WorldWideScience

Sample records for vibrating quartz fork

  1. Simultaneous dual-gas QEPAS detection based on a fundamental and overtone combined vibration of quartz tuning fork

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hongpeng; Yin, Xukun; Dong, Lei; Pei, Kailong; Sampaolo, Angelo; Patimisco, Pietro; Zheng, Huadan; Ma, Weiguang; Zhang, Lei; Yin, Wangbao; Xiao, Liantuan; Spagnolo, Vincenzo; Jia, Suotang; Tittel, Frank K.

    2017-03-01

    A dual-gas quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) sensor system based on a frequency division multiplexing technique of a quartz tuning fork (QTF) was developed and experimentally demonstrated. Two beams from two independently modulated lasers are focused at two different positions between the QTF prongs to excite both the QTF fundamental and 1st overtone flexural modes simultaneously. The 2f-wavelength modulation technique is employed by applying two sinusoidal dithers, whose frequencies are equal to a half of the QTF fundamental and 1st overtone frequencies, respectively, to the currents of two excitation lasers. The resonance frequency difference between two flexural modes ensures that the correlated photoacoustic signals generated by different target gases do not interfere with each other. The proposed QEPAS methodology realizes a continuous real-time dual-gas monitoring with a simple setup and small sensor size compared with previous multi-gas QEPAS sensors.

  2. Sensing Performance Analysis on Quartz Tuning Fork-Probe at the High Order Vibration Mode for Multi-Frequency Scanning Probe Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofei Zhang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Multi-frequency scanning near-field optical microscopy, based on a quartz tuning fork-probe (QTF-p sensor using the first two orders of in-plane bending symmetrical vibration modes, has recently been developed. This method can simultaneously achieve positional feedback (based on the 1st in-plane mode called the low mode and detect near-field optically induced forces (based on the 2nd in-plane mode called the high mode. Particularly, the high mode sensing performance of the QTF-p is an important issue for characterizing the tip-sample interactions and achieving higher resolution microscopic imaging but the related researches are insufficient. Here, we investigate the vibration performance of QTF-p at high mode based on the experiment and finite element method. The frequency spectrum characteristics are obtained by our homemade laser Doppler vibrometer system. The effects of the properties of the connecting glue layer and the probe features on the dynamic response of the QTF-p sensor at the high mode are investigated for optimization design. Finally, compared with the low mode, an obvious improvement of quality factor, of almost 50%, is obtained at the high mode. Meanwhile, the QTF-p sensor has a high force sensing sensitivity and a large sensing range at the high mode, indicating a broad application prospect for force sensing.

  3. Sensing Performance Analysis on Quartz Tuning Fork-Probe at the High Order Vibration Mode for Multi-Frequency Scanning Probe Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaofei; Gao, Fengli; Li, Xide

    2018-01-24

    Multi-frequency scanning near-field optical microscopy, based on a quartz tuning fork-probe (QTF-p) sensor using the first two orders of in-plane bending symmetrical vibration modes, has recently been developed. This method can simultaneously achieve positional feedback (based on the 1st in-plane mode called the low mode) and detect near-field optically induced forces (based on the 2nd in-plane mode called the high mode). Particularly, the high mode sensing performance of the QTF-p is an important issue for characterizing the tip-sample interactions and achieving higher resolution microscopic imaging but the related researches are insufficient. Here, we investigate the vibration performance of QTF-p at high mode based on the experiment and finite element method. The frequency spectrum characteristics are obtained by our homemade laser Doppler vibrometer system. The effects of the properties of the connecting glue layer and the probe features on the dynamic response of the QTF-p sensor at the high mode are investigated for optimization design. Finally, compared with the low mode, an obvious improvement of quality factor, of almost 50%, is obtained at the high mode. Meanwhile, the QTF-p sensor has a high force sensing sensitivity and a large sensing range at the high mode, indicating a broad application prospect for force sensing.

  4. Quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy exploiting tuning fork overtone modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampaolo, A.; Patimisco, P.; Dong, L.; Geras, A.; Scamarcio, G.; Starecki, T.; Tittel, F. K.; Spagnolo, V.

    2015-12-01

    We report on a quartz-enhanced photoacoustic sensor (QEPAS) based on a custom-made quartz tuning fork (QTF) to operate in both the fundamental and the first overtone vibrational mode resonances. The QTF fundamental mode resonance falls at ˜3 kHz and the first overtone at ˜18 kHz. Electrical tests showed that the first overtone provides a higher quality factor and increased piezoelectric current peak values, with respect to the fundamental flexural mode. To evaluate the QTF acousto-electric energy conversion efficiency, we operated the QEPAS in the near-IR and selected water vapor as the target gas. The first overtone resonance provides a QEPAS signal-to-noise ratio ˜5 times greater with respect to that measured for the fundamental mode. These results open the way to employing QTF overtone vibrational modes for QEPAS based trace gas sensing.

  5. Quartz tuning forks with novel geometries for optoacoustic gas sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spagnolo, V.; Sampaolo, A.; Patimisco, P.; Dong, L.; Gupta, Y.; Yu, Y.; Geras, A.; Giglio, M.; Calabrese, P. P.; Starecki, T.; Scamarcio, G.; Tittel, Frank K.

    2016-02-01

    We report the successful realization of quartz-enhanced photo-acoustic (QEPAS) sensors employing quartz tuning forks (QTFs) with novel geometrical parameters. We investigated the influence of QTF sizes on the main resonator parameters, in order to identify the best design parameters optimizing the QTF figures of merit for optoacoustic gas sensing. To evaluate the QTF acousto-electric energy conversion efficiency, we operated the QEPAS sensors in the near- IR and selected water vapor as the target gas. QTFs are forced to resonate at both the fundamental and the first overtone vibrational mode frequencies. Our results shows that two QTF designs exhibit an higher quality factor (and consequently an higher QEPAS signal) when operating on the first overtone mode with respect to the fundamental one.

  6. Study on vacuum packaging reliability of micromachined quartz tuning fork gyroscopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Maoyan; Zhang, Lifang

    2017-09-01

    Packaging technology of the micromachined quartz tuning fork gyroscopes by vacuum welding has been experimentally studied. The performance of quartz tuning fork is influenced by the encapsulation shell, encapsulation method and fixation of forks. Alloy solder thick film is widely used in the package to avoid the damage of the chip structure by the heat resistance and hot temperature, and this can improve the device performance and welding reliability. The results show that the bases and the lids plated with gold and nickel can significantly improve the airtightness and reliability of the vacuum package. Vacuum packaging is an effective method to reduce the vibration damping, improve the quality factor and further enhance the performance. The threshold can be improved nearly by 10 times.

  7. Improved Tuning Fork for Terahertz Quartz-Enhanced Photoacoustic Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Sampaolo, Angelo; Patimisco, Pietro; Giglio, Marilena; Vitiello, Miriam S.; Beere, Harvey E.; Ritchie, David A.; Scamarcio, Gaetano; Tittel, Frank K.; Spagnolo, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    We report on a quartz-enhanced photoacoustic (QEPAS) sensor for methanol (CH3OH) detection employing a novel quartz tuning fork (QTF), specifically designed to enhance the QEPAS sensing performance in the terahertz (THz) spectral range. A discussion of the QTF properties in terms of resonance frequency, quality factor and acousto-electric transduction efficiency as a function of prong sizes and spacing between the QTF prongs is presented. The QTF was employed in a QEPAS sensor system using a ...

  8. A Multi-Fork Z-Axis Quartz Micromachined Gyroscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aiying Yang

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A novel multi-fork z-axis gyroscope is presented in this paper. Different from traditional quartz gyroscopes, the lateral electrodes of the sense beam can be arranged in simple patterns; as a result, the fabrication is simplified. High sensitivity is achieved by the multi-fork design. The working principles are introduced, while the finite element method (FEM is used to simulate the modal and sensitivity. A quartz fork is fabricated, and a prototype is assembled. Impedance testing shows that the drive frequency and sense frequency are similar to the simulations, and the quality factor is approximately 10,000 in air. The scale factor is measured to be 18.134 mV/(°/s and the nonlinearity is 0.40% in a full-scale input range of ±250 °/s.

  9. A Multi-Fork Z-Axis Quartz Micromachined Gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Lihui; Zhao, Ke; Sun, Yunan; Cui, Jianmin; Cui, Fang; Yang, Aiying

    2013-01-01

    A novel multi-fork z-axis gyroscope is presented in this paper. Different from traditional quartz gyroscopes, the lateral electrodes of the sense beam can be arranged in simple patterns; as a result, the fabrication is simplified. High sensitivity is achieved by the multi-fork design. The working principles are introduced, while the finite element method (FEM) is used to simulate the modal and sensitivity. A quartz fork is fabricated, and a prototype is assembled. Impedance testing shows that the drive frequency and sense frequency are similar to the simulations, and the quality factor is approximately 10,000 in air. The scale factor is measured to be 18.134 mV/(°/s) and the nonlinearity is 0.40% in a full-scale input range of ±250 °/s. PMID:24048339

  10. Thermoelastic investigation of a quartz tuning fork used in infrared spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spajer, M., E-mail: michel.spajer@univ-fcomte.fr; Cavallier, B.; Euphrasie, S.; Matten, G.; Vacheret, X.; Vairac, P.; Vernier, D. [Institut FEMTO-ST, Université de Franche-Comté, CNRS, ENSMM, UTBM, 32 avenue de l' Observatoire, F-25044 Besançon cedex (France); Jalocha, A. [CILAS, Département de Photonique, 8 avenue Buffon, BP 6319, F-45000 Orléans (France)

    2013-11-11

    The performances of quartz tuning forks (QTF) used in infrared spectroscopy for pollutant detection are investigated. The transduction between light and QTF vibration is elucidated, thanks to QTF encapsulation under vacuum. From the sensitivity enhancement which is obtained, we conclude that their interaction is photo-thermoelastic rather than photo-thermoacoustic. A mapping of the local sensitivity of the QTF is obtained by scanning its faces with the excitation probe beam. The comparison between the signal mapping and the theoretical strain mapping indicates that the most efficient areas of the QTF correspond to the areas where the strain or stress is the highest.

  11. Improved Tuning Fork for Terahertz Quartz-Enhanced Photoacoustic Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampaolo, Angelo; Patimisco, Pietro; Giglio, Marilena; Vitiello, Miriam S; Beere, Harvey E; Ritchie, David A; Scamarcio, Gaetano; Tittel, Frank K; Spagnolo, Vincenzo

    2016-03-25

    We report on a quartz-enhanced photoacoustic (QEPAS) sensor for methanol (CH₃OH) detection employing a novel quartz tuning fork (QTF), specifically designed to enhance the QEPAS sensing performance in the terahertz (THz) spectral range. A discussion of the QTF properties in terms of resonance frequency, quality factor and acousto-electric transduction efficiency as a function of prong sizes and spacing between the QTF prongs is presented. The QTF was employed in a QEPAS sensor system using a 3.93 THz quantum cascade laser as the excitation source in resonance with a CH₃OH rotational absorption line located at 131.054 cm(-1). A minimum detection limit of 160 ppb in 30 s integration time, corresponding to a normalized noise equivalent absorption NNEA = 3.75 × 10(-11) cm(-1)W/Hz(½), was achieved, representing a nearly one-order-of-magnitude improvement with respect to previous reports.

  12. Quartz Enhanced Photoacoustic Spectroscopy Based Trace Gas Sensors Using Different Quartz Tuning Forks

    OpenAIRE

    Yufei Ma; Guang Yu; Jingbo Zhang; Xin Yu; Rui Sun; Tittel, Frank K.

    2015-01-01

    A sensitive trace gas sensor platform based on quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) is reported. A 1.395 ?m continuous wave (CW), distributed feedback pigtailed diode laser was used as the excitation source and H2O was selected as the target analyte. Two kinds of quartz tuning forks (QTFs) with a resonant frequency (f0 ) of 30.72 kHz and 38 kHz were employed for the first time as an acoustic wave transducer, respectively for QEPAS instead of a standard QTF with a f0 of 32.768 kH...

  13. Finite Element Analysis of Electrically Excited Quartz Tuning Fork Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oria, Roger; Otero, Jorge; González, Laura; Botaya, Luis; Carmona, Manuel; Puig-Vidal, Manel

    2013-01-01

    Quartz Tuning Fork (QTF)-based Scanning Probe Microscopy (SPM) is an important field of research. A suitable model for the QTF is important to obtain quantitative measurements with these devices. Analytical models have the limitation of being based on the double cantilever configuration. In this paper, we present an electromechanical finite element model of the QTF electrically excited with two free prongs. The model goes beyond the state-of-the-art of numerical simulations currently found in the literature for this QTF configuration. We present the first numerical analysis of both the electrical and mechanical behavior of QTF devices. Experimental measurements obtained with 10 units of the same model of QTF validate the finite element model with a good agreement. PMID:23722828

  14. Finite Element Analysis of Electrically Excited Quartz Tuning Fork Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manel Puig-Vidal

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Quartz Tuning Fork (QTF-based Scanning Probe Microscopy (SPM is an important field of research. A suitable model for the QTF is important to obtain quantitative measurements with these devices. Analytical models have the limitation of being based on the double cantilever configuration. In this paper, we present an electromechanical finite element model of the QTF electrically excited with two free prongs. The model goes beyond the state-of-the-art of numerical simulations currently found in the literature for this QTF configuration. We present the first numerical analysis of both the electrical and mechanical behavior of QTF devices. Experimental measurements obtained with 10 units of the same model of QTF validate the finite element model with a good agreement.

  15. Applications of quartz tuning forks in spectroscopic gas sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosterev, Anatoliy A.; Tittel, Frank K.; Serebryakov, Dmitry V.; Malinovsky, Alexander L.; Morozov, Igor V.

    2005-04-01

    A recently introduced approach to photoacoustic detection of trace gases utilizing a quartz tuning fork (TF) as a resonant acoustic transducer is described in detail. Advantages of the technique called quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) compared to conventional resonant photoacoustic spectroscopy include QEPAS sensor immunity to environmental acoustic noise, a simple absorption detection module design, and its capability to analyze gas samples ˜1mm3 in volume. Noise sources and the TF properties as a function of the sampled gas pressure, temperature and chemical composition are analyzed. Previously published results for QEPAS based chemical gas sensing are summarized. The achieved sensitivity of 5.4×10-9cm-1W/√Hz is compared to recent published results of photoacoustic gas sensing by other research groups. An experimental study of the long-term stability of a QEPAS-based ammonia sensor is presented. The results of this study indicate that the sensor exhibits very low drift, which allows data averaging over >3h of continuous concentration measurements. Architecture and practical implementation of autonomous QEPAS-sensor controller electronics is described. Future developments of QEPAS technique are outlined.

  16. Quartz Enhanced Photoacoustic Spectroscopy Based Trace Gas Sensors Using Different Quartz Tuning Forks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yufei Ma

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A sensitive trace gas sensor platform based on quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS is reported. A 1.395 μm continuous wave (CW, distributed feedback pigtailed diode laser was used as the excitation source and H2O was selected as the target analyte. Two kinds of quartz tuning forks (QTFs with a resonant frequency (f0 of 30.72 kHz and 38 kHz were employed for the first time as an acoustic wave transducer, respectively for QEPAS instead of a standard QTF with a f0 of 32.768 kHz. The QEPAS sensor performance using the three different QTFs was experimentally investigated and theoretically analyzed. A minimum detection limit of 5.9 ppmv and 4.3 ppmv was achieved for f0 of 32.768 kHz and 30.72 kHz, respectively.

  17. Quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy based trace gas sensors using different quartz tuning forks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yufei; Yu, Guang; Zhang, Jingbo; Yu, Xin; Sun, Rui; Tittel, Frank K

    2015-03-27

    A sensitive trace gas sensor platform based on quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) is reported. A 1.395 μm continuous wave (CW), distributed feedback pigtailed diode laser was used as the excitation source and H2O was selected as the target analyte. Two kinds of quartz tuning forks (QTFs) with a resonant frequency (f0) of 30.72 kHz and 38 kHz were employed for the first time as an acoustic wave transducer, respectively for QEPAS instead of a standard QTF with a f0 of 32.768 kHz. The QEPAS sensor performance using the three different QTFs was experimentally investigated and theoretically analyzed. A minimum detection limit of 5.9 ppmv and 4.3 ppmv was achieved for f0 of 32.768 kHz and 30.72 kHz, respectively.

  18. A High Sensitivity Preamplifier for Quartz Tuning Forks in QEPAS (Quartz Enhanced PhotoAcoustic Spectroscopy) Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Tomasz Starecki; Piotr Z. Wieczorek

    2017-01-01

    All the preamplifiers dedicated for Quartz Enhanced PhotoAcoustic Spectroscopy (QEPAS) applications that have so far been reported in the literature have been based on operational amplifiers working in transimpedance configurations. Taking into consideration that QEPAS sensors are based on quartz tuning forks, and that quartz has a relatively high voltage constant and relatively low charge constant, it seems that a transimpedance amplifier is not an optimal solution. This paper describes the ...

  19. Vibration Resistant Quartz Crystal Resonators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    occurred and the ribbon eventually pulled edge metallization and quartz from the crystal mounting flat. LI P-I We attempted to anneal the ribbon ourselves...improvement in radiation resistance of the ’SC’ over the ’AT’. ,_/ __ In order to produce a successful SC crystal/ unit, i.e., one that exploits this...7--. .7 -- 1 x~ -7 7: Vida F4Y)A 3 -76 NN - -L3 43-i~ 3 ~ : . -- _____ ____ r ~ - - ____ _ _ _ _ 7-:7 7~ -4~l F-0 d-N I - - . - 7 71 --14A -77- :1

  20. Stimulated Raman rotational photoacoustic spectroscopy using a quartz tuning fork and femtosecond excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schippers, W.; Gershnabel, E.; Burgmeier, J.; Katz, O.; Willer, U.; Averbukh, I. S.; Silberberg, Y.; Schade, W.

    2011-11-01

    Molecular alignment of linear molecules (O2, N2, CO2 and CO) is measured photoacoustically in the gas phase. The rotational excitation is accomplished using a simple femtosecond stimulated Raman excitation scheme, employing two femtosecond pulses with variable delay between the pulses. Molecular alignment is determined directly by measuring the energy dumped into the gas by quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS), utilizing a quartz tuning fork as a sensitive photoacoustic transducer. The experimental results demonstrate for the first time the use of a tuning fork for resonant photoacoustic detection of Raman spectra excited by femtosecond double pulses and match both simulation and literature values.

  1. Noncontact atomic force microscopy in liquid environment with quartz tuning fork and carbon nanotube probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kageshima, M.; Jensenius, Henriette; Dienwiebel, M.

    2002-01-01

    A force sensor for noncontact atomic force microscopy in liquid environment was developed by combining a multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) probe with a quartz tuning fork. Solvation shells of octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane surface were detected both in the frequency shift and dissipation. Due...

  2. Introduction of quartz vibrating beam accelerometer technology providing capability for low cost, fully digital navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdren, F. V.; Norling, B. L.

    The proprietary 'Accelerex' vibrating-beam accelerometer is based on a specialized dual-tine quartz crystal resonator whose vibrating beam crystal employs two slender beams in a double-ended tuning fork-resembling geometry. This configuration furnishes perfect resonator dynamic balance, thereby obviating coupling and energy loss to the connecting structure. The slender beams of the crystal change frequency as a function of force in a way resembling the strings of a musical instrument. The Tactical Grade Accelerex system is optimized for low-cost tactical navigation and flight-control applications.

  3. A High Sensitivity Preamplifier for Quartz Tuning Forks in QEPAS (Quartz Enhanced PhotoAcoustic Spectroscopy Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Starecki

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available All the preamplifiers dedicated for Quartz Enhanced PhotoAcoustic Spectroscopy (QEPAS applications that have so far been reported in the literature have been based on operational amplifiers working in transimpedance configurations. Taking into consideration that QEPAS sensors are based on quartz tuning forks, and that quartz has a relatively high voltage constant and relatively low charge constant, it seems that a transimpedance amplifier is not an optimal solution. This paper describes the design of a quartz QEPAS sensor preamplifier, implemented with voltage amplifier configuration. Discussion of an electrical model of the circuit and preliminary measurements are presented. Both theoretical analysis and experiments show that use of the voltage configuration allows for a substantial increase of the output signal in comparison to the transimpedance circuit with the same tuning fork working in identical conditions. Assuming that the sensitivity of the QEPAS technique depends directly on the properties of the preamplifier, use of the voltage amplifier configuration should result in an increase of QEPAS sensitivity by one to two orders of magnitude.

  4. A High Sensitivity Preamplifier for Quartz Tuning Forks in QEPAS (Quartz Enhanced PhotoAcoustic Spectroscopy) Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starecki, Tomasz; Wieczorek, Piotr Z

    2017-11-03

    All the preamplifiers dedicated for Quartz Enhanced PhotoAcoustic Spectroscopy (QEPAS) applications that have so far been reported in the literature have been based on operational amplifiers working in transimpedance configurations. Taking into consideration that QEPAS sensors are based on quartz tuning forks, and that quartz has a relatively high voltage constant and relatively low charge constant, it seems that a transimpedance amplifier is not an optimal solution. This paper describes the design of a quartz QEPAS sensor preamplifier, implemented with voltage amplifier configuration. Discussion of an electrical model of the circuit and preliminary measurements are presented. Both theoretical analysis and experiments show that use of the voltage configuration allows for a substantial increase of the output signal in comparison to the transimpedance circuit with the same tuning fork working in identical conditions. Assuming that the sensitivity of the QEPAS technique depends directly on the properties of the preamplifier, use of the voltage amplifier configuration should result in an increase of QEPAS sensitivity by one to two orders of magnitude.

  5. Assessment of hand-transmitted vibration exposure from motorized forks used for beach-cleaning operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, Thomas W; Welcome, Daniel E; Warren, Christopher; Xu, Xueyan S; Dong, Ren G

    2013-01-01

    Motorized vibrating manure forks were used in beach-cleaning operations following the massive Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico during the summer of 2010. The objectives of this study were to characterize the vibration emissions of these motorized forks and to provide a first approximation of hand-transmitted vibration exposures to workers using these forks for beach cleaning. Eight operators were recruited to operate the motorized forks during this laboratory study. Four fork configurations were used in the study; two motor speeds and two fork basket options were evaluated. Accelerations were measured near each hand as the operators completed the simulated beach-cleaning task. The dominant vibration frequency for these tools was identified to be around 20 Hz. Because acceleration was found to increase with motor speed, workers should consider operating these tools with just enough speed to get the job done. These forks exhibited considerable acceleration magnitudes when unloaded. The study results suggest that the motor should not be operated with the fork in the unloaded state. Anti-vibration gloves are not effective at attenuating the vibration frequencies produced by these forks, and they may even amplify the transmitted vibration and increase hand/arm fatigue. While regular work gloves are suitable, vibration-reducing gloves may not be appropriate for use with these tools. These considerations may also be generally applicable for the use of motorized forks in other workplace environments.

  6. A Z-Axis Quartz Cross-Fork Micromachined Gyroscope Based on Shear Stress Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Liqiang; Wu, Xuezhong; Li, Shengyi; Wang, Haoxu; Su, Jianbin; Dong, Peitao

    2010-01-01

    Here we propose a novel quartz micromachined gyroscope. The sensor has a simple cross-fork structure in the x-y plane of quartz crystal. Shear stress rather than normal stress is utilized to sense Coriolis’ force generated by the input angular rate signal. Compared to traditional quartz gyroscopes, which have two separate sense electrodes on each sidewall, there is only one electrode on each sidewall of the sense beam. As a result, the fabrication of the electrodes is simplified and the structure can be easily miniaturized. In order to increase sensitivity, a pair of proof masses is attached to the ends of the drive beam, and the sense beam has a tapered design. The structure is etched from a z-cut quartz wafer and the electrodes are realized by direct evaporation using the aperture mask method. The drive mode frequency of the prototype is 13.38 kHz, and the quality factor is approximately 1,000 in air. Therefore, the gyroscope can work properly without a vacuum package. The measurement ability of the shear stress detection design scheme is validated by the Coriolis’ force test. The performance of the sensor is characterized on a precision rate table using a specially designed readout circuit. The experimentally obtained scale factor is 1.45 mV/°/s and the nonlinearity is 3.6% in range of ±200 °/s. PMID:22294887

  7. Piezoelectrically forced vibrations of rectangular SC-cut quartz plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, P. C. Y.; Lin, W. S.

    1998-06-01

    A system of two-dimensional first-order equations for piezoelectric crystal plates with general symmetry and with electroded faces was recently deduced from the three-dimensional equations of linear piezoelectricity. Solutions of these equations for AT-cut plates of quartz were shown to give accurate dispersion curves without corrections, and the resonances predicted agree closely with the experimental data of Koga and Fukuyo [I. Koga and H. Fukuyo, J. Inst. Electr. Commun. Eng. Jpn. 36, 59 (1953)] and that of Nakazawa, Horiuchi, and Ito (M. Nakazawa, K. Horiuchi, and H. Ito, Proceedings of the 1990 IEEE Ultrasonics Symposium, pp. 547-555). In this article, these equations are employed to study the free as well as the forced vibrations of doubly rotated quartz plates. Solutions of straight-crested vibrational modes varying in the x1 and x3 directions of SC-cut quartz plates of infinite extent are obtained and from which dispersion curves are computed. Comparison of those dispersion curves with those from the three-dimensional equations shows that the agreement is very close without any corrections. Resonance frequencies for free vibrations and capacitance ratios for piezoelectrically forced vibrations are computed and examined for various length-to-thickness or width-to-thickness ratios of rectangular SC-cut quartz plates. The capacitance ratio as a function of forcing frequency is computed for a rectangular AT-cut quartz and compared with the experimental data of Seikimoto, Watanabe, and Nakazawa (H. Sekimoto, Y. Watanabe, and M. Nakazawa, Proceedings of the 1992 IEEE Frequency Control Symposium, pp. 532-536) and is in close agreement.

  8. Nanocharacterization of Soft Biological Samples in Shear Mode with Quartz Tuning Fork Probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manel Puig-Vidal

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Quartz tuning forks are extremely good resonators and their use is growing in scanning probe microscopy. Nevertheless, only a few studies on soft biological samples have been reported using these probes. In this work, we present the methodology to develop and use these nanosensors to properly work with biological samples. The working principles, fabrication and experimental setup are presented. The results in the nanocharacterization of different samples in different ambients are presented by using different working modes: amplitude modulation with and without the use of a Phase-Locked Loop (PLL and frequency modulation. Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria are imaged in nitrogen using amplitude modulation. Microcontact printed antibodies are imaged in buffer using amplitude modulation with a PLL. Finally, metastatic cells are imaged in air using frequency modulation.

  9. Implementation and characterization of a quartz tuning fork based probe consisted of discrete resonators for dynamic mode atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Terunobu; de Rooij, Nicolaas F; Staufer, Urs; Detterbeck, Manfred; Braendlin, Dominik; Waldmeier, Simon; Scheidiger, Martin

    2010-06-01

    The quartz tuning fork based probe {e.g., Akiyama et al. [Appl. Surf. Sci. 210, 18 (2003)]}, termed "A-Probe," is a self-sensing and self-actuating (exciting) probe for dynamic mode atomic force microscope (AFM) operation. It is an oscillatory force sensor consisting of the two discrete resonators. This paper presents the investigations on an improved A-Probe: its batch fabrication and assembly, mounting on an AFM head, electrical setup, characterization, and AFM imaging. The fundamental features of the A-Probe are electrically and optically characterized in "approach-withdraw" experiments. Further investigations include the frequency response of an A-Probe to small mechanical vibrations externally applied to the tip and the effective loading force yielding between the tip and the sample during the periodic contact. Imaging of an electronic chip, a compact disk stamper, carbon nanotubes, and Si beads is demonstrated with this probe at ambient conditions in the so-called frequency modulation mode. A special probe substrate, which can snap on a receptacle fixed on an AFM head, and a special holder including a preamplifier electronic are introduced. We hope that the implementation and characterization of the A-Probe described in this paper will provide hints for new scanning probe techniques.

  10. Compact all-fiber quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy sensor with a 30.72 kHz quartz tuning fork and spatially resolved trace gas detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Yufei, E-mail: mayufei@hit.edu.cn [National Key Laboratory of Science and Technology on Tunable Laser, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Post-doctoral Mobile Station of Power Engineering and Engineering Thermophysics, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); He, Ying; Yu, Xin; Zhang, Jingbo [National Key Laboratory of Science and Technology on Tunable Laser, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Sun, Rui [Post-doctoral Mobile Station of Power Engineering and Engineering Thermophysics, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Tittel, Frank K. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Rice University, 6100 Main Street, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States)

    2016-02-29

    An ultra compact all-fiber quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) sensor using quartz tuning fork (QTF) with a low resonance frequency of 30.72 kHz was demonstrated. Such a sensor architecture has the advantages of easier optical alignment, lower insertion loss, lower cost, and more compact compared with a conventional QEPAS sensor using discrete optical components for laser delivery and coupling to the QTF. A fiber beam splitter and three QTFs were employed to perform multi-point detection and demonstrated the potential of spatially resolved measurements.

  11. Compact all-fiber quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy sensor with a 30.72 kHz quartz tuning fork and spatially resolved trace gas detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yufei; He, Ying; Yu, Xin; Zhang, Jingbo; Sun, Rui; Tittel, Frank K.

    2016-02-01

    An ultra compact all-fiber quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) sensor using quartz tuning fork (QTF) with a low resonance frequency of 30.72 kHz was demonstrated. Such a sensor architecture has the advantages of easier optical alignment, lower insertion loss, lower cost, and more compact compared with a conventional QEPAS sensor using discrete optical components for laser delivery and coupling to the QTF. A fiber beam splitter and three QTFs were employed to perform multi-point detection and demonstrated the potential of spatially resolved measurements.

  12. Position-resolved Surface Characterization and Nanofabrication Using an Optical Microscope Combined with a Nanopipette/Quartz Tuning Fork Atomic Force Microscope

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sangmin An Baekman Sung Haneol Noh Corey Stambaugh Soyoung Kwon Kunyoung Lee Bongsu Kim Qhwan Kim Wonho Jhe

    2014-01-01

    ...) combined with a nanopipette-based quartz tuning fork atomic force microscope(nanopipette/QTF-AFM) system. This system is used to accurately determine substrate position and nanoscale phenomena under ambient conditions...

  13. Position-resolved Surface Characterization and Nanofabrication Using an Optical Microscope Combined with a Nanopipette/Quartz Tuning Fork Atomic Force Microscope

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    An, Sangmin; Sung, Baekman; Noh, Haneol; Stambaugh, Corey; Kwon, Soyoung; Lee, Kunyoung; Kim, Bongsu; Kim, Qhwan; Jhe, Wonho

    2014-01-01

    ...) combined with a nanopipette-based quartz tuning fork atomic force microscope (nanopipette/QTF-AFM) system. This system is used to accurately determine substrate position and nanoscale phenomena under ambient conditions...

  14. Adsorption Thermodynamic Analysis of a Quartz Tuning Fork Based Sensor for Volatile Organic Compounds Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yue; Liu, Nai-Yuan; Tsow, Francis; Xian, Xiaojun; Forzani, Erica S

    2017-11-22

    A volatile organic compounds (VOC) sensor based on molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) modified quartz tuning fork (QTF) has been developed. In this paper, the stability of the modified sensor as a function of the MIP composition, and the temperature effect of the analyte adsorption on the sensing transduction mechanism are evaluated. By mixing MIP and PS together, the stability was improved. A target analyte, o-xylene, was chosen as the VOC model to study the sensor response in a temperature range of 6-40 °C. Langmuir model fitted adsorption isotherms were used for thermodynamic analysis. The changes in the sensitivity of the QTF sensor to temperature rendered different behaviors. For a freshly modified QTF sensor, the adsorption response increased with increasing temperature, while for an aged QTF sensor, the adsorption response decreased with increasing temperature. The results indicated that the enthalpy change of the MIP and PS composition sensing material changes from positive to negative over the course of aging. The characterization of the reaction enabled the definition of sensor calibration conditions and stable sensor performance in field testing conditions.

  15. Calibration of quartz tuning fork spring constants for non-contact atomic force microscopy: direct mechanical measurements and simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langewisch, Gernot; Schurig, Philipp; Hölscher, Hendrik; Fuchs, Harald; Schirmeisen, André

    2014-01-01

    Summary Quartz tuning forks are being increasingly employed as sensors in non-contact atomic force microscopy especially in the “qPlus” design. In this study a new and easily applicable setup has been used to determine the static spring constant at several positions along the prong of the tuning fork. The results show a significant deviation from values calculated with the beam formula. In order to understand this discrepancy the complete sensor set-up has been digitally rebuilt and analyzed by using finite element method simulations. These simulations provide a detailed view of the strain/stress distribution inside the tuning fork. The simulations show quantitative agreement with the beam formula if the beam origin is shifted to the position of zero stress onset inside the tuning fork base and torsional effects are also included. We further found significant discrepancies between experimental calibration values and predictions from the shifted beam formula, which are related to a large variance in tip misalignment during the tuning fork assembling process. PMID:24778977

  16. A High Sensitivity Preamplifier for Quartz Tuning Forks in QEPAS (Quartz Enhanced PhotoAcoustic Spectroscopy) Applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tomasz Starecki; Piotr Z Wieczorek

    2017-01-01

    All the preamplifiers dedicated for Quartz Enhanced PhotoAcoustic Spectroscopy (QEPAS) applications that have so far been reported in the literature have been based on operational amplifiers working in transimpedance configurations...

  17. Scanning thermal microscopy based on a quartz tuning fork and a micro-thermocouple in active mode (2ω method)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bontempi, Alexia; Nguyen, Tran Phong; Salut, Roland; Thiery, Laurent; Teyssieux, Damien; Vairac, Pascal [FEMTO-ST Institute UMR 6174, Université de Franche-Comté, CNRS, ENSMM, UTBM, 15B Avenue des Montboucons, F-25030 Besançon (France)

    2016-06-15

    A novel probe for scanning thermal microscope using a micro-thermocouple probe placed on a Quartz Tuning Fork (QTF) is presented. Instead of using an external deflection with a cantilever beam for contact detection, an original combination of piezoelectric resonator and thermal probe is employed. Due to a non-contact photothermal excitation principle, the high quality factor of the QTF allows the probe-to-surface contact detection. Topographic and thermal scanning images obtained on a specific sample points out the interest of our system as an alternative to cantilevered resistive probe systems which are the most spread.

  18. Vibration Study of Fork-lift Truck Based on the Virtual Prototype Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YANG Mingliang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The forklift truck is one of important equipments of the modern logistics system. As the forklift truck is running, the driver seat and steering wheel of a certain type of fork-lift truck vibrate strongly, virtual prototyping technology and multi-body dynamics are used to make simulation of dynamic performance of fork-lift truck in this paper, and then the test result is compared with time course load that obtained from frame junction with the annex. We should repeatedly modify the simulation model based on test results, which is consistent with the actual results. Based on this model, so we put forward measures for improving design: Firstly, the axis of rotation of oval steering axle is implied; Secondly, the overhead guard is connected with the frame by the rubber cushion blocks at four different locations; Thirdly, the engine is fixed on the frame by the rubber cushion blocks (shock mount in two different position. The improved simulation and experimental verification are carried out under the same conditions, and the results show that the fundamental frequency of seat of the improved fork-lift truck and vibration energy are lower. The result proves the practical value of this method in the research of the vibration characteristics of complete engineering machine.

  19. Optical microscope combined with the nanopipette-based quartz tuning fork-atomic force microscope for nanolithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Sangmin; Stambaugh, Corey; Kwon, Soyoung; Lee, Kunyoung; Kim, Bongsu; Kim, Qwhan; Jhe, Wonho

    2013-09-01

    We demonstrated the optical microscope (OM) combined with nanopipette-based quartz tuning fork - atomic force microscope (QTF-AFM) for nanolithography. The nanoparticle (Au, 5 nm), nanowire, PDMS solutions are ejected onto the substrate through the nano/microaperture of the pulled pipette, and the nano/microscale objects were in-situ formed on the surface with the proposed patterning system, while the position is defined by monitoring the phenomena on the substrate with a home-made OM. After forming of capillary condensation between apex of the pipette tip and the surface, the electric field is applied to extract out the inside liquid to the substrate and the nano/microscale objects are fabricated. The nanoscale patterning size can be controlled by the aperture diameters of the pulled pipette.

  20. Low-volume liquid delivery and nanolithography using a nanopipette combined with a quartz tuning fork-atomic force microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Sangmin; Stambaugh, Corey; Kim, Gunn; Lee, Manhee; Kim, Yonghee; Lee, Kunyoung; Jhe, Wonho

    2012-10-21

    Electric-field-induced low-volume liquid ejection under ambient conditions was realized at a low bias potential of 12 V via a nanopipette (aperture diameter of 30 nm) combined with a non-contact, distance-regulated (within 10 nm) quartz tuning fork-atomic force microscope. A capillary-condensed water meniscus, spontaneously formed in the tip-substrate nanogap, reduces the ejection barrier by four orders of magnitude, facilitating nanoliquid ejection and subsequent liquid transport/dispersion onto the substrate without contact damage from the pipette. A study of nanofluidics through a free-standing liquid nanochannel and nanolithography was performed with this technique. This is an important breakthrough for various applications in controlled nanomaterial-delivery and selective deposition, such as multicolor nanopatterning and nano-inkjet devices.

  1. Low-volume liquid delivery and nanolithography using a nanopipette combined with a quartz tuning fork-atomic force microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Sangmin; Stambaugh, Corey; Kim, Gunn; Lee, Manhee; Kim, Yonghee; Lee, Kunyoung; Jhe, Wonho

    2012-09-01

    Electric-field-induced low-volume liquid ejection under ambient conditions was realized at a low bias potential of 12 V via a nanopipette (aperture diameter of 30 nm) combined with a non-contact, distance-regulated (within 10 nm) quartz tuning fork-atomic force microscope. A capillary-condensed water meniscus, spontaneously formed in the tip-substrate nanogap, reduces the ejection barrier by four orders of magnitude, facilitating nanoliquid ejection and subsequent liquid transport/dispersion onto the substrate without contact damage from the pipette. A study of nanofluidics through a free-standing liquid nanochannel and nanolithography was performed with this technique. This is an important breakthrough for various applications in controlled nanomaterial-delivery and selective deposition, such as multicolor nanopatterning and nano-inkjet devices.Electric-field-induced low-volume liquid ejection under ambient conditions was realized at a low bias potential of 12 V via a nanopipette (aperture diameter of 30 nm) combined with a non-contact, distance-regulated (within 10 nm) quartz tuning fork-atomic force microscope. A capillary-condensed water meniscus, spontaneously formed in the tip-substrate nanogap, reduces the ejection barrier by four orders of magnitude, facilitating nanoliquid ejection and subsequent liquid transport/dispersion onto the substrate without contact damage from the pipette. A study of nanofluidics through a free-standing liquid nanochannel and nanolithography was performed with this technique. This is an important breakthrough for various applications in controlled nanomaterial-delivery and selective deposition, such as multicolor nanopatterning and nano-inkjet devices. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr30972f

  2. The conventional tuning fork as a quantitative tool for vibration threshold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alanazy, Mohammed H; Alfurayh, Nuha A; Almweisheer, Shaza N; Aljafen, Bandar N; Muayqil, Taim

    2018-01-01

    This study was undertaken to describe a method for quantifying vibration when using a conventional tuning fork (CTF) in comparison to a Rydel-Seiffer tuning fork (RSTF) and to provide reference values. Vibration thresholds at index finger and big toe were obtained in 281 participants. Spearman's correlations were performed. Age, weight, and height were analyzed for their covariate effects on vibration threshold. Reference values at the fifth percentile were obtained by quantile regression. The correlation coefficients between CTF and RSTF values at finger/toe were 0.59/0.64 (P = 0.001 for both). Among covariates, only age had a significant effect on vibration threshold. Reference values for CTF at finger/toe for the age groups 20-39 and 40-60 years were 7.4/4.9 and 5.8/4.6 s, respectively. Reference values for RSTF at finger/toe for the age groups 20-39 and 40-60 years were 6.9/5.5 and 6.2/4.7, respectively. CTF provides quantitative values that are as good as those provided by RSTF. Age-stratified reference data are provided. Muscle Nerve 57: 49-53, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. A quartz enhanced photo-acoustic gas sensor based on a custom tuning fork and a terahertz quantum cascade laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patimisco, Pietro; Borri, Simone; Sampaolo, Angelo; Beere, Harvey E; Ritchie, David A; Vitiello, Miriam S; Scamarcio, Gaetano; Spagnolo, Vincenzo

    2014-05-07

    An innovative quartz enhanced photoacoustic (QEPAS) gas sensing system operating in the THz spectral range and employing a custom quartz tuning fork (QTF) is described. The QTF dimensions are 3.3 cm × 0.4 cm × 0.8 cm, with the two prongs spaced by ∼800 μm. To test our sensor we used a quantum cascade laser as the light source and selected a methanol rotational absorption line at 131.054 cm(-1) (∼3.93 THz), with line-strength S = 4.28 × 10(-21) cm mol(-1). The sensor was operated at 10 Torr pressure on the first flexion QTF resonance frequency of 4245 Hz. The corresponding Q-factor was 74 760. Stepwise concentration measurements were performed to verify the linearity of the QEPAS signal as a function of the methanol concentration. The achieved sensitivity of the system is 7 parts per million in 4 seconds, corresponding to a QEPAS normalized noise-equivalent absorption of 2 × 10(-10) W cm(-1) Hz(-1/2), comparable with the best result of mid-IR QEPAS systems.

  4. Directing the path of light-induced electron transfer at a molecular fork using vibrational excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delor, Milan; Archer, Stuart A.; Keane, Theo; Meijer, Anthony J. H. M.; Sazanovich, Igor V.; Greetham, Gregory M.; Towrie, Michael; Weinstein, Julia A.

    2017-11-01

    Ultrafast electron transfer in condensed-phase molecular systems is often strongly coupled to intramolecular vibrations that can promote, suppress and direct electronic processes. Recent experiments exploring this phenomenon proved that light-induced electron transfer can be strongly modulated by vibrational excitation, suggesting a new avenue for active control over molecular function. Here, we achieve the first example of such explicit vibrational control through judicious design of a Pt(II)-acetylide charge-transfer donor-bridge-acceptor-bridge-donor 'fork' system: asymmetric 13C isotopic labelling of one of the two -C≡C- bridges makes the two parallel and otherwise identical donor→acceptor electron-transfer pathways structurally distinct, enabling independent vibrational perturbation of either. Applying an ultrafast UVpump(excitation)-IRpump(perturbation)-IRprobe(monitoring) pulse sequence, we show that the pathway that is vibrationally perturbed during UV-induced electron transfer is dramatically slowed down compared to its unperturbed counterpart. One can thus choose the dominant electron transfer pathway. The findings deliver a new opportunity for precise perturbative control of electronic energy propagation in molecular devices.

  5. Improving the lateral resolution of quartz tuning fork-based sensors in liquid by integrating commercial AFM tips into the fiber end.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Laura; Martínez-Martín, David; Otero, Jorge; de Pablo, Pedro José; Puig-Vidal, Manel; Gómez-Herrero, Julio

    2015-01-14

    The use of quartz tuning fork sensors as probes for scanning probe microscopy is growing in popularity. Working in shear mode, some methods achieve a lateral resolution comparable with that obtained with standard cantilevered probes, but only in experiments conducted in air or vacuum. Here, we report a method to produce and use commercial AFM tips in electrically driven quartz tuning fork sensors operating in shear mode in a liquid environment. The process is based on attaching a standard AFM tip to the end of a fiber probe which has previously been sharpened. Only the end of the probe is immersed in the buffer solution during imaging. The lateral resolution achieved is about 6 times higher than that of the etched microfiber on its own.

  6. Ab-initio molecular dynamics and vibrational Raman spectroscopy investigations of quartz polymorph at high temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sediki, Hayet; Simon, Patrick; Hadjadj, Aomar; Krallafa, Abdelghani M.

    2017-09-01

    Quartz has found a wide range of applications over the past years. In the present work, the temperature dependence of microcrystalline quartz is investigated with Raman spectroscopy and DFT-based molecular dynamics simulations. We aimed to determine the structure at short and medium range distances as a function of the increasing temperature. The dynamics and the structural changes are analysed in terms of time-dependent properties, and the vibrational analysis obtained from calculated dipole trajectory and vibrational density of states (VDOS). The computed data is compared to Raman and infrared spectroscopic measurements. The approach is of a particularly great interest when we focus on the structural behaviour, and the dynamical disorder observed and characterised through geometric and thermodynamic data. The calculations confirm that the infrared and Raman signature as a function of temperature provide a sensitive analysis of the structural behaviour of quartz.

  7. Quartz enhanced photoacoustic H2S gas sensor based on a fiber-amplifier source and a custom tuning fork with large prong spacing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hongpeng; Sampaolo, Angelo; Dong, Lei; Patimisco, Pietro; Liu, Xiaoli; Zheng, Huadan; Yin, Xukun; Ma, Weiguang; Zhang, Lei; Yin, Wangbao; Spagnolo, Vincenzo; Jia, Suotang; Tittel, Frank K.

    2015-09-01

    A quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) sensor, employing an erbium-doped fiber amplified laser source and a custom quartz tuning fork (QTF) with its two prongs spaced ˜800 μm apart, is reported. The sensor employs an acoustic micro-resonator (AmR) which is assembled in an "on-beam" QEPAS configuration. Both length and vertical position of the AmR are optimized in terms of signal-to-noise ratio, significantly improving the QEPAS detection sensitivity by a factor of ˜40, compared to the case of a sensor using a bare custom QTF. The fiber-amplifier-enhanced QEPAS sensor is applied to H2S trace gas detection, reaching a sensitivity of ˜890 ppb at 1 s integration time, similar to those obtained with a power-enhanced QEPAS sensor equipped with a standard QTF, but with the advantages of easy optical alignment, simple installation, and long-term stability.

  8. Ultra-high sensitive acetylene detection using quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy with a fiber amplified diode laser and a 30.72 kHz quartz tuning fork

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yufei; He, Ying; Zhang, Ligong; Yu, Xin; Zhang, Jingbo; Sun, Rui; Tittel, Frank K.

    2017-01-01

    An ultra-high sensitive acetylene (C2H2) Quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) sensor based on a high power laser and a quartz tuning fork with a resonance frequency f0 of 30.72 kHz was demonstrated. An erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA) amplified distributed feedback diode laser with a center wavelength of 1.53 μm was used as the exciting source. A 33.2 ppb minimum detection limit (MDL) at 6534.37 cm-1 was achieved, and the calculated normalized noise equivalent absorption coefficient was 3.54 × 10-8 cm-1 W/√Hz when the laser output power was 1500 mW. The ppb-level detection sensitivity of C2H2 validated the reported QEPAS method.

  9. Note: Arbitrary periodical mechanical vibrations can be realized in the resonant state based on multiple tuning fork structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Liangguo; Pan, Chengliang; Wang, Hongbo; Feng, Zhihua

    2013-09-01

    We develop a novel approach to match harmonics and vibration modes based on the mechanism of multiple tuning fork structure (MTFS), through which it is promising to realize arbitrary periodical vibrations in the resonant state. A prototype three-layer MTFS with first three harmonics is presented to verify the feasibility of the proposed principle. The matching process and experimental results confirm the unique advantages of MTFS, as discussed in the theoretical analysis. Typical periodical motions, including sawtooth, square, half-wave rectified, and full-wave rectified waveforms, are achieved by the syntheses of resonant harmonics.

  10. Self-reported back pain in fork-lift truck and freight-container tractor drivers exposed to whole-body vibration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boshuizen, H. C.; Bongers, P. M.; Hulshof, C. T.

    1992-01-01

    To study the long-term health effect of whole-body vibration, a questionnaire on symptoms of ill health was mailed to 242 drivers and a reference group of 210 workers from six harbor companies (response 81%). Vehicles driven were fork-lift trucks and freight-container tractors. Vibration level

  11. The influence of vibrations on time reference signals generated using quartz crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drumea, Andrei; Marcu, Alina; Plotog, Ioan

    2016-12-01

    32.768 kHz low frequency crystals are found in a large part of today's embedded systems that use microcontrollers especially in battery supplied applications which need low power consumption1]. Their main role is to offer a stable time reference. There are situations in which time measurement is needed when the system works in a mechanically unstable environment (cars, industrial equipment). The paper presents the studies done on the behavior of 32.768 kHz quartz crystals that are part of embedded systems which operate in a vibrating environment, in terms of period and long-time jitter of the generated time reference signal. The investigations of this effect were done using a test bench especially designed for this purpose which can measure the presented parameters determined by controlled mechanical stimulus (waveform, amplitude and frequency of the vibrations).

  12. Nanopipette combined with quartz tuning fork-atomic force microscope for force spectroscopy/microscopy and liquid delivery-based nanofabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Sangmin; Lee, Kunyoung; Kim, Bongsu; Noh, Haneol; Kim, Jongwoo; Kwon, Soyoung; Lee, Manhee; Hong, Mun-Heon; Jhe, Wonho

    2014-03-01

    This paper introduces a nanopipette combined with a quartz tuning fork-atomic force microscope system (nanopipette/QTF-AFM), and describes experimental and theoretical investigations of the nanoscale materials used. The system offers several advantages over conventional cantilever-based AFM and QTF-AFM systems, including simple control of the quality factor based on the contact position of the QTF, easy variation of the effective tip diameter, electrical detection, on-demand delivery and patterning of various solutions, and in situ surface characterization after patterning. This tool enables nanoscale liquid delivery and nanofabrication processes without damaging the apex of the tip in various environments, and also offers force spectroscopy and microscopy capabilities.

  13. Nanopipette combined with quartz tuning fork-atomic force microscope for force spectroscopy/microscopy and liquid delivery-based nanofabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Sangmin; Lee, Kunyoung; Kim, Bongsu; Noh, Haneol; Kim, Jongwoo; Kwon, Soyoung; Lee, Manhee; Hong, Mun-Heon; Jhe, Wonho

    2014-03-01

    This paper introduces a nanopipette combined with a quartz tuning fork-atomic force microscope system (nanopipette/QTF-AFM), and describes experimental and theoretical investigations of the nanoscale materials used. The system offers several advantages over conventional cantilever-based AFM and QTF-AFM systems, including simple control of the quality factor based on the contact position of the QTF, easy variation of the effective tip diameter, electrical detection, on-demand delivery and patterning of various solutions, and in situ surface characterization after patterning. This tool enables nanoscale liquid delivery and nanofabrication processes without damaging the apex of the tip in various environments, and also offers force spectroscopy and microscopy capabilities.

  14. Chemical and biological sensing using tuning forks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Nongjian; Boussaad, Salah

    2012-07-10

    A device for sensing a chemical analyte is disclosed. The device is comprised of a vibrating structure having first and second surfaces and having an associated resonant frequency and a wire coupled between the first and second surfaces of the vibrating structure, wherein the analyte interacts with the wire and causes a change in the resonant frequency of the vibrating structure. The vibrating structure can include a tuning fork. The vibrating structure can be comprised of quartz. The wire can be comprised of polymer. A plurality of vibrating structures are arranged in an array to increase confidence by promoting a redundancy of measurement or to detect a plurality of chemical analytes. A method of making a device for sensing a chemical analyte is also disclosed.

  15. Quartz enhanced photoacoustic H{sub 2}S gas sensor based on a fiber-amplifier source and a custom tuning fork with large prong spacing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Hongpeng; Liu, Xiaoli; Zheng, Huadan; Yin, Xukun; Ma, Weiguang; Zhang, Lei; Yin, Wangbao; Jia, Suotang [State Key Laboratory of Quantum Optics and Quantum Optics Devices, Institute of Laser Spectroscopy, Shanxi University, Taiyuan 030006 (China); Sampaolo, Angelo [Dipartimento Interateneo di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Bari and Politecnico di Bari, CNR-IFN UOS BARI, Via Amendola 173, Bari 70126 (Italy); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Dong, Lei, E-mail: donglei@sxu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Quantum Optics and Quantum Optics Devices, Institute of Laser Spectroscopy, Shanxi University, Taiyuan 030006 (China); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Patimisco, Pietro; Spagnolo, Vincenzo [Dipartimento Interateneo di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Bari and Politecnico di Bari, CNR-IFN UOS BARI, Via Amendola 173, Bari 70126 (Italy); Tittel, Frank K. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States)

    2015-09-14

    A quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) sensor, employing an erbium-doped fiber amplified laser source and a custom quartz tuning fork (QTF) with its two prongs spaced ∼800 μm apart, is reported. The sensor employs an acoustic micro-resonator (AmR) which is assembled in an “on-beam” QEPAS configuration. Both length and vertical position of the AmR are optimized in terms of signal-to-noise ratio, significantly improving the QEPAS detection sensitivity by a factor of ∼40, compared to the case of a sensor using a bare custom QTF. The fiber-amplifier-enhanced QEPAS sensor is applied to H{sub 2}S trace gas detection, reaching a sensitivity of ∼890 ppb at 1 s integration time, similar to those obtained with a power-enhanced QEPAS sensor equipped with a standard QTF, but with the advantages of easy optical alignment, simple installation, and long-term stability.

  16. Theoretical analysis of a quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petra, N.; Zweck, J.; Kosterev, A. A.; Minkoff, S. E.; Thomazy, D.

    2009-03-01

    Quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) sensors are based on a recent approach to photoacoustic detection which employs a quartz tuning fork as an acoustic transducer. These sensors enable detection of trace gases for air quality monitoring, industrial process control, and medical diagnostics. To detect a trace gas, modulated laser radiation is directed between the tines of a tuning fork. The optical energy absorbed by the gas results in a periodic thermal expansion which gives rise to a weak acoustic pressure wave. This pressure wave excites a resonant vibration of the tuning fork thereby generating an electrical signal via the piezoelectric effect. This paper describes a theoretical model of a QEPAS sensor. By deriving analytical solutions for the partial differential equations in the model, we obtain a formula for the piezoelectric current in terms of the optical, mechanical, and electrical parameters of the system. We use the model to calculate the optimal position of the laser beam with respect to the tuning fork and the phase of the piezoelectric current. We also show that a QEPAS transducer with a particular 32.8 kHz tuning fork is 2-3 times as sensitive as one with a 4.25 kHz tuning fork. These simulation results closely match experimental data.

  17. A Semi-Analytical Solution for the Thickness-Vibration of Centrally Partially-Electroded Circular AT-Cut Quartz Resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bin; Dai, Xiaoyun; Zhao, Xintao; Qian, Zhenghua

    2017-01-01

    Vibration frequencies and modes for the thickness-shear vibrations of infinite partially-electroded circular AT-cut quartz plates are obtained by solving the two-dimensional (2D) scalar differential equation derived by Tiersten and Smythe. The Mathieu and modified Mathieu equations are derived from the governing equation using the coordinate transform and the collocation method is used to deal with the boundary conditions. Solutions of the resonant frequencies and trapped modes are validated by those results obtained from COMSOL software. The current study provides a theoretical way for figuring out the vibration analysis of circular quartz resonators. PMID:28783124

  18. Experimental Study of the Ultrasonic Vibration-Assisted Abrasive Waterjet Micromachining the Quartz Glass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongguo Hou

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The ultrasonic vibration is used to enhance the capability of the abrasive water micromachining glass. And, the ultrasonic vibration is activated on the abrasive waterjet nozzle. The quality of the flow is improved, and the velocity of the abrasive is increased because of the addition of the ultrasonic energy. The relevant experimental results indicate that the erosion depth and the material volume removal of the glass are obviously increased when ultrasonic vibration is working. As for the influence of process parameters on the material removal of the glass such as vibration amplitude, system pressure, distance of the standoff, and abrasive size, the experimental results indicate that the system pressure and vibration contribute greatly to the glass material removal. Also, the erosion depth and the volume of material removal are increased with the increase in the vibration amplitude and system pressure. There are some uplifts found at the edge of erosion pit. Then, it can be inferred that the plastic method is an important material removal method during the machining process of ultrasonic vibration-assisted abrasive waterjet.

  19. The application of second-order approximation of Taylor series in thickness shear vibration analysis of quartz crystal microbalances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peng; Jin, Feng; Sun, Qing; Ma, Jianxun

    2015-04-01

    The inertia force caused by an additional mass layer is usually adopted to simulate the effective mechanical boundary condition in a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), which may yield incorrect results when the upper layer becomes relative thicker. Thus, a detail analysis of the thickness shear vibration in a QCM for detecting the characteristics of the upper isotropic layer is proceeded based on a second-order approximation of Taylor series. The result calculated by this method has a higher accuracy than that of inertial-force approximation. According to these outcomes, the free and forced vibration has been illustrated, as well as transient effects during the switching on/off processes or under a sudden fluctuation of the driving-voltage amplitude or frequency. It has been revealed by numerical simulation that the additional mass layer has a great influence on the mechanical performance of QCM, including the resonance frequency, amplitudes of displacement and admittance, response time of the transient processes, and so on. These findings can prove effective guidance for physical phenomenon explanations and experimental measurement in mass sensor devices. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Development of a quartz tuning-fork-based force sensor for measurements in the tens of nanoNewton force range during nanomanipulation experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oiko, V. T. A., E-mail: oiko@ifi.unicamp.br; Rodrigues, V.; Ugarte, D. [Instituto de Física “Gleb Wataghin,” Univ. Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Campinas 13083-859 (Brazil); Martins, B. V. C. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2R3 (Canada); Silva, P. C. [Laboratório Nacional de Nanotecnologia, CNPEM, Campinas 13083-970 (Brazil)

    2014-03-15

    Understanding the mechanical properties of nanoscale systems requires new experimental and theoretical tools. In particular, force sensors compatible with nanomechanical testing experiments and with sensitivity in the nN range are required. Here, we report the development and testing of a tuning-fork-based force sensor for in situ nanomanipulation experiments inside a scanning electron microscope. The sensor uses a very simple design for the electronics and it allows the direct and quantitative force measurement in the 1–100 nN force range. The sensor response is initially calibrated against a nN range force standard, as, for example, a calibrated Atomic Force Microscopy cantilever; subsequently, applied force values can be directly derived using only the electric signals generated by the tuning fork. Using a homemade nanomanipulator, the quantitative force sensor has been used to analyze the mechanical deformation of multi-walled carbon nanotube bundles, where we analyzed forces in the 5–40 nN range, measured with an error bar of a few nN.

  1. Influence of surface micro-beams with large deflection on the resonance frequency of a quartz crystal resonator in thickness-shear mode vibrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi Luo

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We study the dynamic behavior of a quartz crystal resonator (QCR in thickness-shear vibrations with the upper surface covered by an array of micro-beams (MBs under large deflection. Through taking into account the continuous conditions of shear force and bending moment at the interface of MBs/resonator, dependences of frequency shift of the compound QCR system versus material parameter and geometrical parameter are illustrated in detail for nonlinear and linear vibrations. It is found that the frequency shift produces a little right (left translation for increasing elastic modulus (length/radius ratio of MBs. Moreover, the frequency right (left translation distance caused by nonlinear deformation becomes more serious in the second-order mode than in the first-order one.

  2. SC tuning fork

    CERN Multimedia

    The tuning fork used to modulate the radiofrequency system of the synchro cyclotron (SC) from 1957 to 1973. This piece is an unused spare part. The SC was the 1st accelerator built at CERN. It operated from August 1957 until it was closed down at the end of 1990. In the SC the magnetic field did not change with time, and the particles were accelerated in successive pulses by a radiofrequency voltage of some 20kV which varied in frequency as they spiraled outwards towards the extraction radius. The frequency varied from 30MHz to about 17Mz in each pulse. The tuning fork vibrated at 55MHz in vacuum in an enclosure which formed a variable capacitor in the tuning circuit of the RF system, allowing the RF to vary over the appropriate range to accelerate protons from the centre of the macine up to 600Mev at extraction radius. In operation the tips of the tuning fork blade had an amplitude of movement of over 1 cm. The SC accelerator underwent extensive improvements from 1973 to 1975, including the installation of a...

  3. Photoacoustic sensing with micro-tuning forks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willer, U.; Köhring, M.; Mordmüller, M.; Schade, W.

    2015-06-01

    Different modifications of quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) are discussed. An analysis of the signal-to-noise ratio for the generated photoacoustic signal gives hints for an optimized geometry of tuning fork and acoustic resonator. Furthermore, simultaneous or alternate photoacoustic and electrical driving is discussed, leading the way to new detection schemes that are capable of measuring changes in molecular relaxation dynamics.

  4. Pitch Fork

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williams, Peter Leslie; Overholt, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Pitch Fork is a prototype of an alternate, actuated digital musical instrument (DMI). It uses 5 infra-red and 4 piezoelectric sensors to control an additive synthesis engine. Iron bars are used as the physical point of contact in interaction with the aim of using this materials natural acoustic p...... properties as a control signal for aspects of the digitally produced sound. This choice of material was also chosen to affect player experience. Sensor readings are relayed to a Macbook via an Arduino Mega. Mappings and audio output signal is carried out with Pure Data Extended....

  5. Analysis of overtone flexural modes operation in quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tittel, Frank K; Sampaolo, Angelo; Patimisco, Pietro; Dong, Lei; Geras, Antonina; Starecki, Tomasz; Spagnolo, Vincenzo

    2016-03-21

    A detailed investigation of a set of custom quartz tuning forks (QTFs), operating in the fundamental and first overtone flexural modes is reported. Support losses are the dominant energy dissipation processes when the QTFs vibrate at the first overtone mode. These losses can be decreased by increasing the ratio between the prong length and its thickness. The QTFs were implemented in a quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) based sensor operating in the near-IR spectral range and water vapor was selected as the gas target. QTF flexural modes having the highest quality factor exhibit the largest QEPAS signal, demonstrating that, by optimizing the QTF prongs sizes, overtone modes can provide a higher QEPAS sensor performance with respect to using the fundamental mode.

  6. Quartz-Enhanced Photoacoustic Spectroscopy: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patimisco, Pietro; Scamarcio, Gaetano; Tittel, Frank K.; Spagnolo, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    A detailed review on the development of quartz-enhanced photoacoustic sensors (QEPAS) for the sensitive and selective quantification of molecular trace gas species with resolved spectroscopic features is reported. The basis of the QEPAS technique, the technology available to support this field in terms of key components, such as light sources and quartz-tuning forks and the recent developments in detection methods and performance limitations will be discussed. Furthermore, different experimental QEPAS methods such as: on-beam and off-beam QEPAS, quartz-enhanced evanescent wave photoacoustic detection, modulation-cancellation approach and mid-IR single mode fiber-coupled sensor systems will be reviewed and analysed. A QEPAS sensor operating in the THz range, employing a custom-made quartz-tuning fork and a THz quantum cascade laser will be also described. Finally, we evaluated data reported during the past decade and draw relevant and useful conclusions from this analysis. PMID:24686729

  7. Quartz-Enhanced Photoacoustic Spectroscopy: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Patimisco

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A detailed review on the development of quartz-enhanced photoacoustic sensors (QEPAS for the sensitive and selective quantification of molecular trace gas species with resolved spectroscopic features is reported. The basis of the QEPAS technique, the technology available to support this field in terms of key components, such as light sources and quartz-tuning forks and the recent developments in detection methods and performance limitations will be discussed. Furthermore, different experimental QEPAS methods such as: on-beam and off-beam QEPAS, quartz-enhanced evanescent wave photoacoustic detection, modulation-cancellation approach and mid-IR single mode fiber-coupled sensor systems will be reviewed and analysed. A QEPAS sensor operating in the THz range, employing a custom-made quartz-tuning fork and a THz quantum cascade laser will be also described. Finally, we evaluated data reported during the past decade and draw relevant and useful conclusions from this analysis.

  8. Quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patimisco, Pietro; Scamarcio, Gaetano; Tittel, Frank K; Spagnolo, Vincenzo

    2014-03-28

    A detailed review on the development of quartz-enhanced photoacoustic sensors (QEPAS) for the sensitive and selective quantification of molecular trace gas species with resolved spectroscopic features is reported. The basis of the QEPAS technique, the technology available to support this field in terms of key components, such as light sources and quartz-tuning forks and the recent developments in detection methods and performance limitations will be discussed. Furthermore, different experimental QEPAS methods such as: on-beam and off-beam QEPAS, quartz-enhanced evanescent wave photoacoustic detection, modulation-cancellation approach and mid-IR single mode fiber-coupled sensor systems will be reviewed and analysed. A QEPAS sensor operating in the THz range, employing a custom-made quartz-tuning fork and a THz quantum cascade laser will be also described. Finally, we evaluated data reported during the past decade and draw relevant and useful conclusions from this analysis.

  9. Quartz-Enhanced Photoacoustic Spectroscopy: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Pietro Patimisco; Gaetano Scamarcio; Tittel, Frank K.; Vincenzo Spagnolo

    2014-01-01

    A detailed review on the development of quartz-enhanced photoacoustic sensors (QEPAS) for the sensitive and selective quantification of molecular trace gas species with resolved spectroscopic features is reported. The basis of the QEPAS technique, the technology available to support this field in terms of key components, such as light sources and quartz-tuning forks and the recent developments in detection methods and performance limitations will be discussed. Furthermore, different experimen...

  10. New approaches in quartz-enhanced photoacoustic sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampaolo, Angelo; Patimisco, Pietro; Pennetta, Riccardo; Scamarcio, Gaetano; Tittel, Frank K.; Spagnolo, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    We report on the design and realization of custom quartz tuning forks with different geometries and sizes aimed to improve the photoacoustic effect in quartz-enhanced photoacoustic (QEPAS) sensor systems. A detailed analysis of the piezoelectric properties in terms of resonance frequencies, quality factors, gas damping was performed.

  11. Determination of SiO2 Raman spectrum indicating the transformation from coesite to quartz in Gföhl migmatitic gneisses in the Moldanubian Zone, Czech Republic

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tomoyuki KOBAYASHI; Takao HIRAJIMA; Yoshikuni HIROI; Martin SVOJTKA

    2008-01-01

    .... The Raman spectrum is composed of the intense vibrations of quartz at 464, 393 and 266 cm-1 of quartz and the weak vibration of coesite at 521 cm-1 is obtained from the quartz proximal to the relict...

  12. The Quartz Analog Watch: A Wonder Machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, H. Richard, Ed.

    1993-01-01

    Summarizes how a quartz watch works. Discusses the quartz crystal, its form, and how its frequency is set to a standard; the integrated circuit chip that drives the crystal in vibration, scales its frequency down, and forms pulses that turn the motor; and the motor that drives the gear train that turns the hands. (ZWH)

  13. Eukaryotic DNA Replication Fork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgers, Peter M J; Kunkel, Thomas A

    2017-06-20

    This review focuses on the biogenesis and composition of the eukaryotic DNA replication fork, with an emphasis on the enzymes that synthesize DNA and repair discontinuities on the lagging strand of the replication fork. Physical and genetic methodologies aimed at understanding these processes are discussed. The preponderance of evidence supports a model in which DNA polymerase ε (Pol ε) carries out the bulk of leading strand DNA synthesis at an undisturbed replication fork. DNA polymerases α and δ carry out the initiation of Okazaki fragment synthesis and its elongation and maturation, respectively. This review also discusses alternative proposals, including cellular processes during which alternative forks may be utilized, and new biochemical studies with purified proteins that are aimed at reconstituting leading and lagging strand DNA synthesis separately and as an integrated replication fork.

  14. Development of Quartz Friction Gauge on Board Balloon and Sounding Rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurihara, Junichi; Abe, Takumi; Murata, Isao; Sato, Kaoru; Tomikawa, Yoshihiro

    The on-board small vacuum gauge developed in this study is the quartz friction gauge, which is based on the principle that the resonance impedance of a quartz oscillator varies with the pressure of ambient gas. The gauge has a wide measuring range (105-10-2 Pa), which corresponds to the atmospheric pressure from the ground to an altitude of about 100 km. The sensor part and data processing part weigh 136 g and 210 g, respectively. In addition, the gauge can operate at a power consumption level of less than 1W. The gauge is suited for high altitude balloon experiments where the weight of on-board instruments must be kept to a minimum. The tuning-fork-shaped quartz oscillator in the gauge is widely used for wrist watches and has high resistance to vibration and shock, and thus the gauge is applicable to sounding rocket experiments that require on-board instruments with high resistance to the environment.

  15. Tuning fork enhanced interferometric photoacoustic spectroscopy: a new method for trace gas analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhring, M.; Pohlkötter, A.; Willer, U.; Angelmahr, M.; Schade, W.

    2011-01-01

    A photoacoustic trace gas sensor based on an optical read-out method of a quartz tuning fork is shown. Instead of conventional piezoelectric signal read-out, as applied in well-known quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS), an interferometric read-out method for measurement of the tuning fork's oscillation is presented. To demonstrate the potential of the optical read-out of tuning forks in photoacoustics, a comparison between the performances of a sensor with interferometric read-out and conventional QEPAS with piezoelectric read-out is reported. The two sensors show similar characteristics. The detection limit (L) for the optical read-out is determined to be L opt=(2598±84) ppm (1 σ) compared to L elec=(2579±78) ppm (1 σ) for piezoelectric read-out. In both cases the detection limit is defined by the thermal noise of the tuning fork.

  16. Spring constant of a tuning-fork sensor for dynamic force microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis van Vörden

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available We present an overview of experimental and numerical methods to determine the spring constant of a quartz tuning fork in qPlus configuration. The simple calculation for a rectangular cantilever is compared to the values obtained by the analysis of the thermal excitation and by the direct mechanical measurement of the force versus displacement. To elucidate the difference, numerical simulations were performed taking account of the real geometry including the glue that is used to mount the tuning fork.

  17. In Situ Adsorption Studies at the Solid/Liquid Interface:Characterization of Biological Surfaces and Interfaces Using SumFrequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy, Atomic Force Microscopy,and Quartz Crystal Microbalance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, Diana Christine [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) have been used to study the molecular surface structure, surface topography and mechanical properties, and quantitative adsorbed amount of biological molecules at the solid-liquid interface. The molecular-level behavior of designed peptides adsorbed on hydrophobic polystyrene and hydrophilic silica substrates has been examined as a model of protein adsorption on polymeric biomaterial surfaces. Proteins are such large and complex molecules that it is difficult to identify the features in their structure that lead to adsorption and interaction with solid surfaces. Designed peptides which possess secondary structure provide simple model systems for understanding protein adsorption. Depending on the amino acid sequence of a peptide, different secondary structures (α-helix and β-sheet) can be induced at apolar (air/liquid or air/solid) interfaces. Having a well-defined secondary structure allows experiments to be carried out under controlled conditions, where it is possible to investigate the affects of peptide amino acid sequence and chain length, concentration, buffering effects, etc. on adsorbed peptide structure. The experiments presented in this dissertation demonstrate that SFG vibrational spectroscopy can be used to directly probe the interaction of adsorbing biomolecules with a surface or interface. The use of well designed model systems aided in isolation of the SFG signal of the adsorbing species, and showed that surface functional groups of the substrate are sensitive to surface adsorbates. The complementary techniques of AFM and QCM allowed for deconvolution of the effects of surface topography and coverage from the observed SFG spectra. Initial studies of biologically relevant surfaces are also presented: SFG spectroscopy was used to study the surface composition of common soil bacteria for use in bioremediation of nuclear waste.

  18. Theoretical analysis of a resonant quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoust, Guillaume; Levy, Raphael; Raybaut, Myriam; Godard, Antoine; Melkonian, Jean-Michel; Lefebvre, Michel

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we report the first analytical model for quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy in combination with an acoustic resonator. A generalized fundamental equation is proposed to model the photoacoustic effect, taking into account the coupling between the tuning fork and the surrounding fluid. The analytical signal-to-noise ratio is derived, yielding a direct physical insight with respect to the system design. Experimental behaviors are very well reproduced, and numerical finite elements methods are implemented to successfully confirm the relevance of our approach. We also provide a detailed explanation of the coupling dynamics between the quartz tuning fork and the acoustically resonant tube.

  19. Double acoustic microresonator quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Lei; Wu, Hongpeng; Zheng, Huadan; Liu, Yanyan; Liu, Xiaoli; Jiang, Wenzhe; Zhang, Lei; Ma, Weiguang; Ren, Wei; Yin, Wangbao; Jia, Suotang; Tittel, Frank K

    2014-04-15

    Quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) based on double acoustic microresonators (AmRs) is developed and experimentally investigated. The double AmR spectrophone configuration exhibits a strong acoustic coupling between the AmR and the quartz tuning fork, which results in a ∼5  ms fast response time. Moreover, the double AmRs provide two independent detection channels that allow optical signal addition or cancellation from different optical wavelengths and facilitate rapid multigas sensing measurements, thereby avoiding laser beam combination.

  20. The Sound Field around a Tuning Fork and the Role of a Resonance Box

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogacz, Bogdan F.; Pedziwiatr, Antoni T.

    2015-01-01

    Atypical two-tine tuning fork is barely audible when held vibrating at an arm's length. It is enough, however, to touch its base to a table or, better, to a resonance box and the emitted sound becomes much louder. An inquiring student may pose questions: (1) Why is a bare tuning fork such a weak emitter of sound? (2) What is the role of the…

  1. Detection of Molecular Oxygen at Low Concentrations Using Quartz Enhanced Photoacoustic Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Andreas Pohlkötter; Michael Köhring; Ulrike Willer; Wolfgang Schade

    2010-01-01

    Molecular oxygen is detected at low concentrations using photoacoustic spectroscopy despite its unfavorable photoacoustic properties. The system consists of a seed laser diode, a tapered amplifier and a quartz tuning fork based spectrophone, thus employing quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS). With this system a detection limit of 13 ppm is reached with a compact and long term stable setup. Further improvement of the detection limit is possible by adding suitable gases to the sa...

  2. [History of the tuning fork. I: Invention of the tuning fork, its course in music and natural sciences. Pictures from the history of otorhinolaryngology, presented by instruments from the collection of the Ingolstadt German Medical History Museum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldmann, H

    1997-02-01

    G. Cardano, physician, mathematician, and astrologer in Pavia, Italy, in 1550 described how sound may be perceived through the skull. A few years later H. Capivacci, also a physician in Padua, realized that this phenomenon might be used as a diagnostic tool for differentiating between hearing disorders located either in the middle ear or in the acoustic nerve. The German physician G. C. Schelhammer in 1684 was the first to use a common cutlery fork in further developing the experiments initiated by Cardano and Capivacci. For a long time to come, however, there was no demand for this in practical otology. The tuning fork was invented in 1711 by John Shore, trumpeter and lutenist to H. Purcell and G.F. Händel in London. A picture of Händel's own tuning fork, probably the oldest tuning fork in existence, is presented here for the first time. There are a number of anecdotes connected with the inventor of the tuning fork, using plays on words involving the name Shore, and mixing up pitch-pipe and pitchfork. Some of these are related here. The tuning fork as a musical instrument soon became a success throughout Europe. The German physicist E. F. F. Chladni in Wittenberg around 1800 was the first to systematically investigate the mode of vibration of the tuning fork with its nodal points. Besides this, he and others tried to construct a complete musical instrument based on sets of tuning forks, which, however, were not widely accepted. J. H. Scheibler in Germany in 1834 presented a set of 54 tuning forks covering the range from 220 Hz to 440 Hz, at intervals of 4 Hz. J. Lissajous in Paris constructed a very elaborate tuning fork with a resonance box, which was intended to represent the international standard of the musical note A with 435 vibrations per second, but this remained controversial. K. R. Koenig, a German physicist living in Paris, invented a tuning fork which was kept in continuous vibration by a clockwork. H. Helmholtz, physiologist in Heidelberg, in 1863

  3. QUARTZ FIBER ELECTROSCOPES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, R.P.

    1957-09-17

    An instrument carried unobtrusively about the person such as in a finger ring to indicate when that person has been exposed to an unusual radiation hazard is described. A metallized quartz fiber is electrically charged to indicate a full scale reading on an etched glass background. The quartz fiber and the scale may be viewed through a magnifying lens for ease of reading. Incident radiation will ionize gaseous particles in the sealed structure thereby allowing the charge to leak off the quartz fiber with its resulting movement across the scale proportionally indicating the radiation exposure.

  4. Vacuum electrolysis of quartz

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, James Claude

    1976-01-13

    The disclosure is directed to a method for processing quartz used in fabricating crystal resonators such that transient frequency change of resonators exposed to pulse irradiation is virtually eliminated. The method involves heating the crystal quartz in a hydrogen-free atmosphere while simultaneously applying an electric field in the Z-axis direction of the crystal. The electric field is maintained during the cool-down phase of the process.

  5. Beat frequency quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy for fast and calibration-free continuous trace-gas monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Hongpeng; Dong, Lei; Zheng, Huadan; Yu, Yajun; Ma, Weiguang; Zhang, Lei; Yin, Wangbao; Xiao, Liantuan; Jia, Suotang; Tittel, Frank K.

    2017-01-01

    Quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) is a sensitive gas detection technique which requires frequent calibration and has a long response time. Here we report beat frequency (BF) QEPAS that can be used for ultra-sensitive calibration-free trace-gas detection and fast spectral scan applications. The resonance frequency and Q-factor of the quartz tuning fork (QTF) as well as the trace-gas concentration can be obtained simultaneously by detecting the beat frequency signal generated w...

  6. Quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy as a platform for non-invasive trace gas analyser targeting breath analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Petersen, Jan C.; Lamard, Laurent; Feng, Yuyang; Focant, J-F.; Peremans, Andre; Lassen, Mikael

    2017-01-01

    An innovative and novel quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) sensor for highly sensitive and selective breath gas analysis is introduced. The QEPAS sensor consists of two acoustically coupled micro-resonators (mR) with an off-axis 20 kHz quartz tuning fork (QTF). The complete acoustically coupled mR system is optimized based on finite element simulations and experimentally verified. Due to the very low fabrication costs the QEPAS sensor presents a clear breakthrough in the field...

  7. Radiation Damage of Quartz Fibers

    OpenAIRE

    Hagopian, V

    1999-01-01

    Quartz fibers are used in high energy physics experiments as the active medium in high radiation area calorimetry. Quartz fibers are also used in the transmission of optical signals. Even though quartz does not damage by moderate amounts of irradiation, the clad of the fibers and the protective coating ( buffer) do damage reducing light transmission. Various types of quartz fibers have been irradiated and measured for light transmission. The most radiation hard quartz fibers are those with qu...

  8. Did mosasaurs have forked tongues?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schulp, Anne S.; Mulder, E. W. A.; Schwenk, K.

    Ever since the first mosasaur restorations were published, these extinct marine reptiles have been pictured with either notched, forked or undivided tongues. Here, we present an overview of existing iconography, a review of the previous literature, and we discuss how best to reconstruct tongue form

  9. Quartz-Enhanced Photoacoustic Detection for Aerosol Optical Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollinger, M.; Black, N.; Mazzoleni, C.

    2010-12-01

    Particulate matter emitted by anthropogenic and natural sources strongly affect the radiative budget of the Earth. Non-absorbing aerosols have a negative radiative forcing effect, acting to cool the planet and thereby masking the warming caused by greenhouse gases. Absorbing aerosols including black carbon, dust and brown carbon can provide positive radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere depending on their optical properties. Due to its short atmospheric lifetime, black carbon can have a strong regional effect (e.g. in Himalaya and in the Arctic, where surface albedo is high). How much aerosols affect the Earth’s climate however remains highly uncertain. Providing accurate, widespread and unbiased measurements of aerosol optical properties is important for understanding how aerosols will affect the future climate system. However, in depth studies on aerosol optical properties, and in particular absorption, are still lacking. Photoacoustic spectrometry has been recently employed to measure aerosol absorption. The technique is more fundamental and unbiased then traditional filter-based techniques. This type of spectrometry exploits the photoacoustic effect, which is the production of an acoustic wave from the excitation of a particle absorbing a photon. Currently available commercial spectrometers are very useful for laboratory and field experiments, but due to their typical size, they are unpractical for studies employing small payload aircrafts (e.g. unmanned aircrafts) or balloons. A recent development in photoacoustic spectrometry reported by Kosterev et al. in 2002 is the use of a quartz tuning fork for the detection, termed Quartz-Enhanced Photoacoustic Spectrometry (QEPAS). Due to the high resonance frequency (~32 KHz) of the tuning fork, QEPAS has good potential for the miniaturization of a photoacoustic spectrometry system. The quartz tuning fork is piezoelectric, and a signal is generated only when the tines of the tuning fork move in opposite

  10. Quartz-Enhanced Photoacoustic Spectroscopy with Right-Angle Prism

    OpenAIRE

    Yongning Liu; Jun Chang; Jie Lian; Zhaojun Liu; Qiang Wang; Zengguang Qin

    2016-01-01

    A right-angle prism was used to enhance the acoustic signal of a quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) system. The incident laser beam was parallelly inverted by the right-angle prism and passed through the gap between two tuning fork prongs again to produce another acoustic excitation. Correspondingly, two pairs of rigid metal tubes were used as acoustic resonators with resonance enhancement factors of 16 and 12, respectively. The QEPAS signal was enhanced by a factor of 22.4 co...

  11. New developments in THz quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spagnolo, Vincenzo; Patimisco, Pietro; Sampaolo, Angelo; Giglio, Marilena; Vitiello, Miriam S.; Scamarcio, Gaetano; Tittel, Frank K.

    2016-09-01

    We will report on new developments of quartz-enhanced photo-acoustic (QEPAS) sensor employing THz quantum cascade laser (QCLs). The extension of the QEPAS technique in the THz range was made possible by the realization of custom made QTFs. With the aim to improve the QTF acousto-electric transduction efficiency, we designed and realized new QTF designs. A detailed analysis of the quality factor, the resonance frequency and the electrical resistance of custom quartz tuning forks (QTFs) with different geometrical parameters is reported. The custom QTFs were employed in QEPAS sensors using THz QCLs as the laser excitation sources and targeting CH3OH and H2S. Minimum detection limits of a few tens of ppb and normalized noise equivalent absorption factors down to 3.75×10-11 cm-1W/Hz½ were achieved.

  12. Allan Deviation Plot as a Tool for Quartz-Enhanced Photoacoustic Sensors Noise Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giglio, Marilena; Patimisco, Pietro; Sampaolo, Angelo; Scamarcio, Gaetano; Tittel, Frank K; Spagnolo, Vincenzo

    2016-04-01

    We report here on the use of the Allan deviation plot to analyze the long-term stability of a quartz-enhanced photoacoustic (QEPAS) gas sensor. The Allan plot provides information about the optimum averaging time for the QEPAS signal and allows the prediction of its ultimate detection limit. The Allan deviation can also be used to determine the main sources of noise coming from the individual components of the sensor. Quartz tuning fork thermal noise dominates for integration times up to 275 s, whereas at longer averaging times, the main contribution to the sensor noise originates from laser power instabilities.

  13. Design and Optimization of QTF Chopper for Quartz-Enhanced Photoacoustic Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Lei; Liu, Yanyan; Zheng, Huadan; Liu, Xiaoli; Wu, Hongpeng; Ma, Weiguang; Zhang, Lei; Yin, Wangbao; Jia, Suotang

    2015-06-01

    A novel quartz-tuning-fork (QTF) chopper was developed for quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS). Unlike the conventional wavelength-modulation-based QEPAS, the QTF chopper chops the continuous wave excitation light into a sequence of light pulses, which realizes the amplitude-modulation (AM)-based QEPAS. In order to reduce the chopping noise and to make the resonance frequency of the QTF chopper perfectly match that of the detection QTF, a careful design and optimization were implemented. The performance of the AM-based QEPAS sensor for detection was also evaluated in detail.

  14. Trace-Gas Detection with Off-Beam Quartz Enhanced Photoacoustic Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kun; Wang, Lei; Tan, Tu; Zhang, Weijun; Chen, Weidong; Gao, Xiaoming

    2015-06-01

    Trace-gas sensors have a wide range of potential applications such as environmental monitoring, climate research, agriculture, workplace safety, medical diagnostics, and industrial process control. A recently introduced technique called quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) is described. QEPAS use a quartz tuning fork as an acoustic transducer for a photoacoustic signal induced in an absorbing gas by modulated optical radiation. Advantages of the QEPAS compared to conventional photoacoustic spectroscopy include immunity to environmental acoustic noise and ultra-small sample volume. Trace gases of , and were monitored with a novel off-beam QEPAS approach and are described in detail.

  15. Detection of Molecular Oxygen at Low Concentrations Using Quartz Enhanced Photoacoustic Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Pohlkötter

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Molecular oxygen is detected at low concentrations using photoacoustic spectroscopy despite its unfavorable photoacoustic properties. The system consists of a seed laser diode, a tapered amplifier and a quartz tuning fork based spectrophone, thus employing quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS. With this system a detection limit of 13 ppm is reached with a compact and long term stable setup. Further improvement of the detection limit is possible by adding suitable gases to the sample gas that promote the radiationless de-excitation of the oxygen molecules.

  16. Detection of molecular oxygen at low concentrations using quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlkötter, Andreas; Köhring, Michael; Willer, Ulrike; Schade, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    Molecular oxygen is detected at low concentrations using photoacoustic spectroscopy despite its unfavorable photoacoustic properties. The system consists of a seed laser diode, a tapered amplifier and a quartz tuning fork based spectrophone, thus employing quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS). With this system a detection limit of 13 ppm is reached with a compact and long term stable setup. Further improvement of the detection limit is possible by adding suitable gases to the sample gas that promote the radiationless de-excitation of the oxygen molecules.

  17. Quartz crystal growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baughman, Richard J.

    1992-01-01

    A process for growing single crystals from an amorphous substance that can undergo phase transformation to the crystalline state in an appropriate solvent. The process is carried out in an autoclave having a lower dissolution zone and an upper crystallization zone between which a temperature differential (.DELTA.T) is maintained at all times. The apparatus loaded with the substance, solvent, and seed crystals is heated slowly maintaining a very low .DELTA.T between the warmer lower zone and cooler upper zone until the amorphous substance is transformed to the crystalline state in the lower zone. The heating rate is then increased to maintain a large .DELTA.T sufficient to increase material transport between the zones and rapid crystallization. .alpha.-Quartz single crystal can thus be made from fused quartz in caustic solvent by heating to 350.degree. C. stepwise with a .DELTA.T of 0.25.degree.-3.degree. C., increasing the .DELTA.T to about 50.degree. C. after the fused quartz has crystallized, and maintaining these conditions until crystal growth in the upper zone is completed.

  18. Development of a quartz digital accelerometer for environmental sensing and navigation applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kass, W.J.; Vianco, P.T.

    1993-03-01

    A quartz digital accelerometer has been developed which uses double ended tuning forks as the active sensing elements. The authors have demonstrated the ability of this accelerometer to be capable of acceleration measurements between {+-}150G with {+-}0.5G accuracy. They have further refined the original design and assembly processes to produce accelerometers with < 1mG stability in inertial measurement applications. This report covers the development, design, processing, assembly, and testing of these devices.

  19. FBH1 Catalyzes Regression of Stalled Replication Forks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fugger, Kasper; Mistrik, Martin; Neelsen, Kai J

    2015-01-01

    DNA replication fork perturbation is a major challenge to the maintenance of genome integrity. It has been suggested that processing of stalled forks might involve fork regression, in which the fork reverses and the two nascent DNA strands anneal. Here, we show that FBH1 catalyzes regression...... of a model replication fork in vitro and promotes fork regression in vivo in response to replication perturbation. Cells respond to fork stalling by activating checkpoint responses requiring signaling through stress-activated protein kinases. Importantly, we show that FBH1, through its helicase activity...... a model whereby FBH1 promotes early checkpoint signaling by remodeling of stalled DNA replication forks....

  20. [Study on the accuracy of pressure determined by raman spectra of quartz].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ning; Zheng, Hai-fei

    2010-08-01

    Quartz as a pressure gauge and its accuracy were studied by Raman spectroscopy at 25 degrees C and ambient pressure. The result shows that even at same temperature and pressure, the Si-O vibrational mode for different grains of quartz varies between 463.59 and 464.65 cm(-1), with (+/- 0.1- +/- 0.3) cm(-1) error. The maximum difference of various grains of quartz is up to 1.06 cm(-1), much higher than the measurement error. The authors believe that the variety is resulted from the stress in the internal grains of quartz, which formed during crushing quartz into small grain. Therefore, Raman spectrum for quartz has to be firstly measured as a reference of zero pressure at ambient pressure and temperature in the experimental study by using diamond anvil cell. In addition, wavenumber drift of the spectrometer and the unstable temperature will also cause remarkable error for measuring pressure.

  1. Measurement of viscosity in small volumes of fluids by tuning fork oscillators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rotter Miloš

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available We report on the construction and performance of a home-built viscometer employing a quartz tuning fork resonator as the sensing element. The resulting device allows measuring the viscosity of fluids in volumes as low as 300 μl, while controlling the temperature between -120 °C and 150 °C. For non-conducting fluids, bare tuning forks can be used, reaching the accuracy of 1% or better in the whole temperature range. For weakly conducting fluids such as aqueous solutions, an insulating coating of paint is applied, resulting in reduced sensitivity and accuracy. The capabilities and limitations of the viscometer are illustrated on the viscosity measurements of n-hexane (between -90 °C and +50 °C and water (between 10 °C and 90 °C. Improvements regarding performance in conducting liquids and temperature stabilization are discussed.

  2. Measurement of viscosity in small volumes of fluids by tuning fork oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divišová, Hana; Lang, Jan; Rotter, Miloš; Schmoranzer, David

    2012-04-01

    We report on the construction and performance of a home-built viscometer employing a quartz tuning fork resonator as the sensing element. The resulting device allows measuring the viscosity of fluids in volumes as low as 300 μl, while controlling the temperature between -120 °C and 150 °C. For non-conducting fluids, bare tuning forks can be used, reaching the accuracy of 1% or better in the whole temperature range. For weakly conducting fluids such as aqueous solutions, an insulating coating of paint is applied, resulting in reduced sensitivity and accuracy. The capabilities and limitations of the viscometer are illustrated on the viscosity measurements of n-hexane (between -90 °C and +50 °C) and water (between 10 °C and 90 °C). Improvements regarding performance in conducting liquids and temperature stabilization are discussed.

  3. South Fork Holston River basin 1988 biomonitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saylor, C.F.; Ahlstedt, S.A.

    1990-06-01

    There is concern over the effects of shifts in land use use practices on the aquatic fauna of streams in the South Fork Holston River basin in northwestern North Carolina and southwestern Virginia. Trout reproduction has noticeably declined in the Watauga River subbasin. The Watauga River and Elk River subbasins have been subjected to commercial and resort development. The Middle fork Holston River and the upper South Fork Holston River subbasins have been affected by agricultural and mining activities, respectively (Cox, 1986). To aid reclamation and management of the South Fork Holston basin, Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) biologists conducted biomonitoring--including index of biotic integrity and macroinvertebrate sampling--on the Middle Fork Holston, South Fork Holston, Watauga, and Elk Rivers to assess cumulative impairment related to changes in habitat and pollutant loading in these subbasins. Biomonitoring can detect environmental degradation, help document problem areas, and assist in development of strategies for managing water quality. This report discusses the methods and materials and results of the biomonitoring of South Fork Holston River Basin. 13 refs., 5 figs., 12 tabs.

  4. Quartz resonator processing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Roswell D. M.

    1983-01-01

    Disclosed is a single chamber ultra-high vacuum processing system for the oduction of hermetically sealed quartz resonators wherein electrode metallization and sealing are carried out along with cleaning and bake-out without any air exposure between the processing steps. The system includes a common vacuum chamber in which is located a rotatable wheel-like member which is adapted to move a plurality of individual component sets of a flat pack resonator unit past discretely located processing stations in said chamber whereupon electrode deposition takes place followed by the placement of ceramic covers over a frame containing a resonator element and then to a sealing stage where a pair of hydraulic rams including heating elements effect a metallized bonding of the covers to the frame.

  5. Quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy with a 3.38 μm antimonide distributed feedback laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahjah, Mohammad; Belahsene, Sofiane; Nähle, Lars; Fischer, Marc; Koeth, Johannes; Rouillard, Yves; Vicet, Aurore

    2012-07-01

    A system for gas sensing based on the quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy technique has been developed. It makes use of a quantum well distributed feedback (DFB) laser diode emitting at 3.38 μm. This laser emits near room temperature in the continuous wave regime. A spectrophone, consisting of a quartz tuning fork and two steel microresonators were used. Second derivative wavelength modulation detection is used to perform low concentration measurements. The sensitivity and the linearity of the Quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) sensor were studied. A normalized noise equivalent absorption coefficient of 4.06×10(-9) cm(-1)·W/Hz(1/2) was achieved.

  6. Grand Forks - East Grand Forks Urban Water Resources Study. Water Supply Appendix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-07-01

    soon for water supply if there was an extreme need for it. Water can be pumped from Audubon Lake to the McClusky Canal which flows to Lone Tree...from the well field to Grand Forks’ and East Grand Forks’ water treatment plants. Alternatively, surface canals could be used to transport the water...size to Grand Forks and East Grand Forks. 15 Midi o .t c"I- u,,-Tjo en en %0" trA .n-4 on 0% %0A.) G n % 4 n 14 0; 11-; 0C4 10 0 r-’ 0 8 - 0 1-1 1-4

  7. Henrys Fork near Ashton, ID (YHEN)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of the Interior — Henrys Fork near Ashton, Idaho (YHEN) Sample Collection: Samples were collected near the USGS stream gage 13046000 (Latitude 44°04'11", Longitude 111°30'38" NAD83)....

  8. Quartz-Enhanced Photoacoustic Spectroscopy with Right-Angle Prism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongning; Chang, Jun; Lian, Jie; Liu, Zhaojun; Wang, Qiang; Qin, Zengguang

    2016-02-06

    A right-angle prism was used to enhance the acoustic signal of a quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) system. The incident laser beam was parallelly inverted by the right-angle prism and passed through the gap between two tuning fork prongs again to produce another acoustic excitation. Correspondingly, two pairs of rigid metal tubes were used as acoustic resonators with resonance enhancement factors of 16 and 12, respectively. The QEPAS signal was enhanced by a factor of 22.4 compared with the original signal, which was acquired without resonators or a prism. In addition, the system noise was reduced a little with double resonators due to the Q factor decrease. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was greatly improved. Additionally, a normalized noise equivalent absorption coefficient (NNEA) of 5.8 × 10(-8) W·cm(-1)·Hz(-1/2) was achieved for water vapor detection in the atmosphere.

  9. Quartz-Enhanced Photoacoustic Spectroscopy with Right-Angle Prism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongning Liu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A right-angle prism was used to enhance the acoustic signal of a quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS system. The incident laser beam was parallelly inverted by the right-angle prism and passed through the gap between two tuning fork prongs again to produce another acoustic excitation. Correspondingly, two pairs of rigid metal tubes were used as acoustic resonators with resonance enhancement factors of 16 and 12, respectively. The QEPAS signal was enhanced by a factor of 22.4 compared with the original signal, which was acquired without resonators or a prism. In addition, the system noise was reduced a little with double resonators due to the Q factor decrease. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR was greatly improved. Additionally, a normalized noise equivalent absorption coefficient (NNEA of 5.8 × 10−8 W·cm−1·Hz−1/2 was achieved for water vapor detection in the atmosphere.

  10. Replication fork reversal triggers fork degradation in BRCA2-defective cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mijic, S. (Sofija); Zellweger, R. (Ralph); Chappidi, N. (Nagaraja); Berti, M. (Matteo); Jacobs, K. (Kurt); Mutreja, K. (Karun); Ursich, S. (Sebastian); Ray Chaudhuri, A. (Arnab); Nussenzweig, A. (Andre); Janscak, P. (Pavel); Lopes, M. (Massimo)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBesides its role in homologous recombination, the tumor suppressor BRCA2 protects stalled replication forks from nucleolytic degradation. Defective fork stability contributes to chemotherapeutic sensitivity of BRCA2-defective tumors by yet-elusive mechanisms. Using DNA fiber spreading

  11. FBH1 Catalyzes Regression of Stalled Replication Forks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasper Fugger

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available DNA replication fork perturbation is a major challenge to the maintenance of genome integrity. It has been suggested that processing of stalled forks might involve fork regression, in which the fork reverses and the two nascent DNA strands anneal. Here, we show that FBH1 catalyzes regression of a model replication fork in vitro and promotes fork regression in vivo in response to replication perturbation. Cells respond to fork stalling by activating checkpoint responses requiring signaling through stress-activated protein kinases. Importantly, we show that FBH1, through its helicase activity, is required for early phosphorylation of ATM substrates such as CHK2 and CtIP as well as hyperphosphorylation of RPA. These phosphorylations occur prior to apparent DNA double-strand break formation. Furthermore, FBH1-dependent signaling promotes checkpoint control and preserves genome integrity. We propose a model whereby FBH1 promotes early checkpoint signaling by remodeling of stalled DNA replication forks.

  12. [Quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy trace gas detection system based on the Fabry-Perot demodulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Cheng; Zhu, Yong; Wei, Wei; Zhang, Jie; Tian, Li; Xu, Zu-Wen

    2013-05-01

    An all-optical quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy system, based on the F-P demodulation, for trace gas detection in the open environment was proposed. In quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS), an optical fiber Fabry-Perot method was used to replace the conventional electronic demodulation method. The photoacoustic signal was obtained by demodulating the variation of the Fabry-Perot cavity between the quartz tuning fork side and the fiber face. An experimental system was setup. The experiment for detection of water vapour in the open environment was carried on. A normalized noise equivalent absorption coefficient of 2.80 x 10(-7) cm(-1) x W x Hz(-1/2) was achieved. The result demonstrated that the sensitivity of the all-optical quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy system is about 2.6 times higher than that of the conventional QEPAS system. The all-optical quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy system is immune to electromagnetic interference, safe in flammable and explosive gas detection, suitable for high temperature and high humidity environments and realizable for long distance, multi-point and network sensing.

  13. Quartz-enhanced photo-acoustic spectroscopy for breath analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Jan C.; Lamard, Laurent; Feng, Yuyang; Focant, Jeff-F.; Peremans, Andre; Lassen, Mikael

    2017-03-01

    An innovative and novel quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) sensor for highly sensitive and selective breath gas analysis is introduced. The QEPAS sensor consists of two acoustically coupled micro- resonators (mR) with an off-axis 20 kHz quartz tuning fork (QTF). The complete acoustically coupled mR system is optimized based on finite element simulations and experimentally verified. Due to the very low fabrication costs the QEPAS sensor presents a clear breakthrough in the field of photoacoustic spectroscopy by introducing novel disposable gas chambers in order to avoid cleaning after each test. The QEPAS sensor is pumped resonantly by a nanosecond pulsed single-mode mid-infrared optical parametric oscillator (MIR OPO). Spectroscopic measurements of methane and methanol in the 3.1 μm to 3.7 μm wavelength region is conducted. Demonstrating a resolution bandwidth of 1 cm-1. An Allan deviation analysis shows that the detection limit at optimum integration time for the QEPAS sensor is 32 ppbv@190s for methane and that the background noise is solely due to the thermal noise of the QTF. Spectra of both individual molecules as well as mixtures of molecules were measured and analyzed. The molecules are representative of exhaled breath gasses that are bio-markers for medical diagnostics.

  14. 16 CFR 1512.13 - Requirements for front fork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Requirements for front fork. 1512.13 Section 1512.13 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR BICYCLES Regulations § 1512.13 Requirements for front fork. The front fork shall...

  15. 27 CFR 9.113 - North Fork of Long Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false North Fork of Long Island... North Fork of Long Island. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “North Fork of Long Island.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of...

  16. Piezoelectric tuning fork probe for atomic force microscopy imaging and specific recognition force spectroscopy of an enzyme and its ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makky, Ali; Viel, Pascal; Chen, Shu-wen Wendy; Berthelot, Thomas; Pellequer, Jean-Luc; Polesel-Maris, Jérôme

    2013-11-01

    Piezoelectric quartz tuning fork has drawn the attention of many researchers for the development of new atomic force microscopy (AFM) self-sensing probes. However, only few works have been done for soft biological materials imaging in air or aqueous conditions. The aim of this work was to demonstrate the efficiency of the AFM tuning fork probe to perform high-resolution imaging of proteins and to study the specific interaction between a ligand and its receptor in aqueous media. Thus, a new kind of self-sensing AFM sensor was introduced to realize imaging and biochemical specific recognition spectroscopy of glucose oxidase enzyme using a new chemical functionalization procedure of the metallic tips based on the electrochemical reduction of diazonium salt. This scanning probe as well as the functionalization strategy proved to be efficient respectively for the topography and force spectroscopy of soft biological materials in buffer conditions. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Development of the Pintle Release Fork Mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BOGER, R.M.; DALE, R.

    1999-08-27

    An improved method of attachment of the pintle to the piston in the universal sampler is being developed. The mechanism utilizes a forked release disk which captures two balls in a cavity formed by a hole in the piston and a groove in the pintle rod.

  18. Homologous Recombination as a Replication Fork Escort: Fork-Protection and Recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey Costes

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Homologous recombination is a universal mechanism that allows DNA repair and ensures the efficiency of DNA replication. The substrate initiating the process of homologous recombination is a single-stranded DNA that promotes a strand exchange reaction resulting in a genetic exchange that promotes genetic diversity and DNA repair. The molecular mechanisms by which homologous recombination repairs a double-strand break have been extensively studied and are now well characterized. However, the mechanisms by which homologous recombination contribute to DNA replication in eukaryotes remains poorly understood. Studies in bacteria have identified multiple roles for the machinery of homologous recombination at replication forks. Here, we review our understanding of the molecular pathways involving the homologous recombination machinery to support the robustness of DNA replication. In addition to its role in fork-recovery and in rebuilding a functional replication fork apparatus, homologous recombination may also act as a fork-protection mechanism. We discuss that some of the fork-escort functions of homologous recombination might be achieved by loading of the recombination machinery at inactivated forks without a need for a strand exchange step; as well as the consequence of such a model for the stability of eukaryotic genomes.

  19. Single-tube on-beam quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Huadan; Dong, Lei; Sampaolo, Angelo; Wu, Hongpeng; Patimisco, Pietro; Yin, Xukun; Ma, Weiguang; Zhang, Lei; Yin, Wangbao; Spagnolo, Vincenzo; Jia, Suotang; Tittel, Frank K

    2016-03-01

    Quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) with a single-tube acoustic microresonator (AmR) inserted between the prongs of a custom quartz tuning fork (QTF) was developed, investigated, and optimized experimentally. Due to the high acoustic coupling efficiency between the AmR and the QTF, the single-tube on-beam QEPAS spectrophone configuration improves the detection sensitivity by 2 orders of magnitude compared to a bare QTF. This approach significantly reduces the spectrophone size with respect to the traditional on-beam spectrophone configuration, thereby facilitating the laser beam alignment. A 1σ normalized noise equivalent absorption coefficient of 1.21×10(-8) cm(-1)·W/√Hz was obtained for dry CO2 detection at normal atmospheric pressure.

  20. Mid-Infrared Trace Gas Sensor Technology Based on Intracavity Quartz-Enhanced Photoacoustic Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Wojtas

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The application of compact inexpensive trace gas sensor technology to a mid-infrared nitric oxide (NO detectoion using intracavity quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (I-QEPAS is reported. A minimum detection limit of 4.8 ppbv within a 30 ms integration time was demonstrated by using a room-temperature, continuous-wave, distributed-feedback quantum cascade laser (QCL emitting at 5.263 µm (1900.08 cm−1 and a new compact design of a high-finesse bow-tie optical cavity with an integrated resonant quartz tuning fork (QTF. The optimum configuration of the bow-tie cavity was simulated using custom software. Measurements were performed with a wavelength modulation scheme (WM using a 2f detection procedure.

  1. Mid-Infrared Trace Gas Sensor Technology Based on Intracavity Quartz-Enhanced Photoacoustic Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtas, Jacek; Gluszek, Aleksander; Hudzikowski, Arkadiusz; Tittel, Frank K

    2017-03-04

    The application of compact inexpensive trace gas sensor technology to a mid-infrared nitric oxide (NO) detectoion using intracavity quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (I-QEPAS) is reported. A minimum detection limit of 4.8 ppbv within a 30 ms integration time was demonstrated by using a room-temperature, continuous-wave, distributed-feedback quantum cascade laser (QCL) emitting at 5.263 µm (1900.08 cm-1) and a new compact design of a high-finesse bow-tie optical cavity with an integrated resonant quartz tuning fork (QTF). The optimum configuration of the bow-tie cavity was simulated using custom software. Measurements were performed with a wavelength modulation scheme (WM) using a 2f detection procedure.

  2. Gas detection with evanescent-wave quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yingchun; Jin, Wei; Ho, Hoi Lut

    2012-02-01

    Evanescent-wave gas sensing with tapered optical fibers (TOFs) and quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) is reported. The evanescent field of TOFs with diameter down to sub-wavelength is utilized for photoacoustic excitation in photoacoustic spectroscopy. A quartz tuning fork (QTF) with resonant frequency about ~32.75 kHz is used to detect the generated pressure wave. A normalized noise equivalent absorption coefficient of 1.5×10-6 cm-1 W/√Hz is achieved for acetylene detection with a fiber taper with a waist diameter of 1.1 μm. It is found that QEPAS with TOFs of sub-wavelength diameters exhibit comparable sensitivities with open path QEPAS but with additional advantages of lower insertion loss, easier alignment, and multiplexing capability.

  3. Quartz-enhanced photoacoustic sensors for H2S trace gas detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spagnolo, Vincenzo; Patimisco, Pietro; Sampaolo, Angelo; Pennetta, Riccardo; Siciliani de Cumis, Mario; Viciani, Silvia; Borri, Simone; De Natale, Paolo; D'Amato, Francesco; Vitiello, Miriam S.; Scamarcio, Gaetano

    2015-01-01

    We report on three different quartz enhanced photoacoustic (QEPAS) sensors operating in the near-IR, mid-IR and THz spectral ranges, employing quartz tuning forks of different sizes and shapes. To test our sensors in the near-IR we used a diode laser working at 2.7 μm, while in the mid-IR we employed a quantum cascade laser (QCL) operating at 7.9 μm, fiber-coupled to the QEPAS cell. In the THz range we employed a QCL emitting at 2.95 THz. H2S absorption features with line-strength up to 10-20 cm/mol were selected and QEPAS normalized noise-equivalent absorption in the 10-10 W•cm-1•Hz-1/2 range was achieved..

  4. THz quartz-enhanced photoacoustic sensor employing a quantum cascade laser source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spagnolo, V.; Patimisco, P.; Borri, S.; Sampaolo, A.; Scamarcio, G.; Vitiello, M. S.; Beere, H. E.; Ritchie, D. A.

    2013-12-01

    We report on an innovative quartz enhanced photoacoustic (QEPAS) gas sensor operating in the THz spectral range, employing a custom quartz tuning fork (QTF) with the two prongs spaced by ~800 μm. To test our sensor we employed a quantum cascade laser light source and selected a methanol rotational absorption line falling at 131.054 cm-1 (~3.93 THz), with line-strength S = 4.28•10-21 cm. The sensor operated at 10 Torr pressure on the QTF first flexion resonance frequency at 4245 Hz. We achieved a QEPAS normalized noise-equivalent absorption of 2•10-10 W·cm-1•Hz-1/2 comparable with the best result of mid-IR QEPAS systems.

  5. Laser welding of fused quartz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piltch, Martin S.; Carpenter, Robert W.; Archer, III, McIlwaine

    2003-06-10

    Refractory materials, such as fused quartz plates and rods are welded using a heat source, such as a high power continuous wave carbon dioxide laser. The radiation is optimized through a process of varying the power, the focus, and the feed rates of the laser such that full penetration welds may be accomplished. The process of optimization varies the characteristic wavelengths of the laser until the radiation is almost completely absorbed by the refractory material, thereby leading to a very rapid heating of the material to the melting point. This optimization naturally occurs when a carbon dioxide laser is used to weld quartz. As such this method of quartz welding creates a minimum sized heat-affected zone. Furthermore, the welding apparatus and process requires a ventilation system to carry away the silicon oxides that are produced during the welding process to avoid the deposition of the silicon oxides on the surface of the quartz plates or the contamination of the welds with the silicon oxides.

  6. On bandwidth characteristics of tuning fork micro-gyroscope with mechanically coupled sense mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Yunfang; Li, Hongsheng; Huang, Libin; Ding, Xukai; Wang, Haipeng

    2014-07-21

    The bandwidth characteristics of a tuning fork micro-gyroscope with mechanically coupled sense mode were investigated in this paper to provide some references for mechanical bandwidth design. The concept of sense mode mechanical coupling is introduced first. Theoretical frequency response analyses were then carried out on the mechanical part of the gyroscope. Equations representing the relationships between the differential output signal and the frequency of the input angular rate were deduced in full frequency range and further simplified in low frequency range. Based on these equations, bandwidth characteristics under ideal and non-ideal conditions are discussed. Analytical results show that under ideal conditions, the bandwidth characteristics of a tuning fork micro-gyroscope are similar to those of a single mass micro-gyroscope, but under non-ideal conditions, especially when sense mass and/or stiffness are asymmetric, the bandwidth characteristics would be quite different because the in-phase mode would participate in the anti-phase vibration response. Experimental verifications were carried out on two micro-gyroscope prototypes designed in our laboratory. The deduced equations and analytical results can be used in guiding the mechanical bandwidth design of tuning fork micro-gyroscopes with mechanically coupled sense mode.

  7. On Bandwidth Characteristics of Tuning Fork Micro-Gyroscope with Mechanically Coupled Sense Mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunfang Ni

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The bandwidth characteristics of a tuning fork micro-gyroscope with mechanically coupled sense mode were investigated in this paper to provide some references for mechanical bandwidth design. The concept of sense mode mechanical coupling is introduced first. Theoretical frequency response analyses were then carried out on the mechanical part of the gyroscope. Equations representing the relationships between the differential output signal and the frequency of the input angular rate were deduced in full frequency range and further simplified in low frequency range. Based on these equations, bandwidth characteristics under ideal and non-ideal conditions are discussed. Analytical results show that under ideal conditions, the bandwidth characteristics of a tuning fork micro-gyroscope are similar to those of a single mass micro-gyroscope, but under non-ideal conditions, especially when sense mass and/or stiffness are asymmetric, the bandwidth characteristics would be quite different because the in-phase mode would participate in the anti-phase vibration response. Experimental verifications were carried out on two micro-gyroscope prototypes designed in our laboratory. The deduced equations and analytical results can be used in guiding the mechanical bandwidth design of tuning fork micro-gyroscopes with mechanically coupled sense mode.

  8. Laser direct synthesis of graphene on quartz

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Dapeng; Mitchell, James I.; Tansarawiput, Chookiat; Nam, Woongsik; Qi, Minghao; Ye, Peide D.; Xu, Xianfan

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate a laser-based technique to directly synthesize few layer graphene on quartz substrates without using any metal catalyst. In our approach, a photoresist S-1805 (from Shipley Comp.) film coated on quartz wafers was heated, and then decomposed, by irradiation of a continuous-wave laser. The carbon atoms from the photoresist were dissolved in the molten quartz, and then extracted to form graphene when the temperature of the quartz was decreased. Raman spectroscopy shows the as-prod...

  9. Optical Detection Technique Using Quartz-Enhanced Photoacoustic Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hongpeng; Zhang, Dongdong; Dong, Lei; Zheng, Huadan; Liu, Yanyan; Yin, Wangbao; Ma, Weiguang; Zhang, Lei; Jia, Suotang

    2015-06-01

    A new optical detection approach based on quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) to detect gases is developed. The new method not only employs a modulated laser to excite acoustic wave, as the general QEPAS does, but also adds an extra laser beam without modulation as the detection source to transform the prong vibration into a laser intensity change. Due to the mechanical vibration of the prongs, the intensity of the reflection laser beam is modulated. Thus, the information of the target gas (composition, concentration, etc.) is obtained by demodulating the reflected light. The achieved sensitivity of is inter-compared to the sensitivity of the conventional QEPAS. Further developments of the new optical detection approach are also discussed in detail.

  10. Code Forking, Governance, and Sustainability in Open Source Software

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juho Lindman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The right to fork open source code is at the core of open source licensing. All open source licenses grant the right to fork their code, that is to start a new development effort using an existing code as its base. Thus, code forking represents the single greatest tool available for guaranteeing sustainability in open source software. In addition to bolstering program sustainability, code forking directly affects the governance of open source initiatives. Forking, and even the mere possibility of forking code, affects the governance and sustainability of open source initiatives on three distinct levels: software, community, and ecosystem. On the software level, the right to fork makes planned obsolescence, versioning, vendor lock-in, end-of-support issues, and similar initiatives all but impossible to implement. On the community level, forking impacts both sustainability and governance through the power it grants the community to safeguard against unfavourable actions by corporations or project leaders. On the business-ecosystem level forking can serve as a catalyst for innovation while simultaneously promoting better quality software through natural selection. Thus, forking helps keep open source initiatives relevant and presents opportunities for the development and commercialization of current and abandoned programs.

  11. The forked flap repair for hypospadias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Chadha

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Despite the abundance of techniques for the repair of Hypospadias, its problems still persist and a satisfactory design to correct the penile curvature with the formation of neourethra from the native urethral tissue or genital or extragenital tissues, with minimal postoperative complications has yet to evolve. Aim: Persisting with such an endeavor, a new technique for the repair of distal and midpenile hypospadias is described. Materials and Methods: The study has been done in 70 cases over the past 11 years. The "Forked-Flap" repair is a single stage method for the repair of such Hypospadias with chordee. It takes advantage of the rich vascular communication at the corona and capitalizes on the established reliability of the meatal based flip-flap. The repair achieves straightening of the curvature of the penis by complete excision of chordee tissue from the ventral surface of the penis beneath the urethral plate. The urethra is reconstructed using the native plate with forked flap extensions and genital tissue relying on the concept of meatal based flaps. Water proofing by dartos tissue and reinforcement by Nesbit′s prepucial tissue transfer completes the one stage procedure. Statistical Analysis: An analysis of 70 cases of this single stage technique of repair of penile hypospadias with chordee, operated at 3 to 5 years of age over the past 11 years is presented. Results and Conclusion: The Forked Flap gives comparable and replicable results; except for a urethrocutaneous fistula rate of 4% no other complications were observed.

  12. Limits of Luminescence Dating: an update regarding quartz of the Southern Alps of New Zealand and the Olympic Mountains, Washington, USA

    OpenAIRE

    Wyshnytzky, Cianna E.; Rittenour, Tammy M.

    2013-01-01

    Late Pleistocene glacial sediments from the South Fork Hoh River valley in the Olympic Mountains, Washington, USA and the Lake Hawea valley in the Southern Alps, New Zealand were dated using optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) on quartz and infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL) on feldspar sand from 2011-2013. High sediment supply (typical of glacial environments), short transport distances, and sediment newly eroded from bedrock sources were expected to pose problems for luminescence d...

  13. Replication fork stability confers chemoresistance in BRCA-deficient cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chaudhuri, Arnab Ray; Callen, Elsa; Ding, Xia

    2016-01-01

    nuclease to stalled replication forks, which in turn protects nascent DNA strands from extensive degradation. More generally, acquisition of PARP inhibitors and cisplatin resistance is associated with replication fork protection in Brca2-deficient tumour cells that do not develop Brca2 reversion mutations....... Disruption of multiple proteins, including PARP1 and CHD4, leads to the same end point of replication fork protection, highlighting the complexities by which tumour cells evade chemotherapeutic interventions and acquire drug resistance....

  14. 33 CFR 207.370 - Big Fork River, Minn.; logging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Big Fork River, Minn.; logging. 207.370 Section 207.370 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 207.370 Big Fork River, Minn.; logging. (a) During the season...

  15. Development of Quartz Fiber Calorimetry

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % RD40 \\\\ \\\\ Very Forward Calorimeters (VFCs) in LHC detectors should cover the pseudorapidity range from $\\eta$~=~2.5 to at least $\\eta$~=~5 in order to compute missing transverse energy and for jet tagging. Operation at such high rapidity requires the use of a calorimetry technique that is very radiation resistant, fast and insensitive to radioactivity (especially to neutrons). This can be accomplished through the Quartz-Calorimeter~(Q-Cal) concept of embedding silica core fibers, that resist to the Gigarad radiation level, into an absorber. In this calorimeter the shower particles produce light through the Cherenkov effect generating a signal less than 10~ns in duration. Unique to this new technology the visible energy of hadronic showers has a transverse dimension nearly an order of magnitude smaller than that in conventional calorimeters, enabling precise spatial resolution, sharper isolation cuts and better jet recognition against the minimum bias events background. Last but not least, most radioactive ...

  16. Quartz-enhanced photoacoustic detection of ethylene using a 10.5 μm quantum cascade laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen; Li, Zhili; Ren, Wei

    2016-02-22

    A quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) sensor has been developed for the sensitive detection of ethylene (C2H4) at 10.5 µm using a continuous-wave distributed-feedback quantum cascade laser. At this long-wavelength infrared, the key acoustic elements of quartz tuning fork and micro-resonators were optimized to improve the detection signal-to-noise ratio by a factor of >4. The sensor calibration demonstrated an excellent linear response (R2>0.999) to C2H4 concentration at the selected operating pressure of 500 and 760 Torr. With a minimum detection limit of 50 parts per billion (ppb) achieved at an averaging time of 70 s, the sensor has been deployed for measuring the C2H4 efflux during the respiration of biological samples in an agronomic environment.

  17. Off-axis quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy using a pulsed nanosecond mid-infrared optical parametric oscillator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassen, Mikael; Lamard, Laurent; Feng, Yuyang; Peremans, Andre; Petersen, Jan C

    2016-09-01

    A trace-gas sensor, based on quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS), consisting of two acoustically coupled micro-resonators (mR) with an off-axis 20 kHz quartz tuning fork (QTF) is demonstrated. The complete acoustically coupled mR system is optimized based on finite-element simulations and is experimentally verified. The QEPAS sensor is pumped resonantly by a nanosecond pulsed single-mode mid-infrared optical parametric oscillator. The sensor is used for spectroscopic measurements on methane in the 3.1-3.5 μm wavelength region with a resolution bandwidth of 1  cm-1 and a detection limit of 0.8 ppm. An Allan deviation analysis shows that the detection limit at the optimum integration time for the QEPAS sensor is 32 ppbv at 190 s, and that the background noise is due solely to the thermal noise of the QTF.

  18. Monitoring vibrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiryaki, B. [Hacettepe University (Turkey). Dept. of Mining Engineering

    2003-12-01

    The paper examines the prediction and optimisation of machine vibrations in longwall shearers. Underground studies were carried out at the Middle Anatolian Lignite Mine, between 1993 and 1997. Several shearer drums with different pick lacing arrangements were designed and tested on double-ended ranging longwall shearers employed at the mine. A computer program called the Vibration Analysis Program (VAP) was developed for analysing machine vibrations in longwall shearers. Shearer drums that were tested underground, as well as some provided by leading manufacturers, were analyzed using these programs. The results of the experiments and computer analyses are given in the article. 4 refs., 9 figs.

  19. Grand Forks - East Grand Forks Urban Water Resources Study. Flood Control Appendix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-07-01

    special interest), mud puppy (one recorded observation in Red River at Grand Forks - special interest) and the gray tree frog (special interest). Few if...have to be evacuated. Similarly, substantial commercial and industrial development along Mill Road in Reach 5 would require relocation to flood-free...to pass normal flows. The tie-back levees would have an average height of 7.1 feet eastward to Mill Road and 4.5 feet westward to high ground. Also

  20. Material removal mechanism and material removal rate model of polishing process for quartz glass using soft particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Defu; Chen, Guanglin; Hu, Qing

    2015-10-01

    Fiber arrays are used to connect arrayed waveguide chips. The end-faces of fiber array components are multi-materials non-uniform surfaces. Their low polishing quality has become a bottleneck that restricts coupling performance of integrated photo-electronic devices. The chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) is normally used to improve the polishing quality of the end-faces of fiber array components. It is very important to optimize process parameters by researching the mechanical behavior of nanoparticles and material microstructure evolution on the CMP interfaces. Based on the elastic and hyper-elastic contact of the soft polishing particle with quartz glass and polishing pad, the material removal mechanism at molecular scale of polishing process for quartz glass using soft polishing particles is investigated, and the material removal rate model is also derived by using Arrhenius theory and molecule vibration theory. Theoretical and experimental results show that the material is mainly removed by the interfacial tribo-chemical effect between polishing particle and quartz glass during CMP process. The depth of a single particle embedding into the quartz glass is at molecular scale, and the superficial molecules of quartz glass are removed by chemical reactions because of enough energy obtained. The material removal rate of quartz glass during CMP process is determined by the polishing pressure, the chemical reagents and its concentration, and the relative movement speed between the quartz glass workpiece and the polishing pad.

  1. Vibrational Diver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlov, Victor; Ivanova, Alevtina; Schipitsyn, Vitalii; Stambouli, Moncef

    2014-10-01

    The paper is concerned with dynamics of light solid in cavity with liquid subjected to rotational vibration in the external force field. New vibrational phenomenon - diving of a light cylinder to the cavity bottom is found. The experimental investigation of a horizontal annulus with a partition has shown that under vibration a light body situated in the upper part of the layer is displaced in a threshold manner some distance away from the boundary. In this case the body executes symmetric tangential oscillations. An increase of the vibration intensity leads to a tangential displacement of the body near the external boundary. This displacement is caused by the tangential component of the vibrational lift force, which appears as soon as the oscillations lose symmetry. In this case the trajectory of the body oscillatory motion has the form of a loop. The tangential lift force makes stable the position of the body on the inclined section of the layer and even in its lower part. A theoretical interpretation has been proposed, which explains stabilization of a quasi-equilibrium state of a light body near the cavity bottom in the framework of vibrational hydromechanics.

  2. Inventory and Monitoring Plan for Deep Fork National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Inventory and Monitoring Plan (IMP) is prepared to document the inventory and monitoring surveys that will, or could be conducted at Deep Fork National Wildlife...

  3. New histone supply regulates replication fork speed and PCNA unloading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mejlvang, Jakob; Feng, Yunpeng; Alabert, Constance

    2014-01-01

    Correct duplication of DNA sequence and its organization into chromatin is central to genome function and stability. However, it remains unclear how cells coordinate DNA synthesis with provision of new histones for chromatin assembly to ensure chromosomal stability. In this paper, we show...... that replication fork speed is dependent on new histone supply and efficient nucleosome assembly. Inhibition of canonical histone biosynthesis impaired replication fork progression and reduced nucleosome occupancy on newly synthesized DNA. Replication forks initially remained stable without activation...... unloading is delayed in the absence of nucleosome assembly. We propose that coupling of fork speed and PCNA unloading to nucleosome assembly provides a simple mechanism to adjust DNA replication and maintain chromatin integrity during transient histone shortage....

  4. An inventory of wildlife resources, Marsh Fork, summer 1973

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Bureau of Sport Fisheries and Wildlife contracted us to do a wildlife resource inventory of the Marsh Fork in summer, 1973. We had planned the inventory in two...

  5. Regulation of replication fork progression through histone supply and demand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Anja; Corpet, Armelle; Cook, Adam J L

    2007-01-01

    DNA replication in eukaryotes requires nucleosome disruption ahead of the replication fork and reassembly behind. An unresolved issue concerns how histone dynamics are coordinated with fork progression to maintain chromosomal stability. Here, we characterize a complex in which the human histone......1 chaperone function, histone supply, and replicative unwinding of DNA in chromatin. We propose that Asf1, as a histone acceptor and donor, handles parental and new histones at the replication fork via an Asf1-(H3-H4)-MCM2-7 intermediate and thus provides a means to fine-tune replication fork...... chaperone Asf1 and MCM2-7, the putative replicative helicase, are connected through a histone H3-H4 bridge. Depletion of Asf1 by RNA interference impedes DNA unwinding at replication sites, and similar defects arise from overproduction of new histone H3-H4 that compromises Asf1 function. These data link Asf...

  6. Fabrication of a novel quartz micromachined gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Liqiang; Xing, Jianchun; Wang, Haoxu; Wu, Xuezhong

    2015-04-01

    A novel quartz micromachined gyroscope is proposed in this paper. The novel gyroscope is realized by quartz anisotropic wet etching and 3-dimensional electrodes deposition. In the quartz wet etching process, the quality of Cr/Au mask films affecting the process are studied by experiment. An excellent mask film with 100 Å Cr and 2000 Å Au is achieved by optimization of experimental parameters. Crystal facets after etching seriously affect the following sidewall electrodes deposition process and the structure's mechanical behaviours. Removal of crystal facets is successfully implemented by increasing etching time based on etching rate ratios between facets and crystal planes. In the electrodes deposition process, an aperture mask evaporation method is employed to prepare electrodes on 3-dimensional surfaces of the gyroscope structure. The alignments among the aperture masks are realized by the ABM™ Mask Aligner System. Based on the processes described above, a z-axis quartz gyroscope is fabricated successfully.

  7. Electronic dipole resonance in smoky quartz

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerssen, J.; Volger, J.

    1967-01-01

    Microwave absorption in smoky quartz mono-crystal is ascribed to resonance transitions of trapped electrons between initially configurational degenerated states, which are Stark-splitted by a polarizing electric field.

  8. Quartz Mountain/Oklahoma Summer Arts Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frates, Mary Y.; Madeja, Stanley S.

    1982-01-01

    Describes the Quartz Mountain Oklahoma Summer Arts Institute program. It is designed to nurture artistic talent and to provide intensive arts experiences in music, dance, theater, and the visual arts for talented students aged 14-18. (AM)

  9. Thermal neutron diffusion cooling in wet quartz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drozdowicz, K. [Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Radzikowskiego 152, PL-31-342 Cracow (Poland)]. E-mail: krzysztof.drozdowicz@ifj.edu.pl; Krynicka, E. [Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Radzikowskiego 152, PL-31-342 Crakcw (Poland); Dabrowska, J. [Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Radzikowskiego 152, PL-31-342 Cracow (Poland)

    2007-07-15

    The thermal neutron diffusion parameters of a rock material depend on the rock matrix itself and on the water content. The effect has been studied in quartz by Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of the variable buckling experiment for nine series of samples. A hyperbolic dependence of the density-removed diffusion cooling coefficient on the water content shows a variability of this parameter by two orders of magnitude. The function obtained for wet quartz is compared with the analogous dependence for wet dolomite.

  10. Quartz-superconductor quantum electromechanical system

    OpenAIRE

    Woolley, M. J.; Emzir, M. F.; Milburn, G. J.; Jerger, M.; Goryachev, M.; Tobar, M. E.; Fedorov, A.

    2016-01-01

    We propose and analyse a quantum electromechanical system composed of a monolithic quartz bulk acoustic wave (BAW) oscillator coupled to a superconducting transmon qubit via an intermediate LC electrical circuit. Monolithic quartz oscillators offer unprecedentedly high effective masses and quality factors for the investigation of mechanical oscillators in the quantum regime. Ground-state cooling of such mechanical modes via resonant piezoelectric coupling to an LC circuit, which is itself sid...

  11. Grand Forks - East Grand Forks Urban Water Resources Study. Background Information Appendix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-07-01

    Mov. Dec. Jan. Feb. M6r. Apr. Kay June Total . son , Sept. Ot. e. Dc Jan. Febr.Mm, Ar.. May J-, total 1898 1.0 6.6 5.7 0 0 0 M 1930 - 1931 C C..4 8.2...plate 13. 141 -I TABLE 30 NEIG ~HOO-10 GROUPS Grand Forks Near South Side Neighborhood Association Near North Side Neighborhood Association Lake Agassiz...families, handicapped, and elderly persons. While not directly con- cerned with water resources, its resources might be utilized if per- sons are displaced

  12. Vibration Control of Flexible Mode for a Beam-Type Substrate Transport Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheol Hoon Park

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Beam-type substrate transport robots are widely used to handle substrates, especially in the solar cell manufacturing process. To reduce the takt time and increase productivity, accurate position control becomes increasingly important as the size of the substrate increases. However, the vibration caused by the flexible forks in beam-type robots interferes with accurate positioning, which results in long takt times in the manufacturing process. To minimize the vibration and transport substrates on the fork as fast as possible, the trajectories should be prevented from exciting the flexible modes of the forks. For this purpose, a fifth-order polynomial trajectory generator and input shaping were incorporated into the controller of the beam-type robot in this study. The flexible modes of the forks were identified by measuring the frequency response function (FRF, and the input shaping was designed so as not to excite the flexible modes. The controller was implemented by using MATLAB/xPC Target. In this paper, the design procedure of input shaping and its effectiveness for vibration attenuation in both “no load” and “load” cases is presented.

  13. Application of Tuning Fork Sensors for In-situ Studies of Dynamic Force Interactions Inside Scanning and Transmission Electron Microscopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana ANDZANE

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical properties of nanoscale contacts have been probed in-situ by specially developed force sensor based on a quartz tuning fork resonator (TF. Additional control is provided by observation of process in scanning electron microscope (SEM and transmission electron microscope (TEM. A piezoelectric manipulator allows precise positioning of atomic force microscope (AFM probe in contact with another electrode and recording of the TF oscillation amplitude and phase while simultaneously visualizing the contact area in electron microscope. Electrostatic control of interaction between the electrodes is demonstrated during observation of the experiment in SEM. In the TEM system the TF sensor operated in shear force mode: Use of TEM allowed for direct control of separation between electrodes. New opportunities for in situ studies of nanomechanical systems using these instruments are discussed.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.18.2.1927

  14. Vibrating minds

    CERN Document Server

    2009-01-01

    Ed Witten is one of the leading scientists in the field of string theory, the theory that describes elementary particles as vibrating strings. This week he leaves CERN after having spent a few months here on sabbatical. His wish is that the LHC will unveil supersymmetry.

  15. Laser ultrasonic analysis of normal modes generated by a voltage pulse on an AT quartz sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goossens, Jozefien; Martinez, Loïc; Glorieux, Christ; Wilkie-Chancellier, Nicolas; Ehssein, Chighali Ould; Serfaty, Stéphane

    2006-12-22

    Laser ultrasonic detection is a versatile and highly sensitive tool for the observation of surface waves. In the following study, laser ultrasonic detection is used for the experimental study of spurious normal vibration modes of a disk quartz sensor excited by a voltage pulse. The AT cut crystal (cut of the crystal relative to the the main crystallographic axis is 35.25 degrees) is optimal for generating mainly thickness-shear vibrations (central frequency 6 MHz) on the quartz surface. However, resulting from shear-to-longitudinal and shear-to-surface mode conversion, and from the weak coupling with the other crystallographic axes, other modes (thickness-compressional and bending modes) are always present in the plate response. Since the laser vibrometer is sensitive to normal displacements, the laser investigation shows waves that can be considered as unwanted for the AT quartz used as a shear sensor. The scanned three dimensional (3D) amplitude-space-time signals are carefully analysed using their representation in three dual Fourier domains (space-time, wave number-frequency). Results on the transient analysis of the waves, the normal bending modes and the dispersion curves are shown.

  16. A quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy sensor for measurement of water vapor concentration in the air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Ping; Xie, Liang; Qi, Xiao-Qiong; Wang, Rui; Wang, Hui; Chang, Ming-Chao; Yang, Hui-Xia; Sun, Fei; Li, Guan-Peng

    2015-01-01

    A compact and highly linear quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) sensor for the measurement of water vapor concentration in the air is demonstrated. A cost-effective quartz tuning fork (QTF) is used as the sharp transducer to convert light energy into an electrical signal based on the piezoelectric effect, thereby removing the need for a photodetector. The short optical path featured by the proposed sensing system leads to a decreased size. Furthermore, a pair of microresonators is applied in the absorbance detection module (ADM) for QTF signal enhancement. Compared with the system without microresonators, the detected QTF signal is increased to approximately 7-fold. Using this optimized QEPAS sensor with the proper modulation frequency and depth, we measure the water vapor concentration in the air at atmospheric pressure and room temperature. The experimental result shows that the sensor has a high sensitivity of 1.058 parts-per-million. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61107070, 61127018, and 61377071).

  17. THz quartz-enhanced photoacoustic sensor for H₂S trace gas detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spagnolo, Vincenzo; Patimisco, Pietro; Pennetta, Riccardo; Sampaolo, Angelo; Scamarcio, Gaetano; Vitiello, Miriam S; Tittel, Frank K

    2015-03-23

    We report on a quartz-enhanced photoacoustic (QEPAS) gas sensing system for hydrogen sulphide (H₂S) detection. The system architecture is based on a custom quartz tuning fork (QTF) optoacoustic transducer with a novel geometry and a quantum cascade laser (QCL) emitting 1.1 mW at a frequency of 2.913 THz. The QTF operated on the first flexion resonance frequency of 2871 Hz, with a quality factor Q = 17,900 at 20 Torr. The tuning range of the available QCL allowed the excitation of a H₂S rotational absorption line with a line-strength as small as S = 1.13·10⁻²² cm/mol. The measured detection sensitivity is 30 ppm in 3 seconds and 13 ppm for a 30 seconds integration time, which corresponds to a minimum detectable absorption coefficient α(min) = 2.3·10⁻⁷ cm⁻¹ and a normalized noise-equivalent absorption NNEA = 4.4·10⁻¹⁰ W·cm⁻¹·Hz(-1/2), several times lower than the values previously reported for near-IR and mid-IR H₂S QEPAS sensors.

  18. OK - Establishing a mussel monitoring program to evaluate point-source discharges into Deep Fork NWR

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A study incorporating several investigative methods was conducted at the Deep Fork River, Okmulgee, Oklahoma in and near the Deep Fork National Wildlife Refuge. The...

  19. Estimating Quartz Reserves Using Compositional Kriging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Taboada

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine spatial distribution and volume of four commercial quartz grades, namely, silicon metal, ferrosilicon, aggregate, and kaolin (depending on content in impurities in a quartz seam. The chemical and mineralogical composition of the reserves in the seam were determined from samples collected from outcrops, blasting operations, and exploratory drilling, and compositional kriging was used to calculate the volume and distribution of the reserves. A more accurate knowledge of the deposit ensures better mine planning, leading to higher profitability and an improved relationship with the environment.

  20. [Physical diagnostic procedures: whispered speech and tuning fork test].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grote, J J; de Laat, J A

    1998-08-08

    Hearing impairment occurs in 10% of the Dutch population and may lead to major communication problems and even social isolation. A good method to detect hearing loss in a general practice is the screening audiometer. The treating physician may further use the whispered speech test and tuning fork tests which together give a good impression of the severity and the nature of the hearing loss if any. The whispered speech test is best performed in the standardized form according to the guideline 'Slechthorendheid' [hardness of hearing] of the Dutch College of General Practitioners (NHG), in which certain combinations of letters are recommended. The tuning fork tests according to Rinne and Weber indicate a difference in perception and conduction deafness, and are decisive for any hearing asymmetry. Use of the whispered speech test and of the tuning fork tests is recommended for adults and children from the age of 7.

  1. Thickness-shear modes of an elliptical, contoured AT-cut quartz resonator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenjun; Wu, Rongxing; Wang, Ji; Du, Jianke; Yang, Jiashi

    2013-06-01

    We study free vibrations of an elliptical crystal resonator of AT-cut quartz with an optimal ratio between the semi-major and semi-minor axes as defined by Mindlin. The resonator is contoured with a quadratic thickness variation. The scalar equation for thickness-shear modes in an AT-cut quartz plate by Tiersten and Smythe is used. Analytical solutions for the frequencies and modes to the scalar equation are obtained using a power series expansion that converges rapidly. The frequencies and modes are exact in the sense that they can satisfy the scalar differential equation and the free edge condition to any desired accuracy. They are simple and can be used conveniently for further studies on other effects on frequencies and modes of contoured resonators.

  2. Effects of air resistance on AT-cut quartz thickness-shear resonators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yangyang; Wang, Ji; Du, Jianke; Zhang, Weiping; Yang, Jiashi

    2013-02-01

    We study theoretically the effects of air resistance on an AT-cut quartz plate thickness-shear mode resonator. Mindlin's two-dimensional equations for coupled thickness-shear and flexural motions of piezoelectric plates are employed for the crystal resonator. The equations of a Newtonian fluid and the equations of linear acoustics are used for the shear and compressive waves in the air surrounding the resonator, respectively. Solutions for free and electrically forced vibrations are obtained. The impedance of the resonator is calculated. The effects of air resistance are examined. It is found that air viscosity causes a relative frequency shift of the order of ppm. When the material quality factor of quartz Q = 10(5), the air viscosity and compressibility both have significant effects on resonator impedance. For resonators with larger aspect ratios the effects of air resistance are weaker, and the effect of air compressibility is weaker than air viscosity.

  3. MRE11 and EXO1 nucleases degrade reversed forks and elicit MUS81-dependent fork rescue in BRCA2-deficient cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaçon, Delphine; Jackson, Jessica; Quinet, Annabel; Brickner, Joshua R; Li, Shan; Yazinski, Stephanie; You, Zhongsheng; Ira, Grzegorz; Zou, Lee; Mosammaparast, Nima; Vindigni, Alessandro

    2017-10-16

    The breast cancer susceptibility proteins BRCA1 and BRCA2 have emerged as key stabilizing factors for the maintenance of replication fork integrity following replication stress. In their absence, stalled replication forks are extensively degraded by the MRE11 nuclease, leading to chemotherapeutic sensitivity. Here we report that BRCA proteins prevent nucleolytic degradation by protecting replication forks that have undergone fork reversal upon drug treatment. The unprotected regressed arms of reversed forks are the entry point for MRE11 in BRCA-deficient cells. The CtIP protein initiates MRE11-dependent degradation, which is extended by the EXO1 nuclease. Next, we show that the initial limited resection of the regressed arms establishes the substrate for MUS81 in BRCA2-deficient cells. In turn, MUS81 cleavage of regressed forks with a ssDNA tail promotes POLD3-dependent fork rescue. We propose that targeting this pathway may represent a new strategy to modulate BRCA2-deficient cancer cell response to chemotherapeutics that cause fork degradation.BRCA proteins have emerged as key stabilizing factors for the maintenance of replication forks following replication stress. Here the authors describe how reversed replication forks are degraded in the absence of BRCA2, and a MUS81 and POLD3-dependent mechanism of rescue following the withdrawal of genotoxic agent.

  4. Forked and Integrated Variants In An Open-Source Firmware Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stanciulescu, Stefan; Schulze, Sandro; Wasowski, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    and interactive source management platforms such as Github. We study advantages and disadvantages of forking using the case of Marlin, an open source firmware for 3D printers. We find that many problems and advantages of cloning do translate to forking. Interestingly, the Marlin community uses both forking...

  5. 77 FR 39675 - Wallowa-Whitman National Forest, Baker County, OR; North Fork Burnt River Mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-05

    ...-Whitman National Forest, Baker County, OR; North Fork Burnt River Mining AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA... North Fork Burnt River Mining Record of Decision will replace and supercede the 2004 North Fork Burnt River Mining Record of Decision only where necessary to address the inadequacies identified by the court...

  6. Replication Termination: Containing Fork Fusion-Mediated Pathologies in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juachi U. Dimude

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Duplication of bacterial chromosomes is initiated via the assembly of two replication forks at a single defined origin. Forks proceed bi-directionally until they fuse in a specialised termination area opposite the origin. This area is flanked by polar replication fork pause sites that allow forks to enter but not to leave. The precise function of this replication fork trap has remained enigmatic, as no obvious phenotypes have been associated with its inactivation. However, the fork trap becomes a serious problem to cells if the second fork is stalled at an impediment, as replication cannot be completed, suggesting that a significant evolutionary advantage for maintaining this chromosomal arrangement must exist. Recently, we demonstrated that head-on fusion of replication forks can trigger over-replication of the chromosome. This over-replication is normally prevented by a number of proteins including RecG helicase and 3’ exonucleases. However, even in the absence of these proteins it can be safely contained within the replication fork trap, highlighting that multiple systems might be involved in coordinating replication fork fusions. Here, we discuss whether considering the problems associated with head-on replication fork fusion events helps us to better understand the important role of the replication fork trap in cellular metabolism.

  7. PRE-FORK SYNTHESIS: A MODEL FOR DNA REPLICATION*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskell, Edwin H.; Davern, Cedric I.

    1969-01-01

    A model of DNA replication is presented in which DNA synthesis is continuously initiated from parental strand nicks and occurs, with conservation of helix winding number, ahead of the so-called replicating fork. The fork in this model is the locus of unwinding of already replicated, but presumably unstable, DNA. The model, involving Okazaki's notion of multiple initiation, is based upon the properties of Kornberg's DNA polymerase and accounts for the presence of single-stranded nascent DNA fragments in cell lysates. In addition to acting as sites of initiation, the parental strand nicks are implicated as sites of free rotation allowing unwinding of the replicated DNA. PMID:5264136

  8. Part-Per-Trillion Level SF6 Detection Using a Quartz Enhanced Photoacoustic Spectroscopy-Based Sensor with Single-Mode Fiber-Coupled Quantum Cascade Laser Excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spagnolo, V.; Patimisco, P.; Borri, Simone; Scamarcio, G.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Kriesel, J.M.

    2012-10-23

    A sensitive spectroscopic sensor based on a hollow-core fiber-coupled quantum cascade laser (QCL) emitting at 10.54 µm and quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) technique is reported. The design and realization of mid-infrared fiber and coupler optics has ensured single-mode QCL beam delivery to the QEPAS sensor . The collimation optics was designed to produce a laser beam of significantly reduced beam size and waist so as to prevent illumination of the quartz tuning fork and micro-resonator tubes. SF6 was selected as the target gas. A minimum detection sensitivity of 50 parts per trillion in 1 s was achieved with a QCL power of 18 mW, corresponding to a normalized noise-equivalent absorption of 2.7x10-10 W•cm-1/Hz1/2.

  9. Part-per-trillion level SF6 detection using a quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy-based sensor with single-mode fiber-coupled quantum cascade laser excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spagnolo, Vincenzo; Patimisco, Pietro; Borri, Simone; Scamarcio, Gaetano; Bernacki, Bruce E; Kriesel, Jason

    2012-11-01

    A sensitive spectroscopic sensor based on a hollow-core fiber-coupled quantum cascade laser (QCL) emitting at 10.54 μm and quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) technique is reported. The design and realization of mid-IR fiber and coupler optics has ensured single-mode QCL beam delivery to the QEPAS sensor. The collimation optics was designed to produce a laser beam of significantly reduced beam size and waist so as to prevent illumination of the quartz tuning fork and microresonator tubes. SF(6) was selected as the target gas. A minimum detection sensitivity of 50 parts per trillion in 1 s was achieved with a QCL power of 18 mW, corresponding to a normalized noise-equivalent absorption of 2.7×10(-10) W·cm(-1)/Hz(1/2).

  10. A quartz-enhanced photoacoustic sensor for H2S trace-gas detection at 2.6 μm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viciani, S.; Siciliani de Cumis, M.; Borri, S.; Patimisco, P.; Sampaolo, A.; Scamarcio, G.; De Natale, P.; D'Amato, F.; Spagnolo, V.

    2015-04-01

    We report on the realization of a quartz-enhanced photoacoustic (QEPAS) sensor for measurement of H2S gas traces. A distributed feedback diode laser working at 2.64 µm wavelength has been coupled to an acoustic detection module composed of a quartz tuning fork and a micro-resonator system, and the QEPAS signal has been optimized in terms of gas sample pressure and laser frequency modulation depth. The sensor shows a very good linearity with respect to the H2S concentration. We performed an Allan-Werle variance analysis to investigate the sensor long-term stability, and we reached a detection limit of four parts per million for 1-s integration time and 500 parts per billion in 60-s integration time. The realized QEPAS sensor represents a good compromise between performance and handiness, in view of a fully portable device.

  11. Urban vibrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morrison, Ann; Knudsen, L.; Andersen, Hans Jørgen

    2012-01-01

      lab   studies   in   that   we   found   a   decreased   detection   rate   in   busy   environments.   Here   we   test   with   a   much   larger   sample   and   age   range,   and   contribute   with   the   first   vibration  sensitivity  testing  outside  the  lab  in  an  urban   public...

  12. Geology of the Quartz Creek Pegmatite District, Gunnison County Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staatz, Mortimer H.; Trites, A.F.

    1952-01-01

    The Quartz Creek pegmatite district includes an area about 29 square miles in the vicinity of Quartz Creek in Gunnison County,. Colo. This area contains 1,803 pegmatites that are intruded into pre-Cambrian rocks.

  13. Resonance Experiments Using AFO Instead of Tuning Fork

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 16; Issue 11. Resonance Experiments Using AFO Instead of Tuning Fork. Deepak H Gadani. Classroom Volume 16 Issue 11 November 2011 pp 1053-1060. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  14. Accurate aging of juvenile salmonids using fork lengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethi, Suresh; Gerken, Jonathon; Ashline, Joshua

    2017-01-01

    Juvenile salmon life history strategies, survival, and habitat interactions may vary by age cohort. However, aging individual juvenile fish using scale reading is time consuming and can be error prone. Fork length data are routinely measured while sampling juvenile salmonids. We explore the performance of aging juvenile fish based solely on fork length data, using finite Gaussian mixture models to describe multimodal size distributions and estimate optimal age-discriminating length thresholds. Fork length-based ages are compared against a validation set of juvenile coho salmon, Oncorynchus kisutch, aged by scales. Results for juvenile coho salmon indicate greater than 95% accuracy can be achieved by aging fish using length thresholds estimated from mixture models. Highest accuracy is achieved when aged fish are compared to length thresholds generated from samples from the same drainage, time of year, and habitat type (lentic versus lotic), although relatively high aging accuracy can still be achieved when thresholds are extrapolated to fish from populations in different years or drainages. Fork length-based aging thresholds are applicable for taxa for which multiple age cohorts coexist sympatrically. Where applicable, the method of aging individual fish is relatively quick to implement and can avoid ager interpretation bias common in scale-based aging.

  15. Assembly of Slx4 signaling complexes behind DNA replication forks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balint, Attila; Kim, TaeHyung; Gallo, David; Cussiol, Jose Renato; Bastos de Oliveira, Francisco M; Yimit, Askar; Ou, Jiongwen; Nakato, Ryuichiro; Gurevich, Alexey; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Smolka, Marcus B; Zhang, Zhaolei; Brown, Grant W

    2015-08-13

    Obstructions to replication fork progression, referred to collectively as DNA replication stress, challenge genome stability. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, cells lacking RTT107 or SLX4 show genome instability and sensitivity to DNA replication stress and are defective in the completion of DNA replication during recovery from replication stress. We demonstrate that Slx4 is recruited to chromatin behind stressed replication forks, in a region that is spatially distinct from that occupied by the replication machinery. Slx4 complex formation is nucleated by Mec1 phosphorylation of histone H2A, which is recognized by the constitutive Slx4 binding partner Rtt107. Slx4 is essential for recruiting the Mec1 activator Dpb11 behind stressed replication forks, and Slx4 complexes are important for full activity of Mec1. We propose that Slx4 complexes promote robust checkpoint signaling by Mec1 by stably recruiting Dpb11 within a discrete domain behind the replication fork, during DNA replication stress. © 2015 The Authors.

  16. A farm to fork approach for nutritious school meals

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    opportunity to influence children's food choices and reduce their risk of ... snacks and drinks within the school environment. Such practices, often ... child nutrition and health. Produce procurement from small farmers. Agricultural technology for food production. Farm to Fork model. Innovation. Collective action. Innovation.

  17. A farm to fork approach to nutritious school meals: Tackling ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-04-26

    Apr 26, 2016 ... Vegetable and fruit consumption among more than 1,000 children has increased significantly, approaching international guidelines. The Kitts-Nevis ... Read the complete story of change: A farm to fork approach for nutritious school meals: tackling childhood obesity in the Caribbean (PDF, 532 KB).

  18. DNA Replication Origins and Fork Progression at Mammalian Telomeres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higa, Mitsunori; Fujita, Masatoshi; Yoshida, Kazumasa

    2017-01-01

    Telomeres are essential chromosomal regions that prevent critical shortening of linear chromosomes and genomic instability in eukaryotic cells. The bulk of telomeric DNA is replicated by semi-conservative DNA replication in the same way as the rest of the genome. However, recent findings revealed that replication of telomeric repeats is a potential cause of chromosomal instability, because DNA replication through telomeres is challenged by the repetitive telomeric sequences and specific structures that hamper the replication fork. In this review, we summarize current understanding of the mechanisms by which telomeres are faithfully and safely replicated in mammalian cells. Various telomere-associated proteins ensure efficient telomere replication at different steps, such as licensing of replication origins, passage of replication forks, proper fork restart after replication stress, and dissolution of post-replicative structures. In particular, shelterin proteins have central roles in the control of telomere replication. Through physical interactions, accessory proteins are recruited to maintain telomere integrity during DNA replication. Dormant replication origins and/or homology-directed repair may rescue inappropriate fork stalling or collapse that can cause defects in telomere structure and functions. PMID:28350373

  19. DNA replication: stalling a fork for imprinting and switching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egel, Richard

    2004-01-01

    Mating-type switching in fission yeast has long been known to be directed by a DNA 'imprint'. This imprint has now been firmly characterized as a protected site-specific and strand-specific nick. New work also links the widely conserved Swi1-Swi3 complex to the protection of stalled replication...... forks in general....

  20. The Fork in the Road: Histone Partitioning During DNA Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony T. Annunziato

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In the following discussion the distribution of histones at the replication fork is examined, with specific attention paid to the question of H3/H4 tetramer "splitting." After a presentation of early experiments surrounding this topic, more recent contributions are detailed. The implications of these findings with respect to the transmission of histone modifications and epigenetic models are also addressed.

  1. Comparative Study of Transcriptome Profiles of Mouse Livers and Skins Infected by Fork-Tailed or Non-Fork-Tailed Schistosoma japonicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yan; He, Jun-Jun; Hu, Shuang; Chang, Hua; Xiang, Xun; Yang, Jian-Fa; Zou, Feng-Cai

    2017-01-01

    Schistosoma japonicum (S. japonicum) is a worldwide spread pathogen which penetrates host skin and then induces several diseases in infected host, such as fibrosis, formation of granulomas, hepatocirrhosis, and hepatomegaly. In present study, for the first time, transcriptomic profiles of mouse livers and skins infected by fork-tailed S. japonicum cercaria or non-fork-tailed S. japonicum cercaria were analyzed by using RNA-seq. The present findings demonstrated that transcriptomic landscapes of livers and skins infected by fork-tailed S. japonicum cercaria or non-fork-tailed S. japonicum cercaria were different. S. japonicum has great influence on hepatic metabolic processes. Fork-tailed S. japonicum cercaria upregulated hepatic metabolic processes, while non-fork-tailed S. japonicum cercaria downregulated hepatic metabolic processes. For the metabolism process or the metabolism enzyme expressional change, the pharmacokinetics of host could be changed during S. japonicum infection, regardless the biotypes of S. japonicum cercariae. The changes of infected skins focused on upregulation of immune response. During the S. japonicum skin infection period, fork-tailed S. japonicum cercaria infection induced stronger immune response comparing with that immune response triggered by non-fork-tailed S. japonicum cercaria. The transcription factor enrichment analysis showed that Irf7, Stat1 and Stat2 could play important roles in gene regulation during fork-tailed S. japonicum cercaria infection.

  2. Comparative Study of Transcriptome Profiles of Mouse Livers and Skins Infected by Fork-Tailed or Non-Fork-Tailed Schistosoma japonicum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Yang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Schistosoma japonicum (S. japonicum is a worldwide spread pathogen which penetrates host skin and then induces several diseases in infected host, such as fibrosis, formation of granulomas, hepatocirrhosis, and hepatomegaly. In present study, for the first time, transcriptomic profiles of mouse livers and skins infected by fork-tailed S. japonicum cercaria or non-fork-tailed S. japonicum cercaria were analyzed by using RNA-seq. The present findings demonstrated that transcriptomic landscapes of livers and skins infected by fork-tailed S. japonicum cercaria or non-fork-tailed S. japonicum cercaria were different. S. japonicum has great influence on hepatic metabolic processes. Fork-tailed S. japonicum cercaria upregulated hepatic metabolic processes, while non-fork-tailed S. japonicum cercaria downregulated hepatic metabolic processes. For the metabolism process or the metabolism enzyme expressional change, the pharmacokinetics of host could be changed during S. japonicum infection, regardless the biotypes of S. japonicum cercariae. The changes of infected skins focused on upregulation of immune response. During the S. japonicum skin infection period, fork-tailed S. japonicum cercaria infection induced stronger immune response comparing with that immune response triggered by non-fork-tailed S. japonicum cercaria. The transcription factor enrichment analysis showed that Irf7, Stat1 and Stat2 could play important roles in gene regulation during fork-tailed S. japonicum cercaria infection.

  3. Fork rotation and DNA precatenation are restricted during DNA replication to prevent chromosomal instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalbetter, Stephanie A; Mansoubi, Sahar; Chambers, Anna L; Downs, Jessica A; Baxter, Jonathan

    2015-08-18

    Faithful genome duplication and inheritance require the complete resolution of all intertwines within the parental DNA duplex. This is achieved by topoisomerase action ahead of the replication fork or by fork rotation and subsequent resolution of the DNA precatenation formed. Although fork rotation predominates at replication termination, in vitro studies have suggested that it also occurs frequently during elongation. However, the factors that influence fork rotation and how rotation and precatenation may influence other replication-associated processes are unknown. Here we analyze the causes and consequences of fork rotation in budding yeast. We find that fork rotation and precatenation preferentially occur in contexts that inhibit topoisomerase action ahead of the fork, including stable protein-DNA fragile sites and termination. However, generally, fork rotation and precatenation are actively inhibited by Timeless/Tof1 and Tipin/Csm3. In the absence of Tof1/Timeless, excessive fork rotation and precatenation cause extensive DNA damage following DNA replication. With Tof1, damage related to precatenation is focused on the fragile protein-DNA sites where fork rotation is induced. We conclude that although fork rotation and precatenation facilitate unwinding in hard-to-replicate contexts, they intrinsically disrupt normal chromosome duplication and are therefore restricted by Timeless/Tipin.

  4. Termination of DNA replication forks: "Breaking up is hard to do".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Rachael; Priego Moreno, Sara; Gambus, Agnieszka

    2015-01-01

    To ensure duplication of the entire genome, eukaryotic DNA replication initiates from thousands of replication origins. The replication forks move through the chromatin until they encounter forks from neighboring origins. During replication fork termination forks converge, the replisomes disassemble and topoisomerase II resolves the daughter DNA molecules. If not resolved efficiently, terminating forks result in genomic instability through the formation of pathogenic structures. Our recent findings shed light onto the mechanism of replisome disassembly upon replication fork termination. We have shown that termination-specific polyubiquitylation of the replicative helicase component - Mcm7, leads to dissolution of the active helicase in a process dependent on the p97/VCP/Cdc48 segregase. The inhibition of terminating helicase disassembly resulted in a replication termination defect. In this extended view we present hypothetical models of replication fork termination and discuss remaining and emerging questions in the DNA replication termination field.

  5. Geology and geochemistry of giant quartz veins from the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The green colour is sometimes due to the presence of secondary epi- dote and chlorite. Very fine-grained green quartz similar to colloidal quartz is also observed in places. Quartz grains occurring within grey-coloured giant veins are highly strained in nature. A number of thin (up to 10cm; figure 3c) sub- vertical, milky white ...

  6. Quartz exposure and increased respiratory symptoms among coal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Quartz has been an inevitable composition of different type of coal mined. The quartz exposures among coalmine workers has been attributed to activities such as cutting the adjacent rock, the roof, the floor and the intrusions. Objective: The aim of the study is to determine the associations between quartz exposures and ...

  7. Theory of vibration protection

    CERN Document Server

    Karnovsky, Igor A

    2016-01-01

    This text is an advancement of the theory of vibration protection of mechanical systems with lumped and distributed parameters. The book offers various concepts and methods of solving vibration protection problems, discusses the advantages and disadvantages of different methods, and the fields of their effective applications. Fundamental approaches of vibration protection, which are considered in this book, are the passive, parametric and optimal active vibration protection. The passive vibration protection is based on vibration isolation, vibration damping and dynamic absorbers. Parametric vibration protection theory is based on the Shchipanov-Luzin invariance principle. Optimal active vibration protection theory is based on the Pontryagin principle and the Krein moment method. The book also contains special topics such as suppression of vibrations at the source of their occurrence and the harmful influence of vibrations on humans. Numerous examples, which illustrate the theoretical ideas of each chapter, ar...

  8. Final Environmental Assessment: Installation of Digital Airport Surveillance Radar at Grand Forks Air Force Base, North Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-11

    SCOT, Radar Maintenance/SCX TSgt William Emmons , Grand Forks AFB, 319 ARW/SEW Katheryn Barry, Grand Forks AFB, 319 CS/SCXP, CS Plans/Project Management...Colonel Donald L. Shaffer Commander, 319th Air Base Wing 460 Steen Blvd Grand Forks AFB, ND 58205 Robert Shepherd, Chairman Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate PO...GRAND FORKS AIR FORCE BASE, NORTH DAKOTA Colonel Donald L. Shaffer Commander, 319th Air Base Wing 460 Steen Blvd Grand Forks AFB, ND 58205 Robert

  9. The CMS forward calorimeter with quartz fibres

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1999-01-01

    Part of the forward hadron calorimeter for the CMS experiment at the LHC is seen here. The calorimeter will be placed at the ends of the experiment barrel to measure the energy of particles produced in the 14 TeV proton-proton collisions. In consists of an iron absorber and specially designed radiation-hard quartz so that it survives the high radiation levels produced by collisions.

  10. Liquinert quartz crucible for the growth of multicrystalline Si ingots

    OpenAIRE

    Fujiwara, Kozo; Horioka, Yukichi; Sakuragi, Shiro

    2017-01-01

    The growth of a multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) ingot for solar cell applications was attempted using a Liquinert quartz crucible. A mc-Si ingot was also grown in a quartz crucible coated with Si3N4 powder for comparison with that from the Liquinert quartz crucible. The mc-Si ingot grown in the Liquinert quartz crucible had a shinier surface which has few impurity particles and higher minority carrier lifetime than the mc-Si ingot grown in a quartz crucible coated with Si3N4 powder. These re...

  11. Manufacturing polycrystalline pellets of natural quartz for applications in thermoluminescence dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho Junior, Alvaro Barbosa de; Khoury, Helen Jamil [Federal University of Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Department of Nuclear Energy; Barros, Thiago Fernandes; Guzzo, Pedro Luiz [Federal University of Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Department of Mining Engineering

    2012-07-15

    This paper describes the manufacturing process of quartz-pellets and shows their potential use as thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD) for those applications where low-levels of ionising radiation are present. Two batches of cold-pressed pellets were produced and their resistance were evaluated by vibration tests and weight-loss measurements. The batch manufactured with 75 Multiplication-Sign 150 Micro-Sign m particles showed enough resistance to be employed as TLD. The dosimetric properties of the 310 Degree-Sign C peak appearing in the glow curves of these pellets were characterized together with commercial TLD-100 units using {gamma}- and X-ray beams with different energies. The uncertainties related to reproducibility and stability of the TL signal were better than 10%. The sensitivity and the linearity of the TL response of quartz-pellets were better than that measured for TLD-100 for doses ranging from 0.5 to 200mGy. The energy dependence of the quartz-pellets was higher than that of TLD-100 but it cannot be considered a restriction to their use in clinical procedures and industrial applications. (author)

  12. Periodic Density Functional Theory Study of Water Adsorption on the a-Quartz (101) Surface.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandura, Andrei V. [St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg, Russia; Kubicki, James D. [Pennsylvania State University; Sofo, Jorge O. [Pennsylvania State University

    2011-01-01

    Plane wave density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been performed to study the atomic structure, preferred H2O adsorption sites, adsorption energies, and vibrational frequencies for water adsorption on the R-quartz (101) surface. Surface energies and atomic displacements on the vacuum-reconstructed, hydrolyzed, and solvated surfaces have been calculated and compared with available experimental and theoretical data. By considering different initial positions of H2O molecules, the most stable structures of water adsorption at different coverages have been determined. Calculated H2O adsorption energies are in the range -55 to -65 kJ/mol, consistent with experimental data. The lowest and the highest O-H stretching vibrational bands may be attributed to different states of silanol groups on the watercovered surface. The dissociation energy of the silanol group on the surface covered by the adsorption monolayer is estimated to be 80 kJ/mol. The metastable states for the protonated surface bridging O atoms (Obr), which may lead to hydrolysis of siloxane bonds, have been investigated. The calculated formation energy of a Q2 center from a Q3 center on the (101) surface with 2/3 dense monolayer coverage is equal to 70 kJ/mol which is in the range of experimental activation energies for quartz dissolution.

  13. Experimental diagenesis of quartz with petroleum; Diagenese experimentale du quartz en presence d'hydrocarbures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teinturier, St.

    2002-11-01

    Quartz cementation has a great impact on petroleum reservoir quality by controlling the porosity and thus the gas or oil storage. However, the possible cementation of quartz during petroleum emplacement is still debated. In most cases, the reconstitution and the understanding of diagenetic processes is based on fluid inclusions studies. However, many questions concerning the representativeness and the reading of the fluid inclusions still remains misunderstood. The experiments were carried out in a silica{+-}water{+-}salts{+-}oil{+-}gas system with the objective to simulate the siliceous diagenesis of natural petroleum reservoirs and to better understand the mechanisms of fluid inclusions formation and quartz cementation in a water and/or petroleum system. Calibration curves have been established using Raman micro-spectroscopy and synthetic reference inclusions to calculate the methane content of aqueous inclusions in the H{sub 2}O-CH{sub 4}-NaCl system. A quantitative procedure for FT-IR micro-spectrometry has been developed to obtain, from individual petroleum fluid inclusions, mole % concentrations of methane, alkanes and carbon dioxide as constraints to thermodynamic modelling. Synthetic aqueous inclusions were created within quartz micro-fractures, with methane (from 150 deg C-200 bar), with petroleum (from 184 deg C-163 bar) and inside quartz overgrowth with the presence of hydrocarbons (from 277 deg C-300 bar). Synthetic petroleum inclusions were created with different water/oil ratios (W/O) within quartz micro-fractures (0quartz overgrowth (10

  14. Identifying well-bleached quartz using the different bleaching rates of quartz and feldspar luminescence signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murray, A.S.; Thomsen, Kristina Jørkov; Masuda, N.

    2012-01-01

    When dating older sedimentary deposits using quartz, there are no unambiguous methods for identifying the presence of incomplete bleaching. Current statistical analysis of dose distributions depends entirely on the assumption that incomplete bleaching and mixing are the main causes of any excess...... dispersion in the distribution; the only existing way to test this assumption is using independent age control. Here we suggest a new approach to this question, based on the differential bleaching rates of quartz and feldspar luminescence signals. We first present data that confirm the differences...... in relative bleaching rates of quartz optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and feldspar luminescence stimulated at 50 °C by infrared light (IR50) and feldspar luminescence stimulated at 290 °C by infrared light after a stimulation at 50 °C (pIRIR290), and use recently deposited samples to determine...

  15. Capitalizing on disaster: Establishing chromatin specificity behind the replication fork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Srinivas; Ahmad, Kami; Henikoff, Steven

    2017-04-01

    Eukaryotic genomes are packaged into nucleosomal chromatin, and genomic activity requires the precise localization of transcription factors, histone modifications and nucleosomes. Classic work described the progressive reassembly and maturation of bulk chromatin behind replication forks. More recent proteomics has detailed the molecular machines that accompany the replicative polymerase to promote rapid histone deposition onto the newly replicated DNA. However, localized chromatin features are transiently obliterated by DNA replication every S phase of the cell cycle. Genomic strategies now observe the rebuilding of locus-specific chromatin features, and reveal surprising delays in transcription factor binding behind replication forks. This implies that transient chromatin disorganization during replication is a central juncture for targeted transcription factor binding within genomes. We propose that transient occlusion of regulatory elements by disorganized nucleosomes during chromatin maturation enforces specificity of factor binding. © 2017 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Stalled replication forks within heterochromatin require ATRX for protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, M S; Ivanochko, D; Hashem, L E; Curtin, M; Delorme, M; Goodall, E; Yan, K; Picketts, D J

    2016-05-12

    Expansive growth of neural progenitor cells (NPCs) is a prerequisite to the temporal waves of neuronal differentiation that generate the six-layered neocortex, while also placing a heavy burden on proteins that regulate chromatin packaging and genome integrity. This problem is further reflected by the growing number of developmental disorders caused by mutations in chromatin regulators. ATRX gene mutations cause a severe intellectual disability disorder (α-thalassemia mental retardation X-linked (ATRX) syndrome; OMIM no. 301040), characterized by microcephaly, urogenital abnormalities and α-thalassemia. Although the ATRX protein is required for the maintenance of repetitive DNA within heterochromatin, how this translates to disease pathogenesis remain poorly understood and was a focus of this study. We demonstrate that Atrx(FoxG1Cre) forebrain-specific conditional knockout mice display poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (Parp-1) hyperactivation during neurogenesis and generate fewer late-born Cux1- and Brn2-positive neurons that accounts for the reduced cortical size. Moreover, DNA damage, induced Parp-1 and Atm activation is elevated in progenitor cells and contributes to their increased level of cell death. ATRX-null HeLa cells are similarly sensitive to hydroxyurea-induced replication stress, accumulate DNA damage and proliferate poorly. Impaired BRCA1-RAD51 colocalization and PARP-1 hyperactivation indicated that stalled replication forks are not efficiently protected. DNA fiber assays confirmed that MRE11 degradation of stalled replication forks was rampant in the absence of ATRX or DAXX. Indeed, fork degradation in ATRX-null cells could be attenuated by treatment with the MRE11 inhibitor mirin, or exacerbated by inhibiting PARP-1 activity. Taken together, these results suggest that ATRX is required to limit replication stress during cellular proliferation, whereas upregulation of PARP-1 activity functions as a compensatory mechanism to protect stalled forks

  17. South Fork Clearwater River Habitat Enhancement, Nez Perce National Forest.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siddall, Phoebe

    1992-04-01

    In 1984, the Nez Perce National forest and the Bonneville Power Administration entered into a contractual agreement which provided for improvement of spring chinook salmon and summer steelhead trout habitat in south Fork Clearwater River tributaries. Project work was completed in seven main locations: Crooked River, Red River, Meadow Creek Haysfork Gloryhole, Cal-Idaho Gloryhole, Fisher Placer and Leggett Placer. This report describes restoration activities at each of these sites.

  18. OH-point defects in quartz in B- and Li-bearing systems and their application to pegmatites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, M. A.; Stalder, R.; Konzett, J.; Hauzenberger, C. A.

    2015-01-01

    OH incorporation in quartz in Al-, B- and Li-bearing systems (granitic systems containing tourmaline or spodumene) was studied experimentally in order to investigate the effect of pressure, temperature and chemical impurities on the generation of OH-defects. High-pressure experiments were carried out at pressures between 5 and 25 kbar and temperatures between 800 and 900 °C, and OH-contents in quartz were calculated from IR absorption spectra measured on oriented quartz crystals. IR absorption features were assigned to impurity substitutions, such as AlOH (3,420, 3,379 and 3,315 cm-1) and BOH (3,595 cm-1), LiOH (3,483 cm-1), and hydrogarnet substitution (4H)Si defects (3,583 cm-1). Results indicate a negative correlation of incorporated Al-specific OH-defect content versus pressure (630 ± 130 wt ppm H2O at 5 kbar to 102 ± 6 wt ppm H2O at 25 kbar), but no clear correlation of B-specific OH-defects with pressure. In runs initially containing spodumene, virtually OH-free quartzes were observed at pressures ≥10 kbar, where impurity cations compensate each other forming an anhydrous eucryptite-defect component. In contrast, at 5 kbar, both Li- ad Al-specific OH-defects are observed (corresponding to 470 ± 75 wt ppm H2O). Results from this study may therefore be used to monitor formation conditions of quartz in terms of pressure and trace metal saturation of the crystallizing petrological system. IR spectra obtained from natural quartz grains from a tourmaline-bearing pegmatite exhibit B- and Al-related OH-bands. The B-related OH-band is also exhibited in quartz from a tourmaline + spodumene-bearing pegmatite. Li- and Al-related OH-bands, however, are subordinate or not observed at all in the spodumene-bearing system, which suggests that OH-vibrations do not reflect absolute Li-contents in quartz due to efficient coupled substitution involving Al. Data from experimental runs and natural specimens indicate that the B-related OH-band can be used as a rough proxy for

  19. Timing, coordination, and rhythm: Acrobatics at the DNA replication fork

    KAUST Repository

    Hamdan, Samir

    2010-04-09

    In DNA replication, the antiparallel nature of the parental duplex imposes certain constraints on the activity of the DNA polymerases that synthesize new DNA. The leading-strand polymerase advances in a continuous fashion, but the lagging-strand polymerase is forced to restart at short intervals. In several prokaryotic systems studied so far, this problem is solved by the formation of a loop in the lagging strand of the replication fork to reorient the lagging-strand DNA polymerase so that it advances in parallel with the leading-strand polymerase. The replication loop grows and shrinks during each cycle of Okazaki fragment synthesis. The timing of Okazaki fragment synthesis and loop formation is determined by a subtle interplay of enzymatic activities at the fork. Recent developments in single-molecule techniques have enabled the direct observation of these processes and have greatly contributed to a better understanding of the dynamic nature of the replication fork. Here, we will review recent experimental advances, present the current models, and discuss some of the exciting developments in the field. 2010 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. Ku stabilizes replication forks in the absence of Brc1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arancha Sánchez

    Full Text Available DNA replication errors are a major source of genome instability in all organisms. In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the DNA damage response protein Brc1 binds phospho-histone H2A (γH2A-marked chromatin during S-phase, but how Brc1 protects genome integrity remains unclear. Here we report that the non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ protein Ku becomes critical for survival of replication stress in brc1∆ cells. Ku's protective activity in brc1∆ cells does not involve its canonical NHEJ function or its roles in protecting telomeres or shielding DNA ends from Exo1 exonuclease. In brc1∆ pku80∆ cells, nuclear foci of Rad52 homologous recombination (HR protein increase and Mus81-Eme1 Holliday junction resolvase becomes critical, indicating increased replication fork instability. Ku's localization at a ribosomal DNA replication fork barrier associated with frequent replisome-transcriptosome collisions increases in brc1∆ cells and increased collisions correlate with an enhanced requirement for Brc1. These data indicate that Ku stabilizes replication forks in the absence of Brc1.

  1. Mutations in DONSON disrupt replication fork stability and cause microcephalic dwarfism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, John J; Bicknell, Louise S; Carroll, Paula; Higgs, Martin R; Shaheen, Ranad; Murray, Jennie E; Papadopoulos, Dimitrios K; Leitch, Andrea; Murina, Olga; Tarnauskaitė, Žygimantė; Wessel, Sarah R; Zlatanou, Anastasia; Vernet, Audrey; von Kriegsheim, Alex; Mottram, Rachel MA; Logan, Clare V; Bye, Hannah; Li, Yun; Brean, Alexander; Maddirevula, Sateesh; Challis, Rachel C; Skouloudaki, Kassiani; Almoisheer, Agaadir; Alsaif, Hessa S; Amar, Ariella; Prescott, Natalie J; Bober, Michael B; Duker, Angela; Faqeih, Eissa; Seidahmed, Mohammed Zain; Al Tala, Saeed; Alswaid, Abdulrahman; Ahmed, Saleem; Al-Aama, Jumana Yousuf; Altmüller, Janine; Al Balwi, Mohammed; Brady, Angela F; Chessa, Luciana; Cox, Helen; Fischetto, Rita; Heller, Raoul; Henderson, Bertram D; Hobson, Emma; Nürnberg, Peter; Percin, E Ferda; Peron, Angela; Spaccini, Luigina; Quigley, Alan J; Thakur, Seema; Wise, Carol A; Yoon, Grace; Alnemer, Maha; Tomancak, Pavel; Yigit, Gökhan; Taylor, A Malcolm R; Reijns, Martin AM; Simpson, Michael A; Cortez, David; Alkuraya, Fowzan S; Mathew, Christopher G; Jackson, Andrew P; Stewart, Grant S

    2017-01-01

    To ensure efficient genome duplication, cells have evolved numerous factors that promote unperturbed DNA replication, and protect, repair and restart damaged forks. Here we identify DONSON as a novel fork protection factor, and report biallelic DONSON mutations in 29 individuals with microcephalic dwarfism. We demonstrate that DONSON is a replisome component that stabilises forks during genome replication. Loss of DONSON leads to severe replication-associated DNA damage arising from nucleolytic cleavage of stalled replication forks. Furthermore, ATR-dependent signalling in response to replication stress is impaired in DONSON-deficient cells, resulting in decreased checkpoint activity, and potentiating chromosomal instability. Hypomorphic mutations substantially reduce DONSON protein levels and impair fork stability in patient cells, consistent with defective DNA replication underlying the disease phenotype. In summary, we identify mutations in DONSON as a common cause of microcephalic dwarfism, and establish DONSON as a critical replication fork protein required for mammalian DNA replication and genome stability. PMID:28191891

  2. Recovery of arrested replication forks by homologous recombination is error-prone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail Iraqui

    Full Text Available Homologous recombination is a universal mechanism that allows repair of DNA and provides support for DNA replication. Homologous recombination is therefore a major pathway that suppresses non-homology-mediated genome instability. Here, we report that recovery of impeded replication forks by homologous recombination is error-prone. Using a fork-arrest-based assay in fission yeast, we demonstrate that a single collapsed fork can cause mutations and large-scale genomic changes, including deletions and translocations. Fork-arrest-induced gross chromosomal rearrangements are mediated by inappropriate ectopic recombination events at the site of collapsed forks. Inverted repeats near the site of fork collapse stimulate large-scale genomic changes up to 1,500 times over spontaneous events. We also show that the high accuracy of DNA replication during S-phase is impaired by impediments to fork progression, since fork-arrest-induced mutation is due to erroneous DNA synthesis during recovery of replication forks. The mutations caused are small insertions/duplications between short tandem repeats (micro-homology indicative of replication slippage. Our data establish that collapsed forks, but not stalled forks, recovered by homologous recombination are prone to replication slippage. The inaccuracy of DNA synthesis does not rely on PCNA ubiquitination or trans-lesion-synthesis DNA polymerases, and it is not counteracted by mismatch repair. We propose that deletions/insertions, mediated by micro-homology, leading to copy number variations during replication stress may arise by progression of error-prone replication forks restarted by homologous recombination.

  3. Environmental Assessment Beddown of NASA DC-8 at Grand Forks Air Force Base, Grand Forks, North Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-09-01

    stinging nettle ( Urtica dioica ), and beggar ticks (Bidens frondosa) (Grand Forks AFB 2003). Final Environmental Assessment September 2004 3-5...Environmental Assessment describes alternatives and impacts to the environment. The FONSI describes why the project would not have a significant effect on the...anticipated direct and indirect effects were assessed, considering both short- and long-tenn project impacts. The following paragraph summarizes the

  4. Beat frequency quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy for fast and calibration-free continuous trace-gas monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hongpeng; Dong, Lei; Zheng, Huadan; Yu, Yajun; Ma, Weiguang; Zhang, Lei; Yin, Wangbao; Xiao, Liantuan; Jia, Suotang; Tittel, Frank K.

    2017-05-01

    Quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) is a sensitive gas detection technique which requires frequent calibration and has a long response time. Here we report beat frequency (BF) QEPAS that can be used for ultra-sensitive calibration-free trace-gas detection and fast spectral scan applications. The resonance frequency and Q-factor of the quartz tuning fork (QTF) as well as the trace-gas concentration can be obtained simultaneously by detecting the beat frequency signal generated when the transient response signal of the QTF is demodulated at its non-resonance frequency. Hence, BF-QEPAS avoids a calibration process and permits continuous monitoring of a targeted trace gas. Three semiconductor lasers were selected as the excitation source to verify the performance of the BF-QEPAS technique. The BF-QEPAS method is capable of measuring lower trace-gas concentration levels with shorter averaging times as compared to conventional PAS and QEPAS techniques and determines the electrical QTF parameters precisely.

  5. Production of quartz plates for CMS-CASTOR Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Adiguzel, Aytul; Ayhan, Aydin; Bakirci, Mustafa Numan; Basegmez, Suzan; Beaumont, Willem; Borras, Kerstin; Campbell, Alan; De Paula Carvalho, W; Çerçi, Salim; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; Dogangün, O; Dumanoglu, Isa; d'Enterria, David; Erchov, Y; Eskut, Eda; Figueiredo, D; Girgis, Semiray; Göttlicher, P; Gouskos, Loukas; Gurpinar, Emine; Hos, Ilknur; Katkov, Igor; Katsas, Panagiotis; Khein, Lev; Knutsson, Albert; Kuznetsov, Andrey; Lebeau, Michel; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Muhl, Carsten; Musienko, Yuri; Ochesanu, Silvia; Onengüt, G; Onengut, G Jr; Ozdemir, Kadri; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Polatoz, A; Ripert, Marion; Shileev, K; Sogut, Kenan; Tiflov, B TaliV; Kayis-Topaksu, A; Uzun, Dilber

    2008-01-01

    Light transmission rate performance of $102$ irradiated quartz samples was measured to select the best quartz plates for CMS-CASTOR calorimeter. All the produced quartz plates were originally used in a previous CERN experiment, DELPHI. Three different doses of $^{60}$Co source were used with the collaboration of PSI (Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen PSI, Switzerland.) to study the transmission rate performance of the quartz samples after irradiation for different incident light, ranging from $250$ to $700$ nm in $5$ nm increasing steps. All samples show different decrease in the rate with wavelength for different doses. Three different steps were followed before irradiation to find out the best way of cleaning the original DELPHI Cu/Cr tracks on the samples. Results of these measurements presented here correspond to the quartz plates that will be used in one hadronic sector of CASTOR calorimeter until end of 2008. For the full calorimeter new quartz plates will be installed. We also present the light transmi...

  6. Luminescence sensitivity changes in quartz as a result of annealing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Agersnap Larsen, N.; Mejdahl, V.

    1995-01-01

    Retrospective dosimetry using optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) on quartz extracted from (for example) bricks needs to account for strong OSL sensitivity changes that are known to occur depending on the previous thermal treatment of the sample. Non-heated quartz exhibits OSL orders...... of magnitude less per unit radiation than that for heated material. The reason these temperature-induced sensitivity changes occur in quartz is presently not well understood. This phenomenon is also seen in the related area of luminescence dating in which sedimentary quartz and quartz from heated...... archaeological samples show very different OSL sensitivities. In this paper we report on studies of the effect of high temperature annealing on the OSL and phototransferred TL (PTTL) signals from sedimentary and synthetic quartz. A dramatic enhancement of both OSL and PTTL sensitivity was found especially...

  7. Take It Slow: can feedback from a smart fork reduce eating speed?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sander Hermsen

    2015-09-01

    The present study examines the efficacy of a smart fork that helps people to eat more slowly. This adapted fork records eating speed and delivers vibrotactile feedback if users eat too quickly. In two studies, we tested the acceptability and user experience of the fork (Study 1, and its effect on eating rate and satiety levels in a controlled lab-setting (Study 2. Method: In study 1, 11 participants (all self-reported fast eaters ate a meal using the fork in our laboratory and used the fork for three consecutive days in their home setting. Participants took part in semi-structured interviews after the first meal and upon returning the fork, covering perceived effect on eating rate, comfort of use, accuracy, and motivational and social aspects of fork use. Interviews were coded and a thematic classification analysis was performed. In study 2, 128 participants (all self-reported fast eaters ate a standardized meal using the fork in our laboratory. We used a between-participants design with 2 conditions; participants ate their meal either with vibrotactile feedback from the fork (experimental condition or ate their meal without vibrotactile feedback (control condition. Eating rate, meal duration, error rate (number of bites taken faster than 10 seconds after previous bite, total food intake, and satiety were recorded for every participant. Results: Study 1: All participants felt that the feedback was generally accurate and consistent. Fork size, weight, and intensity of the feedback were seen as comfortable and acceptable. All participants reported a heightened awareness of eating rate and all but one participant reported eating more slowly with the fork. Study 2: Participants in the experimental condition ate significantly slower, and with a lower error rate than those in the control condition. Feedback did not significantly affect the amount of food eaten. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that this smart fork is an acceptable and effective tool to disrupt and

  8. The fork and the kinase: a DNA replication tale from a CHK1 perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Besteiro, Marina A; Gottifredi, Vanesa

    2015-01-01

    Replication fork progression is being continuously hampered by exogenously introduced and naturally occurring DNA lesions and other physical obstacles. Checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) is activated at replication forks that encounter damaged DNA. Subsequently, Chk1 inhibits the initiation of new replication factories and stimulates the firing of dormant origins (those in the vicinity of stalled forks). Chk1 also avoids fork collapse into DSBs (double strand breaks) and promotes fork elongation. At the molecular level, the current model considers stalled forks as the site of Chk1 activation and the nucleoplasm as the location where Chk1 phosphorylates target proteins. This model certainly serves to explain how Chk1 modulates origin firing, but how Chk1 controls the fate of stalled forks is less clear. Interestingly, recent reports demonstrating that Chk1 phosphorylates chromatin-bound proteins and even holds kinase-independent functions might shed light on how Chk1 contributes to the elongation of damaged DNA. Indeed, such findings have unveiled a puzzling connection between Chk1 and DNA lesion bypass, which might be central to promoting fork elongation and checkpoint attenuation. In summary, Chk1 is a multifaceted and versatile signaling factor that acts at ongoing forks and replication origins to determine the extent and quality of the cellular response to replication stress. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The role of deformation on trace element solubility in quartz: Observations from naturally deformed quartz-rich rocks and experimentally deformed Ti-doped synthetic quartz aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachlas, W.; Whitney, D. L.; Teyssier, C.; Seaton, N. C.; Hirth, G.

    2011-12-01

    Recent advances in resolving the significance of trace element solubility (e.g., Ti) in quartz have largely focused on reconstructing the P-T-X conditions of equilibration. The calibration of Ti in quartz thermometry (TitaniQ) and the refined precision of analytical instrumentation for in-situ quantitative analysis make this a very effective technique for thermobarometric reconstructions of geologic events. However, the incorporation of trace impurities in the quartz lattice is likely to be affected by deformation, as crystal plasticity may influence the mobility of trace elements. To investigate the role of dynamic recrystallization on the accommodation of changing trace element solubility in quartz, this study combines measurements of trace element concentrations and distribution in naturally deformed quartz with high P-T deformation experiments of trace element doped synthetic quartz aggregates. Measurements of the trace element concentration of quartz from an extensional shear zone in the North American Cordillera provide insight to the behavior of trace elements during dynamic recrystallization associated with retrograde cooling and exhumation. Rutile-bearing quartzite mylonites from the Thor-Odin core complex, British Columbia, were selected for analysis based on the ability to determine Ti activity, the identification of a suitable protolith, and the existence of stable isotope thermometry that allows comparison with independent thermometers. High resolution quantitative analysis reveals systematic compositional variability: the interior of deformed quartz grains preserves a higher Ti concentration than the adjacent rim of the grain. This correlation between microstructural domain and trace element distribution suggests a relationship between the solubility of trace impurities and the mechanism of dynamic recrystallization in quartz. To experimentally investigate the role of deformation on the solubility of trace elements in quartz, synthetic quartz

  10. A Novel Wireless and Temperature-Compensated SAW Vibration Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Wang

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A novel wireless and passive surface acoustic wave (SAW based temperature-compensated vibration sensor utilizing a flexible Y-cut quartz cantilever beam with a relatively substantial proof mass and two one-port resonators is developed. One resonator acts as the sensing device adjacent to the clamped end for maximum strain sensitivity, and the other one is used as the reference located on clamped end for temperature compensation for vibration sensor through the differential approach. Vibration directed to the proof mass flex the cantilever, inducing relative changes in the acoustic propagation characteristics of the SAW travelling along the sensing device, and generated output signal varies in frequency as a function of vibration.  A theoretical mode using the Rayleigh method was established to determine the optimal dimensions of the cantilever beam. Coupling of Modes (COM model was used to extract the optimal design parameters of the SAW devices prior to fabrication. The performance of the developed SAW sensor attached to an antenna towards applied vibration was evaluated wirelessly by using the precise vibration table, programmable incubator chamber, and reader unit.  High vibration sensitivity of ~10.4 kHz/g, good temperature stability, and excellent linearity were observed in the wireless measurements.

  11. Phase transitions in shocked porous quartz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akin, M. C.; Crum, R. S.; Lind, J.; Pagan, D. C.; Homel, M. A.; Hurley, R. C.; Herbold, E. B.

    2017-06-01

    The presence of porosity in granular media provides the means to probe regions of the phase diagram that do not coincide with the principal Hugoniot. In particular, the potential for increased heating is likely to lead to observable changes in phase boundaries. 55% dense quartz and forsterite were prepared by tap filling. These samples were shock compressed using the two stage light gas gun at DCS-APS to examine the impact of the increased porosity on the phase boundary. Here we discuss the observed changes to phase in quartz and forsterite compared to the fully dense materials, the effects of porosity upon compaction and phase transitions, and the implications for constructing the phase diagram. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. Work was supported by LLNL's LDRD program under Grant 16-ERD-010. The Dynamic Compression Sector (35) is supported by Department of Energy / National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0002442. This research used resources of the Advanced Photon Source, a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science User Facility operated for the DOE Office of Science by Argonne National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  12. Note: sensitivity multiplication module for quartz crystal microbalance applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burda, Ioan; Silaghi, Andreea; Tunyagi, Arthur; Simon, Simion; Popescu, Octavian

    2014-02-01

    In this Note, a novel sensitivity multiplication module was added to classical quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). The purpose is to increase QCM frequency shift without changing nominal frequency of the quartz crystal resonator or nominal frequency value delivered to the frequency counter. Allan deviance measurement confirms that the multiplication of the frequency shift is limited by the quartz crystal loads with direct effect in quartz crystal quality factor and oscillator stability. An experimental implementation of this new sensitivity multiplication module that can increase up to six times the frequency shift of the QCM was experimentally investigated using different load conditions.

  13. Tunable Passive Vibration Suppressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boechler, Nicholas (Inventor); Dillon, Robert Peter (Inventor); Daraio, Chiara (Inventor); Davis, Gregory L. (Inventor); Shapiro, Andrew A. (Inventor); Borgonia, John Paul C. (Inventor); Kahn, Daniel Louis (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An apparatus and method for vibration suppression using a granular particle chain. The granular particle chain is statically compressed and the end particles of the chain are attached to a payload and vibration source. The properties of the granular particles along with the amount of static compression are chosen to provide desired filtering of vibrations.

  14. Vibrations and Eigenvalues

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We make music by causing strings, membranes, or air columns to vibrate. Engineers design safe structures by control- ling vibrations. I will describe to you a very simple vibrating system and the mathematics needed to analyse it. The ideas were born in the work of Joseph-Louis Lagrange (1736–1813), and I begin by quot-.

  15. Multiplexing of adjacent vortex modes with the forked grating coupler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadovich, Christopher T.; Kosciolek, Derek J.; Crouse, David T.; Jemison, William D.

    2017-08-01

    For vortex fiber multiplexing to reach practical commercial viability, simple silicon photonic interfaces with vortex fiber will be required. These interfaces must support multiplexing. Toward this goal, an efficient singlefed multimode Forked Grating Coupler (FGC) for coupling two different optical vortex OAM charges to or from the TE0 and TE1 rectangular waveguide modes has been developed. A simple, apodized device implemented with e-beam lithography and a conventional dual-etch processing on SOI wafer exhibits low crosstalk and reasonable mode match. Advanced designs using this concept are expected to further improve performance.

  16. Pitch Fork: A Novel tactile Digital Musical Instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williams, Peter Leslie; Overholt, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Pitch Fork is a prototype of an alternate, actuated digital musical instrument (DMI). It uses 5 infra-red and 4 piezoelectric sensors to control an additive synthesis engine. Iron bars are used as the physical point of contact in interaction with the aim of using this materials natural acoustic p...... properties as a control signal for aspects of the digitally produced sound. This choice of material was also chosen to affect player experience. Sensor readings are relayed to a Macbook via an Arduino Mega. Mappings and audio output signal is carried out with Pure Data Extended....

  17. 76 FR 35909 - Temporary Concession Contract for Big South Fork National Recreation Area, TN/KY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-20

    ... National Recreation Area, TN/KY. SUMMARY: Pursuant to 36 CFR 51.24, public notice is hereby given that the...] Temporary Concession Contract for Big South Fork National Recreation Area, TN/KY AGENCY: National Park... visitor services within Big South Fork National Recreation Area, Tennessee and Kentucky, for a term not to...

  18. 76 FR 6114 - Lincoln National Forest, New Mexico, North Fork Eagle Creek Wells Special Use Authorization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-03

    ...-dependent ecosystems. North Fork of Eagle Creek is located in the Sacramento Mountains of south-central New... and drought conditions have placed increasing demands on surface water and groundwater resources of... percent of its water supply from the North Fork well field. During drought conditions prior to 2006, over...

  19. 16 CFR 1512.14 - Requirements for fork and frame assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Requirements for fork and frame assembly. 1512.14 Section 1512.14 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS... assembly. The fork and frame assembly shall be tested for strength by application of a load of 890 N (200...

  20. Thermal quenching of thermoluminescence in quartz samples of various origin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subedi, B. [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Nuclear Physics Laboratory, 54124-Thessaloniki (Greece); Oniya, E. [Archaeometry Laboratory, Cultural and Educational Technology Institute (C.E.T.I.), R.C. ' Athena' , Tsimiski 58, 67100 Xanthi (Greece); Physics and Electronics Department, Adekunle Ajasin University, PMB 01, Akungba Akoko (Nigeria); Polymeris, G.S. [ISIK University, Physics Department, Faculty of Science and Arts, 34980-Sile, Istanbul (Turkey); Afouxenidis, D.; Tsirliganis, N.C. [Archaeometry Laboratory, Cultural and Educational Technology Institute (C.E.T.I.), R.C. ' Athena' , Tsimiski 58, 67100 Xanthi (Greece); Kitis, G., E-mail: gkitis@auth.g [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Nuclear Physics Laboratory, 54124-Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2011-03-15

    The effect of thermal quenching stands among the most important properties in the thermoluminescence (TL) of quartz on which many applications of TL are based. Since the quartz samples used in various applications are all of different origin it is useful to investigate whether the values of the thermal quenching parameters, i.e. the activation energy for thermal quenching W and a parameter C which describes the ratio of non-radiative to radiative luminescence transitions, evaluated mainly in specific quartz samples can be extrapolated to quartz samples of unknown origin as well as to quartz samples which are annealed at high temperatures. In the present work the TL glow curve of a series of un-annealed and annealed natural and synthetic quartz samples were studied as a function of the heating rate between 0.25 K/s and 16 K/s. Using an indirect fitting method it was found that the thermal quenching parameters W and C in most of the quartz samples are very similar to the values accepted in the literature. Furthermore, in some cases the thermal quenching parameters W and C are not the same for all TL glow-peaks in the same glow-curve. Finally, the strong external treatment of annealing the quartz samples at very high temperature can also influence at least one of the thermal quenching parameters.

  1. Electron irradiation damage effects in hydrothermal grown quartz ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Electron irradiation effects in synthetic quartz single crystals were investigated to determine the extent of damage of the crystals during transmission electron microscopy examination, as the rapid deterioration is of major concern. On exposure of the quartz crystals to electron flux of 3.0 x 108 e/cm2/s at 200 kV accelerating ...

  2. Quartz exposure in agriculture: literature review and South African survey.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swanepoel, A.J.; Rees, D.; Renton, K.; Swanepoel, C.; Kromhout, H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074385224; Gardiner, K.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To review the published literature on respirable quartz exposure and associated disease in agricultural related settings systematically and to describe personal respirable dust and quartz measurements collected on a sandy soil farm in the Free State province of South Africa. METHODS: The

  3. Removal of Ozone by Carbon Nanotubes/Quartz Fiber Film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shen; Nie, Jingqi; Wei, Fei; Yang, Xudong

    2016-09-06

    Ozone is recognized as a harmful gaseous pollutant, which can lead to severe human health problems. In this study, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were tested as a new approach for ozone removal. The CNTs/quartz fiber film was fabricated through growth of CNTs upon pure quartz fiber using chemical vapor deposition method. Ozone conversion efficiency of the CNTs/quartz fiber film was tested for 10 h and compared with that of quartz film, activated carbon (AC), and a potassium iodide (KI) solution under the same conditions. The pressure resistance of these materials under different airflow rates was also measured. The results showed that the CNTs/quartz fiber film had better ozone conversion efficiency but also higher pressure resistance than AC and the KI solution of the same weight. The ozone removal performance of the CNTs/quartz fiber film was comparable with AC at 20 times more weight. The CNTs played a dominant role in ozone removal by the CNTs/quartz fiber film. Its high ozone conversion efficiency, lightweight and free-standing properties make the CNTs/quartz fiber film applicable to ozone removal. Further investigation should be focused on reducing pressure resistance and studying the CNT mechanism for removing ozone.

  4. A new irradiated quartz for beta source calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Vicki; Murray, Andrew Sean; Buylaert, Jan-Pieter

    2015-01-01

    laboratories have used the various different batches of Risø calibration quartz for the calibration of beta and X-ray sources, but these have been largely undescribed. Here we describe in detail the preparation and luminescence characteristics of a new quartz standard, based on a North Sea beach sand collected...

  5. Structural analysis and surface morphology of quartz | Jamo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    -ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to observe the surface and internal structure of the quartz. The results among other things revealed that the quartz consist of mainly silica (SiO2), with crystalline ...

  6. Vibration analysis of cryocoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaru, Takayuki; Suzuki, Toshikazu; Haruyama, Tomiyoshi; Shintomi, Takakazu; Yamamoto, Akira; Koyama, Tomohiro; Li, Rui

    2004-05-01

    The vibrations of Gifford-McMahon (GM) and pulse-tube (PT) cryocoolers were measured and analyzed. The vibrations of the cold-stage and cold-head were measured separately to investigate their vibration mechanisms. The measurements were performed while maintaining the thermal conditions of the cryocoolers at a steady state. We found that the vibration of the cold-head for the 4 K PT cryocooler was two orders of magnitude smaller than that of the 4 K GM cryocooler. On the other hand, the vibration of the cold-stages for both cryocoolers was of the same order of magnitude. From a spectral analysis of the vibrations and a simulation, we concluded that the vibration of the cold-stage is caused by an elastic deformation of the pulse tubes (or cylinders) due to the pressure oscillation of the working gas.

  7. Vibration analysis of cryocoolers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomaru, Takayuki; Suzuki, Toshikazu; Haruyama, Tomiyoshi; Shintomi, Takakazu; Yamamoto, Akira [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Koyama, Tomohiro; Rui Li [Sumitomo Heavy Industries Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    2004-05-01

    The vibrations of Gifford-McMahon (GM) and pulse-tube (PT) cryocoolers were measured and analyzed. The vibrations of the cold-stage and cold-head were measured separately to investigate their vibration mechanisms. The measurements were performed while maintaining the thermal conditions of the cryocoolers at a steady state. We found that the vibration of the cold-head for the 4 K PT cryocooler was two orders of magnitude smaller than that of the 4 K GM cryocooler. On the other hand, the vibration of the cold-stages for both cryocoolers was of the same order of magnitude. From a spectral analysis of the vibrations and a simulation, we concluded that the vibration of the cold-stage is caused by an elastic deformation of the pulse tubes (or cylinders) due to the pressure oscillation of the working gas. (Author)

  8. Vibration of hydraulic machinery

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Yulin; Liu, Shuhong; Dou, Hua-Shu; Qian, Zhongdong

    2013-01-01

    Vibration of Hydraulic Machinery deals with the vibration problem which has significant influence on the safety and reliable operation of hydraulic machinery. It provides new achievements and the latest developments in these areas, even in the basic areas of this subject. The present book covers the fundamentals of mechanical vibration and rotordynamics as well as their main numerical models and analysis methods for the vibration prediction. The mechanical and hydraulic excitations to the vibration are analyzed, and the pressure fluctuations induced by the unsteady turbulent flow is predicted in order to obtain the unsteady loads. This book also discusses the loads, constraint conditions and the elastic and damping characters of the mechanical system, the structure dynamic analysis, the rotor dynamic analysis and the system instability of hydraulic machines, including the illustration of monitoring system for the instability and the vibration in hydraulic units. All the problems are necessary for vibration pr...

  9. Influence of molecular relaxation dynamics on quartz-enhanced photoacoustic detection of CO2 at λ =2 μm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysocki, G.; Kosterev, A. A.; Tittel, F. K.

    2006-11-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) trace gas detection based on quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) using a distributed feedback diode laser operating at λ=2 μm is performed, with a primary purpose of studying vibrational relaxation processes in the CO2-N2-H2O system. A simple model is developed and used to explain the experimentally observed dependence of amplitude and phase of the photoacoustic signal on pressure and gas humidity. A (1σ) sensitivity of 110 parts-per-million (with a 1 s lock-in time constant) was obtained for CO2 concentrations measured in humid gas samples.

  10. Mobile phone generated vibrations used to detect diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Jonathan David; Morris, Matthew William John

    2017-12-01

    In the current United Kingdom population the incidence of diabetic peripheral neuropathy is increasing. The presence of diabetic neuropathy affects decision making and treatment options. This study seeks to evaluate if the vibrations generated from a mobile phone can be used to screen patients for diabetic peripheral neuropathy. This study comprised of 61 patients; a control group of 21 patients; a lower limb injury group of 19 patients; a diabetic peripheral neuropathy group of 21 patients. The control and injury group were recruited randomly from fracture clinics. The diabetic peripheral neuropathy group were randomly recruited from the diabetic foot clinic. The 61 patients were examined using a 10g Semmes-Weinstein monofilament, a 128Hz tuning fork and a vibrating mobile phone. The points tested were, index finger, patella, lateral malleoli, medial malleoli, heel, first and fifth metatarsal heads. The most accurate location of all the clinical tests was the head of the 1st metatarsal at 0.86. The overall accuracy of the tuning fork was 0.77, the ten gram monofilament 0.79 and the mobile phone accuracy was 0.88. The control group felt 420 of 441 tests (95%). The injury group felt 349 of 399 tests (87%). The neuropathic group felt 216 of 441 tests (48%). There is a significant difference in the number of tests felt between the control and both the injury and neuropathic groups. pdiabetic peripheral neuropathy. The most accurate location to test for diabetic peripheral neuropathy is the head of the 1st metatarsal. Screening for diabetic peripheral neuropathy in the index finger and patella were inaccurate. An injury to the lower limb affects the patient's vibration sensation, we would therefore recommend screening the contralateral limb to the injury. This study represents level II evidence of a new diagnostic investigation. Copyright © 2016 European Foot and Ankle Society. All rights reserved.

  11. The hydrolytic weakening effect in quartz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, B. E.

    Experiments on single crystals of quartz have shown that an order of magnitude increase in the fugacity of H2O is associated with about an order of magnitude decrease in the flow strength at a given temperature and pressure. The classical interpretation of this hydrolytic weakening effect is that H2O groups are incorporated into the quartz structure as Si-OH.HO-Si groups. Then, in order to move a dislocation, OH.HO bonds need to be broken rather than Si-O bonds. The rate controlling process is envisaged as the diffusion of the (OH)-defect to or with the dislocation core. This paper discusses the manner in which charged hydrogen- or hydroxyl-defects alter the concentrations of other charged defects such as kinks and jogs on dislocations or vacancies and interstitials and so have an influence on the deformation rate. As an example, an increase in the concentration of negatively charged (OH)-defects leads to an increase in the concentration of positively charged kinks on dislocations thus increasing the strain rate. Other deformation mechanisms involving diffusion of oxygen and silicon with or without climb of dislocations or motion of kinks are also investigated and are shown to be capable of explaining the observed effect. This defect chemistry interpretation is consistent with the classical interpretation but also proposes other mechanisms where the direct diffusion of (OH)-defects plays no role in the process. As an example, an increase in the concentration of negatively charged (OH)-defects increases both the concentration of positively charged jogs and positively charged silicon interstitials in such a way as to explain the magnitude of the hydrolytic weakening effect. As such, the rate controlling process is the climb of dislocations controlled by silicon diffusion, not the diffusion of (OH)-defects. Although several different mechanisms are capable of explaining the hydrolytic weakening effect, many have different dependencies upon the activity of oxygen so

  12. Gamma irradiation of quartz from Pannier basin, South America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enokihara, Cyro T.; Rela, Paulo R. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)], E-mail: cteiti@ipen.br, E-mail: prela@ipen.br; Guttler, Rainer A.S. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Geociencias

    2007-07-01

    The use of gamma radiation to induce or enhance color centers in gemstones is a widespread technique and applied worldwide on a industrial scale since at least 1970. The presence of defects and defect structures in quartz from a border region of southern Brazil and Uruguay are the reason for the creation of a new color variety of quartz called 'Prasiolite' in the gem trade. This quartz has a pleasant green color produced by gamma irradiation. The procedures of irradiation at IPEN show that the activation of these color producing defects can be monitored by detailed chemical and spectroscopic analysis. For the first time UV-VIS-NIR spectra of this new color variety of quartz are shown. They revealed special features of these quartz crystals coming from basaltic terranes of the Parana Basin. Contrary to most specimen of quartz from other parts of Brazil, they have such a high water and OH content that they resemble more chalcedony or opal, but not highly crystalline quartz specimens. The cause of the color are broken bonds of Si-OH defining the so-called dangling bonds. (author)

  13. Relationship between amorphous silica and precious metal in quartz veins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrichhausen, N.; Rowe, C. D.; Board, W. S.; Greig, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    Super-saturation of silica is common in fault fluids, due to pressure changes associated with fracture, fault slip, or temperature gradients in hydrothermal systems. These mechanisms lead to precipitation of amorphous silica, which will recrystallize to quartz under typical geologic conditions. These conditions may also promote the saturation of precious metals, such as gold, and the precipitation of nanoparticles. Previous experiments show that charged nanoparticles of gold can attach to the surface of amorphous silica nanoparticles. Thus, gold and silica may be transported as a colloid influencing mineralization textures during amorphous silica recrystallization to quartz. This may enrich quartz vein hosted gold deposits, but the instability of hydrous silica during subsequent deformation means that the microstructural record of precipitation of gold is lost. We investigate a recent, shallow auriferous hydrothermal system at Dixie Valley, Nevada to reveal the nano- to micro-scale relationships between gold and silica in fresh veins. Fault slip surfaces at Dixie Valley exhibit layers of amorphous silica with partial recrystallization to quartz. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) show amorphous silica can contain a few wt. % gold while areas recrystallized to quartz are barren. At the Jurassic Brucejack deposit in British Columbia, Canada we observe the cryptocrystalline quartz textures that may indicate recrystallization from amorphous silica within quartz-carbonate veins containing high grade gold. Comb quartz within syntaxial veins, vugs, and coating breccia clasts indicate structural dilation. Vein geometry is investigated to determine relative importance of fault slip in creating dilational sites. By comparing quartz-carbonate veins from the Dixie Valley to Brucejack, we can determine whether amorphous silica formed in different environments show similar potential to affect precious metal mineralization.

  14. Proton induced defect formation in quartz glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gulamova, R.R.; Gasanov, E.M.; Alimov, R. [Uzbekian AS, Tashkent (Uzbekistan). Inst. of Nuclear Physics

    1996-12-31

    The contributions of ionization energy losses and elastic collisions to radiation induced defect formation along the proton track were considered in quartz glasses irradiated by protons with different energies. It is shown that on a larger part of the proton track the color and luminescence center formation by means of recharging of the native defects is due to the ionization energy losses. Generation of structural defects like displaced atoms and their vacancies by elastic collisions with protons and recoil atoms dominates for proton energies < 5 MeV. At proton energies > 10 MeV the color and luminescence center formation due to ionization energy losses prevails, and generation of the alumina-alkaline centers, causing an increase of the optical absorption at 550 nm and the thermoluminescence peak at 360 C and a band at 460 nm, occurs. At the proton energies E{sub p} < 10 MeV generation of the displaced atoms and their vacancies by elastic collisions dominates, leading to an increase of the E{prime}-centers and to the destruction and transformation of the alumina-alkaline centers.

  15. [Dermatologic risks of quartz-halogen lamps].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesarini, J P; Muel, B

    1992-01-01

    Halogene sources are used increasingly in general illumination. Their quartz envelop is technically necessary, but presents the disadvantage of to letting the emitted UVA, UVB and UVC go through. Originally used as in indirect lighting, they have been introduced as desk-top lamps, without filter. We have proceeded to the verification of their output with a spectrophotometer calibrated by actinometry and we have calculated their relative erythemal efficacy according to the Parrish's action spectrum for human erythema. We found that, at 10 cm from the human skin, the irradiance was able to induce a minimal erythema in about 10 minutes on clear back skin. At working distance (50 cm), a barely perceptible erythema could be observed on the back of the hands after 8 consecutive hours working. We also found that sunburn cells were present in the skin sensitized with a potent phototoxic agent (8-methoxypsoralen) applied 15 minutes before a 4-6 minutes irradiation with the halogen source (at 20 cm), thus, indicating a potential risk for local phototoxicity and photoallergy. The cumulative doses per year, for 4 hours exposure per day, five days a week, reaches 125 minimal erythemal doses, equivalent to the average yearly exposure of individuals for work and leisure. If one assumes that this regimen is maintained for 30 years, the risk for induction of skin cancers on the dorsal aspect of the hands and the forearms, may be increased by a 3.4 factor, according to the widely accepted previsional models.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. The recrystallized grain size piezometer for quartz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stipp, Michael; Tullis, Jan

    2003-11-01

    In order to determine a recrystallized grain size piezometer for quartz, we deformed Black Hills quartzite in a molten salt assembly in a Griggs apparatus at 1.5 GPa, 800 to 1100°C, and strain rates between 2*10-7 and 2*10-4 s-1, conditions which include dislocation creep regimes 2 and 3 of Hirth and Tullis [1992]. Flow stresses ranged from 34 +/- 16 to 268 +/- 38 MPa with corresponding recrystallized grain sizes from 46 +/- 15 to 3.2 +/- 0.7 μm. The data are well fit by a single piezometer relation, D = 103.56+/- 0.27 * σ-1.26 +/- 0.13, with no change in slope at the regime 2-3 transition and no effect of temperature or α/β stability field. Another experimental piezometer relation for regime 1 of Hirth and Tullis [1992] differs in slope, suggesting that different recrystallization mechanisms require different piezometer calibrations.

  17. Intracavity quartz-enhanced photoacoustic sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borri, S., E-mail: simone.borri@ino.it; Galli, I.; Mazzotti, D.; Giusfredi, G.; De Natale, P. [CNR-INO UOS Sesto Fiorentino and LENS, via Carrara 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino FI (Italy); Patimisco, P.; Scamarcio, G.; Spagnolo, V. [CNR-IFN UOS Bari and Dipartimento Interateneo di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Bari e Politecnico di Bari, via Amendola 173, 70126 Bari BA (Italy); Akikusa, N. [Development Bureau Laser Device R and D Group, Hamamatsu Photonics KK, Shizuoka 434-8601 (Japan); Yamanishi, M. [Central Research Laboratories, Hamamatsu Photonics KK, Shizuoka 434-8601 (Japan)

    2014-03-03

    We report on a spectroscopic technique named intracavity quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (I-QEPAS) employed for sensitive trace-gas detection in the mid-infrared spectral region. It is based on a combination of QEPAS with a buildup optical cavity. The sensor includes a distributed feedback quantum cascade laser emitting at 4.33 μm. We achieved a laser optical power buildup factor of ∼500, which corresponds to an intracavity laser power of ∼0.75 W. CO{sub 2} has been selected as the target molecule for the I-QEPAS demonstration. We achieved a detection sensitivity of 300 parts per trillion for 4 s integration time, corresponding to a noise equivalent absorption coefficient of 1.4 × 10{sup −8} cm{sup −1} and a normalized noise-equivalent absorption of 3.2 × 10{sup −10} W cm{sup −1} Hz{sup −1/2}.

  18. Anisotropic annealing of fission fragments in synthetic quartz

    CERN Document Server

    Sawamura, T; Narita, M

    1999-01-01

    A study on the thermal annealing behavior of fission fragments in synthetic quartz crystals was performed for application of synthetic quartz to track detectors under high temperature circumstances: x-, y-, and z-cut quartz plates were exposed to fission fragments from sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf and were annealed up to 750 deg. C. It was found that track retention depended on the crystallographic structure: the annealing temperature, where the number of etched tracks was sharply reduced, was 550 deg. C for the x- and y-cut plates and 750 deg. C for z-cut plates. Track sizes decrease and disperse with reductions in the track retention.

  19. Retention of xenon in quartz and Earth's missing xenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanloup, Chrystèle; Schmidt, Burkhard C; Chamorro Perez, Eva Maria; Jambon, Albert; Gregoryanz, Eugene; Mezouar, Mohamed

    2005-11-18

    The reactivity of xenon with terrestrial oxides was investigated by in situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction. At high temperature (T > 500 kelvin), some silicon was reduced, and the pressure stability of quartz was expanded, attesting to the substitution of some xenon for silicon. When the quartz was quenched, xenon diffused out and only a few weight percent remained trapped in samples. These results show that xenon can be covalently bonded to oxygen in quartz in the lower continental crust, providing an answer to the missing xenon problem; synthesis paths of rare gas compounds are also opened.

  20. Recent developments of OSL techniques for dating quartz and feldspars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Jungner, H.; Mejdahl, V.

    1993-01-01

    The construction of a unit for measuring optically stimulated luminescence from quartz and feldspar is described. The light sources used for stimulation are infrared diodes for feldspar and green light from a halogen lamp (obtained with a system of filters) for both quartz and feldspar. The unit...... can be mounted on the Riso TL reader thus allowing combined TL and OSL measurements. The apparatus was used for studies of (1) the relation between TL and OSL signals, (2) the luminescence of quartz samples annealed at different temperatures and (3) anomalous fading of the latent luminescence signal...

  1. Fork test: A new simple and reliable consistency measurement for the dysphagia diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin-Woo; Kim, In-Jung; Lee, Ho-Jun

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to validate fork test which is a simple tool to assess the consistency of food. The consistencies of 27 water and thickener mixtures were measured with a viscometer. These measures were then compared to those obtained with fork test to evaluate the validity of fork test. The inter-observer and intra-observer reliabilities of the fork test were assessed with an intra-class correlation coefficient. The viscometer was used to obtain reference values for three categories (0-300 cP, 300-10,000 cP, and >10,000 cP) in order to categorize water and thickener mixtures into grade 1, grade 2, or grade 3 according to the results of fork test. Our results revealed that the fork test showed excellent validity (r = -0.889, p < 0.05), intra-observer reliability, and inter-observer reliability. Therefore, fork test may be used as a practical tool to assess food consistency. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Using a titanium-in-quartz geothermometer for crystallization temperature estimation of the Palaeoproterozoic Suursaari quartz porphyry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kairi Ehrlich

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The Suursaari volcanic sequence represents volcanic activity related to Wiborg Batholith rapakivi intrusions in the southern part of the Fennoscandian Shield. The estimated pressure conditions for batholith granitic rocks are 1–5 kbar and crystallization temperatures range from 670 to 890 °C. To describe the temperature regime of the Suursaari volcanic system, a rock sample was taken from the Mäkiinpäällys Mountain outcrop and analysed with laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Sample spots were selected from quartz phenocrysts and groundmass. Quartz crystallization temperatures were calculated by the Ti-in-quartz method that takes into account rutile equilibrium and Ti activity in each phase. The calculated crystallization temperatures of the Suursaari quartz porphyry are in the range of 647–738 °C. The results show that the Suursaari quartz porphyry contains two generations of quartz which can be distinguished on the basis of crystallization temperatures: phenocrysts crystallized at higher and groundmass quartz at lower temperature.

  3. Mammalian RAD52 Functions in Break-Induced Replication Repair of Collapsed DNA Replication Forks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sotiriou, Sotirios K; Kamileri, Irene; Lugli, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    RNA or knockout of the gene by CRISPR/Cas9 compromised restart of collapsed forks and led to DNA damage in cells experiencing DRS. Furthermore, in cancer-prone, heterozygous APC mutant mice, homozygous deletion of the Rad52 gene suppressed tumor growth and prolonged lifespan. We therefore propose that mammalian......Human cancers are characterized by the presence of oncogene-induced DNA replication stress (DRS), making them dependent on repair pathways such as break-induced replication (BIR) for damaged DNA replication forks. To better understand BIR, we performed a targeted siRNA screen for genes whose...... RAD52 facilitates repair of collapsed DNA replication forks in cancer cells....

  4. Structure optimization and simulation analysis of the quartz micromachined gyroscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuezhong Wu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Structure optimization and simulation analysis of the quartz micromachined gyroscope are reported in this paper. The relationships between the structure parameters and the frequencies of work mode were analysed by finite element analysis. The structure parameters of the quartz micromachined gyroscope were optimized to reduce the difference between the frequencies of the drive mode and the sense mode. The simulation results were proved by testing the prototype gyroscope, which was fabricated by micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS technology. Therefore, the frequencies of the drive mode and the sense mode can match each other by the structure optimization and simulation analysis of the quartz micromachined gyroscope, which is helpful in the design of the high sensitivity quartz micromachined gyroscope.

  5. Miniature Quartz Crystal Microbalance for Spacecraft and Missile Applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Uy, O

    1999-01-01

    Quartz crystal microbalances (QCMs) have been used for over 20 years as contamination monitors in spacecraft to measure film deposition on sensitive surfaces such as optical mirrors, thermal radiators, and solar arrays...

  6. Degradation of glycine and alanine on irradiated quartz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlikowski, Maciej; Benko, Aleksandra; Wróbel, Tomasz P

    2013-04-01

    Recent researches suggest participation of minerals in the formation of life under primordial conditions. Among all of the minerals, quartz seems to be one of the most probable to take part in such processes. However, an external source of energy is needed, e.g. electric discharge. A device simulating the proposed conditions was designed and was used to simulate prebiotic conditions. Investigation of processes occurring during the stimulation of quartz with electric discharge was studied by means of Ultraviolet-visible (UV-VIS) spectroscopy, in order to monitor the generation kinetics of free radicals. Additionally, infrared spectroscopy was applied to identify chemical reaction products created in a solution of alanine or glycine, in the presence of quartz treated with electric discharge. Formation of increased amounts of free radicals, compared to experiments performed without quartz and/or amino acid, is reported, along with identification of possible degradation products of alanine. No synthetic reactions were observed.

  7. Petrographic and optical cathodoluminescence study of detrital quartz

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Basange Formation had been investigated using integrated optical Cathodoluminescence and Petrographic characteristics approach. Results showed the presence, in abundance, of detrital quartz with characteristic dull red to violet CL colour and ...

  8. Diagenetic quartz and amorphous silica in New Zealand coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sykes, R.; Lindqvist, J.K. (Institute of Geological and Nuclear Sciences, Dunedin (New Zealand))

    1993-08-01

    New Zealand coal seams (Late Cretaceous-Miocene, lignite-semi-anthracite) contain numerous and varied occurrences of diagenetic quartz and amorphous silica. Early diagenetic silicifications include: sub-horizontal and laterally extensive, quartz-mineralized bands; micro- and megascopic, euhedral quartz crystals, dispersed or concentrated in layers; and silicified in situ tree stumps. Late diagenetic forms include: sub-horizontal, quartz-mineralized bands, mostly [lt] 1 m in length; and fracture-infillings. The origins of the silica remain uncertain but leached basement rocks and coal measure sediments, and siliceous phytoliths within the coal-forming plants, are possible sources. The silicification of coal seams may have significant implications for exploration, mining and geological studies. 39 refs., 5 figs., 4 plates.

  9. Deposits of gold-quartz formation in the Priamur province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    В. А. Степанов

    2017-03-01

    Small deposits of near-bottom ore pipe are quite rare. Ore bodies are represented by quartz veins and zones of metasomatites. Gold is mostly free, of fine and super fine grain size. The prevailing trace element is mercury. Attribution of gold-quartz deposits to a certain part of ore pipe can facilitate more precise estimation of their prospects. In its own turn, this will allow to choose more favorable objects for further evaluation.

  10. Influence of quartz particles on wear in vertical roller mills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lucas R.D.; Friis, Henrik; Fundal, Erling

    2010-01-01

    statistical planning, a total of 10 tests were arried out with two different limestones and one type of quartz sand. The size distributions were kept constant and only the mixing ratios were varied. It appears from the investigation that mixtures consisting of minerals with different grindabilities result...... in an increased concentration of abrasive particles in the grinding bed ðR2 > 0:99Þ. The present study shows that the quartz concentration in the grinding bed is determining the wear rate....

  11. Basic characteristics of quartz crystal sensor with interdigitated electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Muramatsu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes basic characteristics of the quartz crystal sensor with interdigitated electrodes (IDE quartz crystal sensor which is for simultaneous monitoring of mass, viscosity, conductivity and dielectric changes of liquids or thin films. As the IDE quartz crystal sensor has three terminals for a pair of IDEs on the one side and a counter electrode on the other side, the resonance properties have been analyzed using the electrical equivalent circuit models and measured experimentally for all connecting types of electrode pairs. The IDE quartz crystal has shown clear resonance curves for calculating the resonance frequency and resonance resistance values as well as normal quartz crystal in the air and in contact with liquid. Small shifts in the resonance frequency and resonance resistance depending on the connecting types have been obtained and analyzed using the equivalent circuit models. We have found the integrated quartz crystal and IDE sensors could be monitored simultaneously by only one impedance analyzer. Finally, two types of measuring systems have been demonstrated for continuous measuring methods.

  12. Interaction Between Graphene Oxide Nanoparticles and Quartz Sand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotirelis, Nikolaos P; Chrysikopoulos, Constantinos V

    2015-11-17

    In this study, the influence of pH, ionic strength (IS), and temperature on graphene oxide (GO) nanoparticles attachment onto quartz sand were investigated. Batch experiments were conducted at three controlled temperatures (4, 12, and 25 °C) in solutions with different pH values (pH 4, 7, and 10), and ionic strengths (IS = 1.4, 6.4, and 21.4 mM), under static and dynamic conditions. The surface properties of GO nanoparticles and quartz sand were evaluated by electrophoretic mobility measurements. Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) potential energy profiles were constructed for the experimental conditions, using measured zeta potentials. The experimental results showed that GO nanoparticles were very stable under the experimental conditions. Both temperature and pH did not play a significant role in the attachment of GO nanoparticles onto quartz sand. In contrast, IS was shown to influence attachment. The attachment of GO particles onto quartz sand increased significantly with increasing IS. The experimental data were fitted nicely with a Freundlich isotherm, and the attachment kinetics were satisfactorily described with a pseudo-second-order model, which implies that the quartz sand exhibited substantial surface heterogeneity and that GO retention was governed by chemisorption. Furthermore, thermodynamic analysis revealed that the attachment process was nonspontaneous and endothermic, which may be associated with structural changes of the sand surfaces due to chemisorption. Therefore, secondary minimum interaction may not be the dominant mechanism for GO attachment onto the quartz sand under the experimental conditions.

  13. Model Indepedent Vibration Control

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan, Jing

    2010-01-01

    A NMIFC system is proposed for broadband vibration control. It has two important features. Feature F1 is that the NMIFC is stable without introducing any invasive effects, such as probing signals or controller perturbations, into the vibration system; feature F2 is

  14. Vibration Theory, Vol. 3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Søren R. K.

    The present textbook has been written based on previous lecture notes for a course on stochastic vibration theory that is being given on the 9th semester at Aalborg University for M. Sc. students in structural engineering. The present 4th edition of this textbook on linear stochastic vibration...

  15. Vibration Theory, Vol. 3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Søren R. K.

    The present textbook has been written based on previous lecture notes for a course on stochastic vibration theory that is being given on the 9th semester at Aalborg University for M. Sc. students in structural engineering. The present 2nd edition of this textbook on linear stochastic vibration...

  16. Hydroelastic Vibrations of Ships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Juncher; Folsø, Rasmus

    2002-01-01

    A formula for the necessary hull girder bending stiffness required to avoid serious springing vibrations is derived. The expression takes into account the zero crossing period of the waves, the ship speed and main dimensions. For whipping vibrations the probability of exceedance for the combined...

  17. Gearbox vibration diagnostic analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    This report describes the Gearbox Vibration Diagnostic Analyzer installed in the NASA Lewis Research Center's 500 HP Helicopter Transmission Test Stand to monitor gearbox testing. The vibration of the gearbox is analyzed using diagnostic algorithms to calculate a parameter indicating damaged components.

  18. Mechanical vibration and shock analysis, sinusoidal vibration

    CERN Document Server

    Lalanne, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Everything engineers need to know about mechanical vibration and shock...in one authoritative reference work! This fully updated and revised 3rd edition addresses the entire field of mechanical vibration and shock as one of the most important types of load and stress applied to structures, machines and components in the real world. Examples include everything from the regular and predictable loads applied to turbines, motors or helicopters by the spinning of their constituent parts to the ability of buildings to withstand damage from wind loads or explosions, and the need for cars to m

  19. Vibrations of rotating machinery

    CERN Document Server

    Matsushita, Osami; Kanki, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Masao; Keogh, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    This book opens with an explanation of the vibrations of a single degree-of-freedom (dof) system for all beginners. Subsequently, vibration analysis of multi-dof systems is explained by modal analysis. Mode synthesis modeling is then introduced for system reduction, which aids understanding in a simplified manner of how complicated rotors behave. Rotor balancing techniques are offered for rigid and flexible rotors through several examples. Consideration of gyroscopic influences on the rotordynamics is then provided and vibration evaluation of a rotor-bearing system is emphasized in terms of forward and backward whirl rotor motions through eigenvalue (natural frequency and damping ratio) analysis. In addition to these rotordynamics concerning rotating shaft vibration measured in a stationary reference frame, blade vibrations are analyzed with Coriolis forces expressed in a rotating reference frame. Other phenomena that may be assessed in stationary and rotating reference frames include stability characteristic...

  20. Chaperoning HMGA2 Protein Protects Stalled Replication Forks in Stem and Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haojie Yu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Maintaining genome integrity requires the accurate and complete replication of chromosomal DNA. This is of the utmost importance for embryonic stem cells (ESCs, which differentiate into cells of all lineages, including germ cells. However, endogenous and exogenous factors frequently induce stalling of replication forks in every cell cycle, which can trigger mutations and chromosomal instabilities. We show here that the oncofetal, nonhistone chromatin factor HMGA2 equips cells with a highly effective first-line defense mechanism against endonucleolytic collapse of stalled forks. This fork-stabilizing function most likely employs scaffold formation at branched DNA via multiple DNA-binding domains. Moreover, HMGA2 works independently of other human factors in two heterologous cell systems to prevent DNA strand breaks. This fork chaperone function seemingly evolved to preserve ESC genome integrity. It is hijacked by tumor (stem cells to also guard their genomes against DNA-damaging agents widely used to treat cancer patients.

  1. Assessment of contaminant loads at the Deep Fork National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Fish, sediment, and benthic macroinvertebrate communities were sampled on and near the Deep Fork National Wildlife Refuge, Okmulgee County, Oklahoma. Collections...

  2. Geographic distribution of mercury in asiatic clams, Corbicuia plumihea, from the North Fork Holston River, Virginia

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A study was conducted quantifying mercury concentrations in the Asiatic clam, Corbicula fluminea, from the North Fork Holston River, Virginia. The purpose of this...

  3. Synthesis and deformation of a Ti doped quartz aggregate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachlas, William O.; Hirth, Greg; Teyssier, Christian; Whitney, Donna L.; Zimmerman, Mark

    2013-04-01

    A primary advantage of studying mylonites for thermobarometric reconstructions of tectonic events is that it enables direct comparison of P-T estimates with the mechanics of quartz deformation. Quartz is a common phase in crustal mylonites and is a particularly sensitive recorder of metamorphic and rheologic conditions in shear zones, owing to its responsiveness to dynamic recrystallization, involvement in metamorphic reaction, and propensity for dissolution and precipitation. The signature of its trace element chemistry, particularly Ti, can reflect involvement from each of these processes. The concentration of Ti in mylonites is typically heterogeneous at the thin section scale, providing a rich record of the different factors that influence the incorporation of Ti in quartz. Observations of quartz in deformed mylonite and undeformed protolith from an extensional shear zone in the North American Cordillera (Shuswap Complex, Canada) show that an originally uniform Ti distribution was modified during deformation to form zoned crystals in which the core preserves a higher Ti concentration than the rim. The zoned Ti concentration likely records a continuum of deformation conditions during extension-related exhumation, and this presents a challenge in resolving the effect of deformation on the equilibrium solubility of Ti in quartz in natural settings. By conducting deformation experiments on synthetic quartz aggregates with known Ti concentration at a constant, elevated temperature and pressure under high strain conditions, we investigate the influence of progressive dynamic recrystallization on Ti solubility in quartz. This study applies a novel doping technique that enables the synthesis of a large population of quartz crystals with a precisely controlled Ti concentration and distribution. This produces a sample that most closely replicates the protolith of extensional shear zones that typically develop under retrograde conditions. This strategy can be used to

  4. Quartz concentration trends in metal and nonmetal mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Winthrop F; Huynh, Tran B; Ramachandran, Gurumurthy

    2012-01-01

    From 1974 through 2010, the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) collected nearly 147,000 respirable dust samples with a mass of at least 0.1 mg and a minimum of 1% quartz. These samples represent about 50% of all respirable dust compliance samples collected by MSHA. Analysis of these data shows that pockets of high concentrations and overexposure continue to exist. At underground mines, from 2005 to 2010, occupations with >20% of the samples exceeding the permissible exposure limit (PEL) and geometric mean quartz concentrations exceeding the ACGIH threshold limit value of 25 μg/m(3) included mucking, crusher operator, general laborer/utility, and front-end loader operator. During the same period, stone and rock saw operators and bagger and packers working at surface mines and mills also had >20% of the samples exceeding the PEL and geometric mean quartz concentrations >25 μg/m(3). Regardless of mine type or location, slow but steady improvement in exposure levels is seen in jobs involving crushing operations, which are widespread in the mining industry. Crusher operators are more likely to work in an enclosed area where it is easier to apply dust controls and air conditioning. A downward trend is also observed for vehicle equipment operators who drive load-haul-dumps, front-end loaders, trucks, and similar equipment. Crusher operators and vehicle equipment operators represent occupational categories that are widely sampled by MSHA inspectors. A small but statistically significant reduction in the overall mean respirable quartz dust and quartz concentrations from 1993 to 2010 was observed in most commodity groups. Variability from year to year and between commodities is high. Reduction in respirable quartz dust concentration does not necessarily correspond to a reduction in quartz concentration within the same commodity group. These trends are consistent with those reported in previous studies.

  5. Luminescent, optical and color properties of natural rose quartz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kibar, R. [Department of Physics, Science Faculty, Ege University, 35100 Bornova-Izmir (Turkey); Garcia-Guinea, J. [Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales, CSIC, Jose Gutierrez Abascal 2, Madrid 28006 (Spain); Cetin, A.; Selvi, S. [Department of Physics, Science Faculty, Ege University, 35100 Bornova-Izmir (Turkey); Karal, T. [Institute of Nuclear Science, Ege University, 35100 Bornova-Izmir (Turkey); Can, N. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Celal Bayar University, 45140 Muradiye-Manisa (Turkey)], E-mail: cannurdogan@yahoo.com

    2007-11-15

    Rose quartz is an interesting mineral with numerous impurities that have been studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD), cathodoluminescence (CL), ion beam luminescence (IBL), radioluminescence (RL), thermoluminescence (TL) and optical absorption (OA). After HF etching, rose quartz from Oliva de Plasencia (Caceres, Spain) shows under SEM the presence of other silicate phases such as dumortierite [Al{sub 6.5-7}(BO{sub 3})(SiO{sub 4}){sub 3}(O,OH){sub 3}]. The OA spectrum of rose quartz suggests that these inclusions are the cause of coloration of rose quartz. The luminescence (CL, IBL, RL, TL) spectra behavior, at both room temperature and lower, confirms that the {approx}340nm emission could be associated with Si-O strain structures, including non-bridging oxygen or silicon vacancy-hole centers; the observed {approx}400nm emission could be associated with recombination of a hole trapped adjacent to a substitutional, charge-compensated aluminum alkali ion center; the {approx}500nm emission could be associated with substitutional Al{sup 3+} and the {approx}700nm peak could be associated with Fe{sup 3+} point defects in Si{sup 4+} sites. These results suggest that, while defect properties of rose quartz are not greatly dissimilar to those of purer forms of quartz and silica, further research seems necessary to determine criteria for the evolution of the newly-formed self-organized microstructures in the rose quartz lattice under irradiation.

  6. Structural Stability and Vibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiggers, Sine Leergaard; Pedersen, Pauli

    This book offers an integrated introduction to the topic of stability and vibration. Strikingly, it describes stability as a function of boundary conditions and eigenfrequency as a function of both boundary conditions and column force. Based on a post graduate course held by the author at the Uni......This book offers an integrated introduction to the topic of stability and vibration. Strikingly, it describes stability as a function of boundary conditions and eigenfrequency as a function of both boundary conditions and column force. Based on a post graduate course held by the author...... and their derivation, thus stimulating them to write interactive and dynamic programs to analyze instability and vibrational modes....

  7. Thickness vibrations of a piezoelectric plate with dissipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Peter C Y; Liu, Ninghui; Ballato, Arthur

    2004-01-01

    The three-dimensional (3-D) equations of linear piezoelectricity with quasi-electrostatic approximation are extended to include losses attributed to the acoustic viscosity and electrical conductivity. These equations are used to investigate effects of dissipation on the propagation of plane waves in an infinite solid and forced thickness vibrations in an infinite piezoelectric plate with general symmetry. For a harmonic plane wave propagating in an arbitrary direction in an unbounded solid, the complex eigenvalue problem is solved from which the effective elastic stiffness, viscosity, and conductivity are computed. For the forced thickness vibrations of an infinite plate, the complex coupling factor K*, input admittance Y are derived and an explicit, approximate expression for K* is obtained in terms of material properties. Effects of the viscosity and conductivity on the resonance frequency, modes, admittance, attenuation coefficient, dynamic time constant, coupling factor, and quality factor are calculated and examined for quartz and ceramic barium titanate plates.

  8. Ultrasonic superlensing jets and acoustic-fork sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitri, F.G., E-mail: F.G.Mitri@ieee.org

    2017-05-18

    Focusing acoustical (and optical) beams beyond the diffraction limit has remained a major challenge in imaging instruments and systems, until recent advances on “hyper” or “super” lensing and higher-resolution imaging techniques have shown the counterintuitive violation of this rule under certain circumstances. Nonetheless, the proposed technologies of super-resolution acoustical focusing beyond the diffraction barrier require complex tools such as artificially engineered metamaterials, and other hardware equipment that may not be easily synthesized or manufactured. The present contribution therefore suggests a simple and reliable method of using a sound-penetrable circular cylinder lens illuminated by a nonparaxial Gaussian acoustical sheet (i.e. finite beam in 2D) to produce non-evanescent ultrasonic superlensing jets (or bullets) and acoustical ‘snail-fork’ shaped wavefronts with limited diffraction. The generalized (near-field) scattering theory for acoustical sheets of arbitrary wavefronts and incidence is utilized to synthesize the incident beam based upon the angular spectrum decomposition method and the multipole expansion method in cylindrical wave functions to compute the scattered pressure around the cylinder with particular emphasis on its physical properties. The results show that depending on the beam and lens parameters, a tight focusing (with dimensions much smaller than the beam waist) can be achieved. Subwavelength resolution can be also achieved by selecting a lens material with a speed of sound exceeding that of the host fluid medium. The ultrasonic superlensing jets provide the impetus to develop improved subwavelength microscopy and acoustical image-slicing systems, cell lysis and surgery, and photoacoustic imaging to name a few examples. Moreover, an acoustical fork-sheet generation may open innovative avenues in reconfigurable on-chip micro/nanoparticle tweezers and surface acoustic waves devices. - Highlights: • Ultrasonic

  9. The Late Cretaceous Middle Fork caldera, its resurgent intrusion, and enduring landscape stability in east-central Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, Charles R.; Dusel-Bacon, Cynthia; Aleinikoff, John N.; Slack, John F.

    2014-01-01

    Dissected caldera structures expose thick intracaldera tuff and, uncommonly, cogenetic shallow plutons, while remnants of correlative outflow tuffs deposited on the pre-eruption ground surface record elements of ancient landscapes. The Middle Fork caldera encompasses a 10 km × 20 km area of rhyolite welded tuff and granite porphyry in east-central Alaska, ∼100 km west of the Yukon border. Intracaldera tuff is at least 850 m thick. The K-feldspar megacrystic granite porphyry is exposed over much of a 7 km × 12 km area having 650 m of relief within the western part of the caldera fill. Sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe with reverse geometry (SHRIMP-RG) analyses of zircon from intracaldera tuff, granite porphyry, and outflow tuff yield U-Pb ages of 70.0 ± 1.2, 69.7 ± 1.2, and 71.1 ± 0.5 Ma (95% confidence), respectively. An aeromagnetic survey indicates that the tuff is reversely magnetized, and, therefore, that the caldera-forming eruption occurred in the C31r geomagnetic polarity chron. The tuff and porphyry have arc geochemical signatures and a limited range in SiO2 of 69 to 72 wt%. Although their phenocrysts differ in size and abundance, similar quartz + K-feldspar + plagioclase + biotite mineralogy, whole-rock geochemistry, and analytically indistinguishable ages indicate that the tuff and porphyry were comagmatic. Resorption of phenocrysts in tuff and porphyry suggests that these magmas formed by thermal rejuvenation of near-solidus or solidified crystal mush. A rare magmatic enclave (54% SiO2, arc geochemical signature) in the porphyry may be similar to parental magma and provides evidence of mafic magma and thermal input.

  10. Characterization of impurities present on Tihimatine (Hoggar) quartz, Algeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anas Boussaa, S.; Kheloufi, A.; Boutarek Zaourar, N.

    2017-11-01

    Many of today's advanced materials depend on quartz as a raw material. Quartz usually contains abundant inclusions, both solid and liquid, and due to the number of these inclusions and their small size, complete separation is most difficult. Typical properties of raw quartz that must be characterized are: Size and Chemical composition of inclusions, their spatial distribution, localization of isomorphic substitutional elements (e.g. Al, Fe). The aim of this study has been to test experimental methods for investigating some inclusions (impurities) present in the Tihimatine quartz from El Hoggar region deposits (southern Algeria) using X Ray Fluorescence, scanning electron microscopy, optical Microscopy with reflected and transmitted lights, infra-red spectrometer, Raman spectrometer. Despite the high concentration of SiO2 in studied quartz reaching 98%, several harmful inclusions were found and identified as hematite, anatase, muscovite, graphite, it contains: Fe, Ti, Al, K, Ca. Some fluid inclusions were found. We detect the presence of carbon dioxide and water using raman spectroscopy. The repartition of solid impurities is aleatory and not homogeneous with maximum size of 10 μm. Concerning the fluid impurities, their diameter vary between 5 and 20 μm and their repartition is aleatory.

  11. Vibration Analysis and the Accelerometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Have you ever put your hand on an electric motor or motor-driven electric appliance and felt it vibrate? Ever wonder why it vibrates? What is there about the operation of the motor, or the object to which it is attached, that causes the vibrations? Is there anything "regular" about the vibrations, or are they the result of random causes? In this…

  12. Vibrations and Stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jon Juel

    About this textbook An ideal text for students that ties together classical and modern topics of advanced vibration analysis in an interesting and lucid manner. It provides students with a background in elementary vibrations with the tools necessary for understanding and analyzing more complex...... dynamical phenomena that can be encountered in engineering and scientific practice. It progresses steadily from linear vibration theory over various levels of nonlinearity to bifurcation analysis, global dynamics and chaotic vibrations. It trains the student to analyze simple models, recognize nonlinear...... phenomena and work with advanced tools such as perturbation analysis and bifurcation analysis. Explaining theory in terms of relevant examples from real systems, this book is user-friendly and meets the increasing interest in non-linear dynamics in mechanical/structural engineering and applied mathematics...

  13. Mcm10: A Dynamic Scaffold at Eukaryotic Replication Forks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan M. Baxley

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available To complete the duplication of large genomes efficiently, mechanisms have evolved that coordinate DNA unwinding with DNA synthesis and provide quality control measures prior to cell division. Minichromosome maintenance protein 10 (Mcm10 is a conserved component of the eukaryotic replisome that contributes to this process in multiple ways. Mcm10 promotes the initiation of DNA replication through direct interactions with the cell division cycle 45 (Cdc45-minichromosome maintenance complex proteins 2-7 (Mcm2-7-go-ichi-ni-san GINS complex proteins, as well as single- and double-stranded DNA. After origin firing, Mcm10 controls replication fork stability to support elongation, primarily facilitating Okazaki fragment synthesis through recruitment of DNA polymerase-α and proliferating cell nuclear antigen. Based on its multivalent properties, Mcm10 serves as an essential scaffold to promote DNA replication and guard against replication stress. Under pathological conditions, Mcm10 is often dysregulated. Genetic amplification and/or overexpression of MCM10 are common in cancer, and can serve as a strong prognostic marker of poor survival. These findings are compatible with a heightened requirement for Mcm10 in transformed cells to overcome limitations for DNA replication dictated by altered cell cycle control. In this review, we highlight advances in our understanding of when, where and how Mcm10 functions within the replisome to protect against barriers that cause incomplete replication.

  14. Failure analysis of axle shaft of a fork lift

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souvik Das

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available An axle shaft of fork lift failed at operation within 296 h of service. The shaft transmits torque from discrepancy to wheel through planetary gear arrangement. A section of fractured axle shaft made of induction-hardened steel was analyzed to determine the root cause of the failure. Optical microscopies as well as field emission gun scanning electron microscopy (FEG-SEM along with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS were carried out to characterize the microstructure. Hardness profile throughout the cross-section was evaluated by micro-hardness measurements. Chemical analysis indicated that the shaft was made of 42CrMo4 steel grade as per specification. Microstructural analysis and micro-hardness profile revealed that the shaft was improperly heat treated resulting in a brittle case, where crack was found to initiate from the case in a brittle mode in contrast to ductile mode within the core. This behaviour was related to differences in microstructure, which was observed to be martensitic within the case with a micro-hardness equivalent to 735 HV, and a mixture of non-homogeneous structure of pearlite and ferrite within the core with a hardness of 210 HV. The analysis suggests that the fracture initiated from the martensitic case as brittle mode due to improper heat treatment process (high hardness. Moreover the inclusions along the hot working direction i.e. in the longitudinal axis made the component more susceptible to failure.

  15. BIOLOGICAL MONITORING PROGRAM FOR EAST FORK POPLAR CREEK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ADAMS, S.M.; ASHWOOD, T.L.; BEATY, T.W.; BRANDT, C.C.

    1997-10-24

    In May 1985, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit was issued for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. As a condition of the permit a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed to demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for the Y- 12 Plant protect the classified uses of the receiving stream (East Fork Poplar Creek; EFPC), in particular, the growth and propagation of aquatic life (Lear et al. 1989). A second objective of the BMAP is to document the ecological effects resulting from the implementation of a water pollution control program designed to eliminate direct discharges of wastewaters to EFPC and to minimize the inadvertent release of pollutants to the environment. Because of the complex nature of the discharges to EFPC and the temporal and spatial variability in the composition of the discharges, a comprehensive, integrated approach to biological monitoring was developed. A new permit was issued to the Y-12 Plant on April 28, 1995 and became effective on July 1, 1995. Biological monitoring continues to be required under the new permit. The BMAP consists of four major tasks that reflect different but complementary approaches to evaluating the effects of the Y-12 Plant discharges on the aquatic integrity of EFPC. These tasks are (1) toxicity monitoring, (2) biological indicator studies, (3) bioaccumulation studies, and (4) ecological surveys of the periphyton, benthic macroinvertebrate, and fish communities.

  16. Soil Investigation of Lower East Fork Poplar Creek

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickson, Johnbull O [ORNL; Mayes, Melanie [ORNL; Earles, Jennifer E [ORNL; Mehlhorn, Tonia L [ORNL; Lowe, Kenneth Alan [ORNL; Peterson, Mark J [ORNL; Pierce, Eric M [ORNL

    2017-03-01

    Mercury is regarded by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management as a priority contaminant on the Oak Ridge Reservation because of the environmental risks associated with substantial losses from buildings, soils, and surface waters at the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12). As a result of historical releases of mercury from Y-12 primarily in the 1950s and early 1960s, the lower East Fork Poplar Creek (LEFPC) stream channel and bank soil margins are contaminated with mercury (Brooks and Southworth 2011; Tennessee Valley Authority 1985b, a). A Mercury Remediation Technology Development project is underway to evaluate the nature of downstream mercury contamination and to develop targeted site-specific remedial technologies that can mitigate mercury release and biological uptake. It is known that mercury concentration varies longitudinally and with depth in LEFPC bank soils; however, soil types and soil physical properties are not well known, especially relative to the zones of mercury contamination. Moreover, there are no soil maps for the downstream reaches of LEFPC in Roane County (i.e. from the Chestnut Hill Road downstream) and this work represents the first ever soil mapping along this section of LEFPC.

  17. BIOLOGICAL MONITORING PROGRAM FOR EAST FORK POPLAR CREEK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ADAMS, S.M.; BEATY, T.W.; BRANDT, C.C.; CHRISTENSEN, S.W.; CICERONE, D.S.

    1998-09-09

    In May 1985, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit was issued for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. As a condition of the permit, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed to demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for the Y-12 Plant protect the classified uses of the receiving stream (East Fork Poplar Creek; EFPC), in particular, the growth and propagation of aquatic life (Lear et al. 1989). A second objective of the BMAP is to document the ecological effects resulting from the implementation of a water pollution control program designed to eliminate direct discharges of wastewaters to EFPC and to minimize the inadvertent release of pollutants to the environment. Because of the complex nature of the discharges to EFPC and the temporal and spatial variability in the composition of the discharges, a comprehensive, integrated approach to biological monitoring was developed. A new permit was issued to the Y-12 Plant on April 28, 1995 and became effective on July 1, 1995. Biological monitoring continues to be required under the new permit. The BMAP consists of four major tasks that reflect different but complementary approaches to evaluating the effects of the Y-12 Plant discharges on the aquatic integrity of EFPC. These tasks are (1) toxicity monitoring, (2) biological indicator studies, (3) bioaccumulation studies, and (4) ecological surveys of the periphyton, benthic macroinvertebrate, and fish communities.

  18. Equivalent dose determination using a quartz isothermal TL signal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vandenberghe, D.A.G.; Jain, Mayank; Murray, A.S.

    2009-01-01

    We report on further developments in the use of an isothermal thermoluminescence (ITL) signal for determining the equivalent dose (De) in unheated sedimentary quartz. In order to minimise sensitivity change during the first measurement, the ITL signal is measured at 270 °C following a preheat...... agreement with the expected burial dose in samples from a variety of depositional environments and ages. Our results suggest that measurement of the ITL signal at 270 °C enables the quartz 325 °C TL peak to be used for accurate dose measurements on a single aliquot. The signal allows dating over at least...... the same age range as the OSL signal, and it appears especially advantageous for application to quartz samples for which the OSL signal saturates below 500 Gy....

  19. Dosimetric properties of natural quartz grains extracted from fired materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bluszcz, A.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.

    1995-01-01

    The paper describes an examination of the dosimetric properties of natural quartz grains extracted from ancient fired materials. Eleven samples of different origin were tested for their TL and GLSL (green light stimulated luminescence) sensitivities within the mGy dose range. Very promising results...... were obtained showing the possibility of measuring the doses of around 10 mGy with 1% precision using GLSL or TL and using the single aliquot technique for natural quartz as a dosimeter. The lowest detectable dose was estimated to be lower than 500 mu Gy. The results obtained indicate that natural...... quartz grains from selected materials could be used for the dosimetry of environmental gamma radiation for the purposes of paleodosimetric dating methods as well as for accident dosimetry....

  20. Investigations on Local Quartz Sand for Application in Glass Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dararutana, Pisutti; Chetanachan, Prukswan; Wathanakul, Pornsawat; Sirikulrat, Narin

    2009-03-01

    Silica or glass sand is a special type of quartz sand that is suitable for glass-making, because of its high silica content, and its low content of iron oxide and other compounds. In Thailand, deposits of quartz sand are found as the beach and the river sands in many areas; eastern, southern, northeastern and northern. In this work, grain-size distribution and chemical analyses were carried out on 10 sand samples taken from various localities in Thailand such as Chanthaburi, Trat, Rayong, Chumphon, Nakhon Si, Pattani, Phuket, Songkhla, Nong Khai, and Tak provinces. The geological resources show that most of them are the surface-to-near-surface glass sand deposits. The sand grains in most deposits were mainly angular-to-rounded, except in some areas of either angular or rounded grains. Chemical analysis showed that the sands contained more than 95wt% silica and low content of Fe, Al, Ca, Mg, Na, and K. The concentration levels of these components in the samples confirm with internationally acceptable standard for glass production. The quartz sand dressing plants that used the spiral classifier to improve the properties of the quartz sands to meet the standard specifications are mostly located in the eastern area. It can be concluded that most of the quartz sand deposits in Thailand investigated show well-sorted grain-size with considerable purity, i.e. high-grade quality. The advanced works resulted in that these raw quartz sands can be used as raw material for fabrication of soda-lime, lead crystal, and lead-free high refractive index glasses. The colorless and various colored glass products have been satisfactorily used in the domestic art and glass manufactures.

  1. Quartz red TL SAR equivalent dose overestimation for Chinese loess

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lai, Z.P.; Murray, A.S.; Bailey, R.M.

    2006-01-01

    For the red TL of quartz extracted from Chinese loess, the single-aliquot regenerative-dose (SAR) procedure overestimates the known laboratory doses in dose recovery test. The overestimation is the result of the first heating during the measurement of natural TL signal causing a sensitivity...... reduction, which is not corrected for using a SAR protocol. The SARA procedure was used to measure the sensitivity change. Using this as a correction factor is tested by comparison with the quartz optically stimulated luminiscence (OSL) equivalent dose. SARA is also employed to determine the residual level...

  2. Chiral habit selection on nanostructured epitaxial quartz films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carretero-Genevrier, Adrián; Gich, Martí; Picas, Laura; Sanchez, Clément; Rodriguez-Carvajal, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the crystallization of enantiomorphically pure systems can be relevant to diverse fields such as the study of the origins of life or the purification of racemates. Here we report on polycrystalline epitaxial thin films of quartz on Si substrates displaying two distinct types of chiral habits that never coexist in the same film. We combine Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) analysis and computer-assisted crystallographic calculations to make a detailed study of these habits of quartz. By estimating the surface energies of the observed crystallites we argue that the films are enantiomorphically pure and we briefly outline a possible mechanism to explain the habit and chiral selection in this system.

  3. Pressure effect on the sensitivity of quartz Bourdon tube gauges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szaniszlo, A. J.

    1972-01-01

    The sensitivity change for a commercial fused quartz Bourdon tube precision pressure gauge, due to a change in absolute pressure level, has been analytically computed and experimentally confirmed. The computed differential pressure error is 2.5% of full scale at a 100 atm absolute pressure level. The experimental method compared the fused quartz Bourdon tube gauge digital output to the results obtained from a nitrogen gas pressure system which had a high pressure, well-type mercury manometer as the differential pressure reference.

  4. Extensive authigenic quartz overgrowths in the gas-bearing Haynesville-Bossier Shale, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowey, Patrick J.; Taylor, Kevin G.

    2017-07-01

    In sandstone reservoirs, despite grain rearrangement during compaction, significant pore volumes may be retained prior to the onset of late diagenetic quartz cementation. In mudstone reservoirs, grain rearrangement during compaction results in significant pore volume reduction prior to late diagenesis. Where quartz overgrowths have been previously reported in post-compaction mudstones they have been in volumetrically low concentrations and interpreted as anomalous occurrences. Quartz cementation alters rock brittleness resulting in changes to mechanical fracture properties. Quartz overgrowths reduce reservoir porosity and permeability. We present petrographic evidence of two phases of quartz cement in the Haynesville-Bossier Shale: (i) grain replacive and (ii) quartz overgrowths. Carbonate grain replacement is volumetrically low (< 1%). Quartz overgrowths identified from SEM-CL imaging are volumetrically more significant (8-13%). Quartz overgrowths were most commonly observed in the sandy and coarse mudstone microfacies, but are present in both medium and fine mudstone microfacies. Petrographic evidence indicates three processes in the development of quartz overgrowths. Mica and pyrite are (i) engulfed and (ii) displaced by quartz overgrowth cement. The absence of a supportive, primary granular framework surrounding engulfed detrital and early authigenic minerals would indicate that quartz overgrowths are also (iii) replacive. Pressure dissolution of detrital quartz silt grains and smectite-to-illite transformation are likely sources of silica for quartz cement. This study is the first to document large-scale, replacive, authigenic quartz overgrowth development within a producing mudstone.

  5. [Evaluation of forklift trucks operated in dockyards for reducing exposure to whole-body vibration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimura, Hiroji; Taoda, Kazushi; Nishiyama, Katsuo

    2005-03-01

    Our preceding study revealed that many fork-lift truck drivers in Japanese dockyards suffer from fatigue symptoms such as low back pain (LBP). It has been suggested that exposure to whole-body vibration (WBV) is a cause of their LBP. Using forklift models manufactured from 1982 to 2000, we measured and evaluated the vibration of forklift trucks operated in dockyards, adopting experimental procedures based on the European Standard. We investigated various factors related to WBV, with the main focus on attenuating seat vibration. This study showed that (1) the seats did not attenuate vibration in the vertical direction, (2) forklift trucks and their seats had not improved in terms of WBV attenuation for a decade, (3) some forklift trucks in which the seat suspension could no longer be adjusted to the driver's weight continued to be used without being repaired, and impractical seat adjustment methods were adopted, and (4) the seats did not attenuate vertical vibration well in the most undesirable frequency range. We conclude that forklift trucks and especially their seats should urgently be improved with regard to WBV attenuation in order to prevent LBP in forklift truck drivers.

  6. [Exposure to whole body vibrations in workers moving heavy items by mechanical vehicles in the warehouse of a large retail outlet].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siciliano, E; Rossi, A; Nori, L

    2007-01-01

    Efficient warehouse management and item transportation is of fundamental importance in the commercial outlet in exam. Whole body vibrations have been measured in various types of machines, some of which not widely studied yet, like the electrical pallet truck. In some tasks (fork lifts drivers) vibrations propagate through the driving seat whereas in some other tasks (electrical pallet trucks, stackers), operated in a standing posture, vibrations propagate through the lower limbs. Results have been provided for a homogeneous job tasks. In particular conditions, the action level of the Italian national (and European) regulations on occupational exposure to WBV may be exceeded. The authors propose a simple system of probabilistic classification of the risk of exposure to whole body vibrations, based on the respective areas of the distribution which lay within the three risk classes.

  7. South Fork Snake River/Palisades Wildlife Mitigation Project: Environmental assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    BPA proposes to fund the implementation of the South Fork Snake River Programmatic Management Plan to compensate for losses of wildlife and wildlife habitat due to hydroelectric development at Palisades Dam. The Idaho Department of Fish and Game drafted the plan, which was completed in May 1993. This plan recommends land and conservation easement acquisition and wildlife habitat enhancement measures. These measures would be implemented on selected lands along the South Fork of the Snake River between Palisades Dam and the confluence with the Henry`s Fork, and on portions of the Henry`s Fork located in Bonneville, Madison, and Jefferson Counties, Idaho. BPA has prepared an Environmental Assessment evaluating the proposed project. The EA also incorporates by reference the analyses in the South Fork Snake River Activity/Operations Plan and EA prepared jointly in 1991 by the Bureau of Land Management and the Forest Service. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI.

  8. 14-3-3 Proteins regulate exonuclease 1-dependent processing of stalled replication forks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Engels

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Replication fork integrity, which is essential for the maintenance of genome stability, is monitored by checkpoint-mediated phosphorylation events. 14-3-3 proteins are able to bind phosphorylated proteins and were shown to play an undefined role under DNA replication stress. Exonuclease 1 (Exo1 processes stalled replication forks in checkpoint-defective yeast cells. We now identify 14-3-3 proteins as in vivo interaction partners of Exo1, both in yeast and mammalian cells. Yeast 14-3-3-deficient cells fail to induce Mec1-dependent Exo1 hyperphosphorylation and accumulate Exo1-dependent ssDNA gaps at stalled forks, as revealed by electron microscopy. This leads to persistent checkpoint activation and exacerbated recovery defects. Moreover, using DNA bi-dimensional electrophoresis, we show that 14-3-3 proteins promote fork progression under limiting nucleotide concentrations. We propose that 14-3-3 proteins assist in controlling the phosphorylation status of Exo1 and additional unknown targets, promoting fork progression, stability, and restart in response to DNA replication stress.

  9. Biological Monitoring Program for East Fork Poplar Creek

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, S.M.; Christensen, S.W.; Greeley, M.S.jr; Hill, W.R.; Kszos, L.A.; McCarthy, J.F.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon, M.G.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.; Stewart, A.J.

    1998-10-15

    In May 1985, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit was issued for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. As a condition of the permit, a Biologicai Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed to demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for the Y-12 Plant protect the classified uses of the receiving stream (East Fork Poplar Creek; EFPC), in particular, the growth and propagation of aquatic life (Lear et al. 1989). A second objective of the BMAP is to document the ecological effects resulting from the implementation of a water pollution control program designed to eliminate direct discharges of wastewaters to EFPC and to minimize the inadvertent release of pollutants to the environment. Because of the compiex nature of the discharges to EFPC and the temporal and spatial variability in the composition of the discharges, a comprehensive, integrated approach to biological monitoring was developed. A new permit was issued to the Y-12 Plant on April 28, 1995 and became effective on July 1, 1995. Biological monitoring continues to be required under the new permit. The BMAP consists of four major tasks that reflect different but complementary approaches to evaluating the effects of the Y-12 Plant discharges on the aquatic integrity of EFPC, These tasks are (1) toxicity monitoring, (2) biological indicator studies, (3) bioaccumuiation studies, and (4) ecological surveys of the periphyton, benthic macro invertebrate, and fish communities. Monitoring is currently being conducted at five sites, although sites maybe excluded and/or others added depending upon the specific objectives of the various tasks. Criteria used in selecting the sites include: (1) location of sampling sites used in other studies, (2) known or suspected sources of downstream impacts, (3) proximity to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) boundaries, (4) concentration of mercury in the adjacent floodplain, (5) appropriate habitat distribution, and (6

  10. Etching quartz with inductively coupled plasma etching equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xuming; Zhou, Changhe; Xi, Peng; Dai, Enwen; Ru, Huayi; Liu, Liren

    2003-11-01

    Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP)can achieve high density plasma in low pressure,so it has a number of significant advantages such as improved etching rates,better profile control,improved uniformity, greatly increased selectivity and a dramatic reduction in radiation damage and contamination. In optics,quartz is an ideal optical material with transmitting spectral range from deep ultraviolet to far infrared.So we systematically studied the etching characteristics of quartz by using a Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP)etching system.In the xperim nts,the gas was the mixture of CHF3,O2 and Ar,and the chamber pressure was about 10 mTorr.Th influences of gas flow rate and the power of the radio frequency on etching rate were optimized. The uniformity and repeatability of the etching technology were also studied. After residue mask material was removed by wet chemical solution, no polymer was observed on the surfaces of samples,and the surfaces of the fabricated quartz elements were smooth and clean. The optimized etching process is important for the fabrication of micro-optical lements based on quartz. Using this etching process, many gratings such as Dammann grating, rectangular groove grating, and optical disk grating can be fabricated successfully.

  11. Evaluation of trapping parameters of annealed natural quartz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Rui [College of Resources, Environment & Tourism, Capital Normal University, 100048 Beijing (China); Shisanling Seismic Station, Institute of Earthquake Science, CEA, 102200 Beijing (China); Wei, Ming-Jian, E-mail: weimj@cnu.edu.cn [College of Resources, Environment & Tourism, Capital Normal University, 100048 Beijing (China); Song, Bo [College of Resources, Environment & Tourism, Capital Normal University, 100048 Beijing (China); Beijing Jing Yuan School, 100040 Beijing (China); Zhang, Yan [College of Resources, Environment & Tourism, Capital Normal University, 100048 Beijing (China); School of TaiPingqiao, Nan Lu of West Railway Station, 100073 Beijing (China); Zhao, Qiu-Yue [Key Laboratory of Tourism and Resources Environment in Universities of Shandong, Taishan University, 271000 Tai’an (China); Pan, Bao-Lin; Li, Teng-Fei [College of Resources, Environment & Tourism, Capital Normal University, 100048 Beijing (China)

    2016-05-15

    The thermoluminescence (TL) trapping parameters of annealed quartz have been investigated. The apparent TL peaks observed at temperatures of 133 °C, 211 °C, 266 °C and 405 °C, respectively, were named Peak I, Peak II, Peak III and Peak IV. The T{sub m} − T{sub stop} method is applied to investigate the number of peaks and their positions, and to obtain the trap distributions in the quartz. Peak shape (PS), Hoogenstraaten method (Various Heating Rates Method, VHR), and Computerized Glow Curve Deconvolution (CGCD) are used to evaluate the trapping parameters of the annealed quartz. The glow curve can be considered as a superposition of at least nine overlapping peaks. These peaks show up at 133 °C, 211 °C, 266 °C, 308 °C, 333 °C, 384 °C, 441 °C, 466 °C and 484 °C. The PS method can be only used in evaluating the parameters for Peaks I. The VHR method can be used in evaluating the trapping parameters for the first three peaks. CGCD method is complementary to obtaining parameters for the sub-peaks, and the thermal quenching correction with the Urbach’s method is necessary. The Urbach’s coefficient for the quartz is 30.03 kT{sub m}.

  12. Triplet states at an O vacancy in alpha-quartz

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægsgaard, Jesper

    2002-01-01

    The energy landscape of an alpha-quartz O vacancy in the lowest triplet state is investigated. Four local minima are identified and geometries, total energies, and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) parameters are obtained. On the basis of calculated values for the magnetic dipole interaction...

  13. Influence of Quartz Fillers in Dielectric Composites on Electrostrictive Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.Shivamurthy

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available In this investigation E-glass epoxy composite filled with different amount of quartz powder were prepared by compression moulding and hot curing. Plain waived E-glass cloth with density 200gm / meter square was used as reinforcement. Epoxy resin LY556 mixed with Hardener HT907 and accelerator DY063 in the ratio 100:80:2 was used as matrix. The quartz powder of 30 microns particle size was used as fillers. Four types of composites were prepared with different amount of quartz fillers like 0%, 3%, 6% and 9% with unchanged reinforcement. For all the samples, dielectric dissipation factor (tan δ, dielectric constant and a. c. conductivity and electrostriction have been measured by using a LCR meter at 1 KHz frequency. The phenomenon of electrostriction was examined for all samples (of different percentage of quartz filled composites. It is observed that the percentage of filler influences the electrostriction phenomena in the composites. The 6 % filler content composites samples exhibits the improved electrostriction phenomenon required for sensors compared to other types of composites.

  14. Characterization of silica quartz as raw material in photovoltaic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boussaa, S. Anas, E-mail: sabiha.anas@gmail.com; Kheloufi, A.; Kefaifi, A.; Kerkar, F. [Division croissance cristalline et procédés métallurgiques CCPM Centre de recherche en technologie des semi-conducteurs pour l’énergétique (C.R.T.S.E) 02 Bd Frantz Fanon BP. 140 Alger 7 merveilles, Alger 16200 (Algeria); Zaourar, N. Boutarek [Laboratoire des technologies des matériaux, USTHB, B.P. 32 El Alia, Bab Ezzouar, Alger, Algérie 16111 (Algeria)

    2016-07-25

    Raw materials are essential for the functioning of modern societies, and access to these raw materials is vital to the world economy. Sustainable development, both globally level, raises important new challenges associated with access and efficient use of raw materials. High purity quartz, is consider as a critical raw material and it is a rare commodity that only forms under geological conditions where a narrow set of chemical and physical parameters is fulfilled. When identified and following special beneficiation techniques, high purity quartz obtains very attractive prices and is applied in high technology sectors that currently are under rapid expansion such as photovoltaic solar cells, silicon metal - oxide wafers in the semiconductor industry and long distance optical fibers that are used in communication networks. Crystalline silicon remains the principal material for photovoltaic technology. Metallurgical silicon is produced industrially by the reduction of silica with carbon in an electric arc furnace at temperatures higher than 2000 °C in the hottest parts, by a reaction that can be written ideally as: SiO{sub 2} + 2C = Si + 2CO. The aim of this study has been to test experimental methods for investigating the various physical and chemical proprieties of Hoggar quartz with different techniques: X Ray Fluorescence, infra-red spectroscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy, Optic Microscopy, Carbon Analyzer and Vickers Hardness. The results show finally that the quartz has got good result in purity but need enrichment for the photovoltaic application.

  15. Meteorological factors in the Quartz Creek forest fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    H. T. Gisborne

    1927-01-01

    It is not often that a large forest fire occurs conveniently near a weather station specially equipped for measuring forest-fire weather. The 13,000-acre Quartz Creek fire on the Kaniksu National Forest during the summer of 1936 was close enough to the Priest River Experimental Forest of the Northern Rocky Mountain Forest Experiment Station for the roar of the flumes...

  16. Characterization of silica quartz as raw material in photovoltaic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boussaa, S. Anas; Kheloufi, A.; Zaourar, N. Boutarek; Kefaifi, A.; Kerkar, F.

    2016-07-01

    Raw materials are essential for the functioning of modern societies, and access to these raw materials is vital to the world economy. Sustainable development, both globally level, raises important new challenges associated with access and efficient use of raw materials. High purity quartz, is consider as a critical raw material and it is a rare commodity that only forms under geological conditions where a narrow set of chemical and physical parameters is fulfilled. When identified and following special beneficiation techniques, high purity quartz obtains very attractive prices and is applied in high technology sectors that currently are under rapid expansion such as photovoltaic solar cells, silicon metal - oxide wafers in the semiconductor industry and long distance optical fibers that are used in communication networks. Crystalline silicon remains the principal material for photovoltaic technology. Metallurgical silicon is produced industrially by the reduction of silica with carbon in an electric arc furnace at temperatures higher than 2000 °C in the hottest parts, by a reaction that can be written ideally as: SiO2 + 2C = Si + 2CO. The aim of this study has been to test experimental methods for investigating the various physical and chemical proprieties of Hoggar quartz with different techniques: X Ray Fluorescence, infra-red spectroscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy, Optic Microscopy, Carbon Analyzer and Vickers Hardness. The results show finally that the quartz has got good result in purity but need enrichment for the photovoltaic application.

  17. Symmetry and Piezoelectricity: Evaluation of $\\alpha$-Quartz coefficients

    OpenAIRE

    Tannous, C.

    2017-01-01

    Piezoelectric coefficients of $\\alpha$-Quartz are derived from symmetry arguments based on Neumann's Principle with three different methods: Fumi, Landau-Lifshitz and Royer-Dieulesaint. While Fumi method is tedious and Landau-Lifshitz requires additional physical principles to evaluate the piezoelectric coefficients, Royer-Dieulesaint is the most elegant and most efficient of the three techniques.

  18. Absorbed dose evaluations in retrospective dosimetry: Methodological developments using quartz

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bailiff, I.K.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Correcher, V.

    2000-01-01

    Dose evaluation procedures based on luminescence techniques were applied to 50 quartz samples extracted from bricks that had been obtained from populated or partly populated settlements in Russia and Ukraine downwind of the Chernobyl NPP. Determinations of accrued dose in the range similar to 30...

  19. Speciation and phase separation of water in quartz (A review ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Speciation, supersaturation and phase separation of water in hydrothermal grown (synthetic) quartz cryst-als have been examined as fundamental issues determining clustering, nucleation and bubble formation, which have profound influence on hydrolytic weakening, dislocation-bubble interactions and high temperature ...

  20. Application of quartz crystal microbalance technology in tribological investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    The last fifteen years have seen considerable growth in the application of quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) to explore the tribological characteristics of materials. This article reviews some of the advances made in characterizing frictional properties of materials using the QCM, especially with di...

  1. Quartz-like Crystals Found in Planetary Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope has, for the first time, detected tiny quartz-like crystals sprinkled in young planetary systems. The crystals, which are types of silica minerals called cristobalite and tridymite, can be seen close-up in the black-and-white insets (cristobalite is on the left, and tridymite on the right). The main picture is an artist's concept of a young star and its swirling disk of planet-forming materials. Cristobalite and tridymite are thought to be two of many planet ingredients. On Earth, they are normally found as tiny crystals in volcanic lava flows and meteorites from space. These minerals are both related to quartz. For example, if you were to heat the familiar quartz crystals often sold as mystical tokens, the quartz would transform into cristobalite and tridymite. Because cristobalite and tridymite require rapid heating and cooling to form, astronomers say they were most likely generated by shock waves traveling through the planetary disks. The insets are Scanning Electron Microscope pictures courtesy of George Rossman of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, Calif.

  2. Quartz crystal microbalance gas sensor with nanocrystalline diamond sensitive layer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Varga, Marián; Laposa, A.; Kulha, Pavel; Kroutil, J.; Husák, M.; Kromka, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 252, č. 11 (2015), s. 2591-2597 ISSN 0370-1972 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : gas sensor * nanocrystalline diamond * quartz resonator * thickness shear mode Subject RIV: JB - Sensors, Measurment, Regulation Impact factor: 1.522, year: 2015

  3. Geology and geochemistry of giant quartz veins from the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    They show imprints of strong brittle to ductile–brittle deformation, and in places are associated with base metal and gold incidences, and pyrophyllite-diaspore mineralization. The geochemistry of giant quartz veins were studied. Apart from presenting new data on the geology and geochemistry of these veins, an attempt has ...

  4. [Study on the vibrational spectra and XRD characters of Huanglong jade from Longling County, Yunnan Province].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Jing-cheng; Fan, Lu-wei; Xie, Hao

    2014-12-01

    Based on the conventional test methods, the infrared absorption spectrum, Raman spectrum and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were employed to study the characters of the vibration spectrum and mineral composition of Huanglong jade. The testing results show that Huanglong jade shows typical vibrational spectrum characteristics of quartziferous jade. The main infrared absorption bands at 1162, 1076, 800, 779, 691, 530 and 466 cm(-1) were induced by the asymmetric stretching vibration, symmetrical stretching vibration and bending vibration of Si-O-Si separately. Especially the absorption band near 800 cm(-1) is split, which indicates that Huanglong jade has good crystallinity. In Raman spectrum, the main strong vibration bands at 463 and 355 cm(-1) were attributed to bending vibration of Si-O-Si. XRD test confirmed that Quartz is main mineral composition of Huanglong jade and there is a small amount of hematite in red color samples which induced the red color of Huanglong jade. This is the first report on the infrared, Raman and XRD spectra feature of Huanglong jade. It will provide a scientific basis for the identification, naming and other research for huanglong jade.

  5. Fracture flow due to hydrothermally induced quartz growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kling, Tobias; Schwarz, Jens-Oliver; Wendler, Frank; Enzmann, Frieder; Blum, Philipp

    2017-09-01

    Mineral precipitations are a common feature and limitation of initially open, permeable rock fractures by forming sealing structures or secondary roughness in open voids. Hence, the objective of this numerical study is the evaluation of hydraulic properties of fractures sealed by hydrothermally induced needle and compact quartz growth. Phase-field models of progressive syntaxial and idiomorphic quartz growth are implemented into a fluid flow simulation solving the Navier-Stokes equation. Flow simulations for both quartz types indicate an obvious correlation between changes in permeability, fracture properties (e.g. aperture, relative roughness and porosity) and crystal growth behavior, which also forms distinct flow paths. Thus, at lower sealing stages initial fracture permeability significantly drops down for the 'needle fracture' forming highly tortuous flow paths, while the 'compact fracture' records a considerably smaller loss. Fluid flow in both sealing fractures most widely is governed by a ;parallel plate;-like cubic law behavior. However, the 'needle fracture' also reveals flow characteristics of a porous media. A semi-theoretical equation is introduced that links geometrical (am) with hydraulically effective apertures (ah) and the relative fracture roughness. For this purpose, a geometry factor α is introduced being α = 2.5 for needle quartz and α = 1.0 for compact quartz growth. In contrast to most common ah-am-relationships this novel formulation not only reveals more precise predictions for the needle (RMSE = 1.5) and the compact fractures (RMSE = 3.2), but also exhibit a larger range of validity concerning the roughness of the 'needle' (σ/am = 0-2.4) and the 'compact fractures' (σ/am = 0-1.8).

  6. Albite [yields] jadeite + quartz transformation in rock: Mechanism and kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohlen, S.R.; Kirby, S.H. (Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States)); Hacker, B.R.

    1992-01-01

    Recent work on the calcite [yields] aragonite transformation using fully dense marble revealed significant differences from earlier experiments on powders and single-crystals. The reaction rate is retarded by a factor of > 1,000 and reaction mechanisms and resultant textures are considerably more complex. Stimulated by this, the authors conducted a study of the albite [yields] jadeite + quartz/coesite transformation in a fully dense albitite. Again the results are in marked contrast with previous powder-based studies of this archetypal metamorphic reaction. Solid cores of albitite were held at temperatures of 500-1,200 C and at pressure oversteps of 500 MPa into the jadeite + quartz stability field for 1--8 days in piston-cylinder apparatus. Samples that were dried in vacuum transformed appreciably only at temperatures in excess of 1,000 C. At all grain boundaries there is subequal transformation to micron-scale intergrowths of jadeite + quartz. Samples that were vacuum-impregnated with 1 wt% water contain jadeite + quartz to temperatures as low as 600 C. In contrast to the dried samples, transformation is much less homogeneous. The jadeite + quartz intergrowths do not form rows of subparallel crystals on grain boundaries, but rather are flower-shaped clusters that radiate outward from single nucleation sites at 3-grain edges and 4-grain corners. Compared to powders, pressure oversteps a factor of 10 greater are necessary to induce equivalent reaction in albitite. The sluggishness of this reaction has important implications for the evolution of the lower continental crust and subducting oceanic crust in terms of their (1) seismic velocity profiles, (2) petrological evolution, and (3) buoyancy forces, stresses and vertical crustal movements connected with densification and dilatational reactions.

  7. Nascent DNA Proteomics Reveals a Chromatin Remodeler Required for Topoisomerase I Loading at Replication Forks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyril Ribeyre

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available During transcription and DNA replication, the DNA template is overwound ahead of RNA and DNA polymerases and relaxed by DNA topoisomerases. Inhibitors of topoisomerases are potent anti-cancer agents. Camptothecin traps topoisomerase I on DNA and exerts preferential cytotoxicity toward cancer cells by way of its interference with the progression of replication forks. Starting with an unbiased proteomic analysis, we find that the chromatin remodeling complex BAZ1B-SMARCA5 accumulates near replication forks in camptothecin-exposed cells. We report that BAZ1B associates with topoisomerase I and facilitates its access to replication forks. Single-molecule analyses of replication structures show that BAZ1B contributes to replication interference by camptothecin. A lack of BAZ1B confers increased cellular tolerance of camptothecin. These findings reveal BAZ1B as a key facilitator of topoisomerase I function during DNA replication that affects the response of cancer cells to topoisomerase I inhibitors.

  8. Lsd1 and Lsd2 Control Programmed Replication Fork Pauses and Imprinting in Fission Yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allyson Holmes

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, a chromosomal imprinting event controls the asymmetric pattern of mating-type switching. The orientation of DNA replication at the mating-type locus is instrumental in this process. However, the factors leading to imprinting are not fully identified and the mechanism is poorly understood. Here, we show that the replication fork pause at the mat1 locus (MPS1, essential for imprint formation, depends on the lysine-specific demethylase Lsd1. We demonstrate that either Lsd1 or Lsd2 amine oxidase activity is required for these processes, working upstream of the imprinting factors Swi1 and Swi3 (homologs of mammalian Timeless and Tipin, respectively. We also show that the Lsd1/2 complex controls the replication fork terminators, within the rDNA repeats. These findings reveal a role for the Lsd1/2 demethylases in controlling polar replication fork progression, imprint formation, and subsequent asymmetric cell divisions.

  9. The DNA damage checkpoint response to replication stress: A Game of Forks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel eJossen

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Conditions challenging replication fork progression, collectively referred to as replication stress, represent a major source of genomic instability and are associated to cancer onset. The replication checkpoint, a specialized branch of the DNA damage checkpoint, monitors fork problems and triggers a cellular response aimed at preserving genome integrity. Here, we review the mechanisms by which the replication checkpoint monitors and responds to replication stress, focusing on the checkpoint-mediated pathways contributing to protect replication fork integrity. We discuss how cells achieve checkpoint signaling inactivation once replication stress is overcome and how a failure to timely revert checkpoint-mediated changes in cellular physiology might impact on replication dynamics and genome integrity. We also highlight the checkpoint function as an anti-cancer barrier preventing cells malignant transformation following oncogene-induced replication stress.

  10. South Fork Clearwater River Habitat Enhancement, Crooked and Red Rivers : Annual Report, 1989.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baer, William H.

    1990-01-01

    In 1983, the Nez Perce National Forest and the Bonneville Power Administration entered into an interagency agreement to enhance and improve habitat for two anadromous fish species, spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawyscha) and summer steelhead trout (Onchorhyncus mykiss), in the South Fork Clearwater River tributaries. The South Fork Clearwater River was dammed in 1927 for hydroelectric development. Anadromous fish runs were virtually eliminated until the dam was removed in 1962. To complicate the problem, upstream spawning and rearing habitats were severely impacted by dredge and hydraulic mining, road building, timber harvest, and over-grazing. Fish habitat improvement projects under the above contract are being carried out in two major tributaries to the South Fork Clearwater River. Both the Red River and the Crooked River projects began in 1983 and will be completed in 1990. 12 figures., 1 tab.

  11. 77 FR 64125 - Notice of Proposed Withdrawal Extension and Notification of a Public Meeting for the East Fork...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-18

    ... States mining laws, to protect the East Fork Elk Winter Range and elk natural feeding grounds in Fremont... and announces the date, time, and location of a public meeting. ] DATES: We must receive comments on... mineral estate from location or entry under the United States mining laws, to protect the East Fork Elk...

  12. Polyubiquitination of proliferating cell nuclear antigen by HLTF and SHPRH prevents genomic instability from stalled replication forks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Motegi (Akira); H.J. Liaw; K.Y. Lee; H.P. Roest (Henk); A. Maas (Alex); X. Wu; H. Moinova (Helen); S.D. Markowitz (Sanford); H. Ding (Hao); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); K. Myung (Kyungjae)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractChronic stalling of DNA replication forks caused by DNA damage can lead to genomic instability. Cells have evolved lesion bypass pathways such as postreplication repair (PRR) to resolve these arrested forks. In yeast, one branch of PRR involves proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)

  13. Vibrational spectroscopy of resveratrol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billes, Ferenc; Mohammed-Ziegler, Ildikó; Mikosch, Hans; Tyihák, Ernő

    2007-11-01

    In this article the authors deal with the experimental and theoretical interpretation of the vibrational spectra of trans-resveratrol (3,5,4'-trihydroxy- trans-stilbene) of diverse beneficial biological activity. Infrared and Raman spectra of the compound were recorded; density functional calculations were carried out resulting in the optimized geometry and several properties of the molecule. Based on the calculated force constants, a normal coordinate analysis yielded the character of the vibrational modes and the assignment of the measured spectral bands.

  14. Bumblebee vibration activated foraging

    OpenAIRE

    Su, Dan Kuan-Nien

    2009-01-01

    The ability use vibrational signals to activate nestmate foraging is found in the highly social bees, stingless bees and honey bees, and has been hypothesized to exist in the closely related, primitively eusocial bumble bees. We provide the first strong and direct evidence that this is correct. Inside the nest, bumble bee foragers produce brief bursts of vibration (foraging activation pulses) at 594.5 Hz for 63±26 ms (velocityRMS=0.46±0.02mm/s, forceRMS=0.8±0.2 mN. Production of these vibrati...

  15. Man-Induced Vibrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jönsson, Jeppe; Hansen, Lars Pilegaard

    1994-01-01

    concerned with spectator-induced vertical vibrations on grandstands. The idea is to use impulse response analysis and base the load description on the load impulse. If the method is feasable, it could be used in connection with the formulation of requirements in building codes. During the last two decades...... work has been done on the measurement of the exact load functions and related reponse analysis. A recent work using a spectral description has been performed by Per-Erik Erikson and includes a good literature survey. Bachmann and Ammann give a good overview of vibrations caused by human activity. Other...

  16. Vibrations and waves

    CERN Document Server

    Kaliski, S

    2013-01-01

    This book gives a comprehensive overview of wave phenomena in different media with interacting mechanical, electromagnetic and other fields. Equations describing wave propagation in linear and non-linear elastic media are followed by equations of rheological models, models with internal rotational degrees of freedom and non-local interactions. Equations for coupled fields: thermal, elastic, electromagnetic, piezoelectric, and magneto-spin with adequate boundary conditions are also included. Together with its companion volume Vibrations and Waves. Part A: Vibrations this work provides a wealth

  17. Characterization of magnetite particles in shocked quartz by means of electron- and magnetic force microscopy: Vredefort, South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Cloete, M

    1999-11-01

    Full Text Available ) in quartz generally accepted as typical shock lamellae. The magnetite particles along shock lamellae in quartz grains virtually all show uniform crystallographic orientations. In most instances, the groups of magnetite within different quartz grains...

  18. MRX protects fork integrity at protein–DNA barriers, and its absence causes checkpoint activation dependent on chromatin context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentsen, Iben Bach; Nielsen, Ida; Lisby, Michael

    2013-01-01

    To address how eukaryotic replication forks respond to fork stalling caused by strong non-covalent protein–DNA barriers, we engineered the controllable Fob-block system in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This system allows us to strongly induce and control replication fork barriers (RFB) at their natural...... location within the rDNA. We discover a pivotal role for the MRX (Mre11, Rad50, Xrs2) complex for fork integrity at RFBs, which differs from its acknowledged function in double-strand break processing. Consequently, in the absence of the MRX complex, single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) accumulates at the r......DNA. Based on this, we propose a model where the MRX complex specifically protects stalled forks at protein–DNA barriers, and its absence leads to processing resulting in ssDNA. To our surprise, this ssDNA does not trigger a checkpoint response. Intriguingly, however, placing RFBs ectopically on chromosome...

  19. Heterogeneous Dynamics of Coupled Vibrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cringus, Dan; Jansen, Thomas I. C.; Pshenichnikov, Maxim S.; Schoenlein, RW; Corkum, P; DeSilvestri, S; Nelson, KA; Riedle, E

    2009-01-01

    Frequency-dependent dynamics of coupled stretch vibrations of a water molecule are revealed by 2D IR correlation spectroscopy. These are caused by non-Gaussian fluctuations of the environment around the individual OH stretch vibrations.

  20. Replication Fork Stability Is Essential for the Maintenance of Centromere Integrity in the Absence of Heterochromatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pao-Chen Li

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The centromere of many eukaryotes contains highly repetitive sequences marked by methylation of histone H3K9 by Clr4KMT1. This recruits multiple heterochromatin proteins, including Swi6 and Chp1, to form a rigid centromere and ensure accurate chromosome segregation. In the absence of heterochromatin, cells show an increased rate of recombination in the centromere, as well as chromosome loss. These defects are severely aggravated by loss of replication fork stability. Thus, heterochromatin proteins and replication fork protection mechanisms work in concert to prevent abnormal recombination, preserve centromere integrity, and ensure faithful chromosome segregation.

  1. EXTRACTION OF CRISTOBALITE FROM MILKY-WHITE FORMS OF QUARTZ STUFF1

    OpenAIRE

    Issaev, V.; Oreshnikova, N.

    1997-01-01

    Natural quartz is one of die main sources of getting a unique material - quartz glass. Wide application of quartz glass in chemical and electronic industry, aviation and cosmonautics, fibre optics and computer techniques makes it absolutely indispensable. However, industrial reserves of rock-chrystal lodes, that is die most pure source of quartz stuff with minimal mineral admixturer, are practically exhausted everywhere. All this results in usage of.low quality stuff and, thus, to significant...

  2. Properties and behavior of quartz for the silicon process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aasly, Kurt

    2008-07-01

    This PhD-thesis is a result of the study on important properties of quartz as a raw material for the metallurgical production of ferrosilicon and silicon metal. This includes defining mechanical properties important for the size reduction experienced during transport and storage and thermo-mechanical properties of quartz that is important for how the quartz reacts to the high temperatures experienced as it is charged on the furnace. Additionally, softening properties of quartz have been briefly discussed in some of the papers. Another important goal has been to test analytical and experimental methods for investigating the various properties. The investigations of important factors for the mechanical properties of ores and industrial minerals have been carried out as a literature study. The mining operation and transport from mine to smelter has been discussed and several factors that are significant for achieving best possible mechanical properties of the quartz have been identified. The most important factors are related to production in the mine and processing plant, which should be carefully planned to minimize the amount of blast-induced damage in the rock and thus achieve the best possible mechanical strength of the raw material. The amount of fines can be minimized by controlling the handling of the raw materials during the transport and storage. It is especially important to avoid high drops, both high single drops and accumulated height of all the drops in total. Investigations of the thermo-mechanical properties of quartz have been carried out by using different experimental and characterization methods. The petrographic investigations of the raw materials by polarized light microscopy have been important. Thermo-mechanical investigations have been high-temperature microthermometry and shock heating of quartz samples in an induction furnace with subsequent investigations of the heated material. The subsequent investigation included polarized- and

  3. EEPD1 Rescues Stressed Replication Forks and Maintains Genome Stability by Promoting End Resection and Homologous Recombination Repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuehan Wu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Replication fork stalling and collapse is a major source of genome instability leading to neoplastic transformation or cell death. Such stressed replication forks can be conservatively repaired and restarted using homologous recombination (HR or non-conservatively repaired using micro-homology mediated end joining (MMEJ. HR repair of stressed forks is initiated by 5' end resection near the fork junction, which permits 3' single strand invasion of a homologous template for fork restart. This 5' end resection also prevents classical non-homologous end-joining (cNHEJ, a competing pathway for DNA double-strand break (DSB repair. Unopposed NHEJ can cause genome instability during replication stress by abnormally fusing free double strand ends that occur as unstable replication fork repair intermediates. We show here that the previously uncharacterized Exonuclease/Endonuclease/Phosphatase Domain-1 (EEPD1 protein is required for initiating repair and restart of stalled forks. EEPD1 is recruited to stalled forks, enhances 5' DNA end resection, and promotes restart of stalled forks. Interestingly, EEPD1 directs DSB repair away from cNHEJ, and also away from MMEJ, which requires limited end resection for initiation. EEPD1 is also required for proper ATR and CHK1 phosphorylation, and formation of gamma-H2AX, RAD51 and phospho-RPA32 foci. Consistent with a direct role in stalled replication fork cleavage, EEPD1 is a 5' overhang nuclease in an obligate complex with the end resection nuclease Exo1 and BLM. EEPD1 depletion causes nuclear and cytogenetic defects, which are made worse by replication stress. Depleting 53BP1, which slows cNHEJ, fully rescues the nuclear and cytogenetic abnormalities seen with EEPD1 depletion. These data demonstrate that genome stability during replication stress is maintained by EEPD1, which initiates HR and inhibits cNHEJ and MMEJ.

  4. Simulation of Pressure Induced Phase Transition and Modulated Structures of Quartz

    OpenAIRE

    Sergey V., DMITRIEV; Miki, YAJIMA; Yoshiya, MAKITA; Kohji, ABE; Takeshi, SHIGENARI; Department of Applied Physics and Chemistry, University of Electro-Communications; Department of Applied Physics and Chemistry, University of Electro-Communications; Department of Applied Physics and Chemistry, University of Electro-Communications; Department of Applied Physics and Chemistry, University of Electro-Communications; Department of Applied Physics and Chemistry, University of Electro-Communications

    2000-01-01

    In the vicinity of α⟷β transition in quartz there exists an incommensurate phase. We perform numerical calculations to obtain the phase diagram of quartz and estimate the period of modulation. The results show that modulation phase with a short period is preferable in contrast to the currently accepted interpretation of incommensurate phase in quartz.

  5. 30 CFR 71.101 - Respirable dust standard when quartz is present.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Respirable dust standard when quartz is present... UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Dust Standards § 71.101 Respirable dust standard when quartz is present. When the respirable dust in the mine atmosphere of the active workings contains more than 5 percent quartz, the...

  6. 30 CFR 90.101 - Respirable dust standard when quartz is present.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Respirable dust standard when quartz is present... quartz is present. When the respirable dust in the mine atmosphere of the active workings to which a Part 90 miner is exposed contains more than 5 percent quartz, the operator shall continuously maintain the...

  7. 75 FR 30282 - Airworthiness Directives; Quartz Mountain Aerospace, Inc. Model 11E Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    ...-008-AD; Amendment 39-16312; AD 2010-11-07] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Quartz Mountain... Quartz Mountain Aerospace, Inc. Model 11E airplanes. This AD requires you to clean and lubricate the... publications listed in this AD. ADDRESSES: Quartz Mountain Aerospace, Inc. is in liquidation. For service/or...

  8. 30 CFR 70.101 - Respirable dust standard when quartz is present.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Respirable dust standard when quartz is present... Respirable dust standard when quartz is present. When the respirable dust in the mine atmosphere of the active workings contains more than 5 percent quartz, the operator shall continuously maintain the average...

  9. 75 FR 12468 - Airworthiness Directives; Quartz Mountain Aerospace, Inc. Model 11E Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-16

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Quartz Mountain... airworthiness directive (AD) for all Quartz Mountain Aerospace, Inc. Model 11E airplanes. This proposed AD would... 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays. Quartz Mountain Aerospace, Inc. is in...

  10. Some new results on irradiation characteristics of synthetic quartz crystals and their application to radiation hardening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadur, H.; Parshad, R.

    1983-01-01

    The paper reports some new results on irradiation characteristics of synthetic quartz crystals and their application to radiation hardening. The present results show how the frequency shift in quartz crystals can be influenced by heat processing prior to irradiation and how this procedure can lead to radiation hardening for obtaining precise frequencies and time intervals from quartz oscillators in space.

  11. Cancer morbidity and quartz exposure in Swedish iron foundries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westberg, Håkan; Andersson, Lena; Bryngelsson, Ing-Liss; Ngo, Yen; Ohlson, Carl-Göran

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine cancer morbidity amongst Swedish iron foundry workers with special reference to quartz exposure. In addition to respirable dust and quartz, phenol, formaldehyde, furfuryl alcohols, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), carbon black, isocyanates and asbestos are used or generated by foundry production techniques and exposure to any of these substances could have potentially carcinogenic effects. Cancer morbidity between 1958 and 2004 was evaluated in a cohort of 3,045 male foundry workers employed for >1 year between 1913 and 2005. Standardised incidence ratios (SIRs) with 95 % confidence intervals (95 % CI) were determined by comparing observed numbers of incident cancers with frequencies in the Swedish cancer register. Exposure measures were assessed using information from the personal files of employees and modelling quartz measurement based on a database of 1,667 quartz measurements. Dose responses for lung cancer were determined for duration of employment and cumulative quartz exposure for latency periods >20 years. Overall cancer morbidity was not increased amongst the foundry workers (SIR 1.00; 95 % CI, 0.90-1.11), but the incidence of lung cancer was significantly elevated (SIR 1.61; 95 % CI, 1.20-2.12). A non-significant negative dose response was determined using external comparison with a latency period of >20 years (SIR 2.05, 1.72 1.26 for the low, medium and high exposure groups), supported by internal comparison data (hazard ratios 1, 1.01, 0.78) for the corresponding groups. For cancers at sites with at least five observed cases and a SIR > 1.25, non-significant risks with SIRs > 1.5 were determined for cancers of the liver, larynx, testis, connective muscle tissue, multiple myeloma plasmacytoma and lymphatic leukaemia. A significant overall risk of lung cancer was determined, but using external and internal comparison groups could not confirm any dose response at our cumulative quartz dose levels.

  12. Development of a Flow Injection Based High Frequency Dual Channel Quartz Crystal Microbalance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinxing Liang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available When the quartz crystal microbalance (QCM is used in liquid for adsorption or desorption monitoring based bio- or chemical sensing applications, the frequency shift is not only determined by the surface mass change, but also by the change of liquid characteristics, such as density and viscosity, which are greatly affected by the liquid environmental temperature. A monolithic dual-channel QCM is designed and fabricated by arranging two QCM resonators on one single chip for cancelling the fluctuation induced by environmental factors. In actual applications, one QCM works as a specific sensor by modifying with functional membranes and the other acts as a reference, only measuring the liquid property. The dual-channel QCM is designed with an inverted-mesa structure, aiming to realize a high frequency miniaturized chip and suppress the frequency interference between the neighbored QCM resonators. The key problem of dual-channel QCMs is the interference between two channels, which is influenced by the distance of adjacent resonators. The diameter of the reference electrode has been designed into several values in order to find the optimal parameter. Experimental results demonstrated that the two QCMs could vibrate individually and the output frequency stability and drift can be greatly improved with the aid of the reference QCM.

  13. Composite Struts Would Damp Vibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolgin, Benjamin P.

    1991-01-01

    New design of composite-material (fiber/matrix laminate) struts increases damping of longitudinal vibrations without decreasing longitudinal stiffness or increasing weight significantly. Plies with opposing chevron patterns of fibers convert longitudinal vibrational stresses into shear stresses in intermediate viscoelastic layer, which dissipate vibrational energy. Composite strut stronger than aluminum strut of same weight and stiffness.

  14. Ship Vibration Design Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-07-01

    Frachtschiffen," Werft Reederie Hafen, 1925. 4-21 Noonan, E. F. "Vibration Considerations for 120,000 CM LNG Ships," NKF: Preliminary Report No. 7107, 25...Ship Response to Ice - A Second Season by C. Daley, J. W. St. John, R. Brown, J. Meyer , and I. Glen 1990 SSC-340 Ice Forces and Ship Response to Ice

  15. Compact Vibration Damper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanco, Thomas G. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A vibration damper includes a rigid base with a mass coupled thereto for linear movement thereon. Springs coupled to the mass compress in response to the linear movement along either of two opposing directions. A converter coupled to the mass converts the linear movement to a corresponding rotational movement. A rotary damper coupled to the converter damps the rotational movement.

  16. Vibrations and Eigenvalues

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The vibrating string problem is the source of much mathematicsand physics. This article describes Lagrange's formulationof a discretised version of the problem and its solution.This is also the first instance of an eigenvalue problem. Author Affiliations. Rajendra Bhatia1. Ashoka University, Rai, Haryana 131 029, India.

  17. Blade Vibration Measurement System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    The Phase I project successfully demonstrated that an advanced noncontacting stress measurement system (NSMS) could improve classification of blade vibration response in terms of mistuning and closely spaced modes. The Phase II work confirmed the microwave sensor design process, modified the sensor so it is compatible as an upgrade to existing NSMS, and improved and finalized the NSMS software. The result will be stand-alone radar/tip timing radar signal conditioning for current conventional NSMS users (as an upgrade) and new users. The hybrid system will use frequency data and relative mode vibration levels from the radar sensor to provide substantially superior capabilities over current blade-vibration measurement technology. This frequency data, coupled with a reduced number of tip timing probes, will result in a system capable of detecting complex blade vibrations that would confound traditional NSMS systems. The hardware and software package was validated on a compressor rig at Mechanical Solutions, Inc. (MSI). Finally, the hybrid radar/tip timing NSMS software package and associated sensor hardware will be installed for use in the NASA Glenn spin pit test facility.

  18. Vibration Sensitive Keystroke Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lopatka, M.; Peetz, M.-H.; van Erp, M.; Stehouwer, H.; van Zaanen, M.

    2009-01-01

    We present a novel method for performing non-invasive biometric analysis on habitual keystroke patterns using a vibration-based feature space. With the increasing availability of 3-D accelerometer chips in laptop computers, conventional methods using time vectors may be augmented using a distinct

  19. Channelization and floodplain forests: Impacts of accelerated sedimentation and valley plug formation on floodplain forests of the Middle Fork Forked Deer River, Tennessee, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswalt, S.N.; King, S.L.

    2005-01-01

    We evaluated the severe degradation of floodplain habitats resulting from channelization and concomitant excessive coarse sedimentation on the Middle Fork Forked Deer River in west Tennessee from 2000 to 2003. Land use practices have resulted in excessive sediment in the tributaries and river system eventually resulting in sand deposition on the floodplain, increased overbank flooding, a rise in the groundwater table, and ponding of upstream timber. Our objectives were to: (1) determine the composition of floodplain vegetation communities along the degraded river reach, (2) to isolate relationships among these communities, geomorphic features, and environmental variables and (3) evaluate successional changes based on current stand conditions. Vegetation communities were not specifically associated with predefined geomorphic features; nevertheless, hydrologic and geomorphic processes as a result of channelization have clearly affected vegetation communities. The presence of valley plugs and continued degradation of upstream reaches and tributaries on the impacted study reach has arrested recovery of floodplain plant communities. Historically common species like Liquidambar styraciflua L. and Quercus spp. L. were not important, with importance values (IV) less than 1, and occurred in less than 20% of forested plots, while Acer rubrum L., a disturbance-tolerant species, was the most important species on the site (IV = 78.1) and occurred in 87% of forested plots. The results of this study also indicate that channelization impacts on the Middle Fork Forked Deer River are more temporally and spatially complex than previously described for other river systems. Rehabilitation of this system necessitates a long-term, landscape-scale solution that addresses watershed rehabilitation in a spatially and temporally hierarchical manner. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Characterization of authigenic idiomorphous lignite and saliniferous quartz crystals by inclusion studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fruth, M.; Blankenburg, H.J.

    1992-12-01

    Classic microthermometry has been carried out on gas-fluid-inclusions in euhedral quartz crystals in a lignite at open cast mines Espenhain, Zwenkau and Cospuden to the south of Leipzig (called lignite quartz crystals and stub quartz crystals) and in a Stassfurt seam at the Southern Harz Potasch area (called saliniferous quartz crystals). The inclusions are classified after their shape homogenization temperatures and content of the solutions. 1. The isolated gas-fluid- and gas-fluid-solid-inclusions, with a regular shape are found in lignite quartz crystals and in saliniferous quartz crystals which probably formed in carnallitic saltrocks and kieseritic 'Hartsalz'. The inclusions of stub quartz crystals and the other saliniferous quartzes investigated are characterized by irregular thin shape. 2. By the aid of thermometry stub quartz crystals are classified into two quartz generations. The homogenization temperatures of gas-fluid-inclusions in lignite quartz crystals give a mean TH/F41[degree]C. The primary gas-fluid-inclusions of saliniferous quartz crystals can be distinguished such as: carnallitic saltrocks44[degree]C; kieseritic 'Hartsalz'76[degree]C; langbeinitic 'Hartsalz'85[degree]C; glaseritic 'Hartsalz'63[degree]C; polyhaliti 'Hartsalz'71[degree]C; anhydritic 'Hartsalz'61[degree]C; impoverishment44[degree]C. 3. Both generations of stub quartz crystals contain in their gas-fluid-inclusions NaCl-solutions. Highly saline MgCL[sub 2]-solutions were trapped in euhedral quartz crytals selected from lignite directly. The primary gas-fluid-inclusions of saliniferous quartz crystals accumulated highly saline CaCl[sub 2]/MgCl[sub 2]-solutions.

  1. Evaluation of the approach to respirable quartz exposure control in U.S. coal mines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joy, Gerald J

    2012-01-01

    Occupational exposure to high levels of respirable quartz can result in respiratory and other diseases in humans. The Mine Safety and Health Adminstration (MSHA) regulates exposure to respirable quartz in coal mines indirectly through reductions in the respirable coal mine dust exposure limit based on the content of quartz in the airborne respirable dust. This reduction is implemented when the quartz content of airborne respirable dust exceeds 5% by weight. The intent of this dust standard reduction is to restrict miners' exposure to respirable quartz to a time-weighted average concentration of 100 μg/m(3). The effectiveness of this indirect approach to control quartz exposure was evaluated by analyzing respirable dust samples collected by MSHA inspectors from 1995 through 2008. The performance of the current regulatory approach was found to be lacking due to the use of a variable property-quartz content in airborne dust-to establish a standard for subsequent exposures. In one situation, 11.7% (4370/37,346) of samples that were below the applicable respirable coal mine dust exposure limit exceeded 100 μg/m(3) quartz. In a second situation, 4.4% (895/20,560) of samples with 5% or less quartz content in the airborne respirable dust exceeded 100 μg/m(3) quartz. In these two situations, the samples exceeding 100 μg/m(3) quartz were not subject to any potential compliance action. Therefore, the current respirable quartz exposure control approach does not reliably maintain miner exposure below 100 μg/m(3) quartz. A separate and specific respirable quartz exposure standard may improve control of coal miners' occupational exposure to respirable quartz.

  2. Fluid inclusions in quartz crystals from South-West Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvenvolden, K. A.; Roedder, E.

    1971-01-01

    Quartz crystals from calcite veins of unknown age in Precambrian metasedimentary rocks at Geiaus No. 6 and Aukam farms in South-West Africa contain both primary and secondary inclusions filled with one substance or a combination of substances. These substances include organic liquid, moderately saline aqueous liquid, dark-colored solid, and a vapor. Analysis of these materials by microscopy and by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry shows the presence of constituents of both low and high molecular weights.

  3. Symmetry and piezoelectricity: evaluation of α-quartz coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannous, C.

    2017-11-01

    Piezoelectric coefficients of α-quartz are derived from symmetry arguments based on Neumann’s principle using three different methods: Fumi, Landau-Lifshitz and Royer-Dieulesaint. While the Fumi method is tedious and the Landau-Lifshitz method requires additional physical principles to evaluate the piezoelectric coefficients, the Royer-Dieulesaint method is the most elegant and most efficient of the three techniques.

  4. Ablative and mechanical properties of quartz phenolic composites

    OpenAIRE

    Maria L. Gregori; Edson A. Barros; Gilberto P. Filho; Luiz Cláudio Pardini; Sonia F. Costa

    2009-01-01

    Abstract. Quartz phenolic composites have been applied to thermal protection systems (TPSs) for reentry vehicles since the late fifties due to their excellent ablative resistance and mechanical performance. TPSs must withstand the aggressive reentry environment, such as atomic oxygen, when submitted to very high temperatures (> 1000° C) and heat flux. The ablative performance of composites is influenced by both base materiais and environmental parameters during the ablation process. For TPS s...

  5. Improved electron probe microanalysis of trace elements in quartz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, John J.; Lowers, Heather; Rusk, Brian G.

    2011-01-01

    Quartz occurs in a wide range of geologic environments throughout the Earth's crust. The concentration and distribution of trace elements in quartz provide information such as temperature and other physical conditions of formation. Trace element analyses with modern electron-probe microanalysis (EPMA) instruments can achieve 99% confidence detection of ~100 ppm with fairly minimal effort for many elements in samples of low to moderate average atomic number such as many common oxides and silicates. However, trace element measurements below 100 ppm in many materials are limited, not only by the precision of the background measurement, but also by the accuracy with which background levels are determined. A new "blank" correction algorithm has been developed and tested on both Cameca and JEOL instruments, which applies a quantitative correction to the emitted X-ray intensities during the iteration of the sample matrix correction based on a zero level (or known trace) abundance calibration standard. This iterated blank correction, when combined with improved background fit models, and an "aggregate" intensity calculation utilizing multiple spectrometer intensities in software for greater geometric efficiency, yields a detection limit of 2 to 3 ppm for Ti and 6 to 7 ppm for Al in quartz at 99% t-test confidence with similar levels for absolute accuracy.

  6. Investigation of formaldehyde interaction with carbon nanotubes and quartz sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgopoulou, Maria P.; Chrysikopoulos, Constantinos V.

    2017-04-01

    Assessment of the potential impact of synthetic carbon nanotubes on the fate and transport of common chemical contaminants (pesticides, pharmaceuticals, etc.) in groundwater systems is considered to be an increasingly important aspect of environmental research. This study investigates the interaction of formaldehyde with multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and quartz sand under static and dynamic conditions. Due to polarity, formaldehyde, is expected to develop strong adsorptive interactions with carbon nanotubes. Several batch adsorption experiments were conducted in test tubes, under controlled conditions. Various initial formaldehyde solution concentration (2, 5, 8 ppm), contact times, and temperatures (8, 18, 25 °C) were considered. Supernatant liquid samples were collected at regular intervals, and centrifuged. Subsequently, the formaldehyde concentration in the supernatant was quantified indirectly, by derivatization with Nash reagent and subsequent measurement of the resulting complex using spectrophotometry in the visible spectral range. Experimental results suggested that formaldehyde has a low affinity for quartz sand, but an enhanced potential for adsorption onto carbon nanotubes. Formaldehyde adsorption onto both absorbents (quartz sand and MWCNTs) was more pronounced under dynamic than static conditions, probably, because agitation improves the mixing of the absorbent within the solution. Also, it was shown that the adsorption data were adequately described by the pseudo-second order kinetic model, suggesting that the primary adsorption mechanism was chemisorption, where two or more (sequential or parallel) processes (e.g. surface chemisorption, intraparticle diffusion) were taking place. Therefore, MWCNTs could be promising adsorbent materials for groundwater remediation.

  7. Next Generation AT-Cut Quartz Crystal Sensing Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vojko Matko

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Generally, AT-cut quartz crystals have a limited scope of use when it comes to high-precision measurement of very small impedance changes due to their nonlinear frequency-temperature characteristics in the range between 0 °C and 50 °C. The new method improving quartz oscillator frequency-temperature characteristic compensation is switching between two impedance loads. By modifying the oscillator circuit with two logic switches and two impedance loads, the oscillator can switch oscillation between two resonance frequencies. The difference in resonance frequencies compensates the frequency-temperature characteristics influence as well as the influence of offset and quartz crystal ageing. The experimental results show that the new approach using the switching method highly improves second-to-second frequency stability from ±0.125 Hz to ±0.00001 Hz and minute-to-minute frequency stability from 0.1 Hz to 0.0001 Hz, which makes the high-precision measurement of aF and fH changes possible.

  8. Next Generation AT-Cut Quartz Crystal Sensing Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matko, Vojko

    2011-01-01

    Generally, AT-cut quartz crystals have a limited scope of use when it comes to high-precision measurement of very small impedance changes due to their nonlinear frequency-temperature characteristics in the range between 0 °C and 50 °C. The new method improving quartz oscillator frequency-temperature characteristic compensation is switching between two impedance loads. By modifying the oscillator circuit with two logic switches and two impedance loads, the oscillator can switch oscillation between two resonance frequencies. The difference in resonance frequencies compensates the frequency-temperature characteristics influence as well as the influence of offset and quartz crystal ageing. The experimental results show that the new approach using the switching method highly improves second-to-second frequency stability from ±0.125 Hz to ±0.00001 Hz and minute-to-minute frequency stability from 0.1 Hz to 0.0001 Hz, which makes the high-precision measurement of aF and fH changes possible. PMID:22163858

  9. Voltage-controlled narrowband and wide, variable-range four-segment quartz crystal oscillator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruslan, Ruzaini; Satoh, Tomio; Akitsu, Tetsuya

    2012-03-01

    In this work, our goal is to develop a voltage-controlled variable-frequency quartz crystal oscillator with narrowband response, wide, variable frequency range and the capacity to oscillate across the series resonance frequency using a four-segment configuration of a quartz crystal oscillator. In conventional quartz oscillators, the quartz resonator is inserted in the feedback loop between the input and the output of the active circuit, providing sufficient gain and the phase relation. In the oscillator developed here, the quartz crystal resonator is inserted between the loop circuit and the ground potential. The performance of the voltage-controlled variable-frequency oscillator is demonstrated across the series resonance frequency.

  10. 75 FR 25197 - Shasta Trinity National Forest, South Fork Management Unit, California Salt Timber Harvest and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-07

    ... Forest Service Shasta Trinity National Forest, South Fork Management Unit, California Salt Timber Harvest..., Shasta-Trinity National Forest, 3644 Avtech Parkway, Redding, CA 96002; telephone (530) 226-2425, e-mail... Section 18.2. J. Sharon Heywood, Shasta-Trinity National Forest Supervisor, signed a Record of Decision on...

  11. From farm to fork and further. Research tackling the grand challenge of food safety in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ridder, M. de; Polchar, J.; Gehem, M.

    2012-01-01

    The study From Farm to Fork and Further shows how, as traditional causes of food safety problems such as basic hygiene are successfully dealt with, future food safety risks become ever harder to manage. European countries may have the highest food safety standards, however the trends that go hand in

  12. 77 FR 23059 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Determination of Endangered Status for Three Forks...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-17

    ... New Zealand springsnails, and the potential for climate change and drought to dry its springhead... Zealand springsnails, and climate change and drought drying its springhead habitat. Due to the species....). Proposed critical habitat for the Three Forks springsnail included spring ecosystems within Apache County...

  13. Holocene erosion, sedimentation, and stratigraphy at Raven Fork, Southern Blue Ridge Mountains, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    David S. Leigh; Paul A. Webb

    2006-01-01

    Holocene colluvial and alluvial stratigraphy and a radiocarbon chronology are presented for the valley of the lower three kilometers of Raven Fork, a mountain stream draining 194 km2 of high relief (1.3 km) terrain of the Southern Blue Ridge Mountains in western North Carolina, USA, which is in a region that lacks good chronological data. Lower hillslopes, alluvial/...

  14. MediaMill: Fast and effective video search using the ForkBrowser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Rooij, O.; Snoek, C.G.M.; Worring, M.

    2008-01-01

    In this technical demonstration we showcase the MediaMill ForkBrowser for video retrieval. It embeds multiple query methods into a single browsing environment. We show that users can switch query methods on demand without the need to adapt to a different interface. This allows for fast and effective

  15. Mammalian RAD52 Functions in Break-Induced Replication Repair of Collapsed DNA Replication Forks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotiriou, Sotirios K; Kamileri, Irene; Lugli, Natalia; Evangelou, Konstantinos; Da-Ré, Caterina; Huber, Florian; Padayachy, Laura; Tardy, Sebastien; Nicati, Noemie L; Barriot, Samia; Ochs, Fena; Lukas, Claudia; Lukas, Jiri; Gorgoulis, Vassilis G; Scapozza, Leonardo; Halazonetis, Thanos D

    2016-12-15

    Human cancers are characterized by the presence of oncogene-induced DNA replication stress (DRS), making them dependent on repair pathways such as break-induced replication (BIR) for damaged DNA replication forks. To better understand BIR, we performed a targeted siRNA screen for genes whose depletion inhibited G1 to S phase progression when oncogenic cyclin E was overexpressed. RAD52, a gene dispensable for normal development in mice, was among the top hits. In cells in which fork collapse was induced by oncogenes or chemicals, the Rad52 protein localized to DRS foci. Depletion of Rad52 by siRNA or knockout of the gene by CRISPR/Cas9 compromised restart of collapsed forks and led to DNA damage in cells experiencing DRS. Furthermore, in cancer-prone, heterozygous APC mutant mice, homozygous deletion of the Rad52 gene suppressed tumor growth and prolonged lifespan. We therefore propose that mammalian RAD52 facilitates repair of collapsed DNA replication forks in cancer cells. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Speaking with a Forked Tongue: Marlene Van Niekerk's “Labour” as ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Speaking with a Forked Tongue: Marlene Van Niekerk's “Labour” as an Examination of Black Labour and White Dis-ease in Suburban South Africa. ... What she resists and subverts is the sense that middle class, matronly whiteness carries of its legitimacy, which is reinforced by a concomitant sense of normative neutrality.

  17. Stalled DNA Replication Forks at the Endogenous GAA Repeats Drive Repeat Expansion in Friedreich's Ataxia Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhardt, Jeannine; Bhalla, Angela D; Butler, Jill Sergesketter; Puckett, James W; Dervan, Peter B; Rosenwaks, Zev; Napierala, Marek

    2016-08-02

    Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA) is caused by the expansion of GAA repeats located in the Frataxin (FXN) gene. The GAA repeats continue to expand in FRDA patients, aggravating symptoms and contributing to disease progression. The mechanism leading to repeat expansion and decreased FXN transcription remains unclear. Using single-molecule analysis of replicated DNA, we detected that expanded GAA repeats present a substantial obstacle for the replication machinery at the FXN locus in FRDA cells. Furthermore, aberrant origin activation and lack of a proper stress response to rescue the stalled forks in FRDA cells cause an increase in 3'-5' progressing forks, which could enhance repeat expansion and hinder FXN transcription by head-on collision with RNA polymerases. Treatment of FRDA cells with GAA-specific polyamides rescues DNA replication fork stalling and alleviates expansion of the GAA repeats, implicating DNA triplexes as a replication impediment and suggesting that fork stalling might be a therapeutic target for FRDA. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Dynamic DNA Helicase-DNA Polymerase Interactions Assure Processive Replication Fork Movement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamdan, Samir M.; Johnson, Donald E.; Tanner, Nathan A.; Lee, Jong-Bong; Qimron, Udi; Tabor, Stanley; Oijen, Antoine M. van; Richardson, Charles C.

    2007-01-01

    A single copy of bacteriophage T7 DNA polymerase and DNA helicase advance the replication fork with a processivity greater than 17,000 nucleotides. Nonetheless, the polymerase transiently dissociates from the DNA without leaving the replisome. Ensemble and single-molecule techniques demonstrate that

  19. The progression of replication forks at natural replication barriers in live bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moolman, M.C.; Tiruvadi Krishnan, S; Kerssemakers, J.W.J.; de Leeuw, R.; Lorent, V.J.F.; Sherratt, David J.; Dekker, N.H.

    2016-01-01

    Protein-DNA complexes are one of the principal barriers the replisome encounters during replication. One such barrier is the Tus-ter complex, which is a direction dependent barrier for replication fork progression. The details concerning the dynamics of the replisome when encountering these

  20. Animal Communications Through Seismic Vibrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, Peggy (University of Tulsa)

    2001-05-02

    Substrate vibration has been important to animals as a channel of communication for millions of years, but our literature on vibration in this context of biologically relevant information is only decades old. The jaw mechanism of the earliest land vertebrates allowed them to perceive substrate vibrations as their heads lay on the ground long before airborne sounds could be heard. Although the exact mechanism of vibration production and the precise nature of the wave produced are not always understood, recent development of affordable instrumentation to detect and measure vibrations has allowed researchers to answer increasingly sophisticated questions about how animals send and receive vibration signals. We now know that vibration provides information used in predator defense, prey detection, recruitment to food, mate choice, intrasexual competition, and maternal/brood social interactions in a variety of insect orders, spiders, crabs, scorpions, chameleons, frogs, golden moles, mole rats, kangaroos rats, wallabies, elephants and bison.

  1. SUMO modification regulates BLM and RAD51 interaction at damaged replication forks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen J Ouyang

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The gene mutated in Bloom's syndrome, BLM, is important in the repair of damaged replication forks, and it has both pro- and anti-recombinogenic roles in homologous recombination (HR. At damaged forks, BLM interacts with RAD51 recombinase, the essential enzyme in HR that catalyzes homology-dependent strand invasion. We have previously shown that defects in BLM modification by the small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO cause increased gamma-H2AX foci. Because the increased gamma-H2AX could result from defective repair of spontaneous DNA damage, we hypothesized that SUMO modification regulates BLM's function in HR repair at damaged forks. To test this hypothesis, we treated cells that stably expressed a normal BLM (BLM+ or a SUMO-mutant BLM (SM-BLM with hydroxyurea (HU and examined the effects of stalled replication forks on RAD51 and its DNA repair functions. HU treatment generated excess gamma-H2AX in SM-BLM compared to BLM+ cells, consistent with a defect in replication-fork repair. SM-BLM cells accumulated increased numbers of DNA breaks and were hypersensitive to DNA damage. Importantly, HU treatment failed to induce sister-chromatid exchanges in SM-BLM cells compared to BLM+ cells, indicating a specific defect in HR repair and suggesting that RAD51 function could be compromised. Consistent with this hypothesis, RAD51 localization to HU-induced repair foci was impaired in SM-BLM cells. These data suggested that RAD51 might interact noncovalently with SUMO. We found that in vitro RAD51 interacts noncovalently with SUMO and that it interacts more efficiently with SUMO-modified BLM compared to unmodified BLM. These data suggest that SUMOylation controls the switch between BLM's pro- and anti-recombinogenic roles in HR. In the absence of BLM SUMOylation, BLM perturbs RAD51 localization at damaged replication forks and inhibits fork repair by HR. Conversely, BLM SUMOylation relieves its inhibitory effects on HR, and it promotes RAD51 function.

  2. Carbon in intimate contact with quartz reduces the biological activity of crystalline silica dusts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiazza, Mara; Tomatis, Maura; Doublier, Sophie; Grendene, Francesca; Gazzano, Elena; Ghigo, Dario; Fubini, Bice

    2013-01-18

    To evaluate the effect of carbonaceous materials on the pathogenic activity of quartz dusts, mixtures of carbon soot (1 and 10%) and quartz (Min-U-Sil) were prepared and then milled so to attain an intimate association of carbon and the quartz surface. Both cellular and cell-free tests show that carbon associated to quartz completely inhibits the typical free radical generation of quartz dusts (through Fenton activity and homolytic cleavage of a C-H bond) and suppresses the oxidative stress and inflammation induced by quartz alone on MH-S murine macrophage cells (lipid peroxidation, nitric oxide release, and tumor necrosis factor-α synthesis). The cytotoxic response to quartz is also largely reduced. An extremely pure quartz milled with 10% of soot showed inactivating effects on the adverse reactions to quartz similar to Min-U-Sil quartz. None of these effects takes place when the same experiments are carried out with mechanically mixed samples, which suggests that carbon acts not just as a radical quencher but because of its association to the quartz surface.

  3. Impediment of Replication Forks by Long Non-coding RNA Provokes Chromosomal Rearrangements by Error-Prone Restart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takaaki Watanabe

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Naturally stalled replication forks are considered to cause structurally abnormal chromosomes in tumor cells. However, underlying mechanisms remain speculative, as capturing naturally stalled forks has been a challenge. Here, we captured naturally stalled forks in tumor cells and delineated molecular processes underlying the structural evolution of circular mini-chromosomes (double-minute chromosomes; DMs. Replication forks stalled on the DM by the co-directional collision with the transcription machinery for long non-coding RNA. RPA, BRCA2, and DNA polymerase eta (Polη were recruited to the stalled forks. The recruitment of Polη was critical for replication to continue, as Polη knockdown resulted in DM loss. Rescued stalled forks were error-prone and switched replication templates repeatedly to create complex fusions of multiple short genomic segments. In mice, such complex fusions circularized the genomic region surrounding MYC to create a DM during tumorigenesis. Our results define a molecular path that guides stalled replication forks to complex chromosomal rearrangements.

  4. Vibration Attenuation of Plate Using Multiple Vibration Absorbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaman Izzuddin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Vibrations are undesired phenomenon and it can cause harm, distress and unsettling influence to the systems or structures, for example, aircraft, automobile, machinery and building. One of the approach to limit this vibration by introducing passive vibration absorber attached to the structure. In this paper, the adequacy of utilizing passive vibration absorbers are investigated. The vibration absorber system is designed to minimize the vibration of a thin plate fixed along edges. The plate’s vibration characteristics, such as, natural frequency and mode shape are determined using three techniques: theoretical equations, finite element (FE analysis and experiment. The results demonstrate that the first four natural frequencies of fixed-fixed ends plate are 48, 121, 193 and 242 Hz, and these results are corroborated well with theoretical, FE simulation and experiment. The experiment work is further carried out with attached single and multiple vibration absorbers onto plate by tuning the absorber’s frequency to match with the excitation frequency. The outcomes depict that multiple vibration absorbers are more viable in lessening the global structural vibration.

  5. The effect of quartz on the flotation of pyrite depressed by serpentine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Feng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of quartz particles on the flotation of pyrite depressed by serpentine has been investigated through flotation tests, adsorption tests, zeta potential measurements and DLVO calculation. The results show that the presence of hydrophilic serpentine slimes on pyrite surface reduces collector adsorption and results in lower recovery of pyrite. The finer the serpentine slime is, the lower the pyrite recovery will be. Quartz particles do not interfere with pyrite flotation. However, the addition of quartz particles increases the adsorption of collector on pyrite surface and limits the detrimental effect of serpentine on pyrite flotation. The fine-grained quartz is more effective. Zeta potential measurements and DLVO calculation illustrate that the zeta potential of quartz is more negative than that of pyrite and the attraction force between serpentine and quartz is stronger than force between serpentine and pyrite, thus some serpentine slimes were transferred from pyrite surface to quartz in the process of attrition.

  6. Experimental deformation in sandstone, carbonates and quartz aggregate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, Cecilia See Nga [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States)

    2015-05-01

    The first part of my thesis is mainly focused on the effect of grain size distribution on compaction localization in porous sandstone. To identify the microstructural parameters that influence compaction band formation, I conducted a systematic study of mechanical deformation, failure mode and microstructural evolution in Bleurswiller and Boise sandstones, of similar porosity (~25%) and mineralogy but different sorting. Discrete compaction bands were observed to develop over a wide range of pressure in the Bleurswiller sandstone that has a relatively uniform grain size distribution. In contrast, compaction localization was not observed in the poorly sorted Boise sandstone. My results demonstrate that grain size distribution exerts important influence on compaction band development, in agreement with recently published data from Valley of Fire and Buckskin Gulch, as well as numerical studies. The second part aimed to improve current knowledge on inelastic behavior, failure mode and brittle-ductile transition in another sedimentary rock, porous carbonates. A micritic Tavel (porosity of ~13%) and an allochemical Indiana (~18%) limestones were deformed under compaction in wet and dry conditions. At lower confining pressures, shear localization occurred in brittle faulting regime. Through transitional regime, the deformation switched to cataclastic flow regime at higher confining pressure. Specifically in the cataclastic regime, the (dry and wet) Tavel and dry Indiana failed by distributed cataclastic flow, while in contrast, wet Indiana failed as compaction localization. My results demonstrate that different failure modes and mechanical behaviors under different deformation regimes and water saturation are fundamental prior to any geophysical application in porous carbonates. The third part aimed to focus on investigating compaction on quartz aggregate starting at low (MPa) using X-ray diffraction. We report the diffraction peak evolution of quartz with increasing

  7. Amplifier Module for 260-GHz Band Using Quartz Waveguide Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padmanabhan, Sharmila; Fung, King Man; Kangaslahti, Pekka P.; Peralta, Alejandro; Soria, Mary M.; Pukala, David M.; Sin, Seth; Samoska, Lorene A.; Sarkozy, Stephen; Lai, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Packaging of MMIC LNA (monolithic microwave integrated circuit low-noise amplifier) chips at frequencies over 200 GHz has always been problematic due to the high loss in the transition between the MMIC chip and the waveguide medium in which the chip will typically be used. In addition, above 200 GHz, wire-bond inductance between the LNA and the waveguide can severely limit the RF matching and bandwidth of the final waveguide amplifier module. This work resulted in the development of a low-loss quartz waveguide transition that includes a capacitive transmission line between the MMIC and the waveguide probe element. This capacitive transmission line tunes out the wirebond inductance (where the wire-bond is required to bond between the MMIC and the probe element). This inductance can severely limit the RF matching and bandwidth of the final waveguide amplifier module. The amplifier module consists of a quartz E-plane waveguide probe transition, a short capacitive tuning element, a short wire-bond to the MMIC, and the MMIC LNA. The output structure is similar, with a short wire-bond at the output of the MMIC, a quartz E-plane waveguide probe transition, and the output waveguide. The quartz probe element is made of 3-mil quartz, which is the thinnest commercially available material. The waveguide band used is WR4, from 170 to 260 GHz. This new transition and block design is an improvement over prior art because it provides for better RF matching, and will likely yield lower loss and better noise figure. The development of high-performance, low-noise amplifiers in the 180-to- 700-GHz range has applications for future earth science and planetary instruments with low power and volume, and astrophysics array instruments for molecular spectroscopy. This frequency band, while suitable for homeland security and commercial applications (such as millimeter-wave imaging, hidden weapons detection, crowd scanning, airport security, and communications), also has applications to

  8. The investigation of trapped thickness shear modes in a contoured AT-cut quartz plate using the power series expansion technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peng; Jin, Feng

    2018-01-01

    The dynamic model about the anti-plane vibration of a contoured quartz plate with thickness changing continuously is established by ignoring the effect of small elastic constant c 56. The governing equation is solved using the power series expansion technique, and the trapped thickness shear modes caused by bulge thickness are revealed. Theoretically, the proposed method is more general, which can be capable of handling various thickness profiles defined mathematically. After the convergence of the series is demonstrated and the correctness is numerically validated with the aid of finite element method results, systematic parametric studies are subsequently carried out to quantify the effects of the geometry parameter upon the trapped modes, including resonant frequency and mode shape. After that, the band structures of thickness shear waves propagation in a periodically contoured quartz plate, as well as the power transmission spectra, are obtained based on the power series expansion technique. It is revealed that broad stop bands below cut-off frequency exist owing to the trapped modes excited by the geometry inhomogeneity, which has little relationship with the structural periodicity, and its physical mechanism is different from the Bragg scattering effect. The outcome is widely applicable, and can be utilized to provide theoretical and practical guidance for the design and manufacturing of quartz resonators and wave filters.

  9. Mineralogy, morphology, and textural relationships in coatings on quartz grains in sediments in a quartz-sand aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shouliang; Kent, Douglas B.; Elbert, David C.; Shi, Zhi; Davis, James A.; Veblen, David R.

    2011-01-01

    Mineralogical studies of coatings on quartz grains and bulk sediments from an aquifer on Western Cape Cod, Massachusetts, USA were carried out using a variety of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques. Previous studies demonstrated that coatings on quartz grains control the adsorption properties of these sediments. Samples for TEM characterization were made by a gentle mechanical grinding method and focused ion beam (FIB) milling. The former method can make abundant electron-transparent coating assemblages for comprehensive and quantitative X-ray analysis and the latter technique protects the coating texture from being destroyed. Characterization of the samples from both a pristine area and an area heavily impacted by wastewater discharge shows similar coating textures and chemical compositions. Major constituents of the coating include Al-substituted goethite and illite/chlorite clays. Goethite is aggregated into well-crystallized domains through oriented attachment resulting in increased porosity. Illite/chlorite clays with various chemical compositions were observed to be mixed with goethite aggregates and aligned sub-parallel to the associated quartz surface. The uniform spatial distribution of wastewater-derived phosphorus throughout the coating from the wastewater-contaminated site suggests that all of the coating constituents, including those adjacent to the quartz surface, are accessible to groundwater solutes. Both TEM characterization and chemical extraction results indicate there is a significantly greater amount of amorphous iron oxide in samples from wastewater discharge area compared to those from the pristine region, which might reflect the impact of redox cycling of iron under the wastewater-discharge area. Coating compositions are consistent with the moderate metal and oxy-metalloid adsorption capacities, low but significant cation exchange capacities, and control of iron(III) solubility by goethite observed in reactive transport

  10. Mineralogy, morphology, and textural relationships in coatings on quartz grains in sediments in a quartz-sand aquifer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shouliang; Kent, Douglas B; Elbert, David C; Shi, Zhi; Davis, James A; Veblen, David R

    2011-06-01

    Mineralogical studies of coatings on quartz grains and bulk sediments from an aquifer on Western Cape Cod, Massachusetts, USA were carried out using a variety of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques. Previous studies demonstrated that coatings on quartz grains control the adsorption properties of these sediments. Samples for TEM characterization were made by a gentle mechanical grinding method and focused ion beam (FIB) milling. The former method can make abundant electron-transparent coating assemblages for comprehensive and quantitative X-ray analysis and the latter technique protects the coating texture from being destroyed. Characterization of the samples from both a pristine area and an area heavily impacted by wastewater discharge shows similar coating textures and chemical compositions. Major constituents of the coating include Al-substituted goethite and illite/chlorite clays. Goethite is aggregated into well-crystallized domains through oriented attachment resulting in increased porosity. Illite/chlorite clays with various chemical compositions were observed to be mixed with goethite aggregates and aligned sub-parallel to the associated quartz surface. The uniform spatial distribution of wastewater-derived phosphorus throughout the coating from the wastewater-contaminated site suggests that all of the coating constituents, including those adjacent to the quartz surface, are accessible to groundwater solutes. Both TEM characterization and chemical extraction results indicate there is a significantly greater amount of amorphous iron oxide in samples from wastewater discharge area compared to those from the pristine region, which might reflect the impact of redox cycling of iron under the wastewater-discharge area. Coating compositions are consistent with the moderate metal and oxy-metalloid adsorption capacities, low but significant cation exchange capacities, and control of iron(III) solubility by goethite observed in reactive transport

  11. Intermittent loading of teeth restored using quartz fiber, carbon-quartz fiber, and zirconium dioxide ceramic root canal posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannocci, F; Ferrari, M; Watson, T F

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the investigation was to compare the performances of teeth restored with quartz fiber, carbon-quartz fiber, and zirconium-dioxide posts covered with all-ceramic crowns when subjected to a cyclic loading test performed in a wet environment. Forty single-rooted human lower premolars having similar dimensions were endodontically treated and mounted in acrylic resin blocks with a simulated periodontal ligament. The teeth were divided into three experimental groups and one control group. Post holes 8 mm long were prepared in the roots of the experimental groups in which quartz fiber, carbon-quartz fiber, and zirconium dioxide posts were cemented. In the control group, no posts were used. The crown buildup was made with composite resin. The teeth were covered with all-ceramic crowns and intermittently loaded at an angle of 45 degrees to the long axis of the tooth at a frequency of two loads per second. Only one failure (root fracture + post fracture) was observed in each of the fiber post groups, while in the zirconium dioxide post group, six failures were observed (one crown fracture and 5 root fractures + post fractures). The Kaplan-Meier analysis of the three experimental groups showed that the survival rate of zirconium dioxide posts was significantly lower than that of both types of fiber post. All the experimental groups showed a survival rate higher than that of the control group. Fiber posts reduced to a minimum the risk of root fractures of teeth restored with composite cores and Empress crowns under the present experimental conditions (intermittent loading in a wet environment).

  12. Quartz-Enhanced Photoacoustic Spectroscopy (QEPAS) Detection of the ν7 Band of Ethylene at Low Pressure with CO2 Interference Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen; Geng, Jian; Ren, Wei

    2017-08-01

    Ethylene (C2H4) was detected using quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) at 10.5 µm with a continuous wave, distributed-feedback quantum cascade laser as the light source. The QEPAS sensor was operated at low pressures (≤200 torr) to eliminate the cross-talk spectral interference between C2H4 and CO2, a major interfering species in practical applications. The sensor was calibrated to show a good linear response to C2H4 concentration and the Allan deviation analysis demonstrated a minimum detection limit of 8 ppb at an integration time of 90 s. Although no spectral overlap between C2H4 and CO2 was confirmed at the pressure ≤200 torr by the direct absorption measurement using a 28-m multipass cell, we observed the apparent influence of the CO2 addition to the C2H4/N2 mixture on the photoacoustic signal of C2H4. An energy transfer model involving the vibration-vibration (VV) and vibration-translation (VT) transitions in the C2H4-CO2-N2 system was constructed to interpret the experimental data. Additionally, the vibrational relaxation times of C2H4 were obtained based on the QEPAS technique and the energy transfer model, which were in good agreement with the previous studies.

  13. Mechanism of chromosomal DNA replication initiation and replication fork stabilization in eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, LiHong; Liu, Yang; Kong, DaoChun

    2014-05-01

    Chromosomal DNA replication is one of the central biological events occurring inside cells. Due to its large size, the replication of genomic DNA in eukaryotes initiates at hundreds to tens of thousands of sites called DNA origins so that the replication could be completed in a limited time. Further, eukaryotic DNA replication is sophisticatedly regulated, and this regulation guarantees that each origin fires once per S phase and each segment of DNA gets duplication also once per cell cycle. The first step of replication initiation is the assembly of pre-replication complex (pre-RC). Since 1973, four proteins, Cdc6/Cdc18, MCM, ORC and Cdt1, have been extensively studied and proved to be pre-RC components. Recently, a novel pre-RC component called Sap1/Girdin was identified. Sap1/Girdin is required for loading Cdc18/Cdc6 to origins for pre-RC assembly in the fission yeast and human cells, respectively. At the transition of G1 to S phase, pre-RC is activated by the two kinases, cyclindependent kinase (CDK) and Dbf4-dependent kinase (DDK), and subsequently, RPA, primase-polα, PCNA, topoisomerase, Cdc45, polδ, and polɛ are recruited to DNA origins for creating two bi-directional replication forks and initiating DNA replication. As replication forks move along chromatin DNA, they frequently stall due to the presence of a great number of replication barriers on chromatin DNA, such as secondary DNA structures, protein/DNA complexes, DNA lesions, gene transcription. Stalled forks must require checkpoint regulation for their stabilization. Otherwise, stalled forks will collapse, which results in incomplete DNA replication and genomic instability. This short review gives a concise introduction regarding the current understanding of replication initiation and replication fork stabilization.

  14. Good vibrations. [Hydraulic turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynolds, P.

    1994-07-01

    The latest developments in the Voith Turbine Control and Automation System (VTLS), which couples digital control technology to hydropower plant equipment, are described. Prominent among these is the vibration diagnostics module for hydraulic turbines. It provides machine-specific diagnostic logic for a vibration monitoring and analysis system. Of the two other VTLS modules described, the operation module optimizes the control of a power plant with three or more turbines by considering the individual properties of each in turn, recommending which should be run, and how, in order to partition the load for a required power output. The cavitation module is a diagnostic system which enables the limits of operation of the turbines to be extended to bands just outside those determined by cavitation calculations. (3 figures). (UK)

  15. Pickin’ up good vibrations

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2015-01-01

    In preparation for the civil engineering work on the HL-LHC, vibration measurements were carried out at the LHC’s Point 1 last month. These measurements will help evaluate how civil engineering work could impact the beam, and will provide crucial details about the site’s geological make-up before construction begins.   A seismic truck at Point 1 generated wave-like vibrations measured by EN/MME. From carrying out R&D to produce state-of-the-art magnets to developing innovative, robust materials capable of withstanding beam impact, the HL-LHC is a multi-faceted project involving many groups and teams across CERN’s departments. It was in this framework that the project management mandated CERN's Mechanical and Materials Engineering (EN/MME) group to measure the propagation of vibrations around Point 1. Their question: can civil engineering work for the HL-LHC – the bulk of which is scheduled for LS2 – begin while the LHC is running? Alth...

  16. Vibrational stability of graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yangfan Hu

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical stability of graphene as temperature rises is analyzed based on three different self-consistent phonon (SCP models. Compared with three-dimensional (3-D materials, the critical temperature Ti at which instability occurs for graphene is much closer to its melting temperature Tm obtained from Monte Carlo simulation (Ti ≃ 2Tm, K. V. Zakharchenko, A. Fasolino, J. H. Los, and M. I. Katsnelson, J. Phys. Condens. Matter 23, 202202. This suggests that thermal vibration plays a significant role in melting of graphene while melting for 3-D materials is often dominated by topologic defects. This peculiar property of graphene derives from its high structural anisotropy, which is characterized by the vibrational anisotropic coefficient (VAC, defined upon its Lindermann ratios in different directions. For any carbon based material with a graphene-like structure, the VAC value must be smaller than 5.4 to maintain its stability. It is also found that the high VAC value of graphene is responsible for its negative thermal expansion coefficient at low temperature range. We believe that the VAC can be regarded as a new criterion concerning the vibrational stability of any low-dimensional (low-D materials.

  17. VIBRATION ISOLATION SYSTEM PROBABILITY ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smirnov Vladimir Alexandrovich

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the probability analysis for a vibration isolation system of high-precision equipment, which is extremely sensitive to low-frequency oscillations even of submicron amplitude. The external sources of low-frequency vibrations may include the natural city background or internal low-frequency sources inside buildings (pedestrian activity, HVAC. Taking Gauss distribution into account, the author estimates the probability of the relative displacement of the isolated mass being still lower than the vibration criteria. This problem is being solved in the three dimensional space, evolved by the system parameters, including damping and natural frequency. According to this probability distribution, the chance of exceeding the vibration criteria for a vibration isolation system is evaluated. Optimal system parameters - damping and natural frequency - are being developed, thus the possibility of exceeding vibration criteria VC-E and VC-D is assumed to be less than 0.04.

  18. Random vibrations theory and practice

    CERN Document Server

    Wirsching, Paul H; Ortiz, Keith

    1995-01-01

    Random Vibrations: Theory and Practice covers the theory and analysis of mechanical and structural systems undergoing random oscillations due to any number of phenomena— from engine noise, turbulent flow, and acoustic noise to wind, ocean waves, earthquakes, and rough pavement. For systems operating in such environments, a random vibration analysis is essential to the safety and reliability of the system. By far the most comprehensive text available on random vibrations, Random Vibrations: Theory and Practice is designed for readers who are new to the subject as well as those who are familiar with the fundamentals and wish to study a particular topic or use the text as an authoritative reference. It is divided into three major sections: fundamental background, random vibration development and applications to design, and random signal analysis. Introductory chapters cover topics in probability, statistics, and random processes that prepare the reader for the development of the theory of random vibrations a...

  19. Quartz dustiness: A key factor in controlling exposure to crystalline silica in the workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Lilao, A; Escrig, A; Orts, M J; Mallol, Gustavo; Monfort, E

    2016-11-01

    The classification of Respirable Crystalline Silica (RCS) as carcinogenic for humans has drawn greater attention to crystalline silica exposure in the workplace in recent years, leading to recommendations by safety and health bodies in Europe and the U.S. for lower occupational exposure limits. In view of this new scenario, the present study examined quartz dustiness, as quartz handling is a major source of crystalline silica in the workplace. The study was conducted on test samples with different mean particle sizes, prepared from several commercial quartzes. The quartz particle samples were characterised and the influence of certain quartz particle parameters on quartz dustiness was determined. The results indicate that quartz dustiness may be significantly affected by mean particle size, specific surface area, the Hausner ratio, and fine particle content. The study shows that, in order to minimise the adverse health effects associated with the inhalation of crystalline silica, quartz dustiness may be deemed a key factor in controlling the generation of fugitive quartz emissions during quartz processing, both into the outside atmosphere (air pollution) and inside the facilities (occupational health).

  20. The adsorption of methyl methacrylate and vinyl acetate polymers on α-quartz surface: A molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Lijing; Yang, Yan; Jiang, Hui; Zhang, Bingjian; Zhang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    The molecular dynamics simulation was used to investigate the adsorption of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and polyvinyl acetate (PVA), the commonly used surface coating materials, on α-quartz surface. The objective is to understand the interactions between quartz surface and polymers. The results clearly show adsorption of both polymers onto the quartz surface. Carbonyl group plays a significant role in the adsorption process. The adsorption energies of PMMA and PVA on α-quartz surface did not show significant difference, however, more hydrogen bonds were observed on the PVA/quartz system than PMMA/quartz. These observations might offer some insights on the polymer-quartz adhesion and its failure mechanism.

  1. Thermal dependence of luminescence lifetimes and radioluminescence in quartz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagonis, V., E-mail: vpagonis@mcdaniel.edu [McDaniel College, Physics Department, Westminster, MD 21157 (United States); Chithambo, M.L. [Department of Physics and Electronics, Rhodes University, PO BOX 94, Grahamstown 6140 (South Africa); Chen, R. [Raymond and Beverly Sackler School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv 69978 (Israel); Chruścińska, A. [Institute of Physics, Nicholas Copernicus University, 87-100 Toruń (Poland); Fasoli, M. [Department of Materials Science, University of Milano-Bicocca, Via Cozzi 53, 20125 Milano (Italy); Li, S.H. [Department of Earth Sciences, The University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Martini, M. [Department of Materials Science, University of Milano-Bicocca, Via Cozzi 53, 20125 Milano (Italy); Ramseyer, K. [Institut für Geologie, Baltzerstrasse 1-3, 3012 Bern (Switzerland)

    2014-01-15

    During time-resolved optical stimulation experiments (TR-OSL), one uses short light pulses to separate the stimulation and emission of luminescence in time. Experimental TR-OSL results show that the luminescence lifetime in quartz of sedimentary origin is independent of annealing temperature below 500 °C, but decreases monotonically thereafter. These results have been interpreted previously empirically on the basis of the existence of two separate luminescence centers L{sub H} and L{sub L} in quartz, each with its own distinct luminescence lifetime. Additional experimental evidence also supports the presence of a non-luminescent hole reservoir R, which plays a critical role in the predose effect in this material. This paper extends a recently published analytical model for thermal quenching in quartz, to include the two luminescence centers L{sub H} and L{sub L}, as well as the hole reservoir R. The new extended model involves localized electronic transitions between energy states within the two luminescence centers, and is described by a system of differential equations based on the Mott–Seitz mechanism of thermal quenching. It is shown that by using simplifying physical assumptions, one can obtain analytical solutions for the intensity of the light during a TR-OSL experiment carried out with previously annealed samples. These analytical expressions are found to be in good agreement with the numerical solutions of the equations. The results from the model are shown to be in quantitative agreement with published experimental data for commercially available quartz samples. Specifically the model describes the variation of the luminescence lifetimes with (a) annealing temperatures between room temperature and 900 °C, and (b) with stimulation temperatures between 20 and 200 °C. This paper also reports new radioluminescence (RL) measurements carried out using the same commercially available quartz samples. Gaussian deconvolution of the RL emission spectra was

  2. Ablative and mechanical properties of quartz phenolic composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria L. Gregori

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Quartz phenolic composites have been applied to thermal protection systems (TPSs for reentry vehicles since the late fifties due to their excellent ablative resistance and mechanical performance. TPSs must withstand the aggressive reentry environment, such as atomic oxygen, when submitted to very high temperatures (> 1000° C and heat flux. The ablative performance ofcomposites is influenced by both base materials and environmental parameters during the ablation process. For TPS systems phenolic resin is usually used as the base matrix due to its ability to form a stable char during decomposition. This char plays an important role in the absorption of the heat generated during the ablation process. During re-entry, parts of the charred matrix can be abrasively removed by shear force due to high pressure and velocity. In this work the ablative and mechanical properties of quartz phenolic composites were evaluated in order to identify the range of properties suitable for the use of these materials as thermal protection systems for space vehicles. Quartz fabric having an areal weight of 680 g/m2 and a resole-type phenolic resin were used to prepare the composites. The resin has a viscosity of 165 MPa at 20°C. The prepreg material was cured by heating under pressure of 100 bar in a mold. The resin content of the prepreg obtained was about 50 per cent. The mechanical properties evaluated were, tensile, shear and flexural strength. The results obtained showed that this material has average values of 38.5 MPa, 52 MPa and 85 MPa for tensile, shear and flexural strength, respectively. The ablative tests were carried out in a high-energy air plasma in ambient atmosphere and the mass losses were measured for different exposure time.

  3. Evaluation of Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Mercury Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, David B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Brooks, Scott C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Mathews, Teresa J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bevelhimer, Mark S. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); DeRolph, Chris [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Brandt, Craig C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Peterson, Mark J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ketelle, Richard [East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-06-01

    This report summarizes a 3-year research project undertaken to better understand the nature and magnitude of mercury (Hg) fluxes in East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC). This project addresses the requirements of Action Plan 1 in the 2011 Oak Ridge Reservation-wide Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Five Year Review (FYR). The Action Plan is designed to address a twofold 2011 FYR issue: (1) new information suggests mobilization of mercury from the upper and lower EFPC streambeds and stream banks is the primary source of mercury export during high-flow conditions, and (2) the current Record of Decision did not address the entire hydrologic system and creek bank or creek bed sediments. To obtain a more robust watershed-scale understanding of mercury sources and processes in lower EFPC (LEFPC), new field and laboratory studies were coupled with existing data from multiple US Department of Energy programs to develop a dynamic watershed and bioaccumulation model. LEFPC field studies for the project focused primarily on quantification of streambank erosion and an evaluation of mercury dynamics in shallow groundwater adjacent to LEFPC and potential connection to the surface water. The approach to the stream bank study was innovative in using imagery from kayak floats’ surveys from the headwaters to the mouth of EFPC to estimate erosion, coupled with detailed bank soil mercury analyses. The goal of new field assessments and modeling was to generate a more holistic and quantitative understanding of the watershed and the sources, flux, concentration, transformation, and bioaccumulation of inorganic mercury (IHg) and methylmercury (MeHg). Model development used a hybrid approach that dynamically linked a spreadsheet-based physical and chemical watershed model to a systems dynamics, mercury bioaccumulation model for key fish species. The watershed model tracks total Hg and MeHg fluxes and concentrations by examining upstream inputs, floodplain

  4. Flood-inundation maps for the East Fork White River at Columbus, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombard, Pamela J.

    2013-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 5.4-mile reach of the East Fork White River at Columbus, Indiana, from where the Flatrock and Driftwood Rivers combine to make up East Fork White River to just upstream of the confluence of Clifty Creek with the East Fork White River, were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Indiana Department of Transportation. The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation, depict estimates of the areal extent of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at USGS streamgage 03364000, East Fork White River at Columbus, Indiana. Current conditions at the USGS streamgage may be obtained on the Internet from the USGS National Water Information System (http://waterdata.usgs.gov/in/nwis/uv/?site_no=03364000&agency_cd=USGS&). The National Weather Service (NWS) forecasts flood hydrographs for the East Fork White River at Columbus, Indiana at their Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service (AHPS) flood warning system Website (http://water.weather.gov/ahps/), that may be used in conjunction with the maps developed in this study to show predicted areas of flood inundation. In this study, flood profiles were computed for the stream reach by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater model. The hydraulic model was calibrated by using the most current stage-discharge relation at USGS streamgage 03364000, East Fork White River at Columbus, Indiana. The calibrated hydraulic model was then used to determine 15 water-surface profiles for flood stages at 1-foot (ft) intervals referenced to the streamgage datum and ranging from bankfull to approximately the highest recorded water level at the streamgage. The simulated water-surface profiles were then combined with a geographic information system digital elevation model (derived from Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data), having a 0.37-ft vertical accuracy and a 1.02 ft

  5. Synchrotron FTIR imaging of OH in quartz mylonites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Kronenberg

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Previous measurements of water in deformed quartzites using conventional Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR instruments have shown that water contents of larger grains vary from one grain to another. However, the non-equilibrium variations in water content between neighboring grains and within quartz grains cannot be interrogated further without greater measurement resolution, nor can water contents be measured in finely recrystallized grains without including absorption bands due to fluid inclusions, films, and secondary minerals at grain boundaries.Synchrotron infrared (IR radiation coupled to a FTIR spectrometer has allowed us to distinguish and measure OH bands due to fluid inclusions, hydrogen point defects, and secondary hydrous mineral inclusions through an aperture of 10 µm for specimens > 40 µm thick. Doubly polished infrared (IR plates can be prepared with thicknesses down to 4–8 µm, but measurement of small OH bands is currently limited by strong interference fringes for samples < 25 µm thick, precluding measurements of water within individual, finely recrystallized grains. By translating specimens under the 10 µm IR beam by steps of 10 to 50 µm, using a software-controlled x − y stage, spectra have been collected over specimen areas of nearly 4.5 mm2. This technique allowed us to separate and quantify broad OH bands due to fluid inclusions in quartz and OH bands due to micas and map their distributions in quartzites from the Moine Thrust (Scotland and Main Central Thrust (Himalayas.Mylonitic quartzites deformed under greenschist facies conditions in the footwall to the Moine Thrust (MT exhibit a large and variable 3400 cm−1 OH absorption band due to molecular water, and maps of water content corresponding to fluid inclusions show that inclusion densities correlate with deformation and recrystallization microstructures. Quartz grains of mylonitic orthogneisses and paragneisses deformed

  6. Current Rectification with Poly-l-Lysine-Coated Quartz Nanopipettes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umehara, Senkei; Pourmand, Nader; Webb, Chris D.; Davis, Ronald W.; Yasuda, Kenji; Karhanek, Miloslav

    2010-01-01

    Ion current rectification with quartz nanopipette electrodes was investigated through the control of the surface charge. The presence and absence of a positively charged poly-l-lysine (PLL) coating resulted in the rectified current with opposite polarity. The results agreed with the theories developed for current-rectifying conical nanopores, suggesting the similar underlying mechanism among asymmetric nanostructure in general. This surface condition dependence can be used as the fundamental principle of multi-purpose real-time in vivo biosensors. PMID:17090078

  7. Transitional grain-size-sensitive flow of milky quartz aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, J. I.; Holyoke, C. W., III; Kronenberg, A. K.

    2014-12-01

    Fine-grained (~15 μm) milky quartz aggregates exhibit reversible flow strengths in triaxial compression experiments conducted at T = 800-900oC, Pc = 1.5 GPa when strain rates are sequentially decreased (typically from 10-3.5 to 10-4.5 and 10-5.5 s-1), and then returned to the original rate (10-3.5 s-1), while samples that experience grain growth at 1000oC (to 35 μm) over the same sequence of strain rates exhibit an irreversible increase in strength. Polycrystalline quartz aggregates have been synthesized from natural milky quartz powders (ground to 5 μm) by HIP methods at T = 1000oC, Pc = 1.5 GPa and t = 24 hours, resulting in dense, fine-grained aggregates of uniform water content of ~4000 ppm (H/106Si), as indicated by a broad OH absorption band at 3400 cm-1. In experiments performed at 800o and 900oC, grain sizes of the samples are essentially constant over the duration of each experiment, though grain shapes change significantly, and undulatory extinction and deformation lamellae indicate that much of the sample shortening (to 50%) is accomplished, over the four strain-rate steps, by dislocation creep. Differential stresses measured at T = 800oC decrease from 160 to 30 MPa as strain rate is reduced from 10-4.6 to 10-5.5 s-1, and a stress of 140 MPa is measured when strain rate is returned to 10-4.5 s-1. Samples deformed at 1000o and 1100oC experience normal grain growth, with grain boundary energy-driven grain-coarsening textures superposed by undulatory extinction and deformation lamellae. Differential stresses measured at 1000oC and strain rates of 10-3.6, 10-4.6, and 10-5.5 s-1 are 185, 80, and 80 MPa, respectively, while an increased flow stress of 260 MPa is measured (following ~28 hours of prior high temperature deformation and grain growth) when strain rate is returned to 10-3.6 s-1. While all samples exhibit lattice preferred orientations, the stress exponent n inferred for the fine-grained 800oC sample is 1.5 and the stress exponent of the coarse

  8. Synchrotron FTIR imaging of OH in quartz mylonites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kronenberg, Andreas K.; Hasnan, Hasnor F. B.; Holyoke III, Caleb W.; Law, Richard D.; Liu, Zhenxian; Thomas, Jay B.

    2017-01-01

    Previous measurements of water in deformed quartzites using conventional Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) instruments have shown that water contents of larger grains vary from one grain to another. However, the non-equilibrium variations in water content between neighboring grains and within quartz grains cannot be interrogated further without greater measurement resolution, nor can water contents be measured in finely recrystallized grains without including absorption bands due to fluid inclusions, films, and secondary minerals at grain boundaries.

    Synchrotron infrared (IR) radiation coupled to a FTIR spectrometer has allowed us to distinguish and measure OH bands due to fluid inclusions, hydrogen point defects, and secondary hydrous mineral inclusions through an aperture of 10 µm for specimens > 40 µm thick. Doubly polished infrared (IR) plates can be prepared with thicknesses down to 4–8 µm, but measurement of small OH bands is currently limited by strong interference fringes for samples < 25 µm thick, precluding measurements of water within individual, finely recrystallized grains. By translating specimens under the 10 µm IR beam by steps of 10 to 50 µm, using a software-controlled x-y stage, spectra have been collected over specimen areas of nearly 4.5 mm2. This technique allowed us to separate and quantify broad OH bands due to fluid inclusions in quartz and OH bands due to micas and map their distributions in quartzites from the Moine Thrust (Scotland) and Main Central Thrust (Himalayas).

    Mylonitic quartzites deformed under greenschist facies conditions in the footwall to the Moine Thrust (MT) exhibit a large and variable 3400 cm-1 OH absorption band due to molecular water, and maps of water content corresponding to fluid inclusions show that inclusion densities correlate with deformation and recrystallization microstructures. Quartz grains of mylonitic orthogneisses and

  9. Quartz Crystal Microbalance Operation and In Situ Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albyn, K. C.

    2004-01-01

    Quartz crystal microbalances (QCMs) are commonly used to measure the rate of deposition of molecular species on a surface. The measurement is often used to select materials with a low outgassing rate for applications where the material has a line of sight to a contamination-sensitive surface. A quantitative, in situ calibration of the balance, or balances, using a pure material for which the enthalpy of sublimation is known, is described in this Technical Memorandum. Supporting calculations for surface dwell times of deposited materials and the effusion cell Clausing factor are presented along with examples of multiple QCM measurements of outgassing from a common source.

  10. Off-beam quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kun; Guo, Xiaoyong; Yi, Hongming; Chen, Weidong; Zhang, Weijun; Gao, Xiaoming

    2009-05-15

    An off-beam (OB) detection approach is suggested and experimentally investigated and optimized for quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS). This OB-QEPAS configuration, very simple in assembly, not only allows for use of larger excitation optical beams and facilitating optical alignment but also provides higher enhancement of photoacoustic signals than previously published results based on the common on-beam QEPAS under the same experimental conditions. A normalized noise equivalent absorption coefficient (1sigma) of 5.9 x 10(-9) cm(-1)W/Hz(1/2) was obtained for water vapor detection at normal atmospheric pressure.

  11. Quartz enhanced photoacoustic leak sensor for mechatronic components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampaolo, A.; Patimisco, P.; Giglio, M.; Calabrese, P. P.; Chieco, L.; Scamarcio, G.; Tittel, F. K.; Spagnolo, V.

    2016-02-01

    We report the first demonstration of a leak sensor based on a mid-IR quartz-enhanced photoacoustic (QEPAS) spectroscopic technique. A QEPAS sensor was integrated in a vacuum seal test station for mechatronic components. The laser source is a quantum cascade laser emitting at 10.56 μm, resonant with a strong absorption band of sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), which was selected as target gas for leak detection. The minimum detectable concentration of the QEPAS sensor is 6.9 ppb with an integration time of 1 s. This detection sensitivity allowed to measure SF6 leak flows as low as 3x10-5 standard cm3.

  12. Status of fork-tailed and Leach's storm-petrel populations at St. Lazaria Island during the summer of 1985

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purposes of this study were to (1) continue monitoring on Leach's forktail (Oceanadroma furcata) and on fork-tailed storm petrels (Oceanodroma leucorhoa); (2)...

  13. Coordinated degradation of replisome components ensures genome stability upon replication stress in the absence of the replication fork protection complex

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Roseaulin, Laura C; Noguchi, Chiaki; Martinez, Esteban; Ziegler, Melissa A; Toda, Takashi; Noguchi, Eishi

    2013-01-01

    .... However, such mechanisms remain elusive. Here we report that replicative DNA polymerases and helicases, the major components of the replisome, are degraded in concert in the absence of Swi1, a subunit of the replication fork protection complex...

  14. A short G1 phase imposes constitutive replication stress and fork remodelling in mouse embryonic stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahuja, Akshay K.; Jodkowska, Karolina; Teloni, Federico

    2016-01-01

    phosphorylation is dependent on Ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3 related (ATR) and is associated with chromatin loading of the ssDNA-binding proteins RPA and RAD51. Single-molecule analysis of replication intermediates reveals massive ssDNA gap accumulation, reduced fork speed and frequent fork reversal. All...... these marks of replication stress do not impair the mitotic process and are rapidly lost at differentiation onset. Delaying the G1/S transition in ESCs allows formation of 53BP1 nuclear bodies and suppresses ssDNA accumulation, fork slowing and reversal in the following S-phase. Genetic inactivation of fork...... slowing and reversal leads to chromosomal breakage in unperturbed ESCs. We propose that rapid cell cycle progression makes ESCs dependent on effective replication-coupled mechanisms to protect genome integrity....

  15. Chaotic vortex induced vibrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, J.; Sheridan, J. [Fluids Laboratory for Aeronautical and Industrial Research (FLAIR), Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Leontini, J. S. [Department of Mechanical and Product Design Engineering, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, Victoria 3122 (Australia); Lo Jacono, D. [Institut de Mécanique des Fluides de Toulouse (IMFT), CNRS, UPS and Université de Toulouse, 31400 Toulouse (France)

    2014-12-15

    This study investigates the nature of the dynamic response of an elastically mounted cylinder immersed in a free stream. A novel method is utilized, where the motion of the body during a free vibration experiment is accurately recorded, and then a second experiment is conducted where the cylinder is externally forced to follow this recorded trajectory. Generally, the flow response during both experiments is identical. However, particular regimes exist where the flow response is significantly different. This is taken as evidence of chaos in these regimes.

  16. Lattice Vibrations in Chlorobenzenes:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reynolds, P. A.; Kjems, Jørgen; White, J. W.

    1974-01-01

    Lattice vibrational dispersion curves for the ``intermolecular'' modes in the triclinic, one molecule per unit cell β phase of p‐C6D4Cl2 and p‐C6H4Cl2 have been obtained by inelastic neutron scattering. The deuterated sample was investigated at 295 and at 90°K and a linear extrapolation to 0°K...... was applied in order to correct for anharmonic effects. Calculations based on the atom‐atom model for van der Waals' interaction and on general potential parameters for the aromatic compounds agree reasonably well with the experimental observations. There is no substantial improvement in fit obtained either...

  17. Updated glacial chronology of the South Fork Hoh River valley, Olympic Peninsula, Washington through detailed stratigraphy and OSL dating

    OpenAIRE

    Wyshnytzky, Cianna E.; Rittenour, Tammy M.; Thackray, Glenn D.

    2012-01-01

    Four glacial advances are preserved and exposed in the stratigraphy of the South Fork Hoh River valley. The oldest of these advances extended beyond the South Fork valley into the Hoh River valley. The three younger advances are preserved in the stratigraphy cut bank exposures in the valley and geomorphically by moraines and outwash plains. One of these advances represents a re-advance to the same terminal position of the previous advance and has not previously been recognized in this valley ...

  18. Quantum dynamics of vibrational excitations and vibrational charge ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Quantum dynamics of vibrational excitations and vibrational charge transfer processes in H+ + O2 collisions at collision energy 23 eV ... The Fritz Haber Research Centre and The Department of Physical Chemisry, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Israel 91904; Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of ...

  19. Understanding optically stimulated charge movement in quartz and feldspar using time-resolved measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ankjærgaard, Christina

    Thermoluminescence (TL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) from quartz and feldspar are widely used in accident dosimetry and luminescence dating. In order to improve already existing methods or to develop new methods towards extending the current limits of the technique, it is important...... the recombination route(s), and thus obtain insight into the other half of the process involved in luminescence emission. This thesis studies the TR-OSL and optically stimulated phosphorescence signals from quartz and feldspars spanning several orders of magnitude in time (few ns to the seconds time scale) in order...... for the best separation of quartz OSL from a mixed quarts-feldspar sample. It then proceeds to study the different charge transport mechanisms subsequent to an optical stimulation pulse in quartz and feldspars. The results obtained for quartz conclude that the main lifetime component in quartz represents...

  20. Changes in OSL properties of quartz by preheating: an interpretation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vartanian, E. E-mail: crpaa@montaigne.u-bordeaux.fr; Guibert, P.; Roque, C.; Bechtel, F.; Schvoerer, M

    2000-12-15

    A study of OSL variation with preheat temperature showed, in a majority of cases, that OSL recorded at room temperature, increases above 200 deg. C before the normal drainage at higher temperature. To explain this behaviour, an alternative interpretation to the common 'electronic thermal transfer' mechanism is suggested, supported by a study of hydrothermally grown quartz crystals. This interpretation involves impurities in substitution of Si{sup 4+}, specially Al{sup 3+}, which are associated with species like, in the case of quartz, hydrogen (H{sup +}, in fact, OH{sup -}) and alkali ions (Li{sup +}, Na{sup +}, K{sup +}). These monovalent ions usually act as charge compensators and are mobile during heating. As a consequence of the mobility and a possible irreversible exchange between compensators, the number of radiative recombination centres associated with the OSL trap(s), observable within the detection spectral window used (250-400 nm), increases during preheating. This phenomenon could lead to a wrong ED determination.

  1. Infrared optical properties of $\\alpha$ quartz by molecular dynamics simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Gangemi, Fabrizio; Carati, Andrea; Maiocchi, Alberto; Galgani, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    This paper is concerned with theoretical estimates of the refractive--index curves for quartz, obtained by the Kubo formul\\ae\\ in the classical approximation, through MD simulations for the motions of the ions. Two objectives are considered. The first one is to understand the role of nonlinearities in situations where they are very large, as at the $\\alpha$--$\\beta$ structural phase transition. We show that on the one hand they don't play an essential role in connection with the form of the spectra in the infrared. On the other hand they play an essential role in introducing a chaoticity which involves a definite normal mode. This might explain why that mode is Raman active in the $\\alpha$ phase, but not in the $\\beta$ phase. The second objective concerns whether it is possible in a microscopic model to obtain normal mode frequencies, or peak frequencies in the optical spectra, that are in good agreement with the experimental data for quartz. Notwithstanding a lot of effort, we were unable to find results agr...

  2. Study of the bending modes in circular quartz resonators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclaire, Philippe; Goossens, Jozefien; Martinez, Loïc; Wilkie-Chancelier, Nicolas; Serfaty, Stéphane; Glorieux, Christ

    2006-10-01

    An experimental and theoretical study of bending modes in a partially electroded circular piezoelectric quartz (AT-cut) with free edge is presented. The quartz is excited by a voltage pulse applied on the electrodes, and its surface is scanned by a laser vibrometer that measures the out-of-plane displacements. The classical theory of bending of thin disks is used to describe the flexural modes at frequencies lower than the first thickness shear resonance (6 MHz). A fairly good agreement is found between experimental and theoretical results for the forced mode shapes and for the resonance frequencies. However, it appears that the two springs used to maintain the disk in position introduce extra clamping conditions. Several source shapes were studied, among which a collection of an arbitrary number of forces is particularly useful. The two-dimensional wavenumber representation shows the presence of anisotropy related to the crystallographic axes at higher frequencies, which is not predicted by the model. The experimental phase velocities are compared to those given by the classical theory of disks and to those of Lamb A(0) mode. This study confirms the correspondence at low frequencies between the A(0) mode and the bending eigenmodes of a disk with finite size.

  3. Outbreak of silicosis in Spanish quartz conglomerate workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Alonso, Aránzazu; Córdoba-Doña, Juan Antonio; Millares-Lorenzo, José Luis; Figueroa-Murillo, Estrella; García-Vadillo, Cristina; Romero-Morillos, José

    2014-01-01

    To describe the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of an outbreak of occupational silicosis and the associated working conditions. Cases were defined as men working in the stone cutting, shaping, and finishing industry in the province of Cádiz, diagnosed with silicosis between July 2009 and May 2012, and were identified and diagnosed by the department of pulmonology of the University Hospital of Puerto Real (Cádiz). A census of workplaces using quartz conglomerates was carried out to determine total numbers of potentially exposed workers. A patient telephone survey on occupational exposures and a review of medical records for all participants were conducted. Silicosis was diagnosed in 46 men with a median age of 33 years and a median of 11 years working in the manufacturing of countertops. Of these cases, 91.3% were diagnosed with simple chronic silicosis, with an abnormal high-resolution computerized tomography (HRCT) scan. One patient died during the study period. Employer non-compliance in prevention and control measures was frequently reported, as were environmental and individual protection failures. The use of new construction materials such as quartz conglomerates has increased silicosis incidence due to intensive occupational exposures, in the context of high demand fuelled by the housing boom. This widespread exposure poses a risk if appropriate preventive measures are not undertaken.

  4. Synchrotron FTIR imaging of OH in quartz mylonites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronenberg, Andreas K.; Hasnan, Hasnor F. B.; Holyoke, Caleb W., III; Law, Richard D.; Liu, Zhenxian; Thomas, Jay B.

    2017-10-01

    Previous measurements of water in deformed quartzites using conventional Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) instruments have shown that water contents of larger grains vary from one grain to another. However, the non-equilibrium variations in water content between neighboring grains and within quartz grains cannot be interrogated further without greater measurement resolution, nor can water contents be measured in finely recrystallized grains without including absorption bands due to fluid inclusions, films, and secondary minerals at grain boundaries.Synchrotron infrared (IR) radiation coupled to a FTIR spectrometer has allowed us to distinguish and measure OH bands due to fluid inclusions, hydrogen point defects, and secondary hydrous mineral inclusions through an aperture of 10 µm for specimens > 40 µm thick. Doubly polished infrared (IR) plates can be prepared with thicknesses down to 4-8 µm, but measurement of small OH bands is currently limited by strong interference fringes for samples detectable water in highly sheared MCT mylonites challenge our understanding of quartz rheology. However, where water absorption bands can be detected and compared with deformation microstructures, OH concentration maps provide information on the histories of deformation and recovery, evidence for the introduction and loss of fluid inclusions, and water weakening processes.

  5. Electronic Nose using Gas Chromatography Column and Quartz Crystal Microbalance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hari Agus Sujono

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The conventional electronic nose usually consists of an array of dissimilar chemical sensors such as quartz crystal microbalance (QCM combined with pattern recognition algorithm such as Neural network. Because of parallel processing, the system needs a huge number of sensors and circuits which may emerge complexity and inter-channel crosstalk problems. In this research, a new type of odor identification which combines between gas chromatography (GC and electronic nose methods has been developed. The system consists of a GC column and a 10-MHz quartz crystal microbalance sensor producing a unique pattern for an odor in time domain. This method offers advantages of substantially reduced size, interferences and power consumption in comparison to existing odor identification system. Several odors of organic compounds were introduced to evaluate the selectivity of the system. Principle component analysis method was used to visualize the classification of each odor in two-dimensional space. This system could resolve common organic solvents, including molecules of different classes (aromatic from alcohols as well as those within a particular class (methanol from ethanol and also fuels (premium from pertamax. The neural network can be taught to recognize the odors tested in the experiment with identification rate of 85 %. It is therefore the system may take the place of human nose, especially for poisonous odor evaluations.

  6. Analytical model for CO(2) laser ablation of fused quartz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Krzysztof M; Baker, Howard J; Hall, Denis R

    2015-10-10

    This paper reports the development of an analytical model, with supporting experimental data, which quite accurately describes the key features of CO2 laser ablation of fused silica glass. The quantitative model of nonexplosive, evaporative material removal is shown to match the experimental data very well, to the extent that it can be used as a tool for ablative measurements of absorption coefficient and vaporization energy. The experimental results indicated that a minimum of 12  MJ kg-1 is required to fully vaporize fused quartz initially held at room temperature, which is in good agreement with the prediction of the model supplied with input data available in the literature. An optimal window for the machining of fused quartz was revealed in terms of pulse duration 20-80 μs and CO2 laser wavelength optimized for maximum absorption coefficient. Material removal rates of 0.33 μm per J cm-2 allow for a high-precision depth control with modest laser stability. The model may also be used as a parameter selection guide for CO2 laser ablation of fused silica or other materials of similar thermophysical properties.

  7. Mass production of CNTs using CVD multi-quartz tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yousef, Samy; Mohamed, Alaa [Dept. of Production Engineering and Printing Technology, Akhbar Elyom Academy, Giza (Egypt)

    2016-11-15

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have become the backbone of modern industries, including lightweight and heavy-duty industrial applications. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is considered as the most common method used to synthesize high yield CNTs. This work aims to develop the traditional CVD for the mass production of more economical CNTs, meeting the growing CNT demands among consumers by increasing the number of three particular reactors. All reactors housing is connected by small channels to provide the heat exchange possibility between the chambers, thereby decreasing synthesis time and reducing heat losses inside the ceramic body of the furnace. The novel design is simple and cheap with a lower reacting time and heat loss compared with the traditional CVD design. Methane, hydrogen, argon, and catalyzed iron nanoparticles were used as a carbon source and catalyst during the synthesis process. In addition, CNTs were produced using only a single quartz tube for comparison. The produced samples were examined using XRD, TEM, SEM, FTIR, and TGA. The results showed that the yield of CNTs increases by 287 % compared with those synthesized with a single quartz tube. Moreover, the total synthesis time of CNTs decreases by 37 % because of decreased heat leakage.

  8. Threshold sensitivity of quartz variometers with negative feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odintsov, V. I.; Petrov, V. G.

    2017-05-01

    The maximum achievable parameters of magnetometers based on optomechanical quartz variometers are studied in connection with the planned transition of the international network Intermagnet to 1-s recording and the need to provide the network of Russian geomagnetic observatories with domestic magnetometers that satisfy Intermagnet requirements. The mechanism of negative feedback effect on the sensitivity threshold of a variometer with an optoelectronic angle transducer is shown. The optimization criterion for the size and shape of the magnets made of different magnetic materials is defined by the maximum ratio of the magnetic moment to the inertial moment. Theoretical and experimental evaluation of the variometer noise level is based on vicalloy and samarium-cobalt. It is shown that the frequency range of magnetometers with variometers based on vicalloy and samarium-cobalt will be bounded from above by frequencies of 1.6 and 6.4 Hz, respectively, at a threshold sensitivity of about 1 pT. These ratios of the frequency and threshold sensitivity for the given magnetic materials are probably limited for quartz variometers with an optoelectronic angle transducer.

  9. Outbreak of silicosis in Spanish quartz conglomerate workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Alonso, Aránzazu; Córdoba-Doña, Juan Antonio; Millares-Lorenzo, José Luis; Figueroa-Murillo, Estrella; García-Vadillo, Cristina; Romero-Morillo, José

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of an outbreak of occupational silicosis and the associated working conditions. Methods: Cases were defined as men working in the stone cutting, shaping, and finishing industry in the province of Cádiz, diagnosed with silicosis between July 2009 and May 2012, and were identified and diagnosed by the department of pulmonology of the University Hospital of Puerto Real (Cádiz). A census of workplaces using quartz conglomerates was carried out to determine total numbers of potentially exposed workers. A patient telephone survey on occupational exposures and a review of medical records for all participants were conducted. Results: Silicosis was diagnosed in 46 men with a median age of 33 years and a median of 11 years working in the manufacturing of countertops. Of these cases, 91.3% were diagnosed with simple chronic silicosis, with an abnormal high-resolution computerized tomography (HRCT) scan. One patient died during the study period. Employer non-compliance in prevention and control measures was frequently reported, as were environmental and individual protection failures. Conclusions: The use of new construction materials such as quartz conglomerates has increased silicosis incidence due to intensive occupational exposures, in the context of high demand fuelled by the housing boom. This widespread exposure poses a risk if appropriate preventive measures are not undertaken. PMID:24804337

  10. Controls on polyacrylamide adsorption to quartz, kaolinite, and feldspar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graveling, Gary J.; Vala Ragnarsdottir, K.; Allen, Geoff C.; Eastman, John; Brady, Patrick V.; Balsley, Steven D.; Skuse, David R.

    1997-09-01

    Potentiometric titrations of quartz, kaolinite, feldspar, and partially hydrolysed polyacrylamide (HPAM), and sorption measurements of HPAM on the minerals, allows identification of the general mechanisms of polyacrylamide adsorption to aluminosilicates and quartz. Adsorption was monitored at the mineral solution interface by way of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). XPS spectra of the unreacted minerals show bands in the Ols, Si2p, Al2p, and Cls regions. Additional peaks are observed in the C1s and N1s regions after treatment with polyacrylamide and the latter is used in this study to monitor polymer adsorption. N1s peak intensities increase with polymer concentration to a maximum corresponding to surface site saturation. At a fixed polymer concentration, adsorption varies with pH-dependent surface charge. The adsorption mechanism changes with pH, reflecting variation in the pH-dependent concentrations of ionizable groups on polyacrylamide and at aluminosilicate surfaces, and the extent of hydrogen-bonding between uncharged mineral surface sites and polymer amide groups.

  11. Assessing rare earth elements in quartz rich geological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, A; Thoss, V; Ribeiro Guevara, S; Urgast, D; Raab, A; Mastrolitti, S; Feldmann, J

    2016-01-01

    Sodium peroxide (Na2O2) fusion coupled to Inductively Coupled Plasma Tandem Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS/MS) measurements was used to rapidly screen quartz-rich geological samples for rare earth element (REE) content. The method accuracy was checked with a geological reference material and Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) measurements. The used mass-mode combinations presented accurate results (only exception being (157)Gd in He gas mode) with recovery of the geological reference material QLO-1 between 80% and 98% (lower values for Lu, Nd and Sm) and in general comparable to INAA measurements. Low limits of detection for all elements were achieved, generally below 10 pg g(-1), as well as measurement repeatability below 15%. Overall, the Na2O2/ICP-MS/MS method proved to be a suitable lab-based method to quickly and accurately screen rock samples originating from quartz-rich geological areas for rare earth element content; particularly useful if checking commercial viability. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Maps showing mines, quarries, prospects, and exposures in the Devils Fork Roadless Area, Scott County, Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behum, Paul T.

    1984-01-01

    The Wilderness Act (Public Law 88-577, September 3, 1964) and related acts require the U.S. Geological Survey and the U.S. Bureau of Mines to survey certain areas on Federal lands to determine their mineral resource potential. Results must be made available to the public and be submitted to the President and the Congress. This report presents the results of a survey of mines, quarries, prospects, and coal exposures in the vicinity of the Devils Fork Roadless Area in the Jefferson National Forest, Scott County, Virginia. Devils Fork Roadless Area was classified as a further planning area during the Second Roadless Area Review and Evaluation (RARE II) by the U.S. Forest Service, January 1979.

  13. Mercury Content of Sediments in East Fork Poplar Creek: Current Assessment and Past Trends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brooks, Scott C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Eller, Virginia A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Dickson, Johnbull O. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Earles, Jennifer E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lowe, Kenneth Alan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Mehlhorn, Tonia L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Olsen, Todd A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); DeRolph, Christopher R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Watson, David J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Phillips, Debra H. [Queen' s Univ., Belfast (United Kingdom); Peterson, Mark J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-01-01

    This study provided new information on sediment mercury (Hg) and monomethylmercury (MMHg) content and chemistry. The current inventory of Hg in East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) bed sediments was estimated to be 334 kg, which represents a ~67% decrease relative to the initial investigations in 1984. MMHg sediment inventory was estimated to be 44.1 g, lower but roughly similar to past estimates. The results support the relevance and potential impacts of other active and planned investigations within the Mercury Remediation Technology Development for Lower East Fork Poplar Creek project (e.g., assessment and control of bank soil inputs, sorbents for Hg and MMHg removal, re-introduction of freshwater clams to EFPC), and identify gaps in current understanding that represent opportunities to understand controlling variables that may inform future technology development studies.

  14. Z-Axis Micromachined Tuning Fork Gyroscope with Low Air Damping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minh Ngoc Nguyen

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on the design and fabrication of a z-axis tuning fork gyroscope which has a freestanding architecture. In order to improve the performance of the tuning fork gyroscope by eliminating the influence of the squeeze-film air damping, the driving and sensing parts of the gyroscope were designed to oscillate in-plane. Furthermore, by removing the substrate underneath the device, the slide-film air damping in the gap between the proof masses and the substrate was eliminated. The proposed architecture was analyzed by the finite element method using ANSYS software. The simulated frequencies of the driving and sensing modes were 9.788 and 9.761 kHz, respectively. The gyroscope was fabricated using bulk micromachining technology. The quality factor and sensitivity of the gyroscope operating in atmospheric conditions were measured to be 111.2 and 11.56 mV/°/s, respectively.

  15. Turbo Charge CPU Utilization in Fork/Join Using the ManagedBlocker

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    Fork/Join is a framework for parallelizing calculations using recursive decomposition, also called divide and conquer. These algorithms occasionally end up duplicating work, especially at the beginning of the run. We can reduce wasted CPU cycles by implementing a reserved caching scheme. Before a task starts its calculation, it tries to reserve an entry in the shared map. If it is successful, it immediately begins. If not, it blocks until the other thread has finished its calculation. Unfortunately this might result in a significant number of blocked threads, decreasing CPU utilization. In this talk we will demonstrate this issue and offer a solution in the form of the ManagedBlocker. Combined with the Fork/Join, it can keep parallelism at the desired level.

  16. The Suitability Of Local Quartz Sand In The Production Of Bath Crucibles.

    OpenAIRE

    C. O. Okpanachi; S. I. Ibrahim; A. C. Okoro; K. Dogo; M. K. Idris

    2015-01-01

    The suitability of local quartz sand in the production of bath crucibles is a study that was carried out in order to impart overall strength on bath crucibles hence reduce breakages during fettling. Therefore this research constitutes a study to enhance the efficiency of production of bath crucibles by addition of quartz sand in slip preparation. The steps taken in the beneficiation of quartz sand for the production of bath crucibles are comminution which entails crushing and milling classifi...

  17. Molecular dynamics investigation into the adsorption of oil-water-surfactant mixture on quartz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuefen, Zhang; Guiwu, Lu; Xiaoming, Wen; Hong, Yang

    2009-04-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been carried out to investigate the adsorption behavior of different surfactants-water-oil mixture on quartz surfaces. The effects of rhamnolipid, sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate and sodium hexadecyl sulfonate on binding energy and radial distribution function (RDF) of oil-quartz are calculated at molecular level. The study shows that these surfactants can reduce binding energy between oil molecules and quartz surface, which plays a role of oil-displacing agent.

  18. Hydrothermal Synthesis of Monodisperse Single-Crystalline Alpha-Quartz Nanospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xingmao; Jiang, Ying-Bing

    2014-01-01

    Uniformly-sized, single-crystal alpha-quartz nanospheres have been synthesized at 200°C and 15atm under continuous stirring starting from uniform, amorphous Stöber silica colloids and using NaCl and alkali hydroxide as mineralizers. Quartz nanosphere size is controlled by the colloid particle size via direct devitrification. Uniform, high-purity nanocrystalline quartz is important for understanding nanoparticle toxicology and for advanced polishing and nanocomposite fabrication. PMID:21629887

  19. Literature survey on anti-vibration gloves

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Sampson, E

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available ............................................................................................................... 1 2. HAND ARM VIBRATION SYNDROME (HAVS).......................................................... 2 2.1 Hand-arm vibration................................................. Error! Bookmark not defined. 2.2 Human Response to vibration...

  20. AUTOMATION ON FRONT FORK ASSEMBLY MACHINES USING VIBRO-FEEDER & PICK AND PLACE MECHANISM

    OpenAIRE

    Dhananjay Kathar*, Prof. S. V. Lomte, Dilip Pawar

    2017-01-01

    The automation on front fork assembly machine is the project design to improve the quality as well as productivity of manual machines. Manual operating process consist of lots of errors like parts missing in assembly, parts fitment in the wrong direction, misalignment during assembly, inconsistency in process, etc. We are designing the automated multipurpose machine which will eliminate the errors generated by a manual operating process. Propose machine is also focused to reduce operator fati...

  1. Temperature, Frequency, and Young’s Modulus of an Aluminum Tuning Fork

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachery L. Greer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The frequency produced by a standard C (523.3 Hz aluminum alloy tuning fork when struck at temperatures ranging from 29 ̊C to 300 ̊C was studied. It was found that frequency decreased with increasing temperature with an inverse exponential relationship. The frequency was used to calculate Young’s Modulus for aluminum, with the results being in close agreement with published values.

  2. From farm to fork - a life cycle assessment of fresh Austrian pork

    OpenAIRE

    Winkler, T; Schopf, K.; Aschemann, R.; W. Winiwarter

    2016-01-01

    With 7.5% total nutritional value, pork is a staple food for many members of the Austrian population. Among members of the general public, little is known about the environmental impacts "from farm to fork" in the production of pork. This paper identifies three main impact categories for the environmental profile of Austrian pork using the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) method. In a transparent and comprehensive manner, this LCA studied environmental impacts occurring throughout the production ...

  3. Hydrology and water chemistry of shallow aquifers along the upper Clark Fork, western Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimick, D.A.

    1993-01-01

    Shallow ground-water resources in western Montana have been developed primarily in Quaternary alluvium and Tertiary deposits, although bedrock supplies water to wells locally. Well-yield and trans- missivity values were largest (medians of 40 gallons per minute and 970 feet squared per day, respec- tively) in alluvium and smallest (medians of 15 gallons per minute and 130 feet squared per day, respectively) in bedrock. Chemical composition of ground water was dominated by calcium, magnesium, and bicarbonate derived from dissolution of carbonate minerals. Other water types may be the result of ion exchange (increased sodium) and mixing of geothermal water or leachate from mine wastes (increased sulfate). Although concen- trations of arsenic were relatively small (maximum of 20 micrograms per liter), they were somewhat larger in alluvium within 300 feet of the Clark Fork. Elevated concentrations of cadmium (maximum of 6 micrograms per liter) were measured in water from one well downgradient from tailings ponds. Although mining and smelting activities have resulted in widespread distribution of contami- nants in the Clark Fork valley, this study indicates that ground water contains elevated concentrations of trace elements only locally. Streamflow data indicate significant ground-water inflow to the Clark Fork in two reaches. Between Racetrack and Garrison, irrigation-return flow probably augments naturally occurring ground-water discharge. Between Jens and Cramer Creek, geo- thermal water from bedrock flows through alluvium to the river. In the Clark Fork, the maximum arsenic concentration was 8.1 micrograms per liter; copper and manganese concentrations were largest at Warm Springs (maximums of 14 and 350 micrograms per liter, respectively) and decreased downstream.

  4. Environmental Assessment All-Terrain Vehicle Training Area at Grand Forks AFB, North Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-03-17

    Urtica dioica ), beggars’ ticks (Bidens frondosa), and waterleaf (Hydrophyllum viginianum) are typical forbes. 30 One hundred and forty two total...promote the establishment of native plant species. Socioeconomic Resources - This action would have a minor positive effect on the local economy... effects of the associated construction activities along with other concurrent actions at Grand Forks AFB and the surrounding area. 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16

  5. Environmental Assessment: Building Addition Building 233 at Grand Forks AFB, North Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-03-22

    Rosa woodsii) are common in the understory in this area. Wood nettle (Laportea 29 canadensis), stinging nettle ( Urtica dioica ), beggars’ ticks...soil erosion, and promote the establishment of native plant species. Socioeconomic Resources - This action would have a minor positive effect on...cumulative effects of the associated construction activities along with other concurrent actions at Grand Forks AFB and the surrounding area. 15

  6. Initial Geomorphic Responses to Removal of Milltown Dam, Clark Fork River, Montana, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, A. C.; Brinkerhoff, D.; Woelfle-Erskine, C.

    2008-12-01

    The removal of Milltown Dam on the Clark Fork River, Montana, USA, is creating a field-scale experiment on upstream and downstream responses to dam removal and on how gravel-bed rivers respond to sediment pulses. Milltown Dam was removed in 2008, reconnecting the Clark Fork River to its upstream basin in terms of sediment transport and fish passage. This dam removal is especially notable because (1) it is the largest dam removal to date in the United States in terms of the volume of reservoir sediment potentially available for downstream transport (over 3 million m3; 1.7 million m3 are being mechanically removed); and (2) the dam is the downstream end of the largest Superfund site in the United States, the Clark Fork Complex, and reservoir sediments are composed largely of contaminated mine tailings. Data collection on pre- and post-dam removal channel morphology, bed sediment characteristics, and sediment loads are being used to investigate spatial and temporal patterns of sediment transport and deposition associated with this dam removal. In the first several months following breaching of the dam, snowmelt runoff with a 3-year recurrence interval peak caused substantial erosion and downstream transport of metals-laden sediments from Milltown reservoir. Reservoir sediments in the Clark Fork arm of Milltown reservoir eroded at levels far exceeding modeling predictions as a result of both incision to the new base level created by dam removal and bank retreat of over 200 m in reaches upstream of a constructed bypass reach and remediation area. Copper and other metals in these eroded reservoir sediments provide a tracer for identifying whether sediment deposits observed downstream of the dam originated from Milltown reservoir or uncontaminated tributaries and indicate that Milltown sediments have reached over 200 km downstream. Downstream deposition has been greatest along channel margins and in side-channel areas, whereas the transport capacity of the active channel

  7. Vibrational Sensing in Marine Invertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-09-30

    VIBRATIONAL SENSING IN MARINE INVERTEBRATES Peter A. Jumars School of Oceanography University of Washington Box 357940 Seattle, WA 98195-7940 (206...DATES COVERED 00-00-1997 to 00-00-1997 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Vibrational Sensing in Marine Invertebrates 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER

  8. Vibrations and Stability: Solved Problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jon Juel

    Worked out solutions for exercise problems in J. J. Thomsen 'Vibrations and Stability: Advanced Theory, Analysis, and Tools', Springer, Berlin - Heidelberg, 2003.......Worked out solutions for exercise problems in J. J. Thomsen 'Vibrations and Stability: Advanced Theory, Analysis, and Tools', Springer, Berlin - Heidelberg, 2003....

  9. Validation of a Monte Carlo Model of the Fork Detector with a Calibrated Neutron Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borella, Alessandro; Mihailescu, Liviu-Cristian

    2014-02-01

    The investigation of experimental methods for safeguarding spent fuel elements is one of the research areas at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK•CEN. A version of the so-called Fork Detector has been designed at SCK•CEN and is in use at the Belgian Nuclear Power Plant of Doel for burnup determination purposes. The Fork Detector relies on passive neutron and gamma measurements for the assessment of the burnup and safeguards verification activities. In order to better evaluate and understand the method and in view to extend its capabilities, an effort to model the Fork detector was made with the code MCNPX. A validation of the model was done in the past using spent fuel measurement data. This paper reports about the measurements carried out at the Laboratory for Nuclear Calibrations (LNK) of SCK•CEN with a 252Cf source calibrated according to ISO 8529 standards. The experimental data are presented and compared with simulations. In the simulations, not only was the detector modeled but also the measurement room was taken into account based on the available design information. The results of this comparison exercise are also presented in this paper.

  10. MOF suppresses replication stress and contribute to resolution of stalled replication forks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Dharmendra Kumar; Pandita, Raj K; Singh, Mayank; Chakraborty, Sharmistha; Hambarde, Shashank; Ramnarain, Deepti; Charaka, Vijaya; Ahmed, Kazi Mokim; Hunt, Clayton R; Pandita, Tej K

    2018-01-03

    The hMOF protein belongs to the MYST family of histone acetyltransferases and plays a critical role in transcription and the DNA damage response. MOF is essential for cell proliferation, however its role during replication and replicative stress is unknown. Here we demonstrate that cells depleted for MOF and under replicative stress induced by cisplatin, hydroxyurea or camptothecin have reduced survival, a higher frequency of S-phase specific chromosome damage and increased R-loop formation. MOF depletion decreased replication fork speed and, when combined with replicative stress, also increased stalled replication forks as well as new origin firing. MOF interacted with PCNA, a key coordinator of replication and repair machinery at replication forks, and affected its ubiquitination and recruitment to the DNA damage site. Depletion of MOF, therefore, compromised the DNA damage repair response as evidenced by decreased Mre11, RPA70, Rad51, and PCNA foci formation, reduced DNA end resection and decreased CHK1 phosphorylation in cells after exposure to hydroxyurea or cisplatin. These results support the argument that MOF plays an important role in suppressing replication stress induced by genotoxic agents at several stages during the DNA damage response. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  11. Ubc9- and mms21-mediated sumoylation counteracts recombinogenic events at damaged replication forks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branzei, Dana; Sollier, Julie; Liberi, Giordano; Zhao, Xiaolan; Maeda, Daisuke; Seki, Masayuki; Enomoto, Takemi; Ohta, Kunihiro; Foiani, Marco

    2006-11-03

    The Ubc9 SUMO-conjugating enzyme and the Siz1 SUMO ligase sumoylate several repair and recombination proteins, including PCNA. Sumoylated PCNA binds Srs2, a helicase counteracting certain recombination events. Here we show that ubc9 mutants depend on checkpoint, recombination, and replication genes for growth. ubc9 cells maintain stalled-fork stability but exhibit a Rad51-dependent accumulation of cruciform structures during replication of damaged templates. Mutations in the Mms21 SUMO ligase resemble the ubc9 mutations. However, siz1, srs2, or pcna mutants altered in sumoylation do not exhibit the ubc9/mms21 phenotype. Like ubc9/mms21 mutants, sgs1 and top3 mutants also accumulate X molecules at damaged forks, and Sgs1/BLM is sumoylated. We propose that Ubc9 and Mms21 act in concert with Sgs1 to resolve the X structures formed during replication. Our results indicate that Ubc9- and Mms21-mediated sumoylation functions as a regulatory mechanism, different from that of replication checkpoints, to prevent pathological accumulation of cruciform structures at damaged forks.

  12. Developmental regulation of DNA replication: replication fork barriers and programmed gene amplification in Tetrahymena thermophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z; Macalpine, D M; Kapler, G M

    1997-01-01

    The palindromic Tetrahymena ribosomal DNA (rDNA) minichromosome is amplified 10,000-fold during development. Subsequent vegetative replication is cell cycle regulated. rDNA replication differs fundamentally in cycling vegetative and nondividing amplifying cells. Using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, we show for the first time that replication origins that direct gene amplification also function in normal dividing cells. Two classes of amplification intermediates were identified. The first class is indistinguishable from vegetative rDNA, initiating in just one of the two 5' nontranscribed spacer (NTS) copies in the rDNA palindrome at either of two closely spaced origins. Thus, these origins are active throughout the life cycle and their regulation changes at different developmental stages. The second, novel class of amplification intermediates is generated by multiple initiation events. Intermediates with mass greater than fully replicated DNA were observed, suggesting that onionskin replication occurs at this stage. Unlike amplified rDNA in Xenopus laevis, the novel Tetrahymena species are not produced by random initiation; replication also initiates in the 5' NTS. Surprisingly, a replication fork barrier which is activated only in these amplifying molecules blocks the progression of forks near the center of the palindrome. Whereas barriers have been previously described, this is the first instance in which programmed regulation of replication fork progression has been demonstrated in a eukaryote. PMID:9315675

  13. Tectonic blocks at Horse Mountain, N. California: A unique occurrence of mafic blueschists in serpentinite along the South Fork fault adjacent to the Klamath Mountains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn, S.R. (Mount Holyoke Coll., Hadley, MA (United States). Geology Dept.); Aalto, K.R. (Humboldt State Univ., Arcata, CA (United States). Geology Dept.); Abitz, R.J. (IT Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Gilliam, C.E. (Mount Holyoke Coll., Hadley, MA (United States). Geology Dept.)

    1993-04-01

    High-pressure metamorphic blocks within serpentine occur between the South Mtn Schist, Jsfm, (Pickett Peak terrane) of the Franciscan Complex and rocks of the Western Jurassic belt of the Klamaths in the Willow Creek Quadrangle. These rounded to ellipsoidal tectonic blocks range from 1--50 meters and have foliated chlorite [+-] actinolite rinds which presumably resulted from interaction between the mafic blocks and host serpentinite. Metamorphic assemblages within the blocks include lawsonite + glaucophane + chlorite + pumpellyite + albite and subsets of the above with omphacite [+-] quartz [+-] phengite [+-] epidote [+-] aragonite. Relic igneous augite is common, sometimes with omphacite or glaucophane overgrowths. Veins of pumpellyite or fibrous to granular omphacite are rare and epidote + albite [+-] calcite veins are common. Whole-rock chemistry, initial [sup 87]Sr/[sup 86]Sr, and relic augite compositions indicate perhaps both island arc and ocean floor basalt protoliths. Whole rock [delta][sup 18]O range from 4.7--10.2 permil indicating both low- and high-temperature alteration of the protolith in a seafloor setting. These blocks are chemically, mineralogically, and texturally similar to tectonic blocks in the Central Franciscan belt and to metabasites in the Pickett Peak terrane to the south where the Coast Range fault places Jsfm against the Coast Range Ophiolite (CRO), yet omphacite-bearing tectonic blocks in serpentinite have not been reported anywhere else along the South Fork fault adjacent to the Klamath Mountains. These unique blocks are associated with a particularly wide zone of ultramafic rocks, at least some of which appear to have upper-plate Josephine Ophiolite affinity. However, the tectonic block-bearing serpentinite is intercalated by imbricate thrusting with Jsfm suggesting an affinity to the CRO.

  14. The origins of vibration theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimarogonas, A. D.

    1990-07-01

    The Ionian School of natural philosophy introduced the scientific method of dealing with natural phenomena and the rigorous proofs for abstract propositions. Vibration theory was initiated by the Pythagoreans in the fifth century BC, in association with the theory of music and the theory of acoustics. They observed the natural frequency of vibrating systems and proved that it is a system property and that it does not depend on the excitation. Pythagoreans determined the fundamental natural frequencies of several simple systems, such as vibrating strings, pipes, vessels and circular plates. Aristoteles and the Peripatetic School founded mechanics and developed a fundamental understanding of statics and dynamics. In Alexandrian times there were substantial engineering developments in the field of vibration. The pendulum as a vibration, and probably time, measuring device was known in antiquity, and was further developed by the end of the first millennium AD.

  15. Vibration and thermal vacuum qualification test results for a low-voltage tungsten-halogen light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sexton, J. Andrew

    1991-01-01

    The results of a space flight qualification test program for a low-voltage, quartz tungsten-halogen light are presented. The test program was designed to qualify a halogen light for use in the Pool Boiling Experiment, a Get Away Special (GAS) payload that will be flown in the space shuttle payload bay. Vibration and thermal vacuum tests were performed. The test results indicated that the halogen light will survive the launch and ascent loads, and that the convection-free environment associated with the GAS payload system will not detrimentally affect the operation of the halogen light.

  16. Flood-inundation maps for the East Fork White River at Shoals, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldt, Justin A.

    2016-05-06

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 5.9-mile reach of the East Fork White River at Shoals, Indiana (Ind.), were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Indiana Office of Community and Rural Affairs. The flood-inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/ depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at the USGS streamgage on the East Fork White River at Shoals, Ind. (USGS station number 03373500). Near-real-time stages at this streamgage may be obtained on the Internet from the USGS National Water Information System at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/ or the National Weather Service (NWS) Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service (AHPS) at http://water.weather.gov/ahps/, which also forecasts flood hydrographs at this site (NWS AHPS site SHLI3). NWS AHPS forecast peak stage information may be used in conjunction with the maps developed in this study to show predicted areas of flood inundation.Flood profiles were computed for the East Fork White River reach by means of a one-dimensional, step-backwater model developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The hydraulic model was calibrated by using the current stage-discharge relation (USGS rating no. 43.0) at USGS streamgage 03373500, East Fork White River at Shoals, Ind. The calibrated hydraulic model was then used to compute 26 water-surface profiles for flood stages at 1-foot (ft) intervals referenced to the streamgage datum and ranging from approximately bankfull (10 ft) to the highest stage of the current stage-discharge rating curve (35 ft). The simulated water-surface profiles were then combined with a geographic information system (GIS) digital elevation model (DEM), derived from light detection and ranging (lidar) data, to delineate the area flooded at each water level. The areal extent of the 24-ft flood-inundation map was

  17. Flood-inundation maps for the East Fork White River near Bedford, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Kathleen K.

    2014-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for an 1.8-mile reach of the East Fork White River near Bedford, Indiana (Ind.) were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Indiana Department of Transportation. The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/ depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selectedwater levels (stages) at USGS streamgage 03371500, East Fork White River near Bedford, Ind. Current conditions for estimating near-real-time areas of inundation using USGS streamgage information may be obtained on the Internet at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/in/nwis/uv?site_no=03371500. In addition, information has been provided to the National Weather Service (NWS) for incorporation into their Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service (AHPS) flood warning system (http://water.weather.gov/ahps/). The NWS forecasts flood hydrographs at many places that are often colocated with USGS streamgages, including the East Fork White River near Bedford, Ind. NWS-forecasted peak-stage information may be used in conjunction with the maps developed in this study to show predicted areas of flood inundation. For this study, flood profiles were computed for the East Fork White River reach by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater model. The hydraulic model was calibrated by using the most current stage-discharge relations at USGS streamgage 03371500, East Fork White River near Bedford, Ind., and documented high-water marks from the flood of June 2008. The calibrated hydraulic model was then used to determine 20 water-surface profiles for flood stages at 1-foot intervals referenced to the streamgage datum and ranging from bankfull to the highest stage of the current stage-discharge rating curve. The simulated water-surface profiles were then combined with a geographic information system (GIS) digital elevation model (DEM, derived from

  18. Gamma Induced Transparency Loss of Thick Quartz Fibres

    CERN Document Server

    Avezov, Anvar; Gasanov, Eldar; Ibragimova, Elvira; Rustamov, Igor; Ulughbek, P; Volodko, Anton; Yuldashev, Bekhzad S

    1997-01-01

    Radiation response of thick multi-mode Ge, P, F -doped quartz fibre has been examined after exposure to 60^Co gamma-source within a dose interval of 10 - 10^7 Gy at a dose power of 2.3 and 24 Gy/s at 300K. The induced transparency losses A at the wave length of 1.06 mkm do not exceed 0.2 after a dose of 10^6 Gy and reach a saturation, while the fibres are closed for visible light after a smaller dose. Varying focus and an angle of leading a probe light beam in fibre, the core modes were found to close at a dose of 10^4 Gy due to radiation induced colour centres of Ge and non-bridging oxygen O, and the clad modes were suppressed at 500 Gy by the expense of Al impurity colour centres.

  19. Measuring the diffraction properties of an imaging quartz(211) crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haugh, M. J.; Jacoby, K. D.; Koch, J. A. [National Security Technologies, LLC, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Chen, H.; Schneider, M. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Hill, K. W. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2016-06-15

    A dual goniometer X-ray system was used to measure the reflectivity curve for a spherically bent quartz(211) crystal. An analysis of the dual goniometer instrument response function for the rocking curve width measurement was developed and tested against the actual measurements. The rocking curve was measured at 4510.8 eV using the Ti Kα1 characteristic spectral line. The crystal is the dispersion element for a high resolution spectrometer used for plasma studies. It was expected to have a very narrow rocking curve width. The analysis showed that we could measure the upper bound for the rocking curve width of the Qz(211) crystal. The upper bound was 58 μrad giving a lower bound for the instrument resolving power E/ΔE = 34 000. Greatly improved insight into the dual goniometer operation and its limitations was achieved.

  20. Respiratory Monitoring by Porphyrin Modified Quartz Crystal Microbalance Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Woo Lee

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A respiratory monitoring system based on a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM sensor with a functional film was designed and investigated. Porphyrins 5,10,15,20-tetrakis-(4-sulfophenyl-21H,23H-porphine (TSPP and 5,10,15,20-tetrakis-(4-sulfophenyl-21H, 23H-porphine manganese (III chloride (MnTSPP used as sensitive elements were assembled with a poly(diallyldimethyl ammonium chloride (PDDA. Films were deposited on the QCM resonators using layer-by-layer method in order to develop the sensor. The developed system, in which the sensor response reflects lung movements, was able to track human respiration providing respiratory rate (RR and respiratory pattern (RP. The sensor system was tested on healthy volunteers to compare RPs and calculate RRs. The operation principle of the proposed system is based on the fast adsorption/desorption behavior of water originated from human breath into the sensor films deposited on the QCM electrode.

  1. The Werner and Bloom syndrome proteins help resolve replication blockage by converting (regressed) holliday junctions to functional replication forks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machwe, Amrita; Karale, Rajashree; Xu, Xioahua; Liu, Yilun; Orren, David K

    2011-08-16

    Cells cope with blockage of replication fork progression in a manner that allows DNA synthesis to be completed and genomic instability minimized. Models for resolution of blocked replication involve fork regression to form Holliday junction structures. The human RecQ helicases WRN and BLM (deficient in Werner and Bloom syndromes, respectively) are critical for maintaining genomic stability and thought to function in accurate resolution of replication blockage. Consistent with this notion, WRN and BLM localize to sites of blocked replication after certain DNA-damaging treatments and exhibit enhanced activity on replication and recombination intermediates. Here we examine the actions of WRN and BLM on a special Holliday junction substrate reflective of a regressed replication fork. Our results demonstrate that, in reactions requiring ATP hydrolysis, both WRN and BLM convert this Holliday junction substrate primarily to a four-stranded replication fork structure, suggesting they target the Holliday junction to initiate branch migration. In agreement, the Holliday junction binding protein RuvA inhibits the WRN- and BLM-mediated conversion reactions. Importantly, this conversion product is suitable for replication with its leading daughter strand readily extended by DNA polymerases. Furthermore, binding to and conversion of this Holliday junction are optimal at low MgCl(2) concentrations, suggesting that WRN and BLM preferentially act on the square planar (open) conformation of Holliday junctions. Our findings suggest that, subsequent to fork regression events, WRN and/or BLM could re-establish functional replication forks to help overcome fork blockage. Such a function is highly consistent with phenotypes associated with WRN- and BLM-deficient cells.

  2. Is quartz a potential indicator of ultrahigh-pressure metamorphism? Laser Raman spectroscopy of quartz inclusions in ultrahigh-pressure garnets

    OpenAIRE

    Korsakov, Andrey V.; Perraki, Maria; Zhukov, Vladimir P.; De Gussem, Kris; Vandenabeele, Peter; Tomilenko, Anatoly A.

    2009-01-01

    Laser Raman microspectroscopy was applied to quartz inclusions in coesite- and diamond-grade metapelites from the Kokchetav ultrahigh-pressure metamorphic (UHPM) complex, Northern Kazakhstan, and diamond-grade eclogite xenoliths from the Mir kimberlite pipe, Yakutiya, Russia to assess the quantitative correlation between the Raman frequency shift and metamorphic pressure. Quartz crystals sealed in garnets have a higher frequency shift than those in the matrix. Residual pressures retained by q...

  3. Thermoluminescence response of natural white quartz collected from Gelephu, Bhutan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalita, J.M., E-mail: jitukalita09@gmail.com; Wary, G.

    2016-09-15

    Highlights: • TL response of natural white quartz collected from Gelephu, Bhutan was studied. • There was five trapping sites at depths ∼0.68, 0.90, 0.97, 1.06 and 1.10 eV. • The 426 K TL peak showed linear dose response from 10 mGy to 10 Gy. • The 426 K TL peak was found to fade very slowly. - Abstract: TL properties of natural quartz mineral collected from Gelephu, (Bhutan) were studied. With the help of various characterization techniques the quality of the sample was tested. The thermoluminescence (TL) analysis was carried out under X-ray irradiation. The un-irradiated sample showed no TL signal; however, after X-ray irradiation, a composite glow curve was observed. The kinetic analysis of the glow curve was carried out and it was observed that there was five trapping sites at depths ∼0.68, 0.90, 0.97, 1.06 and 1.10 eV responsible for five closely spaced glow peaks at ∼341, 362, 383, 397 and 426 K respectively. The dosimetric features of the mineral were studied. The response when studied from the whole glow curve was non-linear. However, the dose response studied from the 426 K peak was found to be linear from 10 mGy to 10 Gy. The fading of the TL signal of this 426 K peak was ∼12% within 5 days after irradiation and onward it was ∼4% up to 30 days. The reproducibility of the results was also good.

  4. Vibration response of misaligned rotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Tejas H.; Darpe, Ashish K.

    2009-08-01

    Misalignment is one of the common faults observed in rotors. Effect of misalignment on vibration response of coupled rotors is investigated in the present study. The coupled rotor system is modelled using Timoshenko beam elements with all six dof. An experimental approach is proposed for the first time for determination of magnitude and harmonic nature of the misalignment excitation. Misalignment effect at coupling location of rotor FE model is simulated using nodal force vector. The force vector is found using misalignment coupling stiffness matrix, derived from experimental data and applied misalignment between the two rotors. Steady-state vibration response is studied for sub-critical speeds. Effect of the types of misalignment (parallel and angular) on the vibration behaviour of the coupled rotor is examined. Along with lateral vibrations, axial and torsional vibrations are also investigated and nature of the vibration response is also examined. It has been found that the misalignment couples vibrations in bending, longitudinal and torsional modes. Some diagnostic features in the fast Fourier transform (FFT) of torsional and longitudinal response related to parallel and angular misalignment have been revealed. Full spectra and orbit plots are effectively used to reveal the unique nature of misalignment fault leading to reliable misalignment diagnostic information, not clearly brought out by earlier studies.

  5. Tissue vibration in prolonged running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesenbichler, Bernd; Stirling, Lisa M; Federolf, Peter; Nigg, Benno M

    2011-01-04

    The impact force in heel-toe running initiates vibrations of soft-tissue compartments of the leg that are heavily dampened by muscle activity. This study investigated if the damping and frequency of these soft-tissue vibrations are affected by fatigue, which was categorized by the time into an exhaustive exercise. The hypotheses were tested that (H1) the vibration intensity of the triceps surae increases with increasing fatigue and (H2) the vibration frequency of the triceps surae decreases with increasing fatigue. Tissue vibrations of the triceps surae were measured with tri-axial accelerometers in 10 subjects during a run towards exhaustion. The frequency content was quantified with power spectra and wavelet analysis. Maxima of local vibration intensities were compared between the non-fatigued and fatigued states of all subjects. In axial (i.e. parallel to the tibia) and medio-lateral direction, most local maxima increased with fatigue (supporting the first hypothesis). In anterior-posterior direction no systematic changes were found. Vibration frequency was minimally affected by fatigue and frequency changes did not occur systematically, which requires the rejection of the second hypothesis. Relative to heel-strike, the maximum vibration intensity occurred significantly later in the fatigued condition in all three directions. With fatigue, the soft tissue of the triceps surae oscillated for an extended duration at increased vibration magnitudes, possibly due to the effects of fatigue on type II muscle fibers. Thus, the protective mechanism of muscle tuning seems to be reduced in a fatigued muscle and the risk of potential harm to the tissue may increase. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Molecular vibrations the theory of infrared and Raman vibrational spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, E Bright; Cross, Paul C

    1980-01-01

    Pedagogical classic and essential reference focuses on mathematics of detailed vibrational analyses of polyatomic molecules, advancing from application of wave mechanics to potential functions and methods of solving secular determinant.

  7. Effect of substitution of sand stone dust for quartz and clay in triaxial ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Effect of substitution of sand stone dust for quartz and clay in triaxial porcelain composition. M K HALDAR and S K DAS. ∗. Refractories Division, CSIR-Central Glass & Ceramic Research Institute, 196, Raja S.C. Mullick Road,. Kolkata 700 032, India. MS received 6 July 2011; revised 8 February 2012. Abstract. Quartz and ...

  8. The Cherenkov correlated timing detector beam test results from quartz and acrylic bars

    CERN Document Server

    Sugaya, Y; Yoshimura, Y; Kanda, S; Olsen, S; Ueno, K; Varner, G S; Bergfeld, T; Bialek, J J; Lorenc, J; Palmer, M; Rudnick, G; Selen, M; Auran, T; Boyer, V; Honscheid, K; Tamura, N; Yoshimura, K; Lü, C; Marlow, D R; Mindas, C R; Prebys, E J; Asai, M; Kimura, A; Hayashi, S

    1995-01-01

    Several prototypes of a Cherenkov Correlated Timing (CCT) Detector have been tested at the KEK-PS test beam line. We describe the results for Cherenkov light yields and timing characteristics from quartz and acrylic bar prototypes. A Cherenkov angle resolution is found to be 15 mrad at a propagation distance of 100 cm with a 2 cm thick quartz bar prototype.

  9. The Suitability Of Local Quartz Sand In The Production Of Bath Crucibles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. O. Okpanachi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The suitability of local quartz sand in the production of bath crucibles is a study that was carried out in order to impart overall strength on bath crucibles hence reduce breakages during fettling. Therefore this research constitutes a study to enhance the efficiency of production of bath crucibles by addition of quartz sand in slip preparation. The steps taken in the beneficiation of quartz sand for the production of bath crucibles are comminution which entails crushing and milling classification washing liquid dispersion sizing and reduction of iron content by magnetic separation. The slip contains materials like plastic clay feldspar kaolin talc sodium silicate water quartz sand etc. These were all milled in the ball mill for slip production casting and fettling glazing and sintering to get final bath crucibles as the end products. Quartz sand is used in a variety of products essentially as raw material for the foundry casting and glass industries and also in chemicals water filtration and ceramics the heat resistance nature of quartz sand makes it an excellent refractory substance for these industrial processes. Slip can be prepared for production of bath crucibles without the inclusion of quartz sand however the addition of quartz sand is needed to improve the mechanical performance of the slip in the production of bath crucibles.

  10. Effect of substitution of sand stone dust for quartz and clay in triaxial ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Quartz and kaolin were partially substituted by sand stone dust (a siliceous byproduct of Indian stone cutting and polishing industries) in a traditional triaxial porcelain composition consisting of kaolin, quartz and feldsper. The effect of substitution upon heating at different temperatures (1050–1150°C) were studied by ...

  11. Detection of Sarin with a Fluorinated Polymer-coated Quartz Crystal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) modified with a thin layer of fluorinated polymer was utilized to determine sarin. Determination was based on the frequency shifts due to the adsorption and desorption of the compound at the surface of a modified quartz crystal electrode. Fluorosiloxane was synthesized and deposited ...

  12. Detection of Sarin with a Fluorinated Polymer-coated Quartz Crystal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NJD

    2007-09-07

    Sep 7, 2007 ... A quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) modified with a thin layer of fluorinated polymer was utilized to determine sarin. Determination was based on the frequency shifts due to the adsorption and desorption of the compound at the surface of a modified quartz crystal electrode. Fluorosiloxane was synthesized ...

  13. Charge movement in grains of quartz studied using exo-electron emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ankjærgaard, Christina; Denby, Phil M.; Murray, A.S.

    2008-01-01

    movement in luminescence phosphors. Here we show that OSE from natural quartz grains gives an easily detectable, reproducible and light sensitive signal, although it is not as intense as OSL. A single sample of natural quartz grains extracted from a sediment is used to investigate the thermal stability...

  14. Optical dating of single sand-sized grains of quartz: Sources of variability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duller, G.A.T.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Murray, A.S.

    2000-01-01

    Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) measurements have been made of over 3000 sand-sized grains of quartz. Analysis at this scale highlights the variability in the luminescence sensitivity and the dose saturation characteristics of individual quartz grains. Using a new instrument capable of me...... intensity, dose saturation characteristics and instrument uncertainty in equivalent dose calculation. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved....

  15. Optically stimulated luminescence techniques in retrospective dosimetry using single grains of quartz extracted from unheated materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Kristina Jørkov

    dosimetry). Special attention has been paid to quartz extracted from unheated building materials such as concrete and mortar. The single-aliquot regeneration-dose (SAR) protocol has been used to determine absorbeddoses in small aliquots as well as single grains of quartz. It is shown that OSL measurements...

  16. Avoid heat transfer equipment vibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganapathy, V.

    1987-06-01

    Tube bundles in heat exchangers, boilers, superheaters and heaters are often subject to vibration and noise problems. Vibration can lead to tube thinning and wear, resulting in tube failures. Excessive noise can be a problem to plant operating personnel. Large gas pressure drop across the equipment is also a side effect, which results in large operating costs. With the design checks presented in this paper, one can predict during design if problems associated with noise and vibration are likely to occur in petroleum refineries.

  17. Control of Montmorillonite Surface Coatings on Quartz Grains in Bentonite by Precursor Volcanic Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendlandt, R. F.; Harrison, W. J.

    2008-12-01

    The pathogenic tendencies of respirable-sized quartz grains may be dependent on inherent characteristics of the quartz as well as external factors. Surface coatings on quartz are of particular interest as they modify both physical and chemical properties of quartz grain surfaces and sequester the grain from contact with reactive lung fluids. Wendlandt et al. (Appl. Geochem. 22, 2007) investigated the surface properties of respirable-sized quartz grains in bentonites and recognized pervasive montmorillonite surface coatings on the quartz that resisted removal by repeated vigorous washings and reaction with HCl. To understand the persistence of montmorillonite coatings on quartz grains of igneous origin, volcanic ash deposits of varying age and degree of alteration to montmorillonite were sampled in Utah, including the distal Lava Creek (c. 0.64 Ma) and Bishop Tuffs (c. 0.74 Ma), and SW Colorado (Conejos Fm, San Juan Volcanic Field) for comparison with commercial grade Cretaceous-age "western" and "southern" bentonites. Quartz grains, hand-picked from these samples, were analyzed using FE-SEM and HRTEM. Continuous coatings of volcanic glass occur on quartz grains from the distal volcanic ash samples. As glass alteration to montmorillonite becomes more extensive, quartz grain surfaces start to display patches of montmorillonite. These patches become continuous in extent on quartz grains from the bentonites. Late precipitation of opal- CT lepispheres is consistent with the alteration reaction for volcanic glass: Volcanic glass + H2O = montmorillonite + SiO2(am) + ions(aq). HRTEM of quartz grains reveals an amorphous surface layer, consistent with a volcanic glass coating. Our results indicate that persistent montmorillonite coatings on quartz grains in bentonites are related to precursor volcanic glass coatings on these grains. The absence of glass coatings on other mineral grains in bentonite (feldspar, biotite) may be a consequence of the presence of strong cleavage

  18. Cathodoluminescence investigations on quartz cement in sandstones of Khabour Formation from Iraqi Kurdistan region, northern Iraq

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Omer, Muhamed Fakhri; Friis, Henrik

    The Ordovician deltaic to shallow marine Khabour Formation in Northern Iraq consists mainly of sandstone with minor siltstone and interbedded shale. The sandstones are pervasively cemented by quartz that resulted in very little preserved primary porosity. Cathodoluminescence and petrographic...... in silica supply which were classified as very early and early, derived from dissolved biogenic silica that precipitated as opal/microquartz, possibly pre-compactional and of non-luminescent quartz overgrowth type. This was followed by phases whose silica supply derived from pressure solution of quartz......, dissolution of feldspar, and hydrothermal fluids related to major thrust fault event. These successive quartz cement phases showed an increase in luminescence and the development of complicated zonation pattern in late-stage quartz cementation....

  19. 14 CFR 33.63 - Vibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Vibration. 33.63 Section 33.63 Aeronautics... STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.63 Vibration. Each engine... because of vibration and without imparting excessive vibration forces to the aircraft structure. ...

  20. 14 CFR 33.83 - Vibration test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Vibration test. 33.83 Section 33.83... STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.83 Vibration test. (a) Each engine must undergo vibration surveys to establish that the vibration characteristics of those components that...

  1. 14 CFR 33.33 - Vibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Vibration. 33.33 Section 33.33 Aeronautics... STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Reciprocating Aircraft Engines § 33.33 Vibration. The... vibration and without imparting excessive vibration forces to the aircraft structure. ...

  2. 14 CFR 33.43 - Vibration test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Vibration test. 33.43 Section 33.43... STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Reciprocating Aircraft Engines § 33.43 Vibration test. (a) Each engine must undergo a vibration survey to establish the torsional and bending vibration characteristics...

  3. 49 CFR 178.819 - Vibration test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Vibration test. 178.819 Section 178.819... Testing of IBCs § 178.819 Vibration test. (a) General. The vibration test must be conducted for the... vibration test. (b) Test method. (1) A sample IBC, selected at random, must be filled and closed as for...

  4. Rectangular Parallelepiped Vibration in Plane Strain State

    OpenAIRE

    Hanckowiak, Jerzy

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we present a vibration spectrum of a homogenous parallelepiped (HP) under the action of volume and surface forces resulting from the exponent displacements entering the Fourier transforms. Vibration under the action of axial surface tractions and the free vibration are described separately. A relationship between the high frequency vibration and boundary conditions (BC) is also considered.

  5. Simultaneous binding to the tracking strand, displaced strand and the duplex of a DNA fork enhances unwinding by Dda helicase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarattuthodiyil, Suja; Byrd, Alicia K.; Raney, Kevin D.

    2014-01-01

    Interactions between helicases and the tracking strand of a DNA substrate are well-characterized; however, the role of the displaced strand is a less understood characteristic of DNA unwinding. Dda helicase exhibited greater processivity when unwinding a DNA fork compared to a ss/ds DNA junction substrate. The lag phase in the unwinding progress curve was reduced for the forked DNA compared to the ss/ds junction. Fewer kinetic steps were required to unwind the fork compared to the ss/ds junction, suggesting that binding to the fork leads to disruption of the duplex. DNA footprinting confirmed that interaction of Dda with a fork leads to two base pairs being disrupted whereas no disruption of base pairing was observed with the ss/ds junction. Neutralization of the phosphodiester backbone resulted in a DNA-footprinting pattern similar to that observed with the ss/ds junction, consistent with disruption of the interaction between Dda and the displaced strand. Several basic residues in the 1A domain which were previously proposed to bind to the incoming duplex DNA were replaced with alanines, resulting in apparent loss of interaction with the duplex. Taken together, these results suggest that Dda interaction with the tracking strand, displaced strand and duplex coordinates DNA unwinding. PMID:25249618

  6. Human ribonuclease H1 resolves R-loops and thereby enables progression of the DNA replication fork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parajuli, Shankar; Teasley, Daniel C; Murali, Bhavna; Jackson, Jessica; Vindigni, Alessandro; Stewart, Sheila A

    2017-09-15

    Faithful DNA replication is essential for genome stability. To ensure accurate replication, numerous complex and redundant replication and repair mechanisms function in tandem with the core replication proteins to ensure DNA replication continues even when replication challenges are present that could impede progression of the replication fork. A unique topological challenge to the replication machinery is posed by RNA-DNA hybrids, commonly referred to as R-loops. Although R-loops play important roles in gene expression and recombination at immunoglobulin sites, their persistence is thought to interfere with DNA replication by slowing or impeding replication fork progression. Therefore, it is of interest to identify DNA-associated enzymes that help resolve replication-impeding R-loops. Here, using DNA fiber analysis, we demonstrate that human ribonuclease H1 (RNH1) plays an important role in replication fork movement in the mammalian nucleus by resolving R-loops. We found that RNH1 depletion results in accumulation of RNA-DNA hybrids, slowing of replication forks, and increased DNA damage. Our data uncovered a role for RNH1 in global DNA replication in the mammalian nucleus. Because accumulation of RNA-DNA hybrids is linked to various human cancers and neurodegenerative disorders, our study raises the possibility that replication fork progression might be impeded, adding to increased genomic instability and contributing to disease. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Vibrational Damping of Composite Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Biggerstaff, Janet M.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to develop new methods of vibrational damping in polymeric composite materials along with expanding the knowledge of currently used vibrational damping methods. A new barrier layer technique that dramatically increased damping in viscoelastic damping materials that interacted with the composite resin was created. A method for testing the shear strength of damping materials cocured in composites was developed. Directional damping materials, where the loss facto...

  8. Vibration Theory, Vol. 1B

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asmussen, J. C.; Nielsen, Søren R. K.

    The present collection of MATLAB exercises has been published as a supplement to the textbook, Svingningsteori, Bind 1 and the collection of exercises in Vibration theory, Vol. 1A, Solved Problems. Throughout the exercise references are made to these books. The purpose of the MATLAB exercises...... is to give a better understanding of the physical problems in linear vibration theory and to surpress the mathematical analysis used to solve the problems. For this purpose the MATLAB environment is excellent....

  9. Harmonic vibrations of multispan beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyrbye, Claes

    1996-01-01

    Free and forced harmonic vibrations of multispan beams are determined by a method which implies 1 equation regardless of the configuration. The necessary formulas are given in the paper. For beams with simple supports and the same length of all (n) spans, there is a rather big difference between...... the n´th and the (n+1)´th eigenfrequency. The reason for this phenomenon is explained.Keywords: Vibrations, Eigenfrequencies, Beams....

  10. Smart accelerometer. [vibration damage detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The invention discloses methods and apparatus for detecting vibrations from machines which indicate an impending malfunction for the purpose of preventing additional damage and allowing for an orderly shutdown or a change in mode of operation. The method and apparatus is especially suited for reliable operation in providing thruster control data concerning unstable vibration in an electrical environment which is typically noisy and in which unrecognized ground loops may exist.

  11. Improved Predictions for Geotechnical Vibrations

    OpenAIRE

    Macijauskas, Darius

    2015-01-01

    In urban areas where the infrastructure is dense and construction of new structures is near existing and sensitive buildings, frequently vibrations, caused by human activities, occur. Generated waves in the soil may adversely affect surrounding buildings. These vibrations have to be predicted a priori by using currently available knowledge of the soil dynamics. Current research, conducted by Deltares research institute, showed that the reliability of methods for prediction of m...

  12. Stress analysis of vibrating pipelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachwieja, Janusz

    2017-03-01

    The pipelines are subject to various constraints variable in time. Those vibrations, if not monitored for amplitude and frequency, may result in both the fatigue damage in the pipeline profile at high stress concentration and the damage to the pipeline supports. If the constraint forces are known, the system response may be determined with high accuracy using analytical or numerical methods. In most cases, it may be difficult to determine the constraint parameters, since the industrial pipeline vibrations occur due to the dynamic effects of the medium in the pipeline. In that case, a vibration analysis is a suitable alternative method to determine the stress strain state in the pipeline profile. Monitoring the pipeline vibration levels involves a comparison between the measured vibration parameters and the permissible values as depicted in the graphs for a specific pipeline type. Unfortunately, in most cases, the studies relate to the petrochemical industry and thus large diameter, long and straight pipelines. For a pipeline section supported on both ends, the response in any profile at the entire section length can be determined by measuring the vibration parameters at two different profiles between the pipeline supports. For a straight pipeline section, the bending moments, variable in time, at the ends of the analysed section are a source of the pipe excitation. If a straight pipe section supported on both ends is excited by the bending moments in the support profile, the starting point for the stress analysis are the strains, determined from the Euler-Bernoulli equation. In practice, it is easier to determine the displacement using the experimental methods, since the factors causing vibrations are unknown. The industrial system pipelines, unlike the transfer pipelines, are straight sections at some points only, which makes it more difficult to formulate the equation of motion. In those cases, numerical methods can be used to determine stresses using the

  13. Vibrational modes of nanolines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyliger, Paul R.; Flannery, Colm M.; Johnson, Ward L.

    2008-04-01

    Brillouin-light-scattering spectra previously have been shown to provide information on acoustic modes of polymeric lines fabricated by nanoimprint lithography. Finite-element methods for modeling such modes are presented here. These methods provide a theoretical framework for determining elastic constants and dimensions of nanolines from measured spectra in the low gigahertz range. To make the calculations feasible for future incorporation in inversion algorithms, two approximations of the boundary conditions are employed in the calculations: the rigidity of the nanoline/substrate interface and sinusoidal variation of displacements along the nanoline length. The accuracy of these approximations is evaluated as a function of wavenumber and frequency. The great advantage of finite-element methods over other methods previously employed for nanolines is the ability to model any cross-sectional geometry. Dispersion curves and displacement patterns are calculated for modes of polymethyl methacrylate nanolines with cross-sectional dimensions of 65 nm × 140 nm and rectangular or semicircular tops. The vibrational displacements and dispersion curves are qualitatively similar for the two geometries and include a series of flexural, Rayleigh-like, and Sezawa-like modes. This paper is a contribution of the National Institute of Standards and Technology and is not subject to copyright in the United States.

  14. Saccharomyces cerevisiae genetics predicts candidate therapeutic genetic interactions at the mammalian replication fork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Pel, Derek M; Stirling, Peter C; Minaker, Sean W; Sipahimalani, Payal; Hieter, Philip

    2013-02-01

    The concept of synthetic lethality has gained popularity as a rational guide for predicting chemotherapeutic targets based on negative genetic interactions between tumor-specific somatic mutations and a second-site target gene. One hallmark of most cancers that can be exploited by chemotherapies is chromosome instability (CIN). Because chromosome replication, maintenance, and segregation represent conserved and cell-essential processes, they can be modeled effectively in simpler eukaryotes such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here we analyze and extend genetic networks of CIN cancer gene orthologs in yeast, focusing on essential genes. This identifies hub genes and processes that are candidate targets for synthetic lethal killing of cancer cells with defined somatic mutations. One hub process in these networks is DNA replication. A nonessential, fork-associated scaffold, CTF4, is among the most highly connected genes. As Ctf4 lacks enzymatic activity, potentially limiting its development as a therapeutic target, we exploited its function as a physical interaction hub to rationally predict synthetic lethal interactions between essential Ctf4-binding proteins and CIN cancer gene orthologs. We then validated a subset of predicted genetic interactions in a human colorectal cancer cell line, showing that siRNA-mediated knockdown of MRE11A sensitizes cells to depletion of various replication fork-associated proteins. Overall, this work describes methods to identify, predict, and validate in cancer cells candidate therapeutic targets for tumors with known somatic mutations in CIN genes using data from yeast. We affirm not only replication stress but also the targeting of DNA replication fork proteins themselves as potential targets for anticancer therapeutic development.

  15. In-Field Performance Testing of the Fork Detector for Quantitative Spent Fuel Verification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauld, Ian C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hu, Jianwei [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); De Baere, P. [European Commission (Luxembourg). DG Energy, Directorate Nuclear Safeguards; Vaccaro, S. [European Commission (Luxembourg). DG Energy, Directorate Nuclear Safeguards; Schwalbach, P. [European Commission (Luxembourg). DG Energy, Directorate Nuclear Safeguards; Liljenfeldt, Henrik [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (Sweden); Tobin, Stephen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Expanding spent fuel dry storage activities worldwide are increasing demands on safeguards authorities that perform inspections. The European Atomic Energy Community (EURATOM) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) require measurements to verify declarations when spent fuel is transferred to difficult-to-access locations, such as dry storage casks and the repositories planned in Finland and Sweden. EURATOM makes routine use of the Fork detector to obtain gross gamma and total neutron measurements during spent fuel inspections. Data analysis is performed by modules in the integrated Review and Analysis Program (iRAP) software, developed jointly by EURATOM and the IAEA. Under the framework of the US Department of Energy–EURATOM cooperation agreement, a module for automated Fork detector data analysis has been developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) using the ORIGEN code from the SCALE code system and implemented in iRAP. EURATOM and ORNL recently performed measurements on 30 spent fuel assemblies at the Swedish Central Interim Storage Facility for Spent Nuclear Fuel (Clab), operated by the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB). The measured assemblies represent a broad range of fuel characteristics. Neutron count rates for 15 measured pressurized water reactor assemblies are predicted with an average relative standard deviation of 4.6%, and gamma signals are predicted on average within 2.6% of the measurement. The 15 measured boiling water reactor assemblies exhibit slightly larger deviations of 5.2% for the gamma signals and 5.7% for the neutron count rates, compared to measurements. These findings suggest that with improved analysis of the measurement data, existing instruments can provide increased verification of operator declarations of the spent fuel and thereby also provide greater ability to confirm integrity of an assembly. These results support the application of the Fork detector as a fully quantitative spent fuel

  16. Evaluation of Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Mercury Sources - Model Update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ketelle, Richard [East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Brandt, Craig C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Peterson, Mark J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bevelhimer, Mark S. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Watson, David B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Brooks, Scott C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Mayes, Melanie [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); DeRolph, Christopher R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Dickson, Johnbull O. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Olsen, Todd A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this report is to assess new data that has become available and provide an update to the evaluations and modeling presented in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Technical Manuscript Evaluation of lower East Fork Poplar Creek (LEFPC) Mercury Sources (Watson et al., 2016). Primary sources of field and laboratory data for this update include multiple US Department of Energy (DOE) programs including Environmental Management (EM; e.g., Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program, Mercury Remediation Technology Development [TD], and Applied Field Research Initiative), Office of Science (Mercury Science Focus Areas [SFA] project), and the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) Compliance Department.

  17. Mercury Remediation Technology Development for Lower East Fork Poplar Creek - FY 2016 Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickson, Johnbull O. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Smith, John G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). BioEnergy Science Center (BESC); Mehlhorn, Tonia L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). BioEnergy Science Center (BESC); Peterson, Mark J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). BioEnergy Science Center (BESC); Lowe, Kenneth Alan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). BioEnergy Science Center (BESC); Watson, David B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). BioEnergy Science Center (BESC); Brooks, Scott C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). BioEnergy Science Center (BESC); Morris, Jesse G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). BioEnergy Science Center (BESC); Mayes, Melanie [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). BioEnergy Science Center (BESC); Johs, Alexander [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). BioEnergy Science Center (BESC); Mathews, Teresa J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). BioEnergy Science Center (BESC); McManamay, Ryan A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). BioEnergy Science Center (BESC); DeRolph, Christopher R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). BioEnergy Science Center (BESC); Poteat, Monica D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). BioEnergy Science Center (BESC); Olsen, Todd A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). BioEnergy Science Center (BESC); Eller, Virginia A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). BioEnergy Science Center (BESC); Gonez Rodriguez, Leroy [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). BioEnergy Science Center (BESC)

    2017-07-01

    Mercury remediation is a high priority for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management (OREM), especially at and near the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) where historical mercury use has resulted in contaminated buildings, soils, and downstream surface waters. To address mercury contamination of East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC), the DOE has adopted a phased, adaptive management approach to remediation, which includes mercury treatment actions at Y-12 in the short-term and research and technology development (TD) to evaluate longer-term solutions in the downstream environment (US Department of Energy 2014).

  18. Best management practices plan for the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Operable Unit, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    This plan was prepared in support of the Phase II Remedial Design Report (DOE/OR/01-1449&D1) and in accordance with requirements under CERCLA to present the plan for best management practices to be followed during the remediation. This document provides the Environmental Restoration Program with information about spill prevention and control, water quality monitoring, good housekeeping practices, sediment and erosion control measures, and inspections and environmental compliance practices to be used during Phase II of the remediation project for the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Operable Unit.

  19. Quantitative trait loci influencing forking defects in an outbred pedigree of loblolly pine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Jin S; McKeand, Steven E; Isik, Fikret; Wegrzyn, Jill; Neale, David B; Zeng, Zhao-Bang; da Costa E Silva, Luciano; Whetten, Ross W

    2016-10-18

    The use of wood as an industrial raw material has led to development of plantation forestry, in which trees are planted, managed, and harvested as crops. The productivity of such plantations often exceeds that of less-intensively-managed forests, and land managers have the option of choosing specific planting stock to produce specific types of wood for industrial use. Stem forking, or division of the stem into two or more stems of roughly equal size, is a character trait important in determining the quality of the stem for production of solid wood products. This trait typically has very low individual-tree heritability, but can be more accurately assessed in clonally-replicated plantings where each genotype is represented by several individual trees. We report results from a quantitative trait mapping experiment in a clonally-replicated full-sibling family of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.). Quantitative trait loci influencing forking defects were identified in an outbred full-sibling family of loblolly pine, using single-nucleotide polymorphism markers. Genetic markers in this family segregated either in 1:2:1 (F2 intercross-like segregation) or 1:1 ratio (backcross-like segregation). An integrated linkage map combining markers with different segregation ratios was assembled for this full-sib family, and a total of 409 SNP markers were mapped on 12 linkage groups, covering 1622 cM. Two and three trait loci were identified for forking and ramicorn branch traits, respectively, using the interval mapping method. Three trait loci were detected for both traits using multiple-trait analysis. The detection of three loci for forking and ramicorn branching in a multiple-trait analysis could mean that there are genes with pleiotropic effects on both traits, or that separate genes affecting different traits are clustered together. The detection of genetic loci associated with variation in stem quality traits in this study supports the hypothesis that marker

  20. Oxbow Conservation Area; Middle Fork John Day River, Annual Report 2001-2002.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, Shaun; Smith, Brent; Cochran, Brian

    2003-04-01

    In early 2001, the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, through their John Day Basin Office, concluded the acquisition of the Middle Fork Oxbow Ranch. Under a memorandum of agreement with the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the Tribes are required to provided BPA an 'annual written report generally describing the real property interests in the Project, HEP analyses undertaken or in progress, and management activities undertaken or in progress'. This report is to be provided to the BPA by 30 April of each year. This is the first annual report filed for the Oxbow Ranch property.

  1. Environmental Assessment: Replace Sanitary Sewer from Building 801 to Lagoons at Grand Forks AFB, North Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    occasional moose and bear. Amphibian State Species of Concern include the Northern Leopard Frog. Mammal State Species of Concern include the bobcat...1808 15th Ave NE, Grand ’J:or11s, NO 58201 IN TESTIMONY WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my. hand and seal this ~ day of July, 2010 Oan.l:llll/ss...Program 319 CES/CEV A 525 Tuskegee Airmen Blvd. Grand Forks AFB, ND 58205-6434 ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SECTION Gold Seal Center, 918 E. Divide Ave

  2. Engineering of micron-sized electron trap in a superconducting tuning-fork resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ge; Czaplewski, David; Ocola, Leonidas; Schuster, David

    2014-05-01

    Electrons on helium is a unique two-dimensional electron gas system formed at the interface of a quantum liquid (superfluid helium) and vacuum. The motional and spin states of single-electron quantum dots defined on such systems have been proposed for hybrid quantum computing. Here, We will present experiments in which an ensemble of electrons are trapped above a tuning fork superconducting resonator and describe their coupling with both the differential and common mode. Next, we will discuss the design of superconducting resonators with a micron-sized trapping area and a reduced number of trapped electrons, and the experimental progress towards a single trapped electron regime.

  3. SIR2016-5029_cfwgoshor_3: Flood Inundation Depth for a Flow of 21,450 cfs at the Gage Coast Fork Willamette River at Goshen, Oregon

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The domain of the model is as follows: Row River from Dorena dam to the confluence with the Coast Fork; Coast Fork from Cottage Grove dam to the confluence with the...

  4. SIR2016-5029_cfwgoshor_2: Flood Inundation Depth for a Flow of 15,000 cfs at the Gage Coast Fork Willamette River at Goshen, Oregon

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The domain of the model is as follows: Row River from Dorena dam to the confluence with the Coast Fork; Coast Fork from Cottage Grove dam to the confluence with the...

  5. SIR2016-5029_cfwgoshor_4: Flood Inundation Depth for a Flow of 27,900 cfs at the Gage Coast Fork Willamette River at Goshen, Oregon

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The domain of the model is as follows: Row River from Dorena dam to the confluence with the Coast Fork; Coast Fork from Cottage Grove dam to the confluence with the...

  6. SIR2016-5029_cfwgoshor_1: Flood Inundation Depth for a Flow of 12,000 cfs at the Gage Coast Fork Willamette River at Goshen, Oregon

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The domain of the model is as follows: Row River from Dorena dam to the confluence with the Coast Fork; Coast Fork from Cottage Grove dam to the confluence with the...

  7. SIR2016-5029_cfwgoshor_8: Flood Inundation Depth for a Flow of 62,300 cfs at the Gage Coast Fork Willamette River at Goshen, Oregon

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The domain of the model is as follows: Row River from Dorena dam to the confluence with the Coast Fork; Coast Fork from Cottage Grove dam to the confluence with the...

  8. Qualitative Assessment: Evaluating the Impacts of Climate Change on Endangered Species Act Recovery Actions for the South Fork Nooksack River, WA

    Science.gov (United States)

    The South Fork Nooksack River (South Fork) is located in northwest Washington State and is home to nine species of Pacific salmon, including Nooksack early Chinook (aka, spring Chinook salmon), an iconic species for the Nooksack Indian Tribe. The quantity of salmon in the South F...

  9. SIR2016-5029_cfwgoshor_6: Flood Inundation Depth for a Flow of 39,900 at the Gage Coast Fork Willamette River at Goshen, Oregon

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The domain of the model is as follows: Row River from Dorena dam to the confluence with the Coast Fork; Coast Fork from Cottage Grove dam to the confluence with the...

  10. SIR2016-5029_cfwgoshor_7: Flood Inundation Depth for a Flow of 46,800 cfs at the Gage Coast Fork Willamette River at Goshen, Oregon

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The domain of the model is as follows: Row River from Dorena dam to the confluence with the Coast Fork; Coast Fork from Cottage Grove dam to the confluence with the...

  11. SIR2016-5029_cfwgoshor_5: Flood Inundation Depth for a Flow of 33,900 cfs at the Gage Coast Fork Willamette River at Goshen, Oregon

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The domain of the model is as follows: Row River from Dorena dam to the confluence with the Coast Fork; Coast Fork from Cottage Grove dam to the confluence with the...

  12. Rad53-Mediated Regulation of Rrm3 and Pif1 DNA Helicases Contributes to Prevention of Aberrant Fork Transitions under Replication Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Emma Rossi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Replication stress activates the Mec1ATR and Rad53 kinases. Rad53 phosphorylates nuclear pores to counteract gene gating, thus preventing aberrant transitions at forks approaching transcribed genes. Here, we show that Rrm3 and Pif1, DNA helicases assisting fork progression across pausing sites, are detrimental in rad53 mutants experiencing replication stress. Rrm3 and Pif1 ablations rescue cell lethality, chromosome fragmentation, replisome-fork dissociation, fork reversal, and processing in rad53 cells. Through phosphorylation, Rad53 regulates Rrm3 and Pif1; phospho-mimicking rrm3 mutants ameliorate rad53 phenotypes following replication stress without affecting replication across pausing elements under normal conditions. Hence, the Mec1-Rad53 axis protects fork stability by regulating nuclear pores and DNA helicases. We propose that following replication stress, forks stall in an asymmetric conformation by inhibiting Rrm3 and Pif1, thus impeding lagging strand extension and preventing fork reversal; conversely, under unperturbed conditions, the peculiar conformation of forks encountering pausing sites would depend on active Rrm3 and Pif1.

  13. Effects of particle size and laser-induced heating on the Raman spectra of alpha quartz grains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chio, Chi Hong; Sharma, Shiv K; Lucey, Paul G; Muenow, David W

    2003-07-01

    Raman spectra of alpha-quartz (Qz) grains of various size (250 microm to Raman and micro-Raman systems. Frequency downshift and line broadening of the 464 cm(-1), v,(Si-O-Si) band are observed in the smallest size group (Raman lines is also used to estimate the vibrational temperature of the samples under different excitation power. The degree of laser-induced heating is more noticeable in the aggregates than in the individual grains with the use of medium-level laser excitation (< or = 150 mW). Heating diminishes with increasing grain size, and it can only be detected in grain aggregates between 11 and 20 microm in diameter using 150 mW excitation. Intensity studies of the v(s)(Si-O-Si) band using individual grains show no noticeable signs of grain size effects. However, grain size effects become an important factor in the study of aggregates in which spectral intensity diminishes with respect to decreasing grain size.

  14. Ultra-sensitive carbon monoxide detection by using EC-QCL based quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, L.; Lewicki, R.; Liu, K.; Buerki, P. R.; Weida, M. J.; Tittel, F. K.

    2012-05-01

    A quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) based sensor for carbon monoxide detection at ppbv levels was developed with a 4.65 μm external-cavity quantum cascade laser operating both in continuous wave (cw) and pulsed modes. A 23-fold enhancement of the measured CO signal amplitude was obtained when water vapor, acting as a catalyst for vibrational energy transfer, was added to the targeted analyte mixture. In the cw mode, a noise-equivalent sensitivity (NES, 1 σ) of 2 ppbv was achieved at a gas pressure of 100 Torr, for 1-s lock-in amplifier (LIA) time constant (TC), which corresponds to a normalized noise equivalent absorption coefficient (NNEA) of 1.48× 10^{-8} cm^{-1} W/√{Hz}. In the pulsed mode, the determined NES and NNEA were 46 ppbv and 1.07× 10^{-8} cm^{-1} W/√{Hz}, respectively, for a 3-ms LIA TC at atmospheric pressure with a laser scan rate of 18 cm-1/s and a 50 % duty cycle. An intercomparison between cw and pulsed QEPAS-based CO detection is also reported.

  15. Experimental and modelling study of pulsed optically stimulated luminescence in quartz, marble and beta irradiated salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagonis, V; Mian, S M; Barnold, C [Physics Department, McDaniel College, Westminster, MD 21158 (United States); Chithambo, M L [Department of Physics, Rhodes University, PO Box 94, Grahamstown 6140 (South Africa); Christensen, E, E-mail: vpagonis@mcdaniel.ed [Physics Department, Virginia Tech, VA 24061 (United States)

    2009-03-07

    Optical stimulation luminescence (OSL) signals can be obtained using continuous-wave optical stimulation (CW-OSL), the linear modulation optical stimulation method (LM-OSL) and the time-resolved optical stimulation (TR-OSL) method. During TR-OSL measurements, the stimulation and emission of luminescence are experimentally separated in time by using short light pulses. This paper presents new TR-OSL data for annealed high purity synthetic quartz, for marble and for commercially available iodized salt. A new type of behaviour for TR-OSL signals for quartz and iodized salt is presented, in which the OSL signal exhibits a nonmonotonic behaviour during optical stimulation; this type of behaviour has not been reported previously in the literature for quartz. Furthermore, a luminescence component with very long luminescence lifetime is reported for some quartz aliquots, which may be due to the presence of a delayed-OSL (DOSL) mechanism in quartz. A new kinetic model for TR-OSL in quartz is presented, which is based on a main electron trap and on several luminescence centres. The model is used to quantitatively fit several sets of experimental data of pulsed optically stimulated luminescence from quartz.

  16. Mechano-Chemical Preparation of Powder QUARTZ/TiO2 Composite Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Gao-Xiang; He, Hao; Liao, Li-Bing; Wang, Li-Juan

    2013-03-01

    Titanium dioxide pigment is a white pigment of high performance. However, its production could cause severe environmental and resource problems. In this paper, powder quartz/TiO2 composite particles (PQ/TCP), a type of core (powder quartz)-shell(TiO2) composite powder, were prepared by a mechano-chemical method. The pigment properties of PQ/TCP and the mechanism of the mechano-chemical reaction between quartz and TiO2 were investigated. Orthogonal analyses of experimental vairables showed optimal pigment characteristics of PQ/TCP under the following conditions: 4 h of activation for powder quartz, mixing/grinding at 1000 rpm for 1 h, with a mixing slurry made of 50% powder quartz and 0.4% dispersant. Powder quartz was evenly coated by TiO2 and the Si-O-Ti bond was formed between powder quartz and TiO2 in PQ/TCP as revealed by FTIR analyses and confirmed by surface thermodynamic calculation.

  17. Quartz in ash, and air in a high lung cancer incidence area in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downward, George S; Hu, Wei; Rothman, Nat; Reiss, Boris; Tromp, Peter; Wu, Guoping; Wei, Fusheng; Xu, Jun; Seow, Wei Jie; Chapman, Robert S; Lan, Qing; Vermeulen, Roel

    2017-02-01

    Exposure to crystalline silica (quartz) has been implicated as a potential cause of the high lung cancer rates in the neighbouring counties of Xuanwei and Fuyuan, China, where the domestic combustion of locally sourced "smoky" coal (a bituminous coal) is responsible for some of the highest lung cancer rates in the nation, irrespective of gender or smoking status. Previous studies have shown that smoky coal contains approximately twice as much quartz when compared to alternative fuels in the area, although it is unclear how the quartz in coal relates to household air pollution. Samples of ash and fine particulate matter (PM 2.5 ) were collected from 163 households and analysed for quartz content by Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). Additionally, air samples from 12 further households, were analysed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to evaluate particle structure and silica content. The majority (89%) of household air samples had undetectable quartz levels (quartz in smoky coal went on to form part of the ash. These findings indicate that the quartz within smoky coal does not become adequately airborne during the combustion process to cause significant lung cancer risk, instead going on to form part of the ash. The identification of fibre-like particles in air samples is an interesting finding, although the clinical relevance of this finding remains unclear. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Microscopy and Cathodoluminescence Spectroscopy Characterization of Quartz Exhibiting Different Alkali-Silica Reaction Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchařová, Aneta; Götze, Jens; Šachlová, Šárka; Pertold, Zdeněk; Přikryl, Richard

    2016-02-01

    Different quartz types from several localities in the Czech Republic and Sweden were examined by polarizing microscopy combined with cathodoluminescence (CL) microscopy, spectroscopy, and petrographic image analysis, and tested by use of an accelerated mortar bar test (following ASTM C1260). The highest alkali-silica reaction potential was indicated by very fine-grained chert, containing significant amounts of fine-grained to cryptocrystalline matrix. The chert exhibited a dark red CL emission band at ~640 nm with a low intensity. Fine-grained orthoquartzites, as well as fine-grained metamorphic vein quartz, separated from phyllite exhibited medium expansion values. The orthoquartzites showed various CL of quartz grains, from blue through violet, red, and brown. Two CL spectral bands at ~450 and ~630 nm, with various intensities, were detected. The quartz from phyllite displayed an inhomogeneous dark red CL with two CL spectral bands of low intensities at ~460 and ~640 nm. The massive coarse-grained pegmatite quartz from pegmatite was assessed to be nonreactive and displayed a typical short-lived blue CL (~480 nm). The higher reactivity of the fine-grained hydrothermal quartz may be connected with high concentrations of defect centers, and probably with amorphized micro-regions in the quartz, respectively; indicated by a yellow CL emission (~570 nm).

  19. Additive surface complexation modeling of uranium(VI) adsorption onto quartz-sand dominated sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Wenming; Wan, Jiamin

    2014-06-17

    Many aquifers contaminated by U(VI)-containing acidic plumes are composed predominantly of quartz-sand sediments. The F-Area of the Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina (USA) is an example. To predict U(VI) mobility and natural attenuation, we conducted U(VI) adsorption experiments using the F-Area plume sediments and reference quartz, goethite, and kaolinite. The sediments are composed of ∼96% quartz-sand and 3-4% fine fractions of kaolinite and goethite. We developed a new humic acid adsorption method for determining the relative surface area abundances of goethite and kaolinite in the fine fractions. This method is expected to be applicable to many other binary mineral pairs, and allows successful application of the component additivity (CA) approach based surface complexation modeling (SCM) at the SRS F-Area and other similar aquifers. Our experimental results indicate that quartz has stronger U(VI) adsorption ability per unit surface area than goethite and kaolinite at pH ≤ 4.0. Our modeling results indicate that the binary (goethite/kaolinite) CA-SCM under-predicts U(VI) adsorption to the quartz-sand dominated sediments at pH ≤ 4.0. The new ternary (quartz/goethite/kaolinite) CA-SCM provides excellent predictions. The contributions of quartz-sand, kaolinite, and goethite to U(VI) adsorption and the potential influences of dissolved Al, Si, and Fe are also discussed.

  20. Respirable quartz exposure on two medium-sized farms in southern Mozambique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franque Mirembo, José C; Swanepoel, Andrew J; Rees, David

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the potential for overexposure to respirable quartz in farming, in most parts of the world. To measure respirable dust and quartz exposure of tractor operators on two medium-sized dry climate farms. This is a descriptive cross-sectional study of dust exposure of four tractor operators. Farms were selected by convenience sampling. The MDHS 14/3 and FTIR MDHS 101 HSE methods were used to measure dust and to analyze the mass of quartz in dust, respectively. Seventy respirable dust measurements were done. Respirable dust and quartz ranged from 0·01 to 2·88 and 0·001 to 0·30 mg/m(3), respectively. All operators had at least one respirable quartz exposure above 0·1 mg/m(3). Only 17% of respirable quartz concentrations were lower than the ACGIH TLV of 0·025 mg/m(3). The potential for overexposure to respirable quartz was demonstrated. There was a great deal of exposure variability on these farms which has implications for sampling strategies for dust in farming.