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Sample records for vibrational spectroscopy electronic

  1. Vibrational spectroscopy in the electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivanek, Ondrej L; Lovejoy, Tracy C; Dellby, Niklas; Aoki, Toshihiro; Carpenter, R W; Rez, Peter; Soignard, Emmanuel; Zhu, Jiangtao; Batson, Philip E; Lagos, Maureen J; Egerton, Ray F; Crozier, Peter A

    2014-10-09

    Vibrational spectroscopies using infrared radiation, Raman scattering, neutrons, low-energy electrons and inelastic electron tunnelling are powerful techniques that can analyse bonding arrangements, identify chemical compounds and probe many other important properties of materials. The spatial resolution of these spectroscopies is typically one micrometre or more, although it can reach a few tens of nanometres or even a few ångströms when enhanced by the presence of a sharp metallic tip. If vibrational spectroscopy could be combined with the spatial resolution and flexibility of the transmission electron microscope, it would open up the study of vibrational modes in many different types of nanostructures. Unfortunately, the energy resolution of electron energy loss spectroscopy performed in the electron microscope has until now been too poor to allow such a combination. Recent developments that have improved the attainable energy resolution of electron energy loss spectroscopy in a scanning transmission electron microscope to around ten millielectronvolts now allow vibrational spectroscopy to be carried out in the electron microscope. Here we describe the innovations responsible for the progress, and present examples of applications in inorganic and organic materials, including the detection of hydrogen. We also demonstrate that the vibrational signal has both high- and low-spatial-resolution components, that the first component can be used to map vibrational features at nanometre-level resolution, and that the second component can be used for analysis carried out with the beam positioned just outside the sample--that is, for 'aloof' spectroscopy that largely avoids radiation damage.

  2. Electronic and vibrational spectroscopy and vibrationally mediated photodissociation of V+(OCO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citir, Murat; Altinay, Gokhan; Metz, Ricardo B

    2006-04-20

    Electronic spectra of gas-phase V+(OCO) are measured in the near-infrared from 6050 to 7420 cm(-1) and in the visible from 15,500 to 16,560 cm(-1), using photofragment spectroscopy. The near-IR band is complex, with a 107 cm(-1) progression in the metal-ligand stretch. The visible band shows clearly resolved vibrational progressions in the metal-ligand stretch and rock, and in the OCO bend, as observed by Brucat and co-workers. A vibrational hot band gives the metal-ligand stretch frequency in the ground electronic state nu3'' = 210 cm(-1). The OCO antisymmetric stretch frequency in the ground electronic state (nu1'') is measured by using vibrationally mediated photodissociation. An IR laser vibrationally excites ions to nu1'' = 1. Vibrationally excited ions selectively dissociate following absorption of a second, visible photon at the nu1' = 1 CO2, due to interaction with the metal. Larger blue shifts observed for complexes with fewer ligands agree with trends seen for larger V+(OCO)n clusters.

  3. Correlating the motion of electrons and nuclei with two-dimensional electronic-vibrational spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Thomas A A; Lewis, Nicholas H C; Fleming, Graham R

    2014-07-15

    Multidimensional nonlinear spectroscopy, in the electronic and vibrational regimes, has reached maturity. To date, no experimental technique has combined the advantages of 2D electronic spectroscopy and 2D infrared spectroscopy, monitoring the evolution of the electronic and nuclear degrees of freedom simultaneously. The interplay and coupling between the electronic state and vibrational manifold is fundamental to understanding ensuing nonradiative pathways, especially those that involve conical intersections. We have developed a new experimental technique that is capable of correlating the electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom: 2D electronic-vibrational spectroscopy (2D-EV). We apply this new technique to the study of the 4-(di-cyanomethylene)-2-methyl-6-p-(dimethylamino)styryl-4H-pyran (DCM) laser dye in deuterated dimethyl sulfoxide and its excited state relaxation pathways. From 2D-EV spectra, we elucidate a ballistic mechanism on the excited state potential energy surface whereby molecules are almost instantaneously projected uphill in energy toward a transition state between locally excited and charge-transfer states, as evidenced by a rapid blue shift on the electronic axis of our 2D-EV spectra. The change in minimum energy structure in this excited state nonradiative crossing is evident as the central frequency of a specific vibrational mode changes on a many-picoseconds timescale. The underlying electronic dynamics, which occur on the hundreds of femtoseconds timescale, drive the far slower ensuing nuclear motions on the excited state potential surface, and serve as a excellent illustration for the unprecedented detail that 2D-EV will afford to photochemical reaction dynamics.

  4. Symmetry-broken effects on electron momentum spectroscopy caused by adiabatic vibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yinghao; Ma, Xiaoguang; Lou, Wenhua; Wang, Meishan; Yang, Chuanlu

    2017-11-01

    The vibronic coupling effect is usually studied by invoking the breakdown of Born-Oppenheimer approximation. The present study shows that the symmetry-broken effect induced by nuclei vibrations can also lead strong impact on the electronic states under the framework of Born-Oppenheimer approximation. This adiabatic-invoking vibrational effect on electron momentum spectroscopy of ethylene (C2H4), ethane (C2H6) and methanol (CH3OH) was studied with quantum mechanical method. The results show that electron momentum spectroscopy of localized electrons, especially core electrons in axial symmetric geometry molecules can be affected unusually and strongly by several asymmetric vibrational modes.

  5. Vibrational and optical spectroscopies integrated with environmental transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picher, Matthieu; Mazzucco, Stefano [Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-6203 (United States); Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20740 (United States); Blankenship, Steve [Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-6203 (United States); Sharma, Renu, E-mail: renu.sharma@nist.gov [Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-6203 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Here, we present a measurement platform for collecting multiple types of spectroscopy data during high-resolution environmental transmission electron microscopy observations of dynamic processes. Such coupled measurements are made possible by a broadband, high-efficiency, free-space optical system. The critical element of the system is a parabolic mirror, inserted using an independent hollow rod and placed below the sample holder which can focus a light on the sample and/or collect the optical response. We demonstrate the versatility of this optical setup by using it to combine in situ atomic-scale electron microscopy observations with Raman spectroscopy. The Raman data is also used to measure the local temperature of the observed sample area. Other applications include, but are not limited to: cathodo- and photoluminescence spectroscopy, and use of the laser as a local, high-rate heating source. - Highlights: • Broadband, high-efficiency design adaptable to other electron microscopes. • Raman spectroscopy integrated with environmental transmission electron microscopy. • Raman spectra peak frequency shifts enable measurement of local sample temperature. • Multiple types of optical spectroscopy enabled, e.g. cathodoluminescence.

  6. Vibrational Inelastic Electron Tunneling Spectroscopy of Surface Adsorbed Single Molecules at Sub-Kelvin Temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Chi-Lun

    2015-01-01

    With a 600mk homebuilt UHV STM system, we studied molecular vibration at the solid surface with inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) of Acetylene single molecules adsorbed on Cu(100) surface and revealed five new vibrational modes that were previously inaccessible to STM-IETS at 8K temperature. The identification of vibrational IETS features with normalized conductance change (Δσ/σ) as low as 0.24% was demonstrated. Facilitated by the high energy resolution, we also revealed the a...

  7. Damage-free vibrational spectroscopy of biological materials in the electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rez, Peter; Aoki, Toshihiro; March, Katia; Gur, Dvir; Krivanek, Ondrej L; Dellby, Niklas; Lovejoy, Tracy C; Wolf, Sharon G; Cohen, Hagai

    2016-03-10

    Vibrational spectroscopy in the electron microscope would be transformative in the study of biological samples, provided that radiation damage could be prevented. However, electron beams typically create high-energy excitations that severely accelerate sample degradation. Here this major difficulty is overcome using an 'aloof' electron beam, positioned tens of nanometres away from the sample: high-energy excitations are suppressed, while vibrational modes of energies <1 eV can be 'safely' investigated. To demonstrate the potential of aloof spectroscopy, we record electron energy loss spectra from biogenic guanine crystals in their native state, resolving their characteristic C-H, N-H and C=O vibrational signatures with no observable radiation damage. The technique opens up the possibility of non-damaging compositional analyses of organic functional groups, including non-crystalline biological materials, at a spatial resolution of ∼10 nm, simultaneously combined with imaging in the electron microscope.

  8. Communication: Vibrational and vibronic coherences in the two dimensional spectroscopy of coupled electron-nuclear motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albert, Julian; Falge, Mirjam; Hildenbrand, Heiko; Engel, Volker [Universität Würzburg, Institut für Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie, Emil-Fischer-Str. 42, Campus Nord, Am Hubland, 97074 Würzburg (Germany); Gomez, Sandra; Sola, Ignacio R. [Departamento de Quimica Fisica, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-07-28

    We theoretically investigate the photon-echo spectroscopy of coupled electron-nuclear quantum dynamics. Two situations are treated. In the first case, the Born-Oppenheimer (adiabatic) approximation holds. It is then possible to interpret the two-dimensional (2D) spectra in terms of vibrational motion taking place in different electronic states. In particular, pure vibrational coherences which are related to oscillations in the time-dependent third-order polarization can be identified. This concept fails in the second case, where strong non-adiabatic coupling leads to the breakdown of the Born-Oppenheimer-approximation. Then, the 2D-spectra reveal a complicated vibronic structure and vibrational coherences cannot be disentangled from the electronic motion.

  9. Electron-Induced Vibrational Spectroscopy. A New and Unique Tool To Unravel the Molecular Structure of Polymer Surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pireaux, J.J.; Gregoire, Ch.; Caudano, R.; Rei Vilar, M.; Brinkhuis, R.; Schouten, A.J.

    1991-01-01

    Among the surface-sensitive spectroscopies used to characterize clean and surface-modified polymers, one technique has rather recently emerged as a very promising complementary tool. High-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy, or electron-induced vibrational spectroscopy, has potentially all

  10. First-Principles Vibrational Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy of β -Guanine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radtke, G.; Taverna, D.; Lazzeri, M.; Balan, E.

    2017-07-01

    A general approach to model vibrational electron energy loss spectra obtained using an electron beam positioned away from the specimen is presented. The energy-loss probability of the fast electron is evaluated using first-principles quantum mechanical calculations (density functional theory) of the dielectric response of the specimen. The validity of the method is assessed using recently measured anhydrous β -guanine, an important molecular solid used by animals to produce structural colors. The good agreement between theory and experiments lays the basis for a quantitative interpretation of this spectroscopy in complex systems.

  11. Vibrational circular dichroism spectroscopy of a spin-triplet bis-(biuretato) cobaltate(III) coordination compound with low-lying electronic transitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannessen, Christian; Thulstrup, Peter W.

    2007-01-01

    Vibrational absorption (VA) and vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectroscopy was applied in the analysis of vibrational and low lying electronic transitions of a triplet ground state cobalt(III) coordination compound. The spectroscopic measurements were performed on the tetrabutylammonium salt...

  12. Vibrational Inelastic Electron Tunneling Spectroscopy of Single Acetylene Molecules Adsorbed on Copper (100) Surface

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Chi-Lun

    2015-01-01

    With a 600mk homebuilt UHV STM system, we studied molecular vibration at the solid surface with inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) of Acetylene single molecules adsorbed on Cu(100) surface. The identification of vibrational IETS features with normalized conductance change (Δσ/σ) as low as 0.24% in dI2/d2V spectra was demonstrated. Five vibrational modes with energy level at 117.70meV (Δσ/σ =0.42%), 84.07meV (Δσ/σ =0.24%), 58.46meV (Δσ/σ =1.18%), 34.80meV (Δσ/σ =0.65% ) and 22.1...

  13. Electronic and vibrational spectroscopy of intermediates in methane-to-methanol conversion by CoO+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altinay, Gokhan; Kocak, Abdulkadir; Silva Daluz, Jennifer; Metz, Ricardo B.

    2011-08-01

    At room temperature, cobalt oxide cations directly convert methane to methanol with high selectivity but very low efficiency. Two potential intermediates of this reaction, the [HO-Co-CH3]+ insertion intermediate and [H2O-Co=CH2]+ aquo-carbene complex are produced in a laser ablation source and characterized by electronic and vibrational spectroscopy. Reaction of laser-ablated cobalt cations with different organic precursors seeded in a carrier gas produces the intermediates, which subsequently expand into vacuum and cool. Ions are extracted into a time-of-flight mass spectrometer and spectra are measured via photofragment spectroscopy. Photodissociation of [HO-Co-CH3]+ in the visible and via infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) makes only Co+ + CH3OH, while photodissociation of [H2O-Co=CH2]+ produces CoCH2+ + H2O. The electronic spectrum of [HO-Co-CH3]+ shows progressions in the excited state Co-C stretch (335 cm-1) and O-Co-C bend (90 cm-1); the IRMPD spectrum gives νOH = 3630 cm-1. The [HO-Co-CH3]+(Ar) complex has been synthesized and its vibrational spectrum measured in the O-H stretching region. The resulting spectrum is sharper than that obtained via IRMPD and gives νOH = 3642 cm-1. Also, an improved potential energy surface for the reaction of CoO+ with methane has been developed using single point energies calculated by the CBS-QB3 method for reactants, intermediates, transition states and products.

  14. Excitonic, vibrational, and van der Waals interactions in electron energy loss spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizoguchi, T; Miyata, T; Olovsson, W

    2017-09-01

    The pioneer, Ondrej L. Krivanek, and his collaborators have opened up many frontiers for the electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), and they have demonstrated new potentials of the EELS method for investigating materials. Here, inspired by those achievements, we show further potentials of EELS based on the results of theoretical calculations, that is excitonic and van der Waals (vdW) interactions, as well as vibrational information of materials. Concerning the excitonic interactions, we highlight the importance of the two-particle calculation to reproduce the low energy-loss near-edge structure (ELNES), the Na-L 2,3 edge of NaI and the Li-K edge of LiCl and LiFePO 4 . Furthermore, an unusually strong excitonic interaction at the O-K edge of perovskite oxides, SrTiO 3 and LaAlO 3 , is shown. The effect of the vdW interaction in the ELNES is also investigated, and we observe that the magnitude of the vdW effect is approximately 0.1eV in the case of the ELNES from a solid and liquid, whereas its effect is almost negligible in the case of the ELNES from the gaseous phase owing to the long inter-molecular distance. In addition to the "static" information, the influence of the "dynamic" behavior of atoms in materials to EELS is also investigated. We show that measurements of the infrared spectrum are possible by using a modern monochromator system. Furthermore, an estimation of the atomic vibration in core-loss ELNES is also presented. We show the acquisition of vibrational information using the ELNES of liquid methanol and acetic acid, solid Al 2 O 3 , and oxygen gas. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Vibrational Surface Electron-Energy-Loss Spectroscopy Probes Confined Surface-Phonon Modes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Lourenço-Martins

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Recently, two reports [Krivanek et al. Nature (London 514, 209 (2014NATUAS0028-083610.1038/nature13870, Lagos et al. Nature (London 543, 529 (2017NATUAS0028-083610.1038/nature21699] have demonstrated the amazing possibility to probe vibrational excitations from nanoparticles with a spatial resolution much smaller than the corresponding free-space phonon wavelength using electron-energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS. While Lagos et al. evidenced a strong spatial and spectral modulation of the EELS signal over a nanoparticle, Krivanek et al. did not. Here, we show that discrepancies among different EELS experiments as well as their relation to optical near- and far-field optical experiments [Dai et al. Science 343, 1125 (2014SCIEAS0036-807510.1126/science.1246833] can be understood by introducing the concept of confined bright and dark surface phonon modes, whose density of states is probed by EELS. Such a concise formalism is the vibrational counterpart of the broadly used formalism for localized surface plasmons [Ouyang and Isaacson Philos. Mag. B 60, 481 (1989PMABDJ1364-281210.1080/13642818908205921, García de Abajo and Aizpurua Phys. Rev. B 56, 15873 (1997PRBMDO0163-182910.1103/PhysRevB.56.15873, García de Abajo and Kociak Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 106804 (2008PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.100.106804, Boudarham and Kociak Phys. Rev. B 85, 245447 (2012PRBMDO1098-012110.1103/PhysRevB.85.245447]; it makes it straightforward to predict or interpret phenomena already known for localized surface plasmons such as environment-related energy shifts or the possibility of 3D mapping of the related surface charge densities [Collins et al. ACS Photonics 2, 1628 (2015APCHD52330-402210.1021/acsphotonics.5b00421].

  16. Full characterization of vibrational coherence in a porphyrin chromophore by two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Valduga de Almeida Camargo, Franco; Anderson, Harry; Meech, Steve; Heisler, Ismael

    2015-01-01

    In this work we present experimental and calculated two-dimensional electronic spectra for a 5,15-bisalkynyl porphyrin chromophore. The lowest energy electronic Qy transition couples mainly to a single 380 cm–1 vibrational mode. The two-dimensional electronic spectra reveal diagonal and cross peaks which oscillate as a function of population time. We analyze both the amplitude and phase distribution of this main vibronic transition as a function of excitation and detection frequencies. Even t...

  17. Fourier transform two-dimensional electronic-vibrational spectroscopy using an octave-spanning mid-IR probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaynor, James D; Courtney, Trevor L; Balasubramanian, Madhumitha; Khalil, Munira

    2016-06-15

    The development of coherent Fourier transform two-dimensional electronic-vibrational (2D EV) spectroscopy with acousto-optic pulse-shaper-generated near-UV pump pulses and an octave-spanning broadband mid-IR probe pulse is detailed. A 2D EV spectrum of a silicon wafer demonstrates the full experimental capability of this experiment, and a 2D EV spectrum of dissolved hexacyanoferrate establishes the viability of our 2D EV experiment for studying condensed phase molecular ensembles.

  18. Electronic spectroscopies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weckhuysen, B.M.; Schoonheydt, R.A.

    2000-01-01

    Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) in the ultraviolet, visible and near-infrared region is a versatile spectroscopic technique, as both d-d and charge transfer transitions of supported TMI can be probed. One of the advantages of electronic spectroscopy is that the obtained information is

  19. A method for the direct measurement of electronic site populations in a molecular aggregate using two-dimensional electronic-vibrational spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Nicholas H. C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Dong, Hui [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Oliver, Thomas A. A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Fleming, Graham R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-09-28

    Two dimensional electronic spectroscopy has proven to be a valuable experimental technique to reveal electronic excitation dynamics in photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes, nanoscale semiconductors, organic photovoltaic materials, and many other types of systems. It does not, however, provide direct information concerning the spatial structure and dynamics of excitons. 2D infrared spectroscopy has become a widely used tool for studying structural dynamics but is incapable of directly providing information concerning electronic excited states. 2D electronic-vibrational (2DEV) spectroscopy provides a link between these domains, directly connecting the electronic excitation with the vibrational structure of the system under study. In this work, we derive response functions for the 2DEV spectrum of a molecular dimer and propose a method by which 2DEV spectra could be used to directly measure the electronic site populations as a function of time following the initial electronic excitation. We present results from the response function simulations which show that our proposed approach is substantially valid. This method provides, to our knowledge, the first direct experimental method for measuring the electronic excited state dynamics in the spatial domain, on the molecular scale.

  20. A method for the direct measurement of electronic site populations in a molecular aggregate using two-dimensional electronic-vibrational spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Nicholas H. C.; Dong, Hui; Oliver, Thomas A. A.; Fleming, Graham R., E-mail: grfleming@lbl.gov [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Physical Biosciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Kavli Energy Nanosciences Institute at Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2015-09-28

    Two dimensional electronic spectroscopy has proved to be a valuable experimental technique to reveal electronic excitation dynamics in photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes, nanoscale semiconductors, organic photovoltaic materials, and many other types of systems. It does not, however, provide direct information concerning the spatial structure and dynamics of excitons. 2D infrared spectroscopy has become a widely used tool for studying structural dynamics but is incapable of directly providing information concerning electronic excited states. 2D electronic-vibrational (2DEV) spectroscopy provides a link between these domains, directly connecting the electronic excitation with the vibrational structure of the system under study. In this work, we derive response functions for the 2DEV spectrum of a molecular dimer and propose a method by which 2DEV spectra could be used to directly measure the electronic site populations as a function of time following the initial electronic excitation. We present results from the response function simulations which show that our proposed approach is substantially valid. This method provides, to our knowledge, the first direct experimental method for measuring the electronic excited state dynamics in the spatial domain, on the molecular scale.

  1. Full characterization of vibrational coherence in a porphyrin chromophore by two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, Franco V A; Anderson, Harry L; Meech, Stephen R; Heisler, Ismael A

    2015-01-08

    In this work we present experimental and calculated two-dimensional electronic spectra for a 5,15-bisalkynyl porphyrin chromophore. The lowest energy electronic Qy transition couples mainly to a single 380 cm(-1) vibrational mode. The two-dimensional electronic spectra reveal diagonal and cross peaks which oscillate as a function of population time. We analyze both the amplitude and phase distribution of this main vibronic transition as a function of excitation and detection frequencies. Even though Feynman diagrams provide a good indication of where the amplitude of the oscillating components are located in the excitation-detection plane, other factors also affect this distribution. Specifically, the oscillation corresponding to each Feynman diagram is expected to have a phase that is a function of excitation and detection frequencies. Therefore, the overall phase of the experimentally observed oscillation will reflect this phase dependence. Another consequence is that the overall oscillation amplitude can show interference patterns resulting from overlapping contributions from neighboring Feynman diagrams. These observations are consistently reproduced through simulations based on third order perturbation theory coupled to a spectral density described by a Brownian oscillator model.

  2. Two-Dimensional Electronic-Vibrational Spectroscopy of Chlorophyll a and b

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Nicholas H. C. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Molecular Biophysics and Integrated Bioimaging Div.; Kavli Energy Nanoscience Institute at Berkeley, CA (United States); Fleming, Graham R. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Molecular Biophysics and Integrated Bioimaging Div.; Kavli Energy Nanoscience Institute at Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-03-03

    Presented are two-dimensional electronic-vibrational (2DEV) spectra of isolated chlorophyll a and b in deuterated ethanol. We excite the Q-band electronic transitions and measure the effects on the carbonyl and C=C double-bond stretch region of the infrared spectrum. With the aid of density functional theory calculations, we provide assignments for the major features of the spectrum. We show how the 2DEV spectra can be used to readily distinguish different solvation states of the chlorophyll, with features corresponding to the minority pentacoordinate magnesium (Mg) species being resolved along each dimension of the 2DEV spectra from the dominant hexacoordinate Mg species. These assignments represent a crucial first step toward the application of 2DEV spectroscopy to chlorophyll-containing pigment-protein complexes.

  3. Vibrational and electronic spectroscopy of the retro-carotenoid rhodoxanthin in avian plumage, solid-state films, and solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Christopher J; LaFountain, Amy M; Prum, Richard O; Frank, Harry A; Tauber, Michael J

    2013-11-15

    Rhodoxanthin is one of few retro-carotenoids in nature. These chromophores are defined by a pattern of single and double bond alternation that is reversed relative to most carotenoids. Rhodoxanthin is found in the plumage of several families of birds, including fruit doves (Ptilinopus, Columbidae) and the red cotingas (Phoenicircus, Cotingidae). The coloration associated with the rhodoxanthin-containing plumage of these fruit dove and cotinga species ranges from brilliant red to magenta or purple. In the present study, rhodoxanthin is characterized in situ by UV-Vis reflectance and resonance Raman spectroscopy to gain insights into the mechanisms of color-tuning. The spectra are compared with those of the isolated pigment in solution and in thin solid films. Key vibrational signatures are identified for three isomers of rhodoxanthin, primarily in the fingerprint region. Electronic structure (DFT) calculations are employed to describe the normal modes of vibration, and determine characteristic modes of retro-carotenoids. These results are discussed in the context of various mechanisms that change the electronic absorption, including structural distortion of the chromophore or enhanced delocalization of π-electrons in the ground-state. From the spectroscopic evidence, we suggest that the shift in absorption is likely a consequence of perturbations that primarily affect the excited state of the chromophore. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Combined electron microscopy and vibrational spectroscopy study of corroded Magnox sludge from a legacy spent nuclear fuel storage pond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregson, Colin R., E-mail: colin.r.gregson@nnl.co.uk [National Nuclear Laboratory, Central Laboratory, Sellafield, Seascale CA20 1PG (United Kingdom); Goddard, David T., E-mail: dave.t.goddard@nnl.co.uk [National Nuclear Laboratory, Preston Laboratory, Springfields, Salwick, Preston PR4 0XJ (United Kingdom); Sarsfield, Mark J., E-mail: mark.j.sarsfield@nnl.co.uk [National Nuclear Laboratory, Central Laboratory, Sellafield, Seascale CA20 1PG (United Kingdom); Taylor, Robin J., E-mail: robin.j.taylor@nnl.co.uk [National Nuclear Laboratory, Central Laboratory, Sellafield, Seascale CA20 1PG (United Kingdom)

    2011-05-01

    Graphical abstract: Spent Magnox fuel corroding in-situ in storage ponds forms sludges comprised of brucite and other Mg based phases with uranium oxide particles. Display Omitted Research highlights: > Caracterization study of highly radioactive corroded Magnox sludges. > Unique data from samples of actual corroded nuclear fuel. > Combined electron microscopy and vibrational spectroscopy study. > Analysis of particles from legacy spent fuel storage pond at Sellafield. > Supports major UK decommissioning and nuclear clean up challenge. - Abstract: Samples of filtered particulates and sludges, formed from corroding magnesium alloy clad uranium metal ('Magnox') fuel elements, collected from one of the legacy nuclear fuel storage ponds located at Sellafield (UK) were investigated by Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive X-Ray analysis (ESEM/EDX), micro-Raman spectroscopy and Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FT-IR). ESEM imaging confirmed the dominant morphology to be clusters of interlocking platelets typical of brucite (Mg(OH){sub 2}). EDX analysis was suggestive of some conversion to the related phase, hydrotalcite (Mg{sub 6}Al{sub 2}(CO{sub 3})(OH){sub 16}.4H{sub 2}O), due to elevated levels of Al associated with Mg. Other apparent morphologies were less commonly observed including flaky sheets, consistent with earlier stages of Magnox alloy corrosion. In a few specific cases, rods were also observed suggestive of some conversion to Mg-hydroxycarbonate phases. Discrete phases rich in U were also identified. Fluorescence in the Raman spectroscopy also indicated surface coatings of organic macromolecules and iron sulphide on hematite containing particles, attributed to microbial activity within the open air pond. Some specific differences in the solid phases between pond areas with differing conditions were apparent.

  5. Spectral methods for study of the G-protein-coupled receptor rhodopsin: I. Vibrational and electronic spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struts, A. V.; Barmasov, A. V.; Brown, M. F.

    2015-05-01

    Here we review the application of modern spectral methods for the study of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) using rhodopsin as a prototype. Because X-ray analysis gives us immobile snapshots of protein conformations, it is imperative to apply spectroscopic methods for elucidating their function: vibrational (Raman, FTIR), electronic (UV-visible absorption, fluorescence) spectroscopies, and magnetic resonance (electron paramagnetic resonance, EPR), and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). In the first of the two companion articles, we discuss the application of optical spectroscopy for studying rhodopsin in a membrane environment. Information is obtained regarding the time-ordered sequence of events in rhodopsin activation. Isomerization of the chromophore and deprotonation of the retinal Schiff base leads to a structural change of the protein involving the motion of helices H5 and H6 in a pH-dependent process. Information is obtained that is unavailable from X-ray crystallography, which can be combined with spectroscopic studies to achieve a more complete understanding of GPCR function.

  6. Observation of Electronic Excitation Transfer Through Light Harvesting Complex II Using Two-Dimensional Electronic-Vibrational Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, NHC; Gruenke, NL; Oliver, TAA; Ballottari, M; Bassi, R; Fleming, GR

    2016-10-05

    Light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) serves a central role in light harvesting for oxygenic photosynthesis and is arguably the most important photosynthetic antenna complex. In this article, we present two-dimensional electronic–vibrational (2DEV) spectra of LHCII isolated from spinach, demonstrating the possibility of using this technique to track the transfer of electronic excitation energy between specific pigments within the complex. We assign the spectral bands via comparison with the 2DEV spectra of the isolated chromophores, chlorophyll a and b, and present evidence that excitation energy between the pigments of the complex are observed in these spectra. Lastly, we analyze the essential components of the 2DEV spectra using singular value decomposition, which makes it possible to reveal the relaxation pathways within this complex.

  7. Vibrational spectroscopy of resveratrol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billes, Ferenc; Mohammed-Ziegler, Ildikó; Mikosch, Hans; Tyihák, Ernő

    2007-11-01

    In this article the authors deal with the experimental and theoretical interpretation of the vibrational spectra of trans-resveratrol (3,5,4'-trihydroxy- trans-stilbene) of diverse beneficial biological activity. Infrared and Raman spectra of the compound were recorded; density functional calculations were carried out resulting in the optimized geometry and several properties of the molecule. Based on the calculated force constants, a normal coordinate analysis yielded the character of the vibrational modes and the assignment of the measured spectral bands.

  8. Ultrafast infrared vibrational spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Fayer, Michael D

    2013-01-01

    The past ten years or so have seen the introduction of multidimensional methods into infrared and optical spectroscopy. The technology of multidimensional spectroscopy is developing rapidly and its applications are spreading to biology and materials science. Edited by a recognized leader in the field and with contributions from top researchers, including experimentalists and theoreticians, this book presents the latest research methods and results and will serve as an excellent resource for other researchers.

  9. Time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokmakoff, Andrei [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Champion, Paul [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States); Heilweil, Edwin J. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology (NIST), Boulder, CO (United States); Nelson, Keith A. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Ziegler, Larry [Boston Univ., MA (United States)

    2009-05-14

    This document contains the Proceedings from the 14th International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy, which was held in Meredith, NH from May 9-14, 2009. The study of molecular dynamics in chemical reaction and biological processes using time-resolved spectroscopy plays an important role in our understanding of energy conversion, storage, and utilization problems. Fundamental studies of chemical reactivity, molecular rearrangements, and charge transport are broadly supported by the DOE's Office of Science because of their role in the development of alternative energy sources, the understanding of biological energy conversion processes, the efficient utilization of existing energy resources, and the mitigation of reactive intermediates in radiation chemistry. In addition, time-resolved spectroscopy is central to all fiveof DOE's grand challenges for fundamental energy science. The Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy conference is organized biennially to bring the leaders in this field from around the globe together with young scientists to discuss the most recent scientific and technological advances. The latest technology in ultrafast infrared, Raman, and terahertz spectroscopy and the scientific advances that these methods enable were covered. Particular emphasis was placed on new experimental methods used to probe molecular dynamics in liquids, solids, interfaces, nanostructured materials, and biomolecules.

  10. Spectroscopy of Vibrational States in Diatomic Iodine Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulholland, Mary; Harrill, Charles H.; Smith, R. Seth

    2015-04-01

    This project is focused on understanding the vibrational structure of iodine, which is a homonuclear diatomic molecule. A 20 mW, 532 nm cw diode laser was used to selectively excite neutral iodine molecules to a higher energy electronic state. By performing spectroscopy on the transitions from this state to a lower energy electronic state, the data only showed those vibrational bands which connect the two electronic states. Since a number of vibrational levels are populated in the higher energy electronic state, the transitions to all of the allowed vibrational levels in the lower energy electronic state provided sufficient data to determine the vibrational structures of both states. Emission spectra were collected with an Ocean Optics USB4000 Compact CCD Spectrometer. The spectrometer had a range of 500 - 770 nm with a resolution of approximately 0.5 nm and was sensitive enough to resolve the vibrational states in diatomic iodine molecules. The results were compared to a simple harmonic oscillator model.

  11. Excited-state intramolecular hydrogen transfer (ESIHT) of 1,8-Dihydroxy-9,10-anthraquinone (DHAQ) characterized by ultrafast electronic and vibrational spectroscopy and computational modeling

    KAUST Repository

    Mohammed, Omar F.

    2014-05-01

    We combine ultrafast electronic and vibrational spectroscopy and computational modeling to investigate the photoinduced excited-state intramolecular hydrogen-transfer dynamics in 1,8-dihydroxy-9,10-anthraquinone (DHAQ) in tetrachloroethene, acetonitrile, dimethyl sulfoxide, and methanol. We analyze the electronic excited states of DHAQ with various possible hydrogen-bonding schemes and provide a general description of the electronic excited-state dynamics based on a systematic analysis of femtosecond UV/vis and UV/IR pump-probe spectroscopic data. Upon photoabsorption at 400 nm, the S 2 electronic excited state is initially populated, followed by a rapid equilibration within 150 fs through population transfer to the S 1 state where DHAQ exhibits ESIHT dynamics. In this equilibration process, the excited-state population is distributed between the 9,10-quinone (S2) and 1,10-quinone (S1) states while undergoing vibrational energy redistribution, vibrational cooling, and solvation dynamics on the 0.1-50 ps time scale. Transient UV/vis pump-probe data in methanol also suggest additional relaxation dynamics on the subnanosecond time scale, which we tentatively ascribe to hydrogen bond dynamics of DHAQ with the protic solvent, affecting the equilibrium population dynamics within the S2 and S1 electronic excited states. Ultimately, the two excited singlet states decay with a solvent-dependent time constant ranging from 139 to 210 ps. The concomitant electronic ground-state recovery is, however, only partial because a large fraction of the population relaxes to the first triplet state. From the similarity of the time scales involved, we conjecture that the solvent plays a crucial role in breaking the intramolecular hydrogen bond of DHAQ during the S2/S1 relaxation to either the ground or triplet state. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  12. Probing electron density of H-bonding between cation-anion of imidazolium-based ionic liquids with different anions by vibrational spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yan; Zhang, Liqun; Wang, Yong; Li, Haoran

    2010-03-04

    Attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy and density functional theory calculation have been employed to study the spectral properties of imidazolium-based ionic liquids (ILs) with different anions. ILs based on 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium cation with different anions, OH(-), CF(3)CO(2)(-), HSO(4)(-), H(2)PO(4)(-), Cl(-), PF(6)(-), and BF(4)(-), are investigated in the present work. It has been shown that the C(2)-H stretching vibration of the imidazolium ring is closely related to the electron density of H-bonding between the two closest cations and anions for pure ILs. The electron density of H-bonding between cation and anion with different anions decreases in the order [OH](-) > [H(2)PO(4)](-) > [HSO(4)](-) > [CF(3)CO(2)](-) > [Cl](-) > [BF(4)](-) > [PF(6)](-). For aqueous ILs, with increasing water content, the aromatic C-H stretching vibration of the imidazolium cation showed systematic blue-shifts. Especially for BmimOH, the nu(C(2))(-H) undergoes a drastic blue-shift by 58 cm(-1), suggesting that the formation of the strong hydrogen bonds O-H...O may greatly weaken the electron density of H-bonding between the cation and anion of ILs.

  13. Study of conformational stability, structural, electronic and charge transfer properties of cladrin using vibrational spectroscopy and DFT calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Swapnil; Singh, Harshita; Srivastava, Anubha; Tandon, Poonam; Sinha, Kirti; Bharti, Purnima; Kumar, Sudhir; Kumar, Padam; Maurya, Rakesh

    2014-11-11

    In the present work, a detailed conformational study of cladrin (3-(3,4-dimethoxy phenyl)-7-hydroxychromen-4-one) has been done by using spectroscopic techniques (FT-IR/FT-Raman/UV-Vis/NMR) and quantum chemical calculations. The optimized geometry, wavenumber and intensity of the vibrational bands of the cladrin in ground state were calculated by density functional theory (DFT) employing 6-311++G(d,p) basis sets. The study has been focused on the two most stable conformers that are selected after the full geometry optimization of the molecule. A detailed assignment of the FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra has been done for both the conformers along with potential energy distribution for each vibrational mode. The observed and scaled wavenumber of most of the bands has been found to be in good agreement. The UV-Vis spectrum has been recorded and compared with calculated spectrum. In addition, 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectra have been also recorded and compared with the calculated data that shows the inter or intramolecular hydrogen bonding. The electronic properties such as HOMO-LUMO energies were calculated by using time-dependent density functional theory. Molecular electrostatic potential has been plotted to elucidate the reactive part of the molecule. Natural bond orbital analysis was performed to investigate the molecular stability. Non linear optical property of the molecule have been studied by calculating the electric dipole moment (μ) and the first hyperpolarizability (β) that results in the nonlinearity of the molecule. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Spectroscopy and reactions of vibrationally excited transient molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, H.L. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Spectroscopy, energy transfer and reactions of vibrationally excited transient molecules are studied through a combination of laser-based excitation techniques and efficient detection of emission from the energized molecules with frequency and time resolution. Specifically, a Time-resolved Fourier Transform Emission Spectroscopy technique has been developed for detecting dispersed laser-induced fluorescence in the IR, visible and UV regions. The structure and spectroscopy of the excited vibrational levels in the electronic ground state, as well as energy relaxation and reactions induced by specific vibronic excitations of a transient molecule can be characterized from time-resolved dispersed fluorescence in the visible and UV region. IR emissions from highly vibrational excited levels, on the other hand, reveal the pathways and rates of collision induced vibrational energy transfer.

  15. Vibrational spectroscopy and analytical electron microscopy studies of Fe-V-O and In-V-O thin films

    CERN Document Server

    Vuk, A S; Drazic, G; Colomban, P

    2002-01-01

    Orthovanadate (M sup 3 sup + VO sub 4; M= Fe, In) and vanadate (Fe sub 2 V sub 4 O sub 1 sub 3) thin films were prepared using sol-gel synthesis and dip coating deposition. Using analytical electron microscopy (AEM), the chemical composition and the degree of crystallization of the phases present in the thin Fe-V-O films were investigated. TEM samples were prepared in both orientations: parallel (plan view) and perpendicular (cross section) to the substrate. In the first stages of crystallization, when the particle sizes were in the nanometer range, the classical identification of phases using electron diffraction was not possible. Instead of measuring d values, experimentally selected area electron diffraction (SAED) patterns were compared to calculated (simulated) patterns in order to determine the phase composition. The problems of evaluating the ratio of amorphous and crystalline phases in thin films are reported. Results of TEM and XRD as well as IR and Raman spectroscopy showed that the films made at lo...

  16. DFT approach to (benzylthio)acetic acid: Conformational search, molecular (monomer and dimer) structure, vibrational spectroscopy and some electronic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sienkiewicz-Gromiuk, Justyna

    2018-01-01

    The DFT studies were carried out with the B3LYP method utilizing the 6-31G and 6-311++G(d,p) basis sets depending on whether the aim of calculations was to gain the geometry at equilibrium, or to calculate the optimized molecular structure of (benzylthio)acetic acid (Hbta) in the forms of monomer and dimer. The minimum conformational energy search was followed by the potential energy surface (PES) scan of all rotary bonds existing in the acid molecule. The optimized geometrical monomeric and dimeric structures of the title compound were compared with the experimental structural data in the solid state. The detailed vibrational interpretation of experimental infrared and Raman bands was performed on the basis of theoretically simulated ESFF-scaled wavenumbers calculated for the monomer and dimer structures of Hbta. The electronic characteristics of Hbta is also presented in terms of Mulliken atomic charges, frontier molecular orbitals and global reactivity descriptors. Additionally, the MEP and ESP surfaces were computed to predict coordination sites for potential metal complex formation.

  17. Low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy studies of solid-vacuum, solid-air and solid-liquid interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffer, Saskia [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Electron based surface probing techniques can provide detailed information about surface structure or chemical composition in vacuum environments. The development of new surface techniques has made possible in situ molecular level studies of solid-gas interfaces and more recently, solid-liquid interfaces. The aim of this dissertation is two-fold. First, by using novel sample preparation, Low Energy Electron Diffraction (LEED) and other traditional ultra high vacuum (UHV) techniques are shown to provide new information on the insulator/vacuum interface. The surface structure of the classic insulator NaCl has been determined using these methods. Second, using sum frequency generation (SFG) surface specific vibrational spectroscopy studies were performed on both the biopolymer/air and electrode/electrolyte interfaces. The surface structure and composition of polyetherurethane-silicone copolymers were determined in air using SFG, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). SFG studies of the electrode (platinum, gold and copper)/electrolyte interface were performed as a function of applied potential in an electrochemical cell.

  18. Direct probing of photoinduced electron transfer in a self-assembled biomimetic [2Fe2S]-hydrogenase complex using ultrafast vibrational spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ping; Amirjalayer, Saeed; Hartl, František; Lutz, Martin; de Bruin, Bas; Becker, René; Woutersen, Sander; Reek, Joost N H

    2014-05-19

    A pyridyl-functionalized diiron dithiolate complex, [μ-(4-pyCH2-NMI-S2)Fe2(CO)6] (3, py = pyridine (ligand), NMI = naphthalene monoimide) was synthesized and fully characterized. In the presence of zinc tetraphenylporphyrin (ZnTPP), a self-assembled 3·ZnTPP complex was readily formed in CH2Cl2 by the coordination of the pyridyl nitrogen to the porphyrin zinc center. Ultrafast photoinduced electron transfer from excited ZnTPP to complex 3 in the supramolecular assembly was observed in real time by monitoring the ν(C≡O) and ν(C═O)NMI spectral changes with femtosecond time-resolved infrared (TRIR) spectroscopy. We have confirmed that photoinduced charge separation produced the monoreduced species by comparing the time-resolved IR spectra with the conventional IR spectra of 3(•-) generated by reversible electrochemical reduction. The lifetimes for the charge separation and charge recombination processes were found to be τCS = 40 ± 3 ps and τCR = 205 ± 14 ps, respectively. The charge recombination is much slower than that in an analogous covalent complex, demonstrating the potential of a supramolecular approach to extend the lifetime of the charge-separated state in photocatalytic complexes. The observed vibrational frequency shifts provide a very sensitive probe of the delocalization of the electron-spin density over the different parts of the Fe2S2 complex. The TR and spectro-electrochemical IR spectra, electron paramagnetic resonance spectra, and density functional theory calculations all show that the spin density in 3(•-) is delocalized over the diiron core and the NMI bridge. This delocalization explains why the complex exhibits low catalytic dihydrogen production even though it features a very efficient photoinduced electron transfer. The ultrafast porphyrin-to-NMI-S2-Fe2(CO)6 photoinduced electron transfer is the first reported example of a supramolecular Fe2S2-hydrogenase model studied by femtosecond TRIR spectroscopy. Our results show that TRIR

  19. Ultrafast electronic relaxation and vibrational dynamics in a polyacetylene derivative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Takayoshi; Iiyama, Tsugumasa; Okamura, Kotaro; Du, Juan; Masuda, Toshio

    2013-04-01

    Real-time vibrational spectra in a polyacetylene derivative, poly[o-TFMPA([o-(trifluoromethyl) phenyl]acetylene)] in a broad electronic spectral region were observed using a sub-7-fs laser. Using the frequencies and initial phases of vibrational modes obtained by the spectroscopy, the assignment of the wavepackets was made. From the first moment, Huang-Rhys parameters were determined for six most prominent modes, which characterize the potential hypersurface composed of multi-dimensional vibrational mode spaces.

  20. Electronic Spectroscopy & Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark Maroncelli, Nancy Ryan Gray

    2010-06-08

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Electronic Spectroscopy and Dynamics was held at Colby College, Waterville, NH from 07/19/2009 thru 07/24/2009. The Conference was well-attended with participants (attendees list attached). The attendees represented the spectrum of endeavor in this field coming from academia, industry, and government laboratories, both U.S. and foreign scientists, senior researchers, young investigators, and students. The GRC on Electronic Spectroscopy & Dynamics showcases some of the most recent experimental and theoretical developments in electronic spectroscopy that probes the structure and dynamics of isolated molecules, molecules embedded in clusters and condensed phases, and bulk materials. Electronic spectroscopy is an important tool in many fields of research, and this GRC brings together experts having diverse backgrounds in physics, chemistry, biophysics, and materials science, making the meeting an excellent opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of ideas and techniques. Topics covered in this GRC include high-resolution spectroscopy, biological molecules in the gas phase, electronic structure theory for excited states, multi-chromophore and single-molecule spectroscopies, and excited state dynamics in chemical and biological systems.

  1. Vibrational Spectroscopy of Chromatographic Interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeanne E. Pemberton

    2011-03-10

    Chromatographic separations play a central role in DOE-supported fundamental research related to energy, biological systems, the environment, and nuclear science. The overall portfolio of research activities in the Separations and Analysis Program within the DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences includes support for activities designed to develop a molecular-level understanding of the chemical processes that underlie separations for both large-scale and analytical-scale purposes. The research effort funded by this grant award was a continuation of DOE-supported research to develop vibrational spectroscopic methods to characterize the interfacial details of separations processes at a molecular level.

  2. Vibrational Action Spectroscopy of Solids: New Surface-Sensitive Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zongfang; Płucienik, Agata; Feiten, Felix E.; Naschitzki, Matthias; Wachsmann, Walter; Gewinner, Sandy; Schöllkopf, Wieland; Staemmler, Volker; Kuhlenbeck, Helmut; Freund, Hans-Joachim

    2017-09-01

    Vibrational action spectroscopy employing infrared radiation from a free-electron laser has been successfully used for many years to study the vibrational and structural properties of gas phase aggregates. Despite the high sensitivity of this method no relevant studies have yet been conducted for solid sample surfaces. We have set up an experiment for the application of this method to such targets, using infrared light from the free-electron laser of the Fritz Haber Institute. In this Letter, we present first results of this technique with adsorbed argon and neon atoms as messengers. We were able to detect surface-located vibrations of a thin V2O3(0 0 0 1 ) film on Au(111) as well as adsorbate vibrations, demonstrating that this method is highly surface sensitive. We consider that the dominant channel for desorption of the messenger atoms is direct inharmonic vibrational coupling, which is essentially insensitive to subsurface or bulk vibrations. Another channel is thermal desorption due to sample heating by absorption of infrared light. The high surface sensitivity of the nonthermal channel and its insensitivity to subsurface modes makes this technique an ideal tool for the study of surface-located vibrations.

  3. Vibrational Spectroscopy in Studies of Atmospheric Corrosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saman Hosseinpour

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Vibrational spectroscopy has been successfully used for decades in studies of the atmospheric corrosion processes, mainly to identify the nature of corrosion products but also to quantify their amounts. In this review article, a summary of the main achievements is presented with focus on how the techniques infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy can be used in the field. Several different studies have been discussed where these instruments have been used to assess both the nature of corrosion products as well as the properties of corrosion inhibitors. Some of these techniques offer the valuable possibility to perform in-situ measurements in real time on ongoing corrosion processes, which allows the kinetics of formation of corrosion products to be studied, and also minimizes the risk of changing the surface properties which may occur during ex-situ experiments. Since corrosion processes often occur heterogeneously over a surface, it is of great importance to obtain a deeper knowledge about atmospheric corrosion phenomena on the nano scale, and this review also discusses novel vibrational microscopy techniques allowing spectra to be acquired with a spatial resolution of 20 nm.

  4. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 20; Issue 11. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy: Biological Applications. B G Hegde. General Article Volume 20 Issue 11 November 2015 pp 1017-1032. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  5. Characterization of pollen by vibrational spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Boris

    2010-12-01

    Classification, discrimination, and biochemical assignment of vibrational spectra of pollen samples belonging to 43 different species of the order Pinales has been made using three different vibrational techniques. The comparative study of transmission (KBr pellet) and attenuated total reflection (ATR) Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and FT-Raman spectroscopies was based on substantial variability of pollen grain size, shape, and relative biochemical composition. Depending on the penetration depth of the probe light, vibrational techniques acquire predominant information either on pollen grain walls (FT-Raman and ATR-FT-IR) or intracellular material (transmission FT-IR). Compared with the other two methods, transmission FT-IR obtains more comprehensive information and as a result achieves superior spectral identification and discrimination of pollen. The results strongly indicate that biochemical similarities of pollen grains belonging to the same plant genus or family lead to similar features in corresponding vibrational spectra. The exploitation of that property in aerobiological monitoring was demonstrated by simple and rapid pollen identification based on relatively small spectral libraries, with the same (or better) taxonomic resolution as that provided by optical microscopy. Therefore, the clear correlation between vibrational spectra and pollen grain morphology, biochemistry, and taxonomy is obtained, while successful pollen identification illustrates the practicability of such an approach in environmental studies.

  6. Direct Probing of Photoinduced Electron Transfer in a Self-Assembled Biomimetic [2Fe2S]-Hydrogenase Complex Using Ultrafast Vibrational Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, P.; Amirjalayer, S.; Hartl, F.; Lutz, M.; de Bruin, B.; Becker, R.; Woutersen, S.; Reek, J.N.H.

    2014-01-01

    Photoinduced electron transfer in a supramolecular ZnTPP·Fe2S2 complex is investigated using femtosecond infrared spectroscopy, infrared spectro-electrochemistry, and DFT calculations. We find that the electron density is delocalized over the diiron core and the naphthalimide ligand, which explains

  7. Vibrational spectroscopy in diagnosis and screening

    CERN Document Server

    Severcan, F

    2012-01-01

    In recent years there has been a tremendous growth in the use of vibrational spectroscopic methods for diagnosis and screening. These applications range from diagnosis of disease states in humans, such as cancer, to rapid identification and screening of microorganisms. The growth in such types of studies has been possible thanks to advances in instrumentation and associated computational and mathematical tools for data processing and analysis. This volume of Advances in Biomedical Spectroscopy contains chapters from leading experts who discuss the latest advances in the application of Fourier

  8. Thymine Dimer Formation probed by Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreier, Wolfgang J.; Schrader, Tobias E.; Roller, Florian O.; Gilch, Peter; Zinth, Wolfgang; Kohler, Bern

    Cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers are the major photoproducts formed when DNA is exposed to UV light. Femtosecond time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy reveals that thymine dimers are formed in thymidine oligonucleotides in an ultrafast photoreaction.

  9. Vibrational spectroscopy of Cm–C/Cb–Cb stretching vibrations of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 74; Issue 1. Vibrational spectroscopy of –/ – stretching vibrations of copper tetramesityl porphyrin: An algebraic approach. Srinivasa Rao Karumuri Joydeep Choudhury Nirmal Kumar Sarkar Ramendu Bhattacharjee. Research Articles Volume 74 Issue 1 January 2010 pp ...

  10. Electronic resonances in broadband stimulated Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batignani, G.; Pontecorvo, E.; Giovannetti, G.; Ferrante, C.; Fumero, G.; Scopigno, T.

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous Raman spectroscopy is a formidable tool to probe molecular vibrations. Under electronic resonance conditions, the cross section can be selectively enhanced enabling structural sensitivity to specific chromophores and reaction centers. The addition of an ultrashort, broadband femtosecond pulse to the excitation field allows for coherent stimulation of diverse molecular vibrations. Within such a scheme, vibrational spectra are engraved onto a highly directional field, and can be heterodyne detected overwhelming fluorescence and other incoherent signals. At variance with spontaneous resonance Raman, however, interpreting the spectral information is not straightforward, due to the manifold of field interactions concurring to the third order nonlinear response. Taking as an example vibrational spectra of heme proteins excited in the Soret band, we introduce a general approach to extract the stimulated Raman excitation profiles from complex spectral lineshapes. Specifically, by a quantum treatment of the matter through density matrix description of the third order nonlinear polarization, we identify the contributions which generate the Raman bands, by taking into account for the cross section of each process.

  11. Final Report: Vibrational Dynamics in Photoinduced Electron Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenneth G. Spears

    2006-04-19

    The objective of this grant was to understand how molecular vibrational states (geometry distortions) are involved in photoinduced electron transfer rates of molecules. This subject is an important component of understanding how molecular absorbers of light convert that energy into charge separation. This is important because the absorption usually excites molecular vibrations in a new electronic state prior to electron transfer to other molecules or semiconductor nanoparticles, as in some types of solar cells. The speeds of charge separation and charge recombination are key parameters that require experiments such as those in this work to test the rules governing electron transfer rates. Major progress was made on this goal. Some of the molecular structures selected for developing experimental data were bimolecular charge transfer complexes that contained metals of cobalt or vanadium. The experiments used the absorption of an ultrafast pulse of light to directly separate charges onto the two different molecular parts of the complex. The charge recombination then proceeds naturally, and one goal was to measure the speed of this recombination for different types of molecular vibrations. We used picosecond and femtosecond duration pulses with tunable colors at infrared wavelengths to directly observe vibrational states and their different rates of charge recombination (also called electron transfer). We discovered that different contact geometries in the complexes had very different electron transfer rates, and that one geometry had a significant dependence on the amount of vibration in the complex. This is the first and only measurement of such rates, and it allowed us to confirm our interpretation with a number of molecular models and test the sensitivity of electron transfer to vibrational states. This led us to develop a general theory, where we point out how molecular distortions can change the electron transfer rates to be much faster than prior theories

  12. DFT studies on the vibrational and electronic spectra of acetylsalicylic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Yunfeng; Tang, Guodong; Han, Yonghong; Culnane, Lance F.; Zhao, Jianyin; Zhang, Yu

    2016-05-01

    The following is a theoretical and experimental study on the vibrational and electronic properties of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA). Vibrational information was obtained by FT-IR and Raman spectroscopy which agree well with harmonic vibrational frequency calculations. The calculations were carried out using density functional theory B3LYP methods with 6-311G** and LANL2DZ basis sets. The vibrational assignments were calculated by Gaussview. Absorption UV-Vis experiments of ASA reveal three maximum peaks at 203, 224 and 277 nm, which are in agreement with calculated electronic transitions using TD-B3LYP/6-311G**.

  13. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    Recently, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectros- copy has emerged as a powerful tool to study the structure and dynamics of biological macromolecules such as proteins, protein aggregates, RNA and DNA. It is used in combination with molecular modelling to study complex systems such as soluble proteins ...

  14. Four-dimensional coherent electronic Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harel, Elad

    2017-04-01

    The correlations between different quantum-mechanical degrees of freedom of molecular species dictate their chemical and physical properties. Generally, these correlations are reflected in the optical response of the system but in low-order or low-dimensionality measurement the signals are highly averaged. Here, we describe a novel four-dimensional coherent spectroscopic method that directly correlates within and between the manifold of electronic and vibrational states. The optical response theory is developed in terms of both resonant and non-resonant field-matter interactions. Using resonance to select coherences on specific electronic states creates opportunities to directly distinguish coherent dynamics on the ground and electronically excited potentials. Critically, this method is free from lower-order signals that have plagued other electronically non-resonant vibrational spectroscopies. The theory presented here compliments recent work on the experimental demonstration of the 4D spectroscopic method described. We highlight specific means by which non-trivial effects such as anharmonicity (diagonal and off-diagonal), mode-specific vibronic coupling, and curvature of the excited states manifest in different projections of the 4D spectrum.

  15. Single-molecule vibrational spectroscopy of water molecules using an LT-STM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Chikako; Kim, Yousoo; Motobayashi, Kenta; Kawai, Maki

    2006-03-01

    Single-molecule vibrational spectroscopy has attracted considerable attention as a powerful tool for nanoscale chemistry. The adsorption of water molecules on metal surfaces plays an important role in understanding many phenomena in nature, such as heterogeneous catalysis and corrosion, etc. The structure of water at low coverage has been investigated on a variety of transition-metal surfaces with various techniques. But the microscopic understanding of the adsorption feature of single water molecules is still unclear. We report molecular scale study of adsorption behaviors of water molecules on Pt (111) surface at 4.7 K by use of single-molecule vibrational spectroscopy with the scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The Pt (111) surface was dosed with a small amount of water molecules (cherry blossom', which can be explained by one of the water molecules rotating around the other. Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy using the STM was utilized to determine vibrational modes of individual water dimers.

  16. Broadband infrared vibrational nano-spectroscopy using thermal blackbody radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Callahan, Brian T; Lewis, William E; Möbius, Silke; Stanley, Jared C; Muller, Eric A; Raschke, Markus B

    2015-12-14

    Infrared vibrational nano-spectroscopy based on scattering scanning near-field optical microscopy (s-SNOM) provides intrinsic chemical specificity with nanometer spatial resolution. Here we use incoherent infrared radiation from a 1400 K thermal blackbody emitter for broadband infrared (IR) nano-spectroscopy. With optimized interferometric heterodyne signal amplification we achieve few-monolayer sensitivity in phonon polariton spectroscopy and attomolar molecular vibrational spectroscopy. Near-field localization and nanoscale spatial resolution is demonstrated in imaging flakes of hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) and determination of its phonon polariton dispersion relation. The signal-to-noise ratio calculations and analysis for different samples and illumination sources provide a reference for irradiance requirements and the attainable near-field signal levels in s-SNOM in general. The use of a thermal emitter as an IR source thus opens s-SNOM for routine chemical FTIR nano-spectroscopy.

  17. Vibrational Cooling in A Cold Ion Trap: Vibrationally Resolved Photoelectron Spectroscopy of Cold C60- Anions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xue B.; Woo, Hin-koon; Wang, Lai S.

    2005-08-01

    We demonstrate vibrational cooling of anions via collisions with a background gas in an ion trap attached to a cryogenically controlled cold head (10 ? 400 K). Photoelectron spectra of vibrationally cold C60- anions, produced by electrospray ionization and cooled in the cold ion trap, have been obtained. Relative to spectra taken at room temperature, vibrational hot bands are completely eliminated, yielding well resolved vibrational structures and a more accurate electron affinity for neutral C60. The electron affinity of C60 is measured to be 2.683 ? 0.008 eV. The cold spectra reveal complicated vibrational structures for the transition to the C60 ground state due to the Jahn-Teller effect in the ground state of C60-. Vibrational excitations in the two Ag modes and eight Hg modes are observed, providing ideal data to assess the vibronic couplings in C60-.

  18. Seventh international conference on time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyer, R.B.; Martinez, M.A.D.; Shreve, A.; Woodruff, W.H. [comps.

    1997-04-01

    The International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy (TRVS) is widely recognized as the major international forum for the discussion of advances in this rapidly growing field. The 1995 conference was the seventh in a series that began at Lake Placid, New York, 1982. Santa Fe, New Mexico, was the site of the Seventh International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy, held from June 11 to 16, 1995. TRVS-7 was attended by 157 participants from 16 countries and 85 institutions, and research ranging across the full breadth of the field of time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy was presented. Advances in both experimental capabilities for time-resolved vibrational measurements and in theoretical descriptions of time-resolved vibrational methods continue to occur, and several sessions of the conference were devoted to discussion of these advances and the associated new directions in TRVS. Continuing the interdisciplinary tradition of the TRVS meetings, applications of time-resolved vibrational methods to problems in physics, biology, materials science, and chemistry comprised a large portion of the papers presented at the conference.

  19. Electron spectroscopy of crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Nemoshkalenko, V V

    1979-01-01

    This book is conceived as a monograph, and represents an up-to-date collection of information concerning the use of the method of X-ray photoelectron spec­ troscopy in the study of the electron structure of crystals, as well as a personal interpretation of the subject by the authors. In a natural way, the book starts in Chapter 1 with a recapitulation of the fundamentals of the method, basic relations, principles of operation, and a com­ parative presentation of the characteristics and performances of the most com­ monly used ESCA instruments (from the classical ones-Varian, McPherson, Hewlett Packard, and IEEE-up to the latest model developed by Professor Siegbahn in Uppsala), and continues with a discussion of some of the difficult problems the experimentalist must face such as calibration of spectra, prepara­ tion of samples, and evaluation of the escape depth of electrons. The second chapter is devoted to the theory of photoemission from crystal­ line solids. A discussion of the methods of Hartree-Fo...

  20. Acoustic vibration modes and electron-lattice coupling in self-assembled silver nanocolumns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgin, J; Langot, P; Arbouet, A; Margueritat, J; Gonzalo, J; Afonso, C N; Vallée, F; Mlayah, A; Rossell, M D; Van Tendeloo, G

    2008-05-01

    Using ultrafast spectroscopy, we investigated electron-lattice coupling and acoustic vibrations in self-assembled silver nanocolumns embedded in an amorphous Al2O3 matrix. The measured electron-lattice energy exchange time is smaller in the nanocolumns than in bulk silver, with a value very close to that of isolated nanospheres with comparable surface to volume ratio. Two vibration modes were detected and ascribed to the breathing and extensional mode of the nanocolumns, in agreement with numerical simulations.

  1. Spectroscopie de vibration infrarouge du silicium amorphe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ce travail porte sur l'étude des configurations des liaisons Si-H des couches minces du silicium amorphe hydrogéné évaporé (a-Si:H) préparées dans un bâti ultra-vide (UHV). L'hydrogène atomique est obtenu à l'aide d'un plasma dans un tube à décharge dirigé vers le porte-substrat. Les fréquences de vibrations et la ...

  2. Vibrational spectroscopy and imaging: applications for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Querido, William; Falcon, Jessica M; Kandel, Shital; Pleshko, Nancy

    2017-10-23

    Tissue engineering (TE) approaches strive to regenerate or replace an organ or tissue. The successful development and subsequent integration of a TE construct is contingent on a series of in vitro and in vivo events that result in an optimal construct for implantation. Current widely used methods for evaluation of constructs are incapable of providing an accurate compositional assessment without destruction of the construct. In this review, we discuss the contributions of vibrational spectroscopic assessment for evaluation of tissue engineered construct composition, both during development and post-implantation. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy in the mid and near-infrared range, as well as Raman spectroscopy, are intrinsically label free, can be non-destructive, and provide specific information on the chemical composition of tissues. Overall, we examine the contribution that vibrational spectroscopy via fiber optics and imaging have to tissue engineering approaches.

  3. Adsorption-induced symmetry reduction of metal-phthalocyanines studied by vibrational spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sforzini, J.; Bocquet, F. C.; Tautz, F. S.

    2017-10-01

    We investigate the vibrational properties of Pt- and Pd-phthalocyanine (PtPc and PdPc) molecules on Ag(111) with high-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS). In the monolayer regime, both molecules exhibit long-range order. The vibrational spectra prove a flat adsorption geometry. The redshift of specific vibrational modes suggests a moderate interaction of the molecules with the substrate. The presence of asymmetric vibrational peaks indicates an interfacial dynamical charge transfer (IDCT). The molecular orbital that is involved in IDCT is the former Eg lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) of the molecules that becomes partially occupied upon adsorption. A group-theoretical analysis of the IDCT modes, based on calculated vibrational frequencies and line shape fits, provides proof for the reduction of the symmetry of the molecule-substrate complex from fourfold D4 h to C2 v(σv) , Cs(σv) , or C2 and the ensuing lifting of the degeneracy of the former LUMO of the molecule. The vibration-based analysis of orbital degeneracies, as carried out here for PtPc/Ag(111) and PdPc/Ag(111), is particularly useful whenever the presence of multiple molecular in-plane orientations at the interface makes the analysis of orbital degeneracies with angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy difficult.

  4. Vibrational spectroscopy at high external pressures the diamond anvil cell

    CERN Document Server

    Ferraro, John R

    1984-01-01

    Vibrational Spectroscopy at High External Pressures: The Diamond Anvil Cell presents the effects of high pressure on the vibrational properties of materials as accomplished in a diamond anvil cell (DAC). The DAC serves the dual purpose of generating the pressures and being transparent to infrared radiation, allowing the observation of changes caused by pressure. The optical probes highlighted will deal principally with infrared and Raman scattering, although some observations in the visible region will also be presented. The book begins with a discussion of the effects of pressure and pres

  5. Vibrational Spectroscopy of Intramolecular Hydrogen Bonds in the Infrared and Near-Infrared Regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Sidsel Dahl

    and 1,4-diaminobutane). Experimentally, the hydrogen bonds have been studied with vibrational spectroscopy in the infrared and near-infrared regions. The focus is primarily on spectra recorded in the near-infrared regions, which in these studies are dominated by O-H and N-H stretching overtones....... Overtone spectra have been recorded with intracavity laser photoacoustic laser spectroscopy and conventional long path absorption spectroscopy. Theoretically, a combination of electronic structure calculations and local mode models have been employed to guide the assignment of bands in the vibrational......, weak intramolecular hydrogen bonds in methyl lactate, allyl carbinol and methallyl carbinol have been identified and characterized. The effect of substitution of two hydrogen atoms on one of the methylene groups with either methyl groups or tri uoromethyl groups on the intramolecular...

  6. Disentangling electronic and vibrational coherence in the Phycocyanin-645 light-harvesting complex

    CERN Document Server

    Richards, Gethin H; Curmi, Paul M G; Davis, Jeffrey A

    2013-01-01

    Energy transfer between chromophores in photosynthesis proceeds with near unity quantum efficiency. Understanding the precise mechanisms of these processes is made difficult by the complexity of the electronic structure and interactions with different vibrational modes. Two-dimensional spectroscopy has helped resolve some of the ambiguities and identified quantum effects that may be important for highly efficient energy transfer. Many questions remain, however, including whether the coherences observed are electronic and/or vibrational in nature and what role they play. We utilise a two-colour four-wave mixing experiment with control of the wavelength and polarization to selectively excite specific coherence pathways. For the light-harvesting complex PC645, from cryptophyte algae, we reveal and identify specific contributions from both electronic and vibrational coherences and determine an excited state structure based on two strongly-coupled electronic states and two vibrational modes. Separation of the cohe...

  7. Low temperature vibrational spectroscopy. I. Hexachlorotellurates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Rolf W.; Poulsen, Finn Willy; Bjerrum, Niels

    1977-01-01

    Far infrared and Raman spectra of six hexachlorotellurate (IV) salts have been obtained at ~100 K for the first time. In the rubidium, cesium, ammonium, and tetramethylammonium salts the Raman active T2g cation lattice translatory mode was found. In the monoclinic K2[TeCl6] a number of low freque...... pair of electrons present in hexachlorotellurates. The Journal of Chemical Physics is copyrighted by The American Institute of Physics....

  8. High-resolution spectroscopy in superfluid helium droplets. Investigation of vibrational fine structures in electronic spectra of phthalocyanine and porphyrin derivatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riechers, Ricarda Eva Friederike Elisabeth

    2011-03-22

    Since a considerably large variety of substituted compounds is commercially available and the electronic excitation spectra fit well into the spectral range covered by the continuous wave dye laser used for this study several porphyrin and phthalocyanine derivatives substituted with different types and numbers of alkyl and aryl groups were chosen as molecular probes. Recording fluorescence excitation and dispersed emission spectra revealed exclusively sharp transitions for all species. A change of the molecule's electrostatic moments, primarily and most effectively, a change of the molecular dipole moment regarding both magnitude and orientation, was identified as the main contribution for line broadening effects. Apart from the sharp lines presented in their fluorescence excitation spectra, the phthalocyanine derivatives investigated for this study, namely chloro-aluminium-phthalocyanine (AlClPc) and tetra-tertbutyl-phthalocyanine (TTBPc), exhibited more than one emission spectrum.

  9. Drug–excipient interactions in ketoprofen: A vibrational spectroscopy study

    OpenAIRE

    Carvalho, L. A. E. Batista de; Marques, M. Paula M.; Tomkinson, John

    2006-01-01

    Ketoprofen (3-benzoyl-alpha-methylbenzeneacetic acid) is a widely used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), always administered in the form of drug-excipient physical mixtures (PMs). The occurrence of possible interactions between ketoprofen and two commonly used excipients - lactose (LAC) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) - was evaluated, through vibrational spectroscopy techniques [both Raman and Inelastic Neutron Scattering (INS)]. Spectral evidence of drug:excipient close contacts, w...

  10. Influences of quantum mechanically mixed electronic and vibrational pigment states in 2D electronic spectra of photosynthetic systems: Strong electronic coupling cases

    CERN Document Server

    Fujihashi, Yuta; Ishizaki, Akihito

    2015-01-01

    In 2D electronic spectroscopy studies, long-lived quantum beats have recently been observed in photosynthetic systems, and it has been suggested that the beats are produced by quantum mechanically mixed electronic and vibrational states. Concerning the electronic-vibrational quantum mixtures, the impact of protein-induced fluctuations was examined by calculating the 2D electronic spectra of a weakly coupled dimer with vibrational modes in the resonant condition [J. Chem. Phys. 142, 212403 (2015)]. This analysis demonstrated that quantum mixtures of the vibronic resonance are rather robust under the influence of the fluctuations at cryogenic temperatures, whereas the mixtures are eradicated by the fluctuations at physiological temperatures. However, this conclusion cannot be generalized because the magnitude of the coupling inducing the quantum mixtures is proportional to the inter-pigment coupling. In this study, we explore the impact of the fluctuations on electronic-vibrational quantum mixtures in a strongl...

  11. Enhanced Vibrational Spectroscopies as Tools for Small Molecule Biosensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souhir Boujday

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In this short summary we summarize some of the latest developments in vibrational spectroscopic tools applied for the sensing of (small molecules and biomolecules in a label-free mode of operation. We first introduce various concepts for the enhancement of InfraRed spectroscopic techniques, including the principles of Attenuated Total Reflection InfraRed (ATR-IR, (phase-modulated InfraRed Reflection Absorption Spectroscopy (IRRAS/PM-IRRAS, and Surface Enhanced Infrared Reflection Absorption Spectroscopy (SEIRAS. Particular attention is put on the use of novel nanostructured substrates that allow for the excitation of propagating and localized surface plasmon modes aimed at operating additional enhancement mechanisms. This is then be complemented by the description of the latest development in Surface- and Tip-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopies, again with an emphasis on the detection of small molecules or bioanalytes.

  12. Nanomechanical Infrared Spectroscopy with Vibrating Filters for Pharmaceutical Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurek, Maksymilian; Carnoy, Matthias; Larsen, Peter Emil

    2017-01-01

    Standard infrared spectroscopy techniques are well-developed and widely used. However, they typically require milligrams of sample and can involve time-consuming sample preparation. A promising alternative is represented by nanomechanical infrared spectroscopy (NAM-IR) based on the photothermal r...... perform a chemical and morphological analysis on roughly 100 pg of sample. With an absolute estimated sensitivity of 109±15 fg, the presented method is suitable for ultrasensitive vibrational spectroscopy....... response of a nanomechanical resonator, which enables the chemical analysis of picograms of analyte directly from a liquid solution in only a few minutes. Herein, we present NAM-IR using perforated membranes (filters). The method was tested with the pharmaceutical compound indomethacin to successfully...

  13. Investigation of organometallic reaction mechanisms with one and two dimensional vibrational spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cahoon, James Francis [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2008-12-01

    One and two dimensional time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy has been used to investigate the elementary reactions of several prototypical organometallic complexes in room temperature solution. The electron transfer and ligand substitution reactions of photogenerated 17-electron organometallic radicals CpW(CO)3 and CpFe(CO)2 have been examined with one dimensional spectroscopy on the picosecond through microsecond time-scales, revealing the importance of caging effects and odd-electron intermediates in these reactions. Similarly, an investigation of the photophysics of the simple Fischer carbene complex Cr(CO)5[CMe(OMe)] showed that this class of molecule undergoes an unusual molecular rearrangement on the picosecond time-scale, briefly forming a metal-ketene complex. Although time-resolved spectroscopy has long been used for these types of photoinitiated reactions, the advent of two dimensional vibrational spectroscopy (2D-IR) opens the possibility to examine the ultrafast dynamics of molecules under thermal equilibrium conditions. Using this method, the picosecond fluxional rearrangements of the model metal carbonyl Fe(CO)5 have been examined, revealing the mechanism, time-scale, and transition state of the fluxional reaction. The success of this experiment demonstrates that 2D-IR is a powerful technique to examine the thermally-driven, ultrafast rearrangements of organometallic molecules in solution.

  14. Time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy of a molecular shuttle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panman, Matthijs R; Bodis, Pavol; Shaw, Danny J; Bakker, Bert H; Newton, Arthur C; Kay, Euan R; Leigh, David A; Buma, Wybren Jan; Brouwer, Albert M; Woutersen, Sander

    2012-02-14

    Time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy is used to investigate the inter-component motion of an ultraviolet-triggered two-station molecular shuttle. The operation cycle of this molecular shuttle involves several intermediate species, which are observable in the amide I and amide II regions of the mid-IR spectrum. Using ab initio calculations on specific parts of the rotaxane, and by comparing the transient spectra of the normal rotaxane with that of the N-deuterated version, we can assign the observed vibrational modes of each species occurring during the shuttling cycle in an unambiguous way. The complete time- and frequency-dependent data set is analyzed using singular value decomposition (SVD). Using a kinetic model to describe the time-dependent concentrations of the transient species, we derive the absorption spectra associated with each stage in the operation cycle of the molecular shuttle, including the recombination of the charged species.

  15. Electronic spectroscopy of jet-cooled YbNH3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonge, Nicola M.; Rusher, Cassandra A.; Bhalla, Nitika; Varriale, Luigi; Ellis, Andrew M.

    2012-02-01

    We report the first spectroscopic study of a complex consisting of a rare earth atom in combination with ammonia. Using two-color resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) spectroscopy, the lowest energy electronic transition of YbNH3 has been found in the near-infrared. The spectrum arises from a spin-forbidden transition between the 1A1 ground electronic state and the lowest 3E excited electronic state. The transition is metal centered and approximately correlates with the Yb 6s6p 3P ← 6s2 1S transition. The observation of clear spin-orbit structure in the spectrum confirms the C3v symmetry of YbNH3. Vibrational structure is also observed in the REMPI spectrum, which is dominated by excitation of the Yb-N stretching vibration.

  16. Chemometrics applied to vibrational spectroscopy: overview, challenges and pitfalls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haaland, D.M.

    1996-10-01

    Chemometric multivariate calibration methods are rapidly impacting quantitative infrared spectroscopy in many positive ways. The combination of vibrational spectroscopy and chemometrics has been used by industry for quality control and process monitoring. The growth of these methods has been phenomenal in the past decade. Yet, as with any new technology, there are growing pains. The methods are so powerful at finding correlations in the data, that when used without great care they can readily yield results that are not valid for the analysis of future unknown samples. In this paper, the power of the multivariate calibration methods is discussed while pointing out common pitfalls and some remaining challenges that may slow the implementation of chemometrics in research and industry.

  17. Terahertz mechanical vibrations in lysozyme: Raman spectroscopy vs modal analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpinteri, Alberto; Lacidogna, Giuseppe; Piana, Gianfranco; Bassani, Andrea

    2017-07-01

    The mechanical behaviour of proteins is receiving an increasing attention from the scientific community. Recently it has been suggested that mechanical vibrations play a crucial role in controlling structural configuration changes (folding) which govern proteins biological function. The mechanism behind protein folding is still not completely understood, and many efforts are being made to investigate this phenomenon. Complex molecular dynamics simulations and sophisticated experimental measurements are conducted to investigate protein dynamics and to perform protein structure predictions; however, these are two related, although quite distinct, approaches. Here we investigate mechanical vibrations of lysozyme by Raman spectroscopy and linear normal mode calculations (modal analysis). The input mechanical parameters to the numerical computations are taken from the literature. We first give an estimate of the order of magnitude of protein vibration frequencies by considering both classical wave mechanics and structural dynamics formulas. Afterwards, we perform modal analyses of some relevant chemical groups and of the full lysozyme protein. The numerical results are compared to experimental data, obtained from both in-house and literature Raman measurements. In particular, the attention is focused on a large peak at 0.84 THz (29.3 cm-1) in the Raman spectrum obtained analyzing a lyophilized powder sample.

  18. Cryogenic Vibrational Spectroscopy Provides Unique Fingerprints for Glycan Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masellis, Chiara; Khanal, Neelam; Kamrath, Michael Z.; Clemmer, David E.; Rizzo, Thomas R.

    2017-10-01

    The structural characterization of glycans by mass spectrometry is particularly challenging. This is because of the high degree of isomerism in which glycans of the same mass can differ in their stereochemistry, attachment points, and degree of branching. Here we show that the addition of cryogenic vibrational spectroscopy to mass and mobility measurements allows one to uniquely identify and characterize these complex biopolymers. We investigate six disaccharide isomers that differ in their stereochemistry, attachment point of the glycosidic bond, and monosaccharide content, and demonstrate that we can identify each one unambiguously. Even disaccharides that differ by a single stereogenic center or in the monosaccharide sequence order show distinct vibrational fingerprints that would clearly allow their identification in a mixture, which is not possible by ion mobility spectrometry/mass spectrometry alone. Moreover, this technique can be applied to larger glycans, which we demonstrate by distinguishing isomeric branched and linear pentasaccharides. The creation of a database containing mass, collision cross section, and vibrational fingerprint measurements for glycan standards should allow unambiguous identification and characterization of these biopolymers in mixtures, providing an enabling technology for all fields of glycoscience. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  19. Structural dynamics in complex liquids studied with multidimensional vibrational spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokmakoff, Andrei [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2013-08-31

    The development of new sustainable energy sources is linked to our understanding of the molecular properties of water and aqueous solutions. Energy conversion, storage, and transduction processes, particularly those that occur in biology, fuel cells, and batteries, make use of water for the purpose of moving energy in the form of charges and mediating the redox chemistry that allows this energy to be stored as and released from chemical bonds. To build our fundamental knowledge in this area, this project supports work in the Tokmakoff group to investigate the molecular dynamics of water’s hydrogen bond network, and how these dynamics influence its solutes and the mechanism of proton transport in water. To reach the goals of this grant, we developed experiments to observe molecular dynamics in water as directly as possible, using ultrafast multidimensional vibrational spectroscopy. We excite and probe broad vibrational resonances of water, molecular solutes, and protons in water. By correlating how molecules evolve from an initial excitation frequency to a final frequency, we can describe the underlying molecular dynamics. Theoretical modeling of the data with the help of computational spectroscopy coupled with molecular dynamics simulations provided the atomistic insight in these studies.

  20. Quantum control spectroscopy of vibrational modes: Comparison of control scenarios for ground and excited states in {beta}-carotene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauer, Juergen; Buckup, Tiago [Fachbereich Chemie, Physikalische Chemie, Philipps-Universitaet Marburg, Hans-Meerwein-Strasse, D-35043 Marburg (Germany); Motzkus, Marcus [Fachbereich Chemie, Physikalische Chemie, Philipps-Universitaet Marburg, Hans-Meerwein-Strasse, D-35043 Marburg (Germany)], E-mail: motzkus@staff.uni-marburg.de

    2008-06-23

    Quantum control spectroscopy (QCS) is used as a tool to study, address selectively and enhance vibrational wavepacket motion in large solvated molecules. By contrasting the application of Fourier-limited and phase-modulated excitation on different electronic states, the interplay between the controllability of vibrational coherence and electronic resonance is revealed. We contrast control on electronic ground and excited state by introducing an additional pump beam prior to a DFWM-sequence (Pump-DFWM). Via phase modulation of this initial pump pulse, coherent control is extended to structural evolution on the vibrationally hot ground state (hot-S{sub 0}) and lowest lying excited state (S{sub 1}) of {beta}-carotene. In an open loop setup, the control scenarios for these different electronic states are compared in their effectiveness and mechanism.

  1. Vibrational and electronic spectroscopic studies of melatonin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gurpreet; Abbas, J. M.; Dogra, Sukh Dev; Sachdeva, Ritika; Rai, Bimal; Tripathi, S. K.; Prakash, Satya; Sathe, Vasant; Saini, G. S. S.

    2014-01-01

    We report the infrared absorption and Raman spectra of melatonin recorded with 488 and 632.8 nm excitations in 3600-2700 and 1700-70 cm-1 regions. Further, we optimized molecular structure of the three conformers of melatonin within density functional theory calculations. Vibrational frequencies of all three conformers have also been calculated. Observed vibrational bands have been assigned to different vibrational motions of the molecules on the basis of potential energy distribution calculations and calculated vibrational frequencies. Observed band positions match well with the calculated values after scaling except Nsbnd H stretching mode frequencies. It is found that the observed and calculated frequencies mismatch of Nsbnd H stretching is due to intermolecular interactions between melatonin molecules.

  2. The separation of vibrational coherence from ground- and excited-electronic states in P3HT film

    KAUST Repository

    Song, Yin

    2015-06-07

    © 2015 AIP Publishing LLC. Concurrence of the vibrational coherence and ultrafast electron transfer has been observed in polymer/fullerene blends. However, it is difficult to experimentally investigate the role that the excited-state vibrational coherence plays during the electron transfer process since vibrational coherence from the ground- and excited-electronic states is usually temporally and spectrally overlapped. Here, we performed 2-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2D ES) measurements on poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) films. By Fourier transforming the whole 2D ES datasets (S (λ 1, T∼ 2, λ 3)) along the population time (T∼ 2) axis, we develop and propose a protocol capable of separating vibrational coherence from the ground- and excited-electronic states in 3D rephasing and nonrephasing beating maps (S (λ 1, ν∼ 2, λ 3)). We found that the vibrational coherence from pure excited electronic states appears at positive frequency (+ ν∼ 2) in the rephasing beating map and at negative frequency (- ν∼ 2) in the nonrephasing beating map. Furthermore, we also found that vibrational coherence from excited electronic state had a long dephasing time of 244 fs. The long-lived excited-state vibrational coherence indicates that coherence may be involved in the electron transfer process. Our findings not only shed light on the mechanism of ultrafast electron transfer in organic photovoltaics but also are beneficial for the study of the coherence effect on photoexcited dynamics in other systems.

  3. Exciton-vibrational coupling in the dynamics and spectroscopy of Frenkel excitons in molecular aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröter, M.; Ivanov, S. D.; Schulze, J.; Polyutov, S. P.; Yan, Y.; Pullerits, T.; Kühn, O.

    2015-03-01

    given in terms of a stochastic decoupling ansatz. This method has become the standard in exciton-vibrational theory and illustrative examples will be presented as well as a comparison with ML-MCTDH. Applications will be shown for generic model systems as well as for small aggregates mimicking those formed by perylene bisimide dyes. Further, photosynthetic antenna complexes will be discussed, including spectral densities and the role of exciton-vibrational coupling in two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy.

  4. Electron spectrometer for gas-phase spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bozek, J.D.; Schlachter, A.S. [Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    An electron spectrometer for high-resolution spectroscopy of gaseous samples using synchrotron radiation has been designed and constructed. The spectrometer consists of a gas cell, cylindrical electrostatic lens, spherical-sector electron energy analyzer, position-sensitive detector and associated power supplies, electronics and vacuum pumps. Details of the spectrometer design are presented together with some representative spectra.

  5. Vibrational Spectroscopy of He-O_2H^+ and O_2H^+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohguchi, Hiroshi; Yamada, Koichi MT; Jusko, Pavol; Schlemmer, Stephan; Asvany, Oskar

    2017-06-01

    The elusive protonated oxygen, O_2H^+, has been characterized by vibrational action spectroscopy in a cryogenic 22-pole ion trap. On the one hand, the vibrational bands of the tagged He-O_2H^+ have been investigated, using a table-top OPO system for the known OH-stretch^a, whereas the FELIX^b light source has been used to detect the hitherto unknown low-frequency O-O-H bend and O-O stretch. On the other hand, the untagged O_2H^+ has been detected for the first time by high-resolution rovibrational spectroscopy via its ν_1 OH-stretch motion. 38 ro-vibrational fine structure transitions with partly resolved hyperfine satellites were measured (56 resolved lines in total). Spectroscopic parameters were determined by a fit to an asymmetric rotor model with a ^3A'' electronic ground state. The band center is at 3016.73 \\wn, which is in good agreement with experimental^a and ab initio^{c,d} predictions. Based on the spectroscopic parameters, the rotational spectrum is predicted, but not detected yet. ^a S. A. Nizkorodov et al., Chem. Phys. Lett., 278, 26, 1997 ^b D. Oepts et al., Infrared Phys. Technol., 36, 297, 1995 ^c S. L. W. Weaver et al., Astrophys. J., 697, 601, 2009 ^d X. Huang and T. J. Lee, J. Chem. Phys., 129, 044312, 2008

  6. Discovery of Cellulose Surface Layer Conformation by Nonlinear Vibrational Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Libing; Fu, Li; Wang, Hong-fei; Yang, Bin

    2017-03-14

    Significant questions remain with respect to the structure and polymorphs of cellulose. These include the cellulose surface layers and the bulk crystalline core as well as the conformational differences. The Total Internal Reflection Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy (TIR-SFG-VS) combined with the conventional SFG-VS (non-TIR) can help to resolve these questions by selectively characterizing the molecular structures of surface layers and the crystalline core of cellulose. From the SFG spectra in the C-H and O-H regions, we found that the surface layers of Avicel are essentially amorphous; while the surface layers of Iβ cellulose are crystalline but with different structural and spectroscopic signatures than that of its crystalline core. This work demonstrates the capacity of TIR and Non-TIR SFG-VS tools in selectively studying the structures and polymorphs of cellulose. In addition, these results also suggest that the assignments of major vibrational peaks for cellulose need to be further determined.

  7. Liquid Space Lubricants Examined by Vibrational Micro-Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Kenneth W., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Considerable effort has been expended to develop liquid lubricants for satellites and space exploration vehicles. These lubricants must often perform under a range of harsh conditions such as vacuum, radiation, and temperature extremes while in orbit or in transit and in extremely dusty environments at destinations such as the Moon and Mars. Historically, oil development was guided by terrestrial application, which did not provide adequate space lubricants. Novel fluids such as the perfluorinated polyethers provided some relief but are far from ideal. With each new fluid proposed to solve one problem, other problems have arisen. Much of the work performed at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) in elucidating the mechanisms by which chemical degradation of space oils occur has been done by vibrational micro-spectroscopic techniques such as infrared and Raman, which this review details. Presented are fundamental lubrication studies as well as actual case studies in which vibrational spectroscopy has led to millions of dollars in savings and potentially prevented loss of mission.

  8. Vibrationally assisted electron transfer mechanism of olfaction: myth or reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solov'yov, Ilia A; Chang, Po-Yao; Schulten, Klaus

    2012-10-28

    Smell is a vital sense for animals. The mainstream explanation of smell is based on recognition of the odorant molecules through characteristics of their surface, e.g., shape, but certain experiments suggest that such recognition is complemented by recognition of vibrational modes. According to this suggestion an olfactory receptor is activated by electron transfer assisted through odorant vibrational excitation. The hundreds to thousands of different olfactory receptors in an animal recognize odorants over a discriminant landscape with surface properties and vibrational frequencies as the two major dimensions. In the present paper we introduce the vibrationally assisted mechanism of olfaction and demonstrate for several odorants that, indeed, a strong enhancement of an electron tunneling rate due to odorant vibrations can arise. We discuss in this regard the influence of odorant deuteration and explain, thereby, recent experiments performed on Drosophila melanogaster. Our demonstration is based on known physical properties of biological electron transfer and on ab initio calculations on odorants carried out for the purpose of the present study. We identify a range of physical characteristics which olfactory receptors and odorants must obey for the vibrationally assisted electron transfer mechanism to function. We argue that the stated characteristics are feasible for realistic olfactory receptors, noting, though, that the receptor structure presently is still unknown, but can be studied through homology modeling.

  9. Vibrationally coupled electron transport through single-molecule junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haertle, Rainer

    2012-04-26

    Single-molecule junctions are among the smallest electric circuits. They consist of a molecule that is bound to a left and a right electrode. With such a molecular nanocontact, the flow of electrical currents through a single molecule can be studied and controlled. Experiments on single-molecule junctions show that a single molecule carries electrical currents that can even be in the microampere regime. Thereby, a number of transport phenomena have been observed, such as, for example, diode- or transistor-like behavior, negative differential resistance and conductance switching. An objective of this field, which is commonly referred to as molecular electronics, is to relate these transport phenomena to the properties of the molecule in the contact. To this end, theoretical model calculations are employed, which facilitate an understanding of the underlying transport processes and mechanisms. Thereby, one has to take into account that molecules are flexible structures, which respond to a change of their charge state by a profound reorganization of their geometrical structure or may even dissociate. It is thus important to understand the interrelation between the vibrational degrees of freedom of a singlemolecule junction and the electrical current flowing through the contact. In this thesis, we investigate vibrational effects in electron transport through singlemolecule junctions. For these studies, we calculate and analyze transport characteristics of both generic and first-principles based model systems of a molecular contact. To this end, we employ a master equation and a nonequilibrium Green's function approach. Both methods are suitable to describe this nonequilibrium transport problem and treat the interactions of the tunneling electrons on the molecular bridge non-perturbatively. This is particularly important with respect to the vibrational degrees of freedom, which may strongly interact with the tunneling electrons. We show in detail that the resulting

  10. Electronic and Vibrational Coherences in Algal Light-Harvesting Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scholes Gregory D.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We present broadband two-dimensional electronic spectra of a lightharvesting protein from photosynthetic algae. Analysis of the spectra show that the amplitude of the main cross peak oscillates as a function of the waiting time period. Both electronic coupling and intramolecular vibrational modes, and their mixture, can lead to such oscillations. Using predictions based on models of four-level systems, we describe ways to distinguish electronic from vibrational contributions to the coherence and find that both types of coupling contribute to the measured dynamics.

  11. On the accuracy of the noninteracting electron approximation for vibrationally coupled electron transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Haobin, E-mail: haobin.wang@ucdenver.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Colorado Denver, Denver, CO 80217-3364 (United States); Thoss, Michael [Institut für Theoretische Physik und Interdisziplinäres Zentrum für Molekulare Materialien, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Staudtstr. 7/B2, D-91058 (Germany)

    2016-12-20

    The accuracy of the noninteracting electron approximation is examined for a model of vibrationally coupled electron transport in single molecule junction. In the absence of electronic-vibrational coupling, steady state transport in this model is described exactly by Landauer theory. Including coupling, both electronic-vibrational and vibrationally induced electron–electron correlation effects may contribute to the real time quantum dynamics. Using the multilayer multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree (ML-MCTDH) theory to describe nuclear dynamics exactly while maintaining the noninteracting electron approximation for the electronic dynamics, the correlation effects are analyzed in different physical regimes. It is shown that although the noninteracting electron approximation may be reasonable for describing short time dynamics, it does not give the correct long time limit for certain initial conditions.

  12. Single-molecule electronics: Cooling individual vibrational modes by the tunneling current.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lykkebo, Jacob; Romano, Giuseppe; Gagliardi, Alessio; Pecchia, Alessandro; Solomon, Gemma C

    2016-03-21

    Electronic devices composed of single molecules constitute the ultimate limit in the continued downscaling of electronic components. A key challenge for single-molecule electronics is to control the temperature of these junctions. Controlling heating and cooling effects in individual vibrational modes can, in principle, be utilized to increase stability of single-molecule junctions under bias, to pump energy into particular vibrational modes to perform current-induced reactions, or to increase the resolution in inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy by controlling the life-times of phonons in a molecule by suppressing absorption and external dissipation processes. Under bias the current and the molecule exchange energy, which typically results in heating of the molecule. However, the opposite process is also possible, where energy is extracted from the molecule by the tunneling current. Designing a molecular "heat sink" where a particular vibrational mode funnels heat out of the molecule and into the leads would be very desirable. It is even possible to imagine how the vibrational energy of the other vibrational modes could be funneled into the "cooling mode," given the right molecular design. Previous efforts to understand heating and cooling mechanisms in single molecule junctions have primarily been concerned with small models, where it is unclear which molecular systems they correspond to. In this paper, our focus is on suppressing heating and obtaining current-induced cooling in certain vibrational modes. Strategies for cooling vibrational modes in single-molecule junctions are presented, together with atomistic calculations based on those strategies. Cooling and reduced heating are observed for two different cooling schemes in calculations of atomistic single-molecule junctions.

  13. In-trap conversion electron spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Weissman, L; Äystö, J; Forstner, O; Reisinger, K; Rinta-Antila, S

    2002-01-01

    The Penning trap REXTRAP at ISOLDE was used to test the feasibility of in-trap conversion electron spectroscopy. The results of simulations, experiments with solid conversion electron sources as well as first on-line and tests with trapped radioactive ions are presented. In addition to obtaining high-resolution spectroscopic data, the detection of conversion electrons was found to be a useful tool for the diagnostics of the trap operation. The tests proved the feasibility of in-trap spectroscopy but also revealed some potential problems to be addressed in the future.

  14. Line shapes in inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy of single-molecule junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meierott, S.; Néel, N.; Kröger, J.

    2017-11-01

    Spectroscopic line-shape analyses for single-C60 vibrational modes are presented for two kinds of scanning tunneling microscope experiments. Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy is performed for C60 molecules with different adsorption geometries on Pb(111). Depending on the C60 adsorption site and rotational orientation, the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital exhibits varying degrees of overlap with C60 vibrational energies. Concomitantly, the line shapes of vibrational modes are affected according to expectations for on-resonance inelastic electron tunneling. Inelastic electron transport is further studied for decreasing tip-C60 distances covering tunneling and contact ranges. Line-shape changes signaling a conductance increase rather than the expected decrease upon exciting vibrational quanta are observed. A phenomenological approach is suggested to understand the dissimilar behavior of the junction conductance in the different electron transport ranges.

  15. Application of fluorescent and vibration spectroscopy for septic serum human albumin structure deformation during pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyubin, A.; Konstantinova, E.; Slezhkin, V.; Matveeva, K.; Samusev, I.; Bryukhanov, V.

    2017-12-01

    In this paper we perform results of conformational analysis of septic human serum albumin (HSA) carried out by Raman spectroscopy (RS), infrared (IR) spectroscopy and fluorescent spectroscopy. The main vibrational groups were identified and analyzed for septic HSA and its health control. Comparison between Raman and IR results were done. Fluorescent spectral changes of Trp-214 group were analyzed. Application of Raman, IR spectroscopy, fluorescent spectroscopy for conformational changes study of HSA during pathology were shown.

  16. Materials research by electron momentum spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canney, S.A.; Fang, Z.; Guo, X.; McCarthy, I.E. [Flinders Univ. of South Australia, Adelaide, SA (Australia). Electronic Structure of Materials Centre; Kheifets, A.S.; Vos, M.; Weigold, E. [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia). Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, Atomic and Molecular Physcis Laboratories

    1998-06-01

    Electron momentum spectroscopy (EMS), also known as (e,2e) spectroscopy is a relatively new technique for the research of materials. It directly determines the electronic structure of materials using binary electron-electron collisions. The measured intensity is proportional to the energy-momentum density, i.e. the modulus square of the wave function in momentum space. This intensity is simply the probability of finding an electron in the material with a particular combination of binding-energy and momentum. In contrast to photoemission measurements, EMS is able to resolve real momentum (rather than crystal-momentum) and the measured intensity is easily related to the electronic structure itself. The measured and calculated momentum densities of graphite, aluminium and amorphous silicon films are presented. 7 refs., 3 figs.

  17. Theoretical methods for small-molecule ro-vibrational spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lodi, Lorenzo; Tennyson, Jonathan, E-mail: j.tennyson@ucl.ac.u [University College London, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-14

    The solution of the first principle equations of quantum mechanics provides an increasingly accurate and predictive approach for solving problems involving atoms and small molecules. A general introduction to the methods used for the ab initio calculation of rotational-vibrational spectra of small molecules is presented, with a strong focus on triatomic systems. The use of multi-reference electronic structure methods to compute molecular potential-energy and dipole-moment surfaces is discussed. Issues related to the construction of such surfaces and the inclusion of corrections due to relativistic and non-Born-Oppenheimer effects are reviewed. The derivation of exact, internal-coordinate nuclear-motion-effective Hamiltonians and their solution using a discrete-variable representation are discussed. Sample results for the water molecules are used throughout the tutorial to illustrate the theoretical and numerical issues in such calculations. (phd tutorial)

  18. Assessment of Electron Propagator Methods for the Simulation of Vibrationally Resolved Valence and Core Photoionization Spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baiardi, A; Paoloni, L; Barone, V; Zakrzewski, V G; Ortiz, J V

    2017-07-11

    The analysis of photoelectron spectra is usually facilitated by quantum mechanical simulations. Because of the recent improvement of experimental techniques, the resolution of experimental spectra is rapidly increasing, and the inclusion of vibrational effects is usually mandatory to obtain a reliable reproduction of the spectra. With the aim of defining a robust computational protocol, a general time-independent formulation to compute different kinds of vibrationally resolved electronic spectra has been generalized to also support photoelectron spectroscopy. The electronic structure data underlying the simulation are computed using different electron propagator approaches. In addition to the more standard approaches, a new and robust implementation of the second-order self-energy approximation of the electron propagator based on a transition operator reference (TOEP2) is presented. To validate our implementation, a series of molecules has been used as test cases. The result of the simulations shows that, for ultraviolet photoionization spectra, the more accurate nondiagonal approaches are needed to obtain a reliable reproduction of vertical ionization energies but that diagonal approaches are sufficient for energy gradients and pole strengths. For X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, the TOEP2 approach, besides being more efficient, is also the most accurate in the reproduction of both vertical ionization energies and vibrationally resolved bandshapes.

  19. Electronic Properties of Si-Hx Vibrational Modes at Si Waveguide Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashouti, Muhammad Y; Yousefi, Peyman; Ristein, Jürgen; Christiansen, Silke H

    2015-10-01

    Attenuated total reflectance (ATR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy in suite with Kelvin probe were conjugated to explore the electronic properties of Si-Hx vibrational modes by developing Si waveguide with large dynamic detection range compared with conventional IR. The Si 2p emission and work-function related to the formation and elimination of Si-Hx bonds at Si surfaces are monitored based on the detection of vibrational mode frequencies. A transition between various Si-Hx bonds and thus related vibrational modes is monitored for which effective momentum transfer could be demonstrated. The combination of the aforementioned methods provides for results that permit a model for the kinetics of hydrogen termination of Si surfaces with time and advanced surface characterizing of hybrid-terminated semiconducting solids.

  20. Photoelectron spectroscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy of solids and surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowalczyk, S.P.

    1976-01-01

    The use of photoelectron spectroscopy, primarily x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, to obtain information on the electronic structure of a wide variety of solids (especially the bulk electronic structure of solids) is covered. Both valence band and core-level spectra, as well as a few cases of photon excited Auger electron spectroscopy, are employed in the investigations to derive information on N(E). The effect of several modulations inherent in the measured I(E)'s, such as final state band structure, cross section, and relaxation, is discussed. Examples of many-electron interactions in PES are given. Some experimental aspects of PES and AES studies are given with emphasis on sample preparation techniques. Multiple splitting of core levels is examined using the Mn levels in MnF/sub 2/ as a detailed case study. Core level splittings in transition metals, rare earth metals, transition metal halides and several alloys are also reported. The application of PES to the study of the chemical bond in some crystalline semiconductors and insulators, A/sup N/B/sup 8-N/ and A/sup N/B/sup 10-N/ compounds is treated, and a spectroscopic scale of ionicity for these compounds is developed from the measured ''s-band'' splitting in the valence band density of states. (GHT)

  1. Vibrational kinetics of electronically excited states in H2 discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colonna, Gianpiero; Pietanza, Lucia D.; D'Ammando, Giuliano; Celiberto, Roberto; Capitelli, Mario; Laricchiuta, Annarita

    2017-11-01

    The evolution of atmospheric pressure hydrogen plasma under the action of repetitively ns electrical pulse has been investigated using a 0D state-to-state kinetic model that self-consistently couples the master equation of heavy particles and the Boltzmann equation for free electrons. The kinetic model includes, together with atomic hydrogen states and the vibrational kinetics of H2 ground state, vibrational levels of singlet states, accounting for the collisional quenching, having a relevant role because of the high pressure. The mechanisms of excitations, radiative decay and collisional quenching involving the excited H2 states and the corresponding cross sections, integrated over the non-equilibrium electron energy distribution function (EEDF) to obtain kinetic rates, are discussed in the light of the kinetic simulation results, i.e. the time evolution during the pulse of the plasma composition, of the EEDF and of the vibrational distributions of ground and singlet excited states.

  2. Reactivity, vibrational spectroscopy, internal rotation and thermochemical aspects of methylarsine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viana, Rommel B.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to perform a characterization of the spectroscopic and thermodynamic properties of methylarsine (CH3AsH2). Post-Hartree-Fock, 29 DFT methods and eight different composite methodologies were employed in these analyses. A comparison between harmonic and anharmonic frequency accuracies in reproducing the observable frequencies was performed here. In addition, the CH3AsH2 → CH2AsH3 isomerization barrier energy was estimated in 100 kcal mol- 1, whereas the H2-release routes barrier heights were in the 45-107 kcal mol- 1 range. A rate constant of 10- 66 s- 1 was predicted regarding the isomerization route, while the CH2AsH3 hydrogen elimination mechanism is faster than the methylarsine one. The transition state structure of the CH3AsH2 internal rotational barrier energy varied between 1.0 and 1.4 kcal mol- 1. For the CH2AsH3 internal rotation the estimated barrier heights varied 0.6-2.5 kcal mol- 1. The adiabatic ionization energy and the heat of formation each structure was also calculated here. Table S2 Mean absolute error (MAE, in cm- 1) based in the harmonic frequencies calculated for each method in the prediction of the methylarsine experimental vibrational modes. Table S3 Calculated harmonic (ν, in cm- 1) and anharmonic (ω, in cm- 1) vibrational frequencies in reproducing the methylarsine observed frequencies using the cc-pVTZ basis sets. Table S4. Calculated harmonic (ZPVEHARM, in kcal mol- 1) and anharmonic (ZPVEANHARM, in kcal mol- 1) methylarsine zero-point vibrational energy values (ZPVE) and the difference (ΔZPVE) between both values. Table S5. Arsenic-Carbon bond order indexes for each molecule. Table S6 Properties at As-C bond critical points (BCPs) as electronic charge density [ρ(r)] and its Laplacian [∇2ρ(r)], total energy density [H(r)], ellipticity (ε) and the relationship between local potential energy and local energy density [V(r)/G(r)]. Table S7 Carbon [q(C)] and arsenic [q(As)] atomic charge distribution

  3. Low energy electron impact vibrational excitation of acetylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Sigma; Hargreaves, Leigh; Khakoo, Murtadha

    2016-05-01

    Experimental differential cross sections for the vibration excitation of the four fundamental modes of acetylene at low incident electron energies from 1 eV to 20 eV and scattering angles of 10o to 130o will be presented. The results will be compared to results available in the literature. Funded by NSF-AMOP-RUI Grant.

  4. Inelastic vibrational signals in electron transport across graphene nanoconstrictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunst, Tue; Markussen, Troels; Stokbro, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    We present calculations of the inelastic vibrational signals in the electrical current through a graphene nanoconstriction. We find that the inelastic signals are only present when the Fermi-level position is tuned to electron transmission resonances, thus, providing a fingerprint which can link ...

  5. Mechanisms of molecular electronic rectification through electronic levels with strong vibrational coupling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuznetsov, A.M.; Ulstrup, Jens

    2002-01-01

    , corresponding to the fully diabatic limit. The rectification process then reduces to a sequence of vibrationally relaxed single-electron transfer steps. In the limits where the interactions are strong, denoted as the partially and fully adiabatic limits, the character of the rectification process is different......, and electron flow proceeds coherently, without vibrational relaxation. In still another class of mechanisms the electronic level broadening of either donor or acceptor from the adjacent electrode is so strong that it is comparable to the vibrational broadening. The process then reduces to a three...

  6. Two-Dimensional Electronic Spectroscopies for Probing Electronic Structure and Charge Transfer: Applications to Photosystem II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogilvie, Jennifer P. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Physics

    2016-11-22

    Photosystem II (PSII) is the only known natural enzyme that uses solar energy to split water, making the elucidation of its design principles critical for our fundamental understanding of photosynthesis and for our ability to mimic PSII’s remarkable properties. This report discusses progress towards addressing key open questions about the PSII RC. It describes new spectroscopic methods that were developed to answer these questions, and summarizes the outcomes of applying these methods to study the PSII RC. Using 2D electronic spectroscopy and 2D electronic Stark spectroscopy, models for the PSII RC were tested and refined. Work is ongoing to use the collected data to elucidate the charge separation mechanism in the PSII RC. Coherent dynamics were also observed in the PSII RC for the first time. Through extensive characterization and modeling we have assigned these coherences as vibronic in nature, and believe that they reflect resonances between key vibrational pigment modes and electronic energy gaps that may facilitate charge separation. Work is ongoing to definitively test the functional relevance of electronic-vibrational resonances.

  7. Vibrational spectroscopy of Cm–C/Cb–Cb stretching vibrations of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    operator which conveniently describes stretching vibrations of biomolecules. For a copper tetramesityl porphyrin molecule, the higher excited vibrational levels are calculated by applying the U(2) algebraic approach. Keywords. Lie algebraic techniques; vibrational spectra; copper tetramesityl porphyrin. PACS Nos 31.65.

  8. Liicg - a New Method for Rotational and Ro-Vibrational Spectroscopy at 4K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluge, Lars; Stoffels, Alexander; Bruenken, Sandra; Asvany, Oskar; Schlemmer, Stephan

    2014-06-01

    Since many years low temperature ion trapping techniques are successfully used in our laboratories in combination with sensitive action spectroscopy schemes (Laser Induced Reactions) to measure high resolution ro-vibrational and rotational spectra of gas-phase molecular ions. Here we present a further development of a LIR method first introduced for recording rotationally resolved electronic spectra of N2+. This new method, called LIICG (Light Induced Inhibition of Complex Growth), makes use of state specific He-attachment rates to stored cold molecular ions. We have recently demonstrated its applicability to rotational and ro-vibrational spectroscopy of C3H+ and CH5+. The measurements were performed in recently completed 4K 22-pole ion trap instruments. Ionic species are produced in a storage ion source and are mass selected before they enter the trap. For spectroscopy normally a few thousand ions are stored at 4K together with He at high number densities (around 1014 cm-3). Under these conditions He attaches to the ions via ternary collision processes. As we will show, this attachement process is hindered by exciting a rotational or ro-vibrational transition, likely because the attachment rates for He are slower for higher rotational or ro-vibrational levels. So by exciting the bare ion the number of ion- He complexes at equilibrium is reduced. In this way the spectrum of the bare ion can be recorded by counting the number of ion-He complexes as a function of frequency. To test the new method we chose well known rotational ground state transitions of CO+, HCO+ and CD+. In particular CD+ appeared to be a good candidate for understanding the new method in detail, due to its strong LIICG signal and its simple rotational spectrum. In this contribution we will explain the LIICG scheme and its underlying kinetics using the example of CD+. We will show effects of different experimental conditions on the signal (e.g. He number density, temperature, radiation power…) to

  9. Localized surface plasmon resonances in nanostructures to enhance nonlinear vibrational spectroscopies: towards an astonishing molecular sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Lis

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Vibrational transitions contain some of the richest fingerprints of molecules and materials, providing considerable physicochemical information. Vibrational transitions can be characterized by different spectroscopies, and alternatively by several imaging techniques enabling to reach sub-microscopic spatial resolution. In a quest to always push forward the detection limit and to lower the number of needed vibrational oscillators to get a reliable signal or imaging contrast, surface plasmon resonances (SPR are extensively used to increase the local field close to the oscillators. Another approach is based on maximizing the collective response of the excited vibrational oscillators through molecular coherence. Both features are often naturally combined in vibrational nonlinear optical techniques. In this frame, this paper reviews the main achievements of the two most common vibrational nonlinear optical spectroscopies, namely surface-enhanced sum-frequency generation (SE-SFG and surface-enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (SE-CARS. They can be considered as the nonlinear counterpart and/or combination of the linear surface-enhanced infrared absorption (SEIRA and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS techniques, respectively, which are themselves a branching of the conventional IR and spontaneous Raman spectroscopies. Compared to their linear equivalent, those nonlinear vibrational spectroscopies have proved to reach higher sensitivity down to the single molecule level, opening the way to astonishing perspectives for molecular analysis.

  10. Water Oxidation Mechanisms of Metal Oxide Catalysts by Vibrational Spectroscopy of Transient Intermediates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Miao [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Chemical Sciences Division; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Frei, Heinz [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Molecular Biophysics and Integrated Bioimaging Division; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2017-02-22

    Water oxidation is an essential reaction of an artificial photosystem for solar fuel generation because it provides electrons needed to reduce carbon dioxide or protons to a fuel. Earth-abundant metal oxides are among the most attractive catalytic materials for this reaction because of their robustness and scalability, but their efficiency poses a challenge. Knowledge of catalytic surface intermediates gained by vibrational spectroscopy under reaction conditions plays a key role in uncovering kinetic bottlenecks and provides a basis for catalyst design improvements. Recent dynamic infrared and Raman studies reveal the molecular identity of transient surface intermediates of water oxidation on metal oxides. In conclusion, combined with ultrafast infrared observations of how charges are delivered to active sites of the metal oxide catalyst and drive the multielectron reaction, spectroscopic advances are poised to play a key role in accelerating progress toward improved catalysts for artificial photosynthesis.

  11. Water Oxidation Mechanisms of Metal Oxide Catalysts by Vibrational Spectroscopy of Transient Intermediates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Miao; Frei, Heinz

    2017-05-01

    Water oxidation is an essential reaction of an artificial photosystem for solar fuel generation because it provides electrons needed to reduce carbon dioxide or protons to a fuel. Earth-abundant metal oxides are among the most attractive catalytic materials for this reaction because of their robustness and scalability, but their efficiency poses a challenge. Knowledge of catalytic surface intermediates gained by vibrational spectroscopy under reaction conditions plays a key role in uncovering kinetic bottlenecks and provides a basis for catalyst design improvements. Recent dynamic infrared and Raman studies reveal the molecular identity of transient surface intermediates of water oxidation on metal oxides. Combined with ultrafast infrared observations of how charges are delivered to active sites of the metal oxide catalyst and drive the multielectron reaction, spectroscopic advances are poised to play a key role in accelerating progress toward improved catalysts for artificial photosynthesis.

  12. Unusual Synthetic Pathway for an {Fe(NO)2}9 Dinitrosyl Iron Complex (DNIC) and Insight into DNIC Electronic Structure via Nuclear Resonance Vibrational Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Speelman, Amy L.; Zhang, Bo; Silakov, Alexey; Skodje, Kelsey M.; Alp, E. Ercan; Zhao, Jiyong; Hu, Michael Y.; Kim, Eunsuk; Krebs, Karsten; Lehnert, Nicolai

    2016-06-06

    Dinitrosyl iron complexes (DNICs) are among the most abundant NO-derived cellular species. Monomeric DNICs can exist in the {Fe(NO)2}9 or {Fe(NO)2}10 oxidation state (in the Enemark -Feltham notation). However, experimental studies of analogous DNICs in both oxidation states are rare, which prevents a thorough understanding of the di ff erences in the electronic structures of these species. Here, the {Fe(NO)2}9 DNIC [Fe(dmp)(NO)2](OTf) ( 1 ; dmp = 2,9-dimethyl-1,10- phenanthroline) is synthesized from a ferrous precursor via an unusual pathway, involving disproportionation of an {FeNO}7 complex to yield the {Fe(NO)2}9 DNIC and a ferric species, which is subsequently reduced by NO gas to generate a ferrous complex that re-enters the reaction cycle. In contrast to most {Fe(NO)2}9 DNICs with neutral N-donor ligands, 1 exhibits high solution stability and can be characterized structurally and spectroscopically. Reduction of 1 yields the corresponding {Fe(NO)2}10 DNIC [Fe(dmp)(NO)2](2). The Mo ssbauer isomer shift of 2 is 0.08 mm/s smaller than that of 1 , which indicates that the iron center is slightly more oxidized in the reduced complex. The nuclear resonance vibrational spectra (NRVS) of 1 and 2 are distinct and provide direct experimental insight into di ff erences in bonding in these complexes. In particular, the symmetric out-of-plane Fe -N - O bending mode is shifted to higher energy by 188 cm-1 in 2 in comparison to 1 . Using quantum chemistry centered normal coordinate analysis (QCC-NCA), this is shown to arise from an increase in Fe - NO bond order and a sti ff ening of the Fe(NO)2 unit upon reduction of 1 to 2 . DFT calculations demonstrate that the changes in bonding arise from an iron- centered reduction which leads to a distinct increase in Fe - NO π -back-bonding in

  13. Probing flexible conformations in molecular junctions by inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingsen Deng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The probe of flexible molecular conformation is crucial for the electric application of molecular systems. We have developed a theoretical procedure to analyze the couplings of molecular local vibrations with the electron transportation process, which enables us to evaluate the structural fingerprints of some vibrational modes in the inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS. Based on a model molecule of Bis-(4-mercaptophenyl-ether with a flexible center angle, we have revealed and validated a simple mathematical relationship between IETS signals and molecular angles. Our results might open a route to quantitatively measure key geometrical parameters of molecular junctions, which helps to achieve precise control of molecular devices.

  14. Large electron transfer rate effects from the Duschinsky mixing of vibrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sando, Gerald M.; Spears, Kenneth G; Hupp, Joseph T

    2001-01-01

    vibrations are very important. The Duschinsky effect arises when two electronic states have vibrational normal mode coordinate systems that are rotated and translated relative to each other. We use a conventional quantum rate model for ET, and the examples include 6-8 vibrations, where two vibrational modes...

  15. Amplifying vibrational circular dichroism by manipulation of the electronic manifold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingos, Sérgio R; Panman, Matthijs R; Bakker, Bert H; Hartl, Frantisek; Buma, Wybren J; Woutersen, Sander

    2012-01-11

    Vibrational circular dichroism is a powerful technique to study the stereochemistry of chiral molecules, but often suffers from small signal intensities. Electrochemical modulation of the energies of the electronically excited state manifold is now demonstrated to lead to an order of magnitude enhancement of the differential absorption. Quantum-chemical calculations show that increased mixing between ground and excited states is at the origin of this amplification. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012

  16. Photoelectron spectroscopy bulk and surface electronic structures

    CERN Document Server

    Suga, Shigemasa

    2014-01-01

    Photoelectron spectroscopy is now becoming more and more required to investigate electronic structures of various solid materials in the bulk, on surfaces as well as at buried interfaces. The energy resolution was much improved in the last decade down to 1 meV in the low photon energy region. Now this technique is available from a few eV up to 10 keV by use of lasers, electron cyclotron resonance lamps in addition to synchrotron radiation and X-ray tubes. High resolution angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) is now widely applied to band mapping of materials. It attracts a wide attention from both fundamental science and material engineering. Studies of the dynamics of excited states are feasible by time of flight spectroscopy with fully utilizing the pulse structures of synchrotron radiation as well as lasers including the free electron lasers (FEL). Spin resolved studies also made dramatic progress by using higher efficiency spin detectors and two dimensional spin detectors. Polarization depend...

  17. 2012 Gordon Research Conference on Vibrational Spectroscopy - Formal Schedule and Speaker/Poster Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geiger, Franz [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)

    2012-08-10

    The Vibrational Spectroscopy conference brings together experimentalists and theoreticians working at the frontiers of modern vibrational spectroscopy, with a special emphasis on spectroscopies that probe the structure and dynamics of molecules in gases, liquids, and at interfaces. The conference explores the wide range of state-of-the-art techniques based on vibrational motion. These techniques span the fields of time-domain, high-resolution frequency-domain, spatially-resolved, nonlinear, and multidimensional spectroscopies. The conference highlights both the application of these techniques in chemistry, materials, biology, the environment, and medicine as well as the development of theoretical models that enable one to connect spectroscopic signatures to underlying molecular motions including chemical reaction dynamics. The conference goal is to advance the field of vibrational spectroscopy by bringing together a collection of researchers who share common interests and who will gain from discussing work at the forefront of several connected areas. The intent is to emphasize the insights and understanding that studies of vibrations provide about a variety of molecular systems ranging from small polyatomic molecules to large biomolecules, nanomaterials, and environmental systems.

  18. Proton translocation in cytochrome c oxidase: insights from proton exchange kinetics and vibrational spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishigami, Izumi; Hikita, Masahide; Egawa, Tsuyoshi; Yeh, Syun-Ru; Rousseau, Denis L

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase is the terminal enzyme in the electron transfer chain. It reduces oxygen to water and harnesses the released energy to translocate protons across the inner mitochondrial membrane. The mechanism by which the oxygen chemistry is coupled to proton translocation is not yet resolved owing to the difficulty of monitoring dynamic proton transfer events. Here we summarize several postulated mechanisms for proton translocation, which have been supported by a variety of vibrational spectroscopic studies. We recently proposed a proton translocation model involving proton accessibility to the regions near the propionate groups of the heme a and heme a3 redox centers of the enzyme based by hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange Raman scattering studies (Egawa et al., PLoS ONE 2013). To advance our understanding of this model and to refine the proton accessibility to the hemes, the H/D exchange dependence of the heme propionate group vibrational modes on temperature and pH was measured. The H/D exchange detected at the propionate groups of heme a3 takes place within a few seconds under all conditions. In contrast, that detected at the heme a propionates occurs in the oxidized but not the reduced enzyme and the H/D exchange is pH-dependent with a pKa of ~8.0 (faster at high pH). Analysis of the thermodynamic parameters revealed that, as the pH is varied, entropy/enthalpy compensation held the free energy of activation in a narrow range. The redox dependence of the possible proton pathways to the heme groups is discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Vibrational spectroscopies and bioenergetic systems. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Surface studies of praseodymium by electron spectroscopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczyk, Mirosław; Pisarek, Marcin; Lisowski, Wojciech; Jablonski, Aleksander

    2016-12-01

    Electron transport properties in praseodymium (Pr) foil samples were studied by elastic-peak electron spectroscopy (EPES). Prior to EPES measurements, the Pr sample surface was pre-sputtered by Ar ions with ion energy of 2-3 keV. After such treatment, the Pr sample still contained about 10 at.% of residual oxygen in the surface region, as detected by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) analyses. The inelastic mean free path (IMFP), characterizing electron transport within this region (4 nm-thick), was evaluated from EPES using both Ni and Au standards as a function of energy in the range of 0.5-2 keV. Experimental IMFPs, λ, were approximated by the simple function λ = kEp, where E is energy (in eV), and k = 0.1549 and p = 0.7047 were the fitted parameters. These values were compared with IMFPs for the praseodymium surface in which the presence of oxygen was tentatively neglected, and also with IMFPs resulting from the TPP-2M predictive equation for bulk praseodymium. We found that the measured IMFP values to be only slightly affected by neglect of oxygen in calculations. The fitted function applied here was consistent with the energy dependence of the EPES-measured IMFPs. Additionally, the measured IMFPs were found to be from 2% to 4.2% larger than the predicted IMFPs for praseodymium in the energy range of 500-1000 eV. For electron energies of 1500 eV and 2000 eV, there was an inverse correlation between these values, and then the resulting deviations of -0.4% and -2.7%, respectively, were calculated.

  20. Photochromism of Composite Organometallic Nanostructures Based on Diarylethenes. II. Vibrational Spectroscopy and Quantum Chemistry Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilyuk, G. T.; Askirka, V. F.; Lavysh, A. V.; Kurguzenkov, S. A.; Yasinskii, V. M.; Kobeleva, O. I.; Valova, T. M.; Ayt, A. O.; Barachevsky, V. A.; Yarovenko, V. N.; Krayushkin, M. M.; Maskevich, S. A.

    2017-11-01

    The structure and photochromic transformations of nanostructured organometallic composites consisting of Ag nanoparticles with shells of photochromic diarylethenes (DAEs) deposited from various solutions onto the nanoparticles were studied using infrared absorption and surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) vibrational spectroscopy and quantum chemistry. The studied nanostructures exhibited photochromic properties manifested as reversible photoinduced changes of the relative intensities of SERS bands related to vibrations of bonds participating in the reversible photoisomerization. Spectral manifestations of chemical interaction between metal nanoparticles and DAE molecules were detected.

  1. Theory of single molecule vibrational spectroscopy and microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorente, N; Persson, M

    2000-10-02

    We have carried out a density functional study of vibrationally inelastic tunneling in the scanning tunneling microscope of acetylene on copper. Our approach is based on a many-body generalization of the Tersoff-Hamann theory. We explain why only the carbon-hydrogen stretch modes are observed in terms of inelastic and elastic contributions to the tunneling conductance. The inelastic tunneling is found to be efficient and highly localized in space without any resonant interaction and to be governed by a vibration-induced change in tunneling amplitude.

  2. Electronic and vibrational circular dichroism spectra of (R)-(-)-apomorphine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbate, Sergio, E-mail: abbate@med.unibs.it [Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche e Biotecnologie, Universita di Brescia, Viale Europa 11, 25123 Brescia (Italy); CNISM, Consorzio Interuniversitario Scienze Fisiche della Materia, Via della Vasca Navale 84, 00146 Roma (Italy); Longhi, Giovanna; Lebon, France [Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche e Biotecnologie, Universita di Brescia, Viale Europa 11, 25123 Brescia (Italy); CNISM, Consorzio Interuniversitario Scienze Fisiche della Materia, Via della Vasca Navale 84, 00146 Roma (Italy); Tommasini, Matteo [Dipartimento di Chimica, Materiali e Ingegneria Chimica ' G. Natta' , Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Consorzio Interuniversitario per la Scienza e Tecnologia dei Materiali (INSTM), Unita di Ricerca del Politecnico di Milano (Dip. CMIC), Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2012-09-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ECD and VCD Spectra of (R)-(-)-apomorphine measured in various solvents. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DFT calculations allow to study the protonation state and conformations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Contributions from catechol OH vibrations to the VCD spectra is studied. -- Abstract: Apomorphine is a chiral drug molecule; notwithstanding its extraordinary importance, little attention has been paid to the characterization of its chiroptical properties. Here we report on its electronic circular dichroism (ECD) spectra, recorded in methanol and water, and vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) in methanol and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) solutions. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations have allowed us to interpret the spectra and to evaluate the role of possible conformations, charge-states and interactions with counter ions.

  3. Non-renewal statistics for electron transport in a molecular junction with electron-vibration interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosov, Daniel S.

    2017-09-01

    Quantum transport of electrons through a molecule is a series of individual electron tunneling events separated by stochastic waiting time intervals. We study the emergence of temporal correlations between successive waiting times for the electron transport in a vibrating molecular junction. Using the master equation approach, we compute the joint probability distribution for waiting times of two successive tunneling events. We show that the probability distribution is completely reset after each tunneling event if molecular vibrations are thermally equilibrated. If we treat vibrational dynamics exactly without imposing the equilibration constraint, the statistics of electron tunneling events become non-renewal. Non-renewal statistics between two waiting times τ1 and τ2 means that the density matrix of the molecule is not fully renewed after time τ1 and the probability of observing waiting time τ2 for the second electron transfer depends on the previous electron waiting time τ1. The strong electron-vibration coupling is required for the emergence of the non-renewal statistics. We show that in the Franck-Condon blockade regime, extremely rare tunneling events become positively correlated.

  4. Hydrogen Bonding and Vibrational Spectroscopy: A Theoretical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaban, Galina M.

    2005-01-01

    Effects of hydrogen bonding on vibrational spectra are studied for several hydrogen-bonded complexes, in which hydrogen bonding ranges from weak (25 kcal/mol). The systems studied include complexes of inorganic acids and salts with water and ammonia, as well as complexes of several organic molecules (nitriles and amino acids) with water. Since anharmonic effects are very strong in hydrogen-bonded systems, anharmonic vibrational frequencies and infrared intensities are computed using the correlation-corrected vibrational self-consistent field (CC-VSCF) method with ab initio potential surfaces at the MP2 and CCSD(T) levels. The most common spectral effects induced by hydrogen bonding are red shifts of stretching vibrational frequencies ranging from approx.200/cm to over 2000/cm and significant increases of infrared intensities for those bonds that participate in hydrogen bonding. However, some systems (e.g. nitrile-water complexes) exhibit shifts in the opposite direction (to the blue) upon formation of hydrogen bonds.

  5. Prediction of Milk Quality Parameters Using Vibrational Spectroscopy and Chemometrics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskildsen, Carl Emil Aae

    Vibrational spectroscopic techniques are widely used throughout all stages of food production. The analysis of raw materials, real-time process control, and end-product quality evaluation are all crucial steps in food production. In order to increase production throughput there is a need for speed...

  6. Correlating electronic and vibrational motions in charge transfer systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalil, Munira [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2014-06-27

    The goal of this research program was to measure coupled electronic and nuclear motions during photoinduced charge transfer processes in transition metal complexes by developing and using novel femtosecond spectroscopies. The scientific highlights and the resulting scientific publications from the DOE supported work are outlined in the technical report.

  7. Surface studies of praseodymium by electron spectroscopies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krawczyk, Mirosław, E-mail: mkrawczyk@ichf.edu.pl; Pisarek, Marcin; Lisowski, Wojciech; Jablonski, Aleksander

    2016-12-01

    Highlights: • Pr foil. • EPES applied to measure the IMFPs in Pr samples after 3 keV Ar{sup +} ion etching. • Etched surfaces found to be formed by oxygen-containing Pr. • Measured IMFPs for E = 0.5–2 keV were approximated by Eq. (2). • The IMFPs were slightly affected by oxygen and agreed well with those from Eq. (3). - Abstract: Electron transport properties in praseodymium (Pr) foil samples were studied by elastic-peak electron spectroscopy (EPES). Prior to EPES measurements, the Pr sample surface was pre-sputtered by Ar ions with ion energy of 2–3 keV. After such treatment, the Pr sample still contained about 10 at.% of residual oxygen in the surface region, as detected by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) analyses. The inelastic mean free path (IMFP), characterizing electron transport within this region (4 nm-thick), was evaluated from EPES using both Ni and Au standards as a function of energy in the range of 0.5–2 keV. Experimental IMFPs, λ, were approximated by the simple function λ = kE{sup p}, where E is energy (in eV), and k = 0.1549 and p = 0.7047 were the fitted parameters. These values were compared with IMFPs for the praseodymium surface in which the presence of oxygen was tentatively neglected, and also with IMFPs resulting from the TPP-2M predictive equation for bulk praseodymium. We found that the measured IMFP values to be only slightly affected by neglect of oxygen in calculations. The fitted function applied here was consistent with the energy dependence of the EPES-measured IMFPs. Additionally, the measured IMFPs were found to be from 2% to 4.2% larger than the predicted IMFPs for praseodymium in the energy range of 500–1000 eV. For electron energies of 1500 eV and 2000 eV, there was an inverse correlation between these values, and then the resulting deviations of −0.4% and −2.7%, respectively, were calculated.

  8. Vibrational Spectroscopy of the CCl[subscript 4] v[subscript 1] Mode: Theoretical Prediction of Isotopic Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaynor, James D.; Wetterer, Anna M.; Cochran, Rea M.; Valente, Edward J.; Mayer, Steven G.

    2015-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a powerful experimental technique, yet it is often missing from the undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory curriculum. Tetrachloromethane (CCl[subscript 4]) is the ideal molecule for an introductory vibrational spectroscopy experiment and the symmetric stretch vibration contains fine structure due to isotopic variations…

  9. Dissociative electron attachment and vibrational excitation of CF{sub 3}Cl: Effect of two vibrational modes revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarana, Michal [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States); JILA, University of Colorado and NIST, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0440 (United States); Houfek, Karel; Horacek, Jiri [Institute of Theoretical Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University in Prague, V Holesovickach 2, Prague (Czech Republic); Fabrikant, Ilya I. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom)

    2011-11-15

    We present a study of dissociative electron attachment and vibrational excitation processes in electron collisions with the CF{sub 3}Cl molecule. The calculations are based on the two-dimensional nuclear dynamics including the C-Cl symmetric stretch coordinate and the CF{sub 3} symmetric deformation (umbrella) coordinate. The complex potential energy surfaces are calculated using the ab initio R-matrix method. The results for dissociative attachment and vibrational excitation of the umbrella mode agree quite well with experiment whereas the cross section for excitation of the C-Cl symmetric stretch vibrations is about a factor-of-three too low in comparison with experimental data.

  10. Gas Phase Molecular Spectroscopy: Electronic Spectroscopy of Combustion Intermediates, Chlorine Azide kinetics, and Rovibrational Energy Transfer in Acetylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freel, Keith A.

    This dissertation is composed of three sections. The first deals with the electronic spectroscopy of combustion intermediates that are related to the formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Absorption spectra for phenyl, phenoxy, benzyl, and phenyl peroxy radicals were recorded using the technique of cavity ring-down spectroscopy. When possible, molecular constants, vibrational frequencies, and excited state lifetimes for these radicals were derived from these data. The results were supported by theoretical predictions. The second section presents a study of electron attachment to chlorine azide (ClN3) using a flowing-afterglow Langmuir-probe apparatus. Electron attachment rates were measured to be 3.5x10-8 and 4.5x10-8 cm3s-1 at 298 and 400 K respectively. The reactions of ClN3 with eighteen cations and seventeen anions were characterized. Rate constants were measured using a selected ion flow tube. The ionization energy (>9.6eV), proton affinity (713+/-41 kJ mol-1), and electron affinity (2.48+/-0.2 eV) for ClN 3 were determined from these data. The third section demonstrates the use of double resonance spectroscopy to observe state-selected rovibrational energy transfer from the first overtone asymmetric stretch of acetylene. The total population removal rate constants from various rotational levels of the (1,0,1,00,00) vibrational state were determined to be in the range of (9-17) x 10 -10 cm3s-1. Rotational energy transfer accounted for approximately 90% of the total removal rate from each state. Therefore, the upper limit of vibrational energy transfer from the (1,0,1,0 0,00) state was 10%.

  11. Vibrational spectroscopy modeling of a drug in molecular solvents and enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devereux, Christian J.; Fulfer, Kristen D.; Zhang, Xiaoliu; Kuroda, Daniel G.

    2017-09-01

    Modeling of drugs in enzymes is of immensurable value to many areas of science. We present a theoretical study on the vibrational spectroscopy of Rilpivirine, a HIV reverse transcriptase inhibitor, in conventional solvents and in clinically relevant enzymes. The study is based on vibrational spectroscopy modeling of the drug using molecular dynamics simulations, DFT frequency maps, and theory. The modeling of the infrared lineshape shows good agreement with experimental data for the drug in molecular solvents where the local environment motions define the vibrational band lineshape. On the other hand, the theoretical description of the drug in the different enzymes does not match previous experimental findings indicating that the utilized methodology might not apply to heterogeneous environments. Our findings show that the lack of reproducibility might be associated with the development of the frequency map which does not contain all of the possible interactions observed in such systems.

  12. Communication: interfacial water structure revealed by ultrafast two-dimensional surface vibrational spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Z.; Piatkowski, L.; Bakker, H.J.; Bonn, M.

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge of the interfacial water structure is essential for a basic understanding of the many environmental, technological, and biophysical systems in which aqueous interfaces appear. Using ultrafast two-dimensional surface-specific vibrational spectroscopy we show that the structure of heavy

  13. Double resonant absorption measurement of acetylene symmetric vibrational states probed with cavity ring down spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Karhu, J; Vainio, M; Metsälä, M; Hoekstra, S; Halonen, L

    2016-01-01

    A novel mid-infrared/near-infrared double resonant absorption setup for studying infrared-inactive vibrational states is presented. A strong vibrational transition in the mid-infrared region is excited using an idler beam from a singly resonant continuous-wave optical parametric oscillator, to populate an intermediate vibrational state. High output power of the optical parametric oscillator and the strength of the mid-infrared transition result in efficient population transfer to the intermediate state, which allows measuring secondary transitions from this state with a high signal-to-noise ratio. A secondary, near-infrared transition from the intermediate state is probed using cavity ring down spectroscopy, which provides high sensitivity in this wavelength region. Due to the narrow linewidths of the excitation sources, the rovibrational lines of the secondary transition are measured with sub-Doppler resolution. The setup is used to access a previously unreported symmetric vibrational state of acetylene, $\

  14. Vibration isolation techniques suitable for portable electronic speckle pattern interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findeis, Dirk M.; Gryzagoridis, Jasson; Rowland, David R.

    2002-06-01

    Electronic Speckle Pattern Interferometry (ESPI) and Digital Shearography are optical interference techniques, suitable for non-destructive inspection procedures. Due to the stringent vibration isolation conditions required for ESPI, the technique is mainly suited for laboratory based inspection procedures, which cannot be said for Digital Shearography. On the other hand, the interference patterns obtained using ESPI exhibit better fringe definition and contrast than those obtained using Digital Shearography. The image quality of Digital Shearography can be improved by introducing phase stepping and unwrapping techniques, but these methods add a level of complexity to the inspection system and reduce the image refresh rate of the overall process. As part of a project to produce a low cost portable ESPI system suitable for industrial applications, this paper investigates various methods of minimizing the impact of environmental vibration on the ESPI technique. This can be achieved by effectively 'freezing' the object movement during the image acquisition process. The methods employed include using a high-powered infra-red laser, which is continuously pulsed using an electronic signal generator as well as a mechanical chopper. The effect of using a variable shutter speed camera in conjunction with custom written software acquisition routines is also studied. The techniques employed are described and are applied to selected samples. The initial results are presented and analyzed. Conclusions are drawn and their impact on the feasibility of a portable ESPI system discussed.

  15. Vibrational spectroscopy on protons and deuterons in proton conducting perovskites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glerup, M.; Poulsen, F.W.; Berg, R.W.

    2002-01-01

    A short review of IR-spectroscopy on protons in perovskite structure oxides is given. The nature of possible proton sites, libration and combination tones and degree of hydrogen bonding is emphasised. Three new spectroscopic experiments and/or interpretations are presented. An IR-microscopy exper...

  16. Hot Electron Nanoscopy and Spectroscopy (HENs)

    KAUST Repository

    Giugni, Andrea

    2017-08-17

    This chapter includes a brief description of different laser coupling methods with guided surface plasmon polariton (SPP) modes at the surface of a cone. It shows some devices, their electromagnetic simulations, and their optical characterization. A theoretical section illustrates the optical and quantum description of the hot charge generation rate as obtained for the SPP propagation along the nanocone in adiabatic compression. The chapter also shows some experimental results concerning the application of the hot electron nanoscopy and spectroscopy (HENs) in the so-called Schottky configuration, highlighting the sensitivity and the nanoscale resolution of the technique. The comparison with Kelvin probe and other electric atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques points out the intrinsic advantages of the HENs. In the end, some further insights are given about the possibility of exploiting HENs with a pulsed laser at the femtosecond time scale without significant pulse broadening and dispersion.

  17. Vibrational cooling dynamics of a [FeFe]-hydrogenase mimic probed by time-resolved infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplins, Benjamin W; Lomont, Justin P; Nguyen, Son C; Harris, Charles B

    2014-12-11

    Picosecond time-resolved infrared spectroscopy (TRIR) was performed for the first time on a dithiolate bridged binuclear iron(I) hexacarbonyl complex ([Fe₂(μ-bdt)(CO)₆], bdt = benzene-1,2-dithiolate) which is a structural mimic of the active site of the [FeFe]-hydrogenase enzyme. As these model active sites are increasingly being studied for their potential in photocatalytic systems for hydrogen production, understanding their excited and ground state dynamics is critical. In n-heptane, absorption of 400 nm light causes carbonyl loss with low quantum yield (<10%), while the majority (ca. 90%) of the parent complex is regenerated with biexponential kinetics (τ₁ = 21 ps and τ₂ = 134 ps). In order to understand the mechanism of picosecond bleach recovery, a series of UV-pump TRIR experiments were performed in different solvents. The long time decay (τ₂) of the transient spectra is seen to change substantially as a function of solvent, from 95 ps in THF to 262 ps in CCl₄. Broadband IR-pump TRIR experiments were performed for comparison. The measured vibrational lifetimes (T₁(avg)) of the carbonyl stretches were found to be in excellent correspondence to the observed τ₂ decays in the UV-pump experiments, signifying that vibrationally excited carbonyl stretches are responsible for the observed longtime decays. The fast spectral evolution (τ₁) was determined to be due to vibrational cooling of low frequency modes anharmonically coupled to the carbonyl stretches that were excited after electronic internal conversion. The results show that cooling of both low and high frequency vibrational modes on the electronic ground state give rise to the observed picosecond TRIR transient spectra of this compound, without the need to invoke electronically excited states.

  18. Nonlinear vibrational spectroscopy of surfactants at liquid interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miranda, Paulo B. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1998-12-14

    Surfactants are widely used to modify physical and chemical properties of interfaces. They play an important role in many technological problems. Surfactant monolayer are also of great scientific interest because they are two-dimensional systems that may exhibit a very rich phase transition behavior and can also be considered as a model system for biological interfaces. In this Thesis, we use a second-order nonlinear optical technique (Sum-Frequency Generation - SFG) to obtain vibrational spectra of surfactant monolayer at Iiquidhapor and solid/liquid interfaces. The technique has several advantages: it is intrinsically surface-specific, can be applied to buried interfaces, has submonolayer sensitivity and is remarkably sensitive to the confirmational order of surfactant monolayers.

  19. Vibrational spectroscopy and density functional theory study of ninhydrin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ran; Sui, Huimin; Liu, Peipie; Chen, Lei; Cheng, Jianbo; Zhao, Bing

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, ninhydrin was designed as a model molecule for theoretical and experimental studies of the molecule structure. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been performed to predict the IR and Raman spectra for the molecule. In addition, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and Raman spectra of the compound have been obtained experimentally. Based on the modeling results obtained at the B3LYP/6-311++G** level, all FTIR and Raman bands of the compound obtained experimentally were assigned. Our calculated vibrational frequencies are in good agreement with the experimental values. The molecular electrostatic potential surface calculation was performed and the result suggested that the ninhydrin had two potential hydrogen bond donors and four potential hydrogen bond acceptors. HOMO-LUMO gap was also obtained theoretically at B3LYP/6-311++G** level.

  20. An experimental and theoretical study of the synthesis and vibrational spectroscopy of triacetone triperoxide (TATP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco-Londono, Leonardo C.; Pena, Alvaro J.; Primera-Pedrozo, Oliva M.; Hernandez-Rivera, Samuel P.; Mina, Nairmen; Garcia, Rafael; Chamberlain, R. Thomas; Lareau, Richard T.

    2004-09-01

    Non nitrogen containing, organic peroxides explosives Triacetone triperoxide and diacetone diperoxide have been prepared in the laboratory in order to study various aspects of their synthesis and their experimental and theoretical spectroscopic characteristics. By using different proportions of acetone/hydrogen peroxide (Ac/H2O2), sulfuric, hydrochloric and methanosulfuric acids as catalyzers, it was possible to obtain both compounds in a rapid and simple form. Raman, IR spectroscopy, and GC-MS were used in order to determine the precursors, intermediates and final analytes. Experiments and theoretical studies using density functional theory (DFT) have been used in the elucidation step of the mechanism of the synthesis of the so called "transparent" explosives. The B3LYP functional with the 6-31G** basis set was used to carry out the electronic structure calculation of the intermediates and internal rotations and vibrations of TATP. Raman spectra of solid TATP and FTIR spectra of gas TATP, were recorded in order to assign the experimental spectra. Although full agreement with experiment was not obtained, spectral features of the main TATP bands were assigned.

  1. Ultrafast vibrational population transfer dynamics in 2-acetylcyclopentanone studied by 2D IR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sungnam; Ji, Minbiao

    2011-03-14

    2-Acetylcyclopentanone (2-ACP), which is a β-dicarbonyl compound, undergoes keto-enol isomerization, and its enol tautomers are stabilized by a cyclic intramolecular hydrogen bond. 2-ACP (keto form) has symmetric and asymmetric vibrational modes of the two carbonyl groups at 1748 and 1715 cm(-1) , respectively, which are well separated from the carbonyl modes of its enol tautomers in the FTIR spectrum. We have investigated 2-ACP dissolved in carbon tetrachloride by 2D IR spectroscopy and IR pump-probe spectroscopy. Vibrational population transfer dynamics between the two carbonyl modes were observed by 2D IR spectroscopy. To extract the population exchange dynamics (i.e., the down- and uphill population transfer rate constants), we used the normalized volumes of the cross-peaks with respect to the diagonal peaks at the same emission frequency and the survival and conditional probability functions. As expected, the downhill population transfer time constant (3.2 ps) was measured to be smaller than the uphill population transfer time constant (3.8 ps). In addition, the vibrational population relaxation dynamics of the two carbonyl modes were observed to be the same within the experimental error and were found to be much slower than vibrational population transfer between two carbonyl modes. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Efficient Vibrational Energy Transfer through Covalent Bond in Indigo Carmine Revealed by Nonlinear IR Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xuemei; Yu, Pengyun; Zhao, Juan; Wang, Jianping

    2017-10-12

    Ultrafast vibrational relaxation and structural dynamics of indigo carmine in dimethyl sulfoxide were examined using femtosecond pump-probe infrared and two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectroscopies. Using the intramolecularly hydrogen-bonded C═O and delocalized C═C stretching modes as infrared probes, local structural and dynamical variations of this blue dye molecule were observed. Energy relaxation of the vibrationally excited C═O stretching mode was found to occur through covalent bond to the delocalized aromatic vibrational modes on the time scale of a few picoseconds or less. Vibrational quantum beating was observed in magic-angle pump-probe, anisotropy, and 2D IR cross-peak dynamics, showing an oscillation period of ca. 1010 fs, which corresponds to the energy difference between the C═O and C═C transition frequency (33 cm-1). This confirms a resonant vibrational energy transfer happened between the two vibrators. However, a more efficient energy-accepting mode of the excited C═O stretching was believed to be a nearby combination and/or overtone mode that is more tightly connected to the C═O species. On the structural aspect, dynamical-time-dependent 2D IR spectra reveal an insignificant inhomogeneous contribution to time-correlation relaxation for both the C═O and C═C stretching modes, which is in agreement with the generally believed structural rigidity of such conjugated molecules.

  3. Vibrational spectroscopy and DFT calculations of flavonoid derriobtusone A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, A. N. L.; Mendes Filho, J.; Freire, P. T. C.; Santos, H. S.; Albuquerque, M. R. J. R.; Bandeira, P. N.; Leite, R. V.; Braz-Filho, R.; Gusmão, G. O. M.; Nogueira, C. E. S.; Teixeira, A. M. R.

    2017-02-01

    Flavonoids are secondary metabolites of plants which perform various functions. One subclass of flavonoid is auronol that can present immunostimulating activity. In this work Fourier-Transform Infrared with Attenuated Total Reflectance (FTIR-ATR) and Fourier-Transform Raman (FT-Raman) spectra of an auronol, derriobtusone A (C18H12O4), were obtained at room temperature. Theoretical calculations using Density Functional Theory (DFT) were performed in order to assign the normal modes and to interpret the spectra of the derriobtusone A molecule. The FTIR-ATR and FT-Raman spectra of the crystal, were recorded at room temperature in the regions 600 cm-1 to 4000 cm-1 and 40 cm-1 to 4000 cm-1, respectively. The normal modes of vibrations were obtained using Density Functional Theory with B3LYP functional and 6-31G+ (d,p) basis set. The calculated frequencies are in good agreement with those obtained experimentally. Detailed assignments of the normal modes present in both the Fourier-Transform infrared and the Fourier-Transform Raman spectra of the crystal are given.

  4. Olive fruit growth and ripening as seen by vibrational spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Sánchez, Macarena; Ayora-Cañada, María José; Molina-Díaz, Antonio

    2010-01-13

    The aim of this work was to examine the potential of ATR-FTIR and Raman spectroscopies to evaluate changes happening during the development and maturation of olive fruit. To do this, the spectra of the different parts of the olive (skin, flesh and stone) have been measured at different stages of development. The evolution of different spectral bands has been related to the content of olive constituents like triglycerides, water, carotenoids and phenolic compounds. Oil accumulation can be followed using both FTIR and Raman spectroscopy. The increase in bands at 1746 cm(-1) (ATR-FTIR) and 1440 cm(-1) (Raman) correlates well with the oil content in the fruit determined using the standard Soxhlet extraction method. In the case of overripe olives ATR-FTIR does not provide a representative spectrum of the olive flesh due to the accumulation of water on the surface of the ATR crystal. The increase of the content in carotenoids and phenolic compounds during olive growing and their decrease during the ripening phase can be successfully monitored by means of the Raman bands at 1525 and 1605 cm(-1), respectively.

  5. Infrared vibrational spectroscopy of [Ru(bpy)2(bpm)]2+ and [Ru(bpy)3]2+ in the excited triplet state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukuta, Tatsuhiko; Fukazawa, Naoto; Murata, Kei; Inagaki, Akiko; Akita, Munetaka; Tanaka, Sei'ichi; Koshihara, Shin-ya; Onda, Ken

    2014-03-03

    This work involved a detailed investigation into the infrared vibrational spectra of ruthenium polypyridyl complexes, specifically heteroleptic [Ru(bpy)2(bpm)](2+) (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine and bpm = 2,2'-bipyrimidine) and homoleptic [Ru(bpy)3](2+), in the excited triplet state. Transient spectra were acquired 500 ps after photoexcitation, corresponding to the vibrational ground state of the excited triplet state, using time-resolved infrared spectroscopy. We assigned the observed bands to specific ligands in [Ru(bpy)2(bpm)](2+) based on the results of deuterium substitution and identified the corresponding normal vibrational modes using quantum-chemical calculations. Through this process, the more complex vibrational bands of [Ru(bpy)3](2+) were assigned to normal vibrational modes. The results are in good agreement with the model in which excited electrons are localized on a single ligand. We also found that the vibrational bands of both complexes associated with the ligands on which electrons are little localized appear at approximately 1317 and 1608 cm(-1). These assignments should allow the study of the reaction dynamics of various photofunctional systems including ruthenium polypyridyl complexes.

  6. Vibrational Properties of a Monolayer Silicene Sheet Studied by Tip-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Shaoxiang; Wu, Jiang-bin; Cong, Xin; Li, Wenbin; Gou, Jian; Zhong, Qing; Cheng, Peng; Tan, Ping-heng; Chen, Lan; Wu, Kehui

    2017-11-01

    Combining ultrahigh sensitivity, spatial resolution, and the capability to resolve chemical information, tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) is a powerful tool to study molecules or nanoscale objects. Here we show that TERS can also be a powerful tool in studying two-dimensional materials. We have achieved a 109 Raman signal enhancement and a 0.5 nm spatial resolution using monolayer silicene on Ag(111) as a prototypical 2D material system. Because of the selective enhancement on Raman modes with vertical vibrational components in TERS, our experiment provides direct evidence of the origination of Raman modes in silicene. Furthermore, the ultrahigh sensitivity of TERS allows us to identify different vibrational properties of silicene phases, which differ only in the bucking direction of the Si-Si bonds. Local vibrational features from defects and domain boundaries in silicene can also be identified.

  7. Process Analytical Techniques Based on In-Line Vibrational Spectroscopy and their Industrial Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jednačak, T.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Process analytical techniques (PAT involve the monitoring and control of physical and chemical processes as well as the identification of important process parameters in order to obtain the products with desired properties. PAT have been applied in various industrial process phases to ensure better process understanding, quality by optimal design and determination of process disturbances in time. In-line vibrational spectroscopic techniques are one of the major process analytical techniques used today. The most frequently used in-line vibrational spectroscopic techniques are near infrared spectroscopy (NIR, attenuated total reflectance middle infrared spectroscopy (ATR-MIR and Raman spectroscopy (Table 1, Figs. 1 and 2. They provide in situ real-time monitoring of the production processes by using different types of in-line probes (Figs. 3–5 which reduce exposure to hazardous materials and contamination, sample degradation or equilibrium perturbations in the reaction system. Due to the aforementioned advantages, in-line vibrational spectroscopic techniques have been successfully applied for different industrial pur- poses. The analysis of characteristic vibrational bands in in-line infrared and Raman spectra enable the monitoring of different processes such as crystallization, dissolution, polimorphic transitions and chemical reactions (Scheme 1, Figs. 6 and 7. The obtained data are, due to their complexity, very often further processed by multivariate data analysis methods (Fig. 9, such as principal components analysis (PCA and partial least squares (PLS. The basic principles of PCA and PLS are shown in Fig. 8. A number of different in-line vibrational spectroscopic techniques as well as multivariate data analysis methods have been developed recently, but in this article only the most important and most frequently used techniques are described.   KUI – 7/2013 Received April 10, 2012 Accepted July 18, 2012

  8. Two-dimensional vibrational spectroscopy of rotaxane-based molecular machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodis, Pavol; Panman, Matthijs R; Bakker, Bert H; Mateo-Alonso, Aurelio; Prato, Maurizio; Buma, Wybren Jan; Brouwer, Albert M; Kay, Euan R; Leigh, David A; Woutersen, Sander

    2009-09-15

    It has recently become possible to synthesize mechanical devices the size of a single molecule. Although it is tempting to regard such molecular machines as nanoscale versions of their macroscopic analogs, many notions from macroscopic mechanics no longer apply at a molecular level. For instance, the concept of viscous friction is meaningless for a molecular machine because the size of the solvent molecules that cause the friction is comparable to that of the machine itself. Furthermore, in many cases, the interactions between a molecular machine and its surroundings are comparable to the force driving the machine. As a result, a certain amount of intrinsic randomness exists in the motion of molecular machines, and the details of their mechanics are largely unknown. For a detailed understanding of the mechanical behavior of molecular machines, experiments that probe their motion on an ultrafast time scale, such as two-dimensional (2D) vibrational spectroscopy, are essential. This method uses coupling between vibrational modes in a molecule to investigate the molecular conformation. The coupling shows up as off-diagonal peaks in a 2D graph of the vibrational response of the molecule, analogous to the spin coupling observed in multidimensional NMR spectroscopy. Both spin coupling and vibrational coupling are sensitive probes of the molecular conformation, but 2D vibrational spectroscopy shows orders of magnitude better time resolution than NMR. In this Account, we use 2D vibrational spectroscopy to study molecular machines based on rotaxanes. These devices consist of a linear thread and a macrocycle that is noncovalently locked onto the thread. In the rotaxanes we study, the macrocycle and the thread both contain CO and NH groups. By determining the coupling between the stretching modes of these goups from the cross peaks in the 2D spectrum, we directly and quantitatively probe the relative position and orientation of the macrocycle and the thread for both a small

  9. Nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) of rubredoxin and MoFe protein crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Yisong [University of California, Department of Applied Science (United States); Brecht, Eric [Montana State University, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry (United States); Aznavour, Kristen [University of Southern California, Department of Chemistry (United States); Nix, Jay C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Physical Biosciences Division (United States); Xiao, Yuming; Wang, Hongxin [University of California, Department of Applied Science (United States); George, Simon J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Physical Biosciences Division (United States); Bau, Robert [University of Southern California, Department of Chemistry (United States); Keable, Stephen; Peters, John W. [Montana State University, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry (United States); Adams, Michael W. W. [University of Georgia, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (United States); Jenney, Francis E. Jr. [Georgia Campus, Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine (United States); Sturhahn, Wolfgang; Alp, Ercan E.; Zhao, Jiyong [Argonne National Laboratory, Advanced Photon Source (United States); Yoda, Yoshitaka [JASRI (Japan); Cramer, Stephen P., E-mail: spcramer@lbl.gov [University of California, Department of Applied Science (United States)

    2013-12-15

    We have applied {sup 57}Fe nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) for the first time to study the dynamics of Fe centers in Iron-sulfur protein crystals, including oxidized wild type rubredoxin crystals from Pyrococcus furiosus, and the MoFe protein of nitrogenase from Azotobacter vinelandii. Thanks to the NRVS selection rule, selectively probed vibrational modes have been observed in both oriented rubredoxin and MoFe protein crystals. The NRVS work was complemented by extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) measurements on oxidized wild type rubredoxin crystals from Pyrococcus furiosus. The EXAFS spectra revealed the Fe-S bond length difference in oxidized Pf Rd protein, which is qualitatively consistent with the crystal structure.

  10. VSI@ESS: Case study for a vibrational spectroscopy instrument at the european spallation source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoppi Marco

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neutron Vibrational Spectroscopy is a well-established experimental technique where elementary excitations at relatively high frequency are detected via inelastic neutron scattering. This technique attracts a high interest in a large fraction of the scientific community in the fields of chemistry, materials science, physics, and biology, since one of its main applications exploits the large incoherent scattering cross section of the proton with respect to all the other elements, whose dynamics can be spectroscopically detected, even if dissolved in very low concentration in materials composed of much heavier atoms. We have proposed a feasibility study for a Vibrational Spectroscopy Instrument (VSI at the European Spallation Source ESS. Here, we will summarize the preliminary design calculations and the corresponding McStas simulation results for a possible ToF, Inverted Geometry, VSI beamline.

  11. Prognostic and Remaining Life Prediction of Electronic Device under Vibration Condition Based on CPSD of MPI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Prognostic of electronic device under vibration condition can help to get information to assist in condition-based maintenance and reduce life-cycle cost. A prognostic and remaining life prediction method for electronic devices under random vibration condition is proposed. Vibration response is measured and monitored with acceleration sensor and OMA parameters, including vibration resonance frequency, especially first-order resonance frequency, and damping ratio is calculated with cross-power spectrum density (CPSD method and modal parameter identification (MPI algorithm. Steinberg vibration fatigue model which considers transmissibility factor is used to predict the remaining life of electronic component. Case study with a test board is carried out and remaining life is predicted. Results show that with this method the vibration response characteristic can be monitored and predicted.

  12. Synthesis, conductivity, and vibrational spectroscopy of tetraphenylphosphonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Boumediene; Paolone, Annalisa; Villemin, Didier; Taqiyeddine, Moumene; Belarbi, El-habib; Bresson, Serge; Rahmouni, Mustapha; Dhumal, Nilesh R.; Kim, Hyung J.; Kiefer, Johannes

    2017-10-01

    The reaction of lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide with tetraphenylphosphonium bromide in water leads to the formation of tetraphenylphosphonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide ([PPh4+][(CF3SO2)2N-]). The obtained compound was identified by means of 1H, 13C, 19F and 31P NMR spectroscopy. Although it has a structure similar to ionic liquids, it exhibits a melting point above 100 °C. Besides describing the synthesis, a detailed characterization of its conductivity and vibrational spectroscopic properties is presented. For the latter, FT-Raman and FTIR/ATR spectroscopies are used in the wavenumber range from 150 to 3500 cm-1 and from 600 to 3500 cm-1, respectively. Density functional theory calculations reveal a minor influence of the interionic interactions on the vibrational structure. Consequently, the computational vibrational spectra of the isolated ions show a good agreement with the experimental data. A detailed vibrational assignment is presented. Furthermore, the conductivity data indicate a solid-solid phase transition about 130 K below the melting point.

  13. Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Rolf W.

    This introductory booklet covers the basics of molecular spectroscopy, infrared and Raman methods, instrumental considerations, symmetry analysis of molecules, group theory and selection rules, as well as assignments of fundamental vibrational modes in molecules.......This introductory booklet covers the basics of molecular spectroscopy, infrared and Raman methods, instrumental considerations, symmetry analysis of molecules, group theory and selection rules, as well as assignments of fundamental vibrational modes in molecules....

  14. Intermolecular interaction effect on the inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy of bi-octane-monothiol junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Jiancai; Zhao, Liyun; Zhang, Yujin; Ma, Hong

    2017-01-01

    The inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) of bi-octane-monothiol junctions is theoretically studied based on first-principles calculations. The results reveal that IETS is very sensitive to the vertical and lateral distance of the two molecules in the bimolecular junctions owing to the changes of interaction between the two molecules. It is further demonstrated that the transverse vibrational modes ν(C-H) around 0.38 V will be triggered when the two molecules are close to each other and open a new path for electron tunneling. Our theoretical results provide new insight into understanding the origin of the IETS peaks around 0.38 V.

  15. Coherent pump pulses in Double Electron Electron Resonance Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tait, Claudia E.; Stoll, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    The recent introduction of shaped pulses to Double Electron Electron Resonance (DEER) spectroscopy has led to significant enhancements in sensitivity through increased excitation bandwidths and improved control over spin dynamics. The application of DEER has so far relied on the presence of an incoherent pump channel to average out most undesired coherent effects of the pump pulse(s) on the observer spins. However, in fully coherent EPR spectrometers that are increasingly used to generate shaped pulses, the presence of coherent pump pulses means that these effects need to be explicitly considered. In this paper, we examine the effects of coherent rectangular and sech/tanh pump pulses in DEER experiments with up to three pump pulses. We show that, even in the absence of significant overlap of the observer and pump pulse excitation bandwidths, coherence transfer pathways involving both types of pulses generate spin echoes of considerable intensity. These echoes introduce artefacts, which, if not identified and removed, can easily lead to misinterpretation. We demonstrate that the observed echoes can be quantitatively modelled using a simple spin quantum dynamics approach that includes instrumental transfer functions. Based on an analysis of the echo crossing artefacts, we propose efficient phase cycling schemes for their suppression. This enables the use of advanced DEER experiments, characterized by high sensitivity and increased accuracy for long-distance measurements, on novel fully coherent EPR spectrometers. PMID:27339858

  16. Vibrational spectroscopy studies of formalin-fixed cervix tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, C M; Sockalingum, G D; Vadhiraja, B M; Maheedhar, K; Rao, A C K; Rao, L; Venteo, L; Pluot, M; Fernandes, D J; Vidyasagar, M S; Kartha, V B; Manfait, M

    2007-02-15

    Optical histopathology is fast emerging as a potential tool in cancer diagnosis. Fresh tissues in saline are ideal samples for optical histopathology. However, evaluation of suitability of ex vivo handled tissues is necessitated because of severe constraints in sample procurement, handling, and other associated problems with fresh tissues. Among these methods, formalin-fixed samples are shown to be suitable for optical histopathology. However, it is necessary to further evaluate this method from the point of view discriminating tissues with minute biochemical variations. A pilot Raman and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microspectroscopic studies of formalin-fixed tissues normal, malignant, and after-2-fractions of radiotherapy from the same malignant cervix subjects were carried out, with an aim to explore the feasibility of discriminating these tissues, especially the tissues after-2-fractions of radiotherapy from other two groups. Raman and FTIR spectra exhibit large differences for normal and malignant tissues and subtle differences are seen between malignant and after-2-fractions of radiotherapy tissues. Spectral data were analyzed by principal component analysis (PCA) and it provided good discrimination of normal and malignant tissues. PCA of data of three tissues, normal, malignant, and 2-fractions after radiotherapy, gave two clusters corresponding to normal and malignant + after-2-fractions of radiotherapy tissues. A second step of PCA was required to achieve discrimination between malignant and after-2-fractions of radiotherapy tissues. Hence, this study not only further supports the use of formalin-fixed tissues in optical histopathology, especially from Raman spectroscopy point of view, it also indicates feasibility of discriminating tissues with minute biochemical differences such as malignant and after-2-fractions of radiotherapy. 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Vibrational spectroscopy of photosensitizer dyes for organic solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez Leon, C.

    2005-11-18

    Ruthenium(II) complexes containing polypyridyl ligands are intensely investigated as potential photosensitizers in organic solar cells. Of particular interest is their use in dye-sensitized solar cells based on nanocrystalline films of TiO{sub 2}. Functional groups of the dye allow for efficient anchoring on the semiconductor surface and promote the electronic communication between the donor orbital of the dye and the conduction band of the semiconductor. In the present work a new dye, [Ru(dcbpyH{sub 2}){sub 2}(bpy-TPA{sub 2})](PF6{sub )2}, and the well known (Bu{sub 4}N){sub 2}[Ru(dcbpyH){sub 2}(NCS){sub 2}] complex were spectroscopically characterized. The electronic transitions of both dyes showed solvatochromic shifts due to specific interactions of the ligands with the solvent molecules. The surface-enhanced Raman (SER) spectra of the dyes dissolved in water, ethanol, and acetonitrile were measured in silver and gold colloidal solutions. The results demonstrate that the dyes were adsorbed on the metallic nanoparticles in different ways for different solvents. It was also found that in the gold colloid, the aqueous solutions of both dyes did not produce any SERS signal, whereas in ethanolic solution the SERS effect was very weak. Deprotonation, H-bonding, and donor-acceptor interactions seem to determine these different behaviors. Our results indicate the important role of the charge transfer mechanism in SERS. The adsorption of the dye on two different TiO{sub 2} substrates, anatase paste films and anatase nanopowder, was also studied to clarify the role of the carboxylate groups in the anchoring process of the dyes on the semiconductor surface. The recorded spectra indicate a strong dependence of the anchoring configuration on the morphology of the semiconductor. (orig.)

  18. Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy of difurylethene-based photochromic single-molecule junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youngsang; Bahoosh, Safa G; Sysoiev, Dmytro; Huhn, Thomas; Pauly, Fabian; Scheer, Elke

    2017-01-01

    Diarylethene-derived molecules alter their electronic structure upon transformation between the open and closed forms of the diarylethene core, when exposed to ultraviolet (UV) or visible light. This transformation results in a significant variation of electrical conductance and vibrational properties of corresponding molecular junctions. We report here a combined experimental and theoretical analysis of charge transport through diarylethene-derived single-molecule devices, which are created using the mechanically controlled break-junction technique. Inelastic electron tunneling (IET) spectroscopy measurements performed at 4.2 K are compared with first-principles calculations in the two distinct forms of diarylethenes connected to gold electrodes. The combined approach clearly demonstrates that the IET spectra of single-molecule junctions show specific vibrational features that can be used to identify different isomeric molecular states by transport experiments.

  19. Electronic Speckle Pattern Shearing Interferometry using Photopolymer Diffractive Optical Elements for Vibration Measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Mihaylova, Emilia; Naydenova, Izabela; Martin, Suzanne; Toal, Vincent

    2004-01-01

    Electronic speckle pattern shearing interferometry (ESPSI) is superior to Electronic speckle pattern interferometry (ESPI) when strain distribution, arising from object deformation or vibration, need to be measured. This is because shearography provides data directly related to the spatial derivatives of the displacement. Further development of ESPSI systems could be beneficial for wider application to the measurement of mechanical characteristics of vibrating objects. Two electronic speckle ...

  20. Vibrationally mediated control of single-electron transmission in weakly coupled molecule-metal junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Thomas; Schiøtz, Jakob

    2010-01-01

    We propose a mechanism which allows one to control the transmission of single electrons through a molecular junction. The principle utilizes the emergence of transmission sidebands when molecular vibrational modes are coupled to the electronic state mediating the transmission. We will show that i....... As an example we perform a density-functional theory analysis of a benzene molecule between two Au(111) contacts and show that exciting a particular vibrational mode can give rise to transmission of a single electron....

  1. Two-Dimensional Electronic Spectroscopy Using Incoherent Light: Theoretical Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Turner, Daniel B; Sutor, Erika J; Hendrickson, Rebecca A; Gealy, M W; Ulness, Darin J

    2012-01-01

    Electronic energy transfer in photosynthesis occurs over a range of time scales and under a variety of intermolecular coupling conditions. Recent work has shown that electronic coupling between chromophores can lead to coherent oscillations in two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy measurements of pigment-protein complexes measured with femtosecond laser pulses. A persistent issue in the field is to reconcile the results of measurements performed using femtosecond laser pulses with physiological illumination conditions. Noisy-light spectroscopy can begin to address this question. In this work we present the theoretical analysis of incoherent two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy, I(4) 2D ES. Simulations reveal diagonal peaks, cross peaks, and coherent oscillations similar to those observed in femtosecond two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy experiments. The results also expose fundamental differences between the femtosecond-pulse and noisy-light techniques; the differences lead to new challenges and opp...

  2. Double resonant absorption measurement of acetylene symmetric vibrational states probed with cavity ring down spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karhu, J.; Nauta, J.; Vainio, M.; Metsälä, M.; Hoekstra, S.; Halonen, L.

    2016-06-01

    A novel mid-infrared/near-infrared double resonant absorption setup for studying infrared-inactive vibrational states is presented. A strong vibrational transition in the mid-infrared region is excited using an idler beam from a singly resonant continuous-wave optical parametric oscillator, to populate an intermediate vibrational state. High output power of the optical parametric oscillator and the strength of the mid-infrared transition result in efficient population transfer to the intermediate state, which allows measuring secondary transitions from this state with a high signal-to-noise ratio. A secondary, near-infrared transition from the intermediate state is probed using cavity ring-down spectroscopy, which provides high sensitivity in this wavelength region. Due to the narrow linewidths of the excitation sources, the rovibrational lines of the secondary transition are measured with sub-Doppler resolution. The setup is used to access a previously unreported symmetric vibrational state of acetylene, ν 1 + ν 2 + ν 3 + ν4 1 + ν5 - 1 in the normal mode notation. Single-photon transitions to this state from the vibrational ground state are forbidden. Ten lines of the newly measured state are observed and fitted with the linear least-squares method to extract the band parameters. The vibrational term value was measured to be at 9775.0018(45) cm-1, the rotational parameter B was 1.162 222(37) cm-1, and the quartic centrifugal distortion parameter D was 3.998(62) × 10-6 cm-1, where the numbers in the parenthesis are one-standard errors in the least significant digits.

  3. Double resonant absorption measurement of acetylene symmetric vibrational states probed with cavity ring down spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karhu, J; Nauta, J; Vainio, M; Metsälä, M; Hoekstra, S; Halonen, L

    2016-06-28

    A novel mid-infrared/near-infrared double resonant absorption setup for studying infrared-inactive vibrational states is presented. A strong vibrational transition in the mid-infrared region is excited using an idler beam from a singly resonant continuous-wave optical parametric oscillator, to populate an intermediate vibrational state. High output power of the optical parametric oscillator and the strength of the mid-infrared transition result in efficient population transfer to the intermediate state, which allows measuring secondary transitions from this state with a high signal-to-noise ratio. A secondary, near-infrared transition from the intermediate state is probed using cavity ring-down spectroscopy, which provides high sensitivity in this wavelength region. Due to the narrow linewidths of the excitation sources, the rovibrational lines of the secondary transition are measured with sub-Doppler resolution. The setup is used to access a previously unreported symmetric vibrational state of acetylene, ν1+ν2+ν3+ν4 (1)+ν5 (-1) in the normal mode notation. Single-photon transitions to this state from the vibrational ground state are forbidden. Ten lines of the newly measured state are observed and fitted with the linear least-squares method to extract the band parameters. The vibrational term value was measured to be at 9775.0018(45) cm(-1), the rotational parameter B was 1.162 222(37) cm(-1), and the quartic centrifugal distortion parameter D was 3.998(62) × 10(-6) cm(-1), where the numbers in the parenthesis are one-standard errors in the least significant digits.

  4. Study of cancer cell lines with Fourier transform infrared (FTIR)/vibrational absorption (VA) spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uceda Otero, E. P.; Eliel, G. S. N.; Fonseca, E. J. S.

    2013-01-01

    absorption (VA) spectroscopy can be used as a useful tool in medical diagnostics that provides in principle additional information and detail to that which can be obtained/provided from conventional histological studies, and more conventional mass spectroscopic and NMR techniques. The use of high level......In this work we have used Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) / vibrational absorption (VA) spectroscopy to study two cancer cell lines: the Henrietta Lacks (HeLa) human cervix carcinoma and 5637 human bladder carcinoma cell lines. Our goal is to experimentally investigate biochemical changes...... and differences in these cells lines utilizing FTIR spectroscopy. We have used the chemometrical and statistical method principal component analysis (PCA) to investigate the spectral differences. We have been able to identify certain bands in the spectra which are so-called biomarkers for two types of cell lines...

  5. Secondary-electron cascade in attosecond photoelectron spectroscopy from metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baggesen, Jan Conrad; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2009-01-01

    Attosecond spectroscopy is currently restricted to photon energies around 100 eV. We show that under these conditions, electron-electron scatterings, as the photoelectrons leave the metal, give rise to a tail of secondary electrons with lower energies and hence a significant background. We develop...

  6. Calculated low-energy electron-impact vibrational excitation cross sections for CO2 molecule

    CERN Document Server

    Laporta, V; Celiberto, R

    2016-01-01

    Vibrational-excitation cross sections of ground electronic state of carbon dioxide molecule by electron-impact through the CO2-(2\\Pi) shape resonance is considered in the separation of the normal modes approximation. Resonance curves and widths are computed for each vibrational mode. The calculations assume decoupling between normal modes and employ the local complex potential model for the treatment of the nuclear dynamics, usually adopted for the electron-scattering involving diatomic molecules. Results are presented for excitation up to 10 vibrational levels in each mode and comparison with data present in the literature is discussed.

  7. Electron-Beam Mapping of Vibrational Modes with Nanometer Spatial Resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, C; Aoki, T; Rez, P; Chang, S L Y; Lovejoy, T C; Krivanek, O L

    2016-12-16

    We demonstrate that a focused beam of high-energy electrons can be used to map the vibrational modes of a material with a spatial resolution of the order of one nanometer. Our demonstration is performed on boron nitride, a polar dielectric which gives rise to both localized and delocalized electron-vibrational scattering, either of which can be selected in our off-axial experimental geometry. Our experimental results are well supported by our calculations, and should reconcile current controversy regarding the spatial resolution achievable in vibrational mapping with focused electron beams.

  8. An approach to compatible multiple nonlinear vibrational spectroscopy measurements using a commercial sum frequency generation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Shuji; Wei, Feng

    2011-06-21

    In this paper, we designed a compatible multiple nonlinear vibrational spectroscopy system that can be used for recording infrared-visible sum frequency generation vibrational spectra (SFG) and infrared-infrared-visible three-pump-field four-wave-mixing (IIV-TPF-FWM) spectra using a commercial EKSPLA SFG system. This is the first time IIV-TPF-FWM signals were obtained using picosecond laser pulses. We have applied this compatible system to study the surface and vibrational structures of riboflavin molecules (also known as vitamin B2). The SFG spectra of eight polarization combinations have non-vanishing signals. The signals with incoming s-polarized IR are relatively weaker than the signals with incoming p-polarized IR. Under the double resonant conditions, the SFG signals of the conjugated tricyclic ring are greatly enhanced. For the IIV-TPF-FWM spectra with incoming p-polarized IR, only the sspp and pppp polarization combinations have non-vanishing signals. The IIV-TPF-FWM spectra show a very strong peak at 1585 cm(-1) that is mainly dominated by the N(5)-C(4a) stretch. The method developed in this study will be helpful for researchers, either using a home-built or commercial (EKSPLA) SFG system, to obtain independent and complementary measurements for SFG spectroscopy and more detailed structural information of interfacial molecules.

  9. Impedance Spectroscopy of Dielectrics and Electronic Conductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonanos, Nikolaos; Pissis, Polycarpos; Macdonald, J. Ross

    2013-01-01

    Impedance spectroscopy is used for the characterization of materials, such as electroceramics, solid and liquid electrochemical cells, dielectrics and also fully integrated devices, such as fuel cells. It consists of measuring the electrical impedance - or a closely related property, such as admi......Impedance spectroscopy is used for the characterization of materials, such as electroceramics, solid and liquid electrochemical cells, dielectrics and also fully integrated devices, such as fuel cells. It consists of measuring the electrical impedance - or a closely related property...

  10. Absolute Configuration of 3-METHYLCYCLOHEXANONE by Chiral Tag Rotational Spectroscopy and Vibrational Circular Dichroism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangelisti, Luca; Holdren, Martin S.; Mayer, Kevin J.; Smart, Taylor; West, Channing; Pate, Brooks

    2017-06-01

    The absolute configuration of 3-methylcyclohexanone was established by chiral tag rotational spectroscopy measurements using 3-butyn-2-ol as the tag partner. This molecule was chosen because it is a benchmark measurement for vibrational circular dichroism (VCD). A comparison of the analysis approaches of chiral tag rotational spectroscopy and VCD will be presented. One important issue in chiral analysis by both methods is the conformational flexibility of the molecule being analyzed. The analysis of conformational composition of samples will be illustrated. In this case, the high spectral resolution of molecular rotational spectroscopy and potential for spectral simplification by conformational cooling in the pulsed jet expansion are advantages for chiral tag spectroscopy. The computational chemistry requirements for the two methods will also be discussed. In this case, the need to perform conformer searches for weakly bound complexes and to perform reasonably high level quantum chemistry geometry optimizations on these complexes makes the computational time requirements less favorable for chiral tag rotational spectroscopy. Finally, the issue of reliability of the determination of the absolute configuration will be considered. In this case, rotational spectroscopy offers a "gold standard" analysis method through the determination of the ^{13}C-subsitution structure of the complex between 3-methylcyclohexanone and an enantiopure sample of the 3-butyn-2-ol tag.

  11. Accurate Lineshapes from Sub-1 cm-1 Resolution Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy of α-Pinene at Room Temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mifflin, Amanda L.; Velarde Ruiz Esparza, Luis A.; Ho, Junming; Psciuk, Brian; Negre, Christian; Ebben, Carlena J.; Upshur, Mary Alice; Lu, Zhou; Strick, Benjamin; Thomson, Regan; Batista, Victor; Wang, Hongfei; Geiger, Franz M.

    2015-02-26

    Room temperature sub-wavenumber high-resolution broadband sum frequency generation (HR-BB-SFG) spectra of the common terpene (+)-α-pinene reveal ten peaks in the C–H stretching region. The spectral resolution exceeds that of Fourier transform infrared, femtosecond stimulated Raman, and traditional BB-SFG and scanning SFG spectroscopy of the same molecule. Experiment and simulation show the spectral lineshapes to be accurate. Homogeneous vibrational decoherence lifetimes of up to 1.7 psec are assigned to specific oscillators and compare favorably to lifetimes computed from density functional tight binding molecular dynamics calculations, while phase-resolved spectra yield orientation information for them. We propose the new spectroscopy as an attractive alternative to time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy or heterodyne-detection schemes for studying vibrational energy relaxation and vibrational coherences in molecules.

  12. New solid forms of efavirenz: Synthesis, vibrational spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Marcelo M.; Rezende, Carlos A.; Lima, Gabriel C.; Marques, Andressa C. S.; Prado, Lívia D.; Leal, Kátia Z.; Rocha, Helvécio V. A.; Ferreira, Gláucio B.; Resende, Jackson A. L. C.

    2017-06-01

    Efavirenz,(S)-6-chloro-4-(cyclopropylethynyl)-1,4-dihydro-4-(trifluoromethyl)-2H-3,1-benzoxazin-2-one, is an anti HIV agent from the class of the non-nucleoside inhibitors of the HIV-1 virus reverse transcriptase. This paper describes the synthesis of two new solvatomorphs of efavirenz (EFV). The results through XRPD and DSC/TG indicate that the new forms undergo a solvent loss over the days, and then return to the original polymorph. Structural and spectral characteristics of EFV were studied by vibrational spectroscopy and quantum chemical methods. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations for the potential energy curve, optimized geometries and vibrational spectra were carried out using 6-311 + G** basis sets and CAM-B3LYP functional, solid state calculations were also performed using DFT-XGGA (PBE-D3) exchange-correlation functional with the option of mixtures of Gaussian and plane waves method (GPW). Based on these results, the paper discussed the correlation between the vibrational modes and the crystalline structure of the most stable form of EFV. A complete analysis of the experimental infrared and Raman spectra was reported on the basis of the wavenumbers of the vibrational bands and the potential energy distribution.

  13. Analytical Chemistry of Surfaces: Part II. Electron Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hercules, David M.; Hercules, Shirley H.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses two surface techniques: X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ESCA) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). Focuses on fundamental aspects of each technique, important features of instrumentation, and some examples of how ESCA and AES have been applied to analytical surface problems. (JN)

  14. Tungsten spectroscopy at the Livermore electron beam ion trap facility

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Clementson, J; Beiersdorfer, P; Brown, G.V; Gu, M.F; Lundberg, H; Podpaly, Y; Trabert, E

    2011-01-01

    .... In this paper, an overview of recent results from the Livermore WOLFRAM spectroscopy project is presented, which includes experimental investigations at the EBIT-I and SuperEBIT electron beam ion traps...

  15. Ab-initio molecular dynamics and vibrational Raman spectroscopy investigations of quartz polymorph at high temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sediki, Hayet; Simon, Patrick; Hadjadj, Aomar; Krallafa, Abdelghani M.

    2017-09-01

    Quartz has found a wide range of applications over the past years. In the present work, the temperature dependence of microcrystalline quartz is investigated with Raman spectroscopy and DFT-based molecular dynamics simulations. We aimed to determine the structure at short and medium range distances as a function of the increasing temperature. The dynamics and the structural changes are analysed in terms of time-dependent properties, and the vibrational analysis obtained from calculated dipole trajectory and vibrational density of states (VDOS). The computed data is compared to Raman and infrared spectroscopic measurements. The approach is of a particularly great interest when we focus on the structural behaviour, and the dynamical disorder observed and characterised through geometric and thermodynamic data. The calculations confirm that the infrared and Raman signature as a function of temperature provide a sensitive analysis of the structural behaviour of quartz.

  16. Application of high-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy: Vibrational resolved C 1s and O 1s spectra of CO adsorbed on Ni(100)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foehlisch, A.; Nilsson, A.; Martensson, N. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    There are various effects which determine the line shape of a core-level electron spectrum. These are due to the finite life-time of the core hole, inelastic scattering of the outgoing photoelectron, electronic shake-up and shake-off processes and vibrational excitations. For free atoms and molecules the different contributions to the observed line shapes can often be well separated. For solids, surfaces and adsorbates the line shapes are in general much broader and it has in the past been assumed that no separation of the various contributions can be made. In the present report the authors will show that this is indeed not the case. Surprisingly, the vibrational fine structure of CO adsorbed on Ni(100) can be resolved in the C 1s and O 1s electron spectra. This was achieved by the combination of highly monochromatized soft X-rays from B18.0 with a high resolution Scienta 200 mm photoelectron spectrometer. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) with tunable excitation energy yields as a core level spectroscopy atomic and site-specific information. The presented measurements allow for a determination of internuclear distances and potential energy curves in corehole ionized adsorbed molecules. The authors analysis of the c(2x2) phase CO/Ni(100) on {open_quotes}top{close_quotes} yielded a vibrational splitting of 217 +/- 2 meV for C 1s ionization. For O 1s ionization a splitting of 173 +/- 8 meV was found.

  17. Vibrational spectroscopy: a tool being developed for the noninvasive monitoring of wound healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Nicole J.; Elster, Eric A.

    2012-01-01

    Wound care and management accounted for over 1.8 million hospital discharges in 2009. The complex nature of wound physiology involves hundreds of overlapping processes that we have only begun to understand over the past three decades. The management of wounds remains a significant challenge for inexperienced clinicians. The ensuing inflammatory response ultimately dictates the pace of wound healing and tissue regeneration. Consequently, the eventual timing of wound closure or definitive coverage is often subjective. Some wounds fail to close, or dehisce, despite the use and application of novel wound-specific treatment modalities. An understanding of the molecular environment of acute and chronic wounds throughout the wound-healing process can provide valuable insight into the mechanisms associated with the patient's outcome. Pathologic alterations of wounds are accompanied by fundamental changes in the molecular environment that can be analyzed by vibrational spectroscopy. Vibrational spectroscopy, specifically Raman and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, offers the capability to accurately detect and identify the various molecules that compose the extracellular matrix during wound healing in their native state. The identified changes might provide the objective markers of wound healing, which can then be integrated with clinical characteristics to guide the management of wounds.

  18. Electron--impact resonant vibration excitation cross sections and rate coefficients for carbon monoxide

    CERN Document Server

    Laporta, V; Tennyson, J; Celiberto, R; 10.1088/0963-0252/21/4/045005

    2012-01-01

    Resonant vibrational and rotation-vibration excitation cross sections for electron-CO scattering are calculated in the 0-10 eV energy range for all 81 vibrational states of CO, assuming that the excitation occur via the 2{\\Pi} shape resonance. Static exchange plus polarization calculations performed using the R-matrix method are used to estimate resonance positions and widths as functions of internuclear separation. The effects of nuclear motion are considered using a local complex potential model. Good agreement is obtained with available experimental data on excitation from the vibrational ground state. Excitation rates and cross sections are provided as a functions of the initial CO vibrational state for all ground state vibrational levels.

  19. Ion aggregation in high salt solutions. III. Computational vibrational spectroscopy of HDO in aqueous salt solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jun-Ho; Kim, Heejae; Kim, Seongheun; Lim, Sohee; Chon, Bonghwan; Cho, Minhaeng

    2015-05-28

    The vibrational frequency, frequency fluctuation dynamics, and transition dipole moment of the O-D stretch mode of HDO molecule in aqueous solutions are strongly dependent on its local electrostatic environment and hydrogen-bond network structure. Therefore, the time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy the O-D stretch mode has been particularly used to investigate specific ion effects on water structure. Despite prolonged efforts to understand the interplay of O-D vibrational dynamics with local water hydrogen-bond network and ion aggregate structures in high salt solutions, still there exists a gap between theory and experiment due to a lack of quantitative model for accurately describing O-D stretch frequency in high salt solutions. To fill this gap, we have performed numerical simulations of Raman scattering and IR absorption spectra of the O-D stretch mode of HDO in highly concentrated NaCl and KSCN solutions and compared them with experimental results. Carrying out extensive quantum chemistry calculations on not only water clusters but also ion-water clusters, we first developed a distributed vibrational solvatochromic charge model for the O-D stretch mode in aqueous salt solutions. Furthermore, the non-Condon effect on the vibrational transition dipole moment of the O-D stretch mode was fully taken into consideration with the charge response kernel that is non-local polarizability density. From the fluctuating O-D stretch mode frequencies and transition dipole vectors obtained from the molecular dynamics simulations, the O-D stretch Raman scattering and IR absorption spectra of HDO in salt solutions could be calculated. The polarization effect on the transition dipole vector of the O-D stretch mode is shown to be important and the asymmetric line shapes of the O-D stretch Raman scattering and IR absorption spectra of HDO especially in highly concentrated NaCl and KSCN solutions are in quantitative agreement with experimental results. We anticipate that this

  20. Experimental system of ejected electron spectroscopy with ECR ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitazawa, Sin-iti [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1995-09-01

    The experiment of analyzing energy spectrum of electrons ejected from multiple electron capture process on ion-atom collision is carried out using ECR (Electron Cyclotron Resonance) ion source. An old collision system using gas atoms as target and a new system using vapour atoms are developed. In this report, the developments and exploitations of the experimental systems for the ejected electron spectroscopy with ECR Ion source are presented. (author).

  1. Investigating vibrational anharmonic couplings in cyanide-bridged transition metal mixed valence complexes using two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slenkamp, Karla M.; Lynch, Michael S.; Van Kuiken, Benjamin E.; Brookes, Jennifer F.; Bannan, Caitlin C.; Daifuku, Stephanie L.; Khalil, Munira, E-mail: mkhalil@chem.washington.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Washington, Box 351700, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)

    2014-02-28

    Using polarization-selective two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy, we measure anharmonic couplings and angles between the transition dipole moments of the four cyanide stretching (ν{sub CN}) vibrations found in [(NH{sub 3}){sub 5}Ru{sup III}NCFe{sup II}(CN){sub 5}]{sup −} (FeRu) dissolved in D{sub 2}O and formamide and [(NC){sub 5}Fe{sup II}CNPt{sup IV}(NH{sub 3}){sub 4}NCFe{sup II}(CN){sub 5}]{sup 4−} (FePtFe) dissolved in D{sub 2}O. These cyanide-bridged transition metal complexes serve as model systems for studying the role of high frequency vibrational modes in ultrafast photoinduced charge transfer reactions. Here, we focus on the spectroscopy of the ν{sub CN} modes in the electronic ground state. The FTIR spectra of the ν{sub CN} modes of the bimetallic and trimetallic systems are strikingly different in terms of frequencies, amplitudes, and lineshapes. The experimental 2D IR spectra of FeRu and FePtFe and their fits reveal a set of weakly coupled anharmonic ν{sub CN} modes. The vibrational mode anharmonicities of the individual ν{sub CN} modes range from 14 to 28 cm{sup −1}. The mixed-mode anharmonicities range from 2 to 14 cm{sup −1}. In general, the bridging ν{sub CN} mode is most weakly coupled to the radial ν{sub CN} mode, which involves the terminal CN ligands. Measurement of the relative transition dipole moments of the four ν{sub CN} modes reveal that the FeRu molecule is almost linear in solution when dissolved in formamide, but it assumes a bent geometry when dissolved in D{sub 2}O. The ν{sub CN} modes are modelled as bilinearly coupled anharmonic oscillators with an average coupling constant of 6 cm{sup −1}. This study elucidates the role of the solvent in modulating the molecular geometry and the anharmonic vibrational couplings between the ν{sub CN} modes in cyanide-bridged transition metal mixed valence complexes.

  2. Nonequilibrium electron-vibration coupling and conductance fluctuations in a C-60 junction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulstrup, Soren; Frederiksen, Thomas; Brandbyge, Mads

    2012-01-01

    displacement. Combined with a vibrational heating mechanism we construct a model from our results that explain the polarity-dependent two-level conductance fluctuations observed in recent scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) experiments [N. Neel et al., Nano Lett. 11, 3593 (2011)]. These findings highlight...... the significance of nonequilibrium effects in chemical bond formation/breaking and in electron-vibration coupling in molecular electronics....

  3. Gold micro- and nano-particles for surface enhanced vibrational spectroscopy of pyridostigmine bromide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dolgov, Leonid; Fesenko, Olena; Kavelin, Vladyslav

    2017-01-01

    Triangular gold microprisms and spherical silica nanoparticles with attached gold nano-islands were examined as an active nanostructures for the surface enhanced Raman and infrared spectroscopy. These particles were probed for the detection of pyridostigmine bromide as a safe analog of military...... compound sarin. Raman and infrared spectral bands of the pyridostigmine bromide were measured. Detailed correlation of obtained spectral bands with specific vibrations in pyridostigmine bromide was done. Silica nanoparticles with attached gold nano-islands showed more essential enhancement of the Raman...

  4. Vibrational frequencies of anti-diabetic drug studied by terahertz time-domain spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, S. Q.; Li, H.; Xie, L.; Chen, L.; Peng, Y.; Zhu, Y. M.; Li, H.; Dong, P.; Wang, J. T.

    2012-04-01

    By using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy, the absorption spectra of seven anti-diabetic pills have been investigated. For gliquidone, glipizide, gliclazide, and glimepiride, an obvious resonance peak is found at 1.37 THz. Furthermore, to overcome the limit of density functional theory that can analyze the normal mode frequencies of the ground state of organic material, we also present a method that relies on pharmacophore recognition, from which we can obtain the resonance peak at 1.37 THz can be attributed to the vibration of sulfonylurea group. The results indicate that the veracity of density functional theory can be increased by combining pharmacophore recognition.

  5. Communication: atomic force detection of single-molecule nonlinear optical vibrational spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saurabh, Prasoon; Mukamel, Shaul

    2014-04-28

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) allows for a highly sensitive detection of spectroscopic signals. This has been first demonstrated for NMR of a single molecule and recently extended to stimulated Raman in the optical regime. We theoretically investigate the use of optical forces to detect time and frequency domain nonlinear optical signals. We show that, with proper phase matching, the AFM-detected signals closely resemble coherent heterodyne-detected signals. Applications are made to AFM-detected and heterodyne-detected vibrational resonances in Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy (χ((3))) and sum or difference frequency generation (χ((2))).

  6. Single-electron detection and spectroscopy via relativistic cyclotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asner, David M.; Bradley, Rich; De Viveiros Souza Filho, Luiz A.; Doe, Peter J.; Fernandes, Justin L.; Fertl, M.; Finn, Erin C.; Formaggio, Joseph; Furse, Daniel L.; Jones, Anthony M.; Kofron, Jared N.; LaRoque, Benjamin; Leber, Michelle; MCBride, Lisa; Miller, M. L.; Mohanmurthy, Prajwal T.; Monreal, Ben; Oblath, Noah S.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Rosenberg, Leslie; Rybka, Gray; Rysewyk, Devyn M.; Sternberg, Michael G.; Tedeschi, Jonathan R.; Thummler, Thomas; VanDevender, Brent A.; Woods, N. L.

    2015-04-01

    It has been understood since 1897 that accelerating charges should emit electromagnetic radiation. Cyclotron radiation, the particular form of radiation emitted by an electron orbiting in a magnetic field, was first derived in 1904. Despite the simplicity of this concept, and the enormous utility of electron spectroscopy in nuclear and particle physics, single-electron cyclotron radiation has never been observed directly. Here we demonstrate single-electron detection in a novel radiofrequency spectrometer. We observe the cyclotron radiation emitted by individual electrons that are produced with mildly-relativistic energies by a gaseous radioactive source and are magnetically trapped. The relativistic shift in the cyclotron frequency permits a precise electron energy measurement. Precise beta electron spectroscopy from gaseous radiation sources is a key technique in modern efforts to measure the neutrino mass via the tritium decay endpoint, and this work is a proof-of-concept for future neutrino mass experiments using this technique.

  7. Vibrational self-trapping in beta-sheet structures observed with femtosecond nonlinear infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodis, Pavol; Schwartz, Erik; Koepf, Matthieu; Cornelissen, Jeroen J L M; Rowan, Alan E; Nolte, Roeland J M; Woutersen, Sander

    2009-09-28

    Self-trapping of NH-stretch vibrational excitations in synthetic beta-sheet helices is observed using femtosecond infrared pump-probe spectroscopy. In a dialanine-based beta-sheet helix, the transient-absorption change upon exciting the NH-stretch mode exhibits a negative absorption change at the fundamental frequency and two positive peaks at lower frequencies. These two induced-absorption peaks are characteristic for a state in which the vibrational excitation is self-trapped on essentially a single NH-group in the hydrogen-bonded NH...OC chain, forming a small (Holstein) vibrational polaron. By engineering the structure of the polymer we can disrupt the hydrogen-bonded NH...OC chain, allowing us to eliminate the self-trapping, as is confirmed from the NH-stretch pump-probe response. We also investigate a trialanine-based beta-sheet helix, where each side chain participates in two NH...OC chains with different hydrogen-bond lengths. The chain with short hydrogen bonds shows the same self-trapping behavior as the dialanine-based beta-sheet helix, whereas in the chain with long hydrogen bonds the self-trapping is too weak to be observable.

  8. Time evolution of vibrational temperatures in a CO2 glow discharge measured with infrared absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klarenaar, B. L. M.; Engeln, R.; van den Bekerom, D. C. M.; van de Sanden, M. C. M.; Morillo-Candas, A. S.; Guaitella, O.

    2017-11-01

    Vibrational temperatures of CO2 are studied in a pulsed glow discharge by means of time-resolved in situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, with a 10 μs temporal resolution. A method to analyze the infrared transmittance through vibrationally excited CO2 is presented and validated on a previously published CO2 spectrum, showing good agreement between fit and data. The discharge under study is pulsed with a typical duty cycle of 5–10 ms on–off, at 50 mA and 6.7 mbar. A rapid increase of the temperature of the asymmetric stretch vibration (T 3) is observed at the start of the pulse, reaching 1050 K, which is an elevation of 550 K above the rotational temperature ({T}{{rot}}) of 500 K. After the plasma pulse, the characteristic relaxation time of T 3 to {T}{{rot}} strongly depends on the rotational temperature. By adjusting the duty cycle, the rotational temperature directly after the discharge is varied from 530 to 860 K, resulting in relaxation times between 0.4 and 0.1 ms. Equivalently, as the gas heats up during the plasma pulse, the elevation of T 3 above {T}{{rot}} decreases strongly.

  9. Multimode Vibrational Wave Packet Dynamics of Strong-Field-Ionized Methyl Iodide Probed by Femtosecond XUV Absorption Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Zhi-Heng; Wei, Zhengrong; Li, Jialin

    2017-04-01

    Studies of vibrational wave packets (VWPs) created on the neutral electronic ground-state by intense laser fields have identified R -selective depletion (RSD) as the dominant mechanism for their generation. Another mechanism that is proposed to give rise to VWPs, bond softening (BS), remains hitherto unobserved. Here, we employ femtosecond XUV absorption spectroscopy to investigate the VWP dynamics of CH3 I induced by intense laser fields. Analysis of the first-moment time traces computed about the neutral depletion region reveals both the fundamental and the hot bands of the C-I stretch mode. The initial oscillation phases of these vibrations distinguishes the contributions of RSD and BS to the generation of the VWP in the neutral species. The relative oscillation amplitudes that are associated with the two phases suggest that the C-I VWP is generated predominantly by BS. In the case of the CH3 I+ X 2E3 / 2 ion state, VWP motion along the C-I stretch mode is dominant over the CH3 umbrella mode. Moreover, the amplitudes of the VWPs are only 1 pm (C-I distance) and 1° (H-C-I bond angle). The ability to resolve such VWP dynamics points to the exquisite sensitivity of femtosecond XUV absorption spectroscopy to structural changes. This work is supported by a NTU start-up Grant, the A*Star SERC PSF (122-PSF-0011), the Ministry of Education AcRF (MOE2014-T2-2-052), and the award of a Nanyang Assistant Professorship to Z.-H.L.

  10. Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy of Colloidal Platinum Nanoparticle Catalysts: Disordering versus Removal of Organic Capping

    KAUST Repository

    Krier, James M.

    2012-08-23

    Recent work with nanoparticle catalysts shows that size and shape control on the nanometer scale influences reaction rate and selectivity. Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy is a powerful tool for studying heterogeneous catalysis because it enables the observation of surface intermediates during catalytic reactions. To control the size and shape of catalytic nanoparticles, an organic ligand was used as a capping agent to stabilize nanoparticles during synthesis. However, the presence of an organic capping agent presents two major challenges in SFG and catalytic reaction studies: it blocks a significant fraction of active surface sites and produces a strong signal that prevents the detection of reaction intermediates with SFG. Two methods for cleaning Pt nanoparticles capped with poly (vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) are examined in this study: solvent cleaning and UV cleaning. Solvent cleaning leaves more PVP intact and relies on disordering with hydrogen gas to reduce the SFG signal of PVP. In contrast, UV cleaning depends on nearly complete removal of PVP to reduce SFG signal. Both UV and solvent cleaning enable the detection of reaction intermediates by SFG. However, solvent cleaning also yields nanoparticles that are stable under reaction conditions, whereas UV cleaning results in aggregation during reaction. The results of this study indicate that solvent cleaning is more advantageous for studying the effects of nanoparticle size and shape on catalytic selectivity by SFG vibrational spectroscopy. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  11. Vibrational Spectroscopy of Chemical Species in Silicon and Silicon-Rich Nitride Thin Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirill O. Bugaev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Vibrational properties of hydrogenated silicon-rich nitride (SiN:H of various stoichiometry (0.6≤≤1.3 and hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H films were studied using Raman spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Furnace annealing during 5 hours in Ar ambient at 1130∘C and pulse laser annealing were applied to modify the structure of films. Surprisingly, after annealing with such high-thermal budget, according to the FTIR data, the nearly stoichiometric silicon nitride film contains hydrogen in the form of Si–H bonds. From analysis of the FTIR data of the Si–N bond vibrations, one can conclude that silicon nitride is partly crystallized. According to the Raman data a-Si:H films with hydrogen concentration 15% and lower contain mainly Si–H chemical species, and films with hydrogen concentration 30–35% contain mainly Si–H2 chemical species. Nanosecond pulse laser treatments lead to crystallization of the films and its dehydrogenization.

  12. Directing the path of light-induced electron transfer at a molecular fork using vibrational excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delor, Milan; Archer, Stuart A.; Keane, Theo; Meijer, Anthony J. H. M.; Sazanovich, Igor V.; Greetham, Gregory M.; Towrie, Michael; Weinstein, Julia A.

    2017-11-01

    Ultrafast electron transfer in condensed-phase molecular systems is often strongly coupled to intramolecular vibrations that can promote, suppress and direct electronic processes. Recent experiments exploring this phenomenon proved that light-induced electron transfer can be strongly modulated by vibrational excitation, suggesting a new avenue for active control over molecular function. Here, we achieve the first example of such explicit vibrational control through judicious design of a Pt(II)-acetylide charge-transfer donor-bridge-acceptor-bridge-donor 'fork' system: asymmetric 13C isotopic labelling of one of the two -C≡C- bridges makes the two parallel and otherwise identical donor→acceptor electron-transfer pathways structurally distinct, enabling independent vibrational perturbation of either. Applying an ultrafast UVpump(excitation)-IRpump(perturbation)-IRprobe(monitoring) pulse sequence, we show that the pathway that is vibrationally perturbed during UV-induced electron transfer is dramatically slowed down compared to its unperturbed counterpart. One can thus choose the dominant electron transfer pathway. The findings deliver a new opportunity for precise perturbative control of electronic energy propagation in molecular devices.

  13. Conformational Heterogeneity in the Michaelis Complex of Lactate Dehydrogenase: An Analysis of Vibrational Spectroscopy Using Markov and Hidden Markov Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xiaoliang; Schwartz, Steven D

    2016-07-14

    Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) catalyzes the interconversion of pyruvate and lactate. Recent isotope-edited IR spectroscopy suggests that conformational heterogeneity exists within the Michaelis complex of LDH, and this heterogeneity affects the propensity toward the on-enzyme chemical step for each Michaelis substate. By combining molecular dynamics simulations with Markov and hidden Markov models, we obtained a detailed kinetic network of the substates of the Michaelis complex of LDH. The ensemble-average electric fields exerted onto the vibrational probe were calculated to provide a direct comparison with the vibrational spectroscopy. Structural features of the Michaelis substates were also analyzed on atomistic scales. Our work not only clearly demonstrates the conformational heterogeneity in the Michaelis complex of LDH and its coupling to the reactivities of the substates, but it also suggests a methodology to simultaneously resolve kinetics and structures on atomistic scales, which can be directly compared with the vibrational spectroscopy.

  14. Vibrational and Electronic Energy Transfer and Dissociation of Diatomic Molecules by Electron Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    At high altitudes and velocities equal to or greater than the geosynchronous return velocity (10 kilometers per second), the shock layer of a hypersonic flight will be in thermochemical nonequilibrium and partially ionized. The amount of ionization is determined by the velocity. For a trans atmospheric flight of 10 kilometers per second and at an altitude of 80 kilometers, a maximum of 1% ionization is expected. At a velocity of 12 - 17 kilometer per second, such as a Mars return mission, up to 30% of the atoms and molecules in the flow field will be ionized. Under those circumstances, electrons play an important role in determining the internal states of atoms and molecules in the flow field and hence the amount of radiative heat load and the distance it takes for the flow field to re-establish equilibrium. Electron collisions provide an effective means of transferring energy even when the electron number density is as low as 1%. Because the mass of an electron is 12,760 times smaller than the reduced mass of N2, its average speed, and hence its average collision frequency, is more than 100 times larger. Even in the slightly ionized regime with only 1% electrons, the frequency of electron-molecule collisions is equal to or larger than that of molecule-molecule collisions, an important consideration in the low density part of the atmosphere. Three electron-molecule collision processes relevant to hypersonic flows will be considered: (1) vibrational excitation/de-excitation of a diatomic molecule by electron impact, (2) electronic excitation/de-excitation, and (3) dissociative recombination in electron-diatomic ion collisions. A review of available data, both theory and experiment, will be given. Particular attention will be paid to tailoring the molecular physics to the condition of hypersonic flows. For example, the high rotational temperatures in a hypersonic flow field means that most experimental data carried out under room temperatures are not applicable. Also

  15. Vibrationally Assisted Electron Transfer Mechanism of Olfaction: Myth or Reality?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solov'yov, Ilia; Chang, Po-Yao; Schulten, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Smell is a vital sense for animals. The mainstream explanation of smell is based on recognition of the odorant molecules through characteristics of their surface, e.g., shape, but certain experiments suggest that such recognition is complemented by recognition of vibrational modes. According to t...

  16. Atomic Force Microscopy-Infrared Spectroscopy of Individual Atmospheric Aerosol Particles: Subdiffraction Limit Vibrational Spectroscopy and Morphological Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondy, Amy L; Kirpes, Rachel M; Merzel, Rachel L; Pratt, Kerri A; Banaszak Holl, Mark M; Ault, Andrew P

    2017-09-05

    Chemical analysis of atmospheric aerosols is an analytical challenge, as aerosol particles are complex chemical mixtures that can contain hundreds to thousands of species in attoliter volumes at the most abundant sizes in the atmosphere (∼100 nm). These particles have global impacts on climate and health, but there are few methods available that combine imaging and the detailed molecular information from vibrational spectroscopy for individual particles <500 nm. Herein, we show the first application of atomic force microscopy with infrared spectroscopy (AFM-IR) to detect trace organic and inorganic species and probe intraparticle chemical variation in individual particles down to 150 nm. By detecting photothermal expansion at frequencies where particle species absorb IR photons from a tunable laser, AFM-IR can study particles smaller than the optical diffraction limit. Combining strengths of AFM (ambient pressure, height, morphology, and phase measurements) with photothermal IR spectroscopy, the potential of AFM-IR is shown for a diverse set of single-component particles, liquid-liquid phase separated particles (core-shell morphology), and ambient atmospheric particles. The spectra from atmospheric model systems (ammonium sulfate, sodium nitrate, succinic acid, and sucrose) had clearly identifiable features that correlate with absorption frequencies for infrared-active modes. Additionally, molecular information was obtained with <100 nm spatial resolution for phase separated particles with a ∼150 nm shell and 300 nm core. The subdiffraction limit capability of AFM-IR has the potential to advance understanding of particle impacts on climate and health by improving analytical capabilities to study water uptake, heterogeneous reactivity, and viscosity.

  17. Detection of Nitric Oxide by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Hogg, Neil

    2010-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy has been used in a number of ways to study nitric oxide chemistry and biology. As an intrinsically stable and relatively unreactive diatomic free radical, the challenges for detecting this species by EPR are somewhat different than those for transient radical species. This review gives a basic introduction to EPR spectroscopy and discusses its uses to assess and quantify nitric oxide formation in biological systems.

  18. The Application of Vibrational Spectroscopy Techniques in the Qualitative Assessment of Material Traded as Ginseng

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxleene Sandasi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The name “ginseng” is collectively used to describe several plant species, including Panax ginseng (Asian/Oriental ginseng, P. quinquefolius (American ginseng, P. pseudoginseng (Pseudoginseng and Eleutherococcus senticosus (Siberian ginseng, each with different applications in traditional medicine practices. The use of a generic name may lead to the interchangeable use or substitution of raw materials which poses quality control challenges. Quality control methods such as vibrational spectroscopy-based techniques are here proposed as fast, non-destructive methods for the distinction of four ginseng species and the identification of raw materials in commercial ginseng products. Certified ginseng reference material and commercial products were analysed using hyperspectral imaging (HSI, mid-infrared (MIR and near-infrared (NIR spectroscopy. Principal component analysis (PCA and (orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis models (OPLS-DA were developed using multivariate analysis software. UHPLC-MS was used to analyse methanol extracts of the reference raw materials and commercial products. The holistic analysis of ginseng raw materials revealed distinct chemical differences using HSI, MIR and NIR. For all methods, Eleutherococcus senticosus displayed the greatest variation from the three Panax species that displayed closer chemical similarity. Good discrimination models with high R2X and Q2 cum vales were developed. These models predicted that the majority of products contained either /P. ginseng or P. quinquefolius. Vibrational spectroscopy and HSI techniques in tandem with multivariate data analysis tools provide useful alternative methods in the authentication of ginseng raw materials and commercial products in a fast, easy, cost-effective and non-destructive manner.

  19. Structure of the ethylammonium nitrate surface: an X-ray reflectivity and vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niga, Petru; Wakeham, Deborah; Nelson, Andrew; Warr, Gregory G; Rutland, Mark; Atkin, Rob

    2010-06-01

    X-ray reflectivity and vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy are used to probe the structure of the ethylammonium nitrate (EAN)-air interface. X-ray reflectivity reveals that the EAN-air interface is structured and consists of alternating nonpolar and charged layers that extend 31 A into the bulk. Vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy reveals interfacial cations have their ethyl moieties oriented toward air, with the CH(3) C(3) axis positioned approximately 36.5 degrees from interface normal. This structure is invariant between 15 and 51 degrees C. On account of its molecular symmetry, the orientation of the nitrate anion cannot be determined with certainty.

  20. New analytical model for the ozone electronic ground state potential surface and accurate ab initio vibrational predictions at high energy range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyuterev, Vladimir G; Kochanov, Roman V; Tashkun, Sergey A; Holka, Filip; Szalay, Péter G

    2013-10-07

    An accurate description of the complicated shape of the potential energy surface (PES) and that of the highly excited vibration states is of crucial importance for various unsolved issues in the spectroscopy and dynamics of ozone and remains a challenge for the theory. In this work a new analytical representation is proposed for the PES of the ground electronic state of the ozone molecule in the range covering the main potential well and the transition state towards the dissociation. This model accounts for particular features specific to the ozone PES for large variations of nuclear displacements along the minimum energy path. The impact of the shape of the PES near the transition state (existence of the "reef structure") on vibration energy levels was studied for the first time. The major purpose of this work was to provide accurate theoretical predictions for ozone vibrational band centres at the energy range near the dissociation threshold, which would be helpful for understanding the very complicated high-resolution spectra and its analyses currently in progress. Extended ab initio electronic structure calculations were carried out enabling the determination of the parameters of a minimum energy path PES model resulting in a new set of theoretical vibrational levels of ozone. A comparison with recent high-resolution spectroscopic data on the vibrational levels gives the root-mean-square deviations below 1 cm(-1) for ozone band centres up to 90% of the dissociation energy. New ab initio vibrational predictions represent a significant improvement with respect to all previously available calculations.

  1. Electron spectroscopy, molecular structures, and binding energies of Al- and Cu-imidazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xu; Lee, Jung Sup; Yang, Dong-Sheng

    2006-11-30

    Al- and Cu-imidazole are produced in laser-vaporization supersonic molecular beams and studied with pulsed field ionization-zero electron kinetic energy (ZEKE) spectroscopy and second-order Møller-Plesset (MP2) theory. The sigma and pi structures of these complexes are predicted by MP2 calculations, but only the sigma structures are identified by the experimental measurements. For these sigma structures, adiabatic ionization energies and several vibrational frequencies are measured from the ZEKE spectra, the ground electronic states of the neutral and ionized complexes are determined by comparing the observed and calculated spectra, and the metal-ligand bond dissociation energies of the neutral states are derived by using a thermochemical relation. The measured vibrational modes include the metal-ligand stretch and bend and ligand ring distortions. The metal-ligand stretch frequencies of these transient complexes are compared with those of coordinately saturated, stable metal compounds, and the ligand-based distortion frequencies are compared with those of the free ligand. Al-imidazole has a larger bond dissociation energy than Cu-imidazole, although the opposite order was previously found for the corresponding ions. The weaker bonding of the Cu complex is attributed to the antibonding interaction and the electron repulsion between the Cu 4s and N lone-pair electrons.

  2. Lumped Parameter Modeling for Rapid Vibration Response Prototyping and Test Correlation for Electronic Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dyke, Michael B.

    2013-01-01

    Present preliminary work using lumped parameter models to approximate dynamic response of electronic units to random vibration; Derive a general N-DOF model for application to electronic units; Illustrate parametric influence of model parameters; Implication of coupled dynamics for unit/board design; Demonstrate use of model to infer printed wiring board (PWB) dynamics from external chassis test measurement.

  3. Compact holographic optical element-based electronic speckle pattern interferometer for rotation and vibration measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavigadda, Viswanath; Moothanchery, Mohesh; Pramanik, Manojit; Mihaylova, Emilia; Toal, Vincent

    2017-03-01

    An out-of-plane sensitive electronic speckle pattern interferometer (ESPI) using holographic optical elements (HOEs) for studying rotations and vibrations is presented. Phase stepping is implemented by modulating the wavelength of the laser diode in a path length imbalanced interferometer. The time average ESPI method is used for vibration measurements. Some factors influencing the measurements accuracy are reported. Some advantages and limitations of the system are discussed.

  4. Selfconsistent vibrational and free electron kinetics for CO2 dissociation in cold plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capitelli, Mario

    2016-09-01

    The activation of CO2 by cold plasmas is receiving new theoretical interest thanks to two European groups. The Bogaerts group developed a global model for the activation of CO2 trying to reproduce the experimental values for DBD and microwave discharges. The approach of Pietanza et al was devoted to understand the dependence of electron energy distribution function (eedf) of pure CO2 on the presence of concentrations of electronically and vibrationally excited states taken as parameter. To understand the importance of the vibrational excitation in the dissociation process Pietanza et al compared an upper limit to the dissociation process from a pure vibrational mechanism (PVM) with the corresponding electron impact dissociation rate, the prevalence of the two models depending on the reduced electric field and on the choice of the electron molecule cross section database. Improvement of the Pietanza et al model is being considered by coupling the time dependent Boltzmann solver with the non equilibrium vibrational kinetics of asymmetric mode and with simplified plasma chemistry kinetics describing the ionization/recombination process and the excitation-deexcitation of a metastable level at 10.5eV. A new PVM mechanism is also considered. Preliminary results, for both discharge and post discharge conditions, emphasize the action of superelastic collisions involving both vibrationally and electronically excited states in affecting the eedf. The new results can be used to plan a road map for future developments of numerical codes for rationalizing existing experimental values, as well as, for indicating new experimental situations.

  5. Sample presentation, sources of error and future perspectives on the application of vibrational spectroscopy in the wine industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozzolino, Daniel

    2015-03-30

    Vibrational spectroscopy encompasses a number of techniques and methods including ultra-violet, visible, Fourier transform infrared or mid infrared, near infrared and Raman spectroscopy. The use and application of spectroscopy generates spectra containing hundreds of variables (absorbances at each wavenumbers or wavelengths), resulting in the production of large data sets representing the chemical and biochemical wine fingerprint. Multivariate data analysis techniques are then required to handle the large amount of data generated in order to interpret the spectra in a meaningful way in order to develop a specific application. This paper focuses on the developments of sample presentation and main sources of error when vibrational spectroscopy methods are applied in wine analysis. Recent and novel applications will be discussed as examples of these developments. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  6. Smart Woven Fabrics With Portable And Wearable Vibrating Electronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özdemir Hakan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The portable and wearable instrumented fabrics capable of measuring biothermal variable is essential for drivers, especially long-distance drivers. Here we report on portable and wearable devices that are able to read the temperature of human body within the woven fabric. The sensory function of the fabric is achieved by temperature sensors, soldered on conductive threads coated with cotton. The presence of stainless steel wires gives these materials conductive properties, enabling the detection of human body temperature and transmitting the signal form sensors to the motors on the fabric. When body temperature decreases, hardware/software platforms send a signal to the vibration motors in order to stimulate the driver. The ‘smart woven fabric’-sensing architecture can be divided into two parts: a textile platform, where portable and wearable devices acquire thermal signals, and hardware/software platforms, to which a sensor sends the acquired data, which send the signals to the vibration motors.

  7. Mode-selective vibrational modulation of charge transport in organic electronic devices

    KAUST Repository

    Bakulin, Artem A.

    2015-08-06

    The soft character of organic materials leads to strong coupling between molecular, nuclear and electronic dynamics. This coupling opens the way to influence charge transport in organic electronic devices by exciting molecular vibrational motions. However, despite encouraging theoretical predictions, experimental realization of such approach has remained elusive. Here we demonstrate experimentally that photoconductivity in a model organic optoelectronic device can be modulated by the selective excitation of molecular vibrations. Using an ultrafast infrared laser source to create a coherent superposition of vibrational motions in a pentacene/C60 photoresistor, we observe that excitation of certain modes in the 1,500–1,700 cm−1 region leads to photocurrent enhancement. Excited vibrations affect predominantly trapped carriers. The effect depends on the nature of the vibration and its mode-specific character can be well described by the vibrational modulation of intermolecular electronic couplings. This presents a new tool for studying electron–phonon coupling and charge dynamics in (bio)molecular materials.

  8. Spectroscopy of nonequilibrium electrons and phonons

    CERN Document Server

    Shank, CV

    1992-01-01

    The physics of nonequilibrium electrons and phonons in semiconductors is an important branch of fundamental physics that has many practical applications, especially in the development of ultrafast and ultrasmall semiconductor devices. This volume is devoted to different trends in the field which are presently at the forefront of research. Special attention is paid to the ultrafast relaxation processes in bulk semiconductors and two-dimensional semiconductor structures, and to their study by different spectroscopic methods, both pulsed and steady-state. The evolution of energy and space distrib

  9. X-ray and vibrational spectroscopy of manganese complexes relevant to the oxygen-evolving complex of photosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visser, Hendrik [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Manganese model complexes, relevant to the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) in photosynthesis, were studied with Mn K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES), Mn Kb X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), and vibrational spectroscopy. A more detailed understanding was obtained of the influence of nuclearity, overall structure, oxidation state, and ligand environment of the Mn atoms on the spectra from these methods. This refined understanding is necessary for improving the interpretation of spectra of the OEC. Mn XANES and Kb XES were used to study a di-(mu)-oxo and a mono-(mu)-oxo di-nuclear Mn compound in the (III,III), (III,IV), and (IV,IV) oxidation states. XANES spectra show energy shifts of 0.8 - 2.2 eV for 1-electron oxidation-state changes and 0.4 - 1.8 eV for ligand-environment changes. The shifts observed for Mn XES spectra were approximately 0.21 eV for oxidation state-changes and only approximately 0.04 eV for ligand-environment changes. This indicates that Mn Kb XES i s more sensitive to the oxidation state and less sensitive to the ligand environment of the Mn atoms than XANES. These complimentary methods provide information about the oxidation state and the ligand environment of Mn atoms in model compounds and biological systems. A versatile spectroelectrochemical apparatus was designed to aid the interpretation of IR spectra of Mn compounds in different oxidation states. The design, based on an attenuated total reflection device, permits the study of a wide spectral range: 16,700 (600 nm) - 225

  10. Studies of Heterogeneously Catalyzed Liquid-Phase Alcohol Oxidation on Platinum bySum-frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy and Reaction Rate Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Christopher [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Compared to many branches of chemistry, the molecular level study of catalytically active surfaces is young. Only with the invention of ultrahigh vacuum technology in the past half century has it been possible to carry out experiments that yield useful molecular information about the reactive occurrences at a surface. The reason is two-fold: low pressure is necessary to keep a surface clean for an amount of time long enough to perform an experiment, and most atomic scale techniques that are surface speci c (x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, etc.) cannot be used at ambient pressures, because electrons, which act as chemical probes in these techniques, are easily scattered by molecules. Sum-frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy is one technique that can provide molecular level information from the surface without the necessity for high vacuum. Since the advent of SFG as a surface spectroscopic tool it has proved its worth in the studies of surface catalyzed reactions in the gas phase, with numerous reactions in the gas phase having been investigated on a multitude of surfaces. However, in situ SFG characterization of catalysis at the solid-liquid interface has yet to be thoroughly pursued despite the broad interest in the use of heterogeneous catalysts in the liquid phase as replacements for homogeneous counterparts. This work describes an attempt to move in that direction, applying SFG to study the solid-liquid interface under conditions of catalytic alcohol oxidation on platinum.

  11. Vibrational two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2DCOS) study of proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, Isao

    2017-12-01

    A tutorial is provided for the generalized two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2DCOS), which is applicable to the vibrational spectroscopic study of proteins and related systems. In 2DCOS, similarity or dissimilarity among variations of spectroscopic intensities, which are induced by applying an external perturbation to the sample, is examined by constructing correlation spectra defined by two independent spectral variable axes. By spreading congested or overlapped peaks along the second dimension, apparent spectral resolution is enhanced and interpretation of complex spectra becomes simplified. A set of simple rules for the intensities and signs of correlation peaks is used to extract insightful information. Simulated IR spectra for a model protein are used to demonstrate the specific utility of 2DCOS. Additional tools useful in the 2DCOS analysis of proteins, such as data segmentation assisted with moving-window analysis, 2D codistribution analysis, Pareto scaling, and null-space projection are also discussed.

  12. Exchanging conformations of a hydroformylation catalyst structurally characterized using two-dimensional vibrational spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panman, Matthijs R; Vos, Jannie; Bocokić, Vladica; Bellini, Rosalba; de Bruin, Bas; Reek, Joost H N; Woutersen, Sander

    2013-12-16

    Catalytic transition-metal complexes often occur in several conformations that exchange rapidly (vibrational spectroscopy, a method that can be applied to any catalyst provided that the exchange between its conformers occurs on a time scale of a few picoseconds or slower. We find that, in one of the conformations, the OC-Rh-CO angle deviates significantly from the canonical value in a trigonal-bipyramidal structure. On the basis of complementary density functional calculations, we ascribe this effect to attractive van der Waals interaction between the CO and the xantphos ligand.

  13. Theoretical study of sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy on limonene surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Ren-Hui, E-mail: zrh@iccas.ac.cn; Liu, Hao; Jing, Yuan-Yuan; Wang, Bo-Yang; Shi, Qiang [Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, State Key Laboratory for Structural Chemistry of Unstable and Stable Species, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Zhongguancun, Beijing 100190 (China); Wei, Wen-Mei [Department of Chemistry, College of Basic Medicine, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui 230032 (China)

    2014-03-14

    By combining molecule dynamics (MD) simulation and quantum chemistry computation, we calculate the surface sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy (SFVS) of R-limonene molecules at the gas-liquid interface for SSP, PPP, and SPS polarization combinations. The distributions of the Euler angles are obtained using MD simulation, the ψ-distribution is between isotropic and Gaussian. Instead of the MD distributions, different analytical distributions such as the δ-function, Gaussian and isotropic distributions are applied to simulate surface SFVS. We find that different distributions significantly affect the absolute SFVS intensity and also influence on relative SFVS intensity, and the δ-function distribution should be used with caution when the orientation distribution is broad. Furthermore, the reason that the SPS signal is weak in reflected arrangement is discussed.

  14. Vibrational properties of epitaxial Bi4Te3 films as studied by Raman spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Xu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Bi4Te3, as one of the phases of the binary Bi–Te system, shares many similarities with Bi2Te3, which is known as a topological insulator and thermoelectric material. We report the micro-Raman spectroscopy study of 50 nm Bi4Te3 films on Si substrates prepared by molecular beam epitaxy. Raman spectra of Bi4Te3 films completely resolve the six predicted Raman-active phonon modes for the first time. Structural features and Raman tensors of Bi4Te3 films are introduced. According to the wavenumbers and assignments of the six eigenpeaks in the Raman spectra of Bi4Te3 films, it is found that the Raman-active phonon oscillations in Bi4Te3 films exhibit the vibrational properties of those in both Bi and Bi2Te3 films.

  15. Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy of Pyridine Hydrogenation on Platinum Nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bratlie, Kaitlin M.; Komvopoulos, Kyriakos; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2008-02-22

    Pyridine hydrogenation in the presence of a surface monolayer consisting of cubic Pt nanoparticles stabilized by tetradecyltrimethylammonium bromide (TTAB) was investigated by sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy using total internal reflection (TIR) geometry. TIR-SFG spectra analysis revealed that a pyridinium cation (C{sub 5}H{sub 5}NH{sup +}) forms during pyridine hydrogenation on the Pt nanoparticle surface, and the NH group in the C{sub 5}H{sub 5}NH{sup +} cation becomes more hydrogen bound with the increase of the temperature. In addition, the surface coverage of the cation decreases with the increase of the temperature. An important contribution of this study is the in situ identification of reaction intermediates adsorbed on the Pt nanoparticle monolayer during pyridine hydrogenation.

  16. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy on electron-boson interactions in superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Schackert, Michael Peter

    2015-01-01

    This work describes the experimental study of electron-boson interactions in superconductors by means of inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy performed with a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) at temperatures below 1 K. This new approach allows the direct measurement of the Eliashberg function of conventional superconductors as demonstrated on lead (Pb) and niobium (Nb). Preparative experiments on unconventional iron-pnictides are presented in the end.

  17. Photo-vibrational spectroscopy using quantum cascade laser and laser Doppler vibrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huan; Hu, Qi; Xie, Jiecheng; Fu, Yu

    2017-06-01

    Photoacoustic/photothermal spectroscopy is an established technique for detection of chemicals and explosives. However, prior sample preparation is required and the analysis is conducted in a sealed space with a high-sensitivity sensor coupled with a lock-in amplifier, limiting the technique to applications in a controllable laboratory environment. Hence, this technique may not be suitable for defense and security applications where the detection of explosives or hazardous chemicals is required in an open environment at a safe standoff distance. In this study, chemicals in various forms were excited by an intensity-modulated quantum cascade laser (QCL), while a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) was applied to detect the vibration signal resulting from the photocoustic/photothermal effect. The photo-vibrational spectrum obtained by scanning the QCL's wavelength in MIR range, coincides well with the corresponding spectrum obtained using typical FTIR equipment. The experiment in short and long standoff distances demonstrated that the LDV is a capable sensor for chemical detection in an open environment.

  18. Observation of the low frequency vibrational modes of bacteriophage M13 in water by Raman spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsen Shaw-Wei D

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently, a technique which departs radically from conventional approaches has been proposed. This novel technique utilizes biological objects such as viruses as nano-templates for the fabrication of nanostructure elements. For example, rod-shaped viruses such as the M13 phage and tobacco mosaic virus have been successfully used as biological templates for the synthesis of semiconductor and metallic nanowires. Results and discussion Low wave number (≤ 20 cm-1 acoustic vibrations of the M13 phage have been studied using Raman spectroscopy. The experimental results are compared with theoretical calculations based on an elastic continuum model and appropriate Raman selection rules derived from a bond polarizability model. The observed Raman mode has been shown to belong to one of the Raman-active axial torsion modes of the M13 phage protein coat. Conclusion It is expected that the detection and characterization of this low frequency vibrational mode can be used for applications in nanotechnology such as for monitoring the process of virus functionalization and self-assembly. For example, the differences in Raman spectra can be used to monitor the coating of virus with some other materials and nano-assembly process, such as attaching a carbon nanotube or quantum dots.

  19. iDEEAA: A novel, versatile apparatus for electron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lupulescu, C., E-mail: cosmin.lupulescu@helmholtz-berlin.de [Technische Universität Berlin, Institut für Optik und Atomare Physik, Straße des 17. Juni 135, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Arion, T. [Centre for Free-Electron Laser Science (DESY), Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Institut für Experimentalphysik, Universität Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Hergenhahn, U. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Teilinstitut Greifswald, Wendelsteinstr. 1, 17491 Greifswald (Germany); Ovsyannikov, R. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, Albert-Einstein-Str. 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Förstel, M. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Teilinstitut Greifswald, Wendelsteinstr. 1, 17491 Greifswald (Germany); Gavrila, G. [Technische Universität Chemnitz, Fakultät Elektrotechnik und Informationstechnik, Reichenhainer Str. 70, 09126 Chemnitz (Germany); Eberhardt, W. [Technische Universität Berlin, Institut für Optik und Atomare Physik, Straße des 17. Juni 135, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Centre for Free-Electron Laser Science (DESY), Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: •We developed an experimental end station for time- and angle-resolved X-ray electron spectroscopy. •The instrument can operate in combination with synchrotron radiation, VUV Helium discharge source or table-top high-harmonic laser sources. •Band mapping in solids is possible with unprecedented rapidity. •Electron–electron coincidence spectroscopy is performed at higher data collection rate (due to improved transmission) and with improved energy resolution. -- Abstract: We report the development and present status of the iDEEAA (Instrument for Direct Electron Energy and Angular Analysis) experimental end station for time- and angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The setup is based on multidimensional detection of photoelectrons by means of both time-of-flight (TOF) and/or electrostatic analyzers. The instrument offers the possibility to record simultaneously and independently photoelectron and Auger electron spectra. Samples can be either gases or solids. The system can operate with multiple photon sources, such as laboratory-based table-top laser extreme ultraviolet (EUV) sources, monochromatic Helium discharge lamp and soft X-ray synchrotron pulses. We demonstrate the performance of the setup by carrying out electron–electron coincidence experiments on CH{sub 4} and by mapping the band structure of Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} using photons of the BESSY II electron storage ring.

  20. Introduction to Spin Label Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melanson, Michelle; Sood, Abha; Torok, Fanni; Torok, Marianna

    2013-01-01

    An undergraduate laboratory exercise is described to demonstrate the biochemical applications of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The beta93 cysteine residue of hemoglobin is labeled by the covalent binding of 3-maleimido-proxyl (5-MSL) and 2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-1-oxyl-3-methyl methanethiosulfonate (MTSL), respectively. The excess…

  1. On the merits of conversion electron Mossbauer spectroscopy in geosciences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunnlaugsson, H.P.; Bertelsen, P.; Budtz-Jørgensen, Carl

    2006-01-01

    Described are some applications of conversion electron Mossbauer spectroscopy (CEMS) in geosciences. It is shown how easily this technique can be applied in existing Mossbauer laboratories to investigate natural samples. Some examples demonstrate the kind of information CEMS can give on the weath...

  2. High-resolution electron spectroscopy of lanthanide (Ce, Pr, and Nd) complexes of cyclooctatetraene: the role of 4f electrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Sudesh; Roudjane, Mourad; Hewage, Dilrukshi; Liu, Yang; Yang, Dong-Sheng

    2013-04-28

    Cerium, praseodymium, and neodymium complexes of 1,3,5,7-cyclooctatetraene (COT) complexes were produced in a laser-vaporization metal cluster source and studied by pulsed-field ionization zero electron kinetic energy spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations. The computations included the second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory, the coupled cluster method with single, double, and perturbative triple excitations, and the state-average complete active space self-consistent field method. The spectrum of each complex exhibits multiple band systems and is assigned to ionization of several low-energy electronic states of the neutral complex. This observation is different from previous studies of M(COT) (M = Sc, Y, La, and Gd), for which a single band system was observed. The presence of the multiple low-energy electronic states is caused by the splitting of the partially filled lanthanide 4f orbitals in the ligand field, and the number of the low-energy states increases rapidly with increasing number of the metal 4f electrons. On the other hand, the 4f electrons have a small effect on the geometries and vibrational frequencies of these lanthanide complexes.

  3. High-Resolution Conversion Electron Spectroscopy of Valence Electron Configurations (CESVEC) in Solids

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    First measurements with the Zurich $\\beta$-spectrometer on sources from ISOLDE have demonstrated that high resolution spectroscopy of conversion electrons from valence shells is feasible.\\\\ \\\\ This makes possible a novel type of electron spectroscopy (CESVEC) on valence-electron configurations of tracer elements in solids. Thus the density of occupied electron states of impurities in solids has been measured for the first time. Such data constitute a stringent test of state-of-the-art calculations of impurity properties. Based on these results, we are conducting a systematic investigation of impurities in group IV and III-V semiconductors.

  4. Prognostics Health Management of Electronic Systems Under Mechanical Shock and Vibration Using Kalman Filter Models and Metrics

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Structural damage to ball grid array interconnects incurred during vibration testing has been monitored in the prefailure space using resistance spectroscopy-based...

  5. Terahertz electromodulation spectroscopy of electron transport in GaN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelbrecht, S. G.; Arend, T. R.; Kersting, R., E-mail: roland.kersting@lmu.de [Photonics and Optoelectronics Group, Physics Department and Center for NanoScience (CeNS), Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Amalienstr. 54, 80799 München (Germany); Zhu, T.; Kappers, M. J. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom)

    2015-03-02

    Time-resolved terahertz (THz) electromodulation spectroscopy is applied to investigate the high-frequency transport of electrons in gallium nitride at different doping concentrations and densities of threading dislocations. At THz frequencies, all structures reveal Drude transport. The analysis of the spectral response provides the fundamental transport properties, such as the electron scattering time and the electrons' conductivity effective mass. We observe the expected impact of ionized-impurity scattering and that scattering at threading dislocations only marginally affects the high-frequency mobility.

  6. Terahertz electromodulation spectroscopy of electron transport in GaN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelbrecht, S. G.; Arend, T. R.; Zhu, T.; Kappers, M. J.; Kersting, R.

    2015-03-01

    Time-resolved terahertz (THz) electromodulation spectroscopy is applied to investigate the high-frequency transport of electrons in gallium nitride at different doping concentrations and densities of threading dislocations. At THz frequencies, all structures reveal Drude transport. The analysis of the spectral response provides the fundamental transport properties, such as the electron scattering time and the electrons' conductivity effective mass. We observe the expected impact of ionized-impurity scattering and that scattering at threading dislocations only marginally affects the high-frequency mobility.

  7. Examining Electron-Boson Coupling Using Time-Resolved Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sentef, Michael; Kemper, Alexander F.; Moritz, Brian; Freericks, James K.; Shen, Zhi-Xun; Devereaux, Thomas P.

    2013-12-26

    Nonequilibrium pump-probe time-domain spectroscopies can become an important tool to disentangle degrees of freedom whose coupling leads to broad structures in the frequency domain. Here, using the time-resolved solution of a model photoexcited electron-phonon system, we show that the relaxational dynamics are directly governed by the equilibrium self-energy so that the phonon frequency sets a window for “slow” versus “fast” recovery. The overall temporal structure of this relaxation spectroscopy allows for a reliable and quantitative extraction of the electron-phonon coupling strength without requiring an effective temperature model or making strong assumptions about the underlying bare electronic band dispersion.

  8. Combining surface sensitive vibrational spectroscopy and fluorescence microscopy to study biological interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chi; Jasensky, Joshua; Wu, Jing; Chen, Zhan

    2014-03-01

    A multimodal system combining surface sensitive sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy and total-internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy for surface and interface study was developed. Interfacial molecular structural information can be detected using SFG spectroscopy while interfacial fluorescence signal can be visualized using TIRF microscopy from the same sample. As a proof of concept experiment, SFG spectra of fluorescent polystyrene (PS) beads with different surface coverage were correlated with TIRF signal observed. Results showed that SFG signals from the ordered surfactant methyl groups were detected from the substrate surface, while signals from PS phenyl groups on the beads were not seen. Additionally, a lipid monolayer labeled using lipid-associated dye was deposited on a silica substrate and studied in different environments. The contact with water of this lipid monolayer caused SFG signal to disappear, indicating a possible lipid molecular disorder and the formation of lipid bilayers or liposomes in water. TIRF was able to visualize the presence of lipid molecules on the substrate, showing that the lipids were not removed from the substrate surface by water. The integration of the two surface sensitive techniques can simultaneously visualize interfacial molecular dynamics and characterize interfacial molecular structures in situ, which is important and is expected to find extensive applications in biological interface related research.

  9. A Monte Carlo calculation of subexcitation and vibrationally-relaxing electron spectra in irradiated liquid water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cobut, V.; Frongillo, Y.; Jay-Gerin, J.-P. (Sherbrooke Univ., PQ (Canada). Faculte de Medecine); Patau, J.-P. (Toulouse-3 Univ., 31 (France))

    1992-12-01

    An energy spectrum of ''subexcitation electrons'' produced in liquid water by electrons with initial energies of a few keV is obtained by using a Monte Carlo transport simulation calculation. It is found that the introduction of vibrational-excitation cross sections leads to the appearance of a sharp peak in the probability density function near the electronic-excitation threshold. Electrons contributing to this peak are shown to be more naturally described if a novel energy spectrum, that we propose to name ''vibrationally-relaxing electron'' spectrum, is introduced. The corresponding distribution function is presented, and an empirical expression of it is given. (author).

  10. Vibrational Spectrum of an Excited State and Huang-Rhys Factors by Coherent Wave Packets in Time-Resolved Fluorescence Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gyeongjin; Kim, Junwoo; Kim, So Young; Kim, Dong Eon; Joo, Taiha

    2017-03-17

    Coherent nuclear wave packet motions in an electronic excited state of a molecule are measured directly by time-resolved spontaneous fluorescence spectroscopy with an unprecedented time resolution by using two-photon absorption excitation and fluorescence upconversion by noncollinear sum frequency generation. With an estimated time resolution of approximately 25 fs, wave packet motions of vibrational modes up to 1600 cm(-1) are recorded for coumarin 153 in ethanol. Two-color transient absorption at 13 fs time resolution are measured to confirm the result. Vibrational displacements between the ground and excited states and Huang-Rhys factors (HRFs) are calculated by quantum mechanical methods and are compared with the experimental results. HRFs calculated by density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT reproduce the experiment adequately. This fluorescence-based method provides a unique and direct way to obtain the vibrational spectrum of a molecule in an electronic excited state and the HRFs, as well as the dynamics of excited states, and it might provide information on the structure of an excited state through the HRFs. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Identification and Partial Structural Characterization of Mass Isolated Valsartan and Its Metabolite with Messenger Tagging Vibrational Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorlova, Olga; Colvin, Sean M.; Brathwaite, Antonio; Menges, Fabian S.; Craig, Stephanie M.; Miller, Scott J.; Johnson, Mark A.

    2017-08-01

    Recent advances in the coupling of vibrational spectroscopy with mass spectrometry create new opportunities for the structural characterization of metabolites with great sensitivity. Previous studies have demonstrated this scheme on 300 K ions using very high power free electron lasers in the fingerprint region of the infrared. Here we extend the scope of this approach to a single investigator scale as well as extend the spectral range to include the OH stretching fundamentals. This is accomplished by detecting the IR absorptions in a linear action regime by photodissociation of weakly bound N2 molecules, which are attached to the target ions in a cryogenically cooled, rf ion trap. We consider the specific case of the widely used drug Valsartan and two isomeric forms of its metabolite. Advantages and challenges of the cold ion approach are discussed, including disentangling the role of conformers and the strategic choices involved in the selection of the charging mechanism that optimize spectral differentiation among candidate structural isomers. In this case, the Na+ complexes are observed to yield sharp resonances in the high frequency NH and OH stretching regions, which can be used to easily differentiate between two isomers of the metabolite. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  12. Catalyzed hydrogenation of nitrogen and ethylene on metal (Fe, Pt) single crystal surfaces and effects of coadsorption: A sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westerberg, Staffan Per Gustav [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2004-01-01

    High-pressure catalytic reactions and associated processes, such as adsorption have been studied on a molecular level on single crystal surfaces. Sum Frequency Generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy together with Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES), Temperature Programmed Desorption (TPD) and Gas Chromatography (GC) were used to investigate the nature of species on catalytic surfaces and to measure the catalytic reaction rates. Special attention has been directed at studying high-pressure reactions and in particular, ammonia synthesis in order to identify reaction intermediates and the influence of adsorbates on the surface during reaction conditions. The adsorption of gases N2, H2, O2 and NH3 that play a role in ammonia synthesis have been studied on the Fe(111) crystal surface by sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy using an integrated Ultra-High Vacuum (UHV)/high-pressure system. SFG spectra are presented for the dissociation intermediates, NH2 (~3325 cm-1) and NH (~3235 cm-1) under high pressure of ammonia (200 Torr) on the clean Fe(111) surface. Addition of 0.5 Torr of oxygen to 200 Torr of ammonia does not significantly change the bonding of dissociation intermediates to the surface. However, it leads to a phase change of nearly 180° between the resonant and non-resonant second order non-linear susceptibility of the surface, demonstrated by the reversal of the SFG spectral features. Heating the surface in the presence of 200 Torr ammonia and 0.5 Torr oxygen reduces the oxygen coverage, which can be seen from the SFG spectra as another relative phase change of 180°. The reduction of the oxide is also supported by Auger electron spectroscopy. The result suggests that the phase change of the spectral features could serve as a sensitive indicator of the chemical environment of the adsorbates.

  13. The adsorption of fluor-carbon complexes on GaAs(110) studied by electron energy loss spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Förster, A.; Spitzer, A.; Lüth, H.

    1986-06-01

    The room temperature adsorption of CF 3COOH, CH 3COOH and CO on cleaved GaAs(110) surfaces has been studied by vibrational electron energy loss spectroscopy (HRELS), second derivative electron energy spectroscopy (ELS) and electron diffraction (LEED). CO does not adsorb on the GaAs surfaces in measurable quantities. Acetic acid CH 3COOH is dissociatively adsorbed as an acetate bonded to Ga surface atoms with the split-off hydrogen on As surface atoms. The fluorated acid CF 3COOH decomposes via an acetate intermediate CF 3COO into active CF 3 groups which adsorb on Ga surface atoms. The split-off hydrogen sticks to surface As atoms while the generated CO 2 desorbs. The adsorption models are consistent with the LEED c(2×2) superstructure observed after saturated adsorption of both acids.

  14. Nanoscale chemical and mechanical characterization of thin films:sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy at buriedinterfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kweskin, Sasha Joseph [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Sum frequency generation (SFG) surface vibrational spectroscopy was used to characterize interfaces pertinent to current surface engineering applications, such as thin film polymers and novel catalysts. An array of advanced surface science techniques like scanning probe microscopy (SPM), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), gas chromatography (GC) and electron microscopy were used to obtain experimental measurements complementary to SFG data elucidating polymer and catalyst surface composition, surface structure, and surface mechanical behavior. Experiments reported in this dissertation concentrate on three fundamental questions: (1) How does the interfacial molecular structure differ from that of the bulk in real world applications? (2) How do differences in chemical environment affect interface composition or conformation? (3) How do these changes correlate to properties such as mechanical or catalytic performance? The density, surface energy and bonding at a solid interface dramatically alter the polymer configuration, physics and mechanical properties such as surface glass transition, adhesion and hardness. The enhanced sensitivity of SFG at the buried interface is applied to three systems: a series of acrylates under compression, the compositions and segregation behavior of binary polymer polyolefin blends, and the changes in surface structure of a hydrogel as a function of hydration. In addition, a catalytically active thin film of polymer coated nanoparticles is investigated to evaluate the efficacy of SFG to provide in situ information for catalytic reactions involving small mass adsorption and/or product development. Through the use of SFG, in situ total internal reflection (TIR) was used to increase the sensitivity of SFG and provide the necessary specificity to investigate interfaces of thin polymer films and nanostructures previously considered unfeasible. The dynamic nature of thin film surfaces is examined and it is found that the non

  15. Rate coefficients for dissociative attachment and resonant electron-impact dissociation involving vibrationally excited O{sub 2} molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laporta, V. [Istituto di Metodologie Inorganiche e dei Plasmi, CNR, Bari, Italy and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Celiberto, R. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile, Ambientale, del Territorio, Edile e di Chimica, Politecnico di Bari, Italy and Istituto di Metodologie Inorganiche e dei Plasmi, CNR, Bari (Italy); Tennyson, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2014-12-09

    Rate coefficients for dissociative electron attachment and electron-impact dissociation processes, involving vibrationally excited molecular oxygen, are presented. Analytical fits of the calculated numerical data, useful in the applications, are also provided.

  16. Multidimensional electron-nuclear wavepacket dynamics via Time-, Energy- and Angle-resolved Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veyrinas, K.; Makhija, V.; Boguslavskiy, A. E.; Forbes, R.; Wilkinson, I.; Moffatt, D.; Lausten, R.; Stolow, A.

    2017-04-01

    Generating and probing a coherent superposition of coupled vibrational-electronic (vibronic) states - a multidimensional wavepacket - remains a challenging problem in molecular dynamics. Here, we present recent results using time-resolved photoelectron velocity map imaging (VMI) of complex vibronic wavepacket dynamics in the NO molecule following femtosecond single photon excitation in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) range (λpump = 160 nm, 80 fs). The induced ultrafast dynamics, involving highly excited valence and Rydberg states, is probed by single photon ionization (λprobe = 400 nm, 40 fs). Varying the pump-probe time delay, the emitted photoelectrons are detected in a VMI spectrometer for time-, energy- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. We observe that the different final vibrational states of the NO+ (X 1Σ+) cation, onto which this evolving vibronic wavepacket is projected, reveal different time dependences for the kinetic energy distribution and the laboratory frame photoelectron angular distribution (LFPAD). In particular, we observe unusually strong oscillations in the β4 asymmetry parameter, indicating sensitivity to the higher angular momentum components of the electronic aspect of this complex vibronic wavepacket.

  17. Using consumer electronic devices to estimate whole-body vibration exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfgang, Rebecca; Burgess-Limerick, Robin

    2014-01-01

    The cost and complexity of commercially available devices for measuring whole-body vibration is a barrier to the systematic collection of the information required to manage this hazard at workplaces. The potential for a consumer electronic device to be used to estimate whole-body vibration was assessed by use of an accelerometer calibrator, and by collecting 42 simultaneous pairs of measurements from a fifth-generation iPod Touch and one of two gold standard vibration measurement devices (Svantech SV111 [Svantech, Warsaw, Poland] or Brüel & Kjær 4447 [Brüel & Kjær Sound & Vibration Measurement A/S, Nærum, Denmark]) while driving light vehicles on a variety of different roadway surfaces. While sampling rate limitations make the accelerometer data collected from the iPod Touch unsuitable for frequency analysis, the vibration amplitudes recorded are sufficiently accurate (errors less than 0.1 m/s(2)) to assist workplaces manage whole-body vibration exposures.

  18. Bibliography on electron collisions with molecules: rotational and vibrational excitations, 1980-2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itikawa, Yukikazu [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2001-04-01

    A list of papers reporting cross sections for electron-impact excitations of rotational and vibrational states of molecules is presented. The list includes both the theoretical and the experimental papers published in 1980-2000. An index by molecular species is provided at the end of the bibliography. (author)

  19. Vibrational excitation resulting from electron capture in LUMO of F 2 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 124; Issue 1. Vibrational excitation resulting from electron capture in LUMO of F2 and HCl - A treatment using the time-dependent wave packet approach. Bhavesh K Shandilya Manabendra Sarma Satrajit Adhikari Manoj K Mishra. Volume 124 Issue 1 January 2012 ...

  20. Ultrafast dynamics in iron tetracarbonyl olefin complexes investigated with two-dimensional vibrational spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panman, Matthijs R; Newton, Arthur C; Vos, Jannie; van den Bosch, Bart; Bocokić, Vladica; Reek, Joost N H; Woutersen, Sander

    2013-01-28

    The dynamics of iron tetracarbonyl olefin complexes has been investigated using two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy. Cross peaks between all CO-stretching bands show that the CO-stretch modes are coupled, and from the cross-peak anisotropies we can confirm previous assignments of the absorption bands. From the pump-probe delay dependence of the diagonal peaks in the 2D-IR spectrum we obtain a correlation time of ∼3 ps for the spectral fluctuations of the CO-stretch modes. We observe a multi-exponential pump-probe delay dependence of the cross-peak intensities, with rate constants ranging from 0.1 ps(-1) to 0.6 ps(-1). To determine whether this delay dependence originates from fluxionality of the complex or from intramolecular vibrational relaxation (IVR), we modulate the free-energy barrier of fluxional rearrangement by varying the pi-backbonding capacities of the olefin ligand in two iron tetracarbonyl olefin complexes: Fe(CO)(4)(cinnamic acid) and Fe(CO)(4)(dimethyl fumarate). Since the pi-backbonding strongly influences the rate of fluxionality, comparing the dynamics in the two complexes allows us to determine to what extent the observed dynamics is caused by fluxionality. We conclude that on the time scale of our experiments (up to 100 ps) the cross-peak dynamics in the iron complexes is determined by intramolecular vibrational energy relaxation. Hence, in contrast to previously investigated irontricarbonyl and ironpentacarbonyl complexes, iron tetracarbonyl olefin complexes exhibit no fluxionality on the picosecond time scale.

  1. A study of the eigenvectors of the low-frequency vibrational modes in crystalline adenosine via high pressure Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Scott A; Pinnick, David A; Anderson, A

    2014-12-01

    High-pressure Raman spectroscopy has been used to study the eigenvectors and eigenvalues of the vibrational modes of crystalline adenosine at 295 K by evaluating the logarithmic derivative of the vibrational frequency with respect to pressure: [Formula: see text]. Crystalline samples of molecular materials such as adenosine will have vibrational modes that are localized within a molecular unit ("internal" modes) as well as modes in which the molecular units vibrate against each other ("external" modes). The value of the logarithmic derivative is found to be a diagnostic probe of the nature of the eigenvector of the vibrational modes. Stretching modes which are predominantly internal to the molecule have low logarithmic derivatives while external modes have higher logarithmic derivatives. Particular interest is paid to the low-frequency (≤150 cm(-1)) modes. Based on the pressure dependence of its logarithmic derivative, a mode near 49 cm(-1) is identified as internal mode. The other modes below 400 cm(-1) have pressure dependences of their logarithmic derivatives consistent with being either (1) modes which are mainly external, meaning that the molecules of the unit cell vibrate against each other in translational or librational motions (or linear combinations thereof), or (2) torsional or bending modes involving a large number of atoms, mainly within a molecule. The modes above 400 cm(-1) all have pressure dependences of their logarithmic derivatives consistent with being mainly internal modes.

  2. A study of the eigenvectors of the vibrational modes in crystalline cytidine via high-pressure Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Scott A; Pinnick, David A; Anderson, A

    2015-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy has been used to study the eigenvectors and eigenvalues of the vibrational modes of crystalline cytidine at 295 K and high pressures by evaluating the logarithmic derivative of the vibrational frequency ω with respect to pressure P: [Formula: see text]. Crystalline samples of molecular materials have strong intramolecular bonds and weak intermolecular bonds. This hierarchy of bonding strengths causes the vibrational optical modes localized within a molecular unit ("internal" modes) to be relatively high in frequency while the modes in which the molecular units vibrate against each other ("external" modes) have relatively low frequencies. The value of the logarithmic derivative is a useful diagnostic probe of the nature of the eigenvector of the vibrational modes because stretching modes (which are predominantly internal to the molecule) have low logarithmic derivatives while external modes have higher logarithmic derivatives. In crystalline cytidine, the modes at 85.8, 101.4, and 110.6 cm(-1) are external in which the molecules of the unit cell vibrate against each other in either translational or librational motions (or some linear combination thereof). All of the modes above 320 cm(-1) are predominantly internal stretching modes. The remaining modes below 320 cm(-1) include external modes and internal modes, mostly involving either torsional or bending motions of groups of atoms within a molecule.

  3. Use of vibrational spectroscopy to study protein and DNA structure, hydration, and binding of biomolecules: A combined theoretical and experimental approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalkanen, K. J.; Jürgensen, V. Würtz; Claussen, A.; Rahim, A.; Jensen, G. M.; Wade, R. C.; Nardi, F.; Jung, C.; Degtyarenko, I. M.; Nieminen, R. M.; Herrmann, F.; Knapp-Mohammady, M.; Niehaus, T. A.; Frimand, K.; Suhai, S.

    We report on our work with vibrational absorption, vibrational circular dichroism, Raman scattering, Raman optical activity, and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy to study protein and DNA structure, hydration, and the binding of ligands, drugs, pesticides, or herbicides via a combined theoretical and experimental approach. The systems we have studied systematically are the amino acids (L-alanine, L-tryptophan, and L-histidine), peptides (N-4271 acetyl L-alanine N?-methyl amide, N-acetyl L-tryptophan N?-methyl amide, N-acetyl L-histidine N?-methyl amide, L-alanyl L-alanine, tri-L-serine, N-acetyl L-alanine L-proline L-tyrosine N?-methyl amide, Leu-enkephalin, cyclo-(gly-L-pro)3, N-acetyl (L-alanine)n N?-methyl amide), 3-methyl indole, and a variety of small molecules (dichlobenil and 2,6-dochlorobenzamide) of relevance to the protein systems under study. We have used molecular mechanics, the SCC-DFTB, SCC-DFTB+disp, RHF, MP2, and DFT methodologies for the modeling studies with the goal of interpreting the experimentally measured vibrational spectra for these molecules to the greatest extent possible and to use this combined approach to understand the structure, function, and electronic properties of these molecules in their various environments. The application of these spectroscopies to biophysical and environmental assays is expanding, and therefore a thorough understanding of the phenomenon from a rigorous theoretical basis is required. In addition, we give some exciting and new preliminary results which allow us to extend our methods to even larger and more complex systems. The work presented here is the current state of the art to this ever and fast changing field of theoretical spectroscopic interpretation and use of VA, VCD, Raman, ROA, EA, and ECD spectroscopies.

  4. Vinylphosphine-borane: synthesis, gas phase infrared spectroscopy, and quantum chemical vibrational calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khater, Brahim; Guillemin, Jean-Claude; Benidar, Abdessamad; Bégué, Didier; Pouchan, Claude

    2008-12-14

    Both experimental and theoretical investigations are reported on the infrared spectrum of vinylphosphine-borane (CH(2)=CHPH(2) x BH(3)), a donor-acceptor complex. The gas phase infrared spectra (3500-600 cm(-1)) have been recorded at 0.5 cm(-1) resolution. This first primary alpha,beta-unsaturated phosphine-borane synthesized up to now is kinetically very unstable in the gas phase and decomposes rapidly into two fragments: the free vinylphosphine CH(2)=CHPH(2) and the monoborane BH(3) which dimerizes to form the more stable diborane B(2)H(6). Spectra of free CH(2)=CHPH(2) and B(2)H(6) compounds were also recorded to assign some vibration modes of the complex in very dense spectral regions. The analysis was completed by carrying out quantum mechanical calculations by density functional theory method at the B3LYP/6-31+G(**) level. Anharmonic frequencies and infrared intensities of the two predicted gauche and syn conformers of the vinylphosphine-borane complex were calculated in the 3500-100 cm(-1) region with the use of a variational approach, implemented in the P_ANHAR_V1.2 code. Because of the relatively weak interaction between the vinylphosphine and the monoborane, the vibrations of the complex can easily be subdivided into modes localized in the CH(2)=CHPH(2) and BH(3) moieties and into "intermolecular" modes. Localized modes are unambiguously correlated with the modes of the isolated monomers. Therefore, they are described in terms of the monomer vibrations, and the complexation shifts are defined as Delta nu = nu(complex) - nu(monomer) to make the effect of the complexation precise on each localized mode. In this objective, anharmonic frequencies and infrared intensities of the BH(3) monomer and the stable gauche and syn conformers of the free vinylphosphine were obtained at the same level of theory. In the gas phase, only the syn form of the complex was observed and assigned. All theoretically predicted frequencies and complexation shifts in magnitude and

  5. A New Vibration Measurement Procedure for On-Line Quality Control of Electronic Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gian Marco Revel

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the problem of experimentally testing the mechanical reliability of electronic components for quality control is approached. In general, many tests are performed on electronic devices (personal computers, power supply units, lamps, etc., according to the relevant international standards (IEC, in order to verify their resistance to shock and vibrations, but these are mainly “go no-go” experiments, performed on few samples taken from the production batches.

  6. On the electronic configuration in Pu: spectroscopy and theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobin, J G; Soderlind, P; Landa, A; Moore, K T; Schwartz, A J; Chung, B W; Wall, M; Wills, J M; Eriksson, O; Haire, R; Kutepov, A L

    2006-10-11

    Photoelectron spectroscopy, synchrotron-radiation-based x-ray absorption, electron energy-loss spectroscopy, and density-functional calculations within the mixed-level and magnetic models, together with canonical band theory have been used to study the electron configuration in Pu. These methods suggest a 5f{sup n} configuration for Pu of 5 {le} n < 6, with n {ne} 6, contrary to what has recently been suggested in several publications. We show that the n = 6 picture is inconsistent with the usual interpretation of photoemission and x-ray absorption spectra. Instead, these spectra support the traditional conjecture of a 5f{sup 5} configuration in Pu as is obtained by density-functional theory. We further argue, based on 5f-band filling, that an n = 6 hypothesis is incompatible with the position of Pu in the actinide series and its monoclinic ground-state phase.

  7. Ultrafast vibrational energy transfer at the water/air interface revealed by two-dimensional surface vibrational spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Z.; Piatkowski, L.; Bakker, H.J.; Bonn, M.

    2011-01-01

    Water is very different from liquids of similar molecular weight, and one of its unique properties is the very efficient transfer of vibrational energy between molecules, which arises as a result of strong dipole-dipole interactions between the O-H oscillators. Although we have a sound understanding

  8. Possible interaction between thermal electrons and vibrationally excited N2 in the lower E-region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.-I. Oyama

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available As one of the tasks to find the energy source(s of thermal electrons, which elevate(s electron temperature higher than neutral temperature in the lower ionosphere E-region, energy distribution function of thermal electron was measured with a sounding rocket at the heights of 93–131 km by the applying second harmonic method. The energy distribution function showed a clear hump at the energy of ~0.4 eV. In order to find the reason of the hump, we conducted laboratory experiment. We studied difference of the energy distribution functions of electrons in thermal energy range, which were measured with and without EUV radiation to plasma of N2/Ar and N2/O2 gas mixture respectively. For N2/Ar gas mixture plasma, the hump is not clearly identified in the energy distribution of thermal electrons. On the other hand for N2/O2 gas mixture, which contains vibrationally excited N2, a clear hump is found when irradiated by EUV. The laboratory experiment seems to suggest that the hump is produced as a result of interaction between vibrationally excited N2 and thermal electrons, and this interaction is the most probable heating source for the electrons of thermal energy range in the lower E-region. It is also suggested that energy distribution of the electrons in high energy part may not be Maxwellian, and DC probe measures the electrons which are non Maxwellian, and therefore "electron temperature" is calculated higher.

  9. Molecular shock response of explosives: electronic absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mcgrne, Shawn D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Moore, David S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Whitley, Von H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bolme, Cindy A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Eakins, Daniel E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Electronic absorption spectroscopy in the range 400-800 nm was coupled to ultrafast laser generated shocks to begin addressing the question of the extent to which electronic excitations are involved in shock induced reactions. Data are presented on shocked polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) thin films and single crystal pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN). Shocked PMMA exhibited thin film interference effects from the shock front. Shocked PETN exhibited interference from the shock front as well as broadband increased absorption. Relation to shock initiation hypotheses and the need for time dependent absorption data (future experiments) is briefly discussed.

  10. Probing battery chemistry with liquid cell electron energy loss spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unocic, Raymond R; Baggetto, Loïc; Veith, Gabriel M; Aguiar, Jeffery A; Unocic, Kinga A; Sacci, Robert L; Dudney, Nancy J; More, Karren L

    2015-11-25

    We demonstrate the ability to apply electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) to follow the chemistry and oxidation states of LiMn2O4 and Li4Ti5O12 battery electrodes within a battery solvent. This is significant as the use and importance of in situ electrochemical cells coupled with a scanning/transmission electron microscope (S/TEM) has expanded and been applied to follow changes in battery chemistry during electrochemical cycling. We discuss experimental parameters that influence measurement sensitivity and provide a framework to apply this important analytical method to future in situ electrochemical studies.

  11. In-beam conversion-electron spectroscopy of 180Hg

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, R. D.; Andreyev, A. N.; Wiseman, D. R.; Butler, P. A.; Grahn, T.; Greenlees, P. T.; Herzberg, R.-D.; Huyse, M.; Jones, G. D.; Jones, P. M.; Joss, D. T.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Kankaanpää, H.; Keenan, A.; Kettunen, H.; Kuusiniemi, P.; Leino, M.; Muikku, M.; Nieminen, P.; Rahkila, P.; Rainovski, G. I.; Scholey, C.; Uusitalo, J.; van de Vel, K.; van Duppen, P.

    2011-09-01

    Excited states in 180Hg were populated using the 147Sm(36Ar,3n)180Hg reaction and studied by in-beam conversion-electron spectroscopy. Conversion electrons emitted at the target position were measured using the Silicon Array for Conversion Electron Detection (SACRED) spectrometer and tagged through the characteristic α decays of 180Hg detected in a position-sensitive silicon strip detector located at the focal plane of the gas-filled recoil separator Recoil Ion Transport Unit (RITU). Electron conversion of transitions previously assigned to 180Hg through in-beam γ-ray spectroscopy studies was identified up to the 10+→8+ transition and the intensities of the conversion-electron transitions were found to be consistent with the previous multipolarity assignments. Evidence was also found for two highly converted transitions in 180Hg: a 167 keV transition is interpreted as the transition from the newly identified 22+ state at 601 keV to the 21+ state at 434 keV, while a 420 keV transition is assigned as the E0 decay from the 0+ bandhead of the prolate-deformed configuration to the weakly deformed ground state.

  12. Probing the local environment of a single OPE3 molecule using inelastic tunneling electron spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Frisenda

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We study single-molecule oligo(phenylene ethynylenedithiol junctions by means of inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS. The molecule is contacted with gold nano-electrodes formed with the mechanically controllable break junction technique. We record the IETS spectrum of the molecule from direct current measurements, both as a function of time and electrode separation. We find that for fixed electrode separation the molecule switches between various configurations, which are characterized by different IETS spectra. Similar variations in the IETS signal are observed during atomic rearrangements upon stretching of the molecular junction. Using quantum chemistry calculations, we identity some of the vibrational modes which constitute a chemical fingerprint of the molecule. In addition, changes can be attributed to rearrangements of the local molecular environment, in particular at the molecule–electrode interface. This study shows the importance of taking into account the interaction with the electrodes when describing inelastic contributions to transport through single-molecule junctions.

  13. Probing the local environment of a single OPE3 molecule using inelastic tunneling electron spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisenda, Riccardo; Perrin, Mickael L; van der Zant, Herre S J

    2015-01-01

    We study single-molecule oligo(phenylene ethynylene)dithiol junctions by means of inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS). The molecule is contacted with gold nano-electrodes formed with the mechanically controllable break junction technique. We record the IETS spectrum of the molecule from direct current measurements, both as a function of time and electrode separation. We find that for fixed electrode separation the molecule switches between various configurations, which are characterized by different IETS spectra. Similar variations in the IETS signal are observed during atomic rearrangements upon stretching of the molecular junction. Using quantum chemistry calculations, we identity some of the vibrational modes which constitute a chemical fingerprint of the molecule. In addition, changes can be attributed to rearrangements of the local molecular environment, in particular at the molecule-electrode interface. This study shows the importance of taking into account the interaction with the electrodes when describing inelastic contributions to transport through single-molecule junctions.

  14. Vibrational spectroscopy and analysis of pseudo-tetrahedral complexes with metal imido bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehn, Mark P; Brown, Steven D; Jenkins, David M; Peters, Jonas C; Que, Lawrence

    2006-09-04

    electronic structure model in which the added electron resides in a relatively nonbonding orbital. Replacement of the tBu group with a phenyl ring leads to a significantly more complicated resonance Raman spectrum, presumably due to coupling with the vibrations of the phenyl ring. Polarization studies demonstrate that the observed modes have A(1) symmetry. In this case, a clearer resonance enhancement of the signals is observed, supporting a charge transfer designation for the electronic transitions. A series of isotope-labeling experiments has been carried out, and the modes with the greatest metal-nitrogen stretching character have been assigned to peaks at approximately 960 and approximately 1300 cm(-1) in both the iron and cobalt [PhBP3]MNPh complexes. These results are consistent with a multiple M-N bond for these metal imides.

  15. Electronic speckle pattern shearing interferometry using photopolymer diffractive optical elements for vibration measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihaylova, Emilia M.; Naydenova, Izabela; Martin, Suzanne; Toal, Vincent

    2004-06-01

    Electronic speckle pattern shearing interferometry (ESPSI) is superior to Electronic speckle pattern interferometry (ESPI) when strain distribution, arising from object deformation or vibration, need to be measured. This is because shearography provides data directly related to the spatial derivatives of the displacement. Further development of ESPSI systems could be beneficial for wider application to the measurement of mechanical characteristics of vibrating objects. Two electronic speckle pattern shearing interferometers (ESPSI) suitable for vibration measurements are presented. In both ESPSI systems photopolymer holographic gratings are used to shear the images and to control the size of the shear. The holographic gratings are recorded using an acrylamide-based photopolymer material. Since the polymerization process occurs during recording, the holograms are produced without any development or processing. The ESPSI systems with photopolymer holographic gratings are simple and compact. Introducing photopolymer holographic gratings in ESPSI gives the advantage of using high aperture optical elements at relatively low cost. It is demonstrated that both ESPSI system can be used for vibration measurements. The results obtained are promising for future applications of the systems for modal analysis.

  16. Translational, rotational, vibrational and electron temperatures of a gliding arc discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jiajian; Ehn, Andreas; Gao, Jinlong; Kong, Chengdong; Aldén, Marcus; Salewski, Mirko; Leipold, Frank; Kusano, Yukihiro; Li, Zhongshan

    2017-08-21

    Translational, rotational, vibrational and electron temperatures of a gliding arc discharge in atmospheric pressure air were experimentally investigated using in situ, non-intrusive optical diagnostic techniques. The gliding arc discharge was driven by a 35 kHz alternating current (AC) power source and operated in a glow-type regime. The two-dimensional distribution of the translational temperature (Tt) of the gliding arc discharge was determined using planar laser-induced Rayleigh scattering. The rotational and vibrational temperatures were obtained by simulating the experimental spectra. The OH A-X (0, 0) band was used to simulate the rotational temperature (Tr) of the gliding arc discharge whereas the NO A-X (1, 0) and (0, 1) bands were used to determine its vibrational temperature (Tv). The instantaneous reduced electric field strength E/N was obtained by simultaneously measuring the instantaneous length of the plasma column, the discharge voltage and the translational temperature, from which the electron temperature (Te) of the gliding arc discharge was estimated. The uncertainties of the translational, rotational, vibrational and electron temperatures were analyzed. The relations of these four different temperatures (Te>Tv>Tr >Tt) suggest a high-degree non-equilibrium state of the gliding arc discharge.

  17. Enhanced vibrational spectroscopy, intracellular refractive indexing for label-free biosensing and bioimaging by multiband plasmonic-antenna array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cheng-Kuang; Chang, Ming-Hsuan; Wu, Hsieh-Ting; Lee, Yao-Chang; Yen, Ta-Jen

    2014-10-15

    In this study, we report a multiband plasmonic-antenna array that bridges optical biosensing and intracellular bioimaging without requiring a labeling process or coupler. First, a compact plasmonic-antenna array is designed exhibiting a bandwidth of several octaves for use in both multi-band plasmonic resonance-enhanced vibrational spectroscopy and refractive index probing. Second, a single-element plasmonic antenna can be used as a multifunctional sensing pixel that enables mapping the distribution of targets in thin films and biological specimens by enhancing the signals of vibrational signatures and sensing the refractive index contrast. Finally, using the fabricated plasmonic-antenna array yielded reliable intracellular observation was demonstrated from the vibrational signatures and intracellular refractive index contrast requiring neither labeling nor a coupler. These unique features enable the plasmonic-antenna array to function in a label-free manner, facilitating bio-sensing and imaging development. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Ultrafast Relaxation Dynamics of Photoexcited Heme Model Compounds: Observation of Multiple Electronic Spin States and Vibrational Cooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govind, Chinju; Karunakaran, Venugopal

    2017-04-13

    Hemin is a unique model compound of heme proteins carrying out variable biological functions. Here, the excited state relaxation dynamics of heme model compounds in the ferric form are systematically investigated by changing the axial ligand (Cl/Br), the peripheral substituent (vinyl/ethyl-meso), and the solvent (methanol/DMSO) using femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy upon excitation at 380 nm. The relaxation time constants of these model compounds are obtained by global analysis. Excited state deactivation pathway of the model compounds comprising the decay of the porphyrin excited state (S*) to ligand to metal charge transfer state (LMCT, τ 1 ), back electron transfer from metal to ligand (MLCT, τ 2 ), and relaxation to the ground state through different electronic spin states of iron (τ 3 and τ 4 ) are proposed along with the vibrational cooling processes. This is based on the excited state absorption spectral evolution, similarities between the transient absorption spectra of the ferric form and steady state absorption spectra of the low-spin ferrous form, and the data analysis. The observation of an increase of all the relaxation time constants in DMSO compared to the methanol reflects the stabilization of intermediate states involved in the electronic relaxation. The transient absorption spectra of met-myoglobin are also measured for comparison. Thus, the transient absorption spectra of these model compounds reveal the involvement of multiple iron spin states in the electronic relaxation dynamics, which could be an alternative pathway to the ground state beside the vibrational cooling processes and associated with the inherent features of the heme b type.

  19. Multi-channel electronic and vibrational dynamics in polyatomic resonant high-order harmonic generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferré, A.; Boguslavskiy, A. E.; Dagan, M.; Blanchet, V.; Bruner, B. D.; Burgy, F.; Camper, A.; Descamps, D.; Fabre, B.; Fedorov, N.; Gaudin, J.; Geoffroy, G.; Mikosch, J.; Patchkovskii, S.; Petit, S.; Ruchon, T.; Soifer, H.; Staedter, D.; Wilkinson, I.; Stolow, A.; Dudovich, N.; Mairesse, Y.

    2015-01-01

    High-order harmonic generation in polyatomic molecules generally involves multiple channels of ionization. Their relative contribution can be strongly influenced by the presence of resonances, whose assignment remains a major challenge for high-harmonic spectroscopy. Here we present a multi-modal approach for the investigation of unaligned polyatomic molecules, using SF6 as an example. We combine methods from extreme-ultraviolet spectroscopy, above-threshold ionization and attosecond metrology. Fragment-resolved above-threshold ionization measurements reveal that strong-field ionization opens at least three channels. A shape resonance in one of them is found to dominate the signal in the 20–26 eV range. This resonance induces a phase jump in the harmonic emission, a switch in the polarization state and different dynamical responses to molecular vibrations. This study demonstrates a method for extending high-harmonic spectroscopy to polyatomic molecules, where complex attosecond dynamics are expected. PMID:25608712

  20. Femtosecond electron spectroscopy in an electron microscope with high brightness beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Faran; Williams, Joseph; Ruan, Chong-Yu

    2017-09-01

    A concept of performing femtosecond electron spectroscopy in an electron microscope with adaptive optics to handle space-charge-dominated beams is presented. Improved temporal-spectral resolutions are obtained through a combination of time and energy compression optics to disentangle the spectral information buried in temporally compressed pulses. A combined ∼1 eV-sub-ps performance with 105 electrons in single pulses, and femtosecond core-level spectroscopy at single-shots with higher doses are demonstrated. This strategy provides several orders of magnitude improvement in sensitivity compared to the state-of-the-art ultrafast electron microscopes, representing a flexible solution for studying electronic and chemical dynamics in complex systems overcoming the collective space-charge limitations.

  1. Excitation of vibrational quanta in furfural by intermediate-energy electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, D. B. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, South Australia 5001 (Australia); Neves, R. F. C. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, South Australia 5001 (Australia); Instituto Federal do Sul de Minas Gerais, Campus Poços de Caldas, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, 36036-900, Juiz de Fora, MG (Brazil); Lopes, M. C. A. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, 36036-900, Juiz de Fora, MG (Brazil); Costa, R. F. da [Instituto de Física “Gleb Wataghin,” Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas, 13083-859 São Paulo (Brazil); Centro de Ciências Naturais e Humanas, Universidade Federal do ABC, Santo André, 09210-580 São Paulo (Brazil); Varella, M. T. do N. [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, CP 66318, 05315-970 São Paulo, São Paulo (Brazil); Bettega, M. H. F. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Paraná, CP 19044, 81531-990 Curitiba, Paraná (Brazil); Lima, M. A. P. [Instituto de Física “Gleb Wataghin,” Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas, 13083-859 São Paulo (Brazil); García, G. [Instituto de Física Fundamental, CSIC, Serrano 113-bis, 28006 Madrid (Spain); and others

    2015-12-14

    We report cross sections for electron-impact excitation of vibrational quanta in furfural, at intermediate incident electron energies (20, 30, and 40 eV). The present differential cross sections are measured over the scattered electron angular range 10°–90°, with corresponding integral cross sections subsequently being determined. Furfural is a viable plant-derived alternative to petrochemicals, being produced via low-temperature plasma treatment of biomass. Current yields, however, need to be significantly improved, possibly through modelling, with the present cross sections being an important component of such simulations. To the best of our knowledge, there are no other cross sections for vibrational excitation of furfural available in the literature, so the present data are valuable for this important molecule.

  2. Terahertz Spectroscopy and Global Analysis of the Bending Vibrations of Acetylene 12C2D2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shanshan; Drouin, Brian J.; Pearson, John C.; Pickett, Herbert M.; Lattanzi, Valerio; Walters, Adam

    2009-06-01

    Two hundred and fifty-one 12C2D2 transitions have been measured in the 0.2-1.6 THz region of its ν5-ν4 difference band and 202 of them were observed for the first time. The accuracy of these measurements is estimated to be ranging from 50 kHz to 100 kHz. The 12C2D2 molecules were generated under room temperature by passing 120-150 mTorr D2O vapor through calcium carbide (CaC2) powder. A multistate analysis was carried out for the bending vibrational modes ν4 and ν5 of 12C2D2, which includes the lines observed in this work and prior microwave, far-infrared and infrared data on the pure bending levels. Significantly improved molecular parameters were obtained for 12C2D2 by adding the new measurements to the old data set, which had only 10 lines with microwave measurement precision. New frequency and intensity predictions have been made based on the obtained molecular parameters. The more precise measurements and new predictions reported here will support the analyses of astronomical observations by the future high-resolution spectroscopy telescopes such as Herschel, SOFIA, and ALMA, which will work in the terahertz spectral region.

  3. Localised vibrational mode spectroscopy studies of self-interstitial clusters in neutron irradiated silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Londos, C. A.; Antonaras, G. [University of Athens, Solid State Physics Section, Panepistimiopolis Zografos, Athens 157 84 (Greece); Chroneos, A. [Materials Engineering, The Open University, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Department of Materials, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-28

    The evolution of self-interstitial clusters in silicon (Si), produced by fast neutron irradiation of silicon crystals followed by anneals up to 750 °C, is investigated using localised vibrational mode spectroscopy. A band at 582 cm{sup −1} appears after irradiation and is stable up to 550 °C was attributed to small self-interstitial clusters (I{sub n}, n ≤ 4), with the most probable candidate the I{sub 4} structure. Two bands at 713 and 758 cm{sup −1} arising in the spectra upon annealing of the 582 cm{sup −1} band and surviving up to ∼750 °C were correlated with larger interstitial clusters (I{sub n}, 5 ≤ n ≤ 8), with the most probable candidate the I{sub 8} structure or/and with chainlike defects which are precursors of the (311) extended defects. The results illustrate the presence of different interstitial clusters I{sub n}, at the various temperature intervals of the material, in the course of an isochronal anneal sequence. As the annealing temperature increases, they evolve from first-order structures with a small number of self-interstitials (I{sub n}, n ≤ 4) for the temperatures 50 < T < 550 °C, to second order structures (I{sub n}, 5 ≤ n ≤ 8) with a larger number of interstitials, for the temperatures 550 < T < 750 °C.

  4. The chemistry of ethylene and hydrogen on Pt(111) monitored with surface vibrational spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cremer, P.; Shen, Y.R.; Somorjai, G.A. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1995-12-01

    Both the hydrogenation and dehydrogenation of ethylene have been studied using infrared-visible sum frequency generation (SFG), a surface vibrational spectroscopy, on the Pt(111) single crystal surface in the v(CH) range. It was found that the dehydrogenation of ethylene to ethylidyne proceeds through an ethylidene (or ethyl) intermediate. The same intermediate was also found to be present in the conversion of both surface vinyl groups and acetylene to ethylidyne. The hydrogenation of ethylene to ethane was examined in situ using SFG over 10 orders of magnitude in pressure. It was found that di-sigma bonded ethylene was readily hydrogenated in UHV at low temperature. Further, di-sigma bonded ethylene was the only species beside ethylidyne found to be present on the Pt(111) surface under conditions of a few Torr of both ethylene and hydrogen at 300K. The surface concentration of di-sigma bonded ethylene on Pt(111) was about 5% of a monolayer under the high pressure conditions.

  5. Energy calibration issues in nuclear resonant vibrational spectroscopy: observing small spectral shifts and making fast calibrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongxin; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Dong, Weibing; Huang, Songping D

    2013-09-01

    The conventional energy calibration for nuclear resonant vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) is usually long. Meanwhile, taking NRVS samples out of the cryostat increases the chance of sample damage, which makes it impossible to carry out an energy calibration during one NRVS measurement. In this study, by manipulating the 14.4 keV beam through the main measurement chamber without moving out the NRVS sample, two alternative calibration procedures have been proposed and established: (i) an in situ calibration procedure, which measures the main NRVS sample at stage A and the calibration sample at stage B simultaneously, and calibrates the energies for observing extremely small spectral shifts; for example, the 0.3 meV energy shift between the 100%-(57)Fe-enriched [Fe4S4Cl4](=) and 10%-(57)Fe and 90%-(54)Fe labeled [Fe4S4Cl4](=) has been well resolved; (ii) a quick-switching energy calibration procedure, which reduces each calibration time from 3-4 h to about 30 min. Although the quick-switching calibration is not in situ, it is suitable for normal NRVS measurements.

  6. Crystal growth, crystal structure, vibrational spectroscopy, linear and nonlinear optical properties of guanidinium phosphates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Němec, Ivan; Matulková, Irena; Held, Peter; Kroupa, Jan; Němec, Petr; Li, Dongxu; Bohatý, Ladislav; Becker, Petra

    2017-07-01

    Of the three guanidinium phosphates GuH2PO4 (space group P21/c), Gu2HPO4·H2O (space group P 4 bar 21 c) and Gu3PO4· 3/2 H2O (space group Cc) crystal structures and a vibrational spectroscopy study are presented. Large single crystals of GuH2PO4 and Gu2HPO4·H2O are grown. Refractive indices and their dispersion in the wavelength range 365 nm - 1083 nm are determined and used for the analysis of phase matching conditions for collinear SHG in the case of the non-centrosymmetric crystals of Gu2HPO4·H2O. The crystals are not phase-matchable within their transmission range. Both independent components of the SHG tensor of Gu2HPO4·H2O, determined by the Maker fringe method, are given, with d14 = 0.23 pm/V and d36 = 0.22 pm/V. In addition, the thermal stability and the anisotropy of thermal expansion of GuH2PO4 and Gu2HPO4·H2O is reported.

  7. Structure and Dynamics of Urea/Water Mixtures Investigated by Vibrational Spectroscopy and Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, J. K.; Buchanan, L. E.; Schmidt, J. R.; Zanni, M. T.; Skinner, J. L.

    2013-01-01

    Urea/water is an archetypical “biological” mixture, and is especially well known for its relevance to protein thermodynamics, as urea acts as a protein denaturant at high concentration. This behavior has given rise to an extended debate concerning urea’s influence on water structure. Based on a variety of methods and of definitions of water structure, urea has been variously described as a structure-breaker, a structure-maker, or as remarkably neutral towards water. Because of its sensitivity to microscopic structure and dynamics, vibrational spectroscopy can help resolve these debates. We report experimental and theoretical spectroscopic results for the OD stretch of HOD/H2O/urea mixtures (linear IR, 2DIR, and pump-probe anisotropy decay) and for the CO stretch of urea-D4/D2O mixtures (linear IR only). Theoretical results are obtained using existing approaches for water, and a modification of a frequency map developed for acetamide. All absorption spectra are remarkably insensitive to urea concentration, consistent with the idea that urea only very weakly perturbs water structure. Both this work and experiments by Rezus and Bakker, however, show that water’s rotational dynamics are slowed down by urea. Analysis of the simulations casts doubt on the suggestion that urea immobilizes particular doubly hydrogen bonded water molecules. PMID:23841646

  8. Translational, rotational, vibrational and electron temperatures of a gliding arc discharge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Jiajian; Ehn, Andreas; Gao, Jinlong

    2017-01-01

    Translational, rotational, vibrational and electron temperatures of a gliding arc discharge in atmospheric pressure air were experimentally investigated using in situ, non-intrusive optical diagnostic techniques. The gliding arc discharge was driven by a 35 kHz alternating current (AC) power source...... and operated in a glow-type regime. The two-dimensional distribution of the translational temperature (Tt) of the gliding arc discharge was determined using planar laser-induced Rayleigh scattering. The rotational and vibrational temperatures were obtained by simulating the experimental spectra. The OH A–X (0......, 0) band was used to simulate the rotational temperature (Tr) of the gliding arc discharge whereas the NO A–X (1, 0) and (0, 1) bands were used to determine its vibrational temperature (Tv). The instantaneous reduced electric field strength E/N was obtained by simultaneously measuring...

  9. Femtosecond MeV Electron Energy-Loss Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, R. K.; Wang, X. J.

    2017-11-01

    Pump-probe electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) with femtosecond temporal resolution will be a transformative research tool for studying nonequilibrium chemistry and electronic dynamics of matter. In this paper, we propose a concept of femtosecond EELS utilizing mega-electron-volt electron beams from a radio-frequency (rf) photocathode source. The high acceleration gradient and high beam energy of the rf gun are critical to the generation of 10-fs electron beams, which enables an improvement of the temporal resolution by more than 1 order of magnitude beyond the state of the art. In our proposal, the "reference-beam technique" relaxes the energy stability requirement of the rf power source by roughly 2 orders of magnitude. The requirements for the electron-beam quality, photocathode, spectrometer, and detector are also discussed. Supported by particle-tracking simulations, we demonstrate the feasibility of achieving sub-electron-volt energy resolution and approximately 10-fs temporal resolution with existing or near-future hardware performance.

  10. Two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy of anharmonic molecular potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anda, André; Abramavičius, Darius; Hansen, Thorsten

    2018-01-17

    Two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2DES) is a powerful tool in the study of coupled electron-phonon dynamics, yet very little is known about how nonlinearities in the electron-phonon coupling, arising from anharmonicities in the nuclear potentials, affect the spectra. These become especially relevant when the coupling is strong. From the linear spectroscopies, anharmonicities are known to give structure to the zero-phonon line and to break mirror-symmetry between absorption and emission, but the 2D analogues of these effects have not been identified. Using a simple two-level model where the electronic states are described by (displaced) harmonic oscillators with differing curvatures or displaced Morse oscillators, we find that the zero-phonon line shape is essentially transferred to the diagonal in 2DES spectra, and that anharmonicities break a horizontal mirror-symmetry in the infinite waiting time limit. We also identify anharmonic effects that are only present in 2DES spectra: twisting of cross-peaks stemming from stimulated emission signals; and oscillation period mismatch between ground state bleach and stimulated emission (for harmonic oscillators with differing curvatures), or inherently chaotic oscillations (for Morse oscillators). Our findings will facilitate an improved understanding of 2DES spectra and aid the interpretation of signals that are more realistic than those arising from simple models.

  11. Study of calcification formation and disease diagnostics utilising advanced vibrational spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerssens, Marleen Maartje

    The accurate and safe diagnosis of breast cancer is a significant societal issue, with annual disease incidence of 48,000 women and around 370 men in the UK. Early diagnosis of the disease allows more conservative treatments and better patient outcomes. Microcalcifications in breast tissue are an important indicator for breast cancers, and often the only sign of their presence. Several studies have suggested that the type of calcification formed may act as a marker for malignancy and its presence may be of biological significance. In this work, breast calcifications are studied with FTIR, synchrotron FTIR, ATR FTIR, and Raman mapping to explore their disease specific composition. From a comparison between vibrational spectroscopy and routine staining procedures it becomes clear that calcium builds up prior to calcification formation. Raman and FTIR indicate the same size for calcifications and are in agreement with routine staining techniques. From the synchrotron FTIR measurements it can be proven that amide is present in the centre of the calcifications and the intensity of the bands depends on the pathology. Special attention is paid to the type of carbonate substitution in the calcifications relating to different pathology grades. In contrast to mammography, Raman spectroscopy has the capability to distinguish calcifications based on their chemical composition. The ultimate goal is to turn the acquired knowledge from the mapping studies into a clinical tool based on deep Raman spectroscopy. Deep Raman techniques have a considerable potential to reduce large numbers of normal biopsies, reduce the time delay between screening and diagnosis and therefore diminish patient anxiety. In order to achieve this, a deep Raman system is designed and after evaluation of its performance tested on buried calcification standards in porcine soft tissue and human mammary tissue. It is shown that, when the calcification is probed through tissue, the strong 960 cm-1 phosphate band

  12. Trapping of an electron due to molecular vibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narevicius; Moiseyev

    2000-02-21

    Here we first show that the nuclear motion of H-2 generates a continuum of autoionization resonance states. The interference between them increases the lifetime of the trapped electron in the e(-)/H(2) scattering experiments and leads to asymmetric oscillations in the phase of the excitation probability amplitude. This collective coherent interference resonance phenomenon is very different from any known mechanism in quantum mechanics which reveals the fingerprints of overlapping resonances in scattering cross section and results from the non-Hermitian properties of the H-2 Hamiltonian.

  13. Probing Nanoscale Electronic and Magnetic Interaction with Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bork, Jakob

    This thesis is concerned with fundamental research into electronic and magnetic interaction on the nanoscale. From small metallic and magnetic islands and layers to single atoms. The research revolves around magnetic interaction probed through the spectroscopic capabilities of the scanning....... This is related to research in correlated electron materials such as studies of phase transitions in heavy fermion compounds and magnetic interaction in spintronic research. The capping of cobalt islands on Cu(111) with silver is investigated with STM and photoemission spectroscopy. It is shown that at low...... coverage the silver preferably nucleates on top of the bilayer high cobalt islands compared to directly on the Cu(111) substrate. Furthermore, the silver forms a combination of a reconstruction and a Moire pattern which is investigated with low-energy electron diraction and spectroscopic STM mapping at 6...

  14. Probing environment fluctuations by two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy of molecular systems at temperatures below 5 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rancova, Olga; Abramavicius, Darius [Department of Theoretical Physics, Vilnius University, Sauletekio al 9-III, 10222 Vilnius (Lithuania); Jankowiak, Ryszard [Department of Chemistry and Department of Physics, Kansas State University, 213 CBC Building Manhattan, Kansas 66506-0401 (United States)

    2015-06-07

    Two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectroscopy at cryogenic and room temperatures reveals excitation energy relaxation and transport, as well as vibrational dynamics, in molecular systems. These phenomena are related to the spectral densities of nuclear degrees of freedom, which are directly accessible by means of hole burning and fluorescence line narrowing approaches at low temperatures (few K). The 2D spectroscopy, in principle, should reveal more details about the fluctuating environment than the 1D approaches due to peak extension into extra dimension. By studying the spectral line shapes of a dimeric aggregate at low temperature, we demonstrate that 2D spectra have the potential to reveal the fluctuation spectral densities for different electronic states, the interstate correlation of static disorder and, finally, the time scales of spectral diffusion with high resolution.

  15. Insights into the Structural Changes Occurring upon Photoconversion in the Orange Carotenoid Protein from Broadband Two-Dimensional Electronic Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Re, Eleonora; Schlau-Cohen, Gabriela S.; Leverenz, Ryan L.; Huxter, Vanessa M.; Oliver, Thomas A. A.; Mathies, Richard A.; Fleming, Graham R.

    2014-05-22

    Carotenoids play an essential role in photoprotection, interacting with other pigments to safely dissipate excess absorbed energy as heat. In cyanobacteria, the short time scale photoprotective mechanisms involve the photoactive orange carotenoid protein (OCP), which binds a single carbonyl carotenoid. Blue-green light induces the photoswitching of OCP from its ground state form (OCPO) to a metastable photoproduct (OCPR). OCPR can bind to the phycobilisome antenna and induce fluorescence quenching. The photoswitching is accompanied by structural and functional changes at the level of the protein and of the bound carotenoid. In this study, we use broadband two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy to look at the differences in excited state dynamics of the carotenoid in the two forms of OCP. Our results provide insight into the origin of the pronounced vibrational lineshape and oscillatory dynamics observed in linear absorption and 2D electronic spectroscopy of OCPO and the large inhomogeneous broadening in OCPR, with consequences for the chemical function of the two forms.

  16. Electron-Vibration Coupling in Molecular Materials: Assignment of Vibronic Modes from Photoelectron Momentum Mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graus, M; Grimm, M; Metzger, C; Dauth, M; Tusche, C; Kirschner, J; Kümmel, S; Schöll, A; Reinert, F

    2016-04-08

    Electron-phonon coupling is one of the most fundamental effects in condensed matter physics. We here demonstrate that photoelectron momentum mapping can reveal and visualize the coupling between specific vibrational modes and electronic excitations. When imaging molecular orbitals with high energy resolution, the intensity patterns of photoelectrons of the vibronic sidebands of molecular states show characteristic changes due to the distortion of the molecular frame in the vibronically excited state. By comparison to simulations, an assignment of specific vibronic modes is possible, thus providing unique information on the coupling between electronic and vibronic excitation.

  17. Basic molecular spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Gorry, PA

    1985-01-01

    BASIC Molecular Spectroscopy discusses the utilization of the Beginner's All-purpose Symbolic Instruction Code (BASIC) programming language in molecular spectroscopy. The book is comprised of five chapters that provide an introduction to molecular spectroscopy through programs written in BASIC. The coverage of the text includes rotational spectra, vibrational spectra, and Raman and electronic spectra. The book will be of great use to students who are currently taking a course in molecular spectroscopy.

  18. Electron momentum spectroscopy of dimethyl ether taking account of nuclear dynamics in the electronic ground state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morini, Filippo; Watanabe, Noboru; Kojima, Masataka; Deleuze, Michael Simon; Takahashi, Masahiko

    2015-10-01

    The influence of nuclear dynamics in the electronic ground state on the (e,2e) momentum profiles of dimethyl ether has been analyzed using the harmonic analytical quantum mechanical and Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics approaches. In spite of fundamental methodological differences, results obtained with both approaches consistently demonstrate that molecular vibrations in the electronic ground state have a most appreciable influence on the momentum profiles associated to the 2b1, 6a1, 4b2, and 1a2 orbitals. Taking this influence into account considerably improves the agreement between theoretical and newly obtained experimental momentum profiles, with improved statistical accuracy. Both approaches point out in particular the most appreciable role which is played by a few specific molecular vibrations of A1, B1, and B2 symmetries, which correspond to C-H stretching and H-C-H bending modes. In line with the Herzberg-Teller principle, the influence of these molecular vibrations on the computed momentum profiles can be unraveled from considerations on the symmetry characteristics of orbitals and their energy spacing.

  19. Molecular orbital studies (hardness, chemical potential, electrophilicity, and first electron excitation), vibrational investigation and theoretical NBO analysis of 2-hydroxy-5-bromobenzaldehyde by density functional method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nataraj, A.; Balachandran, V.; Karthick, T.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, the vibrational spectral analysis was carried out using Raman and infrared spectroscopy in the range 4000-400 cm-1 and 3500-100 cm-1, respectively, for the 2-hydroxy-5-bromobenzaldehyde (HBB). The experimental spectra were recorded in the solid phase. The fundamental vibrational frequencies and intensity of vibrational bands were evaluated using density functional theory (DFT) with the standard B3LYP/6-311G++(d,p) method and basis set. Normal co-ordinate calculations were performed with the DFT force field corrected by a recommended set of scaling factors yielding fairly good agreement between observed and calculated frequencies. Simulation of infrared and Raman spectra utilizing the results of these calculations led to excellent overall agreement with the observed spectral patterns. The complete assignments were performed on the basis of the potential energy distribution (PED) of the vibrational modes, calculated with scaled quantum mechanics (SQM) method. The optimized geometric parameters (bond lengths and bond angles) were compared with experimental values of related compound. The stability of the molecule arising from hyper conjugative interactions and the charge delocalization has been analyzed using natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. The directly calculated ionization potential (IP), electron affinity (EA), electronegativity (χ), electrophilicity index (ω), hardness (η), chemical potential (μ), and first electron excitation (τ) are all correlated with the HOMO and LUMO energies with their molecular properties. These show that charge transfer occurs within the molecule. Furthermore, molecular electrostatic potential maps (MESP) of the molecule have been calculated.

  20. Excitation of the lowest CO2 vibrational states by electrons in hypersonic boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armenise, I.

    2017-07-01

    The state-to-state vibrational kinetics of a CO2/O2/CO/C/O/e- mixture in a hypersonic boundary layer under conditions compatible with the Mars re-entry is studied. The model adopted treats three CO2 modes (the two degenerated bending modes are approximated as a unique one) as not independent ones. Vibrational-translational transitions in the bending mode, inter-mode exchanges within CO2 molecule and between molecules of different chemical species as well as dissociation-recombination reactions are considered. Attention is paid to the electron-CO2 collisions that cause transitions from the ground vibrational state, CO2(0,0,0), to the first excited ones, CO2(1,0,0), CO2(0,1,0) and CO2(0,0,1). The corresponding processes rate coefficients are obtained starting from the electron energy distribution function, calculated either as an equilibrium Boltzmann distribution at the local temperature or by solving the Boltzmann equation. Results obtained either neglecting or including in the kinetic scheme the electron-CO2 collisions are compared and explained by analysing the rate coefficients of the electron-CO2 collisions.

  1. Ultrafast Control of the electronic phase of a manganite viamode-selective vibrational excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rini, Matteo; Tobey, Ra' anan I.; Dean, Nicky; Tokura, Yoshinori; Schoenlein, Robert W.; Cavalleri, Andrea

    2007-05-01

    Controlling a phase of matter by coherently manipulatingspecific vibrational modes has long been an attractive (yet elusive) goalfor ultrafast science. Solids with strongly correlated electrons, inwhich even subtle crystallographic distortions can result in colossalchanges of the electronic and magnetic properties, could be directedbetween competing phases by such selective vibrational excitation. Inthis way, the dynamics of the electronic ground state of the systembecome accessible, and new insight into the underlying physics might begained. Here we report the ultrafast switching of the electronic phase ofa magnetoresistive manganite via direct excitation of a phonon mode at 71meV (17 THz). A prompt, five-order-of-magnitude drop in resistivity isobserved, associated with a non-equilibrium transition from the stableinsulating phase to a metastable metallic phase. In contrast withlight-induced, and current-driven phase transitions, the vibrationallydriven bandgap collapse observed here is not related to hot-carrierinjection and is uniquely attributed to a large-amplitude Mn-Odistortion. This corresponds to a perturbation of theperovskite-structure tolerance factor, which in turn controls theelectronic bandwidth via inter-site orbital overlap. Phase control bycoherent manipulation of selected metal--oxygen phonons should findextensive application in other complex solids--notably in copper oxidesuperconductors, in which the role of Cu-O vibrations on the electronicproperties is currently controversial.

  2. 2012 ELECTRONIC SPECTROSCOPY & DYNAMICS GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE, JULY 22-27, 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohler, Bern

    2012-07-27

    Topics covered in this GRC include high-resolution spectroscopy, coherent electronic energy transport in biology, excited state theory and dynamics, excitonics, electronic spectroscopy of cold and ultracold molecules, and the spectroscopy of nanostructures. Several sessions will highlight innovative techniques such as time-resolved x-ray spectroscopy, frequency combs, and liquid microjet photoelectron spectroscopy that have forged stimulating new connections between gas-phase and condensed-phase work.

  3. THz Electron Paramagnetic Resonance / THz Spectroscopy at BESSY II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karsten Holldack

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The THz beamline at BESSY II employs high power broadband femto- to picosecond long THz pulses for magneto-optical THz and FIR studies. A newly designed set-up exploits the unique properties of ultrashort THz pulses generated by laser-energy modulation of electron bunches in the storage ring or alternatively from compressed electron bunches. Experiments from 0.15 to 5 THz (~ 5 – 150 cm-1 may be conducted at a user station equipped with a fully evacuated high resolution FTIR spectrometer (0.0063 cm-1, lHe cooled bolometer detectors, a THz TDS set-up and different sample environments, including a superconducting high field magnet (+11 T - 11T with variable temperature insert (1.5 K – 300 K, a sample cryostat and a THz attenuated total reflection chamber.  Main applications are Frequency Domain Fourier transform THz-Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (FD-FT THz-EPR, THz-FTIR spectroscopy and optical pump - THz probe time domain spectroscopy (TDS, with sub-ps time resolution.

  4. Analysis of functional organic molecules at noble metal surfaces by means of vibrational spectroscopies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leyssner, Felix

    2011-10-24

    The goal of this work is to optimize the efficiency of photoinduced molecular switching processes on surfaces via controlled variations of the adsorption and electronic properties of the switch. We investigated the influence of external stimuli, i.e. photons and thermal activation, on surface bound molecular switches undergoing trans/cis-isomerizations and ring-opening/closing-reactions, respectively. High resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) and sum-frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy have been used as the main tools to investigate the adsorption behavior and the molecular switching properties. Two basic concepts of coupling the molecular switch to the surface have been studied: (i) physisorbed or weakly chemisorbed systems deposited on noble metal surfaces under UHV conditions and (ii) molecular switches bound covalently via anchor groups. In the HREELS study following concept (i), we investigated the adsorption geometry and isomerization behavior of various molecular switches on metal substrates which are able to undergo a photoinduced trans/cis-isomerization in solution. We investigated three isoelectronic molecules on Au where we systematically changed the photochemically active group from the diazo-group in an azobenzene-derivative (on Cu(111)) to the imine-group, and the vinylene-group, respectively. Finding the photoisomerization quenched for all systems we observed considerable differences in their thermal isomerization behavior. Comparable we find the photoinduced ring-opening/closing-reaction of spiropyran quenched on Au(111) but a thermally induced ring-opening reaction resulting in the open form being strongly stabilized by the metal. SFG spectroscopy is employed to investigate the reversible, photoinduced trans/cis-isomerization of an azobenzene-functionalized self-assembled monolayer (SAM) on gold using a tripodal linker system. In consequence of the decoupling provided by the tripodal linker, the switching behavior of the

  5. Hypernuclear spectroscopy with electron beam at JLab Hall C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuu Fujii

    2010-12-01

    Hypernuclear spectroscopy with electron beam at JLab Hall C has been studied since 2000. The first experiment, JLab E89-009, used Short Orbit Spectrometer (SOS) as a kaon arm and a split-pole type spectrometer (ENGE) as an electron arm. E89-009 employed zero-degree tagging method, which tags scattered electrons at zero-degree and the kaon arm also covered zero-degree. This method obtains maximum yield of hypernuclei but sufferers from high rate background of electrons from bremsstrahlung and positrons from pair-creation. Nevertheless, this experiment demonstrated the possibility of the (e,e' K{sup +}) reaction for hypernuclear spectroscopy by obtaining a hypernuclear mass spectrum with an energy resolution of better than 1 MeV (FWHM) [1][2]. However, poor signal to noise ratio and poor statistics requires us to improve the experimental setup. Therefore, E01-011 experiment was proposed based on the success of the JLab E01-011 experiment. Improvements of E01-011 from E09-009 can be summarized as: 1. Employed newly constructed high resolution kaon spectrometer (HKS) as a kaon arm. 2. Employed so-called 'tilt-method' for the electron arm. With the newly constructed HKS, having 2-10-4 momentum resolution, we expect an energy resolution of 400 keV (FWHM). The 'tilt-method' means the electron arm is tilted vertically to the splitter dispersive plane to avoid background electrons from bremsstrahlung and moeller scattering. The setup allowed us to use up to a few tens beam. The experiment was performed in 2005 and final result will be shown shortly. The third experiment, JLab E05-115 experiment was proposed as a natural extension of E01-011 experiment and will be performed in 2009. Improvements of experimental setup are, 1. Employed newly constructed high resolution electron spectrometer (HES) as a electron arm, 2. Employed a new charge-separation magnet (Splitter), fully customized for hypernuclear experiment at Hall C. With the third generation

  6. Structural, electronic, vibrational and optical properties of Bin clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Dan; Shen, Wanting; Zhang, Chunfang; Lu, Pengfei; Wang, Shumin

    2017-10-01

    The neutral, anionic and cationic bismuth clusters with the size n up to 14 are investigated by using B3LYP functional within the regime of density functional theory and the LAN2DZ basis set. By analysis of the geometries of the Bin (n = 2-14) clusters, where cationic and anionic bismuth clusters are largely similar to those of neutral ones, a periodic effect by adding units with one to four atoms into smaller cluster to form larger cluster is drawn for the stable structures of bismuth clusters. An even-odd alteration is shown for the properties of the clusters, such as the calculated binding energies and dissociation energies, as well as frontier orbital energies, electron affinities, ionization energies. All the properties indicate that the Bi4 cluster is the most possible existence in bismuth-containing materials, which supports the most recent experiment. The orbital compositions, infrared and Raman activities and the ultraviolet absorption of the most possible tetramer bismuth cluster are given in detail to reveal the periodic tendency of adding bismuth atoms and the stability of tetramer bismuth cluster.

  7. Pulsed field ionization electron spectroscopy and molecular structure of aluminum uracil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasnokutski, Serge A; Yang, Dong-Sheng

    2007-10-25

    Al-uracil (Al-C4H4N2O2) was synthesized in a laser-vaporization supersonic molecular beam source and studied with pulsed field ionization-zero electron kinetic energy (ZEKE) photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT). The DFT calculations predicted several low-energy Al-uracil isomers with Al binding to the diketo, keto-enol, and dienol tautomers of uracil. The ZEKE spectroscopic measurements of Al-uracil determined the ionization energy of 43 064(5) cm-1 [or 5.340(6) eV] and a vibrational mode of 51 cm-1 for the neutral complex and several vibrational modes of 51, 303, 614, and 739 cm-1 for the ionized species. Combination of the ZEEK spectrum with the DFT and Franck-Condon factor calculations determined the preferred isomeric structure and electronic states of the Al-uracil complex. This isomer is formed by Al binding to the O4 atom of the diketo tautomer of uracil and has a planar Cs symmetry. The ground electronic states of the neutral and ionized species are 2A' ' and 1A', respectively. The 2A' ' neutral state has a slightly shorter Al-O4 distance than the 1A' ion state. However, the 1A' ion state has stronger metal-ligand binding compared to the 2A' ' state. The increased Al-O4 distance from the 2A' ' state to the 1A' state is attributed to the loss of the pi binding interaction between Al and O4 in the singlet ion state, whereas the increased metal-ligand binding strength is due to the additional charge-dipole interaction in the ion that surpasses the loss of the pi orbital interaction.

  8. Analysis of vibrational, structural, and electronic properties of rivastigmine by density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, O.; Sinha, L.; Misra, N.; Narayan, V.; Kumar, N.; Kumar, A.

    2010-09-01

    The present work deals with the structural, electronic, and vibrational analysis of rivastigmine. Rivastigmine, an antidementia medicament, is credited with significant therapeutic effects on the cognitive, functional, and behavioural problems that are commonly associated with Alzheimer’s dementia. For rivastigmine, a number of minimum energy conformations are possible. The geometry of twelve possible conformers has been analyzed and the most stable conformer was further optimized at a higher basis set. The electronic properties and vibrational frequencies were then calculated using a density functional theory at the B3LYP level with the 6-311+G(d, p) basis set. The different molecular surfaces have also been drawn to understand the activity of the molecule. A narrower frontier orbital energy gap in rivastigmine makes it softer and more reactive than water and dimethylfuran. The calculated value of the dipole moment is 2.58 debye.

  9. Electron energy and vibrational distribution functions of carbon monoxide in nanosecond atmospheric discharges and microsecond afterglows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietanza, L. D.; Colonna, G.; Capitelli, M.

    2017-12-01

    Nanopulse atmospheric carbon monoxide discharges and corresponding afterglows have been investigated in a wide range of applied reduced electric field (130 kinetics of vibrational and electronic excited states as well as to a simplified plasma chemistry for the different species formed during the activation of CO. The molar fraction of electronically excited states generated in the discharge is sufficient to create structures in the EEDF in the afterglow regime. On the other hand, only for long duration pulses (i.e. 50 ns), non-equilibrium vibrational distributions can be observed especially in the afterglow. The trend of the results for the case study E/N = 200 Td, \\text{pulse}=2$ ns is qualitatively and quantitatively similar to the corresponding case for CO2 implying that the activation of CO2 by cold plasmas should take into account the kinetics of formed CO with the same accuracy as the CO2 itself.

  10. Spectroscopie du Furanne et du Thiophene Par Diffusion Inelastique D'electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotfi, Said

    Nous avons etudie les molecules de furanne ( rm C_4H_4O) et de thiophene (rm C_4H_4O) au moyen de la spectroscopie de diffusion inelastique d'electrons. Pour (rm C_4H_4O), les spectres realises dans differentes conditions d'energie d'impact et d'angle de diffusion contiennent des singularites ou des families de pics correspondant a: (1) des vibrations de l'etat fondamental dans le domaine 0-0.5 eV, (2) des etats triplets ^3 B_1 et ^3 A_1 qui dominent la region 3-5.5 eV, (3) des etats de valences, entre 5 et 10 eV, dont certains son accompagnes de progressions vibrationnelles, soit ~ A _1B_2, ~ B ^1A_1 et ~ C ^1A_1, (4) toujours entre 5 et 10 eV, deux series de Ryhdberg (rm 1a_2to nda_2 et rm 1a_2to npb_2) qui convergent vers la premiere limite d'ionisation de la molecule, avec une progression vibrationnelle associee au mdoe nu_4 pour la seconde, et une troisieme serie (rm 2b_1to nsa_1 ) convergent vers la seconde limite d'ionisation accompagnee de la progression de mode nu _1. Pour rm C_4H_4S, nos spectres presentent les memes etats de vibration et les memes etats triplets que pour rm C_4H _4O. Nous avons releve egalement, dans la region de 5 a 10 eV, des etats de valence ~ A ^1A_1 (ou ~ A ^1B_2), ~ B ^1A_1 (ou ~ B ^1B _2) et ~ C ^1A_1 (ou ~ C ^1B_2). Pour la premiere fois, par la spectroscopie de diffusion inelastique d'electrons, de nombreux pics ont ete identifies et attribues, dans le cadre de ce travail. Il s'agit, notamment, des etats de vibration de l'etat electronique fondamental de ces molecules et egalement de certains etats de Rydberg dans le cas du furanne.

  11. Strong impact of lattice vibrations on electronic and magnetic properties of paramagnetic Fe revealed by disordered local moments molecular dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alling, B.; Kormann, F.H.W.; Grabowski, B; Glensk, A; Abrikosov, I.A.

    2016-01-01

    We study the impact of lattice vibrations on magnetic and electronic properties of paramagnetic bcc and fcc iron at finite temperature, employing the disordered local moments molecular dynamics (DLM-MD) method. Vibrations strongly affect the distribution of local magnetic moments at finite

  12. Vibrational spectroscopy--a powerful tool for the rapid identification of microbial cells at the single-cell level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harz, M; Rösch, P; Popp, J

    2009-02-01

    Rapid microbial detection and identification with a high grade of sensitivity and selectivity is a great and challenging issue in many fields, primarily in clinical diagnosis, pharmaceutical, or food processing technology. The tedious and time-consuming processes of current microbiological approaches call for faster ideally on-line identification techniques. The vibrational spectroscopic techniques IR absorption and Raman spectroscopy are noninvasive methods yielding molecular fingerprint information; thus, allowing for a fast and reliable analysis of complex biological systems such as bacterial or yeast cells. In this short review, we discuss recent vibrational spectroscopic advances in microbial identification of yeast and bacterial cells for bulk environment and single-cell analysis. IR absorption spectroscopy enables a bulk analysis whereas micro-Raman-spectroscopy with excitation in the near infrared or visible range has the potential for the analysis of single bacterial and yeast cells. The inherently weak Raman signal can be increased up to several orders of magnitude by applying Raman signal enhancement methods such as UV-resonance Raman spectroscopy with excitation in the deep UV region, surface enhanced Raman scattering, or tip-enhanced Raman scattering. Copyright 2008 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry

  13. Cross Sections and Rate Coefficients for Vibrational Excitation of HeH+ Molecule by Electron Impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Ayouz

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Cross sections and thermally-averaged rate coefficients for vibration (de-excitation of HeH + by an electron impact are computed using a theoretical approach that combines the multi-channel quantum defect theory and the UK R-matrix code. Fitting formulas with a few numerical parameters are derived for the obtained rate coefficients. The interval of applicability of the formulas is from 40 to 10,000 K.

  14. Vibrational spectroscopy of reduced ReI complexes of 1,10-phenanthroline and substituted analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Sarah L; Gordon, Keith C

    2006-04-13

    IR spectroscopy in concert with DFT calculations and resonance Raman spectroelectrochemistry has been used to identify the molecular orbital nature of the singly occupied molecular orbital (SOMO) in reduced [Re(CO)(3)Cl(L)] and [Re(CO)(3)(4-Mepy)(L)](+) complexes, where L = 1,10-phenanthroline and its 4,7-diphenyl- and 3,4,7,8-tetramethyl-substituted analogues. The SOMO of each reduced species considered was found to be of b(1) symmetry, rather than the close lying orbital of a(2) symmetry (within a C(2)(v)() symmetry description of the phenanthroline moiety). This was deduced in a number of ways. First, the average carbonyl band force constants (Deltak(av) = k(av){reduced complex} - k(av){parent complex}) range from -57 to -41 N m(-1) for the series of compounds studied. The value of Deltak(av) relates to the extent of orbital overlap between the ligand MO and the metal dpi MO. These values are consistent with population of a b(1) MO because the wave function amplitude at the chelating nitrogens for this MO is significantly greater than that for a(2) MO. Second, calculations on singly reduced [Re(CO)(3)(4-Mepy)(phen)](+) and [Re(CO)(3)(4-Mepy)(tem)](+) predict population of a b(2) SOMO. The spectra predicted for these species are in close agreement with the vibrational spectroscopic data; for the IR data the shifts in the CO bands are predicted to 6 cm(-1) and the mean absolute deviation between calculated and measured Raman bands was found to be 10 cm(-1).

  15. Resonant electron-impact excitation of vibrational modes in polyatomic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartwright, David C.; Trajmar, Sandor

    1996-04-01

    Measured differential cross sections (DCSs) for electron-impact excitation of bending vibrational modes involving an odd number of vibrational quanta in 0953-4075/29/8/018/img5 by 4 eV incident energy electrons display a strong trend to zero for forward and backward scattering which is characteristic of `symmetry-forbidden' transitions. This DCS behaviour is postulated here to be produced by a Feshbach resonant mechanism involving a low-lying bent excited state of 0953-4075/29/8/018/img5. The model described here identifies three additional low-lying bent excited states of 0953-4075/29/8/018/img5 which could also be parent states for core-excited Feshbach resonances, one of which may play a role in dissociative attachment in this 3.5 - 5.0 eV energy region. The resonant vibrational excitation mechanism proposed here is also believed to be operative in other polyatomic molecules and could be investigated by performing selected electron energy-loss measurements within the lowest energy resonance regions of the molecules 0953-4075/29/8/018/img8 and 0953-4075/29/8/018/img9.

  16. Vibrational and electronic properties of 4‧-halomethyl-2-biphenylcarbonitrile compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar Rao, Y. B.; Veeraiah, V.; Sundius, Tom; Chaitanya, Kadali

    2017-09-01

    In this paper we studied the structural, vibrational and electronic properties of the 4‧-bromomethyl-2-biphenylcarbonitrile (BMBP) 4‧-chloromethyl-2-biphenylcarbonitrile (CMBP) and 4‧-fluoromethyl-2-biphenylcarbonitrile (FMBP) compounds using experimental and theoretical methods. The FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of BMBP in solid phase were recorded in the region 4000-400 cm-1 and 4000-50 cm-1, respectively. The UV absorption spectrum of BMBP was recorded in dichloromethane and methanol solvents in the range 180-400 nm. The theoretical spectral properties of title compounds were simulated using density functional theory (DFT) and time dependent DFT methods. Scaling of the vibrational frequencies was carried out with the MOLVIB program using multiple scaling factors and assignment to each vibrational frequency was consigned on the basis of potential energy distribution (PED). The electronic spectrum of BMBP in two different solvents (methanol and dichloromethane), calculated at the CAM-B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) level compares well with the experimental data and validates the current method for predicting the absorption spectrum of CMBP and FMBP. Furthermore, the electronic, nonlinear optical and thermodynamics properties of the three compounds were discussed in detailed.

  17. Electron momentum spectroscopy study of amantadine: binding energy spectra and valence orbital electron density distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvinyuk, I. V.; Zheng, Y.; Brion, C. E.

    2000-11-01

    The electron binding energy spectrum and valence orbital electron momentum density distributions of amantadine (1-aminoadamantane), an important anti-viral and anti-Parkinsonian drug, have been measured by electron momentum spectroscopy. Theoretical momentum distributions, calculated at the 6-311++G** and AUG-CC-PVTZ levels within the target Hartree-Fock and also the target Kohn-Sham density functional theory approximations, show good agreement with the experimental results. The results for amantadine are also compared with those for the parent molecule, adamantane, reported earlier (Chem. Phys. 253 (2000) 41). Based on the comparison tentative assignments of the valence region ionization bands of amantadine have been made.

  18. Absolute configuration of an axially chiral sulfonate determined from its optical rotatory dispersion, electronic circular dichroism, and vibrational circular dichroism spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covington, Cody L; Raghavan, Vijay; Smuts, Jonathan P; Armstrong, Daniel W; Polavarapu, Prasad L

    2017-11-01

    The absolute configuration (AC) of an axially chiral sulfonate (aCSO), 3,5-dimethyl-2-(naphthalen-1-yl)-6-(naphthalen-1-yl)benzenesulfonate (labeled as aCSO5), was investigated using optical rotatory dispersion (ORD), electronic circular dichroism (ECD), and vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectroscopies. All three methods led to the same conclusion and the AC of aCSO5 is reliably determined to be (-)-(aR, aR), or conversely (+)-(aS, aS). © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Double resonant absorption measurement of acetylene symmetric vibrational states probed with cavity ring down spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karhu, J.; Nauta, J.; Vainio, M.; Metsala, M.; Hoekstra, S.; Halonen, L.

    2016-01-01

    A novel mid-infrared/near-infrared double resonant absorption setup for studying infrared-inactive vibrational states is presented. A strong vibrational transition in the mid-infrared region is excited using an idler beam from a singly resonant continuous-wave optical parametric oscillator, to

  20. Inexpensive electronics and software for photon statistics and correlation spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamari, Benjamin D; Zhang, Dianwen; Buckman, Richard E; Milas, Peker; Denker, John S; Chen, Hui; Li, Hongmin; Goldner, Lori S

    2014-07-01

    Single-molecule-sensitive microscopy and spectroscopy are transforming biophysics and materials science laboratories. Techniques such as fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and single-molecule sensitive fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) are now commonly available in research laboratories but are as yet infrequently available in teaching laboratories. We describe inexpensive electronics and open-source software that bridges this gap, making state-of-the-art research capabilities accessible to undergraduates interested in biophysics. We include a discussion of the intensity correlation function relevant to FCS and how it can be determined from photon arrival times. We demonstrate the system with a measurement of the hydrodynamic radius of a protein using FCS that is suitable for the undergraduate teaching laboratory. The FPGA-based electronics, which are easy to construct, are suitable for more advanced measurements as well, and several applications are described. As implemented, the system has 8 ns timing resolution, can control up to four laser sources, and can collect information from as many as four photon-counting detectors.

  1. Studies in ferromagnetism using electron polarization analysis Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Saubi, B H

    2001-01-01

    Motivated by recent reports of induced ferromagnetism in non-magnetic transition metals by rare earth metals, we have modified an existing Electron Spectroscopy with Polarization Analysis (ESPA) apparatus to allow for a set of experiments on induced ferromagnetism at Pd:Gd interfaces. We have investigated a number of magnetic materials for their potential as magnetically reversible substrates on which the Gd under layer could be grown. An evaporation source for Gd. suitable for use in Ultra High Vacuum (UHV) has been developed. Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES) has been used to characterize the growth of Gd on a CO sub 6 sub 6 Si sub 1 sub 5 B sub 1 sub 4 Fe sub 4 Ni sub 1 ribbon substrate held at 100K, by comparing the peak to background (P/B) ratios of Gd and Co Auger lines as a function of overlayer film thickness. We have established that Gd grows in a kinetically limited statistical fashion. The magnetic behaviour of the Gd films on the Co-based ribbon substrate has been studied using Spin Polarized Seco...

  2. Electronic and Vibrational Spectra of InP Quantum Dots Formed by Sequential Ion Implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, C.; Mu, R.; Tung, Y. S.; Ueda, A.; Henderson, D. O.; White, C. W.

    1997-01-01

    We have performed sequential ion implantation of indium and phosphorus into silica combined with controlled thermal annealing to fabricate InP quantum dots in a dielectric host. Electronic and vibrational spectra were measured for the as-implanted and annealed samples. The annealed samples show a peak in the infrared spectra near 320/cm which is attributed to a surface phonon mode and is in good agreement with the value calculated from Frolich's theory of surface phonon polaritons. The electronic spectra show the development of a band near 390 nm that is attributed to quantum confined InP.

  3. Neural-Net Processing of Characteristic Patterns From Electronic Holograms of Vibrating Blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Arthur J.

    1999-01-01

    Finite-element-model-trained artificial neural networks can be used to process efficiently the characteristic patterns or mode shapes from electronic holograms of vibrating blades. The models used for routine design may not yet be sufficiently accurate for this application. This document discusses the creation of characteristic patterns; compares model generated and experimental characteristic patterns; and discusses the neural networks that transform the characteristic patterns into strain or damage information. The current potential to adapt electronic holography to spin rigs, wind tunnels and engines provides an incentive to have accurate finite element models lor training neural networks.

  4. Selective excitation of a vibrational level within the electronic ground state of a polyatomic molecule with ultra pulses

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    de Clercq, L

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Coherent control of the upper vibrational level populations in the electronic ground state of a polyatomic molecule was simulated. Results indicate that selective excitation of a specific upper state level is possible...

  5. Selective excitation of a vibrational level within the electronic ground state of a polyatomic molecule with ultra short pulses

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    De Clercq, L

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Coherent control of the upper vibrational level populations in the electronic ground state of a polyatomic molecule was simulated. Results indicate that selective excitation of a specific upper state level is possible....

  6. Infrared vibration-rotation spectra of the ClO radical using tunable diode laser spectroscopy. [ozone destruction in stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogowski, R. S.; Bair, C. H.; Wade, W. R.; Hoell, J. M.; Copeland, G. E.

    1978-01-01

    Tunable diode laser spectroscopy is used to measure the infrared vibration-rotation spectra of the ClO radical. The radical is generated in a flow system where a Cl2-He mixture passes through a microwave discharge to dissociate the Cl2. An O3-O2 mixture from an ozone generator is injected into the system downstream of the microwave discharge where O3 combines with Cl to form ClO. By adjusting the gas flow rates to yield an excess of Cl atoms, all the ozone is combined. ClO concentration is measured with UV absorption at 2577 and 2772 A and a deuterium lamp as a continuous source. Total cell pressure is 5.5 torr. The diode laser spectrometer is calibrated with ammonia lines as a reference where possible. The frequency of vibration-rotation lines is expressed as a function of rotational quantum number, fundamental vibrational frequency, and the rotational constants of the upper and lower vibrational states.

  7. Application of vibrational spectroscopy in the in vitro studies of carbon fiber-polylactic acid composite degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazewicz, Marta; Gajewska, Maria Chomyszyn; Paluszkiewicz, Czeslawa

    1999-05-01

    Vibrational spectroscopy was used for assessment of new material for stomatology, for guided tissue regeneration (GTR) techniqe.Implants applied in the healing of periodontal defects using GTR technique have to meet stringent requirements concerning their chemical as well physical properties.At present the implants prepared from two layers membranes differing in porosity in their outer and inner layers are studied clinically. Composite plates prepared by us consist of three layers: polylactic acid film, carbon fibres coated with polylactic acid and carbon fabric.Vibrational spectroscopic studies of the material; polylactic acid- carbon fiber have made it possible to analyse chemical reactions occurring between the polymer and carbon surface. Analysis of the IR spectra of samples treated in Ringer solution allowed to describe the phenomena resulting from the composite degradation. It was shown that material biostability is related to the presence of carbon fibers.

  8. State-To Rotational and Vibrational Energy Transfers Following Vibrational Excitation of (1010000) and (0112000) in the Ground Electronic State of Acetylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jiande; Freel, Keith; Heaven, Michael C.

    2011-06-01

    We have examined state-to-state rotational and vibrational energy transfers for the vibrational levels (1010000) and (0112000) of C2H2 in the ground electronic state at ambient temperature. Measurements were made using a pulsed IR - UV double resonance technique. Total removal rate constants and state-to-state rotational energy transfer rate constants have been characterized for certain even-numbered rotational levels from J = 0 to 12 within the two vibrational modes. The measured state-to-state rotational energy transfer rate constants were fit to some energy-based empirical scaling and fitting laws, and the rate constants were found to be best reproduced by the statistical power-exponential gap law (PEGL). The measured rate constants were then further evaluated by a kinetic model which simulated the experimental spectra by solving simultaneous first order differential rate equations. Some rotationally-resolved vibrational energy transfer channels were also observed following excitation of (1010000). The vibrational relaxation channels were found to contribute less than 30% to the total removal rate constants of the measured rotational levels for both of the studied vibrational states.

  9. Experimental study on nonlinear vibrating of aluminum foam using electronic speckle pattern interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fujun; Ma, Yinhang; Tao, Nan; He, Xiaoyuan

    2017-06-01

    Due to its multi properties, including excellent stiffness-to-weight and strength-to-weight ratios, closed-cell aluminum and its alloy foams become candidate materials for use in many high-technology industries, such as the automotive and aerospace industries. For the efficient use of closed-cell foams in structural applications, it is necessary and important to detailly understand their mechanical characteristics. In this paper, the nonlinear vibration responses of the cantilever beams of closed-cell aluminum foams were investigated by use of electronic speckle pattern interferometry (ESPI). The nonlinear resonant mode shapes of testing specimens under harmonic excitation were measured. It is first time to obtain from the experimental results that there exist super-harmonic responses when the cantilever beams of closed-cell aluminum foam were forced to vibrate, which was caused by its specific cellular structures.

  10. Nightmare from which you will never awake: Electronic to vibrational spectra!

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Silva, Nuwon [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2013-01-01

    The theoretical background of ab initio methods and density functional theory is provided. The anharmonicity associated with weakly bound metal cation dihydrogen complexes is examined using the vibrational self-consistent field (VSCF) method and the interaction between a hydrogen molecule and a metal cation is characterized. A study of molecular hydrogen clustering around the lithium cation and their accompanied vibrational anharmonicity employing VSCF is illustrated. A qualitative interpretation is provided of solvent-induced shifts of amides and simulated electronic absorption spectra using the combined time-dependent density functional theory/effective fragment potential method (TDDFT/EFP). An excited-state solvent assisted quadruple hydrogen atom transfer reaction of a coumarin derivative is elucidated using micro solvated quantum mechanical (QM) water and macro solvated EFP water. A dispersion correction to the QM-EFP1 interaction energy is presented.

  11. Fructose-water-dimethylsulfoxide interactions by vibrational spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolakis, Vladimiros; Mushrif, Samir H; Herbert, Bryon; Booksh, Karl S; Vlachos, Dionisios G

    2012-09-13

    The solvation of fructose in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and DMSO-H(2)O (or DMSO-D(2)O) mixtures was investigated using vibrational spectroscopy (Raman, ATR/FTIR) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The analysis of the fructose hydroxyl hydrogen-DMSO oxygen radial distribution function showed that the coordination number of DMSO around the furanose form of fructose is ~3.5. This number is smaller than the number of hydroxyl groups of fructose because one DMSO molecule is shared between two hydroxyl groups and because intramolecular hydrogen bonds are formed. In the case of fructose-DMSO mixtures, a red shift of the Raman S═O asymmetric stretch is observed, which indicates that fructose breaks the DMSO clusters through strong hydrogen bonding between the hydrogen atoms of its hydroxyl groups and the oxygen atom of DMSO. The Raman scattering cross sections of the DMSO S═O stretch when a DMSO molecule interacts with another DMSO molecule, a fructose molecule, or a water molecule were estimated from the spectra of the binary mixtures using the coordination numbers from MD simulations. It was also possible to use these values together with the MD-estimated coordination numbers to satisfactorily predict the effect of the water fraction on the Raman scattering intensity of the S═O stretching band in ternary mixtures. MD simulations also showed that, with increasing water content, the DMSO orientation around fructose changed, with the sulfur atom moving away from the carbohydrate. The deconvolution of the fructose IR OH stretching region revealed that the hydroxyls of fructose can be separated into two groups that participate in hydrogen bonds of different strengths. MD simulations showed that the three hydroxyls of the fructose ring form stronger hydrogen bonds with the solvent than the remaining hydroxyls, providing an explanation for the experimental observations. Finally, analysis of ATR/FTIR spectra revealed that, with increasing water content, the average

  12. Formation and function of chromate conversion coating on aircraft aluminum alloy probed by vibrational spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Lin

    2000-10-01

    A Chromate Conversion Coating (CCC) is currently one of the most effective methods for protecting aluminum alloys from corrosion. Its unique "self-healing" property has been proved to be critical in corrosion prevention. During the formation process, CrVI, is "stored" in the CCC films. Under in-field conditions, most of the CrVI can leach out and diffuse to local defects, and stop corrosion. However, the involvement of highly toxic CrVI makes CCC system environmentally hazardous. In order to find less-toxic alternatives, the formation and protection mechanisms of CCC must be understood. Formation and function of CCC film are the focus of this study, and vibrational spectroscopy was chosen due to its superior structural sensitivity. First, the structure of CCC film was characterized. The structural similarity between CCC film and a synthetic Cr-mixed-oxide was found, and certain tests were conducted on the bulk synthetic powder which were not feasible on the thin film. All of the structural studies indicated that CCC film is mainly a CrIII-hydroxide gel layer, which adsorbs CrVI-oxy species through CrIII-O-Cr VI chemical bonds. Further analysis revealed the reversible Cr III-CrVI adsorption-desorption equilibrium, and a mathematical model ("Langmuir" model) was established to explain the Cr VI storage-release mechanism quantitatively. In addition, the function of Fe(CN)63-, an additive in the coating solution, was studied. The results indicate that Fe(CN)63- mediates the slow reaction between Al and CrVI, and the mediation mechanism can be illustrated as below: FeCN 3- 6+Al=FeCN 4-6+Al3+ ↑ FeCN 4- 6+CrVI=FeCN 3-6+CrIII In general, the formation of CCC is mediated by Fe(CN)63-, thus Al reduces CrVI quickly and generates CrIII-hydroxide on the alloy surface. The nascent CrIII-hydroxide is chemically active enough to form chemical bonds with CrVI from the solution, through Cr III-O-CrVI bonding. Such CrIII-O-Cr VI structure can form and break up reversibly according

  13. Structural, Electronic, Magnetic, and Vibrational Properties of Graphene and Silicene: A First-Principles Perspective

    KAUST Repository

    Kaloni, Thaneshwor P.

    2013-11-01

    This thesis covers the structural, electronic, magnetic, and vibrational properties of graphene and silicene. In Chapter I, we will start with an introduction to graphene and silicene. In Chapter II, we will briefly discuss about the methodology (i. e. density functional theory)In Chapter III, we will introduce band gap opening in graphene either by introducing defects/doping or by creating superlattices with h-BN substrate. In Chapter IV, we will focus on the structural and electronic properties of K and Ge-intercalated graphene on SiC(0001). In addition, the enhancement of the superconducting transition temperature in Li-decorated graphene supported by h-BN substrate will be discussed. In Chapter V, we will discuss the vibrational properties of free-standing silicene. In addition, superlattices of silicene with h-BN as well as the phase transition in silicene by applying an external electric field will be discussed. The electronic and magnetic properties transition metal decorated silicene will be discussed, in particular the realization of the quantum anomalous Hall effect will be addressed. Furthermore, the structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of Mn decorated silicene supported by h-BN substrate will be discussed. The conclusion is included in Chapters VI. Finally, we will end with references and a list of publications for this thesis.

  14. Structure and Absolute Configuration of Nyasol and Hinokiresinol via Synthesis and Vibrational Circular Dichroism Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Peter Rygaard

    2005-01-01

    The absolute configuration of the norlignan (+)-nyasol was determined to be S by comparison of the experimental vibrational circular dichroism data with first-principle calculations taking into account the eight lowest energy conformations. The established absolute configuration of (+)-nyasol...

  15. Analysis of solid-state transformations of pharmaceutical compounds using vibrational spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinz, Andrea; Strachan, Clare J; Gordon, Keith C

    2009-01-01

    pharmaceutical ingredient can significantly influence its processing behaviour, including powder flow and compressibility, and biopharmaceutical properties such as solubility, dissolution rate and bioavailability. KEY FINDINGS: Vibrational spectroscopic techniques such as infrared, near-infrared, Raman and, most...

  16. High-resolution electron spectroscopy and structures of lithium-nucleobase (adenine, uracil, and thymine) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasnokutski, Serge A; Lee, Jung Sup; Yang, Dong-Sheng

    2010-01-28

    Li complexes of adenine, uracil, and thymine were produced by laser vaporization of rods made of Li and nucleobase powders in a metal-cluster beam source and studied by pulsed-field-ionization zero-electron-kinetic-energy (ZEKE) spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations. The ZEKE measurements determined the adiabatic ionization energies of the three neutral complexes and frequencies of several vibrational modes for the metal-adenine and -uracil ions. The measured spectra were compared with spectral simulations to determine the preferred metal binding sites. For adenine, the most stable structure is formed by Li/Li(+) bidentately binding to both the N7 atom of the imidazole ring and the NH(2) group of the pyrimidine ring. For uracil and thymine, the ideal site for Li/Li(+) coordination is the O4 atom. Although it has only a small effect on the geometries of uracil and thymine, lithium coordination forces the rotation of the NH(2) group out of the adenine plane. The adiabatic ionization energies of the three complexes follow the trend of uracil (33910+/-5 cm(-1))>thymine (33386+/-5 cm(-1))>adenine (32240+/-5 cm(-1)), whereas their metal-ligand bond dissociation energies are about the same, (92-97) +/-6 kJ mol(-1). For all three complexes, the neutral bond energies are smaller than those of the corresponding ions due to a weaker electrostatic interaction and stronger electron repulsion.

  17. Infrared Spectroscopy of CO Ro-vibrational Absorption Lines toward the Obscured AGN IRAS 08572+3915

    OpenAIRE

    Shirahata, Mai; Nakagawa, Takao; Usuda, Tomonori; Goto, Miwa; Suto, Hiroshi; Geballe, T. R.

    2012-01-01

    We present high-resolution spectroscopy of gaseous CO absorption in the fundamental ro-vibrational band toward the heavily obscured active galactic nucleus (AGN) IRAS 08572+3915. We have detected absorption lines up to highly excited rotational levels (J 200 km s-1) of which is due to blueshifted (-160 km s-1) gas at a temperature of ~ 270 K absorbing at velocities as high as -400 km s-1. A much weaker but even warmer (~ 700 K) component, which is highly redshifted (+100 km s-1), is also dete...

  18. Effects of cations and cholesterol with sphingomyelin membranes investigated by high-resolution broadband sum frequency vibrational spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhen; Feng, Rong-juan; Li, Yi-yi; Liu, Ming-hua; Guo, Yuan

    2017-08-01

    Sphingomyelin(SM) is specifically enriched in the plasma membrane of mammalian cells. Its molecular structure is compose by N-acyl-Derythro-sphingosylphosphorylcholine. The function of the SM related to membrane signaling and protein trafficking are relied on the interactions of the SM, cations, cholesterol and proteins. In this report, the interaction of three different nature SMs, cations and cholesterol at air/aqueous interfaces studied by high-resolution broadband sum frequency vibrational spectroscopy, respectively. Our results shed lights on understanding the relationship between SMs monolayer, cholesterol and Cations.

  19. Electronic structure of atoms: atomic spectroscopy information system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazakov, V. V.; Kazakov, V. G.; Kovalev, V. S.; Meshkov, O. I.; Yatsenko, A. S.

    2017-10-01

    The article presents a Russian atomic spectroscopy, information system electronic structure of atoms (IS ESA) (http://grotrian.nsu.ru), and describes its main features and options to support research and training. The database contains over 234 000 records, great attention paid to experimental data and uniform filling of the database for all atomic numbers Z, including classified levels and transitions of rare earth and transuranic elements and their ions. Original means of visualization of scientific data in the form of spectrograms and Grotrian diagrams have been proposed. Presentation of spectral data in the form of interactive color charts facilitates understanding and analysis of properties of atomic systems. The use of the spectral data of the IS ESA together with its functionality is effective for solving various scientific problems and training of specialists.

  20. Two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy with birefringent wedges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Réhault, Julien; Maiuri, Margherita; Oriana, Aurelio; Cerullo, Giulio [IFN-CNR, Dipartimento di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2014-12-15

    We present a simple experimental setup for performing two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectroscopy in the partially collinear pump-probe geometry. The setup uses a sequence of birefringent wedges to create and delay a pair of phase-locked, collinear pump pulses, with extremely high phase stability and reproducibility. Continuous delay scanning is possible without any active stabilization or position tracking, and allows to record rapidly and easily 2D spectra. The setup works over a broad spectral range from the ultraviolet to the near-IR, it is compatible with few-optical-cycle pulses and can be easily reconfigured to two-colour operation. A simple method for scattering suppression is also introduced. As a proof of principle, we present degenerate and two-color 2D spectra of the light-harvesting complex 1 of purple bacteria.

  1. Tracking electron-induced carbon contamination and cleaning of Ru surfaces by Auger electron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanjilal, Aloke; Catalfano, Mark; Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Hassanein, Ahmed; Rice, Bryan [Center for Materials under Extreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); SEMATECH Inc., Albany, New York 12203 (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation induced growth of carbon and oxygen desorption were investigated on a Ru surface by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) in the presence and absence of additional photoelectrons (PEs) from a focusing Ru mirror. A decrease in EUV reflectivity with carbon growth in the presence of additional PEs has been observed. Conversely, a carbonaceous Ru surface was cleaned in sequential AES, and discussed in terms of secondary electron assisted dissociation of residual hydrocarbons and water molecules, followed by a chemical reaction between adsorbed carbon and oxygen atoms.

  2. Elastic scattering and vibrational excitation for electron impact on para-benzoquinone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, D. B.; Blanco, F.; García, G.; da Costa, R. F.; Kossoski, F.; Varella, M. T. do N.; Bettega, M. H. F.; Lima, M. A. P.; White, R. D.; Brunger, M. J.

    2017-12-01

    We report on theoretical elastic and experimental vibrational-excitation differential cross sections (DCSs) for electron scattering from para-benzoquinone (C6H4O2), in the intermediate energy range 15-50 eV. The calculations were conducted with two different theoretical methodologies, the Schwinger multichannel method with pseudopotentials (SMCPP) and the independent atom method with screening corrected additivity rule (IAM-SCAR) that also now incorporates a further interference (I) term. The SMCPP with N energetically open electronic states (Nopen) at the static-exchange-plus-polarisation (Nopench-SEP) level was used to calculate the scattering amplitudes using a channel coupling scheme that ranges from 1ch-SE up to the 89ch-SEP level of approximation. We found that in going from the 38ch-SEP to the 89ch-SEP, at all energies considered here, the elastic DCSs did not change significantly in terms of both their shapes and magnitudes. This is a good indication that our SMCPP 89ch-SEP elastic DCSs are converged with respect to the multichannel coupling effect for the investigated intermediate energies. While agreement between our IAM-SCAR+I and SMCPP 89ch-SEP computations improves as the incident electron energy increases from 15 eV, overall the level of accord is only marginal. This is particularly true at middle scattering angles, suggesting that our SCAR and interference corrections are failing somewhat for this molecule below 50 eV. We also report experimental DCS results, using a crossed-beam apparatus, for excitation of some of the unresolved ("hybrid") vibrational quanta (bands I-III) of para-benzoquinone. Those data were derived from electron energy loss spectra that were measured over a scattered electron angular range of 10°-90° and put on an absolute scale using our elastic SMCPP 89ch-SEP DCS results. The energy resolution of our measurements was ˜80 meV, which is why, at least in part, the observed vibrational features were only partially resolved. To

  3. Performance of nonlinear mechanical, resonant-shunted piezoelectric, and electronic vibration absorbers for multi-degree-of-freedom structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnes, Gregory Stephen

    Linear vibration absorbers are a valuable tool used to suppress vibrations due to harmonic excitation in structural systems. Limited evaluation of the performance of nonlinear vibration absorbers for nonlinear structures exists in the current literature. The state of the art is extended in this work to vibration absorbers in their three major physical implementations: the mechanical vibration absorber, the inductive-resistive shunted piezoelectric vibration absorber, and the electronic vibration absorber (also denoted a positive position feedback controller). A single, consistent, physically similar model capable of examining the response of all three devices is developed. The performance of vibration absorbers attached to single-degree-of-freedom structures is next examined for performance, robustness, and stability. Perturbation techniques and numerical analysis combine to yield insight into the tuning of nonlinear vibration absorbers for both linear and nonlinear structures. The results both clarify and validate the existing literature on mechanical vibration absorbers. Several new results, including an analytical expression for the suppression region's location and bandwidth and requirements for its robust performance, are derived. Nonlinear multiple-degree-of-freedom structures are next evaluated. The theory of Non-linear Normal Modes is extended to include consideration of modal damping, excitation, and small linear coupling, allowing estimation of vibration absorber performance. The dynamics of the N+1-degree-of-freedom system reduce to those of a two-degree-of-freedom system on a four-dimensional nonlinear modal manifold, thereby simplifying the analysis. Quantitative agreement is shown to require a higher order model which is recommended for future investigation. Finally, experimental investigation on both single and multi-degree-of-freedom systems is performed since few experiments on this topic are reported in the literature. The experimental results

  4. Ultra-Broadband Two-Dimensional Electronic Spectroscopy and Pump-Probe Microscopy of Molecular Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spokoyny, Boris M.

    Ultrafast spectroscopy offers an unprecedented view on the dynamic nature of chemical reactions. From charge transfer in semiconductors to folding and isomerization of proteins, these all important processes can now be monitored and in some instances even controlled on real, physical timescales. One of the biggest challenges of ultrafast science is the incredible energetic complexity of most systems. It is not uncommon to encounter macromolecules or materials with absorption spectra spanning significant portions of the visible spectrum. Monitoring a multitude of electronic and vibrational transitions, all dynamically interacting with each other on femtosecond timescales poses a truly daunting experimental task. The first part of this thesis deals with the development of a novel Two-Dimensional Electronic Spectroscopy (2DES) and its associated, advanced detection methodologies. Owing to its ultra-broadband implementation, this technique enables us to monitor femtosecond chemical dynamics that span the energetic landscape of the entire visible spectrum. In order to demonstrate the utility of our method, we apply it to two laser dye molecules, IR-144 and Cresyl Violet. Variation of photophysical properties on a microscopic scale in either man-made or naturally occurring systems can have profound implications on how we understand their macroscopic properties. Recently, inorganic hybrid perovskites have been tapped as the next generation solar energy harvesting materials. Their remarkable properties include low exciton binding energy, low exciton recombination rates and long carrier diffusion lengths. Nevertheless, considerable variability in device properties made with nearly identical preparation methods has puzzled the community. In the second part of this thesis we use non-linear pump probe microscopy to study the heterogeneous nature of femtosecond carrier dynamics in thin film perovskites. We show that the local morphology of the perovskite thin films has a

  5. Vibrational optical activity of chiral carbon nanoclusters treated by a generalized π-electron method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Péter R.; Surján, Péter R.; Szabados, Ágnes

    2014-01-01

    Cross sections of inelastic light scattering accompanied by vibronic excitation in large conjugated carbon structures is assessed at the π-electron level. Intensities of Raman and vibrational Raman optical activity (VROA) spectra of fullerenes are computed, relying on a single electron per atom. When considering only first neighbor terms in the Hamiltonian (a tight-binding (TB) type or Hückel-model), Raman intensities are captured remarkably well, based on comparison with frequency-dependent linear response of the self-consistent field (SCF) method. Resorting to π-electron levels when computing spectral intensities brings a beneficial reduction in computational cost as compared to linear response SCF. At difference with total intensities, the first neighbor TB model is found inadequate for giving the left and right circularly polarized components of the scattered light, especially when the molecular surface is highly curved. To step beyond first neighbor approximation, an effective π-electron Hamiltonian, including interaction of all sites is derived from the all-electron Fockian, in the spirit of the Bloch-equation. Chiroptical cross-sections computed by this novel π-electron method improve upon first-neighbor TB considerably, with no increase in computational cost. Computed VROA spectra of chiral fullerenes, such as C76 and C28, are reported for the first time, both by conventional linear response SCF and effective π-electron models.

  6. Vibrational analysis, electronic structure and nonlinear optical properties of Levofloxacin by density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunasekaran, Sethu; Rajalakshmi, K.; Kumaresan, Subramanian

    2013-08-01

    The Fourier transform (FT-IR) spectrum of Levofloxacin was recorded in the region 4000-400 cm-1 and a complete vibrational assignment of fundamental vibrational modes of the molecule was carried out using density functional method. The observed fundamental modes have been compared with the harmonic vibrational frequencies computed using DFT (B3LYP) method by employing 6-31 G (d, p) basis sets. The most stable geometry of the molecule under investigation has been determined from the potential energy scan. The first-order hyperpolarizability (βo) and other related properties (μ, αo) of Levofloxacin are calculated using density functional theory (DFT) on a finite field approach. UV-vis spectrum of the molecule was recorded and the electronic properties, such as HOMO and LUMO energies were performed by DFT using 6-31 G (d, p) basis sets. Stability of the molecule arising from hyperconjugative interactions, charge delocalization have been analyzed using natural bond orbital analysis (NBO). The calculated HOMO and LUMO energies show that, the charge transfer occurs within the molecule. The other molecular properties like molecular electrostatic potential (MESP), Mulliken population analysis and thermodynamic properties of the title molecule have been calculated.

  7. Attosecond photoelectron spectroscopy of electron transport in solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magerl, Elisabeth

    2011-03-31

    Time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of condensed matter systems in the attosecond regime promises new insights into excitation mechanisms and transient dynamics of electrons in solids. This timescale became accessible directly only recently with the development of the attosecond streak camera and of laser systems providing few-cycle, phase-controlled laser pulses in the near-infrared, which are used to generate isolated, sub-femtosecond extreme-ultraviolet pulses with a well-defined timing with respect to the near-infrared pulse. Employing these pulses, the attosecond streak camera offers time resolutions as short as a few 10 attoseconds. In the framework of this thesis, a new, versatile experimental apparatus combining attosecond pulse generation in gases with state of the art surface science techniques is designed, constructed, and commissioned. Employing this novel infrastructure and the technique of the attosecond transient recorder, we investigate transport phenomena occurring after photoexcitation of electrons in tungsten and rhenium single crystals and show that attosecond streaking is a unique method for resolving extremely fast electronic phenomena in solids. It is demonstrated that electrons originating from different energy levels, i.e. from the conduction band and the 4f core level, are emitted from the crystal surface at different times. The origin of this time delay, which is below 150 attoseconds for all studied systems, is investigated by a systematic variation of several experimental parameters, in particular the photon energy of the employed attosecond pulses. These experimental studies are complemented by theoretical studies of the group velocity of highly-excited electrons based on ab initio calculations. While the streaking technique applied on single crystals can provide only information about the relative time delay between two types of photoelectrons, the absolute transport time remains inaccessible. We introduce a scheme of a reference

  8. Threshold vibrational excitation of CO{sub 2} by slow electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanroose, Wim; Zhang, Zhiyong; McCurdy, C.W.; Rescigno, T.N.

    2003-07-08

    Threshold structures, reminiscent of those seen in the polar hydrogen halides, have recently been observed in the cross sections for electron impact excitation of certain vibrational levels of the non-polar CO2 molecule. These structures occur at energies outside the range where shape resonances dominate the dynamics. We propose a virtual state model that describes the multi-dimensional nuclear dynamics during the collision and explains quantitatively the selectivity observed in the excitation of the Fermi dyad, as well as the pattern of threshold peaks and oscillations seen in the upper levels of the higher polyads.

  9. Assignment of absolute stereostructures through quantum mechanics electronic and vibrational circular dichroism calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Peng; Jiang, Nan; Tan, Ren-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Elucidation of absolute configuration of chiral molecules including structurally complex natural products remains a challenging problem in organic chemistry. A reliable method for assigning the absolute stereostructure is to combine the experimental circular dichroism (CD) techniques such as electronic and vibrational CD (ECD and VCD), with quantum mechanics (QM) ECD and VCD calculations. The traditional QM methods as well as their continuing developments make them more applicable with accuracy. Taking some chiral natural products with diverse conformations as examples, this review describes the basic concepts and new developments of QM approaches for ECD and VCD calculations in solution and solid states.

  10. A Calculation of Elastic Flexural Vibrations of Whisker Crystals Irradiated with Nanosecond Electron Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chebodayev, M. I.

    2017-10-01

    Within the framework of the linear thermal elasticity theory a dynamic thermoelastic bending of a whisker crystal is considered under conditions of its irradiation with a high-current electron beam of nanosecond duration. It is shown that the characteristic time of leveling the temperature of superthin pin-type rod nonuniformely heated over its thickness is comparable with the period of the fundamental wave of flexural vibrations. This gives rise to a considerable decrease in the bending amplitude, which is concurrent with the heat conduction processes.

  11. Capturing inhomogeneous broadening of the -CN stretch vibration in a Langmuir monolayer with high-resolution spectra and ultrafast vibrational dynamics in sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velarde Ruiz Esparza, Luis A.; Wang, Hongfei

    2013-08-28

    Even though in principle the frequency-domain and time-domain spectroscopic measurement should generate identical information for a given molecular system, inhomogeneous character of surface vibrations in the sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS) studies has only been studied with the time-domain SFGVS by mapping the decay of the vibrational polarization using ultrafast lasers, due to the lack of SFG vibrational spectra with high enough spectral resolution and accurate enough line shape. Here with recently developed high-resolution broadband SFG-VS (HR-BB-SFG-VS) we show that the inhomogeneous line shape can be obtained in the frequency-domain, for the anchoring CN stretch of the 4-n-octyl-4'-cyanobiphenyl (8CB) Langmuir monolayer at the air-water interface, and that an excellent agreement with the time-domain SFG free-induction-decay (FID) results can be established. We found that the 8CB CN stretch spectrum consists of a single peak centered at 2234.00 + * 0.01 cm-1 with a total line width of 10.9 + - 0.3 cm-1 at half maximum. The Lorentzian contribution accounts only for 4:7 + -0:4 cm-1 to this width and the Gaussian (inhomogeneous) broadening for as much as 8:1+*0:2 cm-1. Polarization analysis of the -CN spectra showed that the -CN group is tilted 57 + - 2 degrees from the surface normal. The large heterogeneity in the -CN spectrum is tentatively attributed to the -CN group interactions with the interfacial water molecules penetrated/accomodated into the 8CB monolayer, a unique phenomenon for the nCB Langmuir monolayers reported previously.

  12. Annular electron energy-loss spectroscopy in the scanning transmission electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruben, Gary [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Bosman, Michel [Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, A-STAR (Agency for Science, Technology and Research), 3 Research Link, Singapore 117602 (Singapore); D' Alfonso, Adrian J. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Okunishi, Eiji; Kondo, Yukihito [JEOL Ltd., 1-2, Musashino 3-chome Akishima, Tokyo 196-8558 (Japan); Allen, Leslie J., E-mail: lja@unimelb.edu.au [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia)

    2011-11-15

    We study atomic-resolution annular electron energy-loss spectroscopy (AEELS) in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) imaging with experiments and numerical simulations. In this technique the central part of the bright field disk is blocked by a beam stop, forming an annular entry aperture to the spectrometer. The EELS signal thus arises only from electrons scattered inelastically to angles defined by the aperture. It will be shown that this method is more robust than conventional EELS imaging to variations in specimen thickness and can also provide higher spatial resolution. This raises the possibility of lattice resolution imaging of lighter elements or ionization edges previously considered unsuitable for EELS imaging. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We study annular electron energy-loss spectroscopy (AEELS) in STEM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This is more robust to changes in specimen thickness than conventional EELS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AEELS provides higher spatial resolution than conventional EELS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This raises the possibility of lattice resolution imaging of lighter elements.

  13. NASA-DoD Lead-Free Electronics Project: Vibration Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodrow, Thomas A.

    2010-01-01

    Vibration testing was conducted by Boeing Research and Technology (Seattle) for the NASA-DoD Lead-Free Electronics Solder Project. This project is a follow-on to the Joint Council on Aging Aircraft/Joint Group on Pollution Prevention (JCAA/JG-PP) Lead-Free Solder Project which was the first group to test the reliability of lead-free solder joints against the requirements of the aerospace/miLItary community. Twenty seven test vehicles were subjected to the vibration test conditions (in two batches). The random vibration Power Spectral Density (PSD) input was increased during the test every 60 minutes in an effort to fail as many components as possible within the time allotted for the test. The solder joints on the components were electrically monitored using event detectors and any solder joint failures were recorded on a Labview-based data collection system. The number of test minutes required to fail a given component attached with SnPb solder was then compared to the number of test minutes required to fail the same component attached with lead-free solder. A complete modal analysis was conducted on one test vehicle using a laser vibrometer system which measured velocities, accelerations, and displacements at one . hundred points. The laser vibrometer data was used to determine the frequencies of the major modes of the test vehicle and the shapes of the modes. In addition, laser vibrometer data collected during the vibration test was used to calculate the strains generated by the first mode (using custom software). After completion of the testing, all of the test vehicles were visually inspected and cross sections were made. Broken component leads and other unwanted failure modes were documented.

  14. Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy of Adsorbed Amino Acids, Peptides and Proteins of Hydrophilic and Hydrophobic Solid-Water Interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holinga IV, George Joseph [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2010-09-01

    Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy was used to investigate the interfacial properties of several amino acids, peptides, and proteins adsorbed at the hydrophilic polystyrene solid-liquid and the hydrophobic silica solid-liquid interfaces. The influence of experimental geometry on the sensitivity and resolution of the SFG vibrational spectroscopy technique was investigated both theoretically and experimentally. SFG was implemented to investigate the adsorption and organization of eight individual amino acids at model hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces under physiological conditions. Biointerface studies were conducted using a combination of SFG and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) comparing the interfacial structure and concentration of two amino acids and their corresponding homopeptides at two model liquid-solid interfaces as a function of their concentration in aqueous solutions. The influence of temperature, concentration, equilibration time, and electrical bias on the extent of adsorption and interfacial structure of biomolecules were explored at the liquid-solid interface via QCM and SFG. QCM was utilized to quantify the biological activity of heparin functionalized surfaces. A novel optical parametric amplifier was developed and utilized in SFG experiments to investigate the secondary structure of an adsorbed model peptide at the solid-liquid interface.

  15. Vibrational spectroscopy of triacetone triperoxide (TATP): Anharmonic fundamentals, overtones and combination bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauer, Brina; Dubnikova, Faina; Zeiri, Yehuda; Kosloff, Ronnie; Gerber, R. Benny

    2008-12-01

    The vibrational spectrum of triacetone triperoxide (TATP) is studied by the correlation-corrected vibrational self-consistent field (CC-VSCF) method which incorporates anharmonic effects. Fundamental, overtone, and combination band frequencies are obtained by using a potential based on the PM3 method and yielding the same harmonic frequencies as DFT/cc-pVDZ calculations. Fundamentals and overtones are also studied with anharmonic single-mode (without coupling) DFT/cc-pVDZ calculations. Average deviations from experiment are similar for all methods: 2.1-2.5%. Groups of degenerate vibrations form regions of numerous combination bands with low intensity: the 5600-5800 cm -1 region contains ca. 70 overtones and combinations of CH stretches. Anharmonic interactions are analyzed.

  16. Orientations of nonlocal vibrational modes from combined experimental and theoretical sum frequency spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chase, Hilary M.; Chen, Shunli; Fu, Li; Upshur, Mary Alice; Rudshteyn, Benjamin; Thomson, Regan J.; Wang, Hong-Fei; Batista, Victor S.; Geiger, Franz M.

    2017-09-01

    Inferring molecular orientations from vibrational sum frequency generation (SFG) spectra is challenging in polarization combinations that result in low signal intensities, or when the local point group symmetry approximation fails. While combining experiments with density functional theory (DFT) could overcome this problem, the scope of the combined method has yet to be established. Here, we assess its feasibility of determining the distributions of molecular orientations for one monobasic ester, two epoxides and three alcohols at the vapor/fused silica interface. We find that molecular orientations of nonlocal vibrational modes cannot be determined using polarization-resolved SFG measurements alone.

  17. Valence electron energy-loss spectroscopy in monochromated scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erni, Rolf; Browning, Nigel D

    2005-10-01

    With the development of monochromators for (scanning) transmission electron microscopes, valence electron energy-loss spectroscopy (VEELS) is developing into a unique technique to study the band structure and optical properties of nanoscale materials. This article discusses practical aspects of spatially resolved VEELS performed in scanning transmission mode and the alignments necessary to achieve the current optimum performance of approximately 0.15 eV energy resolution with an electron probe size of approximately 1 nm. In particular, a collection of basic concepts concerning the acquisition process, the optimization of the energy resolution, the spatial resolution and the data processing are provided. A brief study of planar defects in a Y(1)Ba(2)Cu(3)O(7-)(delta) high-temperature superconductor illustrates these concepts and shows what kind of information can be accessed by VEELS.

  18. Raman spectroscopy as a tool to investigate the structure and electronic properties of carbon-atom wires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Milani

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Graphene, nanotubes and other carbon nanostructures have shown potential as candidates for advanced technological applications due to the different coordination of carbon atoms and to the possibility of π-conjugation. In this context, atomic-scale wires comprised of sp-hybridized carbon atoms represent ideal 1D systems to potentially downscale devices to the atomic level. Carbon-atom wires (CAWs can be arranged in two possible structures: a sequence of double bonds (cumulenes, resulting in a 1D metal, or an alternating sequence of single–triple bonds (polyynes, expected to show semiconducting properties. The electronic and optical properties of CAWs can be finely tuned by controlling the wire length (i.e., the number of carbon atoms and the type of termination (e.g., atom, molecular group or nanostructure. Although linear, sp-hybridized carbon systems are still considered elusive and unstable materials, a number of nanostructures consisting of sp-carbon wires have been produced and characterized to date. In this short review, we present the main CAW synthesis techniques and stabilization strategies and we discuss the current status of the understanding of their structural, electronic and vibrational properties with particular attention to how these properties are related to one another. We focus on the use of vibrational spectroscopy to provide information on the structural and electronic properties of the system (e.g., determination of wire length. Moreover, by employing Raman spectroscopy and surface enhanced Raman scattering in combination with the support of first principles calculations, we show that a detailed understanding of the charge transfer between CAWs and metal nanoparticles may open the possibility to tune the electronic structure from alternating to equalized bonds.

  19. Evidence for cooperative vibrational relaxation of the NH-, OH-, and OD-stretching modes in hydrogen-bonded liquids using infrared pump-probe spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, D J; Panman, M R; Woutersen, S

    2009-11-27

    Vibrational energy relaxation of the NH-, OH-, and OD-stretching modes in hydrogen-bonded liquids has been investigated by means of infrared pump-probe spectroscopy. The relaxation rates have been determined both in neat liquids and in isotopic mixtures with systematically varied isotope fractions. In all liquids, the vibrational relaxation rate increases as the isotope fraction is increased and reaches a maximum in the neat liquid. The dependence of the relaxation rate on the isotope fraction suggests a relaxation channel in which the vibrational energy is partitioned between accepting modes of two neighboring molecules.

  20. Structural, electronic, optical and vibrational properties of nanoscale carbons and nanowires: a colloquial review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Milton W; Crespi, Vincent H; Dresselhaus, Mildred S; Dresselhaus, Gene; Fischer, John E; Gutierrez, Humberto R; Kojima, K; Mahan, Gerald D; Rao, Apparao M; Sofo, Jorge O; Tachibana, M; Wako, K; Xiong, Qihua

    2010-08-25

    This review addresses the field of nanoscience as viewed through the lens of the scientific career of Peter Eklund, thus with a special focus on nanocarbons and nanowires. Peter brought to his research an intense focus, imagination, tenacity, breadth and ingenuity rarely seen in modern science. His goal was to capture the essential physics of natural phenomena. This attitude also guides our writing: we focus on basic principles, without sacrificing accuracy, while hoping to convey an enthusiasm for the science commensurate with Peter's. The term 'colloquial review' is intended to capture this style of presentation. The diverse phenomena of condensed matter physics involve electrons, phonons and the structures within which excitations reside. The 'nano' regime presents particularly interesting and challenging science. Finite size effects play a key role, exemplified by the discrete electronic and phonon spectra of C(60) and other fullerenes. The beauty of such molecules (as well as nanotubes and graphene) is reflected by the theoretical principles that govern their behavior. As to the challenge, 'nano' requires special care in materials preparation and treatment, since the surface-to-volume ratio is so high; they also often present difficulties of acquiring an experimental signal, since the samples can be quite small. All of the atoms participate in the various phenomena, without any genuinely 'bulk' properties. Peter was a master of overcoming such challenges. The primary activity of Eklund's research was to measure and understand the vibrations of atoms in carbon materials. Raman spectroscopy was very dear to Peter. He published several papers on the theory of phonons (Eklund et al 1995a Carbon 33 959-72, Eklund et al 1995b Thin Solid Films 257 211-32, Eklund et al 1992 J. Phys. Chem. Solids 53 1391-413, Dresselhaus and Eklund 2000 Adv. Phys. 49 705-814) and many more papers on measuring phonons (Pimenta et al 1998b Phys. Rev. B 58 16016-9, Rao et al 1997a Nature

  1. Structural, electronic, optical and vibrational properties of nanoscale carbons and nanowires: a colloquial review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Milton W.; Crespi, Vincent H.; Dresselhaus, Mildred S.; Dresselhaus, Gene; Fischer, John E.; Gutierrez, Humberto R.; Kojima, K.; Mahan, Gerald D.; Rao, Apparao M.; Sofo, Jorge O.; Tachibana, M.; Wako, K.; Xiong, Qihua

    2010-08-01

    This review addresses the field of nanoscience as viewed through the lens of the scientific career of Peter Eklund, thus with a special focus on nanocarbons and nanowires. Peter brought to his research an intense focus, imagination, tenacity, breadth and ingenuity rarely seen in modern science. His goal was to capture the essential physics of natural phenomena. This attitude also guides our writing: we focus on basic principles, without sacrificing accuracy, while hoping to convey an enthusiasm for the science commensurate with Peter's. The term 'colloquial review' is intended to capture this style of presentation. The diverse phenomena of condensed matter physics involve electrons, phonons and the structures within which excitations reside. The 'nano' regime presents particularly interesting and challenging science. Finite size effects play a key role, exemplified by the discrete electronic and phonon spectra of C60 and other fullerenes. The beauty of such molecules (as well as nanotubes and graphene) is reflected by the theoretical principles that govern their behavior. As to the challenge, 'nano' requires special care in materials preparation and treatment, since the surface-to-volume ratio is so high; they also often present difficulties of acquiring an experimental signal, since the samples can be quite small. All of the atoms participate in the various phenomena, without any genuinely 'bulk' properties. Peter was a master of overcoming such challenges. The primary activity of Eklund's research was to measure and understand the vibrations of atoms in carbon materials. Raman spectroscopy was very dear to Peter. He published several papers on the theory of phonons (Eklund et al 1995a Carbon 33 959-72, Eklund et al 1995b Thin Solid Films 257 211-32, Eklund et al 1992 J. Phys. Chem. Solids 53 1391-413, Dresselhaus and Eklund 2000 Adv. Phys. 49 705-814) and many more papers on measuring phonons (Pimenta et al 1998b Phys. Rev. B 58 16016-9, Rao et al 1997a Nature

  2. Exploring the vibrational fingerprint of the electronic excitation energy via molecular dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deyne, Andy Van Yperen-De; Pauwels, Ewald; Ghysels, An; Waroquier, Michel; Van Speybroeck, Veronique; Hemelsoet, Karen, E-mail: karen.hemelsoet@ugent.be [Center for Molecular Modeling (CMM), Ghent University, Technologiepark 903, 9052 Zwijnaarde (Belgium); De Meyer, Thierry [Center for Molecular Modeling (CMM), Ghent University, Technologiepark 903, 9052 Zwijnaarde (Belgium); Department of Textiles, Ghent University, Technologiepark 907, 9052 Zwijnaarde (Belgium); De Clerck, Karen [Department of Textiles, Ghent University, Technologiepark 907, 9052 Zwijnaarde (Belgium)

    2014-04-07

    A Fourier-based method is presented to relate changes of the molecular structure during a molecular dynamics simulation with fluctuations in the electronic excitation energy. The method implies sampling of the ground state potential energy surface. Subsequently, the power spectrum of the velocities is compared with the power spectrum of the excitation energy computed using time-dependent density functional theory. Peaks in both spectra are compared, and motions exhibiting a linear or quadratic behavior can be distinguished. The quadratically active motions are mainly responsible for the changes in the excitation energy and hence cause shifts between the dynamic and static values of the spectral property. Moreover, information about the potential energy surface of various excited states can be obtained. The procedure is illustrated with three case studies. The first electronic excitation is explored in detail and dominant vibrational motions responsible for changes in the excitation energy are identified for ethylene, biphenyl, and hexamethylbenzene. The proposed method is also extended to other low-energy excitations. Finally, the vibrational fingerprint of the excitation energy of a more complex molecule, in particular the azo dye ethyl orange in a water environment, is analyzed.

  3. Quantum entanglement between electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom in molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKemmish, Laura K; McKenzie, Ross H; Hush, Noel S; Reimers, Jeffrey R

    2011-12-28

    We consider the quantum entanglement of the electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom in molecules with tendencies towards double welled potentials. In these bipartite systems, the von Neumann entropy of the reduced density matrix is used to quantify the electron-vibration entanglement for the lowest two vibronic wavefunctions obtained from a model Hamiltonian based on coupled harmonic diabatic potential-energy surfaces. Significant entanglement is found only in the region in which the ground vibronic state contains a density profile that is bimodal (i.e., contains two separate local maxima). However, in this region two distinct types of density and entanglement profiles are found: one type arises purely from the degeneracy of energy levels in the two potential wells and is destroyed by slight asymmetry, while the other arises through strong interactions between the diabatic levels of each well and is relatively insensitive to asymmetry. These two distinct types are termed fragile degeneracy-induced entanglement and persistent entanglement, respectively. Six classic molecular systems describable by two diabatic states are considered: ammonia, benzene, BNB, pyridine excited triplet states, the Creutz-Taube ion, and the radical cation of the "special pair" of chlorophylls involved in photosynthesis. These chemically diverse systems are all treated using the same general formalism and the nature of the entanglement that they embody is elucidated.

  4. Vibrational spectroscopy of SnBr4 and CCl4 using Lie algebraic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    U(4) algebra. The U(4) model takes the rotation and the vibration into account simultaneously but becomes complex when the number of atoms in the molecules becomes larger than four. After 1981, there is a rapid progress in this field. Iachello et al [3,4] have proposed U(4) algebra to calculate the stretching and bending vi ...

  5. Structural, electronic and vibrational properties of lanthanide monophosphide at high pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panchal, J. M., E-mail: amitjignesh@yahoo.co.in [Government Engineering College, Gandhinagar382028, Gujarat (India); Department of Physics, University School of Sciences, Gujarat University, Ahmedabad 380009, Gujarat (India); Joshi, Mitesh [Government Polytechnic for Girls, Athwagate, Surat395001, Gujarat (India); Gajjar, P. N., E-mail: pngajjar@rediffmail.com [Department of Physics, University School of Sciences, Gujarat University, Ahmedabad 380009, Gujarat (India)

    2016-05-06

    A first-principles plane wave self-consistent method with the ultra-soft-pseudopotential scheme in the framework of the density functional theory (DFT) is performed to study structural, electronic and vibrational properties of LaP for Rock-salt (NaCl/Bl) and Cesium-chloride (CsCl/B2) phases. The instability of Rock-salt (NaCl/Bl) phases around the transition is discussed. Conclusions based on electronic energy band structure, density of state, phonon dispersion and phonon density of states in both phases are outlined. The calculated results are consistence and confirm the successful applicability of quasi-harmonic phonon theory for structural instability studies for the alloys.

  6. Curious matrix effects: a computational, electron diffraction, and vibrational spectroscopic study of dysprosium triiodide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, Zoltán; Groen, Cornelis Petrus; Kolonits, Mária; Hargittai, Magdolna

    2010-07-21

    The molecular and electronic structure of dysprosium triiodide, DyI(3), and its dimer, Dy(2)I(6), was determined by high level computations, gas-phase electron diffraction, and gas-phase infrared and matrix-isolation infrared and Raman spectroscopy. The free monomeric molecule is planar from all methods with an equilibrium bond length of 2.808(9) A; the thermal average bond length from electron diffraction is 2.828(6) A. The molecule forms complexes in the matrix-isolation experiments causing pyramidalisation of planar monomeric molecules. The likelihood of having both pyramidal and planar DyI(3) molecules in the matrix is discussed in order to explain certain features of the spectra. Our computations suggest that the dimer geometry depends on the occupation of the partially filled 4f orbitals. As this is the third molecule in the dysprosium trihalide series studied, trends in their electronic and molecular structures are presented and discussed.

  7. Compact design for two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zheng; Wang, Peng; Shen, Xiong; Yan, Tian-Min; Zhang, Yizhu; Liu, Jun

    2016-03-01

    We present a passively phase-stabilized two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2DES) with a compact size, and the ease of implementation and maintenance. Our design relies on a mask beam-splitter with four holes to form non-collinear box geometry, and a homebuilt stacked retroreflector, which introduces the phase-locked pulse sequence, remedying the instability of commonly used translation stages. The minimized size of the setup suppresses the influences of optical path-length fluctuations during measurements, improving the phase stability and precise timing of pulse sequences. In our 2DES, only few conventional optical components are used, which make this sophisticated instrumentation convenient to establish and particularly easy to conduct alignment. In data analysis, the self-referencing spectral interferometry (SRSI) method is first introduced to extract the complex-valued signal from spectral interferometry in 2DES. The alternative algorithm achieves the improvement of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and considerable reduction of data acquisition time. The new setup is suitable over a tunable range of spectroscopic wavelength, from ultraviolet (UV) to the near-infrared (NIR) regime, and for ultra-broadband bandwidth, few-cycle laser pulses.

  8. Evaluation of the structural, electronic, topological and vibrational properties of N-(3,4-dimethoxybenzyl)-hexadecanamide isolated from Maca (Lepidium meyenii) using different spectroscopic techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chain, Fernando; Iramain, Maximiliano Alberto; Grau, Alfredo; Catalán, César A. N.; Brandán, Silvia Antonia

    2017-01-01

    N-(3,4-dimethoxybenzyl)-hexadecanamide (DMH) was characterized by using Fourier Transform infrared (FT-IR) and Raman (FT-Raman), Ultraviolet- Visible (UV-Visible) and Hydrogen and Carbon Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (1H and 13C NMR) spectroscopies. The structural, electronic, topological and vibrational properties were evaluated in gas phase and in n-hexane employing ONIOM and self-consistent force field (SCRF) calculations. The atomic charges, molecular electrostatic potentials, stabilization energies and topological properties of DMH were analyzed and compared with those calculated for N-(3,4-dimethoxybenzyl)-acetamide (DMA) in order to evaluate the effect of the side chain on the properties of DMH. The reactivity and behavior of this alkamide were predicted by using the gap energies and some descriptors. Force fields and the corresponding force constants were reported for DMA only in gas phase and n-hexane due to the high number of vibration normal modes showed by DMH, while the complete vibrational assignments are presented for DMA and both forms of DMH. The comparisons between the experimental FTIR, FT-Raman, UV-Visible and 1H and 13C NMR spectra with the corresponding theoretical ones showed a reasonable concordance.

  9. The Fourteenth International Meeting on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy (TRVS XIV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-03

    Sponsored by Infrared Systems Development and Infrared Associates Sunday, May 10, 2009      7:30 AM Breakfast 8:50 AM Opening ...solutes 10:20 AM C Artem A Bakulin Wayne Liang Thomas la Cour Do hydrophobic groups stabilize the water structure?. , , Jansen Douwe A Wiersma Huib... opening of a beta turn thioxopeptide 13 Joshua Lessing, Jongjin Kim, Kevin Jones, Ziad Ganim, and Andrei Tokmakoff, MIT Two dimensional vibrational

  10. Influence of weak vibrational-electronic couplings on 2D electronic spectra and inter-site coherence in weakly coupled photosynthetic complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monahan, Daniele M.; Whaley-Mayda, Lukas; Fleming, Graham R., E-mail: grfleming@lbl.gov [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Physical Biosciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Kavli Energy NanoSciences Institute at Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Ishizaki, Akihito [Institute for Molecular Science, National Institutes of Natural Sciences, Okazaki 444-8585 (Japan)

    2015-08-14

    Coherence oscillations measured in two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectra of pigment-protein complexes may have electronic, vibrational, or mixed-character vibronic origins, which depend on the degree of electronic-vibrational mixing. Oscillations from intrapigment vibrations can obscure the inter-site coherence lifetime of interest in elucidating the mechanisms of energy transfer in photosynthetic light-harvesting. Huang-Rhys factors (S) for low-frequency vibrations in Chlorophyll and Bacteriochlorophyll are quite small (S ≤ 0.05), so it is often assumed that these vibrations influence neither 2D spectra nor inter-site coherence dynamics. In this work, we explore the influence of S within this range on the oscillatory signatures in simulated 2D spectra of a pigment heterodimer. To visualize the inter-site coherence dynamics underlying the 2D spectra, we introduce a formalism which we call the “site-probe response.” By comparing the calculated 2D spectra with the site-probe response, we show that an on-resonance vibration with Huang-Rhys factor as small as S = 0.005 and the most strongly coupled off-resonance vibrations (S = 0.05) give rise to long-lived, purely vibrational coherences at 77 K. We moreover calculate the correlation between optical pump interactions and subsequent entanglement between sites, as measured by the concurrence. At 77 K, greater long-lived inter-site coherence and entanglement appear with increasing S. This dependence all but vanishes at physiological temperature, as environmentally induced fluctuations destroy the vibronic mixing.

  11. Extremely slow intramolecular vibrational redistribution: Direct observation by time-resolved raman spectroscopy in trifluoropropyne

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinovsky, A. L.; Makarov, A. A.; Ryabov, E. A.

    2011-04-01

    We have studied the dynamics of intramolecular vibrational redistribution (IVR) from the initially excited mode v1 ≈ 3330 cm-1 (acetylene-type H-C bond) in H-C≡C-CF3 molecules in the gaseous phase by means of anti-Stokes spontaneous Raman scattering. The time constant of this process is estimated as 2.3 ns—this is the slowest IVR time reported so far for the room-temperature gases. It is suggested that so long IVR time with respect to the other propyne derivatives can be explained by a larger defect, in this case, of the Fermi resonance of v1 with v2 + 2v7—the most probable doorway state leading to IVR from v1 to the bath of all vibrational-rotational states with the close energies. In addition, it is shown that the observed dynamics is in agreement with a theoretical model assuming strong vibrational-rotational mixing.

  12. Study of polymorphism in imatinib mesylate: A quantum chemical approach using electronic and vibrational spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Anubha; Joshi, B. D.; Tandon, Poonam; Ayala, A. P.; Bansal, A. K.; Grillo, Damián

    2013-02-01

    Imatinib mesylate, 4-(4-methyl-piperazin-1-ylmethyl)-N-u[4-methyl-3-(4-pyridin-3-yl)pyrimidine-2-ylamino)phenyl]benzamide methanesulfonate is a therapeutic drug that is approved for the treatment of chronic myelogeneous leukemia (CML) and gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). It is known that imatinib mesylate exists in two polymorphic forms α and β. However, β-form is more stable than the α-form. In this work, we present a detailed vibrational spectroscopic investigation of β-form by using FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra. These data are supported by quantum mechanical calculations using DFT employing 6-311G(d,p) basis set, which allow us to characterize completely the vibrational spectra of this compound. The FT-IR spectrum of α-form has also been discussed. The importance of hydrogen-bond formation in the molecular packing arrangements of both forms has been examined with the vibrational shifts observed due to polymorphic changes. The red shift of the NH stretching bands in the infrared spectrum from the computed wavenumber indicates the weakening of the NH bond. The UV-vis spectroscopic studies along with the HOMO-LUMO analysis of both polymorphs (α and β) were performed and their chemical activity has been discussed. The TD-DFT method was used to calculate the electronic absorption spectra in the gas phase as well as in the solvent environment using IEF-PCM model and 6-31G basis set. Finally, the results obtained complements to the experimental findings.

  13. Model-independent quantitative measurement of nanomechanical oscillator vibrations using electron-microscope linescans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Huan; Fenton, J. C.; Chiatti, O. [London Centre for Nanotechnology, University College London, 17–19 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AH (United Kingdom); Warburton, P. A. [London Centre for Nanotechnology, University College London, 17–19 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AH (United Kingdom); Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University College London, Torrington Place, London WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-15

    Nanoscale mechanical resonators are highly sensitive devices and, therefore, for application as highly sensitive mass balances, they are potentially superior to micromachined cantilevers. The absolute measurement of nanoscale displacements of such resonators remains a challenge, however, since the optical signal reflected from a cantilever whose dimensions are sub-wavelength is at best very weak. We describe a technique for quantitative analysis and fitting of scanning-electron microscope (SEM) linescans across a cantilever resonator, involving deconvolution from the vibrating resonator profile using the stationary resonator profile. This enables determination of the absolute amplitude of nanomechanical cantilever oscillations even when the oscillation amplitude is much smaller than the cantilever width. This technique is independent of any model of secondary-electron emission from the resonator and is, therefore, applicable to resonators with arbitrary geometry and material inhomogeneity. We demonstrate the technique using focussed-ion-beam–deposited tungsten cantilevers of radius ∼60–170 nm inside a field-emission SEM, with excitation of the cantilever by a piezoelectric actuator allowing measurement of the full frequency response. Oscillation amplitudes approaching the size of the primary electron-beam can be resolved. We further show that the optimum electron-beam scan speed is determined by a compromise between deflection of the cantilever at low scan speeds and limited spatial resolution at high scan speeds. Our technique will be an important tool for use in precise characterization of nanomechanical resonator devices.

  14. Electronic, vibrational, superconducting and thermodynamic properties of cubic antiperovskite ZnNNi3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tütüncü, H. M.; Srivastava, G. P.

    2013-12-01

    We present results of ab initio theoretical investigations of the structural and electronic properties of the cubic superconductor ZnNNi? by employing the plane wave pseudopotential method within the generalized gradient approximation. The density of states at the Fermi level is found to be governed by the Ni 3d electrons. A linear-response approach to the density functional theory is used to derive the phonon dispersion curves, vibrational density of states and the electron-phonon coupling parameter. The calculated electron-phonon coupling constant ? and the logarithmically averaged phonon frequency are calculated to be 0.654 and 169.89 K, respectively, giving the superconducting transition temperature T?=2.925 K according to the Allen-Dynes formula. Our calculated value of T? is in excellent accord with the corresponding experimental value of 3 K. Using the phonon dispersion results, we further present an assessment of important thermodynamical properties such as internal energy (E), Helmholtz free energy (F), constant-volume specific heat (C?), entropy (S) and Debye temperature (?) in the framework of quasi harmonic approximation theory.

  15. Spectroscopy of hexafluorides with an odd number of electrons; Spectroscopie des hexafluorures a nombre impair d'electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boudon, V

    1995-05-01

    From a theoretical point of view, a tensorial formalism adapted to the study of molecules or octahedral ions with a half-integer angular momentum has been developed for the first time. We have used here the method of projective representations, more consistent than that of double groups. A complete set of coupling coefficients and formulas, as well as the corresponding computing programs have been elaborated. This has firstly allowed us to write a simple model describing the vibronic structure of colored hexafluorides. Then, some applications of this formalism to the study of ro-vibronic couplings of XY{sub 6} molecules in a fourfold degenerate electronic state have been considered, especially concerning operators associated to dynamic Jahn-Teller effect. From an experimental point of view, we have considered IrF{sub 6}, for which we have mastered the synthesis, purification and conservation processes. A first study at low resolution (absorption and Raman scattering) has been performed for this molecule. We have then set up two high resolution spectroscopic devices in the visible region (saturated absorption - tested with an iodine cell- and simple absorption with multiple pass). These especially use a dye laser. They should now allow the spectroscopy of the visible band of IrF{sub 6} in order to resolve for the first time its fine rotational structure. (author)

  16. Simulation of High Resolution Vibrational and Electronic Spectra with a Multifrequency Virtual Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biczysko, Malgorzata; Bloino, Julien; Barone, Vincenzo

    2013-06-01

    Moving from the common practice of extracting numerical data from experiment to be compared with quantum mechanical (QM) results toward a direct vis-à-vis} comparison of experimental and simulated spectra would strongly reduce any arbitrariness in analysis of complex experimental outcomes and allow a proper account of the information connected to both position and shape of spectral bands. The development of such ``virtual ab initio spectrometers'' for a wide range of wavelengths has been one of our major research goals in the last years [1,2]. Recent methodological advances from our group allow simulation of optical (IR, Raman, UV-vis, etc.) spectra line-shapes for medium-to-large closed- and open-shell molecular systems. Vibrational spectra are computed including anharmonicities through perturbative corrections while electronic spectra line-shapes are simulated accounting for the vibrational structure. Well resolved and accurate theoretical spectra provide data as close as possible to the results directly available from experiment allowing to avoid ambiguities in analysis of the latter. Several examples illustrating interpretation, assignment or revision of experimental spectra for prototypes of bio-molecular systems (phenyl radical, glycine, thymine, pyrimidine, anisole dimer) will be presented. 1. V. Barone, A. Baiardi, M. Biczysko, J. Bloino, C. Cappelli, F. Lipparini Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys, 14, 12404, 2012 2. M. Biczysko, J. Bloino, G. Brancato, et al. Theor. Chem. Acc. 113, 1201, 2012

  17. Molecular, vibrational and electronic structure of 4-bromo-2-halogenobenzaldehydes: Halogen and solvent effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, David; Parlak, Cemal; Bilge, Metin; Kaya, Mehmet Fatih; Tursun, Mahir; Keşan, Gürkan; Rhyman, Lydia; Ramasami, Ponnadurai; Şenyel, Mustafa

    2017-09-01

    The halogen and solvent effects on the structure of 4-bromo-2-halogenobenzaldehydes [C7H4BrXO; X = F (BFB), Cl (BCB) or Br (BBB)] were investigated by the density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) methods. The B3LYP functional and HF and MP2 levels of theory were used with the 6-311+G(3df,p) or aug-cc-pVDZ basis sets. Computations were focused on the cis and trans conformers of the investigated compounds in the gas phase and solutions of 18 different polar or non-polar organic solvents. The computed frequencies of the C=O stretching vibration of the compounds were correlated with some empirical solvent parameters such as the Kirkwood-Bauer-Magat (KBM) equation, solvent acceptor number (AN), Swain parameters and linear solvation energy relationships (LSERs). The electronic properties of the compounds were also examined. The present work explores the effects of the medium and halogen on the conformation, geometrical parameters, dipole moment, ν(C=O) vibration, UV data, frontier orbitals and density-of-states diagram of the compounds. The findings of this research can be useful for studies on benzaldehydes.

  18. An insight into evolution of electronic, magnetic, optical, and vibrational properties of ultrathin Pd nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Poorva; Bala, Anu; Nautiyal, Tashi; Auluck, Sushil

    2013-07-01

    We have studied evolution of the electronic, magnetic, optical, and vibrational properties of Pd nanowires (NWs) as we go from linear chains (LCs) (the ideal one-dimensional structure) to zigzag (ZZ) structure to 2 × 2 NWs. The 2 × 2 structure is found to be more stable and stiff, as compared to the LCs and ZZ NWs, with promising and versatile optical and vibrational properties. This 2 × 2 structure, built from the stacking of face-centered cubic (110) planes, has already been observed experimentally for silver NWs. Our calculations, which include relaxation of atomic positions, show that on stretching 2 × 2 NWs undergo a structural change from (110) stacking to a more symmetric (001) stacking, which culminates into a metastable state with stable magnetism. Furthermore, inclusion of spin orbit coupling beautifully illustrates its impact on the atomic magnetic moments in 2 × 2 NWs. Structure dependence of the axial anisotropy and azimuthal anisotropy is nicely brought out on comparison for the three structures. The charge density plots show charge accumulation transverse to NW axis for 2 × 2 NWs, consistent with their one-dimensional nature. A late start of the optical response, to the electric field perpendicular to the wire axis, indicates that well-aligned ultrathin Pd wires can effectively be used as polarizers of the light. Our systematic study also resolves discrepancies in the previous reports on Pd ZZ NWs.

  19. High-energy photoemission spectroscopy for investigating bulk electronic structures of strongly correlated systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekiyama, Akira, E-mail: sekiyama@mp.es.osaka-u.ac.jp [Division of Materials Physics, Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka 560-8531, Osaka (Japan); SPring-8/RIKEN, Sayo 679-5148, Hyogo (Japan)

    2016-04-15

    Progress of high-energy photoemission spectroscopy for investigating the bulk electronic structures of strongly correlated electron systems is reviewed. High-resolution soft X-ray photoemission has opened the door for revealing the bulk strongly correlated spectral functions overcoming the surface contributions. More bulk-sensitive hard X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (HAXPES) enables us to study the electronic structure with negligible surface contribution. The recent development of the polarization-dependent HAXPES is also described in this short review.

  20. To Avoid Chasing Incorrect Chemical Structures of Chiral Compounds: Raman Optical Activity and Vibrational Circular Dichroism Spectroscopies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polavarapu, Prasad L; Covington, Cody L; Raghavan, Vijay

    2017-09-20

    A chemical structure (CS) identifies the connectivities between atoms, and the nature of those connections, for a given elemental composition. For chiral molecules, in addition to the identification of CS, the identification of the correct absolute configuration (AC) is also needed. Several chiral natural products are known whose CSs were initially misidentified and later corrected, and these errors were often discovered during the total synthesis of natural products. In this work, we present a new and convenient approach that can be used with Raman optical activity (ROA) and vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectroscopies, to distinguish between the correct and incorrect CSs of chiral compounds. This approach involves analyzing the spectral similarity overlap between experimental spectra and those predicted with advanced quantum chemical theories. Significant labor needed for establishing the correct CSs via chemical syntheses of chiral natural products can thus be avoided. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. N-H stretching modes around 3300 wavenumber from peptide backbones observed by chiral sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Li; Wang, Zhuguang; Yan, Elsa C Y

    2014-09-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the molecular origin of the chiral sum frequency generation (SFG) signals of proteins and peptides at interfaces in the N-H stretching vibrational region. The N-H stretching can be a probe for investigating structural and functional properties of proteins, but remains technically difficult to analyze due to the overlapping with the O-H stretching of water molecules. Chiral SFG spectroscopy offers unique tools to study the N-H stretching from proteins at interfaces without interference from the water background. However, the molecular origin of the N-H stretching signals of proteins is still unclear. This work provides a justification of the origin of chiral N-H signals by analyzing the vibrational frequencies, examining chiral SFG theory, studying proton (hydrogen/deuterium) exchange kinetics, and performing optical control experiments. The results demonstrate that the chiral N-H stretching signals at ~3300 cm(-1) originate from the amide group of the protein backbones. This chiral N-H stretching signal offers an in situ, real-time, and background-free probe for interrogating the protein structures and dynamics at interfaces at the molecular level. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Molecular gels in the gas phase? Gelator-gelator and gelator-solvent interactions probed by vibrational spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozada-Garcia, Rolando; Mu, Dan; Plazanet, Marie; Çarçabal, Pierre

    2016-08-10

    Benzylidene glucose (BzGlc) is a member of the benzylidene glycoside family. These molecules have the ability to form molecular physical gels. These materials are formed when gelator molecules create a non-covalently bound frame where solvent molecules are trapped. Since the gel formation process and its properties are determined by the subtle balance between non-covalent forces, it is difficult to anticipate them. Quantitative and qualitative understanding of the gelator-gelator and gelator-solvent interactions is needed to better control these materials for important potential applications. We have used gas phase vibrational spectroscopy and theoretical chemistry to study the conformational choices of BzGlc, its dimer and the complexes it forms with water or toluene. To interpret the vibrational spectra we have used the dispersion corrected functional B97D which we have calibrated for the calculation of OH stretching frequencies. Even at the most basic molecular level, it is possible to interrogate a large range of non-covalent interactions ranging from OH → OH hydrogen bonding, to OH → π, and CH → π, all being at the center of gel properties at the macroscopic level.

  3. Spectral investigations of 2,5-difluoroaniline by using mass, electronic absorption, NMR, and vibrational spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kose, Etem; Karabacak, Mehmet; Bardak, Fehmi; Atac, Ahmet

    2016-11-01

    One of the most significant aromatic amines is aniline, a primary aromatic amine replacing one hydrogen atom of a benzene molecule with an amino group (NH2). This study reports experimental and theoretical investigation of 2,5-difluoroaniline molecule (2,5-DFA) by using mass, ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis), 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), Fourier transform infrared and Raman (FT-IR and FT-Raman) spectra, and supported with theoretical calculations. Mass spectrum (MS) of 2,5-DFA is presented with their stabilities. The UV-vis spectra of the molecule are recorded in the range of 190-400 nm in water and ethanol solvents. The 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts are recorded in CDCl3 solution. The vibrational spectra are recorded in the region 4000-400 cm-1 (FT-IR) and 4000-10 cm-1 (FT-Raman), respectively. Theoretical studies are underpinned the experimental results as described below; 2,5-DFA molecule is optimized by using B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The mass spectrum is evaluated and possible fragmentations are proposed based on the stable structure. The electronic properties, such as excitation energies, oscillator strengths, wavelengths, frontier molecular orbitals (FMO), HOMO and LUMO energies, are determined by time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT). The electrostatic potential surface (ESPs), density of state (DOS) diagrams are also prepared and evaluated. In addition to these, reduced density gradient (RDG) analysis is performed, and thermodynamic features are carried out theoretically. The NMR spectra (1H and 13C) are calculated by using the gauge-invariant atomic orbital (GIAO) method. The vibrational spectra of 2,5-DFA molecule are obtained by using DFT/B3LYP method with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. Fundamental vibrations are assigned based on the potential energy distribution (PED) of the vibrational modes. The nonlinear optical properties (NLO) are also investigated. The theoretical and experimental results give a detailed description of

  4. The photodissociation and reaction dynamics of vibrationally excited molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crim, F.F. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This research determines the nature of highly vibrationally excited molecules, their unimolecular reactions, and their photodissociation dynamics. The goal is to characterize vibrationally excited molecules and to exploit that understanding to discover and control their chemical pathways. Most recently the author has used a combination of vibrational overtone excitation and laser induced fluorescence both to characterize vibrationally excited molecules and to study their photodissociation dynamics. The author has also begun laser induced grating spectroscopy experiments designed to obtain the electronic absorption spectra of highly vibrationally excited molecules.

  5. Molecular images and vibrational spectroscopy of sorbic acid with the scanning tunneling microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Douglas P. E.; Kirk, Michael D.; Quate, Calvin F.

    1987-06-01

    Images of sorbic acid molecules absorbed onto graphite have been taken with a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) operating in liquid helium. Molecular clusters were clearly observed, as was the atomic structure of the graphite substrate. The molecules were seen to diffuse across the substrate at a rate of about 1 Å/min. When dI/dV vs V was measured with the STM probe directly over a sorbic acid molecule, a well-defined spectrum of peaks was obtained whose energies corresponded to the vibrational resonances of the molecule. Large changes in the spectra occurred if the tip was moved a lateral distance of 5 Å.

  6. Optical Absorption of Impurities and Defects in Semiconducting Crystals Electronic Absorption of Deep Centres and Vibrational Spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Pajot, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    This book outlines, with the help of several specific examples, the important role played by absorption spectroscopy in the investigation of deep-level centers introduced in semiconductors and insulators like diamond, silicon, germanium and gallium arsenide by high-energy irradiation, residual impurities, and defects produced during crystal growth. It also describes the crucial role played by vibrational spectroscopy to determine the atomic structure and symmetry of complexes associated with light impurities like hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen and oxygen, and as a tool for quantitative analysis of these elements in the materials.

  7. Modeling the high-energy electronic state manifold of adenine: Calibration for nonlinear electronic spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nenov, Artur, E-mail: Artur.Nenov@unibo.it; Giussani, Angelo; Segarra-Martí, Javier; Jaiswal, Vishal K. [Dipartimento di Chimica “G. Ciamician,” Università di Bologna, Via Selmi 2, IT-40126 Bologna (Italy); Rivalta, Ivan [Université de Lyon, CNRS, Institut de Chimie de Lyon, École Normale Supérieure de Lyon, 46 Allée d’Italie, F-69364 Lyon Cedex 07 (France); Cerullo, Giulio [Dipartimento di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano, IFN-CNR, Piazza Leonardo Da Vinci 32, IT-20133 Milano (Italy); Mukamel, Shaul [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Irvine, California 92697-2025 (United States); Garavelli, Marco, E-mail: marco.garavelli@unibo.it, E-mail: marco.garavelli@ens-lyon.fr [Dipartimento di Chimica “G. Ciamician,” Università di Bologna, Via Selmi 2, IT-40126 Bologna (Italy); Université de Lyon, CNRS, Institut de Chimie de Lyon, École Normale Supérieure de Lyon, 46 Allée d’Italie, F-69364 Lyon Cedex 07 (France)

    2015-06-07

    Pump-probe electronic spectroscopy using femtosecond laser pulses has evolved into a standard tool for tracking ultrafast excited state dynamics. Its two-dimensional (2D) counterpart is becoming an increasingly available and promising technique for resolving many of the limitations of pump-probe caused by spectral congestion. The ability to simulate pump-probe and 2D spectra from ab initio computations would allow one to link mechanistic observables like molecular motions and the making/breaking of chemical bonds to experimental observables like excited state lifetimes and quantum yields. From a theoretical standpoint, the characterization of the electronic transitions in the visible (Vis)/ultraviolet (UV), which are excited via the interaction of a molecular system with the incoming pump/probe pulses, translates into the determination of a computationally challenging number of excited states (going over 100) even for small/medium sized systems. A protocol is therefore required to evaluate the fluctuations of spectral properties like transition energies and dipole moments as a function of the computational parameters and to estimate the effect of these fluctuations on the transient spectral appearance. In the present contribution such a protocol is presented within the framework of complete and restricted active space self-consistent field theory and its second-order perturbation theory extensions. The electronic excited states of adenine have been carefully characterized through a previously presented computational recipe [Nenov et al., Comput. Theor. Chem. 1040–1041, 295-303 (2014)]. A wise reduction of the level of theory has then been performed in order to obtain a computationally less demanding approach that is still able to reproduce the characteristic features of the reference data. Foreseeing the potentiality of 2D electronic spectroscopy to track polynucleotide ground and excited state dynamics, and in particular its expected ability to provide

  8. Electronic excitation of furfural as probed by high-resolution vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and ab initio calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira da Silva, F.; Lange, E. [Laboratório de Colisões Atómicas e Moleculares, CEFITEC, Departamento de Física, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Limão-Vieira, P., E-mail: plimaovieira@fct.unl.pt, E-mail: michael.brunger@flinders.edu.au, E-mail: maplima@ifi.unicamp.br [Laboratório de Colisões Atómicas e Moleculares, CEFITEC, Departamento de Física, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, South Australia 5001 (Australia); Jones, N. C.; Hoffmann, S. V. [ISA, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade, DK-8000 Århus C (Denmark); Hubin-Franskin, M.-J.; Delwiche, J. [Départment de Chimie, Institut de Chimie-Bât. B6C, Université de Liège, B-4000 Liège 1 (Belgium); Brunger, M. J., E-mail: plimaovieira@fct.unl.pt, E-mail: michael.brunger@flinders.edu.au, E-mail: maplima@ifi.unicamp.br [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, South Australia 5001 (Australia); Institute of Mathematical Sciences, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); and others

    2015-10-14

    The electronic spectroscopy of isolated furfural (2-furaldehyde) in the gas phase has been investigated using high-resolution photoabsorption spectroscopy in the 3.5–10.8 eV energy-range, with absolute cross section measurements derived. Electron energy loss spectra are also measured over a range of kinematical conditions. Those energy loss spectra are used to derive differential cross sections and in turn generalised oscillator strengths. These experiments are supported by ab initio calculations in order to assign the excited states of the neutral molecule. The good agreement between the theoretical results and the measurements allows us to provide the first quantitative assignment of the electronic state spectroscopy of furfural over an extended energy range.

  9. Ultrafast dynamics in iron tetracarbonyl olefin complexes investigated with two-dimensional vibrational spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Panman, M.R.; Newton, A.C.; Vos, J.; van den Bosch, B.; Bocokić, V.; Reek, J.N.H.; Woutersen, S.

    2013-01-01

    The dynamics of iron tetracarbonyl olefin complexes has been investigated using two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy. Cross peaks between all CO-stretching bands show that the CO-stretch modes are coupled, and from the cross-peak anisotropies we can confirm previous assignments of the

  10. Screening Pinus taeda (loblolly pine) families for physical and mechanical properties using vibrational spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gifty E. Acquah; Brian K. Via; Lori G. Eckhardt

    2016-01-01

    In a bid to control the loblolly pine decline complex, stakeholders are using the selection and deployment of genetically superior families that are disease tolerant. It is vital that we do not compromise other important properties while breeding for disease tolerance. In this preliminary study, near infrared spectroscopy was utilized in conjunction with data collected...

  11. Origin of long-lived oscillations in 2D-spectra of a quantum vibronic model: Electronic versus vibrational coherence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plenio, M. B.; Almeida, J.; Huelga, S. F. [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Albert-Einstein-Allee 11, University Ulm, D-89069 Ulm (Germany)

    2013-12-21

    We demonstrate that the coupling of excitonic and vibrational motion in biological complexes can provide mechanisms to explain the long-lived oscillations that have been obtained in nonlinear spectroscopic signals of different photosynthetic pigment protein complexes and we discuss the contributions of excitonic versus purely vibrational components to these oscillatory features. Considering a dimer model coupled to a structured spectral density we exemplify the fundamental aspects of the electron-phonon dynamics, and by analyzing separately the different contributions to the nonlinear signal, we show that for realistic parameter regimes purely electronic coherence is of the same order as purely vibrational coherence in the electronic ground state. Moreover, we demonstrate how the latter relies upon the excitonic interaction to manifest. These results link recently proposed microscopic, non-equilibrium mechanisms to support long lived coherence at ambient temperatures with actual experimental observations of oscillatory behaviour using 2D photon echo techniques to corroborate the fundamental importance of the interplay of electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom in the dynamics of light harvesting aggregates.

  12. Origin of long-lived oscillations in 2D-spectra of a quantum vibronic model: electronic versus vibrational coherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plenio, M B; Almeida, J; Huelga, S F

    2013-12-21

    We demonstrate that the coupling of excitonic and vibrational motion in biological complexes can provide mechanisms to explain the long-lived oscillations that have been obtained in nonlinear spectroscopic signals of different photosynthetic pigment protein complexes and we discuss the contributions of excitonic versus purely vibrational components to these oscillatory features. Considering a dimer model coupled to a structured spectral density we exemplify the fundamental aspects of the electron-phonon dynamics, and by analyzing separately the different contributions to the nonlinear signal, we show that for realistic parameter regimes purely electronic coherence is of the same order as purely vibrational coherence in the electronic ground state. Moreover, we demonstrate how the latter relies upon the excitonic interaction to manifest. These results link recently proposed microscopic, non-equilibrium mechanisms to support long lived coherence at ambient temperatures with actual experimental observations of oscillatory behaviour using 2D photon echo techniques to corroborate the fundamental importance of the interplay of electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom in the dynamics of light harvesting aggregates.

  13. Intermolecular vibrational modes and H-bond interactions in crystalline urea investigated by terahertz spectroscopy and theoretical calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yonghong; Li, Zhi; Liu, Jianjun; Hu, Cong; Zhang, Huo; Qin, Binyi; Wu, Yifang

    2018-01-01

    The characteristic absorption spectra of crystalline urea in 0.6-1.8 THz region have been measured by terahertz time-domain spectroscopy at room temperature experimentally. Five broad absorption peaks were observed at 0.69, 1.08, 1.27, 1.47 and 1.64 THz respectively. Moreover, density functional theory (DFT) calculation has been performed for the isolated urea molecule, and there is no infrared intensity in the region below 1.8 THz. This means that single molecule calculations are failure to predict the experimental spectra of urea crystals. To simulate these spectra, calculations on a cluster of seven urea molecules using M06-2X and B3LYP-D3 are performed, and we found that M06-2X perform better. The observed THz vibrational modes are assigned to bending and torsional modes related to the intermolecular H-bond interactions with the help of potential energy distribution (PED) method. Using the reduced-density-gradient (RDG) analysis, the positions and types of intermolecular H-bond interactions in urea crystals are visualized. Therefore, we can confirm that terahertz spectroscopy can be used as an effective means to detect intermolecular H-bond interactions in molecular crystals.

  14. Understanding and Manipulating Electrostatic Fields at the Protein-Protein Interface Using Vibrational Spectroscopy and Continuum Electrostatics Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchie, Andrew W; Webb, Lauren J

    2015-11-05

    Biological function emerges in large part from the interactions of biomacromolecules in the complex and dynamic environment of the living cell. For this reason, macromolecular interactions in biological systems are now a major focus of interest throughout the biochemical and biophysical communities. The affinity and specificity of macromolecular interactions are the result of both structural and electrostatic factors. Significant advances have been made in characterizing structural features of stable protein-protein interfaces through the techniques of modern structural biology, but much less is understood about how electrostatic factors promote and stabilize specific functional macromolecular interactions over all possible choices presented to a given molecule in a crowded environment. In this Feature Article, we describe how vibrational Stark effect (VSE) spectroscopy is being applied to measure electrostatic fields at protein-protein interfaces, focusing on measurements of guanosine triphosphate (GTP)-binding proteins of the Ras superfamily binding with structurally related but functionally distinct downstream effector proteins. In VSE spectroscopy, spectral shifts of a probe oscillator's energy are related directly to that probe's local electrostatic environment. By performing this experiment repeatedly throughout a protein-protein interface, an experimental map of measured electrostatic fields generated at that interface is determined. These data can be used to rationalize selective binding of similarly structured proteins in both in vitro and in vivo environments. Furthermore, these data can be used to compare to computational predictions of electrostatic fields to explore the level of simulation detail that is necessary to accurately predict our experimental findings.

  15. Protein-nanoparticle interaction in bioconjugated silver nanoparticles: A transmission electron microscopy and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reymond-Laruinaz, Sébastien; Saviot, Lucien; Potin, Valérie; Marco de Lucas, María del Carmen

    2016-12-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of interaction between proteins and noble metal nanoparticles (NPs) is crucial to extend the use of NPs in biological applications and nanomedicine. We report the synthesis of Ag-NPs:protein bioconjugates synthesized in total absence of citrates or other stabilizing agents in order to study the NP-protein interaction. Four common proteins (lysozyme, bovine serum albumin, cytochrome-C and hemoglobin) were used in this work. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) were mainly used to study these bioconjugated NPs. TEM images showed Ag NPs with sizes in the 5-40 nm range. The presence of a protein layer surrounding the Ag NPs was also observed by TEM. Moreover, the composition at different points of single bioconjugated NPs was probed by electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). The thickness of the protein layer varies in the 3-15 nm range and the Ag NPs are a few nanometers away. This allowed to obtain an enhancement of the Raman signal of the proteins in the analysis of water suspensions of bioconjugates. SERS results showed a broadening of the Raman bands of the proteins which we attribute to the contribution of different configurations of the proteins adsorbed on the Ag NPs surface. Moreover, the assignment of an intense and sharp peak in the low-frequency range to Ag-N vibrations points to the chemisorption of the proteins on the Ag-NPs surface.

  16. Electronic properties of Mn-phthalocyanine–C{sub 60} bulk heterojunctions: Combining photoemission and electron energy-loss spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roth, Friedrich [Center for Free-Electron Laser Science/DESY, Notkestraße 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Herzig, Melanie; Knupfer, Martin [FW Dresden, P.O. Box 270116, D-01171 Dresden (Germany); Lupulescu, Cosmin [Institute of Optics and Atomic Physics, TU Berlin, Straße des 17. Juni 135, D-10623 Berlin (Germany); Darlatt, Erik; Gottwald, Alexander [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Abbestraße 2-12, D-10587 Berlin (Germany); Eberhardt, Wolfgang [Center for Free-Electron Laser Science/DESY, Notkestraße 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Institute of Optics and Atomic Physics, TU Berlin, Straße des 17. Juni 135, D-10623 Berlin (Germany)

    2015-11-14

    The electronic properties of co-evaporated mixtures (blends) of manganese phthalocyanine and the fullerene C{sub 60} (MnPc:C{sub 60}) have been studied as a function of the concentration of the two constituents using two supplementary electron spectroscopic methods, photoemission spectroscopy (PES) and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) in transmission. Our PES measurements provide a detailed picture of the electronic structure measured with different excitation energies as well as different mixing ratios between MnPc and C{sub 60}. Besides a relative energy shift, the occupied electronic states of the two materials remain essentially unchanged. The observed energy level alignment is different compared to that of the related CuPc:C{sub 60} bulk heterojunction. Moreover, the results from our EELS investigations show that, despite the rather small interface interaction, the MnPc related electronic excitation spectrum changes significantly by admixing C{sub 60} to MnPc thin films.

  17. Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy on Electronic Structure and Electron-Phonon Coupling in Cuprate Superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, X.J.

    2010-04-30

    In addition to the record high superconducting transition temperature (T{sub c}), high temperature cuprate superconductors are characterized by their unusual superconducting properties below T{sub c}, and anomalous normal state properties above T{sub c}. In the superconducting state, although it has long been realized that superconductivity still involves Cooper pairs, as in the traditional BCS theory, the experimentally determined d-wave pairing is different from the usual s-wave pairing found in conventional superconductors. The identification of the pairing mechanism in cuprate superconductors remains an outstanding issue. The normal state properties, particularly in the underdoped region, have been found to be at odd with conventional metals which is usually described by Fermi liquid theory; instead, the normal state at optimal doping fits better with the marginal Fermi liquid phenomenology. Most notable is the observation of the pseudogap state in the underdoped region above T{sub c}. As in other strongly correlated electrons systems, these unusual properties stem from the interplay between electronic, magnetic, lattice and orbital degrees of freedom. Understanding the microscopic process involved in these materials and the interaction of electrons with other entities is essential to understand the mechanism of high temperature superconductivity. Since the discovery of high-T{sub c} superconductivity in cuprates, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) has provided key experimental insights in revealing the electronic structure of high temperature superconductors. These include, among others, the earliest identification of dispersion and a large Fermi surface, an anisotropic superconducting gap suggestive of a d-wave order parameter, and an observation of the pseudogap in underdoped samples. In the mean time, this technique itself has experienced a dramatic improvement in its energy and momentum resolutions, leading to a series of new discoveries not

  18. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray spectroscopy applied to mycelial phase of sporothrix schenckii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Thibaut

    1975-04-01

    Full Text Available Scanning electron microscopy applied to the mycelial phase of Sporothrix schenckii shows a matted mycelium with conidia of a regular pattern. X-Ray microanalysis applied in energy dispersive spectroscopy and also in wavelength dispersive spectroscopy reveals the presence of several elements of Mendeleef's classification.

  19. A first principles study of the mechanical, electronic, and vibrational properties of lead oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuravlev, Yu. N.; Korabel'nikov, D. V.

    2017-11-01

    The first principles study of the crystal structure, chemical bonds, elastic and mechanical properties, electron energy band structure and density, and normal long-wave vibrations of nine phases of lead monoxide, dioxide, and tetraoxide has been performed under normal and external pressure within the framework of density functional theory (DFT) with the Perdew-Becke-Ernzerhof (PBE) gradient exchange-correlation functional and its hybrid version with a 25-% Hartree-Fock (HF) exchange contribution in the basis of localized atom orbitals. The behavior of physical parameters has been studied using the cold four- and threeparameter equations of state. The parameters of the crystal structures are in satisfactory agreement with experimental data, and elastic constants indicate their mechanical stability and anisotropy in the elastic properties. The elasticity, shear, and Young moduli, hardness, acoustic velocities, and Debye temperature of dioxide on the one hand and monoxide and tetraoxide on the other hand appreciably differ from each other. The difference between electron properties may be explained by the character of hybridization in the upper filled and lower empty energy bands as evident from the density of states. In monoxide, the indirect band gap width decreases with increasing pressure at a rate of 0.16 eV/GPa, and the direct band gap width increases at a rate of 0.13 eV/GPa. To identify crystalline phases, the frequencies and intensities of long-wave modes active in IR and Raman spectra have been calculated.

  20. Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) of organic molecules in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    India. Abstract. An indigenous electron energy loss spectrometer has been designed and fabricated for the study of free molecules. The spectrometer enables the recording of - low-resolution electronic spectra of molecules in the vapour phase with ready access to the vacuum ultraviolet region. Electron energy loss spectra ...

  1. High-resolution spectroscopy of jet-cooled 1,1'-diphenylethylene: electronically excited and ionic states of a prototypical cross-conjugated system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolarek, Szymon; Vdovin, Alexander; Rijs, Anouk; van Walree, Cornelis A; Zgierski, Marek Z; Buma, Wybren J

    2011-09-01

    The photophysics of a prototypical cross-conjugated π-system, 1,1'-diphenylethylene, have been studied using high-resolution resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization excitation spectroscopy and zero kinetic energy photoelectron spectroscopy, in combination with advanced ab initio calculations. We find that the excitation spectrum of S(1) displays extensive vibrational progressions that we identify to arise from large changes in the torsional angles of the phenyl rings upon electronic excitation. The extensive activity of the antisymmetric inter-ring torsional vibration provides conclusive evidence for a loss of symmetry upon excitation, leading to an inequivalence of the two phenyl rings. Nonresonant zero kinetic energy photoelectron spectroscopy from the ground state of the neutral molecule to the ground state of the radical cation, on the other hand, demonstrates that upon ionization symmetry is retained, and that the geometry changes are considerably smaller. Apart from elucidating how removal of an electron affects the structure of the molecule, these measurements provide an accurate value for the adiabatic ionization energy (65274 ± 1 cm(-1) (8.093 eV)). Zero kinetic energy photoelectron spectra obtained after excitation of vibronic levels in S(1) confirm these conclusions and provide us with an extensive atlas of ionic vibronic energy levels. For higher excitation energies the excitation spectrum of S(1) becomes quite congested and shows unexpected large intensities. Ab initio calculations strongly suggest that this is caused by a conical intersection between S(1) and S(2). © 2011 American Chemical Society

  2. Stereo-electronic, vibrational, and environmental contributions to polarizabilities of large molecular systems: a feasible anharmonic protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egidi, Franco; Giovannini, Tommaso; Piccardo, Matteo; Bloino, Julien; Cappelli, Chiara; Barone, Vincenzo

    2014-06-10

    Reliable computations of linear and non-linear optical properties of molecular systems in condensed phases require a proper account of stereo-electronic, vibrational, and environmental effects. In the framework of density functional theory, these effects can be accurately introduced using second-order vibrational perturbation theory in conjunction with polarizable continuum models. We illustrate the combination of an anharmonic description of the ground-state potential energy surface with solvation effects treated with the polarizable continuum model (PCM) in the calculation of the electronic, zero-point, and pure vibrational polarizabilities of selected systems. The description of the solvation environment is enriched by taking into account the dynamical aspects of the solute-solvent interactions through the inclusion of both electronic and vibrational non-equilbrium effects, as well as the direct effect of the solvent on the electric field that generates the molecular response (local field effect). This treatment yields accurate results which can be directly compared with experimental findings without the need of empirical corrections.

  3. Electronic structure investigation of oxidized aluminium films with electron momentum spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, X.; Canney, S.; Kheifets, A.S.; Vos, M.; Fang, Z.; Utteridge, S.; McCarthy, I.E. [Flinders Univ. of South Australia, Adelaide, SA (Australia). Electronic Structure of Materials Centre; Weigold, E. [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia). Research School of Physical Sciences

    1996-09-01

    Electron momentum spectroscopy (EMS) of (e, 2e) measurements with oxidized aluminium thin films have been performed. Due to the surface sensitive mature of the EMS spectrometer employed the measured (e, 2e) events come from the front oxidized layer as viewed by the electron detectors. The measurements show clearly two major features in the spectral momentum density distribution and they are related to the upper valence band and the lower valence band of aluminum oxide. The first is a `dual parabola` energy-momentum dispersion pattern spanning about 8 eV in the upper valence band. This `dual parabola` pattern has been qualitatively reproduced by a linear muffin-tin orbital (LMTO) calculation on spherically averaged {alpha}-A1{sub 2}O{sub 3} with nearly the same energy span. In the lower valence band, the LMTO calculation indicates a dispersion spanning about 5 eV, and the measured spectral momentum density plot shows a similar `bowl` shape but with less dispersion. The possible causes which blur the dispersion in the lower valence band are discussed. Other features in the spectral momentum density distribution are also discussed and compared with the LMTO calculation. 45 refs., 1 tab., 10 figs.

  4. Adsorption and desorption of hydrogen at nonpolar GaN (1 1 ¯ 00 ) surfaces: Kinetics and impact on surface vibrational and electronic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lymperakis, L.; Neugebauer, J.; Himmerlich, M.; Krischok, S.; Rink, M.; Kröger, J.; Polyakov, V. M.

    2017-05-01

    The adsorption of hydrogen at nonpolar GaN (1 1 ¯00 ) surfaces and its impact on the electronic and vibrational properties is investigated using surface electron spectroscopy in combination with density functional theory (DFT) calculations. For the surface mediated dissociation of H2 and the subsequent adsorption of H, an energy barrier of 0.55 eV has to be overcome. The calculated kinetic surface phase diagram indicates that the reaction is kinetically hindered at low pressures and low temperatures. At higher temperatures ab initio thermodynamics show, that the H-free surface is energetically favored. To validate these theoretical predictions experiments at room temperature and under ultrahigh vacuum conditions were performed. They reveal that molecular hydrogen does not dissociatively adsorb at the GaN (1 1 ¯00 ) surface. Only activated atomic hydrogen atoms attach to the surface. At temperatures above 820 K, the attached hydrogen gets desorbed. The adsorbed hydrogen atoms saturate the dangling bonds of the gallium and nitrogen surface atoms and result in an inversion of the Ga-N surface dimer buckling. The signatures of the Ga-H and N-H vibrational modes on the H-covered surface have experimentally been identified and are in good agreement with the DFT calculations of the surface phonon modes. Both theory and experiment show that H adsorption results in a removal of occupied and unoccupied intragap electron states of the clean GaN (1 1 ¯00 ) surface and a reduction of the surface upward band bending by 0.4 eV. The latter mechanism largely reduces surface electron depletion.

  5. Time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy of hydrated electrons near a liquid water surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Yo-ichi; Suzuki, Yoshi-Ichi; Tomasello, Gaia; Horio, Takuya; Karashima, Shutaro; Mitríc, Roland; Suzuki, Toshinori

    2014-05-09

    We present time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy of trapped electrons near liquid surfaces. Photoemission from the ground state of a hydrated electron at 260 nm is found to be isotropic, while anisotropic photoemission is observed for the excited states of 1,4-diazabicyclo[2,2,2]octane and I- in aqueous solutions. Our results indicate that surface and subsurface species create hydrated electrons in the bulk side. No signature of a surface-bound electron has been observed.

  6. Sodiated Sugar Structures: Cryogenic Ion Vibrational Spectroscopy of Na^+(GLUCOSE) Adducts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Jonathan; Kregel, Steven J.; Fischer, Kaitlyn C.; Garand, Etienne

    2017-06-01

    The recent discovery that ionic liquids help facilitate the dissolution of cellulose has renewed interest in understanding how ionic species interact with carbohydrates. Here we present infrared spectra in the 2800 - 3800 \\wn range of gas-phase mass-selected Na^+(Glucose) adducts. These adducts are further probed with IR-dip spectroscopy to yield conformer specific spectra of at least seven unique species. The relative abundances of conformers show that gas-phase interconversion barriers are sufficiently high to preserve the solution-phase populations. Additionally, our results demonstrate that mM concentrations of NaCl do not strongly perturb the anomeric ratio of glucose in solution.

  7. Coherent wavepacket motion in an ultrafast electron transfer system monitored by femtosecond degenerate four-wave-mixing and pump–probe spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagasawa, Yutaka, E-mail: nagasawa@chem.es.osaka-u.ac.jp [Division of Frontier Materials Science, Department of Materials Engineering Science, Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan); Center for Quantum Science and Technology under Extreme Conditions, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan); PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Yoneda, Yusuke; Nambu, Shohei; Muramatsu, Masayasu; Takeuchi, Eisuke; Tsumori, Hiroki; Morikawa, Soichiro [Division of Frontier Materials Science, Department of Materials Engineering Science, Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan); Katayama, Tetsuro [PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Miyasaka, Hiroshi [Division of Frontier Materials Science, Department of Materials Engineering Science, Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan); Center for Quantum Science and Technology under Extreme Conditions, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan)

    2014-10-17

    Highlights: • Coherent wavepacket motion was investigated for ultrafast electron transfer (ET) system. • Vibrations originating from ground and excited states were extracted with high accuracy. • The dephasing of the excited state vibration was accelerated by the ultrafast ET. - Abstract: Coherent nuclear wavepacket motions were monitored by three types of femtosecond time-resolved spectroscopy, namely, transient absorption measurement utilizing white-light supercontinuum (WC-TA), degenerate four-wave-mixing (DFWM), and pump–probe (PP) measurements, for an ultrafast intermolecular electron transfer (ET) system with a dye molecule, oxazine 1 (Ox1), dissolved in an electron donating solvent, N,N-dimethylaniline (DMA). Vibrational frequencies of the wavepacket motion in the excited and in the ground states were 560–562 and 567–569 cm{sup −1}, respectively, with only a few frequency difference of 5–9 cm{sup −1}, which were clearly distinguishable by the highly accurate measurements. In DMA, the excited state wavepacket motion declined with time constant of 160–240 fs which is somewhat longer than that of the ultrafast ET; 60–80 fs.

  8. Alpha and conversion electron spectroscopy of 238,239Pu and 241Am and alpha-conversion electron coincidence measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dion, Michael P.; Miller, Brian W.; Warren, Glen A.

    2016-09-01

    A technique to determine the isotopics of a mixed actinide sample has been proposed by measuring the coincidence of the alpha particle during radioactive decay with the conversion electron (or Auger) emitted during the relaxation of the daughter isotope. This presents a unique signature to allow the deconvolution of isotopes that possess overlapping alpha particle energy. The work presented here are results of conversion electron spectroscopy of 241Am, 238Pu and 239Pu using a dual-stage peltier-cooled 25 mm2 silicon drift detector. A passivated ion implanted planar silicon detector provided measurements of alpha spectroscopy. The conversion electron spectra were evaluated from 20–55 keV based on fits to the dominant conversion electron emissions, which allowed the relative conversion electron emission intensities to be determined. These measurements provide crucial singles spectral information to aid in the coincident measurement approach.

  9. Final Technical Report Structural Dynamics in Complex Liquids Studied with Multidimensional Vibrational Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokmakoff, Andrei [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Fiechtner, Gregory J. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    2015-12-10

    This grant supported work in the Tokmakoff lab at the University of Chicago aimed at understanding the fundamental properties of water at a molecular level, and how water participates in proton transport in aqueous media. The physical properties of water and aqueous solutions are inextricably linked with efforts to develop new sustainable energy sources. Energy conversion, storage, and transduction processes, particularly those that occur in biology and soft matter, make use of water for the purpose of storing and moving charge. Water’s unique physical and chemical properties depend on the ability of water molecules to participate in up to four hydrogen bonds, and the rapid fluctuations and ultrafast energy dissipation of its hydrogenbonded networks. Our work during the grant period led to advances in four areas: (1) the generation of short pulses of broadband infrared light (BBIR) for use in time-resolved twodimensional spectroscopy (2D IR), (2) the investigation of the spectroscopy and transport of excess protons in water, (3) the study of aqueous hydroxide to describe the interaction of the ion and water and the dynamics of proton transfer, and (4) the coupled motion of water and its hydrogen-bonding solutes.

  10. Detection of molecular changes induced by antibiotics in Escherichia coli using vibrational spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan Nguyen, N. T.; Sarter, Samira; Hai Nguyen, N.; Daniel, Philippe

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to test Raman (400-1800 cm- 1) and Infra-red (1900-500 cm- 1) spectroscopies followed by statistical analysis (principal component analysis) to detect molecular changes induced by antibiotics (ampicillin, cefotaxime - cell wall synthesis inhibitors, tetracycline - protein synthesis inhibitor, ciprofloxacin - DNA synthesis inhibitor) against Escherichia coli TOP10. In case of ampicillin and cefotaxime, a decrease in protein bands in both Raman (1240, 1660 cm- 1), and IR spectra (1230, 1530, 1630 cm- 1), and an increase in carbohydrate bands (1150, 1020 cm- 1) in IR spectra were observed. Tetracycline addition caused an increase in nucleic acid bands (775, 1478, 1578 cm- 1), a sharp decrease in phenylalanine (995 cm- 1) in Raman spectra and the amide I and amide II bands (1630, 1530 cm- 1) in IR spectra, an increase in DNA in both Raman (1083 cm- 1) and IR spectra (1080 cm- 1). Regarding ciprofloxacin, an increase in nucleic acids (775, 1478, 1578 cm- 1) in Raman spectra and in protein bands (1230, 1520, 1630 cm- 1), in DNA (1080 cm- 1) in IR spectra were detected. Clear discrimination of antibiotic-treated samples compared to the control was recorded, showing that Raman and IR spectroscopies, coupled to principal component analysis for data, could be used to detect molecular modifications in bacteria exposed to different classes of antibiotics. These findings contribute to the understanding of the mechanisms of action of antibiotics in bacteria.

  11. Femtosecond nonlinear spectroscopy at surfaces: Second-harmonic probing of hole burning at the Si(111)7x7 surface and fourier-transform sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGuire, John Andrew [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2004-11-24

    The high temporal resolution and broad bandwidth of a femtosecond laser system are exploited in a pair of nonlinear optical studies of surfaces. The dephasing dynamics of resonances associated with the adatom dangling bonds of the Si(111)7 x 7 surface are explored by transient second-harmonic hole burning, a process that can be described as a fourth-order nonlinear optical process. Spectral holes produced by a 100 fs pump pulse at about 800 nm are probed by the second harmonic signal of a 100 fs pulse tunable around 800 nm. The measured spectral holes yield homogeneous dephasing times of a few tens of femtoseconds. Fits with a Lorentzian spectral hole centered at zero probe detuning show a linear dependence of the hole width on pump fluence, which suggests that charge carrier-carrier scattering dominates the dephasing dynamics at the measured excitation densities. Extrapolation of the deduced homogeneous dephasing times to zero excitation density yields an intrinsic dephasing time of {approx} 70 fs. The presence of a secondary spectral hole indicates that scattering of the surface electrons with surface optical phonons at 570 cm-1 occurs within the first 200 fs after excitation. The broad bandwidth of femtosecond IR pulses is used to perform IR-visible sum frequency vibrational spectroscopy. By implementing a Fourier-transform technique, we demonstrate the ability to obtain sub-laser-bandwidth spectral resolution. FT-SFG yields a greater signal when implemented with a stretched visible pulse than with a femtosecond visible pulse. However, when compared with multichannel spectroscopy using a femtosecond IR pulse but a narrowband visible pulse, Fourier-transform SFG is found to have an inferior signal-to-noise ratio. A mathematical analysis of the signal-to-noise ratio illustrates the constraints on the Fourier-transform approach.

  12. Vibrational frequency analysis, FT-IR, FT-Raman, ab initio, HF and DFT studies, NBO, HOMO-LUMO and electronic structure calculations on pycolinaldehyde oxime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suvitha, A.; Periandy, S.; Boomadevi, S.; Govindarajan, M.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, the vibrational spectral analysis is carried out by using Raman and infrared spectroscopy in the range 100-4000 cm-1and 50-4000 cm-1, respectively, for pycolinaldehyde oxime (PAO) (C6H6N2O) molecule. The vibrational frequencies have been calculated and scaled values are compared with experimental FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra. The structure optimizations and normal coordinate force field calculations are based on HF and B3LYP methods with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The results of the calculation shows excellent agreement between experimental and calculated frequencies in B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The optimized geometric parameters are compared with experimental values of PAO. The non linear optical properties, NBO analysis, thermodynamics properties and mulliken charges of the title molecule are also calculated and interpreted. A study on the electronic properties, such as HOMO and LUMO energies, are performed by time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) approach. Besides, frontier molecular orbitals (FMO), molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) are performed. The effects due to the substitutions of CHdbnd NOH ring are investigated. The 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts of the molecule are calculated by the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method and compared with experimental results.

  13. Heavy atom vibrational modes and low-energy vibrational autodetachment in nitromethane anions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Michael C.; Weber, J. Mathias, E-mail: weberjm@jila.colorado.edu [JILA, University of Colorado at Boulder, 440 UCB, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0440 (United States); Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Colorado at Boulder, 215UCB, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0215 (United States); Baraban, Joshua H. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Colorado at Boulder, 215UCB, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0215 (United States); Matthews, Devin A. [Institute for Computational Engineering and Science, University of Texas at Austin, 201 E. 24th St., Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Stanton, John F. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station A5300, Austin, Texas 78712-0165 (United States)

    2015-06-21

    We report infrared spectra of nitromethane anion, CH{sub 3}NO{sub 2}{sup −}, in the region 700–2150 cm{sup −1}, obtained by Ar predissociation spectroscopy and electron detachment spectroscopy. The data are interpreted in the framework of second-order vibrational perturbation theory based on coupled-cluster electronic structure calculations. The modes in the spectroscopic region studied here are mainly based on vibrations involving the heavier atoms; this work complements earlier studies on nitromethane anion that focused on the CH stretching region of the spectrum. Electron detachment begins at photon energies far below the adiabatic electron affinity due to thermal population of excited vibrational states.

  14. High Resolution Vibrational Spectroscopy at the Atomic Scale: CO on Au(110) and Cu(100), and C2H2 on Cu(100)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chen; Jiang, Chilun; Zhang, Yanning; Wu, Ruqian; Ho, Wilson

    2012-11-01

    STM-IETS has been regarded as the ultimate tool to identify and characterize single molecules adsorbed on solid surfaces with atomic spatial resolution. With the improvement of the energy resolution obtained at ˜600 mK, STM-IETS is able to reveal subtle interactions between the molecule and its environment which was previously not possible at higher temperatures. Here we demonstrate the capability of sub-Kelvin STM on detecting the influence of the tip as well as the anisotropy of the reconstructed Au(110) surface on the low energy hindered vibrational motions of single adsorbed CO molecule. In the case of acetylene, more vibrational modes are resolved due to the enhanced spectral resolution. Single molecule vibrational spectroscopy with atomic scale spatial resolution opens new possibilities to probe molecular interactions with high spectral resolution.

  15. Recovering metallic fractions from waste electrical and electronic equipment by a novel vibration system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, Muddasar; Miles, Nicholas J; Hall, Philip

    2013-03-01

    The need to recover and recycle valuable resources from Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) is of growing importance as increasing amounts are generated due to shorter product life cycles, market expansions, new product developments and, higher consumption and production rates. The European Commission (EC) directive, 2002/96/EC, on WEEE became law in UK in January 2007 setting targets to recover up to 80% of all WEEE generated. Printed Wire Board (PWB) and/or Printed Circuit Board (PCB) is an important component of WEEE with an ever increasing tonnage being generated. However, the lack of an accurate estimate for PCB production, future supply and uncertain demands of its recycled materials in international markets has provided the motivation to explore different approaches to recycle PCBs. The work contained in this paper focuses on a novel, dry separation methodology in which vertical vibration is used to separate the metallic and non-metallic fractions of PCBs. When PCBs were comminuted to less than 1mm in size, metallic grades as high as 95% (measured by heavy liquid analysis) could be achieved in the recovered products. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. FEMTOSECOND SPECTROSCOPY OF SOLVATED ELECTRON IN AQUEOUS MEDIA

    OpenAIRE

    Gauduel, Yann; Pommeret, S.; Antonetti, A.

    1991-01-01

    The elucidation of detailed mechanisms of ultrafast events that occur in molecular charge transfer or reaction dynamics has been made possible by recent advances in spectroscopy techniques that use ultrashort laser pulse generation. Ultrashort laser pulses (100 femtoseconds duration, 1 fs = 10-15 s) allow to initiate selective photochemical processes (single charge transfer for instance) and to obtain unique informations on the dynamics of primary steps of radical reactions involving ultrafas...

  17. Direct rate assessment of laccase catalysed radical formation in lignin by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Line; Andersen, Mogens Larsen; Meyer, Anne S.

    2017-01-01

    Laccases (EC 1.10.3.2) catalyse removal of an electron and a proton from phenolic hydroxyl groups, including phenolic hydroxyls in lignins, to form phenoxy radicals during reduction of O2. We employed electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR) for real time measurement of such catalytic...

  18. pH dependence of the conformation of small peptides investigated with two-dimensional vibrational spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerta-Viga, Adriana; Shaw, Daniel J; Woutersen, Sander

    2010-11-25

    We investigate how the conformation of small peptides is influenced by the presence or absence of charge on the C-terminus and on the side groups. To this purpose, the conformations of two tripeptides, with acidic and basic side groups, is determined at several pD values using two-dimensional infrared (2DIR) spectroscopy. The investigated pD values are chosen relative to the C-terminal and side-chain pK(a) values in such a way that the C-terminus and side groups are in well-defined protonation states. The measurements are analyzed quantitatively using an excitonic model for the Amide I' mode. From the vibrational coupling and the angle between the Amide I' transition dipoles obtained in this way, the dihedral angles (φ,ψ) of the central C(α) atom are determined. Interestingly, our measurements show that the backbone structure of the peptides is remarkably stable against changing the charges of both the side groups and the C-terminal carboxylate groups. This is probably a consequence of effective screening of the Coulomb interactions between the charged groups by the water molecules between them. We also find that the (φ,ψ) confidence regions obtained from 2DIR measurements can have highly irregular shapes as a consequence of the nonlinear relation between the dihedral angles and the experimentally determined Amide I' coupling and transition-dipole angle.

  19. Infrared Spectroscopy of CO Ro-Vibrational Absorption Lines toward the Obscured AGN IRAS 08572+3915

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirahata, Mai; Nakagawa, Takao; Usuda, Tomonori; Goto, Miwa; Suto, Hiroshi; Geballe, Thomas R.

    2013-02-01

    We present high-resolution spectroscopy of gaseous CO absorption in the fundamental ro-vibrational band toward the heavily obscured active galactic nucleus (AGN) IRAS 08572+3915. We have detected absorption lines up to highly excited rotational levels (J ≤ 17). The velocity profiles reveal three distinct components, the strongest and broadest (Δυ > 200 km s-1) of which is due to blueshifted (-160 km s-1) gas at a temperature of ˜270 K absorbing at velocities as high as -400 km s-1. A much weaker but even warmer (˜700 K) component, which is highly redshifted (+100 km s-1), is also detected, in addition to a cold (˜20 K) component centered at the systemic velocity of the galaxy. On the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium, the column density of CO in the 270 K component is NCO ˜4.5 × 1018 cm-2, which in fully molecular gas corresponds to an H2 column density of NH2 ˜ 2.5 × 1022 cm-2. The thermal excitation of CO up to the observed high rotational levels requires a density greater than nc (H2) > 2 × 107cm-3, implying that the thickness of the warm absorbing layer is extremely small (Δd warm components, as well as their temperatures, indicate that they originate in molecular clouds near the central engine of the AGN.

  20. Decoding Nucleation and Growth of Zeolitic Imidazolate Framework Thin Films with Atomic Force Microscopy and Vibrational Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öztürk, Zafer; Filez, Matthias; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2017-08-10

    The synthesis of metal-organic framework (MOF) thin films has garnered significant attention during the past decade. By better understanding the parameters governing the nucleation and growth of such thin films, their properties can be rationally tuned, empowering their application as (reactive) membranes. Here, a combined AFM-vibrational spectroscopy research strategy is employed to detail the chemistries governing the nucleation and growth of zeolitic imidazolate framework (ZIF) thin films, in particular isostructural Co-ZIF-67 and Zn-ZIF-8. First, a single step direct synthesis approach is used to investigate the influence of different synthesis parameters -metal/linker ratio, temperature, and metal type- on the thin film nucleation and growth behaviour. While the metal/linker ratio has a pronounced effect on the thin film nucleation rate, the temperature mainly influences the growth kinetics of nuclei forming the thin film. In addition, the nucleation and growth of ZIF thin films is shown to be highly dependent on the electronegativity of the metal type. Thin-film thickness control can be achieved by using a multistep synthesis strategy, implying repetitive applications of single step deposition under identical synthesis conditions, for which a growth mechanism is proposed. This study provides insight into the influence of synthesis parameters on the ZIF thin film properties, using tools at hand to rationally tune MOF thin film properties. © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  1. Alteration of biomacromolecule in corn by steam flaking in relation to biodegradation kinetics in ruminant, revealed with vibrational molecular spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ningning; Liu, Jianxin; Yu, Peiqiang

    2017-10-12

    Large scale of steam flaked corn has been used in dairy ration to maintain high milk production level. This study aimed to determine effects of steam flaking on processing-induced intrinsic molecular structure changes that were associated with rumen degradation kinetics and nutrients supply. The advanced vibrational molecular spectroscopy was applied to reveal the processing-induced intrinsic structure changes on a molecular basis. The rumen degradation kinetics and nutrient supply were determined using in situ approach in ruminant livestock system. Raw corn grain (RC) and steam flaked corn grain (SFC) were obtained from two different processing plants. The results showed that (1) Compared to RC, SFC had greater truly digestible non-fiber carbohydrate [tdNFC: 86.8 versus 78.0% dry matter (DM)], but lower truly digestible crude protein [tdCP: 7.7 versus 9.0% DM]. (2) The steam flaking increased (PMolecular absorbance intensities of most carbohydrate biopolymers were greater in SFC (Pmolecular spectral intensities were lower (Pmolecular structure and nutrient interactive study showed that carbohydrate spectral intensities were positively (Pmolecular structure changes had an interactive relationship with rumen degradation kinetics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Vibrational properties of epitaxial Bi{sub 4}Te{sub 3} films as studied by Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Hao; Pan, Wenwu; Chen, Qimiao; Wu, Xiaoyan [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 865 Changning Road, Shanghai 200050 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, No.19A Yuquan Road, Beijing 100049 (China); Song, Yuxin, E-mail: songyuxin@mail.sim.ac.cn, E-mail: shumin@chalmers.se; Gong, Qian [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 865 Changning Road, Shanghai 200050 (China); Lu, Pengfei [State Key Laboratory of Information Photonics and Optical Communications, Ministry of Education, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, P.O. Box 72, Beijing 100876 (China); Wang, Shumin, E-mail: songyuxin@mail.sim.ac.cn, E-mail: shumin@chalmers.se [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 865 Changning Road, Shanghai 200050 (China); Department of Microtechnology and Nanoscience, Chalmers University of Technology, 41296 Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2015-08-15

    Bi{sub 4}Te{sub 3}, as one of the phases of the binary Bi–Te system, shares many similarities with Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}, which is known as a topological insulator and thermoelectric material. We report the micro-Raman spectroscopy study of 50 nm Bi{sub 4}Te{sub 3} films on Si substrates prepared by molecular beam epitaxy. Raman spectra of Bi{sub 4}Te{sub 3} films completely resolve the six predicted Raman-active phonon modes for the first time. Structural features and Raman tensors of Bi{sub 4}Te{sub 3} films are introduced. According to the wavenumbers and assignments of the six eigenpeaks in the Raman spectra of Bi{sub 4}Te{sub 3} films, it is found that the Raman-active phonon oscillations in Bi{sub 4}Te{sub 3} films exhibit the vibrational properties of those in both Bi and Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} films.

  3. Vibrational spectroscopy and microscopic imaging: novel approaches for comparing barrier physical properties in native and human skin equivalents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Guo; Zhang, Guojin; Flach, Carol R.; Mendelsohn, Richard

    2013-06-01

    Vibrational spectroscopy and imaging have been used to compare barrier properties in human skin, porcine skin, and two human skin equivalents, Epiderm 200X with an enhanced barrier and Epiderm 200 with a normal barrier. Three structural characterizations were performed. First, chain packing and conformational order were compared in isolated human stratum corneum (SC), isolated porcine SC, and in the Epiderm 200X surface layers. The infrared (IR) spectrum of isolated human SC revealed a large proportion of orthorhombically packed lipid chains at physiological temperatures along with a thermotropic phase transition to a state with hexagonally packed chains. In contrast, the lipid phase at physiological temperatures in both porcine SC and in Epiderm 200X, although dominated by conformationally ordered chains, lacked significant levels of orthorhombic subcell packing. Second, confocal Raman imaging of cholesterol bands showed extensive formation of cholesterol-enriched pockets within the human skin equivalents (HSEs). Finally, IR imaging tracked lipid barrier dimensions as well as the spatial disposition of ordered lipids in human SC and Epiderm 200X. These approaches provide a useful set of experiments for exploring structural differences between excised human skin and HSEs, which in turn may provide a rationale for the functional differences observed among these preparations.

  4. Characterisation of the membrane affinity of an isoniazide peptide conjugate by tensiometry, atomic force microscopy and sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy, using a phospholipid Langmuir monolayer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Katalin; Pénzes, Csanád Botond; Schnöller, Donát; Horváti, Kata; Bosze, Szilvia; Hudecz, Ferenc; Keszthelyi, Tamás; Kiss, Eva

    2010-10-07

    Tensiometry, sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy were employed to assess the cell penetration ability of a peptide conjugate of the antituberculotic agent isoniazide. Isoniazide was conjugated to peptide (91)SEFAYGSFVRTVSLPV(106), a functional T-cell epitope of the immunodominant 16 kDa protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. As a simple but versatile model of the cell membrane a phospholipid Langmuir monolayer at the liquid/air interface was used. Changes induced in the structure of the phospholipid monolayer by injection of the peptide conjugate into the subphase were followed by tensiometry and sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy. The drug penetrated lipid films were transferred to a solid support by the Langmuir-Blodgett technique, and their structures were characterized by atomic force microscopy. Peptide conjugation was found to strongly enhance the cell penetration ability of isoniazide.

  5. Femtochemistry in the electronic ground state: Dynamic Stark control of vibrational dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shu, Chuan-Cun; Thomas, Esben Folger; Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    2017-01-01

    We study the interplay of vibrational and rotational excitation in a diatomic molecule due to the non-resonant dynamic Stark effect. With a fixed peak intensity, optimal Gaussian pulse durations for maximizing vibrational or rotational transitions are obtained analytically and confirmed numerically...

  6. FTIR spectroscopy of the reaction center of Chloroflexus aurantiacus: photooxidation of the primary electron donor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabelin, A A; Shkuropatova, V A; Shuvalov, V A; Shkuropatov, A Ya

    2012-02-01

    Photochemical oxidation of the primary electron donor P in reaction centers (RCs) of the filamentous anoxygenic phototrophic bacterium Chloroflexus (C.) aurantiacus was examined by light-induced Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) difference spectroscopy at 95 K in the spectral range of 4000-1200 cm(-1). The light-induced P(+)Q(A)(-)/PQ(A) IR spectrum of C. aurantiacus RCs is compared to the well-characterized FTIR difference spectrum of P photooxidation in the purple bacterium Rhodobacter (R.) sphaeroides R-26 RCs. The presence in the P(+)Q(A)(-)/PQ(A) FTIR spectrum of C. aurantiacus RCs of specific low-energy electronic transitions at ~2650 and ~2200 cm(-1), as well as of associated vibrational (phase-phonon) bands at 1567, 1481, and 1294-1285 cm(-1), indicates that the radical cation P(+) in these RCs has dimeric structure, with the positive charge distributed between the two coupled bacteriochlorophyll a molecules. The intensity of the P(+) absorbance band at ~1250 nm (upon chemical oxidation of P at room temperature) in C. aurantiacus RCs is approximately 1.5 times lower than that in R. sphaeroides R-26 RCs. This fact, together with the decreased intensity of the absorbance band at ~2650 cm(-1), is interpreted in terms of the weaker coupling of bacteriochlorophylls in the P(+) dimer in C. aurantiacus compared to R. sphaeroides R-26. In accordance with the previous (pre)resonance Raman data, FTIR measurements in the carbonyl stretching region show that in C. aurantiacus RCs (i) the 13(1)-keto C=O groups of P(A) and P(B-) molecules constituting the P dimer are not involved in hydrogen bonding in either neutral or photooxidized state of P and (ii) the 3(1)-acetyl C=O group of P(B) forms a hydrogen bond (probably with tyrosine M187) absorbing at 1635 cm(-1). Differential signals at 1757(+)/1749(-) and 1741(+)/1733(-) cm(-1) in the FTIR spectrum of C. aurantiacus RCs are attributed to the 13(3)-ester C=O groups of P in different environments.

  7. Ab initio investigation of doping-enhanced electronic and vibrational second hyperpolarizability of polyacetylene chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champagne, Benoît; Spassova, Milena; Jadin, Jean-Benoit; Kirtman, Bernard

    2002-03-01

    The effect of charging on the longitudinal second hyperpolarizability of polyacetylene (PA) chains containing up to nearly 70 carbon atoms has been investigated ab initio by characterizing chains with and without an explicit alkali atom (Li, Na, K) as dopant. Whereas charging dramatically enhances the static electronic and vibrational hyperpolarizabilities, γLe(0) and γLv, of an isolated chain at intermediate chain lengths, the presence of an alkali atom counterion substantially reduces this effect. As the size of the alkali atom increases, most properties, including the hyperpolarizabilities, approach those of the isolated chain. Detailed analysis shows that the behavior of γLe(0) is most simply explained in terms of a reduced electrostatic pinning potential due to increased distance between chain and counterion. At all chain lengths studied γLe(0) of PA is enhanced by alkali doping. For chains containing 50 carbon atoms (NC=50), the increase due to K doping is about 9×107a.u., which more than doubles the value for an undoped chain of similar length. The normalized quantity γLe(0)/NC exhibits a maximum for the isolated soliton (at about NC=61) that is over four times that of the infinite undoped (and unbent) chain. When the alkali dopant is taken into account this maximum diminishes considerably and shifts to larger NC than we have considered. In comparison with the maximum for the undoped species (at NC=∞) there is a small enhancement of γLe(0)/NC for K doping, but none for either Li or Na doping at the coupled-perturbed Hartree-Fock (CPHF)/6-31G level of theory. Intermediate length isolated chains bearing a charged soliton show order of magnitude increases in γv for the degenerate four-wave mixing (DFWM) and, especially, electric field-induced second harmonic generation (dc-SHG) processes compared to undoped PA. As in the case of γLe(0) this enhancement persists, but is significantly reduced when the dopant atom is included. Vibrational anharmonicity

  8. The vibrational structure of (E,E’)-1,4-diphenyl-1,3-butadiene. Linear dichroism FTIR spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Bjarke Knud Vilster; Møller, Søren; Spanget-Larsen, Jens

    2006-01-01

    The title compound (DPB) was investigated by FTIR spectroscopy in liquid solutions and by FTIR linear dichroism (LD) measurements on samples aligned in stretched polyethylene. The LD data provided experimental assignments of molecular transition moment directions and vibrational symmetries for more...... of a nearly complete assignment of the IR active fundamentals of DPB, involving reassignment of a number of transitions. In addition, previously published Raman spectra of DPB were well predicted by the B3LYP/cc-pVTZ calculations....

  9. Vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy studies at solid/liquid interfaces : Influence of the experimental geometry in the spectral shape and enhancement

    OpenAIRE

    Liljeblad, Jonathan F.D.; Tyrode, Eric

    2012-01-01

    The influence of the experimental geometry, specifically the angles of incidence (AOI) of the exciting beams, on the enhancement of the vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy (VSFS) spectra has been systematically investigated, particularly when approaching total internal reflection (TIR) conditions. Theoretical simulations of the spectral intensity as a function of the AOI and infrared wavelength at three different polarization combinations were critically compared to experimental data obtai...

  10. Final Technical Report: Vibrational Spectroscopy of Transient Combustion Intermediates Trapped in Helium Nanodroplets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douberly, Gary Elliott [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States)

    2017-11-16

    The objective of our experimental research program is to isolate and stabilize transient intermediates and products of prototype combustion reactions. This will be accomplished by Helium Nanodroplet Isolation, a novel technique where liquid helium droplets freeze out high energy metastable configurations of a reacting system, permitting infrared spectroscopic characterizations of products and intermediates that result from hydrocarbon radical reactions with molecular oxygen and other small molecules relevant to combustion environments. The low temperature (0.4 K) and rapid cooling associated with He droplets provides a perfectly suited medium to isolate and probe a broad range of molecular radical and carbene systems important to combustion chemistry. The sequential addition of molecular species to He droplets often leads to the stabilization of high-energy, metastable cluster configurations that represent regions of the potential energy surface far from the global minimum. Single and double resonance IR laser spectroscopy techniques, along with Stark and Zeeman capabilities, are being used to probe the structural and dynamical properties of these systems.

  11. Transient two-dimensional vibrational spectroscopy of an operating molecular machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panman, Matthijs R; van Dijk, Chris N; Huerta-Viga, Adriana; Sanders, Hans J; Bakker, Bert H; Leigh, David A; Brouwer, Albert M; Buma, Wybren Jan; Woutersen, Sander

    2017-12-20

    Synthetic molecular machines are promising building blocks for future nanoscopic devices. However, the details of their mechanical behaviour are in many cases still largely unknown. A deeper understanding of mechanics at the molecular level is essential for the design and construction of complex nanodevices. Here, we show that transient two-dimensional infrared (T2DIR) spectroscopy makes it possible to monitor the conformational changes of a translational molecular machine during its operation. Translation of a macrocyclic ring from one station to another on a molecular thread is initiated by a UV pulse. The arrival of the shuttling macrocycle at the final station is visible from a newly appearing cross peak between these two moieties. To eliminate spectral congestion in the T2DIR spectra, we use a subtraction method applicable to many other complex molecular systems. The T2DIR spectra indicate that the macrocycle adopts a boat-like conformation at the final station, which contrasts with the chair-like conformation at the initial station.

  12. Vibrational spectroscopy via the Caldeira-Leggett model with anharmonic system potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottwald, Fabian; Ivanov, Sergei D; Kühn, Oliver

    2016-04-28

    The Caldeira-Leggett (CL) model, which describes a system bi-linearly coupled to a harmonic bath, has enjoyed popularity in condensed phase spectroscopy owing to its utmost simplicity. However, the applicability of the model to cases with anharmonic system potentials, as it is required for the description of realistic systems in solution, is questionable due to the presence of the invertibility problem [F. Gottwald et al., J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 6, 2722 (2015)] unless the system itself resembles the CL model form. This might well be the case at surfaces or in the solid regime, which we here confirm for a particular example of an iodine molecule in the atomic argon environment under high pressure. For this purpose we extend the recently proposed Fourier method for parameterizing linear generalized Langevin dynamics [F. Gottwald et al., J. Chem. Phys. 142, 244110 (2015)] to the non-linear case based on the CL model and perform an extensive error analysis. In order to judge on the applicability of this model in advance, we give practical empirical criteria and discuss the effect of the potential renormalization term. The obtained results provide evidence that the CL model can be used for describing a potentially broad class of systems.

  13. Vibrational spectroscopy via the Caldeira-Leggett model with anharmonic system potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Gottwald, Fabian; Kühn, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    The Caldeira-Leggett (CL) model, which describes a system bi-linearly coupled to a harmonic bath, has enjoyed popularity in condensed phase spectroscopy owing to its utmost simplicity. However, the applicability of the model to cases with anharmonic system potentials, as it is required for the description of realistic systems in solution, is questionable due to the presence of the invertibility problem [J. Phys. Chem. Lett., \\textbf{6}, 2722 (2015)] unless the system itself resembles the CL model form. This might well be the case at surfaces or in the solid regime, which we here confirm for a particular example of an iodine molecule in the atomic argon environment under high pressure. For this purpose we extend the recently proposed Fourier method for parameterizing linear generalized Langevin dynamics[J. Chem. Phys., \\textbf{142}, 244110 (2015)] to the non-linear case based on the CL model and perform an extensive error analysis. In order to judge on the applicability of this model in advance, we give handy ...

  14. Dissociative electron attachment to vibrationally excited H{sub 2} molecules involving the {sup 2}{Sigma}{sub g}{sup +} resonant Rydberg electronic state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Celiberto, R., E-mail: r.celiberto@poliba.it [Department of Water Engineering and Chemistry, Polytechnic of Bari, 70125 Bari (Italy); Institute of Inorganic Methodologies and Plasmas, CNR, 70125 Bari (Italy); Janev, R.K., E-mail: r.janev@fz-juelich.de [Macedonian Academy of Sciences and Arts, P.O.B 428, 1000 Skopje (Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of); Institute of Energy and Climate Research - Plasma Physics, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH Association EURATOM-FZJ, Partner in Trilateral Euregio Cluster, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Wadehra, J.M., E-mail: wadehra@wayne.edu [Physics Department, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States); Tennyson, J., E-mail: j.tennyson@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2012-04-04

    Graphical abstract: Dissociative electron attachment cross sections as a function of the incident electron energy and for the initial vibration levels v{sub i} = 0-5, 10 of the H{sub 2} molecule. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We calculated electron-hydrogen dissociative attachment cross sections and rates coefficients. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Collision processes occurring through a resonant Rydberg state are considered. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cross sections and rates were obtained for vibrationally excited hydrogen molecules. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The cross sections exhibit pronounced oscillatory structures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A comparison with the process involving the electron-hydrogen resonant ground state is discussed. - Abstract: Dissociative electron attachment cross sections (DEA) on vibrationally excited H{sub 2} molecule taking place via the {sup 2}{Sigma}{sub g}{sup +} Rydberg-excited resonant state are studied using the local complex potential (LCP) model for resonant collisions. The cross sections are calculated for all initial vibrational levels (v{sub i} = 0-14) of the neutral molecule. In contrast to the previously noted dramatic increase in the DEA cross sections with increasing v{sub i}, when the process proceeds via the X {sup 2}{Sigma}{sub u}{sup +} shape resonance of H{sub 2}, for the {sup 2}{Sigma}{sub g}{sup +} Rydberg resonance the cross sections increase only gradually up to v{sub i} = 3 and then decrease. Moreover, the cross sections for v{sub i} Greater-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 6 exhibit pronounced oscillatory structures. A discussion of the origin of the observed behavior of calculated cross sections is given. The DEA rate coefficients for all v{sub i} levels are also calculated in the 0.5-1000 eV temperature range.

  15. Conformational analysis and vibrational spectroscopy of a paracetamol analogous: 2-Bromo-N-(2-hydroxy-5-methylphenyl)-2-methylpropanamide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viana, Rommel B.; Quintero, David E.; Viana, Anderson B.; Moreno-Fuquen, Rodolfo

    2017-11-01

    We conducted an experimental and quantum chemical investigation of the electronic properties and vibrational mode couplings of a structure analogous to a paracetamol (acetaminophen): 2-Bromo-N-(2-hydroxy-5-methylphenyl)-2-methylpropanamide. The spectroscopic and electronic properties were carried out with the PBE1PBE functional, and G3MP2 was used to predict the heat of formation. Among the E/Z stereoisomers, we showed that the energy gap ranged from 3 to 10 kcal mol-1; the relative stability among the regioisomers (involving the different positions of the methyl and hydroxyl groups) exhibited energy differences lower than 5 kcal mol-1. A topological analysis using the Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules (QTAIM) was performed to determine the intramolecular hydrogen bonds that govern the configuration changes, and the Natural Bond Orbital method was used to estimate the interplay between the steric and electrostatic interactions that stabilized each isomer. It was also estimated the influence of the population methodology in to predict the atomic charge distribution for the title compound.

  16. Conformational analysis and vibrational study of daidzein by using FT-IR and FT-Raman spectroscopies and DFT calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Harshita; Singh, Swapnil; Srivastava, Anubha; Tandon, Poonam; Bharti, Purnima; Kumar, Sudhir; Maurya, Rakesh

    2014-01-01

    Daidzein (C15H10O4) is a type of isoflavone. It was isolated from Butea monosperma that belongs to the Fabaceae family. Soybeans and soy products are the abundant source of daidzein. It is the subject of investigation for many reasons, as it has got wide applications, such as anti-tumor, anti-estrogen, weak pro-estrogen and anti-cancer activities. In the present study, a complete vibrational assignment is provided for the observed IR and Raman spectra of daidzein. Electronic properties have been analyzed using TD-DFT method for both gaseous and solvent phase. The optimized geometry, total energy, potential energy surface and vibrational wavenumbers of daidzein have been determined using density functional theory (DFT/B3LYP) method with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set and a good correlation was found between observed and calculated values. The double well potential energy curve of the molecule about three bonds, has been plotted, as obtained from DFT/6-31G basis. The HOMO-LUMO energy gap of possible conformers has been calculated for comparing their chemical activity. Global reactivity descriptors have been calculated for predicting the chemical reactivity and the stability of chemical systems. Electrostatic potential surface has been plotted for predicting the structure activity relationship. NBO analysis has also been performed to study the stability of the molecule. NLO study reveals the nonlinear properties of the molecule. 1H and 13C NMR spectra have also been studied. Finally, the calculated results were used to simulate infrared and Raman spectra of the title compound which showed a good agreement with the observed spectra. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. From Vibrational Spectroscopy to Force Fields and Structures of Saccharides: New Computational Algorithms and Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pincu, Madeleine [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Gerber, Robert Benny [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    2013-07-17

    vibrational bands involving the shared proton were strongly shifted to lower frequencies ( by about ~ 500 cm-1 for the symmetric mode, in this case). A similar motif was also observed recently by us in protonated cellobiose, indicating that this might be a common mechanism for interaction of a proton with sugars, perhaps similar to the proton wires observed in proteins. The simulations with protonated sugars also shed light on different mechanisms of interaction of a sugar with a proton, including formation of a carboxonium ion, mutarotation events, ring puckering and in the disaccharide cellobiose, the breaking of the glycosidic bond (in both forms of cis and trans). One final highlight to note in this summary, is the finding that in the monosaccharide beta-D-Galactose a hydroxyl ion abstracts a proton (forming water) in a barrierless process at room temperature, but the water remains bound to the sugar backbone, though it migrates around it; actual degradation occurs at ~500 K when water leaves the sugar. However, the study also shows that the water abstraction reaction can be reversed in the presence of 2 additional water molecules complexed with the sugar.

  18. Complementary Vibrational Spectroscopy Investigations of Iron and Iron-Bearing Minerals (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, C. A.; Antonangeli, D.; Fiquet, G.; Fei, Y.; Alatas, A.; Dera, P. K.

    2013-12-01

    The high-pressure elastic and thermodynamic properties of iron have been extensively studied because iron is thought to be the main constituent in Earth's core, along with ~5 to 10 wt% nickel and some light elements. In particular, nuclear resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (NRIXS) is an isotope-selective technique that has been used to investigate the vibrational properties of 57Fe at high-pressure via its measured phonon density of states (DOS) [e.g., 1]. For example, the low-energy region of a material's phonon DOS is proportional to its Debye sound velocity (vD), which reflects an average of its compressional (vP) and shear (vS) sound velocities, weighted more heavily towards vS [2]. In order to separate the compressional and shear components of vD, one often relies on established equations of state (EOS) which, in the case of iron, diverge above 100 GPa [e.g., 3; 4]. In turn, such uncertainties are propagated into iron's sound velocities--particularly vP--at pressures approaching those of Earth's core. Here we demonstrate how the combination of NRIXS and high-energy resolution inelastic x-ray scattering (HERIX) data allows for the determination of both vP and vS, independent of an EOS. In particular, we used NRIXS and HERIX to probe the total phonon DOS and points along the longitudinal acoustic phonon branch, respectively, of pure iron loaded into similarly prepared diamond anvil cells, up to a pressure of 171 GPa at 300 K [1; 5]. Experiments were performed at the Advanced Photon Source and European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, where sample volumes (densities) were also measured with in-situ x-ray diffraction. Using established NRIXS and HERIX fitting procedures, we determined iron's density-dependent vD and vP, respectively, accounting for mass effects in the former parameter using a harmonic oscillator model. The combination of these datasets [1; 5] provides a new tight constraint on the density-dependent compressional and shear sound velocities of iron

  19. High energy photoelectron spectroscopy in basic and applied science: Bulk and interface electronic structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knut, Ronny; Lindblad, Rebecka [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, SE-751 21 Uppsala (Sweden); Gorgoi, Mihaela [Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH, Albert-Einstein-Str. 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Rensmo, Håkan [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, SE-751 21 Uppsala (Sweden); Karis, Olof, E-mail: olof.karis@physics.uu.se [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, SE-751 21 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: •We demonstrate how hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy can be used to investigate interface properties of multilayers. •By combining HAXPES and statistical methods we are able to provide quantitative analysis of the interface diffusion process. •We show how photoionization cross sections can be used to map partial density of states contributions to valence states. •We use HAXPES to provide insight into the valence electronic structure of e.g. multiferroics and dye-sensitized solar cells. -- Abstract: With the access of new high-performance electron spectrometers capable of analyzing electron energies up to the order of 10 keV, the interest for photoelectron spectroscopy has grown and many new applications of the technique in areas where electron spectroscopies were considered to have limited use have been demonstrated over the last few decades. The technique, often denoted hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HX-PES or HAXPES), to distinguish the experiment from X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy performed at lower energies, has resulted in an increasing interest in photoelectron spectroscopy in many areas. The much increased mean free path at higher kinetic energies, in combination with the elemental selectivity of the core level spectroscopies in general has led to this fact. It is thus now possible to investigate the electronic structure of materials with a substantially enhanced bulk sensitivity. In this review we provide examples from our own research using HAXPES which to date has been performed mainly at the HIKE facility at the KMC-1 beamline at HZB, Berlin. The review exemplifies the new opportunities using HAXPES to address both bulk and interface electronic properties in systems relevant for applications in magnetic storage, energy related research, but also in purely curiosity driven problems.

  20. Syntheses, crystal structures, NMR spectroscopy, and vibrational spectroscopy of Sr(PO{sub 3}F).H{sub 2}O and Sr(PO{sub 3}F)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jantz, Stephan G.; Hoeppe, Henning A. [Lehrstuhl fuer Festkoerperchemie, Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Augsburg (Germany); Wuellen, Leo van; Fischer, Andreas [Lehrstuhl fuer Chemische Physik und Materialwissenschaften, Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Augsburg (Germany); Libowitzky, Eugen [Institute for Mineralogy and Crystallography, Faculty of Geosciences, Geography and Astronomy, University of Vienna (Austria); Baran, Enrique J. [Centro de Quimica Inorganica (CEQUINOR/CONICET, UNLP), Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata (Argentina); Weil, Matthias [Institute for Chemical Technologies and Analytics, Division Structural Chemistry, Vienna University of Technology (Austria)

    2016-03-15

    Single crystals of Sr(PO{sub 3}F).H{sub 2}O {P2_1/c, Z = 4, a = 7.4844(2) Aa, b = 7.0793(2) Aa, c = 8.4265(2) Aa, β = 108.696(1) , V = 422.91(2) Aa"3, 2391 F_o"2, 70 parameters, R_1[F"2 > 2σ(F"2)] = 0.036; wR_2(F"2 all) = 0.049, S = 1.054} were grown from an aqueous solution by a metathesis reaction. The structure comprises [SrO{sub 8}] polyhedra and PO{sub 3}F tetrahedra that form a layered arrangement parallel to (100). The topotactic dehydration of this phase proceeds between 80 and 140 C to afford Sr(PO{sub 3}F). The monazite-type crystal structure of Sr(PO{sub 3}F) was elucidated from the X-ray powder data by simulated annealing [P2{sub 1}/c, Z = 4, a = 6.71689(9) Aa, b = 7.11774(11) Aa, c = 8.66997(13) Aa, β = 128.0063(7) , V = 326.605(8) Aa{sup 3}, R{sub p} = 0.010, R{sub wp} = 0.015, R{sub F} = 0.030]. During dehydration, the structure of Sr(PO{sub 3}F) .H{sub 2}O collapses along [100] from a layered arrangement into a framework structure, accompanied by a change of the coordination number of the Sr{sup 2+} ions from eight to nine. The magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR and vibrational spectroscopy data of both phases are discussed. (Copyright copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  1. Crystalline indole at high pressure: chemical stability, electronic, and vibrational properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citroni, Margherita; Costantini, Barbara; Bini, Roberto; Schettino, Vincenzo

    2009-10-15

    Vibrational and electronic spectra of crystalline indole were measured up to 25.5 GPa at room temperature in a diamond anvil cell. In particular, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra in the mid-infrared region and two-photon excitation profiles and fluorescence spectra in the region of the HOMO-LUMO transitions were obtained. The analysis of the FTIR spectra revealed a large red-shift of the N-H stretching mode with increasing pressure, indicating the strengthening of the H-bond between the NH group and the pi electron density of nearest neighbor molecules. The frequencies of four vibronic bands belonging to the (1)L(a) and (1)L(b) systems were obtained as a function of pressure. Comparison with literature data shows that the crystal acts as a highly polar environment with regard to the position of the (1)L(b) origin and of the fluorescence maximum, which are largely red-shifted with respect to the gas phase or to solutions in apolar solvents. A large, and increasing with pressure, frequency difference between the (1)L(b) origin and the blue edge of the fluorescence spectrum suggests that the emitting state is (1)L(a), that is known to be more stabilized than (1)L(b) by dipolar relaxation. Crystalline indole was found to be very stable with respect to pressure-induced reactivity. Only traces of a reaction product, containing saturated C-H bonds, are detected after a full compression-decompression cycle. In addition, differently from many unsaturated compounds at high pressure, irradiation with light matching a two-photon absorption for a HOMO-LUMO transition has no enhancing effect on reactivity. The chemical stability of indole at high pressure is ascribed to the crystal structure, where nearest neighbor molecules, formig H-bonds, are not in a favorable position to react, while reaction between equivalent molecules, for which a superposition of the pi electron clouds would be possible, is hindered by H-bonded molecules. Consistently, no excimer emission was

  2. Use of vibrational spectroscopy to study protein and DNA structure, hydration, and binding of biomolecules: A combined theoretical and experimental approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jalkanen, Karl J.; Jürgensen, Vibeke Würtz; Claussen, Anetta

    2006-01-01

    +disp, RHF, MP2, and DFT methodologies for the modeling studies with the goal of interpreting the experimentally measured vibrational spectra for these molecules to the greatest extent possible and to use this combined approach to understand the structure, function, and electronic properties...

  3. Vibration Sensitivity of a Wide-Temperature Electronically Scanned Pressure Measurement (ESP) Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckerwar, Allan J.; Garza, Frederico R.

    2001-01-01

    A vibration sensitivity test was conducted on a Wide-Temperature ESP module. The test object was Module "M4," a 16-channel, 4 psi unit scheduled for installation in the Arc Sector of NTF. The module was installed on a vibration exciter and loaded to positive then negative full-scale pressures (+/-2.5 psid). Test variables were the following: Vibration frequencies: 20, 55, 75 Hz. Vibration level: 1 g. Vibration axes: X, Y, Z. The pressure response was measured on each channel, first without and then with the vibration turned on, and the difference analyzed by means of the statistical t-test. The results show that the vibration sensitivity does not exceed 0.01% Full Scale Output per g (with the exception of one channel on one axis) to a 95 percent confidence level. This specification, limited by the resolution of the pressure source, lies well below the total uncertainty specification of 0.1 percent Full Scale Output.

  4. Resolving molecular vibronic structure using high-sensitivity two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bizimana, Laurie A.; Brazard, Johanna; Carbery, William P.; Gellen, Tobias; Turner, Daniel B., E-mail: dturner@nyu.edu [Department of Chemistry, New York University, 100 Washington Square East, New York, New York 10003 (United States)

    2015-10-28

    Coherent multidimensional optical spectroscopy is an emerging technique for resolving structure and ultrafast dynamics of molecules, proteins, semiconductors, and other materials. A current challenge is the quality of kinetics that are examined as a function of waiting time. Inspired by noise-suppression methods of transient absorption, here we incorporate shot-by-shot acquisitions and balanced detection into coherent multidimensional optical spectroscopy. We demonstrate that implementing noise-suppression methods in two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy not only improves the quality of features in individual spectra but also increases the sensitivity to ultrafast time-dependent changes in the spectral features. Measurements on cresyl violet perchlorate are consistent with the vibronic pattern predicted by theoretical models of a highly displaced harmonic oscillator. The noise-suppression methods should benefit research into coherent electronic dynamics, and they can be adapted to multidimensional spectroscopies across the infrared and ultraviolet frequency ranges.

  5. Resolving molecular vibronic structure using high-sensitivity two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizimana, Laurie A; Brazard, Johanna; Carbery, William P; Gellen, Tobias; Turner, Daniel B

    2015-10-28

    Coherent multidimensional optical spectroscopy is an emerging technique for resolving structure and ultrafast dynamics of molecules, proteins, semiconductors, and other materials. A current challenge is the quality of kinetics that are examined as a function of waiting time. Inspired by noise-suppression methods of transient absorption, here we incorporate shot-by-shot acquisitions and balanced detection into coherent multidimensional optical spectroscopy. We demonstrate that implementing noise-suppression methods in two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy not only improves the quality of features in individual spectra but also increases the sensitivity to ultrafast time-dependent changes in the spectral features. Measurements on cresyl violet perchlorate are consistent with the vibronic pattern predicted by theoretical models of a highly displaced harmonic oscillator. The noise-suppression methods should benefit research into coherent electronic dynamics, and they can be adapted to multidimensional spectroscopies across the infrared and ultraviolet frequency ranges.

  6. Vibration-rotation alchemy in acetylene (12C2H2), at low vibrational excitation: From high resolution spectroscopy to fast intramolecular dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Perry, David; Miller, Anthony; AMYAY, Badr; Fayt, André; Herman, Michel

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The link between energy-resolved spectra and time-resolved dynamics is explored quantitatively for acetylene (12C2H2), with up to 8,600 cm-1 of vibrational energy This comparison is based on the extensive and reliable knowledge of the vibration-rotation energy levels and on the model Hamiltonian used to fit them to high precision (B. Amyay, S. Robert, M. Herman, A. Fayt, B. Raghavendra, A. Moudens, J. Thievin, B. Rowe, and R. Georges, J. Chem. Phys. 131 (2009) 114301-11431...

  7. Electron beam imaging and spectroscopy of plasmonic nanoantenna resonances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vesseur, P.C.

    2011-01-01

    Nanoantennas are metal structures that provide strong optical coupling between a nanoscale volume and the far field. This coupling is mediated by surface plasmons, oscillations of the free electrons in the metal. Increasing the control over the resonant plasmonic field distribution opens up a wide

  8. A study of electron scattering through noise spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kumar, Manohar

    2012-01-01

    Charge counting statistics (C.S.) of traversing electron in quantum devices like atomic-molecular junctions is sensitive to the local perturbation in the charge field at the contact and in the quantum channels. The first cumulant of C.S. i.e. current-voltage characteristic of such devices has been

  9. Atmospheric Corrosion on Steel Studied by Conversion Electron Moessbauer Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakanishi, Akio; Kobayashi, Takayuki [Shiga University of Medical Science, Department of Physics (Japan)

    2004-12-15

    In order to investigate initial products on steel by atmospheric corrosion, conversion electron Moessbauer measurements were carried out at temperatures between 15 K and room temperature. From the results obtained at low temperatures, it was found that the corrosion products on steel consisted of ferrihydrite.

  10. Fukui Function Analysis and Optical, Electronic, and Vibrational Properties of Tetrahydrofuran and Its Derivatives: A Complete Quantum Chemical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apoorva Dwivedi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The spectroscopic, optical, and electronic properties of tetrahydrofuran and its derivatives were investigated by FTIR techniques. We have done a comparative study of tetrahydrofuran and its derivatives with B3LYP with 6-311 G (d, p as the basis set. Here we have done a relative study of their structures, vibrational assignments, and thermal, electronic, and optical properties of ttetrahydrofuran and its derivatives. We have plotted frontier orbital HOMO-LUMO surfaces and molecular electrostatic potential surfaces to explain the reactive nature of tetrahydrofuran and its derivatives.

  11. Recovering metallic fractions from waste electrical and electronic equipment by a novel vibration system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habib, Muddasar, E-mail: muddasar77@hotmail.com [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Engineering and Technology, Peshawar (Pakistan); Miles, Nicholas J.; Hall, Philip [Faculty of Science and Engineering, University of Nottingham Ningbo China, Taikang East Road, Ningbo 315100 (China)

    2013-03-15

    Highlights: ► This work focuses on demonstrating a new scaled up technology to separate the metallic and non-metallic fractions of PCBs. ► PCBs comminuted to <1 mm in size resulted in metallic grade concentration of 95% in some of the recovered products. ► Good separation was observed at 40 mm particle bed height due to the formation of well-structured global convection currents. ► The work reported here contributes to the development of a new approach to dry, fine particle separation. - Abstract: The need to recover and recycle valuable resources from Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) is of growing importance as increasing amounts are generated due to shorter product life cycles, market expansions, new product developments and, higher consumption and production rates. The European Commission (EC) directive, 2002/96/EC, on WEEE became law in UK in January 2007 setting targets to recover up to 80% of all WEEE generated. Printed Wire Board (PWB) and/or Printed Circuit Board (PCB) is an important component of WEEE with an ever increasing tonnage being generated. However, the lack of an accurate estimate for PCB production, future supply and uncertain demands of its recycled materials in international markets has provided the motivation to explore different approaches to recycle PCBs. The work contained in this paper focuses on a novel, dry separation methodology in which vertical vibration is used to separate the metallic and non-metallic fractions of PCBs. When PCBs were comminuted to less than 1 mm in size, metallic grades as high as 95% (measured by heavy liquid analysis) could be achieved in the recovered products.

  12. Vibrational and electronic circular dichroism study of bile pigments: complexes of bilirubin and biliverdin with metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncharova, Iryna; Urbanová, Marie

    2009-09-01

    Complexation of bilirubin (BR) and biliverdin (BV) with biogenic and toxic metals (Mn, Cu, Cd, Co, Fe, Ni, Zn, and Ag) has been studied by means of electronic circular dichroism (ECD) and vibrational circular dichroism (VCD). Poly-L-lysine and beta-cyclodextrin in water were chosen as matrices capable of recognizing the single stereoconformer of the pigments with defined M-helicity. Such systems allow structural changes caused by complexation of pigments with metals in aqueous solution at pH 10-11 to be followed using chiroptical methods, which are intrinsically sensitive to spatial structure. These and other spectroscopic techniques have revealed that BV and BR form monomeric complexes with Cd, Cu, and Zn and dimeric complexes with Mn. The stabilities of the complexes with Fe, Ni, Co, and Ag are remarkably lower. The sign of the ECD and VCD patterns of the complexed BV does not change for the chelates of any of the studied metals other than Zn, this exception being interpreted in terms of manifestation of the opposite helicity of BV in its chelate with Zn. In the case of BR, the observed inversion of ECD signal after complexation, together with the analysis of VCD spectra, reveals that a flattening of the molecule takes place, i.e., an increase in the angle between the pyrrinone chromophores without an inversion of helicity. This chiral stereoselectivity, which is very specific in the case of the Zn chelates, is discussed in connection with the specific inhibition of Zn-required enzymes by bile pigments.

  13. Vibration-based Energy Harvesting Systems Characterization Using Automated Electronic Equipment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis KOSMADAKIS

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A measurement bench has been developed to fully automate the procedure for the characterization of a vibration-based energy scavenging system. The measurement system is capable of monitoring all important characteristics of a vibration harvesting system (input and output voltage, current, and other parameters, frequency and acceleration values, etc.. It is composed of a PC, typical digital measuring instruments (oscilloscope, waveform generator, etc., certain sensors and actuators, along with a microcontroller based automation module. The automation of the procedure and the manipulation of the acquired data are performed by LabVIEW software. Typical measurements of a system consisting of a vibrating source, a vibration transducer and an active rectifier are presented.

  14. Probing Plasmonic Nanostructures with Electron Energy - Loss Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raza, Søren

    -response approximation. Irrespective of the microscopic origin, we find that nonlocal response modifies the electromagnetic wave equation by an additional Laplacian term. The hydrodynamic model, which includes nonlocal response through the Thomas–Fermi pressure of a free-electron gas, is discussed. We present also...... the generalized nonlocal optical response model, which expands the hydrodynamic model by taking into account the diffusion of free electrons in metals through Fick’s law. We go on to consider the implications of these two nonlocal models in the following plasmonic geometries: metal-insulator interface, nanosphere....... Above the plasma frequency, resonant excitations are supported by nonlocal theory due to the inclusion of curl-free waves. The application of EELS to study surface plasmons in nanosized metallic systems is then presented. In particular, we discuss that EELS can provide important information...

  15. Electronic Structure and Spectroscopy of HBr and HBr^+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez, Gabriel J.; Liebermann, H. P.; Lefebvre-Brion, H.

    2016-06-01

    We report preliminary ab initio electronic structure calculations of HBr and HBr^+. The computations were carried out employing the MRD-CI package, with a basis set of cc-pVQZ quality augmented with s--, p-- and d--type diffuse functions. In a first series of calculations, without inclusion of spin--orbit splitting, potential energy curves of about 20 doublet and quartet electronic states of HBr^+, and about 30 singlet and triplet (valence and Rydberg) states of HBr were computed. This exploratory step provides a perspective of the character, shape, leading configurations, energetics, and asymptotic behaviour of the electronic states. The calculations taking into account spin-orbit are currently being performed. Our study focuses mainly on the Rydberg states and their interactions with the repulsive valence states and with the bound valence ion-pair state. In particular, the current calculations seek to provide information that might be relevant to the interpretation of recent REMPI measurements which involve the interaction between the diabatic E^1Σ^+ Rydberg state and the diabatic V^1Σ^+ ion--pair state (which together constitute the adiabatic, double-well, B^1Σ^+ state). Several new states of both HBr and HBr^+ are reported. D. Zaouris, A. Kartakoullis, P. Glodic, P. C. Samartzis, H. R. Hródmarsson, Á. Kvaran, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 17, 10468 (2015)

  16. Vibration-rotation alchemy in acetylene (12C2H2), ? at low vibrational excitation: from high resolution spectroscopy to fast intramolecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, David S.; Miller, Anthony; Amyay, Badr; Fayt, André; Herman, Michel

    2010-04-01

    The link between energy-resolved spectra and time-resolved dynamics is explored quantitatively for acetylene (12C2H2), ? with up to 8600 cm-1 of vibrational energy. This comparison is based on the extensive and reliable knowledge of the vibration-rotation energy levels and on the model Hamiltonian used to fit them to high precision [B. Amyay, S. Robert, M. Herman, A. Fayt, B. Raghavendra, A. Moudens, J. Thiévin, B. Rowe, and R. Georges, J. Chem. Phys. 131, 114301 (2009)]. Simulated intensity borrowing features in high resolution absorption spectra and predicted survival probabilities in intramolecular vibrational redistribution (IVR) are first investigated for the v 4 + v 5 and v 3 bright states, for J = 2, 30 and 100. The dependence of the results on the rotational quantum number and on the choice of vibrational bright state reflects the interplay of three kinds of off-diagonal resonances: anharmonic, rotational l-type, and Coriolis. The dynamical quantities used to characterize the calculated time-dependent dynamics are the dilution factor φ d, the IVR lifetime τ IVR , and the recurrence time τ rec. For the two bright states v 3 + 2v 4 and 7v 4, the collisionless dynamics for thermally averaged rotational distributions at T = 27, 270 and 500 K were calculated from the available spectroscopic data. For the 7v 4 bright state, an apparent irreversible decay of is found. In all cases, the model Hamiltonian allows a detailed calculation of the energy flow among all of the coupled zeroth-order vibration-rotation states.

  17. Alteration of biomacromolecule in corn by steam flaking in relation to biodegradation kinetics in ruminant, revealed with vibrational molecular spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ningning; Liu, Jianxin; Yu, Peiqiang

    2018-02-01

    Large scale of steam flaked corn has been used in dairy ration to maintain high milk production level. This study aimed to determine effects of steam flaking on processing-induced intrinsic molecular structure changes that were associated with rumen degradation kinetics and nutrients supply. The advanced vibrational molecular spectroscopy was applied to reveal the processing-induced intrinsic structure changes on a molecular basis. The rumen degradation kinetics and nutrient supply were determined using in situ approach in ruminant livestock system. Raw corn grain (RC) and steam flaked corn grain (SFC) were obtained from two different processing plants. The results showed that (1) Compared to RC, SFC had greater truly digestible non-fiber carbohydrate [tdNFC: 86.8 versus 78.0% dry matter (DM)], but lower truly digestible crude protein [tdCP: 7.7 versus 9.0% DM]. (2) The steam flaking increased (P < 0.01) rumen degradable DM (RDDM) and starch (RDSt), but decreased (P < 0.01) rumen degradable protein (RDP). (3) Molecular absorbance intensities of most carbohydrate biopolymers were greater in SFC (P < 0.01), but protein amides associated molecular spectral intensities were lower (P < 0.01) in SFC. (4). The molecular structure and nutrient interactive study showed that carbohydrate spectral intensities were positively (P < 0.10) associated with RDDM and RDSt and protein amide spectral intensities were positively (P < 0.10) associated with RDP. This results indicated that the steam flaking induced molecular structure changes had an interactive relationship with rumen degradation kinetics.

  18. Crystal structure, Hirshfeld surface analysis, vibrational, thermal behavior and UV spectroscopy of (2,6-diaminopyridinium) dihydrogen arsenate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouaziz, Emna; Ben Hassen, Chawki; Chniba-Boudjada, Nassira; Daoud, Abdelaziz; Mhiri, Tahar; Boujelbene, Mohamed

    2017-10-01

    A new organic dihydrogenomonoarsenate (C5H8N3)H2AsO4 was synthesized by slow evaporation method at room temperature and characterized by X-ray single crystal diffraction. This compound crystallizes in the monoclinic system with the centro-symmetric space group P21/n. Unit cell parameters are a = 10.124 (5)Ǻ, b = 6.648 (5)Ǻ, c = 13.900 (5)Ǻ, β = 105.532° with Z = 4. The crystal structure was solved and refined to R = 0.038 with 2001 independent reflections. Hirshfeld surfaces analysis were used to visualize the fidelity of the crystal structure which has been determined by X-ray data collection on single crystals (C5H8N3)H2AsO4. Due the strong hydrogen Osbnd H⋯O bond network connecting the H2AsO4 groups, the anionic arrangement must be described as infinite (H2AsO4)nn-of dimers chains spreading, in a zig zag fashion, parallel to the b direction. The organic groups (C5H8N3)+ are anchored between adjacent polyanions through multiple hydrogen bonds Nsbnd H⋯O. The thermal decomposition of precursors studied by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), indicate the existence of two mass loss regions correspond to degradation of the title compound. The existence of vibrational modes correspond to the organic and inorganic groups are identified by the infrared and Raman spectroscopy in the frequency ranges 500-4000 and 25-4000 cm-1, respectively.

  19. Surface and buried interfacial structures of epoxy resins used as underfills studied by sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez, Anne V; Holden, Brad; Kristalyn, Cornelius; Fuller, Mike; Wilkerson, Brett; Chen, Zhan

    2011-05-01

    Flip chip technology has greatly improved the performance of semiconductor devices, but relies heavily on the performance of epoxy underfill adhesives. Because epoxy underfills are cured in situ in flip chip semiconductor devices, understanding their surface and interfacial structures is critical for understanding their adhesion to various substrates. Here, sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy was used to study surface and buried interfacial structures of two model epoxy resins used as underfills in flip chip devices, bisphenol A digylcidyl ether (BADGE) and 1,4-butanediol diglycidyl ether (BDDGE). The surface structures of these epoxies were compared before and after cure, and the orientations of their surface functional groups were deduced to understand how surface structural changes during cure may affect adhesion properties. Further, the effect of moisture exposure, a known cause of adhesion failure, on surface structures was studied. It was found that the BADGE surface significantly restructured upon moisture exposure while the BDDGE surface did not, showing that BADGE adhesives may be more prone to moisture-induced delamination. Lastly, although surface structure can give some insight into adhesion, buried interfacial structures more directly correspond to adhesion properties of polymers. SFG was used to study buried interfaces between deuterated polystyrene (d-PS) and the epoxies before and after moisture exposure. It was shown that moisture exposure acted to disorder the buried interfaces, most likely due to swelling. These results correlated with lap shear adhesion testing showing a decrease in adhesion strength after moisture exposure. The presented work showed that surface and interfacial structures can be correlated to adhesive strength and may be helpful in understanding and designing optimized epoxy underfill adhesives.

  20. Protein–nanoparticle interaction in bioconjugated silver nanoparticles: A transmission electron microscopy and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reymond-Laruinaz, Sébastien; Saviot, Lucien; Potin, Valérie; Marco de Lucas, María del Carmen, E-mail: delucas@u-bourgogne.fr

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • Synthesis of protein-conjugated Ag nanoparticles (NPs) in absence of citrates. • NPs size and protein layer thickness determined by TEM. • SERS spectra showed the chemisorption of proteins on the surface of Ag-NPs. - Abstract: Understanding the mechanisms of interaction between proteins and noble metal nanoparticles (NPs) is crucial to extend the use of NPs in biological applications and nanomedicine. We report the synthesis of Ag-NPs:protein bioconjugates synthesized in total absence of citrates or other stabilizing agents in order to study the NP-protein interaction. Four common proteins (lysozyme, bovine serum albumin, cytochrome-C and hemoglobin) were used in this work. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) were mainly used to study these bioconjugated NPs. TEM images showed Ag NPs with sizes in the 5–40 nm range. The presence of a protein layer surrounding the Ag NPs was also observed by TEM. Moreover, the composition at different points of single bioconjugated NPs was probed by electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). The thickness of the protein layer varies in the 3–15 nm range and the Ag NPs are a few nanometers away. This allowed to obtain an enhancement of the Raman signal of the proteins in the analysis of water suspensions of bioconjugates. SERS results showed a broadening of the Raman bands of the proteins which we attribute to the contribution of different configurations of the proteins adsorbed on the Ag NPs surface. Moreover, the assignment of an intense and sharp peak in the low-frequency range to Ag–N vibrations points to the chemisorption of the proteins on the Ag-NPs surface.

  1. Study of molecular structure, anharmonic vibrational dynamic and electronic properties of sulindac using spectroscopic techniques integrated with quantum chemical calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faizan, Mohd; Alam, Mohammad Jane; Ahmad, Shabbir

    2017-11-01

    In the present investigation, spectroscopic techniques (FTIR, FT-Raman and UV-Vis) and quantum chemical calculations are employed for exploring vibrational and electronic spectra of sulindac compound. The calculations are performed on most stable conformer of the sulindac molecule using density functional theory (DFT). Anharmonic corrections are made to frequencies using vibrational second-order perturbation theory (VPT2). The effect of intermolecular interactions on the vibrational dynamics has been analyzed using dimeric structure of sulindac molecule. Hirshfeld surface analysis and 2D fingerprint plots are utilized to investigate the nature of interaction present in the crystal system. To account for electronic spectra in different solvents, an integral equation formalism of polarizable continuum model (IEFPCM) at TD-DFT/B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) level of theory has been employed. An excellent agreement between the theoretical and experimental data over the entire spectral region is observed. In addition, natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis, frontier molecular orbitals, nonlinear optical properties (NLO) and molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) analysis are also reported.

  2. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Imaging and Spectroscopy of Polydopamine Radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrówczyński, Radosław; Coy, L Emerson; Scheibe, Błażej; Czechowski, Tomasz; Augustyniak-Jabłokow, Maria; Jurga, Stefan; Tadyszak, Krzysztof

    2015-08-13

    A thorough investigation of biomimetic polydopamine (PDA) by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) is shown. In addition, temperature dependent spectroscopic EPR data are presented in the range 3.8-300 K. Small discrepancies in magnetic susceptibility behavior are observed between previously reported melanin samples. These variations were attributed to thermally acitivated processes. More importantly, EPR spatial-spatial 2D imaging of polydopamine radicals on a phantom is presented for the first time. In consequence, a new possible application of polydopamine as EPR imagining marker is addressed.

  3. X-ray and photoelectron spectroscopy of the structure, reactivity, and electronic structure of semiconductor nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamad, Kimberly Sue [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Semiconductor nanocrystals are a system which has been the focus of interest due to their size dependent properties and their possible use in technological applications. Many chemical and physical properties vary systematically with the size of the nanocrystal and thus their study enables the investigation of scaling laws. Due to the increasing surface to volume ratio as size is decreased, the surfaces of nanocrystals are expected to have a large influence on their electronic, thermodynamic, and chemical behavior. In spite of their importance, nanocrystal surfaces are still relatively uncharacterized in terms of their structure, electronic properties, bonding, and reactivity. Investigation of nanocrystal surfaces is currently limited by what techniques to use, and which methods are suitable for nanocrystals is still being determined. This work presents experiments using x-ray and electronic spectroscopies to explore the structure, reactivity, and electronic properties of semiconductor (CdSe, InAs) nanocrystals and how they vary with size. Specifically, x-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) in conjunction with multiple scattering simulations affords information about the structural disorder present at the surface of the nanocrystal. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and ultra-violet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) probe the electronic structure in terms of hole screening, and also give information about band lineups when the nanocrystal is placed in electric contact with a substrate. XPS of the core levels of the nanocrystal as a function of photo-oxidation time yields kinetic data on the oxidation reaction occurring at the surface of the nanocrystal.

  4. `Exotic' Electron Spectroscopy of Molecules in Electric Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Rajeev; Gurav, Nalini; Gejji, Shridhar

    Single molecules, whether polar or non-polar (in their free state), when subjected to an externally applied uniform electric field, are observed to exhibit remarkably different UV spectra from those of their zero-field counterparts. Significant spectral line-shifts, line-splitting, line-merging as well as disappearance, and emergence of `exotic' spectral lines are observed as a function of the applied electric field strength. In particular, we simulate the molecular electronic-transition spectra of methanol, hydrogen-peroxide, water and carbon-dioxide in an electric field, employing time dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) under the versatile M06-2X dispersion-corrected DFT prescription. It is further demonstrated that the Natural Localized Molecular Orbitals (NLMOs), playing a dual donor-acceptor role, can best describe the electron density redistribution and the interplay of various bands in the UV spectrum which is traced back to mutations and crossings of the frontier molecular orbitals. We would like to thank the Center for Advanced Computing, Pune University Campus, for computer time.

  5. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy of lithium donors in monoisotopic silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezhevskii, Alexandr A.; Soukhorukov, Andrey V.; Guseinov, Davud V.; Gusev, Anatoly V.

    2009-12-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (X-band EPR) spectra are reported for lithium-related donors in monoisotopic silicon. High resolution EPR spectra of lithium donor centers in monoisotopic silicon, enriched by 28Si isotope (99.99%) with very narrow individual lines are observed. In monoisotopic silicon sample (28Si enriched floating zone silicon with low concentration of lithium 1016 cm-3), the trigonal EPR spectrum, with well resolved 7Li hyperfine structure is recorded in the temperature range 3.5-20 K. This spectrum was attributed to LiO complex. At high concentration of lithium (about 1018 cm-3) in monoisotopic silicon two types of spectra are observed. The trigonal one has the same feature as for low concentration of lithium with g-values: g∥=1.9974 and g⊥=1.9989. Another spectrum consists of two lines and has tetragonal symmetry with g∥=1.9992 and g⊥=1.9983. This spectrum is more intensive than the trigonal one and has no resolved hyperfine structure probably due to time averaging of the hyperfine interaction caused by hopping motion of electrons.

  6. A Comparative Study of Gold Bonding via Electronic Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruohan

    The bonding and electrostatic properties of gold containing molecules are highly influenced by relativistic effects. To understand this facet on bonding, a series of simple diatomic AuX (X=F, Cl, O and S) molecules, where upon bond formation the Au atom donates or accepts electrons, was investigated and discussed in this thesis. First, the optical field-free, Stark, and Zeeman spectroscopic studies have been performed on AuF and AuCl. The simple polar bonds between Au and typical halogens (i.e. F and Cl) can be well characterized by the electronic structure studies and the permanent electric dipole moments, mu el. The spectroscopic parameters have been precisely determined for the [17.7]1, [17.8]0+ and X1Sigma + states of AuF, and the [17.07]1, [17.20]0+ and X1Sigma+ states of AuCl. The mu el have been determined for ground and excited states of AuF and AuCl. The results from the hyperfine analysis and Stark measurement support the assignments that the [17.7]1 and [17.8]0+ states of AuF are the components of a 3pi state. Similarly, the analysis demonstrated the [19.07]1 and [19.20]0+ states are the components of the 3pi state of AuCl. Second, my study focused on AuO and AuS because the bonding between gold and sulfur/oxygen is a key component to numerous established and emerging technologies that have applications as far ranging as medical imaging, catalysis, electronics, and material science. The high-resolution spectra were record and analyzed to obtain the geometric and electronic structural data for the ground and excited states. The electric dipole moment, muel , and the magnetic dipole moment, mum, has been the precisely measured by applying external static electric and magnetic fields. muel and mum are used to give insight into the unusual complex bonding in these molecules. In addition to direct studies on the gold-containing molecules, other studies of related molecules are included here as well. These works contain the pure rotation measurement of Pt

  7. Electron spectroscopy study of the oxidation of a Zr-Fe getter. Pt. 1; Core spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastianon, A.; Braicovich, L.; Michelis, B. de (Ist. di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano (Italy))

    1992-03-15

    The room temperature oxidation (up to 2500 L) of a Zr-Fe getter having Zr{sub 2}Fe as majority component (80% of the total volume) is studied with X-ray photoemission (h{nu}=1253.6 eV) and Auger spectroscopy. Core photoemission (Zr 3d, Fe 2p and O 1s) and ZrM{sub 45}N{sub 23}V Auger spectra have been measured for increasing oxygen exposure. The oxidation proceeds via an interface suboxide up to an oxide having about the same chemical shift as ZrO{sub 2} (4.3 eV). At saturation the reacted overlayer is about 6 monolayers thick. A small fraction of Fe is found in the reacted overlayer (concentration around 15% of the that of the substrate). (orig.).

  8. Adsorption and Vibrational Study of Folic Acid on Gold Nanopillar Structures Using Surface-enhanced Raman Scattering Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castillo, John J.; Rindzevicius, Tomas; Rozo, Ciro E.

    2015-01-01

    on the nanopillars within the high electromagnetic field areas. The adsorption behaviour of folic acid and the band assignment of the main vibrations together with the optimized geometry of folic acid and folic acid in the presence of a cluster of 10 gold atoms were assessed using the density functional theory (B3......This paper presents a study of adsorption and vibrational features of folic acid, using surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). A gold-capped silicon nanopillar (Au NP) with a height of 600 nm and a width of 120 nm was utilized to study the vibrational features of FA molecules adsorbed......LYP(6-31G(d))) and the scalar relativistic effective core potential with a double-zeta basis set (LANL2DZ). The vibrations obtained from the solid-state folic acid and the folic acid on a gold cluster were in accordance with those observed experimentally. The analysis of the main vibrations indicated...

  9. Theoretical Investigation of C-H Vibrational Spectroscopy. 1. Modeling of Methyl and Methylene Groups of Ethanol with Different Conformers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin; Ishiyama, Tatsuya; Morita, Akihiro

    2017-09-14

    A flexible and polarizable molecular model of ethanol is developed to extend our investigation of thermodynamic, structural, and vibrational properties of the liquid and interface. A molecular dynamics (MD) simulation with the present model confirmed that this model well reproduces a number of properties of liquid ethanol, including density, heat of vaporization, surface tension, molecular dipole moment, and trans/gauche ratio. In particular, the present model can describe vibrational IR, Raman, and sum frequency generation (SFG) spectra of ethanol and partially deuterated analogues with reliable accuracy. The improved accuracy is largely attributed to proper modeling of the conformational dependence and the intramolecular couplings including Fermi resonance in C-H vibrations. Precise dependence of torsional motions is found to be critical in representing vibrational spectra of the C-H bending. This model allows for further vibrational analysis of complicated alkyl groups widely observed in various organic molecules with MD simulation.

  10. Alpha and conversion electron spectroscopy of 238,239Pu and 241Am and alpha-conversion electron coincidence measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dion, Michael P.; Miller, Brian W.; Warren, Glen A.

    2016-09-01

    A technique to determine the isotopic constituents of a mixed actinide sample has been proposed by a coincident alpha-conversion electron measurement. This presents a unique signature to allow the unfolding of isotopes that possess overlapping alpha particle energy and reduce backgrounds of an unseparated sample. The work presented here are results of conversion electron spectroscopy of 241Am, 238Pu and 239Pu using a dual-stage peltier-cooled 25 mm2 silicon drift detector and alpha spectroscopy with a passivated ion implanted planar silicon detector. The conversion electron spectra were evaluated from 20-55 keV based on fits to the dominant conversion electron emissions, which allowed the relative conversion electron emission intensities to be determined. These measurements provide crucial singles spectral information and calibration to aid in the coincident measurement approach. Furthermore, an alpha-conversion electron spectrometer was assembled using the silicon based detectors described and results of a coincident spectrum analysis is reported for 241Am.

  11. Anisotropic plasmons, excitons, and electron energy loss spectroscopy of phosphorene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Barun; Kumar, Piyush; Thakur, Anmol; Chauhan, Yogesh Singh; Bhowmick, Somnath; Agarwal, Amit

    2017-07-01

    In this article, we explore the anisotropic electron energy loss spectrum (EELS) in monolayer phosphorene based on ab initio time-dependent density-functional-theory calculations. Similarly to black phosphorus, the EELS of undoped monolayer phosphorene is characterized by anisotropic excitonic peaks for energies in the vicinity of the band gap and by interband plasmon peaks for higher energies. On doping, an additional intraband plasmon peak also appears for energies within the band gap. Similarly to other two-dimensional systems, the intraband plasmon peak disperses as ωpl∝√{q } in both the zigzag and armchair directions in the long-wavelength limit and deviates for larger wave vectors. The anisotropy of the long-wavelength plasmon intraband dispersion is found to be inversely proportional to the square root of the ratio of the effective masses: ωpl(q y ̂) /ωpl(q x ̂) =√{mx/my } .

  12. Vibrational spectroscopy investigation using ab initio and DFT vibrational analysis of 7-chloro-2-methylamino-5-phenyl-3H-1,4-benzodiazepine-4-oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasath, M.; Muthu, S.; Arun Balaji, R.

    2013-09-01

    The FT-IR and FT-Raman spectrum of 7-chloro-2-methylamino-5-phenyl-3H-1, 4-benzodiazepine-4-oxide (7CMP4BO) has been recorded in the region 4000-400 and 4000-100 cm-1 respectively. The optimized geometry, Thermodynamic properties, NBO, Molecular Electrostatic Potentials, PES, frequency and intensity of the vibrational bands of 7CMP4BO were obtained by the ab initio HF and density functional theory (DFT), B3LYP/6-31G (d,p) basis set. The molecule orbital contributions were studied by using the total (TDOS), partial (PDOS), and overlap population (OPDOS) density of states. The harmonic vibrational frequencies were calculated and the scaled values have been compared with experimental FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra. A detailed interpretation of the vibrational spectra of this compound has been made on the basis of the calculated potential energy distribution (PED). The linear polarizability (α) and the first order hyperpolarizability (β) values of the investigated molecule have been computed using DFT quantum mechanical calculations. The observed and the calculated frequencies are found to be in good agreement. The experimental spectra also coincide satisfactorily with those of theoretically calculated values.

  13. High-resolution electron-energy-loss spectroscopy and photoelectron-diffraction studies of the geometric structure of adsorbates on single-crystal metal surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenblatt, D.H.

    1982-11-01

    Two techniques which have made important contributions to the understanding of surface phenomena are high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and photoelectron diffraction (PD). EELS is capable of directly measuring the vibrational modes of clean and adsorbate covered metal surfaces. In this work, the design, construction, and performance of a new EELS spectrometer are described. These results are discussed in terms of possible structures of the O-Cu(001) system. Recommendations for improvements in this EELS spectrometer and guidelines for future spectrometers are given. PD experiments provide accurate quantitative information about the geometry of atoms and molecules adsorbed on metal surfaces. The technique has advantages when used to study disordered overlayers, molecular overlayers, multiple site systems, and adsorbates which are weak electron scatterers. Four experiments were carried out which exploit these advantages.

  14. Molecular dynamics and simulations study on the vibrational and electronic solvatochromism of benzophenone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravi Kumar, Venkatraman; Umapathy, Siva, E-mail: umapathy@ipc.iisc.ernet.in, E-mail: chandra@bii.a-star.edu.sg [Inorganic and Physical Chemistry Department, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Verma, Chandra, E-mail: umapathy@ipc.iisc.ernet.in, E-mail: chandra@bii.a-star.edu.sg [Bioinformatics Institute - A*STAR, 30 Biopolis Street, # 07-01 Matrix, Singapore 138671 (Singapore); School of Biological Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 60 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637551 (Singapore); Department of Biological Sciences, National University of Singapore, 14 Science Drive 4, Singapore 117543 (Singapore)

    2016-02-14

    Solvent plays a key role in diverse physico-chemical and biological processes. Therefore, understanding solute-solvent interactions at the molecular level of detail is of utmost importance. A comprehensive solvatochromic analysis of benzophenone (Bzp) was carried out in various solvents using Raman and electronic spectroscopy, in conjunction with Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations of supramolecular solute-solvent clusters generated using classical Molecular Dynamics Simulations (c-MDSs). The >C=O stretching frequency undergoes a bathochromic shift with solvent polarity. Interestingly, in protic solvents this peak appears as a doublet: c-MDS and ad hoc explicit solvent ab initio calculations suggest that the lower and higher frequency peaks are associated with the hydrogen bonded and dangling carbonyl group of Bzp, respectively. Additionally, the dangling carbonyl in methanol (MeOH) solvent is 4 cm{sup −1} blue-shifted relative to acetonitrile solvent, despite their similar dipolarity/polarizability. This suggests that the cybotactic region of the dangling carbonyl group in MeOH is very different from its bulk solvent structure. Therefore, we propose that this blue-shift of the dangling carbonyl originates in the hydrophobic solvation shell around it resulting from extended hydrogen bonding network of the protic solvents. Furthermore, the 1{sup 1}nπ{sup ∗} (band I) and 1{sup 1}ππ{sup ∗} (band II) electronic transitions show a hypsochromic and bathochromic shift, respectively. In particular, these shifts in protic solvents are due to differences in their excited state-hydrogen bonding mechanisms. Additionally, a linear relationship is obtained for band I and the >C=O stretching frequency (cm{sup −1}), which suggests that the different excitation wavelengths in band I correspond to different solvation states. Therefore, we hypothesize that the variation in excitation wavelengths in band I could arise from different solvation states leading to

  15. Mapping boron in silicon solar cells using electron energy-loss spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duchamp, Martial; Boothroyd, Chris; Kovács, András

    2011-01-01

    Electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) is used to study the B distribution in a p-i-n layered solar cell structure. The boron concentration in the p-doped Si layer is expected to be ~1021 cm−3 and should not exceed 1017 cm−3 in the neighbouring intrinsic layer. We show that B concentrations...

  16. Electron-energy-loss spectroscopy of plasmon excitations in concentric-shell fullerenes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henrard, L.; Malengreau, F.; Rudolf, P.; Hevesi, K.; Caudano, R.; Lambin, Ph.; Cabioc’h, Th.

    1999-01-01

    We report evidence for surface plasmon excitations in concentric-shell fullerenes. A film of these concentric-shell fullerenes with radii around 5–7 nm was produced by carbon bombardment of a silver polycrystalline target and measured by electron-energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) in reflection

  17. Probing the local environment of a single OPE3 molecule using inelastic tunneling electron spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frisenda, R.; Perrin, M.L.; Van der Zant, H.S.J.

    2015-01-01

    We study single-molecule oligo(phenylene ethynylene)dithiol junctions by means of inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS). The molecule is contacted with gold nano-electrodes formed with the mechanically controllable break junction technique. We record the IETS spectrum of the molecule from

  18. Low Energy Electron-Impact Spectroscopy of C(sup 60) Buckminsterfullerene Molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trajmar, S.; Wang, S.

    1993-01-01

    The methods of electron-impact spectroscopy were utilized to obtain the first low-energy, high-resolution energy-loss spectra of gas phase pure C(sub 60) and C(sub 60) + C(sub 70) mixture buckminsterfullerene molecules.

  19. Local electronic structure of Fe(001) surfaces studied by scanning tunneling spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bischoff, M.M.J.; Yamada, T.K.; Fang, C.M.; Groot, R.A. de; Kempen, H. van

    2003-01-01

    Scanning tunneling spectroscopy is used to study the local electronic structure of Fe(001) whiskers. The influence of a voltage dependent background on the apparent peak energies in the dI/dV curves is discussed. A relation between this background and the apparent barrier height is established. The

  20. In situ light spectroscopy in the environmental transmission electron microscope (ETEM)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavalca, Filippo; Langhammer, C.; Pedersen, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    with several in situ TEM techniques including environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM) [3,4], in situ photo activation and localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) spectroscopy [5,6]. ETEM is a well-established technique for material analysis. In this work we implement indirect nanoplasmonic...

  1. Identification and Quantification of Copper Sites in Zeolites by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godiksen, Anita; Vennestrøm, Peter N. R.; Rasmussen, Søren Birk

    2017-01-01

    Recent quantitative electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR) data on different copper species present in copper exchanged CHA zeolites are presented and put into context with the literature on other copper zeolites. Results presented herein were obtained using ex situ and in situ EPR...

  2. Solid-state transformation of the pseudopolymorphic forms of codeine phosphate hemihydrate and codeine phosphate sesquihydrate monitored by vibrational spectroscopy and thermal analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petruševski, Gjorgji; Ugarkovic, Sonja; Makreski, Petre

    2011-05-01

    The results from the first study on the pseudopolymorphism and solid-state transformations of codeine phosphate hemihydrate and codeine phosphate sesquihydrate are presented. The vibrational (infrared and Raman) spectra for both studied forms have revealed differences indicating that vibrational spectroscopy could discriminate between pseudopolymorphic forms of these compounds. Coupling the obtained spectroscopic data and the results from the thermoanalytical techniques (TGA/DSC) afforded interpretation of the undergoing solid-state transformations that occur when the compounds are being exposed at increased humidity and/or temperature. It was observed that, at room temperature, the hemihydrate and the sesquihydrate forms are the only sufficiently stable pseudopolymorphs of codeine phosphate explaining their intense pharmaceutical application.

  3. Nonadiabatic quantum dynamics calculations of transition state spectroscopy of I + HI and I + DI reactions: the existence of long life vibrational bonding resonances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayanagi, Toshiyuki

    2017-11-08

    We present the results of nonadiabatic quantum wave packet calculations to analyze the experimental transition state spectra for the I(2P3/2,1/2) + XI (X = H and D) hydrogen exchange reactions based on photodetachment of the IXI- anion. We developed (3 × 3) diabatic potential energy surfaces that can reasonably describe the nonadiabatic transitions induced by spin-orbit interactions. A good agreement was obtained between theory and experiment and it was found that nonadiabatic transitions play a role in the reaction dynamics. We also found that the calculated spectra showed very sharp resonance states with a vibrational bonding character, where the resonance wavefunctions are highly localized around the transition state region. Our calculated results suggest that one may experimentally detect these vibrational bonding resonances using time-domain transition state spectroscopy techniques since those states have picosecond-order lifetimes.

  4. Analysis of structure and vibrational dynamics of the BeTe(001) surface using X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and density functional theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumpf, C.; Müller, A.; Weigand, W.

    2003-01-01

    in the underlying Te layer. The Be-rich surface exhibits a (4 X 1) periodicity with alternating Te dimers and Te-Be-Te trimers. A vibration eigenfrequency of 165 cm(-1) is observed for the Te-rich surface, while eigenmodes at 157 and 188 cm(-1) are found for the Be-rich surface. The experimentally derived atomic......The atomic structure and lattice dynamics of epitaxial BeTe(001) thin films are derived from surface x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. On the Te-rich BeTe(001) surface [1 (1) over bar0]-oriented Te dimers are identified. They cause a (2 X 1) superstructure and induce a pronounced buckling...... geometry and the vibration modes are in very good agreement with the results of density functional theory calculations....

  5. An experimental study of the structural and vibrational properties of sesquiterpene lactone cnicin using FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV-visible and NMR spectroscopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chain, Fernando; Romano, Elida; Leyton, Patricio; Paipa, Carolina; Catalán, César Atilio Nazareno; Fortuna, Mario Antonio; Brandán, Silvia Antonia

    2014-05-01

    An experimental and theoretical investigation of cnicin is presented, combining the use of infrared, Raman, NMR and UV-visible spectroscopies with density functional theory (DFT) that employs hybrid B3LYP exchange correlation functional and a 6-31G∗ basis set. The molecular electrostatic potentials, atomic charges, bond orders, stabilization energies, topological properties and energy gap are presented by performing NBO, AIM and HOMO-LUMO calculations at the same level of theory as cnicin. A complete vibrational compound assignment was performed by employing internal coordinate analysis and a scaled quantum mechanical force field (SQMFF) methodology. Comparisons between the theoretical and experimental vibrational and ultraviolet-visible spectra show a strong concordance. The geometrical parameters and NBO studies suggest a probable negative Cotton effect for cnicin, which can be attributed to the π → π∗ transition for an α,β-unsaturated γ-lactone, as reported in the literature.

  6. Support Effects in Catalysis Studied by in-situ Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy and in-situ X-Ray Spectroscopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Griffin John

    Kinetic measurements are paired with in-situ spectroscopic characterization tools to investigate colloidally based, supported Pt catalytic model systems in order to elucidate the mechanisms by which metal and support work in tandem to dictate activity and selectivity. The results demonstrate oxide support materials, while inactive in absence of Pt nanoparticles, possess unique active sites for the selective conversion of gas phase molecules when paired with an active metal catalyst. In order to establish a paradigm for metal-support interactions using colloidally synthesized Pt nanoparticles the ability of the organic capping agent to inhibit reactivity and interaction with the support must first be assessed. Pt nanoparticles capped by poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP), and those from which the PVP is removed by UV light exposure, are investigated for two reactions, the hydrogenation of ethylene and the oxidation of methanol. It is shown that prior to PVP removal the particles are moderately active for both reactions. Following removal, the activity for the two reactions diverges, the ethylene hydrogenation rate increases 10-fold, while the methanol oxidation rate decreases 3-fold. To better understand this effect the capping agent prior to, and the residual carbon remaining after UV treatment are probed by sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy. Prior to removal no major differences are observed when the particles are exposed to alternating H2 and O2 environments. When the PVP is removed, carbonaceous fragments remain on the surface that dynamically restructure in H2 and O2. These fragments create a tightly bound shell in an oxygen environment and a porous coating of hydrogenated carbon in the hydrogen environment. Reaction rate measurements of thermally cleaned PVP and oleic acid capped particles show this effect to be independent of cleaning method or capping agent. In all this demonstrates the ability of the capping agent to mediate nanoparticle catalysis

  7. Interfacial Infrared Vibrational Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-07-30

    aqueous sulphuric acid has been used as the electrolyte, bands in the 900 to 1250 cmŕ region are often observed, and these can be assigned to...high angles of incidence. Fig. 2 shows that Ep is maximized for angles of incidence near 80. For aqueous acid solutions the largest angle of incidence...from a change in dielectric function of the electrode producing a difference in reflectivity of the electrode at the two potentials defining the

  8. Super-micron-scale atomistic simulation for electronic transport with atomic vibration: Unified approach from quantum to classical transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizeki, Keisuke; Sasaoka, Kenji; Konabe, Satoru; Souma, Satofumi; Yamamoto, Takahiro

    2017-07-01

    We develop a powerful simulation method that can treat electronic transport in a super-micron-scale open system with atomic vibration at finite temperature. As an application of the developed method to realistic materials, we simulate electronic transport in metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes from nanometer scale to micrometer scale at room temperature. Based on the simulation results, we successfully identify two different crossovers, namely, ballistic to diffusive crossover and coherent to incoherent crossover, simultaneously and with equal footing, from which the mean free path and the phase coherence length can be extracted clearly. Moreover, we clarify the scaling behavior of the electrical resistance and the electronic current in the crossover regime.

  9. Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellman, Hal

    1968-01-01

    This booklet discusses spectroscopy, the study of absorption of radiation by matter, including X-ray, gamma-ray, microwave, mass spectroscopy, as well as others. Spectroscopy has produced more fundamental information to the study of the detailed structure of matter than any other tools.

  10. Monitoring of alcoholic fermentation using near infrared and mid infrared spectroscopies combined with electronic nose and electronic tongue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buratti, S., E-mail: susanna.buratti@unimi.it [Department of Food Science and Technology, Universita degli Studi di Milano, Via Celoria 2, 20133 Milano (Italy); Ballabio, D. [Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Milano-Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza 1, 20126 Milano (Italy); Giovanelli, G. [Department of Food Science and Technology, Universita degli Studi di Milano, Via Celoria 2, 20133 Milano (Italy); Dominguez, C.M. Zuluanga [Instituto de Ciencia y Tecnologia de Alimentos, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Ciudad Universitaria, Bogota (Colombia); Moles, A.; Benedetti, S.; Sinelli, N. [Department of Food Science and Technology, Universita degli Studi di Milano, Via Celoria 2, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2011-07-04

    Graphical abstract: Application of non destructive methods for the monitoring of red wine fermentation in correlation with the evolution of chemical parameters. Highlights: > We monitored time-related changes in red wine fermentation process. > NIR and MIR spectroscopies, electronic nose and tongue were applied. > Data were kinetically modelled to identify critical points during fermentation. > NIR, MIR electronic nose and tongue were able to follow the fermentation process. > The models agreed with the evolution of chemical parameters. - Abstract: Effective fermentation monitoring is a growing need due to the rapid pace of change in the wine industry, which calls for fast methods providing real time information in order to assure the quality of the final product. The objective of this work is to investigate the potential of non-destructive techniques associated with chemometric data analysis, to monitor time-related changes that occur during red wine fermentation. Eight micro-fermentation trials conducted in the Valtellina region (Northern Italy) during the 2009 vintage, were monitored by a FT-NIR and a FT-IR spectrometer and by an electronic nose and tongue. The spectroscopic technique was used to investigate molecular changes, while electronic nose and electronic tongue evaluated the evolution of the aroma and taste profile during the must-wine fermentation. Must-wine samples were also analysed by traditional chemical methods in order to determine sugars (glucose and fructose) consumption and alcohol (ethanol and glycerol) production. Principal Component Analysis was applied to spectral, electronic nose and electronic tongue data, as an exploratory tool, to uncover molecular, aroma and taste modifications during the fermentation process. Furthermore, the chemical data and the PC1 scores from spectral, electronic nose and electronic tongue data were modelled as a function of time to identify critical points during fermentation. The results showed that NIR and MIR

  11. Primary events in the blue light sensor plant cryptochrome: intraprotein electron and proton transfer revealed by femtosecond spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immeln, Dominik; Weigel, Alexander; Kottke, Tilman; Pérez Lustres, J Luis

    2012-08-01

    Photoreceptors are chromoproteins that undergo fast conversion from dark to signaling states upon light absorption by the chromophore. The signaling state starts signal transduction in vivo and elicits a biological response. Therefore, photoreceptors are ideally suited for analysis of protein activation by time-resolved spectroscopy. We focus on plant cryptochromes which are blue light sensors regulating the development and daily rhythm of plants. The signaling state of these flavoproteins is the neutral radical of the flavin chromophore. It forms on the microsecond time scale after light absorption by the oxidized state. We apply here femtosecond broad-band transient absorption to early stages of signaling-state formation in a plant cryptochrome from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Transient spectra show (i) subpicosecond decay of flavin-stimulated emission and (ii) further decay of signal until 100 ps delay with nearly constant spectral shape. The first decay (i) monitors electron transfer from a nearby tryptophan to the flavin and occurs with a time constant of τ(ET) = 0.4 ps. The second decay (ii) is analyzed by spectral decomposition and occurs with a characteristic time constant τ(1) = 31 ps. We reason that hole transport through a tryptophan triad to the protein surface and partial deprotonation of tryptophan cation radical hide behind τ(1). These processes are probably governed by vibrational cooling. Spectral decomposition is used together with anisotropy to obtain the relative orientation of flavin and the final electron donor. This narrows the number of possible electron donors down to two tryptophans. Structural analysis suggests that a set of histidines surrounding the terminal tryptophan may act as proton acceptor and thereby stabilize the radical pair on a 100 ps time scale.

  12. Vibrational excitation resulting from electron capture in LUMO of F2 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    resonance anionic Hamiltonian HAB- (AB=F2/HCl) is effected using Lanczos reduction technique followed by fast Fourier transform and the target (AB) vibrational eigenfunctions φνi (R) and φν f (R) are calculated using Fourier grid Hamiltonian method applied to potential energy (PE) curve of the neutral target. The result-.

  13. Enantioselective semi-preparative HPLC separation of PCB metabolites and their absolute structures determined by electronic and vibrational circular dichroism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuan, H.P.; Larsson, C.; Huehnerfuss, H. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Organische Chemie; Hoffmann, F.; Froeba, M. [Giessen Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie; Bergmann, Aa. [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Environmental Chemistry

    2004-09-15

    The present paper represents a first result of an ongoing systematic study of atropisomeric methylsulfonyl, methylthionyl, hydroxy, and methoxy metabolites of environmentally most relevant PCBs. This involves semi-preparative enantioselective HPLC separation to obtain pure atropisomers from synthesized PCB metabolite standards, their configuration estimation using the electronic circular dichroism (UV-CD) method and the determination / confirmation of these absolute configurations applying the combined vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) / ab initio approach. The following substances have been investigated: 4-HO-, 4-MeO-, 4-MeS-, 4-MeSO2-, 3-MeS- and 3-MeSO{sub 2}-CB149.

  14. Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Walker, S

    1976-01-01

    The three volumes of Spectroscopy constitute the one comprehensive text available on the principles, practice and applications of spectroscopy. By giving full accounts of those spectroscopic techniques only recently introduced into student courses - such as Mössbauer spectroscopy and photoelectron spectroscopy - in addition to those techniques long recognised as being essential in chemistry teaching - sucha as e.s.r. and infrared spectroscopy - the book caters for the complete requirements of undergraduate students and at the same time provides a sound introduction to special topics for graduate students.

  15. Optimization of Monochromated TEM for Ultimate Resolution Imaging and Ultrahigh Resolution Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Lopatin, Sergei

    2017-09-01

    The performance of a monochromated transmission electron microscope with Wien type monochromator is optimized to achieve an extremely narrow energy spread of electron beam and an ultrahigh energy resolution with spectroscopy. The energy spread in the beam is improved by almost an order of magnitude as compared to specified values. The optimization involves both the monochromator and the electron energy loss detection system. We demonstrate boosted capability of optimized systems with respect to ultra-low loss EELS and sub-angstrom resolution imaging (in a combination with spherical aberration correction).

  16. Probing interfacial electron dynamics with time-resolved X-ray spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neppl, Stefan

    2015-05-01

    Time-resolved core-level spectroscopy techniques using laser pulses to initiate and short X-ray pulses to probe photo-induced processes have the potential to provide electronic state- and atomic site-specific insight into fundamental electron dynamics at complex interfaces. We describe the implementation of femto- and picosecond time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) and at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) in order to follow light-driven electron dynamics at dye-semiconductor interfaces on femto- to nanosecond timescales, and from the perspective of individual atomic sites. A distinct transient binding-energy shift of the Ru3d photoemission lines originating from the metal centers of N3 dye-molecules adsorbed on nanoporous ZnO is observed 500 fs after resonant HOMO-LUMO excitation with a visible laser pulse. This dynamical chemical shift is accompanied by a characteristic surface photo-voltage response of the semiconductor substrate. The two phenomena and their correlation will be discussed in the context of electronic bottlenecks for efficient interfacial charge-transfer and possible charge recombination and relaxation pathways leading to the neutralization of the transiently oxidized dye following ultrafast electron injection. First steps towards in operando time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy techniques to monitor interfacial chemical dynamics will be presented.

  17. High-resolution synchrotron infrared spectroscopy of acrolein: The vibrational levels between 850 and 1020 cm-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKellar, A. R. W.; Billinghurst, B. E.; Xu, Li-Hong; Lees, R. M.

    2015-11-01

    Using spectra obtained at the Canadian Light Source synchrotron radiation facility, a previously unobserved out-of-plane vibration of trans-acrolein (propenal) is reliably assigned for the first time. Its origin is at 1002.01 cm-1, which is about 20 cm-1 higher than usually quoted in the past. This mode is thus labelled as v14, leaving the label v15 for the known vibration at 992.66 cm-1. Weak combination bands 171182 ← 182, 171131 ← 131, 121182 ← 181, and 171182 ← 181 are studied for the first time, and assignments in the known v11, v16, and v15 fundamental bands are also extended. The seven excited vibrations involved in these bands are analyzed, together with five more unobserved vibrations in the same region (850-1020 cm-1), in a large 12-state simultaneous fit which accounts for most of the many observed perturbations in the spectra.

  18. Heterogeneous Dynamics of Coupled Vibrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cringus, Dan; Jansen, Thomas I. C.; Pshenichnikov, Maxim S.; Schoenlein, RW; Corkum, P; DeSilvestri, S; Nelson, KA; Riedle, E

    2009-01-01

    Frequency-dependent dynamics of coupled stretch vibrations of a water molecule are revealed by 2D IR correlation spectroscopy. These are caused by non-Gaussian fluctuations of the environment around the individual OH stretch vibrations.

  19. Electronic Spectroscopy of Phthalocyanine and Porphyrin Derivatives in Superfluid Helium Nanodroplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slenczka, Alkwin

    2017-07-25

    Phthalocyanine and porphyrin were among the first organic compounds investigated by means of electronic spectroscopy in superfluid helium nanodroplets. Superfluid helium nanodroplets serve as a very gentle host system for preparing cold and isolated molecules. The uniqueness of helium nanodroplets is with respect to the superfluid phase which warrants the vanishing viscosity and, thus, minimal perturbation of the dopant species at a temperature as low as 0.37 K. These are ideal conditions for the study of molecular spectra in order to analyze structures as well as dynamic processes. Besides the investigation of the dopant species itself, molecular spectroscopy in helium droplets provides information on the helium droplet and in particular on microsolvation. This article, as part of a special issue on phthalocyanines and porphyrins, reviews electronic spectroscopy of phthalocyanine and porphyrin compounds in superfluid helium nanodroplets. In addition to the wide variety of medical as well as technical and synthetical aspects, this article discusses electronic spectroscopy of phthalocyanines and porphyrins in helium droplets in order to learn about both the dopant and the helium environment.

  20. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray spectroscopy applied to mycelial phase of sporothrix schenckii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Thibaut

    1975-04-01

    Full Text Available Scanning electron microscopy applied to the mycelial phase of Sporothrix schenckii shows a matted mycelium with conidia of a regular pattern. X-Ray microanalysis applied in energy dispersive spectroscopy and also in wavelength dispersive spectroscopy reveals the presence of several elements of Mendeleef's classification.Sporothrix schenckii foi estudado em microscopia eletrônica. Foram observados caracteres das hífas e dos esporos, vários elementos da classificação periódica foram postos em evidência graças à micro-análise a raios X.

  1. Electronically tunable coherent Raman spectroscopy using acousto-optics tunable filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Georgi I; Meng, Zhaokai; Yakovlev, Vladislav V

    2015-09-21

    Fast and sensitive Raman spectroscopy measurements are imperative for a large number of applications in biomedical imaging, remote sensing and material characterization. In this report, by introducing an electronically-tunable acousto-optical filter as a wavelength selector, we demonstrated a novel instrumentation to the broadband coherent Raman spectroscopy. System's tunability allows assessing Raman transitions ranging from <400 cm(-1) to 4500 cm(-1). We validated the use of the new instrumentation by collecting coherent anti-Stokes spectra and stimulated Raman spectra of various samples.

  2. Development of broad bandwidth nonlinear spectroscopies for characterization of electronic states in materials systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehlenbacher, Randy D.

    Carbon nanotubes are an interesting class of materials with many exceptional properties that make them appealing for optoelectronic devices. Their optical properties, particularly when cast in thin films, are not well understood. In this thesis, I describe the development of spectroscopic techniques for measuring energy and charge transport processes in thin films of semiconducting carbon nanotubes. Using transient absorption spectroscopy, I observe energy transport on two time scales in these films, with 20% of nanotubes transferring energy to smaller bandgap nanotubes within 300 fs. After 3 ps, 70% of the photoexcitation resides on small bandgap nanotubes. To study the complete landscape of energy transport in thin films of carbon nanotubes, I developed two dimensional white light spectroscopy (2D-WL). In 2D-WL spectroscopy, a broadband, white light supercontinuum is used to both excite and probe the sample. This technique has a bandwidth spanning > 500-1500 nm, a far broader bandwidth than previously reported in 2D electronic spectra. I take advantage of this large bandwidth to study the interactions and evolution of S1 and S2 excitons in a thin film of carbon nanotubes. I find that energy transfers between S1 excitons on a 2 ps time scale and occurs by a non-Forster energy transfer mechanism. In contrast, the energy in the S2 states redistributes on an ultrafast time scale, electrons and holes. I use 2D-WL spectroscopy to study the electronic states in thin films of bare, semiconducting carbon nanotubes. In these films, energy transfer occurs in electronic states. To facilitate data interpretation, the orientational response for isotropic two dimensional samples to polarized electric fields is developed. Using polarization control 2D-WL spectroscopy, I measure the coupling between nanotube S1 transitions and radial breathing modes. The doped tubes form trions with transition dipoles that are not parallel to the S1 transition and energy transfer from the S1

  3. Vibrational effects on UV/Vis laser-driven π-electron ring currents in aromatic ring molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mineo, H.; Lin, S. H.; Fujimura, Y.

    2014-10-01

    We present the results of a theoretical study of vibrational effects on UV/Vis laser-driven π-electron ring currents in aromatic ring molecules. We consider vibrational effects on both coherent and non-coherent (single quantum state) ring currents. The coherent ring current originates from an excitation of a pair of quasi-degenerate electronic states by an ultrashort linearly polarized UV/Vis laser pulse, while the non-coherent ring current originates from by an excitation of a degenerated electronic state of an aromatic ring molecule with high symmetry by a circularly polarized electric field of a UV/Vis laser pulse. The magnitude of a generated ring current can be expressed as an average of those of the bond currents for both the coherent and non-coherent cases. We derive an analytical expression for the magnitude of the bond currents in the adiabatic approximation. Using the expression, we performed calculations of a non-coherent ring current generated in the optically allowed excited state (1E1U) of benzene and the time evolution of coherent ring current of (P)-2,2-biphenol. Vibrational effects on the non-coherent ring current of benzene were found to be negligibly small. We paid particular attention to the vibrational effects induced by the torsion mode on time evolution of the coherent ring current along the bond bridging between the two aromatic rings of (P)-2,2-biphenol. By comparing the time evolution of the coherent ring current with that in the frozen-nuclear approximation, we found that inclusion of the low-frequency torsion mode brings about modulations in the beating in the ring current. The modulations in the time evolution of the coherent ring current were brought about by contribution of several pairs of the coherently excited vibronic states. Coherent vibronic ring currents generated from pairs of the coherently excited vibronic states interfere each other. The existence of the pairs originates from relatively large potential displacement of the

  4. A position-sensitive electron detector for use in electron spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Hubin-Franskin, M J

    2002-01-01

    A home-made position-sensitive electron detection system has been mounted on an electron energy loss spectrometer. It makes use of advanced technology, is easy to handle with and not too expensive. The K-shell excitation spectrum of benzene is given as an example of the quality of the signal-to-noise ratio while keeping the resolution.

  5. High-energy-resolution monochromator for aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy/electron energy-loss spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivanek, Ondrej L; Ursin, Jonathan P; Bacon, Neil J; Corbin, George J; Dellby, Niklas; Hrncirik, Petr; Murfitt, Matthew F; Own, Christopher S; Szilagyi, Zoltan S

    2009-09-28

    An all-magnetic monochromator/spectrometer system for sub-30 meV energy-resolution electron energy-loss spectroscopy in the scanning transmission electron microscope is described. It will link the energy being selected by the monochromator to the energy being analysed by the spectrometer, without resorting to decelerating the electron beam. This will allow it to attain spectral energy stability comparable to systems using monochromators and spectrometers that are raised to near the high voltage of the instrument. It will also be able to correct the chromatic aberration of the probe-forming column. It should be able to provide variable energy resolution down to approximately 10 meV and spatial resolution less than 1 A.

  6. Applications of aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy to thin oxide films and interfaces.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varela del Arco, Maria [ORNL; Gazquez Alabart, Jaume [ORNL; Lupini, Andrew R [ORNL; Luck, Julia T [ORNL; Torija, Maria [University of Minnesota; Sharma, M [University of Minnesota; Leighton, chris [University of Minnesota; Biegalski, Michael D [ORNL; Christen, Hans M [ORNL; Murfitt, Matt [Nion Co; Dellby, Niklas [ORNL; Krivanek, Ondrej [ORNL; Pennycook, Stephen J [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    Aberration correction in the scanning transmission electron microscope allows spatial resolutions of the order of one ngstr m to be routinely achieved. When combined with electron energy loss spectroscopy, it is possible to simultaneously map the structure, the chemistry and even the electronic properties of materials in one single experiment. Here we will apply these techniques to the characterization of thin films and interfaces based on complex oxides with the perovskite structure. The relatively large lattice parameter of these materials combined with the fact that most of them have absorption edges within the reach of the spectrometer optics makes these materials ideal for these experiments. We will show how it is possible to map the chemistry of interfaces atomic plane by atomic plane, including light element imaging such as O. Applications to cobaltite and titanate thin films will be described.

  7. Ultrafast optical nonlinearity, electronic absorption, vibrational spectra and solvent effect studies of ninhydrin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajan, D.; Devi, T. Uma; Safakath, K.; Philip, Reji; Němec, Ivan; Karabacak, M.

    2013-05-01

    FT-IR, FT-Raman and UV-Vis spectra of the nonlinear optical molecule ninhydrin have been recorded and analyzed. The equilibrium geometry, bonding features, and harmonic vibrational wavenumbers have been investigated with the help of B3LYP density functional theory method. A detailed interpretation of the vibrational spectra is carried out with the aid of normal coordinate analysis following the scaled quantum mechanical force field methodology. Solvent effects have been calculated using time-dependent density functional theory in combination with the polarized continuum model. Natural bond orbital analysis confirms the occurrence of strong intermolecular hydrogen bonding in the molecule. Employing the open-aperture z-scan technique, nonlinear optical absorption of the sample has been studied in the ultrafast and short-pulse excitation regimes, using 100 fs and 5 ns laser pulses respectively. It is found that ninhydrin exhibits optical limiting for both excitations, indicating potential photonic applications.

  8. Communication: Coherences observed in vivo in photosynthetic bacteria using two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahlberg, Peter D. [Graduate Program in the Biophysical Sciences, Institute for Biophysical Dynamics, and The James Franck Institute, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Norris, Graham J.; Wang, Cheng; Viswanathan, Subha; Singh, Ved P.; Engel, Gregory S., E-mail: gsengel@uchicago.edu [Department of Chemistry, Institute for Biophysical Dynamics, and The James Franck Institute, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

    2015-09-14

    Energy transfer through large disordered antenna networks in photosynthetic organisms can occur with a quantum efficiency of nearly 100%. This energy transfer is facilitated by the electronic structure of the photosynthetic antennae as well as interactions between electronic states and the surrounding environment. Coherences in time-domain spectroscopy provide a fine probe of how a system interacts with its surroundings. In two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy, coherences can appear on both the ground and excited state surfaces revealing detailed information regarding electronic structure, system-bath coupling, energy transfer, and energetic coupling in complex chemical systems. Numerous studies have revealed coherences in isolated photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes, but these coherences have not been observed in vivo due to the small amplitude of these signals and the intense scatter from whole cells. Here, we present data acquired using ultrafast video-acquisition gradient-assisted photon echo spectroscopy to observe quantum beating signals from coherences in vivo. Experiments were conducted on isolated light harvesting complex II (LH2) from Rhodobacter sphaeroides, whole cells of R. sphaeroides, and whole cells of R. sphaeroides grown in 30% deuterated media. A vibronic coherence was observed following laser excitation at ambient temperature between the B850 and the B850{sup ∗} states of LH2 in each of the 3 samples with a lifetime of ∼40-60 fs.

  9. Nanoscale probing of bandgap states on oxide particles using electron energy-loss spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qianlang; March, Katia; Crozier, Peter A

    2017-07-01

    Surface and near-surface electronic states were probed with nanometer spatial resolution in MgO and TiO2 anatase nanoparticles using ultra-high energy resolution electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) coupled to a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). This combination allows the surface electronic structure determined with spectroscopy to be correlated with nanoparticle size, morphology, facet etc. By acquiring the spectra in aloof beam mode, radiation damage to the surface can be significantly reduced while maintaining the nanometer spatial resolution. MgO and TiO2 showed very different bandgap features associated with the surface/sub-surface layer of the nanoparticles. Spectral simulations based on dielectric theory and density of states models showed that a plateau feature found in the pre-bandgap region in the spectra from (100) surfaces of 60nm MgO nanocubes is consistent with a thin hydroxide surface layer. The spectroscopy shows that this hydroxide species gives rise to a broad filled surface state at 1.1eV above the MgO valence band. At the surfaces of TiO2 nanoparticles, pronounced peaks were observed in the bandgap region, which could not be well fitted to defect states. In this case, the high refractive index and large particle size may make Cherenkov or guided light modes the likely causes of the peaks. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Simulation of Accurate Vibrationally Resolved Electronic Spectra: the Integrated Time-Dependent and Time-Independent Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baiardi, Alberto; Barone, Vincenzo; Biczysko, Malgorzata; Bloino, Julien

    2014-06-01

    Two parallel theories including Franck-Condon, Herzberg-Teller and Duschinsky (i.e., mode mixing) effects, allowing different approximations for the description of excited state PES have been developed in order to simulate realistic, asymmetric, electronic spectra line-shapes taking into account the vibrational structure: the so-called sum-over-states or time-independent (TI) method and the alternative time-dependent (TD) approach, which exploits the properties of the Fourier transform. The integrated TI-TD procedure included within a general purpose QM code [1,2], allows to compute one photon absorption, fluorescence, phosphorescence, electronic circular dichroism, circularly polarized luminescence and resonance Raman spectra. Combining both approaches, which use a single set of starting data, permits to profit from their respective advantages and minimize their respective limits: the time-dependent route automatically includes all vibrational states and, possibly, temperature effects, while the time-independent route allows to identify and assign single vibronic transitions. Interpretation, analysis and assignment of experimental spectra based on integrated TI-TD vibronic computations will be illustrated for challenging cases of medium-sized open-shell systems in the gas and condensed phases with inclusion of leading anharmonic effects. 1. V. Barone, A. Baiardi, M. Biczysko, J. Bloino, C. Cappelli, F. Lipparini Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys, 14, 12404, (2012) 2. A. Baiardi, V. Barone, J. Bloino J. Chem. Theory Comput., 9, 4097-4115 (2013)

  11. Red shift of the SF6 vibration spectrum induced by the electron absorption: An ab initio study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Tang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available As a widely used gas insulator, sulfur hexafluoride (SF6 has a large cross section for electron absorption, which may make the molecule ionized to the -1 charge state in the high-voltage environment. Using ab initio calculations, we show that the absorbed electron is located averagely on the six F atoms, occupying the antibonding level of the s-p σ bonds and increasing the S-F bond length. The ionized SF6- molecule decreases its decomposition energy to only 1.5 eV, much lower than that of the neutral molecule (4.8 eV, which can be understood according to the occupying of the antibonding orbital and thus weakening of the s-p σ bonds. The weakening of the bonds results in an obvious red shift in the vibrational modes of the ionized SF6- molecule by 120-270 cm-1, compared to those of the neutral molecule. The detailed origin of these vibrational modes is analyzed. Since the appearance of the ionized SF6- molecules is before the decomposition reaction of the SF6- molecule into low-fluoride sulfides, this method may improve the sensitivity of the defection of the partial discharge and save more time for the prevention of the insulation failure in advance.

  12. A Complete Overhaul of the Electron Energy-Loss Spectroscopy and X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy Database: eelsdb.eu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewels, Philip; Sikora, Thierry; Serin, Virginie; Ewels, Chris P; Lajaunie, Luc

    2016-06-01

    The electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) database has been completely rewritten, with an improved design, user interface, and a number of new tools. The database is accessible at https://eelsdb.eu/ and can now be used without registration. The submission process has been streamlined to encourage spectrum submissions and the new design gives greater emphasis on contributors' original work by highlighting their papers. With numerous new filters and a powerful search function, it is now simple to explore the database of several hundred EELS and XAS spectra. Interactive plots allow spectra to be overlaid, facilitating online comparison. An application-programming interface has been created, allowing external tools and software to easily access the information held within the database. In addition to the database itself, users can post and manage job adverts and read the latest news and events regarding the EELS and XAS communities. In accordance with the ongoing drive toward open access data increasingly demanded by funding bodies, the database will facilitate open access data sharing of EELS and XAS spectra.

  13. Imaging spectroscopy of the missing REMPI bands of methyl radicals: Final touches on all vibrational frequencies of the 3p Rydberg states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Huilin; Liu, Kopin

    2018-01-07

    (2 + 1) resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) detection of methyl radicals, in particular that via the intermediate 3p Rydberg states, has shown to be a powerful method and thus enjoyed a wide range of applications. Methyl has six vibrational modes. Among them-including partially and fully deuterated isotopologs-four out of twenty vibrational frequencies in the intermediate 3p states have so far eluded direct spectroscopic determination. Here, by exploiting the imaging spectroscopy approach to a few judiciously selected chemical reactions, the four long-sought REMPI bands-CHD2(611), CH2D(311), CH2D(511), and CH2D(611)-are discovered, which complete the REMPI identification for probing any vibrational mode of excitation of methyl radical and its isotopologs. These results, in conjunction with those previously reported yet scattered in the literature, are summarized here for ready reference, which should provide all necessary information for further spectral assignments and future studies of chemical dynamics using this versatile REMPI scheme.

  14. Intrinsic Chirality and Prochirality at Air/R-(+)- and S-(-)-Limonene Interfaces: Spectral Signatures with Interference Chiral Sum-Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Li; Zhang, Yun; Wei, Zhehao; Wang, Hongfei

    2014-06-04

    We report in this work detailed measurements on the chiral and achiral sum-frequency vibrational spectra in the C-H stretching vibration region (2800-3050cm-1) of the air/liquid interfaces of R-limonene and S-limonene, using the recently developed high-resolution broadband sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (HR-BB-SFG-VS). The achiral SFG spectra of R-limonene and S-limonene, as well as the equal amount (50/50) racemic mixture show that the enantiomers are with the same interfacial orientations. The interference chiral SFG spectra of the limonene enantiomers exhibit spectral signature from chiral response of the Cα-H stretching mode, and spectral signature from prochiral response of the CH2 asymmetric stretching mode, respectively. The chiral spectral feature of the Cα-H stretching mode changes sign from R-limonene to S-limonene, and disappears for the 50/50 racemic mixture. While the prochiral spectral feature of the CH2 asymmetric stretching mode is the same for R-limonene and S-limonene, and also surprisingly remains the same for the 50/50 racemic mixture. These results provided detail information in understanding the structure and chirality of molecular interfaces, and demonstrated the sensitivity and potential of SFG-VS as unique spectroscopic tool for chirality characterization and chiral recognition at the molecular interface.

  15. Evaluation and differentiation of the Betulaceae birch bark species and their bioactive triterpene content using analytical FT-vibrational spectroscopy and GC-MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cîntă-Pînzaru Simona

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aiming to obtain the highest triterpene content in the extraction products, nine bark samples from the forest abundant flora of Apuseni Mountains, Romania were Raman spectroscopically evaluated. Three different natural extracts from Betula pendula Roth birch bark have been obtained and characterized using Fourier transform vibrational spectra. Results This study shows that principal components of the birch tree extract can be rapidly recognized and differentiated based on their vibrational fingerprint band shape and intensity. The vibrational spectroscopy results are supported by the GC-MS data. Based on IR and Raman analysis, one can conclude that all the extracts, independent on the solvent(s used, revealed dominant betulin species, followed by lupeol. Conclusions Since Raman measurements could also be performed on fresh plant material, we demonstrated the possibility to apply the present results for the prediction of the highest triterpene content in bark species, for the selection of harvesting time or individual genotypes directly in the field, with appropriate portable Raman equipment.

  16. Electronic spectroscopy of intermediates involved in the conversion of methane to methanol by FeO+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, Fernando; Husband, John; Thompson, Christopher J.; Stringer, Kay L.; Metz, Ricardo B.

    2002-03-01

    Specific ion-molecule reactions are used to prepare two intermediates of the FeO++CH4 reaction, and photodissociation of the jet-cooled intermediates is examined in the visible and near-ultraviolet using time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The photodissociation spectrum of the aquo iron carbene complex [H2C=Fe-OH2]+ shows transitions to at least four excited electronic states in the FeCH2+ chromophore, with broad vibrational structure. Photoexcitation of the insertion intermediate [HO-Fe-CH3]+ leads to formation of FeOH++CH3 and also triggers the reaction to produce Fe++CH3OH. The photodissociation spectrum of [HO-Fe-CH3]+ presents a vibrationally resolved band involving progressions in the excited state Fe-C stretch, Fe-O stretch, and O-Fe-C bend. The change in the Fe-C bond length in [HO-Fe-CH3]+ and [H2C=Fe-OH2]+ upon photoexcitation is calculated from a Franck-Condon analysis of the vibronic features observed. The analysis of the experimental results is aided by hybrid Hartree-Fock/density-functional (B3LYP) calculations on [HO-Fe-CH3]+ and [H2C=Fe-OH2]+ performed to determine molecular parameters, and time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations on FeCH2+ to predict excited electronic states.

  17. Spectromicroscopy of Polymers: Comparison of Radiation Damage with Electron and Photon Core Excitation Spectroscopy Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ade, H.; Smith, A. P.; Rightor, E. G.; Hitchcock, A. P.; Urquhart, S.; Leapman, R.

    1997-03-01

    Core excitation microspectroscopy has become a powerful tool for the characterization of polymeric materials due to its sensitivity to chemical functionality. However, the excitations utilized in electron energy loss spectroscopy performed in a scanning transmission electron microscope (TEM-EELS) and near edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy can introduce radiation damage and chemically modify the sample. In order to understand the radiation damage associated with TEM-EELS and NEXAFS spectroscopy we have studied the radiation damage of the common polymer poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) as exhibited by changes in the acquired C K-edge excitation spectra. By fitting gaussian functions to the spectral intensity changes as a function of dose, we have determined the critical radiation dose of PET for both NEXAFS spectroscopy and TEM-EELS under typical operating conditions. This critical radiation dose for TEM-EELS is found to be 1.7 ± 0.2 x 10^8 grey (1.7 ± 0.2 x 10^4 Mrad) compared to a critical radiation dose for NEXAFS spectroscopy of 1.4 ± 0.7 x 10^9 grey (1.4 ± 0.7 x 10^5 Mrad). By considering the G factors of the two techniques and the critical radiation dose, a rule of thumb was derived that indicates that with typical present operating conditions, NEXAFS spectroscopy can analyze areas 500 times smaller than TEM-EELS given the same amount of radiation damage. Work supported by: NSF Young Investigator Award (DMR-9458060) and Dow Chemical

  18. High-resolution electron collision spectroscopy with multicharged ions in merged beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lestinsky, M.

    2007-04-18

    The Heidelberg ion storage ring Tsr is currently the only ring equipped with two independent devices for the collinear merging of a cold electron beam with stored ions. This greatly improves the potential of electron-ion collision experiments, as the ion beam can be cooled with one electron beam, while the other one is used as a dedicated target for energy-resolved electron collision processes, such as recombination. The work describes the implementation of this system for rst electron collision spectroscopy experiments. A detection system has been realized including an ion detector and specroscopic beam-control software and instrumentation. Moreover, in order to improve the spectroscopic resolution systematical studies of intrinsic relaxation processes in the electron beam have been carried out. These include the dependence on the electron beam density, the magnetic guiding eld strength, and the acceleration geometry. The recombination measurements on low-lying resonances in lithiumlike Sc{sup 18+} yield a high-precision measurement of the 2s-2p{sub 3/2} transition energy in this system. Operation of the two-electron-beam setup at high collision energy ({approx}1000 eV) is established using resonances of hydrogenlike Mg{sup 11+}, while the unique possibility of modifying the beam-merging geometry con rms its importance for the electron-ion recombination rate at lowest relative energy, as demonstrated on F{sup 6+}. (orig.)

  19. Thermodynamic basis of electron transfer in dihydroorotate dehydrogenase B from Lactococcus lactis: analysis by potentiometry, EPR spectroscopy, and ENDOR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohsen, Al-Walid A; Rigby, Stephen E J; Jensen, Kaj Frank; Munro, Andrew W; Scrutton, Nigel S

    2004-06-01

    Dihydroorotate dehydrogenase B (DHODB) is a complex iron-sulfur flavoprotein that catalyzes the conversion of dihydroorotate to orotate and the reduction of NAD(+). The enzyme is a dimer of heterodimers containing an FMN, an FAD, and a 2Fe-2S center. UV-visible, EPR, and ENDOR spectroscopies have been used to determine the reduction potentials of the flavins and the 2Fe-2S center and to characterize radicals and their interactions. Reductive titration using dithionite indicates a five-electron capacity for DHODB. The midpoint reduction potential of the 2Fe-2S center (-212 +/- 3 mV) was determined from analysis of absorption data at 540 nm, where absorption contributions from the two flavins are small. The midpoint reduction potentials of the oxidized/semiquinone (E(1)) and semiquinone/hydroquinone (E(2)) couples for the FMN (E(1) = -301 +/- 6 mV; E(2) = -252 +/- 8 mV) and FAD (E(1) = -312 +/- 6 mV; E(2) = -297 +/- 5 mV) were determined from analysis of spectral changes at 630 nm. Corresponding values for the midpoint reduction potentials for FMN (E(1) = -298 +/- 4 mV; E(2) = -259 +/- 5 mV) in the isolated catalytic subunit (subunit D, which lacks the 2Fe-2S center and FAD) are consistent with the values determined for the FMN couples in DHODB. During reductive titration of DHODB, small amounts of the neutral blue semiquinone are observed at approximately 630 nm, consistent with the measured midpoint reduction potentials of the flavins. An ENDOR spectrum of substrate-reduced DHODB identifies hyperfine couplings to proton nuclei similar to those recorded for the blue semiquinone of free flavins in aqueous solution, thus confirming the presence of this species in DHODB. Spectral features observed during EPR spectroscopy of dithionite-reduced DHODB are consistent with the midpoint reduction potentials determined using UV-visible spectroscopy and further identify an unusual EPR signal with very small rhombic anisotropy and g values of 2.02, 1.99, and 1.96. This unusual

  20. Signatures of Herzberg-Teller coupling in three-dimensional electronic spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizimana, Laurie A.; Carbery, William P.; Gellen, Tobias A.; Turner, Daniel B.

    2017-02-01

    The coupling between electronic and nuclear variables is a key consideration in molecular dynamics and spectroscopy. However, simulations that include detailed vibronic coupling terms are challenging to perform, and thus a variety of approximations can be used to model and interpret experimental results. Recent work shows that these simplified models can be inadequate. It is therefore important to understand spectroscopic signals that can identify failures of those approximations. Here we use an extended response-function method to simulate coherent three-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (3D ES) and study the sensitivity of this method to the breakdown of the Franck-Condon approximation. The simulations include a coordinate-dependent transition dipole operator that produces nodes, phase shifts, and peak patterns in 3D ES that can be used to identify Herzberg-Teller coupling. Guided by the simulation results, we interpret measurements on a molecular aggregate.