as accurate, rapid, and cost-effective methods for the identification of most, but not all, bacteria and yeasts. Protracted conventional incubation times previously necessary to identify certain species have been mitigated, affording patients quicker diagnosis with associated reduction in exposure to empiric broad-spectrum antimicrobial therapy and shortened hospital stay. This short commentary details such molecular advances and their implications in the clinical microbiology setting.

  5. Poetic justice: A commentary on Joseph B. McCaffrey's "The brain’s heterogeneous landscape"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Witold Hensel

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper is a commentary on McCaffrey (2015. I begin by arguing that the two views on brain pluripotency that McCaffrey intends to reconcile, namely those of Price and Friston (2005 and Klein (2012, are not really in conflict. The alleged disagreement between them stems from two interpretative failures: first on the part of Klein, who has misrepresented the views of Price and Friston, and second on the part of McCaffrey, who has misconstrued Klein’s position. I then take issue with McCaffrey’s claim that each of the structurefunction mapping strategies he discusses allows researchers to discover a different kind of pluripotency: (1 where each subregion of a pluripotent brain area performs a specific function, (2 where a brain area performs a single function in multiple mechanisms (networks, and (3 where a brain area performs multiple functions in multiple mechanisms (networks.

  6. A short commentary on Aristotle's scientific legacy and his definition of the physiologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarros, Apostolos

    2014-06-01

    The roots of physiology - on the basis of a systematic study of the human body's functions and their correlation to anatomy - date back to the works of Aristotle. The pupil of Plato and the tutor of Alexander the Great was a one-man university, and his contributions to the medical sciences have been immense. His surviving works highlight the first serious approach towards the rejection of metaphysical and mythological thought, and have: (i) demonstrated a deep appreciation for a systematic, non-metaphysical study of the natural world, (ii) set the foundations of comparative and human anatomy, (iii) established the first (indirect) definition of the "physiologist", and (iv) exercised a dominant influence upon the subsequent history of Hellenistic, European and Arabic Medicine. The current letter provides a short commentary on the historical account of Physiology as a scientific field and underlines the unique legacy that Aristotle has provided us with.

  7. Editorial Commentary: The Acellular Osteochondral Allograft, the Emperor Has New Clothes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandelbaum, Bert R; Chahla, Jorge

    2017-12-01

    For larger lesions (>2.5-cm 2 ), clinical evidence and practice have shown that fresh osteochondral allograft have good durability, with 88% return to sport and greater than 75% 10-year survival rates for treatment of large femoral condyle lesions. That said, the use of fresh osteochondral allografts in clinical practice is limited by the availability of acceptable donor tissues for eligible patients in a timely fashion. Significant diminution of chondrocyte viability and density occurs during the preservation and storage period. All osteochondral allografts are not equal in performance and outcome. Chondrocyte density and viability are critical for successful transplantation and outcome in the short and long term. This commentary highlights the high failure rates of tissue when it is acellular. Copyright © 2017 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Commentary: The Hash House Harriers and the winding path to materials discovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canfield, Paul C.

    2015-01-01

    Materials science research can be both very demanding and extremely rewarding. In this Commentary, in my own research of new electronic and magnetic materials, I give numerous exemplars of the path followed to materials discovery. I also highlight the parallels between my research experiences with the pastime of running. I hope that my thoughts will help guide junior researchers along the often tortuous and exciting path to new materials and that I can teach them to be open minded and persistent about following new lines of discovery. “No-pain, no-gain” applies to many things in life, running and scientific research being just two examples, but I hope in the case of scientific research that I can convince you the gain normally outweighs the pain

  9. Commentary on a participatory inquiry paradigm used to assess EOL simulation participant outcomes and design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gannon, Jane M

    2017-11-20

    Care at the end-of-life has attracted global attention, as health care workers struggle with balancing cure based care with end-of-life care, and knowing when to transition from the former to the latter. Simulation is gaining in popularity as an education strategy to facilitate health care provider decision-making by improving communication skills with patients and family members. This commentary focuses on the authors' simulation evaluation process. When data were assessed using a participatory inquiry paradigm, the evaluation revealed far more than a formative or summative evaluation of participant knowledge and skills in this area of care. Consequently, this assessment strategy has ramifications for best practices for simulation design and evaluation.

  10. Article Commentary: Insulin Resistance, Type 2 Diabetes and Chronic Liver Disease. A Deadly Trio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amedeo Lonardo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this commentary to the paper by Donadon V. et al (Clinical Medicine: Endocrinology and Diabetes. 2009;2:25–33. the association and significance of insulin resistance with chronic liver disease are shortly reviewed and the molecular mechanisms underlying the diabetogenic and oncogenic potentials of advanced liver disease are summarized. Literature studies demonstrate that hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC can be part of the natural history of NASH. HCCs in patients with features of metabolic syndrome as the only risk factor for liver disease have distinct morphological characteristics and mainly occur in the absence of significant fibrosis in the background liver. Moreover, data indicate that the presence of diabetes carries an approximately three to four-fold increased risk of HCC and such a risk is strongly increased by concurrent viral infections. Finally, the relationship between insulin resistance, steatosis and diabetes in NAFLD and HCV infection will be commented, along with the directions for future studies.

  11. Laid bare: religious intolerance within online commentary about 'bare below the elbows' guidance in professional journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, June; Shanks, Andrew

    2013-09-01

    The decision by the Department of Health to introduce amendments to the uniform and workwear policy for the NHS in response to increasing problems with infection control seemed uncontroversial. There was, however, some difficulty with implementing the policy, which arose largely because of the conflict this caused for staff who wished to keep their arms covered for reasons which stemmed from religious beliefs. This paper uses textual analysis to examine how those reasons and challenges were discussed in online commentary within a medical and nursing journal. The papers shows that there was a marked difference in how the two groups of professionals responded to the changes to workwear, and exposes a worrying degree of religious intolerance expressed by contributors to the nursing journal.

  12. Commentary: Considering Assumptions in Associations Between Music Preferences and Empathy-Related Responding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan A O'Neill

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This commentary considers some of the assumptions underpinning the study by Clark and Giacomantonio (2015. Their exploratory study examined relationships between young people's music preferences and their cognitive and affective empathy-related responses. First, the prescriptive assumption that music preferences can be measured according to how often an individual listens to a particular music genre is considered within axiology or value theory as a multidimensional construct (general, specific, and functional values. This is followed by a consideration of the causal assumption that if we increase young people's empathy through exposure to prosocial song lyrics this will increase their prosocial behavior. It is suggested that the predictive power of musical preferences on empathy-related responding might benefit from a consideration of the larger pattern of psychological and subjective wellbeing within the context of developmental regulation across ontogeny that involves mutually influential individual—context relations.

  13. Commentary on the Assessment and Interpretation of Pediatric Aerobic Fitness-The Year That Was 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Neil

    2018-02-01

    Three papers, which between them contribute to the current debate on the assessment and interpretation of pediatric aerobic fitness, were selected for commentary. The first paper (Children. 2017; 4:6; doi: 10.3390/children4010006 ) highlights the merits of clinical exercise testing and advocates the advancement of pediatric exercise testing through a rationale founded on demonstrated prognostic value of data obtained. It notes the lack of well-accepted definitions of exercise outcome variables in children and promotes the case for data harmonization across laboratories. The second paper (J Appl Physiol. 2017; 122: 997-1002) argues persuasively that the acceptance of peak oxygen uptake (peak [Formula: see text]) at the termination of an exercise test to voluntary exhaustion as a surrogate for a "true" maximal value (ie, [Formula: see text]) is no longer tolerable. The authors present a compelling case for the adoption of a follow-up verification test to unambiguously validate the achievement of [Formula: see text]. The third paper (Br J Sports Med. 2017; 1-10, doi: 10.1136/bjsports-2017-097982 ) compiles large, previously published datasets to provide a review of temporal trends in 20-m shuttle run test scores. The authors assert that temporal trends in 20-m shuttle run test performance provide meaningful insight into trends in population health. The commentary stresses the importance of scientific rigor in pediatric exercise testing, emphasizes the use of precise definitions when describing health-related variables, and cautions against the misuse of exercise outcome measures in recommendations relating to or impacting on young people's health and well-being.

  14. A Commentary on Scipio’s Dream by Macrobius: Macrobii Ambrosii Theodosii In somnium Scipionis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Škamperle

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Ambrosius Theodosius Macrobius (4th—5th cent. A.D. belongs among the late Latin philosophical authors who draw on the traditions of Middle and Late Platonism, partly of Stoicism, and whose allegorical exegetic literature forms a fascinating spiritual and thematic bridge between late antiquity and the Middle Ages. Of Macrobius’ two known treatises, one is Saturnalia (Saturnaliorum libri VII, a conversation named for the Roman December festival, while the other is his allegorical commentary onThe Dream of Scipio (Commentarium in Somnium Scipionis. The latter takes as its starting-point the lost Book 6 of Cicero’s De re publica, or, more precisely, the description of the dream (6.9–29, which has been handed down separately and therefore preserved. Young Scipio Aemilianus is visited in his dream by his deceased grandfather, Publius Cornelius Scipio Africanus (236–184 B.C., who led the Roman army to victory over Hannibal in the Second Punic War. Their dream conversation revolves around eschatological and ethical themes, centring on the soul and her immortality, which may be attained through true cognition as well as through virtuous and moral civil activity. To this, Macrobius adds an allegorical treatise on the structure of the universe, the soul’s descent through the spheres, and her ascent back to the astral celestial sphere, her true eternal home. A comprehensive commentary is provided on the geography of the known world – the continents, the sea, winds – as well as on the structure of the universe, the zodiac belt, and the planetary spheres, including the themes of harmony and music.

  15. Consumption of agro-industrial supplies by the baker subsector of Palmira, Valle, Colombia. Consumo de insumos agroindustriales por el subsector panificador de Palmira, Valle del Cauca.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adarme J Wilson

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The indicators of agroindustrial consumption in the bakers subsector Pymes play a primary role for designing sustainable strategies for the small craftsman of bread. The administrative, operative and human talent subsystems were evaluated, in 30 of 178 organizations that conformed the bakers subsystems of Palmira on 2005. The estimated annual consumption of wheat flour on 2004 was 2016 t; 348 t of sugar; 240 t of cheese; 54 t of salt; 492 t of margarine; 99 t of yeast; 151200 panels of eggs. With regarding to raw materials it consumes 384000 m3 of natural gas; 1.2 million kw of electric power and 156000 m3 of water. The sector generates 681 direct employments. Map is presented with the location of 86% of the bakeries registered in the Trade Chamber. There is not a unique bakery that had implemented a program of Good Manufacture Practices BPM in an integral way, that meets the National Institute of Medications and Foods Surveillance INVIMA Standars, that has of a system of Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP or have been is to be certified with Quality Assuring Standars (ISO 9000, and/or Environmental Administration (ISO 14000, with occupational health programs (OHSAS 18000 and permanent improvement programs relative to administrative and commercial aspects.Los indicadores de consumo agroindustrial en las Pymes del subsector panificador resultan apremiantes para el diseño de estrategias de sostenibilidad para los pequeños artesanos del pan. Se evaluaron los subsistemas administrativos, talento humano y operativo en 30 de las 178 organizaciones que conformaron el subsistema panificador de Palmira en el 2005. El consumo estimado anual para el 2004 de harina de trigo fue 2.016 t; 348 t de azúcar; 240 t de queso; 54 t de sal; 492 t de margarina; 99 t de levadura; 151.200 paneles de huevos. En materias primas auxiliares consume 384.000 m3 de gas natural; 1.2 millones de kw de energía eléctrica y 156.000 m3 de agua. El sector genera

  16. Dowex anion exchanger-loaded-baker's yeast as bi-functionalized biosorbents for selective extraction of anionic and cationic mercury(II) species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmoud, Mohamed E.; Yakout, Amr A.; Osman, Maher M.

    2009-01-01

    Dowex anion exchanger-immobilized-baker's yeast [Dae-yeast] were synthesized and potentially applied as environmental friendly biosorbents to evaluate the up-take process of anionic and cationic mercury(II) species as well as other metal ions. Optimization of mass ratio of Dowex anion exchanger versus yeast (1:1-1:10) in presence of various interacting buffer solutions (pH 4.0-9.0) was performed and evaluated. Surface modification of [Dae-yeast] was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and infrared spectroscopy. The maximum metal biosorption capacity values of [Dae-yeast] towards mercury(II) were found in the range of 0.800-0.960, 0.840-0.950 and 0.730-0.900 mmol g -1 in presence of buffer solutions pH 2.0, 4.0 and 7.0, respectively. Three possible and different mechanisms are proposed to account for the biosorption of mercury and mercuric species under these three buffering conditions based on ion exchange, ion pair and chelation interaction processes. Factors affecting biosorption of mercury from aqueous medium including the pH effect of aqueous solutions (1.0-7.0), shaking time (1-30 min) and interfering ions were searched. The potential applications of modified biosorbents for selective biosorption and extraction of mercury from different real matrices including dental filling waste materials, industrial waste water samples and mercury lamp waste materials were also explored. The results denote to excellent percentage extraction values, from nitric acid as the dissolution solvent with a pH 2.0, as determined in the range of 90.77-97.91 ± 3.00-5.00%, 90.00-93.40 ± 4.00-5.00% and 92.31-100.00 ± 3.00-4.00% for the three tested samples, respectively.

  17. Sci-Thur PM – Brachytherapy 02: Positional accuracy in Pd-103 permanent breast seed implant (PBSI) brachytherapy at the Tom Baker Cancer Centre (TBCC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frederick, Amy; Watt, Elizabeth; Peacock, Michael; Husain, Siraj; Meyer, Tyler; Roumeliotis, Michael [University of Calgary, Tom Baker Cancer Centre (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: This retrospective study aims to quantify the positional accuracy of seed delivery in permanent breast seed implant (PBSI) brachytherapy at the Tom Baker Cancer Centre (TBCC). Methods: Treatment planning and post-implant CT scans for 5 patients were rigidly registered using the MIM Symphony™ software (MIM Software, Cleveland, OH) and used to evaluate differences between planned and implanted seed positions. Total and directional seed displacements were calculated for each patient in a clinically relevant ‘needle coordinate system’, defined relative to the angle of fiducial needle insertion. Results: The overall average total seed displacement was 10±8 mm. Systematic seed displacements were observed in individual patients and the magnitude and direction of these offsets varied among patients. One patient showed a significant directional seed displacement in the shallow-deep direction compared with the other four patients. With the exception of this one patient outlier, no significant systematic directional displacements in the needle coordinate system were observed for this cohort; the average directional displacements were −1±5 mm, 2±3 mm, and −2±4 mm in the shallow-deep, up-down, and right-left directions respectively. Conclusion: With the exception of one patient outlier, the magnitude of seed displacements were relatively consistent among patients. The results indicate that the shallow-deep direction possesses the largest uncertainty for the seed delivery method used at the TBCC. The relatively large uncertainty in seed placement in this direction is expected, as this is the direction of needle insertion. Further work will involve evaluating deflections of delivered needle tracks from their planned positions.

  18. Identification of up-regulated genes from the metal-hyperaccumulator aquatic fern Salvinia minima Baker, in response to lead exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal-Alvarado, Daniel A; Martínez-Hernández, A; Calderón-Vázquez, C L; Uh-Ramos, D; Fuentes, G; Ramírez-Prado, J H; Sáenz-Carbonell, L; Santamaría, J M

    2017-12-01

    Lead (Pb) is one of the most serious environmental pollutants. The aquatic fern Salvinia minima Baker is capable to hyper-accumulate Pb in their tissues. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in its Pb accumulation and tolerance capacity are not fully understood. In order to investigate the molecular mechanisms that are activated by S. minima in response to Pb, we constructed a suppression subtractive hybridization library (SSH) in response to an exposure to 40μM of Pb(NO 3 ) 2 for 12h. 365 lead-related differentially expressed sequences tags (ESTs) were isolated and sequenced. Among these ESTs, 143 unique cDNA (97 were registered at the GenBank and 46 ESTs were not registered, because they did not meet the GenBank conditions). Those ESTs were identified and classified into 3 groups according to Blast2GO. In terms of metabolic pathways, they were grouped into 29 KEGG pathways. Among the ESTs, we identified some that might be part of the mechanism that this fern may have to deal with this metal, including abiotic-stress-related transcription factors, some that might be involved in tolerance mechanisms such as ROS scavenging, membrane protection, and those of cell homeostasis recovery. To validate the SSH library, 4 genes were randomly selected from the library and analyzed by qRT-PCR. These 4 genes were transcriptionally up-regulated in response to lead in at least one of the two tested tissues (roots and leaves). The present library is one of the few genomics approaches to study the response to metal stress in an aquatic fern, representing novel molecular information and tools to understand the molecular physiology of its Pb tolerance and hyperaccumulation capacity. Further research is required to elucidate the functions of the lead-induced genes that remain classified as unknown, to perhaps reveal novel molecular mechanisms of Pb tolerance and accumulation capacity in aquatic plants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Capacity of the aquatic fern (Salvinia minima Baker) to accumulate high concentrations of nickel in its tissues, and its effect on plant physiological processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuentes, Ignacio I.; Espadas-Gil, Francisco; Talavera-May, Carlos; Fuentes, Gabriela; Santamaría, Jorge M., E-mail: jorgesm@cicy.mx

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • We document the capacity of an aquatic fern to hyper-accumulate Ni. • Effects of high Ni concentrations uptake on plant performance is documented. • High concentration of Ni in tissues damage photosynthesis. • Damage is related to carboxylation mechanisms than to electron transfer efficiency. • S. minima is a good candidate for remediation of water bodies contaminated with Ni. - Abstract: An experiment was designed to assess the capacity of Salvinia minima Baker to uptake and accumulate nickel in its tissues and to evaluate whether or not this uptake can affect its physiology. Our results suggest that S. minima plants are able to take up high amounts of nickel in its tissues, particularly in roots. In fact, our results support the idea that S. minima might be considered a hyper-accumulator of nickel, as it is able to accumulate 16.3 mg g{sup −1} (whole plant DW basis). Our results also showed a two-steps uptake pattern of nickel, with a fast uptake of nickel at the first 6 to 12 h of being expose to the metal, followed by a slow take up phase until the end of the experiment at 144 h. S. minima thus, may be considered as a fern useful in the phytoremediation of residual water bodies contaminated with this metal. Also from our results, S. minima can tolerate fair concentrations of the metal; however, at concentrations higher than 80 μM Ni (1.5 mg g{sup −1} internal nickel concentration), its physiological performance can be affected. For instance, the integrity of cell membranes was affected as the metal concentration and exposure time increased. The accumulation of high concentrations of internal nickel did also affect photosynthesis, the efficiency of PSII, and the concentration of photosynthetic pigments, although at a lower extent.

  20. Working towards an international consensus on criteria for assessing Internet Gaming Disorder: a critical commentary on Petry et al. (2014) [forthcoming

    OpenAIRE

    Griffiths, MD; Van Rooij, AJ; Kardefelt-Winther, D; Starcevic, V; Király, O; Pallesen, S; Müller, K; Dreier, M; Carras, M; Prause, N; King, DL; Aboujaoude, E; Kuss, DJ; Pontes, HM; Lopez-Fernandez, O

    2016-01-01

    This commentary paper critically discusses the recent debate paper by Petry et al. (2014) that argued there was now an international consensus for assessing Internet Gaming Disorder (IGD). Our collective opinions vary considerably regarding many different aspects of online gaming. However, we contend that the paper by Petry and colleagues does not provide a true and representative international community of researchers in this area. This paper critically discusses and provides commentary on (...

  1. Análise da atividade antimicrobiana dos extratos de Cordia verbenacea DC, Mikania laevigata Sch. Bip. ex Baker e Psidium Cattleianum frente a microrganismos endodônticos

    OpenAIRE

    Massunari, Loiane [UNESP

    2014-01-01

    Na busca por fontes alternativas de antimicrobianos, diversos autores tem explorado o uso de plantas medicinais para o tratamento de várias doenças. A atividade antimicrobiana de várias espécies de plantas como, Cordia verbenacea DC, Mikania laevigata Schultz Bip. Ex Baker e Psidium cattleianum, popularmente chamadas de erva-baleeira, guaco e de araçá, respectivamente, tem sido relatada contra diversos microrganismos orais. O objetivo do presente estudo foi avaliar o efeito antimicrobiano dos...

  2. Working towards an international consensus on criteria for assessing internet gaming disorder: a critical commentary on Petry et al. (2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    GRIFFITHS, MARK D.; VAN ROOIJ, ANTONIUS J.; KARDEFELT-WINTHER, DANIEL; STARCEVIC, VLADAN; KIRÁLY, ORSOLYA; PALLESEN, STÅLE; MÜLLER, KAI; DREIER, MICHAEL; CARRAS, MICHELLE; PRAUSE, NICOLE; KING, DANIEL L.; ABOUJAOUDE, ELLIAS; KUSS, DARIA J.; PONTES, HALLEY M.; FERNANDEZ, OLATZ LOPEZ; NAGYGYORGY, KATALIN; ACHAB, SOPHIA; BILLIEUX, JOËL; QUANDT, THORSTEN; CARBONELL, XAVIER; FERGUSON, CHRISTOPHER J.; HOFF, RANI A.; DEREVENSKY, JEFFREY; HAAGSMA, MARIA C.; DELFABBRO, PAUL; COULSON, MARK; HUSSAIN, ZAHEER; DEMETROVICS, ZSOLT

    2017-01-01

    This commentary paper critically discusses the recent debate paper by Petry et al. (2014) that argued there was now an international consensus for assessing Internet Gaming Disorder (IGD). Our collective opinions vary considerably regarding many different aspects of online gaming. However, we contend that the paper by Petry and colleagues does not provide a true and representative international community of researchers in this area. This paper critically discusses and provides commentary on (i) the representativeness of the international group that wrote the ‘consensus’ paper, and (ii) each of the IGD criteria. The paper also includes a brief discussion on initiatives that could be taken to move the field towards consensus. It is hoped that this paper will foster debate in the IGD field and lead to improved theory, better methodologically designed studies, and more robust empirical evidence as regards problematic gaming and its psychosocial consequences and impact. PMID:26669530

  3. Working towards an international consensus on criteria for assessing internet gaming disorder: a critical commentary on Petry et al. (2014)

    OpenAIRE

    GRIFFITHS, MARK D.; VAN ROOIJ, ANTONIUS J.; KARDEFELT-WINTHER, DANIEL; STARCEVIC, VLADAN; KIRÁLY, ORSOLYA; PALLESEN, STÅLE; MÜLLER, KAI; DREIER, MICHAEL; CARRAS, MICHELLE; PRAUSE, NICOLE; KING, DANIEL L.; ABOUJAOUDE, ELLIAS; KUSS, DARIA J.; PONTES, HALLEY M.; FERNANDEZ, OLATZ LOPEZ

    2016-01-01

    This commentary paper critically discusses the recent debate paper by Petry et al. (2014) that argued there was now an international consensus for assessing Internet Gaming Disorder (IGD). Our collective opinions vary considerably regarding many different aspects of online gaming. However, we contend that the paper by Petry and colleagues does not provide a true and representative international community of researchers in this area. This paper critically discusses and provides ...

  4. Commentary on two classroom observation systems: moving toward a shared understanding of effective teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, Carol McDonald

    2013-12-01

    In this commentary, I make five points: that designing observation systems that actually predict students' outcomes is challenging; second that systems that capture the complex and dynamic nature of the classroom learning environment are more likely to be able to meet this challenge; three, that observation tools are most useful when developed to serve a particular purpose and are put to that purpose; four that technology can help; and five, there are policy implications for valid and reliable classroom observation tools. The two observation systems presented in this special issue represent an important step forward and a move toward policy that promises to make a true difference in what is defined as high quality and effective teaching, what it looks like in the classroom, and how these practices can be more widely disseminated so that all children, including those attending under-resourced schools, can experience effective instruction, academic success and the lifelong accomplishment that follows. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  5. Commentary: what role should physician organizations play in addressing social justice issues?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bright, Cedric M

    2012-06-01

    A study by Peek and colleagues in this issue reveals that although racial and ethnic health disparities are recognized as a major national challenge, few physician organizations with both the influence and ability to change practice standards and address disparities appear to be effectively directing their resources to mitigate health disparities. In this commentary, the author examines the history of U.S. health disparities through the lens of social justice. He argues that today, physician organizations have the opportunity to change the paradigm of medicine from being a reactive industry to becoming a proactive industry through collaborations such as the Commission to End Health Disparities, which brings together more than 60 organizations, and the National Medical Association's "We Stand With You" program to improve health and combat disparities. Physician organizations can also address health disparities through advocacy for fair reimbursement policies, funding for pipeline programs to increase the diversity of the workforce, diversity in clinical trials, and other issues. Health disparities present to us in organized medicine a challenge that is cleverly disguised as an immovable object but that is truly a great opportunity for innovation, improvement, and growth. Physician organizations have a unique opportunity to provide avenues of innovation and accomplishment.

  6. Commentary: Roles for Pathologists in a High-throughput Image Analysis Team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aeffner, Famke; Wilson, Kristin; Bolon, Brad; Kanaly, Suzanne; Mahrt, Charles R; Rudmann, Dan; Charles, Elaine; Young, G David

    2016-08-01

    Historically, pathologists perform manual evaluation of H&E- or immunohistochemically-stained slides, which can be subjective, inconsistent, and, at best, semiquantitative. As the complexity of staining and demand for increased precision of manual evaluation increase, the pathologist's assessment will include automated analyses (i.e., "digital pathology") to increase the accuracy, efficiency, and speed of diagnosis and hypothesis testing and as an important biomedical research and diagnostic tool. This commentary introduces the many roles for pathologists in designing and conducting high-throughput digital image analysis. Pathology review is central to the entire course of a digital pathology study, including experimental design, sample quality verification, specimen annotation, analytical algorithm development, and report preparation. The pathologist performs these roles by reviewing work undertaken by technicians and scientists with training and expertise in image analysis instruments and software. These roles require regular, face-to-face interactions between team members and the lead pathologist. Traditional pathology training is suitable preparation for entry-level participation on image analysis teams. The future of pathology is very exciting, with the expanding utilization of digital image analysis set to expand pathology roles in research and drug development with increasing and new career opportunities for pathologists. © 2016 by The Author(s) 2016.

  7. COMMENTARY ON FATHERS' PLAY: MEASUREMENT, CONCEPTUALIZATION, CULTURE, AND CONNECTIONS WITH CHILD DEVELOPMENT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MajdandžIć, Mirjana

    2017-11-01

    The diverse set of studies in this special issue on fathers' play includes empirical research from several countries, observational measures of play, and multiple children's outcomes, including language, negativity, social competence, aggression and internalizing problems. The chief conclusion across studies is that the role of paternal play is important in various domains of child development. This is encouraging, yet also disturbing given the results of the State of the World's Fathers: Time for Action report 2017, revealing the low amount of care fathers provide to their children worldwide, relative to mothers. In this commentary, the measurement and conceptualization of play are discussed, as well as cultural considerations regarding the meaning and consequences of play. The findings of the studies are integrated in order to guide future research, addressing what domains of child development appear to be influenced by what types of paternal play, and discussing the contexts that affect paternal play. Lastly, the collective results are related to recent efforts to increase fathers' involvement and implications for interventions are discussed. © 2017 The Authors. Infant Mental Health Journal published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Michigan Association for Infant Mental Health.

  8. A Case Study: Dual-Process Theories of Higher Cognition-Commentary on Evans & Stanovich (2013).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Magda

    2013-05-01

    Dual-process theories of higher order cognition (DPTs) have been enjoying much success, particularly since Kahneman's 2002 Nobel prize address and recent book Thinking, Fast and Slow (2009). Historically, DPTs have attempted to provide a conceptual framework that helps classify and predict differences in patterns of behavior found under some circumstances and not others in a host of reasoning, judgment, and decision-making tasks. As evidence has changed and techniques for examining behavior have moved on, so too have DPTs. Killing two birds with one stone, Evans and Stanovich (2013, this issue) respond to five main criticisms of DPTs. Along with addressing each criticism in turn, they set out to clarify the essential defining characteristics that distinguish one form of higher order cognition from the other. The aim of this commentary is to consider the defining characteristics of Type 1 and Type 2 processing that have been proposed and to suggest that the evidence can be taken to support quantitative differences rather than qualitatively distinct processes. © The Author(s) 2013.

  9. Commentary: Impact of meningococcal group B OMV vaccines, beyond their brief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petousis-Harris, Helen

    2017-10-19

    Meningococcal group B outer membrane vesicle vaccines have been used widely in Cuba, New Zealand, and Brazil. They are immunogenic and initially assessed largely by their ability to induce serum bactericidal activity. Measures of efficacy indicate good protection against homologous strains in older children and adults. Effectiveness appears broader than predicted by immunogenicity and efficacy studies. The recent discovery that meningococcal group B OMVs may protect against the related Neisseria species N.gonorrhoeae suggests more to these interesting antigen collections than meets the eye. Currently there are two OMV-containing group B vaccines available, the new recombinant protein-based Bexsero® developed by Novartis and VA-MENGOC-BC® developed by the Finlay institute in Cuba. Also, a third group B vaccine based on two recombinant factor H binding proteins (Trumenba®, Pfizer), has recently been licenced but it does not include OMV. This commentary explores the population impact that group B OMV vaccines have had on meningococcal and gonorrhoea diseases. Given the heterologous effect against diverse strains of the meningococcus observed in older children and adults, and recent evidence to suggest moderate protection against gonorrhoea, there may be a role for these vaccines in programmes targeting adolescents and groups high at risk for both meningococcal disease and gonorrhoea.

  10. From evidence to understanding: a commentary on Fisher (1922) 'On the mathematical foundations of theoretical statistics'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hand, David J

    2015-04-13

    The nature of statistics has changed over time. It was originally concerned with descriptive 'matters of state'--with summarizing population numbers, economic strength and social conditions. But during the course of the twentieth century its aim broadened to include inference--how to use data to shed light on underlying mechanisms, about what might happen in the future, about what would happen if certain actions were taken. Central to this development was Ronald Fisher. Over the course of his life he was responsible for many of the major conceptual advances in statistics. This is particularly illustrated by his 1922 paper, in which he introduced many of the concepts which remain fundamental to our understanding of how to extract meaning from data, right to the present day. It is no exaggeration to say that Fisher's work, as illustrated by the ideas he described and developed in this paper, underlies all modern science, and much more besides. This commentary was written to celebrate the 350th anniversary of the journal Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society.

  11. Expressive Timing, Musical Tension, and Listener-Performer Synchronicity: Commentary on Ohriner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Gingras

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ohriner (this volume empirically investigated the ability of listeners to rhythmically entrain to performances of Chopin's mazurkas and suggested that performers can manipulate listeners' expectations and influence their perceived musical tension by using eccentric or unpredictable patterns of tempo variation. In this commentary, I attempt to situate Ohriner's research in a broader context, while elaborating on his findings and proposing alternative interpretations in some cases. I suggest that, although mazurkas are particularly suitable for a study of entrainment due to their clear metrical structure, it would be appropriate to study musical genres in which the metrical structure is obscure or even absent. I also question Ohriner's interpretation of a lack of synchronicity as being predominantly associated with negative emotions. Furthermore, in order to examine more rigorously the influence of synchronicity on perceived musical tension, I present a controlled experimental design to disentangle the effects of tempo and rubato, which would involve measuring both entrainment and musical tension while asking participants to rate the perceived eccentricity of the performances.

  12. LRRK2 in Parkinson's disease – drawing the curtain of penetrance: a commentary

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    Krüger Rejko

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Parkinson's disease is the most common neurodegenerative movement disorder and affects about 2% of the population over the age of 60 years. In 2004, mutations in the LRRK2 gene were first described and turned out to be the most frequent genetic cause of familial and sporadic Parkinson's disease and may account for up to 40% of patients in distinct populations. Based on these findings, Latourelle and colleagues show that the penetrance of the most common LRRK2 mutation is higher in patients with familial compared with sporadic Parkinson's disease and identified a substantial number of affected relatives of mutation carriers not presenting with a LRRK2 mutation themselves. This commentary discusses the role of genetic and/or environmental susceptibility factors modulating the expressivity of the disease trait, how these factors may contribute to the phenomenon of phenocopies in genetically defined Parkinson's disease pedigrees, and how the findings of Latourelle and colleagues, published this month in BMC Medicine, relate to current concepts of genetic counselling.

  13. Mechanism-based classification of pain for physical therapy management in palliative care: A clinical commentary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senthil P Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pain relief is a major goal for palliative care in India so much that most palliative care interventions necessarily begin first with pain relief. Physical therapists play an important role in palliative care and they are regarded as highly proficient members of a multidisciplinary healthcare team towards management of chronic pain. Pain necessarily involves three different levels of classification-based upon pain symptoms, pain mechanisms and pain syndromes. Mechanism-based treatments are most likely to succeed compared to symptomatic treatments or diagnosis-based treatments. The objective of this clinical commentary is to update the physical therapists working in palliative care, on the mechanism-based classification of pain and its interpretation, with available therapeutic evidence for providing optimal patient care using physical therapy. The paper describes the evolution of mechanism-based classification of pain, the five mechanisms (central sensitization, peripheral neuropathic, nociceptive, sympathetically maintained pain and cognitive-affective are explained with recent evidence for physical therapy treatments for each of the mechanisms.

  14. The birth of the electric machines: a commentary on Faraday (1832) 'Experimental researches in electricity'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khalili, Jim

    2015-04-13

    The history of science is filled with examples of key discoveries and breakthroughs that have been published as landmark texts or journal papers, and to which one can trace the origins of whole disciplines. Such paradigm-shifting publications include Copernicus' De revolutionibus orbium coelestium (1543), Isaac Newton's Philosophiæ Naturalis Principia Mathematica (1687) and Albert Einstein's papers on relativity (1905 and 1915). Michael Faraday's 1832 paper on electromagnetic induction sits proudly among these works and in a sense can be regarded as having an almost immediate effect in transforming our world in a very real sense more than any of the others listed. Here we review the status of the subject-the relationship between magnetism and electricity both before and after Faraday's paper and delve into the details of the key experiments he carried out at the Royal Institution outlining clearly how he discovered the process of electromagnetic induction, whereby an electric current could be induced to flow through a conductor that experiences a changing magnetic field. His ideas would not only enable Maxwell's later development of his theory of classical electromagnetism, but would directly lead to the development of the electric dynamo and electric motor, two technological advances that are the very foundations of the modern world. This commentary was written to celebrate the 350th anniversary of the journal Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society.

  15. Commentary: Teaching creativity and innovative thinking in medicine and the health sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ness, Roberta B

    2011-10-01

    The National Academies of Science recently criticized the state of scientific innovation and competitiveness in the United States. Evaluations of already-established creativity training programs--examining a broad array of students, from school age to adult and with a wide range of abilities--have shown that such courses improve thinking skills, attitudes, and performance. Although academic medicine provides informal training in creativity and innovation, it has yet to incorporate formal instruction on these topics into medical education. A number of existing, thoughtfully constructed and evaluated creativity programs in other fields provide a pedagogical basis for developing creativity training programs for the health sciences. The content of creativity training programs typically includes instruction and application in (1) divergent thinking, (2) problem solving, and (3) creative production. Instructional formats that have been shown to elicit the best outcomes are an admixture of lectures, discussion, and guided practice. A pilot program to teach innovative thinking to health science students at the University of Texas includes instruction in recognizing and finding alternatives to frames or habitual cognitive patterns, in addition to the constructs already mentioned. As innovation is the engine of scientific progress, the author, founder of Innovative Thinking, the creativity training pilot program at the University of Texas, argues in this commentary that academic health centers should implement and evaluate new methods for enhancing science students' innovative thinking to keep the United States as a worldwide leader in scientific discovery.

  16. An Analysis of the Qualitative Characteristics of Management Commentary Reporting by New Zealand Companies

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    Bikram Chatterjee

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The narrative section of annual reports has considerable value to its user groups, such as financial analysts and investors (Barlett & Chandler 1997; International Accounting Standards Board (IASB 2006; Tiexiera 2004. This narrative section including chirpersons’/presidents’ statement contains twice the quantity ofinformation than the financial statements section (Smith & Taffler 2000. However, the abundance of information does not necessarily enhance the quality of such information (IASB 2006. This issue ofqualitative characteristics has been long foregone by researchers. This issue has attracted the attention of IASB (2006. Following the dearth in research in regard to qualitative characteristics of reporting this paper explores whether investors’ required qualitative characteristics as outlined by the IASB (2006 have beensatisfied in the management commentary section of New Zealand companies’ annual reports. Our result suggests that the principal stakeholders’, that is, investors’ qualitative characteristics requirements have been partially met in this section of annual reports. The qualitative characteristic of ‘relevance’ and ‘supportability’ have been satisfied in more annual reports compared to that of ‘balance’ and ‘comparability’.

  17. Commentary: Rehabilitation for Rural and Remote Residents Following a Traumatic Hand Injury

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    Gail A Kingston

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A traumatic hand injury can involve damage to a number of structures including skin, nerves, tendons, muscle bone, and soft tissue. Impairments such as pain or stiffness and loss of range of motion can last for many years and result in a moderate to extreme impact on a person’s day-to-day life. Work, leisure, financial security, and emotional well-being often most affected. This commentary provides an analysis of those factors that inhibit (barriers and support (enablers the provision of hand therapy rehabilitation in rural and remote areas. Providing a collaborative and flexible rehabilitation programme to rural and remote residents following a traumatic hand injury can be seen as a challenge due to issues such as a limited access to health care services. Established protocols that work in regional or metropolitan locations are unlikely to be effective and innovative and pragmatic strategies are required. The provision of a collaborative and flexible rehabilitation programme regardless of residential location is an important part of the therapist’s intervention plan.

  18. Spinal manipulation under anesthesia: a narrative review of the literature and commentary

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    As exhibited throughout the medical literature over many decades, there is a lack of uniformity in the manner in which spine pain patients have historically qualified for and received manipulation under anesthesia (MUA). Also, for different professions that treat the same types of spinal conditions via the same means, fundamental MUA decision points vary within the published protocols of different professional associations. The more recent chiropractic literature communicates that the evidence to support the efficacy of MUA of the spine remains largely anecdotal. In addition, it has been reported that the types of spinal conditions most suitable for MUA are without clear-cut consensus, with various indications for MUA of the low back resting wholly upon the opinions and experiences of MUA practitioners. This article will provide a narrative review of the MUA literature, followed by a commentary about the current lack of high quality research evidence, the anecdotal and consensus basis of existing clinical protocols, as well as related professional, ethical and legal concerns for the chiropractic practitioner. The limitations of the current medical literature related to MUA via conscious/deep sedation need to be recognized and used as a guide to clinical experience when giving consideration to this procedure. More research, in the form of controlled clinical trials, must be undertaken if this procedure is to remain a potential treatment option for chronic spine pain patients in the chiropractic clinical practice. PMID:23672974

  19. Global Health as a Field of Power Relations: A Response to Recent Commentaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiffman, Jeremy

    2015-05-22

    Actors working in global health often portray it as an enterprise grounded in principled concerns, advanced by individuals and organizations who draw on scientific evidence to pursue health equity. This portrait is incomplete. It is also a field of power relations-a social arena in which actors claim and draw on expertise and moral authority to gain influence and pursue career, organizational and national interests. A clear understanding of how power operates in this field is necessary to ensure that it is used productively to serve the aims of health equity and improved population health. Responding to commentaries on an editorial published in this journal, I offer 3 ideas toward this end: (1) be skeptical of the global health rationality project-the effort to rescue the field from the alleged indignities of politics through the application of scientific methods; (2) analyze global health as a field of power relations, a concept developed by sociologist Pierre Bourdieu; and (3) elevate the place of input legitimacy-inclusive deliberation, fair process and transparency-to address legitimacy and knowledge deficits in this field. © 2015 by Kerman University of Medical Sciences.

  20. Commentary: The relationship status of digital media and professionalism: it's complicated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnan, Jeanne M; Paro, John A M; Higa, Jennifer T; Reddy, Shalini T; Humphrey, Holly J; Arora, Vineet M

    2009-11-01

    The rising popularity of digital applications, such as social networking, media share sites, and blogging, has significantly affected how medical trainees interact with educators, colleagues, and the public. Despite the increased popularity and use of such applications amongst the current generation of trainees, medical educators have little evidence or guidance about preventing misuse and ensuring standards for professional conduct. As trainees become more technologically savvy, it is the responsibility of medical educators to familiarize themselves not only with the advantages of this technology but also with the potential negative effects of its misuse. Professionalism, appropriateness for public consumption, and individual or institutional representation in digital media content are just some of the salient issues that arise when considering the ramifications of trainees' digital behavior in the absence of established policies or education on risk. In this commentary the authors explore the rising use of digital media and its reflection of medical trainees' professionalism. To address possible issues related to professionalism in digital media, the authors hypothesize potential solutions, including exploring faculty familiarity with digital media and policy development, educating students on the potential risks of misuse, and modeling professionalism in this new digital age.

  1. The missing piece: cancer prevention within psycho-oncology - a commentary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosberger, Zeev; Perez, Samara; Bloom, Joan; Shapiro, Gilla K; Fielding, Richard

    2015-09-10

    In this commentary, we review the place of prevention within the field of Psycho-Oncology. The thrust of Psycho-Oncology's clinical and research efforts have historically focused on behavioral and social factors implicated in the cancer patients' experience from detection and diagnosis, to treatment, survivorship and end of life along the cancer trajectory. This conceptualization has raised the standards for research, leading to a better understanding of the patient experience and the delivery of highly effective interventions to improve quality of life. Emerging data on the role of potential prevention behaviors (e.g., diet and exercise, smoking cessation, screening, etc.) suggests that Psycho-Oncology has a significant role to play in understanding and intervening on a population level to reduce cancer incidence. We present and describe an expanded model of research in Psycho-Oncology which incorporates psychosocial variables in prevention research to complement Holland et al.'s (1998, 2010) original model. The implications of this model are discussed in relation to research, clinical work and training within the discipline of Psycho-Oncology. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Of missing voices and the obstetric imaginary: commentary on Jankowski and Burcher.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheney, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    In this commentary, I respond to an ethical analysis of a case study, reported by Jankowski and Burcher, in which a woman gives birth to an infant with a known heart anomaly of unknown severity, at home, attended by a midwife. Jankowski and Burcher argue that the midwife who attended this family acted unethically because she knowingly operated outside of her scope of practice. While I agree that the authors' conclusions are well supported by the portion of the story they were able to gather, the fact that the midwife and mother declined to engage in the ethics consult that informs their piece means that critical segments of the narrative are left untold. Some important additional considerations emerge from these silences. I explore the implicit assumptions of the biotechnical embrace, the roles of the political economy of hope and the obstetric imaginary in driving prenatal testing, and institutional blame for the divisiveness of the home-hospital divide in the United States. The value of Jankowski and Burcher's case study lies in its ability to highlight the intersections and potential conflicts between the principles of beneficence, patients' autonomy, and professional ethics, and to begin to chart a course for us through them. Copyright 2015 The Journal of Clinical Ethics. All rights reserved.

  3. The human repeated insult patch test in the 21st century: a commentary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basketter, David A

    2009-01-01

    The human repeated insult patch test (HRIPT) is over half a century old, but is still used in several countries as a confirmatory test in the safety evaluation of skin sensitizers. This is despite the criticism it receives from an ethical perspective and regarding the scientific validity of such testing. In this commentary, the HRIPT is reviewed, with emphasis on ethical aspects and where the test can, and cannot, contribute in a scientifically meaningful manner to safety evaluation. It is concluded that where there is a specific rationale for testing, for example, to substantiate a no-effect level for a sensitizing chemical or to ensure that matrix effects are not making an unexpected contribution to sensitizing potency, then rigorous independent review may confirm that an HRIPT is ethical and scientifically justifiable. The possibility that sensitization may be induced in volunteers dictates that HRIPTs should be conducted rarely and in cases where the benefits overwhelmingly outweigh the risk. However, for the very large majority of HRIPTs conducted concerning the risk of skin sensitization, there is neither scientific justification nor any other merit.

  4. Global Health as a Field of Power Relations: A Response to Recent Commentaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiffman, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    Actors working in global health often portray it as an enterprise grounded in principled concerns, advanced by individuals and organizations who draw on scientific evidence to pursue health equity. This portrait is incomplete. It is also a field of power relations—a social arena in which actors claim and draw on expertise and moral authority to gain influence and pursue career, organizational and national interests. A clear understanding of how power operates in this field is necessary to ensure that it is used productively to serve the aims of health equity and improved population health. Responding to commentaries on an editorial published in this journal, I offer 3 ideas toward this end: (1) be skeptical of the global health rationality project—the effort to rescue the field from the alleged indignities of politics through the application of scientific methods; (2) analyze global health as a field of power relations, a concept developed by sociologist Pierre Bourdieu; and (3) elevate the place of input legitimacy—inclusive deliberation, fair process and transparency—to address legitimacy and knowledge deficits in this field. PMID:26188819

  5. Theory and Theorizing in Nursing Science: Commentary from the Nursing Research Special Issue Editorial Team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jairath, Nalini N; Peden-McAlpine, Cynthia J; Sullivan, Mary C; Vessey, Judith A; Henly, Susan J

    Articles from three landmark symposia on theory for nursing-published in Nursing Research in 1968-1969-served as a key underpinning for the development of nursing as an academic discipline. The current special issue on Theory and Theorizing in Nursing Science celebrates the 50th anniversary of publication of these seminal works in nursing theory. The purpose of this commentary is to consider the future of nursing theory development in light of articles published in the anniversary issue. The Editorial Team for the special issue identified core questions about continued nursing theory development, as related to the nursing metaparadigm, practice theory, big data, and doctoral education. Using a dialogue format, the editors discussed these core questions. The classic nursing metaparadigm (health, person, environment, nursing) was viewed as a continuing unifying element for the discipline but is in need of revision in today's scientific and practice climates. Practice theory and precision healthcare jointly arise from an emphasis on individualization. Big data and the methods of e-science are challenging the assumptions on which nursing theory development was originally based. Doctoral education for nursing scholarship requires changes to ensure that tomorrow's scholars are prepared to steward the discipline by advancing (not reifying) past approaches to nursing theory. Ongoing reexamination of theory is needed to clarify the domain of nursing, guide nursing science and practice, and direct and communicate the unique and essential contributions of nursing science to the broader health research effort and of nursing to healthcare.

  6. Reclaiming value from academic labor: commentary by the Editors of Human Geography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John C. Finn

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available There have long been discussions about the need for an alternative publishing model for academic research. This has been made clear by the September 2017 scandal involving Third World Quarterly. The editor’s deeply problematic decision to publish an essay arguing in favor of colonialism was likely meant as click-bate to drive clicks and citations. But we should not lose sight of the fact that this latest scandal is only one recent manifestation of a long-simmering problem that has periodically commanded significant attention in the academic literature, blogs, email lists, conference sessions, and the popular press. As a direct result, over the last decade or more, new journals have been created that specifically endeavor to offer routes around corporate/capitalist academic publishing, and several existing journals have removed themselves from this profit-driven ecosystem. In this commentary, the editorial team of the journal Human Geography weighs in on what we see as the nature of the problem, what we are doing in response, what our successes have been, and what challenges remain.

  7. Pattern and Variation in the Timing of Aksak Meter: Commentary on Goldberg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rainer Polak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Daniel Goldberg (2015, this issue explores relations between timing variations, grouping structure, and musical form in the percussive accompaniment of Balkan folk dance music. A chronometric re-analysis of one of the target article’s two audio samples finds a regular metric timing pattern to consistently underlie the variations Goldberg uncovered. Read together, the target article and this commentary demonstrate the complex interplay of a regular timing pattern with several levels of nuanced variation to be performed with fluency, flexibility, and accuracy. This might appear commonplace, but here it is observed in the context of an asymmetric rhythmic mode, non-isochronous beat sequence, and asymmetric metric hierarchy. This context evidently does not represent a constraint of any sort in respect to the rhythmic timing performance, which casts doubts on the deep-seated assumption that metric regularity depends on iso-periodicity and vertical symmetry. This assumption is sometimes explicitly and often implicitly taken as universal; this comment suggests that, on the contrary, it might well be culturally biased.

  8. Understanding and using technological affordances: a commentary on Conole and Dyke

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    Tom Boyle

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper by Conole and Dyke sets the context by pointing to a number of problems that inhibit the widespread, effective use of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT to support learning. They argue that this situation highlights the need to explore a theoretical basis for the use of ICT to support learning. The central argument of the paper is that the notion of affordances can make a significant contribution to this endeavour. The paper aims to articulate the potential impact of these affordances primarily through the development of a taxonomy. It draws on social constructivist theory to help understand and articulate the impact of these affordances. The concept of affordances is potentially both rich and provocative. Conole and Dyke provide a refreshing and diverse look at the theoretical basis for the use of ICT to support learning. We have structured our commentary around six questions that are provided by Conole and Dyke in their Discussion section. Whilst examining these questions we highlight various issues raised by the paper, which we believe, need further consideration and clarification.

  9. Commentary: presenting the value of medical quality to nonclinical senior management and boards of directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetterolf, Donald E

    2003-01-01

    Many physicians find hospital or health plan boards of directors to be intimidating arenas for medical quality presentations. This essay presents a number of "pearls" gleaned from successful senior clinician managers who have learned to relate to senior management and advance in their careers. This commentary was developed from research and a presentation of the same title delivered at the American College of Medical Quality Annual Meeting held in Las Vegas in October, 2001. It is important that medical directors who work with financial managers convert quality concepts into "business value" concepts. Talking in the language of business, rather than the language of doctors, makes it much easier to communicate with management (although some translation is often in order). As a clinician presenting to financial managers, you should become familiar with financial terms and how they are used. Indeed, the development of a financial model representing clinical activity results in the highest level of success. There are a number of methods for estimating impact that have been found within general business and health services research areas that are acceptable. Successful presenters of information approach their task effectively. Reports are in a more readable format and convey information for action by the corporation rather than as a scholarly treatise. Approaching senior management, one must consider the psychology of individuals in senior positions. Senior medical executives who are successful report similar approaches to their tasks, and offer helpful insight into career advancement.

  10. Towards new educational potentialities: Review and commentary of the Preliminary draft Act on higher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madžar Ljubomir

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The Higher Education Act is a long-awaited legal act. A number of uncompleted attempts to prepare it have been undertaken in the course of the last three years. So far without success. Having been and still being a matter of highest social priority, the renewed effort to create and subsequently to enact this act is welcome as a worthwhile and a highly productive endeavor. Welcome also are the main innovations offered by this act, particularly its conspicuous consistency with the Bologna Declaration and other internationally launched and accepted documents. The draft act follows the international documents tracing down the paths of the future development of the educational systems of the European countries and providing for their mutual compatibility. A number of other positive contributions of the draft act are singled out, such as introducing clear and rigorous criteria and procedures for accreditation and quality control, introducing a wide coverage of arts and sciences as a precondition for an institution of higher education to qualify as a university, flexibility in the regime of studying including the domestic and international mobility of the students and requirement for the schools of higher education to have large cores of permanently employed teaching staff. A much larger part of the paper is, however, devoted to critical commentaries. To begin with, the draft is produced without any participation of the private universities, which is seen as a form of discrimination. The organizational pattern of a university is laid out with insufficient clarity and the status of departments (faculties is particularly short of precision and even contradictory. The draft seems to be laden with the old bias towards excessive and potentially disastrous centralization, drastically reducing the decision making capacity of the system. The treatment of the property of the departments (faculties is found inconsistent and legally unfounded. Inconsistency is

  11. A commentary on the "eating addiction" versus "food addiction" perspectives on addictive-like food consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Erica M; Potenza, Marc N; Gearhardt, Ashley N

    2017-08-01

    The food addiction construct posits that vulnerable individuals may experience an addictive-like response to certain foods, such as those high in fat and refined carbohydrates. Recently, an alternative model to food addiction was proposed, suggesting that the act of eating may be a behavioral addiction that can trigger an addictive-like response in susceptible individuals. One major rationale for the eating addiction framework is that the assessment of food addiction is based on behavioral indicators, such as consuming greater quantities of food than intended and eating certain foods despite negative consequences. It is also suggested that the lack of investigation into which foods and food attributes (e.g., sugar) may have an addictive potential is evidence that food addiction does not parallel a substance-based addiction and more closely resembles a behavioral addiction. The present paper provides a commentary suggesting that the substance-based, food-addiction framework is more appropriate than the behavioral-addiction, eating-addiction perspective to conceptualize addictive-like food consumption. In order to illustrate this point, this manuscript will discuss behavioral components characteristic of all substance-use disorders, preliminary evidence to suggest that all foods are not equally associated with addictive-like eating, and key differences between the hypothesized eating addiction phenotype and the only existing behavioral addiction in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), gambling disorder. Further, this paper will consider implications of applying an addiction label to food versus eating and suggest future research directions to evaluate whether food addiction is a valid and clinically useful construct. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Invited commentary: boundless science--putting natural direct and indirect effects in a clearer empirical context.

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    Naimi, Ashley I

    2015-07-15

    Epidemiologists are increasingly using natural effects for applied mediation analyses, yet 1 key identifying assumption is unintuitive and subject to some controversy. In this issue of the Journal, Jiang and VanderWeele (Am J Epidemiol. 2015;182(2):105-108) formalize the conditions under which the difference method can be used to estimate natural indirect effects. In this commentary, I discuss implications of the controversial "cross-worlds" independence assumption needed to identify natural effects. I argue that with a binary mediator, a simple modification of the authors' approach will provide bounds for natural direct and indirect effect estimates that better reflect the capacity of the available data to support empirical statements on the presence of mediated effects. I discuss complications encountered when odds ratios are used to decompose effects, as well as the implications of incorrectly assuming the absence of exposure-induced mediator-outcome confounders. I note that the former problem can be entirely resolved using collapsible measures of effect, such as risk ratios. In the Appendix, I use previous derivations for natural direct effect bounds on the risk difference scale to provide bounds on the odds ratio scale that accommodate 1) uncertainty due to the cross-world independence assumption and 2) uncertainty due to the cross-world independence assumption and the presence of exposure-induced mediator-outcome confounders. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Soy isoflavones, estrogen therapy, and breast cancer risk: analysis and commentary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wood Charles E

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract There has been considerable investigation of the potential for soyfoods to reduce risk of cancer, and in particular cancer of the breast. Most interest in this relationship is because soyfoods are essentially a unique dietary source of isoflavones, compounds which bind to estrogen receptors and exhibit weak estrogen-like effects under certain experimental conditions. In recent years the relationship between soyfoods and breast cancer has become controversial because of concerns – based mostly on in vitro and rodent data – that isoflavones may stimulate the growth of existing estrogen-sensitive breast tumors. This controversy carries considerable public health significance because of the increasing popularity of soyfoods and the commercial availability of isoflavone supplements. In this analysis and commentary we attempt to outline current concerns regarding the estrogen-like effects of isoflavones in the breast focusing primarily on the clinical trial data and place these concerns in the context of recent evidence regarding estrogen therapy use in postmenopausal women. Overall, there is little clinical evidence to suggest that isoflavones will increase breast cancer risk in healthy women or worsen the prognosis of breast cancer patients. Although relatively limited research has been conducted, and the clinical trials often involved small numbers of subjects, there is no evidence that isoflavone intake increases breast tissue density in pre- or postmenopausal women or increases breast cell proliferation in postmenopausal women with or without a history of breast cancer. The epidemiologic data are generally consistent with the clinical data, showing no indication of increased risk. Furthermore, these clinical and epidemiologic data are consistent with what appears to be a low overall breast cancer risk associated with pharmacologic unopposed estrogen exposure in postmenopausal women. While more research is required to definitively

  14. Commentary on: Are we overpathologizing everyday life? A tenable blueprint for behavioral addiction research

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Timary, Philippe; Philippot, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Background This paper is a commentary to the article entitled: “Are we overpathologizing everyday life? A tenable blueprint for behavioral addiction research”, by Billieux, Schimmenti, Khazaal, Maurage and Heeren (2015). Methods and Aims In this manuscript, we commented on two aspects developed by the authors. Billieux et al. (2015) propose that the recent development of propositions of behavioral addiction is driven by an unwise application of an addiction model to excessive behaviors and rests on a confirmatory research strategy that does not question the psychological processes underlying the development of the conduct. They also show that applying a process driven strategy leads to a more appropriate description of the reality of the behavior and conduct, in particular by describing a variety of motivations for the excessive behavior, which is central to understanding the nature of the conduct. We believe that this new approach, which is fruitful to the emerging domain of behavioral addictions, could also apply to the domain of addictions in general. The latter is characterized by the application of a generic biological model, largely influenced by animal models, focusing on neurophysiological determinants of addiction. This approach may have decreased the attention paid to dimensions of addictions that are more specifically human. We will firstly briefly argue on the limitation of this neurophysiological addiction model for the field of excessive behavioral conducts. Secondly, we will argue for an approach centered on the differentiation of motivations and on the adaptive dimension of the behavior when it first developed and on the evocation of a transition where the conduct became independent of its original function. Conclusions The emerging domain of behavioral addictions, where no animal model has been developed so far, may bring a new reflection that may apply to the domain of addictions in general, with a specific attention to human questions. PMID

  15. HIV treatment as prevention: debate and commentary--will early infection compromise treatment-as-prevention strategies?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myron S Cohen

    Full Text Available Universal HIV testing and immediate antiretroviral therapy for infected individuals has been proposed as a way of reducing the transmission of HIV and thereby bringing the HIV epidemic under control. It is unclear whether transmission during early HIV infection--before individuals are likely to have been diagnosed with HIV and started on antiretroviral therapy--will compromise the effectiveness of treatment as prevention. This article presents two opposing viewpoints by Powers, Miller, and Cohen, and Williams and Dye, followed by a commentary by Fraser.

  16. [Commentary on the Nobel Prize that has been granted in Medicine-Physiology, Chemistry and Physics to noteable investigators].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zárate, Arturo; Apolinar, Leticia Manuel; Saucedo, Renata; Basurto, Lourdes

    2015-01-01

    The Nobel Prize was established by Alfred Nobel in 1901 to award people who have made outstanding achievements in physics, chemistry and medicine. So far, from 852 laureates, 45 have been female. Marie Curie was the first woman to receive the Nobel Prize in 1903 for physics and eight years later also for chemistry It is remarkable that her daughter Irene and her husband also received the Nobel Prize for chemistry in 1935. Other two married couples, Cori and Moser, have also been awarded the Nobel Prize. The present commentary attempts to show the female participation in the progress of scientific activities.

  17. Emerging areas of nursing science and PhD education for the 21(st) century: response to commentaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henly, Susan J; McCarthy, Donna O; Wyman, Jean F; Alt-White, Anna C; Stone, Patricia W; McCarthy, Ann Marie; Redeker, Nancy S; Dunbar-Jacob, Jacqueline; Titler, Marita G; Conley, Yvette P; Heitkemper, Margaret M; Moore, Shirley M

    2015-01-01

    We respond to commentaries from the American Academy of Nursing, the American Association of Colleges of Nursing, and the National Institute of Nursing Research on our thoughts about integrating emerging areas of science into nursing PhD programs. We identify areas of agreement and focus our response on cross-cutting issues arising from cautions about the unique focus of nursing science and how best to proceed with incorporation of emerging areas of science into nursing PhD programs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Love and/in psychoanalysis: a commentary on Lacan's reading of Plato's Symposium in Seminar VIII: Transference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Bruce

    2015-02-01

    What is love and what part does it play in psychoanalysis? Where are the analyst and the analysand situated in relation to the roles defined as those of the "lover" and the "beloved"? Jacques Lacan explores these and other questions in his soon-to-be-published Seminar VIII: Transference by providing an extensive commentary on Plato's most famous dialogue on love, the Symposium. This paper outlines some of the major points about love that grow out of Lacan's reading of the dialogue and examines their relevance to the analytic setting. Can the analyst be characterized as a sort of modern-day Socrates?

  19. [A commentary on the Ruling of the Tribuna Constitucional 212/1996 of 19 December 1996 (I)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Morán, L

    1998-01-01

    This article is a commentary on Spain's Constitutional Court's ruling of 19 December 1996 (STC 212/1996), on the challenge (596/89) on grounds of alleged unconstitutionality made against Law 42/1988, 28 December, which regulates the donation of human embryos and foetuses or the cells, tissues and organs therefrom. The article is structured as follows: it opens with a summary of Law 42/1988, since this is felt necessary to understand the subsequent challenge made on grounds of alleged unconstitutionality. We then provide specific details of the challenge and the resulting ruling, before concluding with some critical remarks on the aforementioned Law and ruling.

  20. Matematicas Para La Escuela Primaria, Grado 4 (Parte 1), Comentario. Traduccion Preliminar de la Edicion en Ingles Revisada. (Mathematics for the Elementary School, Grade 4, Part 1, Teacher's Commentary. Preliminary Translation of the Revised English Edition).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beatty, Leslie; And Others

    This is Part 1 of the teacher's commentary for the grade 4 mathematics program. Part 1 includes the commentary for chapters 1 through 5. Topics covered include congruence, numbers and number bases, subtraction of numbers, division of numbers, and elementary geometry. References to the student text are cited. (RH)