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Sample records for vibrational relaxation time

  1. Vibrational and rotational relaxation times of solvated molecular ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, M.; Owrutsky, J.; Sarisky, M.; Culver, J. P.; Yodh, A.; Hochstrasser, R. M.

    1993-04-01

    Infrared pump-probe and infrared polarization spectroscopy have been used to measure the vibrational relaxation times (T1) of the antisymmetric stretching mode and the reorientation times (TR) for N3-, NCS-, and NCO- in D2O and/or methanol. For N3-, experiments were also conducted in H2O and hexamethyl-phosphamide (HPMA) solutions. The rapid vibrational relaxation and slow reorientation observed demonstrate strong coupling between the ions and the solvents. Longer vibrational relaxation and shorter reorientation times measured for NCS- reveal weaker solvent interactions that may be due to the importance of the charge distribution and the form of the normal coordinate. A comparison of the T1 and TR times in different solvents permits a determination of the relative interaction strengths for the solvents investigated. The relatively weaker coupling of N3- in the aprotic solvent HMPA demonstrates the importance of hydrogen bonding in strong solvent interactions in ionic solutions. The experimental results are compared with recent molecular dynamics simulations of ionic solutions.

  2. Vibrational energy relaxation in liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesnoy, J.; Gale, G. M.

    The de-excitation of the vibrational population of small molecules in the liquid state is considered. Experimental techniques applicable to the measurement of relaxation times in dense phases are first described. Theoretical approaches are subsequently developed with special emphasis on the relationship between ab-initio quantum methods and binary interaction models. Finally, a selection of experimental results is analysed in the light of these theories. Special attention is given to the dependence of the relaxation time on experimental parameters such as density, temperature or the concentration of a mixture. The behaviour of the relaxation time across the liquid/solid phase transition is also treated. La désexcitation vibrationnelle de petites molécules est étudiée en phase liquide. Les techniques expérimentales utilisables pour mesurer les temps de relaxation en phase dense sont d'abord décrites. Les approches théoriques sont ensuite développées en montrant en particulier les liens entre les deux principales : l'approche quantique ab-initio et les modèles d'interaction binaire. Un choix de résultats expérimentaux est finalement analysé à la lumière de ces théories. Les dépendances des temps de relaxation envers les paramètres expérimentaux, comme la densité, la température ou la concentration d'un mélange, sont spécialement étudiées. Le comportement de la relaxation à la transition liquide/solide est aussi abordé.

  3. Vibrational and Rotational Energy Relaxation in Liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Jakob

    Vibrational and rotational energy relaxation in liquids are studied by means of computer simulations. As a precursor for studying vibrational energy relaxation of a solute molecule subsequent to the formation of a chemical bond, the validity of the classical Bersohn-Zewail model for describing......, the vibrational energy relaxation of I2 subsequent to photodissociation and recombination in CCl4 is studied using classical Molecular Dynamics simulations. The vibrational relaxation times and the time-dependent I-I pair distribution function are compared to new experimental results, and a qualitative agreement...... the intramolecular dynamics during photodissociation is investigated. The apparent agreement with quantum mechanical calculations is shown to be in contrast to the applicability of the individual approximations used in deriving the model from a quantum mechanical treatment. In the spirit of the Bersohn-Zewail model...

  4. Vibrational Energy Relaxation in Water-Acetonitrile Mixtures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cringus, Dan; Yeremenko, Sergey; Pshenichnikov, Maxim S.; Wiersma, Douwe A.; Kobayashi, Takayoshi; Kobayashi, Tetsuro; Nelson, Keith A.; Okada, Tadashi; Silvestri, Sandro De

    2004-01-01

    IR pump-probe spectroscopy is used to study the effect of hydrogen bonding on the vibrational energy relaxation pathways. Hydrogen bonding accelerates the population relaxation from 12ps in diluted acetonitrile solution to 700fs in bulk water.

  5. Vibrational energy relaxation in water-acetonitrile mixtures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cringus, D; Yeremenko, S; Pshenichnikov, MS; Wiersma, DA; Kobayashi, T; Okada, T; Kobayashi, T; Nelson, KA; DeSilvestri, S

    2005-01-01

    IR pump-probe spectroscopy is used to study the effect of hydrogen bonding on the vibrational energy relaxation pathways. Hydrogen bonding accelerates the population relaxation from 12ps in diluted acetonitrile solution to 700fs in bulk water.

  6. Vibrational energy relaxation in water-acetonitrile mixtures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cringus, Dan; Yeremenko, Sergey; Pshenichnikov, Maxim S.; Wiersma, Douwe A.

    2004-01-01

    IR pump-probe spectroscopy is used to study the effect of hydrogen bonding on the vibrational energy relaxation pathways. Hydrogen bonding accelerates the population relaxation from 12ps in diluted acetonitrile solution to 700fs in bulk water.

  7. Simulations of vibrational relaxation in dense molecular fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holian, B.L.

    1985-07-01

    In the understanding of high-temperatre and -pressure chemistry in explosives, first step is the study of the transfer of energy from translational degrees of freedom into internal vibrations of the molecules. We present new methods using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) for measuring vibrational relaxation in a diatomic fluid, where we expect a classical treatment of many-body collisions to be relevant because of the high densities (2 to 3 times compressed compared to the normal fluid) and high temperatures (2000 to 4000 K) involved behind detonation waves. NEMD techniques are discussed, including their limitations, and qualitative results presented.

  8. Vibrational relaxation of hot carriers in C60 molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madjet, Mohamed; Chakraborty, Himadri

    2017-04-01

    Electron-phonon coupling in molecular systems is at the heart of several important physical phenomena, including the mobility of carriers in organic electronic devices. Following the optical absorption, the vibrational relaxation of excited (hot) electrons and holes to the fullerene band-edges driven by electron-phonon coupling, known as the hot carrier thermalization process, is of particular fundamental interest. Using the non-adiabatic molecular dynamical methodology (PYXAID + Quantum Espresso) based on density functional approach, we have performed a simulation of vibrionic relaxations of hot carriers in C60. Time-dependent population decays and transfers in the femtosecond scale from various excited states to the states at the band-edge are calculated to study the details of this relaxation process. This work was supported by the U.S. National Science Foundation.

  9. Vibrational Relaxation in Neat Crystals of Naphthalene by Picosecond CARS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hesp, Ben H.; Wiersma, Douwe A.

    1980-01-01

    Picosecond delayed CARS experiments on totally symmetric modes in naphthalene at 1.5 K are reported. The Raman lineshape of the vibrational excitons is lorentzian and vibrational relaxation can be surprisingly slow. The Raman lineshape of the Ag exciton level of the 766 cm-1 vibrational mode reveals

  10. Relaxation of vibrationally excited states in solid "nitrate-nitrite" binary systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliev, A. R.; Akhmedov, I. R.; Kakagasanov, M. G.; Aliev, Z. A.; Gafurov, M. M.; Rabadanov, K. Sh.; Amirov, A. M.

    2017-10-01

    The processes of molecular relaxation in the solid NaNO3-NaNO2 and KNO3-KNO2 "nitrate-nitrite" binary systems have been investigated by Raman spectroscopy. The relaxation time of the vibration ν1(A) of an NO- 3 anion in the binary system is found to be shorter than that in individual nitrate. The increase in the relaxation rate is explained by the existence of an additional mechanism of relaxation of vibrationally excited states of the nitrate ion in the system. This mechanism is related to the excitation of vibration of another anion (NO- 2) and generation of a lattice phonon. It has been established that this relaxation mechanism is implemented provided that the difference between the frequencies of the aforementioned vibrations correspond to the range of sufficiently high density of states in the phonon spectrum.

  11. Vibrational relaxation in simulated two-dimensional infrared spectra of two amide modes in solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Arend G.; Jansen, Thomas la Cour; Bloem, Robbert; Knoester, Jasper

    2007-01-01

    Two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy is capable of following the transfer of vibrational energy between modes in real time. We develop a method to include vibrational relaxation in simulations of two-dimensional infrared spectra at finite temperature. The method takes into account the correlated

  12. Vibrational energy transfer in selectively excited diatomic molecules. [Relaxation rates, self-relaxation, upper limits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dasch, C.J.

    1978-09-01

    Single rovibrational states of HCl(v=2), HBr(v=2), DCl(v=2), and CO(v=2) were excited with a pulsed optical parametric oscillator (OPO). Total vibrational relaxation rates near - resonance quenchers were measured at 295/sup 0/K using time resolved infrared fluorescence. These rates are attributed primarily to V - V energy transfer, and they generally conform to a simple energy gap law. A small deviation was found for the CO(v) + DCl(v') relaxation rates. Upper limits for the self relaxation by V - R,T of HCl(v=2) and HBr(v=2) and for the two quantum exchange between HCl and HBr were determined. The HF dimer was detected at 295/sup 0/K and 30 torr HF pressure with an optoacoustic spectrometer using the OPO. Pulsed and chopped, resonant and non-resonant spectrophones are analyzed in detail. From experiments and first order perturbation theory, these V - V exchange rates appear to behave as a first order perturbation in the vibrational coordinates. The rotational dynamics are known to be complicated however, and the coupled rotational - vibrational dynamics were investigated theoreticaly in infinite order by the Dillon and Stephenson and the first Magnus approximations. Large ..delta..J transitions appear to be important, but these calculations differ by orders of magnitude on specific rovibrational transition rates. Integration of the time dependent semiclassical equations by a modified Gordon method and a rotationally distorted wave approximation are discussed as methods which would treat the rotational motion more accurately. 225 references.

  13. Picosecond excite-and-probe absorption measurement of the intra-2E(g)E(3/2)-state vibrational relaxation time in Ti(3+):Al2O3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayen, S. K.; Wang, W. B.; Petricevic, V.; Yoo, K. M.; Alfano, R. R.

    1987-01-01

    The Ti(3+)-doped Al2O3 has been recently demonstrated to be a tunable solid-state laser system with Ti(3+) as the laser-active ion. In this paper, the kinetics of vibrational transitions in the 2E(g)E(3/2) electronic state of Ti(3+):Al2O3a (crucial for characterizing new host materials for the Ti ion) was investigated. A 527-nm 5-ps pulse was used to excite a band of higher vibrational levels of the 2E(g)E(3/2) state, and the subsequent growth of population in the zero vibrational level and lower vibrational levels was monitored by a 3.9-micron picosecond probe pulse. The time evolution curve in the excited 2E(g)E(3/2) state at room temperature was found to be characterized by a sharp rise followed by a long decay, the long lifetime decay reflecting the depopulation of the zero and the lower vibrational levels of the 2E(g)E(3/2) state via radiative transitions. An upper limit of 3.5 ps was estimated for intra-2E(g)E(3/2)-state vibrational relaxation time.

  14. Vibrational relaxation of the bending mode of HDO in liquid D2O.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodis, Pavol; Larsen, Olaf F A; Woutersen, Sander

    2005-06-23

    The vibrational relaxation of the bending mode of HDO in liquid D2O has been studied using time-resolved mid-infrared pump-probe spectroscopy. At short delays, the transient spectrum clearly shows the v = 1 --> 2 induced absorption and v = 1 --> 0 bleaching and stimulated emission, whereas at long delays, the transient spectrum is dominated by the spectral changes caused by the temperature increase in the sample after vibrational relaxation. From the decay of the v = 1 --> 2 induced absorption, we obtain an estimate of 390 +/- 50 fs for the vibrational lifetime, in surprisingly good agreement with recent theoretical predictions. In the v = 0 --> 1 frequency region, the decay of the absorption change involves a second, slower component, which suggests that after vibrational relaxation the system is not yet in thermal equilibrium.

  15. Relaxation times estimation in MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baselice, Fabio; Caivano, Rocchina; Cammarota, Aldo; Ferraioli, Giampaolo; Pascazio, Vito

    2014-03-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging is a very powerful techniques for soft tissue diagnosis. At the present, the clinical evaluation is mainly conducted exploiting the amplitude of the recorded MR image which, in some specific cases, is modified by using contrast enhancements. Nevertheless, spin-lattice (T1) and spin-spin (T2) relaxation times can play an important role in many pathology diagnosis, such as cancer, Alzheimer or Parkinson diseases. Different algorithms for relaxation time estimation have been proposed in literature. In particular, the two most adopted approaches are based on Least Squares (LS) and on Maximum Likelihood (ML) techniques. As the amplitude noise is not zero mean, the first one produces a biased estimator, while the ML is unbiased but at the cost of high computational effort. Recently the attention has been focused on the estimation in the complex, instead of the amplitude, domain. The advantage of working with real and imaginary decomposition of the available data is mainly the possibility of achieving higher quality estimations. Moreover, the zero mean complex noise makes the Least Square estimation unbiased, achieving low computational times. First results of complex domain relaxation times estimation on real datasets are presented. In particular, a patient with an occipital lesion has been imaged on a 3.0T scanner. Globally, the evaluation of relaxation times allow us to establish a more precise topography of biologically active foci, also with respect to contrast enhanced images.

  16. Vibrational energy relaxation of a diatomic molecule in a room-temperature ionic liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Youngseon; Kim, Hyung J

    2006-07-14

    Vibrational energy relaxation (VER) dynamics of a diatomic solute in ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate (EMI(+)PF(6) (-)) are studied via equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. The time scale for VER is found to decrease markedly with the increasing solute dipole moment, consonant with many previous studies in polar solvents. A detailed analysis of nonequilibrium results shows that for a dipolar solute, dissipation of an excess solute vibrational energy occurs almost exclusively via the Lennard-Jones interactions between the solute and solvent, while an oscillatory energy exchange between the two is mainly controlled by their electrostatic interactions. Regardless of the anharmonicity of the solute vibrational potential, VER becomes accelerated as the initial vibrational energy increases. This is attributed primarily to the enhancement in variations of the solvent force on the solute bond, induced by large-amplitude solute vibrations. One interesting finding is that if a time variable scaled with the initial excitation energy is employed, dissipation dynamics of the excess vibrational energy of the dipolar solute tend to show a universal behavior irrespective of its initial vibrational state. Comparison with water and acetonitrile shows that overall characteristics of VER in EMI(+)PF(6) (-) are similar to those in acetonitrile, while relaxation in water is much faster than the two. It is also found that the Landau-Teller theory predictions for VER time scale obtained via equilibrium simulations of the solvent force autocorrelation function are in reasonable agreement with the nonequilibrium results.

  17. Ultrafast electronic relaxation and vibrational dynamics in a polyacetylene derivative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Takayoshi; Iiyama, Tsugumasa; Okamura, Kotaro; Du, Juan; Masuda, Toshio

    2013-04-01

    Real-time vibrational spectra in a polyacetylene derivative, poly[o-TFMPA([o-(trifluoromethyl) phenyl]acetylene)] in a broad electronic spectral region were observed using a sub-7-fs laser. Using the frequencies and initial phases of vibrational modes obtained by the spectroscopy, the assignment of the wavepackets was made. From the first moment, Huang-Rhys parameters were determined for six most prominent modes, which characterize the potential hypersurface composed of multi-dimensional vibrational mode spaces.

  18. Relaxation dynamics and coherent energy exchange in coupled vibration-cavity polaritons (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpkins, Blake S.; Fears, Kenan P.; Dressick, Walter J.; Dunkelberger, Adam D.; Spann, Bryan T.; Owrutsky, Jeffrey C.

    2016-09-01

    Coherent coupling between an optical transition and confined optical mode have been investigated for electronic-state transitions, however, only very recently have vibrational transitions been considered. Here, we demonstrate both static and dynamic results for vibrational bands strongly coupled to optical cavities. We experimentally and numerically describe strong coupling between a Fabry-Pérot cavity and carbonyl stretch ( 1730 cm 1) in poly-methylmethacrylate and provide evidence that the mixed-states are immune to inhomogeneous broadening. We investigate strong and weak coupling regimes through examination of cavities loaded with varying concentrations of a urethane monomer. Rabi splittings are in excellent agreement with an analytical description using no fitting parameters. Ultrafast pump-probe measurements reveal transient absorption signals over a frequency range well-separated from the vibrational band, as well as drastically modified relaxation rates. We speculate these modified kinetics are a consequence of the energy proximity between the vibration-cavity polariton modes and excited state transitions and that polaritons offer an alternative relaxation path for vibrational excitations. Varying the polariton energies by angle-tuning yields transient results consistent with this hypothesis. Furthermore, Rabi oscillations, or quantum beats, are observed at early times and we see evidence that these coherent vibration-cavity polariton excitations impact excited state population through cavity losses. Together, these results indicate that cavity coupling may be used to influence both excitation and relaxation rates of vibrations. Opening the field of polaritonic coupling to vibrational species promises to be a rich arena amenable to a wide variety of infrared-active bonds that can be studied in steady state and dynamically.

  19. Direct evidence for mode-specific vibrational energy relaxation from quantum time-dependent perturbation theory. III. The nu(4) and nu(7) modes of nonplanar nickel porphyrin models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Straub, John E

    2009-06-07

    The time scales and pathways of vibrational energy relaxation (VER) of the nu(4) and nu(7) modes of three nickel porphyrin models, nickel porphine (NiP), nickel protoporphyrin IX (Ni-heme), and nickel octaethylporphyrin (NiOEP), were studied using a non-Markovian time-dependent perturbation theory at the B3LYP/6-31G(d) level. When NiP is calculated with D(4h) symmetry, it has the planar structure and the same VER properties as ferrous iron porphine (FeP). The porphine cores of both Ni-heme and NiOEP were distorted from a planar geometry, assuming a nonplanar structure, similar to that of the heme structure in cytochrome c. The VER time scales of Ni-heme are found to be similar to those predicted for a planar iron heme, but the derived pathways have distinctly different features. In particular, the strong coupling between the nu(7) mode and the overtone of the approximately 350 cm(-1) gamma(7) mode, observed for planar porphyrins, is absent in both nonplanar nickel porphyrins. Direct energy exchange between the nu(4) and nu(7) modes is not observed in NiOEP, but is found to play an essential role in the VER of the nu(4) mode in Ni-heme. The Ni-heme isopropionate groups are involved in the dominant VER pathways of both the nu(4) and nu(7) modes of Ni-heme. However, in contrast with VER pathways derived in planar iron heme, the isopropionate groups are not observed to play an essential role relative to other side chains in spatially directing the vibrational energy flow.

  20. Influence of vibrational relaxation on perturbations in a shock layer on a plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirilovskiy, S. V.; Maslov, A. A.; Poplavskaya, T. V.; Tsyryul'nikov, I. S.

    2015-05-01

    The influence of excitation of molecular vibrational degrees of freedom on the mean flow and perturbation development in a hypersonic (M = 6-14) viscous shock layer is studied. The layer originates on a plate placed in a flow of air, carbon dioxide, or their mixture at high stagnation temperatures (2000-3000 K). The mean flow and pressure pulsation on the surface of the plate are measured in an IT-302M pulsed wind tunnel (Khristianovich Institute of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences). Numerical simulation is carried out in terms of a model of a thermally perfect gas using the ANSYS Fluent program package based on solving nonstationary two-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations. External flow perturbations are introduced into the computational domain in the form of plane monochromatic acoustic waves using UDF modules built in the computational code. It is shown that the excitation of vibrational degrees of freedom in carbon dioxide molecules considerably influences the position of the head wave and intensifies perturbations in contrast to air in which the fraction of vibrationally excited molecules is low at the same parameters of the oncoming low. The influence of the excitation of vibrational degrees of freedom is studied both for equilibrium gas and for a vibrationally nonequilibrium gas. Nonequilibrium vibrational degrees of freedom are simulated using a two-temperature model of relaxation flows in which the time variation of the vibrational energy is described by the Landau-Teller equation with regard to a finite time of energy exchange between vibrational and translational-rotational degrees of freedom of molecules. It is found that the vibrational nonequilibrium has a damping effect on perturbations.

  1. Vibrational relaxation pathways of AI and AII modes in N-methylacetamide clusters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piatkowski, L.; Bakker, H.J.

    2010-01-01

    We studied the pathways of vibrational energy relaxation of the amide I (~1660 cm-1) and amide II (~1560 cm-1) vibrational modes of N-methylacetamide (NMA) in CCl4 solution using two-color femtosecond vibrational spectroscopy. We measured the transient spectral dynamics upon excitation of each of

  2. Vibrational relaxation pathways of AI and AII modes in N-methylacetamide clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piatkowski, L; Bakker, H J

    2010-11-04

    We studied the pathways of vibrational energy relaxation of the amide I (~1660 cm⁻¹) and amide II (~1560 cm⁻¹) vibrational modes of N-methylacetamide (NMA) in CCl₄ solution using two-color femtosecond vibrational spectroscopy. We measured the transient spectral dynamics upon excitation of each of these amide modes. The results show that there is no energy transfer between the amide I (AI) and amide II (AII) modes. Instead we find that the vibrational energy is transferred on a picosecond time scale to a common combination tone of lower-frequency modes. By use of polarization-resolved femtosecond pump-probe measurements we also study the reorientation dynamics of the NMA molecules and the relative angle between the transition dipole moments of the AI and AII vibrations. The spectral dynamics at later times after the excitation (>40 ps) reveal the presence of a dissociation process of the NMA aggregates, trimers, and higher order structures into dimers and monomers. By measuring the dissociation kinetics at different temperatures, we determined the activation energy of this dissociation E(a) = 35 ± 3 kJ mol⁻¹.

  3. Relaxation dynamics in quantum dissipative systems: The microscopic effect of intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uranga-Piña, L. [Facultad de Física, Universidad de la Habana, San Lázaro y L, Vedado, 10400 Havana (Cuba); Institute for Chemistry and Biochemistry, Freie Universität Berlin, Takustr. 3, D-14195 Berlin (Germany); Tremblay, J. C., E-mail: jean.c.tremblay@gmail.com [Institute for Chemistry and Biochemistry, Freie Universität Berlin, Takustr. 3, D-14195 Berlin (Germany)

    2014-08-21

    We investigate the effect of inter-mode coupling on the vibrational relaxation dynamics of molecules in weak dissipative environments. The simulations are performed within the reduced density matrix formalism in the Markovian regime, assuming a Lindblad form for the system-bath interaction. The prototypical two-dimensional model system representing two CO molecules approaching a Cu(100) surface is adapted from an ab initio potential, while the diatom-diatom vibrational coupling strength is systematically varied. In the weak system-bath coupling limit and at low temperatures, only first order non-adiabatic uni-modal coupling terms contribute to surface-mediated vibrational relaxation. Since dissipative dynamics is non-unitary, the choice of representation will affect the evolution of the reduced density matrix. Two alternative representations for computing the relaxation rates and the associated operators are thus compared: the fully coupled spectral basis, and a factorizable ansatz. The former is well-established and serves as a benchmark for the solution of Liouville-von Neumann equation. In the latter, a contracted grid basis of potential-optimized discrete variable representation is tailored to incorporate most of the inter-mode coupling, while the Lindblad operators are represented as tensor products of one-dimensional operators, for consistency. This procedure results in a marked reduction of the grid size and in a much more advantageous scaling of the computational cost with respect to the increase of the dimensionality of the system. The factorizable method is found to provide an accurate description of the dissipative quantum dynamics of the model system, specifically of the time evolution of the state populations and of the probability density distribution of the molecular wave packet. The influence of intra-molecular vibrational energy redistribution appears to be properly taken into account by the new model on the whole range of coupling strengths. It

  4. Analysis of vibroprotection characteristics of pneumatic relaxation seat suspension with capability of vibration energy recuperation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyashenko Mikhail

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes mechanism and control algorithm for pneumatic relaxation system of suspension with vibration energy recuperation applied to standard vehicle operator seat (“Sibeko” company. Mathematical model of the seat pneumatic relaxation suspension with two additional air volumes was created. Pneumatic motor – recuperator activated by means of air flow from the one additional volume to another is installed in air piping between additional volumes. Computational research was made in Matlab/Simulink. Amplitude-frequency characteristics of transmission coefficient for standard and proposed suspensions were plotted for preliminary evaluation of vibration protection properties of seat suspension. Performed comparative analysis of amplitude-frequency characteristics shows that noticeable improvement of vibration protection properties of pneumatic relaxation suspension system with vibration energy recuperation in comparison with standard system both in region of resonance disturbances and in above-resonance region. Main ways for further improvement of vibration protection properties of proposed system were marked out.

  5. Quantum Interference in the Vibrational Relaxation of the O-H Stretch Overtone of Liquid H2O.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Post, Sietse T; Woutersen, Sander; Bakker, Huib J

    2016-05-26

    Using femtosecond two-color infrared pump-probe spectroscopy, we study the vibrational relaxation of the O-H stretch vibrations of liquid H2O after excitation of the overtone transition. The overtone transition has its maximum at 6900 cm(-1) (1.45 μm), which is a relatively high frequency in view of the central frequency of 3400 cm(-1) of the fundamental transition. The excitation of the overtone leads to a transient induced absorption of two-exciton states of the O-H stretch vibrations. When the overtone excitation frequency is tuned from 6600 to 7200 cm(-1), the vibrational relaxation time constant of the two-exciton states increases from 400 ± 50 fs to 540 ± 40 fs. These values define a limited range of relatively long relaxation time constants compared to the range of relaxation time constants of 250-550 fs that we recently observed for the one-exciton O-H stretch vibrational state of liquid H2O ( S. T. van der Post et al., Nature Comm. 2015 , 6 , 8384 ). We explain the high central frequency and the limited range of relatively long relaxation time constants of the overtone transition from the destructive quantum interference of the mechanical and electrical anharmonic contributions to the overtone transition probability. As a result of this destructive interference, the overtone transition of liquid H2O is dominated by molecules of which the O-H groups donate relatively weak hydrogen bonds to other H2O molecules.

  6. Collisional relaxation of the three vibrationally excited difluorobenzene isomers by collisions with CO2: effect of donor vibrational mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Deborah G; Johnson, Alan M; Johnson, Jeremy A; Judd, Kortney A; Kim, Kilyoung; Mayhew, Maurine; Powell, Amber L; Sevy, Eric T

    2008-02-14

    Relaxation of highly vibrationally excited 1,2-, 1,3-, and 1,4-difluorobenzne (DFB) by collisions with carbon dioxide has been investigated using diode laser transient absorption spectroscopy. Vibrationally hot DFB (E' approximately 41,000 cm(-1)) was prepared by 248 nm excimer laser excitation followed by rapid radiationless relaxation to the ground electronic state. Collisions between hot DFB isomers and CO2 result in large amounts of rotational and translational energy transfer from the hot donors to the bath. The CO2 nascent rotational population distribution of the high-J (J = 58-80) tail of the 00(0)0 state was probed at short times following the excimer laser pulse to measure rate constants and probabilities for collisions populating these states. The amount of translational energy gained by CO2 during collisions was determined using Doppler spectroscopy to measure the width of the absorption line for each transition. The energy transfer probability distribution function, P(E,E'), for the large DeltaE tail was obtained by resorting the state-indexed energy transfer probabilities as a function of DeltaE. P(E,E') was fit to a biexponential function to determine the average energy transferred in a single DFB/CO2 collision and fit parameters describing the shape of P(E,E'). P(E,E') fit parameters for DFB/CO2 and the previously studied C6F6/CO2 system are compared to various donor molecular properties. A model based on Fermi's Golden Rule indicates that the shape of P(E,E') is primarily determined by the low-frequency out-of-plane donor vibrational modes. A fractional mode population analysis is performed, which suggests that for energy transfer from DFB and C6F6 to CO2 the two key donor vibrational modes from which energy leaks out of the donor into the bath are nu11 and nu16. These "gateway" modes are some of the same modes determined to be the most efficient energy transfer modes by quantum scattering studies of benzene/He collisions.

  7. Time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokmakoff, Andrei [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Champion, Paul [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States); Heilweil, Edwin J. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology (NIST), Boulder, CO (United States); Nelson, Keith A. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Ziegler, Larry [Boston Univ., MA (United States)

    2009-05-14

    This document contains the Proceedings from the 14th International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy, which was held in Meredith, NH from May 9-14, 2009. The study of molecular dynamics in chemical reaction and biological processes using time-resolved spectroscopy plays an important role in our understanding of energy conversion, storage, and utilization problems. Fundamental studies of chemical reactivity, molecular rearrangements, and charge transport are broadly supported by the DOE's Office of Science because of their role in the development of alternative energy sources, the understanding of biological energy conversion processes, the efficient utilization of existing energy resources, and the mitigation of reactive intermediates in radiation chemistry. In addition, time-resolved spectroscopy is central to all fiveof DOE's grand challenges for fundamental energy science. The Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy conference is organized biennially to bring the leaders in this field from around the globe together with young scientists to discuss the most recent scientific and technological advances. The latest technology in ultrafast infrared, Raman, and terahertz spectroscopy and the scientific advances that these methods enable were covered. Particular emphasis was placed on new experimental methods used to probe molecular dynamics in liquids, solids, interfaces, nanostructured materials, and biomolecules.

  8. Relaxation time estimation in surface NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grunewald, Elliot D.; Walsh, David O.

    2017-03-21

    NMR relaxation time estimation methods and corresponding apparatus generate two or more alternating current transmit pulses with arbitrary amplitudes, time delays, and relative phases; apply a surface NMR acquisition scheme in which initial preparatory pulses, the properties of which may be fixed across a set of multiple acquisition sequence, are transmitted at the start of each acquisition sequence and are followed by one or more depth sensitive pulses, the pulse moments of which are varied across the set of multiple acquisition sequences; and apply processing techniques in which recorded NMR response data are used to estimate NMR properties and the relaxation times T.sub.1 and T.sub.2* as a function of position as well as one-dimensional and two-dimension distributions of T.sub.1 versus T.sub.2* as a function of subsurface position.

  9. Probing relaxation times in graphene quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volk, Christian; Neumann, Christoph; Kazarski, Sebastian; Fringes, Stefan; Engels, Stephan; Haupt, Federica; Müller, André; Stampfer, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Graphene quantum dots are attractive candidates for solid-state quantum bits. In fact, the predicted weak spin-orbit and hyperfine interaction promise spin qubits with long coherence times. Graphene quantum dots have been extensively investigated with respect to their excitation spectrum, spin-filling sequence and electron-hole crossover. However, their relaxation dynamics remain largely unexplored. This is mainly due to challenges in device fabrication, in particular concerning the control of carrier confinement and the tunability of the tunnelling barriers, both crucial to experimentally investigate decoherence times. Here we report pulsed-gate transient current spectroscopy and relaxation time measurements of excited states in graphene quantum dots. This is achieved by an advanced device design that allows to individually tune the tunnelling barriers down to the low megahertz regime, while monitoring their asymmetry. Measuring transient currents through electronic excited states, we estimate a lower bound for charge relaxation times on the order of 60–100 ns. PMID:23612294

  10. Vibrational Energy Relaxation: A Benchmark for Mixed Quantum-Classical Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Amber; Subotnik, Joseph E

    2018-01-11

    We investigate the ability of mixed quantum-classical methods to capture the dynamics of vibrational energy relaxation. Several methods, including surface hopping, and Ehrenfest and symmetrical quasiclassical (SQC) dynamics, are benchmarked for the exactly solvable model problem of a harmonic oscillator bilinearly coupled to a bath of harmonic oscillators. Results show that, very often, one can recover accurate vibrational relaxation rates and detailed balance using simple mixed quantum-classical approaches. A few anomalous results do appear, however, especially regarding Ehrenfest and SQC dynamics.

  11. Strong enhancement of vibrational relaxation by Watson-Crick base pairing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woutersen, Sander; Cristalli, Gloria

    2004-09-15

    We have studied the ultrafast dynamics of NH-stretch vibrational excitations in Watson-Crick base pairs consisting of adenine and uracil derivatives. To estimate the influence of the A:U hydrogen bonding on the vibrational dynamics, we have also studied the uracil derivative in monomeric form. The vibrational relaxation of the NH-stretching mode is found to occur much faster in the Watson-Crick base pair than in monomeric uracil. From the delay dependence of the transient vibrational spectra, it can be concluded that both in base-paired and monomeric uracil, the energy relaxation takes place in two steps, the first step being a rapid transfer of energy from the NH-stretching mode to an accepting mode, the second step the relaxation of this accepting mode. The transient spectra show evidence that in the base pair the hydrogen bond between the nucleobases acts as the accepting mode, and that the hydrogen bonding between the bases is responsible for the extremely fast vibrational relaxation in this system.

  12. Analysis of vibroprotection characteristics of pneumatic relaxation seat suspension with capability of vibration energy recuperation

    OpenAIRE

    Lyashenko Mikhail; Potapov Pavel; Iskaliev Azamat

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes mechanism and control algorithm for pneumatic relaxation system of suspension with vibration energy recuperation applied to standard vehicle operator seat (“Sibeko” company). Mathematical model of the seat pneumatic relaxation suspension with two additional air volumes was created. Pneumatic motor – recuperator activated by means of air flow from the one additional volume to another is installed in air piping between additional volumes. Computational research was made in M...

  13. Vibrational relaxation of the H2O bending mode in liquid water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Olaf F A; Woutersen, Sander

    2004-12-22

    We have studied the vibrational relaxation of the H(2)O bending mode in an H(2)O:HDO:D(2)O isotopic mixture using infrared pump-probe spectroscopy. The transient spectrum and its delay dependence reveal an anharmonic shift of 55+/-10 cm(-1) for the H(2)O bending mode, and a value of 400+/-30 fs for its vibrational lifetime. (c) 2004 American Institute of Physics.

  14. Isotopic effects in vibrational relaxation dynamics of H on a Si(100) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouakline, F.; Lorenz, U.; Melani, G.; Paramonov, G. K.; Saalfrank, P.

    2017-10-01

    In a recent paper [U. Lorenz and P. Saalfrank, Chem. Phys. 482, 69 (2017)], we proposed a robust scheme to set up a system-bath model Hamiltonian, describing the coupling of adsorbate vibrations (system) to surface phonons (bath), from first principles. The method is based on an embedded cluster approach, using orthogonal coordinates for system and bath modes, and an anharmonic phononic expansion of the system-bath interaction up to second order. In this contribution, we use this model Hamiltonian to calculate vibrational relaxation rates of H-Si and D-Si bending modes, coupled to a fully H(D)-covered Si(100)-( 2 × 1 ) surface, at zero temperature. The D-Si bending mode has an anharmonic frequency lying inside the bath frequency spectrum, whereas the H-Si bending mode frequency is outside the bath Debye band. Therefore, in the present calculations, we only take into account one-phonon system-bath couplings for the D-Si system and both one- and two-phonon interaction terms in the case of H-Si. The computation of vibrational lifetimes is performed with two different approaches, namely, Fermi's golden rule, and a generalized Bixon-Jortner model built in a restricted vibrational space of the adsorbate-surface zeroth-order Hamiltonian. For D-Si, the Bixon-Jortner Hamiltonian can be solved by exact diagonalization, serving as a benchmark, whereas for H-Si, an iterative scheme based on the recursive residue generation method is applied, with excellent convergence properties. We found that the lifetimes obtained with perturbation theory, albeit having almost the same order of magnitude—a few hundred fs for D-Si and a couple of ps for H-Si—, are strongly dependent on the discretized numerical representation of the bath spectral density. On the other hand, the Bixon-Jortner model is free of such numerical deficiencies, therefore providing better estimates of vibrational relaxation rates, at a very low computational cost. The results obtained with this model clearly show

  15. Vibrational relaxation beyond the linear damping limit in two-dimensional optical spectra of molecular aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlík, Václav; Šanda, František

    2017-08-01

    We present a computational model for the spectra of molecular aggregates with signatures of vibronic progression. Vibronic dynamics is implemented by coupling the dynamics of Frenkel excitons with underdamped vibrations. Vibrational dynamics includes linear damping resulting in the exponential decay and quadratic damping inducing subexponential or power law relaxation and increasing vibrational decoherence as demonstrated on lineshapes of the absorption spectrum. Simulations of the third-order coherent response account for bath reorganization during excitonic transport, which allows us to study the line-shape evolution of cross peaks of 2D spectra.

  16. Hydrogen bonding and vibrational energy relaxation in water-acetonitrile mixtures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cringus, D; Yeremenko, S; Pshenichnikov, MS; Wiersma, DA; Pshenichnikov, Maxim S.

    2004-01-01

    We present a study of the effect of hydrogen bonding on vibrational energy relaxation of the OH-stretching mode in pure water and in water-acetonitrile mixtures. The extent of hydrogen bonding is controlled by dissolving water at various concentrations in acetonitrile. Infrared frequency-resolved

  17. Ultrafast Relaxation Dynamics of Photoexcited Heme Model Compounds: Observation of Multiple Electronic Spin States and Vibrational Cooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govind, Chinju; Karunakaran, Venugopal

    2017-04-13

    Hemin is a unique model compound of heme proteins carrying out variable biological functions. Here, the excited state relaxation dynamics of heme model compounds in the ferric form are systematically investigated by changing the axial ligand (Cl/Br), the peripheral substituent (vinyl/ethyl-meso), and the solvent (methanol/DMSO) using femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy upon excitation at 380 nm. The relaxation time constants of these model compounds are obtained by global analysis. Excited state deactivation pathway of the model compounds comprising the decay of the porphyrin excited state (S*) to ligand to metal charge transfer state (LMCT, τ 1 ), back electron transfer from metal to ligand (MLCT, τ 2 ), and relaxation to the ground state through different electronic spin states of iron (τ 3 and τ 4 ) are proposed along with the vibrational cooling processes. This is based on the excited state absorption spectral evolution, similarities between the transient absorption spectra of the ferric form and steady state absorption spectra of the low-spin ferrous form, and the data analysis. The observation of an increase of all the relaxation time constants in DMSO compared to the methanol reflects the stabilization of intermediate states involved in the electronic relaxation. The transient absorption spectra of met-myoglobin are also measured for comparison. Thus, the transient absorption spectra of these model compounds reveal the involvement of multiple iron spin states in the electronic relaxation dynamics, which could be an alternative pathway to the ground state beside the vibrational cooling processes and associated with the inherent features of the heme b type.

  18. Kinetic study of low-temperature CO2 plasmas under non-equilibrium conditions. I. Relaxation of vibrational energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, T.; Grofulović, M.; Klarenaar, B. L. M.; Morillo-Candas, A. S.; Guaitella, O.; Engeln, R.; Pintassilgo, C. D.; Guerra, V.

    2018-01-01

    A kinetic model describing the time evolution of ∼70 individual CO2(X1Σ+) vibrational levels during the afterglow of a pulsed DC glow discharge is developed in order to contribute to the understanding of vibrational energy transfer in CO2 plasmas. The results of the simulations are compared against in situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy data obtained in a pulsed DC glow discharge and its afterglow at pressures of a few Torr and discharge currents of around 50 mA. The very good agreement between the model predictions and the experimental results validates the kinetic scheme considered here and the corresponding vibration–vibration and vibration–translation rate coefficients. In this sense, it establishes a reaction mechanism for the vibrational kinetics of these CO2 energy levels and offers a firm basis to understand the vibrational relaxation in CO2 plasmas. It is shown that first-order perturbation theories, namely, the Schwartz–Slawsky–Herzfeld and Sharma–Brau methods, provide a good description of CO2 vibrations under low excitation regimes.

  19. First Passage Times, Lifetimes, and Relaxation Times of Unfolded Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Wei; Sengupta, Anirvan M; Levy, Ronald M

    2015-07-24

    The dynamics of proteins in the unfolded state can be quantified in computer simulations by calculating a spectrum of relaxation times which describes the time scales over which the population fluctuations decay to equilibrium. If the unfolded state space is discretized, we can evaluate the relaxation time of each state. We derive a simple relation that shows the mean first passage time to any state is equal to the relaxation time of that state divided by the equilibrium population. This explains why mean first passage times from state to state within the unfolded ensemble can be very long but the energy landscape can still be smooth (minimally frustrated). In fact, when the folding kinetics is two-state, all of the unfolded state relaxation times within the unfolded free energy basin are faster than the folding time. This result supports the well-established funnel energy landscape picture and resolves an apparent contradiction between this model and the recently proposed kinetic hub model of protein folding. We validate these concepts by analyzing a Markov state model of the kinetics in the unfolded state and folding of the miniprotein NTL9 (where NTL9 is the N-terminal domain of the ribosomal protein L9), constructed from a 2.9 ms simulation provided by D. E. Shaw Research.

  20. Effects of Stress and Relaxation on Time Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    1998). Common relaxation methods include progressive muscle relaxation, meditation, imaging, autogenic training (self- hypnosis ), listening to 14 music...2001). Menstrual and circadian rythms in time perception in healthy women and women with premenstrual syndrome. Neuroscience Research, 41(4), 339

  1. Instantaneous pair theory for high-frequency vibrational energy relaxation in fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Ross E.; Stratt, Richard M.

    1999-01-01

    Notwithstanding the long and distinguished history of studies of vibrational energy relaxation, exactly how it is that high frequency vibrations manage to relax in a liquid remains somewhat of a mystery. Both experimental and theoretical approaches seem to say that there is a natural frequency range associated with intermolecular motion in liquids, typically spanning no more than a few hundred cm-1. Landau-Teller-type theories explain rather easily how a solvent can absorb any vibrational energy within this "band," but how is it that molecules can rid themselves of superfluous vibrational energies significantly in excess of these values? In this paper we develop a theory for such processes based on the idea that the crucial liquid motions are those that most rapidly modulate the force on the vibrating coordinate — and that by far the most important of these motions are those involving what we have called the mutual nearest neighbors of the vibrating solute. Specifically, we suggest that whenever there is a single solvent molecule sufficiently close to the solute that the solvent and solute are each other's nearest neighbors, then the instantaneous scattering dynamics of the solute-solvent pair alone suffices to explain the high-frequency relaxation. This highly reduced version of the dynamics has implications for some of the previous theoretical formulations of this problem. Previous instantaneous-normal-mode theories allowed us to understand the origin of a band of liquid frequencies, and even had some success in predicting relaxation within this band, but lacking a sensible picture of the effects of liquid anharmonicity on dynamics, were completely unable to treat higher frequency relaxation. When instantaneous-normal-mode dynamics is used to evaluate the instantaneous pair theory, though, we end up with a multiphonon picture of the relaxation which is in excellent agreement with the exact high-frequency dynamics — suggesting that the critical anharmonicity

  2. Vibrational relaxation of matrix-isolated CH/sub 3/F and HCl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, L.

    1981-08-01

    Kinetic and spectroscopic studies have been performed on CH/sub 3/F and HCl as a function of host matrix and temperature. Temporally and spectrally resolved infrared fluorescence was used to monitor the populations of both the initially excited state and the lower lying levels which participate in the relaxation process. For CH/sub 3/F, relaxation from any of the levels near 3.5 ..mu.., i.e. the CH stretching fundamentals or bend overtones, occurs via rapid (< 5 ns) V ..-->.. V transfer to 2..nu../sub 3/ with subsequent relaxation of the ..nu../sub 3/ (CF stretch) manifold. Lifetimes of 2..nu../sub 3/ and ..nu../sub 3/ were determined through overtone, ..delta..V = 2, and fundamental fluorescence. These lifetimes show a dramatic dependence on host lattice, an increase of two orders of magnitude in going from Xe and Ar matrices. Lifetimes depend only weakly on temperature. The relaxation of 2..nu../sub 3/ and ..nu../sub 3/ is consistent with a model in which production of a highly rotationally excited guest via collisions with the repulsive wall of the host is the rate limiting step. For HCl, lifetimes of v = 1,2,3 have been determined. In all hosts, the relaxation is non-radiative. For a given vibrational state, v, the relaxation rate increases in the series k(Ar) < k(Kr) < k(Xe). The dependence of the relaxation rate; on v is superlinear in all matrices, the deviation from linearity increasng in the order Ar < Kr < Xe. The relaxation rates become more strongly temperature dependent with increasing vibrational excitation. The results are consistent with a mechanism in which complex formation introduces the anisotropy necessary to induce a near resonant V ..-->.. R transition in the rate limiting step.

  3. Immersed boundary lattice Boltzmann model based on multiple relaxation times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jianhua; Han, Haifeng; Shi, Baochang; Guo, Zhaoli

    2012-01-01

    As an alterative version of the lattice Boltzmann models, the multiple relaxation time (MRT) lattice Boltzmann model introduces much less numerical boundary slip than the single relaxation time (SRT) lattice Boltzmann model if some special relationship between the relaxation time parameters is chosen. On the other hand, most current versions of the immersed boundary lattice Boltzmann method, which was first introduced by Feng and improved by many other authors, suffer from numerical boundary slip as has been investigated by Le and Zhang. To reduce such a numerical boundary slip, an immerse boundary lattice Boltzmann model based on multiple relaxation times is proposed in this paper. A special formula is given between two relaxation time parameters in the model. A rigorous analysis and the numerical experiments carried out show that the numerical boundary slip reduces dramatically by using the present model compared to the single-relaxation-time-based model.

  4. Femtosecond dynamics of fundamental reaction processes in liquids: Proton transfer, geminate recombination, isomerization and vibrational relaxation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, Benjamin Joel [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1992-11-01

    The fast excited state intramolecular proton transfer of 3-hydroxyflavone is measured and effects of external hydrogen-bonding interactions on the proton transfer are studied. The proton transfer takes place in ~240 fsec in nonpolar environments, but becomes faster than instrumental resolution of 110 fsec in methanol solution. The dynamics following photodissociation of CH2I2 and other small molecules provide the first direct observations of geminate recombination. The recombination of many different photodissociating species occurs on a ~350 fsec time scale. Results show that recombination yields but not rates depend on the solvent environment and suggest that recombination kinetics are dominated by a single collision with surrounding solvent cage. Studies of sterically locked phenyl-substituted butadienes offer new insights into the electronic structure and isomerization behavior of conjugated polyenes. Data show no simple correlation between hinderance of specific large amplitude motions and signatures of isomerizative behavior such as viscosity dependent excited state lifetimes, implying that the isomerization does not provide a suitable for simple condensed phase reaction rate theories. The spectral dynamics of a photochromic spiropyran indicate that recombination, isomerization and vibrational relaxation all play important roles in photoreactivity of complex molecules. The interplay of these microscopic phenomena and their effect on macroscopic properties such as photochromism are discussed. All the results indicate that the initial steps of the photochromic reaction process occur extremely rapidly. Laser system and computer codes for data analysis are discussed.

  5. Time scales of relaxation dynamics during transient conditions in two-phase flow: RELAXATION DYNAMICS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlüter, Steffen [School of Chemical, Biological and Environmental Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis Oregon USA; Department Soil Physics, Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research-UFZ, Halle Germany; Berg, Steffen [Shell Global Solutions International B.V., Rijswijk Netherlands; Li, Tianyi [School of Chemical, Biological and Environmental Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis Oregon USA; Vogel, Hans-Jörg [Department Soil Physics, Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research-UFZ, Halle Germany; Institut für Agrar- und Ernährungswissenschaften, Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg, Halle Germany; Wildenschild, Dorthe [School of Chemical, Biological and Environmental Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis Oregon USA

    2017-06-01

    The relaxation dynamics toward a hydrostatic equilibrium after a change in phase saturation in porous media is governed by fluid reconfiguration at the pore scale. Little is known whether a hydrostatic equilibrium in which all interfaces come to rest is ever reached and which microscopic processes govern the time scales of relaxation. Here we apply fast synchrotron-based X-ray tomography (X-ray CT) to measure the slow relaxation dynamics of fluid interfaces in a glass bead pack after fast drainage of the sample. The relaxation of interfaces triggers internal redistribution of fluids, reduces the surface energy stored in the fluid interfaces, and relaxes the contact angle toward the equilibrium value while the fluid topology remains unchanged. The equilibration of capillary pressures occurs in two stages: (i) a quick relaxation within seconds in which most of the pressure drop that built up during drainage is dissipated, a process that is to fast to be captured with fast X-ray CT, and (ii) a slow relaxation with characteristic time scales of 1–4 h which manifests itself as a spontaneous imbibition process that is well described by the Washburn equation for capillary rise in porous media. The slow relaxation implies that a hydrostatic equilibrium is hardly ever attained in practice when conducting two-phase experiments in which a flux boundary condition is changed from flow to no-flow. Implications for experiments with pressure boundary conditions are discussed.

  6. DSMC study of oxygen shockwaves based on high-fidelity vibrational relaxation and dissociation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges Sebastião, Israel; Kulakhmetov, Marat; Alexeenko, Alina

    2017-01-01

    This work evaluates high-fidelity vibrational-translational (VT) energy relaxation and dissociation models for pure O2 normal shockwave simulations with the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method. The O2-O collisions are described using ab initio state-specific relaxation and dissociation models. The Macheret-Fridman (MF) dissociation model is adapted to the DSMC framework by modifying the standard implementation of the total collision energy (TCE) model. The O2-O2 dissociation is modeled with this TCE+MF approach, which is calibrated with O2-O ab initio data and experimental equilibrium dissociation rates. The O2-O2 vibrational relaxation is modeled via the Larsen-Borgnakke model, calibrated to experimental VT rates. All the present results are compared to experimental data and previous calculations available in the literature. It is found that, in general, the ab initio dissociation model is better than the TCE model at matching the shock experiments. Therefore, when available, efficient ab initio models are preferred over phenomenological models. We also show that the proposed TCE + MF formulation can be used to improve the standard TCE model results when ab initio data are not available or limited.

  7. A Monte Carlo calculation of subexcitation and vibrationally-relaxing electron spectra in irradiated liquid water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cobut, V.; Frongillo, Y.; Jay-Gerin, J.-P. (Sherbrooke Univ., PQ (Canada). Faculte de Medecine); Patau, J.-P. (Toulouse-3 Univ., 31 (France))

    1992-12-01

    An energy spectrum of ''subexcitation electrons'' produced in liquid water by electrons with initial energies of a few keV is obtained by using a Monte Carlo transport simulation calculation. It is found that the introduction of vibrational-excitation cross sections leads to the appearance of a sharp peak in the probability density function near the electronic-excitation threshold. Electrons contributing to this peak are shown to be more naturally described if a novel energy spectrum, that we propose to name ''vibrationally-relaxing electron'' spectrum, is introduced. The corresponding distribution function is presented, and an empirical expression of it is given. (author).

  8. Comparison of Vibrational Relaxation Modeling for Strongly Non-Equilibrium Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    3 where SVT is a steric factor, ! is the oscillator frequency, m̃ is the collision reduced mass, µ is the oscillator reduced mass, is the oscillator...f !"i+fCOL exp ("COL) nX r=0 (1)r r! (i r)! (f r)! 1 "rCOL 2 (2) "COL = SVT 4⇡3! m̃ 2/µ ↵2h sinh2 ⇣⇡! ↵v̄ ⌘ (3) For diatom...factors, SVT and SVV, and the parameter ↵ determine the rate of vibrational relaxation, while the inherent form of the transition probability

  9. Molecular dynamics simulations and instantaneous normal-mode analysis of the vibrational relaxation of the C-H stretching modes of N-methylacetamide-d in liquid deuterated water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastida, Adolfo; Soler, Miguel A; Zúñiga, José; Requena, Alberto; Kalstein, Adrián; Fernández-Alberti, Sebastian

    2010-11-04

    Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and instantaneous normal mode (INMs) analyses are used to study the vibrational relaxation of the C-H stretching modes (ν(s)(CH₃)) of deuterated N-methylacetamide (NMAD) in aqueous (D2O) solution. The INMs are identified unequivocally in terms of the equilibrium normal modes (ENMs), or groups of them, using a restricted version of the recently proposed Min-Cost assignment method. After excitation of the parent ν(s)(CH₃) modes with one vibrational quantum, the vibrational energy is shown to dissipate through both intramolecular vibrational redistribution (IVR) and intermolecular vibrational energy transfer (VET). The decay of the vibrational energy of the ν(s)(CH₃) modes is well fitted to a triple exponential function, with each characterizing a well-defined stage of the entire relaxation process. The first, and major, relaxation stage corresponds to a coherent ultrashort (τ(rel) = 0.07 ps) energy transfer from the parent ν(s)(CH₃) modes to the methyl bending modes δ(CH₃), so that the initially excited state rapidly evolves into a mixed stretch-bend state. In the second stage, characterized by a time of 0.92 ps, the vibrational energy flows through IVR to a number of mid-range-energy vibrations of the solute. In the third stage, the vibrational energy accumulated in the excited modes dissipates into the bath through an indirect VET process mediated by lower-energy modes, on a time scale of 10.6 ps. All the specific relaxation channels participating in the whole relaxation process are properly identified. The results from the simulations are finally compared with the recent experimental measurements of the ν(s)(CH₃) vibrational energy relaxation in NMAD/D₂O(l) reported by Dlott et al. (J. Phys. Chem. A 2009, 113, 75.) using ultrafast infrared-Raman spectroscopy.

  10. Analysis of real-time vibration data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safak, E.

    2005-01-01

    In recent years, a few structures have been instrumented to provide continuous vibration data in real time, recording not only large-amplitude motions generated by extreme loads, but also small-amplitude motions generated by ambient loads. The main objective in continuous recording is to track any changes in structural characteristics, and to detect damage after an extreme event, such as an earthquake or explosion. The Fourier-based spectral analysis methods have been the primary tool to analyze vibration data from structures. In general, such methods do not work well for real-time data, because real-time data are mainly composed of ambient vibrations with very low amplitudes and signal-to-noise ratios. The long duration, linearity, and the stationarity of ambient data, however, allow us to utilize statistical signal processing tools, which can compensate for the adverse effects of low amplitudes and high noise. The analysis of real-time data requires tools and techniques that can be applied in real-time; i.e., data are processed and analyzed while being acquired. This paper presents some of the basic tools and techniques for processing and analyzing real-time vibration data. The topics discussed include utilization of running time windows, tracking mean and mean-square values, filtering, system identification, and damage detection.

  11. Evidence for cooperative vibrational relaxation of the NH-, OH-, and OD-stretching modes in hydrogen-bonded liquids using infrared pump-probe spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, D J; Panman, M R; Woutersen, S

    2009-11-27

    Vibrational energy relaxation of the NH-, OH-, and OD-stretching modes in hydrogen-bonded liquids has been investigated by means of infrared pump-probe spectroscopy. The relaxation rates have been determined both in neat liquids and in isotopic mixtures with systematically varied isotope fractions. In all liquids, the vibrational relaxation rate increases as the isotope fraction is increased and reaches a maximum in the neat liquid. The dependence of the relaxation rate on the isotope fraction suggests a relaxation channel in which the vibrational energy is partitioned between accepting modes of two neighboring molecules.

  12. Multiple-Relaxation-Time Lattice Boltzmann Models in 3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    dHumieres, Dominique; Ginzburg, Irina; Krafczyk, Manfred; Lallemand, Pierre; Luo, Li-Shi; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This article provides a concise exposition of the multiple-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann equation, with examples of fifteen-velocity and nineteen-velocity models in three dimensions. Simulation of a diagonally lid-driven cavity flow in three dimensions at Re=500 and 2000 is performed. The results clearly demonstrate the superior numerical stability of the multiple-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann equation over the popular lattice Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook equation.

  13. Immersed Boundary-Lattice Boltzmann Method Using Two Relaxation Times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosuke Hayashi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available An immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method (IB-LBM using a two-relaxation time model (TRT is proposed. The collision operator in the lattice Boltzmann equation is modeled using two relaxation times. One of them is used to set the fluid viscosity and the other is for numerical stability and accuracy. A direct-forcing method is utilized for treatment of immersed boundary. A multi-direct forcing method is also implemented to precisely satisfy the boundary conditions at the immersed boundary. Circular Couette flows between a stationary cylinder and a rotating cylinder are simulated for validation of the proposed method. The method is also validated through simulations of circular and spherical falling particles. Effects of the functional forms of the direct-forcing term and the smoothed-delta function, which interpolates the fluid velocity to the immersed boundary and distributes the forcing term to fixed Eulerian grid points, are also examined. As a result, the following conclusions are obtained: (1 the proposed method does not cause non-physical velocity distribution in circular Couette flows even at high relaxation times, whereas the single-relaxation time (SRT model causes a large non-physical velocity distortion at a high relaxation time, (2 the multi-direct forcing reduces the errors in the velocity profile of a circular Couette flow at a high relaxation time, (3 the two-point delta function is better than the four-point delta function at low relaxation times, but worse at high relaxation times, (4 the functional form of the direct-forcing term does not affect predictions, and (5 circular and spherical particles falling in liquids are well predicted by using the proposed method both for two-dimensional and three-dimensional cases.

  14. Approach to equilibrium of a quantum system and generalization of the Montroll-Shuler equation for vibrational relaxation of a molecular oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenkre, V. M.; Chase, M.

    2017-08-01

    The approach to equilibrium of a quantum mechanical system in interaction with a bath is studied from a practical as well as a conceptual point of view. Explicit memory functions are derived for given models of bath couplings. If the system is a harmonic oscillator representing a molecule in interaction with a reservoir, the generalized master equation derived becomes an extension into the coherent domain of the well-known Montroll-Shuler equation for vibrational relaxation and unimolecular dissociation. A generalization of the Bethe-Teller result regarding energy relaxation is found for short times. The theory has obvious applications to relaxation dynamics at ultra-short times as in observations on the femtosecond time scale and to the investigation of quantum coherence at those short times. While vibrational relaxation in chemical physics is a primary target of the study, another system of interest in condensed matter physics, an electron or hole in a lattice subjected to a strong DC electric field that gives rise to well-known Wannier-Stark ladders, is naturally addressed with the theory. Specific system-bath interactions are explored to obtain explicit details of the dynamics. General phenomenological descriptions of the reservoir are considered rather than specific microscopic realizations.

  15. New insights for mesospheric OH: multi-quantum vibrational relaxation as a driver for non-local thermodynamic equilibrium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. S. Kalogerakis

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The question of whether mesospheric OH(v rotational population distributions are in equilibrium with the local kinetic temperature has been debated over several decades. Despite several indications for the existence of non-equilibrium effects, the general consensus has been that emissions originating from low rotational levels are thermalized. Sky spectra simultaneously observing several vibrational levels demonstrated reproducible trends in the extracted OH(v rotational temperatures as a function of vibrational excitation. Laboratory experiments provided information on rotational energy transfer and direct evidence for fast multi-quantum OH(high-v vibrational relaxation by O atoms. We examine the relationship of the new relaxation pathways with the behavior exhibited by OH(v rotational population distributions. Rapid OH(high-v + O multi-quantum vibrational relaxation connects high and low vibrational levels and enhances the hot tail of the OH(low-v rotational distributions. The effective rotational temperatures of mesospheric OH(v are found to deviate from local thermodynamic equilibrium for all observed vibrational levels. Dedicated to Tom G. Slanger in celebration of his 5 decades of research in aeronomy.

  16. Ice sheet growth with laterally varying bedrock relaxation time

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Wal, Wouter; Vizcaino Rubio, Pablo; De Boer, Bas; van de Wal, Roderik

    2017-04-01

    Isostatic response of the bedrock, or glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) in included in most ice sheet models. This is important because the surface elevation determines the mass balance and thereby implicitly also the strength of the mass balance feedback where higher surface elevation yields lower temperatures implying less melt and vice versa. Usually a single relaxation time or a set of relaxation times is used to model the response everywhere on Earth or at least for an entire ice sheet. In reality the viscosity in the Earth's mantle, and hence the relaxation time experienced by the ice, varies with location. Seismic studies indicate that several regions that were covered by ice during the last glacial cycle are underlain by mantle in which viscosity varies with orders of magnitude, such as Antarctica and North America. The question is whether such a variation of viscosity influences ice evolution. Several GIA models exist that can deal with 3D viscosity, but their large computation times make it nearly impossible to couple them to ice sheet models. Here we use the ANICE ice-sheet model (de Boer et al. 2013) with a simple bedrock-relaxation model in which a different relaxation time is used for separate regions. A temperature anomaly is applied to grow a schematic ice sheet on a flat earth, with other forcing mechanisms neglected. It is shown that in locations with a fast relaxation time of 300 years the equilibrium ice sheet is significantly thinner and narrower but also ice thickness in neighbouring regions (with the more standard relaxation time of 3000 years) is affected.

  17. Parameterization of NMR relaxation curves in terms of logarithmic moments of the relaxation time distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Oleg V.; Stapf, Siegfried

    2017-06-01

    This work addresses the problem of a compact and easily comparable representation of multi-exponential relaxation data. It is often convenient to describe such data in a few parameters, all being of physical significance and easy to interpret, and in such a way that enables a model-free comparison between different groups of samples. Logarithmic moments (LMs) of the relaxation time constitute a set of parameters which are related to the characteristic relaxation time on the log-scale, the width and the asymmetry of an underlying distribution of exponentials. On the other hand, the calculation of LMs does not require knowing the actual distribution function and is reduced to a numerical integration of original data. The performance of this method has been tested on both synthetic and experimental NMR relaxation data which differ in a signal-to-noise ratio, the sampling range and the sampling rate. The calculation of two lower-order LMs, the log-mean time and the log-variance, has proved robust against deficiencies of the experiment such as scattered data point and incomplete sampling. One may consider using them as such to monitor formation of a heterogeneous structure, e.g., in phase separation, vitrification, polymerization, hydration, aging, contrast agent propagation processes. It may also assist in interpreting frequency and temperature dependences of relaxation, revealing a crossover from slow to fast exchange between populations. The third LM was found to be a less reliable quantity due to its susceptibility to the noise and must be used with caution.

  18. Experimental study on relaxation time in direction changing movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chi; Song, Weiguo; Fu, Libi; Lian, Liping; Lo, Siuming

    2017-02-01

    Controlled experiments were conducted to clarify the movement characteristics of pedestrians in direction changing processes. We track pedestrians' trajectories and map them into real space coordinates by the direct linear transformation method. In the acceleration process, the relaxation time and free moving speed in our experiments respectively equal 0.659 s and 1.540 m/s, which are consistent with those for Chinese participants in other experiments. Meanwhile, the values of relaxation time in the direction changing process are calculated by a derived equation from the concept of the social force model. It is observed that the relaxation time is not an invariable parameter, and tends to increase with an increase in the angular difference. Furthermore, results show that pedestrians are insensitive to a tiny angular difference between instantaneous velocity and desired velocity. These experimental results presented in this work can be applied in model development and validation.

  19. Relaxation Characteristics of 828 DGEBA Epoxy Over Long Time Periods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoo, Jasmine; Reprogle, Riley C.; Wisler, Brian; Arechederra, Gabriel K.; McCoy, John D.; Kropka, Jamie M.; Long, Kevin N.

    The mechanical relaxation response in uniaxial compression of a diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A epoxy was studied over long time periods. The epoxy, 828DEA, was Epon 828 cured with diethanolamine (DEA). A sample was compressed at constant strain rate and held at various strain levels for days to allow the sample to relax. The sample was then compressed further and held once more. The relaxation curves were fit with a stretched exponential function. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  20. Stochastic resonance whole body vibration increases perceived muscle relaxation but not cardiovascular activation: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfering, Achim; Burger, Christian; Schade, Volker; Radlinger, Lorenz

    2016-11-18

    To investigate the acute effects of stochastic resonance whole body vibration (SR-WBV), including muscle relaxation and cardiovascular activation. Sixty-four healthy students participated. The participants were randomly assigned to sham SR-WBV training at a low intensity (1.5 Hz) or a verum SR-WBV training at a higher intensity (5 Hz). Systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), heart rate (HR) and self-reported muscle relaxation were assessed before and immediately after SR-WBV. Two factorial analyses of variance (ANOVA) showed a significant interaction between pre- vs post-SR-WBV measurements and SR-WBV conditions for muscle relaxation in the neck and back [F(1,55) = 3.35, P = 0.048, η2 = 0.07]. Muscle relaxation in the neck and back increased in verum SR-WBV, but not in sham SR-WBV. No significant changes between pre- and post-training levels of SBD, DBD and HR were observed either in sham or verum SR-WBV conditions. With verum SR-WBV, improved muscle relaxation was the most significant in participants who reported the experience of back, neck or shoulder pain more than once a month (P < 0.05). A single session of SR-WBV increased muscle relaxation in young healthy individuals, while cardiovascular load was low. An increase in musculoskeletal relaxation in the neck and back is a potential mediator of pain reduction in preventive worksite SR-WBV trials.

  1. Optimal vibration stimulation to the neck extensor muscles using hydraulic vibrators to shorten saccadic reaction time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Katsuo; Kunita, Kenji; Furune, Naoe; Maeda, Kaoru; Asai, Hitoshi; Tomita, Hidehito

    2006-09-01

    Optimal vibration stimulation to the neck extensor muscles using hydraulic vibrators to shorten the saccadic reaction time was examined. Subjects were 14 healthy young adults. Visual targets (LEDs) were located 10 degrees left and right of a central point. The targets were alternately lit for random durations of 2-4 seconds in a resting neck condition and various vibration conditions, and saccadic reaction times were measured. Vibration amplitude was 0.5 mm in every condition. The upper trapezius muscles were vibrated at 40, 60, 80, and 100 Hz in a sub-maximum stretch condition in which the muscles were stretched at 70% of maximum stretch. In addition, the muscles were vibrated at 60 Hz with the muscles maximally stretched, with 70% vertical pressure without stretching, and with vibration applied to the skin in the same area as the muscle vibration. At 60, 80, and 100 Hz at 70% maximum stretch, saccadic reaction time shortened significantly compared with the resting neck condition. However, no significant difference in the reaction time was observed among the frequencies. The saccadic reaction times in the maximum stretch condition, muscle pressure condition, and skin contact condition did not differ significantly from that in the resting neck condition. Vibration stimulation to the trapezius with 60-100 Hz frequencies at 0.5 mm amplitude in the sub-maximum stretch condition was effective for shortening saccadic reaction time. The main mechanism appears to be Ia information originating from the muscle spindle.

  2. Femtosecond dynamics of fundamental reaction processes in liquids: Proton transfer, geminate recombination, isomerization and vibrational relaxation. [Spiropyrans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, B.J.

    1992-11-01

    The fast excited state intramolecular proton transfer of 3-hydroxyflavone is measured and effects of external hydrogen-bonding interactions on the proton transfer are studied. The proton transfer takes place in [approximately]240 fsec in nonpolar environments, but becomes faster than instrumental resolution of 110 fsec in methanol solution. The dynamics following photodissociation of CH[sub 2]I[sub 2] and other small molecules provide the first direct observations of geminate recombination. The recombination of many different photodissociating species occurs on a [approximately]350 fsec time scale. Results show that recombination yields but not rates depend on the solvent environment and suggest that recombination kinetics are dominated by a single collision with surrounding solvent cage. Studies of sterically locked phenyl-substituted butadienes offer new insights into the electronic structure and isomerization behavior of conjugated polyenes. Data show no simple correlation between hinderance of specific large amplitude motions and signatures of isomerizative behavior such as viscosity dependent excited state lifetimes, implying that the isomerization does not provide a suitable for simple condensed phase reaction rate theories. The spectral dynamics of a photochromic spiropyran indicate that recombination, isomerization and vibrational relaxation all play important roles in photoreactivity of complex molecules. The interplay of these microscopic phenomena and their effect on macroscopic properties such as photochromism are discussed. All the results indicate that the initial steps of the photochromic reaction process occur extremely rapidly. Laser system and computer codes for data analysis are discussed.

  3. Krylov-subspace acceleration of time periodic waveform relaxation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumsdaine, A. [Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States)

    1994-12-31

    In this paper the author uses Krylov-subspace techniques to accelerate the convergence of waveform relaxation applied to solving systems of first order time periodic ordinary differential equations. He considers the problem in the frequency domain and presents frequency dependent waveform GMRES (FDWGMRES), a member of a new class of frequency dependent Krylov-subspace techniques. FDWGMRES exhibits many desirable properties, including finite termination independent of the number of timesteps and, for certain problems, a convergence rate which is bounded from above by the convergence rate of GMRES applied to the static matrix problem corresponding to the linear time-invariant ODE.

  4. Viscous hydrodynamics relaxation time from AdS/CFT correspondence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Michał P.; Janik, Romuald A.

    2007-07-01

    We consider an expanding boost-invariant plasma at strong coupling using the AdS/CFT correspondence for N=4 super Yang-Mills theory. We determine the relaxation time in second order viscous hydrodynamics and find that it is around 30 times shorter than weak coupling expectations. We find that the nonsingularity of the dual geometry in the string frame necessitates turning on the dilaton which leads to a nonvanishing expectation value for trF2 behaving like τ-10/3.

  5. Diffusion MRI/NMR magnetization equations with relaxation times

    Science.gov (United States)

    de, Dilip; Daniel, Simon

    2012-10-01

    Bloch-Torrey diffusion magnetization equation ignores relaxation effects of magnetization. Relaxation times are important in any diffusion magnetization studies of perfusion in tissues(Brain and heart specially). Bloch-Torrey equation cannot therefore describe diffusion magnetization in a real-life situation where relaxation effects play a key role, characteristics of tissues under examination. This paper describes derivations of two equations for each of the y and z component diffusion NMR/MRI magnetization (separately) in a rotating frame of reference, where rf B1 field is applied along x direction and bias magnetic field(Bo) is along z direction. The two equations are expected to further advance the science & technology of Diffusion MRI(DMRI) and diffusion functional MRI(DFMRI). These two techniques are becoming increasingly important in the study and treatment of neurological disorders, especially for the management of patients with acute stroke. It is rapidly becoming a standard for white matter disorders, as diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) can reveal abnormalities in white matter fibre structure and provide models of brain connectivity.

  6. Clustered continuous-time random walks: diffusion and relaxation consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weron, Karina; Stanislavsky, Aleksander; Jurlewicz, Agnieszka; Meerschaert, Mark M; Scheffler, Hans-Peter

    2012-06-08

    We present a class of continuous-time random walks (CTRWs), in which random jumps are separated by random waiting times. The novel feature of these CTRWs is that the jumps are clustered. This introduces a coupled effect, with longer waiting times separating larger jump clusters. We show that the CTRW scaling limits are time-changed processes. Their densities solve two different fractional diffusion equations, depending on whether the waiting time is coupled to the preceding jump, or the following one. These fractional diffusion equations can be used to model all types of experimentally observed two power-law relaxation patterns. The parameters of the scaling limit process determine the power-law exponents and loss peak frequencies.

  7. Critical Slowing Down of Relaxation Time in VCSEL's Polarization Switching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yueh-Chen; Kuo, Wang-Chuang; Wu, Yu-Heng; Yen, Tsu-Chiang

    2013-03-01

    This study investigates the polarization switching (PS) of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) approaching to criticality. The dynamical bifurcation of VCSEL's PS (VPS) which was researched in earlier investigations essentially differs from the static cases typically presented in thermodynamics. Therefore, a VCSEL is driven by quasi-increasing step current and quasi-decreasing step current instead of alternating current in this study. The results show a critical slowing down nearing PS, a power law and scaling law of the relaxation time which are the characteristics of second order phase transition. This investigation has potential for connecting the phase transition characteristics of VPS and quantum phase transitions (QPTs).

  8. Effective rotational correlation times of proteins from NMR relaxation interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Donghan; Hilty, Christian; Wider, Gerhard; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2006-01-01

    Knowledge of the effective rotational correlation times, τc, for the modulation of anisotropic spin-spin interactions in macromolecules subject to Brownian motion in solution is of key interest for the practice of NMR spectroscopy in structural biology. The value of τc enables an estimate of the NMR spin relaxation rates, and indicates possible aggregation of the macromolecular species. This paper reports a novel NMR pulse scheme, [ 15N, 1H]-TRACT, which is based on transverse relaxation-optimized spectroscopy and permits to determine τc for 15N- 1H bonds without interference from dipole-dipole coupling of the amide proton with remote protons. [ 15N, 1H]-TRACT is highly efficient since only a series of one-dimensional NMR spectra need to be recorded. Its use is suggested for a quick estimate of the rotational correlation time, to monitor sample quality and to determine optimal parameters for complex multidimensional NMR experiments. Practical applications are illustrated with the 110 kDa 7,8-dihydroneopterin aldolase from Staphylococcus aureus, the uniformly 15N-labeled Escherichia coli outer membrane protein X (OmpX) in 60 kDa mixed OmpX/DHPC micelles with approximately 90 molecules of unlabeled 1,2-dihexanoyl- sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DHPC), and the 16 kDa pheromone-binding protein from Bombyx mori, which cover a wide range of correlation times.

  9. Time course of corticospinal excitability and intracortical inhibition just before muscle relaxation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomotaka eSuzuki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS, we investigated how short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI was involved with transient motor cortex excitability changes observed just before the transition from muscle contraction to muscle relaxation. Ten healthy participants performed a simultaneous relaxation task of the ipsilateral finger and foot, relaxing from 10% of their maximal voluntary contraction force after the go signal. In the simple reaction time paradigm, single or paired TMS pulses were randomly delivered after the go signal, and motor evoked potentials were recorded from the right first dorsal interosseous muscle. We analyzed the time course prior to the estimated relaxation reaction time, defined here as the onset of voluntary relaxation. SICI decreased in the 80–100 ms before relaxation reaction time, and motor evoked potentials were significantly greater in amplitude in the 60–80 ms period before relaxation reaction time than in the other intervals in single-pulse trials. TMS pulses did not effectively increase relaxation reaction time. These results show that cortical excitability in the early stage, before muscle relaxation, plays an important role in muscle relaxation control. SICI circuits may vary between decreased and increased activation to continuously maintain muscle relaxation during or after a relaxation response. With regard to motor cortex excitability dynamics, we suggest that SICI also dynamically changes throughout the muscle relaxation process.

  10. Theory of the short time mechanical relaxation in articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruberti, J W; Sokoloff, J B

    2011-10-01

    Articular cartilage is comprised of macromolecules, proteoglycans, with (charged) chondroitin sulfate side-chains attached to them. The proteoglycans are attached to longer hyaluronic acid chains, trapped within a network of type II collagen fibrils. As a consequence of their relatively long persistence lengths, the number of persistence lengths along the chondroitin sulfate and proteoglycan chains is relatively small, and consequently, the retraction times for these side chains are also quite short. We argue that, as a consequence of this, they will not significantly inhibit the reptation of the hyaluronic acid chains. Scaling arguments applied to this model allow us to show that the shortest of the mechanical relaxation times of cartilage, that have been determined by Fyhrie and Barone to be due to reptation of the hyaluronic acid polymers, should have a dependence on the load, i.e., force per unit interface area P, carried by the cartilage, proportional to P(3/2).

  11. A method for longitudinal relaxation time measurement in inhomogeneous fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hao; Cai, Shuhui; Chen, Zhong

    2017-08-01

    The spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) plays a crucial role in the study of spin dynamics, signal optimization and data quantification. However, the measurement of chemical shift-specific T1 constants is hampered by the magnetic field inhomogeneity due to poorly shimmed external magnetic fields or intrinsic magnetic susceptibility heterogeneity in samples. In this study, we present a new protocol to determine chemical shift-specific T1 constants in inhomogeneous fields. Based on intermolecular double-quantum coherences, the new method can resolve overlapped peaks in inhomogeneous fields. The measurement results are in consistent with the measurements in homogeneous fields using the conventional method. Since spatial encoding technique is involved, the experimental time for the new method is very close to that for the conventional method. With the aid of T1 knowledge, some concealed information can be exploited by T1 weighting experiments.

  12. Time evolution of vibrational temperatures in a CO2 glow discharge measured with infrared absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klarenaar, B. L. M.; Engeln, R.; van den Bekerom, D. C. M.; van de Sanden, M. C. M.; Morillo-Candas, A. S.; Guaitella, O.

    2017-11-01

    Vibrational temperatures of CO2 are studied in a pulsed glow discharge by means of time-resolved in situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, with a 10 μs temporal resolution. A method to analyze the infrared transmittance through vibrationally excited CO2 is presented and validated on a previously published CO2 spectrum, showing good agreement between fit and data. The discharge under study is pulsed with a typical duty cycle of 5–10 ms on–off, at 50 mA and 6.7 mbar. A rapid increase of the temperature of the asymmetric stretch vibration (T 3) is observed at the start of the pulse, reaching 1050 K, which is an elevation of 550 K above the rotational temperature ({T}{{rot}}) of 500 K. After the plasma pulse, the characteristic relaxation time of T 3 to {T}{{rot}} strongly depends on the rotational temperature. By adjusting the duty cycle, the rotational temperature directly after the discharge is varied from 530 to 860 K, resulting in relaxation times between 0.4 and 0.1 ms. Equivalently, as the gas heats up during the plasma pulse, the elevation of T 3 above {T}{{rot}} decreases strongly.

  13. Metastable States, Relaxation Times and Free-energy Barriers in Finite Dimensional Glassy Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Franz, Silvio

    2005-01-01

    In this note we discuss metastability in a long-but-finite range disordered model for the glass transition. We show that relaxation is dominated by configuration belonging to metastable states and associate an in principle computable free-energy barrier to the equilibrium relaxation time. Adam-Gibbs like relaxation times appear naturally in this approach.

  14. Thymine Dimer Formation probed by Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreier, Wolfgang J.; Schrader, Tobias E.; Roller, Florian O.; Gilch, Peter; Zinth, Wolfgang; Kohler, Bern

    Cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers are the major photoproducts formed when DNA is exposed to UV light. Femtosecond time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy reveals that thymine dimers are formed in thymidine oligonucleotides in an ultrafast photoreaction.

  15. Dependence of Brownian and Néel relaxation times on magnetic field strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deissler, Robert J; Wu, Yong; Martens, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    In magnetic particle imaging (MPI) and magnetic particle spectroscopy (MPS) the relaxation time of the magnetization in response to externally applied magnetic fields is determined by the Brownian and Néel relaxation mechanisms. Here the authors investigate the dependence of the relaxation times on the magnetic field strength and the implications for MPI and MPS. The Fokker-Planck equation with Brownian relaxation and the Fokker-Planck equation with Néel relaxation are solved numerically for a time-varying externally applied magnetic field, including a step-function, a sinusoidally varying, and a linearly ramped magnetic field. For magnetic fields that are applied as a step function, an eigenvalue approach is used to directly calculate both the Brownian and Néel relaxation times for a range of magnetic field strengths. For Néel relaxation, the eigenvalue calculations are compared to Brown's high-barrier approximation formula. The relaxation times due to the Brownian or Néel mechanisms depend on the magnitude of the applied magnetic field. In particular, the Néel relaxation time is sensitive to the magnetic field strength, and varies by many orders of magnitude for nanoparticle properties and magnetic field strengths relevant for MPI and MPS. Therefore, the well-known zero-field relaxation times underestimate the actual relaxation times and, in particular, can underestimate the Néel relaxation time by many orders of magnitude. When only Néel relaxation is present--if the particles are embedded in a solid for instance--the authors found that there can be a strong magnetization response to a sinusoidal driving field, even if the period is much less than the zero-field relaxation time. For a ferrofluid in which both Brownian and Néel relaxation are present, only one relaxation mechanism may dominate depending on the magnetic field strength, the driving frequency (or ramp time), and the phase of the magnetization relative to the applied magnetic field. A simple

  16. Seventh international conference on time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyer, R.B.; Martinez, M.A.D.; Shreve, A.; Woodruff, W.H. [comps.

    1997-04-01

    The International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy (TRVS) is widely recognized as the major international forum for the discussion of advances in this rapidly growing field. The 1995 conference was the seventh in a series that began at Lake Placid, New York, 1982. Santa Fe, New Mexico, was the site of the Seventh International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy, held from June 11 to 16, 1995. TRVS-7 was attended by 157 participants from 16 countries and 85 institutions, and research ranging across the full breadth of the field of time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy was presented. Advances in both experimental capabilities for time-resolved vibrational measurements and in theoretical descriptions of time-resolved vibrational methods continue to occur, and several sessions of the conference were devoted to discussion of these advances and the associated new directions in TRVS. Continuing the interdisciplinary tradition of the TRVS meetings, applications of time-resolved vibrational methods to problems in physics, biology, materials science, and chemistry comprised a large portion of the papers presented at the conference.

  17. Tndon vibration does not alter recovery time following fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, Anita D; Miller, Nick R

    2015-05-01

    Tendon vibration has been shown to enhance muscle activity and to increase muscular endurance times. The impact of vibration on recovery from fatigue, however, is not known. This study aims to determine whether tendon vibration reduces recovery time following fatiguing contractions. Eight sedentary males (22 ± 2.8 yr) performed a fatiguing protocol of ankle dorsiflexor muscles on two separate days, with a minimum of 48 h between visits. Surface EMG was recorded from the tibialis anterior muscle while participants were performing 25 maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs), each lasting 5 s and separated by 2 s. Following the fatiguing protocol, recovery was assessed with 3-s MVC each minute over a 10-min period. Recovery time was defined as the time at which force had returned to 90% of baseline values. At one visit, vibration was applied to the distal tendon of the tibialis anterior muscle between MVCs (throughout recovery). The alternate visit involved a sham condition in which no vibration was applied. MVC force (P = 0.48) and EMG amplitude (P = 0.26) were not significantly different across testing days. Both MVC force (P fatigue protocol. However, there were no significant interaction effects for MVC force (P = 0.82) or EMG amplitude (P = 0.09), indicating similar levels of fatigue across days. With tendon vibration, MVC force recovered within 4.0 ± 2.5 min, which was not different from the sham condition (5.3 ± 1.8 min; P = 0.42). Similarly, EMG recovery time was not different between vibration condition (3.9 ± 3.8 min) and sham condition (4.9 ± 2.5 min) (P = 0.41). These results suggest that activation of excitatory group Ia afferents through tendon vibration does not substantially alter recovery time following fatigue.

  18. Time-varying output performances of piezoelectric vibration energy harvesting under nonstationary random vibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Heonjun; Kim, Miso; Park, Choon-Su; Youn, Byeng D.

    2018-01-01

    Piezoelectric vibration energy harvesting (PVEH) has received much attention as a potential solution that could ultimately realize self-powered wireless sensor networks. Since most ambient vibrations in nature are inherently random and nonstationary, the output performances of PVEH devices also randomly change with time. However, little attention has been paid to investigating the randomly time-varying electroelastic behaviors of PVEH systems both analytically and experimentally. The objective of this study is thus to make a step forward towards a deep understanding of the time-varying performances of PVEH devices under nonstationary random vibrations. Two typical cases of nonstationary random vibration signals are considered: (1) randomly-varying amplitude (amplitude modulation; AM) and (2) randomly-varying amplitude with randomly-varying instantaneous frequency (amplitude and frequency modulation; AM-FM). In both cases, this study pursues well-balanced correlations of analytical predictions and experimental observations to deduce the relationships between the time-varying output performances of the PVEH device and two primary input parameters, such as a central frequency and an external electrical resistance. We introduce three correlation metrics to quantitatively compare analytical prediction and experimental observation, including the normalized root mean square error, the correlation coefficient, and the weighted integrated factor. Analytical predictions are in an excellent agreement with experimental observations both mechanically and electrically. This study provides insightful guidelines for designing PVEH devices to reliably generate electric power under nonstationary random vibrations.

  19. Determination of T1- and T2-relaxation times in the spleen of patients with splenomegaly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, C; Josephsen, P; Karle, H

    1990-01-01

    Twenty-nine patients with known splenomegaly and seven healthy volunteers were examined. The T1 and T2 relaxation times were read out from a region of interest centrally in the spleen. Even though different mean T1 and T2 relaxation times were found between the groups, the great scatter and the c......Twenty-nine patients with known splenomegaly and seven healthy volunteers were examined. The T1 and T2 relaxation times were read out from a region of interest centrally in the spleen. Even though different mean T1 and T2 relaxation times were found between the groups, the great scatter...

  20. Time-series analysis of vibrational nuclear wave packet dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thumm, Uwe; Niederhausen, Thomas; Feuerstein, Bernold

    2008-10-01

    We discuss the extent to which measured time-dependent fragment kinetic energy release (KER) spectra and calculated nuclear probability densities can reveal 1) the transition frequencies between stationary vibrational states, 2) the nodal structure of stationary vibrational states, 3) the ground-state adiabatic electronic potential curve of the molecular ion, and 4) the progression of decoherence induced by random interactions with the environment. We illustrate our discussion with numerical simulations for the time-dependent nuclear motion of vibrational wave packets in the D2^+ molecular ion caused by the ionization of its neutral D2 parent molecule with an intense pump laser pulse. Based on a harmonic time-series analysis, we suggest a general scheme for the full reconstruction, up to an overall phase factor, of the initial wave packets based on measured KER spectra, cf., Phys. Rev. A 77, 063401 (2008).

  1. Early Time Spinodal Decomposition in a Relaxational Tricritical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dee, G.; Gunton, J. D.; Kawasaki, K.

    1981-01-01

    We present a Langer, Bar-on, Miller type theory far early stage tricritical spinodal decomposition of a model with relaxational dynamics, based on an adiabatic elimination of the nonconserved order parameter. The structure factor for the conserved variable exhibits an interesting asymmetry with respect to the quench position.

  2. Early Time Spinodal Decomposition in a Relaxational Tricritical Model

    OpenAIRE

    Gregory, DEE; James D., GUNTON; Kyoji, KAWASAKI; Physics Department, Temple University; Physics Department, Kyushu University

    1981-01-01

    We present a Langer, Bar-on, Miller type theory for early stage tricritical spinodal decomposition of a model with relaxational dynamics, based on an adiabatic elimination of the nonconserved order parameter. The structure factor for the conserved variable exhibits an interesting asymmetry with respect to the quench position.

  3. Probing the Nuclear Spin-Lattice Relaxation Time at the Nanoscale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagenaar, J.C.; Den Haan, A. M J; de Voogd, J.M.; Bossoni, L; de Jong, T.A.; de Wit, M.; Bastiaans, K. M.; Thoen, D.J.; Endo, A.; Klapwijk, T.M.; Zaanen, J.; Oosterkamp, TH

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear spin-lattice relaxation times are measured on copper using magnetic-resonance force microscopy performed at temperatures down to 42 mK. The low temperature is verified by comparison with the Korringa relation. Measuring spin-lattice relaxation times locally at very low temperatures opens up

  4. Evaluation of relaxation time measurements by magnetic resonance imaging. A phantom study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, L; Thomsen, C; Henriksen, O

    1987-01-01

    Several circumstances may explain the great variation in reported proton T1 and T2 relaxation times usually seen. This study was designed to evaluate the accuracy of relaxation time measurements by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) operating at 1.5 tesla. Using a phantom of nine boxes with different...

  5. Time-parallel iterative methods for parabolic PDES: Multigrid waveform relaxation and time-parallel multigrid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandewalle, S. [Caltech, Pasadena, CA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Time-stepping methods for parabolic partial differential equations are essentially sequential. This prohibits the use of massively parallel computers unless the problem on each time-level is very large. This observation has led to the development of algorithms that operate on more than one time-level simultaneously; that is to say, on grids extending in space and in time. The so-called parabolic multigrid methods solve the time-dependent parabolic PDE as if it were a stationary PDE discretized on a space-time grid. The author has investigated the use of multigrid waveform relaxation, an algorithm developed by Lubich and Ostermann. The algorithm is based on a multigrid acceleration of waveform relaxation, a highly concurrent technique for solving large systems of ordinary differential equations. Another method of this class is the time-parallel multigrid method. This method was developed by Hackbusch and was recently subject of further study by Horton. It extends the elliptic multigrid idea to the set of equations that is derived by discretizing a parabolic problem in space and in time.

  6. The follow-up of progressive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy using magnetic resonance rotating frame relaxation times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad Arsalan; Laakso, Hanne; Laidinen, Svetlana; Kettunen, Sanna; Heikura, Tommi; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo; Liimatainen, Timo

    2017-12-15

    Magnetic resonance rotating frame relaxation times are an alternative non-contrast agent choice for the diagnosis of chronic myocardial infarct. Fibrosis typically occurs in progressive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Fibrosis has been imaged in myocardial infarcted tissue using rotating frame relaxation times, which provides the possibility to follow up progressive cardiomyopathy without contrast agents. Mild and severe left ventricular hypertrophy were induced in mice by transverse aortic constriction, and the longitudinal rotating frame relaxation times (T1ρ ) and relaxation along the fictitious field (TRAFF2 , TRAFF3 ) were measured at 5, 10, 24, 62 and 89 days after transverse aortic constriction in vivo. Myocardial fibrosis was verified using Masson's trichrome staining. Increases in the relative relaxation time differences of T1ρ , together with TRAFF2 and TRAFF3 , between fibrotic and remote tissues over time were observed. Furthermore, TRAFF2 and TRAFF3 showed higher relaxation times overall in fibrotic tissue than T1ρ . Relaxation time differences were highly correlated with an excess of histologically verified fibrosis. We found that TRAFF2 and TRAFF3 are more sensitive than T1ρ to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy-related tissue changes and can serve as non-invasive diagnostic magnetic resonance imaging markers to follow up the mouse model of progressive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy of a molecular shuttle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panman, Matthijs R; Bodis, Pavol; Shaw, Danny J; Bakker, Bert H; Newton, Arthur C; Kay, Euan R; Leigh, David A; Buma, Wybren Jan; Brouwer, Albert M; Woutersen, Sander

    2012-02-14

    Time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy is used to investigate the inter-component motion of an ultraviolet-triggered two-station molecular shuttle. The operation cycle of this molecular shuttle involves several intermediate species, which are observable in the amide I and amide II regions of the mid-IR spectrum. Using ab initio calculations on specific parts of the rotaxane, and by comparing the transient spectra of the normal rotaxane with that of the N-deuterated version, we can assign the observed vibrational modes of each species occurring during the shuttling cycle in an unambiguous way. The complete time- and frequency-dependent data set is analyzed using singular value decomposition (SVD). Using a kinetic model to describe the time-dependent concentrations of the transient species, we derive the absorption spectra associated with each stage in the operation cycle of the molecular shuttle, including the recombination of the charged species.

  8. The relaxation time of processes in a FitzHugh-Nagumo neural system with time delay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong Ailing; Zeng Chunhua [Faculty of Science, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); Wang Hua, E-mail: zchh2009@126.com [Province Engineering Research Center of Industrial Energy Conservation and New Technology, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming, Yunnan 650093 (China)

    2011-08-01

    In this paper, we study the relaxation time (RT) of the steady-state correlation function in a FitzHugh-Nagumo neural system under the presence of multiplicative and additive white noises and time delay. The noise correlation parameter {lambda} can produce a critical behavior in the RT as functions of the multiplicative noise intensity D, the additive noise intensity Q and the time delay {tau}. That is, the RT decreases as the noise intensities D and Q increase, and increases as the time delay {tau} increases below the critical value of {lambda}. However, above the critical value, the RT first increases, reaches a maximum, and then decreases as D, Q and {tau} increase, i.e. a noise intensity D or Q and a time delay {tau} exist, at which the time scales of the relaxation process are at their largest. In addition, the additive noise intensity Q can also produce a critical behavior in the RT as a function of {lambda}. The noise correlation parameter {lambda} first increases the RT of processes, then decreases it below the critical value of Q. Above the critical value, {lambda} increases it.

  9. Experimental evidence for the role of cross-relaxation in proton nuclear magnetic resonance spin lattice relaxation time measurements in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sykes, B D; Hull, W E; Snyder, G H

    1978-02-01

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spin lattice relaxation time (T1) and spin-spin relaxation time (T2) measurements are presented for a number of proteins with molecular weights spanning the range of 6,500-150,000 daltons. These measurements provide experimental evidence for the role of cross-relaxation in 1H NMR T1 measurements in proteins. The relationship between these measurements and the theory recently presented by Kalk and Berendsen is discussed. The results indicate that cross-relaxation dominates the T1 measurements for the larger proteins, even at relatively low resonance frequencies such as 100 MHz.

  10. Development of rapid methods for relaxation time mapping and motion estimation using magnetic resonance imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Gilani, Syed Irtiza Ali

    2008-01-01

    Recent technological developments in the field of magnetic resonance imaging have resulted in advanced techniques that can reduce the total time to acquire images. For applications such as relaxation time mapping, which enables improved visualisation of in vivo structures, rapid imaging techniques are highly desirable. TAPIR is a Look- Locker-based sequence for high-resolution, multislice T1 relaxation time mapping. Despite the high accuracy and precision of TAPIR, an improveme...

  11. Landauer’s formula with finite-time relaxation: Kramers’ crossover in electronic transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruss, Daniel; Velizhanin, Kirill A.; Zwolak, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Landauer’s formula is the standard theoretical tool to examine ballistic transport in nano- and meso-scale junctions, but it necessitates that any variation of the junction with time must be slow compared to characteristic times of the system, e.g., the relaxation time of local excitations. Transport through structurally dynamic junctions is, however, increasingly of interest for sensing, harnessing fluctuations, and real-time control. Here, we calculate the steady-state current when relaxation of electrons in the reservoirs is present and demonstrate that it gives rise to three regimes of behavior: weak relaxation gives a contact-limited current; strong relaxation localizes electrons, distorting their natural dynamics and reducing the current; and in an intermediate regime the Landauer view of the system only is recovered. We also demonstrate that a simple equation of motion emerges, which is suitable for efficiently simulating time-dependent transport.

  12. Evolvement law of a macroscopic traffic model accounting for density-dependent relaxation time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-Qing; Chu, Xing-Jian; Zhou, Chao-Fan; Jia, Bin; Lin, Sen; Wu, Zi-Han; Zhu, Hua-Bing; Gao, Zi-You

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, a modified macroscopic traffic flow model is presented. The term of the density-dependent relaxation time is introduced here. The relation between the relaxation time and the density in traffic flow is presented quantitatively. Besides, a factor R depicting varied properties of traffic flow in different traffic states is also introduced in the formulation of the model. Furthermore, the evolvement law of traffic flow with distinctly initial density distribution and boundary perturbations is emphasized.

  13. Measurement of the Water Relaxation Time of ɛ-Polylysine Aqueous Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirakashi, Ryo; Amano, Yuki; Yamada, Jun

    2017-05-01

    ɛ-Polylysine is an effective food preservative. In this paper, the β-relaxation time of ɛ-polylysine aqueous solutions, which represents the rotational speed of a single water molecule, was measured by broadband dielectric spectroscopy at various temperatures and concentrations. The broadband dielectric spectrum of each sample containing water ranging from 35 wt% to 75 wt% at temperatures ranging from 0°C to 25°C was measured using a co-axial semirigid cable probe. The measured dielectric spectra of the samples were composed of several Debye relaxation peaks, including a shortest single molecular rotational relaxation time of water, the β-relaxation time, longer than that of pure water. This result represents that ɛ-polylysine suppresses the molecular kinetics of water. It is also found that the β-relaxation time of an ɛ-polylysine solution that contained more than 35 wt% water showed a typical Arrhenius plot in the temperature range from 0°C to 25°C. The activation energy of each sample depends on the water content ratio of the sample. As indicated by its long β-relaxation time, ɛ-polylysine is expected to possess high abilities of suppressing freezing and ice coarsening.

  14. Investigation of microenvironmental factors influencing the longitudinal relaxation times of drugs and other compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dzik-Jurasz, A.S.K.; Leach, M.O.; Rowland, Ian John

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the microenvironmental factors likely to influence the longitudinal relaxation time of MR visible drugs or compounds in vivo at 1.5 T. The relative influence that viscosity, albumin and paramagnetic contrast agent concentrations have on the observed...... longitudinal relaxation times of three 19F MR detectable drugs and compounds have been investigated. Our data show that for 5-fluorouracil, flucloxacillin and tetrafluorosuccinic acid-containing phantoms, the presence of albumin at normal physiological concentrations will have relaxation effects of the same...... order of magnitude as that of a commonly clinically administered contrast agent, gadolinium diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid. The contribution of viscosity is shown, in the examples studied here, to be of minor importance, contributing less than 6.5% to the observed relaxation effects. It is also...

  15. Transient transport in III-nitrides: interplay of momentum and energy relaxation times

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, Cloves G [Nucleo de Pesquisa em Fisica, Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Catolica de Goias, 74605-010, Goiania, Goias (Brazil); Vasconcellos, Aurea R [Instituto de Fisica ' Gleb Wataghin' , Universidade Estadual de Campinas, UNICAMP, 13083-970, Campinas, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Luzzi, Roberto [Instituto de Fisica ' Gleb Wataghin' , Universidade Estadual de Campinas, UNICAMP, 13083-970, Campinas, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Freire, Valder N [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Ceara, Campus do Pici, 60455-760 Fortaleza, Ceara (Brazil)

    2007-08-29

    The ultrafast transient transport in wide-gap polar III-nitride semiconductors in electric fields is considered. A nonlinear and time-dependent (on the evolution of the nonequilibrium-irreversible thermodynamic state of the system) Drude-like law is derived, with the conductivity related to a so-called transport time (or current characteristic time which is related to a memory-dependent momentum relaxation time). From the collision operators, present in the evolution equations for the carriers' energy and momentum, are obtained quantities playing the role of time-dependent energy and momentum relaxation times. The electron drift velocity overshoot at intermediate-intensity fields in GaN, AlN and InN is evidenced, and its onset is explained as a result of the interplay of momentum and energy relaxation times.

  16. Giant deviation of a relaxation time from generalized Newtonian theory in discontinuous shear thickening suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maharjan, Rijan; Brown, Eric

    2017-12-01

    We investigated the transient relaxation of a discontinuous shear thickening (DST) suspension of cornstarch in water. We performed two types of relaxation experiments starting from a steady shear in a parallel-plate rheometer, followed either by stopping the top plate rotation and measuring the transient torque relaxation or by removing the torque on the plate and measuring the transient rotation of the tool. We found that at low effective weight fraction ϕeff<58.8 ±0.4 % , the suspensions exhibited a relaxation behavior consistent with a generalized Newtonian fluid in which the relaxation is determined by the steady-state relationship between shear stress and shear rate. However, for larger weight fraction 58.8 %<ϕeff<61.0 % , near the liquid-solid transition ϕc=61.0 ±0.7 % , we found relaxation behaviors qualitatively and quantitatively different from the generalized Newtonian model. The regime where the relaxation was inconsistent with the generalized Newtonian model was the same where we found positive normal stress during relaxation, and in some cases we found an oscillatory response, suggestive of a solidlike structure consisting of a system-spanning contact network of particles. This regime also corresponds to the same packing fraction range where we consistently found discontinuous shear thickening in rate-controlled, steady-state measurements. The relaxation time in this range scales with the inverse of the critical shear rate at the onset of shear thickening, which may correspond to a contact relaxation time for nearby particles in the structure to flow away from each other. In this range, the relaxation time was the same in both stress- and rate-controlled relaxation experiments, indicating the relaxation time is more intrinsic than an effective viscosity in this range and is needed in addition to the steady-state viscosity function to describe transient flows. The discrepancy between the measured relaxation times and the generalized Newtonian

  17. [MR relaxation time measurements with and without selective fat suppression (SPIR) in endocrine orbitopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauleit, D; Schüller, H; Textor, J; Leutner, C; Keller, E; Sommer, T; Träber, F; Block, W; Boldt, I; Schild, H

    1997-12-01

    To determine the value and utility of relaxation time measurements with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy (G.O.). 20 orbits were studied in control subjects and 58 orbits in patients with G.O. T2 relaxation times of extraocular muscles and retrobulbar fat tissue were calculated. The thickness of the eye muscles was correlated with the calculated T2 times. 18 orbits were measured before and after retro-orbital radiation therapy. Upper limits of determined normal T2 values were 60 ms in extraocular eye muscles and 40 ms in retrobulbar fat tissue. 89% (17/19) of the patients with G.O. had prolonged T2 times in extraocular eye muscles. The retrobulbar fat tissue in 5 of 38 orbits revealed minimal edema with the use of fat saturated sequences. T2 relaxation times decreased significantly (p < 10(-4)) after 10 Gy radiation therapy. No correlation was found between enlargement and T2 relaxation times in extraocular eye muscles (r = 0.44 in patients before radiation therapy). In patients with G.O. the determination of the enlargement of extraocular eye muscles in computed tomography is not a sufficient parameter for an antiinflammatory therapy, since CT cannot visualise eye muscle edema. T2 relaxation time measurements with MR imaging allow differentiation between edematous and fibrotic changes. This is the diagnostic method of choice in patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy.

  18. Long valley relaxation time of free carriers in monolayer WSe2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Tengfei; Yang, Siyuan; Li, Dian; Cui, Xiaodong

    2017-06-01

    Monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) feature a valley degree of freedom, giant spin-orbit coupling, and spin-valley locking. These exotic natures have stimulated efforts of exploring potential applications in conceptual spintronics, valleytronics, and quantum computing. Among all the exotic directions, a long relaxation time of spin and/or valley polarization is critical. The present valley dynamics studies concentrate on the band edge excitons which predominate the optical response due to an enhanced Coulomb interaction in two dimensions. The valley relaxation time of free carriers remains ambiguous. In this Rapid Communication, we use time-resolved Kerr rotation spectroscopy to probe the valley dynamics of excitons and free carriers in monolayer tungsten diselenide. The valley relaxation time of free carriers is found around 2 ns at 70 K, about three orders of magnitude longer than the excitons of about 2 ps, and 15 times larger than that of trions (130 ps). The extended valley relaxation time of free carriers evidences that an exchange interaction dominates the valley relaxation in optical excitations. The pump-probe spectroscopy also reveals an exciton binding energy of 0.60 eV in monolayer WSe2.

  19. Torque and mechanomyogram correlations during muscle relaxation: effects of fatigue and time-course of recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cè, Emiliano; Rampichini, Susanna; Limonta, Eloisa; Esposito, Fabio

    2013-12-01

    To assess the validity and reliability of the mechanomyogram (MMG) as a tool to investigate the fatigue-induced changes in the muscle during relaxation, the torque and MMG signals from the gastrocnemius medialis muscle of 23 participants were recorded during tetanic electrically-elicited contractions before and immediately after fatigue, as well as at min 2 and 7 of recovery. The peak torque (pT), contraction time (CT) and relaxation time (RT), and the acceleration of force development (d2RFD) and relaxation (d2RFR) were calculated. The slope and τ of force relaxation were also determined. MMG peak-to-peak was assessed during contraction (MMG p-p) and relaxation (R-MMG p-p). After fatigue, pT, d2RFD, d2RFR, slope, MMG p-p and R-MMG p-p decreased significantly, while CT, RT and τ increased (P muscle mechanical behavior, and could be therefore considered an effective alternative to the force signal, also during relaxation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Space and time dynamical heterogeneity in glassy relaxation. The role of democratic clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appignanesi, G A; Rodriguez Fris, J A [Fisicoquimica, Departamento de Quimica, Universidad Nacional del Sur, Avenida Alem 1253, 8000 BahIa Blanca (Argentina); Seccion de Fisicoquimica, Instituto de Quimica de la Universidad Nacional del Sur, INQUISUR-UNS-CONICET, Universidad Nacional del Sur, Avenida Alem 1253, 8000 BahIa Blanca (Argentina)], E-mail: appignan@criba.edu.ar

    2009-05-20

    In this work we review recent computational advances in the understanding of the relaxation dynamics of supercooled glass-forming liquids. In such a supercooled regime these systems experience a striking dynamical slowing down which can be rationalized in terms of the picture of dynamical heterogeneities, wherein the dynamics can vary by orders of magnitude from one region of the sample to another and where the sizes and timescales of such slowly relaxing regions are expected to increase considerably as the temperature is decreased. We shall focus on the relaxation events at a microscopic level and describe the finding of the collective motions of particles responsible for the dynamical heterogeneities. In so doing, we shall demonstrate that the dynamics in different regions of the system is not only heterogeneous in space but also in time. In particular, we shall be interested in the events relevant to the long-time structural relaxation or {alpha} relaxation. In this regard, we shall focus on the discovery of cooperatively relaxing units involving the collective motion of relatively compact clusters of particles, called 'democratic clusters' or d-clusters. These events have been shown to trigger transitions between metabasins of the potential energy landscape (collections of similar configurations or structures) and to consist of the main steps in the {alpha} relaxation. Such events emerge in systems quite different in nature such as simple model glass formers and supercooled amorphous water. Additionally, another relevant issue in this context consists in the determination of a link between structure and dynamics. In this context, we describe the relationship between the d-cluster events and the constraints that the local structure poses on the relaxation dynamics, thus revealing their role in reformulating structural constraints. (topical review)

  1. The general time fractional wave equation for a vibrating string

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandev, Trifce [Radiation Safety Directorate, Blv. Partizanski odredi 143, PO Box 22, 1020 Skopje (Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of); Tomovski, Zivorad, E-mail: trifce.sandev@avis.gov.m, E-mail: tomovski@iunona.pmf.ukim.edu.m [Faculty of Natural Sciences and Mathematics, Institute of Mathematics, 1000 Skopje (Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of)

    2010-02-05

    The solution of a general time fractional wave equation for a vibrating string is obtained in terms of the Mittag-Leffler-type functions and complete set of eigenfunctions of the Sturm-Liouville problem. The time fractional derivative used is taken in the Caputo sense, and the method of separation of variables and the Laplace transform method are used to solve the equation. Some results for special cases of the initial and boundary conditions are obtained and it is shown that the corresponding solutions of the integer order equations are special cases of those of time fractional equations. The proposed general equation may be used for modeling different processes in complex or viscoelastic media, disordered materials, etc.

  2. Time and Temperature Dependence of Viscoelastic Stress Relaxation in Gold and Gold Alloy Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mongkolsuttirat, Kittisun

    Radio frequency (RF) switches based on capacitive MicroElectroMechanical System (MEMS) devices have been proposed as replacements for traditional solid-state field effect transistor (FET) devices. However, one of the limitations of the existing capacitive switch designs is long-term reliability. Failure is generally attributed to electrical charging in the capacitor's dielectric layer that creates an attractive electrostatic force between a moving upper capacitor plate (a metal membrane) and the dielectric. This acts as an attractive stiction force between them that may cause the switch to stay permanently in the closed state. The force that is responsible for opening the switch is the elastic restoring force due to stress in the film membrane. If the restoring force decreases over time due to stress relaxation, the tendency for stiction failure behavior will increase. Au films have been shown to exhibit stress relaxation even at room temperature. The stress relaxation observed is a type of viscoelastic behavior that is more significant in thin metal films than in bulk materials. Metal films with a high relaxation resistance would have a lower probability of device failure due to stress relaxation. It has been shown that solid solution and oxide dispersion can strengthen a material without unacceptable decreases in electrical conductivity. In this study, the viscoelastic behavior of Au, AuV solid solution and AuV2O5 dispersion created by DC magnetron sputtering are investigated using the gas pressure bulge testing technique in the temperature range from 20 to 80°C. The effectiveness of the two strengthening approaches is compared with the pure Au in terms of relaxation modulus and 3 hour modulus decay. The time dependent relaxation curves can be fitted very well with a four-term Prony series model. From the temperature dependence of the terms of the series, activation energies have been deduced to identify the possible dominant relaxation mechanism. The measured

  3. Dynamical Performances of a Vibration Absorber for Continuous Structure considering Time-Delay Coupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuting Sun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The nonlinear effect incurred by time delay in vibration control is investigated in this study via a vibration absorber coupled with a continuous beam structure. The stability of the vibration absorber coupled structure system with time-delay coupling is firstly studied, which provides a general guideline for the potential time delay to be introduced to the system. Then it is shown that there is a specific region for the time delay which can bring bifurcation modes to the dynamic response of the coupling system, and the vibration energy at low frequencies can be transferred or absorbed due to the bifurcation mode and the vibration in the corresponding frequency range is thus suppressed. The nonlinear mechanism of this vibration suppression incurred by the coupling time delay is discussed in detail, which provides a novel and alternative approach to the analysis, design, and control of vibration absorbers in engineering practice.

  4. T2 relaxation time mapping of the cartilage cap of osteochondromas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hee Kyung; Horn, Paul; Laor, Tal [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati (United States); Daedzinski, Bernard J. [Dept. of Radiology, Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia (United States); Kim, Dong Hoon [Dept. of Radiology, Pharmacology, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    Our aim was to evaluate the cartilage cap of osteochondromas using T2 maps and to compare these values to those of normal patellar cartilage, from age and gender matched controls. This study was approved by the Institutional Review Board and request for informed consent was waived. Eleven children (ages 5-17 years) with osteochondromas underwent MR imaging, which included T2-weighted fat suppressed and T2 relaxation time mapping (echo time = 9-99/repetition time = 1500 msec) sequences. Lesion origins were femur (n = 5), tibia (n = 3), fibula (n = 2), and scapula (n = 1). Signal intensity of the cartilage cap, thickness, mean T2 relaxation times, and T2 spatial variation (mean T2 relaxation times as a function of distance) were evaluated. Findings were compared to those of patellar cartilage from a group of age and gender matched subjects. The cartilage caps showed a fluid-like high T2 signal, with mean thickness of 4.8 mm. The mean value of mean T2 relaxation times of the osteochondromas was 264.0 ± 80.4 msec (range, 151.0-366.0 msec). Mean T2 relaxation times were significantly longer than the values from patellar cartilage (39.0 msec) (p < 0.0001). These findings were observed with T2 spatial variation plots across the entire distance of the cartilage cap, with the most pronounced difference in the middle section of the cartilage. Longer T2 relaxation times of the cartilage caps of osteochondromas should be considered as normal, and likely to reflect an increased water content, different microstructure and component.

  5. Multigrid waveform relaxation for the time-fractional heat equation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.J. Gaspar Lorenz (Franscisco); C. Rodrigo (Carmen)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractIn this work, we propose an efficient and robust multigrid method for solving the time-fractional heat equation. Due to the nonlocal property of fractional differential operators, numerical methods usually generate systems of equations for which the coefficient matrix is dense.

  6. Theoretical model of the single spin-echo relaxation time for spherical magnetic perturbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz, Felix T; Kampf, Thomas; Heiland, Sabine; Bendszus, Martin; Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter; Ziener, Christian H

    2014-05-01

    Magnetically labeled cells and tissue iron deposits provide qualitative means to detect and monitor cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases with magnetic resonance imaging. However, to quantitatively examine the extent of pathological micromorphological changes, detailed knowledge about microstructural parameters and relaxation times is required. The complex geometrical arrangement of spherical magnetic perturbers is considered in an external magnetic field. They create a magnetic dipole field, whose corresponding spin-echo formation is investigated by analyzing the diffusion process in the dephasing volume. Quantitative predictions of the present analysis are compared with experimental data and empirical models. Single spin-echo relaxation times can be characterized by morphological parameters such as magnetic particle concentration and size as well as tissue diffusion coefficient and local magnetic susceptibility properties. As expected, no formation of a static dephasing plateau is observed in contrast to the gradient-echo relaxation time. Instead, the relaxation rate drops for large particle sizes and exhibits a prominent maximal value at intermediate sizes. These findings agree well with experimental data and previous theoretical results. Obtained results for the single spin-echo relaxation time allow to accurately quantify pathological processes in neurodegenerative disease and migration dynamics of magnetically labeled cells with the help of magnetic resonance imaging. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Spin-relaxation time in the impurity band of wurtzite semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamborenea, Pablo I.; Wellens, Thomas; Weinmann, Dietmar; Jalabert, Rodolfo A.

    2017-09-01

    The spin-relaxation time for electrons in the impurity band of semiconductors with wurtzite crystal structure is determined. The effective Dresselhaus spin-orbit interaction Hamiltonian is taken as the source of the spin relaxation at low temperature and for doping densities corresponding to the metallic side of the metal-insulator transition. The spin-flip hopping matrix elements between impurity states are calculated and used to set up a tight-binding Hamiltonian that incorporates the symmetries of wurtzite semiconductors. The spin-relaxation time is obtained from a semiclassical model of spin diffusion, as well as from a microscopic self-consistent diagrammatic theory of spin and charge diffusion in doped semiconductors. Estimates are provided for particularly important materials. The theoretical spin-relaxation times compare favorably with the corresponding low-temperature measurements in GaN and ZnO. For InN and AlN we predict that tuning of the spin-orbit coupling constant induced by an external potential leads to a potentially dramatic increase of the spin-relaxation time related to the mechanism under study.

  8. Time Resolved Broadband Terahertz Relaxation Dynamics of Electron in Water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Tianwu; Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof; Cooke, David G.

    We investigated the transient response of the solvated electron in water ejected by photodetachment from potassium ferrocyanide using time resolved terahertz spectroscopy (TSTS). Ultrabroadband THz transients are generated and detected by a two-color femtosecond-induced air plasma and air biased...... coherent detection, respectively. We find that the measured frequency dependent conductivity can be well described by a Drude-Smith model, supplemented by a Lorentz model oscillating near 5 THz....

  9. T2 relaxation times are increased in Skeletal muscle of DMD but not BMD patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wokke, Beatrijs H; Van Den Bergen, Janneke C; Hooijmans, Melissa T; Verschuuren, Jan J; Niks, Erik H; Kan, Hermien E

    2016-01-01

    Exon-skipping drugs in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) aim to restore truncated dystrophin expression, which is present in the milder Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD). MRI skeletal muscle T2 relaxation times as a representation of edema/inflammation could be quantitative outcome parameters for such trials. We studied T2 relaxation times, adjusted for muscle fat fraction using Dixon MRI, in lower leg muscles of DMD and BMD patients and healthy controls. T2 relaxation times correlated significantly with fat fractions in patients only (P DMD patients (P DMD but are influenced by fat despite fat suppression. This should be accounted for when using quantitative T2 mapping to investigate edema/inflammation. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Photoacoustic Determination of Non-radiative Relaxation Time of Absorbing Centers in Maize Seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Pacheco, A.; Hernández-Aguilar, C.; Cruz-Orea, A.

    2017-07-01

    Using non-destructive photothermal techniques, it is possible to characterize non-homogenous materials to obtain its optical and thermal properties through photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS). In photoacoustic (PA) phenomena, there are transient states of thermal excitation, when samples absorb the incident light; these states manifest an excitation process that generates the PA signal, being in direct relation with the non-radiative relaxation times with the sample absorbent centers. The objective of this study was to determine the non-radiative relaxation times associated with different absorbent centers of corn seeds ( Zea mays L.), by using PAS. A frequency scan was done at different wavelengths (350 nm, 470 nm and 650 nm) in order to obtain the non-radiative relaxation times with different types of maize seeds.

  11. Only through perturbation can relaxation times be estimated

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditlevsen, Susanne; Lansky, Petr

    2012-01-01

    from finite sample sizes and especially the estimator of the time constant of the system is degraded. Therefore an alternative solution is of paramount importance. We present such a solution based on perturbation of the system, observing trajectories far from equilibrium. The results are illustrated...... on computer experiments based on applications in neuroscience and pharmacokinetics, which show a striking improvement of the quality of estimation. The results are important for judicious designs of experiments to obtain maximal information from each data point, especially when samples are expensive...

  12. On-chip Brownian relaxation measurements of magnetic nanobeads in the time domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østerberg, Frederik Westergaard; Rizzi, Giovanni; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt

    2013-01-01

    the time and frequency domain methods on Brownian relaxation detection of clustering of streptavidin coated magnetic beads in the presence of different concentrations of biotin-conjugated bovine serum albumin and obtain comparable results. In the time domain, a measurement is carried out in less than 30 s...

  13. Option pricing during post-crash relaxation times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dibeh, Ghassan; Harmanani, Haidar M.

    2007-07-01

    This paper presents a model for option pricing in markets that experience financial crashes. The stochastic differential equation (SDE) of stock price dynamics is coupled to a post-crash market index. The resultant SDE is shown to have stock price and time dependent volatility. The partial differential equation (PDE) for call prices is derived using risk-neutral pricing. European call prices are then estimated using Monte Carlo and finite difference methods. Results of the model show that call option prices after the crash are systematically less than those predicted by the Black-Scholes model. This is a result of the effect of non-constant volatility of the model that causes a volatility skew.

  14. Evaluation of relaxation time measurements by magnetic resonance imaging. A phantom study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, L; Thomsen, C; Henriksen, O

    1987-01-01

    Several circumstances may explain the great variation in reported proton T1 and T2 relaxation times usually seen. This study was designed to evaluate the accuracy of relaxation time measurements by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) operating at 1.5 tesla. Using a phantom of nine boxes with different...... concentrations of CuSO4 and correlating the calculated T1 and T2 values with reference values obtained by two spectrometers (corrected to MRI-proton frequency = 64 MHz) we found a maximum deviation of about 10 per cent. Measurements performed on a large water phantom in order to evaluate the homogeneity...

  15. MR pulse sequences for selective relaxation time measurements: a phantom study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, C; Jensen, K E; Jensen, M

    1990-01-01

    The accuracy of relaxation time measurements of spectroscopic inversion recovery and CPMG multi-echo pulse sequences together with ISIS and stimulated echo-pulse methods have been tested on a reference phantom (test object no. 5, of the EEC Concerted Research Project). For the measurements...... a Siemens Magnetom wholebody magnetic resonance scanner operating at 1.5 Tesla was used. For comparison six imaging pulse sequences for relaxation time measurements were tested on the same phantom. The spectroscopic pulse sequences all had an accuracy better than 10% of the reference values....

  16. Nonradiative Relaxation in Real-Time Electronic Dynamics OSCF2: Organolead Triiodide Perovskite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Triet S; Parkhill, John

    2016-09-01

    We apply our recently developed nonequilibrium real-time time-dependent density functional theory (OSCF2) to investigate the transient spectrum and relaxation dynamics of the tetragonal structure of methylammonium lead triiodide perovskite (MAPbI3). We obtain an estimate of the interband relaxation kinetics and identify multiple ultrafast cooling channels for hot electrons and hot holes that largely corroborate the dual valence-dual conduction model. The computed relaxation rates and absorption spectra are in good agreement with the existing experimental data. We present the first ab initio simulations of the perovskite transient absorption (TA) spectrum, substantiating the assignment of induced bleaches and absorptions including a Pauli-bleach signal. This paper validates both OSCF2 as a good qualitative model of electronic dynamics, and the dominant interpretation of the TA spectrum of this material.

  17. Efforts toward developing probes of protein dynamics: vibrational dephasing and relaxation of carbon-deuterium stretching modes in deuterated leucine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Jörg; Gundogdu, Kenan; Cremeens, Matthew E; Bandaria, Jigar N; Hwang, Gil Tae; Thielges, Megan C; Cheatum, Christopher M; Romesberg, Floyd E

    2009-06-11

    The spectral position of C-D stretching absorptions in the so-called "transparent window" of protein absorption (1800-2300 cm(-1)) makes them well suited as probes of protein dynamics with high temporal and structural resolution. We have previously incorporated single deuterated amino acids into proteins to site-selectively follow protein folding and ligand binding by steady-state FT IR spectroscopy. Ultimately, our goal is to use C-D bonds as probes in time-resolved IR spectroscopy to study dynamics and intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution (IVR) in proteins. As a step toward this goal, we now present the first time-resolved experiments characterizing the population and dephasing dynamics of selectively excited C-D bonds in a deuterated amino acid. Three differently deuterated, Boc-protected leucines were selected to systematically alter the number of additional C-D bonds that may mediate IVR out of the initially populated bright C-D stretching mode. Three-pulse photon echo experiments show that the steady-state C-D absorption linewidths are broadened by both homogeneous and inhomogeneous effects, and transient grating experiments reveal that IVR occurs on a subpicosecond time scale and is nonstatistical. The results have important implications for the interpretation of steady-state C-D spectra and demonstrate the potential utility of C-D bonds as probes of dynamics and IVR within a protein.

  18. Estimating mean first passage time of biased random walks with short relaxation time on complex networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuo Qi Lee

    Full Text Available Biased random walk has been studied extensively over the past decade especially in the transport and communication networks communities. The mean first passage time (MFPT of a biased random walk is an important performance indicator in those domains. While the fundamental matrix approach gives precise solution to MFPT, the computation is expensive and the solution lacks interpretability. Other approaches based on the Mean Field Theory relate MFPT to the node degree alone. However, nodes with the same degree may have very different local weight distribution, which may result in vastly different MFPT. We derive an approximate bound to the MFPT of biased random walk with short relaxation time on complex network where the biases are controlled by arbitrarily assigned node weights. We show that the MFPT of a node in this general case is closely related to not only its node degree, but also its local weight distribution. The MFPTs obtained from computer simulations also agree with the new theoretical analysis. Our result enables fast estimation of MFPT, which is useful especially to differentiate between nodes that have very different local node weight distribution even though they share the same node degrees.

  19. Source of non-arrhenius average relaxation time in glass-forming liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyre, Jeppe

    1998-01-01

    A major mystery of glass-forming liquids is the non-Arrhenius temperature-dependence of the average relaxation time. This paper briefly reviews the classical phenomenological models for non-Arrhenius behavior – the free volume model and the entropy model – and critiques against these models. We t...

  20. Local tissue properties of human osteoarthritic cartilage correlate with magnetic resonance T(1) rho relaxation times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Simon Y; Souza, Richard B; Ries, Michael; Hansma, Paul K; Alliston, Tamara; Li, Xiaojuan

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this study is to examine the local relationship between T(1ρ) relaxation times and the mechanical behavior of human osteoarthritic articular cartilage using high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and local in situ microindentation. Seven human tibial plateaus were obtained from patients who underwent total knee arthroplasty due to severe osteoarthritis (OA). Three to six sites were selected from each sample for visual classification using the ICRS Outerbridge scale (a total of 36 sites). Samples were imaged by MR, and the local distribution of T(1ρ) relaxation times were obtained at these selected sites. The elastic and viscoelastic characteristics of the tissue were quantified nondestructively using dynamic microindentation to measure peak dynamic modulus, energy dissipation, and phase angle. Measured Outerbridge scores, MR T(1ρ) relaxation times, and mechanical properties were highly heterogeneous across each cartilage surface. Site-specific measures of T(1ρ) relaxation times correlated significantly with the phase angle (p properties in highly heterogeneous OA cartilage. These findings suggest that MRI T(1ρ) can provide a functional assessment of articular cartilage. Copyright © 2011 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  1. Real-time detection of doorway states in the intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution of the OH/OD stretch vibration of phenol

    OpenAIRE

    Yamada, Yuji; Mikami, Naohiko; Ebata, Takayuki

    2004-01-01

    A picosecond time-resolved IR-UV pump-probe spectroscopic study was carried out for the intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution of the OH/OD stretching vibration of isolated phenol and its isotopomers in supersonic beams. The time evolution due to IVR showed a significant isotope effect; the OH stretch vibration showed a single exponential decay and its lifetime is greatly lengthened upon the deuterium substitution of the CH group. The OD stretch vibration exhibited prominent quantum...

  2. Estimation of T2 relaxation time of breast cancer: Correlation with clinical, imaging and pathological features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Mirinae; Sohn, Yu Mee [Dept. of Radiology, Kyung Hee University Hospital, College of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Jung Kyu; Jahng, Geon Ho; Rhee, Sun Jung; Oh, Jang Hoon; Won, Kyu Yeoun [Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, College of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the T2* relaxation time in breast cancer, and to evaluate the association between the T2* value with clinical-imaging-pathological features of breast cancer. Between January 2011 and July 2013, 107 consecutive women with 107 breast cancers underwent multi-echo T2*-weighted imaging on a 3T clinical magnetic resonance imaging system. The Student's t test and one-way analysis of variance were used to compare the T2* values of cancer for different groups, based on the clinical-imaging-pathological features. In addition, multiple linear regression analysis was performed to find independent predictive factors associated with the T2* values. Of the 107 breast cancers, 92 were invasive and 15 were ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). The mean T2* value of invasive cancers was significantly longer than that of DCIS (p = 0.029). Signal intensity on T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) and histologic grade of invasive breast cancers showed significant correlation with T2* relaxation time in univariate and multivariate analysis. Breast cancer groups with higher signal intensity on T2WI showed longer T2* relaxation time (p = 0.005). Cancer groups with higher histologic grade showed longer T2* relaxation time (p = 0.017). The T2* value is significantly longer in invasive cancer than in DCIS. In invasive cancers, T2* relaxation time is significantly longer in higher histologic grades and high signal intensity on T2WI. Based on these preliminary data, quantitative T2* mapping has the potential to be useful in the characterization of breast cancer.

  3. Optically-detected spin-echo method for relaxation times measurements in a Rb atomic vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharavipour, M.; Affolderbach, C.; Gruet, F.; Radojičić, I. S.; Krmpot, A. J.; Jelenković, B. M.; Mileti, G.

    2017-06-01

    We introduce and demonstrate an experimental method, optically-detected spin-echo (ODSE), to measure ground-state relaxation times of a rubidium (Rb) atomic vapor held in a glass cell with buffer-gas. The work is motivated by our studies on high-performance Rb atomic clocks, where both population and coherence relaxation times (T 1 and T 2, respectively) of the ‘clock transition’ (52S1/2 | {F}g = 1,{m}F=0> ≤ftrightarrow | {F}g=2,{m}F=0> ) are relevant. Our ODSE method is inspired by classical nuclear magnetic resonance spin-echo method, combined with optical detection. In contrast to other existing methods, like continuous-wave double-resonance (CW-DR) and Ramsey-DR, principles of the ODSE method allow suppression of decoherence arising from the inhomogeneity of the static magnetic field across the vapor cell, thus enabling measurements of intrinsic relaxation rates, as properties of the cell alone. Our experimental result for the coherence relaxation time, specific for the clock transition, measured with the ODSE method is in good agreement with the theoretical prediction, and the ODSE results are validated by comparison to those obtained with Franzen, CW-DR and Ramsey-DR methods. The method is of interest for a wide variety of quantum optics experiments with optical signal readout.

  4. Relaxation times of the two-phonon processes with spin-flip and spin-conserving in quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zi-Wu, E-mail: zwwang@semi.ac.cn [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Low Dimensional Materials Physics and Preparing Technology, Department of Physics, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Liu, Lei [Suzhou Institute of Nano-Tech and Nano-Bionics, CAS, Suzhou 215125 (China); Li, Shu-Shen [Institute of Semiconductor, CAS, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2014-04-07

    We perform a theoretical investigation on the two-phonon processes of the spin-flip and spin-conserving relaxation in quantum dots in the frame of the Huang-Rhys' lattice relaxation model. We find that the relaxation time of the spin-flip is two orders of magnitude longer than that of the spin-conserving, which is in agreement with previous experimental measurements. Moreover, the opposite variational trends of the relaxation time as a function of the energy separation for two-phonon processes are obtained in different temperature regime. The relaxation times display the oscillatory behaviors at the demarcation point with increasing magnetic field, where the energy separation matches the optical phonon energy and results in the optical phonon resonance. These results are useful in understanding the intraband levels' relaxation in quantum dots and could be helpful in designing photoelectric and spin-memory devices.

  5. Isothermal structural relaxation of Fe40Ni40B20 metallic glass in the relaxation times spectrum model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Csach, K; Haruyama, O; Kasardova, A; Ocelik, Vaclav

    1997-01-01

    The structural relaxation of amorphous as-quenched Fe40Ni40B20 sample was investigated during isothermal annealing at temperatures close to 400 degrees C by: (i) the residual electrical resistance measured at liquid N-2 temperature; (ii) the in-situ electrical resistance; and (iii) the length

  6. Determination of relaxation modulus of time-dependent materials using neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aulova, Alexandra; Govekar, Edvard; Emri, Igor

    2017-08-01

    Health monitoring systems for plastic based structures require the capability of real time tracking of changes in response to the time-dependent behavior of polymer based structures. The paper proposes artificial neural networks as a tool of solving inverse problem appearing within time-dependent material characterization, since the conventional methods are computationally demanding and cannot operate in the real time mode. Abilities of a Multilayer Perceptron (MLP) and a Radial Basis Function Neural Network (RBFN) to solve ill-posed inverse problems on an example of determination of a time-dependent relaxation modulus curve segment from constant strain rate tensile test data are investigated. The required modeling data composed of strain rate, tensile and related relaxation modulus were generated using existing closed-form solution. Several neural networks topologies were tested with respect to the structure of input data, and their performance was compared to an exponential fitting technique. Selected optimal topologies of MLP and RBFN were tested for generalization and robustness on noisy data; performance of all the modeling methods with respect to the number of data points in the input vector was analyzed as well. It was shown that MLP and RBFN are capable of solving inverse problems related to the determination of a time dependent relaxation modulus curve segment. Particular topologies demonstrate good generalization and robustness capabilities, where the topology of RBFN with data provided in parallel proved to be superior compared to other methods.

  7. Vector Analysis of Ionic Collision on CaCO3 Precipitation Based on Vibration Time History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangestiyono, W.; Muryanto, S.; Jamari, J.; Bayuseno, A. P.

    2017-05-01

    Vibration effects on the piping system can result from the internal factor of fluid or the external factor of the mechanical equipment operation. As the pipe vibrated, the precipitation process of CaCO3 on the inner pipe could be affected. In the previous research, the effect of vibration on CaCO3 precipitation in piping system was clearly verified. This increased the deposition rate and decreased the induction time. However, the mechanism of vibration control in CaCO3 precipitation process as the presence of vibration has not been recognized yet. In the present research, the mechanism of vibration affecting the CaCO3 precipitation was investigated through vector analysis of ionic collision. The ionic vector force was calculated based on the amount of the activation energy and the vibration force was calculated based on the vibration sensor data. The vector resultant of ionic collision based on the vibration time history was analyzed to prove that vibration brings ionic collision randomly to the planar horizontal direction and its collision model was suspected as the cause of the increasing deposition rate.

  8. Time Resolved Energy Transfer and Photodissociation of Vibrationally Excited Molecules

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Crim, F. F

    2007-01-01

    ...) in solution and in the gas phase. This second experiment is one of the few direct comparisons of intramolecular vibrational energy flow in a solvated molecule with that in the same molecule isolated in a gas...

  9. Investigation of dielectric relaxation in systems with hierarchical organization: From time to frequency domain and back again

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokoi, Koki [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Raicu, Valerică, E-mail: vraicu@uwm.edu [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Department of Biological Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    2017-06-28

    Relaxation in fractal structures was investigated theoretically starting from a simple model of a Cantorian tree and kinetic equations linking the change in the number of particles (e.g., electrical charges) populating each branch of the tree and their transfer to other branches or to the ground state. We numerically solved the system of differential equations obtained and determined the so-called cumulative distribution function of particles, which, in dielectric or mechanical relaxation parlance, is the same as the relaxation function of the system. As a physical application, we studied the relationship between the dielectric relaxation in time-domain and the dielectric dispersion in the frequency-domain. Upon choosing appropriate rate constants, our model described accurately well-known non-exponential and non-Debye time- and frequency-domain functions, such as stretched exponentials, Havrilliak–Negami, and frequency power law. Our approach opens the door to applying kinetic models to describe a wide array of relaxation processes, which traditionally have posed great challenges to theoretical modeling based on first principles. - Highlights: • Relaxation was investigated for a system of particles flowing through a Cantorian tree. • A set of kinetic equations was formulated and used to compute the relaxation function of the system. • The dispersion function of the system was computed from the relaxation function. • An analytical method was used to recover the original relaxation function from the dispersion function. • This formalism was used to study dielectric relaxation and dispersion in fractal structures.

  10. Optimal Configuration for Relaxation Times Estimation in Complex Spin Echo Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Baselice

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Many pathologies can be identified by evaluating differences raised in the physical parameters of involved tissues. In a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI framework, spin-lattice T1 and spin-spin T2 relaxation time parameters play a major role in such an identification. In this manuscript, a theoretical study related to the evaluation of the achievable performances in the estimation of relaxation times in MRI is proposed. After a discussion about the considered acquisition model, an analysis on the ideal imaging acquisition parameters in the case of spin echo sequences, i.e., echo and repetition times, is conducted. In particular, the aim of the manuscript consists in providing an empirical rule for optimal imaging parameter identification with respect to the tissues under investigation. Theoretical results are validated on different datasets in order to show the effectiveness of the presented study and of the proposed methodology.

  11. A new approach for calculation of relaxation time and magnetic anisotropy of ferrofluids containing superparmagnetic nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmadi R.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a new approach is described for the calculation of the relaxation time and magnetic anisotropy energy of magnetic nanoparticles. Ferrofluids containing monodispersed magnetite nanoparticles were synthesized via hydrothermal method and then heated using the 10 kA/m external AC magnetic fields in three different frequencies: 10, 50 and 100 kHz. By measuring the temperature variations during the application of the magnetic field, the total magnetic time constant including both Brownian and Neel relaxation times can be calculated. By measuring the magnetic core size and hydrodynamic size of particles, the magnetic anisotropy can be calculated too. Synthesized ferrofluids were characterized via TEM, XRD, VSM and PCS techniques and the results were used for the mentioned calculations.

  12. Correlation and relaxation times for a stochastic process with a fat-tailed steady-state distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z.; Serota, R. A.

    2017-05-01

    We study a stochastic process defined by the interaction strength for the return to the mean and a stochastic term proportional to the magnitude of the variable. Its steady-state distribution is the Inverse Gamma distribution, whose power-law tail exponent is determined by the ratio of the interaction strength to stochasticity. Its time-dependence is characterized by a set of discrete times describing relaxation of respective cumulants to their steady-state values. We show that as the progressively lower cumulants diverge with the increase of stochasticity, so do their relaxation times. We analytically evaluate the correlation function and show that it is determined by the longest of these times, namely the inverse interaction strength, which is also the relaxation time of the mean. We also investigate relaxation of the entire distribution to the steady state and the distribution of relaxation times, which we argue to be Inverse Gaussian.

  13. In vivo measurements of T1 relaxation times of 31P-metabolites in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, C; Jensen, K E; Henriksen, O

    1989-01-01

    The T1 relaxation times were estimated for 31P-metabolites in human skeletal muscle. Five healthy volunteers were examined in a 1.5 Tesla wholebody imaging system using an inversion recovery pulse sequence. The calculated T1 relaxation times ranged from 5.517 sec for phosphocreatine to 3.603 sec...

  14. Rate variation and estimation of divergence times using strict and relaxed clocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Ziheng

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding causes of biological diversity may be greatly enhanced by knowledge of divergence times. Strict and relaxed clock models are used in Bayesian estimation of divergence times. We examined whether: i strict clock models are generally more appropriate in shallow phylogenies where rate variation is expected to be low, ii the likelihood ratio test of the clock (LRT reliably informs which model is appropriate for dating divergence times. Strict and relaxed models were used to analyse sequences simulated under different levels of rate variation. Published shallow phylogenies (Black bass, Primate-sucking lice, Podarcis lizards, Gallotiinae lizards, and Caprinae mammals were also analysed to determine natural levels of rate variation relative to the performance of the different models. Results Strict clock analyses performed well on data simulated under the independent rates model when the standard deviation of log rate on branches, σ, was low (≤0.1, but were inappropriate when σ>0.1 (95% of rates fall within 0.0082-0.0121 subs/site/Ma when σ = 0.1, for a mean rate of 0.01. The independent rates relaxed clock model performed well at all levels of rate variation, although posterior intervals on times were significantly wider than for the strict clock. The strict clock is therefore superior when rate variation is low. The performance of a correlated rates relaxed clock model was similar to the strict clock. Increased numbers of independent loci led to slightly narrower posteriors under the relaxed clock while older root ages provided proportionately narrower posteriors. The LRT had low power for σ = 0.01-0.1, but high power for σ = 0.5-2.0. Posterior means of σ2 were useful for assessing rate variation in published datasets. Estimates of natural levels of rate variation ranged from 0.05-3.38 for different partitions. Differences in divergence times between relaxed and strict clock analyses were greater in two

  15. Menstrual variation of breast volume and T{sub 2} relaxation times in cyclical mastalgia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussain, Zainab [Department of Medical Imaging, University of Liverpool, Johnstone Building, Brownlow Hill, P.O. Box 147, Liverpool, Merseyside L69 3GB (United Kingdom); Magnetic Resonance and Image Analysis Research Centre, University of Liverpool, Johnstone Building, Brownlow Hill, P.O. Box 147, Liverpool, Merseyside L69 3GB (United Kingdom)], E-mail: zay@liverpool.ac.uk; Brooks, Jonathan [Magnetic Resonance and Image Analysis Research Centre, University of Liverpool, Johnstone Building, Brownlow Hill, P.O. Box 147, Liverpool, Merseyside L69 3GB (United Kingdom); Department of Human Anatomy and Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Percy, Dave [Centre for Operational Research and Applied Statistics, University of Salford, Salford, Greater Manchester M5 4WT (United Kingdom)

    2008-02-15

    Purpose: Hormonal activity causes breast volume to change during the menstrual cycle. One possible cause of this volume change is thought to be due to water retention or oedema within the tissues. We used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to study the variation in breast volume and {sup 1}H Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) to measure T{sub 2} relaxation times which are known to increase with increasing tissue water content. We hypothesised that an increase in breast volume will elevate T{sub 2} relaxation due to the presence of an increased water content within the breast. T{sub 2} Relaxation time and volume were studied in fifteen control subjects and in a cohort of eight patients with cyclical mastalgia in order to determine whether changes in breast volume and T{sub 2} relaxation times differed in controls and patients during menses, ovulation and premenses. Method: Breast volume was determined by the Cavalieri method in combination with point counting techniques on MR images and T{sub 2} relaxation times of the water and fat in a voxel of breast tissue were obtained using {sup 1}H Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS). Results: Statistical analysis (ANOVA) demonstrated highly significant differences in breast volume between the three stages of the cycle (p < 0.0005) with breast volume being greatest premenstrually. Patients did not exhibit an increase in volume premenstrually, significantly above controls. T{sub 2} of fat or water did not depend on stage of cycle. T-tests demonstrated no significant differences in T{sub 2} of water or fat between patient and control groups. The average T{sub 2} relaxation time of water was lowest in the patient and control groups during ovulation and highest in the patient group during premenses. Conclusion: We have performed the first combined volumetric and spectroscopic study of women with cyclical mastalgia and demonstrated that the global changes in volumes and T{sub 2} were not significantly different from normal

  16. Dielectric Relaxation Studies of 2-Butoxyethanol with Aniline and Substituted Anilines Using Time Domain Reflectometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Jeevanandham

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The complex dielectric spectra of 2-butoxyethanol with aniline and substituted anilines like aniline, o-chloroaniline, m-chloroaniline, o-anisidine and m-anisidine binary mixtures in the composition of different volumes of percent (0%, 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% have been measured as a function of frequency between 10 MHz and 30 GHz at 298.15 K. The dielectric parameters like static dielectric constant ε0 and relaxation time τ have been obtained by using least square fit method. By using these parameters ε0,τ, effective Kirkwood correlation factor geff, corrective Kirkwood correlation factor gf, Bruggeman factor fB, excess dielectric constant εE, and excess inverse relaxation time 1/τE values are calculated and discussed to yield information on the dipolar alignment and molecular rotation of the binary liquid mixtures. From all the derived dielectric parameters, molecular interactions are interpreted through hydrogen bonding.

  17. Enthalpy Relaxation of a DGEBA Epoxy as a function of Time, Temperature, and Cooling Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarkson, Caitlyn M.; McCoy, John D.; Kropka, Jamie M.

    2015-03-01

    Enthalpy relaxation resulting from physical aging of a DGEBA epoxy, Epon 828, cross-linked with an amine curative, Jeffamine T-403, was studied for two isothermal aging temperatures at sequential aging times up to two weeks. Results were analyzed using the peak shift method to obtain the relaxation parameters β, δ (H*), and χ. The individual effects of cooling rate from the equilibrated state, aging time, and aging temperature were isolated to understand the initial state of the glassy epoxy and its evolution during physical aging. [Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  18. The comparative influence of anesthetics on the in vitro proton NMR relaxation times in rat liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheindlin, B; Jacobs, D O; Settle, R G; Wolf, G L; Rombeau, J L

    1985-01-01

    To determine the effect of anesthetics on liver relaxation times in rat, two experiments were performed. In the first experiment, normal and protein-depleted rats underwent total hepatectomy under ether anesthesia or following decapitation. In the second experiment, livers were excised from normal rats under ketamine or pentobarbital anesthesia, or following decapitation. Hepatic T1 and T2 were measured for all animals using a RADX 10 MHz spin analyzer. Ketamine produced T1 values significantly different from decapitation. Ketamine, pentobarbital, and ether in normal animals all produced T2 values significantly different from decapitation. It is apparent that anesthetization of rats prior to in vitro measurement of hepatic relaxation times is not equivalent to decapitation; nor are the anesthetics examined equivalent to one another.

  19. Transport coefficients in the Polyakov quark meson coupling model: A relaxation time approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abhishek, Aman; Mishra, Hiranmaya; Ghosh, Sabyasachi

    2018-01-01

    We compute the transport coefficients, namely, the coefficients of shear and bulk viscosities, as well as thermal conductivity for hot and dense matter. The calculations are performed within the Polyakov quark meson model. The estimation of the transport coefficients is made using the Boltzmann kinetic equation within the relaxation time approximation. The energy-dependent relaxation time is estimated from meson-meson scattering, quark-meson scattering, and quark-quark scattering within the model. In our calculations, the shear viscosity to entropy ratio and the coefficient of thermal conductivity show a minimum at the critical temperature, while the ratio of bulk viscosity to entropy density exhibits a peak at this transition point. The effect of confinement modeled through a Polyakov loop potential plays an important role both below and above the critical temperature.

  20. Accuracy and Numerical Stabilty Analysis of Lattice Boltzmann Method with Multiple Relaxation Time for Incompressible Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradipto; Purqon, Acep

    2017-07-01

    Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) is the novel method for simulating fluid dynamics. Nowadays, the application of LBM ranges from the incompressible flow, flow in the porous medium, until microflows. The common collision model of LBM is the BGK with a constant single relaxation time τ. However, BGK suffers from numerical instabilities. These instabilities could be eliminated by implementing LBM with multiple relaxation time. Both of those scheme have implemented for incompressible 2 dimensions lid-driven cavity. The stability analysis has done by finding the maximum Reynolds number and velocity for converged simulations. The accuracy analysis is done by comparing the velocity profile with the benchmark results from Ghia, et al and calculating the net velocity flux. The tests concluded that LBM with MRT are more stable than BGK, and have a similar accuracy. The maximum Reynolds number that converges for BGK is 3200 and 7500 for MRT respectively.

  1. In-vivo T2-relaxation times of asymptomatic cervical intervertebral discs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Driscoll, Sean J.; Mao, Haiqing; Li, Guoan [Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Bioengineering Laboratory, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Boston, MA (United States); Zhong, Weiye [Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Bioengineering Laboratory, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Boston, MA (United States); Second Xiangya Hospital and Central South University, Department of Spinal Surgery, Changsha, Hunan (China); Torriani, Martin [Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Musculoskeletal Imaging and Intervention, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Wood, Kirkham B.; Cha, Thomas D. [Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Spine Service, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Limited research exists on T2-mapping techniques for cervical intervertebral discs and its potential clinical utility. The objective of this research was to investigate the in-vivo T2-relaxation times of cervical discs, including C2-C3 through C7-T1. Ten asymptomatic subjects were imaged using a 3.0 T MR scanner and a sagittal multi-slice multi-echo sequence. Using the mid-sagittal image, intervertebral discs were divided into five regions-of-interest (ROIs), centered along the mid-line of the disc. Average T2 relaxation time values were calculated for each ROI using a mono-exponential fit. Differences in T2 values between disc levels and across ROIs of the same disc were examined. For a given ROI, the results showed a trend of increasing relaxation times moving down the spinal column, particularly in the middle regions (ROIs 2, 3 and 4). The C6-C7 and C7-T1 discs had significantly greater T2 values compared to superior discs (discs between C2 and C6). The results also showed spatial homogeneity of T2 values in the C3-C4, C4-C5, and C5-C6 discs, while C2-C3, C6-C7, and C7-T1 showed significant differences between ROIs. The findings indicate there may be inherent differences in T2-relaxation time properties between different cervical discs. Clinical evaluations utilizing T2-mapping techniques in the cervical spine may need to be level-dependent. (orig.)

  2. Influence of Polymer Relaxation Time on the Electrospinning Process: Numerical Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddharth Gadkari

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available “Electrospinnability”, or the ease with which a solution can be used to obtain bead-free uniform fibers, depends on a large number of parameters, including solution properties, process parameters and ambient conditions. In this study, the effect of the polymer relaxation time on electrospinning of dilute polymer solutions is investigated numerically. It is shown that elastic stresses (ES increase exponentially with the Deborah number ( D e . For each polymer concentration there exists a critical D e below which the ES are insufficient to overcome capillary stresses (CS and lead to the formation of beaded fibers. However, above the critical D e , there is a higher probability of the ES overcoming the CS and leading to the formation of uniform fibers. This analysis suggests the possibility of improved electrospinnability even with dilute polymer solutions, provided the relaxation time is sufficiently large. It is also found that changes in the drag coefficient due to change in the polymer conformation and self-concentration of polymer molecules would become significant for the electrospinning of polymer solutions with a longer relaxation time and high conductivity.

  3. Viscosity, relaxation time, and dynamics within a model asphalt of larger molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Derek D.; Greenfield, Michael L., E-mail: greenfield@egr.uri.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, Rhode Island 02881 (United States)

    2014-01-21

    The dynamics properties of a new “next generation” model asphalt system that represents SHRP AAA-1 asphalt using larger molecules than past models is studied using molecular simulation. The system contains 72 molecules distributed over 12 molecule types that range from nonpolar branched alkanes to polar resins and asphaltenes. Molecular weights range from 290 to 890 g/mol. All-atom molecular dynamics simulations conducted at six temperatures from 298.15 to 533.15 K provide a wealth of correlation data. The modified Kohlrausch-Williams-Watts equation was regressed to reorientation time correlation functions and extrapolated to calculate average rotational relaxation times for individual molecules. The rotational relaxation rate of molecules decreased significantly with increasing size and decreasing temperature. Translational self-diffusion coefficients followed an Arrhenius dependence. Similar activation energies of ∼42 kJ/mol were found for all 12 molecules in the model system, while diffusion prefactors spanned an order of magnitude. Viscosities calculated directly at 533.15 K and estimated at lower temperatures using the Debye-Stokes-Einstein relationship were consistent with experimental data for asphalts. The product of diffusion coefficient and rotational relaxation time showed only small changes with temperature above 358.15 K, indicating rotation and translation that couple self-consistently with viscosity. At lower temperatures, rotation slowed more than diffusion.

  4. Two-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann method and its application to advective-diffusive-reactive transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhifeng; Yang, Xiaofan; Li, Siliang; Hilpert, Markus

    2017-11-01

    The lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) based on single-relaxation-time (SRT) or multiple-relaxation-time (MRT) collision operators is widely used in simulating flow and transport phenomena. The LBM based on two-relaxation-time (TRT) collision operators possesses strengths from the SRT and MRT LBMs, such as its simple implementation and good numerical stability, although tedious mathematical derivations and presentations of the TRT LBM hinder its application to a broad range of flow and transport phenomena. This paper describes the TRT LBM clearly and provides a pseudocode for easy implementation. Various transport phenomena were simulated using the TRT LBM to illustrate its applications in subsurface environments. These phenomena include advection-diffusion in uniform flow, Taylor dispersion in a pipe, solute transport in a packed column, reactive transport in uniform flow, and bacterial chemotaxis in porous media. The TRT LBM demonstrated good numerical performance in terms of accuracy and stability in predicting these transport phenomena. Therefore, the TRT LBM is a powerful tool to simulate various geophysical and biogeochemical processes in subsurface environments.

  5. Relaxation of H2O from its |04>- vibrational state in collisions with H2O, Ar, H2, N2, and O2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Peter W.; Sims, Ian R.; Smith, Ian W. M.

    2004-03-01

    We report rate coefficients at 293 K for the collisional relaxation of H2O molecules from the highly excited |04>± vibrational states in collisions with H2O, Ar, H2, N2, and O2. In our experiments, the |04>- state is populated by direct absorption of radiation from a pulsed dye laser tuned to ˜719 nm. Evolution of the population in the (|04>±) levels is observed using the combination of a frequency-quadrupled Nd:YAG laser, which selectively photolyses H2O(|04>±), and a frequency-doubled dye laser, which observes the OH(v=0) produced by photodissociation via laser-induced fluorescence. The delay between the pulse from the pump laser and those from the photolysis and probe lasers was systematically varied to generate kinetic decays. The rate coefficients for relaxation of H2O(|04>±) obtained from these experiments, in units of cm3 molecule-1 s-1, are: k(H2O)=(4.1±1.2)×10-10, k(Ar)=(4.9±1.1)×10-12, k(H2)=(6.8±1.1)×10-12, k(N2)=(7.7±1.5)×10-12, k(O2)=(6.7±1.4)×10-12. The implications of these results for our previous reports of rate constants for the removal of H2O molecules in selected vibrational states by collisions with H atoms (P. W. Barnes et al., Faraday Discuss. Chem. Soc. 113, 167 (1999) and P. W. Barnes et al., J. Chem. Phys. 115, 4586 (2001).) are fully discussed.

  6. Generalized Mittag-Leffler relaxation: clustering-jump continuous-time random walk approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurlewicz, Agnieszka; Weron, Karina; Teuerle, Marek

    2008-07-01

    A stochastic generalization of renormalization-group transformation for continuous-time random walk processes is proposed. The renormalization consists in replacing the jump events from a randomly sized cluster by a single renormalized (i.e., overall) jump. The clustering of the jumps, followed by the corresponding transformation of the interjump time intervals, yields a new class of coupled continuous-time random walks which, applied to modeling of relaxation, lead to the general power-law properties usually fitted with the empirical Havriliak-Negami function.

  7. Effect of Frequency and Vibration Time on Shaker Performance for Mechanized Harvesting of Orange (Thomson cultivar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Ghorbanpour

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Manual citrus harvesting is commonly performing hard, expensive and time consuming. In this study, a factorial experiment with a completely randomized design in three replications was performed to find out the effect of frequency (three levels of 5, 7.5 and 10 Hz, vibration time (three levels of 10, 15 and 20 seconds on harvesting capacity and losses of Thomson cultivar of orange. The results indicated that the effect of frequency and vibration time was significant (P≤0.01 on the harvesting capacity and losses, but their interaction effects weren’t significant. The harvesting capacity significantly increased by increasing frequency, and the highest harvesting capacity was 62.8 % at 10 Hz frequency. Although the harvesting capacity increased by increasing the vibration time, but there was no significant difference in vibration times between 15 and 20 seconds at 10 Hz frequency. Also the fruit loss was increased by increasing the vibration time. Due to these reasons, frequency of 10 Hz and vibration time of 15 seconds were selected as the most suitable condition for mechanized harvesting of this cultivar of orange. Finally a linear mathematical model was developed based on the frequency and vibration time for the harvesting capacity and fruit loss of Thomson cultivar of orange.

  8. Comparative study of acoustic relaxation time of cholesteric liquid crystal and mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhave, Manisha G.; Gharde, Rita; Radha, S.

    2016-09-01

    The present study focuses on the relaxation processes in Cholesteric Liquid Crystal and mixtures. We have dispersed two different monomers in CLC to form Polymer dispersed liquid crystals (PDCLCs). PDLC films have a remarkable electro-optical behavior since they can be switched from highly light scattering state (OFF) to transparent state (ON) simply by application of an electric field. We have also doped ferroelectric nano - powder (NP) in CLC. The phase transitions occurred at temperatures lower than those exhibited by the mesogenic component before doping. The viscosity, ultrasonic velocity and density show variation with change in the material as well as temperature. The acoustic relaxation time and ultrasonic attenuation decrease with increase in temperature for CLC and CLC+NP. The parameters of PDCLC2 in comparison with PDCLC1 are more linear in isotropic and anisotropic regions. For PDCLC2 the values reach maximum value at the Cholesteric-isotropic transition.

  9. Temperature dependence of relaxation times and temperature mapping in ultra-low-field MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesanen, Panu T; Zevenhoven, Koos C J; Nieminen, Jaakko O; Dabek, Juhani; Parkkonen, Lauri T; Ilmoniemi, Risto J

    2013-10-01

    Ultra-low-field MRI is an emerging technology that allows MRI and NMR measurements in microtesla-range fields. In this work, the possibilities of relaxation-based temperature measurements with ultra-low-field MRI were investigated by measuring T1 and T2 relaxation times of agarose gel at 50 μT-52 mT and at temperatures 5-45°C. Measurements with a 3T scanner were made for comparison. The Bloembergen-Purcell-Pound relaxation theory was combined with a two-state model to explain the field-strength and temperature dependence of the data. The results show that the temperature dependencies of agarose gel T1 and T2 in the microtesla range differ drastically from those at 3T; the effect of temperature on T1 is reversed at approximately 5 mT. The obtained results were used to reconstruct temperature maps from ultra-low-field scans. These time-dependent temperature maps measured from an agarose gel phantom at 50 μT reproduced the temperature gradient with good contrast. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Relaxation dynamics and thermophysical properties of vegetable oils using time-domain reflectometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonkamble, Anil A; Sonsale, Rahul P; Kanshette, Mahesh S; Kabara, Komal B; Wananje, Kunal H; Kumbharkhane, Ashok C; Sarode, Arvind V

    2017-04-01

    Dielectric relaxation studies of vegetable oils are important for insights into their hydrogen bonding and intermolecular dynamics. The dielectric relaxation and thermo physical properties of triglycerides present in some vegetable oils have been measured over the frequency range of 10 MHz to 7 GHz in the temperature region 25 to 10 °C using a time-domain reflectometry approach. The frequency and temperature dependence of dielectric constants and dielectric loss factors were determined for coconut, peanut, soya bean, sunflower, palm, and olive oils. The dielectric permittivity spectra for each of the studied vegetable oils are explained using the Debye model with their complex dielectric permittivity analyzed using the Havriliak-Negami equation. The dielectric parameters static permittivity (ε 0), high-frequency limiting static permittivity (ε ∞), average relaxation time (τ 0), and thermodynamic parameters such as free energy (∆F τ), enthalpy (∆H τ), and entropy of activation (∆S τ) were also measured. Calculation and analysis of these thermodynamic parameters agrees with the determined dielectric parameters, giving insights into the temperature dependence of the molecular dynamics of these systems.

  11. Vibration Testing of NASA's Time Machine Near-Infrared Spectrograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jentsch, M.; Knecht, M.; Jollet, D.; Kommer, A.

    2014-06-01

    higher level testing scenarios. For the flight model (FM) an acoustic test on acceptance level and a sine vibration test with proto-flight approach for delta qualification have been performed.During test preparation and performance the focus was set on the validation of the optomechanical stability [2]and the structural integrity. A test prediction based on a detailed finite element model allowed the detection of all critical areas by evaluating the dynamic ceramic stresses, the interface forces in the load path and the accelerations of the instruments, already qualified on subassembly level. Equipped with accelerometers and strain gauges the test runs could be performed according to the predicted notch assessment considering the measured damping. A very good correlation to the predicted results could be determined.The test campaigns have been performed as planned and finished successfully. Thus the NIRSpec instrument is now prepared for JWST integration, to withstand all higher level testing, the Ariane 5 launch, the in-orbit environment and to fulfil its challenging mission - "Looking back to the dawn of time".

  12. New Insight into Time-Temperature Correlation for Polymer Relaxations Ranging from Secondary Relaxation to Terminal Flow: Application of a Universal and Developed WLF Equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonggang Shangguan

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The three equations involved in the time-temperature superposition (TTS of a polymer, i.e., Williams–Landel–Ferry (WLF, Vogel–Fulcher–Tammann–Hesse (VFTH and the Arrhenius equation, were re-examined, and the mathematical equivalence of the WLF form to the Arrhenius form was revealed. As a result, a developed WLF (DWLF equation was established to describe the temperature dependence of relaxation property for the polymer ranging from secondary relaxation to terminal flow, and its necessary criteria for universal application were proposed. TTS results of viscoelastic behavior for different polymers including isotactic polypropylene (iPP, high density polyethylene (HDPE, low density polyethylene (LDPE and ethylene-propylene rubber (EPR were well achieved by the DWLF equation at high temperatures. Through investigating the phase-separation behavior of poly(methyl methacrylate/poly(styrene-co-maleic anhydride (PMMA/SMA and iPP/EPR blends, it was found that the DWLF equation can describe the phase separation behavior of the amorphous/amorphous blend well, while the nucleation process leads to a smaller shift factor for the crystalline/amorphous blend in the melting temperature region. Either the TTS of polystyrene (PS and PMMA or the secondary relaxations of PMMA and polyvinyl chloride (PVC confirmed that the Arrhenius equation can be valid only in the high temperature region and invalid in the vicinity of glass transition due to the strong dependence of apparent activation energy on temperature; while the DWLF equation can be employed in the whole temperature region including secondary relaxation and from glass transition to terminal relaxation. The theoretical explanation for the universal application of the DWLF equation was also revealed through discussing the influences of free volume and chemical structure on the activation energy of polymer relaxations.

  13. Assaying Biomarkers via Real-Time Measurements of the Effective Relaxation Time of Biofunctionalized Magnetic Nanoparticles Associated with Biotargets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Hsien Liao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An assay of biomarkers consisting of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP is reported. Real-time measurements of the effective relaxation time τeff, when the biofunctionalized magnetic nanoparticles (BMNs were conjugating with biotargets, were made. The BMNs are anti-alpha-fetoprotein (antiAFP coated onto dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles labeled as Fe3O4-antiAFP. It was found that the effective relaxation time, τeff, increases as the association of AFP and Fe3O4-antiAFP evolves. We attribute this to the enhanced Brownian motion of BMNs when magnetic clusters are present during the conjugation. We found that saturation magnetization, Ms, increases when the concentration of AFP increases. This is due to the fact that more magnetic clusters are associated in the reagent, and therefore the Ms increases when the concentration of AFP increases. The change of effective relaxation time and saturation magnetization shows a behavior of logistic function, which provides a foundation for assaying an unknown amount of biomolecules. Thus, we demonstrate sensitive platforms for detecting AFP by characterizing τeff. The detection platform is robust and easy to use and shows promise for further use in assaying a broad number of biomarkers.

  14. A unifying model for non-adiabatic coupling at metallic surfaces beyond the local harmonic approximation: from vibrational relaxation to scanning tunneling microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Jean Christophe

    2013-06-28

    A model for treating excitation and relaxation of adsorbates at metallic surfaces induced by non-adiabatic coupling is developed. The derivation is based on the concept of resonant electron transfer, where the adsorbate serves as a molecular bridge for the inelastic transition between an electron source and a sink. In this picture, energy relaxation and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) at metallic surfaces are treated on an equal footing as a quasi-thermal process. The model goes beyond the local harmonic approximation and allows for an unbiased description of floppy systems with multiple potential wells. Further, the limitation of the product ansatz for the vibronic wave function to include the position-dependence of the non-adiabatic couplings is avoided by explicitly enforcing detailed balance. The theory is applied to the excitation of hydrogen on palladium, which has multiple local potential minima connected by low energy barriers. The main aspects investigated are the lifetimes of adsorbate vibrations in different adsorption sites, as well as the dependence of the excitation, response, and transfer rates on an applied potential bias. The excitation and relaxation simulations reveal intricate population dynamics that depart significantly from the simplistic tunneling model in a truncated harmonic potential. In particular, the population decay from an initially occupied local minimum induced by the contact with an STM tip is found to be better described by a double exponential. The two rates are interpreted as a response to the system perturbation and a transfer rate following the perturbation. The transfer rate is found to obey a power law, as was the case in previous experimental and theoretical work.

  15. Two-step relaxation mode analysis with multiple evolution times applied to all-atom molecular dynamics protein simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasawa, N.; Mitsutake, A.; Takano, H.

    2017-12-01

    Proteins implement their functionalities when folded into specific three-dimensional structures, and their functions are related to the protein structures and dynamics. Previously, we applied a relaxation mode analysis (RMA) method to protein systems; this method approximately estimates the slow relaxation modes and times via simulation and enables investigation of the dynamic properties underlying the protein structural fluctuations. Recently, two-step RMA with multiple evolution times has been proposed and applied to a slightly complex homopolymer system, i.e., a single [n ] polycatenane. This method can be applied to more complex heteropolymer systems, i.e., protein systems, to estimate the relaxation modes and times more accurately. In two-step RMA, we first perform RMA and obtain rough estimates of the relaxation modes and times. Then, we apply RMA with multiple evolution times to a small number of the slowest relaxation modes obtained in the previous calculation. Herein, we apply this method to the results of principal component analysis (PCA). First, PCA is applied to a 2-μ s molecular dynamics simulation of hen egg-white lysozyme in aqueous solution. Then, the two-step RMA method with multiple evolution times is applied to the obtained principal components. The slow relaxation modes and corresponding relaxation times for the principal components are much improved by the second RMA.

  16. Relaxation times and symmetries in the nonlinear optical properties of a two-level system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paz, J. L.; León-Torres, J. R.; Lascano, Luis; Vera, César Costa

    2017-12-01

    In this work we introduce a methodology for the determination of the longitudinal and transversal relaxation times in a two-level system using symmetry properties of the optical responses in the frequency space ε(Δ1 ,Δ2). Employing the density matrix formalism and a perturbative scheme for the incident field amplitudes in the Four-wave mixing spectroscopy, the nonlinear macroscopic polarization is determined. The collective effects of the thermal reservoir are modeled as a time dependent frequency, whose manifestation is the broadening of the upper level according to a prescribed random function.

  17. Electron spin relaxation time in (110) InGaAs/InAlAs quantum wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokota, Nobuhide; Yasuda, Yusuke; Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Kawaguchi, Hitoshi, E-mail: khitoshi@ms.naist.jp [Graduate School of Materials Science, Nara Institute of Science and Technology 8916-5 Takayama, Ikoma, Nara 630-0192 (Japan)

    2014-07-14

    Electron spin relaxation time τ{sub s} in InGaAs/InAlAs quantum wells (QWs) grown on (110) and (100) InP substrates was investigated by pump-probe transmission measurements. Similar τ{sub s} of 0.83–1.0 ns were measured at room temperature for all the measured (110) and (100) QWs, indicating suppression of the D'yakonov-Perel' spin relaxation mechanism in (110) QWs is not effective in InGaAs/InAlAs QWs as opposed to GaAs/AlGaAs QWs. Contribution of the Bir-Aronov-Pikus mechanism dominant in (110) GaAs/AlGaAs QWs was found to be small in both the (110) and (100) InGaAs/InAlAs QWs from the weak dependences of τ{sub s} on pump intensity at room temperature. These results suggest that the spin relaxation mechanism dominant in InGaAs/InAlAs QWs at a temperature higher than 200 K is the Elliott-Yafet mechanism independent of the crystal orientation among the above three major mechanisms.

  18. Electron spin relaxation time in (110) InGaAs/InAlAs quantum wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokota, Nobuhide; Yasuda, Yusuke; Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Kawaguchi, Hitoshi

    2014-07-01

    Electron spin relaxation time τs in InGaAs/InAlAs quantum wells (QWs) grown on (110) and (100) InP substrates was investigated by pump-probe transmission measurements. Similar τs of 0.83-1.0 ns were measured at room temperature for all the measured (110) and (100) QWs, indicating suppression of the D'yakonov-Perel' spin relaxation mechanism in (110) QWs is not effective in InGaAs/InAlAs QWs as opposed to GaAs/AlGaAs QWs. Contribution of the Bir-Aronov-Pikus mechanism dominant in (110) GaAs/AlGaAs QWs was found to be small in both the (110) and (100) InGaAs/InAlAs QWs from the weak dependences of τs on pump intensity at room temperature. These results suggest that the spin relaxation mechanism dominant in InGaAs/InAlAs QWs at a temperature higher than 200 K is the Elliott-Yafet mechanism independent of the crystal orientation among the above three major mechanisms.

  19. Stroke Onset Time Determination Using MRI Relaxation Times without Non-Ischaemic Reference in A Rat Stroke Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Terence J T; Pereyra, Marcelo; Knight, Michael J; McGarry, Bryony M; Jokivarsi, Kimmo T; Gröhn, Olli H J; Kauppinen, Risto A

    2017-06-20

    Objective timing of stroke in emergency departments is expected to improve patient stratification. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) relaxations times, T2 and T1ρ , in abnormal diffusion delineated ischaemic tissue were used as proxies of stroke time in a rat model. Both 'non-ischaemic reference'-dependent and -independent estimators were generated. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), T2 and T1ρ , were sequentially quantified for up to 6 hours of stroke in rats (n = 8) at 4.7T. The ischaemic lesion was identified as a contiguous collection of voxels with low ADC. T2 and T1ρ in the ischaemic lesion and in the contralateral non-ischaemic brain tissue were determined. Differences in mean MRI relaxation times between ischaemic and non-ischaemic volumes were used to create reference-dependent estimator. For the reference-independent procedure, only the parameters associated with log-logistic fits to the T2 and T1ρ distributions within the ADC-delineated lesions were used for the onset time estimation. The reference-independent estimators from T2 and T1ρ data provided stroke onset time with precisions of ±32 and ±27 minutes, respectively. The reference-dependent estimators yielded respective precisions of ±47 and ±54 minutes. A 'non-ischaemic anatomical reference'-independent estimator for stroke onset time from relaxometric MRI data is shown to yield greater timing precision than previously obtained through reference-dependent procedures.

  20. Application of Generalized Fractional Thermoelasticity Theory with Two Relaxation Times to an Electromagnetothermoelastic Thick Plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Abd El-Latief

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The fractional mathematical model of Maxwell’s equations in an electromagnetic field and the fractional generalized thermoelastic theory associated with two relaxation times are applied to a 1D problem for a thick plate. Laplace transform is used. The solution in Laplace transform domain has been obtained using a direct method and its inversion is calculated numerically using a method based on Fourier series expansion technique. Finally, the effects of the two fractional parameters (thermo and magneto on variable fields distributions are made. Numerical results are represented graphically.

  1. One-Dimensional Problem of a Conducting Viscous Fluid with One Relaxation Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angail A. Samaan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a magnetohydrodynamic model of boundary-layer equations for conducting viscous fluids. This model is applied to study the effects of free convection currents with thermal relaxation time on the flow of a viscous conducting fluid. The method of the matrix exponential formulation for these equations is introduced. The resulting formulation together with the Laplace transform technique is applied to a variety problems. The effects of a plane distribution of heat sources on the whole and semispace are studied. Numerical results are given and illustrated graphically for the problem.

  2. Long Range Dependence Prognostics for Bearing Vibration Intensity Chaotic Time Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the chaotic features and typical fractional order characteristics of the bearing vibration intensity time series, a forecasting approach based on long range dependence (LRD is proposed. In order to reveal the internal chaotic properties, vibration intensity time series are reconstructed based on chaos theory in phase-space, the delay time is computed with C-C method and the optimal embedding dimension and saturated correlation dimension are calculated via the Grassberger–Procaccia (G-P method, respectively, so that the chaotic characteristics of vibration intensity time series can be jointly determined by the largest Lyapunov exponent and phase plane trajectory of vibration intensity time series, meanwhile, the largest Lyapunov exponent is calculated by the Wolf method and phase plane trajectory is illustrated using Duffing-Holmes Oscillator (DHO. The Hurst exponent and long range dependence prediction method are proposed to verify the typical fractional order features and improve the prediction accuracy of bearing vibration intensity time series, respectively. Experience shows that the vibration intensity time series have chaotic properties and the LRD prediction method is better than the other prediction methods (largest Lyapunov, auto regressive moving average (ARMA and BP neural network (BPNN model in prediction accuracy and prediction performance, which provides a new approach for running tendency predictions for rotating machinery and provide some guidance value to the engineering practice.

  3. Dielectric relaxation processes in ethanol/water mixtures measured with attenuated total reflection terahertz time-domain spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Uffe; Yada, Hiriyuki; Arikawa, Takashi

    We use attenuated total reflection terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-ATR) to characterize the dielectric relaxation processes of 10 different ethanol/water mixtures at 25°C with ethanol mole fractions of 0-100%.......We use attenuated total reflection terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-ATR) to characterize the dielectric relaxation processes of 10 different ethanol/water mixtures at 25°C with ethanol mole fractions of 0-100%....

  4. Kubo formulas for the shear and bulk viscosity relaxation times and the scalar field theory shear τπ calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czajka, Alina; Jeon, Sangyong

    2017-06-01

    In this paper we provide a quantum field theoretical study on the shear and bulk relaxation times. First, we find Kubo formulas for the shear and the bulk relaxation times, respectively. They are found by examining response functions of the stress-energy tensor. We use general properties of correlation functions and the gravitational Ward identity to parametrize analytical structures of the Green functions describing both sound and diffusion mode. We find that the hydrodynamic limits of the real parts of the respective energy-momentum tensor correlation functions provide us with the method of computing both the shear and bulk viscosity relaxation times. Next, we calculate the shear viscosity relaxation time using the diagrammatic approach in the Keldysh basis for the massless λ ϕ4 theory. We derive a respective integral equation which enables us to compute η τπ and then we extract the shear relaxation time. The relaxation time is shown to be inversely related to the thermal width as it should be.

  5. Effects of aging on muscle T2 relaxation time: difference between fast- and slow-twitch muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatakenaka, M; Ueda, M; Ishigami, K; Otsuka, M; Masuda, K

    2001-12-01

    To determine whether the T2 relaxation time of skeletal muscle is affected by aging and to compare the effects of aging between fast- and slow-twitch muscles in a human study. To investigate the mechanisms of age-related changes in T2 relaxation time in an animal (mouse) study. T2 relaxation times of the soleus (slow-twitch, rich in type I fiber) and gastrocnemius (fast-twitch, rich in type II fiber) muscles were examined in 59 healthy human subjects, 22 to 76 years of age, by clinical magnetic resonance imaging. In mice, T2 relaxation times, fat ratios, and extracellular space ratios (extracellular space/intracellular plus extracellular space) of the spinalis (fast-twitch, rich in type II fiber) muscles were also examined (group of 7 old mice, 24-26 months; group of 7 young mice, 8-10 weeks). In the human study, the T2 relaxation time of the gastrocnemius muscle increased significantly with aging (r = 0.53, P muscle did not. In the animal study, the T2 relaxation time of the spinalis muscle was significantly longer (P spinalis muscle significantly wider (P muscle increases with aging, due mainly to increased extracellular space, reflecting age-related type II fiber atrophy.

  6. Investigation of the effect of the uranyl ion on proton-spin-relaxation times in aqueous solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renshaw, A.W.

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to determine the effect of the uranyl ion on the spin-lattice relaxation time of protons in aqueous solutions. A flowmeter using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques is being designed for monitoring the flow rate of aqueous solutions which are acidic, contain plutonium and uranium ions, chemical waste, and radioactive waste materials. The spin-lattice relaxation time is critical to the design of a flowmeter using nuclear magnetic resonance techniques. Experimental studies showed that spin-lattice relaxation time did not change for different molar concentrations of sample solutions of uranyl nitrate and uranyl acetate prepared from pure laboratory chemicals dissolved in distilled water. Therefore, it was concluded that the uranyl ion does not contribute to the relaxation process for protons in water.

  7. Phase-field-based multiple-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann model for incompressible multiphase flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, H; Shi, B C; Guo, Z L; Chai, Z H

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, a phase-field-based multiple-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann (LB) model is proposed for incompressible multiphase flow systems. In this model, one distribution function is used to solve the Chan-Hilliard equation and the other is adopted to solve the Navier-Stokes equations. Unlike previous phase-field-based LB models, a proper source term is incorporated in the interfacial evolution equation such that the Chan-Hilliard equation can be derived exactly and also a pressure distribution is designed to recover the correct hydrodynamic equations. Furthermore, the pressure and velocity fields can be calculated explicitly. A series of numerical tests, including Zalesak's disk rotation, a single vortex, a deformation field, and a static droplet, have been performed to test the accuracy and stability of the present model. The results show that, compared with the previous models, the present model is more stable and achieves an overall improvement in the accuracy of the capturing interface. In addition, compared to the single-relaxation-time LB model, the present model can effectively reduce the spurious velocity and fluctuation of the kinetic energy. Finally, as an application, the Rayleigh-Taylor instability at high Reynolds numbers is investigated.

  8. Evaluation of PHB/Clay nanocomposite by spin-lattice relaxation time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Bruno

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB based on nanocomposites containing different amounts of a commercial organically modified clay (viscogel B7 were prepared employing solution intercalation method. Three solvents, such as: CHCl3, dimethylchloride (DMC and tetrahydrofuran (THF were used. The relationship among the processing conditions; molecular structure and intermolecular interaction, between both nanocomposite components, were investigated using a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR, as a part of characterization methodology, which has been used by Tavares et al. It involves the hydrogen spin-lattice relaxation time, T1H, by solid state nuclear magnetic resonance, employing low field NMR. X ray diffraction was also employed because it is a conventional technique, generally used to obtain the first information on nanocomposite formation. Changes in PHB crystallinity were observed after the organophilic nanoclay had been incorporated in the polymer matrix. These changes, in the microstructure, were detected by the variation of hydrogen nuclear relaxation time values and by X ray, which showed an increase in the clay interlamelar space due to the intercalation of the polymer in the clay between lamellae. It was also observed, for both techniques, that the solvents affect directly the organization of the crystalline region, promoting a better intercalation, considering that they behave like a plasticizer.

  9. Enhancing Web applications in radiology with Java: estimating MR imaging relaxation times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagher, A P; Fitzpatrick, M; Flanders, A E; Eng, J

    1998-01-01

    Java is a relatively new programming language that has been used to develop a World Wide Web-based tool for estimating magnetic resonance (MR) imaging relaxation times, thereby demonstrating how Java may be used for Web-based radiology applications beyond improving the user interface of teaching files. A standard processing algorithm coded with Java is downloaded along with the hypertext markup language (HTML) document. The user (client) selects the desired pulse sequence and inputs data obtained from a region of interest on the MR images. The algorithm is used to modify selected MR imaging parameters in an equation that models the phenomenon being evaluated. MR imaging relaxation times are estimated, and confidence intervals and a P value expressing the accuracy of the final results are calculated. Design features such as simplicity, object-oriented programming, and security restrictions allow Java to expand the capabilities of HTML by offering a more versatile user interface that includes dynamic annotations and graphics. Java also allows the client to perform more sophisticated information processing and computation than is usually associated with Web applications. Java is likely to become a standard programming option, and the development of stand-alone Java applications may become more common as Java is integrated into future versions of computer operating systems.

  10. Normal-appearing brain t1 relaxation time predicts disability in early primary progressive multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfredonia, Francesco; Ciccarelli, Olga; Khaleeli, Zhaleh; Tozer, Daniel J; Sastre-Garriga, Jaume; Miller, David H; Thompson, Alan J

    2007-03-01

    To investigate whether patients with early primary progressive multiple sclerosis show changes in T1 relaxation time (T1-RT) in normal-appearing white matter (NAWM) and normal-appearing gray matter (NAGM) during 2 years and whether T1-RT at baseline predicts disability. Twenty-one patients and 12 control subjects were studied at baseline and after 2 years. Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) and Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite (MSFC) scores were assessed. T1 relaxation time histograms of NAWM and NAGM were obtained in all subjects, and mean, peak height, and peak location of the histograms were measured. Paired t tests were used to compare baseline and 2-year histogram values in patients and control subjects. To investigate whether T1-RT predicted clinical changes, multiple linear regression analysis was used. Patients showed increases in NAWM and NAGM T1-RT mean and peak location during follow-up, and significant decreases in NAWM and NAGM peak height. Baseline NAWM T1-RT mean values and peak height predicted disability at 2 years, as measured with the Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite score. T1 relaxometry is a good marker of disease progression and has prognostic potential in primary progressive multiple sclerosis.

  11. Nuclear magnetic resonance water relaxation time changes in bananas during ripening: a new mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Fayene Zeferino; Marconcini, Lucinéia Vizzotto; de Toledo, Ingrid Bertoni; de Vasconcellos Azeredo, Rodrigo Bagueira; Barbosa, Lucio Leonel; Colnago, Luiz Alberto

    2010-09-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of banana fragments during ripening show an increase on the water transverse relaxation time (T2) and a decrease in water self-diffusion coefficient (D). As T(2) and D are normally directly correlated, we studied these two properties in intact bananas during ripening, in an attempt to rule out the effect of injury on the apparent discrepancies in the behavior of T(2) and D. The results show that injury in bananas causes a decrease in T2 of the water in vacuoles (T(2vac)). They also show that T(2vac) increased and D decreased during ripening, ruling out the injury effect. To explain the apparent discrepancies, we propose a new hypothesis for the increase in T2 values, based on the reduction of Fe3+ ions to Fe2+ by galacturonic acid, produced by the hydrolysis of pectin and a decrease in internal oxygen concentration during ripening. As injury alters T2 values it is necessary to use intact bananas to study relaxation times during ripening. The novel interpretation for the increase in T(2vac) based on reduction of Fe+3 and O2 concentration is an alternative mechanism to that based on the hydrolysis of starch in amyloplasts. Copyright 2010 Society of Chemical Industry.

  12. Time-dependent alteration in cromakalim-induced relaxation of corpus cavernosum from streptozocin-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemi, Mehdi; Sadeghipour, Hamed; Asadi, Shahrzad; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza

    2007-09-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the relaxant responses to the ATP-sensitive potassium (K(ATP)) channel opener cromakalim in corpus cavernosum strips from 1-, 2-, 4-, 6-, and 8-week streptozocin-induced diabetic rats. Cromakalim (1 nM-0.1 mM) produced concentration-dependent relaxation in phenylephrine (7.5 microM)-precontracted isolated rat corporal strips. Compared with age-matched control animals, a significant enhancement in cromakalim-induced relaxation of corpus cavernosum was observed in 2-week diabetic animals, whereas the relaxant responses to cromakalim were decreased in 6-and 8-week diabetic animals. However, the cromakalim-induced relaxation was not altered in either 1-week or 4-week rat corporal strips in comparison with corresponding age-matched non-diabetic groups. Preincubation with the K(ATP) channel blocker glibenclamide (10 microM) significantly inhibited the cromakalim-induced relaxation in both non-diabetic and diabetic rat corpus cavernosum, but neither the voltage-dependent K(+) channel (K(V)) antagonist 4-aminopyridine (1 mM) nor the calcium-activated K(+) channel (K(Ca)) antagonist charybdotoxin (0.1 microM) had significant effect on cromakalim-induced relaxation in both control and diabetic rat corporal strips. Relaxation responses to the nitric oxide donor sodium nitroprusside (1 nM-0.1 mM) in diabetic rat corpus cavernosum were similar to that of age-matched controls. These data demonstrated that the relaxant responses to cromakalim were altered in diabetic cavernosal strips in a time dependent manner, suggesting that the period of diabetes mellitus may play a key role in the K(ATP) channels function in rat corpus cavernosum.

  13. Accurate prediction of spectral phonon relaxation time and thermal conductivity of intrinsic and perturbed materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Tianli

    The prediction of spectral phonon relaxation time, mean-free-path, and thermal conductivity can provide significant insights into the thermal conductivity of bulk and nanomaterials, which are important for thermal management and thermoelectric applications. We perform frequency-domain normal mode analysis (NMA) on pure bulk argon and pure bulk germanium. Spectral phonon properties, including the phonon dispersion, relaxation time, mean free path, and thermal conductivity of argon and germanium at different temperatures have been calculated. We find the dependence of phonon relaxation time tau on frequency o and temperature T vary from ~o-1.3 to ~o -1.8 and ~T-0.8 to ~T-1.8 for argon, and from ~o-0.6 to ~o-2.8 and ~T -0.4 to ~T-2.5 for germanium. The predicted thermal conductivities are in reasonable agreement with those obtained from the Green-Kubo method. We show, using both analytical derivations and numerical simulations, that the eigenvectors are necessary in time-domain NMA but unnecessary in frequency-domain NMA. The function of eigenvectors in frequency-domain NMA is to distinguish each phonon branch. Furthermore, it is found in solids not only the phonon frequency but also the phonon eigenvector can shift from harmonic lattice profile at finite temperature, due to thermal expansion and anharmonicity of interatomic potential. The anharmonicity of phonon eigenvector, different with that of frequency, only exists in the materials which contain at least two types of atoms and two different interatomic forces. Introducing anharmonic eigenvectors makes it easier to distinguish phonon branches in frequency-domain NMA although does not influence the results. For time-domain NMA, anharmonic eigenvectors make the results more accurate than harmonic eigenvectors. In addition, the phonon spectral relaxation time of defective silicon is calculated from frequency-domain NMA based on molecular dynamics. We show that the thermal conductivity k predicted from this approach

  14. Characterization of the uncertainty of divergence time estimation under relaxed molecular clock models using multiple loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Tianqi; Dos Reis, Mario; Yang, Ziheng

    2015-03-01

    Genetic sequence data provide information about the distances between species or branch lengths in a phylogeny, but not about the absolute divergence times or the evolutionary rates directly. Bayesian methods for dating species divergences estimate times and rates by assigning priors on them. In particular, the prior on times (node ages on the phylogeny) incorporates information in the fossil record to calibrate the molecular tree. Because times and rates are confounded, our posterior time estimates will not approach point values even if an infinite amount of sequence data are used in the analysis. In a previous study we developed a finite-sites theory to characterize the uncertainty in Bayesian divergence time estimation in analysis of large but finite sequence data sets under a strict molecular clock. As most modern clock dating analyses use more than one locus and are conducted under relaxed clock models, here we extend the theory to the case of relaxed clock analysis of data from multiple loci (site partitions). Uncertainty in posterior time estimates is partitioned into three sources: Sampling errors in the estimates of branch lengths in the tree for each locus due to limited sequence length, variation of substitution rates among lineages and among loci, and uncertainty in fossil calibrations. Using a simple but analogous estimation problem involving the multivariate normal distribution, we predict that as the number of loci ([Formula: see text]) goes to infinity, the variance in posterior time estimates decreases and approaches the infinite-data limit at the rate of 1/[Formula: see text], and the limit is independent of the number of sites in the sequence alignment. We then confirmed the predictions by using computer simulation on phylogenies of two or three species, and by analyzing a real genomic data set for six primate species. Our results suggest that with the fossil calibrations fixed, analyzing multiple loci or site partitions is the most effective way

  15. Real-Time Performance of Mechatronic PZT Module Using Active Vibration Feedback Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggogeri, Francesco; Borboni, Alberto; Merlo, Angelo; Pellegrini, Nicola; Ricatto, Raffaele

    2016-09-25

    This paper proposes an innovative mechatronic piezo-actuated module to control vibrations in modern machine tools. Vibrations represent one of the main issues that seriously compromise the quality of the workpiece. The active vibration control (AVC) device is composed of a host part integrated with sensors and actuators synchronized by a regulator; it is able to make a self-assessment and adjust to alterations in the environment. In particular, an innovative smart actuator has been designed and developed to satisfy machining requirements during active vibration control. This study presents the mechatronic model based on the kinematic and dynamic analysis of the AVC device. To ensure a real time performance, a H2-LQG controller has been developed and validated by simulations involving a machine tool, PZT actuator and controller models. The Hardware in the Loop (HIL) architecture is adopted to control and attenuate the vibrations. A set of experimental tests has been performed to validate the AVC module on a commercial machine tool. The feasibility of the real time vibration damping is demonstrated and the simulation accuracy is evaluated.

  16. Knee Cartilage Thickness, T1ρ and T2 Relaxation Time Are Related to Articular Cartilage Loading in Healthy Adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam Van Rossom

    Full Text Available Cartilage is responsive to the loading imposed during cyclic routine activities. However, the local relation between cartilage in terms of thickness distribution and biochemical composition and the local contact pressure during walking has not been established. The objective of this study was to evaluate the relation between cartilage thickness, proteoglycan and collagen concentration in the knee joint and knee loading in terms of contact forces and pressure during walking. 3D gait analysis and MRI (3D-FSE, T1ρ relaxation time and T2 relaxation time sequence of fifteen healthy subjects were acquired. Experimental gait data was processed using musculoskeletal modeling to calculate the contact forces, impulses and pressure distribution in the tibiofemoral joint. Correlates to local cartilage thickness and mean T1ρ and T2 relaxation times of the weight-bearing area of the femoral condyles were examined. Local thickness was significantly correlated with local pressure: medial thickness was correlated with medial condyle contact pressure and contact force, and lateral condyle thickness was correlated with lateral condyle contact pressure and contact force during stance. Furthermore, average T1ρ and T2 relaxation time correlated significantly with the peak contact forces and impulses. Increased T1ρ relaxation time correlated with increased shear loading, decreased T1ρ and T2 relaxation time correlated with increased compressive forces and pressures. Thicker cartilage was correlated with higher condylar loading during walking, suggesting that cartilage thickness is increased in those areas experiencing higher loading during a cyclic activity such as gait. Furthermore, the proteoglycan and collagen concentration and orientation derived from T1ρ and T2 relaxation measures were related to loading.

  17. Nuclear transfer and anisotropic motional spin phenomena: relaxation time temperature dependence studies of water adsorbed on silica gel. Part IV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woessner, D.E.; Zimmerman, J.R.

    1962-12-15

    An experimental investigation of the temperature dependence of the nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation phenomena of water vapor adsorbed on silica gel is described. Two-component relaxation data are observed. With temperature increase, the longer T/sub 2/ value decreases while its fractional population increases. These data are shown to be consistent with nuclear transfers between two state environments possessing distinct relaxation characteristics. and a comparison with theory is made. Evidence of a change of surface characteristics is presented; for early experiments, two-component longitudinal relaxation occurs below a transition temperature; in later experiments, only one-component T/sub 1/ behavior is found. A theory for an anisotropic motional model for nuclear magnetic dipole-dipole relaxation on surfaces is presented. The motional model is random reorientation of the interproton vector about an axis normal to the surface that occurs much faster than the time dependence of the angle between the vector and this axis. The relaxation processes are thus related to multiple nuclear correlation times. Consequences of an anisotropic model agree with experimental observations. (auth)

  18. A multiple relaxation time extension of the constant speed kinetic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadehgol, Abed; Ashrafizaadeh, Mahmud

    2016-02-01

    In this work, a multiple relaxation time (MRT) extension of the recently introduced constant speed kinetic model (CSKM) is proposed. The CSKM, which is an entropic kinetic model and based on unconventional entropies of Burg and Tssalis, was introduced in [A. Zadehgol and M. Ashrafizaadeh, J. Comput. Phys. 274, 803 (2014)]; [A. Zadehgol Phys. Rev. E 91, 063311 (2015)] as an extension of the model of Boghosian et al. [Phys. Rev. E 68, 025103 (2003)] in the limit of fixed speed continuous velocities. The present extension improves the stability of the previous models at very high Reynolds numbers, while allowing for a more convenient orthogonal lattice. The model is verified by solving the following benchmark problems: (i) the lid driven square cavity and (ii) the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability of thin shear layers in a doubly periodic square domain.

  19. Influence of spatial resolution and contrast agent dosage on myocardial T1 relaxation times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaszczyk, Edyta; Töpper, Agnieszka; Schmacht, Luisa; Wanke, Felix; Greiser, Andreas; Schulz-Menger, Jeanette; von Knobelsdorff-Brenkenhoff, Florian

    2017-02-01

    Our aim was to study the influence of small variations in spatial resolution and contrast agent dosage on myocardial T1 relaxation time. Twenty-nine healthy volunteers underwent cardiovascular magnetic resonance at 3T twice, including a modified look-locker inversion recovery (MOLLI) technique-3(3)3(3)5-for T1 mapping. Native T1 was assessed in three spatial resolutions (voxel size 1.4 × 1.4 × 6, 1.6 × 1.6 × 6, 1.7 × 1.7 × 6 mm(3)), and postcontrast T1 after 0.1 and 0.2 mmol/kg gadobutrol. Partition coefficient was calculated based on myocardial and blood T1. T1 analysis was done per segment, per slice, and for the whole heart. Native T1 values did not differ with varying spatial resolution per segment (p = 0.116-0.980), per slice (basal: p = 0.772; middle: p = 0.639; apex: p = 0.276), and globally (p = 0.191). Postcontrast T1 values were significantly lower with higher contrast agent dosage (p 3T, very small variations in spatial resolution (voxel sizes between 1.4 × 1.4 × 6 and 1.7 × 1.7 × 6 mm(3)) remained without effect on the native T1 relaxation times. Postcontrast T1 values were naturally shorter with higher contrast agent dosage while the partition coefficient remained constant. Further studies are necessary to test whether these conclusions hold true for larger matrix sizes and in larger cohorts.

  20. Intracerebral pH affects the T2 relaxation time of brain tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schilling, A.M.; Blankenburg, F.B.; Bernarding, J.; Heidenreich, J.O.; Wolf, K.J. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Benjamin Franklin, Free University Berlin, Hindenburgdamm 30, 12200 Berlin (Germany)

    2002-12-01

    Signal changes in activated brain areas are detectable by MRI and MR spectroscopy (MRS). Shifts in pH occur during brain activation. Our aim was to investigate the relationship between changes in pH and T2 relaxation times. T2 was determined in vitro at 24 MHz in various liquids at different pH using a Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) spin-echo sequence. We also studied five Fisher rats were studied at 2.4 tesla with a double-tuneable surface coil. After baseline measurements, potassium cyanide was injected, producing intracerebral acidosis. Alternating series of 1H CPMG spin-echo sequences and 31P spectra were acquired. True T2 relaxation times were calculated from a CPMG multi-echo train. Changes in intracellular pH determined from 31P spectra. In vitro measurements demonstrated a correlation between T2 and pH that could be described by a quadratic fit curve. Depending on the initial pH, changes of 0.2 induced changes in T2 of up to 150 ms. In vivo measurements confirmed these findings. After intraperitoneal injection of a sublethal dose of cyanide, T2 decreased by about 5% in four cases, followed by recovery after 2 h. The in vitro measurements demonstrated that changes in pH can lead to significant signal change on T2- or T2*- weighted images. The dependence of T2 on pH in vitro was confirmed in vivo; it may contribute to signal change in activated brain areas. (orig.)

  1. Relaxation time: a proton NMR-based approach as a metric to measure reactivity of engineered nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paruthi, Archini; Misra, Superb K.

    2017-08-01

    The toxicological impact of engineered nanoparticles in environmental or biological milieu is very difficult to predict and control because of the complexity of interactions of nanoparticles with the varied constituents in the suspended media. Nanoparticles are different from their bulk counterparts due to their high surface area-to-volume ratio per unit mass, which plays a vital role in bioavailability of these nanoparticles to its surroundings. This study explores how changes in the spin-spin nuclear relaxation time can be used to gauge the availability of surface area and suspension stability of selected nanoparticles (CuO, ZnO, and SiO2), in a range of simulated media. Spin-spin nuclear relaxation time can be mathematically correlated to wetted surface area, which is well backed up by the data of hydrodynamic size measurements and suspension stability. We monitored the change in spin-spin relaxation time for all the nanoparticles, over a range of concentrations (2.5 -100 ppm) in deionized water and artificial seawater. Selective concentrations of nanoparticle suspensions were subjected for temporal studies over a period of 48 hrs to understand the concept of spin-spin nuclear relaxation time-based reactivity of nanoparticle suspension. The nanoparticles showed high degree of agglomeration, when suspended in artificial seawater. This was captured by a decrease in spin-spin nuclear relaxation time and also an increment in the hydrodynamic size of the nanoparticles.

  2. Temperature Dependence of Spin Relaxation Time in InAs Columnar Quantum Dots at 10 to 150 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Sota; Sasayama, Kazutoshi; Oyanagi, Yoshitsugu; Yamaguchi, Ryo; Lu, Shulong; Li, Lianhe; Fiore, Andrea; Tackeuchi, Atsushi

    2012-04-01

    We have investigated carrier spin relaxation in InAs columnar quantum dots (CQDs) using time-resolved photoluminescence measurement. The CQDs were formed by depositing a 1.8 monolayer InAs seed dot layer and a short-period GaAs/InAs superlattice (SL). The spin relaxations of the 3- and 35-period SL CQDs show double exponential decay up to 50 and 130 K, respectively. The spin relaxation times of the fast component, whose amplitudes are 4-11 times larger than that of the slow component, are around 100 ps for the two samples. For the 3-period SL CQDs, the fast spin relaxation time shows no temperature dependence up to around 50 K, indicating the relevance of the Bir-Aronov-Pikus process. The slow spin relaxation time of the 35-period SL CQDs was found to decrease from 3.42 ns at 10 K to 0.849 ns at 130 K. This large change may be explained by the Elliott-Yafet process considering acoustic phonon scattering.

  3. Development of rapid methods for relaxation time mapping and motion estimation using magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilani, Syed Irtiza Ali

    2008-09-15

    Recent technological developments in the field of magnetic resonance imaging have resulted in advanced techniques that can reduce the total time to acquire images. For applications such as relaxation time mapping, which enables improved visualisation of in vivo structures, rapid imaging techniques are highly desirable. TAPIR is a Look- Locker-based sequence for high-resolution, multislice T{sub 1} relaxation time mapping. Despite the high accuracy and precision of TAPIR, an improvement in the k-space sampling trajectory is desired to acquire data in clinically acceptable times. In this thesis, a new trajectory, termed line-sharing, is introduced for TAPIR that can potentially reduce the acquisition time by 40 %. Additionally, the line-sharing method was compared with the GRAPPA parallel imaging method. These methods were employed to reconstruct time-point images from the data acquired on a 4T high-field MR research scanner. Multislice, multipoint in vivo results obtained using these methods are presented. Despite improvement in acquisition speed, through line-sharing, for example, motion remains a problem and artefact-free data cannot always be obtained. Therefore, in this thesis, a rapid technique is introduced to estimate in-plane motion. The presented technique is based on calculating the in-plane motion parameters, i.e., translation and rotation, by registering the low-resolution MR images. The rotation estimation method is based on the pseudo-polar FFT, where the Fourier domain is composed of frequencies that reside in an oversampled set of non-angularly, equispaced points. The essence of the method is that unlike other Fourier-based registration schemes, the employed approach does not require any interpolation to calculate the pseudo-polar FFT grid coordinates. Translation parameters are estimated by the phase correlation method. However, instead of two-dimensional analysis of the phase correlation matrix, a low complexity subspace identification of the phase

  4. An anisotropic linear thermo-viscoelastic constitutive law - Elastic relaxation and thermal expansion creep in the time domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettermann, Heinz E.; DeSimone, Antonio

    2017-09-01

    A constitutive material law for linear thermo-viscoelasticity in the time domain is presented. The time-dependent relaxation formulation is given for full anisotropy, i.e., both the elastic and the viscous properties are anisotropic. Thereby, each element of the relaxation tensor is described by its own and independent Prony series expansion. Exceeding common viscoelasticity, time-dependent thermal expansion relaxation/creep is treated as inherent material behavior. The pertinent equations are derived and an incremental, implicit time integration scheme is presented. The developments are implemented into an implicit FEM software for orthotropic material symmetry under plane stress assumption. Even if this is a reduced problem, all essential features are present and allow for the entire verification and validation of the approach. Various simulations on isotropic and orthotropic problems are carried out to demonstrate the material behavior under investigation.

  5. [Vibration-assisted music therapy reduces pain and promotes relaxation of para- and tetraplegic patients. A pilot study of psychiatric and physical effects of simultaneous acoustic and somatosensory music stimulation as pain management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariauzouls, C; Michel, D; Schiftan, Y

    1999-11-01

    Pain is a well known phenomenon in posttraumatic spinal cord injuries. Nearly 10% of the patients develop most severe, invalidizing, as a rule neurogenic pain conditions that are hardly accessible to conventional therapies. A pilot study was therefore conducted with 10 paraplegics and tetraplegics suffering chronic pain, investigating how vibration supported music therapy with the Musica Medica method affected pain experience, tension/relaxation and well-being. In addition to subjective experience, we measured physiological parameters (finger tip skin temperature, electrodermal activity, heart rate, respiration frequency) during the therapy sessions. All patients had a high acceptance of the method which throughout the group had brought about an increase in relaxation and well-being as well as a decrease of pain experience. The autonomic nervous system variables correlated with relaxation and in addition pointed to an activating impact of the therapy chosen.

  6. Characteristics of Viscoelastic Crustal Deformation Following a Megathrust Earthquake: Discrepancy Between the Apparent and Intrinsic Relaxation Time Constants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukahata, Yukitoshi; Matsu'ura, Mitsuhiro

    2017-12-01

    The viscoelastic deformation of an elastic-viscoelastic composite system is significantly different from that of a simple viscoelastic medium. Here, we show that complicated transient deformation due to viscoelastic stress relaxation after a megathrust earthquake can occur even in a very simple situation, in which an elastic surface layer (lithosphere) is underlain by a viscoelastic substratum (asthenosphere) under gravity. Although the overall decay rate of the system is controlled by the intrinsic relaxation time constant of the asthenosphere, the apparent decay time constant at each observation point is significantly different from place to place and generally much longer than the intrinsic relaxation time constant of the asthenosphere. It is also not rare that the sense of displacement rate is reversed during the viscoelastic relaxation. If we do not bear these points in mind, we may draw false conclusions from observed deformation data. Such complicated transient behavior can be explained mathematically from the characteristics of viscoelastic solution: for an elastic-viscoelastic layered half-space, the viscoelastic solution is expressed as superposition of three decaying components with different relaxation time constants that depend on wavelength.

  7. Understanding generalized inversions of nuclear magnetic resonance transverse relaxation time in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, J.; Chandrasekera, T. C.

    2014-12-01

    The nuclear magnetic resonance transverse relaxation time T2, measured using the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) experiment, is a powerful method for obtaining unique information on liquids confined in porous media. Furthermore, T2 provides structural information on the porous material itself and has many applications in petrophysics, biophysics, and chemical engineering. Robust interpretation of T2 distributions demands appropriate processing of the measured data since T2 is influenced by diffusion through magnetic field inhomogeneities occurring at the pore scale, caused by the liquid/solid susceptibility contrast. Previously, we introduced a generic model for the diffusion exponent of the form -ant_e^k (where n is the number and te the temporal separation of spin echoes, and a is a composite diffusion parameter) in order to distinguish the influence of relaxation and diffusion in CPMG data. Here, we improve the analysis by introducing an automatic search for the optimum power k that best describes the diffusion behavior. This automated method is more efficient than the manual trial-and-error grid search adopted previously, and avoids variability through subjective judgments of experimentalists. Although our method does not avoid the inherent assumption that the diffusion exponent depends on a single k value, we show through simulation and experiment that it is robust in measurements of heterogeneous systems that violate this assumption. In this way, we obtain quantitative T2 distributions from complicated porous structures and demonstrate the analysis with examples of ceramics used for filtration and catalysis, and limestone of relevance to the construction and petroleum industries.

  8. Time-series analysis of vibrational nuclear wave-packet dynamics in D2+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thumm, Uwe; Niederhausen, Thomas; Feuerstein, Bernold

    2008-06-01

    We discuss the extent to which measured time-dependent fragment kinetic energy release (KER) spectra and calculated nuclear probability densities can reveal (1) the transition frequencies between stationary vibrational states, (2) the nodal structure of stationary vibrational states, (3) the ground-state adiabatic electronic potential curve of the molecular ion, and (4) the progression of decoherence induced by random interactions with the environment. We illustrate our discussion with numerical simulations for the time-dependent nuclear motion of vibrational wave packets in the D2+ molecular ion caused by the ionization of its neutral D2 parent molecule with an intense pump laser pulse. Based on a harmonic time-series analysis, we suggest a general scheme for the full reconstruction, up to an overall phase factor, of the initial wave packets based on measured KER spectra. We apply this scheme in a numerical simulation for vibrational wave packets in D2+ molecular ions and show how this reconstruction allows the clear distinction between commonly assumed stationary vibrational state distributions of the molecular ion following the ionization of D2 .

  9. Vision-based online vibration estimation of the in-vessel inspection flexible robot with short-time Fourier transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hesheng [Key Laboratory of System Control and Information Processing, Ministry of Education of China (China); Department of Automation, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Chen, Weidong, E-mail: wdchen@sjtu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of System Control and Information Processing, Ministry of Education of China (China); Department of Automation, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Xu, Lifei; He, Tao [Key Laboratory of System Control and Information Processing, Ministry of Education of China (China); Department of Automation, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Vision-based online vibration estimation method for a flexible arm is proposed. • The vibration signal is obtained by image processing in unknown environments. • Vibration parameters are estimated by short-time Fourier transformation. - Abstract: The vibration should be suppressed if it happens during the motion of a flexible robot or under the influence of external disturbance caused by its structural features and material properties, because the vibration may affect the positioning accuracy and image quality. In Tokamak environment, we need to get the real-time vibration information on vibration suppression of robotic arm, however, some sensors are not allowed in the extreme Tokamak environment. This paper proposed a vision-based method for online vibration estimation of a flexible manipulator, which is achieved by utilizing the environment image information from the end-effector camera to estimate its vibration. Short-time Fourier Transformation with adaptive window length method is used to estimate vibration parameters of non-stationary vibration signals. Experiments with one-link flexible manipulator equipped with camera are carried out to validate the feasibility of this method in this paper.

  10. Nonadiabatic dynamics of electron transfer in solution: explicit and implicit solvent treatments that include multiple relaxation time scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwerdtfeger, Christine A; Soudackov, Alexander V; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2014-01-21

    The development of efficient theoretical methods for describing electron transfer (ET) reactions in condensed phases is important for a variety of chemical and biological applications. Previously, dynamical dielectric continuum theory was used to derive Langevin equations for a single collective solvent coordinate describing ET in a polar solvent. In this theory, the parameters are directly related to the physical properties of the system and can be determined from experimental data or explicit molecular dynamics simulations. Herein, we combine these Langevin equations with surface hopping nonadiabatic dynamics methods to calculate the rate constants for thermal ET reactions in polar solvents for a wide range of electronic couplings and reaction free energies. Comparison of explicit and implicit solvent calculations illustrates that the mapping from explicit to implicit solvent models is valid even for solvents exhibiting complex relaxation behavior with multiple relaxation time scales and a short-time inertial response. The rate constants calculated for implicit solvent models with a single solvent relaxation time scale corresponding to water, acetonitrile, and methanol agree well with analytical theories in the Golden rule and solvent-controlled regimes, as well as in the intermediate regime. The implicit solvent models with two relaxation time scales are in qualitative agreement with the analytical theories but quantitatively overestimate the rate constants compared to these theories. Analysis of these simulations elucidates the importance of multiple relaxation time scales and the inertial component of the solvent response, as well as potential shortcomings of the analytical theories based on single time scale solvent relaxation models. This implicit solvent approach will enable the simulation of a wide range of ET reactions via the stochastic dynamics of a single collective solvent coordinate with parameters that are relevant to experimentally accessible

  11. Light-induced refractive-index modifications in dielectric thin films: experimental determination of relaxation time and amplitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monneret, S; Tisserand, S; Flory, F; Rigneault, H

    1996-09-01

    A two-beam setup based on the totally reflecting prism coupler is shown to be a powerful means of characterizing light-induced refractive-index modifications in dielectric thin films. Rise and relaxation times and amplitudes of thin-film refractive-index variations can be measured. Some developments of the electromagnetic theory of prism coupling are presented for Gaussian incident beams. Measurements made on a single Ta(2)O(5) layer deposited on a silica glass are presented. Relaxation times of a few milliseconds reveal the thermal origin of the phenomena. The thermal nonlinear coefficient of this Ta(2)O(5) layer is nearly 10(-15) m(2)/W.

  12. Application of Time Delay Consideration on Bridge Vibration Control Method with Active Tendons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lezin Seba MINSILI

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available For many years bridge structures have been designed or constructed as passive structures that rely on their mass and solidity to resist external forces, while being incapable of adapting to the dynamics of an ever-changing environment. When the rigidity assumption is not met in particular for high-rise structures like bridge towers, a proper dynamic model should be established and conclusions made on the differential vibration of the tower when it is investigated out of the bridge system. The present work outlines a vibration control method by tendons on the tower of cable supported structures considering time delay effects, based on the discrete-time Linearization of the Feedback Gain Matrix. The efficiency of this vibration control method first proposed on the design process of a local bridge in Cameroon, is more compatible to the control of civil structures and is of great interest in accordance with simulation results.

  13. Real-Time Observation of Ultrafast Intraband Relaxation and Exciton Multiplication in PbS Quantum Dots

    KAUST Repository

    El-Ballouli, Ala’a O.

    2014-03-19

    We examine ultrafast intraconduction band relaxation and multiple-exciton generation (MEG) in PbS quantum dots (QDs) using transient absorption spectroscopy with 120 fs temporal resolution. The intraconduction band relaxation can be directly and excellently resolved spectrally and temporally by applying broadband pump-probe spectroscopy to excite and detect the wavelengths around the exciton absorption peak, which is located in the near-infrared region. The time-resolved data unambiguously demonstrate that the intraband relaxation time progressively increases as the pump-photon energy increases. Moreover, the relaxation time becomes much shorter as the size of the QDs decreases, indicating the crucial role of spatial confinement in the intraband relaxation process. Additionally, our results reveal the systematic scaling of the intraband relaxation time with both excess energy above the effective energy band gap and QD size. We also assess MEG in different sizes of the QDs. Under the condition of high-energy photon excitation, which is well above the MEG energy threshold, ultrafast bleach recovery due to the nonradiative Auger recombination of the multiple electron-hole pairs provides conclusive experimental evidence for the presence of MEG. For instance, we achieved quantum efficiencies of 159, 129 and 106% per single-absorbed photon at pump photoexcition of three times the band gap for QDs with band gaps of 880 nm (1.41 eV), 1000 nm (1.24 eV) and 1210 nm (1.0 eV), respectively. These findings demonstrate clearly that the efficiency of transferring excess photon energy to carrier multiplication is significantly increased in smaller QDs compared with larger ones. Finally, we discuss the Auger recombination dynamics of the multiple electron-hole pairs as a function of QD size.

  14. Two-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann method for the anisotropic dispersive Henry problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servan-Camas, Borja; Tsai, Frank T.-C.

    2010-02-01

    This study develops a lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) with a two-relaxation-time collision operator (TRT) to cope with anisotropic heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity and anisotropic velocity-dependent hydrodynamic dispersion in the saltwater intrusion problem. The directional-speed-of-sound technique is further developed to address anisotropic hydraulic conductivity and dispersion tensors. Forcing terms are introduced in the LBM to correct numerical errors that arise during the recovery procedure and to describe the sink/source terms in the flow and transport equations. In order to facilitate the LBM implementation, the forcing terms are combined with the equilibrium distribution functions (EDFs) to create pseudo-EDFs. This study performs linear stability analysis and derives LBM stability domains to solve the anisotropic advection-dispersion equation. The stability domains are used to select the time step at which the lattice Boltzmann method provides stable solutions to the numerical examples. The LBM was implemented for the anisotropic dispersive Henry problem with high ratios of longitudinal to transverse dispersivities, and the results compared well to the solutions in the work of Abarca et al. (2007).

  15. Multiple-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann simulation for flow, mass transfer, and adsorption in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qiang; Chen, Zhenqian; Liu, Hao

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, to predict the dynamics behaviors of flow and mass transfer with adsorption phenomena in porous media at the representative elementary volume (REV) scale, a multiple-relaxation-time (MRT) lattice Boltzmann (LB) model for the convection-diffusion equation is developed to solve the transfer problem with an unsteady source term in porous media. Utilizing the Chapman-Enskog analysis, the modified MRT-LB model can recover the macroscopic governing equations at the REV scale. The coupled MRT-LB model for momentum and mass transfer is validated by comparing with the finite-difference method and the analytical solution. Moreover, using the MRT-LB method coupled with the linear driving force model, the fluid transfer and adsorption behaviors of the carbon dioxide in a porous fixed bed are explored. The breakthrough curve of adsorption from MRT-LB simulation is compared with the experimental data and the finite-element solution, and the transient concentration distributions of the carbon dioxide along the porous fixed bed are elaborated upon in detail. In addition, the MRT-LB simulation results show that the appearance time of the breakthrough point in the breakthrough curve is advanced as the mass transfer resistance in the linear driving force model increases; however, the saturation point is prolonged inversely.

  16. Detailed Vibration Analysis of Pinion Gear with Time-Frequency Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosher, Marianne; Pryor, Anna H.; Lewicki, David G.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, the authors show a detailed analysis of the vibration signal from the destructive testing of a spiral bevel gear and pinion pair containing seeded faults. The vibration signal is analyzed in the time domain, frequency domain and with four time-frequency transforms: the Short Time Frequency Transform (STFT), the Wigner-Ville Distribution with the Choi-Williams kernel (WV-CW), the Continuous Wavelet' Transform (CWT) and the Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT). Vibration data of bevel gear tooth fatigue cracks, under a variety of operating load levels and damage conditions, are analyzed using these methods. A new metric for automatic anomaly detection is developed and can be produced from any systematic numerical representation of the vibration signals. This new metric reveals indications of gear damage with all of the time-frequency transforms, as well as time and frequency representations, on this data set. Analysis with the CWT detects changes in the signal at low torque levels not found with the other transforms. The WV-CW and CWT use considerably more resources than the STFT and the DWT. More testing of the new metric is needed to determine its value for automatic anomaly detection and to develop fault detection methods for the metric.

  17. Characteristics and effectiveness of vasodilatory and pressor compensation for reduced relaxation time during rhythmic forearm contractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Robert F; Poitras, Veronica J; Hong, Terrence; Tschakovsky, Michael E

    2017-06-01

    What is the central question of this study? Reduced relaxation time between contractions in exercise requires increased vasodilatation and/or pressor response to prevent hypoperfusion and potential compromise to exercise tolerance. However, it remains unknown whether and to what extent local vasodilatation and/or systemic pressor compensation occurs and whether the efficacy of compensation is exercise intensity dependent. What is the main finding and its importance? We demonstrate that in a forearm exercise model vasodilatory but not pressor compensation occurs and is adequate to prevent hypoperfusion below but not above ∼40% peak work rate. Inadequate compensation occurs with exercise still well inside the submaximal domain, despite a vasodilatory reserve, and compromises exercise performance. During muscle contraction in rhythmic exercise, muscle blood flow is significantly impeded by microvascular compression. The purpose of this study was to establish the nature and magnitude of vasodilatory and/or pressor compensatory responses during forearm exercise in the face of an increased duration of mechanical microvascular compression, and whether the effectiveness of such compensation was exercise intensity dependent. Seven healthy males (21.0 ± 1.8 years old) completed progressive forearm exercise (24.5 N every 3 min; 2 s contraction-4 s relaxation duty cycle) in two conditions: control (CON), 2 s 100 mmHg forearm cuff inflation during contraction; and impedance (IMP), extension of cuff inflation 2 s beyond contraction. Forearm blood flow (in millilitres per minute); brachial artery Doppler and echo ultrasound), mean arterial blood pressure (in millimetres of mercury; finger photoplethysmography) and exercising forearm venous effluent (antecubital vein catheter) measurements revealed an exercise intensity-dependent compensatory vasodilatation effectiveness whereby increased vasodilatation fully protected forearm blood flow up to the 30% exercise

  18. Real-Time Spatial Monitoring of Vehicle Vibration Data as a Model for TeleGeoMonitoring Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Robidoux, Jeff

    2005-01-01

    This research presents the development and proof of concept of a TeleGeoMonitoring (TGM) system for spatially monitoring and analyzing, in real-time, data derived from vehicle-mounted sensors. In response to the concern for vibration related injuries experienced by equipment operators in surface mining and construction operations, the prototype TGM system focuses on spatially monitoring vehicle vibration in real-time. The TGM vibration system consists of 3 components: (1) Data Acquisition ...

  19. Semi-active vibration absorber based on real-time controlled MR damper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, F.

    2014-06-01

    A semi-active vibration absorber with real-time controlled magnetorheological damper (MR-SVA) for the mitigation of harmonic structural vibrations is presented. The MR damper force targets to realize the frequency and damping adaptations to the actual structural frequency according to the principle of the undamped vibration absorber. The relative motion constraint of the MR-SVA is taken into account by an adaptive nonlinear control of the internal damping of the MR-SVA. The MR-SVA is numerically and experimentally validated for harmonic excitation of the primary structure when the natural frequency of the passive mass spring system of the MR-SVA is correctly tuned to the targeted structural resonance frequency and when de-tuning is present. The results demonstrate that the MR-SVA outperforms the passive TMD at structural resonance frequency by at least 12.4% and up to 60.0%.

  20. A method of real-time fault diagnosis for power transformers based on vibration analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Kaixing; Huang, Hai; Zhou, Jianping; Shen, Yimin; Li, Yujie

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, a novel probability-based classification model is proposed for real-time fault detection of power transformers. First, the transformer vibration principle is introduced, and two effective feature extraction techniques are presented. Next, the details of the classification model based on support vector machine (SVM) are shown. The model also includes a binary decision tree (BDT) which divides transformers into different classes according to health state. The trained model produces posterior probabilities of membership to each predefined class for a tested vibration sample. During the experiments, the vibrations of transformers under different conditions are acquired, and the corresponding feature vectors are used to train the SVM classifiers. The effectiveness of this model is illustrated experimentally on typical in-service transformers. The consistency between the results of the proposed model and the actual condition of the test transformers indicates that the model can be used as a reliable method for transformer fault detection.

  1. New Techniques for Cartilage Magnetic Resonance Imaging Relaxation Time Analysis: Texture Analysis of Flattened Cartilage and Localized Intra- and Inter-subject Comparisons

    OpenAIRE

    Carballido-Gamio, Julio; Link, Thomas M.; Majumdar, Sharmila

    2008-01-01

    MR relaxation time measurements of knee cartilage have shown potential to characterize knee osteoarthritis (OA). In this work, techniques that allow localized intra- and inter-subject comparisons of cartilage relaxation times, as well as cartilage flattening for texture analysis parallel and perpendicular to the natural cartilage layers, are presented. The localized comparisons are based on the registration of bone structures and the assignment of relaxation time feature vectors to each point...

  2. TIME-COURSE OF ACTION AND ENDOTRACHEAL INTUBATING CONDITIONS OF ORG-9487, A NEW SHORT-ACTING STEROIDAL MUSCLE-RELAXANT - A COMPARISON WITH SUCCINYLCHOLINE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WIERDA, JMKH; VANDENBROEK, L; PROOST, JH; VERBAAN, BW; HENNIS, PJ

    In a randomized study, we evaluated lag time (time from the end of injection of muscle relaxant until the first depression of the train-of-four response [TOF]), onset time (time from the end of injection of muscle relaxant until the maximum depression of the first twitch of the TOF [T1]),

  3. On a two-relaxation-time D2Q9 lattice Boltzmann model for the Navier-Stokes equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Weifeng; Wang, Liang; Yong, Wen-An

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, we are concerned with the stability of some lattice kinetic schemes. First, we show that a recently proposed lattice kinetic scheme is a two-relaxation-time model different from those in the literature. Second, we analyze the stability of the model by verifying the Onsager-like relation. In addition, a necessary stability criterion for hyperbolic relaxation systems is adapted to the lattice Boltzmann method. As an application of this criterion, we find some necessary stability conditions for a previously proposed lattice kinetic scheme. Numerical experiments are conducted to validate the necessary stability conditions.

  4. Diffusion relaxation times of nonequilibrium isolated small bodies and their solid phase ensembles to equilibrium states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovbin, Yu. K.

    2017-08-01

    The possibility of obtaining analytical estimates in a diffusion approximation of the times needed by nonequilibrium small bodies to relax to their equilibrium states based on knowledge of the mass transfer coefficient is considered. This coefficient is expressed as the product of the self-diffusion coefficient and the thermodynamic factor. A set of equations for the diffusion transport of mixture components is formulated, characteristic scales of the size of microheterogeneous phases are identified, and effective mass transfer coefficients are constructed for them. Allowing for the developed interface of coexisting and immiscible phases along with the porosity of solid phases is discussed. This approach can be applied to the diffusion equalization of concentrations of solid mixture components in many physicochemical systems: the mutual diffusion of components in multicomponent systems (alloys, semiconductors, solid mixtures of inert gases) and the mass transfer of an absorbed mobile component in the voids of a matrix consisting of slow components or a mixed composition of mobile and slow components (e.g., hydrogen in metals, oxygen in oxides, and the transfer of molecules through membranes of different natures, including polymeric).

  5. Determination of proton transverse relaxation times in homonuclear-coupled Spin Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gochin, Miriam

    A new method is described for obtaining proton transverse relaxation times in homonuclear-coupled systems. The oscillatory effect of the coupling on the T2 decay was removed by using the attached heteronucleus as a filter. A BIRD pulse (J. R. Garbow, D. P. Weitekamp, and A. Pines, Chem. Phys. Lett.93, 504, 1982) was applied in the center of the T2 decay period, causing protons directly and remotely connected to the heteronucleus to be decoupled from each other. Protons directly bound to the heteronucleus were inverted, leaving remote protons unaffected. Thus the method works well in natural-abundance 13C and 15N systems or for 15N-enriched biological materials, where no NN connectivities exist. The importance of obtaining proton T2 values pertains to their usefulness and sensitivity in quantitating structure and mobility in molecules. Sequences for obtaining proton T2 values were described and demonstrated on formate, alcohol, and gramicidin S. The accuracy of the measured T2 as a function of X-nucleus offset and heteronuclear coupling constant was assessed.

  6. Intraindividual comparison of T1 relaxation times after gadobutrol and Gd-DTPA administration for cardiac late enhancement imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doeblin, Patrick, E-mail: Patrick.doeblin@charite.de [Department of Cardiology, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Charité Campus Benjamin Franklin, Berlin (Germany); Schilling, Rene, E-mail: rene.schilling@charite.de [Department of Radiology, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Charité Campus Mitte, Berlin (Germany); Wagner, Moritz, E-mail: moritz.wagner@charite.de [Department of Radiology, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Charité Campus Mitte, Berlin (Germany); Luhur, Reny, E-mail: renyluhur@yahoo.com [Department of Radiology, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Charité Campus Mitte, Berlin (Germany); Huppertz, Alexander, E-mail: alexander.huppertz@charite.de [Department of Radiology, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Charité Campus Mitte, Berlin (Germany); Imaging Science Institute, Charité, Berlin (Germany); Hamm, Bernd, E-mail: bernd.hamm@charite.de [Department of Radiology, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Charité Campus Mitte, Berlin (Germany); Taupitz, Matthias, E-mail: matthias.taupitz@harite.de [Department of Radiology, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Charité Campus Mitte, Berlin (Germany); and others

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: To evaluate T1-relaxation times of chronic myocardial infarction (CMI) using gadobutrol and gadopentetate dimeglumine (Gd-DTPA) over time and to determine the optimal imaging window for late enhancement imaging with both contrast agents. Material and methods: Twelve patients with CMI were prospectively included and examined on a 1.5 T magnetic resonance (MR) system using relaxivity-adjusted doses of gadobutrol (0.15 mmol/kg) and Gd-DTPA (0.2 mmol/kg) in random order. T1-relaxation times of remote myocardium (RM), infarcted myocardium (IM), and left ventricular cavity (LVC) were assessed from short-axis TI scout imaging using the Look–Locker approach and compared intraindividually using a Wilcoxon paired signed-rank test (α < 0.05). Results: Within 3 min of contrast agent administration (CA), IM showed significantly lower T1-relaxation times than RM with both contrast agents, indicating beginning cardiac late enhancement. Differences between gadobutrol and Gd-DTPA in T1-relaxation times of IM and RM were statistically not significant through all time points. However, gadobutrol led to significantly higher T1-relaxation times of LVC than Gd-DTPA from 6 to 9 min (220 ± 15 ms vs. 195 ± 30 ms p < 0.01) onwards, resulting in a significantly greater ΔT1 of IM to LVC at 9–12 min (−20 ± 35 ms vs. 0 ± 35 ms, p < 0.05) and 12–15 min (−25 ± 45 ms vs. −10 ± 60 ms, p < 0.05). Using Gd-DTPA, comparable ΔT1 values were reached only after 25–35 min. Conclusion: This study indicates good delineation of IM to RM with both contrast agents as early as 3 min after administration. However, we found significant differences in T1 relaxation times with greater ΔT1 IM–LVC using 0.15 mmol/kg gadobutrol compared to 0.20 mmol/kg Gd-DTPA after 9–15 min post-CA suggesting earlier differentiability of IM and LVC using gadobutrol.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of spinal cord lesions in multiple sclerosis. Detection of lesions and serial T1 relaxation time values

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kojima, S.; Yagishita, T.; Fukutake, T.; Hirayama, K.; Fukuda, N.

    1987-05-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used in three patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) to demonstrate the longitudinal distribution of demyelinating plaques in the spinal cord and to measure their T1 relaxation time values in these disease processes. Neurological examination allowed the detection of the superior limit of the spinal cord lesions in the three patients, but did not permit detection of the inferior limit in two of the patients. With MRI, however, it was possible to demonstrate the longitudinal distribution of demyelinating plaques in all three patients from coronal or sagittal images using spin echo and inversion recovery pulse sequences. In two patients treated with prednisolone, serial T1 relaxation time values of MS spinal cord lesions were measured from T1 calculated images. In one patient with transverse myelopathy, the T1 relaxation time values of MS spinal cord lesions were significantly increased at a stage of acute exacerbation. This is apparently in contrast with the values at the stage of remission. In the patient with localized cervical myelopathy, the increase in T1 relaxation time values of MS spinal cord lesions at the acute stage was small and significantly different from the values at the remission stage. Several recent reports have indicated that MRI is extremely sensitive in the detection of MS plaques, but most efforts to use MRI in the diagnosis of MS have been concentrated on brain lesions in spite of their frequent associations with spinal cord involvements. It is concluded from our case studies that MRI coronal or sagittal image is useful in demonstrating the longitudinal distribution of MS spinal cord lesions. In addition, serial observations of T1 relaxation time values of MS plaques may be important in assessing the activity of MS plaques and evaluation of the steroid therapy in MS processes.

  8. Sensitivity of the simulated precipitation to changes in convective relaxation time scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Mishra

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the sensitivity of the simulated precipitation to changes in convective relaxation time scale (TAU of Zhang and McFarlane (ZM cumulus parameterization, in NCAR-Community Atmosphere Model version 3 (CAM3. In the default configuration of the model, the prescribed value of TAU, a characteristic time scale with which convective available potential energy (CAPE is removed at an exponential rate by convection, is assumed to be 1 h. However, some recent observational findings suggest that, it is larger by around one order of magnitude. In order to explore the sensitivity of the model simulation to TAU, two model frameworks have been used, namely, aqua-planet and actual-planet configurations. Numerical integrations have been carried out by using different values of TAU, and its effect on simulated precipitation has been analyzed. The aqua-planet simulations reveal that when TAU increases, rate of deep convective precipitation (DCP decreases and this leads to an accumulation of convective instability in the atmosphere. Consequently, the moisture content in the lower- and mid- troposphere increases. On the other hand, the shallow convective precipitation (SCP and large-scale precipitation (LSP intensify, predominantly the SCP, and thus capping the accumulation of convective instability in the atmosphere. The total precipitation (TP remains approximately constant, but the proportion of the three components changes significantly, which in turn alters the vertical distribution of total precipitation production. The vertical structure of moist heating changes from a vertically extended profile to a bottom heavy profile, with the increase of TAU. Altitude of the maximum vertical velocity shifts from upper troposphere to lower troposphere. Similar response was seen in the actual-planet simulations. With an increase in TAU from 1 h to 8 h, there was a significant improvement in the simulation of the seasonal mean precipitation. The fraction

  9. MRI of bone marrow in the distal radius: in vivo precision of effective transverse relaxation times

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grampp, S. [California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States). Musculoskeletal Section and Magnetic Resonance Science Center; Majumdar, S. [California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States). Musculoskeletal Section and Magnetic Resonance Science Center; Jergas, M. [California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States). Musculoskeletal Section and Magnetic Resonance Science Center; Lang, P. [California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States). Musculoskeletal Section and Magnetic Resonance Science Center; Gies, A. [California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States). Musculoskeletal Section and Magnetic Resonance Science Center; Genant, H.K. [California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States). Musculoskeletal Section and Magnetic Resonance Science Center

    1995-02-01

    The effective transverse relaxation time T2{sup *} is influenced by the presence of trabecular bone, and can potentially provide a measure of bone density as well as bone structure. We determined the in vivo precision of T2{sup *} in repeated bone marrow measurements. The T2{sup *} measurements of the bone marrow of the distal radius were performed twice within 2 weeks in six healthy young volunteers using a modified water-presaturated 3D Gradient-Recalled Acquisition at Steady State (GRASS) sequence with TE 7, 10, 12, 20, and 30; TR 67; flip angle (FA) 90 . An axial volume covering a length of 5.6 cm in the distal radius was measured. Regions of interest (ROIs) were determined manually and consisted of the entire trabecular bone cross-section extending proximally from the radial subchondral endplate. Reproducibility of T2{sup *} and area measurements was expressed as the absolute precision error (standard deviation [SD] in ms or mm{sup 2}) or as the relative precision error (SD/mean x 100, or coefficient of variation [CV] in %) between the two-point measurements. Short-term precision of T2{sup *} and area measurements varied depending on section thickness and location of the ROI in the distal radius. Absolute precision errors for T2{sup *} times were between 1.3 and 2.9 ms (relative precision errors 3.8-9.5 %) and for area measurements between 20 and 55 mm{sup 2} (relative precision errors 5.1-16.4%). This MR technique for quantitative assessment of trabecular bone density showed reasonable reproducibility in vivo and is a promising future tool for the assessment of osteoporosis. (orig.)

  10. The influence of vibrations on time reference signals generated using quartz crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drumea, Andrei; Marcu, Alina; Plotog, Ioan

    2016-12-01

    32.768 kHz low frequency crystals are found in a large part of today's embedded systems that use microcontrollers especially in battery supplied applications which need low power consumption1]. Their main role is to offer a stable time reference. There are situations in which time measurement is needed when the system works in a mechanically unstable environment (cars, industrial equipment). The paper presents the studies done on the behavior of 32.768 kHz quartz crystals that are part of embedded systems which operate in a vibrating environment, in terms of period and long-time jitter of the generated time reference signal. The investigations of this effect were done using a test bench especially designed for this purpose which can measure the presented parameters determined by controlled mechanical stimulus (waveform, amplitude and frequency of the vibrations).

  11. Simulation of Vibrations in Real Time Plane Milling with Spindle Speed Correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. I. Ivanov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In milling the hard-to-machine materials vibrations (chatter often arise from the high cutting forces if a technological system is insufficiently rigid.The main way to suppress these vibrations is to increase a stiffness of the mounting system of the tool and the work-piece to be machined. However, sometimes this method doesn’t lead to desirable result because of high values of intrinsic pliability of the tool and the work-piece. Currently, there are more complicated methods to ensure milling process quality. Among them there are three main groups:mathematical simulation of milling process dynamics and computation of processing parameters which provide high quality of machined surface, low level of vibrations and static deflections of a tool and a work-piece;introduction of the active vibration suppression devices into machine tool design; such devices include a vibration sensor, a feedback circuit, and an actuator which induces kinematic or force action on the oscillatory system;control of processing parameters, mainly of rotation frequency for minimizing the amplitudes of vibrations.The paper studies one of the 3rd group methods. There is a suggestion to process a signal of vibrational accelerations in real time and detect a chatter onset. If the chatter has been detected its frequency is to be identified, and the new value of rotation speed is set:where Ω – rotation frequency, rot/s; p – the tool eigenfrequency value identified during processing, Hz; z – mill tooth number; i – positive integer number; ε<1 – small positive parameter. In the current research it is assumed that ε = 0,2.The formula has been chosen because at the rotation frequency axis where tooth pass frequency is slightly less than the eigenfrequency divided by the integer value there are stable zones of dynamics in the milling process.The study shows a developed model of the plane milling dynamics. It includes a dynamic model of the tool, a model of cutting

  12. Measurement of the relaxation time of hot electrons in laser-solid interaction at relativistic laser intensities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, H; Shepherd, R; Chung, H K; Dyer, G; Faenov, A; Fournier, K B; Hansen, S B; Hunter, J; Kemp, A; Pikuz, T; Ping, Y; Widmann, K; Wilks, S C; Beiersdorfer, P

    2006-08-22

    The authors have measured the relaxation time of hot electrons in short pulse laser-solid interactions using a picosecond time-resolved x-ray spectrometer and a time-integrated electron spectrometer. Employing laser intensities of 10{sup 17}, 10{sup 18}, and 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}, they find increased laser coupling to hot electrons as the laser intensity becomes relativistic and thermalization of hot electrons at timescales on the order of 10 ps at all laser intensities. They propose a simple model based on collisional coupling and plasma expansion to describe the rapid relaxation of hot electrons. The agreement between the resulting K{sub {alpha}} time-history from this model with the experiments is best at highest laser intensity and less satisfactory at the two lower laser intensities.

  13. Harsh corporal punishment is associated with increased T2 relaxation time in dopamine-rich regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheu, Yi-Shin; Polcari, Ann; Anderson, Carl M; Teicher, Martin H

    2010-11-01

    Harsh corporal punishment (HCP) was defined as frequent parental administration of corporal punishment (CP) for discipline, with occasional use of objects such as straps, or paddles. CP is linked to increased risk for depression and substance abuse. We examine whether long-term exposure to HCP acts as sub-traumatic stressor that contributes to brain alterations, particularly in dopaminergic pathways, which may mediate their increased vulnerability to drug and alcohol abuse. Nineteen young adults who experienced early HCP but no other forms of maltreatment and twenty-three comparable controls were studied. T2 relaxation time (T2-RT) measurements were performed with an echo planar imaging TE stepping technique and T2 maps were calculated and analyzed voxel-by-voxel to locate regional T2-RT differences between groups. Previous studies indicated that T2-RT provides an indirect index of resting cerebral blood volume. Region of interest (ROI) analyses were also conducted in caudate, putamen, nucleus accumbens, anterior cingulate cortex, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, thalamus, globus pallidus and cerebellar hemispheres. Voxel-based relaxometry showed that HCP was associated with increased T2-RT in right caudate and putamen. ROI analyses also revealed increased T2-RT in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, substantia nigra, thalamus and accumbens but not globus pallidus or cerebellum. There were significant associations between T2-RT measures in dopamine target regions and use of drugs and alcohol, and memory performance. Alteration in the paramagnetic or hemodynamic properties of dopaminergic cell body and projection regions were observed in subjects with HCP, and these findings may relate to their increased risk for drug and alcohol abuse. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Acute changes in knee cartilage transverse relaxation time after running and bicycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatti, Anthony A; Noseworthy, Michael D; Stratford, Paul W; Brenneman, Elora C; Totterman, Saara; Tamez-Peña, José; Maly, Monica R

    2017-02-28

    To compare the acute effect of running and bicycling of an equivalent cumulative load on knee cartilage composition and morphometry in healthy young men. A secondary analysis investigated the relationship between activity history and the change in cartilage composition after activity. In fifteen men (25.8±4.2 years), the vertical ground reaction force was measured to determine the cumulative load exposure of a 15-min run. The vertical pedal reaction force was recorded during bicycling to define the bicycling duration of an equivalent cumulative load. On separate visits that were spaced on average 17 days apart, participants completed these running and bicycling bouts. Mean cartilage transverse relaxation times (T 2 ) were determined for cartilage on the tibia and weight-bearing femur before and after each exercise. T 2 was measured using a multi-echo spin-echo sequence and 3T MRI. Cartilage of the weight bearing femur and tibia was segmented using a highly-automated segmentation algorithm. Activity history was captured using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. The response of T 2 to bicycling and running was different (p=0.019; mean T 2 : pre-running=34.27ms, pre-bicycling=32.93ms, post-running=31.82ms, post-bicycling=32.36ms). While bicycling produced no change (-1.7%, p=0.300), running shortened T 2 (-7.1%, prunning. Activity history was inversely related to tibial T 2 , suggesting cartilage conditioning. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Time-frequency vibration analysis for the detection of motor damages caused by bearing currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prudhom, Aurelien; Antonino-Daviu, Jose; Razik, Hubert; Climente-Alarcon, Vicente

    2017-02-01

    Motor failure due to bearing currents is an issue that has drawn an increasing industrial interest over recent years. Bearing currents usually appear in motors operated by variable frequency drives (VFD); these drives may lead to common voltage modes which cause currents induced in the motor shaft that are discharged through the bearings. The presence of these currents may lead to the motor bearing failure only few months after system startup. Vibration monitoring is one of the most common ways for detecting bearing damages caused by circulating currents; the evaluation of the amplitudes of well-known characteristic components in the vibration Fourier spectrum that are associated with race, ball or cage defects enables to evaluate the bearing condition and, hence, to identify an eventual damage due to bearing currents. However, the inherent constraints of the Fourier transform may complicate the detection of the progressive bearing degradation; for instance, in some cases, other frequency components may mask or be confused with bearing defect-related while, in other cases, the analysis may not be suitable due to the eventual non-stationary nature of the captured vibration signals. Moreover, the fact that this analysis implies to lose the time-dimension limits the amount of information obtained from this technique. This work proposes the use of time-frequency (T-F) transforms to analyse vibration data in motors affected by bearing currents. The experimental results obtained in real machines show that the vibration analysis via T-F tools may provide significant advantages for the detection of bearing current damages; among other, these techniques enable to visualise the progressive degradation of the bearing while providing an effective discrimination versus other components that are not related with the fault. Moreover, their application is valid regardless of the operation regime of the machine. Both factors confirm the robustness and reliability of these tools

  16. Smart panel with time-varying shunted piezoelectric patch absorbers for broadband vibration control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casagrande, D.; Gardonio, P.; Zilletti, M.

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents a simulation study concerning the low and mid frequencies control of flexural vibration in a lightly damped thin plate equipped with five time-varying shunted piezoelectric patch absorbers. The panel is excited by a rain-on-the-roof broad frequency band stationary disturbance. The absorbers are composed by piezoelectric patches connected to time-varying RL shunt circuits. Discrete or continuous variations over time of the shunts are implemented in such a way as to either switch, between given values, or sweep, within certain ranges, the natural frequency and damping factor of the electro-mechanical absorbers to control either the resonant response of targeted flexural modes of the plate with natural frequency comprised between 30 Hz and 1 kHz or to control the resonant responses of all flexural modes with natural frequencies comprised between 30 Hz and 1 kHz. The proposed system is firstly presented; then, the vibration control effects produced by a single patch and by the array of five patches implementing the switching and sweeping shunts are investigated. Both time-varying operation modes produce significant vibration control effects, with reductions of the resonance peaks of the target resonances or target frequency band up to 12 dB. The piezoelectric patch absorbers with sweeping shunts offer an interesting practical solution since they are operated blindly, thus they do not require a system identification during installation and effectively work without on line tuning also on systems whose response may vary substantially in time.

  17. Acceleration of the reaction OH + CO → H + CO2 by vibrational excitation of OH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohno, Nanase; Izumi, Mari; Kohguchi, Hiroshi; Yamasaki, Katsuyoshi

    2011-05-19

    The collision complex formed from a vibrationally excited reactant undergoes redissociation to the reactant, intramolecular vibrational relaxation (randomization of vibrational energy), or chemical reaction to the products. If attractive interaction between the reactants is large, efficient vibrational relaxation in the complex prevents redissociation to the reactants with the initial vibrational energy, and the complex decomposes to the reactants with low vibrational energy or converts to the products. In this paper, we have studied the branching ratios between the intramolecular vibrational relaxation and chemical reaction of an adduct HO(v)-CO formed from OH(X(2)Π(i)) in different vibrational levels v = 0-4 and CO. OH(v = 0-4) generated in a gaseous mixture of O(3)/H(2)/CO/He irradiated at 266 nm was detected with laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) via the A(2)Σ(+)-X(2)Π(i) transition, and H atoms were probed by the two-photon excited LIF technique. From the kinetic analysis of the time-resolved LIF intensities of OH(v) and H, we have found that the intramolecular vibrational relaxation is mainly governed by a single quantum change, HO(v)-CO → HO(v-1)-CO, followed by redissociation to OH(v-1) and CO. With the vibrational quantum number v, chemical process from the adduct to H + CO(2) is accelerated, and vibrational relaxation is decelerated. The countertrend is elucidated by the competition between chemical reaction and vibrational relaxation in the adduct HOCO.

  18. SU-F-I-63: Relaxation Times of Lipid Resonances in NAFLD Animal Model Using Enhanced Curve Fitting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, K-H; Yoo, C-H; Lim, S-I; Choe, B-Y [Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The objective of this study is to evaluate the relaxation time of methylene resonance in comparison with other lipid resonances. Methods: The examinations were performed on a 3.0T MRI scanner using a four-channel animal coil. Eight more Sprague-Dawley rats in the same baseline weight range were housed with ad libitum access to water and a high-fat (HF) diet (60% fat, 20% protein, and 20% carbohydrate). In order to avoid large blood vessels, a voxel (0.8×0.8×0.8 cm{sup 3}) was placed in a homogeneous area of the liver parenchyma during free breathing. Lipid relaxations in NC and HF diet rats were estimated at a fixed repetition time (TR) of 6000 msec, and multi echo time (TEs) of 40–220 msec. All spectra for data measurement were processed using the Advanced Method for Accurate, Robust, and Efficient Spectral (AMARES) fitting algorithm of the Java-based Magnetic Resonance User Interface (jMRUI) package. Results: The mean T2 relaxation time of the methylene resonance in normal-chow diet was 37.1 msec (M{sub 0}, 2.9±0.5), with a standard deviation of 4.3 msec. The mean T2 relaxation time of the methylene resonance was 31.4 msec (M{sub 0}, 3.7±0.3), with a standard deviation of 1.8 msec. The T2 relaxation times of methylene protons were higher in normal-chow diet rats than in HF rats (p<0.05), and the extrapolated M{sub 0} values were higher in HF rats than in NC rats (p<0.005). The excellent linear fit with R{sup 2}>0.9971 and R{sup 2}>0.9987 indicates T2 relaxation decay curves with mono-exponential function. Conclusion: In in vivo, a sufficient spectral resolution and a sufficiently high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) can be achieved, so that the data measured over short TE values can be extrapolated back to TE = 0 to produce better estimates of the relative weights of the spectral components. In the short term, treating the effective decay rate as exponential is an adequate approximation.

  19. Transverse vibration of nematic elastomer Timoshenko beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Dong; Liu, Ying; Liu, Chuang

    2017-01-01

    Being a rubber-like liquid crystalline elastomer, a nematic elastomer (NE) is anisotropic viscoelastic, and displays dynamic soft elasticity. In this paper, the transverse vibration of a NE Timoshenko beam is studied based on the linear viscoelasticity theory of nematic elastomers. The governing equation of motion for the transverse vibration of a NE Timoshenko beam is derived. A complex modal analysis method is used to obtain the natural frequencies and decrement coefficients of NE beams. The influences of the nematic director rotation, the rubber relaxation time, and the director rotation time on the vibration characteristic of NE Timoshenko beams are discussed in detail. The sensitivity of the dynamic performance of NE beams to director initial angle and relaxation times provides a possibility of intelligent controlling of their dynamic performance.

  20. Effect of ultrasonic vibration time on the retention of prefabricated posts luted with two different cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dastnaei Peimaneh Hosseini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available   Background and Aims: In case of nonsurgical endodontic re-treatment or replacing a restoration, one of the best methods for removing post from the canal is using an ultrasonic vibration. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of ultrasonic vibration time on the retention of post luted with zinc phosphate or glass ionmer cements.   Materials and Methods: 96 sound extracted lower premolars were selected. The coronal section of specimen was removed and the roots were endodontically treated. A 9-mm post space was prepared in each specimens and a stainless steel Parapost XP was cemented into the post space. Half of the specimens were cemented with the Zinc phosphate cement and the other by g lass ionomer cement. After 7 days of storage, both groups were equally divided into 4 subgroups of 12 teeth. Control group did not receive any treatment. The other subgroups subjected to ultrasonic vibration for 4, 8 or 12 minutes. The retention of all specimens was evaluated and data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey tests.   Results: In control (no ultrasonic group and 4 minute ultrasonic group, the retention of posts luted with Zinc phosphate cement were not significantly differen t from those luted with g lass ionomer cement. (P=0.372. On the other hand , applying of ultrasonic vibration for 8 and 12 minutes in zinc phosphate and 12 minutes in g lass ionomer caused a significant reduction in the retention of posts (P=0.01.   Conclusion: Although, the initial retention of two cements was not different, the ultrasonic vibration had more catastrophic effect on zinc phosphate in comparison to glass ionomer.

  1. An open-source software tool for the generation of relaxation time maps in magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kühne Titus

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In magnetic resonance (MR imaging, T1, T2 and T2* relaxation times represent characteristic tissue properties that can be quantified with the help of specific imaging strategies. While there are basic software tools for specific pulse sequences, until now there is no universal software program available to automate pixel-wise mapping of relaxation times from various types of images or MR systems. Such a software program would allow researchers to test and compare new imaging strategies and thus would significantly facilitate research in the area of quantitative tissue characterization. Results After defining requirements for a universal MR mapping tool, a software program named MRmap was created using a high-level graphics language. Additional features include a manual registration tool for source images with motion artifacts and a tabular DICOM viewer to examine pulse sequence parameters. MRmap was successfully tested on three different computer platforms with image data from three different MR system manufacturers and five different sorts of pulse sequences: multi-image inversion recovery T1; Look-Locker/TOMROP T1; modified Look-Locker (MOLLI T1; single-echo T2/T2*; and multi-echo T2/T2*. Computing times varied between 2 and 113 seconds. Estimates of relaxation times compared favorably to those obtained from non-automated curve fitting. Completed maps were exported in DICOM format and could be read in standard software packages used for analysis of clinical and research MR data. Conclusions MRmap is a flexible cross-platform research tool that enables accurate mapping of relaxation times from various pulse sequences. The software allows researchers to optimize quantitative MR strategies in a manufacturer-independent fashion. The program and its source code were made available as open-source software on the internet.

  2. Joint Space-Time Coherent Vibration Driven Conformational Transitions in a Single Molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shaowei; Chen, Siyu; Li, Jie; Wu, Ruqian; Ho, W.

    2017-10-01

    We report single-molecule conformational transitions with joint angstrom-femtosecond resolution by irradiating the junction of a scanning tunneling microscope with femtosecond laser pulses. An isolated pyrrolidine molecule adsorbed on a Cu(001) surface undergoes reversible transitions between two conformational states. The transition rate decays in time and exhibits sinusoidal oscillations with periods of specific molecular vibrations. The dynamics of this transition depends sensitively on the molecular environment, as exemplified by the effects of another molecule in proximity.

  3. Intraband relaxation time in wurtzite InGaN quantum-well lasers and comparison with experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Park, S H

    1999-01-01

    The intraband relaxation time for wurtzite (WZ) 3.5-nm In sub 0 sub . sub 1 sub 5 Ga sub 0 sub . sub 8 sub 5 N/In sub 0 sub . sub 0 sub 2 Ga sub 0 sub . sub 9 sub 8 N quantum well (QW) lasers is investigated theoretically. The results are also compared with those obtained from fitting the experimental data with a non-Markovian gain model with many-body effects. An intraband relaxation time of 25 fs is obtained from the comparison with experiment, which is in reasonably good agreement with the calculated value of 20 fs at the subband edge. These values are significantly shorter than those (40 - 100 sf) reported for zinc-blende crystals, such as InP and GaAs. This is because the hole effective masses of GaN are larger than those of GaAs and InP.

  4. Effect of the off-diagonal Onsager rate coefficient on the relaxation times in a spin-1 Ising system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, Mustafa; Erdem, Rıza

    2002-05-01

    As a continuation of our previously published works, we used the lowest approximation of the cluster variation method that is identical to the mean-field approximation and linearized equations of motions which are obtained by the Onsager reciprocity theorem to study the effect of the off-diagonal Onsager rate coefficient ( γ) on the relaxation times τ1 and τ2 near the critical point of the spin-1 Ising system. The temperature variations of the relaxation times have been studied for different values of the kinetic coefficient ( γ) which couples the dipolar and quadrupolar order currents in the system. Below and above the critical temperature ( TC), a maximum of τ2 is observed according to the values of off-diagonal coefficient ( γ).

  5. The effect of guided relaxation and exercise imagery on self-reported leisure-time exercise behaviors in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bang Hyun; Newton, Roberta A; Sachs, Michael L; Giacobbi, Peter R; Glutting, Joseph J

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a 6-wk intervention that used guided relaxation and exercise imagery (GREI) to increase self-reported leisure-time exercise behavior among older adults. A total of 93 community-dwelling healthy older adults (age 70.38 ± 8.15 yr, 66 female) were randomly placed in either a placebo control group or an intervention group. The intervention group received instructions to listen to an audio compact disk (CD) containing a GREI program, and the placebo control group received an audio CD that contained 2 relaxation tracks and instructions to listen to music of their choice for 6 wk. Results revealed that listening to a GREI CD for 6 wk significantly increased self-reported leisure-time exercise behaviors (p = .03). Further exploration of GREI and its effects on other psychological variables related to perceived exercise behaviors may substantiate its effectiveness.

  6. Extremely slow intramolecular vibrational redistribution: Direct observation by time-resolved raman spectroscopy in trifluoropropyne

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinovsky, A. L.; Makarov, A. A.; Ryabov, E. A.

    2011-04-01

    We have studied the dynamics of intramolecular vibrational redistribution (IVR) from the initially excited mode v1 ≈ 3330 cm-1 (acetylene-type H-C bond) in H-C≡C-CF3 molecules in the gaseous phase by means of anti-Stokes spontaneous Raman scattering. The time constant of this process is estimated as 2.3 ns—this is the slowest IVR time reported so far for the room-temperature gases. It is suggested that so long IVR time with respect to the other propyne derivatives can be explained by a larger defect, in this case, of the Fermi resonance of v1 with v2 + 2v7—the most probable doorway state leading to IVR from v1 to the bath of all vibrational-rotational states with the close energies. In addition, it is shown that the observed dynamics is in agreement with a theoretical model assuming strong vibrational-rotational mixing.

  7. Magnetic resonance spin-spin relaxation time estimation in a rat model of fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghamdi, Sami; Sinclair, Benjamin; Cowin, Gary; Brereton, Ian; Tesiram, Yasvir A

    2017-06-22

    To compare mono- and bi-exponential relaxation model equations to discriminate between normal and fatty liver disease. Six rats on a choline deficient amino acid modified (CDAA) diet and six on normal chow were studied. Multiple spin echo images with increasing echo times (TEs) were collected at 9.4T. Pixel-wise T2 maps were generated using mono-exponential decay function to calculate T2M , and a bi-exponential to calculate, short T2 component (T2S ), long T2 component (T2L ), and fractions of these components (ρS , ρL ), respectively. Statistical F-tests and Akaike's information criterion (AIC) were used to assess the relative performance of the two models. F-test and AIC showed that in the CDAA group, T2 bi-exponential model described the signal of T2 weighted imaging of the liver better than the mono-exponential model. Controls were best described by the mono-exponential model. Mean values for T2M , T2L , T2S , ρS , ρL were 31.2 ± 0.7 ms, 72.8 ± 3.3 ms, 8.2 ± 0.6 ms,71.2 ± 2.1%, 30.4 ± 1.3%, respectively, in CDAA rats, compared with 18.8 ± 0.5 ms, 32.3 ± 0.7 ms, 9.2 ± 1.8 ms, 79 ± 2%, 21.0 ± 1.1% in controls. In the fatty liver of CDAA rats we have shown that T2 weighted images fit the bi-exponential model better than mono-exponential decays thus providing a better description of the data. 1 Technical Efficacy: Stage 2 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  8. The application of T1 and T2 relaxation time and magnetization transfer ratios to the early diagnosis of patellar cartilage osteoarthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Weiwu; Qu, Nan; Lu, Zhihua; Yang, Shixun [Shanghai Jiaotong University, Department of Radiology, Shanghai (China)

    2009-11-15

    We compare the T1 and T2 relaxation times and magnetization transfer ratios (MTRs) of normal subjects and patients with osteoarthritis (OA) to evaluate the ability of these techniques to aid in the early diagnosis and treatment of OA. The knee joints in 11 normal volunteers and 40 patients with OA were prospectively evaluated using T1 relaxation times as measured using delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC), T2 relaxation times (multiple spin-echo sequence, T2 mapping), and MTRs. The OA patients were further categorized into mild, moderate, and severe OA. The mean T1 relaxation times of the four groups (normal, mild OA, moderate OA, and severe OA) were: 487.3{+-}27.7, 458.0{+-}55.9, 405.9{+-}57.3, and 357.9{+-}36.7 respectively (p<0.001). The mean T2 relaxation times of the four groups were: 37.8{+-}3.3, 44.0{+-}8.5, 50.9{+-}9.5, and 57.4{+-}4.8 respectively (p<0.001). T1 relaxation time decreased and T2 relaxation time increased with worsening degeneration of patellar cartilage. The result of the covariance analysis showed that the covariate age had a significant influence on T2 relaxation time (p<0.001). No significant differences between the normal and OA groups using MTR were noted. T1 and T2 relaxation times are relatively sensitive to early degenerative changes in the patellar cartilage, whereas the MTR may have some limitations with regard to early detection of OA. In addition, The T1 and T2 relaxation times negatively correlate with each other, which is a novel finding. (orig.)

  9. SU-E-I-64: Transverse Relaxation Time in Methylene Protons of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, K-H; Lee, D-W; Choe, B-Y [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate transverse relaxation time of methylene resonance compared to other lipid resonances. Methods: The examinations were performed using a 3.0 T scanner with a point — resolved spectroscopy (PRESS) sequence. Lipid relaxation time in a lipid phantom filled with canola oil was estimated considering repetition time (TR) as 6000 msec and echo time (TE) as 40 — 550 msec. For in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 1}H — MRS), eight male Sprague — Dawley rats were given free access to a normal - chow (NC) and eight other male Sprague-Dawley rats were given free access to a high — fat (HF) diet. Both groups drank water ad libitum. T{sub 2} measurements in the rats’ livers were conducted at a fixed TR of 6000 msec and TE of 40 – 220 msec. Exponential curve fitting quality was calculated through the coefficients of determination (R{sup 2}). Results: A chemical analysis of phantom and liver was not performed but a T{sub 2} decay curve was acquired. The T{sub 2} relaxation time of methylene resonance was estimated as follows: NC rats, 37.07 ± 4.32 msec; HF rats, 31.43 ± 1.81 msec (p < 0.05). The extrapolated M0 values were higher in HF rats than in NC rats (p < 0.005). Conclusion: This study of {sup 1}H-MRS led to sufficient spectral resolution and signal — to — noise ratio differences to characterize all observable resonances for yielding T{sub 2} relaxation times of methylene resonance. {sup 1}H — MRS relaxation times may be useful for quantitative characterization of various liver diseases, including fatty liver disease. This study was supported by grant (2012-007883 and 2014R1A2A1A10050270) from the Mid-career Researcher Program through the NRF funded by Ministry of Science. In addition, this study was supported by the Industrial R&D of MOTIE/KEIT (10048997, Development of the core technology for integrated therapy devices based on real-time MRI-guided tumor tracking)

  10. Measurement of electron spin-lattice relaxation times in radical doped butanol samples at 1 K using the NEDOR method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hess, C., E-mail: hess@ep1.rub.de [Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Experimentalphysik I, Universitaetsstr. 150, 44801 Bochum (Germany); Herick, J.; Berlin, A.; Meyer, W.; Reicherz, G. [Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Experimentalphysik I, Universitaetsstr. 150, 44801 Bochum (Germany)

    2012-12-01

    The electron spin-lattice relaxation time (T{sub 1e}) of TEMPO- and trityl-doped butanol samples at 2.5 T and temperatures between 0.95 K and 2.17 K was studied by pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) using the nuclear-electron double resonance (NEDOR) method. This method is based on the idea to measure the NMR lineshift produced by the local field of paramagnetic impurities, whose polarization can be manipulated. This is of technical advantage as measurements can be performed under conditions typically used for the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) process - in our case 2.5 T and temperatures around 1 K - where a direct measurement on the electronic spins would be far more complicated to perform. As T{sub 1e} is a crucial parameter determining the overall efficiency of DNP, the effect of the radical type, its spin concentration, the temperature and the oxygen content on T{sub 1e} has been investigated. For radical concentrations as used in DNP (several 10{sup 19} spins/cm{sup 3}) the relaxation rate (T{sub 1e}{sup -1}) has shown a linear dependence on the paramagnetic electron concentration for both radicals investigated. Experiments with perdeuterated and ordinary butanol have given no indication for any influence of the host materials isotopes. The measured temperature dependence has shown an exponential characteristic. It is further observed that the oxygen content in the butanol samples has a considerable effect on the electron relaxation time and thus influences the nuclear relaxation time and polarization rate during the DNP. The experiments also show a variation in the NMR linewidth, leading to comparable time constants as determined by the lineshift. NEDOR measurements were also performed on irradiated, crystal grains of {sup 6}LiD. These samples exhibited a linewidth behavior similar to that of the cylindrically shaped butanol samples.

  11. Algorithmic developments of the kinetic activation-relaxation technique: Accessing long-time kinetics of larger and more complex systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trochet, Mickaël; Sauvé-Lacoursière, Alecsandre; Mousseau, Normand

    2017-10-01

    In spite of the considerable computer speed increase of the last decades, long-time atomic simulations remain a challenge and most molecular dynamical simulations are limited to 1 μ s at the very best in condensed matter and materials science. There is a need, therefore, for accelerated methods that can bridge the gap between the full dynamical description of molecular dynamics and experimentally relevant time scales. This is the goal of the kinetic Activation-Relaxation Technique (k-ART), an off-lattice kinetic Monte-Carlo method with on-the-fly catalog building capabilities based on the topological tool NAUTY and the open-ended search method Activation-Relaxation Technique (ART nouveau) that has been applied with success to the study of long-time kinetics of complex materials, including grain boundaries, alloys, and amorphous materials. We present a number of recent algorithmic additions, including the use of local force calculation, two-level parallelization, improved topological description, and biased sampling and show how they perform on two applications linked to defect diffusion and relaxation after ion bombardement in Si.

  12. T2* relaxation time of acetabular and femoral cartilage with and without intraarticular gadopentetate dimeglumine in patients with femoroacetabular impingement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissi, Mikko J; Mortazavi, Shabnam; Hughes, John; Morgan, Patrick; Ellermann, Jutta

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess whether the presence of intraarticular gadopentetate dimeglumine during clinical MR arthrography significantly alters the T2* relaxation time of hip articular cartilage in patients with femoroacetabular impingement. T2* mapping of 10 patient volunteers (seven female patients, three male patients; age range, 14-49 years; mean, 33.0 ± 12.2 [SD] years) with symptomatic femoroacetabular impingement was performed before and after intraarticular administration of gadopentetate dimeglumine. Overall 323 ROIs were defined in each acetabular and femoral cartilage before and after gadolinium injection. Agreement of the T2* relaxation times before and after gadolinium injection was assessed with the Krippendorff alpha coefficient and linear regression through the origin. T2* relaxation times before and after gadolinium injection in both acetabular and femoral cartilage were found to agree strongly. Specifically, estimated Krippendorff alpha values were greater than 0.8 for both acetabular and femoral cartilage, linear regressions through the origin yielded estimated slopes very close to 1, and R(2) values were greater than 0.98. The results indicate that intraarticular injection of gadopentetate dimeglumine according to the protocol described in this study has little effect on the T2* of femoral and acetabular cartilage. The results suggest that T2* mapping can be safely performed as an addition to a standard clinical hip imaging protocol that includes gadopentetate dimeglumine administration.

  13. Relationship between aging and T1relaxation time in deep gray matter: A voxel-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okubo, Gosuke; Okada, Tomohisa; Yamamoto, Akira; Fushimi, Yasutaka; Okada, Tsutomu; Murata, Katsutoshi; Togashi, Kaori

    2017-09-01

    To investigate age-related changes in T 1 relaxation time in deep gray matter structures in healthy volunteers using magnetization-prepared 2 rapid acquisition gradient echoes (MP2RAGE). In all, 70 healthy volunteers (aged 20-76, mean age 42.6 years) were scanned at 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A MP2RAGE sequence was employed to quantify T 1 relaxation times. After the spatial normalization of T 1 maps with the diffeomorphic anatomical registration using the exponentiated Lie algebra algorithm, voxel-based regression analysis was conducted. In addition, linear and quadratic regression analyses of regions of interest (ROIs) were also performed. With aging, voxel-based analysis (VBA) revealed significant T 1 value decreases in the ventral-inferior putamen, nucleus accumbens, and amygdala, whereas T 1 values significantly increased in the thalamus and white matter as well (P VBA result. T 1 values in the thalamus (P < 0.0001), substantia nigra (P = 0.0003), and globus pallidus (P < 0.0001) had a best fit to quadratic curves, with the minimum T 1 values observed between 30 and 50 years of age. Age-related changes in T 1 relaxation time vary by location in deep gray matter. 2 Technical Efficacy: Stage 2 J. MAGN. RESON. IMAGING 2017;46:724-731. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  14. Tumor T1 Relaxation Time for Assessing Response to Bevacizumab Anti-Angiogenic Therapy in a Mouse Ovarian Cancer Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murali K Ravoori

    Full Text Available To assess whether T1 relaxation time of tumors may be used to assess response to bevacizumab anti-angiogenic therapy.12 female nude mice bearing subcutaneous SKOV3ip1-LC ovarian tumors were administered bevacizumab (6.25ug/g, n=6 or PBS (control, n=6 therapy twice a week for two weeks. T1 maps of tumors were generated before, two days, and 2 weeks after initiating therapy. Tumor weight was assessed by MR and at necropsy. Histology for microvessel density, proliferation, and apoptosis was performed.Bevacizumab treatment resulted in tumor growth inhibition (p<0.04, n=6, confirming therapeutic efficacy. Tumor T1 relaxation times increased in bevacizumab treated mice 2 days and 2 weeks after initiating therapy (p<.05, n=6. Microvessel density decreased 59% and cell proliferation (Ki67+ decreased 50% in the bevacizumab treatment group (p<.001, n=6, but not apoptosis.Findings suggest that increased tumor T1 relaxation time is associated with response to bevacizumab therapy in ovarian cancer model and might serve as an early indicator of response.

  15. Using the Relaxation Test to Study Variation in the Time-Dependent Property of Rock and the Consequent Effect on Time-Dependent Roof Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yuting; Mishra, Brijes; Gao, Danqing

    2017-09-01

    Field observations have demonstrated that roof failure occurs spatially in a mine from the time of excavation. It is suspected that time-dependent deformation propagates failure in the rock mass. In this paper, the relaxation test is used to study variation in the time-dependent property of rock and the consequent effect on time-dependent roof failure. This investigation uses a numerical simulation in 3DEC. The relaxation equation is developed from Burgers model. Variations in the time-dependent property in the post-failure region show negligible variation and, therefore, are averaged to represent the time-dependent property of the failed rock. Finally, these parameters are used in the numerical simulation of underground excavations. Two groups of parameters are used to represent the time-dependent property for pre- and post-failure conditions. FISH functions within 3DEC are used to monitor the state of each zone. Once failure is detected, the parameters are changed to the values corresponding to failed rock. The results show that the new relaxation model accurately predicts the time-dependent propagation of the failure zone. The variation of the time-dependent parameters significantly affects the rock mass behavior and roof convergence.

  16. In vivo field dependence of proton relaxation times in human brain, liver and skeletal muscle: a multicenter study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, O; de Certaines, J D; Spisni, A

    1993-01-01

    and MRS, the in vivo field dispersion of T1 and T2 has been measured in order to evaluate whether ex vivo data are representative for the in vivo situation. Brain, skeletal muscle, and liver of healthy human volunteers were studied. Fifteen MR units with a field strength ranging from 0.08 T to 1.5 T took......T1 and T2 relaxation times are fundamental parameters for signal contrast behaviour in MRI. A number of ex vivo relaxometry studies have dealt with the magnetic field dispersion of T1. By means of multicenter study within the frame of the COMAC BME Concerted Action on Tissue Characterization by MRI...... part in the trial, which comprised 218 volunteers. All the MR systems were tested for measurement accuracy using the Eurospin TO5 test object. The measured relaxation data were subsequently corrected according to the obtained calibration curves. The results showed a clear field dispersion of T1...

  17. A New Framework For Helicopter Vibration Suppression; Time-Periodic System Identification and Controller Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulker, Fatma Demet

    In forward flight, helicopter rotor blades function within a highly complex aerodynamic environment that includes both near-blade and far-blade aerodynamic phenomena. These aerodynamic phenomena cause fluctuating aerodynamic loads on the rotor blades. These loads when coupled with the dynamic characteristics and elastic motion of the blade create excessive amount of vibration. These vibrations degrade helicopter performance, passenger comfort and contributes to high cost maintenance problems. In an effort to suppress helicopter vibration, recent studies have developed active control strategies using active pitch links, flaps, twist actuation and higher harmonic control of the swash plate. In active helicopter vibration control, designing a controller in a computationally efficient way requires accurate reduced-order models of complex helicopter aeroelasticity. In previous studies, controllers were designed using aeroelastic models that were obtained by coupling independently reduced aerodynamic and structural dynamic models. Unfortunately, these controllers could not satisfy stability and performance criteria when implemented in high-fidelity computer simulations or real-time experiments. In this thesis, we present a novel approach that provides accurate time-periodic reduced-order models and time-periodic H2 and H infinity controllers that satisfy the stability and performance criteria. Computational efficiency and the necessity of using the approach were validated by implementing an actively controlled flap strategy. In this proposed approach, the reduced-order models were directly identified from high-fidelity coupled aeroelastic analysis by using the time-periodic subspace identification method. Time-periodic H2 and Hinfinity controllers that update the control actuation at every time step were designed. The control synthesis problem was solved using Linear Matrix Inequality and periodic Riccati Equation based formulations, for which an in-house periodic

  18. Study on Vibration of Heavy-Precision Robot Cantilever Based on Time-varying Glowworm Swarm Optimization Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, T. H.; Liang, S.; Miao, C. B.

    2017-12-01

    A method of terminal vibration analysis based on Time-varying Glowworm Swarm Optimization algorithm is proposed in order to solve the problem that terminal vibration of the large flexible robot cantilever under heavy load precision.The robot cantilever of the ballastless track is used as the research target and the natural parameters of the flexible cantilever such as the natural frequency, the load impact and the axial deformation is considered. Taking into account the change of the minimum distance between the glowworm individuals, the terminal vibration response and adaptability could meet. According to the Boltzmann selection mechanism, the dynamic parameters in the motion simulation process are determined, while the influence of the natural frequency and the load impact as well as the axial deformation on the terminal vibration is studied. The method is effective and stable, which is of great theoretical basis for the study of vibration control of flexible cantilever terminal.

  19. Real-time observation of vibrational revival in the fastest molecular system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudenko, A.; Ergler, Th.; Feuerstein, B.; Zrost, K.; Schröter, C. D.; Moshammer, R.; Ullrich, J.

    2006-10-01

    After preparing a coherent vibrational wave packet in the hydrogen molecular ion by ionizing neutral H 2 molecules with a 6.5 fs, 760 nm laser pulse at 3 × 10 14 W/cm 2, we map its spatio-temporal evolution by the fragmentation induced with a second 6.5 fs laser pulse of doubled intensity. In this proof-of-principle experiment, we visualize the oscillations of this most fundamental molecular system, observe a dephasing of the vibrational wave packet and its subsequent revival. Whereas the experimental data exhibit an overall qualitative agreement with the results of a simple numerical simulation, noticeable discrepancy is found in the characteristic revival time. The most likely reasons for this disagreement originate from the simplifications used in the theoretical model, which assumes a Franck-Condon transition induced by the pump pulse with subsequent field-free propagation of the H2+ vibrational wave packet, and neglects the influence of the rotational motion.

  20. Adaptive Model Predictive Vibration Control of a Cantilever Beam with Real-Time Parameter Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gergely Takács

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an adaptive-predictive vibration control system using extended Kalman filtering for the joint estimation of system states and model parameters. A fixed-free cantilever beam equipped with piezoceramic actuators serves as a test platform to validate the proposed control strategy. Deflection readings taken at the end of the beam have been used to reconstruct the position and velocity information for a second-order state-space model. In addition to the states, the dynamic system has been augmented by the unknown model parameters: stiffness, damping constant, and a voltage/force conversion constant, characterizing the actuating effect of the piezoceramic transducers. The states and parameters of this augmented system have been estimated in real time, using the hybrid extended Kalman filter. The estimated model parameters have been applied to define the continuous state-space model of the vibrating system, which in turn is discretized for the predictive controller. The model predictive control algorithm generates state predictions and dual-mode quadratic cost prediction matrices based on the updated discrete state-space models. The resulting cost function is then minimized using quadratic programming to find the sequence of optimal but constrained control inputs. The proposed active vibration control system is implemented and evaluated experimentally to investigate the viability of the control method.

  1. Predicting How Nanoconfinement Changes the Relaxation Time of a Supercooled Liquid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingebrigtsen, Trond; Errington, Jeff; Truskett, Tom

    2013-01-01

    The properties of nanoconfined fluids can be strikingly different from those of bulk liquids. A basic unanswered question is whether the equilibrium and dynamic consequences of confinement are related to each other in a simple way. We study this question by simulation of a liquid comprising...... asymmetric dumbbell-shaped molecules, which can be deeply supercooled without crystallizing. We find that the dimensionless structural relaxation times—spanning six decades as a function of temperature, density, and degree of confinement—collapse when plotted versus excess entropy. The data also collapse...

  2. Comparison of the T2 relaxation time of the temporomandibular joint articular disk between patients with temporomandibular disorders and asymptomatic volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakimoto, N; Shimamoto, H; Chindasombatjaroen, J; Tsujimoto, T; Tomita, S; Hasegawa, Y; Murakami, S; Furukawa, S

    2014-07-01

    T2 relaxation time is a quantitative MR imaging parameter used to detect degenerated cartilage in the knee and lumbar intervertebral disks. We measured the T2 relaxation time of the articular disk of the temporomandibular joint in patients with temporomandibular disorders and asymptomatic volunteers to demonstrate an association between T2 relaxation time and temporomandibular disorder MR imaging findings. One hundred forty-four patients with temporomandibular disorders and 17 volunteers were enrolled in this study. An 8-echo spin-echo sequence for measuring the T2 relaxation times was performed in the closed mouth position, and the T2 relaxation time of the entire articular disk was measured. Patients were classified according to the articular disk location and function, articular disk configuration, presence of joint effusion, osteoarthritis, and bone marrow abnormalities. The T2 relaxation time of the entire articular disk was 29.3 ± 3.8 ms in the volunteer group and 30.7 ± 5.1 ms in the patient group (P = .177). When subgroups were analyzed, however, the T2 relaxation times of the entire articular disk in the anterior disk displacement without reduction group, the marked or extensive joint effusion group, the osteoarthritis-positive group, and the bone marrow abnormality-positive group were significantly longer than those in the volunteer group (P temporomandibular joint in patients with progressive temporomandibular disorders were longer than those of healthy volunteers. © 2014 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  3. Sparse Representation Based Frequency Detection and Uncertainty Reduction in Blade Tip Timing Measurement for Multi-Mode Blade Vibration Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Minghao; Yang, Yongmin; Guan, Fengjiao; Hu, Haifeng; Xu, Hailong

    2017-01-01

    The accurate monitoring of blade vibration under operating conditions is essential in turbo-machinery testing. Blade tip timing (BTT) is a promising non-contact technique for the measurement of blade vibrations. However, the BTT sampling data are inherently under-sampled and contaminated with several measurement uncertainties. How to recover frequency spectra of blade vibrations though processing these under-sampled biased signals is a bottleneck problem. A novel method of BTT signal processing for alleviating measurement uncertainties in recovery of multi-mode blade vibration frequency spectrum is proposed in this paper. The method can be divided into four phases. First, a single measurement vector model is built by exploiting that the blade vibration signals are sparse in frequency spectra. Secondly, the uniqueness of the nonnegative sparse solution is studied to achieve the vibration frequency spectrum. Thirdly, typical sources of BTT measurement uncertainties are quantitatively analyzed. Finally, an improved vibration frequency spectra recovery method is proposed to get a guaranteed level of sparse solution when measurement results are biased. Simulations and experiments are performed to prove the feasibility of the proposed method. The most outstanding advantage is that this method can prevent the recovered multi-mode vibration spectra from being affected by BTT measurement uncertainties without increasing the probe number. PMID:28758952

  4. Study on hydraulic exciting vibration due to flexible valve in pump system with method of characteristics in the time domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Y. H.; Liu, D.; Yang, X. F.; Si, J.

    2017-08-01

    To analyse the flow characteristics of leakage as well as the mechanism of selfexcited vibration in valves, the method of characteristics was used to assess the effect of flexible valve leakage on the self-excited vibration in water-supply pump system. Piezometric head in upstream of the valve as a function of time was obtained. Two comparative schemes were proposed to simulate the process of self-excited vibration by changing the length, the material of the pipeline and the leakage of valves in the above pump system. It is shown that the length and material of the pipe significantly affect the amplitude and cycle of self-excited vibration as well as the increasing rate of the vibration amplitude. In addition, the leakage of the valve has little influence on the amplitude and cycle of self-excited vibration, but has a significant effect on the increasing rate of vibration amplitude. A pipe explosion accident may occur without the inhibiting of self-excited vibration.

  5. Vibration sensor data denoising using a time-frequency manifold for machinery fault diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qingbo; Wang, Xiangxiang; Zhou, Qiang

    2013-12-27

    Vibration sensor data from a mechanical system are often associated with important measurement information useful for machinery fault diagnosis. However, in practice the existence of background noise makes it difficult to identify the fault signature from the sensing data. This paper introduces the time-frequency manifold (TFM) concept into sensor data denoising and proposes a novel denoising method for reliable machinery fault diagnosis. The TFM signature reflects the intrinsic time-frequency structure of a non-stationary signal. The proposed method intends to realize data denoising by synthesizing the TFM using time-frequency synthesis and phase space reconstruction (PSR) synthesis. Due to the merits of the TFM in noise suppression and resolution enhancement, the denoised signal would have satisfactory denoising effects, as well as inherent time-frequency structure keeping. Moreover, this paper presents a clustering-based statistical parameter to evaluate the proposed method, and also presents a new diagnostic approach, called frequency probability time series (FPTS) spectral analysis, to show its effectiveness in fault diagnosis. The proposed TFM-based data denoising method has been employed to deal with a set of vibration sensor data from defective bearings, and the results verify that for machinery fault diagnosis the method is superior to two traditional denoising methods.

  6. Ultrafast studies of photodissociation in solution: Dissociation, recombination and relaxation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, Jason Christopher [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1995-05-01

    Photodissociation of M(CO)6 (M=Cr,Mo,W) and the formation of solvated M(CO)5•S complex was studied in cyclohexane; rate-limiting step is vibrational energy relaxation from the new bond to the solvent. For both M=Cr and Mo, the primary relaxation occurs in 18 ps; for Cr, there is an additional vibrational relaxation (150 ps time scale) of a CO group poorly coupled to other modes. Relaxation of M=W occurs in 42 ps; several possible mechanisms for the longer cooling are discussed. Vibrational relaxation is also investigated for I2- and IBr- in nonpolar and slightly polar solvents. Attempts were made to discover the mechanism for the fast energy transfer in nonpolar solvent. The longer time scale dynamics of I3- and IBr2- were also studied; both formed a metastable complex following photodissociation and 90-95% return to ground state in 100 ps, implying a barrier to recombination of 4.3 kcal/mol and a barrier to escape of ≥5.5 kcal/mol. The more complex photochemistry of M3(CO)12 (M=Fe,Ru) is also investigated, using visible and ultraviolet radiations, dissociation, geminate recombination, vibrational relaxation, and bridging structures and their reactions were studied. Attempts were made to extend ultrafast spectroscopy into the mid-infrared, but signal-to-noise was poor.

  7. A fast method for the quantification of fat fraction and relaxation times: Comparison of five sites of bone marrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Ster, Caroline; Lasbleiz, Jérémy; Kannengiesser, Stephan; Guillin, Raphaël; Gambarota, Giulio; Saint-Jalmes, Hervé

    2017-06-01

    Bone marrow is found either as red bone marrow, which mainly contains haematopoietic cells, or yellow bone marrow, which mainly contains adipocytes. In adults, red bone marrow is principally located in the axial skeleton. A recent study has introduced a method to simultaneously estimate the fat fraction (FF), the T1 and T2* relaxation times of water (T1w, T2*w) and fat (T1f and T2*f) in the vertebral bone marrow. The aim of the current study was to measure FF, T1w, T1f, T2*w and T2*f in five sites of bone marrow, and to assess the presence of regional variations. MRI experiments were performed at 1.5T on five healthy volunteers (31.6±15.6years) using a prototype chemical-shift-encoded 3D multi-gradient-echo sequence (VIBE) acquired with two flip angles. Acquisitions were performed in the shoulders, lumbar spine and pelvis, with acquisition times of fat fraction and relaxation times were observed in these sites, with higher fat fraction and longer T1w in the epiphyses of long bones. A high correlation between FF and T1w was measured in these bones (R=0.84 in the humerus and R=0.84 in the femur). In most sites, there was a significant difference between water and fat relaxation times, attesting the relevance of measuring these parameters separately. The method proposed in the current study allowed for measurements of FF, T1w, T1f, T2*w and T2*f in five sites of bone marrow. Regional variations of these parameters were observed and a strong negative correlation between the T1 of water and the fat fraction in bones with high fat fractions was found. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Assessment of the two relaxation time Lattice-Boltzmann scheme to simulate Stokes flow in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talon, L.; Bauer, D.; Gland, N.; Youssef, S.; Auradou, H.; Ginzburg, I.

    2012-04-01

    The recent advances in 3-D imaging of porous structures have generated a tremendous interest in the simulation of complex single and two-phase flows. Lattice-Boltzmann (LB) schemes present a powerful tool to solve the flow field directly from the binarized 3-D images. However, as viscosity often plays an important role, the LB scheme should correctly treat viscosity effects. This is the case using a LB scheme with two relaxation times (TRT) unlike the broadly used, the single-relaxation rate, BGK, where the velocity of the modeled fluid does not vary as the inverse of the viscosity applying the bounce-back (no-slip) boundary rule. The aim of this work is to apply the LB-TRT approach to different types of porous media (straight channels, 2-D model porous media, sandstone) to solve for the flow field and to evaluate the approach in terms of parameter dependence, error and convergence time on the basis of permeability. We show that the variation of permeability with the free relaxation parameter Λ of the TRT scheme depends on the heterogeneity of the sample and on the numerical resolution. The convergence time depends on the applied viscosity and the parameter standing for the speed of sound, thus the computation time can be reduced by choosing appropriate values of those parameters. Two approaches to calculate permeability (Darcy's law and viscous energy dissipation) are proposed and investigated. We recommend to use Darcy's law, as dependence on Λ is less important. Periodic (in the presence of a driving body force) and pressure boundary conditions are evaluated in terms of the results.

  9. Multi-level Simulation of a Real Time Vibration Monitoring System Component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Bryan A.; Wilkerson, Delisa

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a custom built Digital Signal Processing (DSP) printed circuit board designed to implement the Advanced Real Time Vibration Monitoring Subsystem proposed by Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Transportation Directorate in 2000 for the Space Shuttle Main Engine Advanced Health Management System (AHMS). This Real Time Vibration Monitoring System (RTVMS) is being developed for ground use as part of the AHMS Health Management Computer-Integrated Rack Assembly (HMC-IRA). The HMC-IRA RTVMS design contains five DSPs which are highly interconnected through individual communication ports, shared memory, and a unique communication router that allows all the DSPs to receive digitized data fiom two multi-channel analog boards simultaneously. This paper will briefly cover the overall board design but will focus primarily on the state-of-the-art simulation environment within which this board was developed. This 16-layer board with over 1800 components and an additional mezzanine card has been an extremely challenging design. Utilization of a Mentor Graphics simulation environment provided the unique board and system level simulation capability to ascertain any timing or functional concerns before production. By combining VHDL, Synopsys Software and Hardware Models, and the Mentor Design Capture Environment, multiple simulations were developed to verify the RTVMS design. This multi-level simulation allowed the designers to achieve complete operability without error the first time the RTVMS printed circuit board was powered. The HMC-IRA design has completed all engineering and deliverable unit testing. P

  10. Nonlinear transition dynamics in a time-delayed vibration isolator under combined harmonic and stochastic excitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tao; Cao, Qingjie

    2017-04-01

    Based on the quasi-zero stiffness vibration isolation (QZS-VI) system, nonlinear transition dynamics have been investigated coupled with both time-delayed displacement and velocity feedbacks. Using a delayed nonlinear Langevin approach, we discuss a new mechanism for the transition of a vibration isolator in which the energy originates from harmonic and noise excitations. For this stochastic process, the effective displacement potential, stationary probability density function and the escape ratio are obtained. We investigate a variety of noise-induced behaviors affecting the transitions between system equilibria states. The results indicate that the phenomena of transition, resonant activation and delay-enhanced stability may emerge in the QZS-VI system. Moreover, we also show that the time delay, delay feedback intensities, and harmonic excitation play significant roles in the resonant activation and delay-enhanced stability phenomena. Finally, a quantitative measure for amplitude response has been carried out to evaluate the isolation performance of the controlled QZS-VI system. The results show that with properly designed feedback parameters, time delay and displacement feedback intensity can play the role of a damping force. This research provides instructive ideas on the application of the time-delayed control in practical engineering.

  11. Simulation of Accurate Vibrationally Resolved Electronic Spectra: the Integrated Time-Dependent and Time-Independent Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baiardi, Alberto; Barone, Vincenzo; Biczysko, Malgorzata; Bloino, Julien

    2014-06-01

    Two parallel theories including Franck-Condon, Herzberg-Teller and Duschinsky (i.e., mode mixing) effects, allowing different approximations for the description of excited state PES have been developed in order to simulate realistic, asymmetric, electronic spectra line-shapes taking into account the vibrational structure: the so-called sum-over-states or time-independent (TI) method and the alternative time-dependent (TD) approach, which exploits the properties of the Fourier transform. The integrated TI-TD procedure included within a general purpose QM code [1,2], allows to compute one photon absorption, fluorescence, phosphorescence, electronic circular dichroism, circularly polarized luminescence and resonance Raman spectra. Combining both approaches, which use a single set of starting data, permits to profit from their respective advantages and minimize their respective limits: the time-dependent route automatically includes all vibrational states and, possibly, temperature effects, while the time-independent route allows to identify and assign single vibronic transitions. Interpretation, analysis and assignment of experimental spectra based on integrated TI-TD vibronic computations will be illustrated for challenging cases of medium-sized open-shell systems in the gas and condensed phases with inclusion of leading anharmonic effects. 1. V. Barone, A. Baiardi, M. Biczysko, J. Bloino, C. Cappelli, F. Lipparini Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys, 14, 12404, (2012) 2. A. Baiardi, V. Barone, J. Bloino J. Chem. Theory Comput., 9, 4097-4115 (2013)

  12. Vibrational frequencies of anti-diabetic drug studied by terahertz time-domain spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, S. Q.; Li, H.; Xie, L.; Chen, L.; Peng, Y.; Zhu, Y. M.; Li, H.; Dong, P.; Wang, J. T.

    2012-04-01

    By using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy, the absorption spectra of seven anti-diabetic pills have been investigated. For gliquidone, glipizide, gliclazide, and glimepiride, an obvious resonance peak is found at 1.37 THz. Furthermore, to overcome the limit of density functional theory that can analyze the normal mode frequencies of the ground state of organic material, we also present a method that relies on pharmacophore recognition, from which we can obtain the resonance peak at 1.37 THz can be attributed to the vibration of sulfonylurea group. The results indicate that the veracity of density functional theory can be increased by combining pharmacophore recognition.

  13. Spin relaxation and dephasing mechanism in (Ga,Mn)As studied by time-resolved Kerr rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yonggang; Zhang, Xinhui; Li, Tao; Chen, Lin; Lu, Jun; Zhao, Jianhua

    2009-04-01

    Spin dynamics in (Ga,Mn)As films grown on GaAs(001) was investigated by Time-resolved magneto-optical Kerr effect. The Kerr signal decay time of (Ga,Mn)As without external magnetic field applied was found to be several hundreds picoseconds, which suggested that photogenerated polarized holes and magnetic ions are coupled as a ferromagnetic system. Nonmonotonic temperature dependence of relaxation and dephasing (R&D) time and Larmor frequency manifests that Bir-Aronov-Pikus mechanism dominates the spin R&D time at low temperature, while D'yakonov-Perel mechanism dominates the spin R&D time at high temperature, and the crossover between the two regimes is Curie temperature.

  14. Relaxed clocks and inferences of heterogeneous patterns of nucleotide substitution and divergence time estimates across whales and dolphins (Mammalia: Cetacea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dornburg, Alex; Brandley, Matthew C; McGowen, Michael R; Near, Thomas J

    2012-02-01

    Various nucleotide substitution models have been developed to accommodate among lineage rate heterogeneity, thereby relaxing the assumptions of the strict molecular clock. Recently developed "uncorrelated relaxed clock" and "random local clock" (RLC) models allow decoupling of nucleotide substitution rates between descendant lineages and are thus predicted to perform better in the presence of lineage-specific rate heterogeneity. However, it is uncertain how these models perform in the presence of punctuated shifts in substitution rate, especially between closely related clades. Using cetaceans (whales and dolphins) as a case study, we test the performance of these two substitution models in estimating both molecular rates and divergence times in the presence of substantial lineage-specific rate heterogeneity. Our RLC analyses of whole mitochondrial genome alignments find evidence for up to ten clade-specific nucleotide substitution rate shifts in cetaceans. We provide evidence that in the uncorrelated relaxed clock framework, a punctuated shift in the rate of molecular evolution within a subclade results in posterior rate estimates that are either misled or intermediate between the disparate rate classes present in baleen and toothed whales. Using simulations, we demonstrate abrupt changes in rate isolated to one or a few lineages in the phylogeny can mislead rate and age estimation, even when the node of interest is calibrated. We further demonstrate how increasing prior age uncertainty can bias rate and age estimates, even while the 95% highest posterior density around age estimates decreases; in other words, increased precision for an inaccurate estimate. We interpret the use of external calibrations in divergence time studies in light of these results, suggesting that rate shifts at deep time scales may mislead inferences of absolute molecular rates and ages.

  15. The effect of timing of intravenous muscle relaxant on the quality of double-contrast barium enema

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elson, E.M.; Campbell, D.M.; Halligan, S.; Shaikh, I.; Davitt, S.; Bartram, C.I

    2000-05-01

    AIM: To determine whether the timing of buscopan administration during double-contrast barium enema examination (DCBE) affects diagnostic quality. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In a prospective setting, 100 consecutive adult out-patients referred for DCBE received 20 mg buscopan (hyoscine-N-butylbromide) intravenously, either before infusion of barium suspension (Group A) or after barium infusion and gas insufflation (Group B). A subjective assessment of ease of contrast medium infusion was made at the time of examination and the films subsequently analysed by two radiologists unaware of the mode of relaxant administration, who noted the quality of mucosal coating and made subjective and objective measurements of segmental distension. RESULTS: There was no significant difference in screening times, infusion difficulty or colonic contrast medium coating between the two groups. Subjective assessment of distension of the caecum, ascending colon, transverse colon and rectum were not significantly different. Patients receiving intravenous relaxant after barium and gas infusion had less subjective descending (P = 0.05) and sigmoid (P = 0.04) colon distension, but there was no significant difference with respect to maximal bowel diameter in any of the segments measured. CONCLUSION: The timing of intravenous administration during DCBE is likely to have no significant effect on the diagnostic quality of the study. Elson, E.M. (2000)

  16. Real-time vibration-based structural damage detection using one-dimensional convolutional neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdeljaber, Osama; Avci, Onur; Kiranyaz, Serkan; Gabbouj, Moncef; Inman, Daniel J.

    2017-02-01

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) and vibration-based structural damage detection have been a continuous interest for civil, mechanical and aerospace engineers over the decades. Early and meticulous damage detection has always been one of the principal objectives of SHM applications. The performance of a classical damage detection system predominantly depends on the choice of the features and the classifier. While the fixed and hand-crafted features may either be a sub-optimal choice for a particular structure or fail to achieve the same level of performance on another structure, they usually require a large computation power which may hinder their usage for real-time structural damage detection. This paper presents a novel, fast and accurate structural damage detection system using 1D Convolutional Neural Networks (CNNs) that has an inherent adaptive design to fuse both feature extraction and classification blocks into a single and compact learning body. The proposed method performs vibration-based damage detection and localization of the damage in real-time. The advantage of this approach is its ability to extract optimal damage-sensitive features automatically from the raw acceleration signals. Large-scale experiments conducted on a grandstand simulator revealed an outstanding performance and verified the computational efficiency of the proposed real-time damage detection method.

  17. Nonlinear Dynamical Analysis on Four Semi-Active Dynamic Vibration Absorbers with Time Delay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongjun Shen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper four semi-active dynamic vibration absorbers (DVAs are analytically studied, where the time delay induced by measurement and execution in control procedure is included in the system. The first-order approximate analytical solutions of the four semi-active DVAs are established by the averaging method, based on the illustrated phase difference of the motion parameters. The comparisons between the analytical and the numerical solutions are carried out, which verify the correctness and satisfactory precision of the approximate analytical solutions. Then the effects of the time delay on the dynamical responses are analyzed, and it is found that the stability conditions for the steady-state responses of the primary systems are all periodic functions of time delay, with the same period as the excitation one. At last the effects of time delay on control performance are discussed.

  18. Simplex-TSDC spectroscopy: An efficient tool to measure the relaxation time of the isothermal transient depolarization current in organic dielectrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benchenane-Mehor, Halima, E-mail: halima_mehor_2000@yahoo.fr [Laboratoire CaSiCCE, Département de Génie Electrique, ENSET-Oran, B.P. 1523, El M’Naouer, 31000 Oran (Algeria); Laboratoire de Microphysique et de Nanophysique (LaMiN), Département de Physique-Chimie, ENSET-Oran, B.P. 1523 EL M’Naouer, 31000 Oran (Algeria); Soufi, Manil M.; Saiter, Jean-Marc; Benzohra, Mohamed [Laboratoire LECAP-AMME, EA 4528, Université de Rouen, Faculté des Sciences, Avenue de l' Université BP 12, 76801 Saint Etienne du Rouvray (France)

    2013-03-01

    The temporal technique analysis by a simplex optimization method of isothermal transient depolarization current measurements (Simplex-TSDC) is presented for the study of the glass transition domain of different polymers. The advantage of the present method compared to the classical TSDC is that it gives direct results comparable to the experiment and allows a good estimate of the relaxation time close to the glass transition temperature in dielectric thin films. The present method also allows a direct determination of two relaxation times corresponding to a fast and a slow dynamics; and then confirms the heterogeneous character of the molecular relaxation dynamics.

  19. Comparison of different pulse sequences for in vivo determination of T1 relaxation times in the human brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, L; Henriksen, O

    1988-01-01

    ). T1 measurements were performed on the human brain using a whole body MR scanner operating at 1.5 tesla. Three different pulse sequences were compared including two 6-points inversion recovery (IR) sequences with TR = 2.0 s and 4.0, respectively, and a 12-points partial saturation inversion recovery...... (PSIR) sequence with TR varying between 0.24 and 8.0 s. The median T1 relaxation times obtained in cortical grey matter and cerebrospinal fluid were significantly shorter in the IR experiments at TR = 2 s than in those carried out at TR = 4 s. Concerning white matter the discrepancy was much less...

  20. Comparative Study of Time-Frequency Decomposition Techniques for Fault Detection in Induction Motors Using Vibration Analysis during Startup Transient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Antonio Delgado-Arredondo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Induction motors are critical components for most industries and the condition monitoring has become necessary to detect faults. There are several techniques for fault diagnosis of induction motors and analyzing the startup transient vibration signals is not as widely used as other techniques like motor current signature analysis. Vibration analysis gives a fault diagnosis focused on the location of spectral components associated with faults. Therefore, this paper presents a comparative study of different time-frequency analysis methodologies that can be used for detecting faults in induction motors analyzing vibration signals during the startup transient. The studied methodologies are the time-frequency distribution of Gabor (TFDG, the time-frequency Morlet scalogram (TFMS, multiple signal classification (MUSIC, and fast Fourier transform (FFT. The analyzed vibration signals are one broken rotor bar, two broken bars, unbalance, and bearing defects. The obtained results have shown the feasibility of detecting faults in induction motors using the time-frequency spectral analysis applied to vibration signals, and the proposed methodology is applicable when it does not have current signals and only has vibration signals. Also, the methodology has applications in motors that are not fed directly to the supply line, in such cases the analysis of current signals is not recommended due to poor current signal quality.

  1. Time-domain filtered-x-Newton narrowband algorithms for active isolation of frequency-fluctuating vibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; He, Lin; Shuai, Chang-geng; Wang, Fei

    2016-04-01

    A time-domain filtered-x Newton narrowband algorithm (the Fx-Newton algorithm) is proposed to address three major problems in active isolation of machinery vibration: multiple narrowband components, MIMO coupling, and amplitude and frequency fluctuations. In this algorithm, narrowband components are extracted by narrowband-pass filters (NBPF) and independently controlled by multi-controllers, and fast convergence of the control algorithm is achieved by inverse secondary-path filtering of the extracted sinusoidal reference signal and its orthogonal component using L×L numbers of 2nd-order filters in the time domain. Controller adapting and control signal generation are also implemented in the time domain, to ensure good real-time performance. The phase shift caused by narrowband filter is compensated online to improve the robustness of control system to frequency fluctuations. A double-reference Fx-Newton algorithm is also proposed to control double sinusoids in the same frequency band, under the precondition of acquiring two independent reference signals. Experiments are conducted with an MIMO single-deck vibration isolation system on which a 200 kW ship diesel generator is mounted, and the algorithms are tested under the vibration alternately excited by the diesel generator and inertial shakers. The results of control over sinusoidal vibration excited by inertial shakers suggest that the Fx-Newton algorithm with NBPF have much faster convergence rate and better attenuation effect than the Fx-LMS algorithm. For swept, frequency-jumping, double, double frequency-swept and double frequency-jumping sinusoidal vibration, and multiple high-level harmonics in broadband vibration excited by the diesel generator, the proposed algorithms also demonstrate large vibration suppression at fast convergence rate, and good robustness to vibration with frequency fluctuations.

  2. SOUND AND VIBRATION SIGNAL ANALYSIS USING IMPROVED SHORT-TIME FOURIER REPRESENTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    June-Yule Lee

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Time-frequency imaging provides a straightforward means to understanding machinery conditions. The methods of short-time Fourier transform (STFT, Wigner-Ville distribution (WVD and smooth-windowed Wigner-Ville distribution (SWWVD are applied to the condition monitoring of rotating machines. The sound and vibration signals of a rotating fan are tested, and time-frequency images are illustrated in terms of STFT, WVD and SWWVD. The results show that the resolution of STFT is low, and the resolution of WVD is high but with interference. To overcome the interference in the WVD image, a variable smooth-windowed weighting function is applied. The smoothing window function resulted in interference attenuation but also in reducing the concentration. The SWWVD is a compromise between STFT and WVD. The SWWVD exhibits better resolution than STFT and has less interference than WVD.

  3. An Attempt to Shorten Loading Time of Epirubicin into DC Beads{sup ®} Using Vibration and a Sieve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonoda, Akinaga, E-mail: akinagasonoda@yahoo.co.jp; Nitta, Norihisa [Shiga University of Medical Science, Department of Radiology (Japan); Yamamoto, Takefumi [Shiga University of Medical Science, Central Research Laboratory (Japan); Tomozawa, Yuki; Ohta, Shinichi; Watanabe, Shobu; Murata, Kiyoshi [Shiga University of Medical Science, Department of Radiology (Japan)

    2017-04-15

    PurposeWe investigated the possibility of shortening the time required for loading epirubicin into calibrated polyvinyl alcohol-based hydrogel beads (DC Beads{sup ®}) to be used for transarterial chemoembolization.MethodAfter separating the beads suspended in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) solution by the use of a sieve (clearance 75 µm), epirubicin hydrochloride (EH) was loaded for 20, 30, or 60 s under vibration into DC beads. The EH loading rate into conventionally prepared (control) beads, i.e., beads loaded for 30 min without vibration, and vibration-loaded beads were calculated from the residual EH concentration in the bead-depleted EH solution. The amount of EH eluted from conventionally and vibration-loaded samples into a PBS solution (pH 7.0) was measured at 15 and 30 min and 1, 2, 6, 12, and 24 h. We also recorded the inhibitory effect of the PBS solution on the loading time. Using frozen sections, the EH load in the beads was evaluated visually under a fluorescence microscope.ResultsSpectrophotometry (495 nm) showed that the loading rate was 98.98 ± 0.34, 99.02 ± 0.32, and 99.50 ± 0.11 % with 20-, 30-, and 60-s vibration, respectively. The eluted rate was statistically similar between vibration- and statically loaded (control) beads. The PBS solution hampered EH loading into the beads. Visually, the distribution of EH in conventionally and vibration-loaded DC beads was similar.DiscussionThe use of vibration and the removal of PBS solution when epirubicin hydrochloride was loaded into DC beads dramatically shortened the loading time of epirubicin hydrochloride into DC beads.

  4. An Attempt to Shorten Loading Time of Epirubicin into DC Beads®Using Vibration and a Sieve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonoda, Akinaga; Nitta, Norihisa; Yamamoto, Takefumi; Tomozawa, Yuki; Ohta, Shinichi; Watanabe, Shobu; Murata, Kiyoshi

    2017-04-01

    We investigated the possibility of shortening the time required for loading epirubicin into calibrated polyvinyl alcohol-based hydrogel beads (DC Beads ® ) to be used for transarterial chemoembolization. After separating the beads suspended in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) solution by the use of a sieve (clearance 75 µm), epirubicin hydrochloride (EH) was loaded for 20, 30, or 60 s under vibration into DC beads. The EH loading rate into conventionally prepared (control) beads, i.e., beads loaded for 30 min without vibration, and vibration-loaded beads were calculated from the residual EH concentration in the bead-depleted EH solution. The amount of EH eluted from conventionally and vibration-loaded samples into a PBS solution (pH 7.0) was measured at 15 and 30 min and 1, 2, 6, 12, and 24 h. We also recorded the inhibitory effect of the PBS solution on the loading time. Using frozen sections, the EH load in the beads was evaluated visually under a fluorescence microscope. Spectrophotometry (495 nm) showed that the loading rate was 98.98 ± 0.34, 99.02 ± 0.32, and 99.50 ± 0.11 % with 20-, 30-, and 60-s vibration, respectively. The eluted rate was statistically similar between vibration- and statically loaded (control) beads. The PBS solution hampered EH loading into the beads. Visually, the distribution of EH in conventionally and vibration-loaded DC beads was similar. The use of vibration and the removal of PBS solution when epirubicin hydrochloride was loaded into DC beads dramatically shortened the loading time of epirubicin hydrochloride into DC beads.

  5. The effects of proteoglycan and type II collagen on T1rho relaxation time of articular cartilage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Won Seok; Yoo, Hye Jin; Hong, Sung Hwan; Choi, Ja Young [Dept. of Radiology and Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    To evaluate the effects of proteoglycan and type II collagen within articular cartilage on T1rho relaxation time of articular cartilage. This study was exempted by the institutional and animal review boards, and informed consent was not required. Twelve porcine patellae were assigned to three groups of control, trypsin-treated (proteoglycan-degraded), or collagenase-treated (collagen-degraded). The T1rho images were obtained with a 3 tesla magnetic resonance imaging scanner with a single loop coil. Statistical differences were detected by analysis of variance to evaluate the effects of the enzyme on T1rho relaxation time. Safranin-O was used to stain proteoglycan in the articular cartilage and immunohistochemical staining was performed for type II collagen. Mean T1rho values of the control, trypsin-treated, and collagenase-treated groups were 37.72 +/- 5.82, 57.53 +/- 8.24, and 45.08 +/- 5.31 msec, respectively (p < 0.001). Histology confirmed a loss of proteoglycan and type II collagen in the trypsin- and collagenase-treated groups. Degradation of proteoglycans and collagen fibers in the articular cartilage increased the articular cartilage T1rho value.

  6. Resonance phonon approach to phonon relaxation time and mean free path in one-dimensional nonlinear lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lubo; Wang, Lei

    2017-04-01

    We extend a previously proposed resonance phonon approach that is based on the linear response theory. By studying the complex response function in depth, we work out the phonon relaxation time besides the oscillating frequency of the phonons in a few one-dimensional nonlinear lattices. The results in the large wave-number-k regime agree with the expectations of the effective phonon theory. However, in the small-k limit they follow different scaling laws. The phonon mean free path can also be calculated indirectly. It coincides well with that derived from the anharmonic phonon approach. A power-law divergent heat conduction, i.e., the heat conductivity κ depends on lattice length N by κ ˜Nβ with β >0 , then is supported for the momentum-conserving lattices. Furthermore, this approach can be applied to diatomic lattices. So obtained relaxation time quantitatively agrees with that from the effective phonon theory. As for the mean free path, the resonance phonon approach can detect both the acoustic and the optical branches, whereas the anharmonic phonon approach can only detect a combined branch, i.e., the acoustic branch for small k and the optical branch for large k .

  7. Evaluation of the kinetic and relaxation time of gentamicin sulfate released from hybrid biomaterial Bioglass-chitosan scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wers, E.; Oudadesse, H.; Lefeuvre, B.; Merdrignac-Conanec, O.; Barroug, A.

    2015-10-01

    Chitosan scaffolds, combined with bioactive glass 46S6, were prepared to serve as gentamicin sulfate delivery in situ systems for bone biomaterials. This work presents a study about the effect of the ratio chitosan/bioactive glass (CH/BG) on the release of gentamicin sulfate and on the bioactivity during in vitro experiments. SEM observations allowed understanding the bond between the glass grains and the chitosan matrix. In vitro results showed that scaffolds form a hydroxyapatite (HA) Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2 after 15 days of immersion in a simulated body fluid (SBF).The interest of this study is to see that the increase of the content of bioactive glass in the chitosan matrix slows the release of gentamicin sulfate in the liquid medium. Starting concentration of gentamicin sulfate has an influence on the relaxation time of the scaffolds. Indeed, an increasing concentration delays the return to a new equilibrium. Contents of chitosan and bioactive glass do not affect the relaxation time. Synthesized scaffolds could be adapted to a clinical situation: severity and type of infection, weight and age of the patient.

  8. Effects of Liver Fibrosis Progression on Tissue Relaxation Times in Different Mouse Models Assessed by Ultrahigh Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Müller

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, clinical studies demonstrated that magnetic resonance relaxometry with determination of relaxation times T1 and T2⁎ may aid in staging and management of liver fibrosis in patients suffering from viral hepatitis and steatohepatitis. In the present study we investigated T1 and T2⁎ in different models of liver fibrosis to compare alternate pathophysiologies in their effects on relaxation times and to further develop noninvasive quantification methods of liver fibrosis. MRI was performed with a fast spin echo sequence for measurement of T1 and a multigradient echo sequence for determination of T2⁎. Toxic liver fibrosis was induced by injections of carbon tetrachloride (1.4 mL CCl4 per kg bodyweight and week, for 3 or 6 weeks in BALB/cJ mice. Chronic sclerosing cholangitis was mimicked using the ATP-binding cassette transporter B4 knockout (Abcb4 -/- mouse model. Untreated BALB/cJ mice served as controls. To assess hepatic fibrosis, we ascertained collagen contents and fibrosis scores after Sirius red staining. T1 and T2⁎ correlate differently to disease severity and etiology of liver fibrosis. T2⁎ shows significant decrease correlating with fibrosis in CCl4 treated animals, while demonstrating significant increase with disease severity in Abcb4 -/- mice. Measurements of T1 and T2⁎ may therefore facilitate discrimination between different stages and causes of liver fibrosis.

  9. Effects of Liver Fibrosis Progression on Tissue Relaxation Times in Different Mouse Models Assessed by Ultrahigh Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Andreas; Hochrath, Katrin; Stroeder, Jonas; Hittatiya, Kanishka; Schneider, Günther; Lammert, Frank; Buecker, Arno; Fries, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Recently, clinical studies demonstrated that magnetic resonance relaxometry with determination of relaxation times T1 and T2⁎ may aid in staging and management of liver fibrosis in patients suffering from viral hepatitis and steatohepatitis. In the present study we investigated T1 and T2⁎ in different models of liver fibrosis to compare alternate pathophysiologies in their effects on relaxation times and to further develop noninvasive quantification methods of liver fibrosis. MRI was performed with a fast spin echo sequence for measurement of T1 and a multigradient echo sequence for determination of T2⁎. Toxic liver fibrosis was induced by injections of carbon tetrachloride (1.4 mL CCl4 per kg bodyweight and week, for 3 or 6 weeks) in BALB/cJ mice. Chronic sclerosing cholangitis was mimicked using the ATP-binding cassette transporter B4 knockout (Abcb4 -/-) mouse model. Untreated BALB/cJ mice served as controls. To assess hepatic fibrosis, we ascertained collagen contents and fibrosis scores after Sirius red staining. T1 and T2⁎ correlate differently to disease severity and etiology of liver fibrosis. T2⁎ shows significant decrease correlating with fibrosis in CCl4 treated animals, while demonstrating significant increase with disease severity in Abcb4 -/- mice. Measurements of T1 and T2⁎ may therefore facilitate discrimination between different stages and causes of liver fibrosis.

  10. Time-frequency analysis of DC bias vibration of transformer core on the basis of Hilbert–Huang transform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingmou Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a time–frequency analysis of the vibration of transformer under direct current (DC bias through Hilbert–Huang transform (HHT. First, the theory of DC bias for the transformer was analyzed. Next, the empirical mode decomposition (EMD process, which is the key in HHT, was introduced. The results of EMD, namely, intrinsic mode functions (IMFs, were calculated and summed by Hilbert transform(HT to obtain time-dependent series in a 2D time–frequency domain. Lastly, a test system of vibration measurement for the transformer was set up. Three direction (x, y, and z axes components of core vibration were measured. Decomposition of EMD and HHT spectra showed that vibration strength increased, and odd harmonics were produced with DC bias. Results indicated that HHT is a viable signal processing tool for transformer health monitoring.

  11. Acoustic Properties of Crystals with Jahn-Teller Impurities: Elastic Moduli and Relaxation Time. Application to SrF2:Cr2+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Averkiev, Nikita S.; Bersuker, Isaac B.; Gudkov, Vladimir V.; Zhevstovskikh, Irina V.; Sarychev, Maksim N.; Zherlitsyn, Sergei; Yasin, Shadi; Shakurov, Gilman S.; Ulanov, Vladimir A.; Surikov, Vladimir T.

    2017-11-01

    A new approach to evaluate the relaxation contribution to the total elastic moduli for crystals with Jahn-Teller (JT) impurities is worked out and applied to the analysis of the experimentally measured ultrasound velocity and attenuation in SrF2:Cr2+. Distinguished from previous work, the background adiabatic contribution to the moduli, important for revealing the impurity relaxation contribution, is taken into account. The temperature dependence of the relaxation time for transitions between the equivalent configurations of the JT centers has been obtained, and the activation energy for the latter in SrF2:Cr2+, as well as the linear vibronic coupling constant have been evaluated.

  12. Changes in MR Relaxation Times of the Meniscus With Acute Loading: An In Vivo Pilot Study in Knee Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subburaj, Karupppasamy; Souza, Richard B.; Wyman, Bradley T.; Le Graverand-Gastineau, Marie-Pierre Hellio; Li, Xiaojuan; Link, Thomas M.; Majumdar, Sharmila

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To prospectively evaluate changes in T1ρ and T2 relaxation times in the meniscal body with acute loading using MRI in osteoarthritic knees and to compare these findings with those of age-matched healthy controls. Materials and Methods Female subjects above 40 years of age with (N1 = 20) and without osteoarthritis (OA) (N2 = 10) were imaged on a 3 Tesla MR scanner using a custom made loading device. MR images were acquired, with the knee flexed at 20°, with and without a compressive load of 50% of the subject's bodyweight. The subjects were categorized based on the radiographic evidence of OA. Three different zones (outer, middle, and inner) of meniscus body were defined (each occupying 1/3rd the width). After adjusting for age and body mass index in the general linear regression model, repeated measures analysis of variance was used to detect significant differences in T1ρ and T2 with and without loading. Results In the unloaded condition, the average T1ρ and T2 times were elevated in the outer and middle zones of the medial meniscus in OA subjects compared with the controls. In the loaded condition, T1ρ and T2 times of the outer zone of the medial meniscus was significantly elevated in OA subjects compared with controls. Finally the change (from unloaded to loaded) was significantly higher in controls than OA subjects (15.1% versus 8.3%; P = 0.039 for ΔT1ρ, and 11.5% versus 6.9%, P = 0.049 for ΔT2). Conclusion These findings suggest that while the OA process appears to affect the relaxation times of all regions within the meniscus, it may affect some regions sooner or to a greater degree. Furthermore, the differences in the change in relaxation times between unloaded and loaded conditions may reveal evidence about load transmission failure of the outer zone of the medial meniscus in subjects with knee OA. It is possible that these metrics (ΔT1ρ and ΔT2) may be valuable as an early biomechanical biomarker, which could be used to predict load

  13. Characterization of the Uncertainty of Divergence Time Estimation under Relaxed Molecular Clock Models Using Multiple Loci

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Genetic sequence data provide information about the distances between species or branch lengths in a phylogeny, but not about the absolute divergence times or the evolutionary rates directly. Bayesian methods for dating species divergences estimate times and rates by assigning priors on them. In particular, the prior on times (node ages on the phylogeny) incorporates information in the fossil record to calibrate the molecular tree. Because times and rates are confounded, our posterior time es...

  14. Dielectric dispersion, relaxation dynamics and thermodynamic studies of Beta-Alanine in aqueous solutions using picoseconds time domain reflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinoth, K.; Ganesh, T.; Senthilkumar, P.; Sylvester, M. Maria; Karunakaran, D. J. S. Anand; Hudge, Praveen; Kumbharkhane, A. C.

    2017-09-01

    The aqueous solution of beta-alanine characterised and studied by their dispersive dielectric properties and relaxation process in the frequency domain of 10×106 Hz to 30×109 Hz with varying concentration in mole fractions and temperatures. The molecular interaction and dielectric parameters are discussed in terms of counter-ion concentration theory. The static permittivity (ε0), high frequency dielectric permittivity (ε∞) and excess dielectric parameters are accomplished by frequency depended physical properties and relaxation time (τ). Molecular orientation, ordering and correlation factors are reported as confirmation of intermolecular interactions. Ionic conductivity and thermo dynamical properties are concluded with the behaviour of the mixture constituents. Solute-solvent, solute-solute interaction, structure making and breaking abilities of the solute in aqueous medium are interpreted. Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectra of beta- alanine single crystal and liquid state have been studied. The 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectral studies give the signature for resonating frequencies and chemical shifts of beta-alanine.

  15. Concentration regimes of biopolymers xanthan, tara, and clairana, comparing dynamic light scattering and distribution of relaxation time.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia D Oliveira

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to evaluate the utilization of analysis of the distribution of relaxation time (DRT using a dynamic light back-scattering technique as alternative method for the determination of the concentration regimes in aqueous solutions of biopolymers (xanthan, clairana and tara gums by an analysis of the overlap (c* and aggregation (c** concentrations. The diffusion coefficients were obtained over a range of concentrations for each biopolymer using two methods. The first method analysed the behaviour of the diffusion coefficient as a function of the concentration of the gum solution. This method is based on the analysis of the diffusion coefficient versus the concentration curve. Using the slope of the curves, it was possible to determine the c* and c** for xanthan and tara gum. However, it was not possible to determine the concentration regimes for clairana using this method. The second method was based on an analysis of the DRTs, which showed different numbers of relaxation modes. It was observed that the concentrations at which the number of modes changed corresponded to the c* and c**. Thus, the DRT technique provided an alternative method for the determination of the critical concentrations of biopolymers.

  16. Engineering estimation of time-dependent deformation characteristics as bending moment relaxation and released unfolding motion of creased paperboard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagasawa, Sh

    2017-02-01

    Paperboards are recognized to be important raw materials for packaging industry due to their advantages such as high strength-to-weight ratio, recyclability. Regarding the development of advanced packaging materials and the requirement of smart formed products, a study of sheet’s response behaviour is necessary for expanding the advanced converting industry. After introducing a couple of past research works concerned crease technologies, a fundamental mechanisms of crease deformation is reviewed using the scoring depth and the folding angle of a paperboard. Since one of important forming characteristics is a time-dependent stress relaxation or time-delayed strain during a fold/unfold process, the author’s experimental approaches for estimating a short term (less than 10 seconds) dynamic deformation behaviour of creased paperboard are discussed.

  17. Using Bio-Functionalized Magnetic Nanoparticles and Dynamic Nuclear Magnetic Resonance to Characterize the Time-Dependent Spin-Spin Relaxation Time for Sensitive Bio-Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Hsien Liao

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we report the use of bio-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles (BMNs and dynamic magnetic resonance (DMR to characterize the time-dependent spin-spin relaxation time for sensitive bio-detection. The biomarkers are the human C-reactive protein (CRP while the BMNs are the anti-CRP bound onto dextran-coated Fe3O4 particles labeled as Fe3O4-antiCRP. It was found the time-dependent spin-spin relaxation time, T2, of protons decreases as time evolves. Additionally, the ΔT2 of of protons in BMNs increases as the concentration of CRP increases. We attribute these to the formation of the magnetic clusters that deteriorate the field homogeneity of nearby protons. A sensitivity better than 0.1 μg/mL for assaying CRP is achieved, which is much higher than that required by the clinical criteria (0.5 mg/dL. The present MR-detection platform shows promise for further use in detecting tumors, viruses, and proteins.

  18. Real-time moving horizon estimation for a vibrating active cantilever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdollahpouri, Mohammad; Takács, Gergely; Rohaľ-Ilkiv, Boris

    2017-03-01

    Vibrating structures may be subject to changes throughout their operating lifetime due to a range of environmental and technical factors. These variations can be considered as parameter changes in the dynamic model of the structure, while their online estimates can be utilized in adaptive control strategies, or in structural health monitoring. This paper implements the moving horizon estimation (MHE) algorithm on a low-cost embedded computing device that is jointly observing the dynamic states and parameter variations of an active cantilever beam in real time. The practical behavior of this algorithm has been investigated in various experimental scenarios. It has been found, that for the given field of application, moving horizon estimation converges faster than the extended Kalman filter; moreover, it handles atypical measurement noise, sensor errors or other extreme changes, reliably. Despite its improved performance, the experiments demonstrate that the disadvantage of solving the nonlinear optimization problem in MHE is that it naturally leads to an increase in computational effort.

  19. Vibrational Förster transfer to hydrated protons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmer, R.L.A.; Tielrooij, K.J.; Bakker, H.J.

    2010-01-01

    We have studied the influence of excess protons on the vibrational energy relaxation of the O-H and O-D stretching modes in water using femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy. Without excess protons, we observe exponential decays with time constants of 1.7 and 4.3 ps for the bulk and anion bound O-D

  20. Characterization of anomalous relaxation using the time-fractional Bloch equation and multiple echo T2*-weighted magnetic resonance imaging at 7 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Shanlin; Liu, Fawang; Turner, Ian W; Yu, Qiang; Yang, Qianqian; Vegh, Viktor

    2017-04-01

    To study the utility of fractional calculus in modeling gradient-recalled echo MRI signal decay in the normal human brain. We solved analytically the extended time-fractional Bloch equations resulting in five model parameters, namely, the amplitude, relaxation rate, order of the time-fractional derivative, frequency shift, and constant offset. Voxel-level temporal fitting of the MRI signal was performed using the classical monoexponential model, a previously developed anomalous relaxation model, and using our extended time-fractional relaxation model. Nine brain regions segmented from multiple echo gradient-recalled echo 7 Tesla MRI data acquired from five participants were then used to investigate the characteristics of the extended time-fractional model parameters. We found that the extended time-fractional model is able to fit the experimental data with smaller mean squared error than the classical monoexponential relaxation model and the anomalous relaxation model, which do not account for frequency shift. We were able to fit multiple echo time MRI data with high accuracy using the developed model. Parameters of the model likely capture information on microstructural and susceptibility-induced changes in the human brain. Magn Reson Med 77:1485-1494, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  1. Harnessing data structure for recovery of randomly missing structural vibration responses time history: Sparse representation versus low-rank structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yongchao; Nagarajaiah, Satish

    2016-06-01

    Randomly missing data of structural vibration responses time history often occurs in structural dynamics and health monitoring. For example, structural vibration responses are often corrupted by outliers or erroneous measurements due to sensor malfunction; in wireless sensing platforms, data loss during wireless communication is a common issue. Besides, to alleviate the wireless data sampling or communication burden, certain accounts of data are often discarded during sampling or before transmission. In these and other applications, recovery of the randomly missing structural vibration responses from the available, incomplete data, is essential for system identification and structural health monitoring; it is an ill-posed inverse problem, however. This paper explicitly harnesses the data structure itself-of the structural vibration responses-to address this (inverse) problem. What is relevant is an empirical, but often practically true, observation, that is, typically there are only few modes active in the structural vibration responses; hence a sparse representation (in frequency domain) of the single-channel data vector, or, a low-rank structure (by singular value decomposition) of the multi-channel data matrix. Exploiting such prior knowledge of data structure (intra-channel sparse or inter-channel low-rank), the new theories of ℓ1-minimization sparse recovery and nuclear-norm-minimization low-rank matrix completion enable recovery of the randomly missing or corrupted structural vibration response data. The performance of these two alternatives, in terms of recovery accuracy and computational time under different data missing rates, is investigated on a few structural vibration response data sets-the seismic responses of the super high-rise Canton Tower and the structural health monitoring accelerations of a real large-scale cable-stayed bridge. Encouraging results are obtained and the applicability and limitation of the presented methods are discussed.

  2. Direct simulation Monte Carlo modeling of relaxation processes in polyatomic gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfeiffer, M., E-mail: mpfeiffer@irs.uni-stuttgart.de; Nizenkov, P., E-mail: nizenkov@irs.uni-stuttgart.de; Mirza, A., E-mail: mirza@irs.uni-stuttgart.de; Fasoulas, S., E-mail: fasoulas@irs.uni-stuttgart.de [Institute of Space Systems, University of Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 29, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2016-02-15

    Relaxation processes of polyatomic molecules are modeled and implemented in an in-house Direct Simulation Monte Carlo code in order to enable the simulation of atmospheric entry maneuvers at Mars and Saturn’s Titan. The description of rotational and vibrational relaxation processes is derived from basic quantum-mechanics using a rigid rotator and a simple harmonic oscillator, respectively. Strategies regarding the vibrational relaxation process are investigated, where good agreement for the relaxation time according to the Landau-Teller expression is found for both methods, the established prohibiting double relaxation method and the new proposed multi-mode relaxation. Differences and applications areas of these two methods are discussed. Consequently, two numerical methods used for sampling of energy values from multi-dimensional distribution functions are compared. The proposed random-walk Metropolis algorithm enables the efficient treatment of multiple vibrational modes within a time step with reasonable computational effort. The implemented model is verified and validated by means of simple reservoir simulations and the comparison to experimental measurements of a hypersonic, carbon-dioxide flow around a flat-faced cylinder.

  3. Multi-relaxation-time Lattice Boltzman model for uniform-shear flow over a rotating circular cylinder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nemati Hasan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A numerical investigation of the two-dimensional laminar flow and heat transfer a rotating circular cylinder with uniform planar shear, where the free-stream velocity varies linearly across the cylinder using Multi-Relaxation-Time Lattice Boltzmann method is conducted. The effects of variation of Reynolds number, rotational speed ratio at shear rate 0.1, blockage ratio 0.1 and Prandtl number 0.71 are studied. The Reynolds number changing from 50 to 160 for three rotational speed ratios of 0, 0.5, 1 is investigated. Results show that flow and heat transfer depends significantly on the rotational speed ratio as well as the Reynolds number. The effect of Reynolds number on the vortex-shedding frequency and period-surface Nusselt numbers is overall very strong compared with rotational speed ratio. Flow and heat conditions characteristics such as lift and drag coefficients, Strouhal number and Nusselt numbers are studied.

  4. A weighted multiple-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann method for multiphase flows and its application to partial coalescence cascades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhari, Abbas; Bolster, Diogo; Luo, Li-Shi

    2017-07-01

    We present a lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) with a weighted multiple-relaxation-time (WMRT) collision model and an adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) algorithm for direct numerical simulation of two-phase flows in three dimensions. The proposed WMRT model enhances the numerical stability of the LBM for immiscible fluids at high density ratios, particularly on the D3Q27 lattice. The effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed WMRT-LBM-AMR is validated through simulations of (a) buoyancy-driven motion and deformation of a gas bubble rising in a viscous liquid; (b) the bag-breakup mechanism of a falling drop; (c) crown splashing of a droplet on a wet surface; and (d) the partial coalescence mechanism of a liquid drop at a liquid-liquid interface. The numerical simulations agree well with available experimental data and theoretical approximations where applicable.

  5. Electron-ion relaxation time dependent signal enhancement in ultrafast double-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harilal, S. S.; Diwakar, P. K.; Hassanein, A. [Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

    2013-07-22

    We investigated the emission properties of collinear double-pulse compared to single-pulse ultrafast laser induced breakdown spectroscopy. Our results showed that the significant signal enhancement noticed in the double pulse scheme is strongly correlated to the characteristic electron-ion relaxation time and hence to the inter-pulse delays. Spectroscopic excitation temperature analysis showed that the improvement in signal enhancement is caused by the delayed pulse efficient reheating of the pre-plume. The signal enhancement is also found to be related to the upper excitation energy of the selected lines, i.e., more enhancement noticed for lines originating from higher excitation energy levels, indicating reheating is the major mechanism behind the signal improvement.

  6. Electron-ion relaxation time dependent signal enhancement in ultrafast double-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harilal, S. S.; Diwakar, P. K.; Hassanein, A.

    2013-07-01

    We investigated the emission properties of collinear double-pulse compared to single-pulse ultrafast laser induced breakdown spectroscopy. Our results showed that the significant signal enhancement noticed in the double pulse scheme is strongly correlated to the characteristic electron-ion relaxation time and hence to the inter-pulse delays. Spectroscopic excitation temperature analysis showed that the improvement in signal enhancement is caused by the delayed pulse efficient reheating of the pre-plume. The signal enhancement is also found to be related to the upper excitation energy of the selected lines, i.e., more enhancement noticed for lines originating from higher excitation energy levels, indicating reheating is the major mechanism behind the signal improvement.

  7. Nonnegative Matrix Factorization of time frequency representation of vibration signal for local damage detection - comparison of algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wodecki, Jacek

    2018-01-01

    Local damage detection in rotating machine elements is very important problem widely researched in the literature. One of the most common approaches is the vibration signal analysis. Since time domain processing is often insufficient, other representations are frequently favored. One of the most common one is time-frequency representation hence authors propose to separate internal processes occurring in the vibration signal by spectrogram matrix factorization. In order to achieve this, it is proposed to use the approach of Nonnegative Matrix Factorization (NMF). In this paper three NMF algorithms are tested using real and simulated data describing single-channel vibration signal acquired on damaged rolling bearing operating in drive pulley in belt conveyor driving station. Results are compared with filtration using Spectral Kurtosis, which is currently recognized as classical method for impulsive information extraction, to verify the validity of presented methodology.

  8. Quantitative Assessment of the T2 Relaxation Time of the Gluteus Muscles in Children with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: a Comparative Study Before and After Steroid Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hee Kyung; Laor, Tal; Wong, Brenda [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati (United States); Horn, Paul S. [University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati (United States)

    2010-06-15

    To determine the feasibility of using T2 mapping as a quantitative method to longitudinally follow the disease activity in children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) who are treated with steroids. Eleven boys with DMD (age range: 5-14 years) underwent evaluation with the clinical functional score (CFS), and conventional pelvic MRI and T2 mapping before and during steroid therapy. The gluteus muscle inflammation and fatty infiltration were evaluated on conventional MRI. The histograms and mean T2 relaxation times were obtained from the T2 maps. The CFS, the conventional MRI findings and the T2 values were compared before and during steroid therapy. None of the patients showed interval change of their CFSs. On conventional MRI, none of the images showed muscle inflammation. During steroid treatment, two boys showed increased fatty infiltration on conventional MRI, and both had an increase of the mean T2 relaxation time (p < 0.05). The remaining nine boys had no increase in fatty infiltration. Of these, three showed an increased mean T2 relaxation time (p < 0.05), two showed no change and four showed a decreased mean T2 relaxation time (p < 0.05). T2 mapping is a feasible technique to evaluate the longitudinal muscle changes in those children who receive steroid therapy for DMD. The differences of the mean T2 relaxation time may reflect alterations in disease activity, and even when the conventional MRI and CFS remain stable.

  9. Real-time micro-vibration multi-spot synchronous measurement within a region based on heterodyne interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Ma; Xiao, Wen; Chen, Zonghui; Hao, Hongliang; Pan, Feng

    2018-01-01

    Real-time micro-vibration measurement is widely used in engineering applications. It is very difficult for traditional optical detection methods to achieve real-time need in a relatively high frequency and multi-spot synchronous measurement of a region at the same time,especially at the nanoscale. Based on the method of heterodyne interference, an experimental system of real-time measurement of micro - vibration is constructed to satisfy the demand in engineering applications. The vibration response signal is measured by combing optical heterodyne interferometry and a high-speed CMOS-DVR image acquisition system. Then, by extracting and processing multiple pixels at the same time, four digital demodulation technique are implemented to simultaneously acquire the vibrating velocity of the target from the recorded sequences of images. Different kinds of demodulation algorithms are analyzed and the results show that these four demodulation algorithms are suitable for different interference signals. Both autocorrelation algorithm and cross-correlation algorithm meet the needs of real-time measurements. The autocorrelation algorithm demodulates the frequency more accurately, while the cross-correlation algorithm is more accurate in solving the amplitude.

  10. Folding dynamics of the Trp-cage miniprotein: evidence for a native-like intermediate from combined time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meuzelaar, Heleen; Marino, Kristen A; Huerta-Viga, Adriana; Panman, Matthijs R; Smeenk, Linde E J; Kettelarij, Albert J; van Maarseveen, Jan H; Timmerman, Peter; Bolhuis, Peter G; Woutersen, Sander

    2013-10-03

    Trp-cage is a synthetic 20-residue miniprotein which folds rapidly and spontaneously to a well-defined globular structure more typical of larger proteins. Due to its small size and fast folding, it is an ideal model system for experimental and theoretical investigations of protein folding mechanisms. However, Trp-cage's exact folding mechanism is still a matter of debate. Here we investigate Trp-cage's relaxation dynamics in the amide I' spectral region (1530-1700 cm(-1)) using time-resolved infrared spectroscopy. Residue-specific information was obtained by incorporating an isotopic label ((13)C═(18)O) into the amide carbonyl group of residue Gly11, thereby spectrally isolating an individual 310-helical residue. The folding-unfolding equilibrium is perturbed using a nanosecond temperature-jump (T-jump), and the subsequent re-equilibration is probed by observing the time-dependent vibrational response in the amide I' region. We observe bimodal relaxation kinetics with time constants of 100 ± 10 and 770 ± 40 ns at 322 K, suggesting that the folding involves an intermediate state, the character of which can be determined from the time- and frequency-resolved data. We find that the relaxation dynamics close to the melting temperature involve fast fluctuations in the polyproline II region, whereas the slower process can be attributed to conformational rearrangements due to the global (un)folding transition of the protein. Combined analysis of our T-jump data and molecular dynamics simulations indicates that the formation of a well-defined α-helix precedes the rapid formation of the hydrophobic cage structure, implying a native-like folding intermediate, that mainly differs from the folded conformation in the orientation of the C-terminal polyproline II helix relative to the N-terminal part of the backbone. We find that the main free-energy barrier is positioned between the folding intermediate and the unfolded state ensemble, and that it involves the formation of

  11. Theoretical study of built-in-polarization effect on relaxation time and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    61

    time is enhanced due to built-in-polarization effect and makes phonon mean free path longer which is required .... The interaction between the phonons and the built-in-polarization field; and their effect on phonon ...... AlxGa1-xN for electric energy generation from waste heat energy through Seebeck effect, can be achieved ...

  12. Improved differentiation between knees with cartilage lesions and controls using 7T relaxation time mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cory Wyatt

    2015-10-01

    Conclusion: T1ρ imaging at 7T has been established as a viable imaging method for the differentiation of degenerated cartilage despite previous concerns over specific absorption rate and imaging time. The potential increased sensitivity of T1ρ and T2 imaging at 7T may be useful for future studies in the development of OA.

  13. Pressure effects on the relaxation of an excited nitromethane molecule in an argon bath

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivera-Rivera, Luis A.; Sewell, Thomas D.; Thompson, Donald L. [Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, Missouri 65211-7600 (United States); Wagner, Albert F. [Argonne National Laboratory, Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2015-01-07

    Classical molecular dynamics simulations were performed to study the relaxation of nitromethane in an Ar bath (of 1000 atoms) at 300 K and pressures 10, 50, 75, 100, 125, 150, 300, and 400 atm. The molecule was instantaneously excited by statistically distributing 50 kcal/mol among the internal degrees of freedom. At each pressure, 1000 trajectories were integrated for 1000 ps, except for 10 atm, for which the integration time was 5000 ps. The computed ensemble-averaged rotational energy decay is ∼100 times faster than the vibrational energy decay. Both rotational and vibrational decay curves can be satisfactorily fit with the Lendvay-Schatz function, which involves two parameters: one for the initial rate and one for the curvature of the decay curve. The decay curves for all pressures exhibit positive curvature implying the rate slows as the molecule loses energy. The initial rotational relaxation rate is directly proportional to density over the interval of simulated densities, but the initial vibrational relaxation rate decreases with increasing density relative to the extrapolation of the limiting low-pressure proportionality to density. The initial vibrational relaxation rate and curvature are fit as functions of density. For the initial vibrational relaxation rate, the functional form of the fit arises from a combinatorial model for the frequency of nitromethane “simultaneously” colliding with multiple Ar atoms. Roll-off of the initial rate from its low-density extrapolation occurs because the cross section for collision events with L Ar atoms increases with L more slowly than L times the cross section for collision events with one Ar atom. The resulting density-dependent functions of the initial rate and curvature represent, reasonably well, all the vibrational decay curves except at the lowest density for which the functions overestimate the rate of decay. The decay over all gas phase densities is predicted by extrapolating the fits to condensed

  14. Pressure Effects on the Relaxation of an Excited Nitromethane Molecule in Argon Bath

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivera-Rivera, Luis A.; Wagner, Albert F.; Sewell, Thomas D.; Thompson, Donald L.

    2015-01-07

    Classical molecular dynamics simulations were performed to study the relaxation of nitromethane in an Ar bath (of 1000 atoms) at 300 K and pressures 10, 50, 75, 100, 125, 150, 300, and 400 atm. The molecule was instantaneously excited by statistically distributing 50 kcal/mol among the internal degrees of freedom. At each pressure, 1000 trajectories were integrated for 1000 ps, except for 10 atm, for which the integration time was 5000 ps. The computed ensemble-averaged rotational energy decay is similar to 100 times faster than the vibrational energy decay. Both rotational and vibrational decay curves can be satisfactorily fit with the Lendvay-Schatz function, which involves two parameters: one for the initial rate and one for the curvature of the decay curve. The decay curves for all pressures exhibit positive curvature implying the rate slows as the molecule loses energy. The initial rotational relaxation rate is directly proportional to density over the interval of simulated densities, but the initial vibrational relaxation rate decreases with increasing density relative to the extrapolation of the limiting low-pressure proportionality to density. The initial vibrational relaxation rate and curvature are fit as functions of density. For the initial vibrational relaxation rate, the functional form of the fit arises from a combinatorial model for the frequency of nitromethane "simultaneously" colliding with multiple Ar atoms. Roll-off of the initial rate from its low-density extrapolation occurs because the cross section for collision events with L Ar atoms increases with L more slowly than L times the cross section for collision events with one Ar atom. The resulting density-dependent functions of the initial rate and curvature represent, reasonably well, all the vibrational decay curves except at the lowest density for which the functions overestimate the rate of decay. The decay over all gas phase densities is predicted by extrapolating the fits to condensed

  15. Broadband ultrafast nonlinear absorption and ultra-long exciton relaxation time of black phosphorus quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Runze; Zheng, Xin; Jiang, Tian

    2017-04-03

    Black phosphorus (BP) has recently attracted significant attention for its brilliant physical and chemical features. The remarkable strong light-matter interaction and tunable direct wide range band-gap make it an ideal candidate in various application regions, especially saturable absorbers. In this paper, ultrasmall black phosphorus quantum dots (BPQDs), a unique form of phosphorus nanostructures, with average size of 5.7 ± 0.8 nm are synthesized. Compared with BP nanosheets (BPNs) with similar thickness, the ultrafast nonlinear optical (NLO) absorption properties and excited carrier dynamics are investigated in wide spectra. Beyond the saturation absorption (SA), giant two photon absorption (TPA) is observed in BPQDs. BPQDs exhibit quite different excitation intensity and wavelength dependent nonlinear optical (NLO) response from BPNs, which is attributed to the quantum confinement and edge effects. The BPQDs show broadband photon-induced absorption (PIA) under the probe wavelength from 470 nm to 850 nm and a fast and a slow decay time are obtained as long as 92 ± 10 ps and 1100 ± 100 ps, respectively. The substantial independence for ultra-long time scales of pump intensity and temperature reveals that the carrier recombination mechanism may be attributed to a defect-assisted Auger capture process. These findings will help to develop optoelectronic and photonic devices operating in the infrared and visible wavelength region.

  16. On the weakly nonlinear, transversal vibrations of a conveyor belt with a low and time-varying velocity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suweken, G.; van Horssen, W.T.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper the weakly nonlinear, transversal vibrations of a conveyor belt will be considered. The belt is assumed to move with a low and time-varying speed. Using Kirchhoff's approach a single equation of motion will be derived from a coupled system of partial differential equations describing

  17. The search for negative amplitude components in quasi-continuous distributions of relaxation times: the example of 1H magnetization exchange in articular cartilage and hydrated collagen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantazzini, Paola; Galassi, Francesca; Bortolotti, Villiam; Brown, Robert J. S.; Vittur, Franco

    2011-06-01

    When inverting nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation data in order to obtain quasi-continuous distributions of relaxation times for fluids in porous media, it is common practice to impose a non-negative (NN) constraint on the distributions. While this approach can be useful in reducing the effects of data distortion and/or preventing wild oscillations in the distributions, it may give misleading results in the presence of real negative amplitude components. Here, some examples of valid negative components for articular cartilage and hydrated collagen are given. Articular cartilage is a connective tissue, consisting mainly of collagen, proteoglycans and water, which can be considered, in many aspects, as a porous medium. Separate T1 relaxation data are obtained for low-mobility ('solid') macromolecular 1H and for higher-mobility ('liquid') 1H by the separation of these components in free induction decays, with α denoting the solid/liquid 1H ratio. When quasi-continuous distributions of relaxation times (T1) of the solid and liquid signal components of cartilage or collagen are computed from experimental relaxation data without imposing the usual NN constraint, valid negative peaks may appear. The features of the distributions, in particular negative peaks, and the fact that peaks at longer times for macromolecular and water protons are at essentially the same T1, are interpreted as the result of a magnetization exchange between these two spin pools. For the only-slightly-hydrated collagen samples, with α>1, the exchange leads to small negative peaks at short T1 times for the macromolecular component. However, for the cartilage, with substantial hydration or for a strongly hydrated collagen sample, both with αLt1, the behavior is reversed, with a negative peak for water at short times. The validity of a negative peak may be accepted (dismissed) by a high (low) cost of NN in error of fit. Computed distributions for simulated data using observed signal

  18. Time-domain quanification of amplitude, chemical shift, apparent relaxation time T2, and phase by wavelet-transform analysis. Application to biomedical magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrai, H; Senhadji, L; de Certaines, J D; Coatrieux, J L

    1997-01-01

    The wavelet-transform method is used to quantify the magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) parameters: chemical shift, apparent relaxation time T2, resonance amplitude, and phase. Wavelet transformation is a time-frequency representation which separates each component from the FID, then successively quantifies it and subtracts it from the raw signal. Two iterative procedures have been developed. They have been combined with a nonlinear regression analysis method and tested on both simulated and real sets of biomedical MRS data selected with respect to the main problems usually encountered in quantifying biomedical MRS, specifically "chemical noise," resulting from overlapping resonances, and baseline distortion. The results indicate that the wavelet-transform method can provide efficient and accurate quantification of MRS data.

  19. Effects of Vibration and G-Loading on Heart Rate, Breathing Rate, and Response Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godinez, Angelica; Ayzenberg, Ruthie; Liston, Dorian B.; Stone, Leland S.

    2013-01-01

    Aerospace and applied environments commonly expose pilots and astronauts to G-loading and vibration, alone and in combination, with well-known sensorimotor (Cohen, 1970) and performance consequences (Adelstein et al., 2008). Physiological variables such as heart rate (HR) and breathing rate (BR) have been shown to increase with G-loading (Yajima et al., 1994) and vibration (e.g. Guignard, 1965, 1985) alone. To examine the effects of G-loading and vibration, alone and in combination, we measured heart rate and breathing rate under aerospace-relevant conditions (G-loads of 1 Gx and 3.8 Gx; vibration of 0.5 gx at 8, 12, and 16 Hz).

  20. AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY ON THE RELAXATION OF BOLTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Abid

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Loss of pre-load with time, commonly known as ‘Relaxation’ is an established phenomena. Behaviour of a bolted joint depends upon the pre-load in the bolts in use, not the pre-load introduced by the mechanic. Loss of pre-load is expected due to the many factors such as embedment relaxation, gasket creep, elastic interactions, and vibration loosening or stress relaxation. In a gasketed joint, due to the gasket flexibility, relaxation is always substantial during preliminary passes, as 80 to 100% loss is not uncommon in almost all the bolts, resulting in a dynamic behaviour. Pre-load in a gasketed joint is stabilized and retained to certain extent in the final passes only. In a non-gasketed joint, due to no gasket and no rotation its static behaviour is concluded. This paper highlights the factors affecting the amount of relaxation with time and presents important considerations that can reduce this. Both the short and long term relaxations are recorded and a ‘best fit’ model for relaxation behaviour is derived.

  1. Relaxation Behind Strong Shock Waves in Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-10-01

    GENERALOV, LOSEV , and OSIPOV (1964) showed that the major effects of vibrational energy transfer occur for moderate Mach numbers corresponding to...an upper limit for needing to include vibrational energy exchange. However, Turchak (as do Generalov, Losev , and Osipov) neglects dissociation and...P.C.T., Physics of Fluids, Suppl. I 12_, 1-54, 1969 GENERALOV, N. A., LOSEV , S. A., and OSIPOV, A. I., "Relaxation of the Vibrational Energy of Air

  2. Magnetic resonance fingerprinting using echo-planar imaging: Joint quantification of T1 and T2∗ relaxation times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieger, Benedikt; Zimmer, Fabian; Zapp, Jascha; Weingärtner, Sebastian; Schad, Lothar R

    2017-11-01

    To develop an implementation of the magnetic resonance fingerprinting (MRF) paradigm for quantitative imaging using echo-planar imaging (EPI) for simultaneous assessment of T1 and T2∗. The proposed MRF method (MRF-EPI) is based on the acquisition of 160 gradient-spoiled EPI images with rapid, parallel-imaging accelerated, Cartesian readout and a measurement time of 10 s per slice. Contrast variation is induced using an initial inversion pulse, and varying the flip angles, echo times, and repetition times throughout the sequence. Joint quantification of T1 and T2∗ is performed using dictionary matching with integrated B1+ correction. The quantification accuracy of the method was validated in phantom scans and in vivo in 6 healthy subjects. Joint T1 and T2∗ parameter maps acquired with MRF-EPI in phantoms are in good agreement with reference measurements, showing deviations under 5% and 4% for T1 and T2∗, respectively. In vivo baseline images were visually free of artifacts. In vivo relaxation times are in good agreement with gold-standard techniques (deviation T1 : 4 ± 2%, T2∗: 4 ± 5%). The visual quality was comparable to the in vivo gold standard, despite substantially shortened scan times. The proposed MRF-EPI method provides fast and accurate T1 and T2∗ quantification. This approach offers a rapid supplement to the non-Cartesian MRF portfolio, with potentially increased usability and robustness. Magn Reson Med 78:1724-1733, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  3. Ultrafast relaxation and reaction of diiodide anion after photodissociation of triiodide in room-temperature ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Yoshio; Terazima, Masahide; Kimura, Yoshifumi

    2012-08-02

    Vibrational dephasing, vibrational relaxation, and rotational relaxation of diiodide (I(2)(-)) after photodissociation of triiodide (I(3)(-)) in room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) were investigated by ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy. The vibrational energy relaxation (VER) rate of I(2)(-) produced by the photodissociation reaction of I(3)(-) was determined from the spectral profile of the transient absorption. The rates in RTILs were slightly slower than those in conventional liquids. On the other hand, the coherent vibration of I(2)(-) was not observed in RTILs, and the vibrational dephasing of the photoproduced I(2)(-) was accelerated. This was explained by the interaction between I(2)(-) and I consisting of a caged contact pair in RTILs. The orientational relaxation time of I(2)(-) determined by the transient absorption anisotropy was much longer in RTILs than in conventional liquids due to their high viscosities although the relaxation time was shorter than the prediction from the Stokes-Einstein-Debye (SED) theory. The deviation from the SED prediction was interpreted by the frequency dependence of the shear stress acting on the molecule. The dynamics of I(2)(-) in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium iodide ([BMIm]I) were quite different from those in other conventional RTILs: the coherent vibration of I(2)(-) was observed for the time profile of the transient absorption and the initial value of the anisotropy was reduced to 0.31 from 0.36 in conventional RTILs. These results suggest that an ultrafast reaction between the photofragment I and the solvent I(-) may occur during the photodissociation process of I(3)(-). The anomaly in the ground state coherent vibration and steady state Raman spectrum of I(3)(-) also suggest the possibility that I(3)(-) and I(-) can be located in vicinity and interact strongly with each other in [BMIm]I.

  4. Spectroscopy and reactions of vibrationally excited transient molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, H.L. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Spectroscopy, energy transfer and reactions of vibrationally excited transient molecules are studied through a combination of laser-based excitation techniques and efficient detection of emission from the energized molecules with frequency and time resolution. Specifically, a Time-resolved Fourier Transform Emission Spectroscopy technique has been developed for detecting dispersed laser-induced fluorescence in the IR, visible and UV regions. The structure and spectroscopy of the excited vibrational levels in the electronic ground state, as well as energy relaxation and reactions induced by specific vibronic excitations of a transient molecule can be characterized from time-resolved dispersed fluorescence in the visible and UV region. IR emissions from highly vibrational excited levels, on the other hand, reveal the pathways and rates of collision induced vibrational energy transfer.

  5. In vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy of liver metabolites in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in rats: T2 relaxation times in methylene protons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kyu-Ho; Baek, Hyeon-Man; Lee, Do-Wan; Choe, Bo-Young

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the transverse relaxation time of methylene resonance as compared to other lipid resonances. The examinations were performed using a 3.0 T scanner with a point-resolved spectroscopy (PRESS) sequence. Lipid relaxation time in a lipid phantom filled with canola oil was estimated with a repetition time (TR) of 6000ms and echo time (TE) of 40-550ms. For in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS), eight male Sprague-Dawley rats were given free access to a normal-chow (NC) and another eight male Sprague-Dawley rats were given free access to a high-fat (HF) diet. Both groups drank water ad libitum. T2 measurements in the rats' livers were conducted at a fixed TR of 6000ms and TE of 40-220ms. Exponential curve fitting quality was calculated through the coefficients of determination (R(2)). Chemical analyses of the phantom and livers were not performed, but T2 decay curves were acquired. The T2 relaxation time of methylene resonance was estimated as follows: NC rats, 37.1±4.3ms; HF rats, 31.4±1.8ms (p<0.05). The extrapolated M0 values were higher in HF rats than in NC rats (p<0.005). This study of (1)H MRS led to sufficient spectral resolution and signal-to-noise ratio differences to characterize the T2 relaxation times of methylene resonance. (1)H MRS relaxation times may be useful for quantitative characterization of various liver diseases, including fatty liver disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Laboratory observations of time-dependent frictional strengthening and stress relaxation in natural and synthetic fault gouges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, B. M.; Ikari, M. J.; Marone, C.

    2016-02-01

    Interseismic recovery of fault strength (healing) following earthquake failure is a fundamental requirement of the seismic cycle and likely plays a key role in determining the stability and slip behavior of tectonic faults. We report on laboratory measurements of time- and slip-dependent frictional strengthening for natural and synthetic gouges to evaluate the role of mineralogy in frictional strengthening. We performed slide-hold-slide (SHS) shearing experiments on nine natural fault gouges and eight synthetic gouges at conditions of 20 MPa normal stress, 100% relative humidity (RH), large shear strain (~15), and room temperature. Phyllosilicate-rich rocks show the lowest rates of frictional strengthening. Samples rich in quartz and feldspar exhibit intermediate rates of frictional strengthening, and calcite-rich gouges show the largest values. Our results show that (1) the rates of frictional strengthening and creep relaxation scale with frictional strength, (2) phyllosilicate-rich fault gouges have low strength and healing characteristics that promote stable, aseismic creep, (3) most natural fault gouges exhibit intermediate rates of frictional strengthening, consistent with a broad range of fault slip behaviors, and (4) calcite-rich fault rocks show the highest rates of frictional strengthening, low values of dilation upon reshear, and high frictional strengths, all of which would promote seismogenic behavior.

  7. Numerical simulation of convection and heat transfer in Czochralski crystal growth by multiple-relaxation-time LBM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ding; Huang, Weichao; Zhang, Ni

    2017-07-01

    A two-dimensional axisymmetric swirling model based on the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) in a pseudo Cartesian coordinate system is posited to simulate Czochralski (Cz) crystal growth in this paper. Specifically, the multiple-relaxation-time LBM (MRT-LBM) combined with the finite difference method (FDM) is used to analyze the melt convection and heat transfer in the process of Cz crystal growth. An incompressible axisymmetric swirling MRT-LB D2Q9 model is applied to solve for the axial and radial velocities by inserting thermal buoyancy and rotational inertial force into the two-dimensional lattice Boltzmann equation. In addition, the melt temperature and the azimuthal velocity are solved by MRT-LB D2Q5 models, and the crystal temperature is solved by FDM. The comparison results of stream functions values of different methods demonstrate that our hybrid model can be used to simulate the fluid-thermal coupling in the axisymmetric swirling model correctly and effectively. Furthermore, numerical simulations of melt convection and heat transfer are conducted under the conditions of high Grashof (Gr) numbers, within the range of 105 ˜ 107, and different high Reynolds (Re) numbers. The experimental results show our hybrid model can obtain the exact solution of complex crystal-growth models and analyze the fluid-thermal coupling effectively under the combined action of natural convection and forced convection.

  8. A multiphase three-dimensional multi-relaxation time (MRT) lattice Boltzmann model with surface tension adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammar, Sami; Pernaudat, Guillaume; Trépanier, Jean-Yves

    2017-08-01

    The interdependence of surface tension and density ratio is a weakness of pseudo-potential based lattice Boltzmann models (LB). In this paper, we propose a 3D multi-relaxation time (MRT) model for multiphase flows at large density ratios. The proposed model is capable of adjusting the surface tension independently of the density ratio. We also present the 3D macroscopic equations recovered by the proposed forcing scheme. A high order of isotropy for the interaction force is used to reduce the amplitude of spurious currents. The proposed 3D-MRT model is validated by verifying Laplace's law and by analyzing its thermodynamic consistency and the oscillation period of a deformed droplet. The model is then applied to the simulation of the impact of a droplet on a dry surface. Impact dynamics are determined and the maximum spread factor calculated for different Reynolds and Weber numbers. The numerical results are in agreement with data published in the literature. The influence of surface wettability on the spread factor is also investigated. Finally, our 3D-MRT model is applied to the simulation of the impact of a droplet on a wet surface. The propagation of transverse waves is observed on the liquid surface.

  9. Native T1 Relaxation Time and Extracellular Volume Fraction as Accurate Markers of Diffuse Myocardial Fibrosis in Heart Valve Disease - Comparison With Targeted Left Ventricular Myocardial Biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kockova, Radka; Kacer, Petr; Pirk, Jan; Maly, Jiri; Sukupova, Lucie; Sikula, Viktor; Kotrc, Martin; Barciakova, Lucia; Honsova, Eva; Maly, Marek; Kautzner, Josef; Sedmera, David; Penicka, Martin

    2016-04-25

    The aim of our study was to investigate the relationship between the cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR)-derived native T1 relaxation time and myocardial extracellular volume (ECV) fraction and the extent of diffuse myocardial fibrosis (DMF) on targeted myocardial left ventricular (LV) biopsy. The study population consisted of 40 patients (age 63±8 years, 65% male) undergoing valve and/or ascending aorta surgery for severe aortic stenosis (77.5%), root dilatation (7.5%) or valve regurgitation (15%). The T1 relaxation time was assessed in the basal interventricular septum pre- and 10-min post-contrast administration using the modified Look-Locker Inversion recovery sequence prior to surgery. LV myocardial biopsy specimen was obtained during surgery from the basal interventricular septal segment matched with the T1 mapping assessment. The percentage of myocardial collagen was quantified using picrosirius red staining. The average percentage of myocardial collagen was 22.0±14.8%. Both native T1 relaxation time with cutoff value ≥1,010 ms (sensitivity=90%, specificity=73%, area under the curve=0.82) and ECV with cutoff value ≥0.32 (sensitivity=80%, specificity=90%, area under the curve=0.85) showed high accuracy to identify severe (>30%) DMF. The native T1 relaxation time showed significant correlation with LV mass (Pmarkers of DMF. (Circ J 2016; 80: 1202-1209).

  10. A robust method for calculating geometric mean times from multiexponential relaxation data, using only a few data points and only a few elementary operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgia, G C; Bortolotti, V; Brown, R J; Fantazzini, P

    1996-01-01

    A method is presented to compute values of geometric mean time Tg that uses only a few data points equispaced in the logarithm of time (or equispaced in time and weighted by 1/t) and a few elementary operations for the computation. The method has been tested on a large number of synthetic relaxation data and on actual NMR relaxation measurements in porous samples, using as few as four points (including the two points needed to normalize the relaxation for decay from 1.0 to 0) on each relaxation curve. This computation of the geometric-mean rate very adequately matches the synthetic data and the results of multiexponential inversion of many (or only a few) data points from NMR measurements. When many computations are needed in short times, as for voxel-by-voxel computations in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or for depth-by-depth computation in nuclear magnetism logging (NML) of oilwells, a very quickly computed estimate of Tg should be useful.

  11. (31) P MR spectroscopic imaging of the human prostate at 7 T: T1 relaxation times, Nuclear Overhauser Effect, and spectral characterization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lagemaat, M.W.; Maas, M.C.; Vos, E.K.; Bitz, A.K.; Orzada, S.; Weiland, E.; Uden, M.J. van; Kobus, T.; Heerschap, A.; Scheenen, T.W.J.

    2015-01-01

    Optimization of phosphorus ((31) P) MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) of the human prostate at 7 T by the evaluation of T1 relaxation times and the Nuclear Overhauser Effect (NOE) of phosphorus-containing metabolites.Twelve patients with prostate cancer and one healthy volunteer were scanned on a 7 T

  12. Semi-Active Pulse-Switching Vibration Suppression Using Sliding Time Window

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Mohammadi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The performance of pulse-switching vibration control technique is investigated using a new method for switching sequence, in order to enhance the vibration damping. The control law in this method which was developed in the field of piezoelectric damping is based on triggering the inverting switch on each extremum of the produced voltage (or displacement; however, its efficiency in the case of random excitation is arguable because of the local extremum detection process. The new proposed method for switching sequence is only based on the fact that the triggering voltage level was determined using windowed statistical examination of the deflection signal. Results for a cantilever beam excited by different excitation forces, such as stationary and nonstationary random samples, and pulse forces are presented. A significant decrease in vibration energy and also the robustness of this method are demonstrated.

  13. Whole brain MP2RAGE-based mapping of the longitudinal relaxation time at 9.4T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagberg, G E; Bause, J; Ethofer, T; Ehses, P; Dresler, T; Herbert, C; Pohmann, R; Shajan, G; Fallgatter, A; Pavlova, M A; Scheffler, K

    2017-01-01

    Mapping of the longitudinal relaxation time (T1) with high accuracy and precision is central for neuroscientific and clinical research, since it opens up the possibility to obtain accurate brain tissue segmentation and gain myelin-related information. An ideal, quantitative method should enable whole brain coverage within a limited scan time yet allow for detailed sampling with sub-millimeter voxel sizes. The use of ultra-high magnetic fields is well suited for this purpose, however the inhomogeneous transmit field potentially hampers its use. In the present work, we conducted whole brain T1 mapping based on the MP2RAGE sequence at 9.4T and explored potential pitfalls for automated tissue classification compared with 3T. Data accuracy and T2-dependent variation of the adiabatic inversion efficiency were investigated by single slice T1 mapping with inversion recovery EPI measurements, quantitative T2 mapping using multi-echo techniques and simulations of the Bloch equations. We found that the prominent spatial variation of the transmit field at 9.4T (yielding flip angles between 20% and 180% of nominal values) profoundly affected the result of image segmentation and T1 mapping. These effects could be mitigated by correcting for both flip angle and inversion efficiency deviations. Based on the corrected T1 maps, new, 'flattened', MP2RAGE contrast images were generated, that were no longer affected by variations of the transmit field. Unlike the uncorrected MP2RAGE contrast images acquired at 9.4T, these flattened images yielded image segmentations comparable to 3T, making bias-field correction prior to image segmentation and tissue classification unnecessary. In terms of the T1 estimates at high field, the proposed correction methods resulted in an improved precision, with test-retest variability below 1% and a coefficient-of-variation across 25 subjects below 3%. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Real time identification of the internal combustion engine combustion parameters based on the vibration velocity signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiuliang; Cheng, Yong; Wang, Limei; Ji, Shaobo

    2017-03-01

    Accurate combustion parameters are the foundations of effective closed-loop control of engine combustion process. Some combustion parameters, including the start of combustion, the location of peak pressure, the maximum pressure rise rate and its location, can be identified from the engine block vibration signals. These signals often include non-combustion related contributions, which limit the prompt acquisition of the combustion parameters computationally. The main component in these non-combustion related contributions is considered to be caused by the reciprocating inertia force excitation (RIFE) of engine crank train. A mathematical model is established to describe the response of the RIFE. The parameters of the model are recognized with a pattern recognition algorithm, and the response of the RIFE is predicted and then the related contributions are removed from the measured vibration velocity signals. The combustion parameters are extracted from the feature points of the renovated vibration velocity signals. There are angle deviations between the feature points in the vibration velocity signals and those in the cylinder pressure signals. For the start of combustion, a system bias is adopted to correct the deviation and the error bound of the predicted parameters is within 1.1°. To predict the location of the maximum pressure rise rate and the location of the peak pressure, algorithms based on the proportion of high frequency components in the vibration velocity signals are introduced. Tests results show that the two parameters are able to be predicted within 0.7° and 0.8° error bound respectively. The increase from the knee point preceding the peak value point to the peak value in the vibration velocity signals is used to predict the value of the maximum pressure rise rate. Finally, a monitoring frame work is inferred to realize the combustion parameters prediction. Satisfactory prediction for combustion parameters in successive cycles is achieved, which

  15. NMR relaxation times of trabecular bone—reproducibility, relationships to tissue structure and effects of sample freezing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prantner, Viktória; Isaksson, Hanna; Närväinen, Johanna; Lammentausta, Eveliina; Nissi, Mikko J.; Avela, Janne; Gröhn, Olli H. J.; Jurvelin, Jukka S.

    2010-12-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy provides a potential tool for non-invasive evaluation of the trabecular bone structure. The objective of this study was to determine the reproducibility of the NMR relaxation parameters (T2, Carr-Purcel-T2, T1ρ) for fat and water and relate those to the structural parameters obtained by micro-computed tomography (μCT). Especially, we aimed to evaluate the effect of freezing on the relaxation parameters. For storing bone samples, freezing is the standard procedure during which the biochemical and cellular organization of the bone marrow may be affected. Bovine trabecular bone samples were stored at -20 °C for 7 days and measured by NMR spectroscopy before and after freezing. The reproducibility of NMR relaxation parameters, as expressed by the coefficient of variation, ranged from 3.1% to 27.9%. In fresh samples, some correlations between NMR and structural parameters (Tb.N, Tb.Sp) were significant (e.g. the relaxation rate for T2 of fat versus Tb.Sp: r = -0.716, p bone samples for NMR relaxation studies may provide inferior information about the trabecular bone structure.

  16. Time-domain seismic response function retrieval from ambient vibration of dams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, S.

    2016-12-01

    The existing seismometers installed at the dams for irrigation have recorded many seismic records during huge earthquake events, especially in Japan. Those are useful for analysis to understand how dams behaved during earthquake. Those records are valuable as the evidence not only to show the behavior of dams caused by but also to retrieve the index to reflect the dynamic property of the dams. Considering this point, we have applied the concept of seismic interferometry and its method to seismic records of the dams to estimate their properties of seismic wave propagation and the dynamic properties of those structures. This shows the applicability of seismic interferometry for small vibration records of existing seismometer of dams, like small earthquake records, whose maximum acceleration are less than 1cm/s2, or ambient noise. Based on the analysis for the waveform of acceleration during more than 10hours, we can retrieve the waveforms of time domain response similar to the one extracted from the seismic record of earthquake events, whose maximum acceleration is more than 2cm/s2, from small earthquake records and even from ambient noise only. This fact shows the proposed method might be applicable more frequently, if we applied it not only earthquake records but also the small records which has been considered to be trivial ones. Though we must verify the applicability of this method to the other many dams, this method might be expected to be more useful in an area where the earthquake frequency is very small, or at a dam site where the seismometer has been installed recently and obtained little or not enough seismic records yet. We will also discuss on reliability of results comparing the response obtained from records of eathquake events and seismic sensors array observation.

  17. The Effect of Timing of Female Vibrational Reply on Male Signalling and Searching Behaviour in the Leafhopper Aphrodes makarovi

    OpenAIRE

    Anka Kuhelj; Maarten de Groot; Andrej Blejec; Meta Virant-Doberlet

    2015-01-01

    Sexual communication in animals often involves duetting characterized by a coordinated reciprocal exchange of acoustic signals. We used playback experiments to study the role of timing of a female reply in the species-specific duet structure in the leafhopper Aphrodes makarovi (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae). In leafhoppers, mate recognition and location is mediated exclusively by species- and sex-specific substrate-borne vibrational signals and a female signal emitted in reply to male advertisemen...

  18. Discrete effect on the halfway bounce-back boundary condition of multiple-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann model for convection-diffusion equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Shuqi; Hong, Ning; Shi, Baochang; Chai, Zhenhua

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we will focus on the multiple-relaxation-time (MRT) lattice Boltzmann model for two-dimensional convection-diffusion equations (CDEs), and analyze the discrete effect on the halfway bounce-back (HBB) boundary condition (or sometimes called bounce-back boundary condition) of the MRT model where three different discrete velocity models are considered. We first present a theoretical analysis on the discrete effect of the HBB boundary condition for the simple problems with a parabolic distribution in the x or y direction, and a numerical slip proportional to the second-order of lattice spacing is observed at the boundary, which means that the MRT model has a second-order convergence rate in space. The theoretical analysis also shows that the numerical slip can be eliminated in the MRT model through tuning the free relaxation parameter corresponding to the second-order moment, while it cannot be removed in the single-relaxation-time model or the Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook model unless the relaxation parameter related to the diffusion coefficient is set to be a special value. We then perform some simulations to confirm our theoretical results, and find that the numerical results are consistent with our theoretical analysis. Finally, we would also like to point out the present analysis can be extended to other boundary conditions of lattice Boltzmann models for CDEs.

  19. The effect of the polymer relaxation time on the nonlinear energy cas- cade and dissipation of statistically steady and decaying homogeneous isotropic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, Pedro C.; da Silva, Carlos B.; Pinho, Fernando T.

    2013-11-01

    We report a numerical study of statistically steady and decaying turbulence of FENE-P fluids for varying polymer relaxation times ranging from the Kolmogorov dissipation time-scale to the eddy turnover time. The total turbulent kinetic energy dissipation is shown to increase with the polymer relaxation time in both steady and decaying turbulence, implying a ``drag increase.'' If the total power input in the statistically steady case is kept equal in the Newtonian and the viscoelastic simulations the increase in the turbulence-polymer energy transfer naturally lead to the previously reported depletion of the Newtonian, but not the overall, kinetic energy dissipation. The modifications to the nonlinear energy cascade with varying Deborah/Weissenberg numbers are quantified and their origins investigated. The authors acknowledge the financial support from Fundação para a Ciência e a Tecnologia under grant PTDC/EME-MFE/113589/2009.

  20. Fully Automatic Analysis of the Knee Articular Cartilage T1ρ relaxation time using Voxel Based Relaxometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedoia, Valentina; Li, Xiaojuan; Su, Favian; Calixto, Nathaniel; Majumdar, Sharmila

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To develop and compare with classical ROI-based approach, a fully-automatic, local and unbiased way of studying the knee T1ρ relaxation time by creating an atlas and using Voxel Based Relaxometry (VBR) in OA and ACL subjects Materials and Methods In this study 110 subjects from 2 cohorts: (i) Mild OA 40 patients with mild-OA KL ≤ 2 and 15 controls KL ≤ 1; (ii) ACL cohort (a model for early OA): 40 ACL-injured patients imaged prior to ACL reconstruction and 1-year post-surgery and 15 controls are analyzed. All the subjects were acquired at 3T with a protocol that includes: 3D-FSE (CUBE) and 3D-T1ρ. A Non-rigid registration technique was applied to align all the images on a single template. This allows for performing VBR to assess local statistical differences of T1ρ values using z-score analysis. VBR results are compared with those obtained with classical ROI-based technique Results ROI-based results from atlas-based segmentation were consistent with classical ROI-based method (CV = 3.83%). Voxel-based group analysis revealed local patterns that were overlooked by ROI-based approach; e.g. VBR showed posterior lateral femur and posterior lateral tibia significant T1ρ elevations in ACL injured patients (sample mean z-score=9.7 and 10.3). Those elevations were overlooked by the classical ROI-based approach (sample mean z-score =1.87, and −1.73) Conclusion VBR is a feasible and accurate tool for the local evaluation of the biochemical composition of knee articular cartilage. VBR is capable of detecting specific local patterns on T1ρ maps in OA and ACL subjects PMID:26443990

  1. Vibrational cooling dynamics of a [FeFe]-hydrogenase mimic probed by time-resolved infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplins, Benjamin W; Lomont, Justin P; Nguyen, Son C; Harris, Charles B

    2014-12-11

    Picosecond time-resolved infrared spectroscopy (TRIR) was performed for the first time on a dithiolate bridged binuclear iron(I) hexacarbonyl complex ([Fe₂(μ-bdt)(CO)₆], bdt = benzene-1,2-dithiolate) which is a structural mimic of the active site of the [FeFe]-hydrogenase enzyme. As these model active sites are increasingly being studied for their potential in photocatalytic systems for hydrogen production, understanding their excited and ground state dynamics is critical. In n-heptane, absorption of 400 nm light causes carbonyl loss with low quantum yield (<10%), while the majority (ca. 90%) of the parent complex is regenerated with biexponential kinetics (τ₁ = 21 ps and τ₂ = 134 ps). In order to understand the mechanism of picosecond bleach recovery, a series of UV-pump TRIR experiments were performed in different solvents. The long time decay (τ₂) of the transient spectra is seen to change substantially as a function of solvent, from 95 ps in THF to 262 ps in CCl₄. Broadband IR-pump TRIR experiments were performed for comparison. The measured vibrational lifetimes (T₁(avg)) of the carbonyl stretches were found to be in excellent correspondence to the observed τ₂ decays in the UV-pump experiments, signifying that vibrationally excited carbonyl stretches are responsible for the observed longtime decays. The fast spectral evolution (τ₁) was determined to be due to vibrational cooling of low frequency modes anharmonically coupled to the carbonyl stretches that were excited after electronic internal conversion. The results show that cooling of both low and high frequency vibrational modes on the electronic ground state give rise to the observed picosecond TRIR transient spectra of this compound, without the need to invoke electronically excited states.

  2. Efficient Vibrational Energy Transfer through Covalent Bond in Indigo Carmine Revealed by Nonlinear IR Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xuemei; Yu, Pengyun; Zhao, Juan; Wang, Jianping

    2017-10-12

    Ultrafast vibrational relaxation and structural dynamics of indigo carmine in dimethyl sulfoxide were examined using femtosecond pump-probe infrared and two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectroscopies. Using the intramolecularly hydrogen-bonded C═O and delocalized C═C stretching modes as infrared probes, local structural and dynamical variations of this blue dye molecule were observed. Energy relaxation of the vibrationally excited C═O stretching mode was found to occur through covalent bond to the delocalized aromatic vibrational modes on the time scale of a few picoseconds or less. Vibrational quantum beating was observed in magic-angle pump-probe, anisotropy, and 2D IR cross-peak dynamics, showing an oscillation period of ca. 1010 fs, which corresponds to the energy difference between the C═O and C═C transition frequency (33 cm-1). This confirms a resonant vibrational energy transfer happened between the two vibrators. However, a more efficient energy-accepting mode of the excited C═O stretching was believed to be a nearby combination and/or overtone mode that is more tightly connected to the C═O species. On the structural aspect, dynamical-time-dependent 2D IR spectra reveal an insignificant inhomogeneous contribution to time-correlation relaxation for both the C═O and C═C stretching modes, which is in agreement with the generally believed structural rigidity of such conjugated molecules.

  3. Effects of unloading on knee articular cartilage T1rho and T2 magnetic resonance imaging relaxation times: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Richard B; Baum, Thomas; Wu, Samuel; Feeley, Brian T; Kadel, Nancy; Li, Xiaojuan; Link, Thomas M; Majumdar, Sharmila

    2012-06-01

    Case series. It has been shown in rodent and canine models that cartilage composition is significantly altered in response to long-term unloading. To date, however, no in vivo human studies have investigated this topic. The objective of this case series was to determine the influence of unloading and reloading on T1rho and T2 relaxation times of articular cartilage in healthy young joints. Ten patients who required 6 to 8 weeks of non-weight bearing (NWB) for injuries affecting the distal lower extremity participated in the study. Quantitative T1rho and T2 imaging of the ipsilateral knee joint was performed at 3 time points: (1) prior to surgery (baseline), (2) immediately after a period of NWB (post-NWB), and (3) after 4 weeks of full weight bearing (post-FWB). Cartilage regions of interest were segmented and overlaid on T1rho and T2 relaxation time maps for quantification. Descriptive statistics are provided for all changes. Increases of 5% to 10% in T1rho times of all femoral and tibial compartments were noted post-NWB. All values returned to near-baseline levels post-FWB. Increases in medial tibia T2 times were noted post-NWB and remained elevated post-FWB. The load-bearing regions showed the most significant changes in response to unloading, with increases of up to 12%. The observation of a transient shift in relaxation times confirms that cartilage composition is subject to alterations based on loading conditions. These changes appear to be mostly related to proteoglycan content and more localized to the load-bearing regions. However, following 4 weeks of full weight bearing, relaxation times of nearly all regions had returned to baseline levels, demonstrating reversibility in compositional fluctuations. Therapy, level 4.

  4. Analysis of vibrational-translational energy transfer using the direct simulation Monte Carlo method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Iain D.

    1991-01-01

    A new model is proposed for energy transfer between the vibrational and translational modes for use in the direct simulation Monte Carlo method (DSMC). The model modifies the Landau-Teller theory for a harmonic oscillator and the rate transition is related to an experimental correlation for the vibrational relaxation time. Assessment of the model is made with respect to three different computations: relaxation in a heat bath, a one-dimensional shock wave, and hypersonic flow over a two-dimensional wedge. These studies verify that the model achieves detailed balance, and excellent agreement with experimental data is obtained in the shock wave calculation. The wedge flow computation reveals that the usual phenomenological method for simulating vibrational nonequilibrium in the DSMC technique predicts much higher vibrational temperatures in the wake region.

  5. Analytical representation of time correlation functions and application to relaxation problems; Representation analytique des fonctions de correlation temporelle et application a des problemes de relaxation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupuis, M. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, 91 - Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires, departement de physico-chimie, services des isotopes stables

    1971-07-01

    Two analytical representations of the Laplace transform of the time autocorrelation of a dynamical variable, namely the moment expansion and Mori's continued fraction expansion, are investigated from the point of view of structure and convergence properties, and the relation between them is established. The general theory is applied first to a dynamical model exactly solvable, the isotopic impurity in a linear chain of coupled harmonic oscillators, and then to two stochastic models recently introduced by Gordon for the rotational diffusion of molecules. In the latter case, the continued fraction expansion yields simple analytical expressions for the infrared absorption band shapes, showing that these models contain all the features of observed shapes in compressed gases, liquids and solutions. (author) [French] Deux representations analytiques de la transformee de Laplace de la fonction d'autocorrelation temporelle d'une variable dynamique, le developpement en moments et le developpement en fraction continue recemment introduit par Mori, sont etudiees du point de vue de leurs proprietes de structure et de convergence, en meme temps que la relation qui existe entre elles est etablie. La theorie generale est appliquee, d'une part, a un modele dynamique exactement soluble, celui d'une particule isotopique dans une chaine lineaire d'oscillateurs harmoniques couples, et, d'autre part, a deux modeles stochastiques recemment proposes par Gordon pour la diffusion rotationnelle des molecules. Dans ce dernier cas, la voie de la fraction continue fournit des expressions analytiques simples pour les formes de bande d'absorption infrarouge, montrant que ces modeles possedent les caracteristiques des formes observees dans les gaz comprimes, les liquides ou les solutions. (auteur)

  6. The Arrow of Time in the Collapse of Collisionless Self-gravitating Systems: Non-validity of the Vlasov-Poisson Equation during Violent Relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beraldo e Silva, Leandro; de Siqueira Pedra, Walter; Sodré, Laerte; Perico, Eder L. D.; Lima, Marcos

    2017-09-01

    The collapse of a collisionless self-gravitating system, with the fast achievement of a quasi-stationary state, is driven by violent relaxation, with a typical particle interacting with the time-changing collective potential. It is traditionally assumed that this evolution is governed by the Vlasov-Poisson equation, in which case entropy must be conserved. We run N-body simulations of isolated self-gravitating systems, using three simulation codes, NBODY-6 (direct summation without softening), NBODY-2 (direct summation with softening), and GADGET-2 (tree code with softening), for different numbers of particles and initial conditions. At each snapshot, we estimate the Shannon entropy of the distribution function with three different techniques: Kernel, Nearest Neighbor, and EnBiD. For all simulation codes and estimators, the entropy evolution converges to the same limit as N increases. During violent relaxation, the entropy has a fast increase followed by damping oscillations, indicating that violent relaxation must be described by a kinetic equation other than the Vlasov-Poisson equation, even for N as large as that of astronomical structures. This indicates that violent relaxation cannot be described by a time-reversible equation, shedding some light on the so-called “fundamental paradox of stellar dynamics.” The long-term evolution is well-described by the orbit-averaged Fokker-Planck model, with Coulomb logarithm values in the expected range 10{--}12. By means of NBODY-2, we also study the dependence of the two-body relaxation timescale on the softening length. The approach presented in the current work can potentially provide a general method for testing any kinetic equation intended to describe the macroscopic evolution of N-body systems.

  7. The contrasting roles of creep and stress relaxation in the time-dependent deformation during in-situ cooling of a nickel-base single crystal superalloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panwisawas, Chinnapat; D'Souza, Neil; Collins, David M; Bhowmik, Ayan

    2017-09-11

    Time dependent plastic deformation in a single crystal nickel-base superalloy during cooling from casting relevant temperatures has been studied using a combination of in-situ neutron diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and modelling. Visco-plastic deformation during cooling was found to be dependent on the stress and constraints imposed to component contraction during cooling, which mechanistically comprises creep and stress relaxation. Creep results in progressive work hardening with dislocations shearing the γ' precipitates, a high dislocation density in the γ channels and near the γ/γ' interface and precipitate shearing. When macroscopic contraction is restricted, relaxation dominates. This leads to work softening from a decreased dislocation density and the presence of long segment stacking faults in γ phase. Changes in lattice strains occur to a similar magnitude in both the γ and γ' phases during stress relaxation, while in creep there is no clear monotonic trend in lattice strain in the γ phase, but only a marginal increase in the γ' precipitates. Using a visco-plastic law derived from in-situ experiments, the experimentally measured and calculated stresses during cooling show a good agreement when creep predominates. However, when stress relaxation dominates accounting for the decrease in dislocation density during cooling is essential.

  8. Design of a Real-Time Adaptively Tuned Dynamic Vibration Absorber with a Variable Stiffness Property Using Magnetorheological Elastomer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshihiko Komatsuzaki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An elastomer composite with controllable stiffness, known as a magnetorheological elastomer (MRE, is used in a dynamic vibration absorber whose natural frequency is tuned adaptively to the disturbance frequency through the application of an external magnetic field. The field-dependent property test of the fabricated MRE sample shows that the stiffness changes by more than six times compared to the baseline property value at a 40% iron powder volume concentration. The MRE is then used to fabricate a frequency-tunable dynamic absorber for mitigating transient vibrations of a one-degree-of-freedom system. Investigations show that the proposed absorber outperforms a conventional passive-type absorber throughout the tunable frequency range.

  9. Investigation of Effectiveness of Some Vibration-Based Techniques in Early Detection of Real-Time Fatigue Failure in Gears

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Ozturk

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Bending fatigue crack is a dangerous and insidious mode of failure in gears. As it produces no debris in its early stages, it gives little warning during its progression, and usually results in either immediate loss of serviceability or greatly reduced power transmitting capacity. This paper presents the applications of vibration-based techniques (i.e. conventional time and frequency domain analysis, cepstrum, and continuous wavelet transform to real gear vibrations in the early detection, diagnosis and advancement monitoring of a real tooth fatigue crack and compares their detection and diagnostic capabilities on the basis of experimental results. Gear fatigue damage is achieved under heavy-loading conditions and the gearbox is allowed to run until the gears suffer badly from complete tooth breakage. It has been found that the initiation and progression of fatigue crack cannot be easily detected by conventional time and frequency domain approaches until the fault is significantly developed. On the contrary, the wavelet transform is quite sensitive to any change in gear vibration and reveals fault features earlier than other methods considered.

  10. Vibration Analysis and Time Series Prediction for Wind Turbine Gearbox Prognostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossam A. Gabbar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Premature failure of a gearbox in a wind turbine poses a high risk of increasing the operational and maintenance costs and decreasing the profit margins. Prognostics and health management (PHM techniques are widely used to access the current health condition of the gearbox and project it in future to predict premature failures. This paper proposes such techniques for predicting gearbox health condition index extracted from the vibration signals emanating from the gearbox. The progression of the monitoring index is predicted using two different prediction techniques, adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS and nonlinear autoregressive model with exogenous inputs (NARX. The proposed prediction techniques are evaluated through sun-spot data-set and applied on vibration based health related monitoring index calculated through psychoacoustic phenomenon. A comparison is given for their prediction accuracy. The results are helpful in understanding the relationship of machine conditions, the corresponding indicating features, the level of damage/degradation, and their progression.

  11. The Fourteenth International Meeting on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy (TRVS XIV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-03

    Sponsored by Infrared Systems Development and Infrared Associates Sunday, May 10, 2009      7:30 AM Breakfast 8:50 AM Opening ...solutes 10:20 AM C Artem A Bakulin Wayne Liang Thomas la Cour Do hydrophobic groups stabilize the water structure?. , , Jansen Douwe A Wiersma Huib... opening of a beta turn thioxopeptide 13 Joshua Lessing, Jongjin Kim, Kevin Jones, Ziad Ganim, and Andrei Tokmakoff, MIT Two dimensional vibrational

  12. Determination of intra-axial brain tumors cellularity through the analysis of T2 Relaxation time of brain tumors before surgery using MATLAB software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdolmohammadi, Jamil; Shafiee, Mohsen; Faeghi, Fariborz; Arefan, Douman; Zali, Alireza; Motiei-Langroudi, Rouzbeh; Farshidfar, Zahra; Nazarlou, Ali Kiani; Tavakkoli, Ali; Yarham, Mohammad

    2016-08-01

    Timely diagnosis of brain tumors could considerably affect the process of patient treatment. To do so, para-clinical methods, particularly MRI, cannot be ignored. MRI has so far answered significant questions regarding tumor characteristics, as well as helping neurosurgeons. In order to detect the tumor cellularity, neuro-surgeons currently have to sample specimens by biopsy and then send them to the pathology unit. The aim of this study is to determine the tumor cellularity in the brain. In this cross-sectional study, 32 patients (18 males and 14 females from 18-77 y/o) were admitted to the neurosurgery department of Shohada-E Tajrish Hospital in Tehran, Iran from April 2012 to February 2014. In addition to routine pulse sequences, T2W Multi echo pulse sequences were taken and the images were analyzed using the MATLAB software to determine the brain tumor cellularity, compared with the biopsy. These findings illustrate the need for more T2 relaxation time decreases, the higher classes of tumors will stand out in the designed table. In this study, the results show T2 relaxation time with a 85% diagnostic weight, compared with the biopsy, to determine the brain tumor cellularity (p<0.05). Our results indicate that the T2 relaxation time feature is the best method to distinguish and present the degree of intra-axial brain tumors cellularity (85% accuracy compared to biopsy). The use of more data is recommended in order to increase the percent accuracy of this techniques.

  13. Acoustic multipole sources for the regularized lattice Boltzmann method: Comparison with multiple-relaxation-time models in the inviscid limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Congshan; Sagaut, Pierre

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, a variant of the acoustic multipole source (AMS) method is proposed within the framework of the lattice Boltzmann method. A quadrupole term is directly included in the stress system (equilibrium momentum flux), and the dependency of the quadrupole source in the inviscid limit upon the fortuitous discretization error reported in the works of E. M. Viggen [Phys. Rev. E 87, 023306 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevE.87.023306] is removed. The regularized lattice Boltzmann (RLB) method with this variant AMS method is presented for the 2D and 3D acoustic problems in the inviscid limit, and without loss of generality, the D3Q19 model is considered in this work. To assess the accuracy and the advantage of the RLB scheme with this AMS for acoustic point sources, the numerical investigations and comparisons with the multiple-relaxation-time (MRT) models and the analytical solutions are performed on the 2D and 3D acoustic multipole point sources in the inviscid limit, including monopoles, x dipoles, and x x quadrupoles. From the present results, the good precision of this AMS method is validated, and the RLB scheme exhibits some superconvergence properties for the monopole sources compared with the MRT models, and both the RLB and MRT models have the same accuracy for the simulations of acoustic dipole and quadrupole sources. To further validate the capability of the RLB scheme with AMS, another basic acoustic problem, the acoustic scattering from a solid cylinder presented at the Second Computational Aeroacoustics Workshop on Benchmark Problems, is numerically considered. The directivity pattern of the acoustic field is computed at r =7.5 ; the present results agree well with the exact solutions. Also, the effects of slip and no-slip wall treatments within the regularized boundary condition on this pure acoustic scattering problem are tested, and compared with the exact solution, the slip wall treatment can present a better result. All simulations demonstrate that the

  14. The Effect of Timing of Female Vibrational Reply on Male Signalling and Searching Behaviour in the Leafhopper Aphrodes makarovi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhelj, Anka; de Groot, Maarten; Blejec, Andrej; Virant-Doberlet, Meta

    2015-01-01

    Sexual communication in animals often involves duetting characterized by a coordinated reciprocal exchange of acoustic signals. We used playback experiments to study the role of timing of a female reply in the species-specific duet structure in the leafhopper Aphrodes makarovi (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae). In leafhoppers, mate recognition and location is mediated exclusively by species- and sex-specific substrate-borne vibrational signals and a female signal emitted in reply to male advertisement calls is essential for recognition and successful location of the female. In A. makarovi, males have to initiate each exchange of vibrational signals between partners, and in a duet the beginning of a female reply overlaps the end of the male advertisement call. Results of playback treatments in which female replies were delayed and did not overlap with the male call revealed that in order to trigger an appropriate behavioural response of the male, female reply has to appear in a period less than 400 ms after the end of the initiating male call. Results also suggest that males are not able to detect a female reply while calling, since female reply that did not continue after the end of male call triggered male behaviour similar to behaviour observed in the absence of female reply. Together, our results show that vibrational duets are tightly coordinated and that the species-specific duet structure plays an important role in mate recognition in location processes.

  15. The Effect of Timing of Female Vibrational Reply on Male Signalling and Searching Behaviour in the Leafhopper Aphrodes makarovi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anka Kuhelj

    Full Text Available Sexual communication in animals often involves duetting characterized by a coordinated reciprocal exchange of acoustic signals. We used playback experiments to study the role of timing of a female reply in the species-specific duet structure in the leafhopper Aphrodes makarovi (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae. In leafhoppers, mate recognition and location is mediated exclusively by species- and sex-specific substrate-borne vibrational signals and a female signal emitted in reply to male advertisement calls is essential for recognition and successful location of the female. In A. makarovi, males have to initiate each exchange of vibrational signals between partners, and in a duet the beginning of a female reply overlaps the end of the male advertisement call. Results of playback treatments in which female replies were delayed and did not overlap with the male call revealed that in order to trigger an appropriate behavioural response of the male, female reply has to appear in a period less than 400 ms after the end of the initiating male call. Results also suggest that males are not able to detect a female reply while calling, since female reply that did not continue after the end of male call triggered male behaviour similar to behaviour observed in the absence of female reply. Together, our results show that vibrational duets are tightly coordinated and that the species-specific duet structure plays an important role in mate recognition in location processes.

  16. The contrasting roles of creep and stress relaxation in the time-dependent deformation during in-situ cooling of a nickel-base single crystal superalloy

    OpenAIRE

    Panwisawas, Chinnapat; D?Souza, Neil; David M. Collins; Bhowmik, Ayan

    2017-01-01

    Time dependent plastic deformation in a single crystal nickel-base superalloy during cooling from casting relevant temperatures has been studied using a combination of in-situ neutron diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and modelling. Visco-plastic deformation during cooling was found to be dependent on the stress and constraints imposed to component contraction during cooling, which mechanistically comprises creep and stress relaxation. Creep results in progressive work hardening w...

  17. Hydration of surfactant-modified and PEGylated cationic cholesterol-based liposomes and corresponding lipoplexes by monitoring a fluorescent probe and the dielectric relaxation time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maitani, Yoshie; Nakamura, Ayako; Tanaka, Takumi; Aso, Yukio

    2012-05-10

    For the optimization of plasmid DNA (pDNA)-cationic lipid complexes and lipoplex delivery, proper indexes of the physicochemical properties of lipoplexes are required. In general, the characteristics of lipoplexes are defined by particle size and zeta-potential at various mixing ratios of cationic liposomes and pDNA. In this study, we characterized the hydration level of surfactant-modified and PEGylated cationic cholesterol-based (OH-Chol) liposomes and their lipoplexes by monitoring both the fluorescent probe laurdan and the dielectric relaxation time. Fluorescence measurement using laurdan detected hydration of the headgroup of lipids in surfactant-modified liposomes and PEGylated DOTAP-liposomes, but hardly any fluorescence was detected in PEGylated OH-Chol-liposomes because the PEG layers may extend and cover the fluorescent maker. On the other hand, the measurement of dielectric relaxation time of water molecules revealed total hydration, including hydration of the PEG layer and the headgroup of cationic lipids. Furthermore, we found an inverse correlation between hydration level and cellular uptake of PEGylated lipoplexes (R=0.946). This finding indicated that the dielectric relaxation time of water molecules provides an important indicator of hydration of liposome and lipoplexes along with the fluorescence intensity of laurdan. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Molecular Relaxation in Liquids

    CERN Document Server

    Bagchi, Biman

    2012-01-01

    This book brings together many different relaxation phenomena in liquids under a common umbrella and provides a unified view of apparently diverse phenomena. It aligns recent experimental results obtained with modern techniques with recent theoretical developments. Such close interaction between experiment and theory in this area goes back to the works of Einstein, Smoluchowski, Kramers' and de Gennes. Development of ultrafast laser spectroscopy recently allowed study of various relaxation processes directly in the time domain, with time scales going down to picosecond (ps) and femtosecond (fs

  19. Influence of aging time of oleate precursor on the magnetic relaxation of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles synthesized by the thermal decomposition method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrera, Adriana P.; Polo-Corrales, Liliana [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Puerto Rico, Mayagueez, Puerto Rico, PR 00681-9000 (United States); Chavez, Ermides; Cabarcas-Bolivar, Jari [Department of Physics, University of Puerto Rico, Mayagueez, Puerto Rico, PR 00681-9000 (United States); Uwakweh, Oswald N.C. [Department of General Engineering, University of Puerto Rico, Mayagueez, Puerto Rico, PR 00681-9000 (United States); Rinaldi, Carlos, E-mail: crinaldi@uprm.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Puerto Rico, Mayagueez, Puerto Rico, PR 00681-9000 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    Cobalt ferrite nanoparticles are of interest because of their room temperature coercivity and high magnetic anisotropy constant, which make them attractive in applications such as sensors based on the Brownian relaxation mechanism and probes to determine the mechanical properties of complex fluids at the nanoscale. These nanoparticles can be synthesized with a narrow size distribution by the thermal decomposition of an iron-cobalt oleate precursor in a high boiling point solvent. We studied the influence of aging time of the iron-cobalt oleate precursor on the structure, chemical composition, size, and magnetic relaxation of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles synthesized by the thermal decomposition method. The structure and thermal behavior of the iron-cobalt oleate was studied during the aging process. Infrared spectra indicated a shift in the coordination state of the oleate and iron/cobalt ions from bidentate to bridging coordination. Aging seemed to influence the thermal decomposition of the iron-cobalt oleate as determined from thermogravimmetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry, where shifts in the temperatures corresponding to decomposition events and a narrowing of the endotherms associated with these events were observed. Aging promoted formation of the spinel crystal structure, as determined from X-ray diffraction, and influenced the nanoparticle magnetic properties, resulting in an increase in blocking temperature and magnetocrystalline anisotropy. Mossbauer spectra also indicated changes in the magnetic properties resulting from aging of the precursor oleate. Although all samples exhibited some degree of Brownian relaxation, as determined from complex susceptibility measurements in a liquid medium, aging of the iron-cobalt oleate precursor resulted in crossing of the in-phase {chi} Prime and out-of-phase {chi} Double-Prime components of the complex susceptibility at the frequency of the Brownian magnetic relaxation peak, as expected for

  20. Vibrational lineshapes of adsorbates on solid surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueba, H.

    A review is presented of the current activity in vibrational spectroscopy of adsorbates on metal surfaces. A brief introduction of the representative spectroscopies is given to demonstrate the rich information contained in vibrational spectra, which are characterized by their intensity, peak position and width. Analysis of vibrational spectra enables us to gain the deep insight into not only the local character of adsorption site or geometry, but also the dynamical interaction between the adsorbates or between the adsorbate and the substrate. Some recent instructive experimental results, mostly of a CO molecule adsorbed on various metal surfaces, are accompanied by the corresponding theoretical recipe for vibrational excitation mechanisms. Wide spread experimental results of the C-O stretching frequency of CO adsorbed on metal surfaces are discussed in terms of the chemical effect involving the static and dynamic charge transfers between the chemisorbed CO and metal, and also of the electrostatic dipole-dipole interaction between the molecules. The central subject of this review is directed to the linshapes characterized by the vibrational relaxation processes of adsorbates. A simple and transparent model is introduced to show that the characteristic decay time of the correlation function for the vibrational coordinates is the key quantity to determine the spectral lineshapes. Recent experimental results focused on a search for an intrinsic broadening mechanism are reviewed in the light of the so-called T1 (energy) and T2 (phase) relaxation processesof the vibrational excited states of adsorbates. Those are the vibrational energy dissipation into the elementary excitation, such as phonons or electron-hole pairs in the metal substrate, and pure dephasing due to the energy exchange with the sorroundings. The change of width and frequency by varying the experimental variables, such as temperature or isotope effect, provides indispensable knowledge for the dynamical

  1. Time-averaged phase-stepped ESPI with CO2 laser and shearography in the visible for identification of vibration mode shapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenrijt, Jean-François; Thizy, Cédric; Georges, Marc P.

    2015-08-01

    We present investigation of interferometric methods for vibration mode identification to be applied on shakers in industrial environment. We consider long wave infrared ESPI in time-averaged mode with the use of phase-stepping which allows transforming Bessel fringes, typical to the time averaging, into phase values which provide a better way for identification of vibration mode shapes. The use of long laser wavelength allows measuring larger amplitudes of vibrations compared to what is achieved in visible light. Also longer wavelengths allow lower sensitivity to external perturbations. Time-averaged phase-stepped shearography in visible is also used as a compared alternative to LWIR ESPI for working in industrial environments. Although not demonstrated here, an interesting feature for the future investigations on LWIR ESPI is its potentiality of simultaneous temperature measurement during vibrations.

  2. Assessment of T2 Relaxation Times for Normal Canine Knee Articular Cartilage by T2 Mapping Using 1.5-T Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Asami; Shimizu, Miki; Beale, Brian; Takahashi, Fumitaka; Yamaguchi, Sinya

    2017-11-01

    Objectives  This study aims to assess and compare the T2 relaxation times for articular cartilage of normal canine stifle joints in four regions by T2 mapping using a 1.5-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods   In vivo prospective study: 20 hindlimbs (left and right) from 10 normal healthy beagle dogs ( n  = 20). The region of interest (ROI) was subdivided into medial and lateral condyles of femoral cartilage (MF and LF, respectively) and medial and lateral condyles of tibial cartilage (MT and LT, respectively). The T2 relaxation times were assessed in regions where the cartilage thickness was greater than 0.5 mm. Results  The median maximum cartilage thickness (mm) of the four ROI were 0.7 (range: 0.9-0.6), 0.6 (range: 0.7-0.5), 0.7 (range: 0.9-0.5) and 0.6 (range: 0.8-0.5) at MF, LF, MT and LT, respectively. The errors in the measurement (%) of the four ROI were 64.3 (range: 50.0-75.0), 75.0 (range: 64.3-90.0), 64.3 (range: 20.0-90.0) and 75.0 (range: 56.3-90.0) at MF, LF, MT and LT, respectively. The median T2 relaxation times (ms) for the articular cartilage of the four ROI were 70.2 (range: 57.9-87.9), 57.5 (range: 46.8-66.9), 65.0 (range: 52.0-92.0) and 57.0 (range: 49.0-66.2) at MF, LF, MT and LT, respectively. The inter-observer correlation coefficient (ICC, 2.1) for the T2 relaxation times of MF was 0.644. Clinical Significance  This study offers useful information on T2 relaxation times for articular cartilage of the stifle joint using a 1.5-T MRI in normal dogs. Schattauer GmbH Stuttgart.

  3. Experimental issues in the measurement of multi-component relaxation times in articular cartilage by microscopic MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Nian; Xia, Yang

    2013-10-01

    A number of experimental issues in the measurement of multi-component T2 and T1ρ relaxations in native and enzymatically digested articular cartilage were investigated by microscopic MRI (μMRI). The issues included the bath solutions (physiological saline and phosphate buffered saline (PBS)), the imaging resolution (35-140 μm), the specimen orientations (0° and 55°), and the strength of spin-lock frequencies (0.5-2 kHz) in the T1ρ experiments. In addition to cartilage, the samples of agar gel and doped water solution were also used in the investigation. Two imaging sequences were used: CPMG-SE and MSME. All raw data were analyzed by the non-negative least square (NNLS) method. The MSME sequence was shown to result in the observation of multi-component T2, even in the gel and liquid samples, demonstrating the artificial uncleanness of this sequence in the multi-component measurements. The soaking of cartilage in PBS reduced the observable T2 components to one at both 0° and 55°, suggesting the effect of phosphate ions on proton exchange between different pools of water molecules. The cartilage orientation with respect to the external magnetic field and the spin-lock strengths in the T1ρ experiment both affected the quantification of the multi-component relaxation. The transitions between a mono-component and multi-components in cartilage under various experimental conditions call for the extra caution in interpreting the relaxation results.

  4. Vibrational Förster transfer to hydrated protons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmer, R L A; Tielrooij, K J; Bakker, H J

    2010-05-21

    We have studied the influence of excess protons on the vibrational energy relaxation of the O-H and O-D stretching modes in water using femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy. Without excess protons, we observe exponential decays with time constants of 1.7 and 4.3 ps for the bulk and anion bound O-D stretch vibrations. The addition of protons introduces a new energy relaxation pathway, which leads to an increasingly nonexponential decay of the O-D stretch vibration. This new pathway is attributed to a distance-dependent long range dipole-dipole (Forster) interaction between the O-D stretching vibration and modes associated with dissolved protons. The high efficiency of hydrated protons as receptors of vibrational energy follows from the very large absorption cross section and broad bandwidth of protons in water. For a proton concentration of 1M we find that Forster energy transfer occurs over an average distance of 4.5 A, which corresponds to a separation of about two water molecules.

  5. Effect of Relaxation and Attachment Behaviors Training on Anxiety in First-time Mothers in Shiraz City, 2010: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akbarzadeh M

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Anxiety of mother, as the first personality influencing child’s mental health, is of great importance. Use of anxiety-reducing techniques for pregnant mothers plays an important role in decreasing maternal and child psychological problems. This study aimed to determine the effect of relaxation and attachment behaviors training on anxiety in first-time mothers.Methods: The present study was done as a clinical trial on 126 primigravida women (42 subjects as relaxation group, 42 subjects as attachment group and 42 subjects as control group referred to Hafiz and Shushtari hospitals in Shiraz (2010. Data were collected using personal data form and Spielberger Anxiety Inventory questionnaire. In addition to routine pregnancy care, four 90 minute sessions of attachment behaviors and relaxation training courses were held during 4 weeks (once a week. The control group only received routine pregnancy care. Anxiety score before the intervention and at the end of the intervention were analyzed in all three groups. Data analysis was done using chi-square, Anova and paired t-test analysis, p<0.05 was considered statistically significant.Results: In this study, the mean anxiety scores were not significantly different in the three groups before the intervention, but there were significant differences among three groups after the intervention (p<0.004. There was a decrease in the mean anxiety score in the two experimental groups after the intervention, whereas there was an increase in the control group. Conclusion: The results of this study indicated that relaxation and attachment behaviors training could reduce anxiety in pregnant mothers.

  6. The contribution of time-dependent stress relaxation in protein gels to the recoverable energy that is used as a tool to describe food texture

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Saskia; van Vliet, Ton; de Jongh, Harmen H. J.

    2015-11-01

    The recoverable energy (RE), defined as the ratio of the work exerted on a test specimen during compression and recovered upon subsequent decompression, has been shown to correlate to sensory profiling of protein-based food products. Understanding the mechanism determining the time-dependency of RE is primordial. This work aims to identify the protein-specific impact on the recoverable energy by stress dissipation via relaxation of (micro)structural rearrangements within protein gels. To this end, caseinate and gelatin gels are studied for their response to time-dependent mechanical deformation as they are known to develop structurally distinct network morphologies. This work shows that in gelatin gels no significant stress relaxation occurs on the seconds timescale, and consequently no time-dependency of the amount of energy stored in this material is observed. In caseinate gels, however, the energy dissipation via relaxation processes does contribute significantly to the time-dependency of reversible stored energy in the network. This can explain the obtained RE as a function of applied deformation at slow deformation rates. At faster deformation, an additional contribution to the dissipated energy is apparent, that increases with the deformation rate, which might point to the role of energy dissipation related to friction of the serum entrapped by the protein-network. This work shows that engineering strategies focused on controlling viscous flow in protein gels could be more effective to dictate the ability to elastically store energy in protein gels than routes that direct protein-specific aggregation and/or network-assembly.

  7. Tracking ultrafast relaxation dynamics of furan by femtosecond photoelectron imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yuzhu, E-mail: yuzhu.liu@gmail.com [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Engineering, Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing 210044 (China); Knopp, Gregor [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen 5232 (Switzerland); Qin, Chaochao [Department of Physics, Henan Normal University, Xinxiang 453007 (China); Gerber, Thomas [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen 5232 (Switzerland)

    2015-01-13

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Relaxation dynamics of furan are tracked by femtosecond photoelectron imaging. • The mechanism for ultrafast formation of α-carbene and β-carbene is proposed. • Ultrafast internal conversion from S{sub 2} to S{sub 1} is observed. • The transient characteristics of the fragment ions are obtained. • Single-color multi-photon ionization dynamics at 800 nm are also studied. - Abstract: Ultrafast internal conversion dynamics of furan has been studied by femtosecond photoelectron imaging (PEI) coupled with photofragmentation (PF) spectroscopy. Photoelectron imaging of single-color multi-photon ionization and two-color pump–probe ionization are obtained and analyzed. Photoelectron bands are assigned to the related states. The time evolution of the photoelectron signal by pump–probe ionization can be well described by a biexponential decay: two rapid relaxation pathways with time constants of ∼15 fs and 85 (±11) fs. The rapid relaxation is ascribed to the ultrafast internal conversion (IC) from the S{sub 2} state to the vibrationally hot S{sub 1} state. The second relaxation process is attributed to the redistributions and depopulation of secondarily populated high vibronic S{sub 1} state and the formation of α-carbene and β-carbene by H immigration. Additionally, the transient characteristics of the fragment ions are also measured and discussed as a complementary understanding.

  8. Density relaxation and particle motion characteristics in a non-ionic deep eutectic solvent (acetamide + urea): Time-resolved fluorescence measurements and all-atom molecular dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Anuradha; Das, Suman; Biswas, Ranjit, E-mail: ranjit@bose.res.in [Chemical, Biological and Macromolecular Sciences, S. N. Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, Block-JD, Sector-III, Salt Lake, Kolkata, West Bengal 700098 (India)

    2015-01-21

    Temperature dependent relaxation dynamics, particle motion characteristics, and heterogeneity aspects of deep eutectic solvents (DESs) made of acetamide (CH{sub 3}CONH{sub 2}) and urea (NH{sub 2}CONH{sub 2}) have been investigated by employing time-resolved fluorescence measurements and all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. Three different compositions (f) for the mixture [fCH{sub 3}CONH{sub 2} + (1 − f)NH{sub 2}CONH{sub 2}] have been studied in a temperature range of 328-353 K which is ∼120-145 K above the measured glass transition temperatures (∼207 K) of these DESs but much lower than the individual melting temperature of either of the constituents. Steady state fluorescence emission measurements using probe solutes with sharply different lifetimes do not indicate any dependence on excitation wavelength in these metastable molten systems. Time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy measurements reveal near-hydrodynamic coupling between medium viscosity and rotation of a dissolved dipolar solute. Stokes shift dynamics have been found to be too fast to be detected by the time-resolution (∼70 ps) employed, suggesting extremely rapid medium polarization relaxation. All-atom simulations reveal Gaussian distribution for particle displacements and van Hove correlations, and significant overlap between non-Gaussian (α{sub 2}) and new non-Gaussian (γ) heterogeneity parameters. In addition, no stretched exponential relaxations have been detected in the simulated wavenumber dependent acetamide dynamic structure factors. All these results are in sharp contrast to earlier observations for ionic deep eutectics with acetamide [Guchhait et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 104514 (2014)] and suggest a fundamental difference in interaction and dynamics between ionic and non-ionic deep eutectic solvent systems.

  9. Nozzle Flow with Vibrational Nonequilibrium. Ph.D. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, John Gary

    1995-01-01

    Flow of nitrogen gas through a converging-diverging nozzle is simulated. The flow is modeled using the Navier-Stokes equations that have been modified for vibrational nonequilibrium. The energy equation is replaced by two equations. One equation accounts for energy effects due to the translational and rotational degrees of freedom, and the other accounts for the affects due to the vibrational degree of freedom. The energy equations are coupled by a relaxation time which measures the time required for the vibrational energy component to equilibrate with the translational and rotational energy components. An improved relaxation time is used in this thesis. The equations are solved numerically using the Steger-Warming flux vector splitting method and the Implicit MacCormack method. The results show that uniform flow is produced outside of the boundary layer. Nonequilibrium exists in both the converging and diverging nozzle sections. The boundary layer region is characterized by a marked increase in translational-rotational temperature. The vibrational temperature remains frozen downstream of the nozzle, except in the boundary layer.

  10. PP084. Magnetic resonance imaging measurements of T2 relaxation times within contrasting regions of murine placenta is dependent upon blood flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobek, G; Stait-Gardner, T; Surmon, L; Makris, A; Price, W S; Hennessy, A

    2012-07-01

    It has been postulated that reduced placental perfusion as a result of abnormal placental implantation is the initiating event that leads to the maternal symptoms of preeclampsia. To be able to directly measure blood flow and perfusion in the placenta in experimental models of preeclampsia would provide valuable insight into the structural abnormalities of this syndrome. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers visualization of anatomy and analysis of changes in tissue morphology and function including blood flow and perfusion. The major source of image contrast in MRI comes from the variation in relaxation times between tissues. Previously, human placenta has appeared as fairly homogeneous in studies of T1 and T2 relaxation times, with no internal morphology apparent. The aim of this study was to investigate, using much higher field strengths (11.7Tesla) and much higher resolution than have been used previously, whether structural inhomogeneities in the placenta can be discerned by T2 mapping and whether T2 mapping is capable of detecting structural abnormalities that may affect blood flow in a preeclamptic placenta. Magnetic resonance images were acquired on an anaesthetised C57BL/6JArc mouse placed in a vertical animal probe using a Bruker Avance 11.7Tesla wide-bore spectrometer with micro-imaging probe capable of generating gradients of 0.45T/m. T2 measurements were acquired using an MSME sequence protocol (Bruker MSME-T2-map) with an in-plane resolution of 0.1-0.2mm. Matlab was used to generate R2 (i.e., 1/T2) maps from the acquired data with the T2 values being calculated from selected regions of interest within 5 individual placenta. Additional T2 measurements were acquired on the same slices immediately after blood flow was reduced to zero. Three distinct regions of T2 contrast were discerned in the mouse placenta, likely correlating to the labrynthine, junctional and decidual zones. The contrast between the inner two regions was substantially abrogated when

  11. EEG-based time and spatial interpretation of activation areas for relaxation and words writing between poor and capable dyslexic children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamad, N B; Lee, Khuan Y; Mansor, W; Mahmoodin, Z; Fadzal, C W N F C W; Amirin, S

    2015-01-01

    Symptoms of dyslexia such as difficulties with accurate and/or fluent word recognition, and/or poor spelling as well as decoding abilities, are easily misinterpreted as laziness and defiance amongst school children. Indeed, 37.9% of 699 school dropouts and failures are diagnosed as dyslexic. Currently, Screening for dyslexia relies heavily on therapists, whom are few and subjective, yet objective methods are still unavailable. EEG has long been a popular method to study the cognitive processes in human such as language processing and motor activity. However, its interpretation is limited to time and frequency domain, without visual information, which is still useful. Here, our research intends to illustrate an EEG-based time and spatial interpretation of activated brain areas for the poor and capable dyslexic during the state of relaxation and words writing, being the first attempt ever reported. From the 2D distribution of EEG spectral at the activation areas and its progress with time, it is observed that capable dyslexics are able to relax compared to poor dyslexics. During the state of words writing, neural activities are found higher on the right hemisphere than the left hemisphere of the capable dyslexics, which suggests a neurobiological compensation pathway in the right hemisphere, during reading and writing, which is not observed in the poor dyslexics.

  12. A New Method to Identify Reservoirs in Tight Sandstones Based on the New Model of Transverse Relaxation Time and Relative Permeability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhang Guo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Relative permeability and transverse relaxation time are both important physical parameters of rock physics. In this paper, a new transformation model between the transverse relaxation time and the wetting phase’s relative permeability is established. The data shows that the cores in the northwest of China have continuous fractal dimension characteristics, and great differences existed in the different pore size scales. Therefore, a piece-wise method is used to calculate the fractal dimension in our transformation model. The transformation results are found to be quite consistent with the relative permeability curve of the laboratory measurements. Based on this new model, we put forward a new method to identify reservoir in tight sandstone reservoir. We focus on the Well M in the northwestern China. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR logging is used to obtain the point-by-point relative permeability curve. In addition, we identify the gas and water layers based on new T2-Kr model and the results showed our new method is feasible. In the case of the price of crude oil being low, this method can save time and reduce the cost.

  13. Ultrafast Dynamics of Vibration-Cavity Polariton Modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owrutsky, Jeff; Dunkelberger, Adam; Fears, Kenan; Simpkins, Blake; Spann, Bryan

    Vibrational modes of polymers, liquids, and solvated compounds can couple to Fabry-Perot optical cavity modes, creating vibration-cavity polariton modes whose energy tunes with the cavity length and incidence angle. Here we report the pump-probe infrared spectroscopy of vibration-cavity polaritons in cavity-coupled W(CO)6. At very early times, we observe quantum beating between the two polariton states find an anomalously low degree of excitation. After the quantum beating, we directly observe spectroscopic signatures of excited-state absorption from both polariton modes and uncoupled reservoir modes. An analytical expression for cavity transmission reproduces these signatures. The upper polariton mode relaxes ten times more quickly than the uncoupled vibrational mode and the polariton lifetime depends on the angle of incidence of the infrared pulses. Coupling to an optical cavity gives a means of control of the lifetime of vibration-cavity polaritons and could have important implications for chemical reactivity in vibrationally excited molecules.

  14. MR relaxation time measurements with and without fat saturation (SPIR) in Graves` ophthalmopathy; MR-Relaxometriemessung mit und ohne frequenzselektive Fettunterdrueckung (SPIR) bei endokriner Orbitopathie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pauleit, D.; Schueller, H.; Textor, J.; Leutner, C.; Keller, E.; Sommer, T.; Traeber, F.; Block, W.; Boldt, I.; Schild, H. [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Radiologische Klinik

    1997-12-01

    Purpose: To determine the value and utility of relaxation time measurements with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in patients with Graves` ophthalmopathy (G.O.). Materials and methods: 20 rrbits were studied in control subjects and 58 orbits in patients with G.O. T{sub 2} relaxation times of extraocular muscles and retrobulbar fat tissue were calculated. The thickness of the eye muscles was correlated with the calculated T{sub 2} times. 18 orbits were measured before and after retroorbital radiation therapy. Results: Upper limits of determined normal T{sub 2} values were 60 ms in extraocular eye muscles and 40 ms in retrobulbar fat tissue. 89% (17/19) of the patients with G.O. had prolonged T{sub 2} times in extraocular eye muscles. The retrobulbar fat tissue in 5 of 38 orbits revealed minimal edema with the use of fat saturated sequences. T{sub 2} relaxation times decreased significantly (p<10{sup -4}) after 10 Gy radiation therapy. No correlation was found between enlargement and T{sub 2} relaxation times in extraocular eye muscles (r=0.44 in patients before radiation therapy). Conclusion: In patients with G.O. the determination of the enlargement of extraocular eye muscles in computed tomography is not a sufficient parameter for an antiinflammatory therapy, since CT cannot visualise eye muscle edema. T{sub 2} relaxation time measurements with MR imaging allow differentiation between edematous and fibrotic changes. This is the diagnostic method of choice in patients with Graves` ophthalmopathy. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ziel: Pruefung der Wertigkeit der MR-Relaxometrie bei Patienten mit endokriner Orbitopathie. Material und Methode: 20 Orbitae von Probanden und 58 Orbitae von Patienten mit endokriner Orbitopathie wurden ausgewertet. Die T{sub 2}-Zeiten der extraokulaeren Augenmuskeln und des retrobulbaeren Fettkoerpers wurden bestimmt. Die Dicke der Augenmuskeln wurde mit den T{sub 2}-Zeiten korreliert. Bei 18 Orbitae wurden der Verlauf unter Strahlentherapie beobachtet

  15. NMR relaxation time measurements of Xenon-129 dissolved in tissue and blood: Toward MR imaging of laser-polarized Xenon-129 in tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Gregory J.

    Nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation measurements of 129Xe in tissue homogenates and blood were performed to explore the feasibility of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of laser-polarized (LP) 129Xe in tissues. Laser polarization of 129Xe by optical pumping and spin exchange increases the signal obtained from 129Xe to a sufficient level that, after inhalation of LP 129Xe, it may be detected by MR throughout the body. Image signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) will depend on longitudinal (T1) and transverse (T2) relaxation times of 129Xe in tissues and blood. 129Xe T1 and T2 were measured at 9.4 T and 10°C in rat whole blood and homogenates of rat liver, brain, kidney, and lung at varying oxygenation levels. T1 values ranged from 4.4 +/- 0.4 to 22 +/- 2 s. T2 values ranged from 1.4 +/- 1.0 to 7.00 +/- 0.09 ms. Oxygenation dependence of the relaxation times varied between tissues. The observed oxygen dependence suggests relaxation due to paramagnetic deoxyhemoglobin dominates that due to free oxygen in tissues with sufficiently high fractions of blood. In addition, T1 and T2 of 129Xe in separated blood plasma were measured at both 9.4 and 1.89 T to explore the dependence on field strength. T1 of 129Xe in plasma decreased from 46 +/- 8 to 20 +/- 3 s and T2 increased from 11 +/- 2 to 127 +/- 8 ms when the field strength decreased from 9.4 to 1.89 T. When an inhalation model of gas delivery to tissue is used, the expected intrinsic SNR for LP 129Xe in gray matter at 9.4 T is approximately 3% of the conventional proton intrinsic SNR at 1.5 T. Short 129Xe T2 values (at 9.4 T) and the finite amount of magnetization available for imaging LP 129Xe further reduce the expected image SNR compared to conventional proton imaging. Several common pulse sequences were modeled to predict their relative effectiveness for imaging LP 129Xe at both 9.4 and 1.89 T. Each modeled sequence predicted higher SNR at 1.89 that at 9.4 T.

  16. Comparison of T2* relaxation times of articular cartilage of the knee in elite professional football players and age-and BMI-matched amateur athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behzadi, C; Welsch, G H; Laqmani, A; Henes, F O; Kaul, M G; Schoen, G; Adam, G; Regier, M

    2017-01-01

    Recent investigation has underlined the potential of quantitative MR imaging to be used as a complementary tool for the diagnosis of cartilage degeneration at an early state. The presented study analyses T2* relaxation times of articular cartilage of the knee in professional athletes and compares the results to age- and BMI (Body Mass Index)-matched healthy amateur athletes. 22 professional football players and 22 age- and BMI-matched individuals were underwent knee Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) at 3T including qualitative and quantitative analysis. Qualitative analysis included e.g. meniscal tears, joint effusion and bone edema. For quantitative analysis T2* (22 ET: 4.6-53.6ms) measurements in 3D data acquisition were performed. Deep and superficial layers of 22 predefined cartilage segments were analysed. All data sets were postprocessed using a dedicated software tool. Statistical analysis included Student t-test, confidence intervals and a random effects model. In both groups, T2* relaxation times were significantly higher in the superficial compared to the deep layers (pweight-bearing segments of the lateral superficial femoral condyle (p<0.001). Elevated T2* values in cartilage layers of professional football players compared to amateur athletes were noted. The effects seem to predominate in superficial cartilage layers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Protein conformational relaxation and ligand migration in myoglobin: a nanosecond to millisecond molecular movie from time-resolved Laue X-ray diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srajer, V; Ren, Z; Teng, T Y; Schmidt, M; Ursby, T; Bourgeois, D; Pradervand, C; Schildkamp, W; Wulff, M; Moffat, K

    2001-11-20

    A time-resolved Laue X-ray diffraction technique has been used to explore protein relaxation and ligand migration at room temperature following photolysis of a single crystal of carbon monoxymyoglobin. The CO ligand is photodissociated by a 7.5 ns laser pulse, and the subsequent structural changes are probed by 150 ps or 1 micros X-ray pulses at 14 laser/X-ray delay times, ranging from 1 ns to 1.9 ms. Very fast heme and protein relaxation involving the E and F helices is evident from the data at a 1 ns time delay. The photodissociated CO molecules are detected at two locations: at a distal pocket docking site and at the Xe 1 binding site in the proximal pocket. The population by CO of the primary, distal site peaks at a 1 ns time delay and decays to half the peak value in 70 ns. The secondary, proximal docking site reaches its highest occupancy of 20% at approximately 100 ns and has a half-life of approximately 10 micros. At approximately 100 ns, all CO molecules are accounted for within the protein: in one of these two docking sites or bound to the heme. Thereafter, the CO molecules migrate to the solvent from which they rebind to deoxymyoglobin in a bimolecular process with a second-order rate coefficient of 4.5 x 10(5) M(-1) s(-1). Our results also demonstrate that structural changes as small as 0.2 A and populations of CO docking sites of 10% can be detected by time-resolved X-ray diffraction.

  18. High-field 1H T1 and T2 NMR relaxation time measurements of H2O in homeopathic preparations of quartz, sulfur, and copper sulfate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, Stephan; Wolf, Martin; Skrabal, Peter; Bangerter, Felix; Heusser, Peter; Thurneysen, André; Wolf, Ursula

    2009-09-01

    Quantitative meta-analyses of randomized clinical trials investigating the specific therapeutic efficacy of homeopathic remedies yielded statistically significant differences compared to placebo. Since the remedies used contained mostly only very low concentrations of pharmacologically active compounds, these effects cannot be accounted for within the framework of current pharmacology. Theories to explain clinical effects of homeopathic remedies are partially based upon changes in diluent structure. To investigate the latter, we measured for the first time high-field (600/500 MHz) 1H T1 and T2 nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation times of H2O in homeopathic preparations with concurrent contamination control by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Homeopathic preparations of quartz (10 c-30 c, n = 21, corresponding to iterative dilutions of 100-10-100-30), sulfur (13 x-30 x, n = 18, 10-13-10-30), and copper sulfate (11 c-30 c, n = 20, 100-11-100-30) were compared to n = 10 independent controls each (analogously agitated dilution medium) in randomized and blinded experiments. In none of the samples, the concentration of any element analyzed by ICP-MS exceeded 10 ppb. In the first measurement series (600 MHz), there was a significant increase in T1 for all samples as a function of time, and there were no significant differences between homeopathic potencies and controls. In the second measurement series (500 MHz) 1 year after preparation, we observed statistically significant increased T1 relaxation times for homeopathic sulfur preparations compared to controls. Fifteen out of 18 correlations between sample triplicates were higher for controls than for homeopathic preparations. No conclusive explanation for these phenomena can be given at present. Possible hypotheses involve differential leaching from the measurement vessel walls or a change in water molecule dynamics, i.e., in rotational correlation time and/or diffusion. Homeopathic preparations

  19. Vibration mode shapes visualization in industrial environment by real-time time-averaged phase-stepped electronic speckle pattern interferometry at 10.6 μm and shearography at 532 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Languy, Fabian; Vandenrijt, Jean-François; Thizy, Cédric; Rochet, Jonathan; Loffet, Christophe; Simon, Daniel; Georges, Marc P.

    2016-12-01

    We present our investigations on two interferometric methods suitable for industrial conditions dedicated to the visualization of vibration modes of aeronautic blades. First, we consider long-wave infrared (LWIR) electronic speckle pattern interferometry (ESPI). The use of long wavelength allows measuring larger amplitudes of vibrations compared with what can be achieved with visible light. Also longer wavelengths allow lower sensitivity to external perturbations. Second, shearography at 532 nm is used as an alternative to LWIR ESPI. Both methods are used in time-averaged mode with the use of phase-stepping. This allows transforming Bessel fringes, typical to time averaging, into phase values that provide higher contrast and improve the visualization of vibration mode shapes. Laboratory experimental results with both techniques allowed comparison of techniques, leading to selection of shearography. Finally a vibration test on electrodynamic shaker is performed in an industrial environment and mode shapes are obtained with good quality by shearography.

  20. Structural Dependence of the Ising-type Magnetic Anisotropy and of the Relaxation Time in Mononuclear Trigonal Bipyramidal Co(II) Single Molecule Magnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Feng; Cahier, Benjamin; Rivière, Eric; Guillot, Régis; Guihéry, Nathalie; Campbell, Victoria E; Mallah, Talal

    2017-02-06

    This paper describes the correlation between Ising-type magnetic anisotropy and structure in trigonal bipyramidal Co(II) complexes. Three sulfur-containing trigonal bipyramidal Co(II) complexes were synthesized and characterized. It was shown that we can engineer the magnitude of the Ising anisotropy using ligand field theory arguments in conjunction with structural parameters. To prepare this series of compounds, we used, on the one hand, a tetradentate ligand containing three sulfur atoms and one amine (NS3tBu) and on the other hand three different axial ligands, namely, Cl-, Br-, and NCS-. The organic ligand imposes a trigonal bipyramidal arrangement with the three sulfur atoms lying in the trigonal plane with long Co-S bond distances. The magnetic properties of the compounds were measured, and ab initio calculations were used to analyze the anisotropy parameters and perform magneto-structural correlations. We demonstrate that a smaller axial zero-field splitting parameter leads to slower relaxation time when the symmetry is strictly axial, while the presence of very weak rhombicity decreases the energy barrier and speeds the relaxation of the magnetization.

  1. Modal Vibration Control in Periodic Time-Varying Structures with Focus on Rotor Blade Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Rene Hardam; Santos, Ilmar

    2004-01-01

    to be overcome. Among others it is necessary, that the control scheme is capable to cope with non-linear time-varying dynamical system behaviour. However, rotating at constant speed the mathematical model becomes periodic time-variant. In this framework the present paper gives a contribution to design procedures...... to demonstrate the applicability and effectiveness of the technique. The results obtained shows that the control design technique is capable to cope with the time periodicity of this class of systems....

  2. Modal Vibration Control in Periodic Time-Varying Structures with Focus on Rotor-Blade Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Rene Hardam; Santos, Ilmar

    2003-01-01

    to be overcome. Among others it is necessary, that the control scheme is capable to cope with non-linear time-varying dynamical system behaviour. However, rotating at constant speed the mathematical model becomes periodic time-variant. In this framework the present paper gives a contribution to design procedures...... to demonstrate the applicability and effectiveness of the technique. The results obtained shows that the control design technique is capable to cope with the time periodicity of this class of systems....

  3. Measurement of 15N longitudinal relaxation rates in 15NH4+ spin systems to characterise rotational correlation times and chemical exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, D. Flemming

    2017-06-01

    Many chemical and biological processes rely on the movement of monovalent cations and an understanding of such processes can therefore only be achieved by characterising the dynamics of the involved ions. It has recently been shown that 15N-ammonium can be used as a proxy for potassium to probe potassium binding in bio-molecules such as DNA quadruplexes and enzymes. Moreover, equations have been derived to describe the time-evolution of 15N-based spin density operator elements of 15NH4+ spin systems. Herein NMR pulse sequences are derived to select specific spin density matrix elements of the 15NH4+ spin system and to measure their longitudinal relaxation in order to characterise the rotational correlation time of the 15NH4+ ion as well as report on chemical exchange events of the 15NH4+ ion. Applications to 15NH4+ in acidic aqueous solutions are used to cross-validate the developed pulse sequence while measurements of spin-relaxation rates of 15NH4+ bound to a 41 kDa domain of the bacterial Hsp70 homologue DnaK are presented to show the general applicability of the derived pulse sequence. The rotational correlation time obtained for 15N-ammonium bound to DnaK is similar to the correlation time that describes the rotation about the threefold axis of a methyl group. The methodology presented here provides, together with the previous theoretical framework, an important step towards characterising the motional properties of cations in macromolecular systems.

  4. Real-time dual visualization of two different modalities for the evaluation of vocal fold vibration - Laryngeal videoendoscopy and 2D scanning videokymography: Preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Geun-Hyo; Wang, Soo-Geun; Lee, Byung-Joo; Park, Hee-June; Kim, Yong-Cheol; Kim, Hyung-Soon; Sohn, Keon-Tae; Kwon, Soon-Bok

    2017-04-01

    Currently, various tools have been introduced for the assessment of vocal fold vibration: laryngeal videolaryngoscopy (LV), videokymography (VKG), high speed videoendoscopy (HSV), digital videokymography (DKG), and 2D scanning videokymography (2D VKG). Among these, the authors have recently designed a dual modality examination system using LV and 2D VKG for more detailed information regarding the vibrations of the vocal folds. The clinical availability of this hybrid system offers medical imaging departments a range of potential advantages in the evaluation of vocal fold vibration. The obvious benefit of simultaneous acquisition is the improved integration of information that allows not only optimal anatomic localization, but also physical movement patterns. Other advantages include the lessened inconvenience to patients due to no longer requiring repeated examinations and shortening the examination time, and increased profitability. The purpose of study was to identify the efficacy of real-time dual examination of two different modalities for the evaluation of vocal fold vibration in human subjects and vocal fold vibration simulator. One vocally healthy subject and three patients with vocal fold nodules, a vocal cyst, and vocal fold paralysis took part in this study. The vibratory patterns of the vocal folds were visualized using simultaneous real-time examination of two different modalities. Additionally, qualitative and quantitative analyses of the dual LV and 2D VKG images were performed. Real-time dual examination using a two modality system provided high definition images of the vibratory movements of the vocal folds. By assessing the obtained images, we confirmed that the dual modality examination method was useful in the evaluation of pathologic vibratory patterns, even in non-periodic phonation. The present system might improve the understanding of the processes of vocal fold vibration and make a contribution to pathologic voice research, as well as

  5. [Relaxation times T1, T2, and T2* of apples, pears, citrus fruits, and potatoes with a comparison to human tissues].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werz, Karin; Braun, Hans; Vitha, Dominik; Bruno, Graziano; Martirosian, Petros; Steidle, Günter; Schick, Fritz

    2011-09-01

    The aim of the project was a systematic assessment of relaxation times of different fruits and vegetables and a comparison to values of human tissues. Results provide an improved basis for selection of plant phantoms for development of new MR techniques and sequences. Vessels filled with agar gel are mostly used for this purpose, preparation of which is effortful and time-consuming. In the presented study apples, (malus, 8 species), pears, (pyrus, 2 species), citrus fruits (citrus, 5 species) and uncooked potatoes (solanum tuberosum, 8 species) from the supermarket were examined which are easily available nearly all-the-year. T1, T2 and T2* relaxation times of these nature products were measured on a 1.5 Tesla MR system with adapted examination protocols and mono-exponential fitting, and compared to literature data of human parenchyma tissues, fatty tissue and body fluid (cerebrospinal fluid). Resulting values were as follows: apples: T1: 1486-1874 ms, T2: 163-281 ms, T2*: 2.3-3.2 ms; pears: T1: 1631-1969 ms, T2: 119-133 ms, T2* : 10.1-10.6 ms, citrus fruits (pulp) T1: 2055-2632 ms, T2: 497-998 ms, T2* : 151-182 ms; citrus fruits (skin) T1: 561-1669 ms, T2: 93-119 ms; potatoes: T1: 1011-1459 ms, T2: 166 - 210 ms, T2* : 20 - 30 ms. All T1-values of the examined objects (except for potatoes and skins of citrus fruits) were longer than T1 values of human tissues. Also T2 values (except for pears and skins of citrus fruits) of the fruits and the potatoes tended to be longer. T2* values of apples, pears and potatoes were shorter than in healthy human tissue. Results show relaxation values of many fruits to be not exactly fitting to human tissue, but with suitable selection of the fruits and optionally with an adaption of measurement parameters one can achieve suitable contrast and signal characteristics for some purposes. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  6. Investigation on vibration excitation of debonded sandwich structures using time-average digital holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Binu P; Annamala Pillai, S; Narayanamurthy, C S

    2017-05-01

    Sandwich structures, in the modern aerospace industry, are more sought after due to their high strength to stiffness ratio resulting in significant weight gains. Optical techniques like time-average holography and shearography are preferred in industries for inspection of huge sandwich and composite panels because of whole-field (full coverage) inspection in a lesser time leading to large savings in cost. These techniques conventionally use sinusoidal frequency sweep to capture the local resonance of defective regions. This paper highlights the difficulties with the conventional approach of time-average digital holography (TADH) and proposes a novel defect identification strategy through square wave excitation. The proposed method enhances the speed and accuracy of inspection; thereby it saves cost and increases confidence level. Extensive experiments have been carried out using honeycomb sandwich panels to demonstrate the methodology.

  7. Unconventional Superconductivity in La(7)Ir(3) Revealed by Muon Spin Relaxation: Introducing a New Family of Noncentrosymmetric Superconductor That Breaks Time-Reversal Symmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, J A T; Singh, D; Thamizhavel, A; Hillier, A D; Lees, M R; Balakrishnan, G; Paul, D McK; Singh, R P

    2015-12-31

    The superconductivity of the noncentrosymmetric compound La(7)Ir(3) is investigated using muon spin rotation and relaxation. Zero-field measurements reveal the presence of spontaneous static or quasistatic magnetic fields below the superconducting transition temperature T(c)=2.25  K-a clear indication that the superconducting state breaks time-reversal symmetry. Furthermore, transverse-field rotation measurements suggest that the superconducting gap is isotropic and that the pairing symmetry of the superconducting electrons is predominantly s wave with an enhanced binding strength. The results indicate that the superconductivity in La(7)Ir(3) may be unconventional and paves the way for further studies of this family of materials.

  8. Determination of correlation times from selective and non-selective spin-lattice relaxation rates and their use in drug-drug and drug-albumin interaction studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tinoco Luzineide Wanderley

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of the changes in sample concentration on the NMR chemical shifts and on the selective and non-selective spin-lattice relaxation rates (R1S and R1NS of the three isomers of nitrobenzaldeyde guanyl hydrazone (NBGH pure and with bovine serum albumin (BSA were measured in solution. The results wereused to determine the correlation times (tauc, showing that the degree of intermolecular drug-drug association varies with the nitro group position on the ring and that this degree of association interferes with the interaction of these drugs with BSA. The results suggest that the degree of drug-drug and drug-BSA association are related to the in vitro anti-Trypanosoma cruzi activity of these compounds.

  9. Role of threading dislocations in strain relaxation during GaInN growth monitored by real-time X-ray reflectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Guangxu; Tabuchi, Masao; Takeda, Yoshikazu; Amano, Hiroshi

    2017-06-01

    Ga1-xInxN epilayers (x = 0.09 or 0.14) grown on c-plane GaN layers with different densities of threading dislocations have been investigated by real-time x-ray reflectivity during metal-organic vapor phase epitaxial growth. We found that the density of pre-existing threading dislocations in GaN plays an important role in the strain relaxation of Ga1-xInxN. Critical thicknesses were obtained and compared with theoretical predictions using the mechanical equilibrium model and the energy balance model. The critical thickness of GaInN varies inversely with dislocation density in the GaN sublayer. When the threading dislocation density in the sublayer was reduced by three orders of magnitude, the photoluminescence intensity of the Ga0.86In0.14N epilayer was improved by a factor of ten.

  10. INVESTIGATION OF MOLECULAR INTERACTION BETWEEN PHENYLACETYLENE AND HEXAMETHYLPHOSPHORIC TRIAMIDE BY 13C NMR T1 RELAXATION TIME STUDIES AND AB INITIO QM CALCULATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parsaoran Siahaan

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Intermolecular interactions and molecular translational and rotational mobility are key factors in molecular material sciences, e.g. liquid crystals. One of the important substructures is given by phenylacetylene, Ph-CºCH. Its rotational behavior in its pure form and in high dilution in hexamethylphosphoric triamide OP[N(CH32]3 (HMPA has been studied by means 13C NMR T1 relaxation times at ambient temperature as measured by the inversion recovery method. HMPA is an exceptional solvent in that is has a quite large dipole moment but comparatively low relative dielectricity constant. From the molecular shape Ph-CºCH is expected to exhibit anisotropic rotational diffusion which in fact can be deduced from the measured set of T1 values of the ortho, meta and para carbon nuclei in the neat liquid as well as in the HMPA solution. This expected result rules the dominance of a linearly molecules pair Ph-CºCH...HMPA along their dipole moment axes as anticipated in view of the large HMPA dipole moment. In order to conform with the T1 data, a linear arrangement of Ph-CºCH via the interaction between its weakly acidic H-atom with negatively charge O-atom of HMPA molecules seems to lead to such an anisotropic rotational motion. This hypothesis is supported by ab initio QM calculations which come out with higher interaction energy for linear orientation than other geometries. These ab initio calculations were performed with the basis set of RHF/6-31G(d for the single molecules of Ph-CºCH and HMPA as well as for their various geometries of the molecules pair. Molecular dynamics simulations need to be performed for further confirmation.   Keywords: Relaxation Times, HMPA, pheylacetylene, ab initio, intermolecular interaction, rotational diffusion

  11. Real-time Kalman filter implementation for active feedforward control of time-varying broadband noise and vibrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ophem, S.; Berkhoff, Arthur P.; Sas, P; Jonckheere, S.; Moens, D.

    2012-01-01

    Tracking behavior and the rate of convergence are critical properties in active noise control applications with time-varying disturbance spectra. As compared to the standard filtered-reference Least Mean Square (LMS) algorithm, improved convergence can be obtained with schemes based on

  12. Electron in the field of flexural vibrations of a membrane: Quantum time, magnetic oscillations, and coherence breaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gornyi, I. V. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institut für Nanotechnologie (Germany); Dmitriev, A. P., E-mail: apd1812@hotmail.com [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physicotechnical Institute (Russian Federation); Mirlin, A. D.; Protopopov, I. V. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institut für Nanotechnologie (Germany)

    2016-08-15

    We have studied the motion of an electron in a membrane under the influence of flexural vibrations with a correlator that decreases upon an increase in the distance in accordance with the law r–{sup 2η}. We have conducted a detailed consideration of the case with η < 1/2, in which the perturbation theory is inapplicable, even for an arbitrarily weak interaction. It is shown that, in this case, reciprocal quantum time 1/τ{sub q} is proportional to g{sup 1/(1–η)}T{sup (2–η)/(2–2η)}, where g is the electron–phonon interaction constant and T is the temperature. The method developed here is applied for calculating the electron density of states in a magnetic field perpendicular to the membrane. In particular, it is shown that the Landau levels in the regime with ω{sub c}τ{sub q} » 1 have a Gaussian shape with a width that depends on the magnetic field as B{sup η}. In addition, we calculate the time τ{sub φ} of dephasing of the electron wave function that emerges due to the interaction with flexural phonons for η < 1/2. It has been shown that, in several temperature intervals, quantity 1/τ{sub φ} can be expressed by various power functions of the electron–phonon interaction constant, temperature, and electron energy.

  13. Negative magnetic relaxation in superconductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krasnoperov E.P.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It was observed that the trapped magnetic moment of HTS tablets or annuli increases in time (negative relaxation if they are not completely magnetized by a pulsed magnetic field. It is shown, in the framework of the Bean critical-state model, that the radial temperature gradient appearing in tablets or annuli during a pulsed field magnetization can explain the negative magnetic relaxation in the superconductor.

  14. Twitch potentiation influences the time course of twitch depression in muscle relaxant studies : A pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic explanation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eleveld, Douglas J.; Proost, Johannes H.; Wierda, J. Mark K. H.

    2006-01-01

    The time course of twitch depression following neuromuscular blocking agent (NMBA) administration is influenced by the duration of control neuromuscular monitoring (twitch stabilization). The physiological mechanism for this interaction is not known. During twitch stabilization twitch response often

  15. Contribution to viscosity from the structural relaxation via the atomic scale Green-Kubo stress correlation function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levashov, V A

    2017-11-14

    We studied the connection between the structural relaxation and viscosity for a binary model of repulsive particles in the supercooled liquid regime. The used approach is based on the decomposition of the macroscopic Green-Kubo stress correlation function into the correlation functions between the atomic level stresses. Previously we used the approach to study an iron-like single component system of particles. The role of vibrational motion has been addressed through the demonstration of the relationship between viscosity and the shear waves propagating over large distances. In our previous considerations, however, we did not discuss the role of the structural relaxation. Here we suggest that the contribution to viscosity from the structural relaxation can be taken into account through the consideration of the contribution from the atomic stress auto-correlation term only. This conclusion, however, does not mean that only the auto-correlation term represents the contribution to viscosity from the structural relaxation. Previously the role of the structural relaxation for viscosity has been addressed through the considerations of the transitions between inherent structures and within the mode-coupling theory by other authors. In the present work, we study the structural relaxation through the considerations of the parent liquid and the atomic level stress correlations in it. The comparison with the results obtained on the inherent structures also is made. Our current results suggest, as our previous observations, that in the supercooled liquid regime, the vibrational contribution to viscosity extends over the times that are much larger than the Einstein's vibrational period and much larger than the times that it takes for the shear waves to propagate over the model systems. Besides addressing the atomic level shear stress correlations, we also studied correlations between the atomic level pressure elements.

  16. Contribution to viscosity from the structural relaxation via the atomic scale Green-Kubo stress correlation function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levashov, V. A.

    2017-11-01

    We studied the connection between the structural relaxation and viscosity for a binary model of repulsive particles in the supercooled liquid regime. The used approach is based on the decomposition of the macroscopic Green-Kubo stress correlation function into the correlation functions between the atomic level stresses. Previously we used the approach to study an iron-like single component system of particles. The role of vibrational motion has been addressed through the demonstration of the relationship between viscosity and the shear waves propagating over large distances. In our previous considerations, however, we did not discuss the role of the structural relaxation. Here we suggest that the contribution to viscosity from the structural relaxation can be taken into account through the consideration of the contribution from the atomic stress auto-correlation term only. This conclusion, however, does not mean that only the auto-correlation term represents the contribution to viscosity from the structural relaxation. Previously the role of the structural relaxation for viscosity has been addressed through the considerations of the transitions between inherent structures and within the mode-coupling theory by other authors. In the present work, we study the structural relaxation through the considerations of the parent liquid and the atomic level stress correlations in it. The comparison with the results obtained on the inherent structures also is made. Our current results suggest, as our previous observations, that in the supercooled liquid regime, the vibrational contribution to viscosity extends over the times that are much larger than the Einstein's vibrational period and much larger than the times that it takes for the shear waves to propagate over the model systems. Besides addressing the atomic level shear stress correlations, we also studied correlations between the atomic level pressure elements.

  17. Non-equilibrium Casimir force between vibrating plates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Hanke

    Full Text Available We study the fluctuation-induced, time-dependent force between two plates confining a correlated fluid which is driven out of equilibrium mechanically by harmonic vibrations of one of the plates. For a purely relaxational dynamics of the fluid we calculate the fluctuation-induced force generated by the vibrating plate on the plate at rest. The time-dependence of this force is characterized by a positive lag time with respect to the driving. We obtain two distinctive contributions to the force, one generated by diffusion of stress in the fluid and another related to resonant dissipation in the cavity. The relation to the dynamic Casimir effect of the electromagnetic field and possible experiments to measure the time-dependent Casimir force are discussed.

  18. The Ehrenfest method with quantum corrections to simulate the relaxation of molecules in solution: equilibrium and dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastida, Adolfo; Cruz, Carlos; Zúñiga, José; Requena, Alberto; Miguel, Beatriz

    2007-01-07

    The use of the Ehrenfest method to simulate the relaxation of molecules in solution is explored. Using the cyanide ion dissolved in water as a test model, the independent trajectory (IT) and the bundle of trajectories (BT) approximations are shown to provide very different results for the time evolution of the vibrational populations of the solute. None of these approximations reproduce the Boltzmann equilibrium vibrational populations accurately. A modification of the Ehrenfest method based on the use of quantum correction factors is thus proposed to solve this problem. The simulations carried out using the modified Ehrenfest method provide IT and BT relaxation times which are closer to each other and which agree quite well with previous hybrid perturbative results.

  19. Ultrafast relaxation kinetics of the dark S{sub 1} state in all-trans-{beta}-carotene explored by one- and two-photon pump-probe spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosumi, Daisuke, E-mail: kosumi@sci.osaka-cu.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Tohoku University, 6-3 Aramaki-Aza-Aoba, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Abe, Kenta; Karasawa, Hiroshi [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Tohoku University, 6-3 Aramaki-Aza-Aoba, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Fujiwara, Masazumi [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Osaka City University, 3-3-138 Sugimoto, Sumiyoshi-ku, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan); Cogdell, Richard J. [Glasgow Biomedical Research Center, University of Glasgow, 120 University Place, Glasgow G12 8TA, Scotland (United Kingdom); Hashimoto, Hideki [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Osaka City University, 3-3-138 Sugimoto, Sumiyoshi-ku, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan); JST/CREST, 4-1-8 Hon-chou, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Yoshizawa, Masayuki [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Tohoku University, 6-3 Aramaki-Aza-Aoba, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); JST/CREST, 4-1-8 Hon-chou, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan)

    2010-07-19

    Femtosecond one- and two-photon pump-probe dispersive spectroscopic measurements have been applied to the investigation of the vibrational relaxation kinetics of the dark S{sub 1} (2{sup 1}A{sub g}{sup -}) state in {beta}-carotene, combining a higher sensitive detection system with tunable visible and infrared excitation pulses. The two-photon excitation measurements enable the preferential detection of the dark S{sub 1} state. The tunable infrared excitation pulses allowed selective excitation to a different vibrational level of S{sub 1}. The S{sub 1} dynamics at early delay times depend strongly on excitation energy. A dependence of the initial S{sub 1} dynamics on excitation energy is discussed in term of the vibrational relaxation of S{sub 1}.

  20. The Effect of Timing of Female Vibrational Reply on Male Signalling and Searching Behaviour in the Leafhopper Aphrodes makarovi

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kuhelj, Anka; de Groot, Maarten; Blejec, Andrej; Virant-Doberlet, Meta

    2015-01-01

    ...). In leafhoppers, mate recognition and location is mediated exclusively by species- and sex-specific substrate-borne vibrational signals and a female signal emitted in reply to male advertisement calls...

  1. Relaxation time of the global order parameter on multiplex networks: The role of interlayer coupling in Kuramoto oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen-Perkins, Alfonso; de Assis, Thiago Albuquerque; Pastor, Juan Manuel; Andrade, Roberto F. S.

    2017-10-01

    This work considers the time scales associated with the global order parameter and the interlayer synchronization of coupled Kuramoto oscillators on multiplexes. For two-layer multiplexes with an initially high degree of synchronization in each layer, the difference between the average phases in each layer is analyzed from two different perspectives: the spectral analysis and the nonlinear Kuramoto model. Both viewpoints confirm that the prior time scales are inversely proportional to the interlayer coupling strength. Thus, increasing the interlayer coupling always shortens the transient regimes of both the global order parameter and the interlayer synchronization. Surprisingly, the analytical results show that the convergence of the global order parameter is faster than the interlayer synchronization, and the latter is generally faster than the global synchronization of the multiplex. The formalism also outlines the effects of frequencies on the difference between the average phases of each layer, and it identifies the conditions for an oscillatory behavior. Computer simulations are in fairly good agreement with the analytical findings, and they reveal that the time scale of the global order parameter is half the size of the time scale of the multiplex, if not smaller.

  2. Diagnosis of industrial gearboxes condition by vibration and time-frequency, scale-frequency, frequency-frequency analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Czech

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In the article methods of vibroacoustic diagnostics of high-power toothed gears are described. It is shown below, that properly registered and processed acoustic signal or vibration signal may serve as an explicitly interpreted source of diagnostic symptoms. The presented analysis were based on vibration signals registered during the work of the gear of a rolling stand working in Katowice Steel Plant (presently one of the branches of Mittal Steel Poland JSC.

  3. Relaxation Pathways in Metallic Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallino, Isabella; Busch, Ralf

    2017-11-01

    At temperatures below the glass transition temperature, physical properties of metallic glasses, such as density, viscosity, electrical resistivity or enthalpy, slowly evolve with time. This is the process of physical aging that occurs among all types of glasses and leads to structural changes at the microscopic level. Even though the relaxation pathways are ruled by thermodynamics as the glass attempts to re-attain thermodynamic equilibrium, they are steered by sluggish kinetics at the microscopic level. Understanding the structural and dynamic pathways of the relaxing glassy state is still one of the grand challenges in materials physics. We review some of the recent experimental advances made in understanding the nature of the relaxation phenomenon in metallic glasses and its implications to the macroscopic and microscopic properties changes of the relaxing glass.

  4. Relaxation processes in optically excites metal clusters; Relaxationsprozesse in optisch angeregten Metallclustern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanzel, J.

    2007-08-10

    The present work is concerned with the dynamics of optically excited metal clusters in the gas phase. Small mass-selected gold and tungsten cluster anions (Au{sup -}{sub n}, n=5-8, 14, 20 and W{sup -}{sub n}, n=3-14) are studied using femtosecond time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. Depending on the electronic structure in the valence region as well as on the optical excitation energy fundamentally different relaxation processes are observed. In small gold cluster anions excited with 1.56 eV an isolated electronically excited state is populated. The time-dependent measurements are strongly sizedependent and open insights into photoinduced geometry changes of the nuclear framework. Oscillatory vibrational wavepacket motion in Au{sup -}{sub 5}, an extremely longlived ({tau} >90 ns) electronically excited state in Au{sup -}{sub 6} as well as photoinduced melting in Au{sup -}{sub 7} and Au{sup -}{sub 8} is monitored in real time. By increasing the OPTICAL excitation energy to 3.12 eV a completely different scenario is observed. A multitude of electronically excited states can be reached upon optical excitation and as a consequence electronic relaxation processes that take place on a time scale of 1 ps are dominating. This is shown for Au{sup -}{sub 7}, Au{sup -}{sub 14} and Au{sup -}{sub 20}. Compared to gold clusters, tungsten clusters are characterized by a significantly higher electronic density of states in the valence region. Therefore electronic relaxation processes are much more likely and take place on a significantly faster time scale. The fast electronic relaxation processes are distinguished from pure vibrational relaxation. It is shown that already in the four atomic tungsten cluster W{sup -}{sub 4} electronic relaxation processes take place on a time scale of 30 fs. In all investigated tungsten cluster anions (W{sup -}{sub n}, n=3-14) an equilibrium between electronic and vibrational system is reached within around 1 ps after optical excitation which

  5. Relaxation Dynamics in Photoexcited Chiral Molecules Studied by Time-Resolved Photoelectron Circular Dichroism: Toward Chiral Femtochemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Comby, Antoine; Boggio-Pasqua, Martial; Descamps, Dominique; Légaré, Francois; Nahon, Laurent; Petit, Stéphane; Pons, Bernard; Fabre, Baptiste; Mairesse, Yann; Blanchet, Valérie

    2016-01-01

    Unravelling the main initial dynamics responsible for chiral recognition is a key stepin the understanding of many biological processes. However this challenging task requires a sensitive enantiospecic probe to investigate molecular dynamics on their natural femtosecond timescale. Here we show that, in the gas phase, the ultrafast relaxationdynamics of photoexcited chiral molecules can be tracked by recording Time-ResolvedPhotoElectron Circular Dichroism (TR-PECD) resulting from the photoionisation bya circularly polarized probe pulse. A large forward/backward asymmetry along theprobe propagation axis is observed in the photoelectron angular distribution. Its evolution with pump-probe delay reveals ultrafast dynamics that are inaccessible in theangle-integrated photoelectron spectrum nor via the usual electron emission anisotropyparameter ($\\beta$). PECD, which originates from the electron scattering in the chiral molecular potential, appears as a new sensitive observable for ultrafast molecular dynamicsin ch...

  6. Shoreline relaxation at pocket beaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turki, Imen; Medina, Raul; Kakeh, Nabil; González, Mauricio

    2015-09-01

    A new physical concept of relaxation time is introduced in this research as the time required for the beach to dissipate its initial perturbation. This concept is investigated using a simple beach-evolution model of shoreline rotation at pocket beaches, based on the assumption that the instantaneous change of the shoreline plan-view shape depends on the long-term equilibrium plan-view shape. The expression of relaxation time is developed function of the energy conditions and the physical characteristics of the beach; it increases at longer beaches having coarse sediments and experiencing low-energy conditions. The relaxation time, calculated by the developed model, is validated by the shoreline observations extracted from video images at two artificially embayed beaches of Barcelona (NW Mediterranean) suffering from perturbations of sand movement and a nourishment project. This finding is promising to estimate the shoreline response and useful to improve our understanding of the dynamic of pocket beaches and their stability.

  7. Combined Fat Imaging/Look Locker for mapping of lipid spin-lattice (T1) relaxation time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jihyun Park, Annie; Yung, Andrew; Kozlowski, Piotr; Reinsberg, Stefan

    2012-10-01

    Tumor hypoxia is a main problem arising in the treatment of cancer due to its resistance to cytotoxic therapy such as radiation and chemotherapy, and selection for more aggressive tumor phenotypes. Attempts to improve and quantify tumor oxygenation are in development and tools to assess the success of such schemes are required. Monitoring oxygen level with MRI using T1 based method (where oxygen acts as T1 shortening agent) is a dynamic and noninvasive way to study tumor characteristics. The method's sensitivity to oxygen is higher in lipids than in water due to higher oxygen solubility in lipid. Our study aims to develop a time-efficient method to spatially map T1 of fat inside the tumor. We are combining two techniques: Fat/Water imaging and Look Locker (a rapid T1 measurement technique). Fat/Water Imaging is done with either Dixon or Direct Phase Encoding (DPE) method. The combination of these techniques poses new challenges that are tackled using spin dynamics simulations as well as experiments in vitro and in vivo.

  8. OS044. Morphological differences in murine placenta detected by magneticresonance imaging measurements of T2 relaxation times in mouse models ofpreeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobek, G; Stait-Gardner, T; Surmon, L; Makris, A; Price, W S; Hennessy, A

    2012-07-01

    We have demonstrated that morphologically distinct regions of the murine placenta can be detected by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), with image contrast arising from the variation in T2 relaxation times between regions and dependent upon blood flow. Previous studies of human placenta by other groups have shown a homogeneous tissue with correlation of relaxation times with gestational age and a trend for shorter relaxation times in pregnancies complicated by preeclampsia and fetal growth restriction. The ability to detect morphological changes and alterations in blood flow in experimental models of preeclampsia would be a significant boost in understanding the relationship between abnormal placental implantation, reduced placental perfusion, inflammatory cytokines, angiogenic molecules and other factors that may play a role in the syndrome. The aim of this study was to investigate whether morphological changes or abnormalities can be detected by T2 mapping in the placenta of mice subject to two experimental models of preeclampsia (reduced uterine perfusion pressure (RUPP) model and TNF-α induced model). Pregnant C57BL/6JArc mice were, on day 13.5 of gestation, either subject to a unilateral ligation of the right uterine artery (RUPP) (n=2) or given an infusion of TNF-α by subcutaneous insertion of a mini-osmotic pump primed to deliver 500ng/kg/day for 4days (n=2). Controls were normal pregnant (n=2), sham-operated (n=1) or saline infused animals(n=1). MRI images were acquired on anaesthetised mice on day 17.5 of gestation using a Bruker Avance 11.7 Tesla wide-bore spectrometer with micro-imaging probe capable of generating gradients of 0.45T/m. T2 measurements were acquired using an MSME sequence protocol (Bruker MSME-T2-map) with an in-plane resolution of 0.1-0.2mm. Matlab was used to generate R2 (i.e.,1/T2) maps from the acquired data with the T2 values being calculated from selected regions of interest from 2-6 individual placenta from each mouse. Differences

  9. Vibrational Spectrum of an Excited State and Huang-Rhys Factors by Coherent Wave Packets in Time-Resolved Fluorescence Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gyeongjin; Kim, Junwoo; Kim, So Young; Kim, Dong Eon; Joo, Taiha

    2017-03-17

    Coherent nuclear wave packet motions in an electronic excited state of a molecule are measured directly by time-resolved spontaneous fluorescence spectroscopy with an unprecedented time resolution by using two-photon absorption excitation and fluorescence upconversion by noncollinear sum frequency generation. With an estimated time resolution of approximately 25 fs, wave packet motions of vibrational modes up to 1600 cm(-1) are recorded for coumarin 153 in ethanol. Two-color transient absorption at 13 fs time resolution are measured to confirm the result. Vibrational displacements between the ground and excited states and Huang-Rhys factors (HRFs) are calculated by quantum mechanical methods and are compared with the experimental results. HRFs calculated by density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT reproduce the experiment adequately. This fluorescence-based method provides a unique and direct way to obtain the vibrational spectrum of a molecule in an electronic excited state and the HRFs, as well as the dynamics of excited states, and it might provide information on the structure of an excited state through the HRFs. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Hybrid approaches to magnetic resonance thermometry using the proton resonance frequency shift and the spin-lattice relaxation time T1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diakite, Mahamadou

    Minimally invasive thermal therapy under Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) guidance is becoming popular with several applications in the process of getting FDA approval. The ability to determine in near real-time the temperature map of a tumor and its surrounding tissue makes MR thermometry very attractive and well suited for thermal treatment. The proton resonance frequency shift (PRF) is currently the gold standard method for temperature monitoring using MRI. However, its incapacity to measure temperature in fatty tissue limits the scope of its applicability. The spin lattice relaxation time T1, on the other hand, has shown good temperature sensitivity and works well in all types of tissues. In this dissertation, we have addressed a number of challenges currently affecting MRI thermometry. A non-CPMG Turbo Spin Echo (TSE) sequence has been implemented to monitor the temperature rise due to the high RF power deposition inherent to this sequence at high field (3T and higher). This new implementation allows TSE sequences to be used safely without altering their high contrast properties which make them appealing in clinical settings. Tissue damage assessment during thermal therapy is critical for the safety of the patient. We have developed a new hybrid PRF-T1 sequence that has the capability to provide simultaneously in near real-time the temperature map and T1 information, which is a good indication of the state of the tissue. The simplicity and the real-time capability of the newly developed sequence make it an ideal tool for tissue damage assessment. Temperature monitoring during thermal therapy in organs with large fat content have been hindered by the lack of an MRI thermometry method that can provide simultaneous temperature in fat and aqueous tissue. A new sequence and acquisition scheme have been developed to address this issue. In sum, this dissertation proposed several pulse sequence implementation techniques and an acquisition scheme to overcome some of

  11. Fast contactless vibrating structure characterization using real time field programmable gate array-based digital signal processing: demonstrations with a passive wireless acoustic delay line probe and vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goavec-Mérou, G; Chrétien, N; Friedt, J-M; Sandoz, P; Martin, G; Lenczner, M; Ballandras, S

    2014-01-01

    Vibrating mechanical structure characterization is demonstrated using contactless techniques best suited for mobile and rotating equipments. Fast measurement rates are achieved using Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) devices as real-time digital signal processors. Two kinds of algorithms are implemented on FPGA and experimentally validated in the case of the vibrating tuning fork. A first application concerns in-plane displacement detection by vision with sampling rates above 10 kHz, thus reaching frequency ranges above the audio range. A second demonstration concerns pulsed-RADAR cooperative target phase detection and is applied to radiofrequency acoustic transducers used as passive wireless strain gauges. In this case, the 250 ksamples/s refresh rate achieved is only limited by the acoustic sensor design but not by the detection bandwidth. These realizations illustrate the efficiency, interest, and potentialities of FPGA-based real-time digital signal processing for the contactless interrogation of passive embedded probes with high refresh rates.

  12. Vibrational Collapse of Hexapod Packings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuchen; Ding, Jingqiu; Barés, Jonathan; Zheng, Hu; Dierichs, Karola; Menges, Achim; Behringer, Robert

    2017-06-01

    Columns made of convex noncohesive grains like sand collapse after being released from a confining container. However, structures built from non-convex grains can be stable without external support. In the current experiments, we investigate the effect of vibration on destroying such columns. The change of column height during vertical vibration, can be well characterized by stretched exponential relaxation when the column is short, which is in agreement with previous work, while a faster collapse happens when the column is tall. We investigate the collapse after the fast process including its dependence on column geometry, and on interparticle and basal friction.

  13. Superparamagnetic relaxation of weakly interacting particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørup, Steen; Tronc, Elisabeth

    1994-01-01

    The influence of particle interactions on the superparamagnetic relaxation time has been studied by Mossbauer spectroscopy in samples of maghemite (gamma-Fe2O3) particles with different particle sizes and particle separations. It is found that the relaxation time decreases with decreasing particl...

  14. Three-dimensional multiple-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann model for convection heat transfer in porous media at the REV scale

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Q

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a three-dimensional (3D) multiple-relaxation-time (MRT) lattice Boltzmann (LB) model is presented for convection heat transfer in porous media at the representative elementary volume (REV) scale. The model is developed in the framework of the double-distribution-function (DDF) approach: an MRT-LB model of the density distribution function with the D3Q19 lattice (or D3Q15 lattice) is proposed to simulate the flow field based on the generalized non-Darcy model, while an MRT-LB model of the temperature distribution function with the D3Q7 lattice is proposed to simulate the temperature filed. The present model is employed to simulate mixed convection flow in a porous channel and natural convection in a cubical porous cavity. The numerical results demonstrate the effectiveness and accuracy of the present model in solving 3D convection heat transfer problems in porous media. The numerical results also demonstrate that the present model is approximately second-order accuracy in space. In addition, an ...

  15. Hydrogen-1 NMR relaxation time studies in membrane: anesthetic systems; Variacao dos tempos de relaxacao longitudinal de protons em sistemas membranares contendo anestesicos locais

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinto, L.M.A.; Fraceto, L.; Paula, E. de [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Bioquimica; Franzoni, L.; Spisni, A. [Universita degli Studi di Parma, Parma (Italy). Ist. di Chimica Biologica

    1997-12-31

    The study of local anesthetics`(LA) interaction with model phospholipid membranes is justified by the direct correlation between anesthetic`s hydrophobicity and its potency/toxicity. By the same reason, uncharged LA species seems to play a crucial role in anesthesia. Most clinically used LA are small amphiphilics with a protonated amine group (pKa around 8). Although both charged (protonated) and uncharged forms can coexist at physiological pH, it has been shown (Lee, Biochim. Biophys. Acta 514:95, 1978; Screier et al. Biochim. Biophys. Acta 769:231, 1984) that the real anesthetic pka can be down-shifted, due to differential partition into membranes, increasing the ratio of uncharged species at pH 7.4. We have measured {sup 1}H-NMR longitudinal relaxation times (T{sub 1}) for phospholipid and three local anesthetics (tetracaine, lidocaine, benzocaine), in sonicated vesicles at a 3:1 molar ratio. All the LA protons have shown smaller T{sub 1} in this system than in isotropic phases, reflecting LA immobilization caused by insertion in the membrane. T{sub 1} values for the lipid protons in the presence of LA were analyzed, in an attempt to identify specific LA:lipid contact regions. (author) 13 refs., 3 figs., 1 tabs.

  16. Transition from Arrhenius to non-Arrhenius temperature dependence of structural relaxation time in glass-forming liquids: continuous versus discontinuous scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popova, V A; Surovtsev, N V

    2014-09-01

    The temperature dependences of α relaxation time τ(α)(T) of three glass-forming liquids (salol, o-terphenyl, and α-picoline) were investigated by a depolarized light scattering technique. A detailed description of τ(α)(T) near T(A), the temperature of the transition from the Arrhenius law at high temperatures to a non-Arrhenius behavior of τ(α)(T) at lower temperatures, was done. It was found that this transition is quite sharp. If the transition is described as switching from the Arrhenius law to the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann law, it occurs within the temperature range of about 15 K or less. Most of the known expressions for τ(α)(T) cannot describe this sharp transition. Our analysis revealed that this transition can be described either as a discontinuous transition in the spirit of the frustration-limited domain theory [D. Kivelson, G. Tarjus, X. Zhao, and S. A. Kivelson, Phys. Rev. E 53, 751 (1996)], implying a phase transition, or by a phenomenological expression recently suggested [B. Schmidtke, N. Petzold, R. Kahlau, M. Hofmann, and E. A. Rössler, Phys. Rev. E 86, 041507 (2012)], where the activation energy includes the term depending exponentially on temperature.

  17. Time-resolved UV-IR pump-stimulated emission pump spectroscopy to probe collisional relaxation of $8p\\,^2P_{3/2}$ Cs I

    CERN Document Server

    Salahuddin, Mohammed; McFarland, Jacob; Bayram, S Burcin

    2015-01-01

    We describe and use a time-resolved pump-stimulated emission pump spectroscopic technique to measure collisional relaxation in a high-lying energy level of atomic cesium. Aligned $8p\\,^2P_{3/2}$ cesium atoms were produced by a pump laser. A second laser, the stimulated emission pump, promoted the population exclusively to the $5d\\,^2D_{5/2}$ level. The intensity of the $5d\\,^2D_{5/2}\\rightarrow6s\\,^2S_{1/2}$ cascade fluorescence at 852.12 nm was monitored. The linear polarization dependence of the $6s\\,^2S_{1/2}\\rightarrow8p\\,^2P_{3/2}\\rightarrow5d\\,^2S_{5/2}$ transition was measured in the presence of argon gas at various pressures. From the measurement, we obtained the disalignment cross section value for the $8p\\,^2P_{3/2}$ level due to collisions with ground-level argon atoms.

  18. Vibrational Spectra of β″-Type BEDT-TTF Salts: Relationship between Conducting Property, Time-Averaged Site Charge and Inter-Molecular Distance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Yamamoto

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between the conducting behavior and the degree of charge fluctuation in the β″-type BEDT-TTF salts is reviewed from the standpoints of vibrational spectroscopy and crystal structure. A group of β″-type ET salts demonstrates the best model compounds for achieving the above relationship because the two-dimensional structure is simple and great diversity in conducting behavior is realized under ambient pressure. After describing the requirement for the model compound, the methodology for analyzing the results of the vibrational spectra is presented. Vibrational spectroscopy provides the time-averaged molecular charge, the charge distribution in the two-dimensional layer, and the inter-molecular interactions, etc. The experimental results applied to 2/3-filled and 3/4-filled β″-type ET salts are reported. These experimental results suggest that the conducting property, the difference in the time-averaged molecular charges between the ionic and neutral-like sites, the alternation in the inter-molecular distances and the energy levels in the charge distributions are relevant to one another. The difference in the time-averaged molecular charges, ∆ρ, is a useful criterion for indicating conducting behavior. All superconductors presented in this review are characterized as small but finite ∆ρ.

  19. THE TISSUE HYDRATION STATE IN UW-PRESERVED HUMAN DONOR LIVERS - A CLINICAL-STUDY OF THE RELATION BETWEEN PROTON MAGNETIC-RESONANCE RELAXATION-TIMES, DONOR CONDITION, PRESERVATION PROCEDURE, AND EARLY GRAFT FUNCTION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WOLF, RFE; DENBUTTER, G; KAMMAN, RL; DEKETH, HP; SLUTTER, WJ; SLOOFF, MJH

    1994-01-01

    To determine the relation between tissue hydration state-as indicated by tissue proton magnetic resonance relaxation times-in UW-preserved human donor livers and viability parameters of the donor and early graft function, ''ex vivo'' magnetic resonance relaxometry was performed with a clinical MR

  20. The computer card Accuspec FMS-Canberra in the relaxation time of thermal neutron flux pulses measuring system; Karta komputerowa Accuspec FMS-Canberra w systemie pomiaru stalej zaniku impulsowego strumienia neutronow termicznych

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Igielski, A.; Burda, J.; Gabanska, B.; Krynicka, E. [The H. Niewodniczanski Inst. of Nuclear Physics, Cracow (Poland)

    1997-12-31

    In this paper the theoretical basis and a measuring method of the relaxation time of pulsed thermal neutron flux is described. The developed measuring system based on the Accuspec FMS computer card of Canberra is presented. The methods of testing and test results are also described 8 refs, 5 figs, 3 tabs

  1. Internal magnetic relaxation in levitation superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Smolyak, B M; Ermakov, G V

    2001-01-01

    Effect of arresting levitation relaxation, appearing during reverse magnetization of YBaCuO superconducting ceramics, was detected. At bipolar magnetization magnetic moment of a sample remains invariable. Internal magnetic relaxation occurs, in the course of which magnetic flux is redistributed inside the sample. As a result the state of filed at the sample boundary does not change and full force acting on the system of closed currents remains constant. A formula for calculating the time of internal relaxation is provided

  2. Vibrational properties of organic donor-acceptor molecular crystals: Anthracene-pyromellitic-dianhydride (PMDA) as a case study

    KAUST Repository

    Fonari, A.

    2015-12-10

    We establish a reliable quantum-mechanical approach to evaluate the vibrational properties of donor-acceptor molecular crystals. The anthracene-PMDA (PMDA = pyromellitic dianhydride) crystal, where anthracene acts as the electron donor and PMDA as the electron acceptor, is taken as a representative system for which experimental non-resonance Raman spectra are also reported. We first investigate the impact that the amount of nonlocal Hartree-Fock exchange (HFE) included in a hybrid density functional has on the geometry, normal vibrational modes, electronic coupling, and electron-vibrational (phonon) couplings. The comparison between experimental and theoreticalRaman spectra indicates that the results based on the αPBE functional with 25%-35% HFE are in better agreement with the experimental results compared to those obtained with the pure PBE functional. Then, taking αPBE with 25% HFE, we assign the vibrational modes and examine their contributions to the relaxation energy related to the nonlocal electron-vibration interactions. The results show that the largest contribution (about 90%) is due to electron interactions with low-frequency vibrational modes. The relaxation energy in anthracene-PMDA is found to be about five times smaller than the electronic coupling.

  3. Vibrational properties of organic donor-acceptor molecular crystals: Anthracene-pyromellitic-dianhydride (PMDA) as a case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fonari, A.; Corbin, N. S.; Coropceanu, V., E-mail: jean-luc.bredas@kaust.edu.sa, E-mail: coropceanu@gatech.edu [School of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Center for Organic Photonics and Electronics, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0400 (United States); Vermeulen, D.; McNeil, L. E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599-3255 (United States); Goetz, K. P.; Jurchescu, O. D. [Department of Physics, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27109-7507 (United States); Bredas, J. L., E-mail: jean-luc.bredas@kaust.edu.sa, E-mail: coropceanu@gatech.edu [School of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Center for Organic Photonics and Electronics, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0400 (United States); Solar and Photovoltaics Engineering Research Center, Division of Physical Science and Engineering, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Thuwal 23955-6900 (Saudi Arabia)

    2015-12-14

    We establish a reliable quantum-mechanical approach to evaluate the vibrational properties of donor-acceptor molecular crystals. The anthracene-PMDA (PMDA = pyromellitic dianhydride) crystal, where anthracene acts as the electron donor and PMDA as the electron acceptor, is taken as a representative system for which experimental non-resonance Raman spectra are also reported. We first investigate the impact that the amount of nonlocal Hartree-Fock exchange (HFE) included in a hybrid density functional has on the geometry, normal vibrational modes, electronic coupling, and electron-vibrational (phonon) couplings. The comparison between experimental and theoretical Raman spectra indicates that the results based on the αPBE functional with 25%-35% HFE are in better agreement with the experimental results compared to those obtained with the pure PBE functional. Then, taking αPBE with 25% HFE, we assign the vibrational modes and examine their contributions to the relaxation energy related to the nonlocal electron-vibration interactions. The results show that the largest contribution (about 90%) is due to electron interactions with low-frequency vibrational modes. The relaxation energy in anthracene-PMDA is found to be about five times smaller than the electronic coupling.

  4. Adaptations of mouse skeletal muscle to low intensity vibration training

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeehen, James N.; Novotny, Susan A.; Baltgalvis, Kristen A.; Call, Jarrod A.; Nuckley, David J.; Lowe, Dawn A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We tested the hypothesis that low intensity vibration training in mice improves contractile function of hindlimb skeletal muscles and promotes exercise-related cellular adaptations. Methods We subjected C57BL/6J mice to 6 wk, 5 d·wk−1, 15 min·d−1 of sham or low intensity vibration (45 Hz, 1.0 g) while housed in traditional cages (Sham-Active, n=8; Vibrated-Active, n=10) or in small cages to restrict physical activity (Sham-Restricted, n=8; Vibrated-Restricted, n=8). Contractile function and resistance to fatigue were tested in vivo (anterior and posterior crural muscles) and ex vivo on the soleus muscle. Tibialis anterior and soleus muscles were evaluated histologically for alterations in oxidative metabolism, capillarity, and fiber types. Epididymal fat pad and hindlimb muscle masses were measured. Two-way ANOVAs were used to determine effects of vibration and physical inactivity. Results Vibration training resulted in a 10% increase in maximal isometric torque (P=0.038) and 16% faster maximal rate of relaxation (P=0.030) of the anterior crural muscles. Posterior crural muscles were unaffected by vibration, with the exception of greater rates of contraction in Vibrated-Restricted mice compared to Vibrated-Active and Sham-Restricted mice (P=0.022). Soleus muscle maximal isometric tetanic force tended to be greater (P=0.057) and maximal relaxation was 20% faster (P=0.005) in Vibrated compared to Sham mice. Restriction of physical activity induced muscle weakness but was not required for vibration to be effective in improving strength or relaxation. Vibration training did not impact muscle fatigability or any indicator of cellular adaptation investigated (P≥0.431). Fat pad but not hindlimb muscle masses were affected by vibration training. Conclusion Vibration training in mice improved muscle contractility, specifically strength and relaxation rates, with no indication of adverse effects to muscle function or cellular adaptations. PMID:23274599

  5. Interaction study of polyisobutylene with paraffins by NMR using the evaluation of spin-lattice relaxation times for hydrogen nuclei; Estudo da interacao do poliisobutileno com parafinas por RMN no estado solido

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marques, Rosana G.G. [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas - CENPES]. E-mail: garrido@cenpes.petrobras.com.br; Tavares, Maria I.B. [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Macromoleculas]. E-mail: mibt@ima.ufrj.br

    2001-07-01

    The evaluation of spin-lattice relaxation times of {sup 1}H for polyisobutylene/paraffin systems, were obtained using the classic inversion recovery technique, and also through Cross Polarization Magic Angle Spinning (CP/MAS) techniques varying the contact time and also by the delayed contact time pulse sequence. NMR results showed that the polyisobutylene/paraffin systems in which high molecular weight paraffins were used, is heterogeneous. However, for paraffins with low molecular weight, the system presents good homogeneity. (author)

  6. Method to measure the relaxation rates of molecular levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakos, J. S.; Mandula, K.; Sorlei, Zsuzsa

    The influence of buffer gases (He and SF6) on vibrational and relaxational rates has been studied. The line shapes (width and amplitude) of the small signal gain of the 119-micron methanol laser line are measured at different methanol vapor and buffer gas pressures using an infrared far-infrared double resonance method. The relaxation rates are calculated using the modified rate equations of the Henningsen-Jensen model.

  7. Space and time analysis of the nanosecond scale discharges in atmospheric pressure air: I. Gas temperature and vibrational distribution function of N2 and O2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, A.; Cessou, A.; Boubert, P.; Vervisch, P.

    2014-03-01

    Reliable experimental data on nanosecond discharge plasmas in air become more and more crucial considering their interest in a wide field of applications. However, the investigations on such nonequilibrium plasmas are made difficult by the spatial non-homogeneities, in particular under atmospheric pressure, the wide range of time scales, and the complexity of multi-physics processes involved therein. In this study, we report spatiotemporal experimental analysis on the gas temperature and the vibrational excitation of N2 and O2 in their ground electronic state during the post-discharge of an overvoltage nanosecond-pulsed discharge generated in a pin-to-plane gap of air at atmospheric pressure. The gas temperature during the pulsed discharge is measured by optical emission spectroscopy related to the rotational bands of the 0-0 vibrational transition N2(C 3 Πu, v = 0) → N2(B3 Πg, v = 0) of nitrogen. The results show a rapid gas heating up to 700 K in tens of nanoseconds after the current rise. This fast gas heating leads to a high gas temperature up to 1000 K measured at 150 ns in the first stages of the post-discharge using spontaneous Raman scattering (SRS). The spatiotemporal measurements of the gas temperature and the vibrational distribution function of N2 and O2, also obtained by SRS, over the post-discharge show the spatial expansion of the high vibrational excitation of N2, and the gas heating during the post-discharge. The present measurements, focused on thermal and energetic aspect of the discharge, provide a base for spatiotemporal analysis of gas number densities of N2, O2 and O atoms and hydrodynamic effects achieved during the post-discharge in part II of this investigation. All these results provide space and time database for the validation of plasma chemical models for nanosecond-pulsed discharges at atmospheric pressure air.

  8. Energy dispersion and relaxation in propynal using laser ir/visible double resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesiecki, M.L.; Smith, G.R.; Stewart, J.A.; Guillory, W.A.

    1979-01-01

    The dynamics of energy dispersion in propynal has been studied over the pressure range of 5 to 500 mtorr following excitation by a TEA CO/sub 2/ laser below the dissociation threshold. Wavelength resolved spectra, using the dye laser-induced fluorescence technique, are used to characterize the vibrational levels that are involved in the various energy transfer processes, while time-resolved spectra are used to determine the corresponding rates. The rate constants are extrapolated to zero pressure to obtain the regime of collisionless intramolecular relaxation time. Mechanisms of energy dispersion involving each of the probed vibrational levels (v = 0, ..nu../sub 6/(v = 1), ..nu../sub 9/(v = 1), and ..nu../sub 4/(v = 1)) are discussed.

  9. Time-domain parameter identification of aeroelastic loads by forced-vibration method for response of flexible structures subject to transient wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Bochao

    Slender structures representing civil, mechanical and aerospace systems such as long-span bridges, high-rise buildings, stay cables, power-line cables, high light mast poles, crane-booms and aircraft wings could experience vortex-induced and buffeting excitations below their design wind speeds and divergent self-excited oscillations (flutter) beyond a critical wind speed because these are flexible. Traditional linear aerodynamic theories that are routinely applied for their response prediction are not valid in the galloping, or near-flutter regime, where large-amplitude vibrations could occur and during non-stationary and transient wind excitations that occur, for example, during hurricanes, thunderstorms and gust fronts. The linear aerodynamic load formulation for lift, drag and moment are expressed in terms of aerodynamic functions in frequency domain that are valid for straight-line winds which are stationary or weakly-stationary. Application of the frequency domain formulation is restricted from use in the nonlinear and transient domain because these are valid for linear models and stationary wind. The time-domain aerodynamic force formulations are suitable for finite element modeling, feedback-dependent structural control mechanism, fatigue-life prediction, and above all modeling of transient structural behavior during non-stationary wind phenomena. This has motivated the developing of time-domain models of aerodynamic loads that are in parallel to the existing frequency-dependent models. Parameters defining these time-domain models can be now extracted from wind tunnel tests, for example, the Rational Function Coefficients defining the self-excited wind loads can be extracted using section model tests using the free vibration technique. However, the free vibration method has some limitations because it is difficult to apply at high wind speeds, in turbulent wind environment, or on unstable cross sections with negative aerodynamic damping. In the current

  10. Phase transitions in semidefinite relaxations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javanmard, Adel; Montanari, Andrea; Ricci-Tersenghi, Federico

    2016-04-19

    Statistical inference problems arising within signal processing, data mining, and machine learning naturally give rise to hard combinatorial optimization problems. These problems become intractable when the dimensionality of the data is large, as is often the case for modern datasets. A popular idea is to construct convex relaxations of these combinatorial problems, which can be solved efficiently for large-scale datasets. Semidefinite programming (SDP) relaxations are among the most powerful methods in this family and are surprisingly well suited for a broad range of problems where data take the form of matrices or graphs. It has been observed several times that when the statistical noise is small enough, SDP relaxations correctly detect the underlying combinatorial structures. In this paper we develop asymptotic predictions for several detection thresholds, as well as for the estimation error above these thresholds. We study some classical SDP relaxations for statistical problems motivated by graph synchronization and community detection in networks. We map these optimization problems to statistical mechanics models with vector spins and use nonrigorous techniques from statistical mechanics to characterize the corresponding phase transitions. Our results clarify the effectiveness of SDP relaxations in solving high-dimensional statistical problems.

  11. Accurate Lineshapes from Sub-1 cm-1 Resolution Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy of α-Pinene at Room Temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mifflin, Amanda L.; Velarde Ruiz Esparza, Luis A.; Ho, Junming; Psciuk, Brian; Negre, Christian; Ebben, Carlena J.; Upshur, Mary Alice; Lu, Zhou; Strick, Benjamin; Thomson, Regan; Batista, Victor; Wang, Hongfei; Geiger, Franz M.

    2015-02-26

    Room temperature sub-wavenumber high-resolution broadband sum frequency generation (HR-BB-SFG) spectra of the common terpene (+)-α-pinene reveal ten peaks in the C–H stretching region. The spectral resolution exceeds that of Fourier transform infrared, femtosecond stimulated Raman, and traditional BB-SFG and scanning SFG spectroscopy of the same molecule. Experiment and simulation show the spectral lineshapes to be accurate. Homogeneous vibrational decoherence lifetimes of up to 1.7 psec are assigned to specific oscillators and compare favorably to lifetimes computed from density functional tight binding molecular dynamics calculations, while phase-resolved spectra yield orientation information for them. We propose the new spectroscopy as an attractive alternative to time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy or heterodyne-detection schemes for studying vibrational energy relaxation and vibrational coherences in molecules.

  12. Optical fiber macro-bend seismic sensor for real-time vibration monitoring in harsh industrial environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poczęsny, T.; Prokopczuk, K.; Makowski, P. L.; Domański, A. W.

    2011-05-01

    Condition monitoring of electromechanical equipment for heavy industry places special requirements on the environmental sensors' construction. Widely available electronic devices can easily suffer from the electromagnetic interference or may pose fire hazard. An important category of dedicated sensing devices emerged during the expansion of fiber optic technology in the last few decades. In this paper, contributing in the basic research in the field, a novel kind of intrinsic intensity fiber optic vibration sensor is proposed. We present a fiber loop based opto-mechanical transducer utilized in two configurations: the inertial sensor system working as accelerometer and a distributed vibration sensor. The complete mathematical model for the latter type configuration has been introduced, as well as some results of preliminary experimental tests on both sensor concepts have been presented.

  13. Anomalous carrier life-time relaxation mediated by head group interaction in surface anchored MnSe quantum dots conjugated with albumin proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarma, Runjun; Mohanta, Dambarudhar, E-mail: best@tezu.ernet.in

    2017-02-01

    We report on the radiative emission decay dynamics of a less known, γ-phase manganese selenide quantum dot system (MnSe QDs) subjected to bio-functionalization. A short-ligand thioglycolic acid (TGA), and a long-chain sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) surfactants were used as surface anchors prior bioconjugation with albumin proteins (BSA). Time resolved photoluminescence (TR-PL) spectra of the QDs have revealed bi-exponential decay trends with the fast (τ{sub 1}) and slow (τ{sub 2}) decay parameters assigned to the core state recombination and surface trapped excitons; respectively. The average lifetime (τ{sub avg}) was found to get shortened from a value of ∼0.87 ns–0.72 ns in unconjugated and BSA conjugated MnSe-TGA QDs; respectively. Conversely, MnSe-SDS QDs with BSA conjugation exhibited nearly four-fold enhancement of τ{sub avg} with respect to its unconjugated counterpart. Moreover, a considerable amount of Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) was found to occur from the TGA coated MnSe QDs to BSA and with an ensuing efficiency of ∼61%. The origin of anomalous carrier life-time relaxation features has also been encountered through a simplified model as regards head group interaction experienced by the MnSe QDs with different surfactant types. Exploiting luminescence decay characteristics of a magneto-fluorescent candidate could find immense scope in diverse biological applications including assays, labeling and imaging. - Highlights: • Surface anchored manganese selenide quantum dots (MnSe QDs) have been synthesized via a physico-chemical reduction route. • Time resolved luminescence spectra of the QDs have displayed bi-exponential decay trend. • Thioglycolic acid (TGA) coated QDs exhibited shorter lifetime as compared to sodium dodecyl sulfo-succinate (SDS) coated ones. • Upon BSA conjugation, the average life time is four-fold enhanced in MnSe-SDS QDs. • An efficient FRET process has been revealed in BSA conjugated TGA coated MnSe QDs.

  14. Enthalpy-based multiple-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann method for solid-liquid phase-change heat transfer in metal foams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qing; He, Ya-Ling; Li, Qing

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, an enthalpy-based multiple-relaxation-time (MRT) lattice Boltzmann (LB) method is developed for solid-liquid phase-change heat transfer in metal foams under the local thermal nonequilibrium (LTNE) condition. The enthalpy-based MRT-LB method consists of three different MRT-LB models: one for flow field based on the generalized non-Darcy model, and the other two for phase-change material (PCM) and metal-foam temperature fields described by the LTNE model. The moving solid-liquid phase interface is implicitly tracked through the liquid fraction, which is simultaneously obtained when the energy equations of PCM and metal foam are solved. The present method has several distinctive features. First, as compared with previous studies, the present method avoids the iteration procedure; thus it retains the inherent merits of the standard LB method and is superior to the iteration method in terms of accuracy and computational efficiency. Second, a volumetric LB scheme instead of the bounce-back scheme is employed to realize the no-slip velocity condition in the interface and solid phase regions, which is consistent with the actual situation. Last but not least, the MRT collision model is employed, and with additional degrees of freedom, it has the ability to reduce the numerical diffusion across the phase interface induced by solid-liquid phase change. Numerical tests demonstrate that the present method can serve as an accurate and efficient numerical tool for studying metal-foam enhanced solid-liquid phase-change heat transfer in latent heat storage. Finally, comparisons and discussions are made to offer useful information for practical applications of the present method.

  15. Enthalpy-based multiple-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann method for solid-liquid phase-change heat transfer in metal foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qing; He, Ya-Ling; Li, Qing

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, an enthalpy-based multiple-relaxation-time (MRT) lattice Boltzmann (LB) method is developed for solid-liquid phase-change heat transfer in metal foams under the local thermal nonequilibrium (LTNE) condition. The enthalpy-based MRT-LB method consists of three different MRT-LB models: one for flow field based on the generalized non-Darcy model, and the other two for phase-change material (PCM) and metal-foam temperature fields described by the LTNE model. The moving solid-liquid phase interface is implicitly tracked through the liquid fraction, which is simultaneously obtained when the energy equations of PCM and metal foam are solved. The present method has several distinctive features. First, as compared with previous studies, the present method avoids the iteration procedure; thus it retains the inherent merits of the standard LB method and is superior to the iteration method in terms of accuracy and computational efficiency. Second, a volumetric LB scheme instead of the bounce-back scheme is employed to realize the no-slip velocity condition in the interface and solid phase regions, which is consistent with the actual situation. Last but not least, the MRT collision model is employed, and with additional degrees of freedom, it has the ability to reduce the numerical diffusion across the phase interface induced by solid-liquid phase change. Numerical tests demonstrate that the present method can serve as an accurate and efficient numerical tool for studying metal-foam enhanced solid-liquid phase-change heat transfer in latent heat storage. Finally, comparisons and discussions are made to offer useful information for practical applications of the present method.

  16. Monitoring vibrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiryaki, B. [Hacettepe University (Turkey). Dept. of Mining Engineering

    2003-12-01

    The paper examines the prediction and optimisation of machine vibrations in longwall shearers. Underground studies were carried out at the Middle Anatolian Lignite Mine, between 1993 and 1997. Several shearer drums with different pick lacing arrangements were designed and tested on double-ended ranging longwall shearers employed at the mine. A computer program called the Vibration Analysis Program (VAP) was developed for analysing machine vibrations in longwall shearers. Shearer drums that were tested underground, as well as some provided by leading manufacturers, were analyzed using these programs. The results of the experiments and computer analyses are given in the article. 4 refs., 9 figs.

  17. Nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, H B; Barker, G J; MacKay, A

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The theory of relaxation processes and their measurements are described. An overview is presented of the literature on relaxation time measurements in the normal and the developing brain, in experimental diseases in animals, and in patients with multiple sclerosis. RESULTS AND CONCLUS...

  18. Time-dependent formulation of the two-dimensional model of resonant electron collisions with diatomic molecules and interpretation of the vibrational excitation cross sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    VáÅa, Martin; Houfek, Karel

    2017-02-01

    A two-dimensional model of the resonant electron-molecule collision processes with one nuclear and one electronic degree of freedom introduced by K. Houfek, T. N. Rescigno, and C. W. McCurdy [Phys. Rev. A 73, 032721 (2006), 10.1103/PhysRevA.73.032721] is reformulated within the time-dependent framework and solved numerically using the finite-element method with the discrete variable representation basis, the exterior complex scaling method, and the generalized Crank-Nicolson method. On this model we illustrate how the time-dependent calculations can provide deep insight into the origin of oscillatory structures in the vibrational excitation cross sections if one evaluates the cross sections not only at sufficiently large time to obtain the final cross sections, but also at several characteristic times which are given by the evolution of the system. It is shown that all details of these structures, especially asymmetrical peaks, can be understood as quantum interference of several experimentally indistinguishable processes separated in time due to a resonant capture of the electron and the subsequent vibrational motion of the negative molecular ion. Numerical results are presented for the N2-like, NO-like, and F2-like models and compared with ones obtained within the time-independent approach and within the local complex potential approximation.

  19. Relaxation of the MCL after an Open-Wedge High Tibial Osteotomy results in decreasing contact pressures of the knee over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Egmond, N; Hannink, G; Janssen, D; Vrancken, A C; Verdonschot, N; van Kampen, A

    2017-03-01

    medial cartilage pressure in an OWO. There was considerable relaxation of the MCL after an OWO that resulted in a decrease of the mean CP in the medial and lateral compartments of the knee over time. However, cartilage pressure shifted from the medial to the lateral compartment only after release of the superficial MCL. The release of the superficial MCL caused a significant increase in the valgus laxity, which could influence stability after an OWO. I.

  20. Vibrational Diver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlov, Victor; Ivanova, Alevtina; Schipitsyn, Vitalii; Stambouli, Moncef

    2014-10-01

    The paper is concerned with dynamics of light solid in cavity with liquid subjected to rotational vibration in the external force field. New vibrational phenomenon - diving of a light cylinder to the cavity bottom is found. The experimental investigation of a horizontal annulus with a partition has shown that under vibration a light body situated in the upper part of the layer is displaced in a threshold manner some distance away from the boundary. In this case the body executes symmetric tangential oscillations. An increase of the vibration intensity leads to a tangential displacement of the body near the external boundary. This displacement is caused by the tangential component of the vibrational lift force, which appears as soon as the oscillations lose symmetry. In this case the trajectory of the body oscillatory motion has the form of a loop. The tangential lift force makes stable the position of the body on the inclined section of the layer and even in its lower part. A theoretical interpretation has been proposed, which explains stabilization of a quasi-equilibrium state of a light body near the cavity bottom in the framework of vibrational hydromechanics.

  1. Separation of angular and energy relaxations of nonequilibrium electrons in a solid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakaleinikov, L. A.; Tropp, E. A.; Flegontova, E. Yu.

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate that the collision integral of the kinetic equation for the interaction of hot electrons with phonons can be split into substantially different parts that correspond to elastic and inelastic collisions. In particular, this applies to electrons with energies of about 1 eV that propagate in semiconductors. The difference in the characteristic energy and momentum relaxation times makes it possible to separate the angular and energy relaxation processes. If the differential cross section of elastic scattering depends, not on the scattering angle, but on the directions of incident and scattered electrons (which is observed, e.g., for the interaction of an electron with piezoelectric lattice vibrations in AIIIBV compounds), the Laplacian in the equation that describes the spatial and energy distributions of electrons can be replaced by an elliptical operator; i.e., the electron diffusion turns out to be anisotropic.

  2. Transverse Vibration of Tapered Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Embedded in Viscoelastic Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Y. J.; Zhang, D. P.; Shen, Z. B.

    2017-10-01

    Based on the nonlocal theory, Euler-Bernoulli beam theory and Kelvin viscoelastic foundation model, free transverse vibration is studied for a tapered viscoelastic single-walled carbon nanotube (visco-SWCNT) embedded in a viscoelastic medium. Firstly, the governing equations for vibration analysis are established. And then, we derive the natural frequencies in closed form for SWCNTs with arbitrary boundary conditions by applying transfer function method and perturbation method. Numerical results are also presented to discuss the effects of nonlocal parameter, relaxation time and taper parameter of SWCNTs, and material property parameters of the medium. This study demonstrates that the proposed model is available for vibration analysis of the tapered SWCNTs-viscoelastic medium coupling system.

  3. Transverse Vibration of Tapered Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Embedded in Viscoelastic Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Y. J.; Zhang, D. P.; Shen, Z. B.

    2017-12-01

    Based on the nonlocal theory, Euler-Bernoulli beam theory and Kelvin viscoelastic foundation model, free transverse vibration is studied for a tapered viscoelastic single-walled carbon nanotube (visco-SWCNT) embedded in a viscoelastic medium. Firstly, the governing equations for vibration analysis are established. And then, we derive the natural frequencies in closed form for SWCNTs with arbitrary boundary conditions by applying transfer function method and perturbation method. Numerical results are also presented to discuss the effects of nonlocal parameter, relaxation time and taper parameter of SWCNTs, and material property parameters of the medium. This study demonstrates that the proposed model is available for vibration analysis of the tapered SWCNTs-viscoelastic medium coupling system.

  4. Unified gas-kinetic scheme for diatomic molecular flow with translational, rotational, and vibrational modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhao; Yan, Hong; Li, Qibing; Xu, Kun

    2017-12-01

    The unified gas-kinetic scheme (UGKS) is a direct modeling method for both continuum and rarefied flow computations. In the previous study, the UGKS was developed for diatomic molecular simulations with translation and rotational motions. In this paper, a UGKS with non-equilibrium translational, rotational, and vibrational degrees of freedom, will be developed. The new scheme is based on the phenomenological gas dynamics model, where the translational, rotational, and vibrational modes get to the equilibrium with different time scales with the introduction of rotational and vibrational collision numbers. This new scheme is tested in a few cases, such as the homogeneous flow relaxation, shock structure, shock tube problem, and flow passing through a circular and semi-circular cylinders. The analytical and DSMC solutions are used for the validation of the UGKS, and reasonable agreements have been achieved.

  5. Comparative study of time-dependent effects of 4 and 8 Hz mechanical vibration at infrasound frequency on E. coli K-12 cells proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martirosyan, Varsik; Ayrapetyan, Sinerik

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to study the time-dependent effects of mechanical vibration (MV) at infrasound (IS) frequency at 4 and 8 Hz on E. coli K-12 growth by investigating the cell proliferation, using radioactive [(3)H]-thymidine assay. In our previous work it was suggested that the aqua medium can serve as a target through which the biological effect of MV on microbes could be realized. At the same time it was shown that microbes have mechanosensors on the surface of the cells and can sense small changes of the external environment. The obtained results were shown that the time-dependent effects of MV at 4 and 8 Hz frequency could either stimulate or inhibit the growth of microbes depending from exposure time. It more particularly, the invention relates to a method for controlling biological functions through the application of mechanical vibration, thus making it possible to artificially control the functions of bacterial cells, which will allow us to develop method that can be used in agriculture, industry, medicine, biotechnology to control microbial growth.

  6. Dielectric and structural relaxation in water and some monohydric alcohols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaatze, Udo

    2017-07-01

    Relaxation times of the principal (Debye-type) relaxation terms in the dielectric spectra of water and normal alcohols have been evaluated in order to eliminate the effect of multi-molecular cross-correlations and to thus yield reorientation times of the molecular electric dipole moments. The reorientation times have been compared to relaxation times from ultraviolet and X-ray Brillouin spectra as well as from broadband ultrasonic spectra, which are considered as the structure relaxation times characterizing the density fluctuations of the liquid hydrogen bond networks. With some alcohols, shear impedance spectra indicate the network fluctuations to be tightly associated with shear viscosity relaxation. Within the limits of uncertainty, the molecular dipole moment reorientation times and the structure relaxation times feature close correlations. This finding suggests a coupling between translational and orientational molecular motions, and it is discussed in the light of the wait-and-switch model of dielectric relaxation.

  7. Relaxation dynamics of iron-group dihalides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulpinar, Gul; Demirhan, Dogan; Buyukkilic, Fevzi

    2007-02-01

    In this study, the relaxation dynamics of iron-group dihalides by making use of spin- 1/2 metamagnetic Ising model has been formulated by the method of thermodynamics of irreversible processes. Using a molecular field approximation for the magnetic Gibbs energy, the magnetic Gibbs energy production in the irreversible process is calculated and time derivatives of the order parameters are treated as fluxes conjugate to their appropriate generalized forces in the sense of Onsager’s theory of irreversible thermodynamics. Two relaxation times are calculated and their temperature variances are examined. Moreover, the phase transition behaviors of the relaxation times are also obtained anaytically via the critical exponents.

  8. Nonlinear fractional relaxation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nonlinear fractional equation; nonlinear fractional relaxation; -expansion. Abstract. We define a nonlinear model for fractional relaxation phenomena. We use -expansion method to analyse this model. By studying the fundamental solutions of this model we find that when → 0 the model exhibits a fast decay rate and ...

  9. Corroborative evidences of TV γ -scaling of the α-relaxation originating from the primitive relaxation/JG β relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngai, K. L.; Paluch, M.

    2017-12-01

    Successful thermodynamic scaling of the structural alpha-relaxation time or transport coefficients of glass-forming liquids determined at various temperatures T and pressures P means the data conform to a single function of the product variable TVgamma, where V is the specific volume and gamma is a material specific constant. In the past two decades we have witnessed successful TVgamma-scaling in many molecular, polymeric, and even metallic glass-formers, and gamma is related to the slope of the repulsive part of the intermolecular potential. The advances made indicate TVgamma-scaling is an important aspect of the dynamic and thermodynamic properties of glass-formers. In this paper we show the origin of TVgamma-scaling is not from the structural alpha-relaxation time. Instead it comes from its precursor, the Johari-Goldstein beta-relaxation or the primitive relaxation of the Coupling Model and their relaxation times or tau_0 respectively. It is remarkable that all relaxation times are functions of TVgamma with the same gama, as well as the fractional exponent of the Kohlrausch correlation function of the structural alpha-relaxation. We arrive at this conclusion convincingly based on corroborative evidences from a number of experiments and molecular dynamics simulations performed on a wide variety of glass-formers and in conjunction with consistency with the predictions of the Coupling Model.

  10. Interrelations of Epicardial Fat Volume, Left Ventricular T1-Relaxation Times and Myocardial Strain in Hypertensive Patients: A Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homsi, Rami; Kuetting, Daniel; Sprinkart, Alois; Steinfeld, Nina; Meier-Schroers, Michael; Luetkens, Julian; Nadal, Jennifer; Dabir, Darius; Fischer, Stefan; Gieseke, Juergen; Schild, Hans; Thomas, Daniel

    2017-05-01

    This cardiac magnetic resonance study was performed to assess myocardial fibrosis by evaluating T1-relaxation time (T1), to measure left ventricular (LV) strain, and to determine epicardial fat volume (EFV) in hypertensive patients with no history of cardiovascular (CV) events and to relate the results to the presence of coronary atherosclerotic artery disease (CAD) in these patients. A total of 123 subjects were examined at 1.5 T. Of them, 98 were hypertensive patients (58 men; mean age, 62.9±10.7 y; body mass index, 29.0±5.6 kg/m) and 25 were controls without CV risk factors or disease (13 men; 60.1±10.7 y; 28.1±5.4 kg/m). All patients had a well-treated blood pressure. In the hypertensive group, 56 patients had no CAD, whereas 42 patients had CAD. T1 was assessed by a modified Look-Locker inversion recovery sequence. Longitudinal and circumferential peak systolic strain (LS; CS) was determined with dedicated cardiac magnetic resonance software (feature tracking). EFV (normalized to the body surface area) was assessed by a 3D Dixon sequence. T1 (ms) and EFV (mL/m) were higher and CS and LS (%) were lower in hypertensive patients compared with those in nonhypertensive controls (PEFV=58.2±21.1; hypertensive patients overall: T1=991.3±45.5, LS=-21.0±4.5, CS=-25.0±5.9, EFV=71.1±25.3; hypertensive patients without CAD: T1=991.6±48.4, LS=-21.0±4.7, CS=-24.6±6.3, EFV=71.3±26.6; hypertensive patients with CAD: T1=986.7±39.2, LS=-21.1±4.3, CS=-25.5±5.4, EFV=70.9±23.6). There were no significant differences between hypertensive patients with and those without CAD and between patients grouped according to the number of vessels affected (0-vessel disease, 1-vessel disease, 2-vessel disease, or 3-vessel disease). Hypertension is associated with signs of myocardial fibrosis and an impaired LV contractility despite a normal LV ejection fraction, as well as with an increased EFV. However, CAD, in the absence of previous pathologies with consecutive myocardial

  11. Relaxation properties in classical diamagnetism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carati, A; Benfenati, F; Galgani, L

    2011-06-01

    It is an old result of Bohr that, according to classical statistical mechanics, at equilibrium a system of electrons in a static magnetic field presents no magnetization. Thus a magnetization can occur only in an out of equilibrium state, such as that produced through the Foucault currents when a magnetic field is switched on. It was suggested by Bohr that, after the establishment of such a nonequilibrium state, the system of electrons would quickly relax back to equilibrium. In the present paper, we study numerically the relaxation to equilibrium in a modified Bohr model, which is mathematically equivalent to a billiard with obstacles, immersed in a magnetic field that is adiabatically switched on. We show that it is not guaranteed that equilibrium is attained within the typical time scales of microscopic dynamics. Depending on the values of the parameters, one has a relaxation either to equilibrium or to a diamagnetic (presumably metastable) state. The analogy with the relaxation properties in the Fermi Pasta Ulam problem is also pointed out.

  12. Electron spin relaxation in graphene nanoribbon quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droth, Matthias; Burkard, Guido

    2013-05-01

    Graphene is promising as a host material for electron spin qubits because of its predicted potential for long coherence times. In armchair graphene nanoribbons (aGNRs) a small band gap is opened, allowing for electrically gated quantum dots, and furthermore the valley degeneracy is lifted. The spin lifetime T1 is limited by spin relaxation, where the Zeeman energy is absorbed by lattice vibrations, mediated by spin-orbit and electron-phonon coupling. We have calculated T1 by treating all couplings analytically and find that T1 can be in the range of seconds for several reasons: (i) low phonon density of states away from Van Hove singularities; (ii) destructive interference between two relaxation mechanisms; (iii) Van Vleck cancellation at low magnetic fields; (iv) vanishing coupling to out-of-plane modes in lowest order due to the electronic structure of aGNRs. Owing to the vanishing nuclear spin of 12C, T1 may be a good measure for overall coherence. These results and recent advances in the controlled production of graphene nanoribbons make this system interesting for spintronics applications.

  13. A quantum-mechanical relaxation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skomski, R.; Kashyap, A.; Sellmyer, D. J.

    2012-04-01

    The atomic origin of micromagnetic damping is investigated by developing and solving a quantum-mechanical relaxation model. A projection-operator technique is used to derive an analytical expression for the relaxation time as a function of the heat-bath and interaction parameters. The present findings are consistent with earlier research beyond the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation and show that the underlying relaxation mechanism is very general. Zermelo's recurrence paradox means that there is no true irreversibility in non-interacting nanoparticles, but the corresponding recurrence times are very long and can be ignored in many cases.

  14. Relaxation of heavy species and gas temperature in the afterglow of a N2 microwave discharge★

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintassilgo, Carlos D.; Guerra, Vasco

    2017-10-01

    In this paper we present a self-consistent kinetic model to study the temporal variation of the gas temperature in the afterglow of a 440 Pa microwave nitrogen discharge operating at 433 MHz in a 3.8 cm diameter tube. The initial conditions in the afterglow are determined by a kinetic model that solves the electron Boltzmann equation coupled to the gas thermal balance equation and a system of rate-balance equations for N2(X 1∑g+, v) molecules, electronically excited states of N2, ground and excited states of atomic nitrogen and the main positive ions. Once the initial concentrations of the heavy species and gas temperature are known, their relaxation in the afterglow is obtained from the solutions to the corresponding time-dependent equations. Modelling predictions are found to be in good agreement with previously measured values for the concentrations of N(4S) atoms and N2(A 3∑u+) molecules, and the radially averaged gas temperature Tg along the afterglow of a microwave discharge in N2 under the same working conditions. It is shown that gas heating in the afterglow comes essentially from the energy transfer involving non-resonant vibration-vibration (V-V) collisions between vibrationally excited nitrogen molecules, as well as from energy exchanges in vibration-translation (V-T) on N2-N collisions. Contribution to the topical issue "Plasma Sources and Plasma Processes (PSPP)", edited by Luis Lemos Alves, Thierry Belmonte and Tiberiu Minea

  15. Two-temperature reaction and relaxation rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesnichenko, E.; Gorbachev, Yu.

    2017-05-01

    Within the method of solving the kinetic equations for gas mixtures with internal degrees of freedom developed by the authors and based on the approximate summational invariants (ASI) concept, gas-dynamic equations for a multi-temperature model for the spatially inhomogeneous case are derived. For the two-temperature case, the expressions for the non-equilibrium reaction and relaxation rates are obtained. Special attention is drawn to corresponding thermodynamic equations. Different possibilities of introducing the gas-dynamic variables related to the internal degrees of freedom are considered. One is based on the choice of quantum numbers as the ASI, while the other is based on the choice of internal (vibrational) energy as the ASI. Limits to a one-temperature situation are considered in all the cases. For the cutoff harmonic oscillator model, explicit expressions for the reaction and relaxation rates are derived.

  16. Psychophysiological Effects of Progressive Relaxation in Anxiety Neurotic Patients and of Progressive Relaxation and Alpha Feedback in Nonpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehrer, Paul M.

    1978-01-01

    Compared physiological effects of progressive relaxation, alpha feedback, and a no-treatment condition. Nonpatients showed more psychophysiological habituation than patients in response to hearing very loud tones and to reaction time tasks. Patients showed greater physiological response to relaxation than nonpatients. After relaxation, autonomic…

  17. Vibrating minds

    CERN Document Server

    2009-01-01

    Ed Witten is one of the leading scientists in the field of string theory, the theory that describes elementary particles as vibrating strings. This week he leaves CERN after having spent a few months here on sabbatical. His wish is that the LHC will unveil supersymmetry.

  18. The origins of vibration theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimarogonas, A. D.

    1990-07-01

    The Ionian School of natural philosophy introduced the scientific method of dealing with natural phenomena and the rigorous proofs for abstract propositions. Vibration theory was initiated by the Pythagoreans in the fifth century BC, in association with the theory of music and the theory of acoustics. They observed the natural frequency of vibrating systems and proved that it is a system property and that it does not depend on the excitation. Pythagoreans determined the fundamental natural frequencies of several simple systems, such as vibrating strings, pipes, vessels and circular plates. Aristoteles and the Peripatetic School founded mechanics and developed a fundamental understanding of statics and dynamics. In Alexandrian times there were substantial engineering developments in the field of vibration. The pendulum as a vibration, and probably time, measuring device was known in antiquity, and was further developed by the end of the first millennium AD.

  19. Vibrations in a moving flexible robot arm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, P. K. C.; Wei, Jin-Duo

    1987-01-01

    The vibration in a flexible robot arm modeled by a moving slender prismatic beam is considered. It is found that the extending and contracting motions have destabilizing and stabilizing effects on the vibratory motions, respectively. The vibration analysis is based on a Galerkin approximation with time-dependent basis functions. Typical numerical results are presented to illustrate the qualitative features of vibrations.

  20. A field study of exposure to whole-body vibration due to agricultural machines in a full-time rice farmer over one year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimura, Hiroji; Taoda, Kazushi; Kitahara, Teruyo

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were to clarify in detail the levels of whole-body vibration (WBV) exposure from a variety of agricultural machines in a rice farmer over one year, and to evaluate the daily level of exposure compared with European and Japanese threshold limits. The subject was a full-time, male rice farmer. We measured vibration accelerations on the seat pan and at the seat base of four tractors with various implements attached, one rice-planting machine, two combine harvesters, produced by the same manufacturer, and one truck used for transportation of agricultural machines. The position and velocity of the machines were recorded in parallel with WBV measurements. In addition, during the year starting in April 2010, the subject completed a questionnaire regarding his work (date, place, content, hours worked, machines used). We calculated the daily exposure to WBV, A(8), on all the days on which the subject used the agricultural machines. The WBV magnitude in farm fields was relatively high during tasks with high velocity and heavy mechanical load on the machine, and had no dominant axis. The subject worked for 159 days using the agricultural machines during the year, and the proportion of days on which A(8) values exceeded the thresholds was 90% for the Japan occupational exposure limit and 24% for the EU exposure action value. Our findings emphasize the need for rice farmers to have health management strategies suited to the farming seasons and measures to reduce WBV exposure during each farm task.

  1. Effect of post length and type of luting agent on the dislodging time of metallic prefabricated posts by using ultrasonic vibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi Dastgurdi, Maziar; Khabiri, Masud; Khademi, Abbasali; Zare Jahromi, Maryam; Hosseini Dastnaei, Peimaneh

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine and compare the times needed to dislodge prefabricated titanium posts of different luting lengths with various cements. Eighty-one intact extracted, single-canal human teeth were selected and endodontically treated. Specimens were randomly divided into 9 groups, which were arranged according to the post space length (5, 7, and 9 mm) and cement type (zinc phosphate, glass ionomer, and resin cement). Titanium posts were cemented into the post spaces, and after 1 week of storage they were subjected to ultrasonic vibration. The dislodging times were recorded and analyzed by using the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests (P ultrasonic device. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Vibration Sensitive Keystroke Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lopatka, M.; Peetz, M.-H.; van Erp, M.; Stehouwer, H.; van Zaanen, M.

    2009-01-01

    We present a novel method for performing non-invasive biometric analysis on habitual keystroke patterns using a vibration-based feature space. With the increasing availability of 3-D accelerometer chips in laptop computers, conventional methods using time vectors may be augmented using a distinct

  3. Stress relaxation in viscous soft spheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boschan, Julia; Vasudevan, Siddarth A; Boukany, Pouyan E; Somfai, Ellák; Tighe, Brian P

    2017-10-04

    We report the results of molecular dynamics simulations of stress relaxation tests in athermal viscous soft sphere packings close to their unjamming transition. By systematically and simultaneously varying both the amplitude of the applied strain step and the pressure of the initial condition, we access both linear and nonlinear response regimes and control the distance to jamming. Stress relaxation in viscoelastic solids is characterized by a relaxation time τ* that separates short time scales, where viscous loss is substantial, from long time scales, where elastic storage dominates and the response is essentially quasistatic. We identify two distinct plateaus in the strain dependence of the relaxation time, one each in the linear and nonlinear regimes. The height of both plateaus scales as an inverse power law with the distance to jamming. By probing the time evolution of particle velocities during relaxation, we further identify a correlation between mechanical relaxation in the bulk and the degree of non-affinity in the particle velocities on the micro scale.

  4. Blade Vibration Measurement System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    The Phase I project successfully demonstrated that an advanced noncontacting stress measurement system (NSMS) could improve classification of blade vibration response in terms of mistuning and closely spaced modes. The Phase II work confirmed the microwave sensor design process, modified the sensor so it is compatible as an upgrade to existing NSMS, and improved and finalized the NSMS software. The result will be stand-alone radar/tip timing radar signal conditioning for current conventional NSMS users (as an upgrade) and new users. The hybrid system will use frequency data and relative mode vibration levels from the radar sensor to provide substantially superior capabilities over current blade-vibration measurement technology. This frequency data, coupled with a reduced number of tip timing probes, will result in a system capable of detecting complex blade vibrations that would confound traditional NSMS systems. The hardware and software package was validated on a compressor rig at Mechanical Solutions, Inc. (MSI). Finally, the hybrid radar/tip timing NSMS software package and associated sensor hardware will be installed for use in the NASA Glenn spin pit test facility.

  5. Domain relaxation in Langmuir films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, James C.; Bernoff, Andrew J.; Mann, Elizabeth K.; Mann, J. Adin; Wintersmith, Jacob R.; Zou, Lu

    We report on theoretical studies of molecularly thin Langmuir films on the surface of a quiescent subfluid and qualitatively compare the results to both new and previous experiments. The film covers the entire fluid surface, but domains of different phases are observed. In the absence of external forcing, the compact domains tend to relax to circles, driven by a line tension at the phase boundaries. When stretched (by a transient applied stagnation-point flow or by stirring), a compact domain elongates, creating a bola consisting of two roughly circular reservoirs connected by a thin tether. This shape will then relax slowly to the minimum-energy configuration of a circular domain. The tether is never observed to rupture, even when it is more than a hundred times as long as it is wide. We model these experiments by taking previous descriptions of the full hydrodynamics, identifying the dominant effects via dimensional analysis, and reducing the system to a more tractable form. The result is a free boundary problem for an inviscid Langmuir film whose motion is driven by the line tension of the domain and damped by the viscosity of the subfluid. Using this model we derive relaxation rates for perturbations of a uniform strip and a circular patch. We also derive a boundary integral formulation which allows an efficient numerical solution of the problem. Numerically this model replicates the formation of a bola and the subsequent relaxation observed in the experiments. Finally, we suggest physical properties of the system (such as line tension) that can be deduced by comparison of the theory and numerical simulations to the experiment. Two movies are available with the online version of the paper.

  6. Influence of molecular relaxation dynamics on quartz-enhanced photoacoustic detection of CO2 at λ =2 μm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysocki, G.; Kosterev, A. A.; Tittel, F. K.

    2006-11-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) trace gas detection based on quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) using a distributed feedback diode laser operating at λ=2 μm is performed, with a primary purpose of studying vibrational relaxation processes in the CO2-N2-H2O system. A simple model is developed and used to explain the experimentally observed dependence of amplitude and phase of the photoacoustic signal on pressure and gas humidity. A (1σ) sensitivity of 110 parts-per-million (with a 1 s lock-in time constant) was obtained for CO2 concentrations measured in humid gas samples.

  7. Stress Relaxation Behavior and Its Prediction of CrMoWV Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CAO Tie-shan

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The stress relaxation data up to 8760h at 550℃ and 600℃of 12Cr-1Mo-1W-0.25V heat-resistant steel were used as the object to study the method of how to accurately and effectively predict long-term relaxation stress by using short-time relaxation data. When relaxation model is used to extrapolate the long-term relaxation stress directly, it is found that the parameters of the relaxation model depend on the length of the fitted data. The time-dependent parameter model, naming as timing parameter method, is proposed to predict the long-term relaxation stress with high accuracy. By comparison of the results of timing parameter method and direct extrapolation method, timing parameter method has obvious advantages in predicting long time relaxation stress with short time relaxation data, as the timing parameter method has a more accurate prediction than that of direct extrapolation method.

  8. Neural control of muscle relaxation in echinoderms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elphick, M R; Melarange, R

    2001-03-01

    Smooth muscle relaxation in vertebrates is regulated by a variety of neuronal signalling molecules, including neuropeptides and nitric oxide (NO). The physiology of muscle relaxation in echinoderms is of particular interest because these animals are evolutionarily more closely related to the vertebrates than to the majority of invertebrate phyla. However, whilst in vertebrates there is a clear structural and functional distinction between visceral smooth muscle and skeletal striated muscle, this does not apply to echinoderms, in which the majority of muscles, whether associated with the body wall skeleton and its appendages or with visceral organs, are made up of non-striated fibres. The mechanisms by which the nervous system controls muscle relaxation in echinoderms were, until recently, unknown. Using the cardiac stomach of the starfish Asterias rubens as a model, it has been established that the NO-cGMP signalling pathway mediates relaxation. NO also causes relaxation of sea urchin tube feet, and NO may therefore function as a 'universal' muscle relaxant in echinoderms. The first neuropeptides to be identified in echinoderms were two related peptides isolated from Asterias rubens known as SALMFamide-1 (S1) and SALMFamide-2 (S2). Both S1 and S2 cause relaxation of the starfish cardiac stomach, but with S2 being approximately ten times more potent than S1. SALMFamide neuropeptides have also been isolated from sea cucumbers, in which they cause relaxation of both gut and body wall muscle. Therefore, like NO, SALMFamides may also function as 'universal' muscle relaxants in echinoderms. The mechanisms by which SALMFamides cause relaxation of echinoderm muscle are not known, but several candidate signal transduction pathways are discussed here. The SALMFamides do not, however, appear to act by promoting release of NO, and muscle relaxation in echinoderms is therefore probably regulated by at least two neuronal signalling systems acting in parallel. Recently, other

  9. [A study on Korean concepts of relaxation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J S

    1992-01-01

    statements, 59 experiences were extracted. And then 9 categories--at rest after physical activities, after problem solving, fancy, bathing in the bed, situation, rest, particular time, others--were organized. 3. The musics of the relaxation; From 229 statements, 108 musics were extracted, and the 9 categories--Western classical music, semi classical music, Korean song, Korean popular classical music, song, western popular song, hymn, characteristics of music, others--were organized. In conclusion, There are some differences between Korean concepts, experiences and musics of relaxation and western concepts, experiences and musics of relaxation.

  10. Ultrafast fluorescence detection in tris(2,2'-bipyridine)ruthenium(II) complex in solution: relaxation dynamics involving higher excited states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhasikuttan, Achikanath C; Suzuki, Masaya; Nakashima, Satoru; Okada, Tadashi

    2002-07-17

    The excited-state dynamics of a transition metal complex, tris(2,2'-bipyridine)ruthenium(II), [Ru(bpy)(3)](2+), has been investigated using femtosecond fluorescence upconversion spectroscopy. The relaxation dynamics in these molecules is of great importance in understanding the various ultrafast processes related to interfacial electron transfer, especially in semiconductor nanoparticles. Despite several experimental and theoretical efforts, direct observation of a Franck-Condon singlet excited state in this molecule was missing. In this study, emission from the Franck-Condon excited singlet state of [Ru(bpy)(3)](2+) has been observed for the first time, and its lifetime has been estimated to be 40 +/- 15 fs. Biexponential decays with a fast rise component observed at longer wavelengths indicated the existence of more than one emitting state in the system. From a detailed data analysis, it has been proposed that, on excitation at 410 nm, crossover from higher excited (1)(MLCT) states to the vibrationally hot triplet manifold occurs with an intersystem crossing time constant of 40 +/- 15 fs. Mixing of the higher levels in the triplet state with the singlet state due to strong spin-orbit coupling is proposed. This enhances the radiative rate constant, k(r), of the vibrationally hot states within the triplet manifold, facilitating the upconversion of the emitted photons. The vibrationally excited triplet, which is emissive, undergoes vibrational cooling with a decay time in the range of 0.56-1.3 ps and relaxes to the long-lived triplet state. The results on the relaxation dynamics of the higher excited states in [Ru(bpy)(3)](2+) are valuable in explaining the role of nonequilibrated higher excited sensitizer states of transition metal complexes in the electron injection and other ultrafast processes.

  11. Urban vibrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morrison, Ann; Knudsen, L.; Andersen, Hans Jørgen

    2012-01-01

      lab   studies   in   that   we   found   a   decreased   detection   rate   in   busy   environments.   Here   we   test   with   a   much   larger   sample   and   age   range,   and   contribute   with   the   first   vibration  sensitivity  testing  outside  the  lab  in  an  urban   public...

  12. Magneto-dependent stress relaxation of magnetorheological gels

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Yangguang

    2017-09-01

    The stress relaxation behaviors of magnetorheological (MR) gels under stepwise shear loading are systematically investigated. The particle-enhanced effect, the magneto-induced effect, and the temperature-enhanced effect on the stress relaxation of MR gels are discussed. For further analysis of the magneto-induced stress relaxation mechanism in MR gels, a phenomenological model is established to describe the stress relaxation behavior of the matrix and the magnetic particle chains. All characteristic parameters introduced in the model, i.e. relaxation time, instantaneous modulus, and stable modulus, have well-defined physical meanings and are fitted based on the experimental results. The influence of each parameter on the macroscopic response is discussed and it is found that the relaxation stress induced by the magneto-mechanical coupling effect plays an important role in the stress relaxation process of MR gels.

  13. Magneto-dependent stress relaxation of magnetorheological gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yangguang; Liu, Taixiang; Liao, Guojiang; Lubineau, Gilles

    2017-11-01

    The stress relaxation behaviors of magnetorheological (MR) gels under stepwise shear loading are systematically investigated. The particle-enhanced effect, the magneto-induced effect, and the temperature-enhanced effect on the stress relaxation of MR gels (MRG) are discussed. For further analysis of the magneto-induced stress relaxation mechanism in MRG, a phenomenological model is established to describe the stress relaxation behavior of the matrix and the magnetic particle chains. All characteristic parameters introduced in the model, i.e. relaxation time, instantaneous modulus, and stable modulus, have well-defined physical meanings and are fitted based on the experimental results. The influence of each parameter on the macroscopic response is discussed and it is found that the relaxation stress induced by the magneto-mechanical coupling effect plays an important role in the stress relaxation process of MRG.

  14. Nuclear Spin Relaxation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    and almost completely destroyed by the chaotic thermal environ- ment. Fortunately, the havoc wreaked by thermal molecular motion is not complete. The tiny residual nuclear magnetism (of the order of 10–5), which is established through spin–lattice relaxation, is the basis of almost all NMR and MRI experiments. [1].

  15. The Time Delay Filtering Method for Cancelling Vibration on Overhead Transportation Systems Modelled as a Physical Pendulum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Peláez

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available An investigation of the response of a physical pendulum to time delay filtered inputs was conducted. It was shown that the physical pendulum model is more accurate than the simple pendulum for modelling the dynamic response of overhead cranes with loads hanging from hooks. Based on the physical pendulum model a Specified Time Delay filter for an experimental mini overhead crane was synthesized. While somewhat limited in the scope by the hardware conditions placed in the system, the results provide basic insights into the successful application of the Time Delay Filtering method to overhead cranes.

  16. Applications de la résonance magnétique nucléaire (RMN en milieu poreux Lissage des courbes de relaxation RMN du domaine du temps par une méthode discrète et continue Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (Nmr Applications in Porous Media Time-Dependent Nmr Relaxation Curve Smoothing Using a Discrete Continuous Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Botlan D.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Dans un champ magnétique hétérogène, le signal RMN de précession libre (FID suit une évolution gaussienne. Le traitement du signal par une méthode discrète peut donner des composantes qui ne correspondent pas à un état physique réel. Par contre l'utilisation d'une méthode de déconvolution continue nous a donné des résultats quantitatifs tout à fait satisfaisants permettant de déterminer les distributions de temps de relaxation correspondant à des états intermédiaires entre les phases solides et liquides. La RMN du domaine du temps peut ainsi être considérée comme une méthode analytique complémentaire des techniques habituellement utilisées pour l'étude de composés complexes hétérogènes ATD, ACD, isothermes de sorption, etc. In a heterogeneous magnetic field, the freely precessing NMR signal (FID describes a Gaussian curve. Processing the signal using a discrete method can give rise to components that do not correspond to a real physical state. However, with a continuous deconvolution method, which gives quite satisfactory quantitative results, it is possible to determine the distributions of relaxation times that correspond to intermediate states between solid and liquid phases. Time-dependent NMR can thus be used to supplement the usual analytical methods, such as DTA, DCA and sorption isotherms, for studying complex heterogeneous compounds.

  17. Adaptations of mouse skeletal muscle to low-intensity vibration training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeehen, James N; Novotny, Susan A; Baltgalvis, Kristen A; Call, Jarrod A; Nuckley, David J; Lowe, Dawn A

    2013-06-01

    We tested the hypothesis that low-intensity vibration training in mice improves contractile function of hindlimb skeletal muscles and promotes exercise-related cellular adaptations. We subjected C57BL/6J mice to 6 wk, 5 d·wk, 15 min·d of sham or low-intensity vibration (45 Hz, 1.0g) while housed in traditional cages (Sham-Active, n = 8; Vibrated-Active, n = 10) or in small cages to restrict physical activity (Sham-Restricted, n = 8; Vibrated-Restricted, n = 8). Contractile function and resistance to fatigue were tested in vivo (anterior and posterior crural muscles) and ex vivo on the soleus muscle. Tibialis anterior and soleus muscles were evaluated histologically for alterations in oxidative metabolism, capillarity, and fiber types. Epididymal fat pad and hindlimb muscle masses were measured. Two-way ANOVAs were used to determine the effects of vibration and physical inactivity. Vibration training resulted in a 10% increase in maximal isometric torque (P = 0.038) and 16% faster maximal rate of relaxation (P = 0.030) of the anterior crural muscles. Posterior crural muscles were unaffected by vibration, except greater rates of contraction in Vibrated-Restricted mice compared with Vibrated-Active and Sham-Restricted mice (P = 0.022). Soleus muscle maximal isometric tetanic force tended to be greater (P = 0.057), and maximal relaxation was 20% faster (P = 0.005) in vibrated compared with sham mice. The restriction of physical activity induced muscle weakness but was not required for vibration to be effective in improving strength or relaxation. Vibration training did not affect muscle fatigability or any indicator of cellular adaptation investigated (P ≥ 0.431). Fat pad but not hindlimb muscle masses were affected by vibration training. Vibration training in mice improved muscle contractility, specifically strength and relaxation rates, with no indication of adverse effects to muscle function or cellular adaptations.

  18. Factors influencing lower esophageal sphincter relaxation after deglutition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibbling, Lita; Gezelius, Per; Franzén, Thomas

    2011-06-21

    To study the relationship between upper esophageal sphincter (UES) relaxation, peristaltic pressure and lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxation following deglutition in non-dysphagic subjects. Ten non-dysphagic adult subjects had a high-resolution manometry probe passed transnasally and positioned to cover the UES, the esophageal body and the LES. Ten water swallows in each subject were analyzed for time lag between UES relaxation and LES relaxation, LES pressure at time of UES relaxation, duration of LES relaxation, the distance between the transition level (TL) and the LES, time in seconds that the peristaltic wave was before (negative value) or after the TL when the LES became relaxed, and the maximal peristaltic pressure in the body of the esophagus. Relaxation of the LES occurred on average 3.5 s after the bolus had passed the UES and in most cases when the peristaltic wave front had reached the TL. The LES remained relaxed until the peristaltic wave faded away above the LES. LES relaxation seemed to be caused by the peristaltic wave pushing the bolus from behind against the LES gate.

  19. Vibration response of misaligned rotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Tejas H.; Darpe, Ashish K.

    2009-08-01

    Misalignment is one of the common faults observed in rotors. Effect of misalignment on vibration response of coupled rotors is investigated in the present study. The coupled rotor system is modelled using Timoshenko beam elements with all six dof. An experimental approach is proposed for the first time for determination of magnitude and harmonic nature of the misalignment excitation. Misalignment effect at coupling location of rotor FE model is simulated using nodal force vector. The force vector is found using misalignment coupling stiffness matrix, derived from experimental data and applied misalignment between the two rotors. Steady-state vibration response is studied for sub-critical speeds. Effect of the types of misalignment (parallel and angular) on the vibration behaviour of the coupled rotor is examined. Along with lateral vibrations, axial and torsional vibrations are also investigated and nature of the vibration response is also examined. It has been found that the misalignment couples vibrations in bending, longitudinal and torsional modes. Some diagnostic features in the fast Fourier transform (FFT) of torsional and longitudinal response related to parallel and angular misalignment have been revealed. Full spectra and orbit plots are effectively used to reveal the unique nature of misalignment fault leading to reliable misalignment diagnostic information, not clearly brought out by earlier studies.

  20. N Vibrational Temperatures and OH Number Density Measurements in a NS Pulse Discharge Hydrogen-Air Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Yichen; Winters, Caroline; Jans, Elijah R.; Frederickson, Kraig; Adamovich, Igor V.

    2017-06-01

    This work presents time-resolved measurements of nitrogen vibrational temperature, translational-rotational temperature, and absolute OH number density in lean hydrogen-air mixtures excited in a diffuse filament nanosecond pulse discharge, at a pressure of 100 Torr and high specific energy loading. The main objective of these measurements is to study a possible effect of nitrogen vibrational excitation on low-temperature kinetics of HO2 and OH radicals. N2 vibrational temperature and gas temperature in the discharge and the afterglow are measured by ns broadband Coherent Anti-Stokes Scattering (CARS). Hydroxyl radical number density is measured by Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) calibrated by Rayleigh scattering. The results show that the discharge generates strong vibrational nonequilibrium in air and H2-air mixtures for delay times after the discharge pulse of up to 1 ms, with peak vibrational temperature of Tv ≈ 2000 K at T ≈ 500 K. Nitrogen vibrational temperature peaks ≈ 200 μs after the discharge pulse, before decreasing due to vibrational-translational relaxation by O atoms (on the time scale of a few hundred μs) and diffusion (on ms time scale). OH number density increases gradually after the discharge pulse, peaking at t 100-300 μs and decaying on a longer time scale, until t 1 ms. Both OH rise time and decay time decrease as H2 fraction in the mixture is increased from 1% to 5%. OH number density in a 1% H2-air mixture peaks at approximately the same time as vibrational temperature in air, suggesting that OH kinetics may be affected by N2 vibrational excitation. However, preliminary kinetic modeling calculations demonstrate that OH number density overshoot is controlled by known reactions of H and O radicals generated in the plasma, rather than by dissociation by HO2 radical in collisions with vibrationally excited N2 molecules, as has been suggested earlier. Additional measurements at higher specific energy loadings and kinetic modeling

  1. Condensed-phase relaxation of multilevel quantum systems. II. Comparison of path integral calculations and second-order relaxation theory for a nondegenerate three-level system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Simone; Evans, Deborah G; Coalson, Rob D

    2006-09-28

    An exactly solvable model of multisite condensed-phase vibrational relaxation was studied in Paper I (Peter, S.; Evans, D. G.; Coalson, R. D. J. Phys. Chem. B 2006, 110, 18758.), where it was shown that long-time steady-state site populations of a degenerate N-level system are not equal (hence, they are non-Boltzmann) and depend on the initial preparation of the system and the number of sites that it comprises. Here we consider a generalization of the model to the case of a nondegenerate three-level system coupled to a high-dimensional bath: such a model system has direct relevance to a large class of donor-bridge-acceptor electron transfer processes. Because the quantum dynamics of this system cannot be computed analytically, we compare numerically exact path integral calculations to the predictions of second-order time-local relaxation theory. For modest system-bath coupling strengths, the two sets of results are in excellent agreement. They show that non-Boltzmann long-time steady-state site populations are obtained when the level splitting is small but nonzero, whereas at larger values of the system bias (asymmetry) these populations become Boltzmann distributed.

  2. Hair Dye and Hair Relaxers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women Hair Dye and Hair Relaxers Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it ... If you have a bad reaction to hair dyes and relaxers, you should: Stop using the product. ...

  3. An impulsive receptance technique for the time domain computation of the vibration of a whole aero-engine model with nonlinear bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hai, Pham Minh; Bonello, Philip

    2008-12-01

    The direct study of the vibration of real engine structures with nonlinear bearings, particularly aero-engines, has been severely limited by the fact that current nonlinear computational techniques are not well-suited for complex large-order systems. This paper introduces a novel implicit "impulsive receptance method" (IRM) for the time domain analysis of such structures. The IRM's computational efficiency is largely immune to the number of modes used and dependent only on the number of nonlinear elements. This means that, apart from retaining numerical accuracy, a much more physically accurate solution is achievable within a short timeframe. Simulation tests on a realistically sized representative twin-spool aero-engine showed that the new method was around 40 times faster than a conventional implicit integration scheme. Preliminary results for a given rotor unbalance distribution revealed the varying degree of journal lift, orbit size and shape at the example engine's squeeze-film damper bearings, and the effect of end-sealing at these bearings.

  4. THE NEUROPHYSIOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF WHOLE BODY VIBRATION TRAINING

    OpenAIRE

    KOÇ, Gözde; K. Alparslan ERMAN

    2012-01-01

    Whole body vibration training, the person’s entire body on a platform, creates a vibration that may affect the muscles and bones. Despite the vibration used of massage and treatment since ancient times, it was used as a training method in recent years and became very popular and has attracted the attention of researchers. Whole body vibration training used both sport science with the aim to improve performance and in the fields of medicine for sports therapy. Whole body vibration training bri...

  5. Relaxation guided imagery reduces motor fluctuations in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlesinger, Ilana; Benyakov, Orna; Erikh, Ilana; Nassar, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Motor fluctuations in Parkinson's disease (PD) cause major disabling symptoms. We aimed to assess the efficacy of relaxation guided imagery in PD patients with motor fluctuation. In a prospective pilot, case cohort, PD patients underwent (i) a relaxation session with relaxation guided imagery, and (ii) a control session of relaxing music. Three-day diaries were completed at baseline and after each intervention. Subsequently, patients received discs for home listening-a relaxation guided imagery disc and a relaxing music disc. After three months the patients were interviewed by phone. Twenty one PD patients participated and 19 completed this study. There was a significant increase in the percent of "on" time after listening to the relaxation guided imagery disc as compared with baseline (from 47.7% to 62.8%, 95% CI 5.26-25.03, p = 0.005). Relaxing music caused no significant change in percent of "on" time from baseline (from 47.7% to 53.0%, p = 0.161). Although all sessions were performed in "on" state, there was a significant decrease in UPDRS motor subscores after each of the two sessions as compared with the UPDRS score before the session (relaxation guided imagery mean reduction -3.81 p = 0.0002 and after relaxing music mean reduction -1.95, p = 0.001), significantly more so after the relaxation guided imagery (p = 0.020). After 3 months listening to the relaxation guided imagery disc increased "on" time from baseline by 12.6% (95% CI 3.19-28.39, p = 0.111) but this did not reach statistical significance. In this pilot study we showed that relaxation guided imagery is a promising treatment for PD.

  6. The rate parameters for coupled vibration-dissociation in a generalized SSH approximation. [Schwarz, Slawsky, and Herzfeld

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Surendra P.; Huo, Winifred M.; Park, Chul

    1988-01-01

    A theoretical study of vibrational excitations and dissociations of nitrogen undergoing a nonequilibrium relaxation process upon heating and cooling is reported. The rate coefficients for collisional induced vibrational transitions and transitions from a bound vibrational state into a dissociative state have been calculated using an extension of the theory originally proposed by Schwarz (SSH) et al. (1952). High-lying vibrational states and dissociative states were explicitly included but rotational energy transfer was neglected. The transition probabilities calculated from the SSH theory were fed into the master equation, which was integrated numerically to determine the population distribution of the vibrational states as well as bulk thermodynamic properties. The results show that: (1) the transition rates have a minimum near the middle of the bound vibrational levels, causing a bottleneck in the vibrational relaxation and dissociation rates; (2) high vibrational states are always in equilibrium with the dissociative state; (3) for the heating case, only the low vibrational states relax according to the Landau-Teller theory; (4) for the cooling case, vibrational relaxation cannot be described by a rate equation; (5) Park's (1985, 1988) two-temperature model is approximately valid; and (6) the average vibrational energy removed in dissociation is about 30 percent of the dissociation energy.

  7. Tissue vibration in prolonged running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesenbichler, Bernd; Stirling, Lisa M; Federolf, Peter; Nigg, Benno M

    2011-01-04

    The impact force in heel-toe running initiates vibrations of soft-tissue compartments of the leg that are heavily dampened by muscle activity. This study investigated if the damping and frequency of these soft-tissue vibrations are affected by fatigue, which was categorized by the time into an exhaustive exercise. The hypotheses were tested that (H1) the vibration intensity of the triceps surae increases with increasing fatigue and (H2) the vibration frequency of the triceps surae decreases with increasing fatigue. Tissue vibrations of the triceps surae were measured with tri-axial accelerometers in 10 subjects during a run towards exhaustion. The frequency content was quantified with power spectra and wavelet analysis. Maxima of local vibration intensities were compared between the non-fatigued and fatigued states of all subjects. In axial (i.e. parallel to the tibia) and medio-lateral direction, most local maxima increased with fatigue (supporting the first hypothesis). In anterior-posterior direction no systematic changes were found. Vibration frequency was minimally affected by fatigue and frequency changes did not occur systematically, which requires the rejection of the second hypothesis. Relative to heel-strike, the maximum vibration intensity occurred significantly later in the fatigued condition in all three directions. With fatigue, the soft tissue of the triceps surae oscillated for an extended duration at increased vibration magnitudes, possibly due to the effects of fatigue on type II muscle fibers. Thus, the protective mechanism of muscle tuning seems to be reduced in a fatigued muscle and the risk of potential harm to the tissue may increase. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Spin Dynamics and Low Energy Vibrations: Insights from Vanadyl-Based Potential Molecular Qubits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atzori, Matteo; Tesi, Lorenzo; Benci, Stefano; Lunghi, Alessandro; Righini, Roberto; Taschin, Andrea; Torre, Renato; Sorace, Lorenzo; Sessoli, Roberta

    2017-03-29

    Here we report the investigation of the magnetization dynamics of a vanadyl complex with diethyldithiocarbamate (Et2dtc(-)) ligands, namely [VO(Et2dtc)2] (1), in both solid-state and frozen solution. This showed an anomalous and unprecedentedly observed field dependence of the relaxation time, which was modeled with three contributions to the relaxation mechanism. The temperature dependence of the weight of the two processes dominating at low fields was found to well correlate with the low energy vibrations as determined by THz spectroscopy. This detailed experimental comparative study represents a fundamental step to understand the spin dynamics of potential molecular quantum bits, and enriches the guidelines to design molecule-based systems with enhanced quantum coherence.

  9. Collision dynamics of methyl radicals and highly vibrationally excited molecules using crossed molecular beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, P.M.Y.

    1991-10-01

    The vibrational to translational (V{yields}T) energy transfer in collisions between large highly vibrationally excited polyatomics and rare gases was investigated by time-of-flight techniques. Two different methods, UV excitation followed by intemal conversion and infrared multiphoton excitation (IRMPE), were used to form vibrationally excited molecular beams of hexafluorobenzene and sulfur hexafluoride, respectively. The product translational energy was found to be independent of the vibrational excitation. These results indicate that the probability distribution function for V{yields}T energy transfer is peaked at zero. The collisional relaxation of large polyatomic molecules with rare gases most likely occurs through a rotationally mediated process. Photodissociation of nitrobenzene in a molecular beam was studied at 266 nm. Two primary dissociation channels were identified including simple bond rupture to produce nitrogen dioxide and phenyl radical and isomerization to form nitric oxide and phenoxy radical. The time-of-flight spectra indicate that simple bond rupture and isomerization occurs via two different mechanisms. Secondary dissociation of the phenoxy radicals to carbon monoxide and cyclopentadienyl radicals was observed as well as secondary photodissociation of phenyl radical to give H atom and benzyne. A supersonic methyl radical beam source is developed. The beam source configuration and conditions were optimized for CH{sub 3} production from the thermal decomposition of azomethane. Elastic scattering of methyl radical and neon was used to differentiate between the methyl radicals and the residual azomethane in the molecular beam.

  10. Collision dynamics of methyl radicals and highly vibrationally excited molecules using crossed molecular beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, Pamela Mei-Ying [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1991-10-01

    The vibrational to translational (V→T) energy transfer in collisions between large highly vibrationally excited polyatomics and rare gases was investigated by time-of-flight techniques. Two different methods, UV excitation followed by intemal conversion and infrared multiphoton excitation (IRMPE), were used to form vibrationally excited molecular beams of hexafluorobenzene and sulfur hexafluoride, respectively. The product translational energy was found to be independent of the vibrational excitation. These results indicate that the probability distribution function for V→T energy transfer is peaked at zero. The collisional relaxation of large polyatomic molecules with rare gases most likely occurs through a rotationally mediated process. Photodissociation of nitrobenzene in a molecular beam was studied at 266 nm. Two primary dissociation channels were identified including simple bond rupture to produce nitrogen dioxide and phenyl radical and isomerization to form nitric oxide and phenoxy radical. The time-of-flight spectra indicate that simple bond rupture and isomerization occurs via two different mechanisms. Secondary dissociation of the phenoxy radicals to carbon monoxide and cyclopentadienyl radicals was observed as well as secondary photodissociation of phenyl radical to give H atom and benzyne. A supersonic methyl radical beam source is developed. The beam source configuration and conditions were optimized for CH3 production from the thermal decomposition of azomethane. Elastic scattering of methyl radical and neon was used to differentiate between the methyl radicals and the residual azomethane in the molecular beam.

  11. Ultrafast vibrational population transfer dynamics in 2-acetylcyclopentanone studied by 2D IR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sungnam; Ji, Minbiao

    2011-03-14

    2-Acetylcyclopentanone (2-ACP), which is a β-dicarbonyl compound, undergoes keto-enol isomerization, and its enol tautomers are stabilized by a cyclic intramolecular hydrogen bond. 2-ACP (keto form) has symmetric and asymmetric vibrational modes of the two carbonyl groups at 1748 and 1715 cm(-1) , respectively, which are well separated from the carbonyl modes of its enol tautomers in the FTIR spectrum. We have investigated 2-ACP dissolved in carbon tetrachloride by 2D IR spectroscopy and IR pump-probe spectroscopy. Vibrational population transfer dynamics between the two carbonyl modes were observed by 2D IR spectroscopy. To extract the population exchange dynamics (i.e., the down- and uphill population transfer rate constants), we used the normalized volumes of the cross-peaks with respect to the diagonal peaks at the same emission frequency and the survival and conditional probability functions. As expected, the downhill population transfer time constant (3.2 ps) was measured to be smaller than the uphill population transfer time constant (3.8 ps). In addition, the vibrational population relaxation dynamics of the two carbonyl modes were observed to be the same within the experimental error and were found to be much slower than vibrational population transfer between two carbonyl modes. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Theory of vibration protection

    CERN Document Server

    Karnovsky, Igor A

    2016-01-01

    This text is an advancement of the theory of vibration protection of mechanical systems with lumped and distributed parameters. The book offers various concepts and methods of solving vibration protection problems, discusses the advantages and disadvantages of different methods, and the fields of their effective applications. Fundamental approaches of vibration protection, which are considered in this book, are the passive, parametric and optimal active vibration protection. The passive vibration protection is based on vibration isolation, vibration damping and dynamic absorbers. Parametric vibration protection theory is based on the Shchipanov-Luzin invariance principle. Optimal active vibration protection theory is based on the Pontryagin principle and the Krein moment method. The book also contains special topics such as suppression of vibrations at the source of their occurrence and the harmful influence of vibrations on humans. Numerous examples, which illustrate the theoretical ideas of each chapter, ar...

  13. Structural Relaxations in the Rotator Phase of N-Eicosane

    OpenAIRE

    Di Giambattista, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    We present relaxations of the heat capacity of the n-alkane n-eicosane (C20H42) in the metastable rotator phase. These relaxations are not connected to melting but rather to structural changes. A comparative study of the relaxation times with calorimetry in the time and frequency domain shows a slowing down of the dynamics on approaching the melting temperature of the rotator phase. Relaxation behaviour is also observed in the lattice structure by investigations with X-ray diffraction. It is ...

  14. Fast relaxations in foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishan, Kapilanjan; Helal, Ahmed; Höhler, Reinhard; Cohen-Addad, Sylvie

    2010-07-01

    Aqueous foams present an anomalous macroscopic viscoelastic response at high frequency, previously shown to arise from collective relaxations in the disordered bubble packing. We demonstrate experimentally how these mesoscopic dynamics are in turn tuned by physico-chemical processes on the scale of the gas-liquid interfaces. Two specific local dissipation processes are identified, and we show how the rigidity of the interfaces selects the dominant one, depending on the choice of the surfactant.

  15. Relaxation from particle production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hook, Anson; Marques-Tavares, Gustavo

    2016-12-01

    We consider using particle production as a friction force by which to implement a "Relaxion" solution to the electroweak hierarchy problem. Using this approach, we are able to avoid superplanckian field excursions and avoid any conflict with the strong CP problem. The relaxation mechanism can work before, during or after inflation allowing for inflationary dynamics to play an important role or to be completely decoupled.

  16. Final Report: Vibrational Dynamics in Photoinduced Electron Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenneth G. Spears

    2006-04-19

    predict. This provides a new method to predict electron transfer rates for particular conditions, and it will be important in designing new types of solar cells. A related set of studies were also done to understand how much the environment around the active charge transfer molecules can control the speed of charge transfer. We studied different complexes with femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy to show that solvent or components of a matrix environment can directly control ultrafast electron transfer when the environmental relaxation time response is on a similar time-scale as the natural electron transfer. Understanding such processes in both liquids and in a matrix is essential for designing new types of solar cells.

  17. A Comparison of State Space LQG, Wiener IMC and Polynomial LQG Discrete Time Feedback Control for Active Vibration Control Purposes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørkholt, Jakob; Elliott, S.J.; Sors, T.C.

    1997-01-01

    with a piezoceramic patch control actuator and a point velocity sensor and excited by a point force driven by white noise acting as the primary source. The design objective has been to suppress the effect of the primary disturbance on the output by minimising the mean square value of the output. Apart from comparing......A comparison of three ways of designing optimal discrete time feedback controllers has been carried out via computer simulations. The three design methods are similar in that they are all based on the minimisation of a quadratic cost function under certain assumptions about the disturbance noise...... and sensor noise in the system to be controlled. They are also based on (different) models of the plant under control and the disturbance to be suppressed by the controllers. Controllers based on the three methods have been designed from a model of a lightly damped, rectangular plate fitted...

  18. Restricted lithium ion dynamics in PEO-based block copolymer electrolytes measured by high-field nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Tan Vu; Messinger, Robert J.; Sarou-Kanian, Vincent; Fayon, Franck; Bouchet, Renaud; Deschamps, Michaël

    2017-10-01

    The intrinsic ionic conductivity of polyethylene oxide (PEO)-based block copolymer electrolytes is often assumed to be identical to the conductivity of the PEO homopolymer. Here, we use high-field 7Li nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation and pulsed-field-gradient (PFG) NMR diffusion measurements to probe lithium ion dynamics over nanosecond and millisecond time scales in PEO and polystyrene (PS)-b-PEO-b-PS electrolytes containing the lithium salt LiTFSI. Variable-temperature longitudinal (T1) and transverse (T2) 7Li NMR relaxation rates were acquired at three magnetic field strengths and quantitatively analyzed for the first time at such fields, enabling us to distinguish two characteristic time scales that describe fluctuations of the 7Li nuclear electric quadrupolar interaction. Fast lithium motions [up to O (ns)] are essentially identical between the two polymer electrolytes, including sub-nanosecond vibrations and local fluctuations of the coordination polyhedra between lithium and nearby oxygen atoms. However, lithium dynamics over longer time scales [O (10 ns) and greater] are slower in the block copolymer compared to the homopolymer, as manifested experimentally by their different transverse 7Li NMR relaxation rates. Restricted dynamics and altered thermodynamic behavior of PEO chains anchored near PS domains likely explain these results.

  19. Stress analysis of vibrating pipelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachwieja, Janusz

    2017-03-01

    The pipelines are subject to various constraints variable in time. Those vibrations, if not monitored for amplitude and frequency, may result in both the fatigue damage in the pipeline profile at high stress concentration and the damage to the pipeline supports. If the constraint forces are known, the system response may be determined with high accuracy using analytical or numerical methods. In most cases, it may be difficult to determine the constraint parameters, since the industrial pipeline vibrations occur due to the dynamic effects of the medium in the pipeline. In that case, a vibration analysis is a suitable alternative method to determine the stress strain state in the pipeline profile. Monitoring the pipeline vibration levels involves a comparison between the measured vibration parameters and the permissible values as depicted in the graphs for a specific pipeline type. Unfortunately, in most cases, the studies relate to the petrochemical industry and thus large diameter, long and straight pipelines. For a pipeline section supported on both ends, the response in any profile at the entire section length can be determined by measuring the vibration parameters at two different profiles between the pipeline supports. For a straight pipeline section, the bending moments, variable in time, at the ends of the analysed section are a source of the pipe excitation. If a straight pipe section supported on both ends is excited by the bending moments in the support profile, the starting point for the stress analysis are the strains, determined from the Euler-Bernoulli equation. In practice, it is easier to determine the displacement using the experimental methods, since the factors causing vibrations are unknown. The industrial system pipelines, unlike the transfer pipelines, are straight sections at some points only, which makes it more difficult to formulate the equation of motion. In those cases, numerical methods can be used to determine stresses using the

  20. Decreased number of acetylcholine receptors is the mechanism that alters the time course of muscle relaxants in myasthenia gravis : a study in a rat model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Haes, A; Proost, JH; De Baets, MH; Stassen, MHW; Houwertjes, MC; Wierda, JMKH

    Background: In myasthenic patients, the time course of action of non-depolarizing neuromuscular blocking agents is prolonged and the sensitivity is increased. We used our antegrade perfused rat peroneal nerve anterior tibialis muscle model to investigate if this altered time course of effect and

  1. Communication: creation of molecular vibrational motions via the rotation-vibration coupling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shu, Chuan-Cun; Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    2015-01-01

    whereas a fast rotational excitation leads to a non-stationary vibrational motion. As a result, under field-free postpulse conditions, either a stretched stationary bond or a vibrating bond can be created due to the coupling between the rotational and vibrational degrees of freedom. The latter corresponds......Building on recent advances in the rotational excitation of molecules, we show how the effect of rotation-vibration coupling can be switched on in a controlled manner and how this coupling unfolds in real time after a pure rotational excitation. We present the first examination of the vibrational...... motions which can be induced via the rotation-vibration coupling after a pulsed rotational excitation. A time-dependent quantum wave packet calculation for the HF molecule shows how a slow (compared to the vibrational period) rotational excitation leads to a smooth increase in the average bond length...

  2. Strain modulations as a mechanism to reduce stress relaxation in laryngeal tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric J Hunter

    Full Text Available Vocal fold tissues in animal and human species undergo deformation processes at several types of loading rates: a slow strain involved in vocal fold posturing (on the order of 1 Hz or so, cyclic and faster posturing often found in speech tasks or vocal embellishment (1-10 Hz, and shear strain associated with vocal fold vibration during phonation (100 Hz and higher. Relevant to these deformation patterns are the viscous properties of laryngeal tissues, which exhibit non-linear stress relaxation and recovery. In the current study, a large strain time-dependent constitutive model of human vocal fold tissue is used to investigate effects of phonatory posturing cyclic strain in the range of 1 Hz to 10 Hz. Tissue data for two subjects are considered and used to contrast the potential effects of age. Results suggest that modulation frequency and extent (amplitude, as well as the amount of vocal fold overall strain, all affect the change in stress relaxation with modulation added. Generally, the vocal fold cover reduces the rate of relaxation while the opposite is true for the vocal ligament. Further, higher modulation frequencies appear to reduce the rate of relaxation, primarily affecting the ligament. The potential benefits of cyclic strain, often found in vibrato (around 5 Hz modulation and intonational inflection, are discussed in terms of vocal effort and vocal pitch maintenance. Additionally, elderly tissue appears to not exhibit these benefits to modulation. The exacerbating effect such modulations may have on certain voice disorders, such as muscle tension dysphonia, are explored.

  3. Using Phylogenomic Data to Explore the Effects of Relaxed Clocks and Calibration Strategies on Divergence Time Estimation: Primates as a Test Case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Reis, Mario; Gunnell, Gregg F; Barba-Montoya, José; Wilkins, Alex; Yang, Ziheng; Yoder, Anne D

    2018-01-12

    Primates have long been a test case for the development of phylogenetic methods for divergence time estimation. Despite a large number of studies, however, the timing of origination of crown Primates relative to the K-Pg boundary and the timing of diversification of the main crown groups remain controversial. Here we analysed a dataset of 372 taxa (367 Primates and 5 outgroups, 3.4 million aligned base pairs) that includes nine primate genomes. We systematically explore the effect of different interpretations of fossil calibrations and molecular clock models on primate divergence time estimates. We find that even small differences in the construction of fossil calibrations can have a noticeable impact on estimated divergence times, especially for the oldest nodes in the tree. Notably, choice of molecular rate model (auto-correlated or independently distributed rates) has an especially strong effect on estimated times, with the independent rates model producing considerably more ancient age estimates for the deeper nodes in the phylogeny. We implement thermodynamic integration, combined with Gaussian quadrature, in the program MCMCTree, and use it to calculate Bayes factors for clock models. Bayesian model selection indicates that the auto-correlated rates model fits the primate data substantially better, and we conclude that time estimates under this model should be preferred. We show that for eight core nodes in the phylogeny, uncertainty in time estimates is close to the theoretical limit imposed by fossil uncertainties. Thus, these estimates are unlikely to be improved by collecting additional molecular sequence data. All analyses place the origin of Primates close to the K-Pg boundary, either in the Cretaceous or straddling the boundary into the Palaeogene. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press, on behalf of the Society of Systematic Biologists.

  4. Relaxing to Three Dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Karch, A; Karch, Andreas; Randall, Lisa

    2005-01-01

    We propose a new selection principle for distinguishing among possible vacua that we call the "relaxation principle". The idea is that the universe will naturally select among possible vacua through its cosmological evolution, and the configuration with the biggest filling fraction is the likeliest. We apply this idea to the question of the number of dimensions of space. We show that under conventional (but higher-dimensional) FRW evolution, a universe filled with equal numbers of branes and antibranes will naturally come to be dominated by 3-branes and 7-branes. We show why this might help explain the number of dimensions that are experienced in our visible universe.

  5. Secondary magnetic relaxations in Mn{sub 12} complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evangelisti, Marco; Bartolome, Juan E-mail: barto@posta.unizar.es

    2000-11-01

    We present new experiments on the zero-field magnetic relaxation in Mn{sub 12} acetate and Mn{sub 12} 2-Cl benzoate. By dynamical magnetic measurements, this study shows that a small portion of few percent of the clusters does not undergo the main relaxation process and that they relax faster in the temperature region of 2 K. The effective relaxation times of these secondary processes follow an Arrhenius law with energy barrier of approximately 23 and 30 K for the acetate and the 2-Cl benzoate, respectively.

  6. Signal prediction by anticipatory relaxation dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Henning U.

    2016-03-01

    Real-time prediction of signals is a task often encountered in control problems as well as by living systems. Here, a parsimonious prediction approach based on the coupling of a linear relaxation-delay system to a smooth, stationary signal is described. The resulting anticipatory relaxation dynamics (ARD) is a frequency-dependent predictor of future signal values. ARD not only approximately predicts signals on average but can anticipate the occurrence of signal peaks, too. This can be explained by recognizing ARD as an input-output system with negative group delay. It is characterized, including its prediction horizon, by its analytically given frequency response function.

  7. Charge relaxation dynamics of an electrolytic nanocapacitor

    CERN Document Server

    Thakore, Vaibhav

    2013-01-01

    Understanding ion relaxation dynamics in overlapping electric double layers (EDLs) is critical for the development of efficient nanotechnology based electrochemical energy storage, electrochemomechanical energy conversion and bioelectrochemical sensing devices besides controlled synthesis of nanostructured materials. Here, using Lattice Boltzmann (LB) method, we present results from the simulations of an electrolytic nanocapacitor subjected to a step potential at t = 0 for various degrees of EDL overlap, solvent viscosities, ratios of cation to anion diffusivity and electrode separations. A continuously varying molecular speed dependent relaxation time, proposed for use with the LB equation, recovers the correct microscopic description of molecular collision phenomena and holds promise for enhancing the stability of the LB algorithm. Results for large EDL overlap showed oscillatory behavior for ionic current densities in contrast to monotonic relaxation to equilibrium for low EDL overlap. Further, at low solv...

  8. Relaxation and Diffusion in Complex Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Ngai, K L

    2011-01-01

    Relaxation and Diffusion in Complex Systems comprehensively presents a variety of experimental evidences of universal relaxation and diffusion properties in complex materials and systems. The materials discussed include liquids, glasses, colloids, polymers, rubbers, plastic crystals and aqueous mixtures, as well as carbohydrates, biomolecules, bioprotectants and pharmaceuticals. Due to the abundance of experimental data, emphasis is placed on glass-formers and the glass transition problem, a still unsolved problem in condensed matter physics and chemistry. The evidence for universal properties of relaxation and diffusion dynamics suggests that a fundamental physical law is at work. The origin of the universal properties is traced to the many-body effects of the interaction, rigorous theory of which does not exist at the present time. However, using solutions of simplified models as guides, key quantities have been identified and predictions of the universal properties generated. These predictions from Ngai’...

  9. Folding of a Zinc-Finger ββα-Motif Investigated Using Two-Dimensional and Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meuzelaar, Heleen; Panman, Matthijs R; van Dijk, Chris N; Woutersen, Sander

    2016-11-03

    Small proteins provide good model systems for studying the fundamental forces that control protein folding. Here, we investigate the folding dynamics of the 28-residue zinc-finger mutant FSD-1, which is designed to form a metal-independent folded ββα-motif, and which provides a testing ground for proteins containing a mixed α/β fold. Although the folding of FSD-1 has been actively studied, the folding mechanism remains largely unclear. In particular, it is unclear in what stage of folding the α-helix is formed. To address this issue we investigate the folding mechanism of FSD-1 using a combination of temperature-dependent UV circular dichroism (UV-CD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy, and temperature-jump (T-jump) transient-IR spectroscopy. Our UV-CD and FTIR data show different thermal melting transitions, indicating multistate folding behavior. Temperature-dependent 2D-IR spectra indicate that the α-helix is the most stable structural element of FSD-1. To investigate the folding/unfolding re-equilibration dynamics of FSD-1, the conformational changes induced by a nanosecond T-jump are probed with transient-IR and transient dispersed-pump-probe (DPP) IR spectroscopy. We observe biexponential T-jump relaxation kinetics (with time constants of 80 ± 13 ns and 1300 ± 100 ns at 322 K), confirming that the folding involves an intermediate state. The IR and dispersed-pump-probe IR spectra associated with the two kinetic components suggest that the folding of FSD-1 involves early formation of the α-helix, followed by the formation of the β-hairpin and hydrophobic contacts.

  10. Dielectric relaxation phenomena of rigid polar liquid molecules ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The dielectric relaxation phenomena of rigid polar liquid molecules chloral and ethyltrichloroacetate () in benzene, -hexane and -heptane () under 4.2,