WorldWideScience

Sample records for vibratory springing response

  1. Optimization of vibratory welding process parameters using response surface methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Pravin Kumar; Kumar, S. Deepak; Patel, D.; Prasad, S. B. [National Institute of Technology Jamshedpur, Jharkhand (India)

    2017-05-15

    The current investigation was carried out to study the effect of vibratory welding technique on mechanical properties of 6 mm thick butt welded mild steel plates. A new concept of vibratory welding technique has been designed and developed which is capable to transfer vibrations, having resonance frequency of 300 Hz, into the molten weld pool before it solidifies during the Shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) process. The important process parameters of vibratory welding technique namely welding current, welding speed and frequency of the vibrations induced in molten weld pool were optimized using Taguchi’s analysis and Response surface methodology (RSM). The effect of process parameters on tensile strength and hardness were evaluated using optimization techniques. Applying RSM, the effect of vibratory welding parameters on tensile strength and hardness were obtained through two separate regression equations. Results showed that, the most influencing factor for the desired tensile strength and hardness is frequency at its resonance value, i.e. 300 Hz. The micro-hardness and microstructures of the vibratory welded joints were studied in detail and compared with those of conventional SMAW joints. Comparatively, uniform and fine grain structure has been found in vibratory welded joints.

  2. Genetics Home Reference: vibratory urticaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions vibratory urticaria vibratory urticaria Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Vibratory urticaria is a condition in which exposing the skin ...

  3. N Springs expedited response action proposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-01-01

    Since signing the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) in 1989, the parties to the agreement have recognized the need to modify the approach to conducting investigations, studies, and cleanup actions at Hanford. To implement this approach, the parties have jointly developed the Hanford Past-Practice Strategy. The strategy defines a non-time-critical expedited response action (ERA) as a response action ``needed to abate a threat to human health or welfare or the environment where sufficient time exists for formal planning prior to initiation of response. In accordance with the past-practice strategy, DOE proposes to conduct an ERA at the N Springs, located in the Hanford 100 N Area, to substantially reduce the strontium-90 transport into the river through the groundwater pathway. The purpose of this ERA proposal is to provide sufficient information to select a preferred alternative at N Springs. The nature of an ERA requires that alternatives developed for the ERA be field ready; therefore, all the technologies proposed for the ERA should be capable of addressing the circumstances at N Springs. A comparison of these alternatives is made based on protectiveness, cost, technical feasibility, and institutional considerations to arrive at a preferred alternative. Following the selection of an alternative, a design phase will be conducted; the design phase will include a detailed look at design parameters, performance specifications, and costs of the selected alternative. Testing will be conducted as required to generate design data.

  4. Modal Damping Ratio and Optimal Elastic Moduli of Human Body Segments for Anthropometric Vibratory Model of Standing Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Manoj; Gupta, T C

    2017-10-01

    The present study aims to accurately estimate inertial, physical, and dynamic parameters of human body vibratory model consistent with physical structure of the human body that also replicates its dynamic response. A 13 degree-of-freedom (DOF) lumped parameter model for standing person subjected to support excitation is established. Model parameters are determined from anthropometric measurements, uniform mass density, elastic modulus of individual body segments, and modal damping ratios. Elastic moduli of ellipsoidal body segments are initially estimated by comparing stiffness of spring elements, calculated from a detailed scheme, and values available in literature for same. These values are further optimized by minimizing difference between theoretically calculated platform-to-head transmissibility ratio (TR) and experimental measurements. Modal damping ratios are estimated from experimental transmissibility response using two dominant peaks in the frequency range of 0-25 Hz. From comparison between dynamic response determined form modal analysis and experimental results, a set of elastic moduli for different segments of human body and a novel scheme to determine modal damping ratios from TR plots, are established. Acceptable match between transmissibility values calculated from the vibratory model and experimental measurements for 50th percentile U.S. male, except at very low frequencies, establishes the human body model developed. Also, reasonable agreement obtained between theoretical response curve and experimental response envelop for average Indian male, affirms the technique used for constructing vibratory model of a standing person. Present work attempts to develop effective technique for constructing subject specific damped vibratory model based on its physical measurements.

  5. A vibratory micromechanical gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boxenhorn, Burton; Greiff, Paul

    A novel vibratory micromechanical gyro with an active area less than one millimeter square has been analyzed, designed, and built. It has been demonstrated that such a gyro can be built using semiconductor fabrication techniques, and that the resulting performance is reasonably predictable. Further improvement of this gyro will result in an instrument that is small, low power, and in particular, will be very cheap in large quantitites.

  6. Silicon Bulk Micromachined Vibratory Gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, T. K.; Gutierrez, R. C.; Wilcox, J. Z.; Stell, C.; Vorperian, V.; Calvet, R.; Li, W. J.; Charkaborty, I.; Bartman, R.; Kaiser, W. J.

    1996-01-01

    This paper reports on design, modeling, fabrication, and characterization of a novel silicon bulk micromachined vibratory rate gyroscope designed for microspacecraft applications. The new microgyroscope consists of a silicon four leaf cloverstructure with a post attached to the center.

  7. Springing response due to bidirectional wave excitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidic-Perunovic, Jelena

    2005-01-01

    Springing is a two-node high frequency resonant vibration of the hull induced by unsteady wave pressure field on the hull. The excitation force may be rather complex - any wave activity (or their combination) in the Ocean matching the two-node natural hull vibration frequency. With some ship...... designs the hull natural frequency may get low enough that the corresponding level of excitation energy becomes large. Springing vibration negatively influences the fatigue life of the ship but, paradoxically, it still doesn't get much attention of the technical society. Usually, non-linear hydroelastic...... theories deal with the unidirectional wave excitation. This is quite standard. The problem is how to include more than one directional wave systems described by a wave spectrum with arbitrary heading. The main objective of the present work has been to account for the additional second-order springing...

  8. Response of spring wheat to different soil and foliar fertilization

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wacław JARECKI; Jan BUCZEK; Dorota BOBRECKA-JAMRO

    2017-01-01

    In the years 2013-2015 a field experiment was carried out, whose aim was to determine the response of spring wheat cultivar Arabella to different levels of soil fertilization with NPK and foliar feeding Plonvit Zboża...

  9. Parsimonious Hydrologic and Nitrate Response Models For Silver Springs, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klammler, Harald; Yaquian-Luna, Jose Antonio; Jawitz, James W.; Annable, Michael D.; Hatfield, Kirk

    2014-05-01

    Silver Springs with an approximate discharge of 25 m3/sec is one of Florida's first magnitude springs and among the largest springs worldwide. Its 2500-km2 springshed overlies the mostly unconfined Upper Floridan Aquifer. The aquifer is approximately 100 m thick and predominantly consists of porous, fractured and cavernous limestone, which leads to excellent surface drainage properties (no major stream network other than Silver Springs run) and complex groundwater flow patterns through both rock matrix and fast conduits. Over the past few decades, discharge from Silver Springs has been observed to slowly but continuously decline, while nitrate concentrations in the spring water have enormously increased from a background level of 0.05 mg/l to over 1 mg/l. In combination with concurrent increases in algae growth and turbidity, for example, and despite an otherwise relatively stable water quality, this has given rise to concerns about the ecological equilibrium in and near the spring run as well as possible impacts on tourism. The purpose of the present work is to elaborate parsimonious lumped parameter models that may be used by resource managers for evaluating the springshed's hydrologic and nitrate transport responses. Instead of attempting to explicitly consider the complex hydrogeologic features of the aquifer in a typically numerical and / or stochastic approach, we use a transfer function approach wherein input signals (i.e., time series of groundwater recharge and nitrate loading) are transformed into output signals (i.e., time series of spring discharge and spring nitrate concentrations) by some linear and time-invariant law. The dynamic response types and parameters are inferred from comparing input and output time series in frequency domain (e.g., after Fourier transformation). Results are converted into impulse (or step) response functions, which describe at what time and to what magnitude a unitary change in input manifests at the output. For the

  10. Prairie falcons quit nesting in response to spring snowstorm

    Science.gov (United States)

    John R. Squires; Stanley H. Anderson; Robert. Oakleaf

    1991-01-01

    A small population of Prairie Falcons (Falco mexicanus) (mean = 6 pairs/year) nesting in northcentral Wyoming quit nesting in response to a severe spring snowstorm in 1984. Temperatures during the April storm were similar to years when the falcons reproduced successfully, but the monthly snowfall was 89.2 cm as compared to the 30-yr monthly average of 29.92 cm...

  11. Estimation of springing response for 550 000 DWT ore carrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adenya, Christiaan Adika; Ren, Huilong; Li, Hui; Wang, Di

    2016-09-01

    The desire to benefit from economy of scale is one of the major driving forces behind the continuous growth in ship sizes. However, models of new large ships need to be thoroughly investigated to determine the carrier's response in waves. In this work, experimental and numerical assessments of the motion and load response of a 550,000 DWT ore carrier are performed using prototype ships with softer stiffness, and towing tank tests are conducted using a segmented model with two schemes of softer stiffness. Numerical analyses are performed employing both rigid body and linear hydroelasticity theories using an in-house program and a comparison is then made between experimental and numerical results to establish the influence of stiffness on the ore carrier's springing response. Results show that softer stiffness models can be used when studying the springing response of ships in waves.

  12. Mapping the Obama administration's response to the Arab Spring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria do Céu de Pinho Ferreira Pinto

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available When the Arab Spring broke out, the United States was in a quandary over how to handle the crisis in its attempt to balance its moral obligations and ideals without undercutting its strategic interests and those of its close allies. Flaws in US diplomatic approach have contributed to one of the most serious foreign policy crisis for a US administration to date with consequential upheaval and erosion of the US-built balance of power. The reactions and policy responses of the Obama administration highlight the difficulties in grasping with the new reality in the Middle East and in enunciating a policy platform that could combine American interests and values.

  13. GEC Ferranti piezo vibratory gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuttall, J. D.

    1993-01-01

    Prototypes of a piezo-electric vibratory angular rate transducer (gyroscope) (PVG) have been constructed and evaluated. The construction is on the lines suggested by Burdess. The sensitive element is a cylinder of radially poled piezo-electric ceramic. The cylinder is metallized inside and out, and the outer metallization is divided into eight electrodes. The metallization on the inside is earthed. A phase locked loop, using pairs of the electrodes, causes the cylinder to vibrate in one of its two fundamental, degenerate modes. In the presence of rotation, some of the vibration is coupled into the outer mode. This can be detected, or suppressed with a closed-up technique and provides a measure of rotation rate. The gyroscope provides a number of advantages over rotating mass and optical instruments: low size and mass, lower power consumption, potentially high reliability, potentially good dormancy, low cost and high maximum rate.

  14. Sphincteric events during penile vibratory ejaculation and electroejaculation in men with spinal cord injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sønksen, J; Ohl, D A; Wedemeyer, G

    2001-02-01

    We investigate internal and external sphincter responses during penile vibratory stimulation and electroejaculation in men with spinal cord injury. Ejaculation induction with simultaneous recording of external and internal sphincter pressures was performed in 9 spinal cord injured men. Of the patients with upper motor neuron lesions 3 underwent penile vibratory stimulation and 3 underwent electroejaculation. In 3 men who did not respond to PVS, including 1 with upper motor neuron and 2 with lower motor neuron lesions, penile vibratory stimulation and subsequent electroejaculation were performed. In successful penile vibratory stimulation and electroejaculation upper motor neuron cases external sphincter pressure first reached a peak (average 180 cm. H2O) and subsequently decrease followed in 3 to 10 seconds by a peak in internal sphincter pressure (average 178 cm. H2O), which exceeded external sphincter pressure and ejaculation occurred. During electroejaculation, the pattern progressed, despite complete discontinuation of electrical stimulation. In electroejaculation, there was a trend for a more rapid return of external sphincter pressure greater than internal sphincter pressure, which may explain the electroejaculation retrograde fraction. In nonresponders external sphincter pressure never increased to more than 105 cm. H2O in response to penile vibratory stimulation and no ejaculation was induced. In nonresponders to penile vibratory stimulation, electroejaculation induced a typical sustained increase in internal sphincter pressure and external sphincter pressure but at lower peak pressures. Forceful contraction of the external sphincter followed by contraction of the internal sphincter always precedes ejaculation during electroejaculation and penile vibratory stimulation. Similarities between penile vibratory stimulation and electroejaculation suggest that the latter induces ejaculation via a complex neurological pathway rather than by simple direct end organ

  15. Response of spring wheat to different soil and foliar fertilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wacław JARECKI

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In the years 2013-2015 a field experiment was carried out, whose aim was to determine the response of spring wheat cultivar Arabella to different levels of soil fertilization with NPK and foliar feeding Plonvit Zboża. Higher level of soil fertilization with NPK caused an increase in the LAI (Leaf Area Index, MTA (Mean Tip Angle and SPAD (Soil Plant Analysis Development indices in comparison to lower fertilization level. The applied soil fertilization and foliar application did not differentiate the number of plants after emergences and prior to the harvest. The higher dose of NPK caused an increase in the number of ears per 1 m2, TGW and grain yield in comparison to the lower dose. Two-time and three-time foliar application caused an increase in MTA and SPAD indices, while TGW and grain yield increased three times in comparison to the control. The higher level of NPK fertilization caused an increase in total protein, K, Cu and Mn contents in grain and a decrease in Fe content. Three-time foliar application caused an increase in ash and Mg contents in grain in comparison to the control. An increase in Cu and Zn contents, in comparison to single foliar application and the control, was also observed.

  16. Whole-body Vibratory Response Study Using a Nonlinear Multi-body Model of Seat-occupant System with Viscoelastic Flexible Polyurethane Foam

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    JOSHI, Gauri; BAJAJ, Anil K; DAVIES, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    .... Since the properties of seating foam affect the response of the occupant, there is need for good models of seat-occupant systems through which the effects of foam properties on the dynamic response...

  17. Interference of Overlapping Insect Vibratory Communication Signals: An Eushistus heros Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrej Čokl

    Full Text Available Plants limit the range of insect substrate-borne vibratory communication by their architecture and mechanical properties that change transmitted signal time, amplitude and frequency characteristics. Stinkbugs gain higher signal-to-noise ratio and increase communication distance by emitting narrowband low frequency vibratory signals that are tuned with transmission properties of plants. The objective of the present study was to investigate hitherto overlooked consequences of duetting with mutually overlapped narrowband vibratory signals. The overlapped vibrations of the model stinkbug species Eushistus heros, produced naturally or induced artificially on different plants, have been analysed. They represent female and male strategies to preserve information within a complex masked signal. The brown stinkbugs E. heros communicate with species and gender specific vibratory signals that constitute characteristic duets in the calling, courtship and rivalry phases of mating behaviour. The calling female pulse overlaps the male vibratory response when the latency of the latter is shorter than the duration of the female triggering signal or when the male response does not inhibit the following female pulse. Overlapping of signals induces interference that changes their amplitude pattern to a sequence of regularly repeated pulses in which their duration and the difference between frequencies of overlapped vibrations are related inversely. Interference does not occur in overlapped narrow band female calling pulses and broadband male courtship pulse trains. In a duet with overlapped signals females and males change time parameters and increase the frequency difference between signals by changing the frequency level and frequency modulation pattern of their calls.

  18. Hydrological response and thermal effect of karst springs linked to aquifer geometry and recharge processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Mingming; Chen, Zhihua; Zhou, Hong; Zhang, Liang; Han, Zhaofeng

    2017-09-01

    To be better understand the hydrological and thermal behavior of karst systems in South China, seasonal variations in flow, hydrochemistry and stable isotope ratios of five karst springs were used to delineate flow paths and recharge processes, and to interpret their thermal response. Isotopic data suggest that mean recharge elevations are 200-820 m above spring outlets. Springs that originate from high elevations have lower NO3 - concentrations than those originating from lower areas that have more agricultural activity. Measured Sr2+ concentrations reflect the strontium contents of the host carbonate aquifer and help delineate the spring catchment's saturated zone. Seasonal variations of NO3 - and Sr2+ concentrations are inversely correlated, because the former correlates with event water and the latter with baseflow. The mean annual water temperatures of springs were only slightly lower than the local mean annual surface temperature at the outlet elevations. These mean spring temperatures suggest a vertical gradient of 6 °C/vertical km, which resembles the adiabatic lapse rate of the Earth's stable atmosphere. Seasonal temperature variations in the springs are in phase with surface air temperatures, except for Heilongquan (HLQ) spring. Event-scale variations of thermal response are dramatically controlled by the circulation depth of karst systems, which determines the effectiveness of heat exchange. HLQ spring undergoes the deepest circulation depth of 820 m, and its thermal responses are determined by the thermally effective regulation processes at higher elevations and the mixing processes associated with thermally ineffective responses at lower elevations.

  19. Whole-body vibratory response study using a nonlinear multi-body model of seat-occupant system with viscoelastic flexible polyurethane foam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Gauri; Bajaj, Anil K; Davies, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    Vehicle occupants are exposed to low frequency vibrations with possible harmful effects such as mild discomfort, lower back pain, and even injury to the spine. Occupational drivers and operators of heavy machinery are exposed to significantly longer duration and higher levels of vibration. Thus, the modeling and prediction of biodynamic response of seated occupants to such vibrations is very important. Since the properties of seating foam affect the response of the occupant, there is need for good models of seat-occupant systems through which the effects of foam properties on the dynamic response can be directly evaluated. A nonlinear planar seat-occupant model which incorporates the nonlinear viscoelastic behavior of seating foam has been developed. This model is used to study response of the occupant to harmonic excitation applied at the seat base, in terms of the frequency response in vertical and fore-and-aft directions, the deflection shapes at resonance, as well as the seat-to-head-transmissibility. In addition, to better understand the role of flexible polyurethane foam in characterizing the system behavior, the response of a single-degree-of-freedom foam-block system is also studied. The effects of different masses riding on the foam block and undergoing vertical vibrations at different acceleration levels are also investigated.

  20. Responses of phenological and physiological stages of spring ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In order to investigate impact of complementary irrigation on phenological stages, chlorophyll content, radiation absorption and extinction coefficient, as well as some aspects concerning the yield of spring safflower, a split-plot experiment based on randomized complete block design with three replication was conducted at ...

  1. Assessment of Penile Vibratory Stimulation as a Management Strategy in Men with Secondary Retarded Orgasm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Christian J.; Ahmed, Absaar; Valenzuela, Rolando; Parker, Marilyn; Mulhall, John P.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To evaluate the effectiveness of penile vibratory stimulation for the management of retarded orgasm. Retarded orgasm, a condition characterized by difficulty achieving orgasm and ejaculation, is one of the most recalcitrant of the male sexual dysfunctions. Currently, no evidence-based treatments have been proven to ameliorate this condition. METHODS Men who had a complete inability to achieve an orgasm during sexual relations in the previous 3 months were instructed in the use of penile vibratory stimulation. The men’s responses were measured by self-report of orgasm function and using the orgasm and satisfaction domains of the International Index of Erectile Function. The responses were assessed at baseline (admission into the study) and at 3 and 6 months. RESULTS A total of 36 men met the inclusion criteria, and 72% reported the restoration of orgasm. These responders reported that orgasm during sexual relations occurred 62% of the time. A statistically and clinically significant increase occurred in the orgasm and satisfaction domains of the International Index of Erectile Function between the baseline visit and the 3-month follow-up visit. These gains were sustained at 6 months. CONCLUSIONS Penile vibratory stimulation is an effective treatment for retarded orgasm. Penile vibratory stimulation should be integrated into current cognitive-behavioral sex therapy techniques to achieve maximal effectiveness and satisfaction. PMID:17382163

  2. New Approaches for Responsible Management of Offshore Springs in Semi-arid Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaban, Amin; de Jong, Carmen; Al-Sulaimani, Zaher

    2017-04-01

    burial under land reclamation rubble has caused the disappearance of offshore springs inducing a drastic decline in the pearl oyster population. Climate change related precipitation decrease and temperature increase is likely to further decrease groundwater and surface water recharge, increase irrigation and domestic water demand, increase water extraction from aquifers and in turn decrease water availability for offshore springs.. Thus in future, continuous monitoring of water quantity and quality as well as new remote sensing approach in addition to observations by citizens such as fishermen and tourist guides are becoming essential to ensure responsible management of offshore freshwater springs.

  3. Complex responses of spring alpine vegetation phenology to snow cover dynamics over the Tibetan Plateau, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Siyuan; Wang, Xiaoyue; Chen, Guangsheng; Yang, Qichun; Wang, Bin; Ma, Yuanxu; Shen, Ming

    2017-09-01

    Snow cover dynamics are considered to play a key role on spring phenological shifts in the high-latitude, so investigating responses of spring phenology to snow cover dynamics is becoming an increasingly important way to identify and predict global ecosystem dynamics. In this study, we quantified the temporal trends and spatial variations of spring phenology and snow cover across the Tibetan Plateau by calibrating and analyzing time series of the NOAA AVHRR-derived normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) during 1983-2012. We also examined how snow cover dynamics affect the spatio-temporal pattern of spring alpine vegetation phenology over the plateau. Our results indicated that 52.21% of the plateau experienced a significant advancing trend in the beginning of vegetation growing season (BGS) and 34.30% exhibited a delaying trend. Accordingly, the snow cover duration days (SCD) and snow cover melt date (SCM) showed similar patterns with a decreasing trend in the west and an increasing trend in the southeast, but the start date of snow cover (SCS) showed an opposite pattern. Meanwhile, the spatial patterns of the BGS, SCD, SCS and SCM varied in accordance with the gradients of temperature, precipitation and topography across the plateau. The response relationship of spring phenology to snow cover dynamics varied within different climate, terrain and alpine plant community zones, and the spatio-temporal response patterns were primarily controlled by the long-term local heat-water conditions and topographic conditions. Moreover, temperature and precipitation played a profound impact on diverse responses of spring phenology to snow cover dynamics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Physiological response cascade of spring wheat to soil warming and drought

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weldearegay, Dawit Fisseha; Yan, F.; Rasmussen, Søren Kjærsgaard

    2016-01-01

    Climate change is affecting wheat production in Northern Europe; in particular, drought and soil warming during anthesis may cause significant yield losses of the crop. In a search for genotypes tolerant to these stresses, the physiological responses of three spring wheat cultivars to increased...

  5. Divergent responses to spring and winter warming drive community level flowering trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Benjamin I; Wolkovich, Elizabeth M; Parmesan, Camille

    2012-06-05

    Analyses of datasets throughout the temperate midlatitude regions show a widespread tendency for species to advance their springtime phenology, consistent with warming trends over the past 20-50 y. Within these general trends toward earlier spring, however, are species that either have insignificant trends or have delayed their timing. Various explanations have been offered to explain this apparent nonresponsiveness to warming, including the influence of other abiotic cues (e.g., photoperiod) or reductions in fall/winter chilling (vernalization). Few studies, however, have explicitly attributed the historical trends of nonresponding species to any specific factor. Here, we analyzed long-term data on phenology and seasonal temperatures from 490 species on two continents and demonstrate that (i) apparent nonresponders are indeed responding to warming, but their responses to fall/winter and spring warming are opposite in sign and of similar magnitude; (ii) observed trends in first flowering date depend strongly on the magnitude of a given species' response to fall/winter vs. spring warming; and (iii) inclusion of fall/winter temperature cues strongly improves hindcast model predictions of long-term flowering trends compared with models with spring warming only. With a few notable exceptions, climate change research has focused on the overall mean trend toward phenological advance, minimizing discussion of apparently nonresponding species. Our results illuminate an understudied source of complexity in wild species responses and support the need for models incorporating diverse environmental cues to improve predictability of community level responses to anthropogenic climate change.

  6. U.S. Community Colleges and a Response to the Arab Spring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumaker, John W.

    2013-01-01

    The tumultuous events of the Arab Spring have challenged higher education systems throughout the Middle East and North Africa to become more responsive to citizens who are impatient for change. Community colleges in the United States can play a vital role in supporting much-needed reforms. This article looks at the possibilities and the challenges…

  7. Exact solutions for dynamic response of a periodic spring and mass structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Q.; Wu, F.; Zhang, H. W.; Zhong, W. X.; Howson, W. P.; Williams, F. W.

    2012-02-01

    This paper derives exact analytical solutions for the dynamic response of a periodic structure for which the unit cell consists of one mass and one spring. The solutions cover arbitrary initial conditions and both polynomial and harmonic external forces. They involve Bessel, Lommel, Weber and hypergeometric functions.

  8. Parametrically disciplined operation of a vibratory gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shcheglov, Kirill V. (Inventor); Hayworth, Ken J. (Inventor); Challoner, A. Dorian (Inventor); Peay, Chris S. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Parametrically disciplined operation of a symmetric nearly degenerate mode vibratory gyroscope is disclosed. A parametrically-disciplined inertial wave gyroscope having a natural oscillation frequency in the neighborhood of a sub-harmonic of an external stable clock reference is produced by driving an electrostatic bias electrode at approximately twice this sub-harmonic frequency to achieve disciplined frequency and phase operation of the resonator. A nearly symmetric parametrically-disciplined inertial wave gyroscope that can oscillate in any transverse direction and has more than one bias electrostatic electrode that can be independently driven at twice its oscillation frequency at an amplitude and phase that disciplines its damping to zero in any vibration direction. In addition, operation of a parametrically-disciplined inertial wave gyroscope is taught in which the precession rate of the driven vibration pattern is digitally disciplined to a prescribed non-zero reference value.

  9. Coriolis vibratory gyroscopes theory and design

    CERN Document Server

    Apostolyuk, Vladislav

    2016-01-01

    This book provides the latest theoretical analysis and design methodologies of different types of Coriolis vibratory gyroscopes (CVG). Together, the chapters analyze different types of sensitive element designs and their kinematics, derivation of motion equations, analysis of sensitive elements dynamics in modulated and demodulated signals, calculation and optimization of main performance characteristics, and signal processing and control. Essential aspects of numerical simulation of CVG using Simulink® are also covered. This is an ideal book for graduate students, researchers, and engineers working in fields that require gyroscope application, including but not limited to: inertial sensors and systems, automotive and consumer electronics, small unmanned aircraft control systems, personal mobile navigation systems and related software development, and augmented and virtual reality systems.

  10. Spring phenological responses of marine and freshwater plankton to changing temperature and light conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Winder, Monika; Berger, Stella A.; Lewandowska, Aleksandra M.; Aberle, Nicole; Lengfellner, Kathrin; Sommer, Ulrich; Diehl, Sebastian

    2012-01-01

    Shifts in the timing and magnitude of the spring plankton bloom in response to climate change have been observed across a wide range of aquatic systems. We used meta-analysis to investigate phenological responses of marine and freshwater plankton communities in mesocosms subjected to experimental manipulations of temperature and light intensity. Systems differed with respect to the dominant mesozooplankton (copepods in seawater and daphnids in freshwater). Higher water temperatures advanced t...

  11. Modification of piezoelectric vibratory gyroscope resonator parameters by feedback control

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Loveday, PW

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available A method for analyzing the effect of feedback control on the dynamics of piezoelectric resonators used in vibratory gyroscopes has been developed. This method can be used to determine the feasibility of replacing the traditional mechanical balancing...

  12. Vibratory gyroscopes : identification of mathematical model from test data

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Shatalov, MY

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Simple mathematical model of vibratory gyroscopes imperfections is formulated, which includes anisotropic damping and variation of mass-stiffness parameters and their harmonics. The method of identification of parameters of the mathematical model...

  13. Configuration System for Simulation Based Design of Vibratory Bowl Feeders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansson, Michael Natapon; Mathiesen, Simon; Ellekilde, Lars-Peter

    2017-01-01

    Vibratory bowl feeders are still among the most commonly used production equipment for automated part feeding, where parts are correctly oriented for further manipulation by being conveyed through a set of orienting devices. Designing vibratory bowl feeders involves selecting and sequencing a num...... the configuration task. To test the approach, the configuration system is used to find three device sequences for feeding three parts in specific orientations. The sequences are validated through simulation and real world experiments, showing good consistency....

  14. Inferring thresholds in karst aquifers from spring responses: the example of the Lurbach karst system (Austria)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birk, Steffen; Wagner, Thomas; Mayaud, Cyril

    2014-05-01

    Threshold behavior in hydrological systems generally involves a qualitative change of a single process, the system response or the functioning of the system. Different types of thresholds and their underlying controls are examined using the example of the Lurbach karst system (Austria). This karst system receives concentrated allogenic recharge from the sinking stream Lurbach, which under low-flow conditions only resurges at the Hammerbach spring. Under medium- to high-flow conditions, however, an overflow toward another spring, the Schmelzbach outlet occurs. The overflow probably is activated when a conduit pathway connecting the two sub-catchments is flooded at a given threshold water level. Unfortunately, the value of this threshold cannot be determined, as information about water levels within this karst system are scarce due to the lack of observation wells and the inaccessibility of relevant cave sections. Yet a corresponding threshold discharge of the Hammerbach spring can be inferred from tracer test results. Interestingly, a tracer test conducted in 2008 suggests that the overflow is activated at a discharge lower than that inferred from tracer tests reported earlier (Wagner et al., EGU2011-7962). In order to better understand this suspected change in the discharge threshold, the physicochemical responses of the Hammerbach spring were analyzed. Applying the concept of process time scales (Birk and Wagner, EGU2013-11365) to the Hammerbach spring suggests that the threshold travel time controlling the response of the spring water temperature was changed in the time period from 2006 to 2009 relative to the years before. At the same time, the Hammerbach spring hydrograph appears to have changed. For instance, the flow duration curve and the master recession curves for the time period from 2006 to 2009 are found to be markedly different from those of earlier time periods. All of these observations can be consistently explained by a reduction of the conduit

  15. Sexual selection predicts advancement of avian spring migration in response to climate change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spottiswoode, Claire N; Tøttrup, Anders P; Coppack, Timothy

    2006-01-01

    Global warming has led to earlier spring arrival of migratory birds, but the extent of this advancement varies greatly among species, and it remains uncertain to what degree these changes are phenotypically plastic responses or microevolutionary adaptations to changing environmental conditions. We...... suggest that sexual selection could help to understand this variation, since early spring arrival of males is favoured by female choice. Climate change could weaken the strength of natural selection opposing sexual selection for early migration, which would predict greatest advancement in species...... in the timing of first-arriving individuals, suggesting that selection has not only acted on protandrous males. These results suggest that sexual selection may have an impact on the responses of organisms to climate change, and knowledge of a species' mating system might help to inform attempts at predicting...

  16. Effects of ejaculation by penile vibratory stimulation on bladder capacity in men with spinal cord lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laessøe, Line; Sønksen, Jens; Bagi, Per

    2003-01-01

    We examined the effects of ejaculation by penile vibratory stimulation on bladder capacity in men with spinal cord lesions.......We examined the effects of ejaculation by penile vibratory stimulation on bladder capacity in men with spinal cord lesions....

  17. A subharmonic vibratory pattern in normal vocal folds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Svec, JG; Schutte, HK; Miller, DG

    This study observes in detail an F-0/2 (sounding an octave below an original tone) subharmonic vibratory pattern produced in a normal larynx. Simultaneous electroglottographic and photoglottographic measurements reveal two different open phases within a subharmonic cycle-the first shorter with a

  18. Automation Selection and Sequencing of Traps for Vibratory Feeders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Simon; Ellekilde, Lars-Peter

    2017-01-01

    Vibratory parts feeders with mechanical orienting devices are used extensively in the assembly automation industry. Even so, the design process is based on trial-and-error approaches and is largely manual. In this paper, a methodology is presented for automatic design of this type of feeder...

  19. Phenological behaviour of early spring flowering trees in Spain in response to recent climate changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo-Galvez, M. D.; García-Mozo, H.; Oteros, J.; Mestre, A.; Botey, R.; Galán, C.

    2017-03-01

    This research reports the phenological trends of four early spring and late winter flowering trees in Spain (south Europe) from a recent period (1986-2012). The studied species were deciduous trees growing in different climatic areas: hazel (Corylus avellana L.), willow (Salix alba L.), ash (Fraxinus angustifolia Vahl.) and white mulberry (Morus alba L.). We analysed the response to climate and the trends of the following phenophases observed at the field: budburst, leaf unfolding, flowering, fruit ripening, fruit harvesting, leaf colour change and leaf-fall. The study was carried out in 17 sampling sites in the country with the aim of detecting the recent phenological response to the climate of these species, and the possible effect of climate change. We have observed differences in the phenological response to climate depending on each species. Sixty-one percent of studied sites suffered an advance of early spring phenophases, especially budburst on average by -0.67 days and flowering on average by -0.15 days during the studied period, and also in the subsequent fruit ripening and harvesting phases on average by -1.06 days. By contrast, it has been detected that 63% of sampling sites showed a delay in autumn vegetative phases, especially leaf-fall events on average by +1.15 days. The statistic correlation analysis shows in the 55% of the studied localities that phenological advances are the consequence of the increasing trend detected for temperature—being minimum temperature the most influential factor—and in the 52% of them, phenological advances occurred by rainfall variations. In general, leaf unfolding and flowering from these species showed negative correlations in relation to temperature and rainfall, whereas that leaf colour change and leaf-fall presented positive correlations. The results obtained have a great relevance due to the fact that they can be considered as reliable bio-indicators of the impact of the recent climate changes in southern

  20. Responsiveness of cold tolerant chickpea characteristics in fall and spring planting: II. yield and yield components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ahmad nezami

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Previous research in Mashhad collection chickpeas (MCC has shown that there are some cold tolerant genotypes for fall planting in the highlands. To obtain more detailed information about the reaction of these genotypes to fall and spring planting, the yield and yield component responses of 33 chickpea genotypes (32 cold tolerant genotypes and one susceptible genotypes to four planting dates (28 Sep., 16 Oct., 2 Nov., and 7 Mar. were evaluated in 2000-2001 growing season. The experiment was conducted at the experimental field of college of agriculture, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad as a split plot design with two replications. The planting dates were imposed as main plot and chickpea genotypes as subplot. Effects of planting date and genotype on percent of plant survival (PPS after winter, number. of pod per plant, 100 seed weight, yield and Harvest Index (HI were significant (p

  1. Mobilisation or dilution? Nitrate response of karst springs to high rainfall events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huebsch, M.; Fenton, O.; Horan, B.; Hennessy, D.; Richards, K. G.; Jordan, P.; Goldscheider, N.; Butscher, C.; Blum, P.

    2014-11-01

    Nitrate (NO3-) contamination of groundwater associated with agronomic activity is of major concern in many countries. Where agriculture, thin free draining soils and karst aquifers coincide, groundwater is highly vulnerable to nitrate contamination. As residence times and denitrification potential in such systems are typically low, nitrate can discharge to surface waters unabated. However, such systems also react quickest to agricultural management changes that aim to improve water quality. In response to storm events, nitrate concentrations can alter significantly, i.e. rapidly decreasing or increasing concentrations. The current study examines the response of a specific karst spring situated on a grassland farm in South Ireland to rainfall events utilising high-resolution nitrate and discharge data together with on-farm borehole groundwater fluctuation data. Specifically, the objectives of the study are to formulate a scientific hypothesis of possible scenarios relating to nitrate responses during storm events, and to verify this hypothesis using additional case studies from the literature. This elucidates the controlling key factors that lead to mobilisation and/or dilution of nitrate concentrations during storm events. These were land use, hydrological condition and karstification, which in combination can lead to differential responses of mobilised and/or diluted nitrate concentrations. Furthermore, the results indicate that nitrate response in karst is strongly dependent on nutrient source, whether mobilisation and/or dilution occur and on the pathway taken. This will have consequences for the delivery of nitrate to a surface water receptor. The current study improves our understanding of nitrate responses in karst systems and therefore can guide environmental modellers, policy makers and drinking water managers with respect to the regulations of the European Union (EU) Water Framework Directive (WFD). In future, more research should focus on the high

  2. Responsiveness summary for the remedial investigation/feasibility study for management of the bulk wastes at the Weldon Spring quarry, Weldon Spring, Missouri

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, J.M.; MacDonell, M.M.

    1990-08-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for conducting remedial actions at the Weldon Spring site in St. Charles County, Missouri, under its Surplus Facilities Management Program. The site consists of a quarry and a chemical plant area located about 6.4 km (4 mi) northeast of the quarry. The quarry is surrounded by the Weldon Spring Wildfire Area and is near an alluvial well field that constitutes a major source of potable water for St. Charles County; the nearest supply well is located about 0.8 km (0.5 mi) southeast of the quarry. From 1942 to 1969, the quarry was used for the disposal of various radioactively and chemically contaminated materials. Bulk wastes in the quarry consist of contaminated soils and sediments, rubble, metal debris, and equipment. As part of overall site remediation, DOE is proposing to conduct an interim remedial action at the quarry to manage the radioactively and chemically contaminated bulk wastes contained therein. Potential remedial action alternatives for managing the quarry bulk wastes have been evaluated consistent with US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) guidance for conducting remedial actions under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended. The contents of these documents were developed in consultation with EPA Region VII and the state of Missouri and reflect the focused scope defined for this interim remedial action. 9 refs.

  3. Characterization of the response of spring-based relative gravimeters during paroxysmal eruptions at Etna volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Filippo; Iafolla, Valerio; Pistorio, Antonio; Fiorenza, Emiliano; Currenti, Gilda; Napoli, Rosalba; Bonaccorso, Alessandro; Del Negro, Ciro

    2014-12-01

    Gravity time sequences collected at Etna volcano by continuously recording spring-based relative gravimeters showed significant variations in temporal correspondence with paroxysmal eruptions. Since the observed gravity variations can only be partially related to subsurface mass redistribution phenomena, we investigated the instrumental effects due to ground vibrations such as those that accompany explosive activity. We simulated the performances of relative gravimeters with laboratory experiments to estimate their response to vertical and horizontal excitations. Laboratory tests were carried out using a vibrating platform capable of accelerating the instruments with intensities and frequencies, in both the vertical and horizontal directions, observed in the ground vibrations associated with paroxysmal events. The seismic signals recorded at Etna volcano during the 10 April 2011 lava fountain were analyzed to retrieve the parameters used to drive the vibration platform. We tested two gravimeters used for Etna volcano monitoring: the LaCoste & Romberg D#185 (Lafayette, CO, USA) and the Scintrex CG-3 M#9310234 (Concord, ON, Canada). The experiment results highlight that the vibrations resembling the seismic waves propagated during paroxysmal events cause an amplitude response in the gravity readings on the order of several hundred microgals (μGal). Generally, the relationship between the vibrations and the gravimeter response is nonlinear, with a fairly complex dependence on the frequencies and amplitudes of the signals acting on the gravimeters.

  4. Penile vibratory stimulation and electroejaculation in the treatment of ejaculatory dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sønksen, Jens; Ohl, Dana A

    2002-12-01

    weeks) an acute SCI. Furthermore, it is suggested that some factors in the seminal plasma and/or disordered storage of spermatozoa in the seminal vesicles are mainly responsible for the impaired semen profiles in men with chronic SCI. Home insemination with semen obtained by penile vibratory and introduced intravaginally in order to achieve successful pregnancies may be an option for some spinal cord injured men and their partners. The majority of men will further enhance their fertility potential when using either penile vibratory or EEJ combined with assisted reproduction techniques such as intrauterine insemination or in-vitro fertilization with or without intracytoplasmic sperm injection.

  5. PHYSICAL WATER QUALITY RESPONSE TO RAINFALL OF BETON KARST SPRING AT GUNUNGKIDUL REGENCY - YOGYAKARTA INDONESIA

    OpenAIRE

    M. Widyastuti; Sudarmadji .; Sutikno; Hendrayana, Heru

    2013-01-01

    Beton karst spring is located in the Ponjong sub District Gunungkidul Regency, at thewestern part of Bribin undergorund river catchment area. The purpose of this study are: 1) toknow the variations of rainfall and discharge in the research area, 2) to know thecharacteristics of the physical water quality of Beton spring and 3) to determine therelationship between the variations of the rainfall toward the discharge and the physicalwater quality of Beton spring. This study uses survey methods a...

  6. PHYSICAL WATER QUALITY RESPONSE TO RAINFALL OF BETON KARST SPRING AT GUNUNGKIDUL REGENCY - YOGYAKARTA INDONESIA

    OpenAIRE

    M. Widyastuti; Sudarmadji .; Sutikno; Heru Hendrayana

    2013-01-01

    Beton karst spring is located in the Ponjong sub District Gunungkidul Regency, at the western part of Bribin undergorund river catchment area. The purpose of this study are: 1) to know the variations of rainfall and discharge in the research area, 2) to know the characteristics of the physical water quality of Beton spring and 3) to determine the relationship between the variations of the rainfall toward the discharge and the physical water quality of Beton spring. This study u...

  7. Spring response to precipitation events using δ(18)O and δ(2)H in the Tanour catchment, NW Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan, Ibraheem; Wiegand, Bettina; Toll, Mathias; Sauter, Martin

    2016-12-01

    The Tanour spring is one of the several karst springs located in the northern part of Jordan. Water samples from the Tanour spring and precipitation were collected in the area of Ajloun in NW Jordan for the analysis of stable oxygen and hydrogen isotopes to evaluate the spring response to precipitation events. Rainwater and snow samples were collected from different elevations during winters of 2013-2014 and 2014-2015. In addition, spring samples were collected between December 2014 and March 2015. δ(18)O values in rainwater vary from -3.26 to -17.34 ‰ (average: -7.84 ± 3.23 ‰), while δ(2)H values range between -4.4 and -110.4 ‰ (average: -35.7 ± 25.0 ‰). Deuterium excess ranges from 17.8 to 34.1 ‰ (average: 27.1 ± 4.0 ‰). The Local Meteoric Water Line for the study area was calculated to be δ(2)H = 7.66*δ(18)O + 24.43 (R(2) = 0.98). Pre-event spring discharge showed variation in δ(18)O (range -6.29 to -7.17 ‰; average -6.58 ± 0.19 ‰) and δ(2)H values (range -28.8 to -32.7 ‰; average: -30.5 ± 1.0 ‰). In contrast, δ(18)O and δ(2)H rapidly changed to more negative values during rainfall and snowmelt events and persisted for several days before returning to background values. Spring water temperature, spring discharge, and turbidity followed the trend in isotopic composition during and after the precipitation events. The rapid change in the isotopic composition, spring discharge, water temperature, and turbidity in response to recharge events is related to fast water travel times and low storage capacity in the conduit system of the karst aquifer. Based on the changes in the isotopic composition of spring water after the precipitation events, the water travel time in the aquifer is in the order of 5-11 days.

  8. Characterization of the Bell-Shaped Vibratory Angular Rate Gyro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junfang Fan

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The bell-shaped vibratory angular rate gyro (abbreviated as BVG is a novel shell vibratory gyroscope, which is inspired by the Chinese traditional bell. It sensitizes angular velocity through the standing wave precession effect. The bell-shaped resonator is a core component of the BVG and looks like the millimeter-grade Chinese traditional bell, such as QianLong Bell and Yongle Bell. It is made of Ni43CrTi, which is a constant modulus alloy. The exciting element, control element and detection element are uniformly distributed and attached to the resonator, respectively. This work presents the design, analysis and experimentation on the BVG. It is most important to analyze the vibratory character of the bell-shaped resonator. The strain equation, internal force and the resonator's equilibrium differential equation are derived in the orthogonal curvilinear coordinate system. When the input angular velocity is existent on the sensitive axis, an analysis of the vibratory character is performed using the theory of thin shells. On this basis, the mode shape function and the simplified second order normal vibration mode dynamical equation are obtained. The coriolis coupling relationship about the primary mode and secondary mode is established. The methods of the signal processing and control loop are presented. Analyzing the impact resistance property of the bell-shaped resonator, which is compared with other shell resonators using the Finite Element Method, demonstrates that BVG has the advantage of a better impact resistance property. A reasonable means of installation and a prototypal gyro are designed. The gyroscopic effect of the BVG is characterized through experiments. Experimental results show that the BVG has not only the advantages of low cost, low power, long work life, high sensitivity, and so on, but, also, of a simple structure and a better impact resistance property for low and medium angular velocity measurements.

  9. Error Model and Compensation of Bell-Shaped Vibratory Gyro

    OpenAIRE

    Zhong Su; Ning Liu; Qing Li

    2015-01-01

    A bell-shaped vibratory angular velocity gyro (BVG), inspired by the Chinese traditional bell, is a type of axisymmetric shell resonator gyroscope. This paper focuses on development of an error model and compensation of the BVG. A dynamic equation is firstly established, based on a study of the BVG working mechanism. This equation is then used to evaluate the relationship between the angular rate output signal and bell-shaped resonator character, analyze the influence of the main error source...

  10. Bifurcations of a flexible rotor response in squeeze-film dampers without centering springs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inayat-Hussain, Jawaid I. [School of Engineering, Monash University Malaysia, No. 2, Jalan Kolej, Bandar Sunway, Petaling Jaya 46150, Selangor Darul Ehsan (Malaysia)]. E-mail: jawaid.inayat-hussain@eng.monash.edu.my

    2005-04-01

    Squeeze-film dampers are often utilized in high-speed rotating machinery to provide additional external damping to the rotor-bearing system for the purpose of reducing the synchronous response of the rotor especially while traversing critical speeds, or to eliminate rotor instability problems. The application of these dampers are widely found in aircraft gas turbine engines that are usually mounted on rolling element bearings, which are known to provide almost negligible damping to the system. Although the squeeze-film damper is an inherently stable machine element, its operation at certain parameters may give rise to undesirable non-synchronous vibration. The effects of the design and operating parameters, namely the bearing parameter, B, gravity parameter, W, and mass ratio, {alpha}, on the bifurcations in the response of a flexible rotor supported by squeeze-film dampers without centering springs were examined using direct numerical integration. Specifically, the effects of these parameters on the onset speed of bifurcation and the extent of non-synchronous response of the rotor within the range of speed parameter, {omega}, between 0.5 and 5.0 were determined. Numerical simulation results showed the occurrence of period-2, period-4 and quasi-periodic vibrations in the response of the rotor as the speed parameter, {omega}, was varied from 0.5 to 5. The results further showed that increasing B resulted in the increase of the onset speed of bifurcation, and a decrease in the range of {omega} where non-synchronous response was observed. With the exception of the case of W = 0.0, the increase of W was found to increase the onset speed of bifurcation and also the range of {omega} where non-synchronous response was observed. The effect of increasing {alpha} resulted in a decrease in the range of {omega} where non-synchronous response existed. The increase of {alpha} also caused the onset speed of bifurcation to increase, except for the case of B = 0.05, W = 0.0, where

  11. The influence of asymmetry in centralizing spring of squeeze film damper on stability and bifurcation of rigid rotor response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamidreza Heidari

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the main challenges in the design of rotating machinery is the occurrence of undesirable vibration. In this paper, stability and bifurcation of the unbalance response of a rigid rotor supported by squeeze film damper with asymmetry in centralizing spring are investigated. The unbalanced rotor response is determined by the shooting method and the stability of these solutions is examined by using the Floquet theorem. Numerical examples are given for both symmetric (Kx=Ky and asymmetry (Kx≠Ky centralizing springs in x or y direction. Jump phenomenon and subharmonic and quasi-periodic vibrations are predicted for a range of design and operating parameters such as the unbalancing (U, gravity (W, bearing (B and spring (K. The results show that increasing the spring stiffness asymmetry parameter in y direction has no influence on the nature of system response and occurrence of bifurcation. But, examining the effect of increase in stiffness parameter in x direction leads to occurrence instability and period-doubling bifurcation in response to the system. Our findings show that this phenomena are due to the weight force in the y direction. Finally, it is shown that the unsymmetrical stiffness of squeeze film dampers in the presence of cavitation promoting the chance of undesirable nonsynchronous vibrations.

  12. How important is exact knowledge of preferential flowpath locations and orientations for understanding spatiotemporally integrated spring hydrologic and transport response?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henson, W.; De Rooij, R.; Graham, W. D.

    2016-12-01

    The Upper Floridian Aquifer is hydrogeologically complex; limestone dissolution has led to vertical and horizontal preferential flow paths. Locations of karst conduits are unknown and conduit properties are poorly constrained. Uncertainty in effects of conduit location, size, and density, network geometry and connectivity on hydrologic and transport responses is not well quantified, leading to limited use of discrete-continuum models that incorporate conduit networks for regional-scale hydrologic regulatory models. However, conduit networks typically dominate flow and contaminant transport in karst aquifers. We evaluated sensitivity of simulated water and nitrate fluxes and flow paths to karst conduit geometry in a springshed representative of Silver Springs, Florida, using a novel calcite dissolution conduit-generation algorithm coupled with a discrete-continuum flow and transport model (DisCo). Monte Carlo simulations of conduit generation, groundwater flow, and conservative solute transport indicate that, if a first magnitude spring system conduit network developed (i.e., spring flow >2.8 m3/s), the uncertainty in hydraulic and solute pulse response metrics at the spring vent was minimally related to locational uncertainty of network elements. Across the ensemble of realizations for various distributions of conduits, first magnitude spring hydraulic pulse metrics (e.g., steady-flow, peak flow, and recession coefficients) had coefficient of variation (CV). Similarly, spring solute breakthrough curve moments had low CV (<0.08); peak arrival had CV=0.06, mean travel time had CV=0.05, and travel time standard deviation had CV=0.08. Nevertheless, hydraulic and solute pulse response metrics were significantly different than those predicted by an equivalent porous-media model. These findings indicate that regional-scale decision models that incorporate karst preferential flow paths within an uncertainty framework can be used to better constrain aquifer

  13. Optimization of process parameters during vibratory welding technique using Taguchi's analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pravin Kumar Singh

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available With an aim to improve the mechanical properties of a weld joint, a new concept of vibratory setup has been designed which is capable to stir the molten weld pool before it solidifies during shielded metal arc welding (SMAW operation. Mechanical vibration having resonance frequency of 300 Hz and amplitude of 0.5 mm was transferred to the molten weld pool of 6 mm thick mild steel butt-welded joints during the welding operation. The experimental work was conducted at various ranges of frequencies, welding current and welding speed. Taguchi's analysis technique has been applied to optimize the process parameters; the response values for analysis are yield strength and micro-hardness. The test results showed that with the application of the vibratory treatment the values of hardness and tensile properties increased. The auxiliary vibrations induced into the weld pool resulted in increased micro-hardness of the weld metal which indicates the orientation of the crystal and refinement of grains took place. This study shows that vibration applied into the weld pool can be successfully improved the mechanical properties of welded joints. Thus this research attempt provided an alternative welding technique for grain refinement of weldments.

  14. Hydrogeochemical response of groundwater springs during central Italy earthquakes (24 August 2016 and 26-30 October 2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Claire; Binda, Gilberto; Terrana, Silvia; Gambillara, Roberto; Michetti, Alessandro; Noble, Paula; Petitta, Marco; Rosen, Michael; Pozzi, Andrea; Bellezza, Paolo; Brunamonte, Fabio

    2017-04-01

    Co-seismic hydrological and chemical response at groundwater springs following strong earthquakes is a significant concern in the Apennines, a region in central Italy characterized by regional karstic groundwater systems interacting with active normal faults capable of producing Mw 6.5 to 7.0 seismic events. These aquifers also provide water supply to major metropolitan areas in the region. On August 24, 2016, a Mw 6.0 earthquake hit Central Italy in the area where Latium joins Umbria, Marche and Abruzzi; this was immediately followed one hour later by a Mw 5.4 shock. The epicenter of the event was located at the segment boundary between the Mt. Vettore and Mt. Laga faults. On October 26, 2016 and on October 30, 2016, three other big shocks (Mw 5.5, Mw 6.0 and Mw 6.5) ruptured again the Vettore Fault and its NW extension. Immediately after Aug. 24, we sampled springs discharging different aquifers in the Rieti area, including the Peschiera spring, which feeds the aqueduct of Rome. Thermal springs connected with deep groundwater flowpaths were also sampled. These springs, sampled previously in 2014 and 2015, provide some pre-earthquake data. Moreover, we sampled 4 springs along the Mt. Vettore fault system: 3 small springs at Forca di Presta, close to the trace of the earthquake surface ruptures, and two in Castel Sant'Angelo sul Nera. The latter are feeding the Nera aqueduct and the Nerea S.p.A. mineral water plant, which also kindly allowed us to collect bottled water samples from the pre-seismic period. The aim of this study is to evaluate the strong earthquake sequence effects on the hydrochemistry and flow paths of groundwater from different aquifer settings based on analysis before and after seismic events. The comparison between the responses of springs ca. 40 km from the epicenter (Rieti basin) and the springs located near the epicenter (Castelsantangelo sul Nera and Forca di Presta) is especially significant for understanding the resilience of groundwater

  15. The influence of asymmetry in centralizing spring of squeeze film damper on stability and bifurcation of rigid rotor response

    OpenAIRE

    Hamidreza Heidari; Mohammadreza Ashkooh

    2016-01-01

    One of the main challenges in the design of rotating machinery is the occurrence of undesirable vibration. In this paper, stability and bifurcation of the unbalance response of a rigid rotor supported by squeeze film damper with asymmetry in centralizing spring are investigated. The unbalanced rotor response is determined by the shooting method and the stability of these solutions is examined by using the Floquet theorem. Numerical examples are given for both symmetric (Kx=Ky) and asymmetry (...

  16. Response of Alum Rock springs to the October 30, 2007 Alum Rock earthquake and implications for the origin of increased discharge after earthquake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowland, Joel C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Manga, Michael [UC BERKELEY

    2009-01-01

    The origin of increased stream flow and spring discharge following earthquakes have been the subject of controversy, in large part because there are many models to explain observations and few measurements suitable for distinguishing between hypotheses. On October 30, 2007 a magnitude 5.5 earthquake occurred near the Alum Rock springs, California, USA. Within a day we documented a several-fold increase in discharge. Over the following year, we have monitored a gradual return towards pre-earthquake properties, but for the largest springs there appears to be a permanent increase in the steady discharge at all the springs. The Alum Rock springs discharge waters that represent a mixture between modern ('shallow') meteoric water and old ('deep') connate waters expelled by regional transpression. After the earthquake, the increased discharge at the largest springs was accompanied by a small decrease in the fraction of connate water in the spring discharge. Combined with the rapid response, this implies that the increased discharge has a shallow origin. Increased discharge at these springs occurs for earthquakes that cause static volumetric expansion and those that cause contraction, supporting models in which dynamic strains are responsible for the subsurface changes that cause flow to increase. We show that models in which the permeability of the fracture system feeding the springs increases after the earthquake are in general consistent with the changes in discharge. The response of these springs to another earthquake will provide critical constraints on the changes that occur in the subsurface.

  17. Enhancement of the spring East China precipitation response to tropical sea surface temperature variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mengqi; Sun, Jianqi

    2017-12-01

    The boreal spring relationship between variabilities of East China precipitation (ECP) and tropical Ocean sea surface temperature (SST) during the period 1951-2014 is investigated in this study. The results show that the leading mode of the ECP variability exhibits an enhanced response to the anomalous El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO)-like SST after the late 1970s, when the SST underwent a decadal change, with two positive centers over the eastern tropical Pacific (ETP) and tropical Indian Ocean (TIO). To further understand the relative roles of the ETP and TIO SST anomalies (SSTAs) in the variability of ECP after the late 1970s, partial regression and correlation methods are used. It is found that, without the contribution of the TIO, ETP SSTA plays a limited role in the variability of ECP after the late 1970s; comparatively, a significant correlation between TIO SST and ECP is identified during the same period, when the ETP signal is linearly removed. Physical analyses show that, after the late 1970s, the TIO SSTA affects East Asian atmospheric circulation in two ways: by exciting a zonal wave-train pattern over the mid-latitude Eurasian Continent and by inducing anomalous convection over the Maritime Continent. Via these two mechanisms, the TIO SST variability results in an anomalous East Asian trough and vertical motion over East China and consequently leads to anomalous precipitation over the region. The physical processes linking the ECP and TIO SST are confirmed by an atmospheric general circulation model experiment forced with idealized TIO warming.

  18. The dynamics of cavity clusters in ultrasonic (vibratory) cavitation erosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansson, I.; Mørch, Knud Aage

    1980-01-01

    The erosion of solids caused by cavitating liquids is a result of the concerted collapse of clusters of cavities. In vibratory cavitation equipment the clusters grow and collapse adjacent to a solid surface and are typically of hemispherical or cylindrical form. In the present paper the collapse...... process of these clusters is described and the collapse equations are developed and solved. The theoretical results are compared with results from high-speed photography of the clusters and with the initial stages of cavitation erosion on metal specimens. Experimental and theoretical results show...

  19. Used Furan Sand Reclamation in REGMAS Vibratory Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dańko J.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper, especially dealt with problems of reclamation of used furan sand, carried out in new, vibratory sand reclamation unit REGMAS developed by researches from AGH-University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Foundry Engineering in Cracow (Poland. Functional characteristics of reclamation unit as well as the results of reclamation of used sand with furfuryl resin are discussed in the paper. The quality of reclaim was tested by means of the LOI and pH value, dust content in the reclaim and at least by the the quality of the castings produced in moulds prepared with the use of reclaimed matrix.

  20. Physiological, proteomic and transcriptional responses of wheat to combination of drought or waterlogging with late spring low temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Xiangnan; Cai, Jian; Liu, Fulai

    2014-01-01

    Spring low temperature events affect winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) during late vegetative or reproductive development, exposing plants to a subzero low temperature stress when winter hardening is lost. The increased climatic variability results in wheat being exposed to more frequent adverse...... impacts of combined low temperature and water stress, including drought and waterlogging. The responses of potted wheat plants cultivated in climatic chambers to these environmental perturbations were investigated at physiological, proteomic and transcriptional levels. At the physiological level...

  1. Sex-specific responses to winter flooding, spring waterlogging and post-flooding recovery in Populus deltoides

    OpenAIRE

    Ling-Feng Miao; Fan Yang; Chun-Yu Han; Yu-Jin Pu; Yang Ding; Li-Jia Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Winter flooding events are common in some rivers and streams due to dam constructions, and flooding and waterlogging inhibit the growth of trees in riparian zones. This study investigated sex-specific morphological, physiological and ultrastructural responses to various durations of winter flooding and spring waterlogging stresses, and post-flooding recovery characteristics in Populus deltoides. There were no significant differences in the morphological, ultrastructural and the majority of ph...

  2. Field Tests to Investigate the Penetration Rate of Piles Driven by Vibratory Installation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaohui Qin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Factors directly affecting the penetration rate of piles installed by vibratory driving technique are summarized and classified into seven aspects which are driving force, resistance, vibratory amplitude, energy consumption, speeding up at the beginning, pile plumbness keeping, and slowing down at the end, from the mechanism and engineering practice of the vibratory pile driving. In order to find out how these factors affect the penetration rate of the pile in three major actors of vibratory pile driving: (i the pile to be driven, (ii the selected driving system, and (iii the imposed soil conditions, field tests on steel sheet piles driven by vibratory driving technique in different soil conditions are conducted. The penetration rates of three different sheet pile types having up to four different lengths installed using two different vibratory driving systems are documented. Piles with different lengths and types driven with or without clutch have different penetration rates. The working parameters of vibratory hammer, such as driving force and vibratory amplitude, have great influences on the penetration rate of the pile, especially at the later stages of the sinking process. Penetration rate of piles driven in different soil conditions is uniform because of the different penetration resistance including shaft friction and toe resistance.

  3. A novel oscillation control for MEMS vibratory gyroscopes using a modified electromechanical amplitude modulation technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wei; Lin, Yiyu; Liu, Siqi; Zheng, Xudong; Jin, Zhonghe

    2017-02-01

    This paper reports a novel oscillation control algorithm for MEMS vibratory gyroscopes using a modified electromechanical amplitude modulation (MEAM) technique, which enhances the robustness against the frequency variation of the driving mode, compared to the conventional EAM (CEAM) scheme. In this approach, the carrier voltage exerted on the proof mass is frequency-modulated by the drive resonant frequency. Accordingly, the pick-up signal from the interface circuit involves a constant-frequency component that contains the amplitude and phase information of the vibration displacement. In other words, this informational detection signal is independent of the mechanical resonant frequency, which varies due to different batches, imprecise micro-fabrication and changing environmental temperature. In this paper, the automatic gain control loop together with the phase-locked loop are simultaneously analyzed using the averaging method and Routh-Hurwitz criterion, deriving the stability condition and the parameter optimization rules of the transient response. Then, a simulation model based on the real system is set up to evaluate the control algorithm. Further, the proposed MEAM method is tested using a field-programmable-gate-array based digital platform on a capacitive vibratory gyroscope. By optimizing the control parameters, the transient response of the drive amplitude reveals a settling time of 45.2 ms without overshoot, according well with the theoretical prediction and simulation results. The first measurement results show that the amplitude variance of the drive displacement is 12 ppm in an hour while the phase standard deviation is as low as 0.0004°. The mode-split gyroscope operating under atmospheric pressure demonstrates an outstanding performance. By virtue of the proposed MEAM method, the bias instability and angle random walk are measured to be 0.9° h-1 (improved by 2.4 times compared to the CEAM method) and 0.068° (√h)-1 (improved by 1.4 times

  4. Spring temperature responses of oaks are synchronous with North Atlantic conditions during the last deglaciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steven L. Voelker; Paul-Emile Noirot-Cosson; Michael C. Stambaugh; Erin R. McMurry; Frederick C. Meinzer; Barbara Lachenburch; Richard P. Guyette

    2012-01-01

    Paleoclimate proxies based on the measurement of xylem cell anatomy have rarely been developed across the temperature range of a species or applied to wood predating the most recent millennium. Here we describe wood anatomy-based proxies for spring temperatures in central North America from modern bur oaks (Quercus macrocarpa Michx.). The strong...

  5. Interannual variations in spring phenology and their response to climate change across the Tibetan Plateau from 1982 to 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lingling; Zhang, Xiaoyang; Donnelly, Alison; Liu, Xinjie

    2016-10-01

    Land surface phenology has been widely used to evaluate the effects of climate change on terrestrial ecosystems in recent decades. Climate warming on the Tibetan Plateau (1960-2010, 0.2 °C/decade) has been found to be greater than the global average (1951-2012, 0.12 °C/decade), which has had a significant impact on the timing of spring greenup. However, the magnitude and direction of change in spring phenology and its response to warming temperature and precipitation are currently under scientific debate. In an attempt to explore this issue further, we detected the onset of greenup based on the time series of daily two-band enhanced vegetation index (EVI2) from the advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) long-term data record (LTDR; 1982-1999) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Climate Modeling Grid (CMG; 2000-2013) using hybrid piecewise logistic models. Further, we examined the temporal trend in greenup onset in both individual pixels and ecoregions across the entire Tibetan Plateau over the following periods: 1982-1999, 2000-2013, and 1982-2013. The interannual variation in greenup onset was linked to the mean temperature and cumulative precipitation in the preceding month, and total precipitation during winter and spring, respectively. Finally, we investigated the relationship between interannual variation in greenup onset dates and temperature and precipitation from 1982 to 2013 at different elevational zones for different ecoregions. The results revealed no significant trend in the onset of greenup from 1982 to 2013 in more than 86 % of the Tibetan Plateau. For each study period, statistically significant earlier greenup trends were observed mainly in the eastern meadow regions while later greenup trends mainly occurred in the southwestern steppe and meadow regions both with areal coverage of less than 8 %. Although spring phenology was negatively correlated with spring temperature and precipitation in the majority of

  6. Interannual variations in spring phenology and their response to climate change across the Tibetan Plateau from 1982 to 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lingling; Zhang, Xiaoyang; Donnelly, Alison; Liu, Xinjie

    2016-10-01

    Land surface phenology has been widely used to evaluate the effects of climate change on terrestrial ecosystems in recent decades. Climate warming on the Tibetan Plateau (1960-2010, 0.2 °C/decade) has been found to be greater than the global average (1951-2012, 0.12 °C/decade), which has had a significant impact on the timing of spring greenup. However, the magnitude and direction of change in spring phenology and its response to warming temperature and precipitation are currently under scientific debate. In an attempt to explore this issue further, we detected the onset of greenup based on the time series of daily two-band enhanced vegetation index (EVI2) from the advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) long-term data record (LTDR; 1982-1999) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Climate Modeling Grid (CMG; 2000-2013) using hybrid piecewise logistic models. Further, we examined the temporal trend in greenup onset in both individual pixels and ecoregions across the entire Tibetan Plateau over the following periods: 1982-1999, 2000-2013, and 1982-2013. The interannual variation in greenup onset was linked to the mean temperature and cumulative precipitation in the preceding month, and total precipitation during winter and spring, respectively. Finally, we investigated the relationship between interannual variation in greenup onset dates and temperature and precipitation from 1982 to 2013 at different elevational zones for different ecoregions. The results revealed no significant trend in the onset of greenup from 1982 to 2013 in more than 86 % of the Tibetan Plateau. For each study period, statistically significant earlier greenup trends were observed mainly in the eastern meadow regions while later greenup trends mainly occurred in the southwestern steppe and meadow regions both with areal coverage of less than 8 %. Although spring phenology was negatively correlated with spring temperature and precipitation in the majority of pixels

  7. Copepod life cycle adaptations and success in response to phytoplankton spring bloom phenology

    OpenAIRE

    Seebens, Hanno; Einsle, Ulrich; Straile, Dietmar

    2009-01-01

    In a seasonal environment, the timing of reproduction is usually scheduled to maximize the survival of offspring. Within deep water bodies, the phytoplankton spring bloom provides a short time window of high food quantity and quality for herbivores. The onset of algal bloom development, however, varies strongly from year to year due to interannual variability in meteorological conditions. Furthermore, the onset is predicted to change with global warming. Here, we use a long-term dataset to st...

  8. Hydrogen Peroxide Cycling in High-Temperature Acidic Geothermal Springs and Potential Implications for Oxidative Stress Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaux M. Meslé

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, superoxide (O2•-, and hydroxyl radicals (OH• are produced in natural waters via ultraviolet (UV light-induced reactions between dissolved oxygen (O2 and organic carbon, and further reaction of H2O2 and Fe(II (i.e., Fenton chemistry. The temporal and spatial dynamics of H2O2 and other dissolved compounds [Fe(II, Fe(III, H2S, O2] were measured during a diel cycle (dark/light in surface waters of three acidic geothermal springs (Beowulf Spring, One Hundred Springs Plain, and Echinus Geyser Spring; pH = 3–3.5, T = 68–80°C in Norris Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park. In situ analyses showed that H2O2 concentrations were lowest (ca. 1 μM in geothermal source waters containing high dissolved sulfide (and where oxygen was below detection and increased by 2-fold (ca. 2–3 μM in oxygenated waters corresponding to Fe(III-oxide mat formation down the water channel. Small increases in dissolved oxygen and H2O2 were observed during peak photon flux, but not consistently across all springs sampled. Iron-oxide microbial mats were sampled for molecular analysis of ROS gene expression in two primary autotrophs of acidic Fe(III-oxide mat ecosystems: Metallosphaera yellowstonensis (Archaea and Hydrogenobaculum sp. (Bacteria. Expression (RT-qPCR assays of specific stress-response genes (e.g., superoxide dismutase, peroxidases of the primary autotrophs were used to evaluate possible changes in transcription across temporal, spatial, and/or seasonal samples. Data presented here documented the presence of H2O2 and general correlation with dissolved oxygen. Moreover, two dominant microbial populations expressed ROS response genes throughout the day, but showed less expression of key genes during peak sunlight. Oxidative stress response genes (especially external peroxidases were highly-expressed in microorganisms within Fe(III-oxide mat communities, suggesting a significant role for these proteins during survival and growth in

  9. Adaptive Control of a Vibratory Angle Measuring Gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sungsu

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an adaptive control algorithm for realizing a vibratory angle measuring gyroscope so that rotation angle can be directly measured without integration of angular rate, thus eliminating the accumulation of numerical integration errors. The proposed control algorithm uses a trajectory following approach and the reference trajectory is generated by an ideal angle measuring gyroscope driven by the estimate of angular rate and the auxiliary sinusoidal input so that the persistent excitation condition is satisfied. The developed control algorithm can compensate for all types of fabrication imperfections such as coupled damping and stiffness, and mismatched stiffness and un-equal damping term in an on-line fashion. The simulation results show the feasibility and effectiveness of the developed control algorithm that is capable of directly measuring rotation angle without the integration of angular rate. PMID:22163667

  10. Climate Change and Some Other Implications of Vibratory Existence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenn McLaren

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Modern Process Philosophy began when Alfred North Whitehead realized that existence is primarily vibratory, not points but processes. Vibrations are best understood as sound waves, or through using auditory metaphors rather than visual ones. Our Universe is more like music than matter, but how does this help us better understand it? In this paper I use the example of the large ocean current oscillators that help drive our climate systems to reveal the more effective nature of auditory approaches. Through an auditory approach, we can better understand the ways these oscillations constrain and interact with other levels of oscillations as well as how they might be destroyed by other levels. This can then lead to us extending our ethics to the conservation of these oscillations.

  11. The Numerical FEM Model of the Kinematics of the Vibratory Shot Peening Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanisław Bławucki

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of numerical calculations, with the finite element method in the ABAQUS program environment, of the vibratory shot peening process with loose peening elements. The behaviour of shot peening elements was analysed in the kinematic aspect. The impact of the initial deployment of vibratory shot peening elements on their behaviour during processing was investigated, including the displacement, velocity, acceleration and the number of collisions. The way of determining the effectiveness of the processing with the vibratory shot peening was illustrated.

  12. Differences between organically grown varieties of spring wheat, in response to weed competition and yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feledyn-Szewczyk Beata

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available When growing wheat, one of the non-chemical methods of weed regulation is to choose wheat varieties which have a high ability to compete with weeds. The first aim of the research was the estimation of the relationships between the morphological features and canopy parameters of six spring wheat varieties. The second aim was the estimation of the varieties’ competitive ability against weeds. The third aim was the estimation of the grain yield of the six varieties. The experiment was carried out in the 2011–2013 time period, on fields which had been organically managed since 1994. Different features affected the weed infestation levels of the spring wheat varieties. For Bombona, negative correlations between the number of weeds and the height, dry matter of wheat, and wheat density, were proved. For Brawura, Hewilla, and Żura, the height, number of tillers, and dry matter of wheat were the main factors influencing weed abundance. A strong negative correlation between the number of weeds and the dry matter of wheat was found for Parabola. Cluster analysis indicated that Bombona and Brawura were the most competitive against weeds, while Monsun and Parabola were characterized as being the least competitive against weeds. Weed number significantly affected the grain yield of spring wheat (r = −0.418. The grain yield was positively correlated with the number of tillers (r = 0.459 and ears (r = 0.355, and the height (r = 0.534 and wheat dry matter (r = 0.411. Bombona and Brawura were the lowest yielding varieties (3.03 and 3.20 t · ha−1, respectively, whereas the highest yield was achieved by Żura (3.82 t · ha−1, on average.

  13. Spring in the Arab Spring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borg, G.J.A.

    2011-01-01

    Column Gert Borg | Spring in the Arab Spring door dr. Gert Borg, onderzoeker bij Islam en Arabisch aan de Radboud Universiteit Nijmegen en voormalig directeur van het Nederlands-Vlaams Instituut Caïro Spring If, in Google, you type "Arab Spring" and hit the button, you get more than

  14. Reconstruction of late spring phenophases in Poland and their response to climate change, 1951–2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartosz Czernecki

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Phenology is primarily seen as an indicator of the impacts of climate change. The strongest biological signal of climatic change is revealed by phenological data from the period after 1990. Unfortunately, the Polish nationwide network of phenological monitoring was terminated in 1992, and was only reactivated in 2005. Here, we attempt to reconstruct late spring phenophases of flowering of Syringa vulgaris L. and Aesculus hippocastanum L. across several sites in Poland from 1951 to 2014 using the GIS-based approach (if observations from neighboring stations were available and multiple regression modeling with stepwise screening and bootstrap resampling. It was found that the air temperature and its indices explain over 60% of the variance, giving an accuracy of 3.0–3.4 days (mean absolute error and correlation coefficients of 0.83 and 0.78 for lilac and horse chestnut, respectively. Altogether, both plant species showed a statistically significant advancement in the onset of flowering with an average rate of 1.7 days per decade. We also found that the final trend is the result of rapid acceleration of the increase in air temperature after the 1990s, while most of the trends for late spring were ambiguous before that period.

  15. Ozone dose-response relationships for spring oilseed rape and broccoli

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bock, Maarten; Op de Beeck, Maarten; De Temmerman, Ludwig; Guisez, Yves; Ceulemans, Reinhart; Vandermeiren, Karine

    2011-03-01

    Tropospheric ozone is an important air pollutant with known detrimental effects for several crops. Ozone effects on seed yield, oil percentage, oil yield and 1000 seed weight were examined for spring oilseed rape ( Brassica napus cv. Ability). For broccoli ( Brassica oleracea L. cv. Italica cv. Monaco) the effects on fresh marketable weight and total dry weight were studied. Current ozone levels were compared with an increase of 20 and 40 ppb during 8 h per day, over the entire growing season. Oilseed rape seed yield was negatively correlated with ozone dose indices calculated from emergence until harvest. This resulted in an R2 of 0.24 and 0.26 ( p broccoli the applied ozone doses had no effect on yield.

  16. Electroejaculation versus vibratory stimulation in spinal cord injured men: sperm quality and patient preference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohl, D A; Sønksen, J; Menge, A C; McCabe, M; Keller, L M

    1997-06-01

    We compared semen quality and patient preference between penile vibratory stimulation and electroejaculation in spinal cord injured men. We treated 11 spinal cord injured men with penile vibratory stimulation and electroejaculation in random order. End points examined were semen analysis, sperm functional assessment, and patient pain scores (1 to 10) and preferred procedure. Differences between the procedures were determined with the paired Student t test. There was no difference in antegrade sperm count but penile vibratory stimulation specimens had greater motility (26.0 versus 10.7%), viability (25.2 versus 9.7%) and motile sperm count (185.0 x 10(6) versus 97.0 x 10(6)). The retrograde sperm count was greater (but not significant) in electroejaculation patients. The total (antegrade plus retrograde) and motile sperm counts were not different. There was no difference in immunobead test (all negative), cervical mucus penetration or sperm penetration assay, although the percent hamster egg penetration approached significance (53.7% for penile vibratory stimulation versus 22.1% for electroejaculation, p = 0.06). There was no difference in the peak blood pressures and no complications were noted. Pain scores were significantly greater for electroejaculation compared to penile vibratory stimulation (5.2 versus 1.7, respectively). All patients preferred penile vibratory stimulation. There was a slight advantage in sperm quality and a high patient preference in favor of penile vibratory stimulation. Penile vibratory stimulation should be attempted first to induce ejaculation in spinal cord injured men, with electroejaculation reserved for failures.

  17. Jean-Martin Charcot and his vibratory chair for Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, Christopher G

    2009-08-11

    Vibration therapy is currently used in diverse medical specialties ranging from orthopedics to urology to sports medicine. The celebrated 19th-century neurologist, J.-M. Charcot, used vibratory therapy to treat Parkinson disease (PD). This study analyzed printed writings by Charcot and other writers on vibratory therapy and accessed unpublished notes from the Salpêtrière Hospital, Paris. Charcot lectured on several occasions on vibratory therapy and its neurologic applications. He developed a vibration chair for patients with PD after he observed that patients were more comfortable and slept better after a train or carriage ride. He replicated this experience by having patients undergo daily 30-minute sessions in the automated vibratory chair (fauteuil trépidant). His junior colleague, Gilles de la Tourette, extended these observations and developed a helmet that vibrated the head on the premise that the brain responded directly to the pulsations. Although after Charcot's death vibratory therapy was not widely pursued, vibratory appliances are reemerging in 21st century medicine and can be retested using adaptations of Charcot's neurologic protocols.

  18. Vocal fold vibratory characteristics of healthy geriatric females--analysis of high-speed digital images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Kartini; Yan, Yuling; Bless, Diane

    2012-11-01

    A high proportion of the geriatric population suffers from presbylaryngis and presbyphonia; however, our knowledge of vibratory patterns in this population is almost nonexistent. In this study, we investigate the vocal fold vibratory patterns of healthy elderly females to determine which features or combination of them could best describe the geriatric voices. Cross-sectional study with 20 elderly healthy females with no history of voice problems. Hilbert transformed glottal area waveforms (GAWs) from serial high-speed digital imaging of sustained phonation are used to provide quantitative measures of glottal vibratory characteristics and perturbations; open quotient, jitter, and shimmer. Nyquist plots provide interpretable patterns to portray the vibratory characteristics as clear, pressed, breathy, and atypical patterns. The GAW from most elderly speakers (50%) showed vibratory characteristics associated with a more pressed voice and higher glottal perturbation values: their Nyquist plot patterns show wide scatterings around the rim of the plot reflecting a much-reduced ability in sustaining vibratory oscillation; these were distinct differences from previously reported data on younger speakers. Qualitative examination revealed more anteriorly placed glottal gaps in the geriatric females. These findings have important implications in understanding voice production in the geriatric population and in helping to establish normal perturbation references among female speakers across age. Copyright © 2012 The Voice Foundation. All rights reserved.

  19. Semen quality of spinal cord injured men is better when obtained by vibratory stimulation versus electroejaculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brackett, N L; Padron, O F; Lynne, C M

    1997-01-01

    Most spinal cord injured men require assisted ejaculation procedures to obtain semen, and the majority can achieve this result by vibratory stimulation or electroejaculation. We determined if semen obtained by vibratory stimulation differed in quality from that obtained by electroejaculation. Between subjects and within subjects designs were used. Of 77 spinal cord injured men 23 underwent vibratory stimulation only, 44 electroejaculation only and 10 both procedures. Antegrade, retrograde and total ejaculates were analyzed in each subject for total sperm count, percent motile sperm and percent sperm with rapid linear motion. With vibratory stimulation compared to electroejaculation the percent motile sperm and percent sperm with rapid linear motion were significantly greater, whereas total sperm count was similar, in the antegrade specimens and total ejaculates. This finding was true for different groups of subjects as well as within a group of the same subjects. Semen obtained by vibratory stimulation is of better quality than that obtained by electroejaculation. In medical practices that include assisted ejaculation of spinal cord injured men, we recommend obtaining a specimen by vibratory stimulation. If that method fails electroejaculation should be performed.

  20. Photosynthetic responses to elevated CO(2) and O(3) in Quercus ilex leaves at a natural CO(2) spring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paoletti, E; Seufert, G; Della Rocca, G; Thomsen, H

    2007-06-01

    Photosynthetic stimulation and stomatal conductance (Gs) depression in Quercus ilex leaves at a CO(2) spring suggested no down-regulation. The insensitivity of Gs to a CO(2) increase (from ambient 1500 to 2000 micromol mol(-1)) suggested stomatal acclimation. Both responses are likely adaptations to the special environment of CO(2) springs. At the CO(2)-enriched site, not at the control site, photosynthesis decreased 9% in leaves exposed to 2x ambient O(3) concentrations in branch enclosures, compared to controls in charcoal-filtered air. The stomatal density reduction at high CO(2) was one-third lower than the concomitant Gs reduction, so that the O(3) uptake per single stoma was lower than at ambient CO(2). No significant variation in monoterpene emission was measured. Higher trichome and mesophyll density were recorded at the CO(2)-enriched site, accounting for lower O(3) sensitivity. A long-term exposure to H(2)S, reflected by higher foliar S-content, and CO(2) might depress the antioxidant capacity of leaves close to the vent and increase their O(3) sensitivity.

  1. Experimental Comparison of Dynamic Responses of a Tension Moored Floating Wind Turbine Platform with and without Spring Dampers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, C.; O'Sullivan, K.; Murphy, J.; Pakrashi, V.

    2015-07-01

    The offshore wind industry is rapidly maturing and is now expanding to more extreme environments in deeper water and farther from shore. To date fixed foundation types (i.e. monopoles, jackets) have been primarily used but become uneconomical in water depths greater than 50m. Floating foundations have more complex dynamics but at the moment no design has reached commercialization, although a number of devices are being tested at prototype stage. The development of concepts is carried out through physical model testing of scaled devices such that to better understand the dynamics of the system and validate numerical models. This paper investigates the testing of a scale model of a tension moored wind turbine at two different scales and in the presence and absence of a spring damper controlling its dynamic response. The models were tested under combined wave and wind thrust loading conditions. The analysis compares the motions of the platform at different scales and structural conditions through RAO, testing a mooring spring damper for load reductions.

  2. Response of spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L. quality traits and yield to sowing date.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukhtar Ahmed

    Full Text Available The unpredictability and large fluctuation of the climatic conditions in rainfed regions do affect spring wheat yield and grain quality. These variations offer the opportunity for the production of better quality wheat. The effect of variable years, locations and sowing managements on wheat grain yield and quality was studied through field experiments using three genotypes, three locations for two years under rainfed conditions. The two studied years as contrasting years at three locations and sowing dates depicted variability in temperature and water stress during grain filling which resulted considerable change in grain yield and quality. Delayed sowing, years (2009-10 and location (Talagang with high temperature and water stress resulted increased proline, and grain quality traits i.e. grain protein (GP and grain ash (GA than optimum conditions (during 2008-09, at Islamabad and early sowing. However, opposite trend was observed for dry gluten (DG, sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS, SPAD content and grain yield irrespective of genotypes. The influence of variable climatic conditions was dominant in determining the quality traits and inverse relationship was observed among some quality traits and grain yield. It may be concluded that by selecting suitable locations and different sowing managements for subjecting the crop to desirable environmental conditions (temperature and water quality traits of wheat crop could be modified.

  3. Response of Spring Diatoms to CO2 Availability in the Western North Pacific as Determined by Next-Generation Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Hisashi

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have enabled us to determine phytoplankton community compositions at high resolution. However, few studies have adopted this approach to assess the responses of natural phytoplankton communities to environmental change. Here, we report the impact of different CO2 levels on spring diatoms in the Oyashio region of the western North Pacific as estimated by NGS of the diatom-specific rbcL gene (DNA), which encodes the large subunit of RubisCO. We also examined the abundance and composition of rbcL transcripts (cDNA) in diatoms to assess their physiological responses to changing CO2 levels. A short-term (3-day) incubation experiment was carried out on-deck using surface Oyashio waters under different pCO2 levels (180, 350, 750, and 1000 μatm) in May 2011. During the incubation, the transcript abundance of the diatom-specific rbcL gene decreased with an increase in seawater pCO2 levels. These results suggest that CO2 fixation capacity of diatoms decreased rapidly under elevated CO2 levels. In the high CO2 treatments (750 and 1000 μatm), diversity of diatom-specific rbcL gene and its transcripts decreased relative to the control treatment (350 μatm), as well as contributions of Chaetocerataceae, Thalassiosiraceae, and Fragilariaceae to the total population, but the contributions of Bacillariaceae increased. In the low CO2 treatment, contributions of Bacillariaceae also increased together with other eukaryotes. These suggest that changes in CO2 levels can alter the community composition of spring diatoms in the Oyashio region. Overall, the NGS technology provided us a deeper understanding of the response of diatoms to changes in CO2 levels in terms of their community composition, diversity, and photosynthetic physiology. PMID:27124280

  4. Response of Spring Diatoms to CO2 Availability in the Western North Pacific as Determined by Next-Generation Sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisashi Endo

    Full Text Available Next-generation sequencing (NGS technologies have enabled us to determine phytoplankton community compositions at high resolution. However, few studies have adopted this approach to assess the responses of natural phytoplankton communities to environmental change. Here, we report the impact of different CO2 levels on spring diatoms in the Oyashio region of the western North Pacific as estimated by NGS of the diatom-specific rbcL gene (DNA, which encodes the large subunit of RubisCO. We also examined the abundance and composition of rbcL transcripts (cDNA in diatoms to assess their physiological responses to changing CO2 levels. A short-term (3-day incubation experiment was carried out on-deck using surface Oyashio waters under different pCO2 levels (180, 350, 750, and 1000 μatm in May 2011. During the incubation, the transcript abundance of the diatom-specific rbcL gene decreased with an increase in seawater pCO2 levels. These results suggest that CO2 fixation capacity of diatoms decreased rapidly under elevated CO2 levels. In the high CO2 treatments (750 and 1000 μatm, diversity of diatom-specific rbcL gene and its transcripts decreased relative to the control treatment (350 μatm, as well as contributions of Chaetocerataceae, Thalassiosiraceae, and Fragilariaceae to the total population, but the contributions of Bacillariaceae increased. In the low CO2 treatment, contributions of Bacillariaceae also increased together with other eukaryotes. These suggest that changes in CO2 levels can alter the community composition of spring diatoms in the Oyashio region. Overall, the NGS technology provided us a deeper understanding of the response of diatoms to changes in CO2 levels in terms of their community composition, diversity, and photosynthetic physiology.

  5. Phylogenetic conservatism and trait correlates of spring phenological responses to climate change in northeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yanjun; Chen, Jingru; Willis, Charles G; Zhou, Zhiqiang; Liu, Tong; Dai, Wujun; Zhao, Yuan; Ma, Keping

    2017-09-01

    Climate change has resulted in major changes in plant phenology across the globe that includes leaf-out date and flowering time. The ability of species to respond to climate change, in part, depends on their response to climate as a phenological cue in general. Species that are not phenologically responsive may suffer in the face of continued climate change. Comparative studies of phenology have found phylogeny to be a reliable predictor of mean leaf-out date and flowering time at both the local and global scales. This is less true for flowering time response (i.e., the correlation between phenological timing and climate factors), while no study to date has explored whether the response of leaf-out date to climate factors exhibits phylogenetic signal. We used a 52-year observational phenological dataset for 52 woody species from the Forest Botanical Garden of Heilongjiang Province, China, to test phylogenetic signal in leaf-out date and flowering time, as well as, the response of these two phenological traits to both temperature and winter precipitation. Leaf-out date and flowering time were significantly responsive to temperature for most species, advancing, on average, 3.11 and 2.87 day/°C, respectively. Both leaf-out and flowering, and their responses to temperature exhibited significant phylogenetic signals. The response of leaf-out date to precipitation exhibited no phylogenetic signal, while flowering time response to precipitation did. Native species tended to have a weaker flowering response to temperature than non-native species. Earlier leaf-out species tended to have a greater response to winter precipitation. This study is the first to assess phylogenetic signal of leaf-out response to climate change, which suggests, that climate change has the potential to shape the plant communities, not only through flowering sensitivity, but also through leaf-out sensitivity.

  6. Framework Spring

    OpenAIRE

    Bobkov, Pavel

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the thesis is to introduce reader to the Spring framework and describe it as a convenient tool for rapid application development and launching projects. It is necessary to grab the Spring issue in a broader context. That's why thesis is trying to note all the relevant technologies that are closely related to Spring, or which is Spring based on. The first step to understanding Spring is a basic knowledge of Java EE. Thesis presents the architecture of Java EE while arguing its flaws...

  7. Microbial food web responses to light and nutrients beneath the coastal Arctic Ocean sea ice during the winter spring transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrado, Ramon; Lovejoy, Connie; Massana, Ramon; Vincent, Warwick F.

    2008-12-01

    We measured the abundance and biomass of phototrophic and heterotrophic microbes in the upper mixed layer of the water column in ice-covered Franklin Bay, Beaufort Sea, Canada, from December 2003 to May 2004, and evaluated the influence of light and nutrients on these communities by way of a shipboard enrichment experiment. Bacterial cell concentrations showed no consistent trends throughout the sampling period, averaging (± SD) 2.4 (0.9) × 10 8 cells L - 1 ; integrated bacterial biomass for the upper mixed layer ranged from 1.33 mg C m - 3 to 3.60 mg C m - 3 . Small cells numerically dominated the heterotrophic protist community in both winter and spring, but in terms of biomass, protists with a diameter > 10 µm generally dominated the standing stocks. Heterotrophic protist biomass integrated over the upper mixed layer ranged from 1.23 mg C m - 3 to 6.56 mg C m - 3 . Phytoplankton biomass was low and variable, but persisted during the winter period. The standing stock of pigment-containing protists ranged from a minimum value of 0.38 mg C m - 3 in winter to a maximal value of 6.09 mg C m - 3 in spring and the most abundant taxa were Micromonas-like cells. These picoprasinophytes began to increase under the ice in February and their population size was positively correlated with surface irradiance. Despite the continuing presence of sea ice, phytoplankton biomass rose by more than an order of magnitude in the upper mixed layer by May. The shipboard experiment in April showed that this phototrophic increase in the community was not responsive to pulsed nutrient enrichment, with all treatments showing a strong growth response to improved irradiance conditions. Molecular (DGGE) and microscopic analyses indicated that most components of the eukaryotic community responded positively to the light treatment. These results show the persistence of a phototrophic inoculum throughout winter darkness, and the strong seasonal response by arctic microbial food webs to sub

  8. Vibratory device for taking ocean floor sediment cores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edigariav, Z.P.; Kudinov, E.I.; Sukhov, V.E.

    1973-04-04

    The present invention relates to devices for taking sediment cores from the ocean floor. It consists in a vibratory device, comprising a string of pipe, a vibrator disposed on the string of pipe for sinking the pipe into the ocean floor, an arrangement for providing for periodical engagement and disengagement of the vibrator with the string of pipe, a hoist providing for periodical displacement of the vibrator, which is originally disposed on the lower portion of the string of pipe, up the string as the latter is being sunk into the ocean floor, and operatively coupled with the engaging arrangement. A piston is freely displaceable in the string of pipe and fixed relative to the ocean floor when the pipe is being sunk, to retain the ocean floor sediments in the pipe. The core of sediment is pressed against the piston under the action of hydrostatic and atmospheric pressures. A system is provided for stabilizing the device consisting of a load platform, a float, and guide cables. (6 claims)

  9. Error Model and Compensation of Bell-Shaped Vibratory Gyro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Zhong; Liu, Ning; Li, Qing

    2015-09-17

    A bell-shaped vibratory angular velocity gyro (BVG), inspired by the Chinese traditional bell, is a type of axisymmetric shell resonator gyroscope. This paper focuses on development of an error model and compensation of the BVG. A dynamic equation is firstly established, based on a study of the BVG working mechanism. This equation is then used to evaluate the relationship between the angular rate output signal and bell-shaped resonator character, analyze the influence of the main error sources and set up an error model for the BVG. The error sources are classified from the error propagation characteristics, and the compensation method is presented based on the error model. Finally, using the error model and compensation method, the BVG is calibrated experimentally including rough compensation, temperature and bias compensation, scale factor compensation and noise filter. The experimentally obtained bias instability is from 20.5°/h to 4.7°/h, the random walk is from 2.8°/h(1/2) to 0.7°/h(1/2) and the nonlinearity is from 0.2% to 0.03%. Based on the error compensation, it is shown that there is a good linear relationship between the sensing signal and the angular velocity, suggesting that the BVG is a good candidate for the field of low and medium rotational speed measurement.

  10. Development and evaluation of a vibratory-pneumatic pomegranate arils extractor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M Nassiri

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Iran is a frontier of pomegranate fruit production in the world (with almost 40 % of the world`s production. However due to traditional processing operations is not ranked as the largest pomegranate exporter. Saveh, Neyriz and Ferdows are the top pomegranate producing cities in Iran. Pomegranate is consumed as a fresh fruit as well as processed product as food additive, paste, syrup, jelly, pectin, jam, beverage, essence, vinegar and concentrate. Aril extraction is the first and essential postharvest operation for pomegranate processing. Arils are mostly extracted manually even in large scales for fresh and processed consumption. This labor intensive operation is rational when aril quality is an important index for consumer. But whenever pomegranate juice is desired, the aril quality has no priority for consumer, and therefore arils can be extracted with less care. Sarig (1985 was the first inventor of a pomegranate aril extractor who employed air jet force to extract the arils. Later, other researchers employed the same method as well as water jet to extract fruit juice and sac. In the present study, fabrication and evaluation of vibratory aril extractor augmented with air system was conducted. Materials and Methods The study was conducted using Rabab cultivar samples which were manually harvested from an orchard in Neyriz town, Fars province. Samples were kept in refrigerator at 5 0C till experimental trials. Initial moisture content of fruit skin, arils and internal fleshes were measured by gravimetric method as 31.7±2.6 %, 61.5±1.8 % and 42.8±1.4 %, respectively and for a whole fruit was measured 45.3±11.5 % (w.b.. For conducting laboratory tests, an aril extraction unit was designed and fabricated. It comprised a steel main frame, a 746 W electric motor, drive mechanism (eccentric and shaft, sample retentive unit, air jet unit, aril tank, and an air compressor-tank assembly. Sample retentive unit was designed in such a

  11. Response to elevated CO 2 from a natural spring in a C 4 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... the late season. CO2-responsiveness in the field generally followed the seasonal phenologies of each species, being greatest during the most active growth period. Keywords: climate change; gas exchange; photosynthetic regulation; stomatal conductance. African Journal of Range & Forage Science: 2002 19(2): 81-91 ...

  12. Innate and adaptive immune responses in migrating spring-run adult chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, Brian P.; Fisher, Kathleen M.; Colvin, Michael E.; Benda, Susan E.; Peterson, James T.; Kent, Michael L.; Schreck, Carl B.

    2016-01-01

    Adult Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) migrate from salt water to freshwater streams to spawn. Immune responses in migrating adult salmon are thought to diminish in the run up to spawning, though the exact mechanisms for diminished immune responses remain unknown. Here we examine both adaptive and innate immune responses as well as pathogen burdens in migrating adult Chinook salmon in the Upper Willamette River basin. Messenger RNA transcripts encoding antibody heavy chain molecules slightly diminish as a function of time, but are still present even after fish have successfully spawned. In contrast, the innate anti-bacterial effector proteins present in fish plasma rapidly decrease as spawning approaches. Fish also were examined for the presence and severity of eight different pathogens in different organs. While pathogen burden tended to increase during the migration, no specific pathogen signature was associated with diminished immune responses. Transcript levels of the immunosuppressive cytokines IL-10 and TGF beta were measured and did not change during the migration. These results suggest that loss of immune functions in adult migrating salmon are not due to pathogen infection or cytokine-mediated immune suppression, but is rather part of the life history of Chinook salmon likely induced by diminished energy reserves or hormonal changes which accompany spawning.

  13. Beginning Spring

    CERN Document Server

    Caliskan, Mert

    2015-01-01

    Get up to speed quickly with this comprehensive guide toSpring Beginning Spring is the complete beginner's guide toJava's most popular framework. Written with an eye towardreal-world enterprises, the book covers all aspects of applicationdevelopment within the Spring Framework. Extensive samples withineach chapter allow developers to get up to speed quickly byproviding concrete references for experimentation, building askillset that drives successful application development byexploiting the full capabilities of Java's latest advances. Spring provides the exact toolset required to build anent

  14. Just Spring

    CERN Document Server

    Konda, Madhusudhan

    2011-01-01

    Get a concise introduction to Spring, the increasingly popular open source framework for building lightweight enterprise applications on the Java platform. This example-driven book for Java developers delves into the framework's basic features, as well as advanced concepts such as containers. You'll learn how Spring makes Java Messaging Service easier to work with, and how its support for Hibernate helps you work with data persistence and retrieval. Throughout Just Spring, you'll get your hands deep into sample code, beginning with a problem that illustrates dependency injection, Spring's co

  15. Differential responses of net ecosystem exchange of carbon dioxide to light and temperature between spring and neap tides in subtropical mangrove forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing; Lu, Weizhi; Chen, Hui; Luo, Yiqi; Lin, Guanghui

    2014-01-01

    The eddy flux data with field records of tidal water inundation depths of the year 2010 from two mangroves forests in southern China were analyzed to investigate the tidal effect on mangrove carbon cycle. We compared the net ecosystem exchange (NEE) and its responses to light and temperature, respectively, between spring tide and neap tide inundation periods. For the most time of the year 2010, higher daytime NEE values were found during spring tides than during neap tides at both study sites. Regression analysis of daytime NEE to photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) using the Landsberg model showed increased sensitivity of NEE to PAR with higher maximum photosynthetic rate during spring tides than neap tides. In contrast, the light compensation points acquired from the regression function of the Landsberg model were smaller during spring tides than neap tides in most months. The dependence of nighttime NEE on soil temperature was lower under spring tide than under neap tides. All these results above indicated that ecosystem carbon uptake rates of mangrove forests were strengthened, while ecosystem respirations were inhibited during spring tides in comparison with those during neap tides, which needs to be considered in modeling mangrove ecosystem carbon cycle under future sea level rise scenarios.

  16. Differential Responses of Net Ecosystem Exchange of Carbon Dioxide to Light and Temperature between Spring and Neap Tides in Subtropical Mangrove Forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The eddy flux data with field records of tidal water inundation depths of the year 2010 from two mangroves forests in southern China were analyzed to investigate the tidal effect on mangrove carbon cycle. We compared the net ecosystem exchange (NEE and its responses to light and temperature, respectively, between spring tide and neap tide inundation periods. For the most time of the year 2010, higher daytime NEE values were found during spring tides than during neap tides at both study sites. Regression analysis of daytime NEE to photosynthetically active radiation (PAR using the Landsberg model showed increased sensitivity of NEE to PAR with higher maximum photosynthetic rate during spring tides than neap tides. In contrast, the light compensation points acquired from the regression function of the Landsberg model were smaller during spring tides than neap tides in most months. The dependence of nighttime NEE on soil temperature was lower under spring tide than under neap tides. All these results above indicated that ecosystem carbon uptake rates of mangrove forests were strengthened, while ecosystem respirations were inhibited during spring tides in comparison with those during neap tides, which needs to be considered in modeling mangrove ecosystem carbon cycle under future sea level rise scenarios.

  17. Dendrophenology: Inferring the response of North American eastern deciduous forests to an earlier spring from tree rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmore, A. J.; Nelson, D. M.; Craine, J. M.

    2016-12-01

    There is wide agreement that anthropogenic climate warming has influenced the phenology of forests during the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. A critical question for predicting the magnitude of future warming under different emissions scenarios is the degree to which forest productivity responds to longer growing seasons in the face of concurrent changes in other drivers of productivity. Longer growing seasons can lead to increased photosynthesis and productivity, which would represent a negative feedback to rising CO2 and consequently warming. Alternatively, increased demand for soil resources due to a longer photosynthetically active period in conjunction with other global change factors might exacerbate resource limitation, restricting forest productivity response to a longer growing season. In this case, increased spring-time productivity has the potential to increase plant N limitation by increasing plant demand for N more than N supplies, or increasing early-season ecosystem N losses. Long-term direct measurements are not yet available to specifically address this question, but advances in remote sensing and dendroecological methods present opportunities to acquire information retrospectively to advance understanding of how phenological changes and resource availability to trees have been affecting forest productivity. Here we show that for 222 trees representing three species in eastern North America over the past 30 years earlier spring phenology has caused declines in N availability to trees by increasing demand for N relative to supply. The observed decline in N availability is not associated with reduced wood production, suggesting that other environmental changes such as increased atmospheric CO2 and water availability have likely overwhelmed reduced N availability. Given current trajectories of environmental changes, N limitation will likely continue to increase for these forests, possibly further limiting C sequestration potential.

  18. Sex-specific responses to winter flooding, spring waterlogging and post-flooding recovery in Populus deltoides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Ling-Feng; Yang, Fan; Han, Chun-Yu; Pu, Yu-Jin; Ding, Yang; Zhang, Li-Jia

    2017-05-31

    Winter flooding events are common in some rivers and streams due to dam constructions, and flooding and waterlogging inhibit the growth of trees in riparian zones. This study investigated sex-specific morphological, physiological and ultrastructural responses to various durations of winter flooding and spring waterlogging stresses, and post-flooding recovery characteristics in Populus deltoides. There were no significant differences in the morphological, ultrastructural and the majority of physiological traits in trees subjected to medium and severe winter flooding stresses, suggesting that males and females of P. deltoides were winter flooding tolerant, and insensitive to winter flooding duration. Males were more tolerant to winter flooding stress in terms of photosynthesis and chlorophyll fluorescence than females. Females displayed greater oxidative damage due to flooding stress than males. Males developed more efficient antioxidant enzymatic systems to control reactive oxygen species. Both sexes had similarly strong post-flooding recovery capabilities in terms of plant growth, and physiological and ultrastructural parameters. However, Males had better recovery capabilities in terms of pigment content. These results increase the understanding of poplars's adaptation to winter flooding stress. They also elucidate sex-specific differences in response to flooding stress during the dormant season, and during post-flooding recovery periods.

  19. Changes in the onset of spring growth in shrubland species in response to experimental warming along a north-south gradient in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prieto, P.; Peñuelas, J.; Niinemets, Ü.; Ogaya, R.; Schmidt, I.K.; Beier, C.; Tietema, A.; Sowerby, A.; Emmett, B.A.; Kovács Láng, E.; Kröel-Dulay, G.; Lhotsky, B.; Cesaraccio, C.; Pellizzaro, G.; De Dato, G.; Sirca, C.; Estiarte, M.

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To test whether the onset of spring growth in European shrublands is advanced in response to the warmer conditions projected for the next two decades by climate models, and, if there is a change, whether it differs across Europe. Location: The studied sites spanned a broad north-south European

  20. The effect of penile vibratory stimulation on male fertility potential, spasticity and neurogenic detrusor overactivity in spinal cord lesioned individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biering-Sørensen, F; Læssøe, Line; Sønksen, J

    2005-01-01

    Present the possibility for treatment of male infertility, spasticity, and neurogenic detrusor overactivity in spinal cord lesioned (SCL) individuals with penile vibratory stimulation (PVS).......Present the possibility for treatment of male infertility, spasticity, and neurogenic detrusor overactivity in spinal cord lesioned (SCL) individuals with penile vibratory stimulation (PVS)....

  1. Insights into the factors responsible for curative effects of Aab-E-Shifa Spring Hasan Abdal (Pakistan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ur Rahman, Sami; Bilal, Salma

    2017-07-01

    Springs are the gifts of nature on the earth as they contribute about eighty essential nutrients that are involved in more than 7000 enzymatic processes in the human body. European balneologists have recommended spring mineral waters for different therapeutic applications. In the present investigation, Aab- e- Shifa (Punjab Pakistan) spring water was analyzed due to its therapeutic behavior in the healing of various skin diseases via atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). It was found that besides other important minerals (Ca, Mg, K, and Na), the spring water contains the most significant antioxidant, i.e., Zn which is probably one of the major features of the curative behavior of Aab- e- Shifa. Other trace elements (Cr, Cd, Ni, Mn, Fe, and Cu) were also found to be present in the spring water under the permissible limits of various national and international organizations.

  2. Structural Calculations of Drip Shield Exposed to Vibratory Ground Motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Mastilovic

    2003-06-16

    The objective of this calculation is twofold. First, to determine whether or not separation of interlocking drip shield (DS) segments occurs during vibratory ground motion. Second, if DS separation does not occur, to estimate the area of the DS for which the residual 1st principal stress exceeds a certain limit. (The area of DS plate-1 and DS plate-2 [see Attachment I] where the residual 1st principal stress exceeds a certain limit will be, for brevity, referred to as ''the damaged area'' throughout this document; also, DS plate-1 and DS plate-2 will be referred to, for brevity, as ''DS plates'' henceforth.) The stress limit used throughout this document is defined as 50 percent of yield strength of the DS plate material, Titanium Grade 7 (Ti-7) (SB-265 R52400), at temperature of 150 C. A set of 15 calculations is performed at two different annual frequencies of occurrence (annual exceedance frequency): 10{sup -6} per year (1/yr) and 10{sup -7} 1/yr . (Note: Due to computational problems only five realizations at 10{sup -7} 1/yr are presented in this document.) Additionally, one calculation is performed at the annual frequency of occurrence of 5 {center_dot} 10{sup -4} 1/yr. The scope of this document is limited to reporting whether or not the DS separation occurs. If the DS separation does not occur the scope is limited to reporting the calculation results in terms of the damaged area. All these results are evaluated for the DS plates. This calculation is intended for use in support of the Total System Performance Assessment-License Application seismicity modeling. This calculation is associated with the DS design and was performed by the Waste Package Design group. AP-3.12Q, ''Design Calculations and Analyses'' (Ref. 1) is used to perform the calculation and develop the document. The DS is classified as Quality Level 1 (Ref. 5, p. 7). Therefore, this calculation is subject to the Quality Assurance

  3. Identification of localised recharge and conduit flow by combined analysis of hydraulic and physico-chemical spring responses (Urenbrunnen, SW-Germany)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birk, Steffen; Liedl, Rudolf; Sauter, Martin

    2004-01-01

    Karst aquifers are highly vulnerable to contamination due to the rapid transport of pollutants in conduit systems. Effective strategies for the management and protection of karst aquifers, therefore, require an adequate hydrogeological characterisation of the conduit systems. In particular, the identification and characterisation of conduits transmitting rapid, localised recharge to springs is of great interest for vulnerability assessments. In this work, it is demonstrated that localised recharge and conduit flow in a karst aquifer (Urenbrunnen catchment, southwest Germany) can be characterised by jointly analysing the hydraulic and physico-chemical responses of a spring to recharge events. Conduit volumes are estimated by evaluating time lags between increases in spring discharge and associated changes in the electrical conductivity and temperature of the discharged water. These estimates are confirmed by the results of a combined tracer and recharge test. Variations in electrical conductivity are also shown to assist in the quantification of the fast recharge component associated with short-term recharge pulses. However, spectral analysis of temperature fluctuations reveals that highly mineralised surface waters locally infiltrate into the aquifer during the winter and spring without causing significant electrical conductivity variations in the spring water. Hence, the most consistent conceptual model is obtained by a combined analysis of both physico-chemical parameters.

  4. Design and Analysis of a Novel Fully Decoupled Tri-axis Linear Vibratory Gyroscope with Matched Modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Dunzhu; Kong, Lun; Gao, Haiyu

    2015-07-13

    We present in this paper a novel fully decoupled silicon micromachined tri-axis linear vibratory gyroscope. The proposed gyroscope structure is highly symmetrical and can be limited to an area of about 8.5 mm × 8.5 mm. It can differentially detect three axes' angular velocities at the same time. By elaborately arranging different beams, anchors and sensing frames, the drive and sense modes are fully decoupled from each other. Moreover, the quadrature error correction and frequency tuning functions are taken into consideration in the structure design for all the sense modes. Since there exists an unwanted in-plane rotational mode, theoretical analysis is implemented to eliminate it. To accelerate the mode matching process, the particle swam optimization (PSO) algorithm is adopted and a frequency split of 149 Hz is first achieved by this method. Then, after two steps of manual adjustment of the springs' dimensions, the frequency gap is further decreased to 3 Hz. With the help of the finite element method (FEM) software ANSYS, the natural frequencies of drive, yaw, and pitch/roll modes are found to be 14,017 Hz, 14,018 Hz and 14,020 Hz, respectively. The cross-axis effect and scale factor of each mode are also simulated. All the simulation results are in good accordance with the theoretical analysis, which means the design is effective and worthy of further investigation on the integration of tri-axis accelerometers on the same single chip to form an inertial measurement unit.

  5. Yield Response of Spring Maize to Inter-Row Subsoiling and Soil Water Deficit in Northern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhandong; Qin, Anzhen; Zhao, Ben; Ata-Ul-Karim, Syed Tahir; Xiao, Junfu; Sun, Jingsheng; Ning, Dongfeng; Liu, Zugui; Nan, Jiqin; Duan, Aiwang

    2016-01-01

    Long-term tillage has been shown to induce water stress episode during crop growth period due to low water retention capacity. It is unclear whether integrated water conservation tillage systems, such asspringdeepinter-row subsoiling with annual or biennial repetitions, can be developed to alleviate this issue while improve crop productivity. Experimentswere carried out in a spring maize cropping system on Calcaric-fluvicCambisolsatJiaozuoexperimentstation, northern China, in 2009 to 2014. Effects of threesubsoiling depths (i.e., 30 cm, 40 cm, and 50 cm) in combination with annual and biennial repetitionswasdetermined in two single-years (i.e., 2012 and 2014)againstthe conventional tillage. The objectives were to investigateyield response to subsoiling depths and soil water deficit(SWD), and to identify the most effective subsoiling treatment using a systematic assessment. Annualsubsoiling to 50 cm (AS-50) increased soil water storage (SWS, mm) by an average of8% in 0-20 cm soil depth, 19% in 20-80 cm depth, and 10% in 80-120 cm depth, followed by AS-40 and BS-50, whereas AS-30 and BS-30 showed much less effects in increasing SWS across the 0-120 cm soil profile, compared to the CK. AS-50 significantly reduced soil water deficit (SWD, mm) by an average of123% during sowing to jointing, 318% during jointing to filling, and 221% during filling to maturity, compared to the CK, followed by AS-40 and BS-50. An integrated effect on increasing SWS and reducing SWD helped AS-50 boost grain yield by an average of 31% and biomass yield by 30%, compared to the CK. A power function for subsoiling depth and a negative linear function for SWD were used to fit the measured yields, showing the deepest subsoiling depth (50 cm) with the lowest SWD contributed to the highest yield. Systematic assessment showed that AS-50 received the highest evaluation index (0.69 out of 1.0) among all treatments. Deepinter-row subsoilingwith annual repetition significantly boosts yield by

  6. Heterotrophic bacterial responses to the winter–spring phytoplankton bloom in open waters of the NW Mediterranean

    KAUST Repository

    Gomes, Ana

    2014-12-03

    The response of planktonic heterotrophic prokaryotes to the NW Mediterranean winter–spring offshore phytoplankton bloom was assessed in 3 cruises conducted in March, April–May and September 2009. Bulk measurements of phytoplankton and bacterioplankton biomass and production were complemented with an insight into bacterial physiological structure by single-cell analysis of nucleic acid content [low (LNA) vs. high (HNA)] and membrane integrity (“Live” vs. “Dead” cells). Bacterial production empirical conversion factors (0.82±0.25 SE kg C mol leucine−1) were almost always well below the theoretical value. Major differences in most microbial variables were found among the 3 periods, which varied from extremely high phytoplankton biomass and production during the bloom in March (>1 g C m−2 d−1 primary production) to typically oligotrophic conditions during September stratification (<200 mg C m−2 d−1). In both these periods bacterial production was ~30 mg C m−2 d−1 while very large bacterial production (mean 228, with some stations exceeding 500 mg C m−2 d−1) but low biomass was observed during the April–May post-bloom phase. The contribution of HNA (30–67%) and “Live” cells (47–97%) were temporally opposite in the study periods, with maxima in March and September, respectively. Different relationships were found between physiological structure and bottom-up variables, with HNA bacteria apparently more responsive to phytoplankton only during the bloom, coinciding with larger average cell sizes of LNA bacteria. Moderate phytoplankton–bacterioplankton coupling of biomass and activity was only observed in the bloom and post-bloom phases, while relationships between both compartments were not significant under stratification. With all data pooled, bacteria were only weakly bottom-up controlled. Our analyses show that the biomass and production of planktonic algae and bacteria followed opposite paths in the transition from bloom to

  7. Theoretical and experimental study of the transport of granular materials by inclined vibratory conveyors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sloot, E.M.; Sloot, E.M.; Kruyt, Nicolaas P.

    1996-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental study was made of the conveying speed with which granular materials are transported by vibratory conveyors. The basic assumption made is that the layer of granular material can be considered as a point mass. The theory incorporates rest, slide, and flight phases of the

  8. Considerations Concerning the Dynamics of Vibratory Mills Used in Powders’ Mechanical Milling Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radu Panaitescu-Liess

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic mechanical milling process in a powder mill was studied by analyzing the vibratory effects of vibration and shock phenomena on the material microstructure ground. During the milling process, there were noticed both distinct modes of ball motion: the one generated by the periodic vibration and the one produced by chaotic vibration.

  9. Comparison of Axial Capacity of Vibratory-Driven Piles to Impact-Driven Piles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-09-01

    vibratory-driven process results in less compacatiori at the pile tip, thus lowering the tip capacity. Hunter and Davisson (1969), in their...Loading Tests," US Army Engineer District, Little Rock, Ark. Hunter, A. A., and Davisson , M. T. (1969). "Measurement of Pile Load Transfer," Performance

  10. Effects of vibratory pile driver noise on echolocation and vigilance in bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branstetter, Brian K; Bowman, Victoria F; Houser, Dorian S; Tormey, Megan; Banks, Patchouly; Finneran, James J; Jenkins, Keith

    2018-01-01

    Vibratory pile drivers, used for marine construction, can produce sustained, high sound pressure levels (SPLs) in areas that overlap with dolphin habitats. Dolphins rely on echolocation for navigation, detecting predators and prey, and to coordinate group behavior. This study examined the effects of vibratory pile driver noise on dolphin sustained target detection capabilities through echolocation. Five dolphins were required to scan their enclosure and indicate the occurrences of phantom echoes during five different source levels of vibratory pile driver playback sound (no-playback control, 110, 120, 130, and 140 dB re 1 μPa). Three of the dolphins demonstrated a significant decrease in target detection performance at 140 dB playback level that was associated with an almost complete secession of echolocation activity. The performance of two dolphins was not affected. All dolphins rapidly returned to baseline levels of target detection performance by their second replication. However, an increased number of clicks was produced at the highest playback SPL. The data suggest that the decrease in vigilant behavior was due to the vibratory pile driver noise distracting the dolphins and decreasing their motivation to perform the task.

  11. ANALYSIS OF VIBRATORY PROTECTION SYSTEM VIBRATION DURING HARMONIC AND POLYHARMONIC EXCITATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. N. Mikulik

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers a mathematical model of local «driver-seat» system and an algorithm for vibratory loading formation at external actions. Results of the investigations on the system vibration according to minimum vibration acceleration depending on transfer force factor acting on the seat and a vibration isolation factor are presented in the paper.

  12. Wave radiation from vibratory and impact pile driving in a layered acousto-elastic medium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsouvalas, A.; Metrikine, A.

    2014-01-01

    A steel monopile is the most common foundation type of a wind turbine installed offshore and is driven into place with the help of vibratory or impact hammers. Underwater noise generated during the installation of steel monopiles has recently received considerable attention from international

  13. Using detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) to analyze whether vibratory insoles enhance balance stability for elderly fallers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chien-Chih; Yang, Wen-Hung

    2012-01-01

    Falls are a common and devastating problem among elderly people. In a previous study, vibratory insoles were developed to improve postural stability for elderly fallers. To verify the effects of vibratory insoles, a two-stage experiment was conducted to collect center of pressure (COP) signals from 26 elderly fallers and 16 healthy young subjects while standing still. The DFA is used to analyze the behavior of different time-series data obtained from the trajectory of COP. Postural stability was compared by the DFA scaling exponent between a control condition (before using vibratory insoles) and a vibration condition (after using vibratory insoles). For elderly fallers, DFA scaling exponents 95% confidence interval were [1.434, 1.547] and [1.329, 1.451] under control and vibration conditions in the anteroposterior (AP) direction, respectively. The experimental results revealed that temporary stimuli of appropriate amplitude produced by vibration insoles enhanced postural stability in elderly fallers and was more obvious in the AP direction. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Control of Vibratory Energy Harvesters in the Presence of Nonlinearities and Power-Flow Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, Ian L.

    Over the past decade, a significant amount of research activity has been devoted to developing electromechanical systems that can convert ambient mechanical vibrations into usable electric power. Such systems, referred to as vibratory energy harvesters, have a number of useful of applications, ranging in scale from self-powered wireless sensors for structural health monitoring in bridges and buildings to energy harvesting from ocean waves. One of the most challenging aspects of this technology concerns the efficient extraction and transmission of power from transducer to storage. Maximizing the rate of power extraction from vibratory energy harvesters is further complicated by the stochastic nature of the disturbance. The primary purpose of this dissertation is to develop feedback control algorithms which optimize the average power generated from stochastically-excited vibratory energy harvesters. This dissertation will illustrate the performance of various controllers using two vibratory energy harvesting systems: an electromagnetic transducer embedded within a flexible structure, and a piezoelectric bimorph cantilever beam. Compared with piezoelectric systems, large-scale electromagnetic systems have received much less attention in the literature despite their ability to generate power at the watt--kilowatt scale. Motivated by this observation, the first part of this dissertation focuses on developing an experimentally validated predictive model of an actively controlled electromagnetic transducer. Following this experimental analysis, linear-quadratic-Gaussian control theory is used to compute unconstrained state feedback controllers for two ideal vibratory energy harvesting systems. This theory is then augmented to account for competing objectives, nonlinearities in the harvester dynamics, and non-quadratic transmission loss models in the electronics. In many vibratory energy harvesting applications, employing a bi-directional power electronic drive to actively

  15. Spring performance tester for miniature extension springs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzbrenner, Bradley; Boyce, Brad

    2017-05-16

    A spring performance tester and method of testing a spring are disclosed that has improved accuracy and precision over prior art spring testers. The tester can perform static and cyclic testing. The spring tester can provide validation for product acceptance as well as test for cyclic degradation of springs, such as the change in the spring rate and fatigue failure.

  16. Effect of Axial Force on the Performance of Micromachined Vibratory Rate Gyroscopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengyi Niu

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available It is reported in the published literature that the resonant frequency of a silicon micromachined gyroscope decreases linearly with increasing temperature. However, when the axial force is considerable, the resonant frequency might increase as the temperature increases. The axial force is mainly induced by thermal stress due to the mismatch between the thermal expansion coefficients of the structure and substrate. In this paper, two types of micromachined suspended vibratory gyroscopes with slanted beams were proposed to evaluate the effect of the axial force. One type was suspended with a clamped-free (C-F beam and the other one was suspended with a clamped-clamped (C-C beam. Their drive modes are the bending of the slanted beam, and their sense modes are the torsion of the slanted beam. The relationships between the resonant frequencies of the two types were developed. The prototypes were packaged by vacuum under 0.1 mbar and an analytical solution for the axial force effect on the resonant frequency was obtained. The temperature dependent performances of the operated mode responses of the micromachined gyroscopes were measured. The experimental values of the temperature coefficients of resonant frequencies (TCF due to axial force were 101.5 ppm/°C for the drive mode and 21.6 ppm/°C for the sense mode. The axial force has a great influence on the modal frequency of the micromachined gyroscopes suspended with a C-C beam, especially for the flexure mode. The quality factors of the operated modes decreased with increasing temperature, and changed drastically when the micromachined gyroscopes worked at higher temperatures.

  17. Effect of axial force on the performance of micromachined vibratory rate gyroscopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Zhanqiang; Xiao, Dingbang; Wu, Xuezhong; Dong, Peitao; Chen, Zhihua; Niu, Zhengyi; Zhang, Xu

    2011-01-01

    It is reported in the published literature that the resonant frequency of a silicon micromachined gyroscope decreases linearly with increasing temperature. However, when the axial force is considerable, the resonant frequency might increase as the temperature increases. The axial force is mainly induced by thermal stress due to the mismatch between the thermal expansion coefficients of the structure and substrate. In this paper, two types of micromachined suspended vibratory gyroscopes with slanted beams were proposed to evaluate the effect of the axial force. One type was suspended with a clamped-free (C-F) beam and the other one was suspended with a clamped-clamped (C-C) beam. Their drive modes are the bending of the slanted beam, and their sense modes are the torsion of the slanted beam. The relationships between the resonant frequencies of the two types were developed. The prototypes were packaged by vacuum under 0.1 mbar and an analytical solution for the axial force effect on the resonant frequency was obtained. The temperature dependent performances of the operated mode responses of the micromachined gyroscopes were measured. The experimental values of the temperature coefficients of resonant frequencies (TCF) due to axial force were 101.5 ppm/°C for the drive mode and 21.6 ppm/°C for the sense mode. The axial force has a great influence on the modal frequency of the micromachined gyroscopes suspended with a C-C beam, especially for the flexure mode. The quality factors of the operated modes decreased with increasing temperature, and changed drastically when the micromachined gyroscopes worked at higher temperatures.

  18. Anesthetic block of the dorsal penile nerve inhibits vibratory-induced ejaculation in men with spinal cord injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieder, J A; Brackett, N L; Lynne, C M; Green, J T; Aballa, T C

    2000-06-01

    [corrected] We investigated which nerve pathways are necessary to achieve ejaculation using penile vibratory stimulation (PVS) in men with spinal cord injury (SCI). Eight men with SCI were selected based on the presence of a bulbocavernosus reflex (BCR) and consistent antegrade ejaculation with PVS. Level of injury was cervical (4), upper thoracic (4), and lower thoracic (1). Mean age was 30.4 years (range 22 to 38). Usual responses to PVS included autonomic dysreflexia (4), erection (4), and consistent somatic responses such as abdominal contractions (8). Local anesthesia of the dorsal penile nerves (penile block) was achieved using 1% plain lidocaine injection. Effective penile block was confirmed by loss of the BCR. Two PVS ejaculation trials were performed: one trial during the penile block and one trial when the penile block had worn off. In 4 subjects, the bladder contents were analyzed for retrograde ejaculation. With the penile block, ejaculation was inhibited in 100% of the subjects. None of the bladder washings demonstrated sperm, indicating absence of retrograde ejaculation. None of the subjects exhibited their usual erectile response, somatic responses, or signs of autonomic dysreflexia. After the penile block wore off, PVS induced ejaculation in all subjects. If subjects usually had erection, somatic responses, or signs of autonomic dysreflexia, these also returned. Our data suggest that ejaculatory response to PVS in SCI men requires the presence of intact dorsal penile nerves.

  19. Reproductive Biology, Mating Behavior, and Vibratory Communication of the Brown-Winged Stink Bug, Edessa meditabunda (Fabr. (Heteroptera: Pentatomidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleonor Cavalcante A. Silva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe different aspects of the reproductive biology, mating behavior, and vibratory communication of the pentatomid Edessa meditabunda (Fabr.. This species shows lower copulation frequency and reproductive potential with longer sexual maturation period compared to other species of pentatomids. Females with multiple mating show increased fecundity when compared with single-mated females and both increased fecundity and reduced longevity when compared with virgin females. Courtship and mating behavior and vibratory signals are typical and similar to what was observed in other species of pentatomids, except that males started the courtship. These results constitute the first paper on biology, behavior, and vibratory communication among species of the subfamily Edessinae.

  20. IMPACT OF VIBRATORY AND ROTATIONAL SHOT PEENING ONTO SELECTED PROPERTIES OF TITANIUM ALLOY SURFACE LAYER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazimierz Zaleski

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the results of tests on impact of vibratory and rotational shot peening of the Ti6A12Mo2Cr titanium alloy onto the processed object surface roughness and surface layer microhardness. The external surfaces of ring-shaped samples were shot peened. The preceding process consisted of turning with a cubic boron nitride blade knife. Steel beads, having a diameter of 6 mm, were used as a processing medium. The variable parameters of shot peening were vibrator amplitude and shot peening time. The range of recommended technological parameters for vibratory and rotational shot peening was determined. As a result of shot peening, the surface roughness could be reduced by approximately 4 times and the surface layer could be hardened to the depth of approximately 0.4 mm.

  1. Vibratory-compacted (vipac/sphere-pac) nuclear fuels - a comparison with pelletized nuclear fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chidester, K.; Rubin, J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Thompson, M

    2001-07-01

    In order to achieve the packing densities required for nuclear fuel stability, economy and performance, the fuel material must be densified. This has traditionally been performed by high-temperature sintering. (At one time, fuel densification was investigated using cold/hot swaging. However, this fabrication method has become uncommon.) Alternatively, fuel can be densified by vibratory compaction (VIPAC). During the late 1950's and into the 1970's, in the U.S., vibratory compaction fuel was fabricated and test irradiated to evaluate its applicability compared to the more traditional pelletized fuel for nuclear reactors. These activities were primarily focused on light water reactors (LWR) but some work was performed for fast reactors. This paper attempts to summarize these evaluations and proposes to reconsider VIPAC fuel for future use. (author)

  2. Vibratory sensory testing in acute compartment syndromes: a clinical and experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, J H; Mackinnon, S E; Beatty, S E; Dellon, A L; O'Brien, J P

    1987-05-01

    Invasive and noninvasive diagnostic testing was correlated in 11 patients with acute compartmental syndromes of the forearm. The excellent correlation between diminished perception of vibration and increasing compartmental pressure suggested that 256 cycle per second (cps) vibratory stimuli may be useful clinically in determining the appropriate time for surgical intervention in the acute compartmental syndrome. In 12 adult male volunteers, elevated compartment pressures were created in the anterior tibial compartment of the leg. A decrease in perception to 256 cycle per second (cps) vibratory stimulus was the earliest sensory abnormality to occur with elevated tissue compartment pressures. Analysis of variance showed significantly that 256-cps vibration was the most reliable and earliest sensory modality to change at pressures of 35 to 40 mmHg. These clinical and experimental findings support the use of the 256-cps tuning fork as a noninvasive diagnostic test in the evaluation of the patient with suspected acute compartment syndrome.

  3. Theoretical and experimental study of the transport of granular materials by inclined vibratory conveyors

    OpenAIRE

    Sloot, E.M.; Kruyt, Nicolaas P.

    1996-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental study was made of the conveying speed with which granular materials are transported by vibratory conveyors. The basic assumption made is that the layer of granular material can be considered as a point mass. The theory incorporates rest, slide, and flight phases of the material. Although the emphasis of this study is on the effect of the inclination (and declination) of the conveyor on the conveying speed, the effects of throw number, friction coefficient and vi...

  4. Groundwater-driven temperature changes at thermal springs in response to recent glaciation: Bormio hydrothermal system, Central Italian Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpi, Giorgio; Magri, Fabien; Frattini, Paolo; Crosta, Giovanni B.; Riva, Federico

    2017-11-01

    Thermal springs are widespread in the European Alps, with hundreds of geothermal sites known and exploited. The thermal circulation and fluid outflows were examined in the area around Bormio (Central Italian Alps), where ten geothermal springs discharge from dolomite bodies located close to the regional Zebrù thrust. Water is heated in deep circulation systems and upwells vigorously at a temperature of about 40 °C. Heat and fluid transport is explored by steady and transient three-dimensional finite-element simulations taking into account the effect of the last glaciation, which in the study area was recognized to end around 11,000-12,000 years ago. The full regional model (ca. 700 km2) is discretized with a highly refined triangular finite-element planar grid. Numerical simulations suggest a reactivation of the system following the end of the Last Glacial Maximum. Results correctly simulate the observed discharge rate of ca. 2,400 L/min and the spring temperatures after ca. 13,000 years from deglaciation, and show a complete cooling of the aquifer within a period of approximately 50,000 years. Groundwater flow and temperature patterns suggest that thermal water flows through a deep system crossing both sedimentary and metamorphic lithotypes along a fracture network associated with the thrust system. This example gives insights into the influences of deep alpine structures and glaciations on groundwater circulation that control the development of many hydrothermal systems not necessarily associated with convective heat flow.

  5. Genotoxicological response of the common carp (Cyprinus carpio) exposed to spring water in Tlaxcala, México.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Nieto, Edelmira; Juárez-Santacruz, Libertad; García-Gallegos, Elizabeth; Tlalmis-Zempoalteca, Joselin; Romo-Gómez, Claudia; Torres-Dosal, Arturo

    2014-10-01

    This study evaluated the genotoxic impact of anthropic activities in Huactzinco Spring, using Cyprinus carpio as a biomonitor. In situ and in vivo experimental designs were compared by means of simultaneous 2-week exposures. The water from the spring generated mean micronuclei frequency values (108.6 ± 32 MN/1,000) and DNA fragmentation values (143.4 ± 35 au) which were statistically higher than those for the negative control (10.9 ± 6 MN/1,000 and 67.6 ± 23 au). The in situ and in vivo experiments supported one another. The comet assay proved to be the most sensitive test, with an EC50 value (11.4 % ± 3.4 %) being less than that determined for the micronuclei test (54.8 % ± 3.2 %). The results of this study confirm the usefulness of C. carpio as an environmental contamination biomonitor, and suggest that Huactzinco Spring water constitutes a latent risk to human health and the environment.

  6. Influence of the Radial Clearance of a Squeeze Film Damper on the Vibratory Behavior of a Single Spool Gas Turbine Designed for Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldo Creci

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a numerical investigation using the finite element method on the vibratory behavior of a single spool gas turbine designed for unmanned aerial vehicle applications. The shaft of the rotor-bearing system is supported on a front bearing composed of a deep groove ball bearing with a vibration absorber element and a rear squeeze film damper bearing. Three radial clearances for the squeeze film damper were analyzed to determine the best geometric configuration for the rear bearing, considering the rotordynamic performance of the entire system. Whirl speeds and unbalanced system responses were carefully evaluated to determine the best radial clearance for the squeeze film damper. After defining the best radial clearance, a transient analysis was performed to simulate the transition of the system through resonance, and a spectral map is presented to illustrate the vibratory behavior of the system considering the influence of all related important frequencies. The rotordynamic behavior of the system is predicted, and vibration problems are avoided. Its mechanical drawings were released to manufacturing, and the first prototype is in the experimental test phase, thus indicating that the numerical results presented in this study are consistent.

  7. Differences in joint-position sense and vibratory threshold in runners with and without a history of overuse injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Switlick, Tiffany; Kernozek, Thomas W; Meardon, Stacey

    2015-02-01

    A relationship between altered postural control and injury has been reported in sports. Sensorimotor function serves a fundamental role in postural control and is not often studied in runners. Persons who sustain running injury may have altered sensorimotor function contributing to risk of injury or reinjury. To determine if differences in knee and ankle proprioception or plantar sensation exist between injured and noninjured runners. Retrospective case-control study. University campus. Twenty runners with a history of lower-extremity overuse injury and 20 noninjured runners were examined. Injured runners were subcategorized into 2 groups based on site of injury: foot/ankle and knee/hip. Active absolute joint-repositioning error of the ankle at 20° inversion and 10° eversion and the knee at 15° and 40° flexion was assessed using an isokinetic dynamometer. Vibratory threshold at the calcaneus, arch, and great toe was determined for each subject using a handheld electric sensory threshold instrument. Runners in the injured-foot/ankle group had increased absolute error during ankle-eversion repositioning (6.55° ± 3.58°) compared with those in the noninjured (4.04° ± 1.78°, P = .01) and the hip/knee (3.63° ± 2.2°, P = .01) groups. Runners in the injured group, as a whole, had greater sensitivity in the arch of the plantar surface (2.94 ± 0.52 V) than noninjured runners (2.38 ± 0.53 V, P = .02). Differences in ankle-eversion proprioception between runners with a history of ankle and foot injuries and noninjured runners were observed. Runners with a history of injury also displayed an increased vibratory threshold in the arch region compared with noninjured runners. Poor ankle-joint-position sense and increased plantar sensitivity suggest altered sensorimotor function after injury. These factors may influence underlying postural control and contribute to altered loading responses commonly observed in injured runners.

  8. Evolution of the Antarctic polar vortex in spring: Response of a GCM to a prescribed Antarctic ozone hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boville, B. A.; Kiehl, J. T.; Briegleb, B. P.

    1988-01-01

    The possible effect of the Antartic ozone hole on the evolution of the polar vortex during late winter and spring using a general circulation model (GCM) is examined. The GCM is a version of the NCAR Community Climate Model whose domain extends from the surface to the mesosphere and is similar to that described on Boville and Randel (1986). Ozone is not a predicted variable in the model. A zonally averaged ozone distribution is specified as a function of latitude, pressure and month for the radiation parameterization. Rather that explicitly address reasons for the formation of the ozone hole, researchers postulate its existence and ask what effect it has on the subsequent evolution of the vortex. The evolution of the model when an ozone hole is imposed is then discussed.

  9. Winter−spring transition in the subarctic Atlantic: microbial response to deep mixing and pre-bloom production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Maria Lund; Riisgaard, Karen; Thingstad, T. Frede

    2015-01-01

    In temperate, subpolar and polar marine systems, the classical perception is that diatoms initiate the spring bloom and thereby mark the beginning of the productive season. Contrary to this view, we document an active microbial food web dominated by pico- and nanoplankton prior to the diatom bloom......, a period with excess nutrients and deep convection of the water column. During repeated visits to stations in the deep Iceland and Norwegian basins and the shallow Shetland Shelf (26 March to 29 April 2012), we investigated the succession and dynamics of photo - synthetic and heterotrophic microorganisms....... We observed that the early phytoplankton production was followed by a decrease in the carbon:nitrogen ratio of the dissolved organic matter in the deep mixed stations, an increase in heterotrophic prokaryote (bacteria) abundance and activity (indicated by the high nucleic acid:low nucleic acid...

  10. Vibratory stimulation and rectal probe electroejaculation as therapy for patients with spinal cord injury: semen parameters and pregnancy rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehra, A; Werner, M A; Bastuba, M; Title, C; Oates, R D

    1996-02-01

    The conception rate of patients with spinal cord injuries following penile vibratory stimulation and rectal probe electroejaculation in conjunction with self-insemination, intrauterine insemination or assisted reproductive technique is poorly documented. We reviewed our success rates with penile vibratory stimulation and rectal probe electroejaculation, and the pregnancy rates achieved with self-insemination, intrauterine insemination and assisted reproductive techniques. A total of 78 consecutive patients with spinal cord injuries had a complete neurological examination and was treated initially with penile vibratory stimulation. If unsuccessful, rectal probe electroejaculation was performed to obtain an ejaculate. The ejaculate was then used with self-insemination, intrauterine insemination or assisted reproductive techniques and pregnancies were monitored. Vibratory stimulation was successful in 20 of 37 patients (54%) with a cervical lesion, 14 of 26 (54%) with a lesion at or above T10 and none of 15 when the lesion was below T10. All patients except 2 who elected followup rectal probe electroejaculation had antegrade or retrograde ejaculate. Six patients (7.7%) with extremely poor semen quality were not candidates for assisted fertilization. Of 27 couples who attempted conception 17 were successful (5 self-insemination, 5 intrauterine insemination and 7 assisted reproductive techniques). Penile vibratory stimulation should be used as first line therapy in patients with lesions above T10 while rectal probe electroejaculation should be considered as a second option. Motivated patients can achieve success with self-insemination, intrauterine insemination and assisted reproductive techniques.

  11. Research on Bell-Shaped Vibratory Angular Rate Gyro’s Character of Resonator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Liu

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Bell-shaped vibratory angular rate gyro (abbreviated as BVG is a new type Coriolis vibratory gyro that was inspired by Chinese traditional clocks. The resonator fuses based on a variable thickness axisymmetric multicurved surface shell. Its characteristics can directly influence the performance of BVG. The BVG structure not only has capabilities of bearing high overload, high impact and, compared with the tuning fork, vibrating beam, shell and a comb structure, but also a higher frequency to overcome the influence of the disturbance of the exterior environment than the same sized hemispherical resonator gyroscope (HRG and the traditional cylinder vibratory gyroscope. It can be widely applied in high dynamic low precision angular rate measurement occasions. The main work is as follows: the issue mainly analyzes the structure and basic principle, and investigates the bell-shaped resonator’s mathematical model. The reasonable structural parameters are obtained from finite element analysis and an intelligent platform. Using the current solid vibration gyro theory analyzes the structural characteristics and principles of BVG. The bell-shaped resonator is simplified as a paraboloid of the revolution mechanical model, which has a fixed closed end and a free opened end. It obtains the natural frequency and vibration modes based on the theory of elasticity. The structural parameters are obtained from the orthogonal method by the research on the structural parameters of the resonator analysis. It obtains the modal analysis, stress analysis and impact analysis with the chosen parameters. Finally, using the turntable experiment verifies the gyro effect of the BVG.

  12. Predicting vibratory stresses from aero-acoustic loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Matthew D.

    Sonic fatigue has been a concern of jet aircraft engineers for many years. As engines become more powerful, structures become more lightly damped and complex, and materials become lighter, stiffer, and more complicated, the need to understand and predict structural response to aeroacoustic loads becomes more important. Despite decades of research, vibration in panels caused by random pressure loads, such as those found in a supersonic jet, is still difficult to predict. The work in this research improves on current prediction methods in several ways, in particular for the structural response due to wall pressures induced by supersonic turbulent flows. First, solutions are calculated using time-domain input pressure loads that include shock cells and their interaction with turbulent flow. The solutions include both mean (static) and oscillatory components. Second, the time series of stresses are required for many fatigue assessment counting algorithms. To do this, a method is developed to compute time-dependent solutions in the frequency domain. The method is first applied to a single-degree-of-freedom system. The equations of motion are derived and solved in both the frequency domain and the time domain. The pressure input is a random (broadband) signal representative of jet flow. The method is then applied to a simply-supported beam vibrating in flexure using a line of pressure inputs computed with computational fluid dynamics (CFD). A modal summation approach is used to compute structural response. The coupling between the pressure field and the structure, through the joint acceptance, is reviewed and discussed for its application to more complicated structures. Results from the new method and from a direct time domain method are compared for method verification. Because the match is good and the new frequency domain method is faster computationally, it is chosen for use in a more complicated structure. The vibration of a two-dimensional panel loaded by jet

  13. Identification of the 3D Vibratory Motion of a Rigid Body by Accelerometer Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Di Puccio

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The identification of the motion of a rigid body by means of linear accelerometers is a problem already investigated by many researchers, but still debated. The optimisation of the number and placement of accelerometers is also another important aspect of the problem. In this study, an experimental procedure is proposed and applied to identify the rigid-body vibratory motion of the steering wheel of a sporting car, by means of six linear accelerometers. Some numerical simulations for investigating possible errors are also presented.

  14. Fundamental understanding, prediction and validation of rotor vibratory loads in steady-level flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Anubhav

    This work isolates the physics of aerodynamics and structural dynamics from the helicopter rotor aeromechanics problem, investigates them separately, identifies the prediction deficiencies in each, improves upon them, and couples them back together. The objective is to develop a comprehensive analysis capability for accurate and consistent prediction of rotor vibratory loads in steady level flight. The rotor vibratory loads are the dominant source of helicopter vibration. There are two critical vibration regimes for helicopters in steady level flight: (1) low speed transition and (2) high speed forward flight. The mechanism of rotor vibration at low speed transition is well understood---inter-twinning of blade tip vortices below the rotor disk. The mechanism of rotor vibration at high speed is not clear. The focus in this research is on high speed flight. The goal is to understand the key mechanisms involved and accurately model them. Measured lift, chord force, pitching moment and damper force from the UH-60A Flight Test Program are used to predict, validate and refine the rotor structural dynamics. The prediction errors originate entirely from structural modeling. Once validated, the resultant blade deformations are used to predict and validate aerodynamics. Air loads are calculated using a table look up based unsteady lifting-line model and compared with predictions from a 3-dimensional unsteady CFD model. Both Navier-Stokes and Euler predictions are studied. (Abstract shortened by UMI.) The 3D Navier-Stokes CFD analysis is then consistently coupled with a rotor comprehensive analysis to improve prediction of rotor vibratory loads at high speed. The CFD-comprehensive code coupling is achieved using a loose coupling methodology. The CFD analysis significantly improves section pitching moment prediction near the blade tip, because it captures the steady and unsteady 3D transonic effects. Accurate pitching moments drive elastic twist deformations which together

  15. Cavitation Erosion Tests Performed by Indirect Vibratory Method on Stainless Steel Welded Samples with Hardened Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian-Dumitru Nedeloni

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of cavitation erosion tests performed on two types of samples. The materials of the samples are frequently used for manufacturing and repairs of the hydro turbines components submitted to cavitation. The first sample was made by welding of an austenitic stainless steel on austenito-feritic base material. The second sample was made similarly with the first but with a martensitic base material. After the welding processes, on both samples was applied a hardening treatment by surface peening. The cavitation erosion tests were performed on vibratory equipment using the indirect method with stationary specimen. The results show a good cavitation erosion resistance on both samples.

  16. Optimization of process parameters during vibratory welding technique using Taguchi's analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Pravin Kumar; Patel, D.; Prasad,S.B.

    2016-01-01

    With an aim to improve the mechanical properties of a weld joint, a new concept of vibratory setup has been designed which is capable to stir the molten weld pool before it solidifies during shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) operation. Mechanical vibration having resonance frequency of 300 Hz and amplitude of 0.5 mm was transferred to the molten weld pool of 6 mm thick mild steel butt-welded joints during the welding operation. The experimental work was conducted at various ranges of frequenc...

  17. Identification of elasticity modulus by vibratory analysis (Application to a natural composite: Aleppo pine wood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DAOUI Abdelhakim

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a method for the determination of the elasticity modulus in the vibratory domain of materials. This approach is based on research and interpretation of the spectrum of natural frequencies resulting from natural vibrations based on the theory of elastic beams. The tests consist of classical tests of longitudinal vibrations of natural composite beams (Aleppo pine wood, long enough to observe some natural frequencies. This identification method showed a good correlation between the theoretical and experimental values, notably the evaluation of the modal parameter for the case of the resonant frequencies and the identification of the modulus of elasticity of the materials used.

  18. Comparison of energy costs for different control laws of a vibratory robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golitsyna, Maria

    2017-01-01

    In the study there are introduced several control methods that maximize average velocity of the vibratory robot subject to several constraints. The robot is presented by a rigid box with a pendulum inside it. It can move forwards and backwards and there is a Coulomb friction between the box and the surface. In the paper it is not only shown the difference and advantages of proposed control laws but there is also done a comparison between efforts done by the motor that provides rotation of the pendulum for different control methods.

  19. Photosynthetic responses to elevated CO{sub 2} and O{sub 3} in Quercus ilex leaves at a natural CO{sub 2} spring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paoletti, E. [Istituto Protezione Piante, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Via Madonna del Piano 10, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy)]. E-mail: e.paoletti@ipp.cnr.it; Seufert, G. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Environment and Sustainability, I-21020 Ispra (Italy); Della Rocca, G. [Istituto Protezione Piante, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Via Madonna del Piano 10, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy); Thomsen, H. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Environment and Sustainability, I-21020 Ispra (Italy)

    2007-06-15

    Photosynthetic stimulation and stomatal conductance (Gs) depression in Quercus ilex leaves at a CO{sub 2} spring suggested no down-regulation. The insensitivity of Gs to a CO{sub 2} increase (from ambient 1500 to 2000 {mu}mol mol{sup -1}) suggested stomatal acclimation. Both responses are likely adaptations to the special environment of CO{sub 2} springs. At the CO{sub 2}-enriched site, not at the control site, photosynthesis decreased 9% in leaves exposed to 2x ambient O{sub 3} concentrations in branch enclosures, compared to controls in charcoal-filtered air. The stomatal density reduction at high CO{sub 2} was one-third lower than the concomitant Gs reduction, so that the O{sub 3} uptake per single stoma was lower than at ambient CO{sub 2}. No significant variation in monoterpene emission was measured. Higher trichome and mesophyll density were recorded at the CO{sub 2}-enriched site, accounting for lower O{sub 3} sensitivity. A long-term exposure to H{sub 2}S, reflected by higher foliar S-content, and CO{sub 2} might depress the antioxidant capacity of leaves close to the vent and increase their O{sub 3} sensitivity. - Very high CO{sub 2} concentrations did not compensate for the effects of O{sub 3} on holm oak photosynthesis.

  20. Changes in Somatosensory Responsiveness in Behaving Monkeys and Human Sub

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-08-30

    MONITORING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUOf1BE(S) Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology University of Tennessee, Memphis Sa. NAME OF PERFORMING ORGANIZATION 6b...and monkeys make ballistic movements more quickly (50-100 msec) in response to vibratory as compared to visual signals. Human subjects also make...quickly (50-100 msec) in response to vibratory as compared to visual signals. Subjects also make movements more quickly to a visual target if, in addition

  1. Modeling of the endosperm crush response profile of hard red spring wheat using a single kernel characterization system

    Science.gov (United States)

    When a wheat endosperm is crushed the force profile shows viscoelastic response and the modulus of elasticity is an important parameter that might have substantial influence on wheat milling. An experiment was performed to model endosperm crush response profile (ECRP) and to determine the modulus o...

  2. Structural-Acoustic Coupling Effects on the Non-Vacuum Packaging Vibratory Cylinder Gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Xiang; Wu, Xuezhong; Wu, Yulie; Zhang, Yongmeng; Tao, Yi; Zheng, Yu; Xiao, Dingbang

    2013-01-01

    The resonant shells of vibratory cylinder gyroscopes are commonly packaged in metallic caps. In order to lower the production cost, a portion of vibratory cylinder gyroscopes do not employ vacuum packaging. However, under non-vacuum packaging conditions there can be internal acoustic noise leading to considerable acoustic pressure which is exerted on the resonant shell. Based on the theory of the structural-acoustic coupling, the dynamical behavior of the resonant shell under acoustic pressure is presented in this paper. A finite element (FE) model is introduced to quantitatively analyze the effect of the structural-acoustic coupling. Several main factors, such as sealing cap sizes and degree of vacuum which directly affect the vibration of the resonant shell, are studied. The results indicate that the vibration amplitude and the operating frequency of the resonant shell will be changed when the effect of structural-acoustic coupling is taken into account. In addition, an experiment was set up to study the effect of structural-acoustic coupling on the sensitivity of the gyroscope. A 32.4 mV/°/s increase of the scale factor and a 6.2 Hz variation of the operating frequency were observed when the radial gap size between the resonant shell and the sealing cap was changed from 0.5 mm to 20 mm. PMID:24351631

  3. Mechanical and Electrical Noise in Sense Channel of MEMS Vibratory Gyroscopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xukai; Jia, Jia; Gao, Yang; Li, Hongsheng

    2017-10-11

    This paper presents a theoretical analysis of mechanical and electrical noise in the sense channel of micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) vibratory gyroscopes. Closed-form expressions for the power spectral density (PSD) of the noise equivalent rate (NER) of gyroscopes in the open-loop and the force-rebalance operations are derived by using an averaged PSD model and an equivalent transfer function. The obtained expressions are verified through numerical simulations, demonstrating close agreements between the analytic and the numerical models. Based on the derived expressions for the PSD of the NER, the impacts of the modal frequency split, quality factor, and the gain of the feedback forcer, as well as the gain of the signal conditioning circuit, on the gyroscope noise characteristics are theoretically analyzed. In addition, the angle random walk (ARW) and the standard deviation of the NER are also discussed through the PSD models. Finally, the effects of the loop closing, the mode matching, and the gain of the feedback forcer on the PSD of the NER were verified via a MEMS vibratory gyroscope with a tunable modal frequency split.

  4. [Penile vibratory stimulation and electroejaculation in the treatment of ejaculatory dysfunction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Long-chang; Liu, Ji-hong

    2005-03-01

    The fertility potential of infertile men can be enhanced to a great extent by the application of assisted reproduction techniques such as intrauterine insemination or in-vitro fertilization with or without intracytoplasmic sperm injection, but how to obtain semen from men with ejaculatory dysfunction remains a problem. The development and refinement of penile vibratory stimulation (PVS) and electroejaculation (EEJ) have significantly brightened the prospects for the treatment of ejaculatory dysfunction. Because vibratory stimulation is non-invasive and easy to perform, and needs no anaesthesia, it is preferred by most of the patients to EEJ, and recommended to be the first choice of treatment for ejaculatory dysfunction. Approximately 80% of all ejaculatory dysfunction men with an intact ejaculatory reflex arc (above T10 ) can obtain antegrade ejaculation by PVS. Any condition which affects the ejaculatory mechanism of the central and/or peripheral nervous system including surgical nerve injury may be treated successfully by EEJ. The purpose of this review is to present the current understanding of PVS and EEJ procedures and their clinical use in men with ejaculatory dysfunction.

  5. Systems of organic farming in spring vetch II: Biological response of Aeolothrips intermedius Bagnall and Coccinella septempunctata L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivelina Nikolova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The effects of four systems of organic farming of spring vetsch on Aeolothrips intermedius Bagnall (Thysanoptera: Aeolothripidae and Coccinella septempunctata L. (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae population density and the toxicity of several products on predatory insects were studied. The variants were: Control (without using any biological products; combined treatment with Polyversum (biological foliar fertilizer and Biofa (biological plant growth regulator; treatment with NeemAzal T/S (biological insecticide, a.i. azadirachtin and treatment with a combination of NeemAzal with Polyversum and Biofa. Variant V was a conventional farming system in which a combination of Nurelle D (synthetic insecticide, Masterblend (foliar fertilizer and Flordimex 420 (growth regulator was used as a standard treatment. In the organic farming system that included treatment of plants with the biological insecticide NeemAzal (azadirachtin, the reduction in A. intermedius abundance was 20.7% when it was applied alone and 24.6 % in combination with the organic products Polyversum and Biofa. NeemAzal achieved a lower reduction in the counts of predatory ladybirds C. septempunctata, from 14.9% (alone to 21.9% (combination. The biological insecticide, applied alone or in combination, was mostly harmless and rarely harmful to A. intermedius. NeemAzal manifested harmlessness to C. septempunctata as its toxic action did not exceed 25%. An analysis of variance regarding product toxicity to A. intermedius and C. septempunctata demonstrated that the type of treatment (the application of insecticides alone or in combination had the strongest effect on product toxicity. Тhe use of neem-based insecticides can be a substantial contribution towards preservation of biodiversity in ecosystems.

  6. Effect of residual stress on modal patterns of MEMS vibratory gyroscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, Shankar, E-mail: shankardutta77@gmail.com; Panchal, Abha; Kumar, Manoj; Pal, Ramjay; Bhan, R. K. [Solid State Physics Laboratory, DRDO, Lucknow Road, Timarpur, Delhi, India 110054 (India)

    2016-04-13

    Deep boron diffusion often induces residual stress in bulk micromachined MEMS structures, which may affect the MEMS devices operation. In this study, we studied the modal patterns of MEMS vibratory gyroscope under the residual stress (100 – 1000 MPa). Modal patterns and modal frequencies of the gyro are found to be dependent on the residual stress values. Without any residual stress, the modal frequencies drive and sense modeswere found to be 20.06 kHz and 20.36 kHz respectively. In presence of 450 MPa residual stress, the modal frequencies of the drive and sense modes were changed to 42.75 kHz and 43.07 kHz respectively.

  7. Characterization of vibratory turning in cutting zone using a pneumatic quick-stop device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeid Amini

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Shear angle and sticking length are two crucial parameters in mechanics of metal cutting. These two parameters directly influence machinability factors such as cutting forces. Thus, shear angle and sticking length were investigated in vibratory turning process by using a pneumatic quick-stop device which was designed and fabricated, in this study. After preparation of ultrasonic assisted turning set-up, experimental tests have been carried out on two types of steel: AISI-1060 and AISI 304. Accordingly, the process of chip formation in each particular cutting test was quickly stopped when deformed chip was still in contact with workpiece. As a result, it was revealed that added linear vibration leads the turning operation to be improved by increase of shear angle and decrease of sticking length. Moreover, the effect of ultrasonic vibration on cutting force and chip micro-hardness is evaluated.

  8. Interspectral combination type resonances of nonlinear conservative/nonconservative distributed parameter vibratory systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padovan, J.

    1985-06-01

    This paper investigates the properties/formation of combination type resonances of nonlinear conservative/nonconservative distributed parameter vibratory systems subject to external harmonic inputs containing a profusion of frequencies. Overall, this includes the evaluation of simultaneously excited harmonic, sub/superharmonics as well as combination harmonics created by interactions between external and interspectral system frequency branches. Additionally, effort is also given to handling nonconservative characteristics wherein critical damping levels may suppress specific combination harmonics. The foregoing is made possible through the development of a warped and constrained multiple time scales perturbation solution scheme. To illustrate the scheme as well as the nature and form of external and interspectral interaction, a nonlinear nonconservative version of the wave equation which is excited by complex external harmonic fields is given detailed consideration.

  9. Development of vibratory stress relief actuators based on giant magnetostrictive materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wen

    2005-12-01

    A kind of actuator, which is used in the high frequency Vibratory Stress Relief (VSR), was researched. The actuator is based on the technology of giant magnetostrictive materials. The design principle of the actuator was firstly analyzed, which consists of the analysis of giant magnetostrictive materials and a force generator. Then the design criterion of magnetostrictive actuators was deeply discussed, which includes the dimension design of magnetostrictive materials, the design of magnetic field and the design of elimination of heat. Finally, a real actuator was developed, which has been used in the high frequency VSR. The experimental results show that the developed actuator works very well. Large exciting force but small vibration amplitude will make it widely used in the VSR.

  10. Application of vibratory-percussion crusher for disintegration of supertough materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishkin, E. V.; Kazakov, S. V.

    2017-10-01

    This article describes the results of theoretical and experimental studies of a vibratory-percussion crusher, which is driven from a pair of self-synchronizing vibration exciters, attached to the shell symmetrically about its vertical axis. In addition to that, crusher’s dynamic model is symmetrical and balanced. Forced oscillation laws for crusher working members and their amplitude-frequency characteristics have been inducted. Domains of existence of synchronous opposite-phase oscillations of crusher working members (crusher’s operating mode) and crusher capabilities have been identified. The results of mechanical and technological tests of a pilot crusher presented in the article show that this crusher may be viewed as an advanced machine for disintegration of supertough materials with minimum regrinding of finished products.

  11. Vibratory synchronization transmission of a cylindrical roller in a vibrating mechanical system excited by two exciters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xueliang; Wen, Bangchun; Zhao, Chunyu

    2017-11-01

    In present work vibratory synchronization transmission (VST) of a cylindrical roller with dry friction in a vibrating mechanical system excited by two exciters, is studied. Using the average method, the criterion of implementing synchronization of two exciters and that of ensuring VST of a roller, are achieved. The criterion of stability of the synchronous states satisfies the Routh-Hurwitz principle. The influences of the structural parameters of the system to synchronization and stability, are discussed numerically, which can be served as the theoretical foundation for engineering designs. An experiment is carried out, which approximately verify the validity of the theoretical and numerical results, as well as the feasibility of the method used. Utilizing the VST theory of a roller, some types of vibrating crushing or grinding equipments, etc., can be designed.

  12. Investigation of Organic Chemicals Potentially Responsible for Mortality and Intersex in Fish of the North Fork of the Shenandoah River, Virginia, during Spring of 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, David A.; Cranor, Walter L.; Perkins, Stephanie D.; Schroeder, Vickie L.; Werner, Stephen; Furlong, Edward T.; Holmes, John

    2008-01-01

    Declining fish health, fish exhibiting external lesions, incidences of intersex, and death, have been observed recently within the Potomac River basin. The basin receives surface runoff and direct inputs from agricultural, industrial, and other human activities. Two locations on the North Fork of the Shenandoah River were selected for study in an attempt to identify chemicals that may have contributed to the declining fish health. Two passive sampling devices, semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) and polar organic chemical integrative samplers (POCIS), were deployed during consecutive two-month periods during the spring and early summer of 2007 to measure select organic contaminants to which fish may have been exposed. This study determined that concentrations of persistent hydrophobic contaminants, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (treatment plant effluent or septic tank discharges were identified. In contrast, para-cresol, N,N-diethyltoluamide, and caffeine commonly were detected. Prescription pharmaceuticals including carbamazepine, venlafaxine, and 17a-ethynylestradiol were at low concentrations. Extracts from the passive samplers also were screened for the presence of estrogenic chemicals using the yeast estrogen screen. An estrogenic response was observed in POCIS samples from both sites, whereas SPMD samples exhibited little to no estrogenicity. This indicates that the chemicals producing the estrogenic response have a greater water solubility and are, therefore, less likely to bioaccumulate in fatty tissues of organisms.

  13. Thermal springs of Wyoming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breckenridge, R.M.; Hinckley, B.S.

    1978-01-01

    This bulletin attempts, first, to provide a comprehensive inventory of the thermal springs of Wyoming; second, to explore the geologic and hydrologic factors producing these springs; and, third, to analyze the springs collectively as an indicator of the geothermal resources of the state. A general discussion of the state's geology and the mechanisms of thermal spring production, along with a brief comparison of Wyoming's springs with worldwide thermal features are included. A discussion of geothermal energy resources, a guide for visitors, and an analysis of the flora of Wyoming's springs follow the spring inventory. The listing and analysis of Wyoming's thermal springs are arranged alphabetically by county. Tabulated data are given on elevation, ownership, access, water temperature, and flow rate. Each spring system is described and its history, general characteristics and uses, geology, hydrology, and chemistry are discussed. (MHR)

  14. Instant Spring Tool Suite

    CERN Document Server

    Chiang, Geoff

    2013-01-01

    Filled with practical, step-by-step instructions and clear explanations for the most important and useful tasks. A tutorial guide that walks you through how to use the features of Spring Tool Suite using well defined sections for the different parts of Spring.Instant Spring Tool Suite is for novice to intermediate Java developers looking to get a head-start in enterprise application development using Spring Tool Suite and the Spring framework. If you are looking for a guide for effective application development using Spring Tool Suite, then this book is for you.

  15. Biochemical Defense Response: Characterizing the Plasticity of Source and Sink in Spring Wheat under Terminal Heat Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjeet R. Kumar

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Wheat is highly prone to terminal heat stress (HS under late-sown conditions. Delayed- sowing is one of the preferred methods to screen the genotypes for thermotolerance under open field conditions. We investigated the effect of terminal HS on the thermotolerance of four popular genotypes of wheat i.e. WR544, HD2967, HD2932, and HD2285 under field condition. We observed significant variations in the biochemical parameters like protein content, antioxidant activity, proline and total reducing sugar content in leaf, stem, and spike under normal (26 ± 2°C and terminal HS (36 ± 2°C conditions. Maximum protein, sugars and proline was observed in HD2967, as compared to other cultivars under terminal HS. Wheat cv. HD2967 showed more adaptability to the terminal HS. Differential protein-profiling in leaves, stem and spike of HD2967 under normal (26 ± 2°C and terminal HS (36 ± 2°C showed expression of some unique protein spots. MALDI-TOF/MS analysis showed the DEPs as RuBisCO (Rub, RuBisCO activase (Rca, oxygen evolving enhancer protein (OEEP, hypothetical proteins, etc. Expression analysis of genes associated with photosynthesis (Rub and Rca and starch biosynthesis pathway (AGPase, SSS and SBE showed significant variations in the expression under terminal HS. HD2967 showed better performance, as compared to other cultivars under terminal HS. SSS activity observed in HD2967 showed more stability under terminal HS, as compared with other cultivars. Triggering of different biochemical parameters in response to terminal HS was observed to modulate the plasticity of carbon assimilatory pathway. The identified DEPs will enrich the proteomic resources of wheat and will provide a potential biochemical marker for screening wheat germplasm for thermotolerance. The model hypothesized will help the researchers to work in a more focused way to develop terminal heat tolerant wheat without compromising with the quality and quantity of grains.

  16. Biochemical Defense Response: Characterizing the Plasticity of Source and Sink in Spring Wheat under Terminal Heat Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ranjeet R; Goswami, Suneha; Shamim, Mohammed; Mishra, Upama; Jain, Monika; Singh, Khushboo; Singh, Jyoti P; Dubey, Kavita; Singh, Shweta; Rai, Gyanendra K; Singh, Gyanendra P; Pathak, Himanshu; Chinnusamy, Viswanathan; Praveen, Shelly

    2017-01-01

    Wheat is highly prone to terminal heat stress (HS) under late-sown conditions. Delayed- sowing is one of the preferred methods to screen the genotypes for thermotolerance under open field conditions. We investigated the effect of terminal HS on the thermotolerance of four popular genotypes of wheat i.e. WR544, HD2967, HD2932, and HD2285 under field condition. We observed significant variations in the biochemical parameters like protein content, antioxidant activity, proline and total reducing sugar content in leaf, stem, and spike under normal (26 ± 2°C) and terminal HS (36 ± 2°C) conditions. Maximum protein, sugars and proline was observed in HD2967, as compared to other cultivars under terminal HS. Wheat cv. HD2967 showed more adaptability to the terminal HS. Differential protein-profiling in leaves, stem and spike of HD2967 under normal (26 ± 2°C) and terminal HS (36 ± 2°C) showed expression of some unique protein spots. MALDI-TOF/MS analysis showed the DEPs as RuBisCO (Rub), RuBisCO activase (Rca), oxygen evolving enhancer protein (OEEP), hypothetical proteins, etc. Expression analysis of genes associated with photosynthesis (Rub and Rca) and starch biosynthesis pathway (AGPase, SSS and SBE) showed significant variations in the expression under terminal HS. HD2967 showed better performance, as compared to other cultivars under terminal HS. SSS activity observed in HD2967 showed more stability under terminal HS, as compared with other cultivars. Triggering of different biochemical parameters in response to terminal HS was observed to modulate the plasticity of carbon assimilatory pathway. The identified DEPs will enrich the proteomic resources of wheat and will provide a potential biochemical marker for screening wheat germplasm for thermotolerance. The model hypothesized will help the researchers to work in a more focused way to develop terminal heat tolerant wheat without compromising with the quality and quantity of grains.

  17. Ultraviolet-LIGA-based fabrication and characterization of a nonresonant drive-mode vibratory gyro/accelerometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Payal; Zaman Khan, Khamar; Khonina, Svetlana Nikolaevna; Kazanskiy, Nikolay Lvovich; Gopal, Ram

    2016-07-01

    A dual-purpose nonresonant 2-degrees of freedom (DOF) drive-mode and 1-DOF sense-mode vibratory gyro/accelerometer fabricated using the economical ultraviolet-lithographie-galvanoformung-abformung (UV-LIGA) fabrication process using SU-8 photoresist is reported. The dual-purpose device presented is capable of detecting acceleration at the lower-frequency band and angular rate at the operating frequency band thereby functioning as both accelerometer and gyroscope. This is achieved by designing the structure such that the frequency response of the drive oscillator has two drive resonances with a flat zone between them, while the sense oscillator has one resonance, which is deliberately placed in the flat region between the two drive resonances. For angular rate detection, the device is operated in the flat zone at the sense resonance frequency at which the device is less susceptible to frequency variations due to both environmental variation and fabrication imperfections and hence is said to be operating in robust mode. The steady-state response and discrimination for angular rate and acceleration sensing have been devised using analytical modeling. The fabrication process is optimized to realize a gyro/accelerometer that has a 9-μm-thick nickel structural layer and 4-μm capacitive gaps. The overall miniature device size is 2.0 mm×1.9 mm. The experimental frequency response of the fabricated devices shows drive-mode resonances at 2.85 and 4.96 kHz and sense resonance at 3.85 kHz compared to the respective design values of drive-mode resonance frequencies 2.97 and 4.81 kHz and sense resonance frequency of 4 kHz. To demonstrate the dual-purpose capability of the device, acceleration characterization has been carried out and presented. The fabricated sensor is packaged in a ceramic package and interfaced with a MS3110 differential capacitive read out IC to characterize the acceleration response of the sensor, using an out-of-plane shaker. The bandwidth for

  18. Intramuscular DNA Vaccination of Juvenile Carp against Spring Viremia of Carp Virus Induces Full Protection and Establishes a Virus-Specific B and T Cell Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen W. E. Embregts

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Although spring viremia of carp virus (SVCV can cause high mortalities in common carp, a commercial vaccine is not available for worldwide use. Here, we report a DNA vaccine based on the expression of the SVCV glycoprotein (G which, when injected in the muscle even at a single low dose of 0.1 µg DNA/g of fish, confers up to 100% protection against a subsequent bath challenge with SVCV. Importantly, to best validate vaccine efficacy, we also optimized a reliable bath challenge model closely mimicking a natural infection, based on a prolonged exposure of carp to SVCV at 15°C. Using this optimized bath challenge, we showed a strong age-dependent susceptibility of carp to SVCV, with high susceptibility at young age (3 months and a full resistance at 9 months. We visualized local expression of the G protein and associated early inflammatory response by immunohistochemistry and described changes in the gene expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and antiviral genes in the muscle of vaccinated fish. Adaptive immune responses were investigated by analyzing neutralizing titers against SVCV in the serum of vaccinated fish and the in vitro proliferation capacity of peripheral SVCV-specific T cells. We show significantly higher serum neutralizing titers and the presence of SVCV-specific T cells in the blood of vaccinated fish, which proliferated upon stimulation with SVCV. Altogether, this is the first study reporting on a protective DNA vaccine against SVCV in carp and the first to provide a detailed characterization of local innate as well as systemic adaptive immune responses elicited upon DNA vaccination that suggest a role not only of B cells but also of T cells in the protection conferred by the SVCV-G DNA vaccine.

  19. On the Quantitative Potential of Viscoelastic Response (VisR) Ultrasound Using the One-Dimensional Mass-Spring-Damper Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selzo, Mallory R; Moore, Christopher J; Hossain, Md Murad; Palmeri, Mark L; Gallippi, Caterina M

    2016-09-01

    Viscoelastic response (VisR) ultrasound is an acoustic radiation force (ARF)-based imaging method that fits induced displacements to a one-dimensional (1-D) mass-spring-damper (MSD) model to estimate the ratio of viscous to elastic moduli, τ, in viscoelastic materials. Error in VisR τ estimation arises from inertia and acoustic displacement underestimation. These error sources are herein evaluated using finite-element method (FEM) simulations, error correction methods are developed, and corrected VisR τ estimates are compared with true simulated τ values to assess VisR's relevance to quantifying viscoelasticity. With regard to inertia, adding a mass term in series with the Voigt model, to achieve the MSD model, accounts for inertia due to tissue mass when ideal point force excitations are used. However, when volumetric ARF excitations are applied, the induced complex system inertia is not described by the single-degree-of-freedom MSD model, causing VisR to overestimate τ. Regarding acoustic displacement underestimation, associated deformation of ARF-induced displacement profiles further distorts VisR τ estimates. However, median error in VisR τ is reduced to approximately -10% using empirically derived error correction functions applied to simulated viscoelastic materials with viscous and elastic properties representative of tissue. The feasibility of corrected VisR imaging is then demonstrated in vivo in the rectus femoris muscle of an adult with no known neuromuscular disorders. These results suggest VisR's potential relevance to quantifying viscoelastic properties clinically.

  20. Penile vibratory stimulation in the recovery of urinary continence and erectile function after nerve‐sparing radical prostatectomy: a randomized, controlled trial

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fode, Mikkel; Borre, Michael; Ohl, Dana A; Lichtbach, Jonas; Sønksen, Jens

    2014-01-01

    To examine the effect of penile vibratory stimulation (PVS) in the preservation and restoration of erectile function and urinary continence in conjunction with nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy (RP...

  1. Water Treatment Technology - Springs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross-Harrington, Melinda; Kincaid, G. David

    One of twelve water treatment technology units, this student manual on springs provides instructional materials for two competencies. (The twelve units are designed for a continuing education training course for public water supply operators.) The competencies focus on spring basin construction and spring protection. For each competency, student…

  2. Pro Spring Batch

    CERN Document Server

    Minella, Michael T

    2011-01-01

    Since its release, Spring Framework has transformed virtually every aspect of Java development including web applications, security, aspect-oriented programming, persistence, and messaging. Spring Batch, one of its newer additions, now brings the same familiar Spring idioms to batch processing. Spring Batch addresses the needs of any batch process, from the complex calculations performed in the biggest financial institutions to simple data migrations that occur with many software development projects. Pro Spring Batch is intended to answer three questions: *What? What is batch processing? What

  3. Vibratory stimulation from powered-toothbrush: A novel approach for orthodontic pain reduction after initial archwire placement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradeep Raghav

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Vibratory stimulation has been reported as an effective means in reducing the orthodontic pain. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of vibratory stimulation from powered-toothbrushes as a noninvasive and nonpharmacological method of reducing pain caused after initial archwire placement and to compare it with other common modalities of management. Materials and Methods: This clinical trial included 75 patients of age 13–25 years, scheduled for fixed mechanotherapy. Patients were divided into five groups: Control, placebo multivitamin, paracetamol, chewing-gum (Cg, and powered-toothbrush. After placement of 0.016″ Nickel Titanium initial archwire (upper/lower in each patient, the discomfort perceived at 2 h, 6 h, bedtime, 24 h, 2 days, 3 days, and 7 days were marked individually using Wong-Baker (0–5 and numeric (0–10 pain rating scales. Kruskal–Wallis test, Friedman test, unpaired t-test were used for statistical analysis. Results: Vibratory stimulation from powered-toothbrushes effectively reduced pain after initial archwire placement. It did not alter the pattern of pain perception, but significantly reduced the overall intensity of pain at each time interval. Cg was not found effective enough to be recommended as a routine treatment modality. Conclusion: Powered-toothbrushes can be recommended as a nonpharmacological and noninvasive substitute for nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for effective pain reduction in the clinical practice.

  4. Perception of Frequency, Amplitude and Azimuth of a Vibratory Dipole-Source by the Octavolateralis System of Goldfish (Carassius auratus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dailey, Deena D.; Braun, Christopher B.

    2011-01-01

    Goldfish (Carassius auratus) were conditioned to suppress respiration to a 40 Hz vibratory source and subsequently tested for stimulus generalization to frequency, stimulus amplitude and position (azimuth). Animals completely failed to generalize to frequencies separated by octave intervals, both lesser and greater than the CS. However they did appear to generalize weakly to an aerial loudspeaker stimulus of the same frequency (40 Hz) after conditioning with an underwater vibratory source. Animals had a gradually decreasing amount of generalization to amplitude changes, suggesting a perceptual dimension of loudness. Animals generalized largely or completely to the same underwater source presented at a range of source azimuths. When these azimuths were presented at a transect of 3 cm, some animals did show decrements in generalization, while others did not. This suggests that although azimuth may be perceived more saliently at distances closer to a dipole source, perception of position is not immediately salient in conditioned vibratory source detection. Differential responding to test stimuli located towards the head or tail suggests the presence of perceptual differences between sources that are rostral or caudal with respect to the position of the animal or perhaps the head. PMID:21574689

  5. System Modeling of a MEMS Vibratory Gyroscope and Integration to Circuit Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hyukjin J; Seok, Seyeong; Lim, Geunbae

    2017-11-18

    Recently, consumer applications have dramatically created the demand for low-cost and compact gyroscopes. Therefore, on the basis of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technology, many gyroscopes have been developed and successfully commercialized. A MEMS gyroscope consists of a MEMS device and an electrical circuit for self-oscillation and angular-rate detection. Since the MEMS device and circuit are interactively related, the entire system should be analyzed together to design or test the gyroscope. In this study, a MEMS vibratory gyroscope is analyzed based on the system dynamic modeling; thus, it can be mathematically expressed and integrated into a circuit simulator. A behavioral simulation of the entire system was conducted to prove the self-oscillation and angular-rate detection and to determine the circuit parameters to be optimized. From the simulation, the operating characteristic according to the vacuum pressure and scale factor was obtained, which indicated similar trends compared with those of the experimental results. The simulation method presented in this paper can be generalized to a wide range of MEMS devices.

  6. Two Novel Measurements for the Drive-Mode Resonant Frequency of a Micromachined Vibratory Gyroscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ancheng Wang

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the drive-mode resonance frequency of a micromachined vibratory gyroscope (MVG, one needs to measure it accurately and efficiently. The conventional approach to measure the resonant frequency is by performing a sweep frequency test and spectrum analysis. The method is time-consuming and inconvenient because of the requirements of many test points, a lot of data storage and off-line analyses. In this paper, we propose two novel measurement methods, the search method and track method, respectively. The former is based on the magnitude-frequency characteristics of the drive mode, utilizing a one-dimensional search technique. The latter is based on the phase-frequency characteristics, applying a feedback control loop. Their performances in precision, noise resistivity and efficiency are analyzed through detailed simulations. A test system is implemented based on a field programmable gate array (FPGA and experiments are carried out. By comparing with the common approach, feasibility and superiorities of the proposed methods are validated. In particular, significant efficiency improvements are achieved whereby the conventional frequency method consumes nearly 5,000 s to finish a measurement, while only 5 s is needed for the track method and 1 s for the search method.

  7. System Modeling of a MEMS Vibratory Gyroscope and Integration to Circuit Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyukjin J. Kwon

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Recently, consumer applications have dramatically created the demand for low-cost and compact gyroscopes. Therefore, on the basis of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS technology, many gyroscopes have been developed and successfully commercialized. A MEMS gyroscope consists of a MEMS device and an electrical circuit for self-oscillation and angular-rate detection. Since the MEMS device and circuit are interactively related, the entire system should be analyzed together to design or test the gyroscope. In this study, a MEMS vibratory gyroscope is analyzed based on the system dynamic modeling; thus, it can be mathematically expressed and integrated into a circuit simulator. A behavioral simulation of the entire system was conducted to prove the self-oscillation and angular-rate detection and to determine the circuit parameters to be optimized. From the simulation, the operating characteristic according to the vacuum pressure and scale factor was obtained, which indicated similar trends compared with those of the experimental results. The simulation method presented in this paper can be generalized to a wide range of MEMS devices.

  8. Separation of water from metal working emulsions by ultrafiltration using vibratory membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulai-Mostefa, Nadji; Frappart, Matthieu; Akoum, Omar; Ding, Luhui; Jaffrin, Michel Y

    2010-05-15

    In this paper, we investigate the application of a vibratory shear-enhanced filtration system (VSEP) to separation of water from oil-in-water emulsions. The VSEP module consists in an annular membrane of 500 cm(2) area which oscillates azimuthally in its own plane with an amplitude depending upon frequency. Polyethersulfone (PES) membranes of 50 and 20 kDa were used. Test fluids consisted of oil-in-water emulsion at an oil concentration of 4% prepared from a concentrated cutting fluid. The critical flux for stable operation was investigated by increasing the permeate flux in steps while monitoring the transmembrane pressure (TMP). With a 50 kDa membrane the flux increased nonlinearly with TMP and reached 250 L h(-1)m(-2) at a TMP of 1500 kPa while permeate turbidity decayed from 1.8 to 0.9 NTU above 600 kPa from an initial emulsion turbidity of 21,900 NTU. With the 20 kDa membrane, the flux increased linearly with TMP until 1600 kPa, but the oil concentration in permeate became negligible (turbidity near zero NTU). Concentration tests showed that the flux decreased linearly with ln(VRR) where VRR is the volume reduction ratio while permeate turbidity increased exponentially to 25NTU above a VRR of 4. This work confirms the high performance of the VSEP for oil separation from water in metal working emulsions. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. A high-efficiency self-powered wireless sensor node for monitoring concerning vibratory events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dacheng; Li, Suiqiong; Li, Mengyang; Xie, Danpeng; Dong, Chuan; Li, Xinxin

    2017-09-01

    This paper presents a self-powered wireless alarming sensor node (SWASN), which was designed to monitor the occurrence of concerning vibratory events. The major components of the sensor node include a vibration-threshold-triggered energy harvester (VTTEH) that powers the sensor node, a dual threshold voltage control circuit (DTVCC) for power management and a radio frequency (RF) signal transmitting module. The VTTEH generates significant electric energy only when the input vibration reaches certain amplitude. Thus, the VTTEH serves as both the power source and the vibration-event-sensing element for the sensor node. The DTVCC was specifically designed to utilize the limited power supply from the VTTEH to operate the sensor node. Constructed with only voltage detectors and MOSFETs, the DTVCC achieved low power consumption, which was 65% lower compared with the power management circuit designed in our previous work. Meanwhile, a RF transmit circuit was constructed based on the commercially available CC1110-F32 wireless transceiver chip and a compact planar antenna was designed to improve the signal transmission distance. The sensor node was fabricated and was characterized both in the laboratory and in the field. Experimental results showed that the SWASN could automatically send out alarming signals when the simulated concerning event occurred. The waiting time between two consecutive transmission periods is less than 125 s and the transmission distance can reach 1.31 km. The SWASN will have broad applications in field surveillances.

  10. Penile vibratory stimulation and electroejaculation before anticancer therapy in two pubertal boys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmiegelow, M L; Sommer, P; Carlsen, E; Sønksen, J O; Schmiegelow, K; Müller, J R

    1998-01-01

    Because more than 70% of children with cancer become long-term survivors, more emphasis is put on reducing late effects. Cryopreservation of semen and the intracytoplasmic sperm injection technique makes it possible to obtain pregnancy with very poor sperm quality. Two new semen retrieval methods are described that are applicable in pubertal boys with a fertility potential, although not psychologically ready to produce a semen sample, who are likely to become infertile because of anticancer therapy. Two pubertal boys (aged 14 and 15 years) had a late testicular relapse of pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia and Hodgkin disease, stage II, respectively. In patient 1, penile vibratory stimulation (PVS) was tried under general anesthesia without success and electroejaculation (EEJ) was performed. Before alkylating chemotherapy and testicular irradiation, PVS was performed with success in patient 2. An antegrade ejaculate of 0.7 ml with 1% motile spermatozoa and an retrograde ejaculate with 1.6 x 10(6)/ml spermatozoa (5% with fair motility) was obtained from patient 1. An antegrade ejaculate of 1.5 ml with 2.5 x 10(6)/ml spermatozoa (29% with fair motility) was obtained from patient 2. PVS should be the first choice of treatment because it is noninvasive, simple, and easily applied. Because EEJ requires general anesthesia, it should be used as a second option.

  11. Penile vibratory stimulation in the treatment of post-prostatectomy incontinence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fode, Mikkel; Sønksen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: To examine penile vibratory stimulation (PVS) in the treatment of post-prostatectomy urinary incontinence (UI). METHODS: Patients with post-prostatectomy UI were included in a 12-week trial. A 24-hr pad test and a 72-hr voiding diary were collected at baseline. Participants were randomized...... men were available for analyses. The difference in the change on the pad test between the groups did not reach statistical significance at 6 weeks (P = 0.13) while the change in incontinence episodes between groups approached statistical significance (P = 0.052). However, there was a median reduction...... of -33 g (P = 0.021) on the pad test and a median reduction in daily incontinence episodes of -1 (P = 0.023) in group 1 at 6 weeks. At 12 weeks, group 2 had a median decrease on the pad test of -8 g (P = 0.10) and no change in incontinence episodes. A pooled analysis showed a decline on the pad test...

  12. Spring 5 & reactive streams

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva; Clozel, Brian

    2017-01-01

    Spring is a framework widely used by the world-wide Java community, and it is also extensively used at CERN. The accelerator control system is constituted of 10 million lines of Java code, spread across more than 1000 projects (jars) developed by 160 software engineers. Around half of this (all server-side Java code) is based on the Spring framework. Warning: the speakers will assume that people attending the seminar are familiar with Java and Spring’s basic concepts. Spring 5.0 and Spring Boot 2.0 updates (45 min) This talk will cover the big ticket items in the 5.0 release of Spring (including Kotlin support, @Nullable and JDK9) and provide an update on Spring Boot 2.0, which is scheduled for the end of the year. Reactive Spring (1h) Spring Framework 5.0 has been released - and it now supports reactive applications in the Spring ecosystem. During this presentation, we'll talk about the reactive foundations of Spring Framework with the Reactor project and the reactive streams specification. We'll al...

  13. Spring viremia of carp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahne, W.; Bjorklund, H.V.; Essbauer, S.; Fijan, N.; Kurath, G.; Winton, J.R.

    2002-01-01

    pring viremia of carp (SVC) is an important disease affecting cyprinids, mainly common carp Cyprinus carpio. The disease is widespread in European carp culture, where it causes significant morbidity and mortality. Designated a notifiable disease by the Office International des Epizooties, SVC is caused by a rhabdovirus, spring viremia of carp virus (SVCV). Affected fish show destruction of tissues in the kidney, spleen and liver, leading to hemorrhage, loss of water-salt balance and impairment of immune response. High mortality occurs at water temperatures of 10 to 17°C, typically in spring. At higher temperatures, infected carp develop humoral antibodies that can neutralize the spread of virus and such carp are protected against re-infection by solid immunity. The virus is shed mostly with the feces and urine of clinically infected fish and by carriers. Waterborne transmission is believed to be the primary route of infection, but bloodsucking parasites like leeches and the carp louse may serve as mechanical vectors of SVCV. The genome of SVCV is composed of a single molecule of linear, negative-sense, single-stranded RNA containing 5 genes in the order 3¹-NPMGL-5¹ coding for the viral nucleoprotein, phosphoprotein, matrix protein, glycoprotein, and polymerase, respectively. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the viral proteins, and sequence homologies between the genes and gene junctions of SVCV and vesicular stomatitis viruses, have led to the placement of the virus as a tentative member of the genus Vesiculovirus in the family Rhabdoviridae. These methods also revealed that SVCV is not related to fish rhabdoviruses of the genus Novirhabdovirus. In vitro replication of SVCV takes place in the cytoplasm of cultured cells of fish, bird and mammalian origin at temperatures of 4 to 31°C, with an optimum of about 20°C. Spring viremia of carp can be diagnosed by clinical signs, isolation of virus in cell culture and molecular methods. Antibodies directed

  14. Framework Spring MVC

    OpenAIRE

    Jindráček, Petr

    2011-01-01

    The topic of this bachelor thesis is the web application framework Spring MVC which is an integral part of the Spring platform. That means it offers many options of adjustment and support of other significant technologies. The aim is to introduce basic principles of this framework on a theoretical level and subsequently examine them on a real example of application. The thesis is divided into three main parts. The first part is focused on Spring framework in general to introduce basic princip...

  15. Spring integration essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Pandey, Chandan

    2015-01-01

    This book is intended for developers who are either already involved with enterprise integration or planning to venture into the domain. Basic knowledge of Java and Spring is expected. For newer users, this book can be used to understand an integration scenario, what the challenges are, and how Spring Integration can be used to solve it. Prior experience of Spring Integration is not expected as this book will walk you through all the code examples.

  16. Pro Spring Integration

    CERN Document Server

    Lui, M; Chan, Andy; Long, Josh

    2011-01-01

    Pro Spring Integration is an authoritative book from the experts that guides you through the vast world of enterprise application integration (EAI) and application of the Spring Integration framework towards solving integration problems. The book is:. * An introduction to the concepts of enterprise application integration * A reference on building event-driven applications using Spring Integration * A guide to solving common integration problems using Spring Integration What makes this book unique is its coverage of contemporary technologies and real-world information, with a focus on common p

  17. Intramuscular DNA vaccination of juvenile carp against spring viremia of carp virus induces full p3wrotection and Establishes a Virus-Specific B and T Cell Response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Embregts, Carmen W.E.; Rigaudeau, Dimitri; Veselỳ, Tomáš; Pokorová, Dagmar; Lorenzen, Niels; Petit, Jules; Houel, Armel; Dauber, Malte; Schütze, Heike; Boudinot, Pierre; Wiegertjes, Geert F.; Forlenza, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Although spring viremia of carp virus (SVCV) can cause high mortalities in common carp, a commercial vaccine is not available for worldwide use. Here, we report a DNA vaccine based on the expression of the SVCV glycoprotein (G) which, when injected in the muscle even at a single low dose of 0.1

  18. Proteome Analysis of Cold Response in Spring and Winter Wheat (Triticum aestivum) Crowns Reveals Similarities in Stress Adaptation and Differences in Regulatory Processes between the Growth Habits

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kosová, K.; Vítámvás, P.; Planchon, S.; Renaut, J.; Vaňková, Radomíra; Prášil, I.T.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 11 (2013), s. 4830-4845 ISSN 1535-3893 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA522/09/2058 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : 2D-DIGE analysis * cold stress * spring and winter growth habit Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 5.001, year: 2013

  19. [Abundances of ammonia-oxidizing archaeal accA and amoA genes in response to NO2 - and NO3 - of hot springs in Yunnan province].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zhaoqi; Wang, Li; Zhou, Enmin; Wang, Fengping; Xiao, Xiang; Zhang, Chuanlun; Li, Wenjun

    2014-12-04

    Yunnan hot springs have highly diverseammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), which are autotrophic and can fix CO2 using the 3-hydroxypropionate/ 4-hydroxybutyrate (HP/HD) pathway. In this study, we investigated the abundances of prokaryotic 16S rRNA gene and archaeal accA and amoA genes in the sediments of hot springs of Yunnan Province, and analysed the correlations between the above gene abundances and environmental factors. We selected the sediments of twenty representative hot springs, and detected the gene abundances by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The principal component analysis (PCA) and the Mantel test in the R software package were performed for the correlations of gene abundance and environmental variables. The bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA gene abundances were from 6.6 x 10(7) to 4.19 x 10(11) and from 1.27 x 10(6) to 1.51 x 10(11) copies/g sediment, respectively; Archaeal accA and amoA genes were from 8.89 x 10(3) to 6.49 x 10(5) and from 7.64 x 10(3) to 4.36 x 10(5) copies/g sediment, respectively. The results of mantel test showed that accA gene was significantly (R = 0.98, P abundances of bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA genes and the ratio between them varied significantly among Yunnan hot springs. The archaealaccA and amoA genes showed significant correlation with each other, validating our previous finding that AOA in terrestrial hot springs might acquire energy from ammonia oxidation coupled with CO2 fixation using the 3-hydroxypropionate/4-hydroxybutyrate pathway.

  20. Penile vibratory stimulation in the treatment of post-prostatectomy incontinence: a randomized pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fode, Mikkel; Sønksen, Jens

    2015-02-01

    To examine penile vibratory stimulation (PVS) in the treatment of post-prostatectomy urinary incontinence (UI). Patients with post-prostatectomy UI were included in a 12-week trial. A 24-hr pad test and a 72-hr voiding diary were collected at baseline. Participants were randomized to receive PVS for the first 6 weeks (group 1) or for the final 6 weeks (group 2) of the study. The primary outcome was the difference in leakage between groups 1 and 2 at 6 weeks as measured by changes in the pad test. The trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.org (NCT01540656). Data from 31 men were available for analyses. The difference in the change on the pad test between the groups did not reach statistical significance at 6 weeks (P = 0.13) while the change in incontinence episodes between groups approached statistical significance (P = 0.052). However, there was a median reduction of -33 g (P = 0.021) on the pad test and a median reduction in daily incontinence episodes of -1 (P = 0.023) in group 1 at 6 weeks. At 12 weeks, group 2 had a median decrease on the pad test of -8 g (P = 0.10) and no change in incontinence episodes. A pooled analysis showed a decline on the pad test of -13.5 g (P = 0.004) after PVS. Small improvements were seen in subjective symptom scores and 58% stated to be satisfied with PVS. Self-limiting side effects were experienced by 15% of patients. PVS is feasible in the treatment of post-prostatectomy UI. Larger trials are needed to document the clinical efficacy. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. A randomized trial of clitoral vacuum suction versus vibratory stimulation in neurogenic female orgasmic dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Marcalee; Bashir, Khurram; Alexander, Craig; Marson, Lesley; Rosen, Raymond

    2017-09-09

    To examine safety and efficacy of use of a clitoral vacuum suction device (CVSD) versus vibratory stimulation (V) to treat orgasmic dysfunction in women with MS or SCI. Randomized clinical trial. Two academic medical centers. Thirty-one women including 20 with MS and 11 with SCI. A 12-week trial of the use of a CVSD versus V MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Female Sexual Function Inventory (FSFI) and Female Sexual Distress Scale (FSDS). 23 women (18 MS; 5 SCI) completed the study including 13/16 randomized to CVSD and 10/15 randomized to V. There was a statistically significant increase in total FSFI score (p=.011), desire (p=. 009), arousal (p=.009), lubrication (p=.008), orgasm (p=.012), and satisfaction (p=.049) and a significant decrease in distress as measured by FSDS (p=.020) in subjects using the CVSD. In subjects who used V, there was a statistically significant increase in the orgasm subscale of the FSFI (p=.028). Subjects using the CVSD maintained improvements 4 weeks after treatment. CVSD is safe and overall efficacious to treat female neurogenic sexual dysfunction related to MS and SCI. V is also safe and efficacious to female neurogenic orgasmic dysfunction; however, results were limited to the active treatment period. Due to ease of access and cost, clinicians can consider use of V for women with MS or SCI with orgasmic dysfunction. CVSD is recommended for women with multiple sexual dysfunctions or for whom V is ineffective. Copyright © 2017 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Acoustic-Frequency Vibratory Stimulation Regulates the Balance between Osteogenesis and Adipogenesis of Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis can be associated with the disordered balance between osteogenesis and adipogenesis of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs. Although low-frequency mechanical vibration has been demonstrated to promote osteogenesis, little is known about the influence of acoustic-frequency vibratory stimulation (AFVS. BM-MSCs were subjected to AFVS at frequencies of 0, 30, 400, and 800 Hz and induced toward osteogenic or adipogenic-specific lineage. Extracellular matrix mineralization was determined by Alizarin Red S staining and lipid accumulation was assessed by Oil Red O staining. Transcript levels of osteogenic and adipogenic marker genes were evaluated by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Cell proliferation of BM-MSCs was promoted following exposure to AFVS at 800 Hz. Vibration at 800 Hz induced the highest level of calcium deposition and significantly increased mRNA expression of COL1A1, ALP, RUNX2, and SPP1. The 800 Hz group downregulated lipid accumulation and levels of adipogenic genes, including FABP4, CEBPA, PPARG, and LEP, while vibration at 30 Hz supported adipogenesis. BM-MSCs showed a frequency-dependent response to acoustic vibration. AFVS at 800 Hz was the most favorable for osteogenic differentiation and simultaneously suppressed adipogenesis. Thus, acoustic vibration could potentially become a novel means to prevent and treat osteoporosis.

  3. Spring A Developer's Notebook

    CERN Document Server

    Tate, Bruce A

    2009-01-01

    This no-nonsense book quickly gets you up to speed on the new Spring open source framework. Favoring examples and practical application over theory, Spring: A Developer's Notebook features 10 code-intensive labs that'll reveal the many assets of this revolutionary, lightweight architecture. In the end, you'll understand how to produce simple, clean, and effective applications.

  4. Mockito for Spring

    CERN Document Server

    Acharya, Sujoy

    2015-01-01

    If you are an application developer with some experience in software testing and want to learn more about testing frameworks, then this technology and book is for you. Mockito for Spring will be perfect as your next step towards becoming a competent software tester with Spring and Mockito.

  5. Masters of the springs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Steffen

    2010-01-01

    flanked by villages that relied on these water recourses for agricultural production. The springs emerged in the zone separating the cemeteries from the settlements. The freshwater springs were actively incorporated into the religious landscape of the dead, by consistently erecting mounds of a particular...

  6. Implementation of the resonant vibratory feeders control algorithm on Simatic S7-1200 from MATLAB Simulink enviroment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitrović Radomir B.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Simulink is an important tool for modeling and simulation of process and control algorithms. It's expansion, PLC Coder, enables direct conversion of model subsystem into SCL, structured text code, which is then used by PLC IDE to create function blocks. This shortens developing time of algorithms for PLC controller. Also, this reduces possibility for a coding error. This paper describes Simulink PLC Coder and workflow for developing PID control algorithm for Siemens Simatic S7-1200 PLC. Control object used here is resonant vibratory feeder having electromagnetic drive.

  7. Penile vibratory stimulation in the recovery of urinary continence and erectile function after nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fode, Mikkel; Borre, Michael; Ohl, Dana A

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the effect of penile vibratory stimulation (PVS) in the preservation and restoration of erectile function and urinary continence in conjunction with nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy (RP). PATIENTS AND METHODS: The present study was conducted between July 2010 and March 2013...... and 12 months after surgery with the IIEF-5 questionnaire and questions regarding urinary bother. Patients using up to one pad daily for security reasons only were considered continent. The study was registered at http://clinicaltrials.gov/ (NCT01067261). RESULTS: Data from 68 patients were available...

  8. Digital data for Quick Response (QR codes of thermophiles to identify and compare the bacterial species isolated from Unkeshwar hot springs (India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhagwan N. Rekadwad

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available 16S rRNA sequences of morphologically and biochemically identified 21 thermophilic bacteria isolated from Unkeshwar hot springs (19°85′N and 78°25′E, Dist. Nanded (India has been deposited in NCBI repository. The 16S rRNA gene sequences were used to generate QR codes for sequences (FASTA format and full Gene Bank information. Diversity among the isolates is compared with known isolates and evaluated using CGR, FCGR and PCA i.e. visual comparison and evaluation respectively. Considerable biodiversity was observed among the identified bacteria isolated from Unkeshwar hot springs. The hyperlinked QR codes, CGR, FCGR and PCA of all the isolates are made available to the users on a portal https://sites.google.com/site/bhagwanrekadwad/.

  9. Digital data for Quick Response (QR) codes of thermophiles to identify and compare the bacterial species isolated from Unkeshwar hot springs (India).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rekadwad, Bhagwan N; Khobragade, Chandrahasya N

    2016-03-01

    16S rRNA sequences of morphologically and biochemically identified 21 thermophilic bacteria isolated from Unkeshwar hot springs (19°85'N and 78°25'E), Dist. Nanded (India) has been deposited in NCBI repository. The 16S rRNA gene sequences were used to generate QR codes for sequences (FASTA format and full Gene Bank information). Diversity among the isolates is compared with known isolates and evaluated using CGR, FCGR and PCA i.e. visual comparison and evaluation respectively. Considerable biodiversity was observed among the identified bacteria isolated from Unkeshwar hot springs. The hyperlinked QR codes, CGR, FCGR and PCA of all the isolates are made available to the users on a portal https://sites.google.com/site/bhagwanrekadwad/.

  10. Invertebrate responses to the management of genetically modified herbicide-tolerant and conventional spring crops. I. Soil-surface-active invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, D R; Bohan, D A; Champion, G T; Haughton, A J; Hawes, C; Heard, M S; Clark, S J; Dewar, A M; Firbank, L G; Perry, J N; Rothery, P; Scott, R J; Woiwod, I P; Birchall, C; Skellern, M P; Walker, J H; Baker, P; Bell, D; Browne, E L; Dewar, A J G; Fairfax, C M; Garner, B H; Haylock, L A; Horne, S L; Hulmes, S E; Mason, N S; Norton, L R; Nuttall, P; Randle, Z; Rossall, M J; Sands, R J N; Singer, E J; Walker, M J

    2003-11-29

    The effects of herbicide management of genetically modified herbicide-tolerant (GMHT) beet, maize and spring oilseed rape on the abundance and diversity of soil-surface-active invertebrates were assessed. Most effects did not differ between years, environmental zones or initial seedbanks or between sugar and fodder beet. This suggests that the results may be treated as generally applicable to agricultural situations throughout the UK for these crops. The direction of the effects was evenly balanced between increases and decreases in counts in the GMHT compared with the conventional treatment. Most effects involving a greater capture in the GMHT treatments occurred in maize, whereas most effects involving a smaller capture were in beet and spring oilseed rape. Differences between GMHT and conventional crop herbicide management had a significant effect on the capture of most surface-active invertebrate species and higher taxa tested in at least one crop, and these differences reflected the phenology and ecology of the invertebrates. Counts of carabids that feed on weed seeds were smaller in GMHT beet and spring oilseed rape but larger in GMHT maize. In contrast, collembolan detritivore counts were significantly larger under GMHT crop management.

  11. Learning Spring application development

    CERN Document Server

    Soni, Ravi Kant

    2015-01-01

    This book is intended for those who are interested in learning the core features of the Spring Framework. Prior knowledge of Java programming and web development concepts with basic XML knowledge is expected.

  12. Spring Bottom Trawl Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The standardized NEFSC Spring Bottom Trawl Survey was initiated in 1968 and covered an area from Cape Hatteras, NC, to Nova Scotia, Canada, at depths >27m....

  13. Use Videostrobokymography to Quantitatively Analyze the Vibratory Characteristics Before and After Conservative Medical Treatment of Vocal Fold Leukoplakia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiao-Wei; Huang, Yong-Wang; Liu, Li-Yan; Ouyang, Jie

    2016-03-01

    To quantitatively analyze the vibratory characteristics of vocal folds before and after conservative treatments to evaluate the outcomes of conservative treatments for vocal fold leukoplakia using videostrobokymography (VSK). This is a prospective study. Twenty patients and 20 controls were enrolled into the study. All patients received conservative treatments for 3 weeks and received VSK examination before and 3 weeks after the treatments. All controls only received VSK examination once. Vocal fold lengths of 25%, 50%, and 75% were chosen as the line-scan positions to evaluate the vocal fold vibration. Open quotient (OQ) and asymmetry index (AI) were obtained using VSK. Significant improvements in the main symptoms including voice hoarseness were found. Videostroboscopic findings showed that the white lesions on the vocal folds almost completely disappeared in all patients, and the vocal fold flexibility returned to normal. All OQs and AIs at each line-scan position in patients before the treatments were larger than those in controls (P  0.017). VSK could quantitatively evaluate the vibratory characteristics of vocal folds before and after the treatments, and conservative treatment could improve VSK measurements to normal control values, suggesting that VSK is a tool to assess the outcomes of the conservative treatments for vocal fold leukoplakia. Copyright © 2016 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The Springs at Pipe Spring National Monument, Arizona (pisp_springs)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This is an Arc/Info coverage consisting of 5 points representing the springs, natural and man-made, at Pipe Spring National Monument, Arizona. The springs were...

  15. Modeling of the effects of the electrical dynamics on the electromechanical response of a DEAP circular actuator with a mass-spring load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzello, G.; Hodgins, M.; Naso, D.; York, A.; Seelecke, S.

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents a modeling approach of an actuator system based on a dielectric electro-active polymer (DEAP) circular membrane mechanically loaded with a mass and a linear spring. The motion is generated by the deformation of the membrane caused by the electrostatic compressive force between two compliant electrodes applied on the surface of the polymer. A mass and a linear spring are used to pre-load the membrane, allowing stroke in the out-of-plane direction. The development of mathematical models which accurately describe the nonlinear coupling between electrical and mechanical dynamics is a fundamental step in order to design model-based, high-precision position control algorithms operating in high-frequency regimes (up to 150 Hz). The knowledge of the nonlinear electrical dynamics of the actuator driving circuit can be exploited during the control system design in order to achieve desirable features, such as higher modeling accuracy for high-frequency actuation, self-sensing or control energy minimization. This work proposes a physical model of the DEAP actuator system which couples both electrical and mechanical dynamics occurring during the actuation process. By means of numerous experiments, it is shown that the model can be used to predict both actuator current and displacement, and therefore to increase the overall displacement prediction accuracy with respect to actuator models which neglect electrical behavior.

  16. Walking with springs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugar, Thomas G.; Hollander, Kevin W.; Hitt, Joseph K.

    2011-04-01

    Developing bionic ankles poses great challenges due to the large moment, power, and energy that are required at the ankle. Researchers have added springs in series with a motor to reduce the peak power and energy requirements of a robotic ankle. We developed a "robotic tendon" that reduces the peak power by altering the required motor speed. By changing the required speed, the spring acts as a "load variable transmission." If a simple motor/gearbox solution is used, one walking step would require 38.8J and a peak motor power of 257 W. Using an optimized robotic tendon, the energy required is 21.2 J and the peak motor power is reduced to 96.6 W. We show that adding a passive spring in parallel with the robotic tendon reduces peak loads but the power and energy increase. Adding a passive spring in series with the robotic tendon reduces the energy requirements. We have built a prosthetic ankle SPARKy, Spring Ankle with Regenerative Kinetics, that allows a user to walk forwards, backwards, ascend and descend stairs, walk up and down slopes as well as jog.

  17. Characterization of the hydrogeology of the sacred Gihon Spring, Jerusalem: a deteriorating urban karst spring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiel, Ronit Benami; Grodek, Tamir; Frumkin, Amos

    2010-09-01

    The Gihon Spring, Jerusalem, is important for the major monotheistic religions. Its hydrogeology and hydrochemistry is studied here in order to understand urbanization effects on karst groundwater resources, and promote better water management. High-resolution monitoring of the spring discharge, temperature and electrical conductivity, was performed, together with chemical and bacterial analysis. All these demonstrate a rapid response of the spring to rainfall events and human impact. A complex karst system is inferred, including conduit flow, fissure flow and diffuse flow. Electrical conductivity, Na+ and K+ values (2.0 mS/cm, 130 and 50 mg/l respectively) are very high compared to other nearby springs located at the town margins (0.6 mS/cm, 15 and <1 mg/l respectively), indicating considerable urban pollution in the Gihon area. The previously cited pulsating nature of the spring was not detected during the present high-resolution monitoring. This phenomenon may have ceased due to additional water sources from urban leakage and irrigation feeding the spring. The urbanization of the recharge catchment thus affects the spring water dramatically, both chemically and hydrologically. Appropriate measures should therefore be undertaken to protect the Gihon Spring and other karst aquifers threatened by rapid urbanization.

  18. OPTIMIZATION OF MANUFACTURING TEHNOLOGY FOR “ECCENTRIC MASS” COMPONENT OF A NEW TYPE OF VIBRATORY COMPACTOR USING NX 7.5 SOFTWARE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eftimie Dorin

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the technological optimization process of the eccentric mass component using the NX 7.5 software. The new design of the vibratory compactor with variable amplitudes was modeled 3D. The manufacturing technology presents graphical aspects of operations during mechanical processing.

  19. Damper Spring For Omega Seal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maclaughlin, Scott T.; Montgomery, Stuart K.

    1993-01-01

    Damper spring reduces deflections of omega-cross-section seal, reducing probability of failure and extending life of seal. Spring is split ring with U-shaped cross section. Placed inside omega seal and inserted with seal into seal cavity. As omega seal compressed into cavity, spring and seal make contact near convolution of seal, and spring becomes compressed also. During operation, when seal dynamically loaded, spring limits deflection of seal, reducing stress on seal.

  20. Spring of women?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Castillo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Terms such as “Islamic feminism” and “women’s movement” refer to those social movements of women that seek to assert their rights in Islamic societies. This brief study focuses on theses social movements of women and will presentan overview of the role and participation of women in the Arab Spring by examining news, events, press articles and opinions in order to contextualize the participation of women and feminists in the Arab Spring from a perspective of the social networking phenomenon as apparent drivers of the revolution.

  1. Pro Spring security

    CERN Document Server

    Scarioni, Carlo

    2013-01-01

    Security is a key element in the development of any non-trivial application. The Spring Security Framework provides a comprehensive set of functionalities to implement industry-standard authentication and authorization mechanisms for Java applications. Pro Spring Security will be a reference and advanced tutorial that will do the following: Guides you through the implementation of the security features for a Java web application by presenting consistent examples built from the ground-up. Demonstrates the different authentication and authorization methods to secure enterprise-level applications

  2. Instant Spring security starter

    CERN Document Server

    Jagielski, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    Get to grips with a new technology, understand what it is and what it can do for you, and then get to work with the most important features and tasks. A concise guide written in an easy-to-follow format following the Starter guide approach.This book is for people who have not used Spring Security before and want to learn how to use it effectively in a short amount of time. It is assumed that readers know both Java and HTTP protocol at the level of basic web programming. The reader should also be familiar with Inversion-of-Control/Dependency Injection, preferably with the Spring framework itsel

  3. Engineering applications and analysis of vibratory motion fourth order fluid film over the time dependent heated flat plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohmand, Muhammad Ismail; Mamat, Mustafa Bin; Shah, Qayyum

    2017-07-01

    This article deals with the time dependent analysis of thermally conducting and Magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) liquid film flow of a fourth order fluid past a vertical and vibratory plate. In this article have been developed for higher order complex nature fluids. The governing-equations have been modeled in the terms of nonlinear partial differential equations with the help of physical boundary circumstances. Two different analytical approaches i.e. Adomian decomposition method (ADM) and the optimal homotopy asymptotic method (OHAM), have been used for discoveryof the series clarification of the problems. Solutions obtained via two diversemethods have been compared using the graphs, tables and found an excellent contract. Variants of the embedded flow parameters in the solution have been analysed through the graphical diagrams.

  4. Low-frequency vibratory exercise reduces the risk of bone fracture more than walking: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusi, Narcís; Raimundo, Armando; Leal, Alejo

    2006-11-30

    Whole-body vibration (WBV) is a new type of exercise that has been increasingly tested for the ability to prevent bone fractures and osteoporosis in frail people. There are two currently marketed vibrating plates: a) the whole plate oscillates up and down; b) reciprocating vertical displacements on the left and right side of a fulcrum, increasing the lateral accelerations. A few studies have shown recently the effectiveness of the up-and-down plate for increasing Bone Mineral Density (BMD) and balance; but the effectiveness of the reciprocating plate technique remains mainly unknown. The aim was to compare the effects of WBV using a reciprocating platform at frequencies lower than 20 Hz and a walking-based exercise programme on BMD and balance in post-menopausal women. Twenty-eight physically untrained post-menopausal women were assigned at random to a WBV group or a Walking group. Both experimental programmes consisted of 3 sessions per week for 8 months. Each vibratory session included 6 bouts of 1 min (12.6 Hz in frequency and 3 cm in amplitude with 60 degrees of knee flexion) with 1 min rest between bouts. Each walking session was 55 minutes of walking and 5 minutes of stretching. Hip and lumbar BMD (g.cm-2) were measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and balance was assessed by the blind flamingo test. ANOVA for repeated measurements was adjusted by baseline data, weight and age. After 8 months, BMD at the femoral neck in the WBV group was increased by 4.3% (P = 0.011) compared to the Walking group. In contrast, the BMD at the lumbar spine was unaltered in both groups. Balance was improved in the WBV group (29%) but not in the Walking group. The 8-month course of vibratory exercise using a reciprocating plate is feasible and is more effective than walking to improve two major determinants of bone fractures: hip BMD and balance.

  5. A Quadratic Spring Equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fay, Temple H.

    2010-01-01

    Through numerical investigations, we study examples of the forced quadratic spring equation [image omitted]. By performing trial-and-error numerical experiments, we demonstrate the existence of stability boundaries in the phase plane indicating initial conditions yielding bounded solutions, investigate the resonance boundary in the [omega]…

  6. Editors' Spring Picks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Library Journal, 2011

    2011-01-01

    While they do not represent the rainbow of reading tastes American public libraries accommodate, Book Review editors are a wildly eclectic bunch. One look at their bedside tables and ereaders would reveal very little crossover. This article highlights an eclectic array of spring offerings ranging from print books to an audiobook to ebook apps. It…

  7. Spring batch essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Rao, P Raja Malleswara

    2015-01-01

    If you are a Java developer with basic knowledge of Spring and some experience in the development of enterprise applications, and want to learn about batch application development in detail, then this book is ideal for you. This book will be perfect as your next step towards building simple yet powerful batch applications on a Java-based platform.

  8. Energy Matters - Spring 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2002-03-01

    Quarterly newsletter from DOE's Industrial Technologies Program to promote the use of energy-efficient industrial systems. The focus of the Spring 2002 Issue of Energy Matters focuses on premium energy efficiency systems, with articles on new gas technologies, steam efficiency, the Augusta Newsprint Showcase, and more.

  9. Springing of ships waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Gunsteren, F.F.

    1978-01-01

    This thesis is the result of an investigation of the assumptions underlying the general applied method for the calculation of springing of ships in waves, which has been proposed by the author some decade ago. It has been found that, contrary to the general practice in seakeeping research, the

  10. RESPOSTA DO FEIJOEIRO A DOSES DE BORO EM CULTIVO DE INVERNO E DE PRIMAVERA DRY BEAN RESPONSE TO DOSES OF BORON IN WINTER AND SPRING PLANTINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HIPÓLITO ASSUNÇÃO ANTONIO MASCARENHAS

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Um experimento em vasos foi instalado em casa de vegetação com o objetivo de estudar a resposta do feijoeiro à aplicação de boro (B em solo com baixa disponibilidade desse nutriente. Os tratamentos consistiram na aplicação de doses correspondentes a 0, 1, 2, 4, 8 e 16 kg.ha-1 de B, na forma de bórax. Dois ensaios foram desenvolvidos, sendo o primeiro no inverno (junho a julho e o outro na primavera (setembro a outubro. No ensaio do inverno, foi observada a deficiência de B, apenas na testemunha, fato comprovado pela análise de tecidos. Nos demais tratamentos não apareceram sintomas de deficiência e os teores do elemento na parte aérea das plantas foram considerados adequados. No ensaio de primavera, não foi observada deficiência visual de B, mesmo na testemunha. Em ambos os ensaios, aplicações superiores a 2 kg.ha-1 de B proporcionaram teores muito elevados do elemento nas plantas (138 a 710 mg.kg-1. Os dados sugerem que a deficiência é mais relevante no inverno e que o excesso é prejudicial, em qualquer época, ocasionando toxicidade.A greenhouse experiment was conducted to study the effect of boron in dry bean plants (Phaseolus vulgaris L. grown in pots. The treatments consisted of 0, 1, 2, 4, 8, and 16 kg.ha-1 of boron in the form of borax. Two identical experiments were carried out during the winter (June/July and the spring (September/October seasons. In the winter experiment, the boron deficiency symptoms were shown only by the control plants. In those conditions, the high concentrations of Ca and Mg and the low temperatures affected the boron absorption of the plants. The application of 1 kg.ha-1 of boron was sufficient to reduce the visible symptoms of B deficiency, and increased the dry weight of the shoots. At the rate of the 2 kg.ha-1 B or above there was excess of boron in the dry matter of the shoots. In the spring experiment there was no deficiency symptoms in the plants and the boron concentration was adequate

  11. The molecular dimension of microbial species: 3. Comparative genomics of Synechococcus strains with different light responses and in situ diel transcription patterns of associated ecotypes in the Mushroom Spring microbial mat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Millie T. Olsen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Genomes were obtained for three closely related strains of Synechococcus that are representative of putative ecotypes that predominate at different depths in the 1 mm-thick, upper-green layer in the 60°C mat of Mushroom Spring, Yellowstone National Park, and exhibit different light adaptation and acclimation responses. The genomes were compared to the published genome of a previously obtained, closely related strain from a neighboring spring, and differences in both gene content and orthologous gene alleles between high-light-adapted and low-light-adapted strains were identified. Evidence of genetic differences that relate to adaptation to light intensity and/or quality, CO2 uptake, nitrogen metabolism, organic carbon metabolism, and uptake of other nutrients were found between strains of the different putative ecotypes. In situ diel transcription patterns of genes, including genes unique to either low-light-adapted or high-light-adapted strains and different alleles of an orthologous photosystem gene, revealed that expression is fine-tuned to the different light environments experienced by ecotypes prevalent at various depths in the mat. This study suggests that strains of closely related putative ecotypes have different genomic adaptations that enable them to inhabit distinct ecological niches while living in close proximity within a microbial community.

  12. Fish Springs molluscan studies: House and Percy Springs

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the findings of a limited survey of House and Percy Springs molluscan fauna within Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge. Various...

  13. Leaf spring, and electromagnetic actuator provided with a leaf spring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkhoff, Arthur P.; Lemmen, Remco Louis Christiaan

    2002-01-01

    The invention relates to a leaf spring for an electromagnetic actuator and to such an electromagnetic actuator. The leaf spring is formed as a whole from a disc of plate-shaped, resilient material. The leaf spring comprises a central fastening part, an outer fastening part extending therearound and

  14. Studying Springs in Series Using a Single Spring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serna, Juan D.; Joshi, Amitabh

    2011-01-01

    Springs are used for a wide range of applications in physics and engineering. Possibly, one of their most common uses is to study the nature of restoring forces in oscillatory systems. While experiments that verify Hooke's law using springs are abundant in the physics literature, those that explore the combination of several springs together are…

  15. Spring magnet films.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bader, S. D.; Fullerton, E. E.; Gornakov, V. S.; Inomata, A.; Jiang, J. S.; Nikitenko, V. I.; Shapiro, A. J.; Shull, R. D.; Sowers, C. H.

    1999-03-29

    The properties of exchange-spring-coupled bilayer and superlattice films are highlighted for Sm-Co hard magnet and Fe or Co soft magnet layers. The hexagonal Sm-Co is grown via magnetron sputtering in a- and b-axis epitaxial orientations. In both cases the c-axis, in the film plane, is the easy axis of magnetization. Trends in coercivity with film thickness are established and related to the respective microstructure of the two orientations. The magnetization reversal process for the bilayers is examined by magnetometry and magneto-optical imaging, as well as by simulations that utilize a one-dimensional model to provide the spin configuration for each atomic layer. The Fe magnetization is pinned to that of the Sm-Co at the interface, and reversal proceeds via a progressive twisting of the Fe magnetization. The Fe demagnetization curves are reversible as expected for a spring magnet. Comparison of experiment and simulations indicates that the spring magnet behavior can be understood from the intrinsic properties of the hard and soft layers. Estimated are made of the ultimate gain in performance that can potentially be realized in this system.

  16. Differential flight responses of spring staging Teal Anas crecca and Wigeon A. penelope to human vs. natural disturbance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnballe, Thomas; Speich, Charlotte; Horsten, Anders

    2017-01-01

    (anglers, cyclists, farming activity) on the flight responses and displacement distances of ducks within uniform habitat along a public path were compared with the birds’ reaction to natural stimuli such as mammals or birds of prey. Excluding the controlled disturbance by a pedestrian, undertaken as part...... of the study, the main cause of flushing in Wigeon was a response to the movements of birds of prey and other birds, especially Lapwings Vanellus vanellus performing flight displays. For Teal, birds of prey accounted for around half of the flushes, with other birds accounting for one third of the flushes...... from a passing pedestrian with their response patterns in the absence of pedestrians, but found no evidence to suggest that they did so. In our study area, Wigeon used land for feeding and water as predator-escape habitat; 23% of the 144 observed take-offs of Wigeon were from water but 68...

  17. Influence оf 2d Vibratory Motion Conveyed to Billet on Force And Timing Parameters of its Contact Interaction With Sawing Disc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. G. Kiselev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an experimental investigation on influence of 2D vibratory dimension conveyed to a billet on force and timing parameters of its contact interaction with a sawing disc. Description of the modernized sawing section ensuring conveyance of 2D vibratory motion to a billet, methodology and  hardware facilities applied for normal force measurement of its impact with the disc and longevity of their contact for the period of the billet circulation motion. The paper provides, analyzes and generalizes experimentally obtained dependences reflecting influence of gap clearance between a boom and an upper stop on the mentioned force and timing parameters of the billet contact interaction with the sawing disc.

  18. A Mode Matched Triaxial Vibratory Wheel Gyroscope with Fully Decoupled Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Dunzhu; Kong, Lun; Gao, Haiyu

    2015-11-17

    To avoid the oscillation of four unequal masses seen in previous triaxial linear gyroscopes, a modified silicon triaxial gyroscope with a rotary wheel is presented in this paper. To maintain a large sensitivity and suppress the coupling of different modes, this novel gyroscope structure is designed be perfectly symmetrical with a relatively large size of about 9.8 mm × 9.8 mm. It is available for differentially detecting three-axis angular rates simultaneously. To overcome the coupling between drive and sense modes, numerous necessary frames, beams, and anchors are delicately figured out and properly arranged. Besides, some frequency tuning and feedback mechanisms are addressed in the case of post processing after fabrication. To facilitate mode matched function, a new artificial fish swarm algorithm (AFSA) performed faster than particle swarm optimization (PSO) with a frequency split of 108 Hz. Then, by entrusting the post adjustment of the springs dimensions to the finite element method (FEM) software ANSYS, the final frequency splits can be below 3 Hz. The simulation results demonstrate that the modal frequencies in drive and different sense modes are respectively 8001.1, 8002.6, 8002.8 and 8003.3 Hz. Subsequently, different axis cross coupling effects and scale factors are also analyzed. The simulation results effectively validate the feasibility of the design and relevant theoretical calculation.

  19. Intramuscular DNA Vaccination of Juvenile Carp against Spring Viremia of Carp Virus Induces Full Protection and Establishes a Virus-Specific B and T Cell Response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Embregts, Carmen W. E.; Rigaudeau, Dimitri; Veselý, Tomas

    2017-01-01

    this optimized bath challenge, we showed a strong age-dependent susceptibility of carp to SVCV, with high susceptibility at young age (3 months) and a full resistance at 9 months. We visualized local expression of the G protein and associated early inflammatory response by immunohistochemistry and described...

  20. Low-frequency vibratory exercise reduces the risk of bone fracture more than walking: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leal Alejo

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Whole-body vibration (WBV is a new type of exercise that has been increasingly tested for the ability to prevent bone fractures and osteoporosis in frail people. There are two currently marketed vibrating plates: a the whole plate oscillates up and down; b reciprocating vertical displacements on the left and right side of a fulcrum, increasing the lateral accelerations. A few studies have shown recently the effectiveness of the up-and-down plate for increasing Bone Mineral Density (BMD and balance; but the effectiveness of the reciprocating plate technique remains mainly unknown. The aim was to compare the effects of WBV using a reciprocating platform at frequencies lower than 20 Hz and a walking-based exercise programme on BMD and balance in post-menopausal women. Methods Twenty-eight physically untrained post-menopausal women were assigned at random to a WBV group or a Walking group. Both experimental programmes consisted of 3 sessions per week for 8 months. Each vibratory session included 6 bouts of 1 min (12.6 Hz in frequency and 3 cm in amplitude with 60° of knee flexion with 1 min rest between bouts. Each walking session was 55 minutes of walking and 5 minutes of stretching. Hip and lumbar BMD (g·cm-2 were measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and balance was assessed by the blind flamingo test. ANOVA for repeated measurements was adjusted by baseline data, weight and age. Results After 8 months, BMD at the femoral neck in the WBV group was increased by 4.3% (P = 0.011 compared to the Walking group. In contrast, the BMD at the lumbar spine was unaltered in both groups. Balance was improved in the WBV group (29% but not in the Walking group. Conclusion The 8-month course of vibratory exercise using a reciprocating plate is feasible and is more effective than walking to improve two major determinants of bone fractures: hip BMD and balance.

  1. Influence of the Radial Clearance of a Squeeze Film Damper on the Vibratory Behavior of a Single Spool Gas Turbine Designed for Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Geraldo Creci; José Orlando Balastrero; Sidney Domingues; Luis Vanderlei Torres; João Carlos Menezes

    2017-01-01

    This study presents a numerical investigation using the finite element method on the vibratory behavior of a single spool gas turbine designed for unmanned aerial vehicle applications. The shaft of the rotor-bearing system is supported on a front bearing composed of a deep groove ball bearing with a vibration absorber element and a rear squeeze film damper bearing. Three radial clearances for the squeeze film damper were analyzed to determine the best geometric configuration for the rear bear...

  2. Changes in the onset of spring growth in shrubland species in response to experimental warming along a north-south gradient in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prieto, Patricia; Penuelas, Josep; Niinemets, Üelo

    2009-01-01

    gradient with average annual temperatures (8.2–15.6 °C) and precipitation (511–1427 mm). Methods 'Bud break' was monitored in eight shrub and grass species in six European sites under control and experimentally warmer conditions generated by automatic roofs covering vegetation during the night. Results...... treatments, the responses at each site were species specific and year dependent. Under experimental warming 25% of cases exhibited a significantly earlier onset of the growing season and 10% had a significantly delayed onset of vegetative growth. No geographical gradient was detected in the experimental...

  3. LaJolla Spring Cave Complex - Meramec Caverns

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA Region 7 is directing the potentially responsible party at a groundwater contamination Superfund site in Franklin County, Mo., to perform additional work to protect workers and visitors from potentially harmful exposures at LaJolla Springs Cave Complex

  4. Joint position sense and vibratory perception sense in patients with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type III (hypermobility type).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rombaut, Lies; De Paepe, Anne; Malfait, Fransiska; Cools, Ann; Calders, Patrick

    2010-03-01

    Neurophysiological deficits could make patients with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) type III (hypermobility type) more vulnerable to musculoskeletal problems, particularly to joint instability. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether joint position sense (JPS) and vibratory perception sense (VPS) in EDS type III patients in the knee and shoulder joints are impaired. Thirty-two female EDS type III patients as defined by the Villefranche criteria and 32 individually gender- and age-matched healthy control subjects were included in the study. Range of motion was determined using a goniometer, passive and active JPS were assessed with an isokinetic dynamometer system, and the VPS was measured by a biothesiometer. Daily physical activity was evaluated by the Baecke questionnaire. The EDS type III group showed significantly larger ranges of movement (P physical activity (SPA) compared to the control group (P = 0.023). Considering SPA as covariate, the EDS type III group demonstrated a significant impairment in knee joint reposition compared to the control group (P = 0.018). No significant differences were found for shoulder JPS. The VPS was not significantly different in the EDS type III group compared to the control group. In addition, no significant correlation was found between JPS and VPS, neither at the knee nor at the shoulder joint. This is the first study examining proprioception deficits in EDS type III patients as defined by the Villefranche criteria. Further research on the neurophysiological dysfunctions and mechanisms in this pathologic entity is needed.

  5. Experimental Investigation on the Fatigue Life of Ti-6Al-4V Treated by Vibratory Stress Relief

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han-Jun Gao

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Vibratory stress relief (VSR is a highly efficient and low-energy consumption method to relieve and homogenize residual stresses in materials. Thus, the effect of VSR on the fatigue life should be determined. Standard fatigue specimens are fabricated to investigate the fatigue life of Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy treated by VSR. The dynamic stresses generated under different VSR amplitudes are measured, and then the relationship between the dynamic stress and vibration amplitude is obtained. Different specimen groups are subjected to VSRs with different amplitudes and annealing treatment with typical process parameters. Residual stresses are measured to evaluate the stress relieving effects. Finally, the fatigue behavior under different states is determined by uniaxial tension–compression fatigue experiments. Results show that VSR and annealing treatment have negative effects on the fatigue life of Ti-6Al-4V. The fatigue life is decreased with the increase in VSR amplitude. When the VSR amplitude is less than 0.1 mm, the decrease in fatigue limit is less than 2%. Compared with specimens without VSR or annealing treatment, the fatigue limit of the specimens treated by VSR with 0.2 mm amplitude and annealing treatment decreases by 10.60% and 8.52%, respectively. Although the stress relieving effect is better, high amplitude VSR will lead to the decrease of Ti-6Al-4V fatigue life due to the defects generated during vibration. Low amplitude VSR can effectively relieve the stress with little decrease in fatigue life.

  6. Experimental investigations of higher-order springing and whipping-WILS project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Sa Young

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Springing and whipping are becoming increasingly important considerations in ship design as container ships increase in size. In this study, the springing and whipping characteristics of a large container ship were investigated through a series of systematic model tests in waves. A multi-segmented hull model with a backbone was adopted for measurement of springing and whipping signals. A conversion method for extracting torsion springing and whipping is described in this paper for the case of an open-section backbone. Higher-order springing, higher-mode torsion responses, and the effects of linear and nonlinear springing in irregular waves are highlighted in the discussion.

  7. Developing bulk exchange spring magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mccall, Scott K.; Kuntz, Joshua D.

    2017-06-27

    A method of making a bulk exchange spring magnet by providing a magnetically soft material, providing a hard magnetic material, and producing a composite of said magnetically soft material and said hard magnetic material to make the bulk exchange spring magnet. The step of producing a composite of magnetically soft material and hard magnetic material is accomplished by electrophoretic deposition of the magnetically soft material and the hard magnetic material to make the bulk exchange spring magnet.

  8. Spring security 3.x cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Mankale, Anjana

    2013-01-01

    This book follows a cookbook style exploring various security solutions provided by Spring Security for various vulnerabilities and threat scenarios that web applications may be exposed to at the authentication and session level layers.This book is for all Spring-based application developers as well as Java web developers who wish to implement robust security mechanisms into web application development using Spring Security.Readers are assumed to have a working knowledge of Java web application development, a basic understanding of the Spring framework, and some knowledge of the fundamentals o

  9. Mineralogy of saline perennial cold springs on Axel Heiberg Island, Nunavut, Canada and implications for spring deposits on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battler, Melissa M.; Osinski, Gordon R.; Banerjee, Neil R.

    2013-06-01

    In recent years evidence for spring deposits on Mars has been mounting. It seems increasingly likely that groundwater upwelling and surfacing as springs may be responsible for some mineral deposits on Mars' surface. In order to more easily detect and better understand potential spring deposits on Mars, it is pertinent that we gain a better understanding of the distribution of minerals at cold spring systems on Earth. Here, we report on the detailed mineralogy and distribution of precipitates in crusts and sediments of three non-volcanic perennial saline cold spring systems associated with gypsum/anhydrite diapirs on Axel Heiberg Island, Canada: Wolf spring (WS; also known as Lost Hammer), Colour Peak springs (CP), and Gypsum Hill springs (GH). At these sites permafrost, frigid winter temperatures, and arid atmospheric conditions approximate conditions of present-day, as well as past, Mars. Mineralogy of the three springs is dominated by halite (NaCl), calcite (CaCO3), gypsum (CaSO4·2H2O), thenardite (Na2SO4), mirabilite (Na2SO4·10H2O), and elemental sulfur (S°). Minerals at WS are more sodium-rich than at the other two sites, and water salinity is much higher, suggesting water flows through halite in the subsurface. Mirabilite is likely deposit at WS during winter months and dehydrates to thenardite during summer months. Elemental sulfur is typically associated with gypsum, and may be related to microbial metabolism. Spring sediments are home to thriving microbial communities in winter and summer months, and presumably year round. If spring systems did exist on the surface of Mars, they may represent environments capable of supporting microbial life. It is not known to what extent mineral crusts in cold saline spring systems on Earth preserve evidence of microbial life, or if they ever did on Mars. Therefore, studying terrestrial saline spring mineral deposits such as those on Axel Heiberg Island may help us to better understand cold spring precipitation on Mars

  10. Vibratory Stimuli: A Novel Rehabilitation Method for Preventing Post-Traumatic Knee Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    provision of law, no person shall be subject to any penalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid...osteoarthritis. While the specific aims will not be realized and cannot be analyzed until the study’s completion in Year 3 due to the single- blind ...Biomechanics, Rehabilitation 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON USAMRMC a

  11. Fatigue behaviour of technical springs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaiser, B.; Berger, C. [Institut fuer Werkstoffkunde und Staatliche Materialpruefungsanstalt Darmstadt, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Grafenstrasse 2, 64283 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2005-11-01

    Technical Springs belong to the components with the highest cyclic and superposed static load. Nevertheless they have to fulfill the requirements of lightweight constructions. This is only possible, if high strength materials with special properties are carefully manufactured to well designed springs and special additional treatments are carried out, which impose an advantageous residual stress profile in the surface layers of the springs. After a short historical view on the spring research activities in Professor Thums area, some aspects of the fatigue behaviour of hot formed parabolic leaf springs are presented. Then the fatigue properties of cold formed helical compression springs made of different steel spring wires are discussed. Finally some results on the fatigue behaviour of helical springs at a very high number of load cycles are reported. (Abstract Copyright [2005], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.) [German] Technische Federn gehoeren zu den am hoechsten zyklisch beanspruchten Bauteilen mit gleichzeitig hoher Vorspannung bzw. Mittelspannung. Trotzdem sollen sie den Forderungen des Leichtbaus genuegen. Realisierbar ist dies nur durch hochfeste Federwerkstoffe mit speziellen Eigenschaften, die sorgfaeltig zu ueberlegt konstruierten Federn verarbeitet werden, und wenn zusaetzliche Behandlungen durchgefuehrt werden, die einen guenstigen Eigenspannungszustand in der Federrandschicht erzeugen. Nach einem kurzen historischen Rueckblick auf die Forschungsaktivitaeten zur Zeit von August Thum wird zunaechst das Ermuedungsverhalten warm geformter Parabelfedern behandelt. Der folgende Abschnitt befasst sich mit den Schwingfestigkeitseigenschaften kalt geformter Schraubendruckfedern aus verschiedenen Federstahldraehten. Abschliessend wird ueber das Ermuedungsverhalten von Schraubenfedern bei sehr hohen Schwingspielzahlen berichtet. (Abstract Copyright [2005], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  12. Experimenting with Inexpensive Plastic Springs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Leander; Marques, Adriana; Sánchez, Iván

    2014-01-01

    Acommon undergraduate laboratory experience is the determination of the elastic constant of a spring, whether studying the elongation under a static load or studying the damped harmonic motion of the spring with a suspended mass. An alternative approach to this laboratory experience has been suggested by Menezes et al., aimed at studying the…

  13. A bountiful spring harvest

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    Although we recently put the clocks forward and spring has officially begun, the view from my window looks more autumnal – befitting of the season of mists and mellow fruitfulness, rather than that of sowing seeds for the future. Which, in a way is appropriate. With the LHC paused, we are reaping a kind of harvest in the form of recognition for our efforts.   Two weeks ago, I was in Edinburgh, on behalf of everyone at CERN, to collect the Edinburgh medal, which we shared with Peter Higgs. I particularly like the citation for this honour: “The Edinburgh Medal is awarded each year to men and women of science and technology whose professional achievements are judged to have made a significant contribution to the understanding and well-being of humanity.” I like this, because it underlines a fact that needs to be shouted louder – that fundamental science does more than build the sum of human knowledge, it is also the foundation of human well-being. A few d...

  14. Spring comes for ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    Butin, F.

    2004-01-01

    (First published in the CERN weekly bulletin 24/2004, 7 June 2004.) A short while ago the ATLAS cavern underwent a spring clean, marking the end of the installation of the detector's support structures and the cavern's general infrastructure. The list of infrastructure to be installed in the ATLAS cavern from September 2003 was long: a thousand tonnes of mechanical structures spread over 13 storeys, two lifts, two 65-tonne overhead travelling cranes 25 metres above cavern floor, with a telescopic boom and cradle to access the remaining 10 metres of the cavern, a ventilation system for the 55 000 cubic metre cavern, a drainage system, a standard sprinkler system and an innovative foam fire-extinguishing system, as well as the external cryogenic system for the superconducting magnets and the liquid argon calorimeters (comprising, amongst other things, two helium refrigeration units, a nitrogen refrigeration unit and 5 km of piping for gaseous or liquid helium and nitrogen), not to mention the handling eq...

  15. Responses to comments on the remedial investigation/feasibility study-environmental impact statement for remedial action at the Chemical Plant area of the Weldon Spring site (November 1992)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-06-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for cleanup activities at the Weldon Spring site in St. Charles County, Missouri. The site consists of a chemical plant area and a noncontiguous limestone quarry; both areas are radioactively and chemically contaminated as a result of past processing and disposal activities. Explosives were produced by the US Army at the chemical plant in the 1940s, and uranium and thorium materials were processed by DOE`s predecessor agency in the 1950s and 1960s. During that time, various wastes were disposed of at both areas of the site. The DOE is conducting cleanup activities at the site under its Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Program. The integrated remedial investigation/feasibility study-environmental impact statement (RI/FS-EIS) documents for the chemical plant area were issued to the public in November 1992 as the draft RI/FS-EIS. (The CERCLA RI/FS is considered final when issued to the public, whereas per the NEPA process, an EIS is initially issued as a draft and is finalized after substantive public comments have been addressed.) Four documents made up the draft RI/FS-EIS, which is hereafter referred to as the RI/FS-EIS: (1) the RI (DOE 1992d), which presents general information on the site environment and the nature and extent of contamination; (2) the baseline assessment (BA) (DOE 1992a), which evaluates human health and environmental effects that might occur if no cleanup actions were taken; (3) the FS (DOE 1992b), which develops and evaluates alternatives for site cleanup; and (4) the proposed plan (PP) (DOE 1992c), which summarizes key information from the RI, BA, and FS reports and identifies DOE`s preferred alternative for remedial action. This comment response document combined with those four documents constitutes the final RI/FS-EIS for the chemical plant area.

  16. Bias Errors in Measurement of Vibratory Power and Implication for Active Control of Structural Vibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ohlrich, Mogens; Henriksen, Eigil; Laugesen, Søren

    1997-01-01

    errors can be largely compensated for by an absolute calibration of the transducers and inverse filtering that results in very small residual errors. Experimental results of this study indicate that these uncertainties will be in the order of one percent with respect to amplitude and two tenth......Uncertainties in power measurements performed with piezoelectric accelerometers and force transducers are investigated. It is shown that the inherent structural damping of the transducers is responsible for a bias phase error, which typically is in the order of one degree. Fortunately, such bias...... of a degree for the phase. This implies that input power at a single point can be measured to within one dB in practical structures which possesses some damping. The uncertainty is increased, however, when sums of measured power contributions from more sources are to be minimised, as is the case in active...

  17. Ship Springing Response in Finite Water Depth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidic-Perunovic, Jelena

    2012-01-01

    Second-order forces and moments are derived for the pressure integration and the momentum conservation methods. They are implemented in the time-domain boundary element code AEGIR. Both Neumann-Kelvin and double-body flow linearization are used. Good agreement is found between AEGIR’s results and...

  18. Predicting the patterns of change in spring onset and false springs in China during the twenty-first century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Likai; Meng, Jijun; Li, Feng; You, Nanshan

    2017-10-28

    Spring onset has generally shifted earlier in China over the past several decades in response to the warming climate. However, future changes in spring onset and false springs, which will have profound effects on ecosystems, are still not well understood. Here, we used the extended form of the Spring Indices model (SI-x) to project changes in the first leaf and first bloom dates, and predicted false springs for the historical (1950-2005) and future (2006-2100) periods based on the downscaled daily maximum/minimum temperatures under two emission scenarios from 21 General Circulation Models (GCMs) of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5). On average, first leaf and first bloom in China were projected to occur 21 and 23 days earlier, respectively, by the end of the twenty-first century in the Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) 8.5 scenario. Areas with greater earlier shifts in spring onset were in the warm temperate zone, as well as the north and middle subtropical zones of China. Early false spring risk increased rapidly in the warm temperate and north subtropical zones, while that declined in the cold temperate zone. Relative to early false spring risk, late false spring risk showed a common increase with smaller magnitude in the RCP 8.5 scenario but might cause greater damage to ecosystems because plants tend to become more vulnerable to the later occurrence of a freeze event. We conclude that future climate warming will continue to cause earlier occurrence of spring onset in general, but might counterintuitively increase plant damage risk in natural and agricultural systems of the warm temperate and subtropical China.

  19. Predicting the patterns of change in spring onset and false springs in China during the twenty-first century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Likai; Meng, Jijun; Li, Feng; You, Nanshan

    2017-10-01

    Spring onset has generally shifted earlier in China over the past several decades in response to the warming climate. However, future changes in spring onset and false springs, which will have profound effects on ecosystems, are still not well understood. Here, we used the extended form of the Spring Indices model (SI-x) to project changes in the first leaf and first bloom dates, and predicted false springs for the historical (1950-2005) and future (2006-2100) periods based on the downscaled daily maximum/minimum temperatures under two emission scenarios from 21 General Circulation Models (GCMs) of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5). On average, first leaf and first bloom in China were projected to occur 21 and 23 days earlier, respectively, by the end of the twenty-first century in the Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) 8.5 scenario. Areas with greater earlier shifts in spring onset were in the warm temperate zone, as well as the north and middle subtropical zones of China. Early false spring risk increased rapidly in the warm temperate and north subtropical zones, while that declined in the cold temperate zone. Relative to early false spring risk, late false spring risk showed a common increase with smaller magnitude in the RCP 8.5 scenario but might cause greater damage to ecosystems because plants tend to become more vulnerable to the later occurrence of a freeze event. We conclude that future climate warming will continue to cause earlier occurrence of spring onset in general, but might counterintuitively increase plant damage risk in natural and agricultural systems of the warm temperate and subtropical China.

  20. Mapping the Obama administration's response to the Arab Spring A evolução da resposta da Administração Obama à Primavera Árabe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria do Céu de Pinho Ferreira Pinto

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available When the Arab Spring broke out, the United States was in a quandary over how to handle the crisis in its attempt to balance its moral obligations and ideals without undercutting its strategic interests and those of its close allies. Flaws in US diplomatic approach have contributed to one of the most serious foreign policy crisis for a US administration to date with consequential upheaval and erosion of the US-built balance of power. The reactions and policy responses of the Obama administration highlight the difficulties in grasping with the new reality in the Middle East and in enunciating a policy platform that could combine American interests and values.Quando a Primavera Árabe eclodiu, os Estados Unidos ficaram num dilema sobre como lidar com a crise tentando equilibrar as suas obrigações morais e os ideais sem fragilizar os seus interesses estratégicos e aqueles dos seus aliados mais próximos. A indecisão e as contradições na abordagem diplomática dos EUA contribuíram para avolumar uma das mais graves crises de política externa dos EUA, pondo em perigo a balança de poder que os EUA criaram na região. A reação e a resposta política da administração Obama põe em destaque a dificuldade de Washington em lidar com a nova realidade no Oriente Médio e em enunciar uma plataforma política que possa conciliar os interesses e os valores americanos.

  1. Fish Springs weather CY 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Weather data for calendar year 2010 at Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge. Data is provided for each month and includes maximum temperature, minimum temperature,...

  2. Steller's Eider spring migration surveys

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Annual spring aerial surveys were conducted most years from 1992 to 2008, to monitor the population status and habitat use of Steller's eiders (Polysticta stelleri)...

  3. Obtention of hydroxyapatite submicrometric of bovine origin by vibratory grinding for rapid prototyping; Obtencao de hidroxiapatita submicrometrica de origem bovina por moagem vibratoria visando prototipagem rapida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meira, C.R.; Purquerio, B.M.; Fortulan, C.A., E-mail: camilameira@sc.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia; Braga, F.J.C. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Submicron bovine hydroxyapatite was obtained for rapid prototyping. Hydroxyapatite structure originated from bovine mineral bone has great importance among the biomaterials and biocompatibility due to its great similarity with the human bone structure. This study aims to obtain powder for manufacture by rapid prototyping of scaffolds. This technique manufacture requires highly reactive powders to compensate for the absence of pressure forming. Hydroxyapatite was milled in a ball mill and vibratory mill, and analyzed for their average equivalent spherical diameter and surface area. Test specimens were isostatically pressed at 100 MPa and machined into cylindrical test specimens. These specimens were sintered at several temperatures to determine the optimal sintering temperature based on densification and chemistry stability. In grinding ball mill was obtained particles of equivalent diameter of 0.74 micron in vibratory mill of 0.46 micrometers. An average flexural strength of 100 MPa and 99,8% of real density was attained for the sample sintered at 1300 deg C/2h, signaling potential for use in rapid prototyping. (author)

  4. Instant Spring for Android starter

    CERN Document Server

    Dahanne, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Packt Instant Starter: get to grips with a new technology, understand what it is and what it can do for you, and then get to work with the most important features and tasks.This is a Starter which gives you an introduction to Spring for Android with plenty of well-explained practical code examples.If you are an Android developer who wants to learn about RESTful web services and OAuth authentication and authorization, and you also want to know how to speed up your development involving those architectures using Spring for Android abstractions, then this book is for you.But core Java developers

  5. Phototrophy in Mildly Acidic Hot Spring Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fecteau, K.; Boyd, E. S.; Shock, E.

    2014-12-01

    Microbial light-driven reduction of carbon in continental hydrothermal ecosystems is restricted to environments at temperatures less than 73 °C. In circumneutral and alkaline systems bacterial phototrophs (cyanobacteria and anoxygenic phototrophs) are suggested to be principally responsible for this activity whereas algal (i.e., eukaryotic) phototrophs are thought to be responsible for this activity in acidic systems. In Yellowstone National Park numerous examples of phototrophic microbial communities exist at high and low pH, while hot springs with intermediate pH (values 3-5) are rare and commonly dilute. It is thought that the transition from algal photosynthesis to bacterial photosynthesis occurs within this pH range. To test this hypothesis, we sequenced bacterial and eukaryal small subunit ribosomal RNA genes, analyzed pigments, and performed comprehensive geochemical measurements from 12 hot springs within this pH realm. At all sites, the largest phototrophic population was either comprised of Cyanobacteria or affiliated with the algal order Cyanidiales, which are ubiquitous in acidic springs, yet abundant sequences of both lineages were present in 8 of the 12 sites. Nevertheless, some of these samples exceeded the known temperature limit of the algae (56 °C), suggesting that these populations are dead or inactive. Indeed, one site yielded evidence for a large Cyanidiales population as the only phototrophs present, yet an experiment at the time of sampling failed to demonstrate light-driven carbon fixation, and analysis of extracted pigments showed a large amount of the chlorophyll degradation product pheophorbide a and very little intact chlorophyll, indicating photosynthesis occurred at this site when conditions were different. Our observations illustrate the dynamic nature of these systems that may be transiently conducive to photosynthesis, which may open niches for phototrophs of both domains and likely played a role in the evolution of photosynthesis.

  6. Winter chilling speeds spring development of temperate butterflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stålhandske, Sandra; Gotthard, Karl; Leimar, Olof

    2017-07-01

    Understanding and predicting phenology has become more important with ongoing climate change and has brought about great research efforts in the recent decades. The majority of studies examining spring phenology of insects have focussed on the effects of spring temperatures alone. Here we use citizen-collected observation data to show that winter cold duration, in addition to spring temperature, can affect the spring emergence of butterflies. Using spatial mixed models, we disentangle the effects of climate variables and reveal impacts of both spring and winter conditions for five butterfly species that overwinter as pupae across the UK, with data from 1976 to 2013 and one butterfly species in Sweden, with data from 2001 to 2013. Warmer springs lead to earlier emergence in all species and milder winters lead to statistically significant delays in three of the five investigated species. We also find that the delaying effect of winter warmth has become more pronounced in the last decade, during which time winter durations have become shorter. For one of the studied species, Anthocharis cardamines (orange tip butterfly), we also make use of parameters determined from previous experiments on pupal development to model the spring phenology. Using daily temperatures in the UK and Sweden, we show that recent variation in spring temperature corresponds to 10-15 day changes in emergence time over UK and Sweden, whereas variation in winter duration corresponds to 20 days variation in the south of the UK versus only 3 days in the south of Sweden. In summary, we show that short winters delay phenology. The effect is most prominent in areas with particularly mild winters, emphasising the importance of winter for the response of ectothermic animals to climate change. With climate change, these effects may become even stronger and apply also at higher latitudes. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Animal Ecology © 2017 British Ecological Society.

  7. Research Synopsis: Spring 1983 Retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta Community Coll. District, Oakland, CA. Office of Research, Planning and Development.

    An analysis of spring 1983 retention rates and grade distributions within the Peralta Community College District (PCCD) revealed: (1) College of Alameda had the highest successful retention rate in the PCCD, defined as the total of all students who completed the term with a grade of A, B, C, D, or CR (credit); (2) the PCCD's successful retention…

  8. Spring for It: First Novels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffert, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    How do publishers describe the first novels they will be releasing this spring and summer? "Amazing," "fabulous," and "unique" are words that pop up frequently, though hats off to one publicist forthright or cheeky enough to call a work "weird Western/horror." The proof of such praise is in the reading, but why not check out this preview of first…

  9. A Laboratory of Spring. Introduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Witold Wachowski

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction to a special issue published on the occasion of the 100th anniversary of the premiere of 'The Rite of Spring' by Igor Stravinsky. The articles cover the field of musicology as well as history, philosophy, psychology, sociology, ethnography and cognitive science of music.

  10. Finding Spring on Planet X

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoson, Andrew J.

    2007-01-01

    For a given orbital period and eccentricity, we determine the maximum time lapse between the winter solstice and the spring equinox on a planet. In addition, given an axial precession path, we determine the effects on the seasons. This material can be used at various levels to illustrate ideas such as periodicity, eccentricity, polar coordinates,…

  11. Optimization of holddown spring in KOFA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Jung Sik; Lee, Jae Kyung; Sohn, Dong Sung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-08-01

    As a part of establishment of capability for design change and optimization of fuel components, the analysis method of holddown spring was improved and the optimization capability for the holddown spring was established. With the improved analysis method the characteristics of 17 x 17 holddown spring of KOFA and straight type holddown spring were analyzed and the results were compared with test results. It showed that the improved analysis method predicts the spring characteristic well agree with the test results. As an example of an optimization, the thickness of straight type holddown spring was optimized and the characteristic with this thickness was discussed. (Author) 39 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Portrait of a Geothermal Spring, Hunter's Hot Springs, Oregon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castenholz, Richard W

    2015-01-27

    Although alkaline Hunter's Hot Springs in southeastern Oregon has been studied extensively for over 40 years, most of these studies and the subsequent publications were before the advent of molecular methods. However, there are many field observations and laboratory experiments that reveal the major aspects of the phototrophic species composition within various physical and chemical gradients of these springs. Relatively constant temperature boundaries demark the upper boundary of the unicellular cyanobacterium, Synechococcus at 73-74 °C (the world-wide upper limit for photosynthesis), and 68-70 °C the upper limit for Chloroflexus. The upper limit for the cover of the filamentous cyanobacterium, Geitlerinema (Oscillatoria) is at 54-55 °C, and the in situ lower limit at 47-48 °C for all three of these phototrophs due to the upper temperature limit for the grazing ostracod, Thermopsis. The in situ upper limit for the cyanobacteria Pleurocapsa and Calothrix is at ~47-48 °C, which are more grazer-resistant and grazer dependent. All of these demarcations are easily visible in the field. In addition, there is a biosulfide production in some sections of the springs that have a large impact on the microbiology. Most of the temperature and chemical limits have been explained by field and laboratory experiments.

  13. Triangular springs for modeling nonlinear membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delingette, Hervé

    2008-01-01

    This paper provides a formal connexion between springs and continuum mechanics in the context of one-dimensional and two-dimensional elasticity. In a first stage, the equivalence between tensile springs and the finite element discretization of stretching energy on planar curves is established. Furthermore, when considering a quadratic strain function of stretch, we introduce a new type of springs called tensile biquadratic springs. In a second stage, we extend this equivalence to non-linear membranes (St Venant-Kirchhoff materials) on triangular meshes leading to triangular biquadratic and quadratic springs. Those tensile and angular springs produce isotropic deformations parameterized by Young modulus and Poisson ratios on unstructured meshes in an efficient and simple way. For a specific choice of the Poisson ratio, 0.3, we show that regular spring-mass models may be used realistically to simulate a membrane behavior. Finally, the different spring formulations are tested in pure traction and cloth simulation experiments.

  14. Fish Springs NWR Water Use Report : 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) for 2010. A general background is presented on historical spring water...

  15. Spring Framework 5: Themes & Trends

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    Spring Framework 5.0/5.1, scheduled for release in early/late 2017, focuses on several key themes: reactive web applications based on Reactive Streams, comprehensive support for JDK 9 and HTTP/2, as well as the latest API generations in the Enterprise Java ecosystem. This talk presents the overall story in the context of wider industry trends, highlighting Spring’s unique programming model strategy.

  16. The first CERN Spring Campus

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2014-01-01

    From 14 to 16 April, the first edition of the CERN Spring Campus took place in Spain. Taking place over three intensive days, this event brought experts from CERN together at the University of Oviedo, where they met the engineers and scientists of the future in a programme of scientific and technological dissemination and cultural exchange.   The young participants of the first CERN Spring Campus and their instructors show their enthusiasm after the intensive three-day course. “This three-day school focuses on preparing young engineers for the job market, with a particular emphasis on computing,” explains Derek Mathieson, Advanced Information Systems Group Leader in the GS Department and Head of the CERN Spring Campus organising committee. “We organised talks on entrepreneurship and IT, as well as on job interviews and CV writing. It was also an important opportunity for the participants to meet CERN computing engineers to find out what it is like to work in I...

  17. 75 FR 39241 - Hooper Springs Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-08

    ... Bonneville Power Administration Hooper Springs Project AGENCY: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA... Hooper Springs Project). The new BPA substation would be called Hooper Springs Substation and would be... 115-kV Lane Creek Substation, east of the City of Wayan, Idaho. The proposed project would address...

  18. 49 CFR 236.822 - Switch, spring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Switch, spring. 236.822 Section 236.822 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Switch, spring. A switch equipped with a spring device which forces the points to their original position...

  19. Spring Recipes A Problem-solution Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Long, Josh; Mak, Gary

    2010-01-01

    With over 3 Million users/developers, Spring Framework is the leading "out of the box" Java framework. Spring addresses and offers simple solutions for most aspects of your Java/Java EE application development, and guides you to use industry best practices to design and implement your applications. The release of Spring Framework 3 has ushered in many improvements and new features. Spring Recipes: A Problem-Solution Approach, Second Edition continues upon the bestselling success of the previous edition but focuses on the latest Spring 3 features for building enterprise Java applications.

  20. Determination of groundwater travel time in a karst aquifer by stable water isotopes, Tanour and Rasoun spring (Jordan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan, Ibraheem; Wiegand, Bettina; Sauter, Martin; Ptak, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Key words: karst aquifers, stable isotopes, water travel time, Jordan. Tanour and Rasoun karst springs are located about 75 kilometers northwest of the city of Amman in Jordan. The aquifer is composed of Upper Cretaceous limestone that exhibits a moderate to high degree of karstification. The two springs represent the main drinking water resources for the surrounding villages. The yearly water production is about 1,135,000 m3/yr for Tanour spring and 125,350 m3/yr for Rasoun spring (MWI 2015). Due to contamination from microbiological pollution (leakage of wastewater from septic tanks) or infiltration of wastewater from local olive presses, drinking water supply from the two springs is frequently interrupted. From November 2014 through March 2015, spring water samples were collected from Tanour and Rasoun spring for the analysis of stable hydrogen and oxygen isotopes to investigate spring response to precipitation and snowmelt events. Both Tanour and Rasoun spring show a fast response to precipitation and snowmelt events, implying short water travel times. Based on the variation of δ 18O and δ 2H in spring discharge, the average maximum water travel time is in the order of 8 days for Tanour spring and 6 days for Rasoun spring. Due to fast water travel times, Tanour and Rasoun spring can be considered as highly vulnerable to pollutants. δ 18O and δ 2H values of Tanour and Rasoun springs parallel other monitored parameter like water temperature, turbidity, electrical conductivity and spring discharge. In addition, a high turbidity peak was monitored in Tanour spring during a pollution event from olive mills wastewater (Hamdan et al., 2016; Hamdan, in prep.). The fast response in both Tanour and Rasoun springs to precipitation events requires monitoring potential sources of pollution within the catchment area. References: MWI (Ministry of Water and Irrigation) (2015) Monthly Production values for Tanour and Rasoun Springs for the time period between 1996 and 2014

  1. Weed suppression ability of spring barley varieties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Svend

    1995-01-01

    Three years of experiments with spring barley showed significant differences in weed suppression ability among varieties. Weed dry matter in the most suppressive variety, Ida, was 48% lower than the mean weed dry matter of all varieties, whereas it was 31% higher in the least suppressive variety......, Grit. Ranking varietal responses to weed competition in terms of grain yield loss corresponded well to ranking weed dry matter produced in crop weed mixtures. There was no correspondence between the varietal grain yields in pure stands and their competitiveness, suggesting that breeding to optimize...... interception model was developed to describe the light interception profiles of the varieties. A study of the estimated parameters showed significant correlation between weed dry matter, rate of canopy height development and the light interception profile. However, when estimates were standardized to eliminate...

  2. CACTUS SPRING ROADLESS AREA, CALIFORNIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matti, Jonathan C.; Kuizon, Lucia

    1984-01-01

    Geologic, geochemical, and geophysical studies together with a review of historic mining and prospecting activities indicate that the Cactus Spring Roadless Area in California has little promise for the occurrence of mineral or energy resources. Marble bodies occur in the northern part of the roadless area and are possible resources for building stone, crushed and quarried aggregate, and lime and magnesium for Portland cement and industrial applications. It is recommended that the terrane of marble be mapped and sampled carefully in order to evaluate the quantity and quality of the carbonate resources.

  3. Stopover habitats of spring migrating surf scoters in southeast Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lok, E.K.; Esler, Daniel; Takekawa, John Y.; De La Cruz, S.W.; Sean, Boyd W.; Nysewander, D.R.; Evenson, J.R.; Ward, D.H.

    2011-01-01

    Habitat conditions and nutrient reserve levels during spring migration have been suggested as important factors affecting population declines in waterfowl, emphasizing the need to identify key sites used during spring and understand habitat features and resource availability at stopover sites. We used satellite telemetry to identify stopover sites used by surf scoters migrating through southeast Alaska during spring. We then contrasted habitat features of these sites to those of random sites to determine habitat attributes corresponding to use by migrating scoters. We identified 14 stopover sites based on use by satellite tagged surf scoters from several wintering sites. We identified Lynn Canal as a particularly important stopover site for surf scoters originating throughout the Pacific winter range; approximately half of tagged coastally migrating surf scoters used this site, many for extended periods. Stopover sites were farther from the mainland coast and closer to herring spawn sites than random sites, whereas physical shoreline habitat attributes were generally poor predictors of site use. The geography and resource availability within southeast Alaska provides unique and potentially critical stopover habitat for spring migrating surf scoters. Our work identifies specific sites and habitat resources that deserve conservation and management consideration. Aggregations of birds are vulnerable to human activity impacts such as contaminant spills and resource management decisions. This information is of value to agencies and organizations responsible for emergency response planning, herring fisheries management, and bird and ecosystem conservation. Copyright ?? 2011 The Wildlife Society.

  4. The molecular dimension of microbial species: 2. Synechococcus strains representative of putative ecotypes inhabiting different depths in the Mushroom Spring microbial mat exhibit different adaptive and acclimative responses to light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shane eNowack

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Closely related strains of thermophilic Synechococcus were cultivated from the microbial mats found in the effluent channels of Mushroom Spring, Yellowstone National Park (YNP. These strains have identical or nearly identical 16S rRNA sequences but are representative of separate, predicted putative ecotype populations, which were identified by using the more highly resolving psaA locus and which predominate at different vertical positions within the 1-mm-thick upper-green layer of the mat. Pyrosequencing confirmed that each strain contained a single, predominant psaA genotype. Strains differed in growth rate as a function of irradiance. A strain with a psaA genotype corresponding to a predicted putative ecotype that predominates near the mat surface grew fastest at high irradiances, whereas strains with psaA genotypes representative of predominant subsurface populations grew faster at low irradiance and exhibited greater sensitivity to abrupt shifts to high light. The high-light-adapted and low-light-adapted strains also exhibited differences in pigment content and the composition of the photosynthetic apparatus (photosystem ratio when grown under different light intensities. Cells representative of the different strains had similar morphologies under low-light conditions, but under high-light conditions, cells of low-light-adapted strains became elongated and formed short chains of cells. Collectively, the results presented here are consistent with the hypothesis that closely related, but distinct, ecological species of Synechococcus occupy different light niches in the Mushroom Spring microbial mat and acclimate differently to changing light environments.

  5. Extreme spring conditions in the Arctic delay spring phenology of long-distance migratory songbirds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boelman, Natalie T; Krause, Jesse S; Sweet, Shannan K; Chmura, Helen E; Perez, Jonathan H; Gough, Laura; Wingfield, John C

    2017-09-01

    Arctic regions are warming rapidly, with extreme weather events increasing in frequency, duration, and intensity just as in other regions. Many studies have focused on how shifting seasonality in environmental conditions affects vegetation phenology, while far fewer have examined how the breeding phenology of arctic fauna responds. We studied two species of long-distance migratory songbirds, Lapland longspurs, Calcarius lapponicus, and white-crowned sparrows, Zonotrichia leucophrys gambelii, across five consecutive breeding seasons in northern Alaskan tundra. We aimed to understand how spring environmental conditions affected breeding cycle phenology, including the timing of arrival on breeding grounds, territory establishment, and clutch initiation. Spring temperatures, precipitation, and snow-free dates differed significantly among years, with 2013 characterized by unusually late snow cover. In response, we found a significant delay in breeding-cycle phenology for both study species in 2013 relative to other study years: the first bird observed was delayed by 6-10 days, with mean arrival by 3-6 days, territory establishment by 6-13 days, and clutch initiation by 4-10 days. Further, snow cover, temperature, and precipitation during the territory establishment period were important predictors of clutch initiation dates for both species. These findings suggest that Arctic-breeding passerine communities may have the flexibility required to adjust breeding phenology in response to the increasingly extreme and unpredictable environmental conditions-although future generations may encounter conditions that exceed their current range of phenological flexibility.

  6. EFFECT OF MECHANICAL VIBRATION GENERATED IN OSCILLATING/VIBRATORY PLATFORM ON THE CONCENTRATION OF PLASMA BIOMARKERS AND ON THE WEIGHT IN RATS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederico, Éric Heleno Freire Ferreira; de Sá-Caputo, Danúbia da Cunha; Moreira-Marconi, Eloá; Guimarães, Carlos Alberto Sampaio; Cardoso, André Luiz Bandeira Dionísio; Dionello, Carla da Fontoura; Morel, Danielle Soares; Sousa-Gonçalves, Cintia Renata; Paineiras-Domingos, Laisa Liana; Cavalcanti, Rebeca Graça Costa; Asad, Nasser Ribeiro; Marin, Pedro Jesus; Bernardo-Filho, Mario

    2017-01-01

    Background: Whole body vibration (WBV) exercise has been used in health sciences. Authors have reported that changes on the concentration of plasma biomarkers could be associated with the WBV effects. The aim of this investigation is to assess the consequences of exposition of 25 Hz mechanical vibration generated in oscillating/vibratory platform (OVP) on the concentration of some plasma biomarkers and on the weight of rats. Materials and Methods: Wistar rats were divided into two groups. The animals of the Experimental Group (EG) were submitted to vibration (25 Hz) generated in an OVP with four bouts of 30 seconds with rest time of 60 seconds between the bouts. This procedure was performed daily for 12 days. The animals of the control group (CG) were not exposed to vibration. Results: Our findings show that the WBV exercise at 25 Hz was not capable to alter significantly (p<0.05) the weight of the rats. A significant alteration in the concentrations of amylase was found. Conclusion: Our results indicate a modulation of the WBV exercise with vibration of 25 Hz of frequency (i) in the pathways related to the weight and (ii) in the concentration of some biomarkers, such as amylase. PMID:28740944

  7. Robert oerley and Tuzla mineral springs

    OpenAIRE

    Ateş Can, Sevim

    2014-01-01

    In the Tuzla borough of İstanbul are located mineral springs of great importance which have been known and used since ancient times. Although the therapeutic value of Tuzla Mineral Springs has always been recognized, this value in terms of the history of architecture has not been very well understood. The current facilities in the springs were built in the Republican Period. The most important among them is the Spa Hotel, whose project was initiated by Robert Oerley. The oth...

  8. Spatial variation in spring CO2 efflux along the trans-Alaska pipeline, Alaska: Contribution of spring carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Spring soil CO2 efflux-measurement was conducted in representative sites along the trans-Alaska pipeline during 2010 to 2012 for the understanding of spatial variation in spring CO2 efflux response to change in snow-melting timing. The sites is 3 tundra sites (coastal tundra, upland tundra, upland tundra, and sub-alpine tundra), 2 white spruce sites in tundra-boreal forest ecotone, and Gold Creek, and 3 black spruce sites in Coldfoot, upper and lower reaches of the Yukon River. Soil CO2 efflux-measurement, which is a portable manual chamber CO2 efflux system, was conducted during snow-covered and snow-melting periods, minimizing artificial effects. CO2 effluxes in snow-covered and exposed soils showed a significantly difference, suggesting that spring CO2 efflux is much higher than that in snow-covered soil. The efflux was measured at 4-direction due to the difference of exposed extent, implying the magnitude of CO2 production. Average diameter in breast height (DBH: 85 × 11 cm) of white spruce is much thicker than black spruce (DBH: 33 × 5 cm), suggesting the difference of heat uptake and emission capacity between both forests. Soil temperature at 5 cm below the surface is one of significant keys in determining soil CO2 efflux. The magnitude of spring CO2 efflux showed white spruce, black spruce, and tundra in turn, suggesting that spring CO2 efflux (> 8 gC/m2/day) of corresponds to summer soil CO2 efflux. Then, spring soil CO2 efflux should be not overlooked the contribution of annual soil carbon efflux in spite of difficulties in snow-disappeared timing and springtime.

  9. Radon activity measurements around Bakreswar thermal springs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaudhuri, Hirok [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata, West Bengal 700 064 (India); Das, Nisith K., E-mail: nkdas@veccal.ernet.i [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Atomic Energy, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata, West Bengal 700 064 (India); Bhandari, Rakesh K. [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Atomic Energy, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata, West Bengal 700 064 (India); Sen, Prasanta [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata, West Bengal 700 064 (India); Sinha, Bikash [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Atomic Energy, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata, West Bengal 700 064 (India)

    2010-01-15

    {sup 222}Rn concentrations were measured in the bubble gases, spring waters, soil gases and in ambient air around the thermal springs at Bakreswar in West Bengal, India. This group of springs lies within a geothermal zone having exceptionally high heat flow about 230 mW/m{sup 2}, resembling young oceanic ridges. The spring gas has a high radon activity (approx885 kBq/m{sup 3}) and is rich in helium (approx1.4 vol. %) with appreciably large flow rate. The measured radon exhalation rates in the soils of the spring area show extensive variations from 831 to 4550/mBqm{sup 2} h while {sup 222}Rn concentrations in the different spring waters vary from 3.18 to 46.9 kBq/m{sup 3}. Surface air at a radius of 40 m around the springs, within which is situated the Bakreswar temple complex and a group of dwellings, has radon concentration between 450 and 500 Bq/m{sup 3}. In the present paper we assess the radon activity background in and around the spring area due to the different contributing sources and its possible effect on visiting pilgrims and the people who reside close to the springs.

  10. Work Term Assignment Spring 2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sico, Mallory

    2017-01-01

    My tour in the Engineering Robotics directorate exceeded my expectations. I learned lessons about Creo, manufacturing and assembly, collaboration, and troubleshooting. During my first tour, last spring, I used Creo on a smaller project, but had limited experience with it before starting in the Dynamic Systems Test branch this spring. I gained valuable experience learning assembly design, sheet metal design and designing with intent for manufacturing and assembly. These skills came from working both on the hatch and the floor. I also learned to understand the intent of other designers on models I worked with. While redesigning the floor, I was modifying an existing part and worked to understand what the previous designer had done to make it fit with the new model. Through working with the machine shop and in the mock-up, I learned much more about manufacturing and assembly. I used a Dremel, rivet gun, belt sander, and countersink for the first time. Through taking multiple safety training for different machine shops, I learned new machine shop safety skills specific to each one. This semester also gave me new collaborative opportunities. I collaborated with engineers within my branch as well as with Human Factors and the building 10 machine shop. This experience helped me learn how to design for functionality and assembly, not only for what would be easiest in my designs. In addition to these experiences, I learned many lessons in troubleshooting. I was the first person in my office to use a Windows 10 computer. This caused unexpected issues with NASA services and programs, such as the Digital Data Management Server (DDMS). Because of this, I gained experience finding solutions to lockout and freeze issues as well as Creo specific settings. These will be useful skills to have in the future and will be implemented in future rotations. This co-op tour has motivated me more to finish my degree and pursue my academic goals. I intend to take a machining Career Gateway

  11. The Influence of Drought on Spring Vegetation Green-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, J. F.; Ji, L.; Gallant, A.; Kauffman, M.

    2015-12-01

    Herbivore species such as elk and deer depend on the availability of herbaceous plants and deciduous shrubs for forage. These vegetation types are most nutritious for herbivores during the early part of the growing season, so characterizing spring vegetation phenology over decades can provide crucial information towards understanding how shifts in climate could affect animal behavior and health. Many studies have shown that spring vegetation growth is sensitive to temperature, but less research exists on the influence of drought on phenology. We tested hypotheses on the interactions of recent drought and the phenology of forage utilized by herbivores across the state of Wyoming, USA. Phenological indicators, including the start of season time (SOST), the time of maximum change (in greenness response) (MCT), length of the green-up window (GUW: days from SOST to time of peak greenness), and early spring window (ESW: days from the SOST to the MCT) developed from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer satellite imagery at 250-m resolution, provided broad coverage of the temporal and spatial characteristics of green-up cycles. Gridded precipitation data generated with the Precipitation-elevation Regressions on Independent Slopes Model (PRISM) were used to characterize drought conditions at a coarser spatial scale. We found evidence to prove an initial hypothesis that drought advanced spring development. Spring drought conditions were statistically related to advanced vegetation green-up in SOST and MCT variables, especially across higher elevations and in forested land cover, as well as in some shrublands and grasslands. We did not find evidence that drought made green-up occur faster (based on GUW and ESW variables), although the ESW showed slight acceleration across the northern third of Wyoming. We are further investigating whether the phenological signal of vegetation in more arid areas has been too subtle to detect a significant response to drought.

  12. Spring tube braces for seismic isolation of buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karayel, V.; Yuksel, Ercan; Gokce, T.; Sahin, F.

    2017-01-01

    A new low-cost seismic isolation system based on spring tube bracings has been proposed and studied at the Structural and Earthquake Engineering Laboratory of Istanbul Technical University. Multiple compression-type springs are positioned in a special cylindrical tube to obtain a symmetrical response in tension and compression-type axial loading. An isolation floor, which consists of pin-ended steel columns and spring tube bracings, is constructed at the foundation level or any intermediate level of the building. An experimental campaign with three stages was completed to evaluate the capability of the system. First, the behavior of the spring tubes subjected to axial displacement reversals with varying frequencies was determined. In the second phase, the isolation floor was assessed in the quasi-static tests. Finally, a ¼ scaled 3D steel frame was tested on the shake table using actual acceleration records. The transmitted acceleration to the floor levels is greatly diminished because of the isolation story, which effects longer period and higher damping. There are no stability and self-centering problems in the isolation floor.

  13. Rheological behavior of a confined bead-spring cube consisting of equal Fraenkel springs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Denneman, A.I.M.; Denneman, A.I.M.; Jongschaap, R.J.J.; Mellema, J.

    2000-01-01

    A general bead-spring model is used to predict linear viscoelastic properties of a non-Hookean bead-spring cube immersed in a Newtonian fluid. This K×K×K cube consist of K 3 beads with equal friction coefficients and 3K 2(K–1) equal Fraenkel springs with length q. The cube has a topology based upon

  14. Inleiding symposium 'Silent Spring, 50 jaar later'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenteren, van J.C.; Hunneman, H.

    2013-01-01

    Een halve eeuw geleden publiceerde Rachel Carson het boek Silent Spring, dat de aandacht vestigde op milieuproblemen en het begin betekende van de milieubeweging. Op zaterdag 17 november 2012 vond in Leiden het symposium ‘Silent Spring, 50 jaar later’ plaats. De Nederlandse Entomologische Vereniging

  15. Nonlinear Vibration of a Magnetic Spring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Juhua; Cheng, Zhongqi; Ge, Ziming; Zhang, Yuelan; Lu, Wenqiang; Song, Feng; Li, Chuanyong

    2012-01-01

    To demonstrate the different vibration characteristics of a magnetic spring compared with those of a metal one, a magnetic spring apparatus was constructed from a pair of circular magnets of the same size with an inside diameter of 2.07 cm and an outside diameter of 4.50 cm. To keep the upper magnet in a suspension state, the two magnets were…

  16. 1988 Hanford riverbank springs characterization report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dirkes, R.L.

    1990-12-01

    This reports presents the results of a special study undertaken to characterize the riverbank springs (i.e., ground-water seepage) entering the Columbia River along the Hanford Site. Radiological and nonradiological analyses were performed. River water samples were also analyzed from upstream and downstream of the Site as well as from the immediate vicinity of the springs. In addition, irrigation return water and spring water entering the river along the shoreline opposite Hanford were analyzed. Hanford-origin contaminants were detected in spring water entering the Columbia River along the Hanford Site. The type and concentrations of contaminants in the spring water were similar to those known to exist in the ground water near the river. The location and extent of the contaminated discharges compared favorably with recent ground-water reports and predictions. Spring discharge volumes remain very small relative to the flow of the Columbia. Downstream river sampling demonstrates the impact of ground-water discharges to be minimal, and negligible in most cases. Radionuclide concentrations were below US Department of Energy Derived Concentration Guides (DCGs) with the exception {sup 90}Sr near the 100-N Area. Tritium, while below the DCG, was detected at concentrations above the US Environmental Protection Agency drinking water standards in several springs. All other radionuclide concentrations were below drinking water standards. Nonradiological contaminants were generally undetectable in the spring water. River water contaminant concentrations, outside of the immediate discharge zones, were below drinking water standards in all cases. 19 refs., 5 figs., 12 tabs.

  17. Identifying anomalously early spring onsets in the CESM large ensemble project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labe, Zachary; Ault, Toby; Zurita-Milla, Raul

    2017-06-01

    Seasonal transitions from winter to spring impact a wide variety of ecological and physical systems. While the effects of early springs across North America are widely documented, changes in their frequency and likelihood under the combined influences of climate change and natural variability are poorly understood. Extremely early springs, such as March 2012, can lead to severe economical losses and agricultural damage when these are followed by hard freeze events. Here we use the new Community Earth System Model Large Ensemble project and Extended Spring Indices to simulate historical and future spring onsets across the United States and in the particular the Great Lakes region. We found a marked increase in the frequency of March 2012-like springs by midcentury in addition to an overall trend towards earlier spring onsets, which nearly doubles that of observational records. However, changes in the date of last freeze do not occur at the same rate, therefore, causing a potential increase in the threat of plant tissue damage. Although large-scale climate modes, such as the Pacific Decadal Oscillation, have previously dominated decadal to multidecadal spring onset trends, our results indicate a decreased role in natural climate variability and hence a greater forced response by the end of the century for modulating trends. Without a major reduction in greenhouse gas emissions, our study suggests that years like 2012 in the US could become normal by mid-century.

  18. Spring Hydrology Determines Summer Net Carbon Uptake in Northern Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Yonghong; Kimball, John; Reichle, Rolf H.

    2014-01-01

    Increased photosynthetic activity and enhanced seasonal CO2 exchange of northern ecosystems have been observed from a variety of sources including satellite vegetation indices (such as the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index; NDVI) and atmospheric CO2 measurements. Most of these changes have been attributed to strong warming trends in the northern high latitudes (greater than or equal to 50N). Here we analyze the interannual variation of summer net carbon uptake derived from atmospheric CO2 measurements and satellite NDVI in relation to surface meteorology from regional observational records. We find that increases in spring precipitation and snow pack promote summer net carbon uptake of northern ecosystems independent of air temperature effects. However, satellite NDVI measurements still show an overall benefit of summer photosynthetic activity from regional warming and limited impact of spring precipitation. This discrepancy is attributed to a similar response of photosynthesis and respiration to warming and thus reduced sensitivity of net ecosystem carbon uptake to temperature. Further analysis of boreal tower eddy covariance CO2 flux measurements indicates that summer net carbon uptake is positively correlated with early growing-season surface soil moisture, which is also strongly affected by spring precipitation and snow pack based on analysis of satellite soil moisture retrievals. This is attributed to strong regulation of spring hydrology on soil respiration in relatively wet boreal and arctic ecosystems. These results document the important role of spring hydrology in determining summer net carbon uptake and contrast with prevailing assumptions of dominant cold temperature limitations to high-latitude ecosystems. Our results indicate potentially stronger coupling of boreal/arctic water and carbon cycles with continued regional warming trends.

  19. Weldon Spring historical dose estimate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meshkov, N.; Benioff, P.; Wang, J.; Yuan, Y.

    1986-07-01

    This study was conducted to determine the estimated radiation doses that individuals in five nearby population groups and the general population in the surrounding area may have received as a consequence of activities at a uranium processing plant in Weldon Spring, Missouri. The study is retrospective and encompasses plant operations (1957-1966), cleanup (1967-1969), and maintenance (1969-1982). The dose estimates for members of the nearby population groups are as follows. Of the three periods considered, the largest doses to the general population in the surrounding area would have occurred during the plant operations period (1957-1966). Dose estimates for the cleanup (1967-1969) and maintenance (1969-1982) periods are negligible in comparison. Based on the monitoring data, if there was a person residing continually in a dwelling 1.2 km (0.75 mi) north of the plant, this person is estimated to have received an average of about 96 mrem/yr (ranging from 50 to 160 mrem/yr) above background during plant operations, whereas the dose to a nearby resident during later years is estimated to have been about 0.4 mrem/yr during cleanup and about 0.2 mrem/yr during the maintenance period. These values may be compared with the background dose in Missouri of 120 mrem/yr.

  20. Leg extension test, sEMG and vibratory stimuli to assess functional recovery following knee joint surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foti, Calogero; Laurini, Alessandro; Tiberti, Simone; Carli, Giancarlo; Tsarpela, Olga; Adamidis, Kostas; Bonifazi, Marco; Giombini, Arrigo; Tihanyi, Joszef; von Duvillard, Serge; De Vita, Marilena; Bosco, Carmelo

    2012-04-01

    the purpose of this study was to introduce new procedure to determine the magnitude of functional recovery after knee surgery. we compared the performance in the leg extension test and the response in the sEMG activity to vibration in the operated to the non-operated leg. Thirty-eight patients with knee operation and 14 healthy subjects participated in these experiments. during leg extension test, the mechanical power of the operated leg showed a lower value (Ptest. results of our study suggest that combination of vibration and sEMG recordings may detect the impairment as well as monitoring progress of the rehabilitation programs.

  1. Spring/dimple instrument tube restraint

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMario, Edmund E.; Lawson, Charles N.

    1993-01-01

    A nuclear fuel assembly for a pressurized water nuclear reactor has a spring and dimple structure formed in a non-radioactive insert tube placed in the top of a sensor receiving instrumentation tube thimble disposed in the fuel assembly and attached at a top nozzle, a bottom nozzle, and intermediate grids. The instrumentation tube thimble is open at the top, where the sensor or its connection extends through the cooling water for coupling to a sensor signal processor. The spring and dimple insert tube is mounted within the instrumentation tube thimble and extends downwardly adjacent the top. The springs and dimples restrain the sensor and its connections against lateral displacement causing impact with the instrumentation tube thimble due to the strong axial flow of cooling water. The instrumentation tube has a stainless steel outer sleeve and a zirconium alloy inner sleeve below the insert tube adjacent the top. The insert tube is relatively non-radioactivated inconel alloy. The opposed springs and dimples are formed on diametrically opposite inner walls of the insert tube, the springs being formed as spaced axial cuts in the insert tube, with a web of the insert tube between the cuts bowed radially inwardly for forming the spring, and the dimples being formed as radially inward protrusions opposed to the springs.

  2. Spring pendulum with dry and viscous damping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butikov, Eugene I.

    2015-01-01

    Free and forced oscillations of a torsion spring pendulum damped by viscous and dry friction are investigated analytically and with the help of numerical simulations. A simplified mathematical model is assumed (Coulomb law) which nevertheless can explain many peculiarities in behavior of various oscillatory systems with dry friction. The amplitude of free oscillations diminishes under dry friction linearly, and the motion stops after a final number of cycles. The amplitude of sinusoidally driven pendulum with dry friction grows at resonance without limit if the threshold is exceeded. At strong enough non-resonant sinusoidal forcing dry friction causes transients that typically lead to definite limit cycles - periodic steady-state regimes of symmetric non-sticking forced oscillations which are independent of initial conditions. However, at the subharmonic sinusoidal forcing interesting peculiarities of the steady-state response are revealed such as multiple coexisting regimes of asymmetric oscillations that depend on initial conditions. Under certain conditions simple dry friction pendulum shows complicated stick-slip motions and chaos.

  3. Karst hydrogeology and hydrochemistry of the Cave Springs basin near Chattanooga, Tennessee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlicek, D.J.

    1996-01-01

    . Selected ground-water samples in the study area are characterized by calcium bicarbonate type water and calcium magnesium bicarbonate type water. Calcium bicarbonate type water characterizes Lick Branch and Poe Branch. North Chickamauga Creek water is calcium magnesium sulfate type water and reflects interaction with the pyrite-containing siliciclastic rocks of the Cumberland Plateau or acid mine drainage. Seasonal high spring discharge is associated with lower specific conductance and lower temperatures, which lag in response to increasing spring discharge by approximately 2 months. Seasonal decrease in spring discharge is accompanied by an incident increase in specific conductance and temperature increase, which leads by about 4 months.

  4. Hydrogeologic assessment—Figeh Spring, Damascus, Syria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamoreaux, P. E.; Hughes, Travis H.; Memon, Bashir A.; Lineback, Neal

    1989-03-01

    Hydrogeological studies at Figeh Springs were directed to determine groundwater flow paths, research, storage and discharge units, and the maximum reliable yield. The project was designed to provide information upon which to base pumpage to augment low-season flows from the spring which is the major water supply for the city of Damascus, Syria. As a basis for conclusions and recommendations, work included extensive surface geologic mapping, air photographic interpretation, a detailed well and spring inventory, and a quality of water sampling program. Geologic structural work included mapping and jointing, faulting, and folding, and an analysis of their impact on groundwater movement.

  5. Executive summary: Weldon Spring Site Environmental Report for calendar year 1992. Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project, Weldon Spring, Missouri

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-06-01

    This report has been prepared to provide information about the public safety and environmental protection programs conducted by the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project. The Weldon Spring site is located in southern St. Charles County, Missouri, approximately 48 km (30 mi) west of St. Louis. The site consists of two main areas, the Weldon Spring Chemical Plant and raffinate pits and the Weldon Spring Quarry. The objectives of the Site Environmental Report are to present a summary of data from the environmental monitoring program, to characterize trends and environmental conditions at the site, and to confirm compliance with environmental and health protection standards and requirements. The report also presents the status of remedial activities and the results of monitoring these activities to assess their impacts on the public and environment. The scope of the environmental monitoring program at the Weldon Spring site has changed since it was initiated. Previously, the program focused on investigations of the extent and level of contaminants in the groundwater, surface waters, buildings, and air at the site. In 1992, the level of remedial activities required monitoring for potential impacts of those activities, particularly on surface water runoff and airborne effluents. This report includes monitoring data from routine radiological and nonradiological sampling activities. These data include estimates of dose to the public from the Weldon Spring site; estimates of effluent releases; and trends in groundwater contaminant levels. Also, applicable compliance requirements, quality assurance programs, and special studies conducted in 1992 to support environmental protection programs are reviewed.

  6. Process for Forming a High Temperature Single Crystal Canted Spring

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMange, Jeffrey J (Inventor); Ritzert, Frank J (Inventor); Nathal, Michael V (Inventor); Dunlap, Patrick H (Inventor); Steinetz, Bruce M (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    A process for forming a high temperature single crystal canted spring is provided. In one embodiment, the process includes fabricating configurations of a rapid prototype spring to fabricate a sacrificial mold pattern to create a ceramic mold and casting a canted coiled spring to form at least one canted coil spring configuration based on the ceramic mold. The high temperature single crystal canted spring is formed from a nickel-based alloy containing rhenium using the at least one coil spring configuration.

  7. Vibratory interneurons in the non-hearing cave cricket indicate evolutionary origin of sound processing elements in Ensifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stritih, Natasa; Stumpner, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    Tympanal hearing organs in the front tibiae of ensiferan insects supposedly evolved from vibration-sensitive tibial organs (TO), like those in the cave cricket Troglophilus neglectus (Rhaphidophoridae). If this is true, one expects to find interneurons in the cave cricket that are homologous to auditory neurons from hearing Ensifera. Therefore, we examined the central projections of the foreleg TO of the cave cricket, as well as morphology and response properties of interneurons responding to foreleg vibration. Sensory axons of the TO adjoined to the "tympanal nerve" terminate in the equivalent portion of the ring tract neuropile in the prothoracic ganglion as corresponding receptors of crickets and weta. We found nine putatively homologous elements to sound- and/or vibration-sensitive interneurons of Ensifera--one local neuron (unpaired median, DUM), three T-fibres (TN), three descending (DN) and two ascending neurons (AN). Presumable first-order interneurons arborising in the ring tract correspond to a local auditory DUM cell of bush crickets and to TN1, DN1 and AN2 of various Ensifera, respectively. Homologues of some prominent auditory cells, the "omega" neuron(s) and the ascending neuron 1 (AN1), however, were not found. We conclude that (a) T. neglectus interneurons are morphologically primitive with respect to those of hearing taxa, (b) significant changes in the dendritic structure/synaptic connectivity have taken place during the evolution of the most specialised first-order auditory interneurons of Ensifera, (c) the data do not contradict independent evolution of hearing in Grylloidea and Tettigonoidea. Other interneurons appear morpho-physiologically conserved across hearing and non-hearing species, possibly as a part of a multimodal "alert" system.

  8. Fish Springs pond snail : Refuge communication scenario

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Communication scenario between the branch of Listing and Recovery, Fish and Wildlife Enhancement, and Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), in regards to the...

  9. Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge habitat map

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Habitat map for Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge. This habitat map was created along with the National Vegetation Classification (NVC) map of the refuge. Refuge...

  10. Pagosa Springs geothermal project. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-10-19

    This booklet discusses some ideas and methods for using Colorado geothermal energy. A project installed in Pagosa Springs, which consists of a pipeline laid down 8th street with service to residences retrofitted to geothermal space heating, is described. (ACR)

  11. Stravinsky: The Rite of Spring. Canticum sacrum

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    1996-01-01

    Uuest heliplaadist "Stravinsky: The Rite of Spring. Canticum sacrum. Requiem canticles. Choral Variations on "Vom Himmel hoch". Lausanne Pro Arte Choir, Suisse Romande Chamber Choir and Orchestra, Neeme Järvi" Chandos CHAN 9408 (75 minutes:DDD)

  12. SPring-8 and application of nuclear scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harami, Taikan [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Kamigori, Hyogo (Japan). Kansai Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    The SPring-8 has Linac synchrotron, incidence type facility and an accumulation ring. By preparing a beam line to take out light at the accumulation ring, the SPring-8 is supplied for common applications. Development of science adopting new method to study of properties and organisms by using high brightness source is expected. Construction of the SPring-8 accelerator was finished and adjusting test and commissioning of apparatuses are now in proceeding. At pre-use inspection of the accumulation ring on March, 1997, beam lines for R and D and crystalline structure analysis are applied to the Science and Technology Agency to inspect them simultaneously. And, by activating character of the SPring-8 radiation facility of high brightness and high energy X-ray generator, property study using Moessbauer nuclide to a probe can be conducted. (G.K.)

  13. Inleiding symposium 'Silent Spring, 50 jaar later'

    OpenAIRE

    Lenteren, van, J.C.; Hunneman, H.

    2013-01-01

    Een halve eeuw geleden publiceerde Rachel Carson het boek Silent Spring, dat de aandacht vestigde op milieuproblemen en het begin betekende van de milieubeweging. Op zaterdag 17 november 2012 vond in Leiden het symposium ‘Silent Spring, 50 jaar later’ plaats. De Nederlandse Entomologische Vereniging (NEV) organiseerde deze dag met medewerking van de Uyttenboogaart-Eliasen Stichting, De Vlinderstichting, Stichting Natuur en Milieu, Vereniging Natuurmonumenten en de Faunabescherming. Het was ee...

  14. The Affective Legacy of Silent Spring

    OpenAIRE

    Alex Lockwood

    2012-01-01

    In the fiftieth year since the publication of Silent Spring, the importance of Rachel Carson’s work can be measured in its affective influence on contemporary environmental writing across the humanities. The ground broken by Silent Spring in creating new forms of writing has placed affect at the very centre of contemporary narratives that call for pro-environmental beliefs and behaviours. A critical public-feelings framework is used to explore these issues and trace their passage from the pri...

  15. The diagnosis of pelvic fractures by 'springing'.

    OpenAIRE

    Grant, P. T.

    1990-01-01

    Thirty-six patients were studied prospectively to assess the benefit of 'springing' the pelvis in traumatized patients, to confirm or refute a fracture of the pelvis. None of the patients was multiply injured and half of those with fractures were elderly, sustaining their injuries in simple falls. Springing the pelvis was a poor predictor of the presence or absence of a pelvic fracture, at best it yielded a specificity of 71% and sensitivity of 59%. Its routine use in clinical examination sho...

  16. How sick is the Spring AGU Meeting?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goff, John A.

    I confess—I missed Spring AGU this year. But who can be surprised? After all, I am in the Tectonophysics Section, and almost none of us showed up.Recently skimming the Spring 2000 AGU abstract volume, I was stunned to see that the Tectonophysics abstracts constituted only a bit more than twelve pages—slightly less than Geomagnetism and Paleomagnetism, and a touch more than Geodesy. What has become of us?

  17. Vanishing Springs in Nepalese Mountains: Assessment of Water Sources, Farmers' Perceptions, and Climate Change Adaptation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durga D. Poudel

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The Thulokhola watershed of the Nuwakot district in the midhills region of Nepal can be considered typical of climate change-related stresses in the region. To assess the status of water resources and document farmers' perceptions of and adaptation to climate change impacts in this watershed, we invited community groups to monitor water quality and conducted 6 focus group meetings, 3 participatory rural appraisals, and spring and household surveys in 2011 and 2012. Historical precipitation data from a nearby weather station and discharge data for the Tadi Khola, the nearest major river, were also analyzed. The spring survey results confirmed farmers' perceptions and showed that 73.2% of the springs used as water sources had a decreased flow and 12.2% had dried up over the past 10 or more years, as recognized by local residents. In response to the severe decline of precipitation and the drying up of springs, local communities have implemented some climate change adaptation measures, such as constructing water tanks at water sources, using pipes to transport drinking water, diverting water from other springs, digging deeper wells, and traveling farther to wash clothes and fetch drinking water. To enhance drinking water supplies and ensure the agricultural, ecological, and environmental integrity of the watershed, initiatives such as comprehensive research on springs and groundwater hydrology, a spring rejuvenation program, and community capacity building for water sustainability and climate change adaptation are suggested.

  18. Experimental Study of Vibration Isolation Characteristics of a Geometric Anti-Spring Isolator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lixun Yan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to realize low-frequency vibration isolation, a novel geometric anti-spring isolator consisting of several cantilever blade springs are developed in this paper. The optimal design parameters of the geometric anti-spring isolator for different nonlinear geometric parameters are theoretically obtained. The transmissibility characteristic of the geometric anti-spring isolator is investigated through mathematical simulation. A geometric anti-spring isolator with a nonlinear geometric parameter of 0.92 is designed and its vibration isolation performance and nonlinearity characteristic is experimentally studied. The experiment results show that the designed isolator has good low-frequency vibration isolation performance, of which the initial isolation frequency is less than 3.6 Hz when the load weight is 21 kg. The jump phenomena of the response of the isolator under linear frequency sweep excitation are observed, and this result demonstrates that the geometric anti-spring isolator has a complex nonlinearity characteristics with the increment of excitation amplitude. This research work provides a theoretical and experimental basis for the application of the nonlinear geometric anti-spring low-frequency passive vibration isolation technology in engineering practice.

  19. Water quality modelling of Jadro spring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margeta, J; Fistanic, I

    2004-01-01

    Management of water quality in karst is a specific problem. Water generally moves very fast by infiltration processes but far more by concentrated flows through fissures and openings in karst. This enables the entire surface pollution to be transferred fast and without filtration into groundwater springs. A typical example is the Jadro spring. Changes in water quality at the spring are sudden, but short. Turbidity as a major water quality problem for the karst springs regularly exceeds allowable standards. Former practice in problem solving has been reduced to intensive water disinfection in periods of great turbidity without analyses of disinfection by-products risks for water users. The main prerequisite for water quality control and an optimization of water disinfection is the knowledge of raw water quality and nature of occurrence. The analysis of monitoring data and their functional relationship with hydrological parameters enables establishment of a stochastic model that will help obtain better information on turbidity in different periods of the year. Using the model a great number of average monthly and extreme daily values are generated. By statistical analyses of these data possibility of occurrence of high turbidity in certain months is obtained. This information can be used for designing expert system for water quality management of karst springs. Thus, the time series model becomes a valuable tool in management of drinking water quality of the Jadro spring.

  20. DEPENDENCE OF AIR SPRING PARAMETERS ON THROTTLE RESISTANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. H. Reidemeister

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. In this paper it is necessary to conduct: 1 research and analyse the influence of throttle element pneumatic resistance on elastic and damping parameters of air spring; 2 to obtain the dependence of air spring parameters on throttle element pneumatic resistance value. Methodology. The work presents the elaborated model of the air spring as a dynamic system with three phase coordinates (cylinder pressure, auxiliary reservoir pressure, cylinder air mass. Stiffness and viscosity coefficients were determined on the basis of system response to harmonic kinematic disturbance. The data for the analysis are obtained by changing the capacity of the connecting element and the law of pressure variation between the reservoir and the cylinder. The viscosity coefficient is regarded as the viscosity ratio of the hydraulic damper, which for one oscillation cycle consumes the same energy as the air spring. The process of air condition change inside the cylinder (reservoir is considered to be adiabatic; the mass air flow through the connecting element depends on the pressure difference. Findings. We obtained the curves for spring viscosity and stiffness coefficients dependence on the throttle resistance at three different laws, linking airflow through the cylinder with the pressure difference in cylinder and reservoir. At both maximum and minimum limiting resistance values the spring viscosity tends to zero, reaching its peak in the mean resistance values. Stiffness increases monotonically with increasing resistance, tends to the limit corresponding to the absence of an auxiliary reservoir (at high resistance and the increase in cylinder volume by the reservoir volume (at low resistance. Originality.The designed scheme allows determining the optimal parameters of elastic and damping properties of the pneumatic system as function of the throttle element air resistance. Practical value.The ability to predict the parameters of elastic and damping properties

  1. The source, discharge, and chemical characteristics of water from Agua Caliente Spring, Palm Springs, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contributors: Brandt, Justin; Catchings, Rufus D.; Christensen, Allen H.; Flint, Alan L.; Gandhok, Gini; Goldman, Mark R.; Halford, Keith J.; Langenheim, V.E.; Martin, Peter; Rymer, Michael J.; Schroeder, Roy A.; Smith, Gregory A.; Sneed, Michelle; Martin, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Agua Caliente Spring, in downtown Palm Springs, California, has been used for recreation and medicinal therapy for hundreds of years and currently (2008) is the source of hot water for the Spa Resort owned by the Agua Caliente Band of the Cahuilla Indians. The Agua Caliente Spring is located about 1,500 feet east of the eastern front of the San Jacinto Mountains on the southeast-sloping alluvial plain of the Coachella Valley. The objectives of this study were to (1) define the geologic structure associated with the Agua Caliente Spring; (2) define the source(s), and possibly the age(s), of water discharged by the spring; (3) ascertain the seasonal and longer-term variability of the natural discharge, water temperature, and chemical characteristics of the spring water; (4) evaluate whether water-level declines in the regional aquifer will influence the temperature of the spring discharge; and, (5) estimate the quantity of spring water that leaks out of the water-collector tank at the spring orifice.

  2. Penile vibratory stimulation yields increased spermatozoa and accessory gland production compared with rectal electroejaculation in a neurologically intact primate (Saimiri boliviensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeoman, R R; Sonksen, J; Gibson, S V; Rizk, B M; Abee, C R

    1998-09-01

    Assisted reproductive techniques require an efficient semen collection procedure in cases of ejaculatory dysfunction. Anejaculation may be of psychogenic or neurogenic origin but can be overcome with stimulatory techniques. Penile vibratory stimulation (PVS) therapy for anejaculation has recently emerged as an alternative to rectal probe electroejaculation (RPE) and more invasive testicular procedures. Comparison of the stimulatory procedures in neurologically intact subjects is not ethically possible due to the discomfort involved with electroejaculation, and comparison in spinal cord injured men may be compromised due to the intricate effects of chronic denervation on semen quality. We have previously shown the efficacy of PVS in a non-human primate, the squirrel monkey. A cross-over study design comparing semen collected by PVS and RPE was employed during the breeding season in which 15 donor males were divided into two groups. One group received PVS and the other RPE, then, three days later, treatments were reversed. Twelve of 15 animals responded to PVS (80%), all with spermatozoa in the ejaculate. Mean volume (436 +/- 90 microl), motility (80.6 +/- 4.3%), and total spermatozoa (32.8 +/- 10.2 x 10(6)) were significantly higher than in the semen after RPE. RPE resulted in ejaculation in all 15 animals with a semen volume of 205 +/- 25 microl, but fewer samples contained spermatozoa (9/15) resulting in a low total count (0.5 +/- 0.3 x 10(6)). The motility was reduced in those samples with spermatozoa (n = 9; 44.1 +/- 11.4%). Additionally, accessory gland activity was measured via the seminal vesicle and prostrate markers, fructose and citric acid, respectively. The PVS specimens had significantly more fructose (2.9 +/- 0.7 mg/ejaculate) and citric acid (0.46 +/- 0.14 mg/ejaculate) compared to RPE collected specimens (1.2 +/- 0.3 mg/ejaculate and 0.24 +/- 0.04 mg/ejaculate, respectively). In conclusion, PVS produces a much greater sperm yield and increased

  3. Smolt Quality Assessment of Spring Chinook Salmon : Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaugg, Waldo S.

    1991-04-01

    The physiological development and physiological condition of spring chinook salmon are being studied at several hatcheries in the Columbia River Basin. The purpose of the study is to determine whether any or several smolt indices can be related to adult recovery and be used to improve hatchery effectiveness. The tests conducted in 1989 on juvenile chinook salmon at Dworshak, Leavenworth, and Warm Springs National Fish Hatcheries, and the Oregon State Willamette Hatchery assessed saltwater tolerance, gill ATPase, cortisol, insulin, thyroid hormones, secondary stress, fish morphology, metabolic energy stores, immune response, blood cell numbers, and plasma ion concentrations. The study showed that smolt development may have occurred before the fish were released from the Willamette Hatchery, but not from the Dworshak, Leavenworth, or Warm Springs Hatcheries. These results will be compared to adult recovery data when they become available, to determine which smolt quality indices may be used to predict adult recovery. The relative rankings of smolt quality at the different hatcheries do not necessarily reflect the competency of the hatchery managers and staff, who have shown a high degree of professionalism and expertise in fish rearing. We believe that the differences in smolt quality are due to the interaction of genetic and environmental factors. One aim of this research is to identify factors that influence smolt development and that may be controlled through fish husbandry to regulate smolt development. 35 refs., 27 figs., 5 tabs.

  4. Spring break versus spring broken: predictive utility of spring break alcohol intentions and willingness at varying levels of extremity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litt, Dana M; Lewis, Melissa A; Patrick, Megan E; Rodriguez, Lindsey; Neighbors, Clayton; Kaysen, Debra L

    2014-02-01

    Within the domain of risk-related behavior, many times the decision to engage is not a product of premeditation or intention. The prototype willingness model was created to capture and explain the unintended element of risk behavior. The present study aimed to evaluate the importance of willingness versus intention, two important constructs within the prototype willingness model, in relation to spring break drinking behavior when assessed at both high and low extremities. College undergraduates (N = 275) completed questionnaires prior to spring break regarding their anticipated spring break activities. Willingness and intention were assessed for different levels of risk. Specifically, participants indicated the extent to which they intended to (a) get drunk and (b) drink enough to black out or pass out; and the extent to which they were willing to (a) get drunk and (b) drink enough to black out or pass out. When classes resumed following spring break, the students indicated the extent to which they actually (a) got drunk and (b) drank enough to black out or pass out. Results demonstrated that when the health-related risk was lower (i.e., getting drunk), intention was a stronger predictor of behavior than was willingness. However, as the level of risk increased (i.e., getting drunk enough to black out or pass out), willingness more strongly predicted behavior. The present study suggests that willingness and intentions differentially predict spring break alcohol-related behavior depending on the extremity of behavior in question. Implications regarding alcohol interventions are discussed.

  5. Sulfate Reduction and Inorganic Carbon Assimilation in Acidic Thermal Springs of the Kamchatka Peninsula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Thermoacidophilic sulfate reduction remains a poorly studied process, which was investigated in the present work. Radioisotope analysis with 35S-Iabeled sulfate was used to determine the rates of dissimilatory sulfate reduction in acidic thermal springs of Kamchatka, Russia. Sulfate reduction rates were found to vary from 0.054 to 12.9 nmol S04/(cm3 day). The Neftyanaya ploshchadka spring (Uzon caldera, 60'C, pH 4.2) and Oreshek spring (Mutnovskii volcano, 91'C, pH 3.5) exhibited the highest activity of sulfate-reducing prokaryotes. Stable enrich- ment'cultures reducing sulfate at pH and temperature values close to'the environmental ones were obtained from these springs. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that'a chemolithoautotrophic bacterium Ther- modesufobium sp. 3127-1 was responsible for sulfate reduction in the enrichment from the Oil Site spring. A chemoorganoheterotrophic archaeon Vulcanisaeta sp. 3102-1 (phylum Crenarchaeota) was identified in the en- richment from Oreshek spring. Thus, dissimilatory sulfate reduction under thermoacidophilic conditions was demonstrated and the agents responsible for this process were revealed.

  6. Formulating the spring discharge-function for the recession period ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 122; Issue 5. Formulating the spring discharge-function for the recession period by analyzing its recession curve: A case study of the Ranichauri spring (India) ... Keywords. Spring hydrograph; exponential fitting; gravity spring; recession period; recession curve.

  7. Hydrochemical Characteristics of Springs in Oke–Igbo, Ondo State ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael Horsfall

    ABSTRACT: This study was carried out to determine the hydrochemical characteristics of six springs in Oke-. Igbo community, Ondo state, .... organisms. Spring water pH was generally low ranging from slightly acid in Majeroku, Omi Iya. Isobo and Ogiran springs to acidic in Omi Iye, Ojege. Amuye and Egbatedo springs.

  8. Analysis of Vibratory Driven Pile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-10-01

    DF ) . Deiier. CO.I Smioak. F)ctl er. ( (C (odite IS. Port IlierICeme. (A; (odeC 155. Port I Iienemeri. (A..: COdIC 156. P’oll F Ficiciiic. (NA...23C;~.i~ ode F)LNA OF19424(1.\\ N i’i nu, toil. F C: ocO’’lK \\;~i~oi .(d ( CGARF R&D(’ Fijbrir\\. (irotoit CI( (I INWI, IANI COdIC S.31F, Norfolk.V

  9. Spring Bird Migration Phenology in Eilat, Israel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reuven Yosef

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of the mean date of first captures and median arrival dates of spring migration for 34 species of birds at Eilat, Israel, revealed that the earlier a species migrates through Eilat, the greater is the inter-annual variation in the total time of its passage. Birds arrive during spring migration in Eilat in four structured and independent waves. The annual fluctuation in the initial arrival dates (initial capture dates and median dates (median date of all captures, not including recaptures, did not depend on the length of the migratory route. This implies that migrants crossing the Sahara desert depart from their winter quarters on different Julian days in different years. We suggest that negative correlations between the median date of the spring migration of early and late migrants depends upon the easterly (Hamsin wind period. Moreover, we believe that the phenology of all birds during spring migration in Eilat is possibly also determined by external factors such as weather conditions on the African continent or global climatic processes in the Northern hemisphere. Orphean Warblers (Sylvia hortensis show a strong positive correlation (rs=-0.502 of initial capture date with calendar years, whereas other species such as Barred Warbler (S. nisoria; rs = -0.391 and Spotted Flycatcher (Muscicapa striata; rs = -0.398 display an insignificant trend. The Dead Sea Sparrow (Passer moabiticus and Red-Backed Shrike (Lanius collurio are positively correlated regarding initial arrival date and medians of spring migration.

  10. [Six cases of spring DRESS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollaert, M; Jeulin, H; Waton, J; Gastin, I; Tréchot, P; Rabaud, C; Schmutz, J-L; Barbaud, A

    2012-01-01

    An association between herpes virus reactivations and Drug Reaction with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms (DRESS) is accepted. We report six cases of DRESS with viral reactivation occurring within a single 1-month period. We attempted to find a common factor for these six cases and carried out clinical and virological examinations. Before and after this "epidemic", the mean number of cases of DRESS seen at the same centre was one per quarter, making the occurrence of six cases within a single month all the more remarkable and prompting us to seek an explanation. All six patients had taken a partly causative medication from different drug classes three to six weeks prior to the start of symptoms and herpes virus was detected in the blood of all of these subjects at the time of DRESS onset (four reactivations and two primary infections), and one patient subsequently displayed herpetic meningoencephalitis 95 days after the initial episode, associated with recurrence of DRESS. There was no common denominator among these six DRESS patients in terms of either drug class or reactivation of a particular type of herpes virus, which raises the possibility of a single unidentified environmental agent. DRESS does not appear fully explainable in terms of a cellular response to drug antigens but seems rather to result from complex interactions between the drug-induced immune response, viral reactivation and antiviral immune response. Several investigators have reported sequential reactivation of herpes viruses in DRESS. A viral epidemic could thus cause a "DRESS epidemic" in patients on medication. These cases point to the possible existence of a shared initial environmental factor (infectious or not) that favours reactivation of herpes viruses and induces DRESS in patients on medication. Before and after this "DRESS epidemic", about one patient each quarter was admitted to hospital for DRESS. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Nonlinear Squeeze Film Dampers without Centralized Springs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Changsheng

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the bifurcation behavior of a flexible rotor supported on nonlinear squeeze film dampers without centralized springs is analyzed numerically by means of rotor trajectories, Poincar maps, bifurcation diagrams and power spectra, based on the short bearing and cavitated film assumptions. It is shown that there also exist two different operations (i.e., socalled bistable operations in some speed regions in the rotor system supported on the nonlinear squeeze film dampers without centralized springs. In the bistable operation speed regions, the rotor system exhibits synchronous, sub-synchronous, sub-super-synchronous and almost-periodic as well as nonperiodic motions. The periodic bifurcation behaviors of the rotor system supported on nonlinear squeeze film dampers without centralized springs are very complex and require further investigations.

  12. FATIGUE PROPERTIES OF SPRING REINFORCES POLYMER GEARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilal CAN

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Failure of gears, occur surface pressure stress and fracture at base of teeth. For steel gears, it is known that process of carburizing increases fatigue strength. Internal stress on the surface increases of fracture fatigue strength. In this study fatigue properties of polypropylene gear reinforced with 1.2 mm wire diameter metallic springs was investigated. Extension springs were used as reinforcement element and placed into the mould and stretched before injection of polypropylene material into the mould. After injection of polypropylene, stretched springs were loosened in order to obtain pre-stressing. Fatigue tests were performed on the produced gear. Reinforcement increased the strength of gears. At result of experiments, pre-stressing increase in service life 12 times more than that of specimens without reinforcement.

  13. Spring Deposits and Mud Volcanoes on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, C. C.; Oehler, D. Z.; Baker, D. M.

    2008-12-01

    We report evidence for spring deposits in Vernal Crater, Arabia Terra. The Vernal structures are low mounds, each approximately 250 m by 500 m in extent, with terraced flanks, apical depressions, river-like channels, concentric fractures, and elliptical tonal anomalies. All of these features are common in terrestrial springs such as the Dalhousie complex in Australia. The structures occur in an apparent unit of interdune, water-laid sediment and are associated with evidence of subsurface fluid flow in sets of aligned outcrops. The Vernal springs may be part of a larger complex of spring deposits and lineations, suggesting that fluid flow in this region was relatively extensive. The structures in Vernal Crater are coated with a thin layer of dust, which prevents mineral identification from orbit. In an attempt to find evidence for additional spring mounds, we conducted a survey of nearly 2,000 locations for which CRISM spectral images are available. We used CRISM data to identify dust-free, hydrated areas and HiRISE, CTX, and MOC images to evaluate morphology. This study covered all longitudes and latitudes from 50N to 70S, except near Tharsis where data were analyzed south of 15S. No location exhibited morphological features that closely resembled those in Vernal Crater, suggesting that these putative spring mounds are not common in the highlands of Mars. Our search led us to concentrate on a dust-free area, centered at 41.8N, 332.5E in Acidalia Planitia where Farrand et al. (2005) identified features resembling spring mounds or mud volcanoes. Tanaka et al. (2005) mapped this region as part of the Early Amazonian Vastitas Borealis Unit, interpreted as reworked sediments from outflow channels and highland sources. We mapped over 20 high-albedo pitted domes in the area covered by one HiRISE frame, with dome diameters ranging from 350 m to 1 km. Nearby, similar domes have measured heights ranging from 36 to 65 m. The dome material is darker in THEMIS nighttime IR than

  14. Assessing the combined effects of climatic factors on spring wheat phenophase and grain yield in Inner Mongolia, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Junfang; Pu, Feiyu; Li, Yunpeng; Xu, Jingwen; Li, Ning; Zhang, Yi; Guo, Jianping; Pan, Zhihua

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the regional relationships between climate change and crop production will benefit strategic decisions for future agricultural adaptation in China. In this study, the combined effects of climatic factors on spring wheat phenophase and grain yield over the past three decades in Inner Mongolia, China, were explored based on the daily climate variables from 1981-2014 and detailed observed data of spring wheat from 1981-2014. Inner Mongolia was divided into three different climate type regions, the eastern, central and western regions. The data were gathered from 10 representative agricultural meteorological experimental stations in Inner Mongolia and analysed with the Agricultural Production Systems Simulator (APSIM) model. First, the performance of the APSIM model in the spring wheat planting areas of Inner Mongolia was tested. Then, the key climatic factors limiting the phenophases and yield of spring wheat were identified. Finally, the responses of spring wheat phenophases and yield to climate change were further explored regionally. Our results revealed a general yield reduction of spring wheat in response to the pronounced climate warming from 1981 to 2014, with an average of 3564 kg·ha-1. The regional differences in yields were significant. The maximum potential yield of spring wheat was found in the western region. However, the minimum potential yield was found in the middle region. The air temperature and soil surface temperature were the optimum climatic factors that affected the key phenophases of spring wheat in Inner Mongolia. The influence of the average maximum temperature on the key phenophases of spring wheat was greater than the average minimum temperature, followed by the relative humidity and solar radiation. The most insensitive climatic factors were precipitation, wind speed and reference crop evapotranspiration. As for the yield of spring wheat, temperature, solar radiation and air relative humidity were major meteorological

  15. Physical, chemical, and isotopic data for samples from the Anderson Springs area, Lake County, California, 1998-1999

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janik, C.J.; Goff, F.; Sorey, M.L.; Rytuba, J.J.; Counce, D.; Colvard, E.M.; Huebner, M.; White, L.D.; Foster, A.

    1999-01-01

    Anderson Springs is located about 90 miles (145 kilometers) north of San Francisco, California, in the southwestern part of Lake County. The area was first developed in the late 1800s as a health resort, which was active until the 1930s. In the rugged hills to the south of the resort were four small mercury mines of the eastern Mayacmas quicksilver district. About 1,260 flasks of mercury were produced from these mines between 1909 and 1943. In the 1970s, the high-elevation areas surrounding Anderson Springs became part of The Geysers geothermal field. Today, several electric powerplants are located on the ridges above Anderson Springs, utilizing steam produced from a 240°C vapor-dominated reservoir. The primary purpose of this report is to provide physical, chemical, and isotopic data on samples collected in the Anderson Springs area during 1998 and 1999, in response to a Freedom of Information Act request. In July 1998, drainage from the Schwartz adit of the abandoned Anderson mercury mine increased substantially over a 2-day period, transporting a slurry of water and precipitates down a tributary and into Anderson Creek. In August 1998, J.J. Rytuba and coworkers sampled the Schwartz adit drainage and water from the Anderson Springs Hot Spring for base metal and methylmercury analysis. They measured a maximum temperature (Tm) of 85°C in the Hot Spring. Published records show that the temperature of the Anderson Springs Hot Spring (main spring) was 63°C in 1889, 42–52°C from 1974 through 1991, and 77°C in March 1995. To investigate possible changes in thermal spring activity and to collect additional samples for geochemical analysis, C.J. Janik and coworkers returned to the area in September and December 1998. They determined that a cluster of springs adjacent to the main spring had Tm=98°C, and they observed that a new area of boiling vents and small fumaroles (Tm=99.3°C) had formed in an adjacent gully about 20 meters to the north of the main spring

  16. Non-linear Springing Excitation Due to a Bidirectional Wave Field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidic-Perunovic, Jelena; Jensen, Jørgen Juncher

    2005-01-01

    Significant springing vibrations in ships have recently been measured in a large ocean-going bulk carrier. So far calculations using various linear and non-linear hydrodynamic procedures have not been able to predict the measured responses. In the present paper it is shown that the springing...... response depends strongly on second order (sum frequency) terms involving cross-coupling terms from the combined wind- and swell-driven wave system. The calculations are based on the second order strip theory formulation and thus no three-dimensional effects are accounted for. The agreement with measured...

  17. Nonlinear Study of Industrial Arc Spring Dampers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lahriri, Said; Santos, Ilmar; Hartmann, Henning

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to present a numerical approach for analyzing parameter excited vibrations on a gas compressor, induced by the nonlinear characteristic of the arc spring feature of certain designs of squeeze film dampers, SFDs. The behavior of the journal is studied in preparation...... acting on the SFD are presented. It is worth mentioning, that the maps and diagrams can be used as design guidance. Finally, a comparison between the numerical results and experimental result is facilitated in form of waterfall diagrams. For this, a full scale model of the arc-spring damper was designed...

  18. Evaluación de Spring MVC

    OpenAIRE

    Mayor Martín, David

    2014-01-01

    Spring Framework cuenta con su propio framework de aplicaciones web basado en el Modelo Vista Controlador (MVC). Los desarrolladores de Spring decidieron escribir su propio framework web como una reacción a lo que percibían como el mal diseño de Jakarta Struts framework web, así como por las deficiencias en otros frameworks disponibles. En particular, sentían que no había la separación suficiente entre las capas de presentación y tratamiento de la petición, y entre las capas de...

  19. Modeling karst spring hydrograph recession based on head drop at sinkholes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guangquan; Goldscheider, Nico; Field, Malcolm S.

    2016-11-01

    Spring discharge often responds to rainfall with a rapid increase followed by a slower recession, and the mode of recession is often exponential-like. We propose a new model of the response of spring discharge to rainfall based on the square law for turbulent conduit flow. The new non-exponential model is compared against the exponential model under specific constraints. A hydrograph of St. Marks River in Florida is used to illustrate that when the change in ;sinkhole head; (defined as the hydraulic head at the upstream end of the karst conduit connected to the spring) is relatively small, the solution of the new model is close to that of the exponential model, which extends the validity and application of the exponential solution. When the change in sinkhole head is very large, the solutions from the two models clearly differ from each other. Limitations of the non-exponential model are analyzed by simulation of a hydrograph observed downstream of Wakulla Springs. It is concluded that both solutions are applicable when spring response is smaller than or comparable to the base flow, but are nonphysical when the response is much larger than the base discharge.

  20. Fish Health Studies Associated with the Kingston Fly Ash Spill, Spring 2009 - Fall 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Marshall [ORNL; Fortner, Allison M [ORNL

    2012-05-01

    On December 22, 2008, over 4 million cubic meters of fly ash slurry was released into the Emory River when a dike surrounding a solid waste containment area at the Tennessee Valley Authority's (TVA) Kingston Fossil Plant ruptured. One component of TVA's response to the spill is a biological monitoring program to assess short- and long-term ecological responses to the ash and associated chemicals, including studies on fish health and contaminant bioaccumulation. These studies were initiated in early Spring 2009 for the purposes of: (1) documenting the levels of fly ash-associated metals in various tissues of representative sentinel fish species in the area of the fly ash spill, (2) determining if exposure to fly ash-associated metals causes short, intermediate, or long-term health effects on these sentinel fish species, (3) assessing if there are causal relationships between exposure to metals and health effects on fish, (4) evaluating, along with information from other ecological and physicochemical studies, the nature and route of contaminant transfer though food chains into higher level consumers, (5) providing important information for the Ecological Risk Assessment (ERA) for the Kingston fly ash project, and (6) serving as an important technology information transfer or model study focused on how to best evaluate the environmental effects of fly ash (and related environmental stressors), not only at the Kingston site, but also at sites on other aquatic systems where coal-fired generating stations are located. This report presents the results of the first two years of the fish health study. To date, fish health and bioaccumulation studies have been conducted from Spring 2009 though Fall 2011 and includes 6 seasonal studies: Spring 2009, Fall 2009, Spring 2010, Fall 2010, Spring 2011, and Fall 2011. Both the Spring and Fall studies have focused on 3-4 sentinel fish species that represent different feeding habits, behaviors, and home ranges. In addition

  1. FINAL REPORT WIND POWER WARM SPRINGS RESERVATION TRIBAL LANDS DOE GRANT NUMBER DE-FG36-07GO17077 SUBMITTED BY WARM SPRINGS POWER & WATER ENTERPRISES A CORPORATE ENTITY OF THE CONFEDERATED TRIBES OF WARM SPRINGS WARM SPRINGS, OREGON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jim Manion; Michael Lofting; Wil Sando; Emily Leslie; Randy Goff

    2009-03-30

    Wind Generation Feasibility Warm Springs Power and Water Enterprises (WSPWE) is a corporate entity owned by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation, located in central Oregon. The organization is responsible for managing electrical power generation facilities on tribal lands and, as part of its charter, has the responsibility to evaluate and develop renewable energy resources for the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs. WSPWE recently completed a multi-year-year wind resource assessment of tribal lands, beginning with the installation of wind monitoring towers on the Mutton Mountains site in 2003, and collection of on-site wind data is ongoing. The study identified the Mutton Mountain site on the northeastern edge of the reservation as a site with sufficient wind resources to support a commercial power project estimated to generate over 226,000 MWh per year. Initial estimates indicate that the first phase of the project would be approximately 79.5 MW of installed capacity. This Phase 2 study expands and builds on the previously conducted Phase 1 Wind Resource Assessment, dated June 30, 2007. In order to fully assess the economic benefits that may accrue to the Tribes through wind energy development at Mutton Mountain, a planning-level opinion of probable cost was performed to define the costs associated with key design and construction aspects of the proposed project. This report defines the Mutton Mountain project costs and economics in sufficient detail to allow the Tribes to either build the project themselves or contract with a developer under the most favorable terms possible for the Tribes.

  2. Tree rings reveal recent intensified spring drought in the central Himalaya, Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panthi, Shankar; Bräuning, Achim; Zhou, Zhe-Kun; Fan, Ze-Xin

    2017-10-01

    To better understand long-term drought variations in the central Himalaya, we developed new tree-ring width chronologies of Himalayan spruce (Picea smithiana (Wall.) Boiss.) from three sites in the north-western Nepal. The local site chronologies showed high cross correlations and similar growth-climate responses to regional spring drought variability. We thus combined all site chronologies into a regional composite (RC) standard chronology that spans 516 years (1498-2013 CE). The RC chronology showed significant positive (negative) correlations with spring (March-May) precipitation (temperature) variability. Meanwhile, RC chronology showed the highest correlation with spring self-calibrating Palmer drought severity index (scPDSI, r = 0.652, p scPDSI during the calibration period 1957-2012. Our reconstructed spring drought variability in the central Himalaya showed consistent wet-dry episodes with other regional drought and precipitation reconstructions from the Himalaya and nearby regions. Spectral peaks and spatial correlation analysis indicate that spring drought variability in the central Himalaya may be linked to large scale climatic drivers, mainly Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation activities due to sea surface temperatures variation in the Atlantic Ocean. Our reconstruction revealed a continuous shift toward drier conditions in the central Himalaya since early 1980s that coincide with continental-scale warming and reduced spring precipitation in the central Himalaya.

  3. Does artificial UV use prior to spring break protect students from sunburns during spring break?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Leslie K; Lowe, John B

    2013-06-01

    Dark-skinned individuals are less likely than light-skinned individuals to become sunburned or develop skin cancer. Some have extrapolated this relationship and surmised that developing and maintaining a tan will reduce the risk of sunburns and melanoma. In order to examine whether this strategy indeed protects against sunburns, we surveyed college students about both their tanning habits prior to spring break and their spring break activities. Sorority and fraternity students were recruited after spring break. Analyses examined associations between potential risk factors and the development of one or more sunburns during spring break. As expected, the risk of obtaining a sunburn increased with: time spent in the sun during spring break; light complexion, as assessed by various sun-sensitivity factors; and lack of sunscreen use. We also found that tanning using an artificial UV source during the 10 weeks prior to spring break was not associated with reduced risk of sunburns during spring-break, but rather with a marginal increase in this risk. These data provide evidence that maintaining a tan may not provide protection from sunburns. Public health messages need to address this misconception, stating clearly that a tan does not protect against or reduce the chances of developing a sunburn. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Diversity and Ecological Functions of Crenarchaeota in Terrestrial Hot Springs of Tengchong, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, W.; Song, Z.; Chen, J.; Jiang, H.; Zhou, E.; Wang, F.; Xiao, X.; Zhang, C.

    2010-12-01

    The diversity and potential ecological functions of Crenarchaeota were investigated in eight terrestrial hot springs (pH: 2.8-7.7; temperature: 43.6-96 C) located in Tengchong, China, using 16S rRNA gene phylogenetic analysis. A total of 826 crenarchaeotal clones were analyzed and a total of 47 Operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were identified. Most (93%) of the identified OTUs were closely related (89-99%) to those retrieved from hot springs and other thermal environments. Our data showed that temperature may predominate over pH in affecting crenarchaeotal diversity in Tengchong hot springs. Crenarchaeotal diversity in moderate-temperature (59 to 77 C) hot springs was the highest, indicating that the moderate-temperature hot springs are more inclusive for Crenarchaeota. To understand what ecological functions these Crenarchaeota may play in Tengchong hot springs, we isolated the environmental RNA and constructed four cDNA clone libraries of the archaeal accA gene that encodes Acetyl CoA carboxylase. The accA gene represents one of the key enzymes responsible for the CO2 fixation in the 3-hydroxypropionate/4-hydroxybutyrate pathway. The results of phylogenetic analysis showed all the transcribed accA gene sequences can be classified into three large clusters, with the first one being affiliated with marine crenarchaeota, the second one with cultured crenarchaeota, and the third one with Chlorobi (Green sulfur bacteria), which have been proved to employ the 3-hydroxypropionate/4-hydroxybutyrate pathway. The long-branch distances of the phylogenetic tree suggest that these sequences represent novel accA-like gene. Our results also showed that sequences of the accA-like gene from the same hot spring belonged to one cluster, which suggests that a single crenarchaeotal group may fix CO2 via 3-hydroxypropionate/4-hydroxybutyrate pathway in the investigated hot springs.

  5. Baseline risk assessment for the quarry residuals operable unit of the Weldon Spring Site, Weldon Spring, Missouri

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-02-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting cleanup activities at the Weldon Spring site, located in St. Charles County, Missouri, about 48 km (30 mi) west of St. Louis. Cleanup of the site consists of several integrated components. The quarry residuals operable unit (QROU), consisting of the Weldon Spring quarry and its surrounding area, is one of four operable units being evaluated. In accordance with requirements of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended, DOE is conducting a remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) to determine the proper response to address various contaminated media that constitute the QROU. Specifically, the operable unit consists of the following areas and media: the residual material remaining at the Weldon Spring quarry after removal of the pond water and the bulk waste; groundwater underlying the quarry and surrounding area; and other media located in the surrounding vicinity of the quarry, including surface water and sediment at Femme Osage Slough, Little Femme Osage Creek, and Femme Osage Creek. An initial evaluation of conditions at the quarry area identified remaining data requirements needed to support the conceptual site exposure and hydrogeological models. These data requirements are discussed in the RI/FS work plan issued in January 1994. Soil contamination located at a property adjacent to the quarry, referred to as Vicinity Property 9 (VP9), was originally part of the scope of the QROU, as discussed in the work plan. However, a decision was subsequently made to remediate this vicinity property as part of cleanup activities for the chemical plant operable unit, as provided for in the Record of Decision (ROD). Remediation of VP9 was completed in early 1996. Hence, this baseline risk assessment (BRA) does not address VP9.

  6. Feasibility study for remedial action for the Quarry Residuals Operable Unit at the Weldon Spring Site, Weldon Spring, Missouri

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting cleanup activities at the Weldon Spring site, which is located in St. Charles County, Missouri, about 48 km (30 mi) west of St. Louis (Figure 1.1). Cleanup of the Weldon Spring site consists of several integrated components. The quarry residuals operable unit (QROU) is one of four operable units being evaluated. In accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended, a remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) is being conducted to evaluate conditions and potential responses for the following areas and/or media that constitute the QROU: (1) the residual material (soil and sediment) remaining at the Weldon Spring quarry after removal of the bulk waste (about 11 million L [3 million gal] of uranium-contaminated ponded water was also addressed previous to bulk waste removal); (2) other media located in the surrounding vicinity of the quarry, including adjacent soil, surface water, and sediment in Femme Osage Slough and several creeks; and (3) quarry groundwater located primarily north of Femme Osage Slough. Potential impacts to the St. Charles County well field downgradient of the quarry area are also being addressed as part of QROU RI/FS evaluations. For remedial action sites, it is DOE policy to integrate values associated with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) into the CERCLA decision-making process. The analyses contained herein address NEPA values as appropriate to the actions being considered for the QROU. A work plan summarizing initial site conditions and providing conceptual site hydrogeological and exposure models was published in January 1994. The RI and baseline risk assessment (BRA) reports have been completed. The RI discusses in detail the nature and extent and the fate and transport of contamination at the quarry area.

  7. Hydrogeochemistry of Damt thermal springs, Yemen Republic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fara, M. [Sana' a University, Yemen Republic (Yemen). Dept. of Geology; Chandrasekharam, D. [Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay (India). Dept. of Earth Sciences; C.N.R. Center for Minerogenesis and Applied Geochemistry, Florence (Italy); Minissale, A. [C.N.R. Center for Minerogenesis and Applied Geochemistry, Florence (Italy)

    1999-04-01

    The Damt thermal springs (40-45{sup o}C), flowing through travertine deposits, belong to the Na-HCO{sub 3} type of water, and have higher pCO{sub 2} (from -1.18 to -0.58 = PCO{sub 2} from 0.07 to 0.26 atm) relative to cold Ca-SO{sub 4}-(Cl) groundwaters. The cold waters have pCO{sub 2} ranging from -1.86 to -2.50 (= PCO{sub 2} from 0.014 to 0.0035 atm). The chemical composition of the cold springs is controlled by evaporate deposits present in the Tawilah sandstone and Amran limestone formations, while simple crustal dissolution, coupled with CO{sub 2}-rich fluid-rock interaction control the chemical signature of the hot spring waters. The temperature of the feeding system, based on the K{sup 2}/Mg geothermometer, varies between 80 and 120{sup o}C. Damt thermal springs appear to be related to a 10,000 year-old volcanic activity that led to the appearance of several craters in the area. (author)

  8. AAAI 1991 Spring Symposium Series Reports

    OpenAIRE

    AAAI,

    1991-01-01

    The Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence held its 1991 Spring Symposium Series on March 26-28 at Stanford University, Stanford, California. This article contains short summaries of the eight symposia that were conducted: Argumentation and Belief, Composite System Design, Connectionist Natural Language Processing, Constraint-Based Reasoning, Implemented Knowledge Representation and Reasoning Systems, Integrated Intelligent Architectures, Logical Formalizations of Commonse...

  9. The Silent Spring of Rachel Carson.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerstetter, Ned

    1996-01-01

    Presents a lesson plan examining Rachel Carson's call to arms concerning the harmful consequences of pesticides. Students view a video documentary on Carson's work and read a synopsis of her book, "Silent Spring." Assessment is provided by various activities including writing assignments, creating posters, and editorial cartoons. (MJP)

  10. Ultrabasic Spring Geomicrobiology of the Cedars Peridotite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, O. J.; Morrill, P.; Muyzer, G.; Kuenen, J. G.; Nealson, K. H.

    2006-12-01

    Peridotite hosted aquifers are becoming well-known as a modern analog for both extraterrestrial and early- Earth habitats despite relatively few studies on microbes in ultramafic systems. To investigate the microbiology associated with aquifers of the actively serpentinizing Cedars Peridotite in coastal Northern California an interdisciplinary approach involving molecular phylogenetics, organic and inorganic geochemistry, as well as culture-based ecophysiological methods are being utilized. Based on our findings, Cedars spring microorganisms endure one of the harshest low-temperature aqueous environments on Earth with pH greater than 11.8, Eh less than -600 mV, undetectable dissolved CO2 and O2 and a lack of other obvious e- acceptors. Despite these conditions, life inhabits solid substrate surfaces within the springs to a concentration of 10E6-10E7 cells/sq. cm, but planktonic cell densities are extremely low (much less than 10E3/ml). Preliminary 16S data of 3 ultrabasic fluids reveals a community comprised primarily of bacteria that appears to be of low-diversity. Methanogens are strongly suggested to be present based on the isotopic composition of methane bubbling from the springs, but have not yet been identified via molecular techniques. Community level metagenomic sequencing of the ultrabasic spring microorganisms sampled from peridotite-associated mineral surfaces and glass slides incubated in specially designed flow- through chambers are currently in-progress and are likely to reveal several novel metabolic pathways.

  11. Climate change and spring-fruiting fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauserud, Håvard; Heegaard, Einar; Semenov, Mikhail A; Boddy, Lynne; Halvorsen, Rune; Stige, Leif Chr; Sparks, Tim H; Gange, Alan C; Stenseth, Nils Chr

    2010-04-22

    Most macrofungi produce ephemeral fruit bodies during autumn but some have adapted to spring fruiting. In this study, temporal changes in the time of spring fruiting in Norway and the UK during 1960-2007 have been investigated by statistical analyses of about 6000 herbarium and field records, covering 34 species. Nearly 30 per cent of the temporal variation in fruiting could be ascribed to spatial and species-specific effects. Correcting for these effects, linear trends towards progressively earlier fruiting were detected during the entire period in both Norway and the UK, with a change in average fruiting day of 18 days over the study period. Early fruiting was correlated with high winter temperatures in both countries, indicating that the observed phenological changes are likely due to earlier onset of spring. There were also significant correlations between climatic conditions in one year and timing of fruiting the following year, indicating that below-ground mycelia are influenced by climatic conditions over a longer time period before fruiting. Fruiting dates were, however, not strictly related to changes in vernal accumulated thermal time. Our results indicate that global warming has lead to progressively earlier fruiting of spring fungi in northwest Europe during the last half century.

  12. Registration of 'Prevail' hard red spring wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grower and end-user acceptance of new Hard Red Spring Wheat (HRSW; Triticum aestivum L.) cultivars is largely contingent upon satisfactory agronomic performance, end-use quality potential, and disease resistance levels. Additional characteristics, such as desirable plant height, can also contribute...

  13. Spring reflections on Louisiana sugar cane

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Louisiana sugar industry continues to produce high cane and sugar yields despite a short growing season. Spring fallow land management is essential for the upcoming crop. In the past few years, wide row spacing, billet cane planting, and cover-cropping have received significant attention. The ei...

  14. Experimental demonstration of coupled optical springs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, N. A.; Barr, B. W.; Bell, A.; Graef, C.; Hild, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Leavey, S. S.; Macarthur, J.; Sorazu, B.; Wright, J.; Strain, K. A.

    2017-02-01

    Optical rigidity will play an important role in improving the sensitivity of future generations of gravitational wave (GW) interferometers, which employ high laser power in order to reach and exceed the standard quantum limit. Several experiments have demonstrated the combined effect of two optical springs on a single system for very low-weight mirror masses or membranes. In this paper we investigate the complex interactions between multiple optical springs and the surrounding apparatus in a system of comparable dynamics to a large-scale GW detector. Using three 100 g mirrors to form a coupled cavity system capable of sustaining two or more optical springs, we demonstrate a number of different regimes of opto-mechanical rigidity and measurement techniques. Our measurements reveal couplings between each optical spring and the control loops that can affect both the achievable increase in sensitivity and the stability of the system. Hence this work establishes a better understanding of the realisation of these techniques and paves the way to their application in future GW observatories, such as upgrades to Advanced LIGO.

  15. Spring Season Habitat Suitability Index raster

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This raster represents a continuous surface of sage-grouse habitat suitability index (HSI, created using ArcGIS 10.2.2) values for Nevada during spring, which is a...

  16. Bacteriological Analysis of Protected Springs in Jimma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    were found to percolate adjacent to some springs and appear to be the major sources of contamination in these poorly maintained water supply systems. In smaller towns, absence of diversion ditches, and poor drainage systems around the protection "ox were implicated as contributing factors to water quality deterioration.

  17. Cold Spring Brook Site Investigation Work Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-11-01

    floodplain is a forested swamp habitat dominated by red maples (Acer rubrum). Various oak species ( Quercus spp.), grey birch (Betula populifolia...Vaccinium corymbosum), and speckled alder (Alnus rugosa ) also occur in the floodplain of Cold Spring Brook. Typical floodplain herbaceous components

  18. Decadal radon cycles in a hot spring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Rui; Woith, Heiko; Wang, Rongjiang; Wang, Guangcai

    2017-09-21

    A high-fidelity record covering nearly 40 years of water-dissolved radon from the hot spring site of BangLazhang (BLZ), Southwestern China is presented to study multi-year periodicities of radon. Ancillary observational data, i.e., water temperature, spring discharge rate, barometric pressure, combined with regional rainfall, galactic cosmic rays (GCR flux is modulated by solar wind and thus a proxy for solar activity) and regional seismicity from the same period are considered to identify potentially influencing factors controlling the changes in radon. Variations in radon concentration and ancillary observational data are studied using continuous Wavelet Power Spectrum (WPS), Wavelet Coherence (WTC), and Partial Wavelet Coherence (PWC). The results show that the long-period radon concentration is characterized by a quasi-decadal (8-11 years) cycle, matching well with the concurrent periodicity in water temperature, spring discharge rates and GCR. PWCs of radon, discharge rate and water temperature suggest that water temperature variations explain most of the coherent variability of radon and the discharge rate. We tentatively conclude that radon variations are mainly explained by variations in water temperature and spring discharge, which are modified and modulated by earthquakes and quasi-decadal variations of an unidentified process. The influence of solar activity on the decadal periodicity is discussed.

  19. Intern Abstract for Spring 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, William

    2016-01-01

    The Human Interface Branch - EV3 - is evaluating Organic lighting-emitting diodes (OLEDs) as an upgrade for current displays on future spacecraft. OLEDs have many advantages over current displays. Conventional displays require constant backlighting which draws a lot of power, but with OLEDs they generate light themselves. OLEDs are lighter, and weight is always a concern with space launches. OLEDs also grant greater viewing angles. OLEDs have been in the commercial market for almost ten years now. What is not known is how they will perform in a space-like environment; specifically deep space far away from the Earth's magnetosphere. In this environment, the OLEDs can be expected to experience vacuum and galactic radiation. The intern's responsibility has been to prepare the OLED for a battery of tests. Unfortunately, it will not be ready for testing at the end of the internship. That being said much progress has been made: a) Developed procedures to safely disassemble the tablet. b) Inventoried and identified critical electronic components. c) 3D printed a testing apparatus. d) Wrote software in Python that will test the OLED screen while being radiated. e) Built circuits to restart the tablet and the test pattern, and ensure it doesn't fall asleep during radiation testing. f) Built enclosure that will house all of the electronics Also, the intern has been working on a way to take messages from a simulated Caution and Warnings system, process said messages into packets, send audio packets to a multicast address that audio boxes are listening to, and output spoken audio. Currently, Cautions and Warnings use a tone to alert crew members of a situation, and then crew members have to read through their checklists to determine what the tone means. In urgent situations, EV3 wants to deliver concise and specific alerts to the crew to facilitate any mitigation efforts on their part. Significant progress was made on this project: a) Open channel with the simulated Caution

  20. Episodic sediment-discharge events in Cascade Springs, southern Black Hills, South Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Timothy Scott

    1999-01-01

    upper Minnelusa Formation, which is caused by upward leakage of relatively fresh water from the Madison aquifer. The anhydrite dissolution and dedolomitization account for the net removal of minerals that would lead to breccia pipe formation by gravitational collapse. Breccia pipes in the lower Minnelusa Formation are uncommon; however, networks of interconnected breccia layers and breccia dikes are common. These networks, along with vertical fractures and faults, are likely pathways for transmitting upward leakage from the Madison aquifer. It is concluded that suspended sediment discharged at Cascade Springs probably results from episodic collapse brecciation that is caused by subsurface dissolution of anhydrite beds and cements of the upper Minnelusa Formation, accompanied by replacement of dolomite by calcite. It is further concluded that many breccia pipes probably are the throats of artesian springs that have been abandoned and exposed by erosion. The locations of artesian spring-discharge points probably have been shifting outwards from the center of the Black Hills uplift, essentially keeping pace with regional erosion over geologic time. Thus, artesian springflow probably is a factor in controlling water levels in the Madison and Minnelusa aquifers, with hydraulic head declining over geologic time, in response to development of new discharge points. Development of breccia pipes as throats of artesian springs would greatly enhance vertical hydraulic conductivity in the immediate vicinity of spring-discharge points. Horizontal hydraulic conductivity in the Minnelusa Formation also may be enhanced by dissolution processes related to upward leakage from the Madison aquifer. Potential processes could include dissolution resulting from leakage in the vicinity of breccia pipes that are abandoned spring throats, active spring discharge, development of subsurface breccias with no visible surface expression or spring discharge, as well as general areal leakage

  1. Response of Italian ryegrass seed crop to spring nitrogen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam.) cv. Tetraflorum was sown with different nitrogen application rates and it was tested under the agroecological conditions of Western Serbia. Four-year field experiments were carried out from 2002 to 2006 and the biometric characteristics of generative tillers, seed yield and shoot dry ...

  2. Arbiters of Social Unrest: Military Responses to the Arab Spring

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    hotels, clubs, libraries, cinemas , construction businesses, bottled water plants, and gas stations – even using conscripts for a portion of the labor...1960. 2 See Peter Katzenstein, The Culture of National Security. New York: Columbia University Press, 1996; Elizabeth Kier, Imagining War: French ...the wife of Ben Ali) hosted the dinner with Siberian tigers and French ice cream flown in overnight. He was a school teacher who made $300/month

  3. Weakening temperature control on the interannual variations of spring carbon uptake across northern lands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piao, Shilong [Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing (China); Peking Univ., Beijing (China); Liu, Zhuo [Peking Univ., Beijing (China); Wang, Tao [Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing (China); Peng, Shushi [Peking Univ., Beijing (China); Ciais, Philippe [Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Huang, Mengtian [Peking Univ., Beijing (China); Ahlstrom, Anders [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Burkhart, John F. [Univ. of Oslo (Norway); Chevallier, Frédéric [Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Janssens, Ivan A. [Univ. of Antwerp, Wilrijk (Belgium); Jeong, Su-Jong [South Univ. of Science and Technology of China, Shenzhen (China); Lin, Xin [Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Mao, Jiafu [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Miller, John [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Earth Systems Research Lab., Boulder, CO (United States); Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Mohammat, Anwar [Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing (China); Myneni, Ranga B. [Boston Univ., MA (United States); Peñuelas, Josep [Centre for Ecological Research and Forestry Applications (CREAF), Barcelona (Spain); Shi, Xiaoying [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Stohl, Andreas [Norwegian Institute for Air Research (NILU), Kjeller (Norway); Yao, Yitong [Peking Univ., Beijing (China); Zhu, Zaichun [Peking Univ., Beijing (China); Tans, Pieter P. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Earth Systems Research Lab., Boulder, CO (United States)

    2017-04-24

    Ongoing spring warming allows the growing season to begin earlier, enhancing carbon uptake in northern ecosystems. We use 34 years of atmospheric CO2 concentration measurements at Barrow, Alaska (BRW, 71° N) to show that the interannual relationship between spring temperature and carbon uptake has recently shifted. Here, we use two indicators: the spring zero-crossing date of atmospheric CO2 (SZC) and the magnitude of CO2 drawdown between May and June (SCC). The previously reported strong correlation between SZC, SCC and spring land temperature (ST) was found in the first 17 years of measurements, but disappeared in the last 17 years. As a result, the sensitivity of both SZC and SCC to warming decreased. Simulations with an atmospheric transport model coupled to a terrestrial ecosystem model suggest that the weakened interannual correlation of SZC and SCC with ST in the last 17 years is attributable to the declining temperature response of spring net primary productivity (NPP) rather than to changes in heterotrophic respiration or in atmospheric transport patterns. Reduced chilling during dormancy and emerging light limitation are possible mechanisms that may have contributed to the loss of NPP response to ST. These results thus challenge the ‘warmer spring–bigger sink’ mechanism.

  4. Contaminant discharge in habitat springs of the Barton Springs Salamander during storm rainfall events

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Aquatic habitat of the endangered Barton Springs salamander, Eurycea sosorum, in Travis County, Texas can potentially be impacted by contaminants in surface runoff...

  5. A springs actuated finger exoskeleton: From mechanical design to spring variables evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortoletto, Roberto; Mello, Ashley N; Piovesan, Davide

    2017-07-01

    In the context of post-stroke patients, suffering of hemiparesis of the hand, robot-aided neuro-motor rehabilitation allows for intensive rehabilitation treatments and quantitative evaluation of patients' progresses. This work presents the design and evaluation of a spring actuated finger exoskeleton. In particular, the spring variables and the interaction forces between the assembly and the hand were investigated, in order to assess the effectiveness of the proposed exoskeleton.

  6. THE SPRING OF THE NETWORKED NATIONS: SOCIAL MEDIA AND THE ARAB SPRING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harel Chorev

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This essay argues that social media played an important role in the Arab Spring and contributed to a change in the political culture of some of those countries that have gone through regime-change through 2011-2012. The article further posits that the contribution of social media was mainly instrumental, not causal, and that the main reasons behind the Arab Spring were problems generated by regional, local and global trends, affecting each country differently.

  7. Device-length changes and implant function following surgical implantation of the KineSpring in cadaver knees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McNicholas MJ

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Michael J McNicholas,1 Stefan M Gabriel,2 Anton G Clifford,2 Evelyne M Hasler2 1Aintree University Hospital, Teaching Hospital, Major Trauma Centre, NHS Foundation Trust, Liverpool, UK; 2Moximed, Hayward, CA, USA Introduction: The KineSpring implant system has been shown to provide load reductions at the medial compartment of the knee, and has demonstrated clinical success in reducing pain and increasing function in patients with medial knee osteoarthritis. These results depend on the ability of the KineSpring to rotate, lengthen, and shorten to accommodate knee motions, and in response to knee position and loading. Purpose: The present study was undertaken to determine length changes of the implanted KineSpring in response to a range of knee positions, external knee loads, and placements by different orthopedic surgeons. Materials and methods: KineSpring system components were implanted in ten cadaver leg specimens by ten orthopedic surgeons, and absorber-length changes were measured under combined loading and in different positions of the knee. Results and conclusion: Spring compression consistent with knee-load reduction, and device lengthening and shortening to accommodate knee loads and motions were seen. These confirm the functionality of the KineSpring when implanted medially to the knee. Keywords: KineSpring, knee, function, preservation, offloading, osteoarthritis

  8. 2D resistivity imaging and magnetic survey for characterization of thermal springs: A case study of Gergedi thermal springs in the northwest of Wonji, Main Ethiopian Rift, Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulkadir, Yahya Ali; Eritro, Tigistu Haile

    2017-09-01

    Electrical resistivity imaging and magnetic surveys were carried out at Gergedi thermal springs, located in the Main Ethiopian Rift, to characterize the geothermal condition of the area. The area is geologically characterized by alluvial and lacustrine deposits, basaltic lava, ignimbrites, and rhyolites. The prominent structural feature in this part of the Main Ethiopian Rift, the SW -NE trending structures of the Wonji Fault Belt System, crosse over the study area. Three lines of imaging data and numerous magnetic data, encompassing the active thermal springs, were collected. Analysis of the geophysical data shows that the area is covered by low resistivity response regions at shallow depths which resulted from saline moisturized soil subsurface horizon. Relatively medium and high resistivity responses resulting from the weathered basalt, rhyolites, and ignimbrites are also mapped. Qualitative interpretation of the magnetic data shows the presence of structures that could act as pathways for heat and fluids manifesting as springs and also characterize the degree of thermal alteration of the area. Results from the investigations suggest that the Gergedi thermal springs area is controlled by fault systems oriented parallel and sub-parallel to the main tectonic lines of the Main Ethiopian Rift.

  9. Personalized Learning Instructional Staff Survey Results (Spring 2014). Working Paper WR-1062-BMGF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siler-Evans, Kyle; Steiner, Elizabeth D.; Hamilton, Laura S.; Pane, John F.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to descriptively summarize instructional staff responses to a survey administered by RAND in 23 personalized learning (PL) schools in Spring 2014. This work was performed at the request of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF), as part of a multi-year evaluation contract. The 23 schools were selected from a…

  10. Modelling, characterisation and uncertainties of stabilised pseudoelastic shape memory alloy helical springs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enemark, Søren; Santos, Ilmar; Savi, M. A.

    2016-01-01

    The thermo-mechanical behaviour of pseudoelastic shape memory alloy helical springs is of concern discussing stabilised and cyclic responses. Constitutive description of the shape memory alloy is based on the framework developed by Lagoudas and co-workers incorporating two modifications related...

  11. The Arab Spring and the African Union's Reaction to the Crisis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article refl ects on the AU and its responses to the Libyan crisis, UN intervention, regime change in Libya and Gaddafi 's assassination. After providing a background to the Arab Spring that led to the crisis, the article will first revisit the AU's objectives, principles and organisational structure. It will then critically assess the ...

  12. Quaternary geology of Fish Springs flat, Juab county, Utah

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Fish Springs Flat is a sediment-filled valley between two tilted mountain blocks, the Thomas Range and the Fish Springs Range, in the Basin and Range physiographic...

  13. Archaeological resources of Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge: Preliminary report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document presents results of an archeological survey of two caves located in the Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge. It was concluded that the Fish Springs...

  14. Initial Survey Instructions for Spring Water Monitoring : Flow

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Initial survey instructions for the Spring Water Monitoring - Flow 1.02 survey at Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge. This coop baseline monitoring survey has...

  15. Initial Survey Instructions for Spring Water Monitoring : Quality

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Initial survey instructions for 1.04 spring water monitoring (quality) and 1.06 management unit water monitoring (quality) at Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge....

  16. Archaeal diversity in Icelandic hot springs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvist, Thomas; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær; Westermann, Peter

    2007-01-01

    of Archaea by analysis of amplified 16S rRNA genes. In addition to the three solfataras and the neutral hot spring, 10 soil samples in transects of the soil adjacent to the solfataras were analysed using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (t-RFLP). The sequence data from the clone libraries...... in combination with 14 t-RFLP profiles revealed a high abundance of clones clustering together with sequences from the nonthermophilic I.1b group of Crenarchaeota. The archaeal diversity in one solfatara was high; 26 different RFLP patterns were found using double digestion of the PCR products with restriction......Whole-cell density gradient extractions from three solfataras (pH 2.5) ranging in temperature from 81 to 90 degrees C and one neutral hot spring (81 degrees C, pH 7) from the thermal active area of Hveragerethi (Iceland) were analysed for genetic diversity and local geographical variation...

  17. Daily variations in Spring Break alcohol and sexual behaviors based on intentions, perceived norms, and daily trip context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Megan E; Lee, Christine M

    2012-07-01

    Given the known risks of alcohol use and sexual behavior for college students on Spring Break, this study was designed to document the behaviors and correlates associated with being on a Spring Break trip on a given day (controlling for average time on a trip). Participants were undergraduate students (n = 261; 55% women) who reported that they planned to go on a Spring Break trip. Web-based survey responses before and after Spring Break documented perceived norms, intentions, and actual behavior on each of the 10 days of Spring Break. Students who went on longer trips, who previously engaged in more heavy episodic drinking, or who had greater pre-Spring Break intentions to drink reported greater alcohol use during Spring Break. Similarly, students with greater pre-Spring Break intentions to have sex, greater perceived norms for sex, or more previous sexual partners had greater odds of having sex. On days students were on trips, they had a greater likelihood of having sex, drinking to higher estimated blood alcohol concentrations, consuming more drinks, and reporting perceived drunkenness than on nontrip days, especially if they had intentions to have sex and drink alcohol (and, for models predicting sexual behavior and drunkenness, had greater perceived norms for sex and drinking). Students who went on Spring Break trips engaged in more risk behaviors. In addition, the context of being on a trip on a given day was associated with increased risk, especially if they had stronger intentions and, in some cases, higher perceived norms. Further research is needed to describe the contexts of Spring Break trips and how to intervene effectively.

  18. Monitoring and reactive-transport modeling of the spatial and temporal variations of the Strengbach spring hydrochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerer, J.; Chabaux, F.; Lucas, Y.; Clément, A.; Fritz, B.; Beaulieu, E.; Viville, D.; Pierret, M. C.; Gangloff, S.; Négrel, Ph.

    2018-03-01

    This study focuses on 20 years of hydrochemical monitoring of the small springs that emerge in the experimental granitic catchment of Strengbach (OHGE, France) and the simulation of these data using the KIRMAT code. The data indicate that the Strengbach springs display chemostatic behavior; that is, limited temporal variations were noted in the concentrations of dissolved silica (H4SiO4) and most of the basic cations during the studied period (1987-2010), resulting in relative stability of the global weathering fluxes exported by the springs. Only the Ca2+ concentrations reflect a significant decrease in all the Strengbach springs since 1987, and the variations differ from one spring to another. The modeling results show that the decrease in Ca2+ in the Strengbach springs is due to the response of the water-rock interactions within the bedrock to the variations in the chemical composition of the soil solutions, which were characterized by a significant increase in pH and a decrease in Ca2+ concentrations between 1987 and 2010. The decrease in Ca2+ concentrations seen in the Strengbach springs is controlled by changes in the apatite dissolution rate and the compositions of clay minerals induced by the soil solution changes. The differences observed between the Ca2+ trends of the springs are related to changes in the residence time of the water supplying the different springs. The weak impact of the soil solution modifications on the dissolution rates of other primary minerals and on the bulk precipitation rates of the clay minerals explains the relative stability over time of the concentrations of the other cations and dissolved silica in the water derived from the Strengbach springs. Further, the hydrochemical simulations suggest that the chemostatic behavior of the Strengbach springs cannot be explained by the mobilization of waters that are close to chemical equilibrium, but rather by a hydrological control of the spring water residence times. Finally, a

  19. Weldon Spring, Missouri, Site Annual Report for Calendar Year 2015 June 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starr, Ken [U.S. Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Legacy Management (LM); Deyo, Yvonne [Navarro Research and Engineering, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-06-01

    1.1 Purpose and Scope. This report summarizes the activities, compliance status, annual inspection, and environmental monitoring results from calendar year 2015 for the Weldon Spring, Missouri, Site. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) prepares this annual report as part of the site’s long-term surveillance and maintenance (LTS&M) activities, in accordance with the requirements of the Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan for the Weldon Spring, Missouri, Site (LTS&M Plan) (DOE 2008a) and the Federal Facility Agreement for the Weldon Spring Site (DOE 2006). The Weldon Spring site is a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) site. 1.2 Site Description. The Weldon Spring site is located in St. Charles County, Missouri, about 30 miles west of St. Louis, Missouri (Figure 1). The site comprises two geographically distinct, DOE-owned properties: the former Weldon Spring Chemical Plant and Raffinate Pit sites (Chemical Plant) and the former Weldon Spring Quarry (Quarry). The former Chemical Plant is located about 2 miles southwest of the junction of Missouri State Route 94 and Interstate 64. The Quarry is about 4 miles southwest of the former Chemical Plant. Both sites are accessible from Missouri State Route 94. During the early 1940s, the Department of the Army acquired 17,232 acres of private land in St. Charles County for the construction of the Weldon Spring Ordnance Works facility. The former Ordnance Works site has since been divided into several contiguous areas under different ownership, as depicted in Figure 2. Current land use of the former Ordnance Works site includes the former Chemical Plant and Quarry, the U.S. Army Reserve Weldon Spring Training Area, the Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC), the Missouri Department of Natural Resources (MDNR) Division of State Parks (MDNR-Parks), Francis Howell High School, a St. Charles County highway maintenance (formerly Missouri Department of Transportation [Mo

  20. A Lagrangian View of Spring Phytoplankton Blooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kida, Shinichiro; Ito, Takamitsu

    2017-11-01

    The mechanisms of spring phytoplankton blooms are investigated from a Lagrangian framework by using a Lagrangian NPZD model that can track the movement and transfers of nutrient parcels in a turbulent environment. The model reveals that the onset of spring blooms depends on the cumulative euphotic age, which is the total time that inorganic nutrient is exposed to light before the photosynthetic conversion to phytoplankton biomass. A spring bloom, defined as a tenfold increase of near-surface phytoplankton, occurs when this cumulative euphotic age is approximately μeff-1·ln⁡10, where μeff is the effective growth rate in the euphotic layer, regardless of the underlying mechanism. If the turbulent layer depth is shallower than the critical depth and turbulence is strong, nutrient parcels accumulate enough light exposure through multiple entries to the sun-lit zone near the surface. If turbulence is weak, as that considered in the critical turbulence theory, the accumulation of the light exposure depends on the residence time of the nutrients parcels near the surface. The spectral shape of the cumulative euphotic age can clearly distinguish these two modes of spring blooms. The spectrum shows a peak at the theoretical growth timescale when multiple entries become important, while it shows a maximum near age zero that decays with age when the near-surface residence time becomes important. Mortality increases the cumulative euphotic age necessary for a bloom but does not affect the spectral shape, suggesting that it does not alter the primary mechanism behind the accumulation of cumulative euphotic age.

  1. Quarry residuals RI/FS scoping document. [Weldon Spring quarry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-10-01

    The purpose of this document is to serve as a planning tool for the implementation of the Quarry Residual Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) process and to provide direct input to revising and updating the 1988 Work Plan for the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP) Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study-Environmental Impact Statement for the Weldon Spring Site (RI/FS-EIS) (Peterson et al. 1988) for this effort. The scoping process is intended to outline the tasks necessary to develop and implement activities in compliance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act-National Environmental Policy Act (CERCLA-NEPA) process from detailed planning through the appropriate decision document. In addition to scoping the entire process, this document will serve as the primary tool for planning and accomplishing all activities to be developed in the Quarry Residual RI/FS Work Plan. Subsequent tasks are difficult to plan at this time. 10 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  2. Spring bloom onset in the Nordic Seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mignot, Alexandre; Ferrari, Raffaele; Mork, Kjell Arne

    2016-06-01

    The North Atlantic spring bloom is a massive annual growth event of marine phytoplankton, tiny free-floating algae that form the base of the ocean's food web and generates a large fraction of the global primary production of organic matter. The conditions that trigger the onset of the spring bloom in the Nordic Seas, at the northern edge of the North Atlantic, are studied using in situ data from six bio-optical floats released north of the Arctic Circle. It is often assumed that spring blooms start as soon as phytoplankton cells daily irradiance is sufficiently abundant that division rates exceed losses. The bio-optical float data instead suggest the tantalizing hypothesis that Nordic Seas blooms start when the photoperiod, the number of daily light hours experienced by phytoplankton, exceeds a critical value, independently of division rates. The photoperiod trigger may have developed at high latitudes where photosynthesis is impossible during polar nights and phytoplankton enters into a dormant stage in winter. While the first accumulation of biomass recorded by the bio-optical floats is consistent with the photoperiod hypothesis, it is possible that some biomass accumulation started before the critical photoperiod but at levels too low to be detected by the fluorometers. More precise observations are needed to test the photoperiod hypothesis.

  3. Rain-induced spring wheat harvest losses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, A.; Black, A. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1983-01-01

    When rain or a combination of rain and high humidity delay wheat harvest, losses can occur in grain yield and/or grain quality. Yield losses can result from shattering, from reduction in test weight, and in the case of windrowed grain, from rooting of sprouting grain at the soil: windrow contact. Losses in grain quality can result from reduction in test weight and from sprouting. Sprouting causes a degradation of grain proteins and starches, hence flour quality is reduced, and the grain price deteriorates to the value of feed grain. Although losses in grain yield and quality are rain-induced, these losses do not necessarily occur because a standing or windrowed crop is wetted by rain. Spike water concentration in hard red spring wheat must be increased to about 45-49% before sprouting is initiated in grain that has overcome dormancy. The time required to overcome this dormancy after the cultivar has dried to 12 to 14% water concentration differs with hard red spring cultivars. The effect of rain on threshing-ready standing and windrowed hard red spring wheat grain yeild and quality was evaluated. A goal was to develop the capability to forecast the extent of expected loss of grain yield and quality from specific climatic events that delay threshing.

  4. 49 CFR 213.139 - Spring rail frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Spring rail frogs. 213.139 Section 213.139..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TRACK SAFETY STANDARDS Track Structure § 213.139 Spring rail frogs. (a) The outer edge of a wheel tread shall not contact the gage side of a spring wing rail. (b) The toe of each...

  5. Thermal and chemical characteristics of hot water springs in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-02-15

    Feb 15, 2011 ... Keywords: thermal springs, South Africa, macro and micro-elements, geological controls. Introduction. A spring is .... features of the study areas in view of their impact on the physi- cal location of the springs and on .... rating the resultant solutions over open fires in clay pots' (Kent,. 1942: 35). According to ...

  6. The order-chaos-order sequence in the spring pendulum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Weele, J.P.; de Kleine, Elian

    1996-01-01

    We study the motions of a spring pendulum as a function of its two control parameters (the ratio of the spring and pendulum frequencies, and the energy). It is shown that in the limits for very small and very large parameter values the dynamics of the spring pendulum is predominantly regular, while

  7. Hydrochemical Characteristics of Springs in Oke–Igbo, Ondo State ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... parameter in which high coliform colonies were observed at the lower courses of each spring. The pH of the springs was generally low ranging from slightly acidic to acidic. The presence of bacteria count and Escherichia coli in the springs' water indicated fecal pollution, which could result in related water-borne diseases.

  8. Use of thermal springs for geochemical exploration in Ethiopia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hence, hot spring water anomalous in Au, Mn, Zn, Pb, Cu, Co and Ag could be a proxy for precious metal searching in epithermal systems associated with thermal springs. Keywords: Epithermal system, Ethiopian Rift Valley, geochemical exploration, thermal springs. Ethiopian Journal of Environmental Studies and ...

  9. Microbiological and chemical assessment of spring water from a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREG

    2013-06-20

    Jun 20, 2013 ... Assessment of spring water from Ikare-Akoko, a rural setting in southwest, Nigeria for microbial and chemical contaminants ... Key words: Rural setting, spring water, heterotrophic bacteria, coliform bacteria, physico-chemical properties, ..... logical quality of spring water depends on the source rock and how ...

  10. Thermal and chemical characteristics of hot water springs in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The temperatures at source vary from 30°C to 67.5°C. The springs are associated with faults and impermeable dykes and are assumed to be of meteoric origin. The mineral composition of the ... the ultimate use of the thermal springs. Keywords: thermal springs, South Africa, macro and micro-elements, geological controls ...

  11. Distribution of cultivated and uncultivated cyanobacteria and Chloroflexus-like bacteria in hot spring microbial mats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruff-Roberts, A. L.; Kuenen, J. G.; Ward, D. M.

    1994-01-01

    Oligodeoxynucleotide hybridization probes were developed to complement specific regions of the small subunit (SSU) rRNA sequences of cultivated and uncultivated cyanobacteria and Chloroflexus-like bacteria, which inhabit hot spring microbial mats. The probes were used to investigate the natural distribution of SSU rRNAs from these species in mats of Yellowstone hot springs of different temperatures and pHs as well as changes in SSU rRNA distribution resulting from 1-week in situ shifts in temperature, pH, and light intensity. Synechococcus lividus Y-7c-s SSU rRNA was detected only in the mat of a slightly acid spring, from which it may have been initially isolated, or when samples from a more alkaline spring were incubated in the more acid spring. Chloroflexus aurantiacus Y-400-fl SSU rRNA was detected only in a high-temperature mat sample from the alkaline Octopus Spring or when lower-temperature samples from this mat were incubated at the high-temperature site. SSU rRNAs of uncultivated species were more widely distributed. Temperature distributions and responses to in situ temperature shifts suggested that some of the uncultivated cyanobacteria might be adapted to high-, moderate-, and low-temperature ranges whereas an uncultivated Chloroflexus-like bacterium appears to have broad temperature tolerance. SSU rRNAs of all uncultivated species inhabiting a 48 to 51 degrees C Octopus Spring mat site were most abundant in the upper 1 mm and were not detected below a 2.5-to 3.5-mm depth, a finding consistent with their possible phototrophic nature. However, the effects of light intensity reduction on these SSU rRNAs were variable, indicating the difficulty of demonstrating a phototrophic phenotype in light reduction experiments.

  12. Utilities:Water:Spring Water Lines at Pipe Spring National Monument, Arizona (Utilities.gdb:Water:springwtr)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This feature class represents spring water lines at Pipe Spring National Monument, Arizona. The data were collected using Trimble Global Positioning System (GPS)...

  13. Interannual influence of spring phenological transitions on the water use efficiency of forest ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jiaxin; Wang, Ying

    2017-04-01

    Climate change has significantly influenced the productivity of terrestrial ecosystems through water cycles. Understanding the phenological regulation mechanisms underlying coupled carbon-water cycles is important for improving ecological assessments and projecting terrestrial ecosystem responses and feedback to climate change. In this study, we present an analysis of the interannual relationships among flux-based spring phenological transitions (referred as photosynthetic onset) and water use efficiency (WUE) in North America and Europe using 166 site-years of data from 22 flux sites, including 10 deciduous broadleaf forest (DBF) and 12 evergreen needleleaf forest (ENF) ecosystems. We found that the WUE responses to variations in spring phenological transitions differed substantially across plant functional types (PFTs) and growth periods. During the early spring (defined as one month from spring onset) in the DBF ecosystem, photosynthetic onset dominated changes in WUE by dominating gross primary production (GPP), with one day of advanced onset increasing the WUE by 0.037 gC kg-1H2O in early spring. For the ENF sites, although advanced photosynthetic onset also significantly promoted GPP, earlier onset did not have a significant positive impact on WUE in early spring because it was not significantly correlated to evapotranspiration (ET), which is a more dominant factor for WUE than GPP across the ENF sites. Statistically significant correlations were not observed between interannual variability in photosynthetic onset and WUE for either the DBF or ENF ecosystems following a prolonged period after photosynthetic onset. For the DBF sites, the interannual variability of photosynthetic onset provided a better explanation of the variations in WUE (ca. 51.4%) compared with climatic factors, although this was only applicable to the early spring. For the ENF sites, photosynthetic onset variations did not provide a better explanation of the interannual WUE variations

  14. Springs as Ecosystems: Clarifying Groundwater Dependence and Wetland Status (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, L.; Springer, A. E.; Ledbetter, J. D.

    2013-12-01

    Springs ecosystems are among the most productive, biologically diverse and culturally important ecosystems on Earth. Net annual productivity of some springs exceeds 5 kg/m^2/yr. Springs support an estimated 19% of the endangered species and numerous rare taxa in the United States. Springs serve as keystone ecosystems in arid regions, and as cornerstones of indigenous cultural well-being, history, economics, and aesthetics. Despite their significance, the ecosystem ecology and stewardship of springs have received scant scientific and public attention, resulting in loss or impairment of 50-90% of the springs in many regions, both arid and temperate. Six reasons contribute to the lack of attention to springs. Springs are poorly mapped because: 1) their generally small size is less than the pixel area of most remote sensing analyses and they are overlooked; and 2) springs detection is often limited by emergence on cliff faces, beneath heavy vegetation cover, or under water. In addition, 3) high levels of ecosystem complexity at springs require multidisciplinary team approaches for inventory, assessment, and research, but collaboration between the fields of hydrogeology and ecology has been limited. 4) Protectionism by land owners and organizations that manage springs limits the availability information, preventing regional assessment of status. 5) Prior to recent efforts, the absence of a descriptive lexicon of springs types has limited discussion about variation in ecological characteristics and processes. 6) Neither regarded entirely as groundwater or as surface water, springs fall 'between jurisdictional cracks' and are not subject to clear legal and regulatory oversight. With regards to the latter point, two jurisdictional phrases have reduced scientific understanding and stewardship of springs ecosystems: 'jurisdictional wetlands' and 'groundwater-dependent ecosystems' (GDEs). Most springs have insufficient monitoring data to establish perenniality or the range of

  15. High autumn temperature delays spring bud burst in boreal trees, counterbalancing the effect of climatic warming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heide, O. M. [Agricultural Univesity of Norway, Department of Biology and Nature Conservation, As (Norway)

    2003-09-01

    The effect of temperature during short-day dormancy induction on the duration and stability of bud dormancy was examined in three boreal tree species (2 birches and 1 alder) grown in a controlled environment. The phenology of the latitudinal range of birch populations, and the relationship between spring bud burst and autumn and spring temperatures were also studied. Results showed that during short-day dormancy induction in the autumn high temperatures delayed bud burst in the following spring in both controlled and natural environments. It is suggested that this response to higher autumn temperatures may be a manifestation of a general synergism between high temperature and short-day photoperiodic processes, and may be an adaptive mechanism common to boreal trees. It is further conjectured that this mechanism may be important in counterbalancing the potentially adverse effects of higher winter temperatures on dormancy stability of boreal trees during climate warming. 23 refs., 2 tabs., 4 figs.

  16. Integrated Field Analyses of Thermal Springs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shervais, K.; Young, B.; Ponce-Zepeda, M. M.; Rosove, S.

    2011-12-01

    A group of undergraduate researchers through the SURE internship offered by the Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) have examined thermal springs in southern Idaho, northern Utah as well as mud volcanoes in the Salton Sea, California. We used an integrated approach to estimate the setting and maximum temperature, including water chemistry, Ipad-based image and data-base management, microbiology, and gas analyses with a modified Giggenbach sampler.All springs were characterized using GISRoam (tmCogent3D). We are performing geothermometry calculations as well as comparisons with temperature gradient data on the results while also analyzing biological samples. Analyses include water temperature, pH, electrical conductivity, and TDS measured in the field. Each sample is sealed and chilled and delivered to a water lab within 12 hours.Temperatures are continuously monitored with the use of Solinst Levelogger Juniors. Through partnership with a local community college geology club, we receive results on a monthly basis and are able to process initial data earlier in order to evaluate data over a longer time span. The springs and mudpots contained microbial organisms which were analyzed using methods of single colony isolation, polymerase chain reaction, and DNA sequencing showing the impact of the organisms on the springs or vice versa. Soon we we will collect gas samples at sites that show signs of gas. This will be taken using a hybrid of the Giggenbach method and our own methods. Drawing gas samples has proven a challenge, however we devised a method to draw out gas samples utilizing the Giggenbach flask, transferring samples to glass blood sample tubes, replacing NaOH in the Giggenbach flask, and evacuating it in the field for multiple samples using a vacuum pump. We also use a floating platform devised to carry and lower a levelogger, to using an in-line fuel filter from a tractor in order to keep mud from contaminating the equipment.The use of raster

  17. Assessment of spring cranioplasty biomechanics in sagittal craniosynostosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghi, Alessandro; Schievano, Silvia; Rodriguez Florez, Naiara; McNicholas, Roisin; Rodgers, Will; Ponniah, Allan; James, Greg; Hayward, Richard; Dunaway, David; Jeelani, N U Owase

    2017-11-01

    OBJECTIVE Scaphocephaly secondary to sagittal craniosynostosis has been treated in recent years with spring-assisted cranioplasty, an innovative approach that leverages the use of metallic spring distractors to reshape the patient skull. In this study, a population of patients who had undergone spring cranioplasty for the correction of scaphocephaly at the Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children was retrospectively analyzed to systematically assess spring biomechanical performance and kinematics in relation to spring model, patient age, and outcomes over time. METHODS Data from 60 patients (49 males, mean age at surgery 5.2 ± 0.9 months) who had received 2 springs for the treatment of isolated sagittal craniosynostosis were analyzed. The opening distance of the springs at the time of insertion and removal was retrieved from the surgical notes and, during the implantation period, from planar radiographs obtained at 1 day postoperatively and at the 3-week follow-up. The force exerted by the spring to the patient skull at each time point was derived after mechanical testing of each spring model-3 devices with the same geometry but different wire thicknesses. Changes in the cephalic index between preoperatively and the 3-week follow-up were recorded. RESULTS Stiffer springs were implanted in older patients (p springs were used (p spring models, however, the devices all plateaued. Indeed, regardless of patient age or spring model, after 10 days from insertion, all the devices were open. CONCLUSIONS Results in this study provide biomechanical insights into spring-assisted cranioplasty and could help to improve spring design and follow-up strategy in the future.

  18. A Preliminary Investigation of Caffeinated Alcohol Use During Spring Break.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linden-Carmichael, Ashley N; Lau-Barraco, Cathy

    2016-06-06

    Caffeinated alcoholic beverages (e.g., Red Bull and vodka) are popular but associated with negative consequences. CABs may be particularly popular during Spring Break, a potentially risky social event. We aimed to identify the prevalence of Spring Break caffeinated alcohol use, determine how caffeinated alcohol use Spring Break drinking habits differ from usual, and examine the association between Spring Break caffeinated alcohol use and alcohol-related problems. Data were collected from 95 college students during March of 2013 and 2014. Students completed questionnaires of their alcohol and caffeinated alcohol use before and during Spring Break and Spring Break alcohol-related problems. Approximately 54% of students used caffeinated alcohol during Spring Break. Spring Break caffeinated alcohol use was associated with more alcohol-related problems, even after controlling for other alcohol consumed and Spring Break vacation status. Caffeinated alcoholic beverages are commonly consumed during Spring Break and their use uniquely predicted harms. Prevention efforts placed on caffeinated alcoholic beverage users may be helpful in reducing Spring Break-related harms.

  19. Characteristics Analysis and Testing of SMA Spring Actuator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianzuo Ma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The biasing form two-way shape memory alloy (SMA actuator composed of SMA spring and steel spring is analyzed. Based on the force equilibrium equation, the relationship between load capacity of SMA spring and geometric parameters is established. In order to obtain the characteristics of SMA spring actuator, the output force and output displacement of SMA spring under different temperatures are analyzed by the theoretical model and the experimental method. Based on the shape memory effect of SMA, the relationship of the SMA spring actuator's output displacement with the temperature, the stress and strain, the material parameters, and the size parameters is established. The results indicate that the trend of theoretical results is basically consistent with the experimental data. The output displacement of SMA spring actuator is increased with the increasing temperature.

  20. Stiffness and design for strength of trapezoidal Belleville springs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Niels Leergaard; Pedersen, Pauli

    2011-01-01

    Belleville springs or coned disc springs are commonly used in machine design. The geometric dimensions of the spring and the determination of non-linear force–displacement curve are regulated by different standards. However, the theory behind Belleville spring design standards is founded on a study...... published in 1936. Furthermore, the common spring design with cross-sections of uniform thickness poses problems in terms of non-uniformity of stress distribution. In view of this, non-linear three-dimensional finite element analyses of spring designs including uniform or variable thickness are carried out...... in this paper. Finite element results are compared with analytical predictions and critically analysed in terms of the effect of Poisson ratio, overall stiffness, and stress distribution in the spring. This is done in order to verify the range of validity of design standards. Finite element analysis emerges...

  1. Acidification and Increasing CO2 Flux Associated with Five, Springs Coast, Florida Springs (1991-2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera, Kira E.; Robbins, Lisa L.

    2017-01-01

    Scientists from the South West Florida Management District (SWFWMD) acquired and analyzed over 20 years of seasonally-sampled hydrochemical data from five first-order-magnitude (springs that discharge 2.83 m3 s-1 or more) coastal springs located in west-central Florida. These data were subsequently obtained by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) for further analyses and interpretation. The spring study sites (Chassahowitzka, Homosassa, Kings Bay, Rainbow, and Weeki Wachee), which are fed by the Floridan Aquifer system and discharge into the Gulf of Mexico were investigated to identify temporal and spatial trends of pH, alkalinity, partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2) and CO2 flux.

  2. Preliminary hydrogeologic assessment near Tassi and Pakoon Springs, western part of Grand Canyon-Parashant National Monument, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truini, Margot

    2013-01-01

    Tassi and Pakoon Springs are both in the Grand Wash Trough in the western part of Grand Canyon-Parashant National Monument on the Arizona Strip. The monument is jointly managed by the National Park Service (NPS) and the Bureau of Land Management. This study was in response to NPS’s need to better understand the influence from regional increases in groundwater withdrawals near Grand Canyon-Parashant on the groundwater discharge from Tassi and Pakoon Springs. The climate of the Arizona Strip is generally semiarid to arid, and springs in the monument provide the water for the fragile ecosystems that are commonly separated by large areas of dry washes in canyons with pinyon and juniper. Available hydrogeologic data from previous investigations included water levels from the few existing wells, location information for springs, water chemistry from springs, and geologic maps. Available groundwater-elevation data from the wells and springs in the monument indicate that groundwater in the Grand Wash Trough is moving from north to south, discharging to springs and into the Colorado River. Groundwater may also be moving from east to west from Paleozoic rocks in the Grand Wash Cliffs into sedimentary deposits in the Grand Wash Trough. Finally, groundwater may be moving from the northwest in the Mesoproterozoic crystalline rocks of the Virgin Mountains into the northern part of the Grand Wash Trough. Water discharging from Tassi and Pakoon Springs has a major-ion chemistry similar to that of other springs in the western part of Grand Canyon-Parashant. Stable-isotopic signatures for oxygen-18 and hydrogen-2 are depleted in the water from both Tassi and Pakoon Springs in comparison to other springs on the Arizona Strip. Tassi Spring discharges from multiple seeps along the Wheeler Fault, and the depleted isotopic signatures suggest that water may be flowing from multiple places into Lake Mead and seems to have a higher elevation or an older climate source. Elevated water

  3. Microbial Biosignatures in High Iron Thermal Springs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parenteau, M. N.; Embaye, T.; Jahnke, L. L.; Cady, S. L.

    2003-12-01

    The emerging anoxic source waters at Chocolate Pots hot springs in Yellowstone National Park contain 2.6 to 11.2 mg/L Fe(II) and are 51-54° C and pH 5.5-6.0. These waters flow down the accumulating iron deposits and over three major phototrophic mat communities: Synechococcus/Chloroflexus at 51-54° C, Pseudanabaena at 51-54° C, and a narrow Oscillatoria at 36-45° C. We are assessing the contribution of the phototrophs to biosignature formation in this high iron system. These biosignatures can be used to assess the biological contribution to ancient iron deposits on Earth (e.g. Precambrian Banded Iron Formations) and, potentially, to those found on Mars. Most studies to date have focused on chemotrophic iron-oxidizing communities; however, recent research has demonstrated that phototrophs have a significant physiological impact on these iron thermal springs (Pierson et al. 1999, Pierson and Parenteau 2000, and Trouwborst et al., 2003). We completed a survey of the microfossils, biominerals, biofabrics, and lipid biomarkers in the phototrophic mats and stromatolitic iron deposits using scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM), energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS). The Synechococcus/Chloroflexus mat was heavily encrusted with iron silicates while the narrow Oscillatoria mat was encrusted primarily with iron oxides. Encrustation of the cells increased with depth in the mats. Amorphous 2-line ferrihydrite is the primary precipitate in the spring and the only iron oxide mineral associated with the mats. Goethite, hematite, and siderite were detected in dry sediment samples on the face of the main iron deposit. Analysis of polar lipid fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) generated a suite of lipid biomarkers. The Synechococcus/Chloroflexus mat contained two mono-unsaturated isomers of n-C18:1 with smaller amounts of polyunsaturated n-C18:2, characteristic of cyanobacteria

  4. Scoping assessment of radiological doses to aquatic organisms and wildlife -- N Springs. [N Springs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poston, T.M.; Soldat, J.K.

    1992-10-01

    Estimated does rates were determined for endemic biota inhabiting the N Springs area based primarily on spring water data collected from the first 6 months of 1991. Radiological dose estimates were computed from measured values of specific radionuclides and modeled levels of radionuclides using established computer codes. The highest doses were predicted in hypothetical populations of clams, fish-eating ducks, and rabbits. The calculated dose estimates did not exceed 1 rad/d, an administrative dose rate established by the US Department of Energy for the protection of native aquatic biota. An administrative dose rate has not been established for terrestrial wildlife.

  5. Penetrating ocular trauma from trampoline spring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spokes, David; Siddiqui, Salina; Vize, Colin

    2010-02-01

    The case is presented of a 12-year old boy who sustained severe penetrating ocular trauma while playing on a domestic trampoline. A main spring broke under tension and the hook had struck the eye at high velocity and penetrated the sclera. Primary repair was undertaken but on review it became apparent the eye could not be salvaged. Evisceration was carried out and an orbital implant was placed. Post-operative cosmesis is acceptable. This type of injury has not been reported before. Adult supervision of children on trampolines is recommended to minimise the chance of serious injury.

  6. The United States and the Arab Spring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timo Kivimäki

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This article reveals, by studying correlative relationships between US regime support and regime properties, that the US foreign policy in the Middle East has traditionally helped governments to limit the political participation of Islamists, communists, enemies of Israel and populations that could be hostile to the US oil interests. This way the US economic and strategic security interests have contributed to human insecurity in the region. With the exception of the last interest, the US has relaxed its support for repression of the above-mentioned groups. This seems to be one of the international factors that made the Arab Spring possible.

  7. Novosadski golozrni, a spring oat variety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pržulj Novo

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The naked oat variety Novosadski golozrni was developed from a cross between the variety Adam and a spring-type naked oat line from Canada. The variety is early, medium tall, with excellent resistance to lodging. The yield of Novosadski golozrni is 30-40% lower than that of the hulled standard and it is to the largest measure dependent on the interaction variety x year x location. The variety has high contents of proteins and fats (19.2% DM and 6.2% DM, respectively and a low cellulose content (2.8% DM. .

  8. Getting started with Spring Framework a hands-on guide to begin developing applications using Spring Framework

    CERN Document Server

    Sharma, J

    2016-01-01

    Getting started with Spring Framework is a hands-on guide to begin developing applications using Spring Framework. The examples (consisting of 74 sample projects) that accompany this book are based on Spring 4.3 and Java 8. You can download the examples described in this book from the following GitHub project:github.com/getting-started-with-spring/3rdEdition This book is meant for Java developers with little or no knowledge of Spring Framework. Getting started with Spring Framework, Third Edition has been updated to reflect changes in Spring 4.3 and also includes new chapters on Java-based configuration and Spring Data (covers Spring Data JPA and Spring Data MongoDB projects). The existing chapters have been revised to include information on Java-based configuration. The book also includes some new information on bean definition profiles, importing application context XML files, lazy autowiring, creating custom qualifier annotations, JSR 349 annotations, spring-messaging module, Java 8's Optional type, and s...

  9. Contrasting and interacting changes in simulated spring and summer carbon cycle extremes in European ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sippel, Sebastian; Forkel, Matthias; Rammig, Anja; Thonicke, Kirsten; Flach, Milan; Heimann, Martin; Otto, Friederike E. L.; Reichstein, Markus; Mahecha, Miguel D.

    2017-07-01

    Climate extremes have the potential to cause extreme responses of terrestrial ecosystem functioning. However, it is neither straightforward to quantify and predict extreme ecosystem responses, nor to attribute these responses to specific climate drivers. Here, we construct a factorial experiment based on a large ensemble of process-oriented ecosystem model simulations driven by a regional climate model (12 500 model years in 1985-2010) in six European regions. Our aims are to (1) attribute changes in the intensity and frequency of simulated ecosystem productivity extremes (EPEs) to recent changes in climate extremes, CO2 concentration, and land use, and to (2) assess the effect of timing and seasonal interaction on the intensity of EPEs. Evaluating the ensemble simulations reveals that (1) recent trends in EPEs are seasonally contrasting: spring EPEs show consistent trends towards increased carbon uptake, while trends in summer EPEs are predominantly negative in net ecosystem productivity (i.e. higher net carbon release under drought and heat in summer) and close-to-neutral in gross productivity. While changes in climate and its extremes (mainly warming) and changes in CO2 increase spring productivity, changes in climate extremes decrease summer productivity neutralizing positive effects of CO2. Furthermore, we find that (2) drought or heat wave induced carbon losses in summer (i.e. negative EPEs) can be partly compensated by a higher uptake in the preceding spring in temperate regions. Conversely, however, carry-over effects from spring to summer that arise from depleted soil moisture exacerbate the carbon losses caused by climate extremes in summer, and are thus undoing spring compensatory effects. While the spring-compensation effect is increasing over time, the carry-over effect shows no trend between 1985-2010. The ensemble ecosystem model simulations provide a process-based interpretation and generalization for spring-summer interacting carbon cycle effects

  10. Theoretical Predictions of Springing and Their Comparison with Full Scale Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gu, X.; Storhaug, G.; Vidic-Perunovic, Jelena

    2003-01-01

    The present paper considers a large ocean going ship with significant springing responses, which have made a large contribution to the fatigue cracking for certain structural details. Four different theories for predicting ship responses and associated computer programs for predictions of springing...... are described. These theories represent four different approaches with various characteristics, e.g. linear, scond-order, nonlinear, frequency-domain, time-domain, two-dimensional and three-dimensional, in calculating hydrodynamic loads and vibrations. The numerical programs, WASIM (DNV), SOST (DTU), SINO...... (CSSRC) and VERES (Marintek), have been well validated for ordinary ship responses. Assumptions regarding how the different programs are sued in the present calculations are provided. Sensitivity studies are carried out and the main results are presented. A selected number of full-scale measurements...

  11. A test for the relative strength of maternal and stock effects in spring Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) from two different hatcheries (Study site: Warm Springs Hatchery; Stocks: Warm Springs Hatchery and Carson Hatchery; Year class: 1993): Chapter 10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetzel, Lisa A.; Rubin, Stephen P.; Reisenbichler, Reginald R.; Stenberg, Karl D.; Rubin, Stephen P.; Reisenbichler, Reginald R.; Wetzel, Lisa A.; Hayes, Michael C.

    2012-01-01

    An experiment was undertaken to determine the relative strength of maternal and stock effects in Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) reared in a common environment, as a companion study to our investigation of hatchery and wild Chinook salmon. Pure-strain and reciprocal crosses were made between two hatchery stocks (Carson and Warm Springs National Fish Hatcheries). The offspring were reared together in one of the hatcheries to the smolt stage, and then were transferred to a seawater rearing facility (USGS-Marrowstone Field Station). Differences in survival, growth and disease prevalence were assessed. Fish with Carson parentage grew to greater size at the hatchery and in seawater than the pure-strain Warm Springs fish, but showed higher mortality at introduction to seawater. The analyses of maternal and stock effects were inconclusive, but the theoretical responses to different combinations of maternal and stock effects may be useful in interpreting stock comparison studies.

  12. Spring and Autumn Phenological Variability across Environmental Gradients of Great Smoky Mountains National Park, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven P. Norman

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Mountainous regions experience complex phenological behavior along climatic, vegetational and topographic gradients. In this paper, we use a MODIS time series of the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI to understand the causes of variations in spring and autumn timing from 2000 to 2015, for a landscape renowned for its biological diversity. By filtering for cover type, topography and disturbance history, we achieved an improved understanding of the effects of seasonal weather variation on land surface phenology (LSP. Elevational effects were greatest in spring and were more important than site moisture effects. The spring and autumn NDVI of deciduous forests were found to increase in response to antecedent warm temperatures, with evidence of possible cross-seasonal lag effects, including possible accelerated green-up after cold Januarys and early brown-down following warm springs. Areas that were disturbed by the hemlock woolly adelgid and a severe tornado showed a weaker sensitivity to cross-year temperature and precipitation variation, while low severity wildland fire had no discernable effect. Use of ancillary datasets to filter for disturbance and vegetation type improves our understanding of vegetation’s phenological responsiveness to climate dynamics across complex environmental gradients.

  13. Study of the Mechanical Properties and Vibration Isolation Performance of a Molecular Spring Isolator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muchun Yu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular Spring Isolator (MSI is a novel passive vibration isolation technique, providing High-Static-Low-Dynamic (HSLD stiffness based on the use of molecular spring material. The molecular spring material is a solid-liquid mixture consisting of water and hydrophobic nanoporous materials. Under a certain level of external pressure, water molecules can intrude into the hydrophobic pores of nanoporous materials, developing an additional solid-liquid interface. Such interfaces are able to store, release, and transform mechanical energy, providing properties like mechanical spring. Having been only recently developed, the basic mechanic properties of a MSI have not been studied in depth. This paper focuses on the stiffness influence factors, the dynamic frequency response, and the vibration isolation performance of a MSI; these properties help engineers to design MSIs for different engineering applications. First, the working mechanism of a MSI is introduced from a three-dimensional general view of the water infiltration massive hydrophobic nanoporous pores. Next, a wide range of influence factors on the stiffness properties of MSI are studied. In addition, the frequency response functions (FRFs of the MSI vibration isolation system are studied utilizing the matching method based on equivalent piecewise linear (EPL system. Finally, the vibration isolation properties of MSI are evaluated by force transmissibility.

  14. The Egyptian Arab Spring and Political Islam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman Gad El ashkar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This study elaborates and analyzes the phenomenon and concept of political Islam, the reasons of the increased role of the Islamists and their political and reformist tendencies in the light of the Egyptian revolution of Arab Spring, reasons and the main factors that have contributed on their advent into power and their influence in that time, the issue of the application of Islamic Sharia and complex realities about this dilemma. The revolutions of Arab Spring, including the Egyptian revolution, are considered one of the most important and most dangerous events in the XXI century after the terrorist attacks of 11 September 2001, not only in the Middle East but throughout the world because of their impact on peace and global security. The growth of the phenomenon of political Islam and the advent of Islamists into power in Egypt has represented one of the most remarkable features of this sudden revolution. No doubt that the issue of the relationship between Islam and the state's political system raises many confusing questions for many people. In this sense the importance of this study will directly identify the fact that the leadership of Islamists in Egypt is not the implementation of Islamic Sharia but their movements and ideology.

  15. Hydrosalinity studies of the Virgin River, Dixie Hot Springs, and Littlefield Springs, Utah, Arizona, and Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerner, Steven J.; Thiros, Susan A.; Gerner, Steven J.; Thiros, Susan A.

    2014-01-01

    The Virgin River contributes a substantial amount of dissolved solids (salt) to the Colorado River at Lake Mead in the lower Colorado River Basin. Degradation of Colorado River water by the addition of dissolved solids from the Virgin River affects the suitability of the water for municipal, industrial, and agricultural use within the basin. Dixie Hot Springs in Utah are a major localized source of dissolved solids discharging to the Virgin River. The average measured discharge from Dixie Hot Springs during 2009–10 was 11.0 cubic feet per second (ft3/s), and the average dissolved-solids concentration was 9,220 milligrams per liter (mg/L). The average dissolved-solids load—a measurement that describes the mass of salt that is transported per unit of time—from Dixie Hot Springs during this period was 96,200 tons per year (ton/yr). Annual dissolved-solids loads were estimated at 13 monitoring sites in the Virgin River Basin from streamflow data and discrete measurements of dissolved-solids concentrations and (or) specific conductance. Eight of the sites had the data needed to estimate annual dissolved-solids loads for water years (WYs) 1999 through 2010. During 1999–2010, the smallest dissolved-solids loads in the Virgin River were upstream of Dixie Hot Springs (59,900 ton/yr, on average) and the largest loads were downstream of Littlefield Springs (298,200 ton/yr, on average). Annual dissolved-solids loads were smallest during 2002–03, which was a period of below normal precipitation. Annual dissolved-solids loads were largest during 2005—a year that included a winter rain storm that resulted in flooding throughout much of the Virgin River Basin. An average seepage loss of 26.7 ft3/s was calculated from analysis of monthly average streamflow from July 1998 to September 2010 in the Virgin River for the reach that extends from just upstream of the Utah/Arizona State line to just above the Virgin River Gorge Narrows. Seepage losses from three river reaches

  16. Wildfire may increase habitat quality for spring Chinook salmon in the Wenatchee River subbasin, WA, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flitcroft, Rebecca L; Falke, Jeffrey A.; Reeves, Gordon H.; Hessburg, Paul F.; McNyset, Kris M.; Benda, Lee E.

    2016-01-01

    which in-stream habitat for most life stages has a consistently positive response to fire. This compares to the historic distribution of spring Chinook, in which in-stream habitat exhibited a variable response to fire, including decreases in habitat quality overall or for specific life stages. This suggests that as the distribution of spring Chinook has decreased, they now occupy those areas with the most positive potential response to fire. Our work shows the potentially positive link between wildfire and aquatic habitat that supports forest managers in setting broader goals for fire management, perhaps leading to less fire suppression in some situations.

  17. Coupled Iron and Sulfur Transformations in Hydrothermal Springs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, E. S.; Amenabar, M.; Roden, E. E.

    2014-12-01

    Iron (Fe) and sulfur (S) compounds are common constituents of terrestrial hydrothermal systems. The transformation of Fe and S compounds is inferred to be an ancient mechanism of energy conservation that is still represented in extant life inhabiting contemporary hydrothermal environments. While substantial research has been conducted to uncover the ability of microorganisms to couple Fe and S transformations with other biogeochemical cycles (e.g., H, O, C cycles) in hydrothermal environments, few studies have focused on the interplay between the Fe and S cycles. In particular, a paucity of studies has been conducted on this phenomenon in acidic high temperature ecosystems despite the common co-occurrence of Fe and S in these environments. Here, we report the isolation and physiological characterization of a metabolically diverse thermoacidiphilic and autotrophic archaeon from an acidic hot spring environment in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) that is capable of both direct and indirect coupling of the Fe and S cycles. Growth experiments indicate differential attachment requirements depending on the mode of growth and imply the importance of intermediate sulfur species in supporting its metabolism. Genomic analyses confirm the metabolic plasticity of this strain and suggest numerous other mechanisms by which this organism may exploit other geochemical cycles during Fe or S dependent growth. Cultivation and cultivation independent approaches suggest that the distribution of this archaeon is widespread in Fe and S rich hot spring environments in YNP and is likely a keystone population in these environments, responsible for a large proportion of primary productivity. These results underscore the utility of integrating geochemical, cultivation, physiological, and genomic approaches in understanding biogeochemical cycling in volcanic environments.

  18. The origin of neap-spring tidal cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvale, E.P.

    2006-01-01

    The origin of oceanic tides is a basic concept taught in most introductory college-level sedimentology/geology, oceanography, and astronomy courses. Tides are typically explained in the context of the equilibrium tidal theory model. Yet this model does not take into account real tides in many parts of the world. Not only does the equilibrium tidal model fail to explicate amphidromic circulation, it also does not explain diurnal tides in low latitude positions. It likewise fails to explain the existence of tide-dominated areas where neap-spring cycles are synchronized with the 27.32-day orbital cycle of the Moon (tropical month), rather than with the more familiar 29.52-day cycle of lunar phases (synodic month). Both types of neap-spring cycles can be recognized in the rock record. A complete explanation of the origin of tides should include a discussion of dynamic tidal theory. In the dynamic tidal model, tides resulting from the motions of the Moon in its orbit around the Earth and the Earth in its orbit around the Sun are modeled as products of the combined effects of a series of phantom satellites. The movement of each of these satellites, relative to the Earth's equator, creates its own tidal wave that moves around an amphidromic point. Each of these waves is referred to as a tidal constituent. The geometries of the ocean basins determine which of these constituents are amplified. Thus, the tide-raising potential for any locality on Earth can be conceptualized as the result of a series of tidal constituents specific to that region. A better understanding of tidal cycles opens up remarkable opportunities for research on tidal deposits with implications for, among other things, a more complete understanding of the tidal dynamics responsible for sediment transport and deposition, changes in Earth-Moon distance through time, and the possible influences tidal cycles may exert on organisms. ?? 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Biogeographic Congruency among Bacterial Communities from Terrestrial Sulfidic Springs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brendan eHeadd

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Terrestrial sulfidic springs support diverse microbial communities by serving as stable conduits for geochemically diverse and nutrient-rich subsurface waters. Microorganisms that colonize terrestrial springs likely originate from groundwater, but may also be sourced from the surface. As such, the biogeographic distribution of microbial communities inhabiting sulfidic springs should be controlled by a combination of spring geochemistry and surface and subsurface transport mechanisms, and not necessarily geographic proximity to other springs. We examined the bacterial diversity of seven springs to test the hypothesis that occurrence of taxonomically similar microbes, important to the sulfur cycle, at each spring is controlled by geochemistry. Complementary Sanger sequencing and 454 pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes retrieved five proteobacterial classes, and Bacteroidetes, Chlorobi, Chloroflexi, and Firmicutes phyla from all springs, which suggested the potential for a core sulfidic spring microbiome. Among the putative sulfide-oxidizing groups (Epsilonproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria, up to 83% of the sequences from geochemically similar springs clustered together. Abundant populations of Hydrogenimonas-like or Sulfurovum-like spp. (Epsilonproteobacteria occurred with abundant Thiothrix and Thiofaba spp. (Gammaproteobacteria, but Arcobacter-like and Sulfurimonas spp. (Epsilonproteobacteria occurred with less abundant gammaproteobacterial populations. These distribution patterns confirmed that geochemistry rather than biogeography regulates bacterial dominance at each spring. Potential biogeographic controls were related to paleogeologic sedimentation patterns that could control long-term microbial transport mechanisms that link surface and subsurface environments. Knowing the composition of a core sulfidic spring microbial community could provide a way to monitor diversity changes if a system is threatened by anthropogenic processes or

  20. Comparative germination of Tamarix ramosissima spring and summer seeds

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Cheng; Wei, Yan; Yang, Meilin

    2011-01-01

    Tamarix ramosissima has bi-seasonal flowering and fruit-setting characteristics. This study compared the morphology and germination characteristics of seeds from Tamarix ramosissima plants during the spring flowering period and the summer flowering period. The results are as follows: there is no significant difference in morphology, such as size and thousand-seed weight, between seeds from different the spring and summer flowering periods. Freshly harvested spring and summer flowering period ...

  1. Effects of springs on a pendulum electromechanical energy harvester

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud Notué Kadjie

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies a model of energy harvester that consists of an electromechanical pendulum system subjected to nonlinear springs. The output power is analyzed in terms of the intrinsic parameters of the device leading to optimal parameters for energy harvesting. It is found that in an appropriate range of the springs constant, the power attains higher values as compared to the case without springs. The dynamical behavior of the device shows transition to chaos.

  2. Closure of large midline diastema by a "HIV-Spring".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harikrishnan, Pandurangan

    2015-01-01

    Midline diastema is a common orthodontic problem in mixed dentition caused by various factors like genetic, supernumery teeth, abnormal frenum attachment, habits and microdontia etc. Large diastemas need closure for the eruption of adjacent teeth. I present here a newly designed customized self active HIV-Spring (Hari Inverted 'V' Spring) for closing a large diastema with minimum orthodontic materials and less activation visits. The spring can be modfied for the three dimensional movement of central incisors.

  3. Analysis of Composite Leaf Spring Enhanced With Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Ganesan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Weight reduction is now the main issue in automobile industries. In this work due to reduce the weight of steel spring with composite leaf spring due to high strength ratio is need to improve. The main aim is to compare to the load carrying capacity, stiffness and weight savings of composite leaf spring with that of steel leaf spring at rated-load and over-load condition. The analysis has been carried out for the leaf spring made up of steel and Composite materials. Composite specimens are fabricated with two different staking sequences like the (resin with clay and enhanced with Nanoparticles. The thickness and width for constant cross section is maintained on the moulding techniques. The design of multi leaf spring was modeled in PRO-E and imported in ANSYS 14.5.the dimensions of an existing multi leaf spring is taken for modeling and analysis of a laminated composite multi leaf spring with different composite sequence materials subjected to the same load as that of steel spring.

  4. Analytical Technique of Selection of Constructive Parameters Pneumatichydraulic Springs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Tsipilev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article "Technique for Analytical Selection of Design Parameters of Pneumatichydraulic Springs concerns the ride smoothness of high-speed vehicles. Author of article Tsipilev A.A. is an assistant at chair "Multi-purpose Tracked Vehicles and Mobile Robots" of BMSTU. The article represents a synthesis of known information on the springing systems and an analysis of relation between spring design data and running gear. It describes standard units of running gear of vehicle in the context of springing systems. Classification of springing systems is considered. Modernization general policy for existing suspensions and prospects for creation of new ones are given. The article considers a design of various pneumatic-hydraulic springs to be set on domestic tracked vehicles. A developed technique allows us to have elastic characteristics of pneumatic-hydraulic springs of various types using these design data and kinematics of the running gear. The article provides recommendations to calculate characteristics of springing systems. The adequacy analysis of the given technique based on the comparison of real and rated characteristics of the existing suspension is conducted. This article can be useful to the experts dealing with springing systems of wheel and tracked vehicles.

  5. MEMS Variable Stiffness Spring and Its Application in Fuze

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Sui

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available MEMS processing technology can manufacture any complex structures in a plane, using this point, a variable stiffness design idea for the planar micro-spring is proposed. That is, using one type of structure named contact pairs to achieve stiffness change during the micro-spring’s stretching process. Using contact pairs, three types of variable stiffness springs are designed: stiffness increase spring, stiffness decrease spring and stiffness hump spring. Finally, the variable stiffness springs’ application for fuze setback arming device is discussed. When the three types of springs are used in setback arming device, the stiffness decrease spring is better than the other two springs from security analysis. Kinematic analysis shows that, if the variable stiffness spring’s design is reasonable, the setback arming device not only can effectively solve the safety and reliability issues for rocket fuze, but also applies in small caliber grenade fuze’s working environment without changing the setback arming device’s size and structure. Analysis result indicate that the setback arming device based on MEMS variable stiffness spring is universal for rocket fuze and small caliber grenade fuze.

  6. Monolithic geometric anti-spring blades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cella, G. [Universita di Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Sannibale, V. [LIGO Project, California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Blvd, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)]. E-mail: sannibale_v@ligo.caltech.edu; DeSalvo, R. [LIGO Project, California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Blvd, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Marka, S. [LIGO Project, California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Blvd, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Takamori, A. [University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan)

    2005-03-21

    In this article we investigate the principle and properties of a vertical passive seismic noise attenuator conceived for ground based gravitational wave interferometers. This mechanical attenuator based on a particular geometry of cantilever blades called monolithic geometric anti springs (MGAS) permits the design of mechanical harmonic oscillators with very low resonant frequency (below 10 mHz). Here we address the theoretical description of the mechanical device, focusing on the most important quantities for the low-frequency regime, on the distribution of internal stresses, and on the thermal stability. In order to obtain physical insight of the attenuator peculiarities, we devise some simplified models, rather than use the brute force of finite element analysis. Those models have been used to optimize the design of a seismic attenuation system prototype for LIGO advanced configurations and for the next generation of the TAMA interferometer.

  7. Hot Springs-Garrison Fiber Optic Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-10-01

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is proposing to upgrade its operational telecommunications system between the Hot Springs Substation and the Garrison Substation using a fiber optic system. The project would primarily involve installing 190 kilometers (120 miles) of fiber optic cable on existing transmission structures and installing new fiber optic equipment in BPA`s substation yards and control houses. BPA prepared an environmental assessment (EA) evaluating the proposed action. This EA was published in October 1994. The EA identifies a number of minor impacts that might occur as a result of the proposed action, as well as some recommended mitigation measures. This Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) identifies specific measures to avoid, minimize, or compensate for impacts identified in the EA.

  8. Spectral characteristics of spring arctic mesosphere dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Hall

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available The spring of 1997 has represented a stable period of operation for the joint University of Tromsø / University of Saskatchewan MF radar, being between refurbishment and upgrades. We examine the horizontal winds from the February to June inclusive and also include estimates of energy dissipation rates derived from signal fading times and presented as upper limits on the turbulent energy dissipation rate, ε. Here we address the periodicity in the dynamics of the upper mesosphere for time scales from hours to one month. Thus, we are able to examine the changes in the spectral signature of the mesospheric dynamics during the transition from winter to summer states.Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (middle atmosphere dynamics; turbulence; waves and tides.

  9. Submarine thermal springs on the Galapagos Rift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corliss, J.B.; Dymond, J.; Gordon, L.I.; Edmond, J.M.; Von Herzen, R. P.; Ballard, Richard D.; Green, K.; Williams, D.; Bainbridge, A.; Crane, K.; Van Andel, T. H.

    1979-01-01

    The submarine hydrothermal activity on and near the Galápagos Rift has been explored with the aid of the deep submersible Alvin. Analyses of water samples from hydrothermal vents reveal that hydrothermal activity provides significant or dominant sources and sinks for several components of seawater; studies of conductive and convective heat transfer suggest that two-thirds of the heat lost from new oceanic lithosphere at the Galápagos Rift in the first million years may be vented from thermal springs, predominantly along the axial ridge within the rift valley. The vent areas are populated by animal communities. They appear to utilize chemosynthesis by sulfur-oxidizing bacteria to derive their entire energy supply from reactions between the seawater and the rocks at high temperatures, rather than photosynthesis

  10. Efeitos da estimulação vibro-acústica na velocidade do sangue da artéria cerebral média e na freqüência cardíaca fetal: 1. entre a 35ª e 41ª semanas de gestação The effect of vibratory acoustic stimulation on fetal middle cerebral artery impedance and instantaneous fetal heart rate: 1. a transversal study on fetuses with 35 to 41 weeks of gestational age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivo Behle

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available RESUMO Objetivos: estudar, em fetos hígidos, quais são as respostas da freqüência cardíaca fetal basal e da resistência na artéria cerebral média à estimulação vibro-acústica padronizada. Métodos: em estado comportamental de hipo ou de inatividade fetal (apnéia e ausência de movimentos corpóreos, mediu-se o índice de pulsatilidade (IP da artéria cerebral média (ACM, bem como calculou-se a freqüência cardíaca fetal basal (FCFB pela análise da onda espectral, antes e após a aplicação de estímulo vibro-acústico (EVA por 3 segundos. Foram empregados ecógrafos de alta resolução, com Doppler pulsado e mapeamento a cores. A fonte sonora emitia som com 400 a 40.000 Hz, sob forma de varredura, com pressão sonora de 65 a 110 dB. Resultados: a média da FCFB pré-estímulo foi 139 bpm, com desvio padrão de 3,14 bpm. A média da FCFB pós-estímulo foi 153 bpm, com desvio padrão de 7,23 bpm (pSUMMARY Purpose: to examine the response of the fetal heart rate (FHR and middle cerebral artery resistance (MCA PI to vibratory stimulation (VAS in normal human fetuses. Methods: when the fetuses were without activity (in apnea and without corporal movements, we obtained baseline measurements of MCA PI and FHR before and after the application of a 3-sec vibratory acoustic stimulus. Real time ultrasonography with pulsed wave and color Doppler imaging was used for the execution of the study. The VAS was performed using a bicycle horn with 400 to 4000 Hz and sound pressure was 65 to 110 dB. Results: the FHR before VAS was 139 ± 3.14 bpm and after VAS was 153 ± 7.23 bpm (p<0.0001. The MCA PI rate before VAS was 1.84 ± 0.07 and after VAS was 1.56 ± 0.04 (p<0.001. In all cases we observed a fetal response with vigorous corporal movements, FHR rise and MCA PI reduction after VAS. Conclusions: we conclude that VAS, in human fetuses near term, for 3 sec as described in this study, determines some response, with increase in FHR and corporal

  11. Okanogan Basin Spring Spawner Report for 2007.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colville Tribes, Department of Fish & Wildlife

    2007-09-01

    The Okanogan Basin Monitoring and Evaluation Program collected data related to spring spawning anadromous salmonid stocks across the entire Okanogan River basin. Data were collected using redd surveys, traps, underwater video, and PIT-tag technology then summarized and analyzed using simple estimate models. From these efforts we estimated that 1,266 summer steelhead spawned in the Okanogan River basin and constructed 552 redds;152 of these fish where of natural origin. Of these, 121 summer steelhead, including 29 of natural origin, created an estimated 70 redds in the Canadian portion of the Okanagan basin. We estimated summer steelhead spawner escapement into each sub-watershed along with the number from natural origin and the number and density of redds. We documented redd desiccation in Loup Loup Creek, habitat utilization in Salmon Creek as a result of a new water lease program, and 10 spring Chinook returning to Omak Creek. High water through most of the redd survey period resulted in development of new modeling techniques and allowed us to survey additional tributaries including the observation of summer steelhead spawning in Wanacut Creek. These 2007 data provide additional support that redd surveys conducted within the United States are well founded and provide essential information for tracking the recovery of listed summer steelhead. Conversely, redd surveys do not appear to be the best approach for enumerating steelhead spawners or there distribution within Canada. We also identified that spawning distributions within the Okanogan River basin vary widely and stocking location may play an over riding roll in this variability.

  12. Geothermal Exploration in Hot Springs, Montana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toby McIntosh, Jackola Engineering

    2012-09-26

    The project involves drilling deeper in the Camp Aqua well dri lled in June 1982 as part of an effort to develop an ethanol plant. The purpose of the current drill ing effort is to determine if water at or above 165°F exists for the use in low temperature resource power generation. Previous geothermal resource study efforts in and around Hot Springs , MT and the Camp Aqua area (NE of Hot Springs) have been conducted through the years. A confined gravel aquifer exists in deep alluvium overlain by approximately 250 of si lt and c lay deposits from Glacial Lake Missoula. This gravel aquifer overlies a deeper bedrock aquifer. In the Camp Aqua area several wel l s exist in the gravel aquifer which receives hot water f rom bedrock fractures beneath the area. Prior to this exploration, one known well in the Camp Aqua area penetrated into the bedrock without success in intersecting fractures transporting hot geothermal water. The exploration associated with this project adds to the physical knowledge database of the Camp Aqua area. The dri l l ing effort provides additional subsurface information that can be used to gain a better understanding of the bedrock formation that i s leaking hot geothermal water into an otherwise cold water aquifer. The exi s t ing well used for the explorat ion is located within the center of the hottest water within the gravel aquifer. This lent i t sel f as a logical and economical location to continue the exploration within the existing well. Faced with budget constraints due to unanticipated costs, changing dril l ing techniques stretched the limited project resources to maximize the overa l l well depth which f e l l short of original project goals. The project goal of finding 165°F or hotter water was not achieved; however the project provides additional information and understanding of the Camp Aqua area that could prove valuable in future exploration efforts

  13. Mass-spring-damper modelling of the human body to study running and hopping--an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikooyan, A A; Zadpoor, A A

    2011-12-01

    Several mass-spring-damper models have been developed to study the response of the human body to the collision with the ground during hopping, trotting, or running. The mass, spring, and damper elements represent the masses, stiffness properties, and damping properties of hard and soft tissues. The masses that models are composed of are connected to each other via springs and dampers. The present paper reviews the various types of mass-spring-damper models including one-body and multi-body models. The models are further categorized as being either passive or active. In passive models, the mechanical properties (stiffness and damping) of soft tissues remain constant regardless of the type of footwear, ground stiffness, etc. In active models, the mechanical properties adapt to external loads. The governing equations of motion of all models as well as their parameters are presented. The specific ways that the models take account of the shoe-ground interactions are discussed as well. The methods used for determination of different modelling parameters are briefly surveyed. The advantages and disadvantages of the different types of mass-spring-damper models are also discussed. The paper concludes with a brief discussion of possible future research trends in the area of mass-spring-damper modelling.

  14. Winter soil warming exacerbates the impacts of spring low temperature stress on wheat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Xiangnan; Jiang, D.; Liu, Fulai

    2016-01-01

    The increase in global mean air temperature is likely to affect the soil temperatures in agricultural areas. This study aims to study the effects of winter soil warming on the responses of wheat to low temperature stress in spring. Wheat plants were grown under either normal or increased soil...... temperature by 2.5 °C for 82 days in winter. The physiological and yield responses of the plants to a 2-day low temperature stress (4/2 °C in the day/night) at jointing stage were investigated. After exposing to low spring temperature, the plants that had experienced winter soil warming showed lower leaf...... and root water potential, lower oxygen scavenging capacity and poor photosynthetic performance as compared with the plants grown under normal soil temperature during winter. WL plants had significantly lower sugar content in shoot than the CL plants, which might have contributed to their higher...

  15. Experimental and numerical study on hysteretic performance of SMA spring-friction bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Peng; Xue, Suduo; Nie, Pan; Wang, Wenting

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents an experimental and numerical study to investigate the hysteretic performance of a new type of isolator consisting of shape memory alloy springs and friction bearing called an SMA spring-friction bearing (SFB). The SFB is a sliding-type isolator with SMA devices used for the seismic protection of engineering structures. The principle of operation of the isolation bearing is introduced. In order to explore the possibility of applying SMA elements in passive seismic control devices, large diameter superelastic tension/compression NiTi SMA helical springs used in the SFB isolator were developed. Mechanical experiments of the SMA helical spring were carried out to understand its superelastic characteristics. After that, a series of quasi-static tests on a single SFB isolator prototype were conducted to measure its force-displacement relationships for different loading conditions and study the corresponding variation law of its mechanical performance. The experimental results demonstrate that the SFB exhibits full hysteretic curves, excellent energy dissipation capacity, and moderate recentering ability. Finally, a theoretical model capable of emulating the hysteretic behavior of the SMA-based isolator was then established and implemented in MATLAB software. The comparison of the numerical results with the experimental results shows the efficacy of the proposed model for simulating the response of the SFB.

  16. Evaluation of Multiple Spring Phenological Indicators of Yearly GPP and NEP at Three Canadian Forest Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Wang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Phenological shifts in events such as flowering and bud break are important indicators of ecosystem processes, and are therefore of particular significance for carbon (C cycle research. Using long-term flux data from three contrasting plant functional type (evergreen and deciduous boreal forest sites, we evaluated and compared the responses of annual C fluxes to multiple spring phenological indicators, including the C-uptake period onset (CUP onset, spring temperature (average value from March to May, and satellite-derived enhanced vegetation index (EVI (average value from March to May. We found that the CUP onset was negatively correlated with annual gross primary production (GPP for all three sites, but that its predictive strength for annual net ecosystem production (NEP differed substantially among plant functional types. Spring temperature demonstrated particularly good potential for predicting both annual GPP and NEP for the evergreen sites, but not for the deciduous site. Spring EVI was demonstrated to have potential for predicting annual NEP for all sites. However, both plant functional types confounded the correlation of annual NEP with annual GPP. Although none of these phenological indicators provided consistent insight into annual C fluxes, using various currently available datasets our results remain potentially useful for the assessment of forest C cycling with future climate change. Previous analyses using only a single phenological metric should be considered with caution.

  17. Optimization and Static Stress Analysis of Hybrid Fiber Reinforced Composite Leaf Spring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luay Muhammed Ali Ismaeel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A monofiber reinforced composite leaf spring is proposed as an alternative to the typical steel one as it is characterized by high strength-to-weight ratio. Different reinforcing schemes are suggested to fabricate the leaf spring. The composite and the typical steel leaf springs are subjected to the same working conditions. A weight saving of about more than 60% can be achieved while maintaining the strength for the structures under consideration. The objective of the present study was to replace material for leaf spring. This study suggests various materials of hybrid fiber reinforced plastics (HFRP. Also the effects of shear moduli of the fibers, matrices, and the composites on the composites performance and responses are discussed. The results and behaviors of each are compared with each other and verified by comparison with analytical solution; a good convergence is found between them. The elastic properties of the hybrid composites are calculated using rules of mixtures and Halpin-Tsi equation through the software of MATLAB v-7. The problem is also analyzed by the technique of finite element analysis (FEA through the software of ANSYS v-14. An element modeling was done for every leaf with eight-node 3D brick element (SOLID185 3D 8-Node Structural Solid.

  18. Arab Spring vs. Zero Problems Policy Impact of the Arab Spring on Trade Expansion of Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engin Sorhun

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Although Turkey has historically concentrated its trade with the European Union (EU it has diversified its trade markets with the neighbouring regions and different group of countries during the last decade. Among them, Arab countries have come into prominence. Especially, following the “zero problems with neighbours” policy (ZPN, pursued by Turkey since 2002, the trade volume with the Middle Eastern neighbours has increased faster than that with its traditional partners. Nevertheless so called “Arab Spring” has started to manifest its effects on this trend. It deteriorates not only the economies of the concerned countries but also Turkey’s trade expansion. This paper aims: (i to test through a gravity model the positive impacts of the ZPN policy and the negative impact of the Arab Spring on the trade expansion with the Spring Countries; and (ii to reveal the positive impact of the policy change and the negative impact of the uprising movements on the realization of trade potential by Turkey in the Spring Countries.

  19. Portrait of a Geothermal Spring, Hunter’s Hot Springs, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castenholz, Richard W.

    2015-01-01

    Although alkaline Hunter’s Hot Springs in southeastern Oregon has been studied extensively for over 40 years, most of these studies and the subsequent publications were before the advent of molecular methods. However, there are many field observations and laboratory experiments that reveal the major aspects of the phototrophic species composition within various physical and chemical gradients of these springs. Relatively constant temperature boundaries demark the upper boundary of the unicellular cyanobacterium, Synechococcus at 73–74 °C (the world-wide upper limit for photosynthesis), and 68–70 °C the upper limit for Chloroflexus. The upper limit for the cover of the filamentous cyanobacterium, Geitlerinema (Oscillatoria) is at 54–55 °C, and the in situ lower limit at 47–48 °C for all three of these phototrophs due to the upper temperature limit for the grazing ostracod, Thermopsis. The in situ upper limit for the cyanobacteria Pleurocapsa and Calothrix is at ~47–48 °C, which are more grazer-resistant and grazer dependent. All of these demarcations are easily visible in the field. In addition, there is a biosulfide production in some sections of the springs that have a large impact on the microbiology. Most of the temperature and chemical limits have been explained by field and laboratory experiments. PMID:25633225

  20. Portrait of a Geothermal Spring, Hunter’s Hot Springs, Oregon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard W. Castenholz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Although alkaline Hunter’s Hot Springs in southeastern Oregon has been studied extensively for over 40 years, most of these studies and the subsequent publications were before the advent of molecular methods. However, there are many field observations and laboratory experiments that reveal the major aspects of the phototrophic species composition within various physical and chemical gradients of these springs. Relatively constant temperature boundaries demark the upper boundary of the unicellular cyanobacterium, Synechococcus at 73–74 °C (the world-wide upper limit for photosynthesis, and 68–70 °C the upper limit for Chloroflexus. The upper limit for the cover of the filamentous cyanobacterium, Geitlerinema (Oscillatoria is at 54–55 °C, and the in situ lower limit at 47–48 °C for all three of these phototrophs due to the upper temperature limit for the grazing ostracod, Thermopsis. The in situ upper limit for the cyanobacteria Pleurocapsa and Calothrix is at ~47–48 °C, which are more grazer-resistant and grazer dependent. All of these demarcations are easily visible in the field. In addition, there is a biosulfide production in some sections of the springs that have a large impact on the microbiology. Most of the temperature and chemical limits have been explained by field and laboratory experiments.

  1. An investigation of contaminant impacts to watercress darter, Etheostama nuchale, habitat at Roebuck Springs, Thomas' Spring, and Glenn Springs, Jefferson Country, Alabama

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes a study with the following results: 1. Roebuck Springs was the only site found with contaminant loading with PAH's at levels suspected of...

  2. The Design of Reactor Internals Hold-Down Spring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guohong Xue

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hold down spring(HDS, clamped between the upper support plate flange and the core barrel flange inside a pressurized reactor vessel, is used to provide a downward force to keep the core barrel stable and from being lifted off from the vessel ledge during reactor normal operation. Spring designer used to think under certain extreme operating conditions, the spring could be lifted off from the ledge because the spring is not stiff enough to prevent the “lift-off”. Therefore, the spring was designed as stiff as it practically can be. However, finite element study indicated that the magnitude of preload is a strong function of friction coefficient. To find the magnitude of the friction coefficient, a series of tests were conducted on 1/10 scale hold down spring samples of three different spring designs. From the test results, it was found that the friction coefficient increases rapidly as the number of loading cycles increases. This implies that the spring preload would increase rapidly during plant operation. Therefore, it is concluded that, because of the strong frictional effect, not only the current design is more than adequate, but also should be made even softer.

  3. International trends in health tourism: Implications for thermal spring ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Travel to thermal springs for the sake of health and healing can be traced at least as far back as the ancient Greeks and Romans, with the earliest forms of tourism being based on apparent curative powers of mineral-rich thermal waters. There are 11 thermal springs in the Western Cape, seven of which have been ...

  4. Nano-G accelerometer using geometric anti-springs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boom, B. A.; Bertolini, A.; Hennes, E.; Brookhuis, R. A.; Wiegerink, R. J.; Van Den Brand, J. F J; Beker, M. G.; Oner, A.; Van Wees, D.

    2017-01-01

    We report an ultra-sensitive seismic accelerometer with nano-g sensitivity, using geometric anti-spring technology. High sensitivity is achieved by an on-chip mechanical preloading system comprising four sets of curved leaf springs that support a proof-mass. Using this preloading mechanism,

  5. Synergy of a warm spring and dry summer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yude Pan; David. Schimel

    2016-01-01

    An analysis suggests that high carbon uptake by US land ecosystems during the warm spring of 2012 offset the carbon loss that resulted from severe drought over the summer — and hints that the warm spring could have worsened the drought.

  6. Geophysical and hydrogeochemical evaluation of a spring In Ado ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The ER utilized pole-pole and Schlumberger electrode arrays for profiling and Vertical Electrical Soundings (VES) respectively. A hand-dug well was sited at higher elevation and ten meters away from the spring. Microbial and physicochemical analyses were conducted on water samples from the spring and the well.

  7. Microbiological and chemical assessment of spring water from a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Physico-chemical properties of the spring waters were mostly within the WHO benchmark for potable water. Arae had the highest total dissolved solids (TDS) value of 969 mgL-1 (benchmark, 500 mg/L), total hardness values were normal except at Arae (260 mg/L). Heavy metals levels in the spring water were generally low ...

  8. 36 CFR 7.18 - Hot Springs National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hot Springs National Park. 7.18 Section 7.18 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.18 Hot Springs National Park. (a) Commercial...

  9. Remote access and automation of SPring-8 MX beamlines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueno, Go, E-mail: ueno@spring8.or.jp; Hikima, Takaaki; Yamashita, Keitaro; Hirata, Kunio; Yamamoto, Masaki [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Koto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 JAPAN (Japan); Hasegawa, Kazuya; Murakami, Hironori; Furukawa, Yukito; Mizuno, Nobuhiro; Kumasaka, Takashi [SPring-8/JASRI, 1-1-1 Koto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 JAPAN (Japan)

    2016-07-27

    At SPring-8 MX beamlines, a remote access system has been developed and started user operation in 2010. The system has been developed based on an automated data collection and data management architecture utilized for the confirmed scheme of SPring-8 mail-in data collection. Currently, further improvement to the remote access and automation which covers data processing and analysis are being developed.

  10. 78 FR 18967 - Walla Walla Basin Spring Chinook Hatchery Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-28

    ... Bonneville Power Administration Walla Walla Basin Spring Chinook Hatchery Program AGENCY: Bonneville Power... Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation's (CTUIR) proposal to construct and operate a hatchery for spring Chinook salmon in the Walla Walla River basin. The hatchery would expand facilities at the site of...

  11. Formulating the spring discharge-function for the recession period ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prediction of spring water availability during the recession period is the key to its proper management. ... The efficiency of the formulated master discharge function of the spring for the recession period has been ... The only feasible answer to this water scarcity problem in recession period is to store it when it is in excess ...

  12. Impacts of Discharge Reductions on Physical and Thermal Habitat Characteristics in a Desert Spring, Death Valley National Park, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, R. R.; Stone, M. C.; Sada, D. W.

    2013-12-01

    Desert springs are biodiversity hotspots that are sensitive to anthropogenic activities. Despite their importance, the effects of human disturbance on desert springs are not well known, and scarce information exists describing the biotic or environmental effects of incrementally increasing disturbance. The objective of this research was to quantify the influence of incremental reductions in discharge on the physical and thermal characteristics of a desert springbrook. This objective was accomplished through a combination of field experiments at Travertine Spring in Death Valley National Park, USA, and hydraulic/temperature modeling in order to: (1) quantify changes in physical characteristics of the springbrook channel and aquatic environment; (2) investigate the effects of reduced spring discharge on seasonal spatial temperature patterns; (3) delineate tipping points that exhibit a non-linear response to decreased flow. The study results supported our predictions that decreased discharge would modify physical habitat characteristics of the springbrook, reduce aquatic habitat volume, increase variability in water temperatures along the springbrook, and reduce springbrook suitability for invertebrates that require stable environments. Field observations revealed a significant relationship between water depth and flow velocity with reduced spring discharge. The rate of change of mean water depths, velocities, and habitat volumes were greatest with only a 10% reduction in spring flow. In addition, a non-linear temperature response to flow reductions was present under all modeled conditions. Generally, water temperature gradients increased as flows were decreased, and the sensitivity of reduced discharge increased with distance from the spring source. The degree of sensitivity was a function of season, which reflects the influence of ambient air temperature and wind in the cooling of the springbrook. These results suggest that habitat for species using stable thermal

  13. Groundwater conditions in Utah, spring of 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burden, Carole B.

    2015-01-01

    This is the fifty-second in a series of annual reports that describe groundwater conditions in Utah. Reports in this series, published cooperatively by the U.S. Geological Survey and the Utah Department of Natural Resources, Division of Water Rights, and the Utah Department of Environmental Quality, Division of Water Quality, provide data to enable interested parties to maintain awareness of changing groundwater conditions. This report, like the others in the series, contains information on well construction, groundwater withdrawals from wells, water-level changes, precipitation, streamflow, and chemical quality of water. Information on well construction included in this report refers only to new wells constructed for withdrawal of groundwater. Supplementary data are included in reports of this series only for those years or areas that are important to a discussion of changing groundwater conditions and for which applicable data are available.This report includes individual discussions of selected significant areas of groundwater development in the State for calendar year 2014. Most of the reported data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Utah Department of Natural Resources, Division of Water Rights, and the Utah Department of Environmental Quality, Division of Water Quality. This report is also available online at http://www.waterrights.utah.gov/techinfo/ and http://ut.water.usgs.gov/publications/GW2015.pdf. Groundwater conditions in Utah for calendar year 2013 are reported in Burden and others (2014) and are available online at http://ut.water.usgs.gov/publications/GW2014.pdf.The water-level change maps in this report show the difference between water levels measured in the same well at two distinct times: in the spring of 1985 and the spring of 2015. Throughout the state, many groundwater levels were near their peak in or around 1985 following a multiple-year period of above average precipitation in the early 1980s. Conversely

  14. Diversity of Bamboos around springs in Malang East Java

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solikin Solikin

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Bamboos have important roles to people in the villages area. They are planted and used by the people for making houses, food, buckets, fences, ropes, fuels, musical instruments and plaits. The root distribution of Bamboos is large and fibrous, also the growth of their new clumps is ascendant so the Bamboos has good potency for water and soil conservation on river banks, around the springs, hillsides and scarps. The survey to invent the bamboos growing around the springs was conducted in Singosari, Lawang, Karangploso, Dau and Lowokwaru Malang East Java in May 2009. The Bamboos invented at 0-100 m from the springs. The results Showed that there were four Bamboos founded around the springs namely Bambusa blumeana,Dendrocalamus asper, Gigantochloa atter and Gigantochloa apus. Dendrocalamus asper was the most dominant species founded around the springs with relative frequency, relative density and important value index is 45.83 ; 58.49 and 104.32 respectively.

  15. Diversity of Crenarchaeota in terrestrial hot springs in Tengchong, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zhao-Qi; Chen, Jing-Quan; Jiang, Hong-Chen; Zhou, En-Min; Tang, Shu-Kun; Zhi, Xiao-Yang; Zhang, Li-Xin; Zhang, Chuan-Lun L; Li, Wen-Jun

    2010-05-01

    Diversity of Crenarchaeota was investigated in eight terrestrial hot springs (pH 2.8-7.7; temperature 44-96 degrees C) located in Tengchong, China, using 16S rRNA gene phylogenetic analysis. A total of 826 crenarchaeotal clones were sequenced and a total of 47 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were identified. Most (93%) of the identified OTUs were closely related (89-99%) to those retrieved from hot springs and other thermal environments. Our data showed that temperature may predominate over pH in affecting crenarchaeotal diversity in Tengchong hot springs. Crenarchaeotal diversity in moderate-temperature (59-77 degrees C) hot springs was the highest, indicating that the moderately hot-temperature springs may provide optimal conditions for speciation of Crenarchaeota.

  16. Applying spatial analysis techniques to assess the suitability of multipurpose uses of spring water in the Jiaosi Hot Spring Region, Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Cheng-Shin

    2016-04-01

    The Jiaosi Hot Spring Region is located in northeastern Taiwan and is rich in geothermal springs. The geothermal development of the Jiaosi Hot Spring Region dates back to the 18th century and currently, the spring water is processed for various uses, including irrigation, aquaculture, swimming, bathing, foot spas, and recreational tourism. Because of the proximity of the Jiaosi Hot Spring Region to the metropolitan area of Taipei City, the hot spring resources in this region attract millions of tourists annually. Recently, the Taiwan government is paying more attention to surveying the spring water temperatures in the Jiaosi Hot Spring Region because of the severe spring water overexploitation, causing a significant decline in spring water temperatures. Furthermore, the temperature of spring water is a reliable indicator for exploring the occurrence and evolution of springs and strongly affects hydrochemical reactions, components, and magnitudes. The multipurpose uses of spring water can be dictated by the temperature of the water. Therefore, accurately estimating the temperature distribution of the spring water is critical in the Jiaosi Hot Spring Region to facilitate the sustainable development and management of the multipurpose uses of the hot spring resources. To evaluate the suitability of spring water for these various uses, this study spatially characterized the spring water temperatures of the Jiaosi Hot Spring Region by using ordinary kriging (OK), sequential Gaussian simulation (SGS), and geographical information system (GIS). First, variogram analyses were used to determine the spatial variability of spring water temperatures. Next, OK and SGS were adopted to model the spatial distributions and uncertainty of the spring water temperatures. Finally, the land use (i.e., agriculture, dwelling, public land, and recreation) was determined and combined with the estimated distributions of the spring water temperatures using GIS. A suitable development strategy

  17. Microbial mercury methylation in the Ngawha hot springs and the abandoned Puhipuhi mine, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gionfriddo, C. M.; Ogorek, J. M.; Thompson, C. D.; Power, J.; Krabbenhoft, D. P.; Stott, M. B.; Moreau, J. W.

    2011-12-01

    Hot springs and fumaroles release significant quantities of aqueous and gaseous mercury into the environment. Yet few studies have focused on the biogeochemical cycling of mercury in geothermal settings. In this study, we investigated the abundance, speciation, and partitioning of mercury in geothermal waters and sediments in the Ngawha geothermal field and Puhipuhi region of New Zealand. The Ngawha geothermal field contains over 20 hot springs with variable chemistry (pH 2.9 - 7.1, ORP 15.7 to 249.1 mV, 22-40.5°C), from which approximately 530 kg of mercury is released annually from deep geological sources, most of which remains in the local surficial waters and sediments. Puhipuhi is the site of an historic mercury mining operation located about 22 miles southeast of Ngawha. The mercury-bearing geological deposits at Ngawha and Puhipuhi were formed over the same period and are connected to the young basalt flows of the region. Puhipuhi no longer hosts active hot springs, but is transected by a stream that varies in chemistry (pH 5.1-7.2, ORP -3.8-115.3 mV, ~22°C). Total- and methylmercury concentrations were measured using ICP-MS and CVAFS. Preliminary analyses of dissolved total- and methylmercury levels across the hot springs ranged from 5-10,000 ng/L and 0.6-23.5 ng/L, respectively, indicating a wide range of environmental conditions exist and may support a diverse array of microbial communities. Due to their high mercury content, geothermal settings may hold clues about the evolution of microbial mercury resistance (detoxification response to environmental Hg), as the ancestral mer operon evolved in thermophilic bacteria such as Thermus thermophilus and Methylacidophilum infernorum. Thus, the Ngawha hot springs provide an opportunity to investigate the evolution of microbial responses to mercury. Adjacent sites often display radically different chemical traits, with implications for changes in microbial community structure and genetic responses to mercury

  18. Note: Determination of torsional spring constant of atomic force microscopy cantilevers: Combining normal spring constant and classical beam theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Álvarez-Asencio, R.; Thormann, Esben; Rutland, M.W.

    2013-01-01

    A technique has been developed for the calculation of torsional spring constants for AFM cantilevers based on the combination of the normal spring constant and plate/beam theory. It is easy to apply and allow the determination of torsional constants for stiff cantilevers where the thermal power...

  19. Karst spring real time monitoring to identify the groundwater circulation in the feeding aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sappa, Giuseppe; Ferranti, Flavia; De Filippi, Francesco M.; Cardilo, Giulia

    2017-04-01

    About one quarter of the world's population is largely or entirely dependent on groundwater from karst systems. However, karst aquifers have specific hydraulic and hydrogeological characteristics that render them highly vulnerable to pollution from human activities. Intrinsic vulnerability of a karst aquifer takes account of the inherent geological, hydrological and hydrogeological characteristics of an area; however, it is independent of the nature of contaminants. Groundwater circulation is usually very rapidly as a function of high rainfall input. As consequence, in case of contamination, these systems are characterized by limited attenuation processes in the unsaturated zone. The analysis of karst spring responses to rainfall events, at the catchment scale, is one promising approach for groundwater flow characterization. Karst springs are, in fact, an important source of information in order to understand the circulation characteristics in such complex systems. The karst Pertuso Spring, located in the Upper Valley of Aniene River, is the main outlet of a large aquifer which is one of the most important water resource in the southeast part of Latium Region, Central Italy, used for drinking, agriculture and hydroelectric supplies. This paper deals with Pertuso Spring data collected from December 2014 to March 2016, using a multiparametric probe which directly interfaces with a data logger for real-time recording of hourly data. This instrument simultaneously measures up to 6 parameters (pH, groundwater level, temperature, electric conductivity, redox and dissolved oxygen). In particular, water temperature, electrical conductivity and rainfall data coming from meteorological stations have been studied to identify the groundwater circulation in the aquifer feeding Pertuso Spring. The study of the lag time between peak rainfall and peak of T and EC allow to highlight the seasonal vulnerability of this aquifer.

  20. Predicting a change in the order of spring phenology in temperate forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Adrian M I; Tansey, Christine; Smithers, Richard J; Phillimore, Albert B

    2015-03-02

    The rise in spring temperatures over the past half-century has led to advances in the phenology of many nontropical plants and animals. As species and populations differ in their phenological responses to temperature, an increase in temperatures has the potential to alter timing-dependent species interactions. One species-interaction that may be affected is the competition for light in deciduous forests, where early vernal species have a narrow window of opportunity for growth before late spring species cast shade. Here we consider the Marsham phenology time series of first leafing dates of thirteen tree species and flowering dates of one ground flora species, which spans two centuries. The exceptional length of this time series permits a rare comparison of the statistical support for parameter-rich regression and mechanistic thermal sensitivity phenology models. While mechanistic models perform best in the majority of cases, both they and the regression models provide remarkably consistent insights into the relative sensitivity of each species to forcing and chilling effects. All species are sensitive to spring forcing, but we also find that vernal and northern European species are responsive to cold temperatures in the previous autumn. Whether this sensitivity reflects a chilling requirement or a delaying of dormancy remains to be tested. We then apply the models to projected future temperature data under a fossil fuel intensive emissions scenario and predict that while some species will advance substantially others will advance by less and may even be delayed due to a rise in autumn and winter temperatures. Considering the projected responses of all fourteen species, we anticipate a change in the order of spring events, which may lead to changes in competitive advantage for light with potential implications for the composition of temperate forests. © 2015 The Authors. Global Change Biology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Preferred temperatures of Tarentola mauritanica in spring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel A. Carretero

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Variation of the preferred temperatures (Tp by the Moorish gecko (Tarentola mauritanica in spring was analysed in a population from NE Iberia. Ten adult specimens were exposed to a thermal gradient and Tp was measured at seven time intervals between 16 and 24 h. Tp values were low (23.44 ± 0.61 ºC, 20.7-26.9 ºC, mean ± SE, range but geckoes gradually increased Tps between late afternoon and early evening. Surprisingly, mean, maximum and minimum Tps inversely correlated with the body size (SVL, but the results of the analyses remained after size correction. Compared to a previous study carried out in summer, Tps found here were much lower but diel variation persisted. Such patterns are more similar to other nocturnal or crepuscular geckonids rather than to the well-studied diurnal lacertids living in the same sites. Specifically, Tp seems to be more plastic and the relationships with body size are opposite. Possible adaptive explanations and guidelines for further work are suggested.

  2. "I just wanted to get away": An analysis of spring breakers' travel motivations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuno F. Ribeiro; Paul E. Durrenberger; Careen M. Yarnal; Garry E. Chick

    2010-01-01

    Scholarly research on Spring Break has grown substantially and has often associated spring breakers' motivations with a number of risky behaviors. Recent research, however, has challenged these assumptions. The purpose of this study was to examine spring breakers' motivations for going on Spring Break. Unlike the media portrayal of Spring Break as a time of...

  3. Sediment discharges during storm flow from proximal urban and rural karst springs, central Kentucky, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, T.M.; Todd, McFarland J.; Fryar, A.E.; Fogle, A.W.; Taraba, J.L.

    2010-01-01

    Since the mid-1990s, various studies have addressed the timing of sediment transport to karst springs during storm flow or the composition and provenance of sediment discharged from springs. However, relatively few studies have focused on the flow thresholds at which sediment is mobilized or total sediment yields across various time scales. We examined each of these topics for a mainly urban spring (Blue Hole) and a rural spring (SP-2) in the Inner Bluegrass region of central Kentucky (USA). Suspended sediment consisted mostly of quartz silt and sand, with lesser amounts of calcite and organic matter. Total suspended sediment (TSS) values measured during storm flow were greater at SP-2 than at Blue Hole. By aggregating data from four storms during 2 years, we found that median suspended-sediment size jumped as Q exceeded ???0.5 m3/s for both springs. At Blue Hole, TSS tended to vary with Q and capacity approached 1 g/L, but no systematic relationship between TSS and Q was evident at SP-2. Sediment fluxes from the Blue Hole basin were ???2 orders of magnitude greater for storms in March (2002 and 2004) than September (2002 and 2003). In contrast, sediment fluxes from the SP-2 basin were of similar magnitude in September 2003 and March 2004. The overall range of area-normalized fluxes for both springs, 9.16 ?? 10-3-4.45 ?? 102 kg/(ha h), overlaps values reported for farm plots and a stream in the Inner Bluegrass region and for other spring basins in the eastern USA and western Europe. Sediment compositions, sizes, and responses to storms in the basins may differ because of land use (e.g., the extent of impervious cover in the Blue Hole basin), basin size (larger for Blue Hole), conduit architecture, which appears to be more complex in the Blue Hole basin, and the impoundment of SP-2, which may have promoted decadal-scale storage of sediment upgradient. ?? 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Applying spatial analysis techniques to assess the suitability of multipurpose uses of spring water in the Jiaosi Hot Spring Region, Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Cheng-Shin; Huang, Han-Chen

    2017-07-01

    The Jiaosi Hot Spring Region is one of the most famous tourism destinations in Taiwan. The spring water is processed for various uses, including irrigation, aquaculture, swimming, bathing, foot spas, and recreational tourism. Moreover, the multipurpose uses of spring water can be dictated by the temperature of the water. To evaluate the suitability of spring water for these various uses, this study spatially characterized the spring water temperatures of the Jiaosi Hot Spring Region by integrating ordinary kriging (OK), sequential Gaussian simulation (SGS), and Geographic information system (GIS). First, variogram analyses were used to determine the spatial variability of spring water temperatures. Next, OK and SGS were adopted to model the spatial uncertainty and distributions of the spring water temperatures. Finally, the land use (i.e., agriculture, dwelling, public land, and recreation) was determined using GIS and combined with the estimated distributions of the spring water temperatures. A suitable development strategy for the multipurpose uses of spring water is proposed according to the integration of the land use and spring water temperatures. The study results indicate that the integration of OK, SGS, and GIS is capable of characterizing spring water temperatures and the suitability of multipurpose uses of spring water. SGS realizations are more robust than OK estimates for characterizing spring water temperatures compared to observed data. Furthermore, current land use is almost ideal in the Jiaosi Hot Spring Region according to the estimated spatial pattern of spring water temperatures.

  5. Changes in structural and functional diversity of nematode communities during a spring phytoplankton bloom in the southern North Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanaverbeke, J.; Steyaert, M.; Soetaert, K.E.R.; Rousseau, V.; van Gansbeke, D.; Parent, J-Y.; Vincx, M.

    2004-01-01

    The response of nematode communities to the sedimentation of a spring phytoplankton bloom in a sandy, well-oxygenated sediment at a single station (station 330) in the Southern North Sea was investigated monthly from early March to July 1999. Both structural (nematode density, diversity, vertical

  6. Genetic analysis of kernel texture (grain hardness) in a hard red spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) bi-parental population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grain hardness is a very important trait in determining wheat market class and also influences milling and baking traits. At the grain Hardness (Ha) locus on chromosome 5DS, there are two primary mutations responsible for conveying a harder kernel texture among U.S. hard red spring wheats: (1) the P...

  7. Intercomparison, interpretation, and assessment of spring phenology in North America estimated from remote sensing for 1982-2006

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    White, M.A.; Beurs, de K.M.; Didan, K.; Inouye, D.W.; Richardson, A.D.; Jensen, O.P.; Magnuson, J.; O'Keefe, J.; Zhang, G.; Nemani, R.R.; Leeuwen, van W.J.D.; Brown, J.F.; Wit, de A.J.W.; Schaepman, M.E.; Lin, X.; Dettinger, M.; Bailey, A.; Kimball, J.; Schwartz, M.D.; Baldocchi, D.D.; Lee, J.T.; Lauenroth, W.K.

    2009-01-01

    Shifts in the timing of spring phenology are a central feature of global change research. Long-term observations of plant phenology have been used to track vegetation responses to climate variability but are often limited to particular species and locations and may not represent synoptic patterns.

  8. Patterns of Macroinvertebrate and Fish Diversity in Freshwater Sulphide Springs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Greenway

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Extreme environments are characterised by the presence of physicochemical stressors and provide unique study systems to address problems in evolutionary ecology research. Sulphide springs provide an example of extreme freshwater environments; because hydrogen sulphide’s adverse physiological effects induce mortality in metazoans even at micromolar concentrations. Sulphide springs occur worldwide, but while microbial communities in sulphide springs have received broad attention, little is known about macroinvertebrates and fish inhabiting these toxic environments. We reviewed qualitative occurrence records of sulphide spring faunas on a global scale and present a quantitative case study comparing diversity patterns in sulphidic and adjacent non-sulphidic habitats across replicated river drainages in Southern Mexico. While detailed studies in most regions of the world remain scarce, available data suggests that sulphide spring faunas are characterised by low species richness. Dipterans (among macroinvertebrates and cyprinodontiforms (among fishes appear to dominate the communities in these habitats. At least in fish, there is evidence for the presence of highly endemic species and populations exclusively inhabiting sulphide springs. We provide a detailed discussion of traits that might predispose certain taxonomic groups to colonize sulphide springs, how colonizers subsequently adapt to cope with sulphide toxicity, and how adaptation may be linked to speciation processes.

  9. [Spring water quality assessment regarding the problem of endemic fluorosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leshchenko, D V; Mialo, O A; Beliakova, M B; Beliaeva, E A; Samoukina, A M; Chervinets, Iu V; Ivanova, O V

    2013-01-01

    A possible variant for reducing the consumption of fluoride by population of Tver region is the use of water with low fluoride content, such as spring water. Assessment of drinking suitability of spring water (the content of physiologically important mineral elements and microbial purity) is relevant to our region. Water samples from 6 spring-water source of Tver region were studied during the year. The content of fluoride and calcium were measured by using an ion-selective electrodes. Microbiological purity tested by the presence of total coliform bacteria, thermotolerant coliform bacteria, coliphages and total microbial numbers. The analysis of some mineral components in spring water of Tver region showed that calcium content was in range 33-88 mg/l, that satisfied the recommended value; fluoride concentration is less then 0.5 mg/l. In all spring water samples total coliforms, thermotolerant coliforms and coliphages were absent. The total microbial number was in standard range, except of two spring-water source in the autumn and summer. The data suppose that spring water of Tver region can be used as a component of diet normalizing the fluoride consumption at risk of dental fluorosis in children.

  10. Holy springs and holy water: underestimated sources of illness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschner, Alexander K T; Atteneder, Michael; Schmidhuber, Angelika; Knetsch, Sonja; Farnleitner, Andreas H; Sommer, Regina

    2012-09-01

    Use of holy springs and holy water is inherent in religious activities. Holy spring water is also used extensively for personal drinking water, although not assessed according to drinking water standards. Holy water in churches and chapels may cause infections via wetting of lips and sprinkling on persons. Our aim was to assess the microbiological and chemical water quality of holy springs and holy water in churches and hospital chapels. Of the holy springs investigated, only 14% met the microbiological and chemical requirements of national drinking water regulations. Considering results from sanitary inspections of the water catchments, no spring was assessed as a reliable drinking water source. All holy water samples from churches and hospital chapels showed extremely high concentrations of HPC; fecal indicators, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus occurred only in the most frequently visited churches. We conclude that it is highly necessary to include holy springs in programs for assessment and management of water quality. Public awareness has to be raised to perceive holy springs as potential sources of illness. Holy water can be another source of infection, especially in hospital chapels and frequently visited churches. Recommendations are made for proper water quality management of both water types.

  11. Fortnightly atmospheric tides forced by spring and neap tides in coastal waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Shinsuke; Isobe, Atsuhiko; Miyao, Yasuyuki

    2015-05-18

    The influence of sea surface temperature (SST) on atmospheric processes over the open ocean has been well documented. However, atmospheric responses to SST in coastal waters are poorly understood. Oceanic stratification (and consequently, SST) in coastal waters largely depends on the fortnightly spring-neap tidal cycle, because of variations in vertical tidal mixing. Here we investigate how changes in SST during the fortnightly tidal cycle affect the lower-level atmosphere over the Seto Inland Sea, Japan. We use a combination of in situ measurements, satellite observations and a regional atmospheric model. We find that the SST in summer shows cool (warm) anomalies over most of the inland sea during spring (neap) tides. Additionally, surface air temperature is positively correlated with the SST as it varies during the fortnightly tidal cycle. Moreover, the fortnightly spring-neap cycle also influences the surface wind speed because the atmospheric boundary layer becomes stabilized or destabilized in response to the difference between air temperature and SST.

  12. A positive relationship between spring temperature and productivity in 20 songbird species in the boreal zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meller, Kalle; Piha, Markus; Vähätalo, Anssi V; Lehikoinen, Aleksi

    2018-01-19

    Anthropogenic climate warming has already affected the population dynamics of numerous species and is predicted to do so also in the future. To predict the effects of climate change, it is important to know whether productivity is linked to temperature, and whether species' traits affect responses to climate change. To address these objectives, we analysed monitoring data from the Finnish constant effort site ringing scheme collected in 1987-2013 for 20 common songbird species together with climatic data. Warm spring temperature had a positive linear relationship with productivity across the community of 20 species independent of species' traits (realized thermal niche or migration behaviour), suggesting that even the warmest spring temperatures remained below the thermal optimum for reproduction, possibly due to our boreal study area being closer to the cold edge of all study species' distributions. The result also suggests a lack of mismatch between the timing of breeding and peak availability of invertebrate food of the study species. Productivity was positively related to annual growth rates in long-distance migrants, but not in short-distance migrants. Across the 27-year study period, temporal trends in productivity were mostly absent. The population sizes of species with colder thermal niches had decreasing trends, which were not related to temperature responses or temporal trends in productivity. The positive connection between spring temperature and productivity suggests that climate warming has potential to increase the productivity in bird species in the boreal zone, at least in the short term.

  13. Overexploitation and cumulative drought trend effect on Ras El Ain karstic spring discharge (Khabour Sub-basin, Syria)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou Zakhem, Boulos; Kattaa, Bassam

    2017-10-01

    The effects of climate change and overexploitation are being strongly perceived in the studied area and the springs discharge is obviously affected. In this paper, Ras El Ain spring discharge and precipitation were analyzed by normalized methods on an yearly timescale. The deficit of Ras El Ain spring discharge due to overexploitation factors and drought effects was estimated. Cumulative drought analyses were carried out using SPI10 and SQI10. Finally, the decreasing trends of the spring discharge due to the deficiency in rainfall were analyzed. The main results reveal that the annual mean deficit of Ras El Ain spring discharge due to overpumping was between 32 and 45%, whereas, annual mean deficit related to drought was between 22 and 35% on average, during the last 30 years (post-1984). The moving averages of SPI and SQI delineate very well the drought periods during last three decades. The cumulative droughts using SPI10 and SQI10 reveal that wet period (pre-1984) with positive values was characterized by high precipitation and spring discharge. Overexploitation period (1984-1989) is distinguished by decreasing SQI10 values whereas, SPI10 is almost stable. The response of the karst system to the precipitation signal has been changed, during the drought period (1990-2000), and the spring behaviour has been modified due to the first overexploitation period. Finally, overexploitation period (2001-2008) is related to the second phase of groundwater intensive pumping for irrigation purposes. Consequently, this period is completely catastrophic causing the drying up of the spring. The decreasing trends analyzed using DPI and DQI showed annual decreasing rates relative to the mean values of -0.268% and -0.105%, respectively. Thus, the results of theoretical model reveal that precipitation will decrease by about DPI = -20.7% and the discharge will decline by about -9.2% by 2050. Consequently, the declining discharge due to climatic variation under natural conditions as

  14. SPRING FLORA OF CEMETERIES OF ODESSA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SPRING FLORA OF CEMETERIES OF ODESSA

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The spring flora was analyzed on six cemeteries in Odessa, such cemeteries as Vtoroe xristianskoe, Troickoe, Tairovskoe, Trete evrejskoe, Oficerskoe (Dmitrievskое and Severnoe. There were found and identified 235 species of plants, which belong to 186 genera and 67 families. There was taken a taxonomic analysis of flora of the cemeteries also of spreding of plants by ekobiomorphs, the analysis of hronotyp and origin. The proportion of the flora on the cemeteries is 1:2,8:3,5. The dominant family of the flora of Odessa’s cemeteries is Asteraceae. There are other leading families such as Rosaceae, Fabaceae, Poaceae, Brassicaceae, Lamiaceae. Herbs and trees are dominant among the life forms. Mesophytes and kseromezophytes are in the majority among hihromorphs. Heliophytes are on the first place by adapting to the light. Our results showed that the adventitious plants occupy up to 44% of all amount of plants at the cemeteries in Odessa. Kenophytes is a dominant group among them. Floragenetics analysis revealed the dominance of the plants from Asia. There have been allocated plants that were met at all six cemeteries independently of the location religious and age characteristics of the cemetery. "Core" of the flora of Odessa’s cemetery have made weed Acer negundo L., Ballota nigra L. and decorative Hedera helix L., Centaurea dealbata Willd., Buxus sempervirens L., Convallaria majalis L., Sedum kamtschaticum Fisch., Thuja occidentalis L., Hemerocalis fulva (L. L. There were found 4 species of plants that belong to the rare and endangered plants of Odessa’s region: Convallaria majalis L., Hyacinthella leucophaea (K. Koch Schur, Clematis integrifolia L., Paeonia tenuifolia L. Moreover Convallaria majalis L. grows on all six investigated cemeteries. Also two species: Hyacinthella leucophaea (K. Koch Schur and Clematis

  15. SPRING FLORA OF CEMETERIES OF ODESSA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Gerasimyuk

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The spring flora was analyzed on six cemeteries in Odessa, such cemeteries as Vtoroe xristianskoe, Troickoe, Tairovskoe, Trete evrejskoe, Oficerskoe (Dmitrievskое and Severnoe. There were found and identified 235 species of plants, which belong to 186 genera and 67 families. There was taken a taxonomic analysis of flora of the cemeteries also of spreding of plants by ekobiomorphs, the analysis of hronotyp and origin. The proportion of the flora on the cemeteries is 1:2,8:3,5. The dominant family of the flora of Odessa’s cemeteries is Asteraceae. There are other leading families such as Rosaceae, Fabaceae, Poaceae, Brassicaceae, Lamiaceae. Herbs and trees are dominant among the life forms. Mesophytes and kseromezophytes are in the majority among hihromorphs. Heliophytes are on the first place by adapting to the light. Our results showed that the adventitious plants occupy up to 44% of all amount of plants at the cemeteries in Odessa. Kenophytes is a dominant group among them. Floragenetics analysis revealed the dominance of the plants from Asia. There have been allocated plants that were met at all six cemeteries independently of the location religious and age characteristics of the cemetery. "Core" of the flora of Odessa’s cemetery have made weed Acer negundo L., Ballota nigra L. and decorative Hedera helix L., Centaurea dealbata Willd., Buxus sempervirens L., Convallaria majalis L., Sedum kamtschaticum Fisch., Thuja occidentalis L., Hemerocalis fulva (L. L. There were found 4 species of plants that belong to the rare and endangered plants of Odessa’s region: Convallaria majalis L., Hyacinthella leucophaea (K. Koch Schur, Clematis integrifolia L., Paeonia tenuifolia L. Moreover Convallaria majalis L. grows on all six investigated cemeteries. Also two species: Hyacinthella leucophaea (K. Koch Schur and Clematis Keywords: cemeteries, Odessa, flora, plants, ekobiomorphs.

  16. Analysis of the response to recharge in Alpujarride carbonates via a hydrodynamic, hydrochemical and isotopic study of the Carcabal spring at La Peza, Granada; Analisis de la respuesta a la recarga en carbonatos alpujarrides mediante el estudio hidrodinamico, hidroquimico e isotopico del manantial del Carcabal (La Peza, Granada)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Ramon, A.; Delgado, A.; Mudarra, M.

    2011-07-01

    We have studied the hydrodynamic, physical-chemical and isotopic characteristics of a spring associated with a smallish aquifer located in the province of Granada on the northern slope of the Sierra Nevada. The aquifer, composed of carbonate rocks belonging to the Alpujarride domain in the Betic Cordillera, shows considerable surface karstification, with presence of large sinkholes, which is quite unusual in this type of rock. Our study was based on flow and climate data obtained between the years 2006 and 2008 at a gauging station and a weather station built by the Geological Survey of Spain, together with physical-chemical data collected during 2008. The hydrodynamic study concludes that the aquifer behaves as a karstic aquifer during winter, with a well developed pipeline network. In the spring it behaves as a complex karst aquifer. From the hydrochemical and isotopic data it is possible to differentiate the water that flows quickly through the aquifer in periods coinciding with abundant recharge of the water stored in the saturated zone. Our results provide important information about an area where there are a very large number of carbonate aquifers that have hardly been little studied to date due to the complexity of their drainage systems, which are very difficult to monitor, and often a complete lack of meteorological data for their immediate surroundings. (Author) 29 refs.

  17. Local temperature fine-tunes the timing of spring migration in birds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tøttrup, Anders P.; Rainio, Kalle; Coppack, Timothy

    2010-01-01

    Evidence for climate-driven phenological changes is rapidly increasing at all trophic levels. Our current poor knowledge of the detailed control of bird migration from the level of genes and hormonal control to direct physiological and behavioral responses hampers our ability to understand...... and predict consequences of climatic change for migratory birds. In order to better understand migration phenology and adaptation in environmental changes, we here assess the scale at which weather affects timing of spring migration in passerine birds. We use three commonly used proxies of spring...... breeding area. Local temperature was the best single predictor of phenology with the highest explanatory power achieved in combination with NAO. Furthermore, early individuals are more affected by climatic variation compared to individuals on later passage, indicating that climatic change affects subsets...

  18. Desert spring mounds: a potential analogue to Martian arid environments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franchi, F.; Frisia, S.

    2017-09-01

    Spring carbonates have been often considered as putative analogues of Martian arid environments. On Earth these are believed to form by the interaction of highly saline water and microbial communities, which favor the formation of authigenic micrite. Here we present new data from spring mounds in the western Makgadikgadi Pan (Botswana) and the Great Artesian Basin (South Australia). In both areas, upwelling of ground water give rise to mounds and layered deposits which are close morphological analogues of landforms documented on Mars. The authigenic carbonates and evaporites associated with the spring mounds retain evidence of microbial microfabric founded elsewhere, pointing to the potential existence of similar microbial in the extreme Martian conditions.

  19. Characterization of closed nickel-titanium orthodontic coil springs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langeron, T. [Rene Descartes Univ., Paris V, Pontoise (France). Faculte de Chirurgie Dentaire; Filleul, M.P. [Rene Descartes Univ., Paris V, Pontoise (France). Faculte de Chirurgie Dentaire; ENSCP, Paris (France). Lab. de Metallurgie Structurale; Humbeeck, J. van [Katholieke Univ. Leuven, Heverlee (Belgium). Faculteit Toegepaste Wetenschappen, Metaalkunde en Toegepaste Materialkund

    2001-11-01

    Nickel-titanium orthodontic coil springs are used to move teeth with low forces and slow deactivation. The present paper provides data on transformation temperatures and on load-deflection rate at buccal temperature of closed Nickel-Titanium coil springs available on the market from ORMCO {sup trademark} and GAC {sup trademark}. All the springs exhibited superelasticity but their properties were not stable in the range of buccal temperatures and varied not only from one manufacturer to the other but they also varied from one batch to the other of each supplier. The need for more stability is stressed. (orig.)

  20. 76 FR 63714 - Big Spring Rail System, Inc.;Operation Exemption;Transport Handling Specialists, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-13

    ...] Big Spring Rail System, Inc.;Operation Exemption;Transport Handling Specialists, Inc. Big Spring Rail... Howard County, Tex., owned by the City of Big Spring, Tex. (City). BSRS will be operating the line for...

  1. Hatcheries, Harvest and Wild Fish: An Integrated Program at Warm Springs National Fish Hatchery, Oregon

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Warm Springs National Fish Hatchery is operated by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and is located on the Warm Springs River within the Warm Springs Indian...

  2. Declining effect of warm temperature on spring phenology of tree species at low elevation in the Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asse, Daphné; Randin, Christophe; Chuine, Isabelle

    2017-04-01

    Mountain regions are particularly exposed to climate change and temperature. In the Alps increased twice faster than in the northern hemisphere during the 20th century. As an immediate response, spring phenological phases of plant species such as budburst and flowering, have tended to occur earlier. In 2004, the CREA (Centre de Recherches sur les Ecosystèmes d'Altitude, Chamonix, France) initiated the citizen science program Phenoclim, which aims at assessing the long-term effects of climate changes on plant phenology over the entire French Alps. Sixty sites with phenological observations were equipped with temperature stations across a large elevational gradient. Here we used phenological records for five tree species (birch, ash, hazel, spruce and larch) combined with measurements or projections of temperature. We first tested the effects of geographic and topo-climatic factors on the timing of spring phenological phases. We then tested the hypothesis that a lack of chilling temperature during winter delayed dormancy release and subsequently spring phenological phases. Our data are currently being used to calibrate process-based phenological models to test to which extent soil temperature and photoperiod affect the timing of spring phenological phases. We found that growing degree-days was the best predictor of the timing of spring phenological phases, with a significant contribution of chilling. Our results also suggest that spring phenological phases were consistently delayed at low elevation by a lack of chilling in fall during warm years for the three deciduous species. Key words: Spring phenology, elevation gradients, citizen science, empirical and process-based modeling

  3. SMA spring-based artificial muscle actuated by hot and cool water using faucet-like valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Cheol Hoon; Son, Young Su

    2017-04-01

    An artificial muscle for a human arm-like manipulator with high strain and high power density are under development, and an SMA(Shape memory alloy) spring is a good actuator for this application. In this study, an artificial muscle composed of a silicon tube and a bundle of SMA(Shape memory alloy) springs is evaluated. A bundle of SMA springs consists of five SMA springs which are fabricated by using SMA wires with a diameter of 0.5 mm, and hot and cool water actuates it by heating and cooling SMA springs. A faucet-like valve was also developed to mix hot water and cool water and control the water temperature. The mass of silicon tube and a bundle of SMA springs is only 3.3 g and 2.25 g, respectively, and the total mass of artificial muscle is 5.55 g. It showed good actuating performance for a load with a mass of 2.3 kg and the power density was more than 800 W/kg for continuous valve switching with a cycle of 0.6 s. The faucet-like valve can switch a water output from hot water to cold water within 0.3s, and the artificial muscle is actuated well in response to the valve position and speed. It is also presented that the temperature of the mixed water can be controlled depending on the valve position, and the displacement of the artificial muscle can be controlled well by the mixed water. Based on these results, SMA spring-based artificial muscle actuated by hot and cool water could be applicable to the human arm-like robot manipulators.

  4. Interactions between a Candidate Gene for Migration (ADCYAP1, Morphology and Sex Predict Spring Arrival in Blackcap Populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raeann Mettler

    Full Text Available Avian research has begun to reveal associations between candidate genes and migratory behaviors of captive birds, yet few studies utilize genotypic, morphometric, and phenological data from wild individuals. Previous studies have identified an association between ADCYAP1 polymorphism and autumn migratory behavior (restlessness, or zugunruhe, but little is known about the relationship between ADCYAP1 and spring migratory behavior. The timing of spring migration and arrival to the breeding ground are phenological traits which could be particularly favorable for establishing territories and acquiring mates, thus important to fitness and reproductive success. Here, we investigated how individual genotypic ADCYAP1 variation and phenotypic variation (wing length and shape of blackcaps (Sylvia atricapilla affect spring arrival date across nine natural populations in Europe. We hypothesized that longer alleles should be associated with earlier spring arrival dates and expected the effect on arrival date to be stronger for males as they arrive earlier. However, we found that longer wings were associated with earlier spring arrival to the breeding grounds for females, but not for males. Another female-specific effect indicated an interaction between ADCYAP1 allele size and wing pointedness on the response of spring arrival: greater allele size had a positive effect on spring arrival date for females with rounder wings, while a negative effect was apparent for females with more pointed wings. Also, female heterozygotes with pointed wing tips arrived significantly earlier than both homozygotes with pointed wings and heterozygotes with round wings. Stable isotope ratios (δ2H of a subset of blackcaps captured in Freiburg in 2011 allowed us also to assign individuals to their main overwintering areas in northwest (NW and southwest (SW Europe. NW males arrived significantly earlier to the Freiburg breeding site than both SW males and females in 2011. NW

  5. Northeast Oregon Hatchery Spring Chinook Master Plan, Technical Report 2000.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashe, Becky L.; Concannon, Kathleen; Johnson, David B.

    2000-04-01

    Spring chinook salmon populations in the Imnaha and Grande Ronde rivers are listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) and are at high risk of extirpation. The Nez Perce Tribe, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, are co-managers of conservation/restoration programs for Imnaha and Grande Ronde spring chinook salmon that use hatchery supplementation and conventional and captive broodstock techniques. The immediate goal of these programs is to prevent extirpation and provide the potential for restoration once factors limiting production are addressed. These programs redirect production occurring under the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan (LSRCP) from mitigation to conservation and restoration. Both the Imnaha and Grande Ronde conservation/restoration programs are described in ESA Section 10 permit applications and the co-managers refer to the fish production from these programs as the Currently Permitted Program (CPP). Recently, co-managers have determined that it is impossible to produce the CPP at Lookingglass Hatchery, the LSRCP facility intended for production, and that without additional facilities, production must be cut from these conservation programs. Development of new facilities for these programs through the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program is considered a new production initiative by the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) and requires a master plan. The master plan provides the NPPC, program proponents and others with the information they need to make sound decisions about whether the proposed facilities to restore salmon populations should move forward to design. This master plan describes alternatives considered to meet the facility needs of the CPP so the conservation program can be fully implemented. Co-managers considered three alternatives: modify Lookingglass Hatchery; use existing facilities elsewhere in the Basin; and use new facilities in

  6. Climate change is advancing spring onset across the U.S. national park system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monahan, William B.; Rosemartin, Alyssa; Gerst, Katharine L.; Fisichelli, Nicholas A.; Ault, Toby R.; Schwartz, Mark D.; Gross, John E.; Weltzin, Jake F.

    2016-01-01

    Many U.S. national parks are already at the extreme warm end of their historical temperature distributions. With rapidly warming conditions, park resource management will be enhanced by information on seasonality of climate that supports adjustments in the timing of activities such as treating invasive species, operating visitor facilities, and scheduling climate-related events (e.g., flower festivals and fall leaf-viewing). Seasonal changes in vegetation, such as pollen, seed, and fruit production, are important drivers of ecological processes in parks, and phenology has thus been identified as a key indicator for park monitoring. Phenology is also one of the most proximate biological responses to climate change. Here, we use estimates of start of spring based on climatically modeled dates of first leaf and first bloom derived from indicator plant species to evaluate the recent timing of spring onset (past 10–30 yr) in each U.S. natural resource park relative to its historical range of variability across the past 112 yr (1901–2012). Of the 276 high latitude to subtropical parks examined, spring is advancing in approximately three-quarters of parks (76%), and 53% of parks are experiencing “extreme” early springs that exceed 95% of historical conditions. Our results demonstrate how changes in climate seasonality are important for understanding ecological responses to climate change, and further how spatial variability in effects of climate change necessitates different approaches to management. We discuss how our results inform climate change adaptation challenges and opportunities facing parks, with implications for other protected areas, by exploring consequences for resource management and planning.

  7. Kelly Hot Spring Geothermal Project: Kelly Hot Spring Agricultural Center preliminary design. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longyear, A.B. (ed.)

    1980-08-01

    A Phase 1 Preliminary Design, Construction Planning and Economic Analysis has been conducted for the Kelly Hot Spring Agricultural Center in Modoc County, California. The core activity is a 1360 breeding sow, swine raising complex that utilizes direct heat energy from the Kelly Hot Spring geothermal resource. The swine is to be a totally confined operation for producing premium pork in controlled-environment facilities. The complex contains a feed mill, swine raising buildings and a complete waste management facility that produces methane gas to be delivered to a utility company for the production of electricity. The complex produces 6.7 million pounds of live pork (29,353 animals) shipped to slaughter per year; 105,000 cu. ft. of scrubbed methane per day; and fertilizer. Total effluent is less than 200 gpm of agricultural quality-water with full odor control. The methane production rate made possible with geothermal direct heat is equivalent to at least 400 kw continuous. Sale of the methane on a co-generation basis is being discussed with the utility company. The use of geothermal direct heat energy in the complex displaces nearly 350,000 gallons of fuel oil per year. Generation of the biogas displaces an additional 300,000 gallons of fuel oil per year.

  8. Interactions between non-native armored suckermouth catfish (Loricariidae: Pterygoplichthys) and native Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris) in artesian springs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nico, Leo G.; Loftus, William F.; Reid, James P.

    2009-01-01

    Non-native suckermouth armored catfishes (Loricariidae) of the genus Pterygoplichthys are now common throughout much of peninsular Florida. In this paper, we present preliminary observations on interactions between a Pterygoplichthys species, tentatively identified as P. disjunctivus (Weber, 1991), and endangered native Florida manatees, Trichechus manatus latirostris (Harlan, 1824), in artesian spring systems in Florida's St. Johns River drainage. The introduced catfish have become abundant in spring habitats, sites used by manatees as winter thermal refuges. In the spring runs, Pterygoplichthys regularly attaches to manatees and grazes the epibiota on their skin. On occasion, dozens of Pterygoplichthys congregate on individual manatees. Manatee responses varied widely; some did not react visibly to attached catfish whereas others appeared agitated and attempted to dislodge the fish. The costs and/or benefits of this interaction to manatees remain unclear.

  9. Hydrogeology of the Mammoth Spring groundwater basin and vicinity, Markagunt Plateau, Garfield, Iron, and Kane Counties, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangler, Lawrence E.

    2012-01-01

    other springs. Temperature and specific conductance of water from Mammoth and other springs showed substantial variance and generally were inversely related to changes in discharge during snowmelt runoff and rainfall events. Over the 3-year study period, daily mean temperature and specific conductance of water from Mammoth Spring ranged from 3.4 degrees Celsius (°C) and 112 microsiemens per centimeter (μS/cm) during peak flow from snowmelt runoff to 5.3°C and 203 μS/cm during baseflow conditions. Increases in specific conductance of the spring water prior to an increase in discharge in 2008–09 were likely the result of drainage of increasingly older water from storage. Variations in these parameters in water from two rise pools upstream from Mammoth Spring were the largest observed in relation to discharge and indicate a likely hydraulic connection to Mammoth Creek. Variations in water quality, discharge, and turbidity indicate a high potential for transport of contaminants from surface sources to Mammoth and other large springs in a matter of days. Results of dye-tracer tests indicated that recharge to Mammoth Spring largely originates from southwest of the spring and outside of the watershed for Mammoth Creek, particularly along the drainages of Midway and Long Valley Creeks, and in the Red Desert, Horse Pasture, and Hancock Peak areas, where karst development is greatest. A significant component of recharge to the spring takes place by both focused and diffuse infiltration through the basalt and into the underlying Claron limestone. Losing reaches along Mammoth Creek are also a source of rapid recharge to the spring. Maximum groundwater travel time to the spring during the snowmelt runoff period was about 7 days from sinking streams as far as 9 miles away and 1,900 feet higher, indicating a velocity of more than a mile per day. Response of the spring to rainfall events in the recharge area, however, indicated potential lag times of only about 1 to 2 days

  10. Arab Spring vs. Zero Problems Policy Impact of the Arab Spring on the Trade Expansion of Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engin Sorhun

    2016-01-01

    Spring” has started to manifest its effects on this trend. It deteriorates not only the economies of the concerned countries but also Turkey’s trade expansion. This paper aims: (i to test through a gravity model the positive impacts of the ZPN policy and the negative impact of the Arab Spring on the trade expansion with the Spring Countries; and (ii to reveal the positive impact of the policy change and the negative impact of the uprising movements on the realization of trade potential by Turkey in the Spring Countries.

  11. Initial assessment of recharge areas for large karst springs: a case study from the central Zagros Mountains, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi Vardanjani, Hossein; Chitsazan, Manouchehr; Ford, Derek; Karimi, Haji; Charchi, Abbas

    2018-02-01

    Sousan Spring emerges from the Keyno Anticline, Zagros Mountains (Iran), and the mean annual discharge is 24 m3/s. Geological and hydrochemical evaluations suggest that the spring recharge is from the limestone Ilam-Sarvak Formation (Cretaceous) but the Mafaroon Fault, a major thrust feature, influences the regional groundwater flow path by juxtaposing other strata. Geological, geochemical, stable isotope and water balance studies were employed to interpret this behavior. Using the isotope data, the sources and elevations of the recharge area were found. Temporal variations of the isotopic data were compared with variations of electrical conductivity (EC). Unexpectedly, high EC was associated with a relative increase of discharge and depletion of δ18O. Several hypotheses were investigated and approximate water balance studies employed for validation. It was found that an elongated catchment on the Keyno Anticline plus a lesser catchment on a pair of parallel anticlines recharge the aquifer. While the long groundwater flow path along the Keyno Anticline plus guidance by Mafaroon Fault and the adjacent Garou shaly strata lead to increased EC in the Sousan Spring at the end of the dry season, a flow pulse from two adjoining anticlines (Mahalbakh and Shirgoon) arrives at the same time to increase the discharge and deplete the δ18O signal. Apparently the spring did not experience true base flow conditions during the recorded hydrological year. Although the spring response to specific precipitation events was similar to typical karst aquifers, standard interpretation of recession curves and related coefficients will not be practical at Sousan.

  12. Mammals of Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge [1966

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The following is a summary of mammals observed at Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge, Juab County, Utah. These observations were made in May 1966, by the...

  13. Ten NCI Researchers Among Spring Research Festival Award Winners | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    In a ceremony at the Fort Detrick Community Activities Center earlier this week, Maj. Gen. Barbara R. Holcomb, the commanding officer of the Fort Detrick garrison, distributed the awards for outstanding presentations and posters at the 2017 Spring Research Festival.

  14. Mammals of Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge [1998

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The following checklist was derived from mammals collected in 1998, observed or heard in the environs of Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge. It also includes...

  15. The Orchard points at Pipe Spring National Monument, Arizona (orchard)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This is an Arc/Info coverage consisting of 56 points representing the bubblers of mid-point of planting spots in the orchard at Pipe Spring National Monument,...

  16. SEAMAP Spring 2016 Plankton Survey (R21601, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — During the 2016 Spring Plankton Survey, plankton samples were collected from a systematic grid of stations to assess distribution, occurrence and abundance of the...

  17. Evaluating spring wheat cultivars for drought tolerance through yield ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluating spring wheat cultivars for drought tolerance through yield and physiological parameters at booting and anthesis. MJ Baloch, Jim Dunwell, Mike Dennet, Zia ul-hassan, I Rajpar, Wajid Ali Jatoi, NF Veesar ...

  18. Annual California Sea Otter Census—2017 Spring Census Summary

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The spring 2017 mainland sea otter count began on April 30, and although the shore-based counts were completed by May 12, 2017, the aerial counts were not completed...

  19. Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report 2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 2013 calendar year. This Annual Narrative Report...

  20. Aqua/Aura Spring 2017 Inclination Adjust Maneuver Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noyes, Thomas; Stezelberger, Shane

    2017-01-01

    This will be presented at the International Earth Science Constellation Mission Operations Working Group meeting June 13-15, 2017 to discuss the AquaAura Spring 2017 Inclination Adjust Maneuver series.

  1. Elk Distributions Relative to Spring Normalized Difference Vegetation Index Values

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel T. Smallidge

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus that winter near San Antonio Mountain in northern New Mexico provide important recreational and economic benefits while creating management challenges related to temporospatial variation in their spring movements. Our objective was to examine spring distributions of elk in relation to vegetative emergence as it progresses across the landscape as measured by remote sensing. Spring distributions of elk were closely associated with greater photosynthetic activity of spring vegetation in 2 of 3 years as determined using NDVI values derived from AVHRR datasets. Observed elk locations were up to 271% greater than expected in the category representing the most photosynthetic activity. This association was not observed when analyses at a finer geographic scale were conducted. Managers facing challenges involving human-wildlife interactions and land-use issues should consider environmental conditions that may influence variation in elk association with greener portions of the landscape.

  2. Fish Springs NWR mammal, fish, amphibian, and reptile list

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The following is a species list for mammals, fishes, amphibians, and reptiles found on or adjacent to Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge, as of October, 1996.

  3. Wildland fire management plan : Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This plan considers fire on Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge as a tool for management and as a potential problem to be dealt with. This document discusses...

  4. NEFSC 1999 Spring Bottom Trawl Survey (AL9903, EK500)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The objectives of the cruise are to: (1) determine the spring distribution and relative abundance of fish and selected invertebrate species; (2) collect biological...

  5. NEFSC 2001 Spring Bottom Trawl Survey (AL0104, EK500)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The objectives of the cruise are to: (1) determine the spring distribution and relative abundance of fish and selected invertebrate species; (2) collect biological...

  6. Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge National Vegetation Classification (NVC) map

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — National Vegetation Classification (NVC) map for Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge. NVC provides a standardized hierarchical approach to classifying vegetation...

  7. Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge water regime map

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Water regime map for Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge. This map of water regimes on the refuge was created along with the National Vegetation Classification...

  8. SEAMAP 2011 Spring Plankton Survey (CU1101, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The primary survey objective was to assess the occurrence, abundance and geographical distribution of the early life stages of spring spawning fishes, especially...

  9. NEFSC 2000 Spring Bottom Trawl Survey (AL0002, EK500)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The objectives of the cruise are to: (1) determine the spring distribution and relative abundance of fish and selected invertebrate species; (2) collect biological...

  10. The Tree Lines at Pipe Spring National Monument, Arizona (treeline)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This is an Arc/Info coverage consisting of 7 arcs representing the tree lines at Pipe Spring National Monument, Arizona. The tree lines were collected by a Trimble...

  11. Stravinsky: The Rite of Spring / Hartmut, Lück

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Lück, Hartmut

    1996-01-01

    Uuest heliplaadist "Stravinsky: The Rite of Spring. Canticum Sacrum. Requiem Canticles. Choral Variations on "Vom Himmel hoch". Lausanne Pro Arte Choir, Suisse Romande Chamber Choir and Orchestra, Neeme Järvi. Chandos CHAN 9408 (75 minutes:DDD)

  12. Spring Chinook Distribution, Pacific Northwest (updated March, 2006)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission — This dataset is a record of fish distribution and activity for SPRING CHINOOK contained in the StreamNet database. This feature class was created based on linear...

  13. SEAMAP Spring 2015 Plankton Survey (GU1501, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — During the 2015 Spring Plankton Survey, plankton samples were collected from a systematic grid of stations to assess distribution, occurrence and abundance of the...

  14. The Redox Potential of Hot Springs in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Fu Chen Menghau Sung

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Scientists began acquiring the basic of geology, occurrence, water temperature and chemistry of hot springs in Tai wan over a century ago. However, data regarding redox potential and important redox couples still remains limited. This study explores the redox status of hot springs in Taiwan by measuring Eh in the field and by determining the concentrations of commonly found redox couples, i.e., O2/H2O, NO3 -/NH4 +, and HS-/SO4 -2. Water samples were collected at hot spring discharge pools or the heads of water wells using a pump. A total of 11 hot springs located at 9 different locations across Taiwan were surveyed.

  15. Comprehensive Conservation Plan: Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Fish Springs NWR for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the Refuge vision and...

  16. [Least chub introduction at Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document contains information about the least chub, and the concern that it may be inhibiting Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge, as of 1983. Possibility of...

  17. Final Critical Habitat for the Leon springs pupfish (Cyprinodon bovinus)

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — To provide the user with a general idea of areas where final critical habitat for Leon springs pupfish (Cyprinodon bovinus) occur based on the description provided...

  18. Archeological survey of Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge: Special report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document presents information from an archeological reconnaissance which was conducted at Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge on April 17 - 24, 1961. The...

  19. Integrated Pest Management Plan - Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of the Integrated Pest Management Plan is to provide a comprehensive, environmentally sensitive approach to managing pests on the Fish Springs NWR. The...

  20. Monthly report of activities - Fish Springs Refuge - November, 1966

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report describes activities on Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge in November 1966. Weather conditions are discussed as well as wildlife - including...