WorldWideScience

Sample records for viable listeria monocytogenes

  1. Colpoda secrete viable Listeria monocytogenes within faecal pellets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghu Nadhanan, Rethish; Thomas, Connor J

    2014-02-01

    Transmission electron microscopy was used to demonstrate that co-cultures of the ciliate Colpoda RR (an environmental isolate) and Colpoda MLS-5 (a food processing environment isolate) with the pathogenic Listeria monocytogenes DRDC8 resulted in secretion of faecal pellets containing intact DRDC8 cells. A green fluorescent protein expressing variant of DRDC8 was used in co-cultures to confirm that the pellet-associated bacterial cells were L. monocytogenes. Viability was confirmed by plate counts, and assay of microbial respiratory activity-proved DRDC8 cells present within faecal pellets was metabolically active. Following treatment of faecal pellets secreted by Colpoda RR and MLS-5 with gentamycin and sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), no loss of viability of the pellet-located DRDC8 cells was observed, indicating that faecal pellet encapsulated DRDC8 cells are resistant to biocidal agents. This work suggests that Colpoda-derived faecal pellets may provide a mechanism for transmission of L. monocytogenes and other pathogenic bacteria. Furthermore, bacteria encapsulated by faecal pellets may be resistant to disinfectants and cleaning agents used in food manufacturing and preparation facilities. © 2013 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Eradication of high viable loads of Listeria monocytogenes contaminating food-contact surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia ede Candia

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This study demonstrates the efficacy of cold gaseous ozone treatments at low concentrations in the eradication of high Listeria monocytogenes viable cell loads from glass, polypropylene, stainless steel and expanded polystyrene food-contact surfaces. Using a step by step approach, involving the selection of the most resistant strain-surface combinations, 11 Listeria spp. strains resulted inactivated by a continuous ozone flow at 1.07 mg m-3 after 24 or 48 h of cold incubation, depending on both strain and surface evaluated. Increasing the inoculum level to 9 log CFU coupon-1, the best inactivation rate was obtained after 48h of treatment at 3.21 mg m-3 ozone concentration when cells were deposited onto stainless steel and expanded polystyrene coupons, resulted the most resistant food-contact surfaces in the previous assays.The addition of naturally microbiologically contaminated meat extract to a high load of L. monocytogenes LMG 23775 cells, the most resistant strain out of the 11 assayed Listeria spp. strains, led to its complete inactivation after four days of treatment.To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report describing the survival of L. monocytogenes and the effect of ozone treatment under cold storage conditions on expanded polystyrene, a commonly-used material in food packaging. These results could be useful for reducing pathogen cross-contamination phenomena during cold food storage.

  3. Fate of viable but non-culturable Listeria monocytogenes in pig manure microcosms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy eDesneux

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The fate of two strains of L. monocytogenes and their ability to become viable but non-culturable (VBNC was investigated in microcosms containing piggery effluents (two raw manures and two biologically treated manures stored for two months at 8°C and 20°C. Levels of L. monocytogenes were estimated using the culture method, qPCR, and propidium monoazide treatment combined with qPCR (qPCRPMA. The chemical composition and the microbial community structure of the manures were also analysed. The strains showed similar decline rates and persisted up to 63 days. At day zero, the percentage of VBNC cells among viable cells was higher in raw manures (81.5-94.8% than in treated manures (67.8-79.2%. The changes in their proportion over time depended on the temperature and on the type of effluent: the biggest increase was observed in treated manures at 20°C and the smallest increase in raw manures at 8°C. The chemical parameters had no influence on the behaviour of the strains, but decrease of the persistence of viable cells was associated with an increase in the microbial richness of the manures. This study demonstrated that storing manure altered the culturability of L. monocytogenes, which rapidly entered the VBNC state, and underlines the importance of including VBNC cells when estimating the persistence of the pathogens in farm effluents.

  4. Listeria monocytogenes: diagnostic problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beumer, R.R.; Hazeleger, W.C.

    2003-01-01

    The first isolation methods for the detection of Listeria spp. were generally based on the direct culture of samples on simple agar media, but isolation of the pathogenic Listeria monocytogenes was difficult. In time, new techniques were developed, based on a variety of selective and elective agents

  5. [Listeria monocytogenes infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquier, Léna; Chuard, Christian

    2017-10-11

    Listeria monocytogenes infections are caused by food ingestion. They are not only transmitted by animal products, but also by secondarily contaminated fruits and vegetables. They preferentially affect pregnant women, patients of extreme ages and the immu-nocompromised, and manifest as a gastroenteritis, bacteremia, meningo-encephalitis or maternal-fetal infection. Diagnosis is achieved by culture of usually sterile sites. The preferred treatment is amoxicillin with or without gentamicin. For patients at risk, prevention is based on avoiding at-risk food or cooking it when possible.

  6. Listeria monocytogenes Monographic Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emil Tirziu

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes is a ubiquitous bacteria with a remarkable resistance in discordant condition which produce listeriosis, an infectious disease that affects multiple domestic and wild animals’ species, but also humans. Receptive to listeriosis are the majority of domestic or wild mammals and birds, in the last years being registered an increase of receptivity in humans. The concept of listeriosis in human pathology, a disease caused by eating or drinking contaminated food and water, appeared for the first time in 1981, during an outbreak in Canada with seven cases in adults and 34 cases of maternalfetal listeriosis. The alimentary origin of human listeriosis can be easily explained if considered some general characteristics of the bacteria. Thus, resistance in various conditions, especially at lower temperatures, justifies its dissemination and food contamination, particularly when is conserved by refrigeration. Also, L. monocytogenes has a significant presence in alimentary products. Some studies showed that 4% of the milk products, 29% of the meat products, 5% of the vegetable products and 26% of the products obtained from fishes and shell fishes are positive for L. monocytogenes, which allows us to say that battle against these bacteria is a war against microbial contamination.

  7. First Trimester Listeria monocytogenes Septicemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goddijn, M.; Schipper, H. G.; Spanjaard, L.; Wolf, H.

    1997-01-01

    Background: Little is known about fetal outcome after Listeria monocytogenes septicemia in the first trimester of pregnancy.Case: A primigravida with L. monocytogenes septicemia at 9 weeks gestation was treated with amoxicillin. At 40 weeks gestation a healthy female infant was born.Conclusion: This

  8. [Listeria monocytogenes in human infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kołakowska, Agnieszka; Madajczak, Grzegorz

    2011-01-01

    The Listeria genus is distinguished into six species from which just one--Listeria monocytogenes is pathogenic for humans. The main route of acquisition of Listeria is through the ingestion of contaminated food products. An important element of the L. monocytogenes pathogenesis infection is affiliation with high-risk group of immunocompromised patients, infants or pregnant women, who infected by this microorganism can lead to miscarriage. Listeriosis can appear in the form of sepsis, infection of the nervous system or local abscesses. Another form of listeriosis is gastrointestinal tract infection--noticed in case of food poisoning outbreak.

  9. Inhibitory effects of raw carrots on Listeria monocytogenes.

    OpenAIRE

    Beuchat, L R; Brackett, R E

    1990-01-01

    The survival and growth of two strains of Listeria monocytogenes on raw and cooked carrots stored at 5 and 15 degrees C and in carrot juice media at 30 degrees C were investigated. The influence of shredding, chlorine treatment, and packaging under an atmosphere containing 3% O2 and 97% N2 on the behavior of L. monocytogenes and naturally occurring microflora was determined. Populations of viable L. monocytogenes decreased upon contact with whole and shredded raw carrots but not cooked carrot...

  10. Listeria monocytogenes & Listeriozis

    OpenAIRE

    Koçan,  Deniz; Halkman  , A. Kadir

    2014-01-01

    L. monocytogenes is an important human food-borne pathogen that is widely distributed throughout the environment and that can be isolated from many food products. In human listeriosis there is high rate of mortality and disease is largely confined to pregnant women, neonates and patients with underlying immunosupresion.

  11. Listeria monocytogenes & Listeriozis

    OpenAIRE

    Koçan,  Deniz; Halkman  , A. Kadir

    2006-01-01

    L. monocytogenes is an important human food-borne pathogen that is widely distributed throughout the environment and that can be isolated from many food products. In human listeriosis there is high rate of mortality and disease is largely confined to pregnant women, neonates and patients with underlying immunosupresion.

  12. Fødevarebetinget listeria monocytogenes endokarditis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydland, Martin; Bundgaard, Henning; Moser, Claus

    2014-01-01

    Infection with Listeria monocytogenes is rare and mainly seen in immunosuppressed patients. Infection with L. monocytogenes has a mortality rate of 30%. We present a case report of L. monocytogenes bacteraemia and endocarditis in a 70-year-old man with several co-morbidities and following four...

  13. Carrier status for Listeria monocytogenes and other Listeria species ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Listeria organisms are documented to be zoonotic; one of the sources of infection is the domestic fowl where it could occur as in apparent infection. The carriage of Listeria monocytogenes and other Listeria in indigenous birds has not been documented in Kenya. Objective: To establish whether healthy looking ...

  14. Listeria monocytogenes endophthalmitis following keratoconjunctivitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoughy SS

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Samir S Shoughy,1 Khalid F Tabbara1–31The Eye Center and The Eye Foundation for Research in Ophthalmology, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 2Department of Ophthalmology, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 3The Wilmer Ophthalmological Institute of The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USAAbstract: Endophthalmitis due to endogenous or exogenous bacteria is a rare infection of the eye. We report a case of endophthalmitis following Listeria monocytogenes keratoconjunctivitis in a 27-year-old healthy white male presenting with hand motion visual acuity, right eye mucopurulent conjunctivitis, elevated intraocular pressure, and pigmented hypopyon 6 months post-keratectomy. The conjunctivitis was unresponsive to a 5-day course of topical tobramycin eye drops, and the patient developed keratitis with pain that progressed to endophthalmitis after 21 days. Diagnostic B-scan revealed vitreous exudates. Intraocular fluid specimen showed Gram-positive organisms and the aqueous culture grew penicillin-/aminoglycoside-sensitive L. monocytogenes. The patient was given intravitreal and systemic vancomycin and ceftazidime. The eye was unresponsive to intravenous penicillin and gentamicin; the anterior chamber progressively flattened and developed phthisis bulbi. L. monocytogenes keratoconjunctivitis may lead to bacterial endophthalmitis. Prompt culture and early antibiotic therapy are recommended.Keywords: conjunctivitis, L. monocytogenes, endophthalmitis

  15. Listeria monocytogenes en comidas preparadas

    OpenAIRE

    Vila Brugalla, Montserrat

    2013-01-01

    Tradicionalmente Listeria monocytogenes no era considerado como un importante patógeno transmitido a través de los alimentos y, en consecuencia, no había recibido mucha atención por parte de la industria alimentaria. Los índices de listeriosis en la población humana siempre habían estado enormemente ensombrecidos por otras enfermedades transmitidas por los alimentos como la salmonelosis o la campilobacterosis, y la confirmación de brotes era poco frecuente. Sin embargo, los brotes de listerio...

  16. Phylogenomic grouping of Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doijad, Swapnil; Weigel, Markus; Barbuddhe, Sukhadeo; Blom, Jochen; Goesmann, Alexander; Hain, Torsten; Chakraborty, Trinad

    2015-09-01

    The precise delineation of lineages and clonal groups are a prerequisite to examine within-species genetic variations, particularly with respect to pathogenic potential. A whole-genome-based approach was used to subtype and subgroup isolates of Listeria monocytogenes. Core-genome typing was performed, employing 3 different approaches: total core genes (CG), high-scoring segment pairs (HSPs), and average nucleotide identity (ANI). Examination of 113 L. monocytogenes genomes available in-house and in public domains revealed 33 phylogenomic groups (PGs). Each PG could be differentiated into a number of genomic types (GTs), depending on the approach used: HSPs (n = 57 GTs), CG (n = 71 GTs), and ANI (n = 83 GTs). Demarcation of the PGs was concordant with the 4 known lineages and led to the identification of sublineages in the lineage groups I, II, and III. In addition, PG assignments had discriminatory power similar to multi-virulence-locus sequence typing types and clonal complexes of multilocus sequence typing. Clustering of genomically highly similar isolates from different countries, sources, and isolation dates using whole-genome-based PG suggested that dispersion of phylogenomic clones of L. monocytogenes preceded their subsequent evolution. Classification according to PG may act as a guideline for future epidemiological studies.

  17. Response of Listeria monocytogenes to disinfection stress at the single-cell and population levels as monitored by intracellular pH measurements and viable-cell counts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastbjerg, Vicky Gaedt; Nielsen, Dennis S.; Arneborg, Nils

    2009-01-01

    .05). The protective effect of NaCl was reflected by viable-cell counts at a higher concentration of Incimaxx (0.0031%), where the salt-grown population survived better than the population grown without NaCl (P ... that a population of L. monocytogenes cells, whether planktonic or attached, is homogenous with respect to sensitivity to an acidic disinfectant studied on the single-cell level. Hence a major subpopulation more tolerant to disinfectants, and hence more persistent, does not appear to be present....

  18. Listeria monocytogenes and other Listeria species in retail meat and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Listeria monocytogenes and other Listeria species in retail meat and milk products in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Bayleyegn Molla, Roman Yilma, Daniel Alemayehu. Abstract. No Abstract Available Ethiop.J.Health Dev. Vol.18(3) 2004: 208-212. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL ...

  19. Prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes in poultry meat

    OpenAIRE

    ELMALI,Mehmet; Hayriye Yeşim CAN; Yaman, Hilmi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The objectives of this study were i) to isolate Listeria spp. and Listeria monocytogenes in broiler wing meat samples, ii) to confirm the isolates by PCR, based on prs and hly A gene sequences, iii) to determine the seasonal and monthly distribution of the isolates. A total of 120 broiler wing meat samples (60 packaged pieces wrapped using strech film in styrofoam plates and 60 unpackaged pieces) bought from different markets in Hatay province were analysed. Listeria spp. was isolate...

  20. 78 FR 27939 - Draft Interagency Risk Assessment-Listeria monocytogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-13

    ... Draft Interagency Risk Assessment--Listeria monocytogenes in Retail Delicatessens: Notice of... Assessment--Listeria monocytogenes in Retail Delicatessens.'' This draft quantitative risk assessment (QRA... conditions, such as Listeria (L.) monocytogenes contamination of certain ready-to-eat (RTE) foods, for...

  1. Prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes in poultry meat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet ELMALI

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe objectives of this study were i to isolate Listeria spp. and Listeria monocytogenes in broiler wing meat samples, ii to confirm the isolates by PCR, based on prs and hly A gene sequences, iii to determine the seasonal and monthly distribution of the isolates. A total of 120 broiler wing meat samples (60 packaged pieces wrapped using strech film in styrofoam plates and 60 unpackaged pieces bought from different markets in Hatay province were analysed. Listeria spp. was isolated from 57 (47.5% out of 120 samples. Fifty-four, out of 57 Listeria spp. isolates were identified as L. monocytogenes. L. monocytogenes was isolated from the samples collected during the spring, winter, summer, and autumn at the levels of 26.6%, 40%, 53.3%, 60%, respectively. In this study, the isolation rates were found to be the highest in autumn, while the isolation rates were found to be the lowest in spring. As a consequence, high prevalence of Listeria spp. and L. monocytogenes in poultry wing meat samples may pose a risk for human health. We consider that with obeying the rules of good hygiene practices (GHP, good manufacturing practices (GMP and HACCP can minimize the contamination with Listeria spp.

  2. Prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes in Idiazabal cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrese, E; Arroyo-Izaga, M

    2012-01-01

    Raw-milk cheese has been identified in risk assessment as a food of greater concern to public health due to listeriosis. To determine the prevalence and levels of Listeria monocytogenes in semi-hard Idiazabal cheese manufactured by different producers in the Basque Country at consumer level. A total of 51 Idiazabal cheese samples were obtained from 10 separate retail establishments, chosen by stratified random sampling. Samples were tested using the official standard ISO procedure 11290-1 for detection and enumeration methods. All cheese samples tested negative for L. monocytogenes. However, 9.8% tested positive for Listeria spp., different from L. monocytogenes. Positive samples came from two brands, two were natural and three were smoked. The presence of Listeria spss. suggests that the cheese making process and the hygiene whether at milking or during cheese making could be insufficient.

  3. Occurrence of Listeria monocytogenes in salami

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borges Maria de Fatima

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Eighty-one samples of four different types of salami (Friolan, Hamburguese, Italian and Milanese, belonging to five brands, and purchased at Rio de Janeiro market, were evaluated for the occurrence of Listeria monocytogenes. The pathogen was detected in 13.3% of Italian type samples of salami, while L. innocua occurred in 6.5% of the Italian type and in 16.6% of the Milanese type. The remaining samples were negative for Listeria spp.

  4. Effect of Listeria seeligeri or Listeria welshimeri on Listeria monocytogenes detection in and recovery from buffered Listeria enrichment broth☆

    OpenAIRE

    DAILEY, RACHEL C.; Welch, Lacinda J.; Hitchins, Anthony D.; Smiley, R. Derike

    2014-01-01

    The presence of multiple species of Listeria in regulated food products is not uncommon and can complicate the recovery of Listeria monocytogenes particularly on a non-differentiating medium. The potential complications of Listeria seeligeri and Listeria welshimeri on the recovery of L. monocytogenes from inoculated food test samples using the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) selective enrichment procedure was investigated. Post-enrichment enumeration, in the absence of food product,...

  5. A Dual Filtration-Based Multiplex PCR Method for Simultaneous Detection of Viable Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, and Staphylococcus aureus on Fresh-Cut Cantaloupe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke Feng

    Full Text Available Fresh-cut cantaloupe is particularly susceptible to contamination with pathogenic bacteria, such as Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, and Staphylococcus aureus. Therefore, development of rapid, yet accurate detection techniques is necessary to ensure food safety. In this study, a multiplex PCR system and propidium monoazide (PMA concentration were optimized to detect all viable pathogens in a single tube. A dual filtration system utilized a filtration membrane with different pore sizes to enrich pathogens found on fresh-cut cantaloupe. The results revealed that an optimized multiplex PCR system has the ability to effectively detect three pathogens in the same tube. The viable pathogens were simultaneously detected for PMA concentrations above 10 μg/ml. The combination of a nylon membrane (15 μm and a micro pore filtration membrane (0.22 μm formed the dual filtration system used to enrich pathogens. The achieved sensitivity of PMA-mPCR based on this dual filtration system was 2.6 × 103 cfu/g for L. monocytogenes, 4.3 × 10 cfu/g for E. coli O157:H7, and 3.1 × 102 cfu/g for S. aureus. Fresh-cut cantaloupe was inoculated with the three target pathogens using concentrations of 103, 102, 10, and 1 cfu/g. After 6-h of enrichment culture, assay sensitivity increased to 1 cfu/g for each of these pathogens. Thus, this technique represents an efficient and rapid detection tool for implementation on fresh-cut cantaloupe.

  6. Prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes in European cheeses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez Rios, Veronica; Dalgaard, Paw

    2017-01-01

    Both in Europe and worldwide cheese has caused important outbreaks of listeriosis and can be a vehicle for transmission of Listeria monocytogenes to consumers. A systematic review and meta-analysis were conducted using scientific literature and European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) reports...

  7. Control options for Listeria monocytogenes in seafoods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huss, Hans Henrik; Jørgensen, Lasse Vigel; Vogel, Birte Fonnesbech

    2000-01-01

    At least three outbreaks of listeriosis associated with seafood have been reported. Listeria monocytogenes is widely distributed in the general environment including fresh water, coastal water and live fish from these areas. Contamination or recontamination of seafood may also take place during...

  8. Listeria monocytogenes : nog steeds een probleem?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beumer, R.R.

    2011-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is net als vele andere bacteriële voedselpathogenen al tientallen jaren bekend. De meeste grondstoffen voor voedingsmiddelen komen uit de akker- en tuinbouw, de veehouderij en de visserij. Besmetting vindt daar plaats met micro-organismen afkomstig uit grond, fecaliën, water,

  9. Photodynamic Inactivation of Food Pathogen Listeria monocytogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Buchovec

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to examine the possibility to inactivate food pathogen Listeria monocytogenes by nonthermal antimicrobial treatment – photosensitization. L. monocytogenes was incubated with 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA (7.5 mM for 0–2 h to produce endogenous photosensitizers and then illuminated with visible light. The LED-based light source used for the illumination of L. monocytogenes emitted light at λ=400 nm with energy density of 20 mW/cm2. The illumination time varied from 0 to 20 min, and a total energy dose reached 0–24 J/cm2. The obtained results reveal that L. monocytogenes can effectively produce endogenous porphyrins after incubation with 7.5 mM ALA. Subsequent illumination of cells with visible light significantly decreased their viability in vitro (4 log. After adhesion of Listeria to the surface of packaging material and following photosensitization, the surface-attached bacterial population was inactivated by 3.7 log. In addition, most resistant Listeria biofilms are susceptible to this treatment. Their inactivation reached 3.1 log under certain experimental conditions. The cells and biofilms of Gram-positive bacteria L. monocytogenes ATCL3C 7644 could be effectively inactivated by ALA-based photosensitization in the solution as well as adhered onto the surface of packaging material in a nonthermal way.

  10. 78 FR 23901 - Interagency Risk Assessment-Listeria monocytogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-23

    ... Food Safety and Inspection Service Interagency Risk Assessment--Listeria monocytogenes in Retail... risk assessment (QRA), ``Interagency Risk Assessment--Listeria monocytogenes in Retail Delicatessens... and on the FSIS Web site at http://www.fsis.usda.gov/PDF/Listeria-Transcript_062309.pdf ). II. Purpose...

  11. Listeria monocytogenes transiently alters mitochondrial dynamics during infection

    OpenAIRE

    Stavru, Fabrizia; Bouillaud, Frederic; Sartori, Anna; Ricquier, Daniel; Cossart, Pascale

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondria are essential and highly dynamic organelles, constantly undergoing fusion and fission. We analyzed mitochondrial dynamics during infection with the human bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes and show that this infection profoundly alters mitochondrial dynamics by causing transient mitochondrial network fragmentation. Mitochondrial fragmentation is specific to pathogenic Listeria monocytogenes, and it is not observed with the nonpathogenic Listeria innocua species or several ...

  12. Uncommon manifestations of Listeria monocytogenes infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavada, Ruchir; Keighley, Caitlin; Quadri, Syed; Asghari, Ray; Hofmeyr, Ann; Foo, Hong

    2014-12-03

    Listeria monocytogenes causes gastroenteritis, meningitis and bacteraemia in immunocompromised, pregnant patients, the elderly as well in immunocompetent patients. Focal infections with this organism are uncommon, especially in sporadic (non-outbreak) setting, require high index of suspicion and are challenging to diagnose. We present 3 cases of Listeria monocytogenes presenting as focal infections to our hospitals, all of which are the first reported cases from Australia. Three unrelated cases of unique focal infections caused by Listeria monocytogenes are presented. 1) A 73 year old Caucasian lady on immunosuppression for colorectal cancer presented with prosthetic knee joint septic arthritis, 2) An 83 year old Caucasian man presented with prosthetic vascular graft infection and 3) A 60 year old Asian man with perianal abscess. Except for case 1, the other cases had a prolonged duration of symptoms on presentation. Listeria was not thought to be causative organism in any of these cases until microbiological specimens isolated the organism. Matrix Associated Laser Desorption/Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) assisted in making an earlier diagnosis of the infection in all three cases. All of these patients had Listeria monocytogenes isolated from clinical specimens. They were managed with antibiotics and surgery with favourable outcomes. Public health investigations to determine any dietary association were done, however no intervention was thought to be necessary in any of the cases except provide dietary advice. The first two cases highlight the importance of microbiological sampling in serious infections for definitive antibiotic therapy to be administered. Sporadic focal infections with Listeria occur infrequently and are often not diagnosed till culture results from microbiological specimens become available. Dietary history should be an important aspect of thorough clinical history and food consumption advice is crucial in

  13. Combined action of nisin and carvacrol on Bacillus cereus and Listeria monocytogenes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pol, I.E.; Smid, E.J.

    1999-01-01

    Nisin, a small antimicrobial protein, was tested for its bactericidal action against Listeria monocytogenes and Bacillus cereus and a typical biphasic reduction of the viable count was observed. The reduction was most fast during the first 10 min of exposure, while the viable count remained stable

  14. [Listeria monocytogenes in women of reproductive age].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljicević, Mufida; Beslagić, Edina; Zvizdić, Sukrija; Hamzić, Sadeta; Mahmutović, Sabina

    2005-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes (LM) is gram-positive bacteria linear shaped which grows good also at refrigerator temperature (4 degrees C). The bacteria is resistant on high and low temperatures. This bacteria can be found in the dirt, rotted vegetation, vegetables and fruit, milk and dairy products, and also in the meat and processed meat. This bacteria cause disease called Listeriosis. This bacteria attacks at first people with weak immune system like infants, pregnant women, people with chronic diseases, people with HIV and people who are 60 and over. Pregnant women can transfer Listeria through the placenta, from mother to child and that can cause premature delivery, premature birth, early rupture of placenta or still born. Find out if there is serological respond by female patients in the reproductive age who had spontaneous abortion and female patients in the reproductive age who never had the spontaneous abortion. By agglutination serologic method it had been researched if there is any antibody on Listeria monocytogenes. Two groups were included in testing: experimental and control group with a total of 60 patients. In experimental group there were 18 (60%) positive samples. In control group there were 8 (26.70%) positive samples. The results investigations have shown that there is serological respond to Listeria monocytogenes in the women of reproductive age. The number of positive patients was greater in women who had spontaneous abortion compared to women who never had the spontaneous abortion.

  15. Listeria Monocytogenes: a rare cause of endophthalmitis, a case report

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Katherine M. Gaskell; Gwyn Williams; Kathie Grant; Susan Lightman; Gauri Godbole

    2017-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a known cause of gastroenteritis. Invasive disease can follow bacteremia causing meningoencephalitis, endocarditis and spontaneous miscarriages in immunocompromised patients and pregnant women respectively...

  16. Listeria monocytogenes: antibiotic resistance in food production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lungu, Bwalya; O'Bryan, Corliss A; Muthaiyan, Arunachalam; Milillo, Sara R; Johnson, Michael G; Crandall, Philip G; Ricke, Steven C

    2011-05-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is an opportunistic human pathogen that causes listeriosis, a disease that mainly affects the immunocompromised, the elderly, infants, and pregnant women. Listeriosis has become increasingly common in the last 25 years since the first foodborne outbreak was noted. Treatment for listeriosis currently consists primarily of supportive therapy in conjunction with the use of intravenous antibiotics. Antibiotics have been commercially available for over 60 years for treatment of a myriad of clinical diseases. Bacteria resistant to antibiotics have been developing over this same period. This review seeks to elucidate the extent of antibiotic resistance in L. monocytogenes, the possible transmission mechanisms, and contributing factors to distribution of antibiotic resistance among Listeria species, and possible control strategies.

  17. PCR-based methodologies for detection and characterization of Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria ivanovii in foods and environmental sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Qiang Chen

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes is an important foodborne pathogen responsible for listeriosis, a fatal disease. It is widely distributed in various foods and environmental sources. In this review, we focused on addressing PCR-based technologies, including conventional PCR, qPCR and droplet digital PCR (ddPCR. Specifically, we described (a conventional PCR and mono-, duplex- and multiplex-qPCR methodologies; (b development and applications of gene HlyA-, Iap-, PrfA – and SsrA-based conventional and qPCR assays as well as PCR assays targeting newly identified gene targets for specific detection of L. monocytogenes; differentiation of viable from dead L. monocytogenes by qPCR in conjugation with propidium monoazide pretreatment; PCR-based serotype identification of L. monocytogenes isolates; PCR-based detection of L. ivanovii, infecting ruminants, differentiation of L. monocytogenes from other Listeria species; and sigB-gene based PCR identification of Listeria spp; (c applications of ddPCR in detection of L. monocytogenes; and (d application of qPCR assays in detection and subtyping of L. monocytogenes in milk and dairy products; meats, meat products and meat-processing environment; and seafood, seafood products and processing environment. Our goal was to provide a relatively comprehensive overview of PCR-based methodologies available in detection, characterization and subtyping of various strains of L. monocytogenes in foods and environmental sources.

  18. How does Listeria monocytogenes combat acid conditions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, James L; Liu, Yanhong; Paoli, George C

    2013-03-01

    Listeria monocytogenes, a major foodborne pathogen, possesses a number of mechanisms that enable it to combat the challenges posed by acidic environments, such as that of acidic foods and the gastrointestinal tract. One mechanism employed by L. monocytogenes for survival at low pH is the adaptive acid tolerance response (ATR) in which a short adaptive period at a nonlethal pH induces metabolic changes that allow the organism to survive a lethal pH. Overcoming acid conditions by L. monocytogenes involves a variety of regulatory responses, including the LisRK 2-component regulatory system, the SOS response, components of the σ(B) regulon, changes in membrane fluidity, the F0F1-ATPase proton pump, and at least 2 enzymatic systems that regulate internal hydrogen ion concentration (glutamate decarboxylase and arginine deiminase). It is not clear if these mechanisms exert their protective effects separately or in concert, but it is probable that these mechanisms overlap. Studies using mutants indicate that the glutamate decarboxylase system can protect L. monocytogenes when the organism is present in acidic juices, yogurt, salad dressing, mayonnaise, and modified CO2 atmospheres. The glutamate decarboxylase system also has a role in protecting L. monocytogenes against the acidic environment of the stomach. There is a need to study other acid resistance mechanisms of L. monocytogenes to determine their effectiveness in protecting the organism in acidic foods or during transit through the acid stomach.

  19. LACTIC FLORA-LISTERIA MONOCYTOGENES INTERACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Colombo

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The EC Regulation 2073/2005 (1 requires that food processors evaluate the capability of ready-to-use (RTE products to support the development of Listeria monocytogenes when their pH and aW values are favourable to the growth of this microorganism. It is renown that the lactic flora plays an important role in many different foods, both from a technological and a food safety standpoint. This study was aimed to observe the behaviour and the potential anti-Listeria effect of some natural lactic flora present in Italian liver patè crostini (chicken heart and liver, anchovies, onions, capers, starch, no added preservatives through the Combase Predictor – Max Growth Rate predictive software. The natural lactic flora of the crostini demonstrated a variable capability to inhibit the growth of Listeria monocytogenes which depends upon : the concentration of the lactic flora at the beginning of the shelf life period and the subsequent lag phase, the possible release of anti-Listeria substances, and the maximum growth rate.

  20. ( Camellia sinensis ) on Listeria monocytogenes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    antibacterial activities against L. monocytogenes. The leaf extract produced inhibition zone ranging from 10.0 – 20.1 mm against the test bacteria. The methanol extracts of the test plant produces larger zones of inhibition against the bacteria than the water extract. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) for the methanol ...

  1. Novel Cadmium Resistance Determinant in Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Cameron; Lee, Sangmi; Jayeola, Victor; Kathariou, Sophia

    2017-03-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne pathogen that can cause severe disease (listeriosis) in susceptible individuals. It is ubiquitous in the environment and often exhibits resistance to heavy metals. One of the determinants that enables Listeria to tolerate exposure to cadmium is the cadAC efflux system, with CadA being a P-type ATPase. Three different cadA genes (designated cadA1 to cadA3) were previously characterized in L. monocytogenes A novel putative cadmium resistance gene (cadA4) was recently identified through whole-genome sequencing, but experimental confirmation for its involvement in cadmium resistance is lacking. In this study, we characterized cadA4 in L. monocytogenes strain F8027, a cadmium-resistant strain of serotype 4b. By screening a mariner-based transposon library of this strain, we identified a mutant with reduced tolerance to cadmium and that harbored a single transposon insertion in cadA4 The tolerance to cadmium was restored by genetic complementation with the cadmium resistance cassette (cadA4C), and enhanced cadmium tolerance was conferred to two unrelated cadmium-sensitive strains via heterologous complementation with cadA4C Cadmium exposure induced cadA4 expression, even at noninhibitory levels. Virulence assessments in the Galleria mellonella model suggested that a functional cadA4 suppressed virulence, potentially promoting commensal colonization of the insect larvae. Biofilm assays suggested that cadA4 inactivation reduced biofilm formation. These data not only confirm cadA4 as a novel cadmium resistance determinant in L. monocytogenes but also provide evidence for roles in virulence and biofilm formation.IMPORTANCEListeria monocytogenes is an intracellular foodborne pathogen causing the disease listeriosis, which is responsible for numerous hospitalizations and deaths every year. Among the adaptations that enable the survival of Listeria in the environment are the abilities to persist in biofilms, grow in the cold, and tolerate

  2. application à une population de Listeria monocytogenes CIP 7831 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Etude de l'impact de la variation de la température sur les activités microbiennes : application à une population de Listeria monocytogenes CIP 7831, Listeria monocytogenes Scott A CIP 103575 et Escherichia coli ATCC 25922.

  3. Growth inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes by a nonbacteriocinogenic Carnobacterium piscicola

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Lilian; Bech Hansen, T.; Garrido, P.

    2005-01-01

    Aims: This study elucidates the mechanisms by which a nonbacteriocinogenic Carnobacterium piscicola inhibits growth of Listeria monocytogenes. Methods and Results: Listeria monocytogenes was exposed to live cultures of a bacteriocin-negative variant of C. piscicola A9b in co-culture, in a diffusion...

  4. Effect of Listeria seeligeri or Listeria welshimeri on Listeria monocytogenes detection in and recovery from buffered Listeria enrichment broth☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dailey, Rachel C.; Welch, Lacinda J.; Hitchins, Anthony D.; Smiley, R. Derike

    2016-01-01

    The presence of multiple species of Listeria in regulated food products is not uncommon and can complicate the recovery of Listeria monocytogenes particularly on a non-differentiating medium. The potential complications of Listeria seeligeri and Listeria welshimeri on the recovery of L. monocytogenes from inoculated food test samples using the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) selective enrichment procedure was investigated. Post-enrichment enumeration, in the absence of food product, indicates that some L. seeligeri and L. monocytogenes pairings may have population differentials as great as 2.7 ± 0.1 logs with L. seeligeri being the predominant species. A similar observation was noted for L. welshimeri and L. monocytogenes pairings which resulted in population differentials as large as 3.7 ± 0.2 logs with L. welshimeri being the predominant species. Select strain pairings were used to inoculate guacamole, crab meat, broccoli, and cheese with subsequent recovery by the FDA Bacteriological Analytical Manual (BAM) method with 10 colonies per sample selected for confirmation. The presence of L. seeligeri had little effect on the recovery of L. monocytogenes. The presence of L. welshimeri resulted in the failure to recover L. monocytogenes in three out of the four food matrices. This work extends the observation that non-pathogenic species of Listeria can complicate the recovery of L. monocytogenes and that competition during selective enrichment is not limited to the presence of just Listeria innocua. PMID:25475325

  5. Effect of Listeria seeligeri or Listeria welshimeri on Listeria monocytogenes detection in and recovery from buffered Listeria enrichment broth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dailey, Rachel C; Welch, Lacinda J; Hitchins, Anthony D; Smiley, R Derike

    2015-04-01

    The presence of multiple species of Listeria in regulated food products is not uncommon and can complicate the recovery of Listeria monocytogenes particularly on a non-differentiating medium. The potential complications of Listeria seeligeri and Listeria welshimeri on the recovery of L. monocytogenes from inoculated food test samples using the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) selective enrichment procedure was investigated. Post-enrichment enumeration, in the absence of food product, indicates that some L. seeligeri and L. monocytogenes pairings may have population differentials as great as 2.7 ± 0.1 logs with L. seeligeri being the predominant species. A similar observation was noted for L. welshimeri and L. monocytogenes pairings which resulted in population differentials as large as 3.7 ± 0.2 logs with L. welshimeri being the predominant species. Select strain pairings were used to inoculate guacamole, crab meat, broccoli, and cheese with subsequent recovery by the FDA Bacteriological Analytical Manual (BAM) method with 10 colonies per sample selected for confirmation. The presence of L. seeligeri had little effect on the recovery of L. monocytogenes. The presence of L. welshimeri resulted in the failure to recover L. monocytogenes in three out of the four food matrices. This work extends the observation that non-pathogenic species of Listeria can complicate the recovery of L. monocytogenes and that competition during selective enrichment is not limited to the presence of just Listeria innocua. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. NATURAL ATYPICAL LISTERIA INNOCUA STRAINS WITH LISTERIA MONOCYTOGENES PATHOGENICITY ISLAND 1 GENES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The detection of the human foodborne pathogen, Listeria monocytogenes, in food, environmental samples and clinical specimens associated with cases of listeriosis, a rare but high mortality-rate disease, requires distinguishing the pathogen from other Listeria species. Speciation...

  7. Recombinant phage probes for Listeria monocytogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnazza, S.; Gioffrè, G.; Felici, F.; Guglielmino, S.

    2007-10-01

    Monitoring of food and environmental samples for biological threats, such as Listeria monocytogenes, requires probes that specifically bind biological agents and ensure their immediate and efficient detection. There is a need for robust and inexpensive affinity probes as an alternative to antibodies. These probes may be recruited from random peptide libraries displayed on filamentous phage. In this study, we selected from two phage peptide libraries phage clones displaying peptides capable of specific and strong binding to the L. monocytogenes cell surface. The ability of isolated phage clones to interact specifically with L. monocytogenes was demonstrated using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and confirmed by co-precipitation assay. We also assessed the sensitivity of phage-bacteria binding by PCR on phage-captured Listeria cells, which could be detected at a concentration of 104 cells ml-1. In addition, as proof-of-concept, we tested the possibility of immobilizing the affinity-selected phages to a putative biosensor surface. The quality of phage deposition was monitored by ELISA and fluorescent microscopy. Phage-bacterial binding was confirmed by high power optical phase contrast microscopy. Overall, the results of this work validate the concept of affinity-selected recombinant filamentous phages as probes for detecting and monitoring bacterial agents under any conditions that warrant their recognition, including in food products.

  8. Recombinant phage probes for Listeria monocytogenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carnazza, S; Gioffre, G; Felici, F; Guglielmino, S [Department of Microbiological, Genetic and Molecular Sciences, University of Messina, Messina (Italy)

    2007-10-03

    Monitoring of food and environmental samples for biological threats, such as Listeria monocytogenes, requires probes that specifically bind biological agents and ensure their immediate and efficient detection. There is a need for robust and inexpensive affinity probes as an alternative to antibodies. These probes may be recruited from random peptide libraries displayed on filamentous phage. In this study, we selected from two phage peptide libraries phage clones displaying peptides capable of specific and strong binding to the L. monocytogenes cell surface. The ability of isolated phage clones to interact specifically with L. monocytogenes was demonstrated using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and confirmed by co-precipitation assay. We also assessed the sensitivity of phage-bacteria binding by PCR on phage-captured Listeria cells, which could be detected at a concentration of 10{sup 4} cells ml{sup -1}. In addition, as proof-of-concept, we tested the possibility of immobilizing the affinity-selected phages to a putative biosensor surface. The quality of phage deposition was monitored by ELISA and fluorescent microscopy. Phage-bacterial binding was confirmed by high power optical phase contrast microscopy. Overall, the results of this work validate the concept of affinity-selected recombinant filamentous phages as probes for detecting and monitoring bacterial agents under any conditions that warrant their recognition, including in food products.

  9. Listeria monocytogenes infection in pregnancy and neonatal sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Pascale

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Authors report a fatal neonatal sepsis caused by Listeria monocytogenes. While the diagnostic procedure aimed to identify the microrganism is described, it is emphasized the importance to recover Streptococcus agalactiae (GBS and L. monocytogenes by means of vaginal-rectal swab culture. The intrapartum screening for L. monocytogenes, by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR providing results in 75 minutes is also evaluated.

  10. Utilization of exogenous siderophores and natural catechols by Listeria monocytogenes.

    OpenAIRE

    Simon, N.; Coulanges, V; Andre, P.; Vidon, D J

    1995-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes does not produce siderophores for iron acquisition. We demonstrate that a number of microbial siderophores and natural iron-binding compounds are able to promote the growth of iron-starved L. monocytogenes. We suggest that the ability of L. monocytogenes to use a variety of exogenous siderophores and natural catechols accounts for its ubiquitous character.

  11. Fate of Listeria monocytogenes in Gouda microcheese: No growth, and substantial inactivation after extended ripening times

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wemmenhove, E.; Stampelou, I.; Hooijdonk, van A.C.M.; Zwietering, M.H.; Wells-Bennik, M.H.J.

    2013-01-01

    This challenge study demonstrates that Listeria monocytogenes does not grow in Gouda cheese: during the first 8 weeks of ripening no growth was observed and between 8 and 52 weeks viable numbers declined significantly in a well-established Gouda microcheese system. Cheese milk was artificially

  12. Adenovirus-based vaccine against Listeria monocytogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Søren; Steffensen, Maria Abildgaard; Jensen, Benjamin Anderschou Holbech

    2013-01-01

    The use of replication-deficient adenoviruses as vehicles for transfer of foreign genes offers many advantages in a vaccine setting, eliciting strong cellular immune responses involving both CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells. Further improving the immunogenicity, tethering of the inserted target Ag to MHC...... class II-associated invariant chain (Ii) greatly enhances both the presentation of most target Ags, as well as overall protection against viral infection, such as lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). The present study extends this vaccination concept to include protection against intracellular...... bacteria, using Listeria monocytogenes as a model organism. Protection in C57BL/6 mice against recombinant L. monocytogenes expressing an immunodominant epitope of the LCMV glycoprotein (GP33) was greatly accelerated, augmented, and prolonged following vaccination with an adenoviral vaccine encoding GP...

  13. Antimicrobial Tolerance in Listeria monocytogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Curtis, Thomas Darwin

    There are two ways in which bacteria survive killing by antibiotics. The most well-known, is antibiotic resistance, which results from the acquisition of a resistance gene or mutation that allows bacteria to grow and divide in the presence of antibiotic concentrations that would normally kill other...... bacteria. Antibiotic tolerance on the other hand, is the ability of bacteria to survive (but not grow) prolonged exposure to concentrations that should normally kill them. The predominant mechanism underlying tolerance is the so-called persister cell, a small subpopulation of dormant like cells...... mechanisms in this organism. The body of work over the course of this PhD study has been organized into three manuscripts, which are summarized below. The first manuscript sought to link the Small Colony Variant (SCV) to persister cells in L. monocytogenes. SCV cells of bacteria are a slow growing phenotype...

  14. Antimicrobial susceptibility of listeria monocytogenes from food products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Knöchel, Susanne; Hasman, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the susceptibility of Listeria monocytogenes isolated from food products to antimicrobial agents commonly used for treatment of infections with gram-positive bacteria, and to disinfectants. A total of 114 L. monocytogenes retail isolates were tested for susce......This study was conducted to determine the susceptibility of Listeria monocytogenes isolated from food products to antimicrobial agents commonly used for treatment of infections with gram-positive bacteria, and to disinfectants. A total of 114 L. monocytogenes retail isolates were tested...

  15. Relationship between Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria spp. in seafood processing plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alali, Walid Q; Schaffner, Donald W

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the relationship between prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes as an outcome and Listeria spp. as an explanatory variable by food products, food contact surfaces, and nonfood contact surfaces in seafood processing plants by using peer-reviewed published data. Nine sets of prevalence data of L. monocytogenes and Listeria spp. were collected from published studies and used for the analyses. Based on our analysis, the relationship between L. monocytogenes prevalence and Listeria spp. prevalence in food products (incoming raw materials and finish products) was significant (P = 0.04) with (low) R² = 0.36. Furthermore, Listeria spp. were not a good indicator for L. monocytogenes when testing food contact surfaces (R² = 0.10). Listeria spp. were a good indicator for L. monocytogenes only on nonfood contact surfaces (R² = 0.90). On the other hand, the presence of Listeria spp. on food contact surfaces (R² = 0.002) and nonfood contact surfaces (R² = 0.03) was not a good indicator for L. monocytogenes presence in food products. In general, prevalence of Listeria spp. does not seem to be a good indicator for L. monocytogenes prevalence in seafood processing plants.

  16. Listeria monocytogenes in Aquatic Food Products—A Review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jami, Mansooreh; Ghanbari, Mahdi; Zunabovic, Marija; Domig, Konrad J; Kneifel, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    With the increased demand for lightly preserved and/or ready‐to‐eat (RTE) food products, the prevalence of the foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes has increased, which is a public health concern...

  17. Antibiotic susceptibility of Listeria monocytogenes in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, Mónica; Martínez, Claudia; Aguerre, Lorena; Rocca, María Florencia; Cipolla, Lucía; Callejo, Raquel

    2016-02-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is the causative agent of listeriosis, a food-borne disease that mainly affects pregnant women, the elderly, and immunocompromised patients. The primary treatment of choice of listeriosis is the combination of ampicillin or penicillin G, with an aminoglycoside, classically gentamicin. The second-choice therapy for patients allergic to β-lactams is the combination of trimethoprim with a sulfonamide (such as co-trimoxazole). The aim of this study was to analyze the antimicrobial susceptibility profile of strains isolated from human infections and food during the last two decades in Argentina. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 8 antimicrobial agents was determined for a set of 250 strains of L. monocytogenes isolated in Argentina during the period 1992-2012. Food-borne and human isolates were included in this study. The antibiotics tested were ampicillin, chloramphenicol, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, erythromycin, gentamicin, penicillin G, tetracycline and rifampicin. Breakpoints for penicillin G, ampicillin and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole were those given in the CLSI for L. monocytogenes. CLSI criteria for staphylococci were applied to the other antimicrobial agents tested. Strains were serotyped by PCR, and confirmed by an agglutination method. Strains recovered from human listeriosis patients showed a prevalence of serotype 4b (71%), with the remaining 29% corresponding to serotype 1/2b. Serotypes among food isolates were distributed as 62% serotype 1/2b and 38% serotype 4b. All antimicrobial agents showed good activity. The strains of L. monocytogenes isolated in Argentina over a period of 20 years remain susceptible to antimicrobial agents, and that susceptibility pattern has not changed during this period. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  18. Listeria monocytogenes in Fresh Produce: Outbreaks, Prevalence and Contamination Levels

    OpenAIRE

    Qi Zhu; Ravi Gooneratne; Malik Altaf Hussain

    2017-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes, a member of the genus Listeria, is widely distributed in agricultural environments, such as soil, manure and water. This organism is a recognized foodborne pathogenic bacterium that causes many diseases, from mild gastroenteritis to severe blood and/or central nervous system infections, as well as abortion in pregnant women. Generally, processed ready-to-eat and cold-stored meat and dairy products are considered high-risk foods for L. monocytogenes infections that caus...

  19. Genome sequences of Listeria monocytogenes strains with resistance to arsenic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Listeria monocytogenes frequently exhibits resistance to arsenic. We report here the draft genome sequences of eight genetically diverse arsenic-resistant L. monocytogenes strains from human listeriosis and food-associated environments. Availability of these genomes would help to elucidate the role ...

  20. Monitoring paneer for Listeria monocytogenes - A high risk food ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was developed and applied to spiked and natural paneer samples to detect Listeria monocytogenes, a high risk food pathogen. The sensitivity of the assay on L. monocytogenes spiked paneer samples was 104 cells prior to enrichment, was improved to 103 cells after 4 h ...

  1. Listeria monocytogenes internalizes in Romaine Lettuce grown in greenhouse conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Listeria monocytogenes has been implicated in a number of outbreaks involving fresh produce, including an outbreak in 2016 resulting from contaminated packaged salads. The persistence and internalization potential of L. monocytogenes in romaine lettuce was evaluated, and the persistence of two L. mo...

  2. Occurrence of Listeria monocytogenes in smoked fish in Sokoto ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study was conducted to determine the prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes in smoked fish in Sokoto, Nigeria. A total of 115 different species of smoked fish from the various retail outlets and market places within the metropolis were analysed for the presence of L. monocytogenes using ISO culture method.

  3. Prevalence and growth of Listeria monocytogenes in naturally contaminated seafood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Lasse Vigel; Huss, Hans Henrik

    1998-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes contamination of seafood varies with product category. The highest prevalence was found in cold- smoked fish (34-60%), while the lowest was found in heat- treated and cured seafood (4-12%). The prevalence of L. monocytogenes differed greatly in cold-smoked salmon between...

  4. Survival strategies of Listeria monocytogenes - roles of regulators and transporters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wemekamp-Kamphuis, H.H.

    2003-01-01

    Outbreaks of the food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes are mainly associated with ready-to-eatfoods. Survival strategies of L. monocytogenes in relation to minimally processed foods were studied.

  5. Listeria monocytogenes Biofilms in the Wonderland of Food Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colagiorgi, Angelo; Bruini, Ilaria; Di Ciccio, Pierluigi Aldo; Zanardi, Emanuela; Ghidini, Sergio; Ianieri, Adriana

    2017-01-01

    The foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes is a concern in food safety because of its ability to form biofilm and to persist in food industry. In this mini-review, the issue represented by this pathogen and some of the latest efforts performed in order to investigate the composition of biofilms formed by L. monocytogenes are summarized. PMID:28869552

  6. Listeria monocytogenes Biofilms in the Wonderland of Food Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colagiorgi, Angelo; Bruini, Ilaria; Di Ciccio, Pierluigi Aldo; Zanardi, Emanuela; Ghidini, Sergio; Ianieri, Adriana

    2017-09-04

    The foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes is a concern in food safety because of its ability to form biofilm and to persist in food industry. In this mini-review, the issue represented by this pathogen and some of the latest efforts performed in order to investigate the composition of biofilms formed by L. monocytogenes are summarized.

  7. Listeria monocytogenes Biofilms in the Wonderland of Food Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Colagiorgi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes is a concern in food safety because of its ability to form biofilm and to persist in food industry. In this mini-review, the issue represented by this pathogen and some of the latest efforts performed in order to investigate the composition of biofilms formed by L. monocytogenes are summarized.

  8. Listeria monocytogenes growth limits and stress resistance mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, van der S.

    2008-01-01

    The food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive facultative anaerobic rod, which is the causative agent of listeriosis. Due to the severity of the disease and the fact that its incidence is increasing in numerous European countries, L. monocytogenes is of great public health

  9. Listeria monocytogenes meningitis in an immunocompromised patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barocci, Simone; Mancini, Alessio; Canovari, Benedetta; Petrelli, Enzo; Sbriscia-Fioretti, Emanuela; Licci, Alberto; D'Addesa, Simona; Petrini, Giancarlo; Giacomini, Marinella; Renzi, Antonella; Migali, Antonio; Briscolini, Sara

    2015-01-01

    This report describes a case of meningitis caused by Listeria monocytogenes in a stem cell transplant recipient on immunosuppressive therapy for cutaneous chronic graft-versus host disease. A 59-year-old woman had undergone allogeneic stem cell transplantation (from a matched unrelated donor) 13 months previously for chronic lymphocytic leukemia. She was on regular hematologic follow-up. Though her previous malignancy has been in remission, she was immunosuppressed due to the pharmacological treatment. We describe a meningitis caused by a typical food-borne pathogen, dangerous in patients with impaired cell-mediated immunity. Moreover the bacterium had a multidrug resistance, a rare characteristic in clinical listeriosis. Rapid diagnosis and treatment are key factors in these cases. We chose ampicillin and rifampicin that allowed a complete resolution of the clinical manifestations.

  10. Incidence of Listeria monocytogenes and Other Bacteria in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The involvement of Listeria monocytogenes in spontaneous abortion in Jos was investigated. One hundred blood and 100 placenta samples were collected from spontaneous abortion patients in Jos. The samples were inoculated first into Listeria enrichment broth. Incubation was at 37o C, followed by cold enrichment at ...

  11. Occurrence of listeria monocytogenes in bulked raw milk and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    fermented dairy product sold at most informal milk cooling points in Uganda, were assessed for occurrence of Listeria spp. and Listeria monocytogenes. Total plate counts (TPC), holding temperature, pH and titratable acidity were also determined in all the milk products at the point of collection using standard methods.

  12. Occurrence of Listeria Monocytogenes in Irrigation Water and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, thirty water samples obtained from rivers, streams and ponds used for irrigation of vegetables at thirty different sites in Jos, Plateau state, Nigeria were analyzed for the presence Listeria monocytogenes and other Listeria species using the two-step enrichment method. Ten samples each spinach, lettuce and ...

  13. Cerebrospinal fluid inflammatory markers in patients with Listeria monocytogenes meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopmans, Merel M.; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; Geldhoff, Madelijn; Seron, Mercedes Valls; Houben, Judith; van der Ende, Arie; van de Beek, Diederik

    2014-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes meningitis is the third most common cause of bacterial meningitis and is associated with high rates of mortality and unfavorable outcome. We analyzed 101 cytokines, chemokines and complement factors in CSF of adult patients with Listeria meningitis included in a prospective

  14. Listeria monocytogenes transiently alters mitochondrial dynamics during infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavru, Fabrizia; Bouillaud, Frédéric; Sartori, Anna; Ricquier, Daniel; Cossart, Pascale

    2011-03-01

    Mitochondria are essential and highly dynamic organelles, constantly undergoing fusion and fission. We analyzed mitochondrial dynamics during infection with the human bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes and show that this infection profoundly alters mitochondrial dynamics by causing transient mitochondrial network fragmentation. Mitochondrial fragmentation is specific to pathogenic Listeria monocytogenes, and it is not observed with the nonpathogenic Listeria innocua species or several other intracellular pathogens. Strikingly, the efficiency of Listeria infection is affected in cells where either mitochondrial fusion or fission has been altered by siRNA treatment, highlighting the relevance of mitochondrial dynamics for Listeria infection. We identified the secreted pore-forming toxin listeriolysin O as the bacterial factor mainly responsible for mitochondrial network disruption and mitochondrial function modulation. Together, our results suggest that the transient shutdown of mitochondrial function and dynamics represents a strategy used by Listeria at the onset of infection to interfere with cellular physiology.

  15. CHALLENGE TESTS WITH LISTERIA MONOCYTOGENES IN SALAMI: PRELIMINARY RESULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Mioni

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Challenge tests are the preferable methodology to study the behaviour of Listeria monocytogenes on ready to eat foods, according to Regulation (EC 2073/2005. Challenge testing using L. monocytogenes in seasoned salami from different food business operators showed, after seasoning of the product, a count reduction of the inoculated organisms without any further growth of the pathogen; however differences of L. monocytogenes behaviour could be observed according to different production protocols.

  16. Detection of Listeria monocytogenes in pigs and pork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanuganti, Sreenivas R; Wesley, Irene V; Reddy, P Gopal; McKean, James; Hurd, H Scott

    2002-09-01

    In this study, we surveyed hogs (n = 300) as well as pork products (ground pork and raw chitterlings) for Listeria monocytogenes. Pig specimens collected before (tonsil swabs) and after slaughter (tonsils, lymph nodes, carcass swabs, and rectal contents) were examined for L. monocytogenes by enrichment with conventional enrichment broths followed by subculturing to selective agar. A multiplex polymerase chain reaction assay targeting the highly conserved 16S rRNA gene of the Listeria species as well as the hlyA gene unique to L. monocytogenes was used to screen aliquots of the enrichment (method I) as well as to confirm presumptive Listeria colonies from Columbia agar with 0.05% glucose supplemented with polymyxin B-acriflavine-lithium chloride-ceftazidime-aesculin-mannitol (PALCAM; method II). Subculturing to PALCAM agar was the more sensitive of the two methods on the basis of the overall detection of Listeria. For hog tissues, method I detected L. monocytogenes (0.87% positive) and no other Listeria spp. in all samples (n = 1,849). In contrast, method II detected significantly more (P enrichments with University of Vermont modified Listeria enrichment broth; plating to PALCAM slightly improved recovery (9%). Overall, ground pork samples (n = 340) harbored L. monocytogenes (45% positive) and other Listeria species (1.5% positive), as determined by method I. Subculturing to PALCAM significantly (P < 0.05) improved the detection of L. monocytogenes (50.2%) but not that of other Listeria species (1.7%). L. monocytogenes isolates (n = 243) were assigned to serotype 1 (53.5%), serotype 4 (25%), and serotypes other than 1 and 4 (21.4%).

  17. Silver As Antibacterial toward Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belluco, Simone; Losasso, Carmen; Patuzzi, Ilaria; Rigo, Laura; Conficoni, Daniele; Gallocchio, Federica; Cibin, Veronica; Catellani, Paolo; Segato, Severino; Ricci, Antonia

    2016-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a serious foodborne pathogen that can contaminate food during processing and can grow during food shelf-life. New types of safe and effective food contact materials embedding antimicrobial agents, like silver, can play an important role in the food industry. The present work aimed at evaluating the in vitro growth kinetics of different strains of L. monocytogenes in the presence of silver, both in its ionic and nano form. The antimicrobial effect was determined by assaying the number of culturable bacterial cells, which formed colonies after incubation in the presence of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) or silver nitrate (AgNO3). Ionic release experiments were performed in parallel. A different reduction of bacterial viability between silver ionic and nano forms was observed, with a time delayed effect exerted by AgNPs. An association between antimicrobial activity and ions concentration was shown by both silver chemical forms, suggesting the major role of ions in the antimicrobial mode of action.

  18. A New Perspective on Listeria monocytogenes Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragon, Marie; Wirth, Thierry; Hollandt, Florian; Lavenir, Rachel; Lecuit, Marc; Le Monnier, Alban; Brisse, Sylvain

    2008-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a model organism for cellular microbiology and host–pathogen interaction studies and an important food-borne pathogen widespread in the environment, thus representing an attractive model to study the evolution of virulence. The phylogenetic structure of L. monocytogenes was determined by sequencing internal portions of seven housekeeping genes (3,288 nucleotides) in 360 representative isolates. Fifty-eight of the 126 disclosed sequence types were grouped into seven well-demarcated clonal complexes (clones) that comprised almost 75% of clinical isolates. Each clone had a unique or dominant serotype (4b for clones 1, 2 and 4, 1/2b for clones 3 and 5, 1/2a for clone 7, and 1/2c for clone 9), with no association of clones with clinical forms of human listeriosis. Homologous recombination was extremely limited (r/m<1 for nucleotides), implying long-term genetic stability of multilocus genotypes over time. Bayesian analysis based on 438 SNPs recovered the three previously defined lineages, plus one unclassified isolate of mixed ancestry. The phylogenetic distribution of serotypes indicated that serotype 4b evolved once from 1/2b, the likely ancestral serotype of lineage I. Serotype 1/2c derived once from 1/2a, with reference strain EGDe (1/2a) likely representing an intermediate evolutionary state. In contrast to housekeeping genes, the virulence factor internalin (InlA) evolved by localized recombination resulting in a mosaic pattern, with convergent evolution indicative of natural selection towards a truncation of InlA protein. This work provides a reference evolutionary framework for future studies on L. monocytogenes epidemiology, ecology, and virulence. PMID:18773117

  19. Effects of electrolyzed oxidizing water on reducing Listeria monocytogenes contamination on seafood processing surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chengchu; Duan, Jingyun; Su, Yi-Cheng

    2006-02-15

    The effects of electrolyzed oxidizing (EO) water on reducing Listeria monocytogenes contamination on seafood processing surfaces were studied. Chips (5 x 5 cm(2)) of stainless steel sheet (SS), ceramic tile (CT), and floor tile (FT) with and without crabmeat residue on the surface were inoculated with L. monocytogenes and soaked in tap or EO water for 5 min. Viable cells of L. monocytogenes were detected on all chip surfaces with or without crabmeat residue after being held at room temperature for 1 h. Soaking contaminated chips in tap water resulted in small-degree reductions of the organism (0.40-0.66 log cfu/chip on clean surfaces and 0.78-1.33 log cfu/chip on dirty surfaces). Treatments of EO water significantly (peffectiveness of EO water on inactivating Listeria cells. However, treatments of EO water also resulted in significant reductions of L. monocytogenes on dirty surfaces (2.33 log on SS and CT and 1.52 log on FT) when compared with tap water treatments. The antimicrobial activity of EO water was positively correlated with its chlorine content. High oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) of EO water also contributed significantly to its antimicrobial activity against L. monocytogenes. EO water was more effective than chlorine water on inactivating L. monocytogenes on surfaces and could be used as a chlorine alternative for sanitation purpose. Application of EO water following a thorough cleaning process could greatly reduce L. monocytogenes contamination in seafood processing environments.

  20. Foodborne Listeria monocytogenes: A Real Challenge in Quality Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusztahelyi, Tünde; Szabó, Judit; Dombrádi, Zsuzsanna; Kovács, Szilvia; Pócsi, István

    2016-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne pathogen, and the detection and differentiation of this bacterium from the nonpathogenic Listeria species are of great importance to the food industry. Differentiation of Listeria species is very difficult, even with the sophisticated MALDI-TOF MS technique because of the close genetic relationship of the species and the usual gene transfer. The present paper emphasizes the difficulties of the differentiation through the standardized detection and confirmation according to ISO 11290-1:1996 and basic available L. monocytogenes detection methods and tests (such as API Listeria test, MALDI-TOF MS analysis, and hly gene PCR). With the increase of reports on the pathogenesis of atypical Listeria strains in humans, the significance of species level determination has become questionable, especially in food quality control, and the detection of pathogenic characteristics seems to be more relevant.

  1. Foodborne Listeria monocytogenes: A Real Challenge in Quality Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tünde Pusztahelyi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne pathogen, and the detection and differentiation of this bacterium from the nonpathogenic Listeria species are of great importance to the food industry. Differentiation of Listeria species is very difficult, even with the sophisticated MALDI-TOF MS technique because of the close genetic relationship of the species and the usual gene transfer. The present paper emphasizes the difficulties of the differentiation through the standardized detection and confirmation according to ISO 11290-1:1996 and basic available L. monocytogenes detection methods and tests (such as API Listeria test, MALDI-TOF MS analysis, and hly gene PCR. With the increase of reports on the pathogenesis of atypical Listeria strains in humans, the significance of species level determination has become questionable, especially in food quality control, and the detection of pathogenic characteristics seems to be more relevant.

  2. ASSESSMENT OF ACTION OF DISINFECTANTS AGAINST LISTERIA MONOCYTOGENES BIOFILMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. K. CABEÇA

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available

    The purpose of this study was to assess the action of various disinfectants used in food industry against biofilm cells of Listeria monocytogenes formed on stainless steel surfaces during 24, 72 and 120 hours. Numbers of viable biofilm cells decreased after treatment with all the tested disinfectants (iodine, biguanide, quaternary ammonium compounds, peracetic acid and sodium hypochlorite. Sodium hypochlorite was the most effective disinfectant against the biofilm cells, while biguanide and iodine were the least. Scanning electron microscopy observations demonstrated attached cells on stainless steel surfaces after treatment with all the disinfectants. These observations showed that microorganisms were not completely removed from stainless steel surfaces after treatment with the disinfectants, however, the attachment did not means the viability of remaining cells. The biofilm age in hours (24, 72 and 120 had no apparent influence on resistance of microbiological cells to the disinfectants under study. In conclusion biofilm cells of L. monocytogenes can withstand disinfectants action.

  3. Determination of Listeria monocytogenes Growth during Mushroom Production and Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dara Leong

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In the EU, food is considered safe with regard to Listeria monocytogenes if its numbers do not exceed 100 CFU/g throughout the shelf-life of the food. Therefore, it is important to determine if a food supports growth of L. monocytogenes. Challenge studies to determine the ability of a food to support growth of L. monocytogenes are essential as predictive modelling often overestimates the growth ability of L. monocytogenes. The aim of this study was to determine if growth of L. monocytogenes was supported during the production and distribution of mushrooms. A three-strain mixture of L. monocytogenes was inoculated onto three independent batches of whole mushrooms, sliced mushrooms, mushroom casing and mushroom substrate at a concentration of about 100–1000 CFU/g. The batches were incubated at potential abuse temperatures, as a worst case scenario, and at intervals during storage L. monocytogenes numbers, % moisture and pH were determined. The results showed that the sliced and whole mushrooms had the ability to support growth, while mushroom casing allowed survival but did not support growth. Mushroom substrate showed a rich background microflora that grew on Listeria selective media and this hindered enumeration of L. monocytogenes. In the case of this study, Combase predictions were not always accurate, indicating that challenge studies may be a necessary part of growth determination of L. monocytogenes.

  4. Assessment of Listeria sp. Interference Using a Molecular Assay To Detect Listeria monocytogenes in Food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zittermann, Sandra I; Stanghini, Brenda; See, Ryan Soo; Melano, Roberto G; Boleszczuk, Peter; Murphy, Allana; Maki, Anne; Mallo, Gustavo V

    2016-01-01

    Detection of Listeria monocytogenes in food is currently based on enrichment methods. When L. monocytogenes is present with other Listeria species in food, the species compete during the enrichment process. Overgrowth competition of the nonpathogenic Listeria species might result in false-negative results obtained with the current reference methods. This potential issue was noted when 50 food samples artificially spiked with L. monocytogenes were tested with a real-time PCR assay and Canada's current reference method, MFHPB-30. Eleven of the samples studied were from foods naturally contaminated with Listeria species other than those used for spiking. The real-time PCR assay detected L. monocytogenes in all 11 of these samples; however, only 6 of these samples were positive by the MFHPB-30 method. To determine whether L. monocytogenes detection can be affected by other species of the same genus due to competition, an L. monocytogenes strain and a Listeria innocua strain with a faster rate of growth in the enrichment broth were artificially coinoculated at different ratios into ground pork meat samples and cultured according to the MFHPB-30 method. L. monocytogenes was detected only by the MFHPB-30 method when L. monocytogenes/L. innocua ratios were 6.0 or higher. In contrast, using the same enrichments, the real-time PCR assay detected L. monocytogenes at ratios as low as 0.6. Taken together, these findings support the hypothesis that L. monocytogenes can be outcompeted by L. innocua during the MFHPB-30 enrichment phase. However, more reliable detection of L. monocytogenes in this situation can be achieved by a PCR-based method mainly because of its sensitivity.

  5. Longitudinal monitoring of Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria phages in seafood processing environments in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vongkamjan, Kitiya; Benjakul, Soottawat; Kim Vu, Hue Thi; Vuddhakul, Varaporn

    2017-09-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne pathogen commonly found in environments of seafood processing, thus presenting a challenge for eradication from seafood processing facilities. Monitoring the prevalence and subtype diversity of L. monocytogenes together with phages that are specific to Listeria spp. ("Listeria phages") will provide knowledge on the bacteria-phage ecology in food processing plants. In this work, a total of 595 samples were collected from raw material, finished seafood products and environmental samples from different sites of a seafood processing plant during 17 sampling visits in 1.5 years of study. L. monocytogenes and Listeria spp. (non-monocytogenes) were found in 22 (3.7%) and 43 (7.2%) samples, respectively, whereas 29 Listeria phages were isolated from 9 (1.5%) phage-positive samples. DNA fingerprint analysis of L. monocytogenes isolates revealed 11 Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) profiles, with two subtypes were frequently observed over time. Our data reveal a presence of Listeria phages within the same seafood processing environments where a diverse set of L. monocytogenes subtypes was also found. Although serotype 4b was observed at lower frequency, data indicate that isolates from this seafood processing plant belonged to both epidemiologically important serotypes 1/2a and 4b, which may suggest a potential public health risk. Phages (all showed a unique genome size of 65 ± 2 kb) were classified into 9 host range groups, representing both broad- and narrow-host range. While most L. monocytogenes isolates from this facility were susceptible to phages, five isolates showed resistance to 12-20 phages. Variations in phage host range among Listeria phages isolated from food processing plant may affect a presence of a diverse set of L. monocytogenes isolates derived from the same processing environment in Thailand. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Listeria monocytogenes: Overview and Targeting Advances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa F.N. Abushahba

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes is a serious foodborne zoonotic pathogen capable of causing gastroenteritis and severe systemic infections such as septicemia, meningitis or abortion in the infected individuals what is called listeriosis. The bacterium is reported as the third leading cause of death among the foodborne pathogens preceded by nontyphoidal Salmonella spp. and Toxoplasma gondii. The power to tolerate a wide range of temperatures is considered the most prominent trait distinguishing it from the other foodborne pathogens. Within the infected host, the bacteria harbor inside macrophages and jump from cell to another without leaving the safeguarding milieu of the host's cells utilizing a set of genes including hly (listeriolysin O, plcA (phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase c, plcB (phosphatidylcholine-phospholipase C and actA (actin-assembly inducing protein. In addition to the health concerns associated with antibiotics, treatment failure likely occurs among listeriosis-infected persons especially with the inability of most antibiotics to access intracellular replicative niches and achieve the optimum therapeutic concentrations within the infected cells. Recently, one novel choice, peptide nucleic acid (PNA, has been emerged to target this bacterium as a model of targeting intracellular pathogens with anti-sense agents. PNA is a one of the DNA analogues which works via specific inhibition of bacterial gene expression.

  7. Incidence and control of Listeria monocytogenes in foods in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørrung, Birgit; Andersen, Jens Kirk; Schlundt, Jørgen

    1999-01-01

    The Danish regulatory policy on Listeria monocytogenes in foods is based on the principles of HACCP and was developed using a health risk assessment approach. The Danish policy focuses examinations and criteria for L. monocytogenes in ready-to-eat foods and is based on a combination of inspection...... of L. monocytogenes in 25 g is required in foods heat treated in the final package and in heat-treated as well as preserved, non heat-treated foods which can support growth within the shelf life. This level is necessary in foods capable of supporting growth, in order not to exceed 100 L. monocytogenes...... per g at the point of consumption. In heat-treated and preserved foods, which are not supportive of growth within the shelf-life and for raw, ready to eat foods, a level below 10 L. monocytogenes per g is regarded acceptable. A level between 10 and 100 L. monocytogenes per g is not satisfactory...

  8. Early trigeminal nerve involvement in Listeria monocytogenes rhombencephalitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, William K; Harboe, Zitta Barrella; Roed, Casper

    2017-01-01

    dysfunction on that side. In addition, we identified another 120 cases of Listeria rhombencephalitis following a systematic review. Cranial nerves VII, V, IX, and X, respectively, medulla oblongata, cerebellum and pons, were the most frequently involved brain structures. The present clinical and radiological...... findings corroborate earlier data from animal experiments, indicating that L. monocytogenes may be capable of retrograde intra-axonal migration along the cranial nerves. We suggest that in a subset of patients with rhombencephalitis L. monocytogenes enters the cerebellopontine angle through the trigeminal......Listeria monocytogenes is associated with rhombencephalitis. However, the exact mechanisms of brainstem invasion remains poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate clinical and radiological data suggesting that Listeria may invade the brainstem via the trigeminal nerve. Three females (41, 64 and 70...

  9. COMPARISON OF TWO METHODS FOR THE DETECTION OF LISTERIA MONOCYTOGENES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Tantillo

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the performance of the conventional methods for detection of Listeria monocytogenes in food using media Oxford and ALOA (Agar Listeria acc. to Ottaviani & Agosti in according to the ISO 11290-1 to a new chromogenic medium “CHROMagar Listeria” standardized in 2005 AFNOR ( CHR – 21/1-12/01. A total of 40 pre-packed ready-to-eat food samples were examined. Using two methods six samples were found positive for Listeria monocytogenes but the medium “CHROMagar Listeria” was more selective in comparison with the others. In conclusion this study has demonstrated that isolation medium able to target specifically the detection of L. monocytogenes such as “CHROMagar Listeria” is highly recommendable because of that detection time is significantly reduced and the analysis cost is less expensive.

  10. Listeria monocytogenes in Ready-to-Eat Seafood and Potential Hazards for the Consumers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrizia Gambarin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The risk of exposure to Listeria monocytogenes (L. monocytogenes when consuming Ready-to-Eat (RTE seafood was assessed in the Veneto Region (Italy. Thirty-eight samples were analyzed, each sample consisted of three subunits belonging to the same batches. The first of the three units was examined immediately, the second was stored at +4°C (for all of its shelf-life and the third at +10°C (for the latter third of its shelf-life before the analysis. Chemical-physical and microbiological parameters were tested simultaneously. Culture results showed the presence of viable L. monocytogenes in 9 (23,68% of the 38 samples analysed, 3 (33,33% of which with a concentration >100 cfu/g. PCR tests yielded 12 L. monocytogenes positive samples. Semipreserves with aw (water activity and pH values that favour L. monocytogenes growth were the only ones to result positive to microbiological and PCR tests. Temperature proved to be an important factor as it limits the growth of L. monocytogenes, including products with potentially high competitive microbial charges. Four different serotypes were recovered and ribotyping has helped to highlight the genomic variability of L. monocytogenes strains in food. This supports the hypothesis that L. monocytogenes continues to evolve genetically to the detriment of phenotypic conservation.

  11. Phage display-derived binders able to distinguish Listeria monocytogenes from other Listeria species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Josephine; Karoonuthaisiri, Nitsara; Charlermroj, Ratthaphol; Stewart, Linda D; Elliott, Christopher T; Grant, Irene R

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to produce phage display-derived binders with the ability to distinguish Listeria monocytogenes from other Listeria spp., which may have potential utility to enhance detection of Listeria monocytogenes. To obtain binders with the desired binding specificity a series of surface and solution phage-display biopannings were performed. Initially, three rounds of surface biopanning against gamma-irradiated L. monocytogenes serovar 4b cells were performed followed by an additional surface biopanning round against L. monocytogenes 4b which included prior subtraction biopanning against gamma-irradiated L. innocua cells. In an attempt to further enhance binder specificity for L. monocytogenes 4b two rounds of solution biopanning were performed, both rounds included initial subtraction solution biopanning against L. innocua. Subsequent evaluations were performed on the phage clones by phage binding ELISA. All phage clones tested from the second round of solution biopanning had higher specificity for L. monocytogenes 4b than for L. innocua and three other foodborne pathogens (Salmonella spp., Escherichia coli and Campylobacter jejuni). Further evaluation with five other Listeria spp. revealed that one phage clone in particular, expressing peptide GRIADLPPLKPN, was highly specific for L. monocytogenes with at least 43-fold more binding capability to L. monocytogenes 4b than to any other Listeria sp. This proof-of-principle study demonstrates how a combination of surface, solution and subtractive biopanning was used to maximise binder specificity. L. monocytogenes-specific binders were obtained which could have potential application in novel detection tests for L. monocytogenes, benefiting both the food and medical industries.

  12. Phage display-derived binders able to distinguish Listeria monocytogenes from other Listeria species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josephine Morton

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to produce phage display-derived binders with the ability to distinguish Listeria monocytogenes from other Listeria spp., which may have potential utility to enhance detection of Listeria monocytogenes. To obtain binders with the desired binding specificity a series of surface and solution phage-display biopannings were performed. Initially, three rounds of surface biopanning against gamma-irradiated L. monocytogenes serovar 4b cells were performed followed by an additional surface biopanning round against L. monocytogenes 4b which included prior subtraction biopanning against gamma-irradiated L. innocua cells. In an attempt to further enhance binder specificity for L. monocytogenes 4b two rounds of solution biopanning were performed, both rounds included initial subtraction solution biopanning against L. innocua. Subsequent evaluations were performed on the phage clones by phage binding ELISA. All phage clones tested from the second round of solution biopanning had higher specificity for L. monocytogenes 4b than for L. innocua and three other foodborne pathogens (Salmonella spp., Escherichia coli and Campylobacter jejuni. Further evaluation with five other Listeria spp. revealed that one phage clone in particular, expressing peptide GRIADLPPLKPN, was highly specific for L. monocytogenes with at least 43-fold more binding capability to L. monocytogenes 4b than to any other Listeria sp. This proof-of-principle study demonstrates how a combination of surface, solution and subtractive biopanning was used to maximise binder specificity. L. monocytogenes-specific binders were obtained which could have potential application in novel detection tests for L. monocytogenes, benefiting both the food and medical industries.

  13. Role of Extracellular DNA during Biofilm Formation by Listeria monocytogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harmsen, Morten; Lappann, Martin; Knøchel, S

    2010-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a food-borne pathogen that is capable of living in harsh environments. It is believed to do this by forming biofilms, which are surface-associated multicellular structures encased in a self-produced matrix. In this paper we show that in L. monocytogenes extracellular DNA...... cell biofilm assays. However, it was also demonstrated that in a culture without eDNA, neither Listeria genomic DNA nor salmon sperm DNA by itself could restore the capacity to adhere. A search for additional necessary components revealed that peptidoglycan (PG), specifically N-acetylglucosamine (NAG...

  14. Listeria Monocytogenes: a rare cause of endophthalmitis, a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Gaskell, Katherine M.; Williams, Gwyn; Grant, Kathie; Lightman, Susan; Godbole, Gauri

    2017-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a known cause of gastroenteritis. Invasive disease can follow bacteremia causing meningoencephalitis, endocarditis and spontaneous miscarriages in immunocompromised patients and pregnant women respectively. We present the first case in England of endogenous endophthalmitis caused by L. monocytogenes following acute gastroenteritis in an immunocompetent host. A 50-year-old South Asian female presented with acute painful unilateral visual loss occurring shortly after a...

  15. Outbreak of Listeria monocytogenes in an urban poultry flock

    OpenAIRE

    Crespo, Rocio; Garner, Michael M; Hopkins, Sharon G; Shah, Devendra H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Listeria monocytogenes infection is most commonly recognized in ruminants, including cattle, sheep, and goats; but it is rarely diagnosed in poultry. This report describes an outbreak of L. monocytogenes in a backyard poultry flock. Also, it points out the importance of collaboration between veterinarians and public health departments and the possible implications of zoonotic diseases. Case presentation Depression, lack of appetite, labored breathing, and increased mortality were n...

  16. [Listeria monocytogenes meningitis in children in France].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crouzet-Ozenda, L; Haas, H; Bingen, E; Lécuyer, A; Levy, C; Cohen, R

    2008-12-01

    Listeriosis is a serious invasive disease which affects mainly pregnant women, newborns and immunocompromised adults. To analyze specifically the epidemiological and clinical data of the meningitis due to Listeria monocytogenes (Lm), from the French Network of Surveillance of Bacterial Meningitis in childhood. Patients were aged 0 to 18 years. The diagnosis was based on a combination of a feverish meningeal syndrome and a positive culture of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and/or a positive PCR in the CSF and/or positive blood culture associated with a pleiocytose. Among 2539 cases of bacterial meningitis recorded in 6 years (2001 to 2006), 18 cases were due to Lm (0.7 %) (sex ratio M / F : 0.8). The average of age was 2.5 years (median : 0.5 ; ext : 0-15.1). The serotype of Lm was 4B in half of the cases. Most cases have occured in summer and autumn. Two patients presented an acquired or congenital immunodeficiency. Fifty-six percent (n=10) were younger than 1 year, among them, 7 were newborns. The CSF direct microbiologic investigation was suggestive of Lm (Gram positive bacilli) only in two cases, but the culture of CSF was positive for 16 patients and the blood culture was positive for 2 other patients. Three of 18 patients died between 7 and 13 days after admittance : a premature baby of 25 weeks'gestational age, two full-term newborns of 2 days and 1.5 months old. The mortality rate was 16.7 % before the age of 1 year (no death after this age). Meningitis due to Lm remains a rare disease, including in neonatal period. The recent increase of cases in adults requires to maintain vigilance in children especially since direct examination of CSF can rarely allow the diagnosis.

  17. Comparison of Listeria monocytogenes isolates across the island of Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Daniel; Luque-Sastre, Laura; DeLappe, Niall; Moore, John E; Cormican, Martin; Jordan, Kieran N; Fanning, Séamus; Fox, Edward M

    2014-08-01

    Building a comprehensive knowledge base of the association of Listeria monocytogenes isolates across national food chains, clinical cases, and environments can play a key role in helping control the incidence of listeriosis. Today, many food chains cross national borders and are often shared by neighboring countries. This study characterized L. monocytogenes isolated from food samples in Northern Ireland and investigated whether similarities in the population and associations of L. monocytogenes strains exist in the neighboring countries of Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland, which together constitute the island of Ireland. Listeria monocytogenes isolates were characterized using serotyping and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis subtyping. This data was then interrogated against existing data for the Republic of Ireland, to identify any shared trends in the ecology and contamination patterns of L. monocytogenes strains. The results of this study indicated that contaminated food products often shared L. monocytogenes strains with other products. A total of six different strain subtypes were identified among 18 contaminated products. Overall strain diversity in positive samples was low, with no sample yielding more than one L. monocytogenes strain, as determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis subtyping. When comparisons against an Irish strain database were performed, many related strain subtypes were also shared by a variety of sources in the Republic of Ireland. This study highlights the potential benefits that a whole-island surveillance approach may present to food safety and public health in both Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland.

  18. Listeria monocytogenes in Food-Processing Facilities, Food Contamination, and Human Listeriosis: The Brazilian Scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, Anderson Carlos; Woodward, Joshua John; Call, Douglas Ruben; Nero, Luís Augusto

    2017-11-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne pathogen that contaminates food-processing environments and persists within biofilms on equipment, utensils, floors, and drains, ultimately reaching final products by cross-contamination. This pathogen grows even under high salt conditions or refrigeration temperatures, remaining viable in various food products until the end of their shelf life. While the estimated incidence of listeriosis is lower than other enteric illnesses, infections caused by L. monocytogenes are more likely to lead to hospitalizations and fatalities. Despite the description of L. monocytogenes occurrence in Brazilian food-processing facilities and foods, there is a lack of consistent data regarding listeriosis cases and outbreaks directly associated with food consumption. Listeriosis requires rapid treatment with antibiotics and most drugs suitable for Gram-positive bacteria are effective against L. monocytogenes. Only a minority of clinical antibiotic-resistant L. monocytogenes strains have been described so far; whereas many strains recovered from food-processing facilities and foods exhibited resistance to antimicrobials not suitable against listeriosis. L. monocytogenes control in food industries is a challenge, demanding proper cleaning and application of sanitization procedures to eliminate this foodborne pathogen from the food-processing environment and ensure food safety. This review focuses on presenting the L. monocytogenes distribution in food-processing environment, food contamination, and control in the food industry, as well as the consequences of listeriosis to human health, providing a comparison of the current Brazilian situation with the international scenario.

  19. Inhibition of calpain blocks the phagosomal escape of Listeria monocytogenes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Lopez-Castejon

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes is a gram-positive facultative intracellular bacterium responsible for the food borne infection listeriosis, affecting principally the immunocompromised, the old, neonates and pregnant women. Following invasion L. monocytogenes escapes the phagosome and replicates in the cytoplasm. Phagosome escape is central to L. monocytogenes virulence and is required for initiating innate host-defence responses such as the secretion of the cytokine interleukin-1. Phagosome escape of L. monocytogenes is reported to depend upon host proteins such as γ-interferon-inducible lysosomal thiol reductase and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator. The host cytosolic cysteine protease calpain is required in the life cycle of numerous pathogens, and previous research reports an activation of calpain by L. monocytogenes infection. Thus we sought to determine whether host calpain was required for the virulence of L. monocytogenes. Treatment of macrophages with calpain inhibitors blocked escape of L. monocytogenes from the phagosome and consequently its proliferation within the cytosol. This was independent of any direct effect on the production of bacterial virulence factors or of a bactericidal effect. Furthermore, the secretion of interleukin-1β, a host cytokine whose secretion induced by L. monocytogenes depends upon phagosome escape, was also blocked by calpain inhibition. These data indicate that L. monocytogenes co-opts host calpain to facilitate its escape from the phagosome, and more generally, that calpain may represent a cellular Achilles heel exploited by pathogens.

  20. Inhibition of calpain blocks the phagosomal escape of Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Castejon, Gloria; Corbett, David; Goldrick, Marie; Roberts, Ian S; Brough, David

    2012-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a gram-positive facultative intracellular bacterium responsible for the food borne infection listeriosis, affecting principally the immunocompromised, the old, neonates and pregnant women. Following invasion L. monocytogenes escapes the phagosome and replicates in the cytoplasm. Phagosome escape is central to L. monocytogenes virulence and is required for initiating innate host-defence responses such as the secretion of the cytokine interleukin-1. Phagosome escape of L. monocytogenes is reported to depend upon host proteins such as γ-interferon-inducible lysosomal thiol reductase and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator. The host cytosolic cysteine protease calpain is required in the life cycle of numerous pathogens, and previous research reports an activation of calpain by L. monocytogenes infection. Thus we sought to determine whether host calpain was required for the virulence of L. monocytogenes. Treatment of macrophages with calpain inhibitors blocked escape of L. monocytogenes from the phagosome and consequently its proliferation within the cytosol. This was independent of any direct effect on the production of bacterial virulence factors or of a bactericidal effect. Furthermore, the secretion of interleukin-1β, a host cytokine whose secretion induced by L. monocytogenes depends upon phagosome escape, was also blocked by calpain inhibition. These data indicate that L. monocytogenes co-opts host calpain to facilitate its escape from the phagosome, and more generally, that calpain may represent a cellular Achilles heel exploited by pathogens.

  1. Reduced detectability of Listeria monocytogenes in the presence of Listeria innocua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zitz, Ulrike; Zunabovic, Marija; Domig, Konrad J; Wilrich, Peter-Theodor; Kneifel, Wolfgang

    2011-08-01

    Recent foodborne crises have demonstrated the importance of monitoring food safety. In terms of microbiological criteria, food safety requires the reliable detection of pathogens such as Listeria monocytogenes along the food chain by appropriate analytical methods. However, indications exist that accompanying Listeria innocua strains suppress the growth of L. monocytogenes during selective enrichment, which may cause reduced or even inhibited detection. To study these effects, the limit of detection of L. monocytogenes was investigated in the presence of L. innocua using the International Organization for Standardization standard method ISO 11290-1 and the VIDAS LDUO system, an automated method based on enzyme-linked fluorescence technology. The challenge was to provide low initial Listeria concentrations at sufficient precision to quantify the influence on the probability of detection of L. monocytogenes. The application of reference materials appropriate for quantitative test methods and a standardized dilution procedure were necessary to ensure accurate CFU levels of defined proportions of mixtures of both Listeria species. During selective enrichment, overgrowth of L. monocytogenes by L. innocua could be confirmed, leading to high rates of false-negative results. Moreover, with both methods, a significant decrease in the detectability of L. monocytogenes could be quantified at ratios of 2:1 at very low concentrations representative of natural contamination levels often found in foods and environments. It is concluded that there is a need to improve existing procedures with respect to selective enrichment, as well as the detection techniques.

  2. Invasive Listeria monocytogenes infections in the Netherlands, 1995-2003

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doorduyn, Y.; de Jager, C. M.; van der Zwaluw, W. K.; Wannet, W. J. B.; van der Ende, A.; Spanjaard, L.; van Duynhoven, Y. T. H. P.

    2006-01-01

    In order to add to the limited data available about the incidence of invasive Listeria monocytogenes infection in the Netherlands, two studies were conducted. In the first study, data on hospital patients with listeriosis in the period 1995-2003 were obtained from the National Medical Registration

  3. Incidence of Listeria monocytogenes and Other Bacteria in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Ogunji

    Bacterial infections were reported as major causes (Smith et al., 2009). This was supported by the isolation of Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus agalactiae, Escherichia coli, Bacillus spp and Listeria monocytogenes from aborted placenta bits by Mirdamadi (2005) and Kaur et al. (2007) in some cases of spontaneous ...

  4. Presence of Listeria monocytogenes in silage products of Shahrekord city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Sharifzadeh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the presence of Listeria monocytogenes in the silage samples. Methods: Silage samples obtained from 150 different farms in Shahrekord city (Iran and after DNA extraction, all samples were analyzed by PCR technique using one pair of primers for presence of this pathogen. The amplified products were detected on 1.5% agarose gel electrophoresis. Results: Listeria monocytogenes was isolated in 4 (2% of the 150 samples. The detection of this bacterium from silage samples in Shahrekord city indicated that these products could create a serious risk in public health of animal and human. The findings showed that in positive silage samples for Listeria monocytogenes, the pH value was about five and it was due to bacterial activity in these products. Conclusions: The quality of silage and hygiene parameters and good herd health management play an important role in the microbiological quality of herd and farm. Considering the high specificity and sensitivity of the employed PCR technique, it is recommended to be useful technique for identification of Listeria monocytogenes.

  5. Effect of Listeria monocytogenes inoculation, sodium acetate and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-08-08

    Aug 8, 2011 ... combination treatments. Key words: Listeria monocytogenes, nisin, sodium acetate, microbial quality, chemical quality, grass carp. ... Eight batches were dipped in pre-chilled (4°C) aqueous solution. (0, 0.1 and 0.2% nisin ... serial solution was prepared with a normal saline (0.85% NaCl) and used for the ...

  6. Studies on the risk assessment of Listeria monocytogenes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Notermans, S.; Dufrenne, J.; Teunis, P.; Chackraborty, T.

    1998-01-01

    Humans are frequently exposed to Listeria monocytogenes, and high numbers may be ingested during consumption of certain types of food. However, epidemiological investigations show that listeriosis is a rare disease. Risk assessment studies using an animal mouse model indicate that almost all L.

  7. Prevalence and antibiotic susceptibility of Listeria monocytogenes in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    One hundred and ninety two raw milk samples were collected from lactating cows identified in Fulani herds and small scale dairy farms within Sokoto metropolis in order to investigate the presence and determine the antibiotic susceptibility of Listeria monocytogenes in the milk. Selective culture and identification method ...

  8. Formation of biofilm by strains of Listeria monocytogenes isolated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Quantification of biofilm formation by 40 Listeria monocytogenes strains from wara soft cheese and its processing environment was assessed on glass vials surfaces. Attachement to glass surface was quantified using a crystal violet binding assay. All the 40 strains produced biofilms after 48 and 72 h incubation at 37oC.

  9. Influence of temperature on alkali stress adaptation in Listeria monocytogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Listeria monocytogenes cells may induce alkali stress adaptation when exposed to sublethal concentrations of alkaline cleaners and sanitizers that may be frequently used in the food processing environment. In the present study, the effect of temperature on the induction and the stability of such alk...

  10. Variations in virulence between different electrophoretic types of Listeria monocytogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørrung, Birgit; Andersen, Jens Kirk

    2000-01-01

    A total of 245 strains of Listeria monocytogenes, representing 33 different electrophoretic types (ETs), were examined quantitatively for haemolytic activity. No significant difference was observed in the mean haemolytic activity between different ETs. Eighty four out of 91 strains examined were...

  11. Listeria monocytogenes response regulators important for stress tolerance and pathogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallipolitis, B H; Ingmer, H

    2001-01-01

    Environmental sensing by two-component signal transduction systems is likely to play a role for growth and survival of Listeria monocytogenes both during transmission in food products and within a host organism. Two-component systems typically consist of a membrane-associated sensor histidine...

  12. Neonatal infection with Listeria monocytogenes: Rare, but serious

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Stuijvenberg, M.; Spanjaard, L.; Bergman, K.A.

    2006-01-01

    Between 1993 and 2003, three infants, two girls and a boy, were found to have an invasive infection with Listeria monocytogenes. They received intensive care including respiratory and circulatory support, antibiotics, and treatment of the neurological complications when possible. One of the girls

  13. Listeria monocytogenes : the nature, public health aspects and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    New food borne infectious diseases have continued to emerge world over in the food industries. Listeria monocytogenes, an intracellular bacterium has become an emerging food borne pathogen that causes listeriosis; a zoonotic disease, posing serious risks to public health; in livestock industries, pregnant mothers, ...

  14. Overlevingsstrategieën Listeria monocytogenes bij lage temperatuur

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wemekamp-Kamphuis, H.H.; Abee, T.

    2004-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is an important food-borne pathogen that may cause severe infections in humans. Many outbreaks caused by this organism have been associated with ready-to-eat foods wich may have undergone some form of minimal processing, or have been contaminated after processing. Ready-to-eat

  15. LISTERIA MONOCYTOGENES IN THE CONTEXT OF THE NEW COMMUNITY REGULATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bragagnolo

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available In recent years in the countries of the European Union have occurred profound and radical changes regarding the safety and hygiene of foodstuffs. The aim of this work is to highlight the significant changes made by the recent legislation in the control of Listeria monocytogenes.

  16. Antimicrobial resistance of Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria innocua from meat products and meat-processing environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Diego; Azón, Ester; Marco, Noelia; Carramiñana, Juan J; Rota, Carmina; Ariño, Agustín; Yangüela, Javier

    2014-09-01

    A total of 336 Listeria isolates from ready-to-eat (RTE) meat products and meat-processing environments, consisting of 206 Listeria monocytogenes, and 130 Listeria innocua isolates, were characterized by disc diffusion assay and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values for antimicrobial susceptibility against twenty antimicrobials. Resistance to one or two antimicrobials was observed in 71 L. monocytogenes isolates (34.5%), and 56 L. innocua isolates (43.1%). Multidrug resistance was identified in 24 Listeria isolates, 18 belonging to L. innocua (13.9%) and 6 to L. monocytogenes (2.9%). Oxacillin resistance was the most common resistance phenotype and was identified in 100% Listeria isolates. A medium prevalence of resistance to clindamycin (39.3% isolates) and low incidence of resistance to tetracycline (3.9% isolates) were also detected. Listeria isolates from RTE meat products displayed higher overall antimicrobial resistance (31.3%) than those from the environment (13.4%). All the strains assayed were sensitive to the preferred antibiotics used to treat listeriosis. Results showed that although antimicrobial resistance in L. monocytogenes still occurs at a low prevalence, L. innocua can form a reservoir of resistance genes which may transfer between bacterial species, including transference to organisms capable of causing disease in humans. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Recombinant Probiotic Expressing Listeria Adhesion Protein Attenuates Listeria monocytogenes Virulence In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Ok Kyung; Amalaradjou, Mary Anne Roshni; Bhunia, Arun K.

    2012-01-01

    Background Listeria monocytogenes, an intracellular foodborne pathogen, infects immunocompromised hosts. The primary route of transmission is through contaminated food. In the gastrointestinal tract, it traverses the epithelial barrier through intracellular or paracellular routes. Strategies to prevent L. monocytogenes entry can potentially minimize infection in high-risk populations. Listeria adhesion protein (LAP) aids L. monocytogenes in crossing epithelial barriers via the paracellular route. The use of recombinant probiotic bacteria expressing LAP would aid targeted clearance of Listeria from the gut and protect high-risk populations from infection. Methodology/Principal Findings The objective was to investigate the ability of probiotic bacteria or LAP-expressing recombinant probiotic Lactobacillus paracasei (LbpLAP) to prevent L. monocytogenes adhesion, invasion, and transwell-based transepithelial translocation in a Caco-2 cell culture model. Several wild type probiotic bacteria showed strong adhesion to Caco-2 cells but none effectively prevented L. monocytogenes infection. Pre-exposure to LbpLAP for 1, 4, 15, or 24 h significantly (Pmonocytogenes in Caco-2 cells, whereas pre-exposure to parental Lb. paracasei had no significant effect. Similarly, LbpLAP pre-exposure reduced L. monocytogenes translocation by as much as 46% after 24 h. LbpLAP also prevented L. monocytogenes-mediated cell damage and compromise of tight junction integrity. Furthermore, LbpLAP cells reduced L. monocytogenes-mediated cell cytotoxicity by 99.8% after 1 h and 79% after 24 h. Conclusions/Significance Wild type probiotic bacteria were unable to prevent L. monocytogenes infection in vitro. In contrast, LbpLAP blocked adhesion, invasion, and translocation of L. monocytogenes by interacting with host cell receptor Hsp60, thereby protecting cells from infection. These data show promise for the use of recombinant probiotics in preventing L. monocytogenes infection in high

  18. [A case of Listeria monocytogenes meningitis in an immunocompetent infant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattarino, G; Arrigoni, S; Grazioli, R; De Palma, A; di Natale, B

    2006-08-01

    Listeria Monocytogenes meningitis is a rare affection after the neonatal period, but in immunocompromised patients. Listeria Monocytogenes is a Gram-positive, facultative intracellular bacterium frequently causing infection in pregnant women, in patients with cell-mediated immunity deficit and in the early and late stages of life. We present a case of Listeria Monocytogenes meningitis in an immunocompetent nomad 8-month-child, preceded by gastroenteritis. Although gastrointestinal symptoms may be due to intestinal infection by Listeria, the concomitant presence of other bacteric or viral enteric pathogens may have promoted bacterium intestinal translocation and generated disseminated disease. The main transmission route of infection after the neonatal period is ingestion of contaminated food. A diet history was taken after isolation of the bacterium in liquor and showed that the child was an eater of undercooked hot-dogs. Despite the frequency of clinical complication in such affection, the outcome in this patient was a complete recovery. Although the infection is extremely infrequent in healthy children, physicians should always consider Listeria as a possible etiologic agent of meningitis in pediatric patients, regardless of their age or immunological status, especially in patients living in precarious sanitary conditions, where weaning times and conditions are not respected and a suitable food cooking is not assured.

  19. 77 FR 58804 - Testing of Product Samples for Listeria monocytogenes: Changes in Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-24

    ... Food Safety and Inspection Service Testing of Product Samples for Listeria monocytogenes: Changes in... Inspection Service (FSIS) is announcing changes in procedures for Listeria (L.) monocytogenes product... products for laboratory analysis (21 U.S.C. 642(a) and 460(b)). RTE Sampling Programs for Listeria...

  20. Listeria Monocytogenes: a rare cause of endophthalmitis, a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskell, Katherine M; Williams, Gwyn; Grant, Kathie; Lightman, Susan; Godbole, Gauri

    2017-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a known cause of gastroenteritis. Invasive disease can follow bacteremia causing meningoencephalitis, endocarditis and spontaneous miscarriages in immunocompromised patients and pregnant women respectively. We present the first case in England of endogenous endophthalmitis caused by L. monocytogenes following acute gastroenteritis in an immunocompetent host. A 50-year-old South Asian female presented with acute painful unilateral visual loss occurring shortly after an episode of self-limiting gastroenteritis. On examination, the eye was very inflamed with a hypopyon uveitis. A vitreous biopsy confirmed growth of L.monocytogenes serotype 1/2a. Diagnostic delay commonly occurs in endogenous endophthalmitis and exacerbates an already poor visual prognosis. Listeria spp. must be considered in ocular inflammation following gastroenteritis. The intraocular inflammation subsided but surgical intervention was required to remove vitreous debris and improve visual acuity.

  1. Listeria spp., y L. monocytogenes EN LECHE CRUDA DE CABRA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda Albarracín C

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To test non-pasteurized goat’s milk from the village of ‘la Garita’, Northern Santander, for Listeria monocytogenes. Material and methods. 90 samples of non-pasteurized goat’s milk were obtained over a 4 month period; pH and temperature of each sample were measured. The INVIMA technique was used to isolate L. monocytogenes; the species was confirmed by PCR. Results. The study showed that eight goat milk providers of the zone neither had refrigeration nor pasteurized the milk. The prevalence of L. monocytogenes was 3%; 15% of the samples had other species of Listeria. The milk obtained from this zone contained the pathogen that may cause listeriosis in children less than 5 years of age, pregnant women, adults and immunologically compromised patients. Conclusions. This study shows the occurrence of this pathogen in goat’s milk and identified areas of risk for those people who drink goat’s milk.

  2. Case of contamination by Listeria monocytogenes in mozzarella cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Greco

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Following a Listeria monocytogenes detection in a mozzarella cheese sampled at a dairy plant in Lazio Region, further investigations have been conducted both by the competent Authority and the food business operatordairy factory (as a part of dairy factory HACCP control. In total, 90 dairy products, 7 brine and 64 environmental samples have been tested. The prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes was 24.4% in mozzarella cheese, and 9.4% in environmental samples, while brines were all negatives. Forty-seven strains of L. monocytogenes have been isolated, all belonging to 4b/4e serotype. In 12 of these, the macrorestriction profile has been determined by means of pulsed field gel electrophoresis. The profiles obtained with AscI enzyme showed a 100% similarity while those obtained with ApaI a 96.78% similarity. These characteristics of the isolated strains jointly with the production process of mozzarella cheese has allowed to hypothesise an environmental contamination.

  3. Analytical bioconjugates, aptamers, enable specific quantitative detection of Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Hee; Ahn, Ji-Young; Lee, Kyeong-Ah; Um, Hyun-Ju; Sekhon, Simranjeet Singh; Sun Park, Tae; Min, Jiho; Kim, Yang-Hoon

    2015-06-15

    As a major human pathogen in the Listeria genus, Listeria monocytogenes causes the bacterial disease listeriosis, which is a serious infection caused by eating food contaminated with the bacteria. We have developed an aptamer-based sandwich assay (ABSA) platform that demonstrates a promising potential for use in pathogen detection using aptamers as analytical bioconjugates. The whole-bacteria SELEX (WB-SELEX) strategy was adopted to generate aptamers with high affinity and specificity against live L. monocytogenes. Of the 35 aptamer candidates tested, LMCA2 and LMCA26 reacted to L. monocytogenes with high binding, and were consequently chosen as sensing probes. The ABSA platform can significantly enhance the sensitivity by employing a very specific aptamer pair for the sandwich complex. The ABSA platform exhibited a linear response over a wide concentration range of L. monocytogenes from 20 to 2×10(6) CFU per mL and was closely correlated with the following relationship: y=9533.3x+1542.3 (R(2)=0.99). Our proposed ABSA platform also provided excellent specificity for the tests to distinguish L. monocytogenes from other Listeria species and other bacterial genera (3 Listeria spp., 4 Salmonella spp., 2 Vibrio spp., 3 Escherichia coli and 3 Shigella spp.). Improvements in the sensitivity and specificity have not only facilitated the reliable detection of L. monocytogenes at extremely low concentrations, but also allowed for the development of a 96-well plate-based routine assay platform for multivalent diagnostics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Outbreak of Listeria monocytogenes in an urban poultry flock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo, Rocio; Garner, Michael M; Hopkins, Sharon G; Shah, Devendra H

    2013-10-11

    Listeria monocytogenes infection is most commonly recognized in ruminants, including cattle, sheep, and goats; but it is rarely diagnosed in poultry. This report describes an outbreak of L. monocytogenes in a backyard poultry flock. Also, it points out the importance of collaboration between veterinarians and public health departments and the possible implications of zoonotic diseases. Depression, lack of appetite, labored breathing, and increased mortality were noted for 5 months in several affected birds within the flock. The pathologic changes in the internal organs of infected birds included severe myocarditis, pericarditis, pneumonia, hepatitis, and splenitis. No lesions were noted in the brain. Gram-positive organisms were seen in histologic sections of the heart and spleen. Listeria monocytogenes was detected by real time PCR from formalin fixed heart and spleen, and was isolated from fresh lung, spleen, and liver. This isolate was identified as L. monocytogenes serotype 4b by 16S rDNA sequencing and by PCR-based serotyping assay. This is the first report describing outbreak of L. monocytogenes in backyard poultry flock in Washington State and use of molecular methods to confirm L. monocytogenes infection from formalin fixed tissues.

  5. A review of the ecology, genomics, and stress response of Listeria innocua and Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milillo, Sara R; Friedly, Erik C; Saldivar, Joshua C; Muthaiyan, Arunachalam; O'Bryan, Corliss; Crandall, Philip G; Johnson, Michael G; Ricke, Steven C

    2012-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive foodborne pathogen responsible for a severe disease occurring in immuno-compromised populations. Foodborne illness caused by L. monocytogenes is a serious public health concern because of the high associated mortality. Study of the closely related, but nonpathogenic Listeria innocua has accounted for a better understanding of the behavior of L. monocytogenes in environments beyond the laboratory. Traditionally, the ecological co-habitation, genomic synteny, and physiological similarity of the two species have supported use of L. innocua for predicting the behavior of L. monocytogenes in farm and food processing environments. However, a careful review of the current literature indicates that in a given situation it may not be prudent to use L. innocua as a surrogate for L. monocytogenes without prior confirmation of their similar phenotypes, as an increasing number of studies have arisen demonstrating differences in L. monocytogenes and L. innocua stress response, and furthermore, there are differences among the L. monocytogenes subgroups. Future research should take into consideration that multiple surrogates might be required to accurately model even a single condition depending on the L. monocytogenes subgroup of interest.

  6. Incidence of Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria spp. in a small-scale mushroom production facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanath, Prema; Murugesan, Latha; Knabel, Stephen J; Verghese, Bindhu; Chikthimmah, Naveen; Laborde, Luke F

    2013-04-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne pathogen of significant concern to the agricultural and food processing industry because of its ability to grow and persist in cool and moist environments and its association with listeriosis, a disease with a very high mortality rate. Although there have been no listeriosis outbreaks attributed to fresh mushrooms in the United States, retail surveys and recalls are evidence that L. monocytogenes contamination of mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus) can occur. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of Listeria spp., including L. monocytogenes, in a small-scale mushroom production facility on the campus of the Pennsylvania State University in the United States. Of 184 samples taken from five production zones within the facility, 29 (15.8%) samples were positive for Listeria spp. Among the Listeria spp. isolates, L. innocua was most prevalent (10.3%) followed by L. welshimeri (3.3%), L. monocytogenes (1.6%), and L. grayi (0.5%). L. monocytogenes was recovered only from the phase I raw material composting area. Isolates of L. monocytogenes were confirmed and serotyped by multiplex PCR. The epidemiological relatedness of the three L. monocytogenes isolates to those serotypes or lineages frequently encountered in listeriosis infections was determined by multi-virulence-locus sequence typing using six virulence genes, namely, prfA, inlB, inlC, dal, clpP, and lisR. The phylogenetic positions of the three isolates in the dendrogram prepared with data from other isolates of L. monocytogenes showed that all isolates were grouped with serotype 4a, lineage IIIA. To date, this serotype has rarely been reported in foodborne disease outbreaks.

  7. The Distribution of Listeria in Pasture-Raised Broiler Farm Soils Is Potentially Related to University of Vermont Medium Enrichment Bias toward Listeria innocua over Listeria monocytogenes

    OpenAIRE

    Locatelli, Aude; Lewis, Micah A.; Rothrock, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    The occurrence of Listeria monocytogenes has been widely investigated in the poultry production chain from the processing plant to the final product. However, limited data are available on Listeria species, including Listeria monocytogenes, in the poultry farm environment. Therefore, fecal and soil samples from 37 pastured poultry flocks from 10 all-natural farms over 3 years were assessed to determine the prevalence and diversity of Listeria within these alternative poultry farm environments...

  8. A Look inside the Listeria monocytogenes Biofilms Extracellular Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Colagiorgi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne pathogen able to persist in food industry and is responsible for a severe illness called listeriosis. The ability of L. monocytogenes to persist in environments is due to its capacity to form biofilms that are a sessile community of microorganisms embedded in a self-produced matrix of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS’s. In this review, we summarized recent efforts performed in order to better characterize the polymeric substances that compose the extracellular matrix (ECM of L. monocytogenes biofilms. EPS extraction and analysis led to the identification of polysaccharides, proteins, extracellular DNA, and other molecules within the listerial ECM. All this knowledge will be useful for increasing food protection, suggesting effective strategies for the minimization of persistence of L. monocytogenes in food industry environments.

  9. Metabolic determinants in Listeria monocytogenes anaerobic listeriolysin O production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Nathan; Newton, Eric; Abrams, Elizabeth; Zani, Ashley; Sun, Yvonne

    2017-08-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a human pathogen and a facultative anaerobe. To better understand how anaerobic growth affects L. monocytogenes pathogenesis, we first showed that anaerobic growth led to decreased growth and changes in surface morphology. Moreover, compared to aerobically grown bacteria, anaerobically grown L. monocytogenes established higher level of invasion but decreased intracellular growth and actin polymerization in cultured cells. The production of listeriolysin O (LLO) was significantly lower in anaerobic cultures-a phenotype observed in wild type and isogenic mutants lacking transcriptional regulators SigB or CodY or harboring a constitutively active PrfA. To explore potential regulatory mechanisms, we established that the addition of central carbon metabolism intermediates, such as acetate, citrate, fumarate, pyruvate, lactate, and succinate, led to an increase in LLO activity in the anaerobic culture supernatant. These results highlight the regulatory role of central carbon metabolism in L. monocytogenes pathogenesis under anaerobic conditions.

  10. Listeria monocytogenes infection causes metabolic shifts in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moria C Chambers

    Full Text Available Immunity and metabolism are intimately linked; manipulating metabolism, either through diet or genetics, has the power to alter survival during infection. However, despite metabolism's powerful ability to alter the course of infections, little is known about what being "sick" means metabolically. Here we describe the metabolic changes occurring in a model system when Listeria monocytogenes causes a lethal infection in Drosophila melanogaster. L. monocytogenes infection alters energy metabolism; the flies gradually lose both of their energy stores, triglycerides and glycogen, and show decreases in both intermediate metabolites and enzyme message for the two main energy pathways, beta-oxidation and glycolysis. L. monocytogenes infection also causes enzymatic reduction in the anti-oxidant uric acid, and knocking out the enzyme uric oxidase has a complicated effect on immunity. Free amino acid levels also change during infection, including a drop in tyrosine levels which may be due to robust L. monocytogenes induced melanization.

  11. A Look inside the Listeria monocytogenes Biofilms Extracellular Matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colagiorgi, Angelo; Di Ciccio, Pierluigi; Zanardi, Emanuela; Ghidini, Sergio; Ianieri, Adriana

    2016-07-05

    Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne pathogen able to persist in food industry and is responsible for a severe illness called listeriosis. The ability of L. monocytogenes to persist in environments is due to its capacity to form biofilms that are a sessile community of microorganisms embedded in a self-produced matrix of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS's). In this review, we summarized recent efforts performed in order to better characterize the polymeric substances that compose the extracellular matrix (ECM) of L. monocytogenes biofilms. EPS extraction and analysis led to the identification of polysaccharides, proteins, extracellular DNA, and other molecules within the listerial ECM. All this knowledge will be useful for increasing food protection, suggesting effective strategies for the minimization of persistence of L. monocytogenes in food industry environments.

  12. Behavior of Listeria monocytogenes inoculated into raw tomatoes and processed tomato products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuchat, L R; Brackett, R E

    1991-01-01

    Rates of death and growth of Listeria monocytogenes inoculated onto raw whole and into chopped tomatoes stored at 10 and 21 degrees C were not influenced by prior treatment of tomatoes with chlorine or packaging under an atmosphere of 3% O2 and 97% N2. Growth of the pathogen occurred in whole tomatoes held at 21 degrees C but not at 10 degrees C, while death occurred in chopped tomatoes stored at these temperatures. Likewise, growth patterns of mesophilic aerobic microorganisms, psychrotrophic microorganisms, and yeasts and molds on whole and chopped tomatoes were essentially unaffected by chlorine and modified atmosphere packaging treatments. Populations of L. monocytogenes inoculated into commercially processed tomato juice and sauce and held at 5 degrees C remained constant for 14 days. A gradual decrease in the number of viable L. monocytogenes cells was observed in juice and sauce held at 21 degrees C. In contrast, the organism died rapidly when suspended in commercial tomato ketchup at 5 and 21 degrees C. Unlike low-acid raw salad vegetables such as lettuce, broccoli, asparagus, and cauliflower on which we have observed L. monocytogenes grow at refrigeration temperatures, tomatoes are not a good growth substrate for the organism. Nevertheless, L. monocytogens can remain viable on raw whole and chopped tomatoes and in commercial tomato juice and sauce for periods extending beyond their normal shelf-life expectancy. PMID:1906697

  13. Listeria monocytogenes - kvantitatiivisen määritysmenetelmän validointi

    OpenAIRE

    Riihiaho, Matti

    2012-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes on elintarvikelaboratorioissa tutkittava patogeeninen bakteeri, joka voi pahimmillaan aiheuttaa jopa kuoleman ihmiselle. Listeria monocytogenes on gram-positiivinen bakteeri, jota esiintyy yleisesti maaperässä, eläimissä, kasveissa, vedessä ja rehuissa. Listeria-sukuun kuuluu seitsemän eri lajia, joista L. monocytogenes on ainoa, joka voi aiheuttaa ruokamyrkytyksiä ihmiselle. Riskiryhmiin kuuluvat vastustuskyvyltään alentuneet ihmiset kuten vanhukset, raskaana olevat, v...

  14. Comparison of the Prevalences and Diversities of Listeria Species and Listeria monocytogenes in an Urban and a Rural Agricultural Watershed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stea, Emma C; Purdue, Laura M; Jamieson, Rob C; Yost, Chris K; Truelstrup Hansen, Lisbeth

    2015-06-01

    Foods and related processing environments are commonly contaminated with the pathogenic Listeria monocytogenes. To investigate potential environmental reservoirs of Listeria spp. and L. monocytogenes, surface water and point source pollution samples from an urban and a rural municipal water supply watershed in Nova Scotia, Canada, were examined over 18 months. Presumptive Listeria spp. were cultured from 72 and 35% of rural and urban water samples, respectively, with 24% of the positive samples containing two or three different Listeria spp. The L. innocua (56%) and L. welshimeri (43%) groups were predominant in the rural and urban watersheds, respectively. Analysis by the TaqMan assay showed a significantly (P Listeria spp. were associated with 70 times higher odds of isolating L. monocytogenes (odds ratio = 70; P Listeria species population and could be a potential reservoir for L. monocytogenes, especially in rural agricultural watersheds. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  15. Comparison of the Prevalences and Diversities of Listeria Species and Listeria monocytogenes in an Urban and a Rural Agricultural Watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stea, Emma C.; Purdue, Laura M.; Jamieson, Rob C.; Yost, Chris K.

    2015-01-01

    Foods and related processing environments are commonly contaminated with the pathogenic Listeria monocytogenes. To investigate potential environmental reservoirs of Listeria spp. and L. monocytogenes, surface water and point source pollution samples from an urban and a rural municipal water supply watershed in Nova Scotia, Canada, were examined over 18 months. Presumptive Listeria spp. were cultured from 72 and 35% of rural and urban water samples, respectively, with 24% of the positive samples containing two or three different Listeria spp. The L. innocua (56%) and L. welshimeri (43%) groups were predominant in the rural and urban watersheds, respectively. Analysis by the TaqMan assay showed a significantly (P pathogen regardless of the detection method. Isolation of Listeria spp. were associated with 70 times higher odds of isolating L. monocytogenes (odds ratio = 70; P Listeria species population and could be a potential reservoir for L. monocytogenes, especially in rural agricultural watersheds. PMID:25819965

  16. Occurrence and growth of Listeria monocytogenes in packaged raw milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Hanna; Ruusunen, Marjo; Lindström, Miia

    2017-11-16

    The increased availability of packaged raw drinking milk necessitates the investigation of the occurrence and growth of Listeria monocytogenes in raw milk during distribution and storage. The occurrence of L. monocytogenes in 105 retailed raw milk bottles, 115 bulk tank milk samples, 23 in-line milk filter socks and in 50 environmental samples collected from an on-farm dairy establishment were investigated. Growth of inoculated low-level L. monocytogenes contamination was also investigated in two types of raw milk packaging, namely in 1-litre plastic bottles and 3-litre bag-in-boxes, both stored at three different storage temperatures of 6, 8 and 10°C. The occurrence of L. monocytogenes was higher (4.8%) in bottled raw milk stored until the use-by-date of the package compared to fresh bulk tank milk (1.7%). L. monocytogenes counts were ≤13CFU/ml in bottled raw milk and ≤1CFU/ml in bulk tank milk. L. monocytogenes was not detected in the packaging facility, but occurred very frequently (39%) in the milk filter socks. Subtyping of L. monocytogenes isolates using pulsed-field gel-electrophoresis revealed seven pulsotypes, of which two occurred in multiple samples. Targeted inoculum levels of 1-2CFU/ml yielded L. monocytogenes counts≥100CFU/ml within seven days of storage in 22% of the raw milk packages stored at 6°C, and in all of the raw milk packages stored at 8°C. The frequent occurrence of L. monocytogenes in raw milk and the ability of a low-level L. monocytogenes contamination to grow at refrigeration temperatures highlight the importance of consumer education regarding the appropriate raw milk storage and handling. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Listeria monocytogenes in Fresh Produce: Outbreaks, Prevalence and Contamination Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Qi; Gooneratne, Ravi; Hussain, Malik Altaf

    2017-03-09

    Listeria monocytogenes, a member of the genus Listeria, is widely distributed in agricultural environments, such as soil, manure and water. This organism is a recognized foodborne pathogenic bacterium that causes many diseases, from mild gastroenteritis to severe blood and/or central nervous system infections, as well as abortion in pregnant women. Generally, processed ready-to-eat and cold-stored meat and dairy products are considered high-risk foods for L. monocytogenes infections that cause human illness (listeriosis). However, recently, several listeriosis outbreaks have been linked to fresh produce contamination around the world. Additionally, many studies have detected L. monocytogenes in fresh produce samples and even in some minimally processed vegetables. Thus L. monocytogenes may contaminate fresh produce if present in the growing environment (soil and water). Prevention of biofilm formation is an important control measure to reduce the prevalence and survival of L. monocytogenes in growing environments and on fresh produce. This article specifically focuses on fresh produce-associated listeriosis outbreaks, prevalence in growing environments, contamination levels of fresh produce, and associated fresh produce safety challenges.

  18. Listeria monocytogenes in Fresh Produce: Outbreaks, Prevalence and Contamination Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Zhu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes, a member of the genus Listeria, is widely distributed in agricultural environments, such as soil, manure and water. This organism is a recognized foodborne pathogenic bacterium that causes many diseases, from mild gastroenteritis to severe blood and/or central nervous system infections, as well as abortion in pregnant women. Generally, processed ready-to-eat and cold-stored meat and dairy products are considered high-risk foods for L. monocytogenes infections that cause human illness (listeriosis. However, recently, several listeriosis outbreaks have been linked to fresh produce contamination around the world. Additionally, many studies have detected L. monocytogenes in fresh produce samples and even in some minimally processed vegetables. Thus L. monocytogenes may contaminate fresh produce if present in the growing environment (soil and water. Prevention of biofilm formation is an important control measure to reduce the prevalence and survival of L. monocytogenes in growing environments and on fresh produce. This article specifically focuses on fresh produce–associated listeriosis outbreaks, prevalence in growing environments, contamination levels of fresh produce, and associated fresh produce safety challenges.

  19. Effect of citral and carvacrol on the susceptibility of Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria innocua to antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanini, S F; Silva-Angulo, A B; Rosenthal, A; Rodrigo, D; Martínez, A

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the antibiotic susceptibility of Listeria innocua (L. innocua) and Listeria monocytogenes (L. monocytogenes) cells in the presence of citral and carvacrol at sublethal concentrations in an agar medium. The presence of terpenes in the L. monocytogenes and L. innocua culture medium provided a reduction in the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of all the antibiotics tested. These effects were dependent on the concentration of terpenes present in the culture medium. The combination of citral and carvacrol potentiated antibiotic activity by reducing the MIC values of bacitracin and colistin from 32.0 and 128.0 μg ml⁻¹ to 1.0 and 2.0 μg ml⁻¹, respectively. Thus, both Listeria species became more susceptible to these drugs. In this way, the colistin and bacitracin resistance of L. monocytogenes and L. innocua was reversed in the presence of terpenes. Results obtained in this study show that the phytochemicals citral and carvacrol potentiate antibiotic activity, reducing the MIC values of cultured L. monocytogenes and L. innocua. Phytochemicals citral and carvacrol potentiate antibiotic activity of erythromycin, bacitracin and colistin by reducing the MIC values of cultured Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria innocua. This effect in reducing the MIC values of the antibiotics tested in both micro-organisms was increased when natural antimicrobials were combined. This finding indicated that the combination among terpenes and antibiotic may contribute in reducing the required dosage of antibiotics due to the possible effect of terpenes on permeation barrier of the micro-organism cell membrane. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  20. Limitation in the detection of Listeria monocytogenes in food in the presence of competing Listeria innocua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oravcová, K; Trncíková, T; Kuchta, T; Kaclíková, E

    2008-02-01

    Detectability of Listeria monocytogenes at 10(0) CFU per food sample in the presence of Listeria innocua using standard microbiological detection was evaluated and compared with the real-time PCR-based method. Enrichment in half-Fraser broth followed by subculture in Fraser broth according to EN ISO 11290-1 was used. False-negative detection of 10(0) CFU L. monocytogenes was obtained in the presence of 10(1) CFU L. innocua per sample using the standard detection method in contrast to more than 10(5) CFU L. innocua per sample using real-time PCR. Identification of L. monocytogenes on the chromogenic medium by the standard procedure was impossible if L. innocua was able to overgrow L. monocytogenes by more than three orders of magnitude after the enrichment in model samples. These results were confirmed using naturally contaminated food samples. Standard microbiological method was insufficient for the reliable detection of 10(0) CFU L. monocytogenes in the presence of more than 10(0) CFU of L. innocua per sample. On the other hand, if the growth of L. monocytogenes was sufficient to reach the concentration equal to the detection limit of PCR, the amount of the other microflora present in the food sample including L. innocua was not relevant for success of the PCR detection of L. monocytogenes. After the enrichment, the PCR detection is more convenient than the standard one as PCR detection is not compromised by other present microflora.

  1. Comparative experimental infection of Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria ivanovii in bovine trophoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Cláudia E; Mol, Juliana P S; Garcia, Luize N N; Costa, Luciana F; Santos, Renato L; Paixão, Tatiane A

    2017-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive, facultative intracellular and invasive bacterium that has tropism to the placenta, and causes fetal morbidity and mortality in several mammalian species. While infection with L. monocytogenes and L. ivanovii are known as important causes of abortion and reproductive failure in cattle, the pathogenesis of maternal-fetal listeriosis in this species is poorly known. This study used the bovine chorioallantoic membrane explant model to investigate the kinetics of L. monocytogenes, L. ivanovii, and L. innocua infections in bovine trophoblastic cells for up to 8 h post infection. L. monocytogenes and L. ivanovii were able to invade and multiply in trophoblastic cells without causing cell death or inducing expression of pro-inflammatory genes. Although L. innocua was unable to multiply in bovine trophoblastic cells, it induced transcription of the pro-inflammatory mediator CXCL6. This study demonstrated for the first time the susceptibility of bovine trophoblastic cells to L. monocytogenes and L. ivanovii infection.

  2. Listeria spp. and Listeria monocytogenes contamination in ready-to-eat sandwiches collected from vending machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Cossu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Ready-to-eat (RTE food is characterised by a long shelf-life at refrigerated temperature and can be consumed as such, without any treatment. The aim of the work was to evaluate the presence of Listeria spp. and Listeria monocytogenes in RTEs collected from refrigerated vending machines placed in hospital environment and accessible to the hospitalised patients. In 4 different sampling, 55 RTEs were collected from vending machines of six hospitals located in different areas of Sardinia region. All the samples were characterised by similar manufacturing process, such as the use of modified atmosphere packaging and belonged to 5 different producers. Listeria spp. was not countable using the enumeration method in all of the analysed samples. Using the detection method, Listeria spp. was recovered from 9 sandwich samples. Interestingly, 3 of these samples (5.5% made by the manufacturer, were positive for L. monocytogenes contamination. The risk related to the L. monocytogenes presence in RTEs proportionally increases when food is introduced in susceptible environments, such as hospitals and consumed by susceptible people. Although the RTEs analysed showed values that complied with the European microbiological criteria for foodstuffs, the availability of these products in a susceptible environment should be carefully checked. Therefore, in order to limit the possible exposition to L. monocytogenes, more information on the risk related to RTE consumption should be provided to the hospitalised patients.

  3. Listeria monocytogenes as a vector for anti-cancer therapies.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tangney, Mark

    2012-01-31

    The intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes represents a promising therapeutic vector for the delivery of DNA, RNA or protein to cancer cells or to prime immune responses against tumour-specific antigens. A number of biological properties make L. monocytogenes a promising platform for development as a vector for either gene therapy or as an anti-cancer vaccine vector. L. monocytogenes is particularly efficient in mediating internalization into host cells. Once inside cells, the bacterium produces specific virulence factors which lyse the vaculolar membrane and allow escape into the cytoplasm. Once in the cytosol, L. monocytogenes is capable of actin-based motility and cell-to-cell spread without an extracellular phase. The cytoplasmic location of L. monocytogenes is significant as this potentiates entry of antigens into the MHC Class I antigen processing pathway leading to priming of specific CD8(+) T cell responses. The cytoplasmic location is also beneficial for the delivery of DNA (bactofection) by L. monocytogenes whilst cell-to-cell spread may facilitate access of the vector to cells throughout the tumour. Several preclinical studies have demonstrated the ability of L. monocytogenes for intracellular gene or protein delivery in vitro and in vivo, and this vector has also displayed safety and efficacy in clinical trial. Here, we review the features of the L. monocytogenes host-pathogen interaction that make this bacterium such an attractive candidate with which to induce appropriate therapeutic responses. We focus primarily upon work that has led to attenuation of the pathogen, demonstrated DNA, RNA or protein delivery to tumour cells as well as research that shows the efficacy of L. monocytogenes as a vector for tumour-specific vaccine delivery.

  4. Characterization of Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria innocua from a vegetable processing plant by RAPD and REA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguado, V; Vitas, A I; García-Jalón, I

    2004-02-01

    The incidence of Listeria monocytogenes in a vegetable processing plant was investigated over a 23-month period. Frozen ready-to-eat vegetable samples, well as the plant environment, were sampled. The molecular subtyping techniques, Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and Restriction Endonuclease Analyses (REA), were performed to help investigate the origin and routes of Listeria dissemination. The low and sporadic incidence of L. monocytogenes made it impossible to establish an epidemiological sequence in the processing plant, though a case of cross-contamination between tomato and ratatouille was detected. Listeria innocua subtyping, however, allowed us to determine the prevalence of several strains in vegetables, and their presence on machinery samples suggested the possibility of cross-contamination during processing. The low incidence of L. monocytogenes indicated that the risk of listeriosis transmission by vegetable consumption is low. On the other hand, the isolation of the same strain of L. innocua in several surveys pointed out the risk of colonisation on surfaces and machinery. The persistence of Listeria spp. is a cause for concern as can lead to future contamination of vegetables processed in the plant and to a possible increased risk for health. Therefore, periodic controls for the presence of Listeria spp. and a further review of the cleaning and disinfection procedures used in frozen vegetable plants are recommended.

  5. Evaluation of a monoclonal antibody able to detect live Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria innocua

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sølve, Marianne; Boel, Jeppe; Nørrung, Birgit

    2000-01-01

    A monoclonal Listeria antibody, designated B4, was evaluated. The ability of the antibody to bind to viable bacteria belonging to Listeria spp, compared to bacteria of the same species killed by beat treatment, acid or base treatment, sanitizers, and irradiation was examined. The antibody was found...

  6. Antimicrobial Activity of Chitosan Films With Essential Oils Against Listeria monocytogenes on Cabbage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovanovic, Gordana D; Klaus, Anita S; P Niksic, Miomir

    2016-09-01

    The highest incidence of listeriosis, due to consumption of ready-to-eat foods and fresh, shredded, minimally processed vegetables, occurs among pregnant women and the elderly. In order to reduce the prevalence of listeriosis among consumers, better protective measures are recommended. Chitosan films, with or without added essential oils, represent a modern, safe method of preserving the quality of such vegetables and significantly reducing the incidence of Listeria monocytogenes in these foods. The present study was conducted to evaluate the antimicrobial properties of composite chitosan-gelatin films with and without essential oils against two strains of L. monocytogenes, ATCC 19115 and ATCC 19112, in fresh shredded cabbage. Shredded cabbage was inoculated with L. monocytogenes and packed between two layers of the chitosan composite film, then placed in Petri dishes. The prepared samples were stored at 4°C then analyzed for total viable count on PALCAM agar while incubated at 37°C, every 24 hours for 7 days. Average L. monocytogenes content ranged from 4.2 - 5.4 log CFU/g, reaching values of 7.2 - 8.6 log CFU/g in samples of untreated cabbage. A complete reduction of L. monocytogenes ATCC 19115 on cabbage was achieved after 120 hours in the presence of 0.5% chitosan film, whereas reduction of L. monocytogenes ATCC 19112 was achieved after 144 hours. In the presence of 1% chitosan film, the bacteria withered more quickly and complete reduction of both species of L. monocytogenes was achieved after 96 hours. All tested formulations of chitosan films exhibited strong antimicrobial activity on the growth of both strains of L. monocytogenes on cabbage. The best effect was achieved with a 1% chitosan concentration. The addition of essential oils increased the antimicrobial activity of all tested films.

  7. Antimicrobial Activity of Chitosan Films With Essential Oils Against Listeria monocytogenes on Cabbage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovanovic, Gordana D.; Klaus, Anita S.; P. Niksic, Miomir

    2016-01-01

    Background The highest incidence of listeriosis, due to consumption of ready-to-eat foods and fresh, shredded, minimally processed vegetables, occurs among pregnant women and the elderly. In order to reduce the prevalence of listeriosis among consumers, better protective measures are recommended. Chitosan films, with or without added essential oils, represent a modern, safe method of preserving the quality of such vegetables and significantly reducing the incidence of Listeria monocytogenes in these foods. Objectives The present study was conducted to evaluate the antimicrobial properties of composite chitosan-gelatin films with and without essential oils against two strains of L. monocytogenes, ATCC 19115 and ATCC 19112, in fresh shredded cabbage. Methods Shredded cabbage was inoculated with L. monocytogenes and packed between two layers of the chitosan composite film, then placed in Petri dishes. The prepared samples were stored at 4°C then analyzed for total viable count on PALCAM agar while incubated at 37°C, every 24 hours for 7 days. Results Average L. monocytogenes content ranged from 4.2 - 5.4 log CFU/g, reaching values of 7.2 - 8.6 log CFU/g in samples of untreated cabbage. A complete reduction of L. monocytogenes ATCC 19115 on cabbage was achieved after 120 hours in the presence of 0.5% chitosan film, whereas reduction of L. monocytogenes ATCC 19112 was achieved after 144 hours. In the presence of 1% chitosan film, the bacteria withered more quickly and complete reduction of both species of L. monocytogenes was achieved after 96 hours. Conclusions All tested formulations of chitosan films exhibited strong antimicrobial activity on the growth of both strains of L. monocytogenes on cabbage. The best effect was achieved with a 1% chitosan concentration. The addition of essential oils increased the antimicrobial activity of all tested films. PMID:27800143

  8. Listeria monocytogenes does not survive ingestion by Acanthamoeba polyphaga.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akya, Alisha; Pointon, Andrew; Thomas, Connor

    2010-03-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a ubiquitous bacterium capable of infecting humans, particularly pregnant women and immunocompromised individuals. Although the intracellular invasion and pathogenesis of listeriosis in mammalian tissues has been well studied, little is known about the ecology of L. monocytogenes , and in particular the environmental reservoir for this bacterium has not been identified. This study used short-term co-culture at 15, 22 and 37 degrees C to examine the interaction of L. monocytogenes strains with Acanthamoeba polyphaga ACO12. Survival of L. monocytogenes cells phagocytosed by monolayers of trophozoites was assessed by culture techniques and microscopy. A. polyphaga trophozoites eliminated bacterial cells within a few hours post-phagocytosis, irrespective of the incubation temperature used. Wild-type L. monocytogenes and a phenotypic listeriolysin O mutant were unable to either multiply or survive within trophozoites. By contrast, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium C5 cells used as controls were able to survive and multiply within A. polyphaga trophozoites. The data presented indicate that A. polyphaga ACO12 is unlikely to harbour L. monocytogenes, or act as an environmental reservoir for this bacterium.

  9. Evolutionary dynamics of the accessory genome of Listeria monocytogenes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henk C den Bakker

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes, a foodborne bacterial pathogen, is comprised of four phylogenetic lineages that vary with regard to their serotypes and distribution among sources. In order to characterize lineage-specific genomic diversity within L. monocytogenes, we sequenced the genomes of eight strains from several lineages and serotypes, and characterized the accessory genome, which was hypothesized to contribute to phenotypic differences across lineages. The eight L. monocytogenes genomes sequenced range in size from 2.85-3.14 Mb, encode 2,822-3,187 genes, and include the first publicly available sequenced representatives of serotypes 1/2c, 3a and 4c. Mapping of the distribution of accessory genes revealed two distinct regions of the L. monocytogenes chromosome: an accessory-rich region in the first 65° adjacent to the origin of replication and a more stable region in the remaining 295°. This pattern of genome organization is distinct from that of related bacteria Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus cereus. The accessory genome of all lineages is enriched for cell surface-related genes and phosphotransferase systems, and transcriptional regulators, highlighting the selective pressures faced by contemporary strains from their hosts, other microbes, and their environment. Phylogenetic analysis of O-antigen genes and gene clusters predicts that serotype 4 was ancestral in L. monocytogenes and serotype 1/2 associated gene clusters were putatively introduced through horizontal gene transfer in the ancestral population of L. monocytogenes lineage I and II.

  10. Inhibition of sortase A by chalcone prevents Listeria monocytogenes infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongen; Chen, Yutao; Zhang, Bing; Niu, Xiaodi; Song, Meng; Luo, Zhaoqing; Lu, Gejin; Liu, Bowen; Zhao, Xiaoran; Wang, Jianfeng; Deng, Xuming

    2016-04-15

    The critical role of sortase A in gram-positive bacterial pathogenicity makes this protein a good potential target for antimicrobial therapy. In this study, we report for the first time the crystal structure of Listeria monocytogenes sortase A and identify the active sites that mediate its transpeptidase activity. We also used a sortase A (SrtA) enzyme activity inhibition assay, simulation, and isothermal titration calorimetry analysis to discover that chalcone, an agent with little anti-L. monocytogenes activity, could significantly inhibit sortase A activity with an IC50 of 28.41 ± 5.34 μM by occupying the active site of SrtA. The addition of chalcone to a co-culture of L. monocytogenes and Caco-2 cells significantly inhibited bacterial entry into the cells and L. monocytogenes-mediated cytotoxicity. Additionally, chalcone treatment decreased the mortality of infected mice, the bacterial burden in target organs, and the pathological damage to L. monocytogenes-infected mice. In conclusion, these findings suggest that chalcone is a promising candidate for the development of treatment against L. monocytogenes infection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Biofilm Formation of Listeria monocytogenes on Various Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Mahdavi

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Listeria monocytogenes is considered as a ubiquitous foodborne pathogen which can lead to serious infections, especially in newborns, elderly, pregnant, and immunocompromised people. The organism has been isolated from many foods and may cause meningitis, septicemia and abortion in pregnant women. Also L. monocytogenes forms biofilms on many food contact surface materials and medical devices. Development of biofilms on many surfaces is a potential source of contamination of foods that may lead to spoilage or transmission of foodborne pathogens. Materials & Methods: Biofilm formation of L. monocytogenes (RITCC 1293 serotype 4a was investigated. Hydrophobicity of L. monocytogenes was measured by MATH method. Then biofilm formation of the organism was assessed at 2, 4, 8, 16 and 20 hours on stainless steel (type 304 no 2B, polyethylene and glass by drop plate method. Results: Results indicated that L. monocytogenes with 85% of hydrophobicity formed biofilm on each of three surfaces. Biofilm formation on stainless steel surfaces was significantly more than other surfaces (p<0.05. Conclusion: The ability of biofilm formation of L. monocytogenes on medical devices and food containers is very important as far as hygiene and disease outbreaks are concerned.

  12. LISTERIA MONOCYTOGENES RISK EVALUATION IN READY TO EAT DELI PRODUCTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Civera

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes has become one of the major concerns for food safety. Its ability to survive and replicate at low temperature, pH and high salt concentration, makes the bacterium a threat, mostly for RTE products. For these reasons, the present research was aimed at detecting the ability of growth of L. monocytogenes in RTE products retrieved from one deli store. Samples were analysed for L. monocytogenes detection, then inoculated with the pathogen (105cell/ml and stored at refrigeration temperature for the duration of their shelf-life (15-60 days. In all the products L. monocytogenes was not detected before experimental contamination. The challenge test evidenced that experimentally inoculated L. monocytogenes was not able to multiply for the duration of the entire shelf-life. These results indicated that the tested products could be considered as foods which are not able to support the growth of L. monocytogenes, as indicated by E.C. Regulation 2073/05. However, in order to guarantee consumer’s safety, it needs to be emphasized the need of a correct application of the GMPs, required for lowering the risk of initial contamination.

  13. Methods used for the detection and subtyping of Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadhav, Snehal; Bhave, Mrinal; Palombo, Enzo A

    2012-03-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is an important foodborne pathogen responsible for non-invasive and invasive diseases in the elderly, pregnant women, neonates and immunocompromised populations. This bacterium has many similarities with other non-pathogenic Listeria species which makes its detection from food and environmental samples challenging. Subtyping of L. monocytogenes strains can prove to be crucial in epidemiological investigations, source tracking contamination from food processing plants and determining evolutionary relationships between different strains. In recent years there has been a shift towards the use of molecular subtyping. This has led to the development of new subtyping techniques such as multi-locus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) and multi-locus sequence based typing (MLST). This review focuses on the available methods for Listeria detection including immuno-based techniques and the more recently developed molecular methods and analytical techniques such as matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight based mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). It also includes a comparison and critical analysis of the available phenotypic and genotypic subtyping techniques that have been investigated for L. monocytogenes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Research advancement of detection methods of Listeria monocytogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Yunxia

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes is a food-borne pathogen of both human beings and animals,which has been widely recognized over the world.L.monocytogenes can be found in dairy products,vegetables,meat and other food,so it has caused great threat to human health.How to detect the trace of L.monocytogenes is a key link in the process of food-borne disease prevention and control.A wide variety of culture and alternative methods have been developed in order to detect this pathogen in food.The current articl introduces the traditional detection method and all kinds of rapid methods such as immunoassay,biosensors,Bacteriophage-based detection methods and molecular biological assay.

  15. Whole genome sequence-based serogrouping of Listeria monocytogenes isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyden, Patrick; Pietzka, Ariane; Lennkh, Anna; Murer, Andrea; Springer, Burkhard; Blaschitz, Marion; Indra, Alexander; Huhulescu, Steliana; Allerberger, Franz; Ruppitsch, Werner; Sensen, Christoph W

    2016-10-10

    Whole genome sequencing (WGS) is currently becoming the method of choice for characterization of Listeria monocytogenes isolates in national reference laboratories (NRLs). WGS is superior with regards to accuracy, resolution and analysis speed in comparison to several other methods including serotyping, PCR, pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), multilocus sequence typing (MLST), multilocus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA), and multivirulence-locus sequence typing (MVLST), which have been used thus far for the characterization of bacterial isolates (and are still important tools in reference laboratories today) to control and prevent listeriosis, one of the major sources of foodborne diseases for humans. Backward compatibility of WGS to former methods can be maintained by extraction of the respective information from WGS data. Serotyping was the first subtyping method for L. monocytogenes capable of differentiating 12 serovars and national reference laboratories still perform serotyping and PCR-based serogrouping as a first level classification method for Listeria monocytogenes surveillance. Whole genome sequence based core genome MLST analysis of a L. monocytogenes collection comprising 172 isolates spanning all 12 serotypes was performed for serogroup determination. These isolates clustered according to their serotypes and it was possible to group them either into the IIa, IIc, IVb or IIb clusters, respectively, which were generated by minimum spanning tree (MST) and neighbor joining (NJ) tree data analysis, demonstrating the power of the new approach. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. BEHAVIOUR OF LISTERIA MONOCYTOGENES IN FRESH SAUCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Grassi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ready to use fresh sauces are among Ready to Eat foods for which producers need to respect the 100 UFC/g limit for the presence of L. monocytogenes. In the current research a Challenge test was performed on fresh mushroom and cheese sauces. Both were placed at two storage temperatures and the L. monocytogenes potential growth (d was evaluated. Only cheese sauce stored at 8°C showed a δ> 0,5 log10 UFC/g. However, considering the limited initial contamination it can be excluded that the product could reach 100 UFC/g by the expiration date.

  17. Removal of Listeria monocytogenes dual-species biofilms using combined enzyme-benzalkonium chloride treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-López, Pedro; Carballo-Justo, Alba; Draper, Lorraine A; Cabo, Marta L

    2017-01-01

    The effects of pronase (PRN), cellulase (CEL) or DNaseI alone or combined with benzalkonium chloride (BAC) against Listeria monocytogenes-carrying biofilms were assayed. The best removal activity against L. monocytogenes-Escherichia coli biofilms was obtained using DNaseI followed by PRN and CEL. Subsequently, a modified logistic model was used to quantify the combined effects of PRN or DNaseI with BAC. A better BAC performance after PRN compared to DNaseI eradicating L. monocytogenes was observed. In E. coli the effects were the opposite. Finally, effects of DNaseI and DNaseI-BAC treatments were compared against two different L. monocytogenes-carrying biofilms. DNaseI-BAC was more effective against L. monocytogenes when co-cultured with E. coli. Nonetheless, comparing the removal effects after BAC addition, these were higher in mixed-biofilms with Pseudomonas fluorescens. However, a high number of released viable cells was observed after combined treatments. These results open new perspectives of enzymes as an anti-biofilm strategy for environmental pathogen control.

  18. Enterocin CRL35 inhibits Listeria monocytogenes in a murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvucci, Emiliano; Saavedra, Lucila; Hebert, Elvira Maria; Haro, Cecilia; Sesma, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne pathogen causative of opportunistic infections. Listeriosis is associated with severe infections in pregnant women causing abortion or neonatal listeriosis. An alternative to antibiotics are safe novel bacteriocins peptides such as enterocin CRL35 with strong antilisterial activity produced by Enterococcus mundtii CRL35. In the present paper, our goal is to study the effectiveness of this peptide and the producer strain in a murine model of pregnancy-associated listeriosis. A single dose of 5×10(9) colony-forming unit of L. monocytogenes FBUNT (Faculty of Biochemistry-University of Tucumán) resulted in translocation of pathogen to liver and spleen of BALB/c pregnant mice. The maximum level of Listeria was observed on day 3 postinfection. Interestingly, the intragastric administration of enterocin CRL35 significantly reduced the translocation of the pathogen to vital organs. On the other hand, the preadministration of E. mundtii CRL35 slightly inhibited this translocation. Listeria infection caused a significant increase in polymorphonuclear leukocytes at day 3 postinfection compared to the noninfected group. This value was reduced after the administration of enterocin CRL35. No significant changes were observed in either white blood cells or lymphocytes counts. Based on the data presented in the present work enterocin CRL35 would be a promising alternative for the prevention of Listeria infections.

  19. listeria monocytogenes AND OTHER Listeria species IN POUL TRY ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BSN

    ABSTRACT. Many diseases of poultry, particularly Listeriosis may be disseminated by faecal contamination of the environment or water. An assessment of the prevalence of l . monocy1ogenes and other listeria species in poultry faeces often utilized as manure in soil supplements for maximum crop yield was evaluated.

  20. A multiplex PCR for detection of Listeria monocytogenes and its lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawool, Deepak B; Doijad, Swapnil P; Poharkar, Krupali V; Negi, Mamta; Kale, Satyajit B; Malik, S V S; Kurkure, Nitin V; Chakraborty, Trinad; Barbuddhe, Sukhadeo B

    2016-11-01

    A novel multiplex PCR assay was developed to identify genus Listeria, and discriminate Listeria monocytogenes and its major lineages (LI, LII, LIII). This assay is a rapid and inexpensive subtyping method for screening and characterization of L. monocytogenes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Listeria monocytogenes: maternal-foetal infections in Denmark 1994-2005

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Birgitte; Kemp, Michael; Ethelberg, Steen

    2009-01-01

    Maternal-foetal infection by Listeria monocytogenes is a rare complication in pregnancy. In the period 1994-2005, 37 culture-confirmed cases of maternal-foetal Listeria monocytogenes infections were reported in Denmark. We examined 36 patients' files in order to evaluate risk factors, clinical...

  2. Listeria monocytogenes and Escherichia coli septicemia and meningoencephalitis in a 7-day-old llama.

    OpenAIRE

    Frank, N; Couëtil, L L; Clarke, K A

    1998-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes and Escherichia coli were isolated from blood collected on presentation and tissues samples taken postmortem. Listeria monocytogenes was isolated from cerebrospinal fluid collected antemortem. The importance of passive transfer of immunity, the subtlety of neurologic signs in early meningitis, and considering blood-CSF penetration in antimicrobial selection are discussed.

  3. Listeria monocytogenes'in Belirlenmesinde Minimum İnhibisyon Konsantrasyonu (Minimum Inhibition Concentration for Determining of Listeria monocytogenes)

    OpenAIRE

    Koçan, Deniz

    2008-01-01

    Bu çalışmada Listeria monocytogenes analizi sırasında PALCAM agar besiyerinde gelişen refakatçi flora, L. monocytogenes 'in gelişimi etkilenmeden inhibe edilmeye çalışılmış ve oluşturulan inhibisyon sisteminde yer alan ön zenginleştirme, selektif zenginleştirme ve selektif katı besiyerleri geliştirilmiştir. Bu çalışma 4 aşamada tamamlanmıştır.Bu amaçla çalışmanın birinci aşamasında çeşitli gıdalarda ISO 11290-1 yöntemine göre L. monocytogenes analizi yapılmış ve PALCAM agarda gelişen 107 mikr...

  4. 9 CFR 430.4 - Control of Listeria monocytogenes in post-lethality exposed ready-to-eat products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Control of Listeria monocytogenes in... Control of Listeria monocytogenes in post-lethality exposed ready-to-eat products. (a) Listeria..., such as Listeria species, to verify the effectiveness of their sanitation procedures in the post...

  5. Listeria monocytogenes Internalizes in Romaine Lettuce Grown in Greenhouse Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenoy, Archana G; Oliver, Haley F; Deering, Amanda J

    2017-04-01

    Listeria monocytogenes has been implicated in a number of outbreaks involving fresh produce, including an outbreak in 2016 resulting from contaminated packaged salads. The persistence and internalization potential of L. monocytogenes in romaine lettuce was evaluated, and the persistence of two L. monocytogenes strains was assessed on three romaine lettuce cultivars. Seeds were germinated, and plants grown in three soil types (i.e., standard potting mix, autoclaved potting mix, and top soil) and sterile soft-top agar for up to 21 days. Average CFU per gram of L. monocytogenes on seeds and plants was calculated from five replicates per harvest day. Up to 8.2 log CFU/g L. monocytogenes persisted on romaine lettuce plants (Braveheart cultivar) grown in soft-top agar, while those grown in commercial potting mix (initial soil aerobic plate count of 4.0 × 10 4 CFU/g) had a final concentration of 5.4 log CFU/g, and autoclaved commercial potting mix had a final concentration of 3.8 ± 0.2 log CFU/g after a 21-day period. Pathogen levels dropped below the limit of detection (2 log CFU/g) by day 18 in 75% topsoil (initial soil aerobic plate count of 4.0 × 10 1 CFU/g); this did not occur in sterile media. Although L. monocytogenes strain differences and presence of a clay coating on seeds did not affect persistence, differences were observed in L. monocytogenes growth and survival among cultivars. To assess internalization, seeds were inoculated with L. monocytogenes expressing green fluorescent protein. Three plants were fixed, paraffin embedded, and sectioned; localization was studied by using standard immunohistochemistry techniques. A total of 539 internalized L. monocytogenes cells were visualized among three 20-day seedlings. L. monocytogenes cells were located in all major tissue types (pith followed by cortex, xylem, phloem, and epidermis). The presence of L. monocytogenes in the plant vasculature suggests potential for transport throughout the plant into edible

  6. Elimination of Listeria monocytogenes on hotdogs by infrared surface treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, L; Sites, J

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this research was to develop an infrared pasteurization process with automatic temperature control for inactivation of surface-contaminated Listeria monocytogenes on ready-to-eat meats such as hotdogs. The pasteurization system contained 4 basic elements: an infrared emitter, a hotdog roller, an infrared sensor, and a temperature controller. The infrared sensor was used to monitor the surface temperature of hotdogs while the infrared emitter, modulated by a power controller, was used as a heating source. The surface temperature of hotdogs was increased to set points (70, 75, 80, or 85 degrees C), and maintained for bacterial kill. The infrared surface pasteurization was evaluated using hotdogs that were surface-inoculated with a 4-strain L. monocytogenes cocktail to an average initial inoculum of 7.32 log (CFU/g). On the average 1.0, 2.1, 3.0, or 5.3 log-reduction in L. monocytogenes was observed after the surface temperature of hotdogs was increased to 70, 75, 80, or 85 degrees C, respectively. Holding the sample temperature led to additional bacterial inactivation. With a 3 min holding at 80 degrees C or 2 min at 85 degrees C, a total of 6.4 or 6.7 logs of L. monocytogenes were inactivated. This study demonstrated that the infrared surface pasteurization was effective in inactivating L. monocytogenes in RTE meats.

  7. Listeria monocytogenes: Strain Heterogeneity, Methods, and Challenges of Subtyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyarko, Esmond B; Donnelly, Catherine W

    2015-12-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a food-borne bacterial pathogen that is associated with 20% to 30% case fatality rate. L. monocytogenes is a genetically heterogeneous species, with a small fraction of strains (serotypes 1/2a, 1/2b, 4b) implicated in human listeriosis. Monitoring and source tracking of L. monocytogenes involve the use of subtyping methods, with the performance of genetic-based methods found to be superior to phenotypic-based ones. Various methods have been used to subtype L. monocytogenes isolates, with the pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) being the gold standard. Although PFGE has had a massive impact on food safety through the establishment of the PulseNet, there is no doubt that whole genome sequence (WGS) typing is accurate, has a discriminatory power superior to any known method, and allows genome-wide differences between strains to be quantified through the comparison of nucleotide sequences. This review focuses on the different techniques that have been used to type L. monocytogenes strains, their performance challenges, and the tremendous impact WGS typing could have on the food safety landscape. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  8. Listeria monocytogenes switches from dissemination to persistence by adopting a vacuolar lifestyle in epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortebi, Mounia; Milohanic, Eliane; Mitchell, Gabriel; Péchoux, Christine; Prevost, Marie-Christine; Cossart, Pascale; Bierne, Hélène

    2017-11-01

    Listeria monocytogenes causes listeriosis, a foodborne disease that poses serious risks to fetuses, newborns and immunocompromised adults. This intracellular bacterial pathogen proliferates in the host cytosol and exploits the host actin polymerization machinery to spread from cell-to-cell and disseminate in the host. Here, we report that during several days of infection in human hepatocytes or trophoblast cells, L. monocytogenes switches from this active motile lifestyle to a stage of persistence in vacuoles. Upon intercellular spread, bacteria gradually stopped producing the actin-nucleating protein ActA and became trapped in lysosome-like vacuoles termed Listeria-Containing Vacuoles (LisCVs). Subpopulations of bacteria resisted degradation in LisCVs and entered a slow/non-replicative state. During the subculture of host cells harboring LisCVs, bacteria showed a capacity to cycle between the vacuolar and the actin-based motility stages. When ActA was absent, such as in ΔactA mutants, vacuolar bacteria parasitized host cells in the so-called "viable but non-culturable" state (VBNC), preventing their detection by conventional colony counting methods. The exposure of infected cells to high doses of gentamicin did not trigger the formation of LisCVs, but selected for vacuolar and VBNC bacteria. Together, these results reveal the ability of L. monocytogenes to enter a persistent state in a subset of epithelial cells, which may favor the asymptomatic carriage of this pathogen, lengthen the incubation period of listeriosis, and promote bacterial survival during antibiotic therapy.

  9. [A fatal case of Listeria monocytogenes sepsis and meningitis in a patient with Wegener's granulomatosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonkić, Marija; Grgić, Dusanka; Goić-Barisić, Ivana; Novak, Anita; Milas, Ivo; Bradarić, Nikola

    2006-12-01

    The bacillus Listeria monocytogenes is widely distributed in the environment. Listeria monocytogenes most often causes infection in the neonates, pregnant women, elderly and immunosuppressed persons. We report on a case of fatal sepsis and meningitis in a 59-year-old woman receiving cyclophosphamide and glucocorticoid therapy for Wegener's granulomatosis over a 10-year period. Listeriosis should be suspected in case of sepsis and/or meningitis in patients who receive immunosuppressive agents. Since meningitis due to Listeria monocytogenes is not distinguishable clinically from other types of bacterial meningitis, antibiotics against Listeria monocytogenes should be included in the initial empirical therapy of bacterial meningitis in immunosuppressed patients, antibiotics against Listeria monocytogenes should be included.

  10. Control of listeria monocytogenes and staphylococcus aureaus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    La susceptibilité aux antimicrobiens des micro-organismes testés a montré que la résistance de S. aureus aux antibiotiques variait de 12,9% (pour Kanamycine) à 40,3% (pour le chloramphénicol), tandis que celle de L. monocytogenes aux antibiotiques a varié de 14,3% (érythromycine) et 100% (Colistine sulfate).

  11. Inactivation of Listeria monocytogenes in raw fruits by enterocin AS-48.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinos, Antonio Cobo; Abriouel, Hikmate; Ben Omar, Nabil; Lucas, Rosario; Valdivia, Eva; Gálvez, Antonio

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of enterocin AS-48 on Listeria monocytogenes CECT 4032 in fruits and fruit juice. Fruits were contaminated with a L. monocytogenes cell suspension, washed with enterocin AS-48 (25 microg/ml) or with sterile distilled water as control, and stored at different temperatures (-20, 6, 15, 22 degrees C). Washing treatments significantly inhibited or completely inactivated L. monocytogenes in strawberries, raspberries, and blackberries stored at 15 and 22 degrees C for up to 2 days and in blackberries and strawberries at 6 degrees C for up to 7 days. Washing treatments with enterocin AS-48 also reduced viable counts in sliced melon, watermelon, pear, and kiwi but did not avoid proliferation of survivors during storage at 15 and 22 degrees C. Added enterocin (25 microg/ml) completely inactivated L. monocytogenes in watermelon juice within 24 h. To enhance the antilisterial activity of treatments, enterocin AS-48 was tested in combination with other antimicrobial substances on sliced melon stored at 22 degrees C. The combinations of enterocin AS-48 and trisodium trimetaphosphate, sodium lactate, lactic acid, polyphosphoric acid, carvacrol, hydrocinnamic acid, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, n-propyl p-hydroxybenzoate, or 2-nitropropanol showed increased antilisterial activities compared with each antimicrobial tested separately. Washing treatments with enterocin AS-48 in combination with 12 mM carvacrol, as well as with 100 mM n-propyl p-hydroxybenzoate, avoided regrowth of Listeria during storage at 22 degrees C. Results from this study indicate that enterocin AS-48 alone or in combination with other preservatives could serve as an additional hurdle against L. monocytogenes in fruits and fruit juices.

  12. Management of Pregnant Women With Presumptive Exposure to Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-05

    : Listeriosis is predominantly a foodborne illness, with sporadic and outbreak-related cases tied to consumption of food contaminated with listeria (Listeria monocytogenes). The incidence of listeriosis associated with pregnancy is approximately 13 times higher than in the general population. Maternal infection may present as a nonspecific, flu-like illness with fever, myalgia, backache, and headache, often preceded by diarrhea or other gastrointestinal symptoms. However, fetal and neonatal infections can be severe, leading to fetal loss, preterm labor, neonatal sepsis, meningitis, and death. Pregnant women have been advised to avoid foods with a high risk of contamination with listeria. An exposed pregnant woman with a fever higher than 38.1°C (100.6°F) and signs and symptoms consistent with listeriosis for whom no other cause of illness is known should be simultaneously tested and treated for presumptive listeriosis. No testing, including blood and stool cultures, or treatment is indicated for an asymptomatic pregnant woman who reports consumption of a product that was recalled or implicated during an outbreak of listeria contamination. A pregnant woman who ate a product that was recalled because of listeria contamination and who is afebrile but has signs and symptoms consistent with a minor gastrointestinal or flu-like illness can be managed expectantly.

  13. Influence of growth conditions on biofilm formation of Listeria monocytogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomičić Ružica M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes is ubiquitous in nature and a major concern for the food industry, since it is the causal agent of the serious foodborne illness listeriosis. This organism can be introduced through many routes to food-processing environments and may become established on food-processing equipment. Subsequently, food products may become contaminated during processing. In addition, the bacterium can grow at refrigeration temperatures. Biofilms are regarded as important with respect to the survival and growth of microorganisms in the food industry. Microorganisms growing in biofilms are protected against cleaning and disinfection and are difficult to eradicate. L. monocytogenes may grow in biofilms that protect them against environmental stress and can be isolated from surfaces after cleaning and disinfection. In this study, a total of eight L. monocytogenes strains isolated from the meat industry and one reference strain L. monocytogenes ATCC 19111 were studied for their capability to form a biofilm. The biofilm forming behavior of nine L. monocytogenes strains was determined in two different media, Tryptone soya yeast extract broth (TSYEB or Brain-heart infusion broth (BHI, at temperatures 7 °C, 25 °C, 37 °C, 42 °C for 5 days. The method used to assess biofilm formation was crystal violet staining. All strains were able to form biofilm, but the growth condition affected the levels formed. The lowest biofilm formation was observed at 7 °C. Further, the most effective medium in promoting biofilm production by the L. monocytogenes isolates from meat was BHI medium while for reference strain L. monocytogenes ATCC 19111 it was TSYEB. Incubation temperature was the most significant factor influencing the biofilm production levels, and also the type of used nutritive medium was important factor.

  14. Antimicrobial treatments to control Listeria monocytogenes in queso fresco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourenço, António; Kamnetz, Mary B; Gadotti, Camila; Diez-Gonzalez, Francisco

    2017-06-01

    Queso fresco, is a Hispanic non-fermented cheese highly susceptible to contamination with L. monocytogenes. This research was aimed to determine the effect of GRAS antimicrobial ingredients to control L. monocytogenes. Antimicrobials included caprylic acid (CA), Nisaplin® (N, 2.5% nisin), a mixture of sodium lactate and sodium diacetate (SL/SD), Lactococcus lactis sbp. lactis DPC 3147, monolaurin, and lactic acid (LA). Batches of queso fresco curds were inoculated with 104 CFU/g and stored at 4 °C for three weeks. During storage the count of L. monocytogenes reached 7 to 8 Log CFU/g in control samples. Most individual antimicrobial treatments resulted in less than 1 Log CFU/g reductions in final counts, with the exception of N (0.5 g/kg) and CA (2.9 g/kg) that caused more than 3 and 5 Log CFU/g differences with controls, respectively. Mixtures of ingredients were more effective in inhibiting L. monocytogenes growth, and treatments with N and CA consistently delivered 6 Log CFU/g less counts than controls. Supplementation of 12 g/kg LA to treatments with SL/SD (3%/0.22%) caused differences of more than 4 Log CFU/g in final Listeria populations. Samples treated with the binary mixtures of N and CA (0.5 and 0.7 g/kg, respectively) were evaluated in a consumer panel (n = 67). Panelists slightly preferred control and commercial over treated samples, but all samples were in average rated between "slightly liking" and "moderately liking." These experiments indicated that combined use of antimicrobial ingredients may be an effective way to control the population of Listeria monocytogenes in queso fresco. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. ISG15 counteracts Listeria monocytogenes infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radoshevich, Lilliana; Impens, Francis; Ribet, David; Quereda, Juan J; Nam Tham, To; Nahori, Marie-Anne; Bierne, Hélène; Dussurget, Olivier; Pizarro-Cerdá, Javier; Knobeloch, Klaus-Peter; Cossart, Pascale

    2015-01-01

    ISG15 is an interferon-stimulated, linear di-ubiquitin-like protein, with anti-viral activity. The role of ISG15 during bacterial infection remains elusive. We show that ISG15 expression in nonphagocytic cells is dramatically induced upon Listeria infection. Surprisingly this induction can be type I interferon independent and depends on the cytosolic surveillance pathway, which senses bacterial DNA and signals through STING, TBK1, IRF3 and IRF7. Most importantly, we observed that ISG15 expression restricts Listeria infection in vitro and in vivo. We made use of stable isotope labeling in tissue culture (SILAC) to identify ISGylated proteins that could be responsible for the protective effect. Strikingly, infection or overexpression of ISG15 leads to ISGylation of ER and Golgi proteins, which correlates with increased secretion of cytokines known to counteract infection. Together, our data reveal a previously uncharacterized ISG15-dependent restriction of Listeria infection, reinforcing the view that ISG15 is a key component of the innate immune response. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06848.001 PMID:26259872

  16. Listeria monocytogenes in poultry and poultry products: Epidemiological investigations in seven Danish abattoirs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ojeniyi, B.; Wegener, Henrik Caspar; Jensen, N.E.

    1996-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes was isolated from 11/236 (4 . 7%) caecal samples from parent flocks, providing broilers to the abattoirs investigated. Caecal samples from 2078 broilers representing 90 randomly selected broiler flocks were negative for L. monocytogenes. A total of 3080 samples from seven...... abattoirs including poultry processing line samples, and final products were also examined for L. monocytogenes. Listeria monocytogenes was isolated in 0 . 3% to 18 . 7% of the samples collected in the different abattoirs. Epidemiological typing of 247 L. monocytogenes isolates, including serotyping, phage...

  17. Quantification of cell infection caused by Listeria monocytogenes invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arif, Muhammad; Rajpoot, Nasir M; Nattkemper, Tim W; Technow, Ulrike; Chakraborty, Trinad; Fisch, Nicole; Jensen, Nickels A; Niehaus, Karsten

    2011-06-01

    Listeria monocytogenes causes a life-threatening food-borne disease known as Listeriosis. Elderly,immunocompromised, and pregnant women are primarily the victims of this facultative intracellular Gram-positive pathogen. Since the bacteria survive intracellularly within the human host cells they are protected against the immune system and poorly accessed by many antibiotics. In order to screen pharmaceutical substances for their ability to interfere with the infection, persistence and release of L. monocytogenes a high content as say is required. We established a high content screen (HCS) using the RAW 264.7 mouse macrophage cell line seeded into 96-well glass bottom microplates. Cells were infected with GFP-expressing L. monocytogenes and stained thereafter with Hoechst 33342.Automated image acquisition was carried out by the Scan(R) screening station. We have developed an algorithm that automatically grades cells in microscopy images of fluorescent-tagged Listeria for the severity of infection. The grading accuracy of this newly developed algorithm is 97.1% as compared to a 74.3%grading accuracy we obtained using the commercial Olympus Scan(R) software. 2011 Elsevier B.V. Allrights reserved.

  18. Evaluation of enrichment and plating media for isolating Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaminathan, B; Hayes, P S; Przybyszewski, V A; Plikaytis, B D

    1988-01-01

    We compared selective enrichment broths used by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Food Safety and Inspection Service, for their efficiency in the quantitative recovery of Listeria monocytogenes from a naturally contaminated Brie cheese that was obtained as part of an epidemic investigation. Quantitative recovery of Listeria in FDA broth (greater than 2.4 x 10(5) colony forming units/mL) was significantly better than recovery in USDA broth (9.3 x 10(3) colony forming units/mL). When USDA broth was supplemented with D-glucose and Phytone (papaic digest of soy protein), its recovery efficiency improved but did not equal that of FDA broth for isolating L. monocytogenes from Brie cheese. A comparison of 4 selective plating media [modified McBride's agar, gum base nalidixic acid agar, lithium chloride-phenylethanol-moxalactam agar (LPM), and acriflavine-ceftazidime agar (AC)] showed that 3 L. monocytogenes strains belonging to serotype 1/2a were partially or completely inhibited on LPM and AC agars. One strain of serotype 1/2a formed microcolonies on modified McBride's agar after 48 h of incubation.

  19. Comparison of two multiplex PCR assays for the detection of Listeria spp. and Listeria monocytogenes in biological samples

    OpenAIRE

    Budniak Sylwia; Kędrak-Jabłońska Agnieszka; Szczawińska Anna; Reksa Monika; Krupa Marek; Szulowski Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of the study was to optimise and compare two multiplex PCR assays for the detection of Listeria spp. and Listeria monocytogenes in biological samples including the liver, brain, and blood. Material and Methods: Three strains of L. monocytogenes and single strains of each of the species: L. ivanovii, L. innocua, L. grayi, L. welshimeri, and L. seeligeri were used. Additionally, five other species of bacterium were used to evaluate the specificity of the tests. Results: Sp...

  20. Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria spp. contamination patterns in retail delicatessen establishments in three U.S. states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Courtenay; Stasiewicz, Matthew J; Wright, Emily; Warchocki, Steven; Roof, Sherry; Kause, Janell R; Bauer, Nathan; Ibrahim, Salam; Wiedmann, Martin; Oliver, Haley F

    2014-11-01

    Postprocessing contamination in processing plants has historically been a significant source of Listeria monocytogenes in ready-to-eat delicatessen meats, and therefore a major cause of human listeriosis cases and outbreaks. Recent risk assessments suggest that a majority of human listeriosis cases linked to consumption of contaminated deli meats may be due to L. monocytogenes contamination that occurs at the retail level. To better understand the ecology and transmission of Listeria spp. in retail delicatessens, food and nonfood contact surfaces were tested for L. monocytogenes and other Listeria spp. in a longitudinal study conducted in 30 retail delis in three U.S. states. In phase I of the study, seven sponge samples were collected monthly for 3 months in 15 delis (5 delis per state) prior to start of daily operation; in phase II, 28 food contact and nonfood contact sites were sampled in each of 30 delis during daily operation for 6 months. Among the 314 samples collected during phase I, 6.8% were positive for L. monocytogenes. Among 4,503 samples collected during phase II, 9.5% were positive for L. monocytogenes; 9 of 30 delis showed low L. monocytogenes prevalence (Listeria spp. isolates, including 184 Listeria innocua, 48 Listeria seeligeri, and 13 Listeria welshimeri were characterized. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) was used to characterize 446 L. monocytogenes isolates. PFGE showed that for 12 of 30 delis, one or more PFGE types were isolated on at least three separate occasions, providing evidence for persistence of a given L. monocytogenes subtype in the delis. For some delis, PFGE patterns for isolates from nonfood contact surfaces were distinct from patterns for occasional food contact surface isolates, suggesting limited cross-contamination between these sites in some delis. This study provides longitudinal data on L. monocytogenes contamination patterns in retail delis, which should facilitate further development of control strategies in

  1. Characterization of Listeria monocytogenes from three countries and antibiotic resistance differences among countries and Listeria monocytogenes serogroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obaidat, M M; Bani Salman, A E; Lafi, S Q; Al-Abboodi, A R

    2015-06-01

    A total of 104 Listeria monocytogenes isolates from 330 fish samples from three countries were characterized by multiplex PCR for serogrouping and virulence markers determination and tested for antibiotics resistance. A 53·8% of the isolates belonged to serogroup 1/2a, 3a; 32% belonged to 1/2b, 3b, 7; 14·4% belonged to 4b, 4d, 4e and 1% belonged to 1/2c, 3c. All isolates exhibited resistance to at least one antibiotic but the resistance rates varied among countries. The isolates exhibited high resistance to penicillin, rifampicin, clindamycin, erythromycin and tetracycline, but low resistance to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, streptomycin, sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim, gentamicin, chloramphenicol and kanamycin. When comparing countries, the resistance rate for rifampicin, clindamycin, erythromycin, tetracycline, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid varied among countries. When comparing serogroup, 1/2a, 3a exhibited the highest resistance to clindamycin, erythromycin, tetracycline and vancomycin while serogroup 4b, 4d, 4e exhibited the highest resistance to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid. All isolates carried inlA, inlC, inlJ and lmo2672. Listeriolysin S was carried by 42 and 30% of 4b and 1/2b isolates respectively. Significance and impact of the study: This is one of few studies to correlate antibiotic resistance with Listeria monocytogenes serogroups. The study also compared the antibiotic resistance and serogroups of L. monocytogenes isolates from three countries in one single study. The findings of this study will be helpful in improving data on the antibiotics resistance of L. monocytogenes in developing countries and enriches the epidemiological and public health studies of L. monocytogenes. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  2. Prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes in Retail Lightly Pickled Vegetables and Its Successful Control at Processing Plants.

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    Taguchi, Masumi; Kanki, Masashi; Yamaguchi, Yuko; Inamura, Hideichi; Koganei, Yosuke; Sano, Tetsuya; Nakamura, Hiromi; Asakura, Hiroshi

    2017-03-01

    Incidences of food poisoning traced to nonanimal food products have been increasingly reported. One of these was a recent large outbreak of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O157 infection from the consumption of lightly pickled vegetables, indicating the necessity of imposing hygienic controls during manufacturing. However, little is known about the bacterial contamination levels in these minimally processed vegetables. Here we examined the prevalence of STEC, Salmonella spp., and Listeria monocytogenes in 100 lightly pickled vegetable products manufactured at 55 processing factories. Simultaneously, we also performed quantitative measurements of representative indicator bacteria (total viable counts, coliform counts, and β-glucuronidase-producing E. coli counts). STEC and Salmonella spp. were not detected in any of the samples; L. monocytogenes was detected in 12 samples manufactured at five of the factories. Microbiological surveillance at two factories (two surveys at factory A and three surveys at factory B) between June 2014 and January 2015 determined that the areas predominantly contaminated with L. monocytogenes included the refrigerators and packaging rooms. Genotyping provided further evidence that the contaminants found in these areas were linked to those found in the final products. Taken together, we demonstrated the prevalence of L. monocytogenes in lightly pickled vegetables sold at the retail level. Microbiological surveillance at the manufacturing factories further clarified the sources of the contamination in the retail products. These data indicate the necessity of implementing adequate monitoring programs to minimize health risks attributable to the consumption of these minimally processed vegetables.

  3. Low prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes in foods from Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latorre, L; Parisi, A; Fraccalvieri, R; Normanno, G; La Porta, M C Nardella; Goffredo, E; Palazzo, L; Ciccarese, G; Addante, N; Santagada, G

    2007-06-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is an important foodborne pathogen that causes gastrointestinal disorders, and, especially in immunocompromised people, serious extraintestinal diseases, such as septicemia and meningitis, as well as abortion in pregnant women. Many foods, from both plant and animal origin, have been involved in listeriosis outbreaks. This article reports the results of a 12-year survey (1993 through 2004) on the presence of L. monocytogenes in several kinds of food marketed in Italy. Of 5,788 analyzed samples, 121 (2.1%) were contaminated with L. monocytogenes. The highest prevalence was found in smoked salmon (10.6%) and in poultry meat samples (8.5%) and the lowest in red meat (0.3%). L. monocytogenes was not found in 154 samples of fresh seafood products. Fifty-two isolates were also serotyped by the agglutination method. The most common serotypes detected in the 52 strains tested were 1/2a (36.5%), followed by 1/2c (32.8%), 1/2b (13.5%), 4b (11.5%), 3a (3.8%), and 3b (1.9%). The results of the present study showed low levels of L. monocytogenes in the analyzed samples. A total of 61.5% of the 52 L. monocytogenes strains analyzed belonged to serotypes 1/2a, 1/2b, and 4b, namely the serovars that are most commonly involved in extraintestinal human listeriosis outbreaks. In the ready-to-eat samples, these three serotypes were 40.0% (1/2a), 17.1% (1/2b), and 14.3% (4b). This finding highlights the need to implement strict hygienic measures during the production, distribution, and sale of foods to reduce the risk of foodborne listeriosis in humans to an acceptable level.

  4. Spontaneous Loss of Virulence in Natural Populations of Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maury, Mylène M; Chenal-Francisque, Viviane; Bracq-Dieye, Hélène; Han, Lei; Leclercq, Alexandre; Vales, Guillaume; Moura, Alexandra; Gouin, Edith; Scortti, Mariela; Disson, Olivier; Vázquez-Boland, José A; Lecuit, Marc

    2017-11-01

    The pathogenesis of Listeria monocytogenes depends on the ability of this bacterium to escape from the phagosome of the host cells via the action of the pore-forming toxin listeriolysin O (LLO). Expression of the LLO-encoding gene ( hly ) requires the transcriptional activator PrfA, and both hly and prfA genes are essential for L. monocytogenes virulence. Here, we used the hemolytic activity of LLO as a phenotypic marker to screen for spontaneous virulence-attenuating mutations in L. monocytogenes Sixty nonhemolytic isolates were identified among a collection of 57,820 confirmed L. monocytogenes strains isolated from a variety of sources (0.1%). In most cases (56/60; 93.3%), the nonhemolytic phenotype resulted from nonsense, missense, or frameshift mutations in prfA Five strains carried hly mutations leading to a single amino acid substitution (G299V) or a premature stop codon causing strong virulence attenuation in mice. In one strain, both hly and gshF (encoding a glutathione synthase required for full PrfA activity) were missing due to genomic rearrangements likely caused by a transposable element. The PrfA/LLO loss-of-function (PrfA - /LLO - ) mutants belonged to phylogenetically diverse clades of L. monocytogenes , and most were identified among nonclinical strains (57/60). Consistent with the rare occurrence of loss-of-virulence mutations, we show that prfA and hly are under purifying selection. Although occurring at a low frequency, PrfA - /LLO - mutational events in L. monocytogenes lead to niche restriction and open an evolutionary path for obligate saprophytism in this facultative intracellular pathogen. Copyright © 2017 Maury et al.

  5. Diversity and distribution of Listeria monocytogenes in meat processing plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, Belén; Perich, Adriana; Gómez, Diego; Yangüela, Javier; Rodríguez, Alicia; Garriga, Margarita; Aymerich, Teresa

    2014-12-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a major concern for the meat processing industry because many listeriosis outbreaks have been linked to meat product consumption. The aim of this study was to elucidate L. monocytogenes diversity and distribution across different Spanish meat processing plants. L. monocytogenes isolates (N = 106) collected from food contact surfaces of meat processing plants and meat products were serotyped and then characterised by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). The isolates were serotyped as 1/2a (36.8%), 1/2c (34%), 1/2b (17.9%) and 4b (11.3%). MLST identified ST9 as the most predominant allelic profile (33% of isolates) followed by ST121 (16%), both of which were detected from several processing plants and meat products sampled in different years, suggesting that those STs are highly adapted to the meat processing environment. Food contact surfaces during processing were established as an important source of L. monocytogenes in meat products because the same STs were obtained in isolates recovered from surfaces and products. L. monocytogenes was recovered after cleaning and disinfection procedures in two processing plants, highlighting the importance of thorough cleaning and disinfection procedures. Epidemic clone (EC) marker ECI was identified in 8.5%, ECIII was identified in 2.8%, and ECV was identified in 7.5% of the 106 isolates. Furthermore, a selection of presumably unrelated ST9 isolates was analysed by multi-virulence-locus sequence typing (MVLST). Most ST9 isolates had the same virulence type (VT11), confirming the clonal origin of ST9 isolates; however, one ST9 isolate was assigned to a new VT (VT95). Consequently, MLST is a reliable tool for identification of contamination routes and niches in processing plants, and MVLST clearly differentiates EC strains, which both contribute to the improvement of L. monocytogenes control programs in the meat industry. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Patogénesis de Listeria monocytogenes, microorganismo zoonotico emergente

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    Kirvis Torres

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes además de ser un paradigma para la investigación inmunológica se ha convertidoen sistema modelo apropiado para el análisis de los mecanismos moleculares del parasitismo intracelularde otras bacterias. Investigadores en el área de la inmunología se interesaron en este microorganismocuando se reconoció el riesgo que representaba para la salud pública y la seguridad en la industria dealimentos. Desde mediados de los años 80’s se ha investigado la biología molecular de los marcadores devirulencia de este microorganismo, la biología celular de las interacciones de los marcadores de virulenciacon los receptores de la célula hospedero, el citoesqueleto, las vías de transducción de señales y losmecanismos de inmunidad mediada por células del hospedero. El propósito de esta revisión es describiralgunas características taxonómicas y filogenéticas de Listeria monocytogenes , la incidencia humana yanimal de varios serotipos, la fisiopatología de la infección , modelos animales y de cultivo celular utilizadospara estudios de virulencia, las poblaciones de riesgo, manifestaciones clínicas de listeriosis humana yanimal, el tratamiento, la organización genética y evolución de los determinantes de virulencia, losmecanismos empleados para interactuar con la célula hospedera, y los mecanismos para escapar de losprocesos de muerte celular y pasar de una célula infectada a otra. La información recopilada resulta degran importancia para el personal de salud, industria, consumidores y población de riesgo; razón por lacual Listeria monocytogenes es un patógeno que representa una amenaza para la salud pública mundial.

  7. Uncovering Listeria monocytogenes hypervirulence by harnessing its biodiversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maury, Mylène M; Tsai, Yu-Huan; Charlier, Caroline; Touchon, Marie; Chenal-Francisque, Viviane; Leclercq, Alexandre; Criscuolo, Alexis; Gaultier, Charlotte; Roussel, Sophie; Brisabois, Anne; Disson, Olivier; Rocha, Eduardo P C; Brisse, Sylvain; Lecuit, Marc

    2016-03-01

    Microbial pathogenesis studies are typically performed with reference strains, thereby overlooking within-species heterogeneity in microbial virulence. Here we integrated human epidemiological and clinical data with bacterial population genomics to harness the biodiversity of the model foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes and decipher the basis of its neural and placental tropisms. Taking advantage of the clonal structure of this bacterial species, we identify clones epidemiologically associated either with food or with human central nervous system (CNS) or maternal-neonatal (MN) listeriosis. The latter clones are also most prevalent in patients without immunosuppressive comorbidities. Strikingly, CNS- and MN-associated clones are hypervirulent in a humanized mouse model of listeriosis. By integrating epidemiological data and comparative genomics, we have uncovered multiple new putative virulence factors and demonstrate experimentally the contribution of the first gene cluster mediating L. monocytogenes neural and placental tropisms. This study illustrates the exceptional power in harnessing microbial biodiversity to identify clinically relevant microbial virulence attributes.

  8. The interaction between Listeria monocytogenes and the host gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleator, Roy D; Watson, Debbie; Hill, Colin; Gahan, Cormac G M

    2009-08-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a ubiquitous bacterium that causes significant foodborne disease with high mortality rates in immunocompromised adults. In pregnant women foodborne infection can give rise to infection of the fetus resulting in miscarriage. In addition, the bacterium has recently been demonstrated to cause localized gastrointestinal symptoms, predominantly in immunocompetent individuals. The murine model of systemic L. monocytogenes infection has provided numerous insights into the mechanisms of pathogenesis of this organism. However, recent application of transcriptomic and proteomic approaches as well as the development of new model systems has allowed a focus upon factors that influence adaptation to gastrointestinal environments and adhesion to and invasion of the gastrointestinal mucosa. In addition, the availability of a large number of complete L. monocytogenes genome sequences has permitted inter-strain comparisons and the identification of factors that may influence the emergence of 'epidemic' phenotypes. Here we review some of the exciting recent developments in the analysis of the interaction between L. monocytogenes and the host gastrointestinal tract.

  9. The Continuous Challenge of Characterizing the Foodborne Pathogen Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, Anderson Carlos; Woodward, Joshua John; Nero, Luís Augusto

    2016-08-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is an important foodborne pathogen commonly isolated from food processing environments and food products. This organism can multiply at refrigeration temperatures, form biofilms on different materials and under various conditions, resist a range of environmental stresses, and contaminate food products by cross-contamination. L. monocytogenes is recognized as the causative agent of listeriosis, a serious disease that affects mainly individuals from high-risk groups, such as pregnant women, newborns, the elderly, and immunocompromised individuals. Listeriosis can be considered a disease that has emerged along with changing eating habits and large-scale industrial food processing. This disease causes losses of billions of dollars every year with recalls of contaminated foods and patient medical treatment expenses. In addition to the immune status of the host and the infecting dose, the virulence potential of each strain is crucial for the development of disease symptoms. While many isolates are naturally virulent, other isolates are avirulent and unable to cause disease; this may vary according to the presence of molecular determinants associated with virulence. In the last decade, the characterization of genetic profiles through the use of molecular methods has helped track and demonstrate the genetic diversity among L. monocytogenes isolates obtained from various sources. The purposes of this review were to summarize the main methods used for isolation, identification, and typing of L. monocytogenes and also describe its most relevant virulence characteristics.

  10. [Resistance of Listeria monocytogenes in simulated gastrointestinal systems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lingli; Zhou, Xiangyang

    2013-07-04

    Resistance of Listeria monocytogenes was determined through its survival rate and intracellular pH (pH(i)) after exposed to in vitro digestion models. Simulated gastrointestinal systems were prepared according to the major natural components in saliva, gastric juice and contents of the small intestine. Survival of L. monocytogenes was estimated by plate counting and pH(i) measured via fluorescence ratio imaging microscopy. L. monocytogenes had a survival rate of over 90% after saliva treatment. Viability was low (less than 0.05%) in gastric juice with pH at or below 3.0 and in the subsequent intestinal fluid. The survival rate started to increase in gastric juice at pH 3.5 and was higher between 11.2% - 85.9% for the two tested strains at pH 4.0. The pH(i) was similar between saliva-treated and untreated bacteria as revealed by fluorescence ratio imaging microscopy. The pH(i) remained relatively stable at or higher than 7.75 in gastric juice at pH 3. 5 and 4.0 or with subsequent introduction of intestinal fluid. L. monocytogenes could tolerate gastric juice with pH(i) at or above 3.5 as shown by its good survivability and stable pH(i) most probably by maintaining integrity of its membranes.

  11. Comparison between Listeria monocytogenes single and multipathogen detection methods

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    Vanessa Rodrigues de Souza

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Multipathogen detection methods have been used to provide a broad range of microorganism detection. We aimed to identify the most searched pathogens in L. monocytogenes detection methods and evaluate if there are sensitivity and specificity differences between single and multipathogen methods. A systematic review was performed by including studies carried out in order to detect L. monocytogenes in a broad range of food sample. A total of 2770 records were retrieved, of which 191 were selected. The majority of the studies (104 presented multipathogen detection, other 87 searched for L. monocytogenes specifically. From the studies for multipathogen detection; other Listeria species (19.4%, Salmonella spp. (21.6%, E. coli O157:H7 (13.2%, Staphylococcus spp. (9.7%, E. coli (5.7% were more frequently reported. Sensitivity and specificity calculations were derived from only 26 studies, because they compared their data with an official method. Sensitivity and specificity values were close to 100%, showing that others characteristics such as time and cost should be considered to evaluate alternative methods in further research. As a conclusion, evidence generated regarding L. monocytogenes identification methods contribute to method improvements and listeriosis control.

  12. Simvastatin enhances protection against Listeria monocytogenes infection in mice by counteracting Listeria-induced phagosomal escape.

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    Suraj P Parihar

    Full Text Available Statins are well-known cholesterol lowering drugs targeting HMG-CoA-reductase, reducing the risk of coronary disorders and hypercholesterolemia. Statins are also involved in immunomodulation, which might influence the outcome of bacterial infection. Hence, a possible effect of statin treatment on Listeriosis was explored in mice. Statin treatment prior to subsequent L. monocytogenes infection strikingly reduced bacterial burden in liver and spleen (up to 100-fold and reduced histopathological lesions. Statin-treatment in infected macrophages resulted in increased IL-12p40 and TNF-α and up to 4-fold reduced bacterial burden within 6 hours post infection, demonstrating a direct effect of statins on limiting bacterial growth in macrophages. Bacterial uptake was normal investigated in microbeads and GFP-expressing Listeria experiments by confocal microscopy. However, intracellular membrane-bound cholesterol level was decreased, as analyzed by cholesterol-dependent filipin staining and cellular lipid extraction. Mevalonate supplementation restored statin-inhibited cholesterol biosynthesis and reverted bacterial growth in Listeria monocytogenes but not in listeriolysin O (LLO-deficient Listeria. Together, these results suggest that statin pretreatment increases protection against L. monocytogenes infection by reducing membrane cholesterol in macrophages and thereby preventing effectivity of the cholesterol-dependent LLO-mediated phagosomal escape of bacteria.

  13. Occurrence of Listeria monocytogenes in cheese and ice cream produced in the State of Paraná, Brazil Ocorrência de Listeria monocytogenes em queijos e sorvetes produzidos no Estado do Paraná, Brasil

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    Wanda Moscalewski Abrahão

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of Listeria monocytogenes in Brazilian ice cream and in some soft and semi-soft cheeses produced and sold in the State of Paraná, Brazil was evaluated. Ninety samples of cheese and sixty samples of ice creams were analyzed following the guidelines outlined by the official institutes, AOAC and FDA. In the ice cream samples no isolation of Listeria spp. was found. The percentage of these ninety samples of cheeses positive for Listeria spp. was 12.20%. Listeria monocytogenes was detected in six (6.70% of the same samples. The presence of Listeria innocua was five (5.50% in the samples analyzed was also observed. According to the results of the work it is possible to presume that there is a potential health risk to the brazilian population, heightened by aging and the increase in immunodepressed. These results indicate the need for the implementation of monitoring of these microorganisms as much by producers as by health inspectors. The results also show that the VIP (visual immunoprecipitation assay is a viable triage method of contaminated samples for the liberation of products for commercialization, as it is quick, reliable and does not require additional equipment other than that normally found in production labs, while presenting reliable results.A ocorrência de Listeria monocytogenes em sorvetes e alguns tipos de queijos macios e semi-macios produzidos e vendidos no Estado do Paraná Brasil foram avaliados. Noventa amostras de queijo e sessenta amostras de sorvete foram analisadas seguindo os protocolos da AOAC e FDA. Nas amostras de sorvete, não ocorreu o isolamento de Listeria spp. Foi detectada Listeria spp em 12,20% de amostras de queijo, das quais 6 (6,70% foram positivas para Listeria monocytogenes. Foi também observada a presença de Listeria innocua em 5 amostras (5,50% das mesmas amostras. Pelos resultados deste trabalho pode-se pressupor que existe um risco potencial à saúde da população brasileira com o

  14. Well-known but rare pathogen in neonates: Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cekmez, F; Tayman, C; Saglam, C; Cetinkaya, M; Bedir, O; Gnal, A; Tun, T; Sarici, S Ü

    2012-10-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a very important life-threatening bacteria in certain risk groups such as neonates, pregnant women, elderly people, transplant recipients and others with impaired cell-mediated immunity. However, its infections are very rare in healthy children. Reports of listeriosis in newborn period are limited. We report a case of neonatal listeriosis with erythematous rash, intractable convulsions, severe early neonatal sepsis, disseminated intravascular coagulation, multiple organ dysfunction syndrome and death. Although an empirical antibiotic therapy including ampicillin (semisentetic penicillin) and aminoglycoside combination is effective by the means of a probable Listeria infection, the progression of the very early-onset disease may be fatal, despite vigorous treatment efforts as in our case.

  15. Control of Listeria monocytogenes growth in soft cheeses by bacteriophage P100

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    Elaine Nóbrega Gibson Silva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of bacteriophage P100 on strains of Listeria monocytogenes in artificially inoculated soft cheeses. A mix of L. monocytogenes 1/2a and Scott A was inoculated in Minas Frescal and Coalho cheeses (approximately 10(5 cfu/g with the bacteriophage added thereafter (8.3 x 10(7 PFU/g. Samples were analyzed immediately, and then stored at 10 ºC for seven days. At time zero, 30 min post-infection, the bacteriophage P100 reduced L. monocytogenes counts by 2.3 log units in Minas Frescal cheese and by 2.1 log units in Coalho cheese, compared to controls without bacteriophage. However, in samples stored under refrigeration for seven days, the bacteriophage P100 was only weakly antilisterial, with the lowest decimal reduction (DR for the cheeses: 1.0 log unit for Minas Frescal and 0.8 log units for Coalho cheese. The treatment produced a statistically significant decrease in the counts of viable cells (p < 0.05 and in all assays performed, we observed an increase of approximately one log cycle in the number of viable cells of L. monocytogenes in the samples under refrigeration for seven days. Moreover, a smaller effect of phages was observed. These results, along with other published data, indicate that the effectiveness of the phage treatment depends on the initial concentration of L. monocytogenes, and that a high concentration of phages per unit area is required to ensure sustained inactivation of target pathogens on food surfaces.

  16. Patogénesis de Listeria monocytogenes, microorganismo zoonotico emergente

    OpenAIRE

    Kirvis Torres; Sara Sierra; Raúl Poutou; Ana Carrascal; Marcela Mercado

    2005-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes además de ser un paradigma para la investigación inmunológica se ha convertidoen sistema modelo apropiado para el análisis de los mecanismos moleculares del parasitismo intracelularde otras bacterias. Investigadores en el área de la inmunología se interesaron en este microorganismocuando se reconoció el riesgo que representaba para la salud pública y la seguridad en la industria dealimentos. Desde mediados de los años 80’s se ha investigado la biología molecular de los ...

  17. Survival of Listeria monocytogenes in uncooked Italian dry sausage (salami).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianfranceschi, M; Gattuso, A; Fiore, A; D'Ottavio, M C; Casale, M; Palumbo, A; Aureli, P

    2006-07-01

    This study was undertaken to supplement existing information on the survival of Listeria monocytogenes in Italian salami. The fact that Italian salami is frequently consumed by a large number of people poses some serious health implications. Some raw materials have been found to be microbiologically contaminated, for their production occurs without any thermic treatment, and these are in circulation throughout Italy all year round. We selected the product for its microbiological, technological, and commercial characteristics. We analyzed 1,020 samples taken during the autumn and winter 2002 and spring and summer 2003 periods and immediately before selling. The samples were collected from 17 plants with an annual production of between 1 and 2000 metric tons and with a distribution of products in over 80% of Italy in geographic terms. To detect and enumerate L. monocytogenes, we followed International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 11290 part 1 and 2: 1996 (modified using chromogenic medium Agar Listeria according to Ottarviani and Agosti [ALOA]). L. monocytogenes was found in 22.7% of samples, but the contamination level was less than 10 CFU/g. Contamination prevalence ranged from 1.6 to 58.3% and was lower than 10% in 5 of the 17 plants checked. The most frequently isolated serotypes were 1/2c, 1/2a, 1/2b, and 4b. Additional studies are necessary to establish if the exposure to a small number of L. monocytogenes cells through the consumption of salami represents a significant health risk and, in light of the future introduction of the SANCO/4198/2001 revision 21 "Commission Regulation on Microbiological Criteria for Foodstuffs," is a necessary investigation.

  18. Prevalence and level of Listeria monocytogenes and other Listeria sp. in ready-to-eat minimally processed and refrigerated vegetables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovačević, Mira; Burazin, Jelena; Pavlović, Hrvoje; Kopjar, Mirela; Piližota, Vlasta

    2013-04-01

    Minimally processed and refrigerated vegetables can be contaminated with Listeria species bacteria including Listeria monocytogenes due to extensive handling during processing or by cross contamination from the processing environment. The objective of this study was to examine the microbiological quality of ready-to-eat minimally processed and refrigerated vegetables from supermarkets in Osijek, Croatia. 100 samples of ready-to-eat vegetables collected from different supermarkets in Osijek, Croatia, were analyzed for presence of Listeria species and Listeria monocytogenes. The collected samples were cut iceberg lettuces (24 samples), other leafy vegetables (11 samples), delicatessen salads (23 samples), cabbage salads (19 samples), salads from mixed (17 samples) and root vegetables (6 samples). Listeria species was found in 20 samples (20 %) and Listeria monocytogenes was detected in only 1 sample (1 %) of cut red cabbage (less than 100 CFU/g). According to Croatian and EU microbiological criteria these results are satisfactory. However, the presence of Listeria species and Listeria monocytogenes indicates poor hygiene quality. The study showed that these products are often improperly labeled, since 24 % of analyzed samples lacked information about shelf life, and 60 % of samples lacked information about storage conditions. With regard to these facts, cold chain abruption with extended use after expiration date is a probable scenario. Therefore, the microbiological risk for consumers of ready-to-eat minimally processed and refrigerated vegetables is not completely eliminated.

  19. PRESENCE OF Listeria monocytogenes IN HEALTHY CATTLE AT SLAUGHTERING: FIRST RESULTS

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    G. Colavita

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes is an ubiquitous pathogen occasionally present in the intestinal tract of various animal species. The aim of this study was to assess the incidence of Listeria spp. and Listeria monocytogenes in faeces of healthy cattle at slaughtering. Listeria spp. was isolated in 18 out of 220 (8.2% faecal samples, and Listeria monocytogenes was isolated in 3 faecal samples (1.4%. From the 220 faecal samples were also isolated 9 strains of L. grayi, 4 strains of L. innocua and 2 strains of L. ivanovii. Although limited, our results show that animal faeces can represent a source of L. monocytogenes contamination of carcasses in abattoirs and can be a potential hazard to human health.

  20. PRÉVALENCE DE LISTERIA MONOCYTOGENES DANS LE LAIT CRU DE VACHE AU LIBAN NORD

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    Imad al Kassaa

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Al Kassaa Imad, Khaled el Omari, Marwa Saati, Bachar Ismail and Monzer Hamze. 2016. Prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes in raw cow milk in north Lebanon. Lebanese Science Journal, 17(1: 39-45. Listeriosis, although a zoonosis, is an invasive disease that can affect newborns, pregnant women and immunocompromised adults. Clinical manifestations can be expressed by febrile gastroenteritis, invasive forms including severe sepsis, meningitis, rhombencephalitis, prenatal infections and abortions. Species of Listeria bacteria are ubiquitous and adaptable to the environment in animal and plant foods. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes in 100 samples of fresh cow milk collected from different areas of North Lebanon. Listeria monocytogenes was detected by using the Grand VIDAS technique (Biomérieux France. The results obtained revealed the absence of Listeria monocytogenes in all analyzed samples.

  1. Occurrence and distribution of Listeria monocytogenes and other Listeria species in ready-to-eat and raw meat products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengesha, Desalegn; Zewde, Bayleyegn Molla; Toquin, Marie-Thérèse; Kleer, Josef; Hildebrandt, Goetz; Gebreyes, Wondwossen A

    2009-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to estimate the occurrence and distribution of Listeria monocytogenes and other Listeria species in ready-to-eat food items (pasteurized milk, cheese, ice cream, and cakes) and raw meat products (minced beef, pork, and chicken carcasses). A total of 711 randomly selected samples were collected from supermarkets and pastry shops in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Listeria monocytogenes and other Listeria species were isolated and identified according to the techniques recommended by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO 11290-1). Serotyping of L. monocytogenes strains was carried out at the French Food Safety Agency (AFSSA), Ploufragan, France. Of the 711 food samples examined, 189 (26.6%) were Listeria positive of which 34 (4.8%) were L. monocytogenes. Pork was the most contaminated with Listeria species (62.5%) followed by minced beef (47.7%), ice cream (42.7%), soft cheese (16.8%), chicken carcasses (16.0%), and cakes (12.1%). All pasteurized milk and cottage cheese samples examined were Listeria negative. Listeria monocytogenes strains were isolated in ready-to-eat food items consisting of ice cream (11.7%), cakes (6.5%), and soft cheese (3.9%) and in meat products ranging from 3.7% to 5.1%. Among the 34 isolates of L. monocytogenes serotyped, serotypes 4b/4e (n = 32), 4c, and 4e (n = 2) were identified. The presence of L. monocytogenes in some ready-to-eat food items could pose public health hazards to the consumer, particularly to the high-risk group of the population.

  2. The survival of Listeria monocytogenes during long term desiccation is facilitated by sodium chloride and organic material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Birte Fonnesbech; Hansen, Lisbeth Truelstrup; Mordhorst, Hanne; Gram, Lone

    2010-06-15

    One specific DNA-subtype, as determined by RAPD, of Listeria monocytogenes persisted in a fish slaughterhouse for years, even during months with no production where the plant was cleaned and kept dry. We hypothesised that tolerance to desiccation could be a factor in explaining the persistence of L. monocytogenes in food processing environments and the purpose of the present study was to determine ability of L. monocytogenes to survive desiccation on stainless steel under simulated food processing conditions. Viable counts of eight different L. monocytogenes strains exposed to different soils and relative humidities (RHs) during desiccation decreased significantly (pjuice, survivors decreased slowly resulting in low numbers (10(2)-10(3)CFU/cm(2)) from all eight strains remaining viable after 3months. Whilst conditions during desiccation had a pronounced influence on inactivation kinetics and the number of survivors, persistent L. monocytogenes were not more tolerant to desiccation than presumed non-persistent isolates. Our study shows that the ability to survive for months during desiccated conditions may be a factor explaining the ability of L. monocytogenes to persist in food processing environments. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Various Ready-to-Eat Products from Retail Stores Linked to Occurrence of Diverse Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria spp. Isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vongkamjan, Kitiya; Fuangpaiboon, Janejira; Turner, Matthew P; Vuddhakul, Varaporn

    2016-02-01

    Listeriosis outbreaks have been associated with a variety of foods. This study investigated the prevalence and diversity of Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria spp. in ready-to-eat (RTE) products and evaluated the performance of a rapid detection method, the 3M molecular detection assay for L. monocytogenes (MDA-LM), for detection of L. monocytogenes. Assay results were compared with those obtained using the U.S. Food and Drug Administration standard culture method described in the Bacteriological Analytical Manual. Products (n = 200) were purchased from retail stores: 122 aquatic products, 22 products of animal origin, 18 vegetarian products, 15 deli meat products, 13 salad and vegetable products, 4 desserts, 2 egg-based products, and 4 other products. L. monocytogenes prevalence was comparable with both methods. Overall, 15 (7.5%) of 200 samples were positive for L. monocytogenes: 3% of aquatic products, 1.5% of products of animal origin, 1% of vegetarian products, and 2% of deli meat products. Compared with the standard culture method, the sensitivity, specificity, and the accuracy of the MDA-LM were 86.7% (95% confidence interval, 58.4 to 97.7%), 98.4% (95% confidence interval, 95.0 to 99.6%), and 97.5%, respectively. Using the culture-based method, 18 (9%) of 200 samples were positive for Listeria species other than L. monocytogenes. Listeria isolates from these samples were classified into nine allelic types (ATs). The majority of isolates were classified as ATs 58 and 74, which were identified as L. monocytogenes lineages I and IV, respectively. Listeria innocua and Listeria welshimeri also were represented by isolates of multiple ATs. The MDA-LM is a rapid and reliable technique for detecting L. monocytogenes in various RTE foods. Further study is needed to develop effective control strategies to reduce L. monocytogenes contamination in RTE foods.

  4. The Distribution of Listeria in Pasture-Raised Broiler Farm Soils Is Potentially Related to University of Vermont Medium Enrichment Bias toward Listeria innocua over Listeria monocytogenes

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    Aude Locatelli

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of Listeria monocytogenes has been widely investigated in the poultry production chain from the processing plant to the final product. However, limited data are available on Listeria species, including Listeria monocytogenes, in the poultry farm environment. Therefore, fecal and soil samples from 37 pastured poultry flocks from 10 all-natural farms over 3 years were assessed to determine the prevalence and diversity of Listeria within these alternative poultry farm environments using standard cultural and molecular methods. Listeria species were isolated in 15% of poultry farm samples and included Listeria innocua (65.7%, L. monocytogenes (17.4%, and Listeria welshimeri (15.1%. Additional multiplex PCR serotyping showed group 1/2a-3a to be the most dominant L. monocytogenes serovar group. Based on these results, monoculture growth experiments were conducted on four Listeria soil isolates (three L. monocytogenes isolates representing the three recovered serovar groups and one L. innocua isolate to determine if culture medium [tripticase soy broth (TSB and University of Vermont modified Listeria enrichment broth (UVM], inoculum concentration (102 or 105 CFU/ml, or incubation temperature (20, 30, and 42°C differentially affected these Listeria species. Overall, very few significant growth differences were observed between the behavior of the three L. monocytogenes isolates (representing the three recovered serovar groups under the growth conditions tested. Alternatively, at 30°C in UVM with the lower inoculum concentration, the L. innocua isolate had a significantly shorter lag phase than the L. monocytogenes isolates. In coculture growth studies under these same incubation conditions, the lag phase of L. innocua and L. monocytogenes was similar, but the final concentration of L. innocua was significantly higher than L. monocytogenes. However, cocultures in UVM for high inoculum concentration did not show preferential growth of

  5. The Distribution of Listeria in Pasture-Raised Broiler Farm Soils Is Potentially Related to University of Vermont Medium Enrichment Bias toward Listeria innocua over Listeria monocytogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locatelli, Aude; Lewis, Micah A.; Rothrock, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    The occurrence of Listeria monocytogenes has been widely investigated in the poultry production chain from the processing plant to the final product. However, limited data are available on Listeria species, including Listeria monocytogenes, in the poultry farm environment. Therefore, fecal and soil samples from 37 pastured poultry flocks from 10 all-natural farms over 3 years were assessed to determine the prevalence and diversity of Listeria within these alternative poultry farm environments using standard cultural and molecular methods. Listeria species were isolated in 15% of poultry farm samples and included Listeria innocua (65.7%), L. monocytogenes (17.4%), and Listeria welshimeri (15.1%). Additional multiplex PCR serotyping showed group 1/2a-3a to be the most dominant L. monocytogenes serovar group. Based on these results, monoculture growth experiments were conducted on four Listeria soil isolates (three L. monocytogenes isolates representing the three recovered serovar groups and one L. innocua isolate) to determine if culture medium [tripticase soy broth (TSB) and University of Vermont modified Listeria enrichment broth (UVM)], inoculum concentration (102 or 105 CFU/ml), or incubation temperature (20, 30, and 42°C) differentially affected these Listeria species. Overall, very few significant growth differences were observed between the behavior of the three L. monocytogenes isolates (representing the three recovered serovar groups) under the growth conditions tested. Alternatively, at 30°C in UVM with the lower inoculum concentration, the L. innocua isolate had a significantly shorter lag phase than the L. monocytogenes isolates. In coculture growth studies under these same incubation conditions, the lag phase of L. innocua and L. monocytogenes was similar, but the final concentration of L. innocua was significantly higher than L. monocytogenes. However, cocultures in UVM for high inoculum concentration did not show preferential growth of L. innocua

  6. Rapid methods to assess sanitizing efficacy of benzalkonium chloride to Listeria monocytogenes biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanova, Nadya A; Gawande, Purushottam V; Brovko, Lubov Y; Griffiths, Mansel W

    2007-12-01

    Different methods were used to investigate biofilm growth including crystal violet staining, ATP bioluminescence and total viable count. Seven strains of Listeria monocytogenes and 8 of their derivative strains were screened for their capacity to form biofilms. Both adaptation to benzalkonium chloride (BC) and curing of plasmids did not significantly affect biofilm-forming ability. The strains of L. monocytogenes belonging to serotype 1 formed biofilms significantly better as compared to serotype 4 (P=0.0003). To estimate the efficacy of BC for biofilm elimination the best and the poorest biofilm-formers were used (C719 and LJH 381). It was observed that, L. monocytogenes strain C719 in biofilms is at least 1000 times more resistant to BC than in planktonic form. Cells present in biofilms were shown to recover and grow after BC treatment thus providing a source of recontamination. It was shown that ATP bioluminescence provides good correlation with bacterial counts of L. monocytogenes in biofilms. Staining with crystal violet, on the contrary, did not correlate with bacterial growth in biofilms in the presence of high concentrations of BC but provided information on the concentration of bacterial cells, both live and dead, attached to the surface. ATP bioluminescence was found to be a reliable method for rapid estimation of the efficacy of sanitizers for biofilm disinfection. Crystal violet staining, on the other hand, was shown to be a suitable method to monitor removal of biofilms. Our investigation showed that for Listeria biofilms concentrations of BC higher then 10 mg/ml should be applied for at least 30 min to kill almost all the live cells in biofilms. However, this concentration was still not enough to remove biofilms from the surface of plastic.

  7. A case of meningoencephalitis caused by Listeria monocytogenes in a healthy child

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    Ji Eun Lee

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes is a facultative anaerobic, gram-positive bacillus that is isolated from the soil, vegetables, and wild or domestic animals. Listeria occurs predominantly in the elderly, immunocompromised patients, pregnant women and newborns. Infections by this microorganism are rare in healthy infants and children. L. monocytogenes may cause meningitis, meningoencephalitis, brain abscess, pyogenic arthritis, osteomyelitis, and liver abscesses in children. The course of meningoencephalitis by listeria is often severe and even fatal. Acute hydrocephalus can develop as a complication and the mortality associated with listeriosis is significantly high. We present a case of meningoencephalitis caused by L. monocytogenes in a previously healthy 7-year-old girl.

  8. A case of meningoencephalitis caused by Listeria monocytogenes in a healthy child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji Eun; Cho, Won Kyoung; Nam, Chan Hee; Jung, Min Ho; Kang, Jin Han; Suh, Byung Kyu

    2010-05-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a facultative anaerobic, gram-positive bacillus that is isolated from the soil, vegetables, and wild or domestic animals. Listeria occurs predominantly in the elderly, immunocompromised patients, pregnant women and newborns. Infections by this microorganism are rare in healthy infants and children. L. monocytogenes may cause meningitis, meningoencephalitis, brain abscess, pyogenic arthritis, osteomyelitis, and liver abscesses in children. The course of meningoencephalitis by listeria is often severe and even fatal. Acute hydrocephalus can develop as a complication and the mortality associated with listeriosis is significantly high. We present a case of meningoencephalitis caused by L. monocytogenes in a previously healthy 7-year-old girl.

  9. Invasive Listeria monocytogenes infections in the Netherlands, 1995-2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doorduyn, Y; de Jager, C M; van der Zwaluw, W K; Wannet, W J B; van der Ende, A; Spanjaard, L; van Duynhoven, Y T H P

    2006-07-01

    In order to add to the limited data available about the incidence of invasive Listeria monocytogenes infection in the Netherlands, two studies were conducted. In the first study, data on hospital patients with listeriosis in the period 1995-2003 were obtained from the National Medical Registration (study 1). In the second study, hospital discharge letters for patients whose Listeria isolates were received by the Netherlands Reference Laboratory for Bacterial Meningitis (NRLBM) in the period 1999-2003 were retrieved (study 2). Serotyping and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) were used to subtype the various strains of Listeria. These reviews revealed 283 hospital patients and 159 patients with Listeria isolates. Discharge letters were received for 107 (67%) patients. The mean annual incidence of listeriosis in both studies was 2.0 per million inhabitants. The main clinical manifestations were meningitis (incidence: 0.9 and 1.0 per million in studies 1 and 2, respectively) and septicaemia (incidence: 0.08 and 1.0 per million, respectively). Listeriosis in pregnancy was rare (incidence: 1.3 and 2.4 per 100,000 pregnancies over 24 weeks of gestation, respectively). Predisposing conditions were present in 47 and 71% of the patients in studies 1 and 2, respectively. The mortality due to listeriosis was 18%. Serotypes 4b, 1/2a, and 1/2b were responsible for 96% of the cases of human listeriosis. Listeriosis is rare in the Netherlands, but its clinical course is severe and the resulting mortality is high. Therefore, the current recommendations for pregnant women to avoid high-risk foods should be continued. These dietary recommendations should also be given to individuals with predisposing conditions, since they, too, are at risk of Listeria infection.

  10. Comparison of two multiplex PCR assays for the detection of Listeria spp. and Listeria monocytogenes in biological samples

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    Budniak Sylwia

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of the study was to optimise and compare two multiplex PCR assays for the detection of Listeria spp. and Listeria monocytogenes in biological samples including the liver, brain, and blood. Material and Methods: Three strains of L. monocytogenes and single strains of each of the species: L. ivanovii, L. innocua, L. grayi, L. welshimeri, and L. seeligeri were used. Additionally, five other species of bacterium were used to evaluate the specificity of the tests. Results: Specific amplification products were obtained for both multiplex PCR assays, which confirmed the tested strains as Listeria spp. and L. monocytogenes, respectively. Isolates of other species did not yield PCR products. Conclusion: Both multiplex PCR assays proved to be significantly sensitive and highly-specific methods for the detection of Listeria strains.

  11. Incidence of Listeria spp. and Listeria monocytogenes in a poultry processing environment and in poultry products and their rapid confirmation by multiplex PCR.

    OpenAIRE

    Lawrence, L M; Gilmour, A

    1994-01-01

    The incidence of Listeria spp. and Listeria monocytogenes in a poultry processing plant and in raw and cooked poultry products was determined over a 6-month period. Within the raw and cooked poultry processing environments, 46% (36 of 79) and 29% (51 of 173) of the samples contained Listeria spp. while 26% (21 of 79) and 15% (27 of 173) contained L. monocytogenes, respectively. Various sites within the processing environment were found to be consistently positive for L. monocytogenes througho...

  12. Combination of endolysins and high pressure to inactivate Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Nassau, Tomas J; Lenz, Christian A; Scherzinger, Anna S; Vogel, Rudi F

    2017-12-01

    Outbreaks of listeriosis are often related to the consumption of low-processed ready-to-eat food products (e.g. soft cheeses or smoked fish) contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes. Traditional preservation techniques, such as heat treatment, cannot eliminate Listeria from these products without strongly affecting the quality of the foods. We therefore investigated the use of endolysin (PlyP40, Ply511, or PlyP825) in combination with high hydrostatic pressure processing to kill L. monocytogenes in buffer. The results demonstrated a more than additive effect when both treatments were combined. For example, whereas 0.16 μg/mL PlyP825 or 300 MPa (1 min, 30 °C) applied individually reduced the cell count by 0.2 and 0.3 log cfu, respectively, a combined treatment resulted in a reduction of 5.5 log cfu. Similar results were obtained for the other endolysins combined with high pressure processing. We also showed that the synergistic inactivation of cells by endolysin and HHP is possible at a pressure level of only 200 MPa (2 min, 30 °C). Thus, the application of endolysins did not only substantially increase the bactericidal effect of high pressure, but it also enabled the inactivation of bacterial cells at much lower pressure levels. This shows the potential of using such combined processes for the inactivation of L. monocytogenes and food preservation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Listeria spp. E Listeria monocytogenes NA PRODUÇÃO DE SALSICHAS TIPO HOT DOG

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    ALESSANDRA PARO RODRIGUES CESAR

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes is widely distributed in the environment and it has been isolated from food that were associated to outbreaks of high lethality in many countries. Thus, this bacterium represents an important pathogen to the public health. Ready-to-eat products, likecooked stuffed food, within them, frankfurters, are associated to human listeriosis in many countries. Taking into consideration the importance of the subject and the need of more data about it, the occurrence of Listeria spp. and L. monocytogenes in industrial plants, in meat raw materials, in slurry and frankfurters was investigated.These samples were collected in two production plants with SIF (Federal Inspection Service; in one of them GMP, HACCP and SOP were implemented. The results of the 1 06 microbiological analysis were submitted to the program @Risk to obtain the risk analysis; the meanvalues results showed that 7 to 9% of the frankfurters in the market may have L. monocytogenes. The analysis indicated that 88 strains of L. monocytogenes were obtained from 1 06 samples; among them, 76 werecollected in the industrial plants that participate in the experiment, and 30 were collected in the market. In serological typification, 95% of these strains were classified as serotypes 4b, 1 /2a and 1 /2b. Besides the presence of the bacterium in frankfurthers consumed inBrazil and the risk factors associated to this pathogen, the situation concerns because of the lack of epidemiological data, absence of patterns and the deficient information given to the consumer, specially information related to the presence of L. monocytogenes, particularly important to the groups at risk, as well as information related to the importance of heating the product

  14. Catabolite repression and virulence gene expression in Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbreth, Stefanie Evans; Benson, Andrew K; Hutkins, Robert W

    2004-08-01

    Previous studies have suggested that carbohydrates may affect expression of virulence genes in Listeria monocytogenes. Which carbohydrates influence virulence gene expression and how carbohydrates mediate expression, however, is not clear. The goal of this work was to examine how carbohydrates affect virulence gene expression in L. monocytogenes 10403S. Growth studies were conducted in medium containing glucose and various sugars. Metabolism of arbutin, arabitol, cellobiose, mannose, maltose, trehalose, and salicin were repressed in the presence of glucose. Only when glucose was consumed were these sugars fermented, indicating that catabolite repression by glucose had occurred. To determine whether virulence gene expression was also influenced by catabolite repression, we performed primer extension experiments, using primers for hly and prfA, which encode for a hemolysin and the regulator protein PrfA, respectively. In the presence of cellobiose and arbutin, transcription of hemolysin was reduced. However, none of the sugars affected transcription of prfA. The results demonstrate that catabolite repression occurs in L. monocytogenes and suggests that, at least in strain 10403S, cellobiose and arbutin repress expression of hemolysin.

  15. Biofilm Formation among Clinical and Food Isolates of Listeria monocytogenes

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    Joana Barbosa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. A total of 725 Listeria monocytogenes isolates, 607 from various foods and 118 from clinical cases of listeriosis, were investigated concerning their ability to form biofilms, at 4°C during 5 days and at 37°C during 24 h. Methods. Biofilm production was carried out on polystyrene tissue culture plates. Five L. monocytogenes isolates were tested for biofilm formation after being exposed to acidic and osmotic stress conditions. Results. Significant differences (P<0.01 between clinical and food isolates were observed. At 37°C for 24 h, most food isolates were classified as weak or moderate biofilm formers whereas all the clinical isolates were biofilm producers, although the majority were weak. At 4°C during 5 days, 65 and 59% isolates, from food and clinical cases, respectively, were classified as weak. After both sublethal stresses, at 37°C just one of the five isolates tested was shown to be more sensitive to subsequent acidic exposure. However, at 4°C both stresses did not confer either sensitivity or resistance. Conclusions. Significant differences between isolates origin, temperature, and sublethal acidic stress were observed concerning the ability to form biofilms. Strain, origin, and environmental conditions can determine the level of biofilm production by L. monocytogenes isolates.

  16. Listeria monocytogenes Meningitis Complicating Rotavirus Gastroenteritis in an Immunocompetent Child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, Takuma; Kawano, Akiko; Araki, Mayumi; Hamahata, Yuko; Usui, Machiko; Shimoyamada, Motoko; Tamame, Takuya; Akashi, Masayuki; Sato, Seiji

    2017-06-25

    Listeria monocytogenes only occasionally causes bacterial meningitis in immunocompetent children. We report a case of L. monocytogenes meningitis associated with rotavirus gastroenteritis. The patient was a previously healthy 20-month-old girl who was admitted because of sustained fever and lethargy after suffering from gastroenteritis for 6 days. The patient's peripheral white blood cell count was 18,600/µL and the C-reactive protein level was 2.44 mg/dL. A stool sample tested positive for rotavirus antigen. A cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) sample showed pleocytosis. Cultures of the CSF and stool samples revealed the presence of L. monocytogenes. The patient was successfully treated with ampicillin and gentamicin. We speculate that translocation of enteric flora across the intestinal epithelium that had been damaged by rotavirus gastroenteritis might have caused bacteremia that disseminated into the CSF. Both listeriosis and secondary systemic infection after rotavirus gastroenteritis are rare but not unknown. Initiation of appropriate treatment as soon as possible is important for all types of bacterial meningitis. This rare but serious complication should be taken into consideration even if the patient does not have any medical history of immune-related problems.

  17. Postenrichment Population Differentials Using Buffered Listeria Enrichment Broth: Implications of the Presence of Listeria innocua on Listeria monocytogenes in Food Test Samples†

    Science.gov (United States)

    KEYS, ASHLEY L.; DAILEY, RACHEL C.; HITCHINS, ANTHONY D.; SMILEY, R. DERIKE

    2016-01-01

    The recovery of low levels of Listeria monocytogenes from foods is complicated by the presence of competing microorganisms. Nonpathogenic species of Listeria pose a particular problem because variation in growth rate during the enrichment step can produce more colonies of these nontarget cells on selective and/or differential media, resulting in a preferential recovery of nonpathogens, especially Listeria innocua. To gauge the extent of this statistical barrier to pathogen recovery, 10 isolates each of L. monocytogenes and L. innocua were propagated together from approximately equal initial levels using the current U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s enrichment procedure. In the 100 isolate pairs, an average 1.3-log decrease was found in the 48-h enrichment L. monocytogenes population when L. innocua was present. In 98 of the 100 isolate pairs, L. innocua reached higher levels at 48 h than did L. monocytogenes, with a difference of 0.2 to 2.4 log CFU/ml. The significance of these population differences was apparent by an increase in the difficulty of isolating L. monocytogenes by the streak plating method. L. monocytogenes went completely undetected in 18 of 30 enrichment cultures even after colony isolation was attempted on Oxoid chromogenic Listeria agar. This finding suggests that although both Listeria species were present on the plate, the population differential between them restricted L. monocytogenes to areas of the plate with confluent growth and that isolated individual colonies were only L. innocua. PMID:24215687

  18. Postenrichment population differentials using buffered Listeria enrichment broth: implications of the presence of Listeria innocua on Listeria monocytogenes in food test samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keys, Ashley L; Dailey, Rachel C; Hitchins, Anthony D; Smiley, R Derike

    2013-11-01

    The recovery of low levels of Listeria monocytogenes from foods is complicated by the presence of competing microorganisms. Nonpathogenic species of Listeria pose a particular problem because variation in growth rate during the enrichment step can produce more colonies of these nontarget cells on selective and/or differential media, resulting in a preferential recovery of nonpathogens, especially Listeria innocua. To gauge the extent of this statistical barrier to pathogen recovery, 10 isolates each of L. monocytogenes and L. innocua were propagated together from approximately equal initial levels using the current U. S. Food and Drug Administration's enrichment procedure. In the 100 isolate pairs, an average 1.3-log decrease was found in the 48-h enrichment L. monocytogenes population when L. innocua was present. In 98 of the 100 isolate pairs, L. innocua reached higher levels at 48 h than did L. monocytogenes, with a difference of 0.2 to 2.4 log CFU/ml. The significance of these population differences was apparent by an increase in the difficulty of isolating L. monocytogenes by the streak plating method. L. monocytogenes went completely undetected in 18 of 30 enrichment cultures even after colony isolation was attempted on Oxoid chromogenic Listeria agar. This finding suggests that although both Listeria species were present on the plate, the population differential between them restricted L. monocytogenes to areas of the plate with confluent growth and that isolated individual colonies were only L. innocua.

  19. Characterization of plasmids from Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria innocua strains isolated from short-ripened cheeses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolles, A; de los Reyes-Gavilán, C G

    1998-02-17

    The plasmid content of 30 isolates of Listeria monocytogenes and 18 isolates of Listeria innocua obtained from short-ripened cheeses was analysed. The isolates of L. monocytogenes serogroup 1 harboured a single plasmid, pLM33 (33.2 kbp), whereas the serogroup 4 isolates did not contain plasmids. One group of L. innocua strains harboured the plasmid pLI71 (71 kbp) and another one contained two plasmids: pLI59 (59.5 kbp) and pLI56 (56.5 kbp). These plasmid groups were in accordance with clusters previously defined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis of the chromosomal DNA of Listeria isolates. Plasmids pLM33, pLI71 and pLI59 shared homology regions of at least 20 kbp. Plasmid pLI56 did not encode genes for any known character (such as carbohydrate fermentation, resistance to antibiotics, heavy metals or disinfectants, growth at low pH, NaCl tolerance or thermal inactivation by pasteurisation) and displayed different characteristics to the other three plasmids. It was also the only one cured from the parent strain and the sole plasmid not digested by the restriction enzyme PstI. In addition, its lack of homology with pLM33, pLI71 and pLI59 enhanced the possibility of a different origin for plasmid pLI56.

  20. Microwave oven heating for inactivation of Listeria monocytogenes on frankfurters before consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Marval, Mawill; Geornaras, Ifigenia; Kendall, Patricia A; Scanga, John A; Belk, Keith E; Sofos, John N

    2009-10-01

    Microwave oven heating was evaluated for inactivation of Listeria monocytogenes on inoculated and stored frankfurters. Frankfurters formulated without/with 1.5% potassium lactate and 0.1% sodium diacetate were inoculated with L. monocytogenes (1.9 +/- 0.2 log CFU/cm(2)), vacuum-packaged, and stored (4 degrees C) to simulate conditions prior to purchase by consumers. At storage days 18, 36, and 54, packages were opened and placed at 7 degrees C, simulating aerobic storage in a household refrigerator. At 0, 3, and 7 d of aerobic storage, 2 frankfurters were placed in a bowl with water (250 mL) and treated in a household microwave oven at high (1100 W) power for 30, 45, 60, or 75 s, or medium (550 W) power for 60 or 75 s. Frankfurters and the heating water were analyzed for total microbial counts and L. monocytogenes populations. Exposure to high power for 75 s reduced pathogen levels (0.7 +/- 0.0 to 1.0 +/- 0.1 log CFU/cm(2)) to below the detection limit ( 1.5 and 5.9 log CFU/cm(2) from control levels of 1.5 +/- 0.1 to 7.2 +/- 0.5 log CFU/cm(2). Depending on treatment and storage time, the water used to reheat the frankfurters had viable L. monocytogenes counts of microwave oven at high power for 75 s to inactivate up to 3.7 log CFU/cm(2) of L. monocytogenes contamination.

  1. Effect of humidity and temperature on the survival of Listeria monocytogenes on surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redfern, J; Verran, J

    2017-04-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a pathogenic bacterium, with human disease and infection linked to dairy products, seafood, ready-to-eat meat and raw & undercooked meats. Stainless steel is the most common food preparation surface and therefore, it is important to understand how food storage conditions such as surface materials, temperature and relative humidity can affect survival of L. monocytogenes. In this study, survival of L. monocytogenes on stainless steel was investigated at three temperatures (4, 10 and 21°C), each approx. 11, 50 and 85% humidity. Results indicate that the lower the temperature, the more cells were recovered in all three humidity environments, while medium humidity enhances survival, irrespective of temperature. Lower humidity decreases recovery at all temperatures. These data support the guidance noted above that humidity control is important, and that lower humidity environments are less likely to support retention of viable L. monocytogenes on a stainless steel surface. Understanding survival of potential food-borne pathogens is essential for the safe production and preparation of food. While it has long been 'common knowledge' that relative humidity can affect the growth and survival of micro-organisms, this study systematically describes the survival of L. monocytogenes on stainless steel under varying humidity and temperatures for the first time. The outcomes from this paper will allow those involved with food manufacture and preparation to make informed judgement on environmental conditions relating to humidity control, which is lacking in the food standards guidelines. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  2. Growth of Listeria monocytogenes within a Caramel-Coated Apple Microenvironment

    OpenAIRE

    Glass, Kathleen A.; Golden, Max C.; Wanless, Brandon J.; Bedale, Wendy; Czuprynski, Charles

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT A 2014 multistate listeriosis outbreak was linked to consumption of caramel-coated apples, an unexpected and previously unreported vehicle for Listeria monocytogenes. This outbreak was unanticipated because both the pH of apples (

  3. Internalization of Listeria monocytogenes in cantaloupes during dump tank washing and hydrocooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent listeriosis outbreaks and recalls associated with cantaloupes urge for studies to understand the mechanisms of cantaloupe contamination by Listeria monocytogenes. Postharvest practices such as washing and hydrocooling were suggested to facilitate the contamination of fresh fruits by human pat...

  4. Effects of ultraviolet-B exposure on the resistance to Listeria monocytogenes in the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goettsch W; Garssen J; de Klerk A; Herremans MMPT; Dortant P; de Gruijl FR; van Loveren H; LPI; VIR; UU

    1996-01-01

    Een Listeria monocytogenes infectiemodel in de rat werd gebruikt om de immuunsuppressieve activiteit van ultraviolet-B straling (UVB) te onderzoeken. Ratten werden dagelijks blootgesteld aan suberythemale hoeveelheden UVB straling gedurende 5 of 7 opeenvolgende dagen. Twee verschillende UV bronnen

  5. Characteristics of the biologically active 35-kDa metalloprotease virulence factor from Listeria monocytogenes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coffey, A; van den Burg, B; Veltman, R; Abee, T

    Listeria monocytogenes, a facultative intracellular pathogen, synthesizes an extracellular protease which is responsible for the maturation of phosphatidylcholine phospholipase C (lecithinase), a virulence factor involved in cell-to-cell spread. This work describes the environmental parameters

  6. Listeria monocytogenes Prevalence and Characteristics in Retail Raw Foods in China: e0136682

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shi Wu; Qingping Wu; Jumei Zhang; Moutong Chen; Ze'an Yan; Huijuan Hu

    2015-01-01

      The prevalence and levels of Listeria monocytogenes in retail raw foods covering most provincial capitals in China were studied with testing of 1036 samples of vegetables, edible mushrooms, raw meat...

  7. Listeria monocytogenes Prevalence and Characteristics in Retail Raw Foods in China

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wu, Shi; Wu, Qingping; Zhang, Jumei; Chen, Moutong; Yan, Ze An; Hu, Huijuan

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence and levels of Listeria monocytogenes in retail raw foods covering most provincial capitals in China were studied with testing of 1036 samples of vegetables, edible mushrooms, raw meat...

  8. Efficiency of high pressure treatment for destruction of Listeria monocytogenes in fruit juices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpas, Hami; Bozoglu, Faruk

    2003-04-01

    The objective of this study was to compare high pressure resistance of Listeria monocytogenes strains at 25 degrees C and 50 degrees C at 350 MPa and to use high pressure (250 MPa and 350 MPa) at 30 degrees C and 40 degrees C for the inactivation of the relatively most pressure resistant strain inoculated in pasteurized apple, apricot, cherry and orange juices. L. monocytogenes CA was found to be the relatively most pressure resistant strain and increasing pressurization from 250 MPa to 350 MPa at 30 degrees C had an additional three to four log cycle reduction in viability, still leaving viable cells after 5 min. When 350 MPa at 40 degrees C for 5 min was applied more than eight log cycle reduction in cell population of all fruit juices was achieved. This study demonstrated that low temperature (40 degrees C) high pressure (350 MPa) treatment has the potential to inactivate relatively pressure resistant L. monocytogenes strains inoculated in different fruit juices within 5 min.

  9. Effects of CO2 on the resuscitation of Listeria monocytogenes injured by various bactericidal treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Houteghem, Nancy; Devlieghere, Frank; Rajkovic, Andreja; Gómez, Sandra Maria Osés; Uyttendaele, Mieke; Debevere, Johan

    2008-03-31

    To assure the microbiological safety and quality of a food product, a combination of preservation hurdles is often used. Therefore, the effects of carbon dioxide at concentrations of 0, 20, 40 and 60% in modified atmospheres on the resuscitation of Listeria monocytogenes cells injured by mild bactericidal treatments during storage at 7 degrees C were examined. The bactericidal treatments were intense light pulses (ILP), chlorine dioxide (ClO(2)), lactic acid (LA) and heat. The results indicated additional bactericidal effects of CO(2) on cultures treated with LA, ClO(2) and ILP, with additional reductions in viable L. monocytogenes of 0.5-1.0 log cfu/ml. Lag phase duration was significantly different between the different treatments, with non-treated cells having the shortest lag phase, followed by that of heat, intense light pulses, lactic acid and finally ClO(2) treated cells. Maximum growth rate was also estimated and results showed a negative correlation with increasing CO(2) concentrations. A relationship was found between the amount of sub-lethally damaged cells after a mild inactivation treatment and the lag phase duration in the CO(2) environment. Current findings demonstrate the possibility that combining mild decontamination treatments and packaging in a CO(2) enriched environment could reduce the risk of L. monocytogenes infections in food due to an extension of the lag phase.

  10. Growth Kinetics of Listeria monocytogenes in Cut Produce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Joelle K; Sahu, Surasri N; Hildebrandt, Ian M; Zhang, Lijie; Qi, Yan; Liggans, Girvin; Datta, Atin R; Tortorello, Mary Lou

    2017-08-01

    Cut produce continues to constitute a significant portion of the fresh fruit and vegetables sold directly to consumers. As such, the safety of these items during storage, handling, and display remains a concern. Cut tomatoes, cut leafy greens, and cut melons, which have been studied in relation to their ability to support pathogen growth, have been specifically identified as needing temperature control for safety. Data are needed on the growth behavior of foodborne pathogens in other types of cut produce items that are commonly offered for retail purchase and are potentially held without temperature control. This study assessed the survival and growth of Listeria monocytogenes in cut produce items that are commonly offered for retail purchase, specifically broccoli, green and red bell peppers, yellow onions, canned green and black olives, fresh green olives, cantaloupe flesh and rind, avocado pulp, cucumbers, and button mushrooms. The survival of L. monocytogenes strains representing serotypes 1/2a, 1/2b, and 4b was determined on the cut produce items for each strain individually at 5, 10, and 25°C for up to 720 h. The modified Baranyi model was used to determine the growth kinetics (the maximum growth rates and maximum population increases) in the L. monocytogenes populations. The products that supported the most rapid growth of L. monocytogenes, considering the fastest growth and resulting population levels, were cantaloupe flesh and avocado pulp. When stored at 25°C, the maximum growth rates for these products were 0.093 to 0.138 log CFU/g/h and 0.130 to 0.193 log CFU/g/h, respectively, depending on the strain. Green olives and broccoli did not support growth at any temperature. These results can be used to inform discussions surrounding whether specific time and temperature storage conditions should be recommended for additional cut produce items.

  11. How Listeria monocytogenes organizes its surface for virulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Filipe; Sousa, Sandra; Cabanes, Didier

    2014-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive pathogen responsible for the manifestation of human listeriosis, an opportunistic foodborne disease with an associated high mortality rate. The key to the pathogenesis of listeriosis is the capacity of this bacterium to trigger its internalization by non-phagocytic cells and to survive and even replicate within phagocytes. The arsenal of virulence proteins deployed by L. monocytogenes to successfully promote the invasion and infection of host cells has been progressively unveiled over the past decades. A large majority of them is located at the cell envelope, which provides an interface for the establishment of close interactions between these bacterial factors and their host targets. Along the multistep pathways carrying these virulence proteins from the inner side of the cytoplasmic membrane to their cell envelope destination, a multiplicity of auxiliary proteins must act on the immature polypeptides to ensure that they not only maturate into fully functional effectors but also are placed or guided to their correct position in the bacterial surface. As the major scaffold for surface proteins, the cell wall and its metabolism are critical elements in listerial virulence. Conversely, the crucial physical support and protection provided by this structure make it an ideal target for the host immune system. Therefore, mechanisms involving fine modifications of cell envelope components are activated by L. monocytogenes to render it less recognizable by the innate immunity sensors or more resistant to the activity of antimicrobial effectors. This review provides a state-of-the-art compilation of the mechanisms used by L. monocytogenes to organize its surface for virulence, with special focus on those proteins that work “behind the frontline”, either supporting virulence effectors or ensuring the survival of the bacterium within its host. PMID:24809022

  12. How Listeria monocytogenes organizes its surface for virulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipe eCarvalho

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive pathogen responsible for the manifestation of human listeriosis, an opportunistic foodborne disease with an associated high mortality rate. The key to the pathogenesis of listeriosis is the capacity of this bacterium to trigger its internalization by non-phagocytic cells and to survive and even replicate within phagocytes. The arsenal of virulence proteins deployed by L. monocytogenes to successfully promote the invasion and infection of host cells has been progressively unveiled over the past decades. A large majority of them are located at the cell envelope, which provides an interface for the establishment of close interactions between these bacterial factors and their host targets. Along the multistep pathways carrying these virulence proteins from the inner side of the cytoplasmic membrane to their cell envelope destination, a multiplicity of auxiliary proteins must act on the immature polypeptides to ensure that they not only maturate into fully functional effectors but also are placed or guided to their correct position in the bacterial surface. As the major scaffold for surface proteins, the cell wall and its metabolism are critical elements in listerial virulence. Conversely, the crucial physical support and protection provided by this structure make it an ideal target for the host immune system. Therefore, mechanisms involving fine modifications of cell envelope components are activated by L. monocytogenes to render it less recognizable by the innate immunity sensors or more resistant to the activity of antimicrobial effectors. This review provides a state-of-the-art compilation of the mechanisms used by L. monocytogenes to organize its surface for virulence, with special focus on those proteins that work behind the frontline, either supporting virulence effectors or ensuring the survival of the bacterium within its host.

  13. A case of meningoencephalitis caused by Listeria monocytogenes in a healthy child

    OpenAIRE

    Ji Eun Lee; Won Kyoung Cho; Chan Hee Nam; Min Ho Jung; Jin Han Kang; Byung Kyu Suh

    2010-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a facultative anaerobic, gram-positive bacillus that is isolated from the soil, vegetables, and wild or domestic animals. Listeria occurs predominantly in the elderly, immunocompromised patients, pregnant women and newborns. Infections by this microorganism are rare in healthy infants and children. L. monocytogenes may cause meningitis, meningoencephalitis, brain abscess, pyogenic arthritis, osteomyelitis, and liver abscesses in children. The course of meningoencepha...

  14. Distribution of the bacteria Listeria monocytogenes in the western part of the Sea of Okhotsk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terekhova, V. E.; Sosnin, V. A.; Buzoleva, L. S.; Shakirov, R. B.

    2010-04-01

    The Amur River’s influence on the distribution of the opportunistic bacteria Listeria monocytogenes in the western part of the Sea of Okhotsk is discussed. The presence of Listeria in the seawater, sea ice, and sediments on the northeastern Sakhalin shelf and slope supports the idea of its connection with the Amur River discharge. The hypothesis of the allochtonic parentage of L. monocytogenes in the sea’s development is proved.

  15. Complete Genome Sequence of the Persistent Listeria monocytogenes Strain R479a

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmitz-Esser, Stephan; Gram, Lone; Wagner, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of the persistent Listeria monocytogenes strain R479a isolated from smoked salmon in Denmark and belonging to lineage II, serovar 1/2a, and multilocus sequence type 8 (ST8) is presented here.......The complete genome sequence of the persistent Listeria monocytogenes strain R479a isolated from smoked salmon in Denmark and belonging to lineage II, serovar 1/2a, and multilocus sequence type 8 (ST8) is presented here....

  16. Environmental prevalence and persistence of Listeria monocytogenes in cold-smoked trout processing plants

    OpenAIRE

    Dimitrijević Mirjana; Anderson R.C.; Karabasil N.; Pavlićević Nataša; Jovanović S.; Nedeljković-Trailović Jelena; Teodorović V.; Marković Maja; Dojčinović S.

    2011-01-01

    The presence of Listeria monocytogenes on the surfaces of equipment and worker’s hands during different production stages, as well as on fish skin and meat during processing and storage of cold-smoked trout, was investigated. Listeria monocytogenes was recovered from 10 (6.06%) of a total 165 cotton-swabbed samples collected from the surfaces of equipment and worker’s hands at two separate processing facilities. Of 105 samples collected from fish skin and m...

  17. Lineage specific recombination rates and microevolution in Listeria monocytogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nightingale Kendra K

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The bacterium Listeria monocytogenes is a saprotroph as well as an opportunistic human foodborne pathogen, which has previously been shown to consist of at least two widespread lineages (termed lineages I and II and an uncommon lineage (lineage III. While some L. monocytogenes strains show evidence for considerable diversification by homologous recombination, our understanding of the contribution of recombination to L. monocytogenes evolution is still limited. We therefore used STRUCTURE and ClonalFrame, two programs that model the effect of recombination, to make inferences about the population structure and different aspects of the recombination process in L. monocytogenes. Analyses were performed using sequences for seven loci (including the house-keeping genes gap, prs, purM and ribC, the stress response gene sigB, and the virulence genes actA and inlA for 195 L. monocytogenes isolates. Results Sequence analyses with ClonalFrame and the Sawyer's test showed that recombination is more prevalent in lineage II than lineage I and is most frequent in two house-keeping genes (ribC and purM and the two virulence genes (actA and inlA. The relative occurrence of recombination versus point mutation is about six times higher in lineage II than in lineage I, which causes a higher genetic variability in lineage II. Unlike lineage I, lineage II represents a genetically heterogeneous population with a relatively high proportion (30% average of genetic material imported from external sources. Phylograms, constructed with correcting for recombination, as well as Tajima's D data suggest that both lineages I and II have suffered a population bottleneck. Conclusion Our study shows that evolutionary lineages within a single bacterial species can differ considerably in the relative contributions of recombination to genetic diversification. Accounting for recombination in phylogenetic studies is critical, and new evolutionary models that

  18. Inhibition effect of tea tree oil on Listeria monocytogenes growth and exotoxin proteins listeriolysin O and p60 secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z; Meng, R; Zhao, X; Shi, C; Zhang, X; Zhang, Y; Guo, N

    2016-12-01

    Listeria monocytogenes (L. monocytogenes) is a Gram-positive bacterium that causes infections in humans. In this study, the effects of tea tree oil (TTO) at subinhibitory concentrations on L. monocytogenes growth and two important exotoxin proteins secreted by L. monocytogenes were researched. Treatment with half of minimal inhibitory concentration of TTO demonstrated very little or no reduction in numbers of viable ATCC 19115 cells. Listeriolysin O (LLO) and p60, were investigated. A listeriolysin assay was used to investigate the hemolytic activities of L. monocytogenes exposed to TTO, and the secretion of LLO and p60 was detected by immunoblot analysis. Additionally, real-time RT-PCR was used to analyse the influence of TTO on the transcription of LLO and p60 encoded genes hly and iap respectively. According to our experimental results, we propose that TTO could be used as a promising natural compound against L. monocytogenes and its virulence factors. This is the first report on the influence of subinhibitory concentrations of tea tree oil (TTO) on the secretion of listeriolysin O (LLO) and p60, the critical virulence factors involved in Listeria pathogenesis. The results showed that TTO at 0·25 mg ml-1 reduced the secretion of LLO and p60 to 10 and 34·9% respectively, in addtion, the transcription of hly and iap was reduced to 10 and 4·3% at 0·5 mg ml-1 respectively. We propose that TTO could be used as a promising antimicrobial compound and virulence inhibitor against L. monocytogenes. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  19. Development of synthetic media mimicking food soils to study the behaviour of Listeria monocytogenes on stainless steel surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overney, Anaïs; Chassaing, Danielle; Carpentier, Brigitte; Guillier, Laurent; Firmesse, Olivier

    2016-12-05

    Listeria monocytogenes is one of the main targets of hygiene procedures in the ready-to-eat food industry due to its ability to persist for months or even years in processing plants, where it can contaminate food during processing. The factors associated with persistence are often those that foster growth, which itself depends on food contamination of surfaces. It is therefore essential to experiment by using food soils or media modelling these soils to understand the behaviour of L. monocytogenes on surfaces of food processing plants. Thus, we set up an experimental plan including three physiological parameters characteristic of the behaviour of cells on surfaces, namely spatial distribution, adhesion forces and the physiological state of sessile L. monocytogenes. These were recorded in two food soils: smoked salmon juice and meat exudate. According to our results, the behaviour of L. monocytogenes on stainless steel surfaces is highly dependent on the food soil used. The presence of viable but non-culturable (VBNC) cells was demonstrated using meat exudate, while all viable cells were recovered using smoked salmon juice. Moreover, on the basis of our criteria and after validation with three strains of L. monocytogenes, we showed that smoked salmon juice can be substituted by a modified culture medium, demonstrating that drawbacks associated with the use of food soils can be overcome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Listeria monocytogenes Impact on Mature or Old Pseudomonas fluorescens Biofilms During Growth at 4 and 20°C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puga, Carmen H; Orgaz, Belen; SanJose, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Changes in spatial organization, as observed by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), viable cell content, biovolume, and substratum surface coverage of the biofilms formed on glass by Pseudomonas fluorescens resulting from co-culture with Listeria monocytogenes, were examined. Two strains of L. monocytogenes, two culture temperatures and two biofilm developmental stages were investigated. Both L. monocytogenes strains, a persistently sampled isolate (collected repeatedly along 3 years from a meat factory) and Scott A, induced shrinkage in matrix volume, both at 20°C and 4°C, in mature or old biofilms, without loss of P. fluorescens cell count per surface unit. The nearly homogeneous pattern of surface coverage shown by mono-species P. fluorescens biofilms, turned into more irregular layouts in co-culture with L. monocytogenes. The upper layer of both mono and dual-species biofilms turned to predominantly consist of matrix, with plenty of viable cells underneath, in old biofilms cultured at 20°C, but not in those grown at 4°C. Between 15 and 56% of the substratum area was covered by biofilm, the extent depending on temperature, time and L. monocytogenes strain. Real biofilms in food-related surfaces may thus be very heterogeneous regarding their superficial components, i.e., those more accessible to disinfectants. It is therefore a hygienic challenge to choose an adequate agent to disrupt them.

  1. Prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes in raw bovine milk and milk products from central highlands of Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyoum, Eyasu Tigabu; Woldetsadik, Daniel Asrat; Mekonen, Tesfu Kassa; Gezahegn, Haile Alemayehu; Gebreyes, Wondwossen Abebe

    2015-11-30

    Listeria monocytogenes is of major significance in human and veterinary medicine. Most human Listeria infections are foodborne and the association of contaminated milk and dairy produce consumption with human listeriosis is noteworthy. In Ethiopia, there is limited data regarding the prevalence of L. monocytogenes in raw bovine milk and dairy products. The aim of this study was, therefore, to determine the prevalence of L. monocytogenes in raw bovine milk and dairy produce. A total of 443 milk and milk product samples were microbiologically analyzed following methods recommended by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Bacteriological Analytical Manual to isolate Listeria spp. The overall prevalence of Listeria spp. was 28.4% and specifically that of L. monocytogenes was 5.6%. Taking the prevalence of Listeria spp. into consideration, cheese was found to be highly contaminated at 60%, followed by pasteurized milk samples (40%), raw milk (18.9%) and yoghurt (5%). Considering the prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes only, raw milk had the lowest contamination while cheese had the highest, followed by pasteurized milk and yoghurt. Raw milk and milk products produced in urban and peri-urban areas of central Ethiopia were contaminated with pathogenic bacteria, L. monocytogenes. The detection of this pathogen in raw milk and milk products warrants an urgent regulatory mechanism to be put in place and also the potential role of milk processing plants in the contamination of dairy products should be investigated.

  2. Prevalence and serotypes of Listeria monocytogenes contamination in Chinese beef processing plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lixian; Feng, Xiaohui; Zhang, Lihua; Zhu, Ruiliang; Luo, Xin

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this work was to study the epidemiology of Listeria spp., particularly Listeria monocytogenes, and to identify the serotypes present in contaminated samples from beef processing plants in China. A total of 439 samples were obtained from bovine feces, hides, and carcasses at three commercial processing plants. A standard protocol (ISO 11290-1) was followed to detect Listeria spp. and L. monocytogenes, and multiplex polymerase chain reaction was used to identify the various L. monocytogenes serotypes. The overall prevalences of Listeria spp. and L. monocytogenes were 65.6% and 26.4%, respectively, and the contamination was highest in the hide samples. The identified L. monocytogenes serotypes were 1/2c and 1/2a. The results of the current study indicate that Listeria spp. contamination is common in Chinese beef processing plants; specific measures should be taken to prevent and/or treat L. monocytogenes contamination of feces and hides in beef slaughter plants. Furthermore, because Listeria spp. contamination was found to be prevalent, it should, therefore, be studied further. The prevention of cases of sporadic listeriosis in China should also be addressed.

  3. Listeria monocytogenes switches from dissemination to persistence by adopting a vacuolar lifestyle in epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Gabriel

    2017-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes causes listeriosis, a foodborne disease that poses serious risks to fetuses, newborns and immunocompromised adults. This intracellular bacterial pathogen proliferates in the host cytosol and exploits the host actin polymerization machinery to spread from cell-to-cell and disseminate in the host. Here, we report that during several days of infection in human hepatocytes or trophoblast cells, L. monocytogenes switches from this active motile lifestyle to a stage of persistence in vacuoles. Upon intercellular spread, bacteria gradually stopped producing the actin-nucleating protein ActA and became trapped in lysosome-like vacuoles termed Listeria-Containing Vacuoles (LisCVs). Subpopulations of bacteria resisted degradation in LisCVs and entered a slow/non-replicative state. During the subculture of host cells harboring LisCVs, bacteria showed a capacity to cycle between the vacuolar and the actin-based motility stages. When ActA was absent, such as in ΔactA mutants, vacuolar bacteria parasitized host cells in the so-called “viable but non-culturable” state (VBNC), preventing their detection by conventional colony counting methods. The exposure of infected cells to high doses of gentamicin did not trigger the formation of LisCVs, but selected for vacuolar and VBNC bacteria. Together, these results reveal the ability of L. monocytogenes to enter a persistent state in a subset of epithelial cells, which may favor the asymptomatic carriage of this pathogen, lengthen the incubation period of listeriosis, and promote bacterial survival during antibiotic therapy. PMID:29190284

  4. Listeria monocytogenes switches from dissemination to persistence by adopting a vacuolar lifestyle in epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mounia Kortebi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes causes listeriosis, a foodborne disease that poses serious risks to fetuses, newborns and immunocompromised adults. This intracellular bacterial pathogen proliferates in the host cytosol and exploits the host actin polymerization machinery to spread from cell-to-cell and disseminate in the host. Here, we report that during several days of infection in human hepatocytes or trophoblast cells, L. monocytogenes switches from this active motile lifestyle to a stage of persistence in vacuoles. Upon intercellular spread, bacteria gradually stopped producing the actin-nucleating protein ActA and became trapped in lysosome-like vacuoles termed Listeria-Containing Vacuoles (LisCVs. Subpopulations of bacteria resisted degradation in LisCVs and entered a slow/non-replicative state. During the subculture of host cells harboring LisCVs, bacteria showed a capacity to cycle between the vacuolar and the actin-based motility stages. When ActA was absent, such as in ΔactA mutants, vacuolar bacteria parasitized host cells in the so-called "viable but non-culturable" state (VBNC, preventing their detection by conventional colony counting methods. The exposure of infected cells to high doses of gentamicin did not trigger the formation of LisCVs, but selected for vacuolar and VBNC bacteria. Together, these results reveal the ability of L. monocytogenes to enter a persistent state in a subset of epithelial cells, which may favor the asymptomatic carriage of this pathogen, lengthen the incubation period of listeriosis, and promote bacterial survival during antibiotic therapy.

  5. Effect of Phenolic Compound Mixtures on the Viability of Listeria monocytogenes in Meat Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María José Rodríguez Vaquero

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to investigate the synergistic antibacterial effect of phenolic compound mixtures against Listeria monocytogenes in brain heart infusion (BHI medium, and to select the best mixture for testing their antibacterial activity in a meat model system. In BHI medium, the most effective mixtures were those of gallic and caffeic acids, gallic and protocatechuic acids, and rutin and quercetin. At the concentration of 200 mg/L, the mixtures of gallic and protocatechuic, then gallic and caffeic acids, and quercetin and rutin reduced the number of inoculated cells. At the concentration of 100 mg/L, only the quercetin and rutin mixture produced the same synergistic effect. These combinations were selected for testing in meat. At 20 °C, 100 mg/L of gallic and protocatechuic, then gallic and caffeic acid, and rutin and quercetin mixtures decreased the growth of L. monocytogenes, as compared to the control. The inhibitory effect of gallic and protocatechuic acid mixtures increased at the concentration of 200 mg/L. The death of inoculated cells was observed in the treatment with 100 mg/L of all combinations at 4 °C. With the addition of 200 mg/L of these combinations, the lethal effect increased. Gallic and caffeic acid, and rutin and quercetin were the most effective mixtures since after 14 days of incubation no viable cells of Listeria monocytogenes were detected. The lowest decimal reduction times of 1.0 and 0.95 day were found for gallic and caffeic acid, and rutin and quercetin mixtures, respectively. These results demonstrate that phenolic compound mixtures have synergistic antilisterial effect with an important bacterial reduction in meat. Therefore, it is possible to search for strategies to combine the synergistic antimicrobial effects of phenolic compounds with their natural biological properties.

  6. Longitudinal studies on Listeria monocytogenes and other Listeria species in two salmon processing plants

    OpenAIRE

    Klæboe, Halvdan; Rosef, Olav; Sæbø, Mona

    2005-01-01

    Two plants processing salmon fillets and cold smoked salmon were investigated for occurrence of Listeria in products and the environment. Analyses were conducted for a period of 31 weeks. At plant A, 252 samples were examined of which 97 were from unprocessed fish and 155 from cold-smoked fish. At plant B, 189 samples of unprocessed fish were investigated. The first examination of unprocessed fish at plant A showed a presence of L. monocytogenes and L. spp. in 81% and 19% of the samples respe...

  7. Draft Genome Sequences of Listeria monocytogenes Strains from Listeriosis Outbreaks Linked to Soft Cheese in Washington State

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Zhen; Marsland, Paula A.; Meek, Roxanne T.; Eckmann, Kaye; Allard, Marc W.; P?rez-Osorio, Ailyn C.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Listeria monocytogenes has caused listeriosis outbreaks linked to soft cheese. Here, we report the draft genome sequences of seven L.?monocytogenes isolates from two possibly related outbreaks caused by soft cheese products in Washington State.

  8. A study on the effects of some laboratory-derived genetic mutations on biofilm formation by Listeria monocytogenes

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kumar, S.; Parvathi, A; George, J.; Krohne, G.; Karunasagar, Indrani; Karunasagar, Iddya

    Biofilms formed by the human pathogen Listeria monocytogenes in food-processing environments can be a potential source of contamination. In this study, we investigated the ability of L. monocytogenes wild type and its laboratory-derived isogenic...

  9. InlB-mediated Listeria monocytogenes internalization requires a balanced phospholipase D activity maintained through phospho-cofilin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Han, Xuelin; Yu, Rentao; Ji, Lei; Zhen, Dongyu; Tao, Sha; Li, Shuai; Sun, Yansong; Huang, Liuyu; Feng, Zhe; Li, Xianping; Han, Gaige; Schmidt, Martina; Han, Li

    Internalization of Listeria monocytogenes into non-phagocytic cells is tightly controlled by host cell actin dynamics and cell membrane alterations. However, knowledge about the impact of phosphatidylcholine cleavage driven by host cell phospholipase D (PLD) on Listeria internalization into

  10. Transfer of antibiotic resistance from Enterococcus faecium of fermented meat origin to Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria innocua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahan, M; Holley, R A

    2016-04-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is an important foodborne pathogen that can cause infection in children, pregnant women, the immunocompromised and the elderly. Antibiotic resistance in this species would represent a significant public health problem since the organism has a high fatality/case ratio and resistance may contribute to failure of therapeutic treatment. This study was designed to explore whether the in vitro transferability of antibiotic resistance from enterococci to Listeria spp. could occur. It was found that 2/8 Listeria strains were able to acquire tetracycline resistance from Enterococcus faecium. Listeria monocytogenes GLM-2 acquired the resistance determinant tet(M) and additional streptomycin resistance through in vitro mating with Ent. faecium S27 isolated from commercial fermented dry sausage. Similarly, Listeria innocua became more resistant to tetracycline, but the genetic basis for this change was not confirmed. It has been suggested that enterococci may transfer antibiotic resistance genes via transposons to Listeria spp., and this may explain, in part, the origin of their antibiotic resistance. Thus, the presence of enterococci in food should not be ignored since they may actively contribute to enhanced antibiotic resistance of L. monocytogenes and other pathogens. Acquisition of antibiotic resistance by pathogenic bacteria in the absence of antibiotic pressure represents an unquantified threat to human health. In the present work resistance to tetracycline and streptomycin were transferred by nonplasmid-based conjugation from Enterococcus faecium isolated from fermented sausage to Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria innocua. Thus, natural transfer of antibiotic resistance to Listeria strains may occur in the future which reinforces the concern about the safety of enterococcal strains present in foods. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  11. Listeria prevalence and Listeria monocytogenes serovar diversity at cull cow and bull processing plants in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerini, Michael N; Brichta-Harhay, Dayna M; Shackelford, T Steven D; Arthur, Terrance M; Bosilevac, Joseph M; Kalchayanand, Norasak; Wheeler, Tommy L; Koohmaraie, Mohammad

    2007-11-01

    Listeria monocytogenes, the causative agent of epidemic and sporadic listeriosis, is routinely isolated from many sources, including cattle, yet information on the prevalence of Listeria in beef processing plants in the United States is minimal. From July 2005 through April 2006, four commercial cow and bull processing plants were sampled in the United States to determine the prevalence of Listeria and the serovar diversity of L. monocytogenes. Samples were collected during the summer, fall, winter, and spring. Listeria prevalence on hides was consistently higher during cooler weather (28 to 92% of samples) than during warmer weather (6 and 77% of samples). The Listeria prevalence data collected from preevisceration carcass ranged from undetectable in some warm season samples to as high as 71% during cooler weather. Listeria on postintervention carcasses in the chill cooler was normally undetectable, with the exception of summer and spring samples from one plant where > 19% of the carcasses were positive for Listeria. On hides, L. monocytogenes serovar 1/2a was the predominant serovar observed, with serovars 1/2b and 4b present 2.5 times less often and serovar 1/2c not detected on any hides sampled. L. monocytogenes serovars 1/2a, 1/2c, and 4b were found on postintervention carcasses. This prevalence study demonstrates that Listeria species are more prevalent on hides during the winter and spring and that interventions being used in cow and bull processing plants appear to be effective in reducing or eliminating Listeria contamination on carcasses.

  12. Betaine and L-carnitine transport by Listeria monocytogenes Scott A in response to osmotic signals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheul, Annette; Glaasker, Erwin; Poolman, Bert; Abee, Tjakko

    1997-01-01

    The naturally occurring compatible solutes betaine and L-carnitine allow the food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes to adjust to environments of high osmotic strength. Previously, it was demonstrated that L. monocytogenes possesses an ATP-dependent L-carnitine transporter. The present study

  13. Microbiological criteria for Listeria monocytogenes in foods under special consideration of risk assessment approaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørrung, Birgit

    2000-01-01

    This paper shortly summarizes data related to risk assessment of Listeria monocytogenes. From available data on risk assessment, it is concluded that the levels of L. monocytogenes consumed is an important factor affecting the incidence of listeriosis. Foods that do not support the growth of L. m...

  14. Listeria monocytogenes : detection and behaviour in food and in the environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beumer, R.

    1997-01-01


    In this thesis, Listeria monocytogenes, a bacterial pathogen was studied, with emphasis on the detection and behaviour in food and environment.

    Epidemics of foodborne listeriosis have raised concern about the incidence of L. monocytogenes

  15. A putative ABC transporter is involved in negative regulation of biofilm formation by Listeria monocytogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Xinna; Long, Fei; Chen, Yonghui

    2008-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes may persist for long periods in food processing environments. In some instances, this may be due to aggregation or biofilm formation. To investigate the mechanism controlling biofilm formation in the food-borne pathogen L. monocytogenes, we characterized LM-49, a mutant...

  16. A dynamical systems approach to actin-based motility in Listeria monocytogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotton, S.

    2010-11-01

    A simple kinematic model for the trajectories of Listeria monocytogenes is generalized to a dynamical system rich enough to exhibit the resonant Hopf bifurcation structure of excitable media and simple enough to be studied geometrically. It is shown how L. monocytogenes trajectories and meandering spiral waves are organized by the same type of attracting set.

  17. Occurrence and characterization of Listeria monocytogenes isolated from food markets in Culiacan, Sinaloa, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Listeria monocytogenes is a food borne pathogen associated with severe disease in humans. We determined the prevalence, levels, antimicrobial susceptibility, and pulsotypes of L. monocytogenes in foodstuffs of common sale in three retail markets of Culiacan, Sinaloa, Mexico. The pathogen was isolate...

  18. A novel suicide plasmid for efficient gene mutation in Listeria monocytogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although several plasmids have been used in Listeria monocytogenes for generating mutants by allelic exchange, construction of L. monocytogenes mutants has been inefficient due to lack of effective selection markers for first and second recombination events. To address this problem, we have develope...

  19. Diversity assessment of Listeria monocytogenes biofilm formation: Impact of growth condition, serotype and strain origin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kadam, S.R.; Besten, den H.M.W.; Veen, van der S.; Zwietering, M.H.; Moezelaar, R.; Abee, T.

    2013-01-01

    The foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes has the ability to produce biofilms in food-processing environments and then contaminate food products, which is a major concern for food safety. The biofilm forming behavior of 143 L. monocytogenes strains was determined in four different media that

  20. Listeria monocytogenes DNA glycosylase AdiP affects flagellar motility, biofilm formation, virulence, and stress responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    The temperature-dependent alteration of flagellar motility gene expression is critical for the foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes to respond to a changing environment. In this study, a genetic determinant, L. monocytogenes f2365_0220 (lmof2365_0220), encoding a putative protein that is struct...

  1. Stability of sublethal acid stress adaptaion and induced cross protection against lauric arginate in Listeria monocytogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    The stability of acid stress adaptation in Listeria monocytogenes and its induced cross protection effect against GRAS (generally recognized as safe) antimicrobial compounds has never been investigated before. In the present study, the acid stress adaptation in L. monocytogenes was initially induced...

  2. Occurrence and antimicrobial susceptibility of Listeria monocytogenes isolated from brined white cheese in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osaili, Tareq M; Al-Nabulsi, Anas A; Taha, Mohammad H; Al-Holy, Murad A; Alaboudi, Akram R; Al-Rousan, Walid M; Shaker, Reyad R

    2012-09-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a serious foodborne pathogen that has been isolated from different dairy food products. Several foodborne outbreaks of listeriosis have been associated with consumption of cheese. The aims of this study were to determine the occurrence of L. monocytogenes and Listeria spp. in brined white cheese (BWC) sold in Jordan, and to determine the susceptibility of isolated L. monocytogenes to antimicrobials. Three hundred and fifty samples of 5 different types of BWC (akkawi, boiled, halloumi, pasteurized, and shellal) were collected from a local market in Jordan. The ISO (11290-1) procedure was followed for isolation and identification of Listeria spp. from cheese samples and a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique was used for confirmation of L. monocytogenes isolates. The VITEK2 automated system was used for testing antimicrobial susceptibility of L. monocytogenes isolates. The overall prevalence of Listeria spp. in cheese sample was 27.1%. L. monocytogenes was isolated from 39 (11.1%) samples. Other isolated species were L. grayi (6.9%), L. innocua (2%), L. ivanovii (4%), L. seeligeri (2%), and L. welshimeri (0.3%). The pH values and salt concentrations of L. monocytogenes positive cheese samples ranged from 5.10 to 6.32 and 5.64 to 13.16, respectively. L. monocytogenes isolates were sensitive or intermediate susceptible to imipenem, gentamicin, linezolid, teicoplanin, vancomycin, fusidic acid, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, benzylpenicillin, ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, tetracycline, and rifampicin, but resistant to fosfomycin, oxacillin, and clindamycin. © 2012 Institute of Food Technologists®

  3. The antibacterial activity of Virkon measured by colony growth and bioluminescence of lux recombinant Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, A J; Holah, J T; Denyer, S P; Stewart, G S

    1992-08-01

    Concentration exponents for the broad spectrum antimicrobial Virkon were determined for Listeria monocytogenes using both plate counts and bioluminescence measurements; the values of 3.15 and 2.6 indicate a close equivalence between these two measurement procedures. Virkon is an effective biocide for L. monocytogenes at the manufacturer's in-use concentration of 1%.

  4. Physiology of Listeria monocytogenes in relation to food components and biopreservation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheul, A.

    1997-01-01


    Listeria monocytogenes is an important foodborne pathogen that has been responsible for severe infections in humans. The ubiquitous distribution of L. monocytogenes in the environment and its ability to grow at refrigeration

  5. [Neonatal septicemia caused by Listeria monocytogenes: report of 6 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Li; Zhang, Xian-hua; Chen, Hao; Yin, Xue-lei

    2008-01-01

    Neonatal listeriosis is a relatively rare but serious disease with a high mortality rate. This study was conducted to analyze the clinical features, treatment, and outcome of 6 cases with Listeria monocytogenes septicemia confirmed by positive blood cultures. Totally 12,538 live births delivered in the hospital from January 1, 2004 to June 30, 2006 were investigated. Differences in the time of onset of the disease, clinical presentation, illness severity, laboratory data, management, and prognosis were compared between preterm and full-term infants. The incidence of neonatal listeriosis was 4.8% in this study. All the cases with listeriosis were found to have early onset and the disease was transmitted from the mother to the fetus, 4 of the cases were delivered via cesarean section, 2 were born via normal spontaneous vaginal delivery. Maternal infection before parturition presented with fever in 4, diarrhea in 1; 5 had abnormal white blood cell counts and total neutrophil counts; 1 had positive result of Listeria monocytogenes in intrauterine contents culture. Three premature infants showed signs and symptoms of severe bacterial septicemia at birth, such as reduced activity, respiratory distress, poor skin color and poor peripheral perfusion; the enlarged liver was palpable 2 - 3 cm below the right costal margin and 5 cm below the xiphoid in one; congestive rashes over the body and muscular hypotonia. Abnormal results of laboratory tests included peripheral blood white cell count (21.6 - 33.8 x 10(9))/L, total neutrophil count 0.77 - 0.83; platelet count (102 - 59 x 10(9))/L; C-reactive protein (CRP) > (160 - 118) mg/L(24 - 72 h after birth). Three preterm infants who received intensive care, accompanied by pathological changes of lungs indicated by chest X ray required assisted mechanical ventilation and 2 of them survived without sequelae but the other one died at 51 h of life. The initial clinical signs of septicemia in 3 full-term infants appeared later than

  6. Spontaneous Bacterial Peritonitis Caused by Infection with Listeria monocytogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Vincent F. Tablang

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis is a severe and life-threatening complication in patients with ascites caused by advanced liver disease. The organisms most commonly involved are coliform bacteria and third-generation cephalosporins are the empiric antibiotics of choice. This is an uncommon case of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis caused by Listeria monocytogenes in a female patient with liver cirrhosis from autoimmune hepatitis. She did not improve with ceftriaxone and her course was complicated by hepatic encephalopathy, seizures and multi-organ failure. This case emphasizes that a high index of suspicion should be maintained for timely diagnosis and treatment. Listerial peritonitis should be suspected in patients with end-stage liver disease and inadequate response to conventional antibiotics within 48–72 h. Ampicillin/sulbactam should be initiated while awaiting results of ascitic fluid or blood culture.

  7. Antibacterial activity of domestic Balkan donkey milk toward Listeria monocytogenes and Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šarić Ljubiša Ć.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the antibacterial activity of raw milk from Domestic Balkan donkey breed toward Listeria monocytogenes and Staphylococcus aureus. Examination of antibacterial activity was performed in artificially contaminated milk samples by monitoring the changes of count of viable cells of tested bacteria during 8 hours of incubation at 38°C. Lysozyme and fatty acids contents were also determined in donkey milk. The obtained results indicated inhibitory effect of donkey milk toward both tested bacteria. The lysozyme content in the analyzed milk samples was ranged from 0.67 to 3.54 g/L. The most abundant fatty acids with known antibacterial activity toward Gram positive bacteria were linoleic, lauric and oleic acid.

  8. Listeria monocytogenes Meningitis in an Immunosuppressed Patient with Autoimmune Hepatitis and IgG4 Subclass Deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaini, Shahin

    2015-01-01

    A 51-year-old Caucasian woman with Listeria monocytogenes meningitis was treated and discharged after an uncomplicated course. Her medical history included immunosuppressive treatment with prednisolone and azathioprine for autoimmune hepatitis. A diagnostic work-up after the meningitis episode...... revealed that she had low levels of the IgG4 subclass. To our knowledge, this is the first case report describing a possible association between autoimmune hepatitis and the occurrence of Listeria monocytogenes meningitis, describing a possible association between Listeria monocytogenes meningitis...... and deficiency of the IgG4 subclass and finally describing a possible association between Listeria monocytogenes meningitis and immunosuppressive therapy with prednisolone and azathioprine....

  9. Enrichment dynamics of Listeria monocytogenes and the associated microbiome from naturally contaminated ice cream linked to a listeriosis outbreak

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ottesen, Andrea; Ramachandran, Padmini; Reed, Elizabeth; White, James R; Hasan, Nur; Subramanian, Poorani; Ryan, Gina; Jarvis, Karen; Grim, Christopher; Daquiqan, Ninalynn; Hanes, Darcy; Allard, Marc; Colwell, Rita; Brown, Eric; Chen, Yi

    2016-01-01

    .... Here, dynamics of co-enriching microbiota during recovery of Listeria monocytogenes from naturally contaminated ice cream samples linked to an outbreak are described for three different initial...

  10. Listeria monocytogenes Meningitis in an Immunosuppressed Patient with Autoimmune Hepatitis and IgG4 Subclass Deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaini, Shahin

    2015-01-01

    A 51-year-old Caucasian woman with Listeria monocytogenes meningitis was treated and discharged after an uncomplicated course. Her medical history included immunosuppressive treatment with prednisolone and azathioprine for autoimmune hepatitis. A diagnostic work-up after the meningitis episode re...... and deficiency of the IgG4 subclass and finally describing a possible association between Listeria monocytogenes meningitis and immunosuppressive therapy with prednisolone and azathioprine....... revealed that she had low levels of the IgG4 subclass. To our knowledge, this is the first case report describing a possible association between autoimmune hepatitis and the occurrence of Listeria monocytogenes meningitis, describing a possible association between Listeria monocytogenes meningitis...

  11. Effect of Filling Type and Heating Method on Prevalence of Listeria species and Listeria monocytogenes in Dumplings Produced in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymczak, Barbara; Dąbrowski, Waldemar

    2015-05-01

    The count of Listeria monocytogenes was determined, before and after heat treatment, in 200 samples of dumplings of 9 brands and with different types of stuffing. Analyses were conducted according to ISO 11290-1 standard and with real-time PCR method. The highest count of L. monocytogenes was found in meat dumplings (10(2) to 10(4) CFU/g), whereas products with white cheese-potato stuffing and vegetable-mushroom stuffing contained significantly less Listeria, 20 to 80 and 5 to 32 CFU/g, respectively. In cooled meat dumplings the extent of contamination depended significantly on the producer. In addition, a significant (P Listeria sp. and L. monocytogenes were isolated from cooked dumplings with fruits (strawberries or blueberries). © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  12. Symptomatic hydrocephalus in a newborn infected with listeria monocytogenes Hidrocefalia sintomática em um recém-nascido infectado com Listeria monocytogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Analía L. Laciar

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available Central nervous system infections caused by Listeria monocytogenes produce a wide range of clinical symptoms which include cerebral abscesses, meningitis and nonmeningitic parenchymal cerebritis. A case study is presented of early listeriosis with signs of meningitis accompanied with septicemia and complicated with severe hydrocephalus.As infecções do sistema nervoso central produzidas por Listeria monocytogenes provocam una grande variedade de sintomas clínicos que incluem abscessos cerebrais, meningites e cerebrites parenquimáticas não meningíticas. Apresenta-se um caso de listeriose precoce com sinais de meningite acompanhada de septicemia e agravado com hidrocefalia grave.

  13. Nisin, Carvacrol and Their Combinations Against the Growth of Heat-Treated Listeria monocytogenes Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Esteban, María-Dolores; Palop, Alfredo

    2011-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive microorganism responsible for one of the most serious food-borne diseases in the world, listeriosis. The aim of this study is to evaluate the combined effect of a heat pretreatment with the use of antimicrobials, nisin and carvacrol, on the growth of L. monocytogenes, and their potential uses as food preservatives. Carvacrol showed a dose-dependent inhibitory effect, while nisin did not, it decreased the growth rate of L. monocytogenes up to 20 %, and...

  14. Microevolution and persistence of Listeria monocytogenes in the environment and links to a foodborne outbreak

    OpenAIRE

    Borges, Vítor; Maia, Carla; Barreira, Maria João; Silveira, Leonor; Silva, Catarina; Duarte, Sílvia; Vieira, Luís; Lito, Luís; Oleastro, Mónica; Gomes, João Paulo

    2016-01-01

    Background: Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne human pathogen associated with a high mortality rate. Given the remarkable ability of this bacterium to persist in food processing facilities, ready-to-eat food products are common vehicles of L. monocytogenes. In the present study, we report the use of whole-genome sequencing (WGS) to investigate the diversity among L. monocytogenes isolates associated with a hospital outbreak of listeriosis occurred in Portugal. N/A

  15. Prevalence, antimicrobial susceptibility and virulotyping of Listeria species and Listeria monocytogenes isolated from open-air fish markets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamali, Hossein; Paydar, Mohammadjavad; Ismail, Salmah; Looi, Chung Yeng; Wong, Won Fen; Radmehr, Behrad; Abedini, Atefeh

    2015-07-25

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and characterization of Listeria species and Listeria monocytogenes isolated from raw fish and open-air fish market environments. Eight hundred and sixty two samples including raw fish and fish market environments (samples from workers' hands, workers' knives, containers and work surface) were collected from the open-air fish markets in the Northern region of Iran. Listeria spp. was isolated from 104/488 (21.3%) raw fish and 29/374 (7.8%) of samples from open-air fish market environment. The isolates of Listeria spp. included L. innocua (35.3%), L. monocytogenes (32.3%), L. seeligeri (18%), and L. ivanovii (14.3%). Of the 43 L. monocytogenes isolates, 31 (72.1%), 10 (23.3%) and 2 (4.7%) belonged to serovars 1/2a, 4b, and 1/2b, respectively. The inlA, inlB, inlC, inlJ, actA, hlyA, iap, plcA, and prfA virulence-associated genes were detected in almost all of the L. monocytogenes isolates. The Listeria spp. isolates showed high resistance against tetracycline (23.3%), penicillin G, and cephalothin (each 16.5%). Besides, we observed significant resistance level to tetracycline (27.9%), ampicillin (20.9%), cephalothin, penicillin G, and streptomycin (each 16.3%) in the L. monocytogenes isolates. All of the isolates were susceptible to cefotaxime, gentamicin, kanamycin, and pefloxacin. We found that tetM (25.6%), tetA (23.3%), ampC (14%), and penA (11.6%) were the most prevalent antibiotic resistance genes in the L. monocytogenes isolates. Recovery of potentially pathogenic L. monocytogenes from raw fish and environment of open-air fish market samples in this study is a convincing evidence for the zoonotic potential of listeriosis.

  16. Incidence and contamination level of Listeria monocytogenes and other Listeria spp. in ready-to-eat meat products in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awaisheh, S S

    2010-03-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the incidence and contamination levels of different Listeria monocytogenes serovars in ready-to-eat meat products (RTE-MP) collected from different outlets and processing plants in Jordan in order (i) to provide information to Jordanian health authorities on the incidence of L. monocytogenes in RTE-MP sold and consumed in Jordan and (ii) to ascertain the risks of these products for consumers. Two hundred forty RTE-MP samples, 120 beef and 120 poultry, were analyzed. European International Organization for Standardization (EN ISO) 11290-1 and -2 standard protocols were used for detection and enumeration of L. monocytogenes. The identity of suspected L. monocytogenes was confirmed using PCR. Three Listeria spp., L. monocytogenes, L. innocua, and L. welshimeri, were isolated. L. innocua and L. welshimeri were the most and least frequently isolated with 56 and 36 samples, respectively. L. monocytogenes was isolated from 41 samples (17.1%): 23 from beef and 18 from poultry samples. The contamination levels of L. monocytogenes were 100 CFU/g was found. The L. monocytogenes strains isolated fell into two serotypes (1 and 4) and four different serovars (1/2a, 1/2b, 1/2c, and 4b).

  17. Ozone Inactivation of Acid Stressed Listeria Monocytogenes and Listeria Innocua in Orange Juice Using a Bubble Column

    OpenAIRE

    Patil, Sonal; Valdramidis, Vasilis; Frias, Jesus Maria; Cullen, Patrick; Bourke, Paula

    2010-01-01

    Orange juice inoculated with Listeria monocytogenes strains ATCC 7644, NCTC 11994 and Listeria innocua NCTC 11288 (106 CFU/ml) as challenge microorganisms was treated with direct ozone at 0.098mg/min/ml for different time periods (0-8 min) using an ozone bubble column. Ozone treatment of mild acid stressed and mild acid stress-habituated (pH 5.5) cells of L. monocytogenes resulted in higher inactivation times compared to control non-acid stressed cells. Additionally acid stressed cells habitu...

  18. Phenotypic and Genotypic Characterization of Atypical Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria innocua Isolated from Swine Slaughterhouses and Meat Markets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Zanolli Moreno

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade, atypical Listeria monocytogenes and L. innocua strains have been detected in food and the environment. Because of mutations in the major virulence genes, these strains have different virulence intensities in eukaryotic cells. In this study, we performed phenotypic and genotypic characterization of atypical L. monocytogenes and L. innocua isolates obtained from swine slaughterhouses and meat markets. Forty strains were studied, including isolates of L. monocytogenes and L. innocua with low-hemolytic activity. The isolates were characterized using conventional phenotypic Listeria identification tests and by the detection and analysis of L. monocytogenes-specific genes. Analysis of 16S rRNA was used for the molecular identification of the Listeria species. The L. monocytogenes isolates were positive for all of the virulence genes studied. The atypical L. innocua strains were positive for hly, plcA, and inlC. Mutations in the InlC, InlB, InlA, PI-PLC, PC-PLC, and PrfA proteins were detected in the atypical isolates. Further in vitro and transcriptomic studies are being developed to confirm the role of these mutations in Listeria virulence.

  19. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of atypical Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria innocua isolated from swine slaughterhouses and meat markets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Luisa Zanolli; Paixão, Renata; de Gobbi, Debora Dirani Sena; Raimundo, Daniele Cristine; Porfida Ferreira, Thais Sebastiana; Micke Moreno, Andrea; Hofer, Ernesto; dos Reis, Cristhiane Moura Falavina; Matté, Glavur Rogério; Matté, Maria Helena

    2014-01-01

    In the last decade, atypical Listeria monocytogenes and L. innocua strains have been detected in food and the environment. Because of mutations in the major virulence genes, these strains have different virulence intensities in eukaryotic cells. In this study, we performed phenotypic and genotypic characterization of atypical L. monocytogenes and L. innocua isolates obtained from swine slaughterhouses and meat markets. Forty strains were studied, including isolates of L. monocytogenes and L. innocua with low-hemolytic activity. The isolates were characterized using conventional phenotypic Listeria identification tests and by the detection and analysis of L. monocytogenes-specific genes. Analysis of 16S rRNA was used for the molecular identification of the Listeria species. The L. monocytogenes isolates were positive for all of the virulence genes studied. The atypical L. innocua strains were positive for hly, plcA, and inlC. Mutations in the InlC, InlB, InlA, PI-PLC, PC-PLC, and PrfA proteins were detected in the atypical isolates. Further in vitro and transcriptomic studies are being developed to confirm the role of these mutations in Listeria virulence.

  20. Liofilchem® O.A. Listeria agar and direct CAMP test provided sooner Listeria monocytogenes identification from neonatal bacteremia

    OpenAIRE

    Savini, Vincenzo; Marrollo, Roberta; Serio, Annalisa; Paparella, Antonello; Argentieri, Angela Valentina; D’Antonio, Marianna; Coclite, Eleonora; Fusilli, Paola; Fazii, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes infection in pregnant women and newborns is a cause for serious concern, and invasive disease outcome strongly depends on prompt antibiotic therapy. To provide sooner identification from neonatal bacteremia we performed a CAMP test directly on positive blood aliquots and inoculated the Liofilchem® O.A. Listeria chromogenic agar as well, thus providing a 24-h turn-around time for response.

  1. Liofilchem(®) O.A. Listeria agar and direct CAMP test provided sooner Listeria monocytogenes identification from neonatal bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savini, Vincenzo; Marrollo, Roberta; Serio, Annalisa; Paparella, Antonello; Argentieri, Angela Valentina; D'Antonio, Marianna; Coclite, Eleonora; Fusilli, Paola; Fazii, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes infection in pregnant women and newborns is a cause for serious concern, and invasive disease outcome strongly depends on prompt antibiotic therapy. To provide sooner identification from neonatal bacteremia we performed a CAMP test directly on positive blood aliquots and inoculated the Liofilchem(®) O.A. Listeria chromogenic agar as well, thus providing a 24-h turn-around time for response.

  2. Effects of Dielectrophoresis on Growth, Viability and Immuno-reactivity of Listeria monocytogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhunia Arun K

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dielectrophoresis (DEP has been regarded as a useful tool for manipulating biological cells prior to the detection of cells. Since DEP uses high AC electrical fields, it is important to examine whether these electrical fields in any way damage cells or affect their characteristics in subsequent analytical procedures. In this study, we investigated the effects of DEP manipulation on the characteristics of Listeria monocytogenes cells, including the immuno-reactivity to several Listeria-specific antibodies, the cell growth profile in liquid medium, and the cell viability on selective agar plates. It was found that a 1-h DEP treatment increased the cell immuno-reactivity to the commercial Listeria species-specific polyclonal antibodies (from KPL by ~31.8% and to the C11E9 monoclonal antibodies by ~82.9%, whereas no significant changes were observed with either anti-InlB or anti-ActA antibodies. A 1-h DEP treatment did not cause any change in the growth profile of Listeria in the low conductive growth medium (LCGM; however, prolonged treatments (4 h or greater caused significant delays in cell growth. The results of plating methods showed that a 4-h DEP treatment (5 MHz, 20 Vpp reduced the viable cell numbers by 56.8–89.7 %. These results indicated that DEP manipulation may or may not affect the final detection signal in immuno-based detection depending on the type of antigen-antibody reaction involved. However, prolonged DEP treatment for manipulating bacterial cells could produce negative effects on the cell detection by growth-based methods. Careful selection of DEP operation conditions could avoid or minimize negative effects on subsequent cell detection performance.

  3. Eugenol in combination with lactic acid bacteria attenuates Listeria monocytogenes virulence in vitro and in invertebrate model Galleria mellonella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Abhinav; Upadhyaya, Indu; Mooyottu, Shankumar; Venkitanarayanan, Kumar

    2016-06-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a human enteric pathogen that causes severe foodborne illness in high-risk populations. Crossing the intestinal barrier is the first critical step for Listeria monocytogenes infection. Therefore, reducing L. monocytogenes colonization and invasion of intestinal epithelium and production of virulence factors could potentially control listeriosis in humans. This study investigated the efficacy of sub-inhibitory concentration (SIC) of the plant-derived antimicrobial eugenol, either alone, or in combination with five lactic acid bacteria (LAB), namely Bifidobacterium bifidum (NRRL-B41410), Lactobacillus reuteri (B-14172), Lactobacillus fermentum (B-1840), Lactobacillus plantarum (B-4496) and Lactococcus lactis subspecies lactis (B-633) in reducing Listeria monocytogenes adhesion to and invasion of human intestinal epithelial cells (Caco-2). Additionally, the effect of the aforementioned treatments on Listeria monocytogenes listeriolysin production, epithelial E-cadherin binding and expression of virulence genes was investigated. Moreover, the in vivo efficacy of eugenol-LAB treatments in reducing Listeria monocytogenes virulence in the invertebrate model Galleria mellonella was studied. Eugenol and LAB, either alone or in combination, significantly reduced Listeria monocytogenes adhesion to and invasion of intestinal cells (P Listeria monocytogenes haemolysin production, E-cadherin binding and virulence gene expression (P Listeria monocytogenes (P < 0.05). The results highlight the antilisterial effect of eugenol either alone or in combination with LAB, and justify further investigations in a mammalian model.

  4. Prevalence and antimicrobial resistance of Listeria monocytogenes isolated in chicken slaughterhouses in Northern Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaridis, I; Soultos, N; Iossifidou, E; Papa, A; Ambrosiadis, I; Koidis, P

    2011-06-01

    This study was conducted to determine the prevalence and antimicrobial resistance of Listeria monocytogenes recovered from chicken carcasses in slaughterhouses in Northern Greece. A total of 100 poultry samples (300 carcasses) were examined for Listeria spp. The samples were neck skin taken from four different slaughterhouses in Northern Greece. Forty samples were also taken from the environment of the slaughterhouses. Identification of L. monocytogenes was carried out by PCR and fingerprinting of the isolates by random amplified polymorphic DNA. L. monocytogenes strains isolated from chicken carcasses and from the environment of the slaughterhouses were also examined for antibiotic resistance. Fifty-five isolates of L. monocytogenes were tested for susceptibility to 20 antibiotics using the disk diffusion method. Listeria spp. were present in 99 of the poultry samples tested (99%), and 38 yielded L monocytogenes (38%). L. monocytogenes was also isolated in 80% of samples from the environment of a certain slaughterhouse, while the other slaughterhouses were found to be contaminated only with Listeria spp. All isolates were resistant to nalidixic acid and oxolinic acid, the majority of them to clindamycin, and only a few to tetracycline and oxytetracycline, whereas they were found to be susceptible to all other antimicrobials. The results of this study demonstrate a high prevalence of L. monocytogenes contamination in chicken carcasses, and all isolates were found to be sensitive to the antimicrobials most commonly used to treat human listeriosis.

  5. Keberadaan Bakteri Listeria monocytogenes pada Keju Gouda Produksi Lokal dan Impor (PRESENCE OF LISTERIA MONOCYTOGENES IN LOCAL AND IMPORTED GOUDA CHEESES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debby Fadhilah Pazra

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes is included in the foodborne pathogen, which has been associated with severaloutbreaks of human listeriosis especially in high risk groups. Listeria monocytogenes could be found inGouda cheeses because of poor hygienic and sanitation practices. In addition, this bacteria could surviveduring the making of cheese and cheese ripening process. The purpose of this study was to identify thepresence of L. monocytogenes in local and imported Gouda cheeses and how the safety level of the Goudacheese against contamination of L. monocytogenes. This study used the conventional method in accordancewith the Bacteriological Analytical Manual, US Food and Drug Administration and Bergey’s Manual ofDeterminative Bacteriology to detect the presence of L. monocytogenes at 15 samples of local Gouda cheeseand 15 samples of imported Gouda cheese sold in supermarkets in Jakarta and Bogor. The results of thisstudy showed that was not found L. monocytogenes in local and imported Gouda cheese. It could be concludedthat is Gouda cheese relatively safe from L. monocytogenes and meets Indonesian National Standard.

  6. Isolation and detection of Listeria monocytogenes in poultry meat by standard culture methods and PCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kureljušić, J.; Rokvić, N.; Jezdimirović, N.; Kureljušić, B.; Pisinov, B.; Karabasil, N.

    2017-09-01

    Listeria is the genus of a bacteria found in soil and water and some animals, including poultry and cattle. It can be present in raw milk and food made from raw milk. It can also live in food processing plants and contaminate a variety of processed meats. Microscopically, Listeria species appear as small, Gram-positive rods, which are sometimes arranged in short chains. In direct smears, they can be coccoid, so they can be mistaken for streptococci. Longer cells can resemble corynebacteria. Flagella are produced at room temperature but not at 37°C. Haemolytic activity on blood agar has been used as a marker to distinguish Listeria monocytogenes among other Listeria species, but it is not an absolutely definitive criterion. Further biochemical characterization is necessary to distinguish between the different Listeria species. The objective of this study was to detect, isolate and identify Listeria monocytogenes from poultry meat. Within a period of six months from January to June 2017, a total of 15 samples were collected. Three samples were positive for the presence of Listeria monocytogenes. Biochemical and microbiological tests as well as PCR technique using specific primers were used to confirm L. Monocytogenes in the samples.

  7. Growth and survival of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Listeria monocytogenes in egg products held at different temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, S E; Chou, C C

    2000-07-01

    Growth and survival of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Listeria monocytogenes in steamed eggs and scrambled eggs held at different temperatures (5, 18, 22, 37, 55, and 60 degrees C) were investigated in the present study. Among the holding temperatures tested, both pathogens multiplied best at 37 degrees C followed by 22, 18, and 5 degrees C. In general, E. coli O157:H7 grew better in the egg products than L. monocytogenes did at all the storage temperatures tested except at 5 degrees C. E. coli O157:H7 did not grow in steamed eggs and scrambled eggs held at 5 degrees C. L. monocytogenes showed a slight population increase of approximately 0.6 to 0.9 log CFU/g in these egg products at the end of the 36-h storage period at 5 degrees C. The population of both pathogens detected in the egg products was affected by the initial population, holding temperature, and length of the holding period. It was also noted that L. monocytogenes was more susceptible than E. coli O157:H7 in steamed eggs held at 60 degrees C. After holding at 60 degrees C for 1 h, no detectable viable cells of L. monocytogenes with a population reduction of 5.4 log CFU/g was observed in steamed eggs, whereas a lower population reduction of only approximately 0.5 log CFU/ml was noted for E. coli O157:H7.

  8. Sensitive enumeration of Listeria monocytogenes and other Listeria species in various naturally contaminated matrices using a membrane filtration method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barre, Léna; Brasseur, Emilie; Doux, Camille; Lombard, Bertrand; Besse, Nathalie Gnanou

    2015-06-01

    For the enumeration of Listeria monocytogenes (L. monocytogenes) in food, a sensitive enumeration method has been recently developed. This method is based on a membrane filtration of the food suspension followed by transfer of the filter on a selective medium to enumerate L. monocytogenes. An evaluation of this method was performed with several categories of foods naturally contaminated with L. monocytogenes. The results obtained with this technique were compared with those obtained from the modified reference EN ISO 11290-2 method for the enumeration of L. monocytogenes in food, and are found to provide more precise results. In most cases, the filtration method enabled to examine a greater quantity of food thus greatly improving the sensitivity of the enumeration. However, it was hardly applicable to some food categories because of filtration problems and background microbiota interference. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Ocorrência de Listeria spp. e de Listeria monocytogenes, em um matadouro-frigorífico de bovinos do estado de São Paulo

    OpenAIRE

    Caselani, Kelly [UNESP; Prata, Luiz Francisco [UNESP; Bizari, Paula Adriana [UNESP; Pereira, Gener Tadeu [UNESP; de Marchi, Patrícia Gelli Feres [UNESP; Picinato, Mirelle Andréa de Carvalho [UNESP

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated the presence of Listeria spp. and Listeria monocytogenes in environmental samples by means of swabs collected the bovine slaughter plant enabled to export, located in the state of Sao Paulo, Brazil. After the pre-enrichment at 30±1°C for 22 to 26h the samples were analyzed using the BAX System Listeria. Those positive for Listeria spp. were submitted a second PCR reaction to confirm the presence of Listeria monocytogenes. From 411 environmental samples analyzed, 62 (15.1%) were p...

  10. Listeria monocytogenes lineages: Genomics, evolution, ecology, and phenotypic characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsi, Renato H; den Bakker, Henk C; Wiedmann, Martin

    2011-02-01

    Listeria monocytogenes consists of at least 4 evolutionary lineages (I, II, III, and IV) with different but overlapping ecological niches. Most L. monocytogenes isolates seem to belong to lineages I and II, which harbor the serotypes more commonly associated with human clinical cases, including serotype 1/2a (lineage II) and serotypes 1/2b and 4b (lineage I). Lineage II strains are common in foods, seem to be widespread in the natural and farm environments, and are also commonly isolated from animal listeriosis cases and sporadic human clinical cases. Most human listeriosis outbreaks are associated with lineage I isolates though. In addition, a number of studies indicate that, in many countries, lineage I strains are overrepresented among human isolates, as compared to lineage II strains. Lineage III and IV strains on the other hand are rare and predominantly isolated from animal sources. The apparent differences in the distribution of strains representing the L. monocytogenes lineages has lead to a number of studies aimed at identifying phenotypic differences among the different lineages. Interestingly, lineage II isolates seem to carry more plasmids than lineage I isolates and these plasmids often confer resistance to toxic metals and possibly other compounds that may be found in the environment. Moreover, lineage II isolates seem to be more resistant to bacteriocins than lineage I isolates, which probably confers an advantage in environments where bacteriocin-producing organisms are abundant. A large number of lineage II isolates and strains have been shown to be virulence-attenuated due to premature stop codon mutations in inlA and mutations in prfA. A subset of lineage I isolates carry a listeriolysin S hemolysin, which is not present in isolates belonging to lineages II, III, or IV. While lineage II isolates also show higher recombination rates than lineage I isolates, possibly facilitating adaptation of lineage II strains to diverse environments, lineage I

  11. Gene expression in Listeria monocytogenes exposed to sublethal concentration of benzalkonium chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamburro, Manuela; Ripabelli, Giancarlo; Vitullo, Monia; Dallman, Timothy James; Pontello, Mirella; Amar, Corinne Francoise Laurence; Sammarco, Michela Lucia

    2015-06-01

    In this study, tolerance at sublethal concentration of benzalkonium chloride and transcription levels of mdrL, ladR, lde, sigB and bcrABC genes in Listeria monocytogenes strains were evaluated. Viable cells reduction occurred in 45% of strains and clinical isolates showed lower sensitivity than isolates from foods. An increased transcription of an efflux system encoding gene was found in 60% of strains, and simultaneous mdrL overexpression and ladR underexpression occurred in 30% of isolates. A significant association between reduced benzalkonium chloride activity and both mdrL and sigB overexpression was observed; sigB expression also correlated with both mdrL and ladR genes. The bcrABC gene was only found in six strains, all isolated from foods and sensitive to benzalkonium chloride, and in four strains an underexpression was observed. Disinfection at sublethal concentration was less effective in clinical isolates, and mdrL and sigB expression was significantly affected by disinfection. Further insights are needed to understand the adaptation to benzalkonium chloride and to evaluate whether changes in gene expression could affect the L. monocytogenes virulence traits and persistence in the environment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Isolation and lytic activity of the Listeria bacteriophage endolysin LysZ5 against Listeria monocytogenes in soya milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Bao, Hongduo; Billington, Craig; Hudson, J Andrew; Wang, Ran

    2012-08-01

    The endolysin gene (lysZ5) from the genome of the Listeria monocytogenes phage FWLLm3 was cloned in Escherichia coli and characterized. Comparative sequence analysis revealed that lysZ5 resembled the murein hydrolase ply511 encoded by L. monocytogenes phage A511. The encoded protein LysZ5 had a predicted molecular mass of 35.8 kDa and was expressed in E. coli as an N-terminal fusion protein of 41.5 kDa. Addition of purified fusion protein to lawns of indicator bacteria showed that LysZ5 could lyse L. monocytogenes, Listeria innocua and Listeria welshimeri, but not Staphylococcus aureus or Enterococcus faecalis. The purified protein was able to kill L. monocytogenes growing in soya milk, with the pathogen concentration reduced by more than 4 log₁₀ CFU ml⁻¹ after 3 h incubation at 4 °C. As far as we know, this is the first report of a Listeria phage endolysin to control pathogens in soya milk and to demonstrate endolysin activity in foods at refrigeration temperatures. Moreover, LysZ5 may also be useful for biocontrol in other ready-to-eat foods. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Comparative evaluation of the VIDAS Listeria monocytogenes Xpress (LMX) for the detection of Listeria monocytogenes in a variety of foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Ronald; Mills, John; Pittet, Jean-Louis; Hughes, Denise

    2013-01-01

    The VIDAS Listeria monocytogenes Xpress (LMX) test is an enzyme-linked fluorescent immunoassay designed for use with the automated VIDAS or mini-VIDAS instruments for the specific detection of L. monocytogenes using a 26 h proprietary enrichment broth. The VIDAS LMX method was validated according to harmonized AOAC Research Institute (RI) and Official Methods of Analysis guidelines in both the AOAC Performance Tested Method (PTM) and GovVal programs. In the PTM comparison studies, the VIDAS LMX method was compared to the U.S. Department of Agriculture-Food Safety and Inspection Service Microbiology Laboratory Guidebook, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Bacteriological Analytical Manual, and AOAC Official Methods. The comparative food studies consisted of two main parts: internal testing and AOAC independent laboratory testing, which included seven food matrixes (deli ham, processed cheese, vanilla ice cream, cooked shrimp, smoked white fish, frozen spinach, and peanut butter). As part of the AOAC R1 GovVal program, the VIDAS LMX method was compared to the Health Canada MFHPB-30 method for the detection of L. monocytogenes in five ready-to-eat (RTE) meats (hot dogs, deli turkey, deli ham, fermented sausage, and liver paté). Twenty replicates of each inoculation level and five uninoculated controls were evaluated in each study. The LMX method also included the use ofchromogenic media, chromID Ottaviani Agosti agar and chromID L. mono. agar, for confirmation of LMX presumptive results. In both the PTM and GovVal evaluations, there were no significant differences in the Chi-square values for the LMX method when compared to reference methods. The additional parameters tested in the PTM evaluation (inclusivity, exclusivity, ruggedness, stability, and lot-to-lot) satisfied the AOAC RI performance requirements. In both the PTM and GovVal validation studies, the VIDAS LMX method demonstrated reliability as a rapid qualitative method for next-day detection of L

  14. Characterization and antibiotic susceptibility of Listeria monocytogenes isolated from poultry and red meat in Morocco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayat Ennaji

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Hayat Ennaji1,2, Mohammed Timinouni2, My Mustapha Ennaji3, Mohammed Hassar1, Nozha Cohen11Laboratoire de Microbiologie et Hygiène des Aliments et de l’Environnement, Institut Pasteur du Maroc., Casablanca, Morocco; 2Laboratoire de Microbiologie et Biologie Moléculaire, Institut Pasteur du Maroc., Casablanca, Morocco; 3Laboratoire de Virologie et Hygiène and Microbiologie., Faculté des Sciences et Techniques - Mohammedia, Université Hassan II, Mohammedia, MoroccoAbstract: This study was carried out on 426 samples of raw meats collected from butcheries and supermarkets in Casablanca, Morocco. The samples were examined for the occurrence of Listeria species. Strains of Listeria monocytogenes were characterized by several biochemical tests and confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR. β-hemolytic cultures and nonhemolytic isolates were tested for biochemical properties with the Listeria API test. Among the 43 Listeria species isolates; we identified 10 strains for L. monocytogenes (23.3%, 31 strains for L. innocua (72.1% and 2 strains for L. welshimeri (4.6%. Strains of L. monocytogenes were separated by multiplex PCR; two serogroups IIb and IVb were thus differentiated. Antibiotic susceptibility of L. monocytogenes to 21 antibiotics was determined by the disk diffusion method. All isolates were susceptible to a wide range of the tested antibiotics with the exception of nalidixic acid, colistine and cephalosporins second and third generation for which they were all resistant.Keywords: antibiotic susceptibility, Listeria monocytogenes, meat, PCR

  15. [Bacteriostatic and/or bactericidal extract of Aloe vera gel on cultures of Listeria monocytogenes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez Mérida, Luis Guillermo; Morón de Salim, Alba; Catinella, Rosangela; Castillo, Luis

    2012-03-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a bacteria responsible for food borne diseases (FBD). The effect of Aloe vera gel extract as a possible bacteriostatic and/or bactericidal against Listeria monocytogenes, was checked by determined the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), the time of minimum inhibition (TMI) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) solutions extract of Aloe vera gel in different concentrations on cultures of Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 7635. We applied the agar diffusion method, using solutions of extract of Aloe vera gel at concentrations of 0 to 100% for the MIC. The TMI was determined by growth curves in trypticase soy broth with an initial inoculum of Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 7635 of 108 CFU/mL in each solution. It was determined that the MIC was 10% extract of Aloe vera gel and TMI was 5 hours at concentrations of 10%, 20% and 30% of Aloe vera, while concentrations of 50, 80, 90 and 100%, the time was 8 hours. It was found that indeed the Aloe vera gel is bacteriostatic power on Listeria monocytogenes (p < 0.001), but yet, no bactericidal effect was obtained in our study.

  16. L-glutamine Induces Expression of Listeria monocytogenes Virulence Genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adi Haber

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The high environmental adaptability of bacteria is contingent upon their ability to sense changes in their surroundings. Bacterial pathogen entry into host poses an abrupt and dramatic environmental change, during which successful pathogens gauge multiple parameters that signal host localization. The facultative human pathogen Listeria monocytogenes flourishes in soil, water and food, and in ~50 different animals, and serves as a model for intracellular infection. L. monocytogenes identifies host entry by sensing both physical (e.g., temperature and chemical (e.g., metabolite concentrations factors. We report here that L-glutamine, an abundant nitrogen source in host serum and cells, serves as an environmental indicator and inducer of virulence gene expression. In contrast, ammonia, which is the most abundant nitrogen source in soil and water, fully supports growth, but fails to activate virulence gene transcription. We demonstrate that induction of virulence genes only occurs when the Listerial intracellular concentration of L-glutamine crosses a certain threshold, acting as an on/off switch: off when L-glutamine concentrations are below the threshold, and fully on when the threshold is crossed. To turn on the switch, L-glutamine must be present, and the L-glutamine high affinity ABC transporter, GlnPQ, must be active. Inactivation of GlnPQ led to complete arrest of L-glutamine uptake, reduced type I interferon response in infected macrophages, dramatic reduction in expression of virulence genes, and attenuated virulence in a mouse infection model. These results may explain observations made with other pathogens correlating nitrogen metabolism and virulence, and suggest that gauging of L-glutamine as a means of ascertaining host localization may be a general mechanism.

  17. Listeria monocytogenes infection of HD11, chicken macrophage-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, N A; Donaldson, J R; O'Bryan, C A; Ricke, S C; Crandall, P G

    2017-04-01

    Listeria monocytogenes can be carried by and infect poultry, although the clinical disease in birds is rare. Escape from macrophage phagocytosis is a key step in pathogenesis for L. monocytogenes. Therefore, we investigated the infection of the chicken macrophage-like cell line HD11 with 2 strains of L. monocytogenes EGD-e and Scott A. After infection, L. monocytogenes was quantified by spread plating and HD11 was quantified with trypan blue exclusion stain before enumeration. The standard macrophage killing protocols require washing the cell monolayers 3 times with PBS, which was found to negatively influence HD11 monolayers. Maximum bacterial densities within macrophages were not different between the 2 Listeria strains. HD11 required more than 11 h to effectively reduce intracellular L. monocytogenes Scott A, and Scott A was more susceptible to HD11 killing than EGD-e. It appears that Listeria infection initially causes attenuation of HD11 growth, and infected HD11 cells do not begin to lyse until at least 11 h post infection. These results suggest that there are subtle strain to strain differences in response to HD11 macrophage phagocytosis. The long lead-time required for HD11 to kill L. monocytogenes cells means that there is sufficient time available for chicken macrophages to circulate in the blood and transfer the intracellular Listeria to multiple tissues. © 2016 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  18. New Aspects Regarding Evolution and Virulence of Listeria monocytogenes Revealed by Comparative Genomics and DNA Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doumith, Michel; Cazalet, Christel; Simoes, Natalie; Frangeul, Lionel; Jacquet, Christine; Kunst, Frank; Martin, Paul; Cossart, Pascale; Glaser, Philippe; Buchrieser, Carmen

    2004-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a food-borne bacterial pathogen that causes a wide spectrum of diseases, such as meningitis, septicemia, abortion, and gastroenteritis, in humans and animals. Among the 13 L. monocytogenes serovars described, invasive disease is mostly associated with serovar 4b strains. To investigate the genetic diversity of L. monocytogenes strains with different virulence potentials, we partially sequenced an epidemic serovar 4b strain and compared it with the complete sequence of the nonepidemic L. monocytogenes EGDe serovar 1/2a strain. We identified an unexpected genetic divergence between the two strains, as about 8% of the sequences were serovar 4b specific. These sequences included seven genes coding for surface proteins, two of which belong to the internalin family, and three genes coding for transcriptional regulators, all of which might be important in different steps of the infectious process. Based on the sequence information, we then characterized the gene content of 113 Listeria strains by using a newly designed Listeria array containing the “flexible” part of the sequenced Listeria genomes. Hybridization results showed that all of the previously identified virulence factors of L. monocytogenes were present in the 93 L. monocytogenes strains tested. However, distinct patterns of the presence or absence of other genes were identified among the different L. monocytogenes serovars and Listeria species. These results allow new insights into the evolution of L. monocytogenes, suggesting that early divergence of the ancestral L. monocytogenes serovar 1/2c strains from the serovar 1/2b strains led to two major phylogenetic lineages, one of them including the serogroup 4 strains, which branched off the serovar 1/2b ancestral lineage, leading (mostly by gene loss) to the species Listeria innocua. The identification of 30 L. monocytogenes-specific and several serovar-specific marker genes, such as three L. monocytogenes serovar 4b

  19. Prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes in the river receiving the effluent of municipal wastewater treatment plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atefeh Taherkhani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The objective of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of Listeria spp. in the river water before and after discharge of the effluent of the municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP in Isfahan, Iran. Materials and Methods: A total of 66 samples were collected bi-weekly over 4 months from eleven discrete sampling locations in Zayandehrood River, Iran. Three sampling sites were located above the discharge point and five sites were located after the discharge point of WWTP. Samples were also collected from the influent and the effluent of WWTP. Listeria spp. were isolated using a selective enrichment procedure and a subculture onto polymyxin-acriflavine-lithium chloride-ceftazidime-esculin-mannitol Agar. All isolates were subjected to standard biochemical tests. Results: L. monocytogenes was isolated from influent (83%, effluent (50% and (18.5% river water. Listeria spp. was not found before the discharge point in river water. However, L. monocytogenes was isolated in samples collected from 200 m (33%, 500 m (33%, 2 km (16.5%, 5 km (16.5% and 10 km (16.5% downstream from the WWTP. Listeria innocua (9% and Listeria seeligeri (10% were the second most frequently isolated species. Conclusion: During the wastewater treatment, Listeria spp. is not removed completely. L. monocytogenes is widely distributed in the Zayandehrood river. L. monocytogenes released into surface water demonstrates a potential risk for public health. These results indicate the need for appropriate water management in order to reduce human and animal exposure to such pathogens.

  20. Optimizing detection of heat-injured Listeria monocytogenes in pasteurized milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, A Y; Ziegler, G R; Knabel, S J

    2001-07-01

    Optimal conditions for the detection of heat-injured cells of Listeria monocytogenes in modified Pennsylvania State University (mPSU) broth were determined using a response surface design generated by a computer program, EChip. Different combinations of incubation temperatures and lithium, magnesium, and D-serine concentrations were evaluated to determine the optimum conditions for the detection of heat-injured L. monocytogenes in filter-sterilized whole milk inoculated with selected problematic background microflora. A concentration of 212 mM lithium chloride completely inhibited the growth of Enterococcus faecium while permitting recovery and detection of L. monocytogenes. A concentration of 15.8 mM MgSO4 was found to be optimum for the recovery and detection of L. monocytogenes. A concentration of 140.2 mM D-serine was found to completely inhibit the germination of Bacillus subtilis var. globii spores but not recovery and detection of L. monocytogenes. Under optimum concentrations of LiCl, MgSO4, and D-serine and in the absence of background microflora, the effect of incubation temperature on percentage detection was described by a second-order polynomial model, and 28 degrees C was determined to be optimal. In the presence of background microflora, the effect of incubation temperature on percentage detection of heat-injured cells was described by a third-order polynomial model, and 30 degrees C was found to be optimal. Optimizing the levels of highly specific and selective agents, nutrients, and incubation temperature in one recovery enrichment system dramatically increased the Listeria/background microflora ratio. This resulting medium, optimized PSU (oPSU) broth, greatly improved the detection of heat-injured and nonheat-injured L. monocytogenes by both conventional and molecular methods (Oxoid's Listeria Rapid Test, Gen-Probe's Accuprobe Listeria monocytogenes Culture Identification Test, and Qualicon's BAX for screening Listeria monocytogenes).

  1. Impact of environmental factors on the culturability and viability of Listeria monocytogenes under conditions encountered in food processing plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overney, Anaïs; Jacques-André-Coquin, Joséphine; Ng, Patricia; Carpentier, Brigitte; Guillier, Laurent; Firmesse, Olivier

    2017-03-06

    The ability of Listeria monocytogenes to adhere to and persist on surfaces for months or even years may be responsible for its transmission from contaminated surfaces to food products. Hence the necessity to find effective means to prevent the establishment of L. monocytogenes in food processing environments. The aim of this study was to assess, through a fractional experimental design, the environmental factors that could affect the survival of L. monocytogenes cells on surfaces to thereby prevent the persistence of this pathogen in conditions mimicking those encountered in food processing plants: culture with smoked salmon juice or meat exudate, use of two materials with different hygiene status, biofilm of L. monocytogenes in pure-culture or dual-culture with a Pseudomonas fluorescens strain, application of a drying step after cleaning and disinfection (C&D) and comparison of two strains of L. monocytogenes. Bacterial survival was assessed by culture, qPCR to quantify total cells, and propidium monoazide coupled with qPCR to quantify viable cells and highlight viable but non-culturable (VBNC) cells. Our results showed that failure to apply C&D causes cell persistence on surfaces. Moreover, the sanitation procedure leads only to a loss of culturability and appearance of VBNC populations. However, an additional daily drying step after C&D optimises the effectiveness of these procedures to reduce culturable populations. Our results reinforce the importance to use molecular tools to monitor viable pathogens in food processing plants to avoid underestimating the amounts of cells using only methods based on cell culture. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Fate of Listeria monocytogenes during the manufacture and ripening of Parmesan cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousef, A E; Marth, E H

    1990-12-01

    Parmesan cheese was made from a mixture of pasteurized whole and skim milk that was inoculated to contain ca. 10(4) to 10(5) cells of Listeria monocytogenes/ml. Curd was cooked at 51 degrees C (124 degrees F) for ca. 45 min. During cheese making, maximum numbers of L. monocytogenes appeared just before cooking; at this point, the increase over initial numbers was a .61 to 1.0 order of magnitude. During cooking of curd, the average decrease in numbers of L. monocytogenes was a .22 order of magnitude. During cheese ripening, numbers of L. monocytogenes decreased almost linearly and faster than reported for other hard cheeses. Listeria monocytogenes strain California died faster than did strain V7. Listeria monocytogenes were not detected in cheese after 2 to 16 wk of ripening, depending on the strain of the pathogen and the lot of cheese. Parmesan cheese made in this study was not a favorable medium for survival of L. monocytogenes.

  3. Growth and thermal inactivation of Listeria monocytogenes in cabbage and cabbage juice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuchat, L R; Brackett, R E; Hao, D Y; Conner, D E

    1986-10-01

    Studies were done to determine the interacting effects of pH, NaCl, temperature, and time on growth, survival, and death of two strains of Listeria monocytogenes. Viable population of the organism steadily declined in heat-sterilized cabbage stored at 5 degrees C for 42 days. In contrast, the organism grew on raw cabbage during the first 25 days of a 64-day storage period at 5 degrees C. Growth was observed in heat-sterilized unclarified cabbage juice containing less than or equal to 5% NaCl and tryptic phosphate broth containing less than or equal to 10% NaCl. Rates of thermal inactivation increased as pH of clarified cabbage juice heating medium was decreased from 5.6 to 4.0. At 58 degrees C (pH 5.6), 4 X 10(6) cells/mL were reduced to undetectable levels within 10 min. Thermal inactivation rates in clarified cabbage juice (pH 5.6) were not significantly influenced by the presence of up to 2% NaCl; however, heat-stressed cells had increased sensitivity to NaCl in tryptic soy agar recovery medium. Cold enrichment of heat-stressed cells at 5 degrees C for 21 days enhanced resuscitation. Results indicate that L. monocytogenes can proliferate on refrigerated (5 degrees C) raw cabbage which, in turn, may represent a hazard to health of the consumer. Heat pasteurization treatments normally given to cabbage juice or sauerkraut would be expected to kill any L. monocytogenes cells which may be present.

  4. Benzalkonium tolerance genes and outcome in Listeria monocytogenes meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, P H C; Lees, J A; Koopmans, M M; Ferwerda, B; Arends, A W M; Feller, M M; Schipper, K; Valls Seron, M; van der Ende, A; Brouwer, M C; van de Beek, D; Bentley, S D

    2017-04-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a food-borne pathogen that can cause meningitis. The listerial genotype ST6 has been linked to increasing rates of unfavourable outcome over time. We investigated listerial genetic variation and the relation with clinical outcome in meningitis. We sequenced 96 isolates from adults with listerial meningitis included in two prospective nationwide cohort studies by whole genome sequencing, and evaluated associations between bacterial genetic variation and clinical outcome. We validated these results by screening listerial genotypes of 445 cerebrospinal fluid and blood isolates from patients over a 30-year period from the Dutch national surveillance cohort. We identified a bacteriophage, phiLMST6 co-occurring with a novel plasmid, pLMST6, in ST6 isolates to be associated with unfavourable outcome in patients (p 2.83e-05). The plasmid carries a benzalkonium chloride tolerance gene, emrC, conferring decreased susceptibility to disinfectants used in the food-processing industry. Isolates harbouring emrC were growth inhibited at higher levels of benzalkonium chloride (median 60 mg/L versus 15 mg/L; p meningitis in the Netherlands. Suggesting increased disease severity, our findings warrant consideration of disinfectants used in the food-processing industry that select for resistance mechanisms and may, inadvertently, lead to increased risk of poor disease outcome. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. Listeria monocytogenes Meningitis in Adults: The Czech Republic Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Dzupova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Listeria monocytogenes (LM is currently the third most frequent pathogen of bacterial meningitis in adults. Methods. A prospective study of patients with LM meningitis in a Czech tertiary care hospital, carried out from 1997 to 2012. Results. Thirty-one patients were diagnosed with LM meningitis, which was 7% of a total of 440 adult patients with acute bacterial meningitis (ABM over a 16-year period. Their median age was 63 years, range 26–80 years. Nineteen patients (61% had underlying immunocompromising comorbidity; 15 patients (48% were older than 65 years. Fourteen patients (45% had arterial hypertension. The typical triad of fever, neck stiffness, and altered mental status was present in 21 patients (68%. The median count of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF leukocytes was 680/L, protein level 2.6 g/L, and glucose ratio 0.28. Four patients (13% died, and nine (29% survived with moderate to severe sequelae. Conclusion. LM meningitis is known to affect immunosuppressed and elderly patients. Arterial hypertension seems to be another important predisposing factor. Clinical symptoms, CSF findings, and disease outcomes, did not significantly differ from other community-acquired ABM in our study, although the CSF leukocyte count was lower. Ampicillin showed good clinical and bacteriological efficacy in the majority of patients.

  6. Inhibition of listeriolysin O oligomerization by lutein prevents Listeria monocytogenes infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bowen; Teng, Zihao; Wang, Jianfeng; Lu, Gejin; Deng, Xuming; Li, Li

    2017-01-01

    The foodborne pathogenic bacterial species Listeria monocytogenes (L. monocytogenes) has caused incalculable damages to public health, and its successful infection requires various virulence factors, including Listeriolysin O (LLO). By forming pores in phagosomal membranes and even in some organelles, LLO plays an indispensable role in the ability of L. monocytogenes to escape from host immune attacks. Because of its critical role, LLO offers an appropriate therapeutic target against L. monocytogenes infection. Here, lutein, a natural small molecule existing widely in fruits and vegetables, is demonstrated as an effective inhibitor of LLO that works by blocking its oligomerization during invasion without showing significant bacteriostatic activity. Further assays applying lutein in cell culture models of invasion and in animal models showed that lutein could effectively inhibit L. monocytogenes infection. Overall, our results indicate that lutein may represent a promising and novel therapeutic agent against L. monocytogenes infection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Factors controlling acid tolerance of Listeria monocytogenes: effects of nisin and other ionophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, A R; Benjamin, M M

    1997-01-01

    The acid tolerance of a Listeria monocytogenes serotype 4b strain was studied by measuring its ability to survive at an acidic pH at 37 degrees C. The acid tolerance of L. monocytogenes was much lower than those of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Shigella flexneri strains. This observation suggested a higher infective dose for L. monocytogenes than E. coli O157:H7 and Shigella. The susceptibility of L. monocytogenes to acidic pH was dependent upon growth medium pH and growth phase of the culture. Nisin and some other ionophores reduced the acid tolerance of both stationary-phase and log-phase cultures of L. monocytogenes. These studies indicated that nisin might be a useful candidate for controlling acid tolerance of L. monocytogenes. PMID:9327581

  8. Visualisation of morphological interactionof diamond and silver nanoparticles with Salmonella enteritidis and Listeria Monocytogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sawosz, Ewa; Chwalibog, André; Mitura, Katarzyna

    2011-01-01

    Currently, medicine intensively searches for methods to transport drugs to a target (sick) point within the body. The objective of the present investigation was to evaluate morphological characteristics of the assembles of silver or diamond nanoparticles with Salmonella Enteritidis (G-) or Listeria...... monocytogenes (G+), to reveal possibilities of constructing nanoparticle-bacteria vehicles. Diamond nanoparticles (nano-D) were produced by the detonation method. Hydrocolloids of silver nanoparticles (nano-Ag) were produced by electric non-explosive patented method. Hydrocolloids of nanoparticles (200 microl......) were added to bacteria suspension (200 microl) in the following order: nano-D + Salmonella E.; nano-D + Listeria monocytogenes; nano-Ag + Salmonella E; nano-Ag + Listeria monocytogenes. Samples were inspected by transmission electron microscopy. Visualisation of nanoparticles and bacteria interaction...

  9. The Efficiency of UVC Radiation in the Inactivation of Listeria monocytogenes on Beef-Agar Food Models

    OpenAIRE

    Hamidi-Oskouei, Amir M.; James, Christian; James, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the eff ect of meat content and surface smoothness on the deactivation of Listeria monocytogenes in beef-agar food models achieved by shortwave ultraviolet (UVC) light. Food models with various meat contents were made using chopped beef slices and agar solution. Prepared models together with a Listeria selective agar (LSA) plate and a slice of cooked beef were inoculated with L. monocytogenes and then exposed to UVC light. Population of Listeria reduced to...

  10. The Efficiency of UVC Radiation in the Inactivation of
Listeria monocytogenes on Beef-Agar Food Models

    OpenAIRE

    Christian James; Stephen James; Hamidi-Oskouei, Amir M.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the eff ect of meat content and surface smoothness on the deactivation of Listeria monocytogenes in beef-agar food models achieved by shortwave ultraviolet (UVC) light. Food models with various meat contents were made using chopped beef slices and agar solution. Prepared models together with a Listeria selective agar (LSA) plate and a slice of cooked beef were inoculated with L. monocytogenes and then exposed to UVC light. Population of Listeria reduced to...

  11. Latex protein extracts from Calotropis procera with immunomodulatory properties protect against experimental infections with Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Danielle Cristina de Oliveira; Ralph, Maria Taciana; Batista, Jacqueline Ellen Camelo; Silva, Diogo Manoel Farias; Gomes-Filho, Manoel Adrião; Alencar, Nylane Maria; Leal, Nilma Cintra; Ramos, Márcio Viana; Lima-Filho, Jose Vitor

    2016-06-15

    The latex from the medicinal plant Calotropis procera is often used in folk medicine against infectious and inflammatory diseases. In this study, we investigate a protein fraction with immunomodulatory properties, named LPPI, against experimental infections, in vitro and in vivo, with a virulent strain of Listeria monocytogenes. LPPI was exposed to cultured macrophages or Swiss mice and then challenged with L. monocytogenes. Peritoneal macrophages were obtained from Swiss mice, and cultured in 96-well microplates. Soluble latex proteins (LP) were subjected to fractionation by ion-exchange chromatography. The major peak (LPPI) was added into wells at 10 or 100µg/ml. Albumin (100µg/ml) was used for comparison between protein treatments. After incubation for 1h at 5% CO2/ 37°C, the supernatant was discarded and 0.2ml of L. monocytogenes overnight culture was added in the wells. Following 4h and 24h infection, the cytokine mRNA expression was evaluated as well as the number of intracellular colony forming units. Swiss mice (n=16) were injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) with LPPI (5 and 10mg/kg) while the control mice received albumin (10mg/kg) or LP (10mg/kg). After 24h, all animal groups were challenged with L. monocytogenes (10(6) CFU/ ml), also by i.p. route. LPPI was not toxic to uninfected macrophages (pMØ) and significantly increased mRNA expression of TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β and iNOS. Following infection, cell viability was reduced by 50% in albumin-treated pMØ (control); but only 17% in pMØ treated with LPPI at 100µg/ml. In this case, LPPI increased expression of TNF-α and IL-6 whereas the number of bacterial colony-forming units was reduced 100-fold in comparison to control groups. Swiss mice pretreated with LPPI showed dose-dependent survival rates that reached 80%, while mice that received albumin died 1-3 days after infection. After 24h infection, leukocyte migration to the infectious foci was high in LPPI-treated mice whereas the number of viable

  12. Methods for the isolation and identification of Listeria spp. and Listeria monocytogenes: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasanov, Uta; Hughes, Denise; Hansbro, Philip M

    2005-11-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is an important food-borne pathogen and is widely tested for in food, environmental and clinical samples. Identification traditionally involved culture methods based on selective enrichment and plating followed by the characterization of Listeria spp. based on colony morphology, sugar fermentation and haemolytic properties. These methods are the gold standard; but they are lengthy and may not be suitable for testing of foods with short shelf lives. As a result more rapid tests were developed based on antibodies (ELISA) or molecular techniques (PCR or DNA hybridization). While these tests possess equal sensitivity, they are rapid and allow testing to be completed within 48 h. More recently, molecular methods were developed that target RNA rather than DNA, such as RT-PCR, real time PCR or nucleic acid based sequence amplification (NASBA). These tests not only provide a measure of cell viability but they can also be used for quantitative analysis. In addition, a variety of tests are available for sub-species characterization, which are particularly useful in epidemiological investigations. Early typing methods differentiated isolates based on phenotypic markers, such as multilocus enzyme electrophoresis, phage typing and serotyping. These phenotypic typing methods are being replaced by molecular tests, which reflect genetic relationships between isolates and are more accurate. These new methods are currently mainly used in research but their considerable potential for routine testing in the future cannot be overlooked.

  13. Formylpeptide receptors are critical for rapid neutrophil mobilization in host defense against Listeria monocytogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mingyong; Chen, Keqiang; Yoshimura, Teizo; Liu, Ying; Gong, Wanghua; Wang, Aimin; Gao, Ji-Liang; Murphy, Philip M.; Wang, Ji Ming

    2012-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes (Listeria) causes opportunistic infection in immunocompromised hosts with high mortality. Resistance to Listeria depends on immune responses and recruitment of neutrophils of the immune system into infected sites is an early and critical step. Mouse neutrophils express two G protein-coupled formylpeptide receptor subtypes Fpr1 and Fpr2 that recognize bacterial and host-derived chemotactic molecules including Listeria peptides for cell migration and activation. Here we report deficiency in Fprs exacerbated the severity of the infection and increased the mortality of infected mice. The mechanism involved impaired early neutrophil recruitment to the liver with Fpr1 and Fpr2 being sole receptors for neutrophils to sense Listeria chemoattractant signals and for production of bactericidal superoxide. Thus, Fprs are essential sentinels to guide the first wave of neutrophil infiltration in the liver of Listeria-infected mice for effective elimination of the invading pathogen. PMID:23139859

  14. The Response Regulator ResD Plays a Role in Metabolism of Listeria monocytogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Marianne Halberg; Sørensen, Martine; Ingmer, Hanne

    Listeria monocytogenes is a serious food borne pathogenic bacterium that can cause listeriosis with high mortality rate. L. monocytogenes is commonly found in the environment particularly in association with decaying plant material.  From the environmental niche the bacterium is believed...... to be transmitted to food processing plants from where it can establish and survive for extended periods of time contaminating processed food products. Recently we have identified the response regulator ResD of L. monocytogenes and showed that it is important for growth in laboratory media and for sugar uptake...... (Larsen et al., 2006). The aim of this study was to investigate in more detail the role of the response regulator ResD in metabolisme of Listeria monocytogenes EGD. The role of ResD was first  investigated by microarray analysis. This analysis resulted in identification of genes repressed under aerobic...

  15. Evaluation of Third-Party Deep Cleaning as a Listeria monocytogenes Control Strategy in Retail Delis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammons, Susan R; Etter, Andrea J; Wang, Jingjin; Wu, Tongyu; Ford, Thomas; Howard, Michael T; Oliver, Haley F

    2017-10-20

    The objective of this study was to develop and assess the efficacy of an aggressive deep cleaning sanitation standard operating procedure (DC-SSOP) in nine retail delicatessens to reduce persistent Listeria monocytogenes environmental contamination. The DC-SSOP was developed from combined daily SSOPs recommended by the Food Marketing Institute and input from experts in Listeria control from food manufacturing and sanitation. The DC-SSOP was executed by a trained professional cleaning service during a single 12-h shutdown period. A modified protocol from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Bacteriological Analytical Manual was used to detect L. monocytogenes in samples from 28 food and nonfood contact surfaces that were collected immediately before and after each cleaning and in samples collected monthly for 3 months. The DC-SSOP significantly reduced L. monocytogenes prevalence overall during the 3-month follow-up period and produced variable results for persistent L. monocytogenes isolates. Six delis with historically low to moderate L. monocytogenes prevalence had no significant changes in the number of samples positive for L. monocytogenes after deep cleaning. Deep cleaning in very high prevalence delis (20 to 30% prevalence) reduced L. monocytogenes by 25.6% (P adj 30%), positive samples from nonfood contact surfaces were reduced by 19.6% (P adj = 0.0002, n = 294) during the follow-up period. The inability of deep cleaning to completely eliminate persistent L. monocytogenes was likely due to the diverse infrastructures in each deli, which may require more individualized intervention strategies.

  16. Isolamento e caracterização de Listeria monocytogenes em água de esgoto

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Hofer

    1975-01-01

    Full Text Available São apresentados os resultados preliminares, sobre a ocorrência de Listeria monocytogenes em vinte amostras de água de esgoto, colhidas de afluentes de duas estações de tratamento. Como esquema de isolamento, foram utilizados o processo de enriquecimento à baixa temperatura, segundo Gray, e quatro meios seletivos. Foram isoladas duas amostras de Listeria, em análise sorológica identificadas como sorotipos L4b e L4ab.Date are presented, as a preliminary report of a study of the ocurrence of Listeria monocytogenes, in twenty samples of sewage water collected from affluents of two different sewage treatment station. A scheme for the isolation of the bacterium involving different selective media and employing Gray's cold incubation technique has been used for the purpose. In two opportunities, Listeria were isolated and the serological study of these strains were indentified as serotypes L4b and L4ab.

  17. Rapid detection of Listeria monocytogenes in milk using confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy and chemometric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junping; Xie, Xinfang; Feng, Jinsong; Chen, Jessica C; Du, Xin-jun; Luo, Jiangzhao; Lu, Xiaonan; Wang, Shuo

    2015-07-02

    Listeria monocytogenes is a facultatively anaerobic, Gram-positive, rod-shape foodborne bacterium causing invasive infection, listeriosis, in susceptible populations. Rapid and high-throughput detection of this pathogen in dairy products is critical as milk and other dairy products have been implicated as food vehicles in several outbreaks. Here we evaluated confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy (785 nm laser) coupled with chemometric analysis to distinguish six closely related Listeria species, including L. monocytogenes, in both liquid media and milk. Raman spectra of different Listeria species and other bacteria (i.e., Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella enterica and Escherichia coli) were collected to create two independent databases for detection in media and milk, respectively. Unsupervised chemometric models including principal component analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis were applied to differentiate L. monocytogenes from Listeria and other bacteria. To further evaluate the performance and reliability of unsupervised chemometric analyses, supervised chemometrics were performed, including two discriminant analyses (DA) and soft independent modeling of class analogies (SIMCA). By analyzing Raman spectra via two DA-based chemometric models, average identification accuracies of 97.78% and 98.33% for L. monocytogenes in media, and 95.28% and 96.11% in milk were obtained, respectively. SIMCA analysis also resulted in satisfied average classification accuracies (over 93% in both media and milk). This Raman spectroscopic-based detection of L. monocytogenes in media and milk can be finished within a few hours and requires no extensive sample preparation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Whole-Genome Sequence of Listeria monocytogenes Type Strain 53 XXIII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, K W; Daligault, H E; Minogue, T D; Bishop-Lilly, K A; Bruce, D C; Chain, P S; Coyne, S R; Frey, K G; Jaissle, J; Koroleva, G I; Ladner, J T; Li, P-E; Palacios, G F; Redden, C L; Scholz, M B; Teshima, H; Johnson, S L

    2014-09-25

    Listeria monocytogenes causes the food-borne illness listeriosis that primarily infects "vulnerable" groups (e.g., elderly adults, pregnant women, very young children, and the immunocompromised). We sequenced the genome of L. monocytogenes XXIII (ATCC 15313) and assembled it into a single scaffold (three contigs) and deposited the annotated assembly into GenBank as accession no. JOOX00000000. Copyright © 2014 Davenport et al.

  19. [Primary Listeria monocytogenes infection in a cirrhotic woman: report of one case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanqueo C, Leonardo; Gutiérrez R, Catalina; Armas M, Rodolfo; Urriola J, Gabriela; Bustos M, Marisol; Tapia P, Cecilia; Vásquez T, Patricia

    2008-02-01

    L. monocytogenes infections are infrequent. Sepsis in pregnant women and newborns and central nervous system infections in the elderly are the most common clinical manifestations. We report a 61 years old woman with diabetes Mellitus and a Child B hepatic cirrhosis, admitted for persistent fever. Blood cultures were positive for Listeria monocytogenes. Cerebrospinal fluid was normal and sterile. She was treated with ampicillin and amikacin with a good response. Control blood cultures were negative. She was discharged 14 days after in good conditions.

  20. Anti-Listerial Activity of Four Seaweed Essential Oils Against Listeria monocytogenes

    OpenAIRE

    Patra, Jayanta Kumar; Baek, Kwang-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Background Listeria monocytogenes is one of the most virulent types of bacteria and causes severe foodborne illness, such as listeriosis. Because this pathogen has become resistant to sanitizers and other disinfectants that are used to clean utensils and surfaces during food processing, it poses a serious threat to the food industry. Objectives The study was conducted to determine the anti-listerial potential of essential oils extracted from four edible seaweeds against L. monocytogenes. Mate...

  1. Fate of Listeria monocytogenes in tissues of experimentally infected cattle and in hard salami.

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, J. L.; Doyle, M P; Cassens, R. G.; Schoeni, J L

    1988-01-01

    Muscle, organ, and lymphoid tissues of four Holstein cows experimentally inoculated (intravenously) with Listeria monocytogenes were examined 2, 6, or 54 days postinoculation for the presence of the organism by direct plating and cold enrichment procedures. L. monocytogenes was isolated from 66% of the tissues sampled; 38% of the isolations were attributed to the use of cold enrichment. Isolation of the organism from muscle tissue was possible only with animals inoculated 2 days before slaugh...

  2. QUANTIFICATION OF LISTERIA MONOCYTOGENES IN MILK BY MPN-PCR AND MPN-CULTURE METHODS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahzad Hosseini

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the MPN-PCR (Most Probable Number- Polymerase Chain Reaction and MPN-Culture methods in enumerating of Listeria monocytogenes in milk. In order to compare the accuracy of these methods, 103 cell/ml Listeria monocytogenes and different background bacteria which may be present in raw milk, were inoculated in sterilized milk. After preparing serial dilutions, three replicates per dilution were inoculated in tubes containing listeria enrichment broth. After 48 hours of incubation, for MPN-Culture three inoculated replicates were subcultured on Oxford agar and suspected colonies were confirmed by performing by biochemical tests. For MPN-PCR assay, the DNA extraction was performed from the three inoculated replicates which were already used for MPN-Culture and PCR assay was performed using primers specific for Listeria monocytogenes. The experiment was repeated three times and the average of enumerated bacteria was calculated by each method separately. Statistical analysis using one sample Wilcoxon signed rank test showed that enumeration by MPN-PCR method was more accurate than enumeration by MPN-Culture method. The result of this study showed that MPN-PCR method in comparision with MPN-Culture even in the presence of different background microorganisms is more rapid and reliable. It is concluded that MPN-PCR method facilitates the enumeration of Listeria monocytogenes without excessive work and could be considered as an alternative to MPN-Culture technique.

  3. Contamination of cooked peeled shrimp (Pandalus borealis) by Listeria monocytogenes during processing at two processing plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudmundsdóttir, Sigrún; Gudbjörnsdóttir, Birna; Einarsson, Hjörleifur; Kristinsson, Karl G; Kristjansson, Már

    2006-06-01

    Listeria spp. and Listeria monocytogenes contamination was evaluated in cooked peeled shrimp (final or semifinal product, 82 samples) and the shrimp-processing environment (two plants, 613 samples) in eight surveys conducted from 1998 through 2001. Listeria was detected in 12.5% (78) of the 695 samples (11.2% of the samples were positive for L. monocytogenes), but none of the samples of final product contained Listeria. One hundred seventy-two L. monocytogenes isolates were characterized by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Cleavage with macrorestriction enzymes AscI and ApaI yielded 14 different pulsotypes in the plants; two types were dominant, one in each plant. Sixty-three of the 106 isolates in plant A and 43 of the 66 isolates in plant B were of the dominant types. Certain strains, mainly of serotypes 1/2c and 4b and pulsotypes 1A and 2H, were persistent for long periods in both plants. Adaptation of good hygienic practices in the processing plants, including strict rules concerning traffic of staff and equipment, and existing hygienic requirements appeared to be effective in preventing contamination between areas within plants and in the final product. The persistence of Listeria strains in these two processing plants indicates the importance of detecting the places in the processing environment (e.g., transporters, equipment, floors, and drains) where L. monocytogenes can survive so that cleaning and disinfection efforts can be directed to such niches.

  4. Comparative Evaluation of Veriflow® Listeria monocytogenes to USDA and AOAC Culture Based Methods for the Detection of Listeria monocytogenes in Food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joelsson, Adam C; Brown, Ashley S; Puri, Amrita; Keough, Martin P; Gaudioso, Zara E; Siciliano, Nicholas A; Snook, Adam E

    2015-01-01

    Veriflow® Listeria monocytogenes (LM) is a molecular based assay for the presumptive detection of Listeria monocytogenes from environmental surfaces, dairy, and ready-to-eat (RTE) food matrixes (hot dogs and deli meat). The assay utilizes a PCR detection method coupled with a rapid, visual, flow-based assay that develops in 3 min post PCR amplification and requires only 24 h of enrichment for maximum sensitivity. The Veriflow LM system eliminates the need for sample purification, gel electrophoresis, or fluorophore-based detection of target amplification, and does not require complex data analysis. This Performance Tested Method(SM) validation study demonstrated the ability of the Veriflow LM method to detect low levels of artificially inoculated L. monocytogenes in seven distinct environmental and food matrixes. In each unpaired reference comparison study, probability of detection analysis indicated no significant difference between the Veriflow LM method and the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Food Safety and Inspection Service Microbiology Laboratory Guidebook 8.08 or AOAC 993.12 reference method. Fifty strains of L. monocytogenes were detected in the inclusivity study, while 39 nonspecific organisms were undetected in the exclusivity study. The study results show that Veriflow LM is a sensitive, selective, and robust assay for the presumptive detection of L. monocytogenes sampled from environmental, dairy, or RTE (hot dogs and deli meat) food matrixes.

  5. The overgrowth of Listeria monocytogenes by other Listeria spp. in food samples undergoing enrichment cultivation has a nutritional basis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besse, Nathalie Gnanou; Barre, Lena; Buhariwalla, Colin; Vignaud, Marie Léone; Khamissi, Elissa; Decourseulles, Emilie; Nirsimloo, Marjorie; Chelly, Minyar; Kalmokoff, Martin

    2010-01-01

    The isolation of Listeria monocytogenes from food is carried out using a double enrichment. In cases where multiple Listeria species are present within the original sample, L. monocytogenes can be overgrown during enrichment by other species of listeria present in the original sample. From a practical perspective, this can result in a false negative or complicate the ability of public health investigators to match food and clinical isolates. We have further investigated this phenomenon by analysing the growth kinetics of single species and pairs of different species over the ISO 11290-1 enrichment process. The overgrowth of a strain of L. monocytogenes by a strain of Listeria innocua resulted primarily from interactions which occurred in late exponential phase, where it was observed that growth of both strains stopped when the dominant strain reached stationary phase. In a second mixed culture, the dominant L. monocytogenes strain suppressed the exponential growth rate of the second Listeria welshimeri strain. Both findings suggest that the overgrowth could partially be explained in terms of a nutritional competition. Multi-factor analysis of Fraser broth constituents and growth temperatures using both stressed and non-stressed inoculants failed to identify any single factor in the ISO 11290-1 methodology which would contribute to the overgrowth phenomenon in our model system. Furthermore, species was not a significant factor in observed differences in growth parameters among a wider array of strains which had been stressed or not stressed prior to grown in Fraser broths, even though some strains had significantly faster growth rates than others. Limiting diffusion in Fraser broth through the addition of agar significantly reduced the extent of the overgrowth in experiments using mixtures of strains originally isolated from foods where overgrowth had been previously observed. Taken together, these findings support that the overgrowth phenomenon in most instances

  6. Efficacy of activated alginate-based nanocomposite films to control Listeria monocytogenes and spoilage flora in rainbow trout slice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alboofetileh, Mehdi; Rezaei, Masoud; Hosseini, Hedayat; Abdollahi, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Essential oils of clove, coriander, caraway, marjoram, cinnamon, and cumin were tested for their antilisterial activity by application of agar diffusion assay (experiment 1). Marjoram essential oil (MEO) showed the highest inhibitory effect, followed by clove and cinnamon. Subsequently, these essential oils were incorporated to alginate/clay nanocomposite films and antilisterial effectiveness of the films was studied in a model solid food system during 12 days at 10 °C (experiment 2). The results revealed that the films with MEO were more effective against Listeria monocytogenes in the model step. Finally, alginate-clay film incorporating 1 % MEO was applied to inoculated trout slices during refrigerated storage (4 °C) for 15 days (experiment 3). The control and the wrapped fish samples were analyzed periodically for microbiological (L. monocytogenes, total viable count, psychrotrophic count) and chemical (TVB-N) properties. The results demonstrated that alginate-clay films enriched with 1 % MEO significantly delayed the growth of L. monocytogenes during the 15-day storage with final counts reaching 6.23 log CFU/g while the counts in control samples were significantly higher reaching 7.38 log CFU/g (p < 0.05). Furthermore, active films efficiently reduced total viable count and psychrotrophic count as well as TVB-N in the fish slice during refrigerated storage.

  7. Comparative study of the effects of citral on the growth and injury of Listeria innocua and Listeria monocytogenes cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Angulo, Angela B; Zanini, Surama F; Rosenthal, Amauri; Rodrigo, Dolores; Klein, Günter; Martínez, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of citral on growth and on the occurrence of sublethal damage in Listeria innocua Serovar 6a (CECT 910) and Listeria monocytogenes Serovar 4b (CECT 4032) cells that were exposed to citral as a natural antimicrobial agent. Two initial inoculum concentrations were considered in this investigation: 10(2) and 10(6) cfu/mL. Citral exhibited antilisterial activity against L. innocua and L. monocytogenes, and the observed effects were dependent on the concentration of citral present in the culture medium (0, 0.150 and 0.250 μL/mL) (p ≤ 0.05). L. innocua had a shorter lag phase than L. monocytogenes, and the two species had nearly identical maximum specific growth rates. These results indicate that L. innocua could be used as surrogate for L. monocytogenes when testing the effects of this antimicrobial. Significant differences in the lag phase and growth rate were observed between the small and large inoculum concentration (p ≤ 0.05). Citral-treated L. innocua and L. monocytogenes that were recovered on selective medium (i.e., TSA-YE-SC) had a shorter lag phase and a higher maximum specific growth rate than cells that were recovered on non-selective medium (i.e., TSA-YE) (p ≤ 0.05). This result suggests that damage occurs at sublethal concentrations of citral.

  8. Sublethal injury and virulence changes in Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria innocua treated with antimicrobials carvacrol and citral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, A; Genovés, S; Martorell, P; Zanini, S F; Rodrigo, D; Martinez, A

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of two antimicrobial substances, carvacrol and citral, on Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria innocua cells, as well as possible virulence changes in injured cells, using Caenorhabditis elegans as a model test. The results indicated that the percentage of sublethal damage was higher in L. monocytogenes than in L. innocua. The results of the study carried out by using C. elegans indicated that C. elegans fed in a lawn of L. monocytogenes previously treated with carvacrol showed a loss in life span (p ≤ 0.05) as compared with L. monocytogenes treated with citral, Escherichia coli OP50 as a negative control, and treated and untreated L. innocua. Egg laying was also affected: worms fed in a lawn of treated and untreated L. monocytogenes laid fewer eggs than those fed in a lawn of treated and untreated L. innocua or fed with OP50 as a negative control. Worms fed in a lawn of treated and untreated L. innocua also laid fewer eggs than those fed with OP50 as a negative control. A phenotype named bag of worms and an undescribed new one, "vulva inflammation", were also observed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The contribution of bacteriocin to inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes by Carnobacterium piscicola strains in cold-smoked salmon systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, L; Ng, Y Y; Christiansen, J N; Jørgensen, B L; Grótinum, D; Gram, L

    2004-01-01

    To study the importance of bacteriocin production for the antilisterial effect of a bacteriocinogenic Carnobacterium piscicola strain A9b on growth of Listeria monocytogenes in broth and cold-smoked salmon systems. Acriflavin treatment of strain A9b resulted in loss of bacteriocin production and of immunity to carnobacteriocin B2. Two plasmids present in the wild-type were lost in the variant that was also more sensitive to bavaricin and leucocin A than the wild-type indicating cross-resistance to class IIa bacteriocins. The growth rate of the bac- mutant was higher than that of the wild-type at 5 and 37 degrees C but not at 25 or 30 degrees C. In salmon juice the maximum cell density of L. monocytogenes was suppressed 3 and 6 log by co-culture with C. piscicola A9b bac- and bac+, respectively, as compared with the control. Sterile filtered cultures of C. piscicola A9b bac- caused a limited suppression of the maximum cell density of L. monocytogenes similar to that observed when sterile buffer was added in equal amounts. Semi-purified carnobacteriocin B2 caused a 3.5 log decline in viable cell count after 6 day of incubation in cold-smoked salmon juice at 5 degrees C. High resistance level to carnobacteriocin B2 was observed for L. monocytogenes cells exposed to semi-purified and in situ produced carnobacteriocin B2. The presence of bacteriocin production in C. piscicola enhances its inhibition of L. monocytogenes. Due to the emergence of resistance, a bacteriocin negative lactic acid bacteria may be more suited for practical use as a bioprotective agent against L. monocytogenes in ready-to-eat foods.

  10. Rapid Identification and Classification of Listeria spp. and Serotype Assignment of Listeria monocytogenes Using Fourier Transform-Infrared Spectroscopy and Artificial Neural Network Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K F Romanolo

    Full Text Available The use of Fourier Transform-Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR in conjunction with Artificial Neural Network software NeuroDeveloper™ was examined for the rapid identification and classification of Listeria species and serotyping of Listeria monocytogenes. A spectral library was created for 245 strains of Listeria spp. to give a biochemical fingerprint from which identification of unknown samples were made. This technology was able to accurately distinguish the Listeria species with 99.03% accuracy. Eleven serotypes of Listeria monocytogenes including 1/2a, 1/2b, and 4b were identified with 96.58% accuracy. In addition, motile and non-motile forms of Listeria were used to create a more robust model for identification. FT-IR coupled with NeuroDeveloper™ appear to be a more accurate and economic choice for rapid identification of pathogenic Listeria spp. than current methods.

  11. Enhanced detection and enumeration of Listeria monocytogenes from foodstuffs and food-processing environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, T

    1998-03-03

    Listeria monocytogenes blood agar (LMBA) was compared to Listeria selective agar based on lithium chloride and ceftazidime (LA) and to the Oxford and Palcam media recommended by ISO and IDF for the detection and enumeration of L. monocytogenes from foodstuffs and food-processing environments. LMBA is based on trypticase soy agar with the following additions: sheep blood (5%) and as selective agents lithium chloride (10 g/l), polymyxin B sulphate (10 mg/l) and ceftazidime (20 mg/l), whereas the selectivity of LA is based on lithium chloride (15 g/l) and ceftazidime (15 g/l). The media were compared in the detection of L. monocytogenes after enrichment from naturally contaminated foodstuffs (n = 423) and from food-processing environments (n = 93), and in the enumeration of the species from naturally contaminated foodstuffs (n = 287). LMBA was superior both to the standard media and to LA in detection after enrichment and also in enumeration, except in the case of fresh broiler cut samples. The overall sensitivities of the Palcam, Oxford, LA and LMBA media were 68%, 67%, 74% and 96% in detection after enrichment and 64%, 73%, 76% and 80% in the enumeration of the species from ready to eat foods. The superiority of LMBA is based on distinguishing L. monocytogenes from other Listeria species by detection of beta-hemolysis, whereas the other media gave false-negative results because of the overgrowth of Listeria spp. other than L. monocytogenes, especially in detection after enrichment. A more selective medium than LMBA would have been required for the enumeration of the species from samples with high levels of competitive bacteria other than Listeria spp. The results indicate the need for a more specific isolation medium for L. monocytogenes in addition to those recommended by ISO and IDF for both detection and enumeration. LMBA offers an alternative to be used in combination with either Palcam or Oxford as well as with LA.

  12. InstantLabs Listeria monocytogenes food safety kit. Performance tested method 051304.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Neil; Bambusch, Lauren; Le, Thu; Morey, Amit

    2014-01-01

    The InstantLabs Listeria monocytogenes Food Safety Kit was validated against the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) reference method 11290-1 for the detection of Listeria monocytogenes and other Listeria species. The matrixes (stainless steel, sealed concrete, ice cream, whole milk, cheddar cheese, raw shrimp, hot dogs, deli turkey, and lettuce) were inoculated with approximately 1 CFU/test portion of L. monocytogenes to generate fractional positives (5-15) in 20 inoculated samples. Enrichments were also fractionally inoculated with L. grayii for side-by-side testing of the Listeria Species Food Safety Kit. Stainless steel and sealed concrete samples were validated using 4 x 4" and 1 x 1 " test areas, respectively, and enriched in Buffered Listeria Enrichment Broth (BLEB) at 35 +/- 1degreesC for 22-28 h. All food samples were tested at 25 g and enriched in BLEB at 35 +/- 1 degreesC for 24-28 h. All samples were confirmed using the ISO reference method, regardless of initial screen result. The InstantLabs test method performed as well as or better than the reference method for the detection of L. monocytogenes on stainless steel and sealed concrete and in ice cream, whole milk, cheddar cheese, raw shrimp, hot dogs, deli turkey, and lettuce. Inclusivity and exclusivity testing revealed no false negatives and no false positives among the 50 L. monocytogenes serovars and 30 non-L. monocytogenes species examined. The method was shown to be robust when the enrichment times, volumes for DNA extraction, and heat block times were varied.

  13. Antibiofilm effect of plant derived antimicrobials on Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Abhinav; Upadhyaya, Indu; Kollanoor-Johny, Anup; Venkitanarayanan, Kumar

    2013-10-01

    The present study investigated the efficacy of sub-inhibitory concentrations (SICs, concentrations not inhibiting bacterial growth) and bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) of four, generally recognized as safe (GRAS), plant-derived antimicrobials (PDAs) in inhibiting Listeria monocytogenes (LM) biofilm formation and inactivating mature LM biofilms, at 37, 25 and 4 °C on polystyrene plates and stainless-steel coupons. In addition, the effect of SICs of PDAs on the expression of LM genes critical for biofilm synthesis was determined by real-time quantitative PCR. The PDAs and their SICs used for inhibition of biofilm were trans-cinnamaldehyde (TC 0.50, 0.75 mM), carvacrol (CR 0.50, 0.65 mM), thymol (TY 0.33, 0.50 mM), and eugenol (EG 1.8, 2.5 mM), whereas the PDA concentrations used for inactivating mature biofilms were 5.0 and 10.0 mM (TC, CR), 3.3 and 5.0 mM (TY), 18.5 and 25.0 mM (EG). All PDAs inhibited biofilm synthesis and inactivated fully formed LM biofilms on both matrices at three temperatures tested (P < 0.05). Real-time quantitative PCR data revealed that all PDAs down-regulated critical LM biofilm-associated genes (P < 0.05). Results suggest that TC, CR, TY, and EG could potentially be used to control LM biofilms in food processing environments, although further studies under commercial settings are necessary. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Pneumonia by Listeria monocytogenes: A Common Infection by an Uncommon Pathogen

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    Theocharis Koufakis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Infections by Listeria monocytogenes typically occur in infants, the elderly, pregnant women, and immunosuppressed subjects. Pulmonary infections in adults are extremely uncommon and only few reports can be found in the literature. We here report a case of Listeria pneumonia in an 85-year-old female patient and we discuss our diagnostic and therapeutic approach. Despite being rare and in most cases difficult to be identified, Listeria pneumonia should always be considered in immunosuppressed patients, presenting with fever and symptoms from the lower respiratory system.

  15. Pneumonia by Listeria monocytogenes: A Common Infection by an Uncommon Pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koufakis, Theocharis; Chatzopoulou, Marianneta; Margaritis, Anastasios; Tsiakalou, Maria; Gabranis, Ioannis

    2015-01-01

    Infections by Listeria monocytogenes typically occur in infants, the elderly, pregnant women, and immunosuppressed subjects. Pulmonary infections in adults are extremely uncommon and only few reports can be found in the literature. We here report a case of Listeria pneumonia in an 85-year-old female patient and we discuss our diagnostic and therapeutic approach. Despite being rare and in most cases difficult to be identified, Listeria pneumonia should always be considered in immunosuppressed patients, presenting with fever and symptoms from the lower respiratory system.

  16. Inhibitory Effect of Nisin on Listeria monocytogenes Inoculated into Surimi and Minced Meat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Rezaei

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objective: Listeria monocytogenes has already established as an important food born pathogen which induce listeriosis in human. Use of bacteriocins to provide food safety has been increased dramatically. Nisin has a wide spectrum inhibitory effect than the other bacteriocins and inhibits food-borne pathogens such as L. monocytogenes and many other Gram-positive spoilage microorganisms. The purpose of this study was to investigate the inhibitory effect of Nisin on population of Listeria monocytogenes and the role of changes in food components on the antilisterial properties of Nisin. Materials & Methods: The minced meat and surimi samples were inoculated by 1×104 cfu/g of L. monocytogenes. Then samples exposed to Nisin at the levels of 500 or 1000 IU/g were prepared. All treatments after packaging in plastic bags were kept for 12 days at refrigerator temperature. Samples were cultured on CHROMagarTM Listeria every 2 days and the number of listeria monocytogenes was counted. Results: two different concentrations of Nisin (500 or 1000 IU/g was not able to inhibit L. monocytogenes below the acceptable level for raw food (100 cells per g in minced meat and surimi of silver carp. But the number of bacteria reduces more in fish surimi as compared to the mince meal. Also, antilisterial activity of Nisin was reduced during the storage period. Conclusion: Inhibitory property of Nisin against L. monocytogenes in surimi significantly was higher than the minced (P<0.05. So it is possible the antilisterial properties of Nisin will increase by elimination of some enzymes during processing.

  17. Assessment of Listeria monocytogenes virulence in the Galleria mellonella insect larvae model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakic Martinez, Mira; Wiedmann, Martin; Ferguson, Martine; Datta, Atin R

    2017-01-01

    Several animal models have been used to understand the molecular basis of the pathogenicity, infectious dose and strain to strain variation of Listeria monocytogenes. The greater wax worm Galleria mellonella, as an alternative model, provides some useful advantages not available with other models and has already been described as suitable for the virulence assessment of various pathogens including L. monocytogenes. The objectives of this study are: 1) confirming the usefulness of this model with a wide panel of Listeria spp. including non-pathogenic L. innocua, L. seeligeri, L. welshimeri and animal pathogen L. ivanovii; 2) assessment of virulence of several isogenic in-frame deletion mutants in virulence and stress related genes of L. monocytogenes and 3) virulence assessment of paired food and clinical isolates of L. monocytogenes from 14 major listeriosis outbreaks occurred worldwide between 1980 and 2015. Larvae injected with different concentrations of Listeria were incubated at 37°C and monitored over seven days for time needed to kill 50% of larvae (LT50) and to determine change of bacterial population in G. mellonella, 2 and 24 hours post-inoculation. Non-pathogenic members of Listeria and L. ivanovii showed significantly (P < 0.05) higher LT50 (lower virulence) than the wild type L. monocytogenes strains. Isogenic mutants of L. monocytogenes with the deletions in prfA, plcA, hly, actA and virR genes, also showed significantly (P < 0.05) higher LT50 than the wild type strain at the inoculum of 106CFU/larva. Food isolates had significantly (P < 0.05) lower virulence than the paired clinical isolates, at all three inoculum concentrations. L. monocytogenes strains related to non-invasive (gastroenteritis) outbreaks of listeriosis showed significantly (P < 0.05) lower virulence than isolates of the same serotype obtained from outbreaks with invasive symptoms. The difference, however, was dose and strain- dependent. No significant differences in virulence were

  18. Optical biosensors with an integrated Mach-Zehnder Interferometer for detection of Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Dibyo; Gunda, Naga Siva Kumar; Jamal, Iqbal; Mitra, Sushanta K

    2014-08-01

    In this work, we have demonstrated an efficient optical immunoassay technique for the detection of a food-borne pathogen, Listeria monocytogenes, using a Mach-Zehnder Interferometer (MZI) configuration. We have investigated ten different MZI configurations with angular and Sbend Y-junction geometries. An efficient Hydrofluoric acid (HF) based technique was used for rapid and specific binding of L. monocytogenes to the sensor arm of the MZI biosensor. The MZI biosensor was able to detect L. monocytogenes at concentrations of the order of 10(5) CFU/ml, which is lower than the infection dose for healthy human beings. SEM analysis and light intensity measurements showed the biosensor is highly selective to L. monocytogenes over other microbial species (such as Escherichia coli). Finally, a novel calibration scheme of the MZI biosensor was developed from experimental data that can be used for determining unknown concentrations of L. monocytogenes.

  19. Molecular analysis of the iap gene of Listeria monocytogenes isolated from cheeses in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil Análise molecular do gene iap de Listeria monocytogenes isoladas de queijos no Estado do Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil

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    Jozi Fagundes de Mello

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The polymorphic region sequences in the iap gene were analyzed in 25 strains of Listeria monocytogenes isolated from cheeses in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, and compared with reference strains. This investigation distinguished two clusters of L. monocytogenes: I (20 strains and II (5 strains.A seqüência da região polimórfica do gene iap foi analisada em 25 cepas de Listeria monocytogenes isoladas de queijo no Estado do Rio Grande do Sul e comparadas com cepas referências. Esta investigação distinguiu L. monocytogenes em dois grupos: I (20 cepas e II (5 cepas.

  20. Seropositivity for Listeria monocytogenes in women with spontaneous abortion: a case-control study in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamshidi, Mahin; Jahromi, Abdolreza Sotoodeh; Davoodian, Parivash; Amirian, Malihe; Zangeneh, Mehrangiz; Jadcareh, Fatemeh

    2009-03-01

    There are many studies supporting the role of certain asymptomatic infections such as Listeria monocytogenes (L. monocytogenes) in spontaneous abortion. In some cases, latent listeriosis may complicate the pregnancy, and serologic tests can, therefore, be used to detect the disease. This study was designed to assess the relationship between seropositivity for L. monocytogenes and spontaneous abortion. A total of 250 women with previous spontaneous abortion and a control group of 200 women with normal full-term deliveries entered the study as case and control groups, respectively. Demographic characteristics were recorded for each subject, and serum samples were obtained from all participants. All serum samples were examined using the indirect immunofluorescence antibody test for L. monocytogenes antibody. Data was analyzed using Chi-squared and t tests. The average age of participants was 25.6 +/- 7.6 years in cases and 25.3 +/- 6.5 years in controls. Eighty-nine (35.6%) of the cases with abortion and 35 (17.5%) of the control group were positive for L. monocytogenes antibody (p = 0.001). No relationship was observed between the number of pregnancies and infection with L. monocytogenes (p = 0.4), or between the number of previous abortions and L. monocytogenes seropositivity (p = 0.2). We suggest monitoring L. monocytogenes seroprevalence in pregnant women at high risk of threatened abortion, and further microbiological assessment of symptomatic women for detection of L. monocytogenes and insidious infection.

  1. Colonization of a newly constructed commercial chicken further processing plant with Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrang, Mark E; Meinersmann, Richard J; Frank, Joseph F; Ladely, Scott R

    2010-02-01

    This study was undertaken to determine potential sources of Listeria monocytogenes in a newly constructed chicken further processing plant and document the eventual colonization of the facility by this pathogen. To ascertain the colonization status of the plant, floor drains were sampled after a production shift and again after a cleanup shift on roughly a monthly basis for 21 months. Potential sources of L. monocytogenes to the plant included incoming raw meat, incoming fresh air, and personnel. Nearby environment and community samples were also examined. All L. monocytogenes detected were subjected to DNA sequence-based subtyping. L. monocytogenes was not detected in the plant before the commencement of processing operations. Within 4 months, several subtypes of L. monocytogenes were detected in floor drains, both before and after cleaning and sanitizing operations. No L. monocytogenes was detected on filters for incoming air, samples associated with plant employees, or a nearby discount shopping center. One subtype of L. monocytogenes was detected in a natural stream near the plant; however, this subtype was never detected inside the plant. Eight subtypes of L. monocytogenes were detected in raw meat staged for further processing; one of the raw meat subtypes was indistinguishable from a persistent drain subtype recovered after cleaning on eight occasions in four different drains. Poultry further processing plants are likely to become colonized with L. monocytogenes; raw product is an important source of the organism to the plant.

  2. Mathematical modelling of growth of Listeria  monocytogenes in raw chilled pork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, K; Wang, K; Liu, M; Liu, J; Zhu, L; Zhou, G

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the growth kinetics of Listeria monocytogenes in naturally contaminated chilled pork. A cocktail of 26 meat-borne L. monocytogenes was inoculated to raw or sterile chilled pork to observe its growth at 4, 10, 16, 22 and 28°C respectively. The growth data were fitted by the Baranyi model and Ratkowsky square-root model. Results showed that the Baranyi model and Ratkowsky square-root model could describe the growth characteristics of L. monocytogenes at different temperatures reasonably well in raw chilled pork (1·0 ≤ Bf ≤ Af ≤ 1·1). Compared with the growth of L. monocytogenes in sterile chilled pork, the background microflora had no impact on the growth parameters of L. monocytogenes, except for the lag phase at low temperature storage. The microbial predictive models developed in this study can be used to predict the growth of L. monocytogenes during natural spoilage, and construct quantitative risk assessments in chilled pork. This study simulated the actual growth of Listeria monocytogenes in chilled pork to the maximum extent, and described its growth characteristics of L. monocytogenes during natural spoilage. This study showed that the background microflora had no impact on the growth parameters of L. monocytogenes, except for the lag phase at low temperature storage. The models developed in this study can be used to predict the growth of L. monocytogenes during refrigerated storage. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  3. An insight into the isolation, enumeration, and molecular detection of Listeria monocytogenes in food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Jodi Woan-Fei; Ab Mutalib, Nurul-Syakima; Chan, Kok-Gan; Lee, Learn-Han

    2015-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes, a foodborne pathogen that can cause listeriosis through the consumption of food contaminated with this pathogen. The ability of L. monocytogenes to survive in extreme conditions and cause food contaminations have become a major concern. Hence, routine microbiological food testing is necessary to prevent food contamination and outbreaks of foodborne illness. This review provides insight into the methods for cultural detection, enumeration, and molecular identification of L. monocytogenes in various food samples. There are a number of enrichment and plating media that can be used for the isolation of L. monocytogenes from food samples. Enrichment media such as buffered Listeria enrichment broth, Fraser broth, and University of Vermont Medium (UVM) Listeria enrichment broth are recommended by regulatory agencies such as Food and Drug Administration-bacteriological and analytical method (FDA-BAM), US Department of Agriculture-Food and Safety (USDA-FSIS), and International Organization for Standardization (ISO). Many plating media are available for the isolation of L. monocytogenes, for instance, polymyxin acriflavin lithium-chloride ceftazidime aesculin mannitol, Oxford, and other chromogenic media. Besides, reference methods like FDA-BAM, ISO 11290 method, and USDA-FSIS method are usually applied for the cultural detection or enumeration of L. monocytogenes. most probable number technique is applied for the enumeration of L. monocytogenes in the case of low level contamination. Molecular methods including polymerase chain reaction, multiplex polymerase chain reaction, real-time/quantitative polymerase chain reaction, nucleic acid sequence-based amplification, loop-mediated isothermal amplification, DNA microarray, and next generation sequencing technology for the detection and identification of L. monocytogenes are discussed in this review. Overall, molecular methods are rapid, sensitive, specific, time- and labor-saving. In future, there are

  4. An insight into the isolation, enumeration, and molecular detection of Listeria monocytogenes in food

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Jodi Woan-Fei; Ab Mutalib, Nurul-Syakima; Chan, Kok-Gan; Lee, Learn-Han

    2015-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes, a foodborne pathogen that can cause listeriosis through the consumption of food contaminated with this pathogen. The ability of L. monocytogenes to survive in extreme conditions and cause food contaminations have become a major concern. Hence, routine microbiological food testing is necessary to prevent food contamination and outbreaks of foodborne illness. This review provides insight into the methods for cultural detection, enumeration, and molecular identification of L. monocytogenes in various food samples. There are a number of enrichment and plating media that can be used for the isolation of L. monocytogenes from food samples. Enrichment media such as buffered Listeria enrichment broth, Fraser broth, and University of Vermont Medium (UVM) Listeria enrichment broth are recommended by regulatory agencies such as Food and Drug Administration-bacteriological and analytical method (FDA-BAM), US Department of Agriculture-Food and Safety (USDA-FSIS), and International Organization for Standardization (ISO). Many plating media are available for the isolation of L. monocytogenes, for instance, polymyxin acriflavin lithium-chloride ceftazidime aesculin mannitol, Oxford, and other chromogenic media. Besides, reference methods like FDA-BAM, ISO 11290 method, and USDA-FSIS method are usually applied for the cultural detection or enumeration of L. monocytogenes. most probable number technique is applied for the enumeration of L. monocytogenes in the case of low level contamination. Molecular methods including polymerase chain reaction, multiplex polymerase chain reaction, real-time/quantitative polymerase chain reaction, nucleic acid sequence-based amplification, loop-mediated isothermal amplification, DNA microarray, and next generation sequencing technology for the detection and identification of L. monocytogenes are discussed in this review. Overall, molecular methods are rapid, sensitive, specific, time- and labor-saving. In future, there are

  5. An insight into the isolation, enumeration and molecular detection of Listeria monocytogenes in food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jodi Woan-Fei Law

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes, a foodborne pathogen that can cause listeriosis through the consumption of food contaminated with this pathogen. The ability of L. monocytogenes to survive in extreme conditions and cause food contaminations have become a major concern. Hence, routine microbiological food testing is necessary to prevent food contamination and outbreaks of foodborne illness. This review provides insight into the methods for cultural detection, enumeration and molecular identification of L. monocytogenes in various food samples. There are a number of enrichment and plating media that can be used for the isolation of L. monocytogenes from food samples. Enrichment media such as buffered Listeria Enrichment Broth (BLEB, Fraser broth and University of Vermont Medium (UVM Listeria enrichment broth are recommended by regulatory agencies such as FDA-BAM, USDA-FSIS and ISO. Many plating media are available for the isolation of L. monocytogenes, for instance, PALCAM, Oxford and other chromogenic media. Besides, reference methods like FDA-BAM, ISO 11290 method and USDA-FSIS method are usually applied for the cultural detection or enumeration of L. monocytogenes. MPN technique is applied for the enumeration of L. monocytogenes in the case of low level contamination. Molecular methods including polymerase chain reaction (PCR, multiplex polymerase chain reaction (mPCR, real-time/quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR, nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA, loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP, DNA microarray and Next Generation Sequencing (NGS technology for the detection and identification of L. monocytogenes are discussed in this review. Overall, molecular methods are rapid, sensitive, specific, time- and labour-saving. In future, there are chances for the development of new techniques for the detection and identification of foodborne with improved features.

  6. Two Listeria monocytogenes Pseudo-outbreaks Caused by Contaminated Laboratory Culture Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matanock, Almea; Katz, Lee S; Jackson, Kelly A; Kucerova, Zuzana; Conrad, Amanda R; Glover, William A; Nguyen, Von; Mohr, Marika C; Marsden-Haug, Nicola; Thompson, Deborah; Dunn, John R; Stroika, Steven; Melius, Beth; Tarr, Cheryl; Dietrich, Stephen E; Kao, Annie S; Kornstein, Laura; Li, Zhen; Maroufi, Azarnoush; Marder, Ellyn P; Meyer, Rebecca; Perez-Osorio, Ailyn C; Reddy, Vasudha; Reporter, Roshan; Carleton, Heather; Tweeten, Samantha; Waechter, HaeNa; Yee, Lisa M; Wise, Matthew E; Davis, Kim; Jackson, Brendan R

    2016-03-01

    Listeriosis is a serious foodborne infection that disproportionately affects elderly adults, pregnant women, newborns, and immunocompromised individuals. Diagnosis is made by culturing Listeria monocytogenes from sterile body fluids or from products of conception. This report describes the investigations of two listeriosis pseudo-outbreaks caused by contaminated laboratory media made from sheep blood. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  7. Early gene response of human brain endothelial cells to Listeria monocytogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    The gene expression of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC) to Listeria monocytogenes at 4 hour infection was analyzed. Four hours after infection, the expression of 456 genes of HBMEC had changed (p<0.05). We noted that many active genes were involved in the formyl-methionylleucylph...

  8. Enhanced biofilm formation in dual-species culture of Listeria monocytogenes and Ralstonia insidiosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the environment, many microorganisms coexist in communities as biofilms. The objective of this study was to investigate the interactions between Listeria monocytogenes and Ralstonia insidiosa in dual species biofilms. Biofilm development was measured using crystal violet in 96-well microtiter pla...

  9. Evaluation of Listeria monocytogenes survival and infectivity in non-traditional agricultural waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introduction: Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) is an enteric bacterium that can be found in environmental reservoirs. Restricted water availability for agriculture has increased interest in surface and reuse water sources which could potentially transmit Lm. Purpose: Persistence and infectivity of Lm re...

  10. The challenge of setting risk-based microbiological criteria for Listeria monocytogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Kirk; Nørrung, Birgit

    2011-01-01

    After more than 20 years of work with discussing the setting of microbiological criteria for Listeria monocytogenes in foods, Codex Alimentarius on Food Hygiene has finalised a proposal that was recently adopted by the Codex Alimentarius Commission. The effort of developing procedures for making...

  11. Draft Genome Sequences of Historical Listeria monocytogenes from Human Listeriosis, 1933

    Science.gov (United States)

    We report here the draft genome sequences of two Listeria monocytogenes strains from some of the earliest reported cases of human listeriosis in North America. The strains were isolated in 1933 from patients in Massachusetts and Connecticut, USA, and belong to the widely disseminated hypervirulent c...

  12. Triclosan-Induced Aminoglycoside-Tolerant Listeria monocytogenes Isolates Can Appear as Small-Colony Variants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastbjerg, Vicky Gaedt; Hein-Kristensen, Line; Gram, Lone

    2014-01-01

    Exposure of the human food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes to sublethal concentrations of triclosan can cause resistance to several aminoglycosides. Aminoglycoside-resistant isolates exhibit two colony morphologies: normal-size and pinpoint colonies. The purposes of the present study were...

  13. Morphological change and decreasing transfer rate of biofilm-featured Listeria monocytogenes EGDe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Listeria monocytogenes, a lethal foodborne pathogen, has the ability to resist the hostile food-processing environment and, thus, frequently contaminates ready-to-eat foods during processing. It is commonly accepted that L. monocytogenes’ tendency to generate biofilms on various surfaces enhances it...

  14. REAL-TIME PCR DETECTION OF LISTERIA MONOCYTOGENES IN FOOD SAMPLES OF ANIMAL ORIGIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslav Pochop

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to follow the contamination of food with Listeria monocytogenes by using Step One real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR. We used the PrepSEQ Rapid Spin Sample Preparation Kit for isolation of DNA and SensiFAST SYBR Hi-ROX Kit for the real-time PCR performance. In 24 samples of food of animal origin without incubation were detected strains of Listeria monocytogenes in 15 samples (swabs. Nine samples were negative. Our results indicated that the real-time PCR assay developed in this study could sensitively detect Listeria monocytogenes in food of animal origin without incubation. This could prevent infection caused by Listeria monocytogenes, and also could benefit food manufacturing companies by extending their product’s shelf-life as well as saving the cost of warehousing their food products while awaiting pathogen testing results. The rapid real-time PCR-based method performed very well compared to the conventional method. It is a fast, simple, specific and sensitive way to detect nucleic acids, which could be used in clinical diagnostic tests in the future.

  15. Survival of Listeria monocytogenes in Wilted and Additive-Treated Grass Silage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauly, TM; Tham, WA

    2003-01-01

    Grass was field-dried to 3 different dry matter (DM) levels (200, 430 and 540 g/kg) and inoculated with 106–107 cfu/g of a Listeria monocytogenes strain sharing a phagovar occasionally involved in food-borne outbreaks of listeriosis. Formic acid (3 ml/kg) or lactic acid bacteria (8·105/g) with cellulolytic enzymes were applied only to forages with low and intermediate DM levels. Forages were ensiled in laboratory silos (1700 ml) and were stored at 25°C for 30 or 90 days. After 90 days of storage, L. monocytogenes could not be detected in any silo, except one with the high dry matter grass without additive. After 30 days of storage, between 102 and 106 cfu L. monocytogenes/g silage were isolated from the untreated silages. Increasing the DM content from 200 to 540 g/kg did not reduce listeria counts possibly because of the lower production of fermentation acids (higher pH). In silages treated with additives, counts of L. monocytogenes were always lower than in silages without additive. In wet silages (DM 200 g/kg) both additives were effective, but in the wilted silages (DM 430 g/kg) only the bacterial additive reduced listeria counts below detection level. Listeria counts were highly correlated to silage pH (r = 0.92), the concentration of lactic acid (r = -0.80) and the pooled amount of undissociated acids (r = -0.83). PMID:14650546

  16. Evaluation of TA10 Broth for Recovery of Listeria monocytogenes from Ground Beef.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamisaki-Horikoshi, Naoko; Okada, Yukio; Takeshita, Kazuko; Takada, Makoto; Kawamoto, Shinichi; Kawasaki, Susumu

    2017-03-01

    In 2009, the enrichment broth TA10 was released for simultaneous recovery of Salmonella spp., Listeria monocytogenes, and Escherichia coli O157:H7. This medium was compared with other Salmonella enrichment broths [lactose (LAC) broth, buffered peptone water (BPW), and universal pre-enrichment (UP) broth] for the recovery of heat- and freeze-injured Salmonella spp. in beef by the conventional culture method. There was a significant difference between TA10 and LAC enrichment broths for detecting injured Salmonella spp. In this study, the International Organization for Standardization Listeria pre-enrichment broth (Half-Fraser/Fraser) was compared with TA10 broth for the recovery of L. monocytogenes from ground beef. Ground beef samples were contaminated with single Listeria serovars at levels of 0.096 to 0.001 most probable number/g. Twenty 25 g test portions of the contaminated ground beef were pre-enriched in each broth, and the ISO-11290-1 Listeria official isolation protocol was used thereafter. There was a significant difference between TA10 broth (48 h) and Half-Fraser/Fraser broth (72 h) in the recovery of L. monocytogenes. In addition, the incubation time for TA10 broth was shorter than for Half-Fraser/Fraser broth. The results indicate that TA10 broth should be used instead of Half-Fraser/Fraser broth for analysis of beef that may be contaminated with very low levels of L. monocytogenes.

  17. Identification of a sigma B-dependent small noncoding RNA in Listeria monocytogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jesper Sejrup; Olsen, Anders Steno; Bonde, Mette

    2008-01-01

    In Listeria monocytogenes, the alternative sigma factor sigma(B) plays important roles in stress tolerance and virulence. Here, we present the identification of SbrA, a novel small noncoding RNA that is produced in a sigma(B)-dependent manner. This finding adds the sigma(B) regulon to the growing...

  18. Chitinase Expression in Listeria monocytogenes Is Positively Regulated by the Agr System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paspaliari, Dafni Katerina; Mollerup, Maria Storm; Kallipolitis, Birgitte H.

    2014-01-01

    The food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes encodes two chitinases, ChiA and ChiB, which allow the bacterium to hydrolyze chitin, the second most abundant polysaccharide in nature. Intriguingly, despite the absence of chitin in human and mammalian hosts, both of the chitinases have been deemed...

  19. Survival of Listeria monocytogenes on a conveyor belt material with or without antimicrobial additives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chaitiemwong, N.; Hazeleger, W.C.; Beumer, R.R.

    2010-01-01

    Survival of Listeria monocytogenes on a conveyor belt material with or without antimicrobial additives, in the absence or presence of food debris from meat, fish and vegetables and at temperatures of 10, 25 and 37 °C was investigated. The pathogen survived best at 10 °C, and better at 25 °C than at

  20. Sublethal Triclosan Exposure Decreases Susceptibility to Gentamicin and Other Aminoglycosides in Listeria monocytogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Ellen Gerd; Gram, Lone; Kastbjerg, Vicky Gaedt

    2011-01-01

    The human food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes is capable of persisting in food processing plants despite cleaning and sanitation and is likely exposed to sublethal biocide concentrations. This could potentially affect susceptibility of the bacterium to biocides and other antimicrobial agents...

  1. Industrial disinfectants do not select for resistance in Listeria monocytogenes following long term exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastbjerg, Vicky Gaedt; Gram, Lone

    2012-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a food-borne pathogen that can persist for years in food processing plants. It has been hypothesized that this could be due to the development of tolerance or resistance to the disinfectants used. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether biocide resistance...

  2. Performance of the municipal wastewater treatment plant for removal of Listeria monocytogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahid Navidjouy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The aim of present study was determination of occurrence of Listeria Listeria spp. in various point of a municipal wastewater treatment plant. Materials and Methods: The samples were collected of influent, effluent, raw sludge, stabilized sludge and dried sludge from north wastewater treatment plant Isfahan, Iran. The presence of Listeria spp. was determined using USDA procedure and enumerated by a three-tube most probable number assay using Fraser enrichment broth. Then, biochemically identified Listeria monocytogenes was further confirmed by PCR amplification. Results: L. monocytogenes, L. innocua and L. seeligeri were isolated from 76.9%, 23.1% and 23.1% of influent, 38.5%, 46.2% and 7.7% of effluent, 84.6%, 69.2% and 46.2% of raw sludge, 69.2%, 76.9% and 0% of stabilized sludge and 46.2%, 7.7% and 0% of dried sludge samples, respectively. The efficiency of wastewater treatment processes, digester tank and drying bed in removal of L. monocytogenes were 69.6%, 64.7% and 73.4%, respectively. All phenotypically identified L. monocytogenes were further confirmed by PCR method. Conclusion: Application of sewage sludge in agricultural farms as fertilizer may result in bacteria spreading in agriculture fields and contaminated foods with plant origin. This may cause a risk of spreading disease to human and animals. Using parameters such as BOD 5 is not sufficient standard for the elimination of pathogenic microorganisms.

  3. Combined action of S-carvone and mild heat treatment on Listeria monocytogenes Scott A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karatzas, A.K.; Bennik, M.H.J.; Smid, E.J.; Kets, E.P.W.

    2000-01-01

    The combined action of the plant-derived volatile, S-carvone, and mild heat treatment on the food-borne pathogen, Listeria monocytogenes, was evaluated. The viability of exponential phase cultures grown at 8 °C could be reduced by 1.3 log units after exposure to S-carvone (5 mmol 1-1) for 30 min at

  4. Multiparameter viability assay for stress profiling applied to the food pathogen Listeria monocytogenes F2365

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nocker, A.; Caspers, M.; Esveld-Amanatidou, A.; Vossen, J. van der; Schuren, F.; Montijn, R.; Kort, R.

    2011-01-01

    A novel generic approach for stress profiling was applied to Listeria monocytogenes strain F2365. This food-borne pathogen was exposed to gradients of five different stresses of increasing intensity, typically ranging from moderate to lethal conditions. The stress factors included heat, acidic pH, a

  5. Genome comparison of Listeria monocytogenes serotype 4a strain HCC23 with selected lineage I and lineage II L. monocytogenes strains and other Listeria strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Debarati; Steele, Chelsea; Donaldson, Janet R; Banes, Michelle M; Kumar, Ranjit; Bridges, Susan M; Arick, Mark; Lawrence, Mark L

    2014-12-01

    More than 98% of reported human listeriosis cases are caused by specific serotypes within genetic lineages I and II. The genome sequence of Listeria monocytogenes lineage III strain HCC23 (serotype 4a) enables whole genomic comparisons across all three L. monocytogenes lineages. Protein cluster analysis indicated that strain HCC23 has the most unique protein pairs with nonpathogenic species Listeria innocua. Orthology analysis of the genome sequences of representative strains from the three L. monocytogenes genetic lineages and L. innocua (CLIP11262) identified 319 proteins unique to nonpathogenic strains HCC23 and CLIP11262 and 58 proteins unique to pathogenic strains F2365 and EGD-e. BLAST comparison of these proteins with all the sequenced L. monocytogenes and L. innocua revealed 126 proteins unique to serotype 4a and/or L. innocua; 14 proteins were only found in pathogenic serotypes. Some of the 58 proteins unique to pathogenic strains F2365 and EGD-e were previously published and are already known to contribute to listerial virulence.

  6. Listeria monocytogenes in spontaneous abortions in humans and its detection by multiplex PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, S; Malik, S V S; Vaidya, V M; Barbuddhe, S B

    2007-11-01

    To assess the extent of Listeria monocytogenes in causation of human spontaneous abortions by isolation methods and PCR analysis for the presence of virulence-associated genes. A total of 305 samples comprising blood, urine, placental bits, faecal and vaginal swabs were collected from 61 patients with spontaneous abortions. Listeria spp. were isolated from 10 samples collected from nine (14.8%) patients. Confirmation of these isolates was based on biochemical tests, haemolysis on blood agar, CAMP test, phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) assay followed by in vivo pathogenicity tests and multiplex PCR to detect virulence-associated genes (prfA, plcA, hlyA, actA and iap). Three isolates were confirmed as L. monocytogenes. Of these, two isolates turned out to be pathogenic and found to posses all five genes. However, the remaining two haemolytic L. monocytogenes isolates lacking the plcA gene and activity in the PI-PLC assay were found to be nonpathogenic by in vivo tests. The occurrence of pathogenic L. monocytogenes in cases of spontaneous abortions was 3.3%. It seems that the plcA gene and its expression have an important role as essential virulence determinants in pathogenic Listeria spp. The recovery of pathogenic L. monocytogenes isolates from cases of spontaneous abortion indicates the significance of listeric infection in pregnant women.

  7. An outbreak of an unusual strain of Listeria monocytogenes infection in North-East Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okpo, Emmanuel; Leith, Jayne; Smith-Palmer, Alison; Bell, John; Parks, Duncan; Browning, Fiona; Byers, Lynn; Corrigan, Helen; Webster, Diana; Karcher, Anne M; Murray, Andrew; Storey, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes infection is an important cause of illness and hospitalization in vulnerable individuals. In the present study, we describe a community outbreak of Listeria monocytogenes in the North-East region of Scotland, which was epidemiologically, environmentally and microbiologically linked to a local meat product and ready-to-eat product manufacturer. Infected individuals were interviewed, and an environmental investigation was conducted. Clinical and environmental samples were tested by culture, and isolates were typed by fluorescent amplified fragment length polymorphism (fAFLP). Three cases of Listeria monocytogenes were linked geographically, had the same serotype (1/2a) and were indistinguishable by fAFLP type XII.6. The human, food and environmental isolates were of the same serotype and were indistinguishable by molecular typing. This is the first community outbreak of L. monocytogenes reported in Scotland since the current outbreak surveillance was established in 1996. Epidemiological and laboratory evidence indicated poor hand hygiene, unhygienic practices and cross-contamination throughout the manufacturing process of ready-to-eat foods as a possible cause of the outbreak. More stringent control of commercial food establishments that provide ready-to-eat food and the need to advise specifically vulnerable groups, e.g., pregnant women, of the risk of L. monocytogenes in ready-to-eat food is urgently needed. Copyright © 2015 King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Antimicrobial Resistance Profiles of Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria innocua Isolated from Ready-to-Eat Products of Animal Origin in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escolar, Cristina; Gómez, Diego; Del Carmen Rota García, María; Conchello, Pilar; Herrera, Antonio

    2017-06-01

    The objective of this work was to investigate the antimicrobial resistance in Listeria spp. isolated from food of animal origin. A total of 50 Listeria strains isolated from meat and dairy products, consisting of 7 Listeria monocytogenes and 43 Listeria innocua strains, were characterized for antimicrobial susceptibility against nine antimicrobials. The strains were screened by real-time PCR for the presence of antimicrobial resistance genes: tet M, tet L, mef A, msr A, erm A, erm B, lnu A, and lnu B. Multidrug resistance was identified in 27 Listeria strains, 4 belonging to L. monocytogenes. Resistance to clindamycin was the most common resistance phenotype and was identified in 45 Listeria strains; the mechanisms of resistance are still unknown. A medium prevalence of resistance to tetracycline (15 and 9 resistant and intermediate strains) and ciprofloxacin (13 resistant strains) was also found. Tet M was detected in Listeria strains with reduced susceptibility to tetracycline, providing evidence that both L. innocua and L. monocytogenes displayed acquired resistance. The presence of antimicrobial resistance genes in L. innocua and L. monocytogenes indicates that these genes may be transferred to commensal and pathogenic bacteria via the food chain; besides this, antibiotic resistance in L. monocytogenes could compromise the effective treatment of listeriosis in humans.

  9. Antimicrobial susceptibility and antibiotic resistance gene transfer analysis of foodborne, clinical, and environmental Listeria spp. isolates including Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertsch, David; Muelli, Mirjam; Weller, Monika; Uruty, Anaïs; Lacroix, Christophe; Meile, Leo

    2014-02-01

    The aims of this study were to assess antibiotic resistance pheno- and genotypes in foodborne, clinical, and environmental Listeria isolates, as well as to elucidate the horizontal gene transfer potential of detected resistance genes. A small fraction of in total 524 Listeria spp. isolates (3.1%) displayed acquired antibiotic resistance mainly to tetracycline (n = 11), but also to clindamycin (n = 4) and trimethoprim (n = 3), which was genotypically confirmed. In two cases, a tetracycline resistance phenotype was observed together with a trimethoprim resistance phenotype, namely in a clinical L. monocytogenes strain and in a foodborne L. innocua isolate. Depending on the applied guidelines, a differing number of isolates (n = 2 or n = 20) showed values for ampicillin that are on the edge between intermediate susceptibility and resistance. Transferability of the antibiotic resistance genes from the Listeria donors, elucidated in vitro by filter matings, was demonstrated for genes located on transposons of the Tn916 family and for an unknown clindamycin resistance determinant. Transfer rates of up to 10(-5) transconjugants per donor were obtained with a L. monocytogenes recipient and up to 10(-7) with an Enterococcus faecalis recipient, respectively. Although the prevalence of acquired antibiotic resistance in Listeria isolates from this study was rather low, the transferability of these resistances enables further spread in the future. This endorses the importance of surveillance of L. monocytogenes and other Listeria spp. in terms of antibiotic susceptibility. © 2014 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Applicability of the EN ISO 11290-1 standard method for Listeria monocytogenes detection in presence of new Listeria species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barre, Léna; Angelidis, Apostolos S; Boussaid, Djouher; Brasseur, Emilie Decourseulles; Manso, Eléonore; Gnanou Besse, Nathalie

    2016-12-05

    During the past six years, new species of the genus Listeria have been isolated from foods and other environmental niches worldwide. The Standard method EN ISO 11290-1 that is currently under revision will include in its scope all Listeria species in addition to L. monocytogenes. The objective of this project was to evaluate the ability of the Standard EN ISO 11290-1 method to detect and identify the newly discovered Listeria spp., and to assess potential over-growth effects of the new species in mixed cultures with L. monocytogenes during each step of the enrichment process. This objective was addressed by the generation of necessary data on the behavior of the new species during the pre-enrichment and the enrichment steps of the reference method as well as data on their phenotypic characteristics on rich and selective media used for isolation and identification. Most of the new Listeria species developed well on selective agar media for Listeria, however the recovery of some species was difficult due to poor growth in Half Fraser and Fraser broth. Good results (consistently positive) were obtained for confirmation at the genus level via the catalase test, the Gram test and the blueish appearance test on non-selective medium, but not with the VP test, as most of the new species yielded a negative result. In the light of results obtained in co-culture experiments and inhibition tests, and considering the growth rates in Half Fraser and Fraser broths, the new species do not seem to interfere with the detection of L. monocytogenes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. [Listeria monocytogenes prosthetic joint infection: Case report and review of the literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morchón, David; Tejedor, Marta; Quereda, Carmen; Navas, Enrique; Meseguer, María

    2009-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is an unusual pathogenic agent in the general population, but is an important cause of bacteriemia and meningoencephalitis among newborns, pregnant women, the elderly population, and immunosuppressed patients. In rare cases, it has been described in joint prosthesis infections. A case description of prosthetic joint infection caused by Listeria in a 74-year-old man is presented. A systematic review of the literature (MEDLINE up to November 2007) was performed, and the reported cases are summarized. Sixteen cases of prosthetic joint infection by L. monocytogenes have been reported, mainly in patients of advanced age (mean, 67.4 years; mode, 70 years) and immunosuppressed patients. Most cases were late infections. L. monocytogenes should be kept in mind as a pathogen involved in joint prosthesis infection, particularly among the elderly and immunosuppressed populations. Based on the literature review, parenteral ampicillin for at least 6 weeks is the treatment of choice. If possible, prosthesis removal should also be performed.

  12. Teichoic acid is the major polysaccharide present in the Listeria monocytogenes biofilm matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauge, Thomas; Sadovskaya, Irina; Faille, Christine; Benezech, Thierry; Maes, Emmanuel; Guerardel, Yann; Midelet-Bourdin, Graziella

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the Listeria monocytogenes biofilm and particularly the nature of the carbohydrates in the biofilm extracellular matrix and culture supernatant versus to cell wall carbohydrates. Listeria monocytogenes serotype 1/2a and 4b strains were able to form complex biofilms embedded in an extracellular matrix. The soluble carbohydrates from biofilm extracellular matrix and culture supernatant were identified as teichoic acids, structurally identical to cell wall teichoic acids. In addition, the DSS 1130 BFA2 strain had a serotype 1/2a teichoic acid lacking N-acetyl glucosamine glycosylation due to a mutation in the lmo2550 gene. Consequently, we hypothesized that the extracellular teichoic acids in L. monocytogenes biofilms have the same origin as cell wall teichoic acid. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Internalization of Listeria monocytogenes in cantaloupes during dump tank washing and hydrocooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macarisin, Dumitru; Wooten, Anna; De Jesus, Antonio; Hur, Minji; Bae, Seonjae; Patel, Jitendra; Evans, Peter; Brown, Eric; Hammack, Thomas; Chen, Yi

    2017-09-18

    Recent listeriosis outbreaks and recalls associated with cantaloupes urge for studies to understand the mechanisms of cantaloupe contamination by Listeria monocytogenes. Postharvest practices such as washing and hydrocooling were suggested to facilitate the contamination of fresh fruits by human pathogens. This study assessed the potential of L. monocytogenes internalization into cantaloupes during dump tank washing and immersion-type hydrocooling in water contaminated with L. monocytogenes. The effect of cantaloupe cultivar, water temperature, and harvesting technique on L. monocytogenes internalization was also evaluated. Full slip (cantaloupe without any residual stem) Western and Eastern cultivar cantaloupes were pre-warmed to 42°C (to imitate peak-high field temperatures of freshly harvested cantaloupes) and then immersed in water at 6°C and 18°C containing 4 and 6logCFU/ml of L. monocytogenes. Clipped (cantaloupe with short stem residues obtained by clipping the stem at harvest) Western and Eastern cantaloupes were pre-warmed to 42°C and then immersed in water at 6°C containing 6logCFU/ml of L. monocytogenes. Additionally, full slip and clipped Western cantaloupes were equilibrated to 18°C and then immersed in water at 18°C containing 6logCFU/ml of L. monocytogenes (isothermal immersion without temperature differential). Water containing L. monocytogenes infiltrated both full slip and clipped cantaloupes through the stems/stem scars and was then distributed along the vascular system in hypodermal mesocarp reaching the calyx area of the fruit. The current study demonstrated that, under experimental conditions, L. monocytogenes can internalize into cantaloupes during immersion in water contaminated by L. monocytogenes, both in the presence and absence of temperature differential, and that temperature differential moderately enhanced the internalization of L. monocytogenes. The incidence and levels of L. monocytogenes internalized in the middle

  14. Discrimination of intact and injured Listeria monocytogenes by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and principal component analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Mengshi; Al-Holy, Murad; Al-Qadiri, Hamzah; Kang, Dong-Hyun; Cavinato, Anna G; Huang, Yiqun; Rasco, Barbara A

    2004-09-22

    Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR, 4000-600 cm(-)(1)) was used to discriminate between intact and sonication-injured Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 19114 and to distinguish this strain from other selected Listeria strains (L. innocua ATCC 51742, L. innocua ATCC 33090, and L. monocytogenes ATCC 7644). FT-IR vibrational overtone and combination bands from mid-IR active components of intact and injured bacterial cells produced distinctive "fingerprints" at wavenumbers between 1500 and 800 cm(-)(1). Spectral data were analyzed by principal component analysis. Clear segregations of different intact and injured strains of Listeria were observed, suggesting that FT-IR can detect biochemical differences between intact and injured bacterial cells. This technique may provide a tool for the rapid assessment of cell viability and thereby the control of foodborne pathogens.

  15. Listeria monocytogenes endophthalmitis - case report and review of risk factors and treatment outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajor, Anna; Luhr, Anke; Brockmann, Dorothee; Suerbaum, Sebastian; Framme, Carsten; Sedlacek, Ludwig

    2016-07-16

    The majority of cases of endophthalmitis are caused by exogenous pathogens; only 5-10 % are of endogenous origin. One cause of these rare cases of endogenous endophthalmitis is Listeria monocytogenes. Twenty-six cases of endophthalmitis due to this pathogen have been published over the last twenty years. The aim of this review is to summarize the main risk factors and common clinical findings of endogenous endophthalmitis due to Listeria monocytogenes. We report on a 62-year-old female presenting with a sterile hypopyon iritis with secondary glaucoma and an underlying rheumatoid disease. In microbiological analysis we identified Listeria monocytogenes. Further we searched through all published cases for typical signs, risk factors, details of medical and surgical treatment and outcome of endogenous endophthalmitis due to this rare pathogen. Ocular symptoms in almost all of these published cases included pain, redness of the eye, and decreased vision. Main clinical features included elevated intraocular pressure and fibrinous anterior chamber reaction, as well as a dark hypopyon. While the infection is typically spread endogenously, neither an exogenous nor endogenous source of infection could be identified in most cases. Immunocompromised patients are at higher risk of being infected than immunocompetent patients. The clinical course of endophthalmitis caused by Listeria monocytogenes had different visual outcomes. In some cases, the infection led to enucleation, blindness, or strong visual loss, whereas most patients showed a tendency of visual improvement during therapy. Early diagnosis and treatment initiation are crucial factors in the outcome of endogenous endophthalmitis caused by Listeria monocytogenes. This possible differential diagnosis should be kept in mind while treating patients with presumable sterile hypopyon and anterior uveitis having a high intraocular pressure. A bacterial source should be considered with a prompt initiation of systemic

  16. Rapid identification and classification of Listeria spp. and serotype assignment of Listeria monocytogenes using fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy and artificial neural network analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    The use of Fourier Transform-Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) in conjunction with Artificial Neural Network software, NeuroDeveloper™ was examined for the rapid identification and classification of Listeria species and serotyping of Listeria monocytogenes. A spectral library was created for 245 strains...

  17. Morphological Change and Decreasing Transfer Rate of Biofilm-Featured Listeria monocytogenes EGDe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yuejia; Wang, Chinling

    2017-03-01

    Listeria monocytogenes , a lethal foodborne pathogen, has the ability to resist the hostile food processing environment and thus frequently contaminates ready-to-eat foods during processing. It is commonly accepted that the tendency of L. monocytogenes ' to generate biofilms on various surfaces enhances its resistance to the harshness of the food processing environment. However, the role of biofilm formation in the transferability of L. monocytogenes EGDe remains controversial. We examined the growth of Listeria biofilms on stainless steel surfaces and their effect on the transferability of L. monocytogenes EGDe. The experiments were a factorial 2 × 2 design with at least three biological replicates. Through scanning electron microscopy, a mature biofilm with intensive aggregates of cells was observed on the surface of stainless steel after 3 or 5 days of incubation, depending on the initial level of inoculation. During biofilm development, L. monocytogenes EGDe carried out binary fission vigorously before a mature biofilm was formed and subsequently changed its cellular morphology from rod shaped to sphere shaped. Furthermore, static biofilm, which was formed after 3 days of incubation at 25°C, significantly inhibited the transfer rate of L. monocytogenes EGDe from stainless steel blades to 15 bologna slices. During 7 days of storage at 4°C, however, bacterial growth rate was not significantly impacted by whether bacteria were transferred from biofilm and the initial concentrations of transferred bacteria on the slice. In conclusion, this study is the first to report a distinct change in morphology of L. monocytogenes EGDe at the late stage of biofilm formation. More importantly, once food is contaminated by L. monocytogenes EGDe, contamination proceeds independently of biofilm development and the initial level of contamination when food is stored at 4°C, even if contamination with L. monocytogenes EGDe was initially undetectable before storage.

  18. Effect of honokiol on exotoxin proteins listeriolysin O and p60 secreted by Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Rizeng; Zhao, Ziwen; Guo, Na; Liu, Zonghui; Zhao, Xingchen; Li, Wenli; Li, Xiaoxu; Shi, Ce; Nie, Dandan; Wang, Weilin; Liu, Tao; Ma, Wenchen; Yu, Lu; Li, Juan

    2015-12-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is considered one of the most important foodborne pathogens. The virulence-related proteins listeriolysin O (LLO) and p60 are critical factors involved in Listeria pathogenesis. In the present study, we investigated the effect of honokiol on LLO and p60 secreted from L. monocytogenes. A listeriolysin assay was used to investigate the haemolytic activities of L. monocytogenes exposed to honokiol, and the secretion of LLO and p60 was detected by immunoblot analysis. Additionally, the influence of honokiol on the transcription of LLO and p60 genes (hly and iap, respectively) was analysed by real-time reverse transcription PCR. TNF-α release assays were performed to elucidate the biological relevance of changes in LLO and p60 secretion induced by honokiol. According to the data, honokiol showed good anti-L. monocytogenes activity, with MICs of 8-16 μg ml(-1), and the secretion of LLO and p60 was decreased by honokiol. In addition, the transcription of hly and iap was inhibited by honokiol. Our results indicate that TNF-α production by RAW264.7 cells stimulated with L. monocytogenes supernatants was inhibited by honokiol. Based on these data, we propose that honokiol could be used as a promising natural compound against L. monocytogenes and its virulence factors.

  19. Carbon Dioxide and Nisin Act Synergistically on Listeria monocytogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Lilian; Chen, Yuhuan; Chikindas, Michael L.; Huss, Hans Henrik; Gram, Lone; Montville, Thomas J.

    2000-01-01

    This paper examines the synergistic action of carbon dioxide and nisin on Listeria monocytogenes Scott A wild-type and nisin-resistant (Nisr) cells grown in broth at 4°C. Carbon dioxide extended the lag phase and decreased the specific growth rate of both strains, but to a greater degree in the Nisr cells. Wild-type cells grown in 100% CO2 were two to five times longer than cells grown in air. Nisin (2.5 μg/ml) did not decrease the viability of Nisr cells but for wild-type cells caused an immediate 2-log reduction of viability when they were grown in air and a 4-log reduction when they were grown in 100% CO2. There was a quantifiable synergistic action between nisin and CO2 in the wild-type strain. The MIC of nisin for the wild-type strain grown in the presence of 2.5 μg of nisin per ml increased from 3.1 to 12.5 μg/ml over 35 days, but this increase was markedly delayed for cultures in CO2. This synergism between nisin and CO2 was examined mechanistically by following the leakage of carboxyfluorescein (CF) from listerial liposomes. Carbon dioxide enhanced nisin-induced CF leakage, indicating that the synergistic action of CO2 and nisin occurs at the cytoplasmic membrane. Liposomes made from cells grown in a CO2 atmosphere were even more sensitive to nisin action. Liposomes made from cells grown at 4°C were dramatically more nisin sensitive than were liposomes derived from cells grown at 30°C. Cells grown in the presence of 100% CO2 and those grown at 4°C had a greater proportion of short-chain fatty acids. The synergistic action of nisin and CO2 is consistent with a model where membrane fluidity plays a role in the efficiency of nisin action. PMID:10653749

  20. Short-Term Bactericidal Efficacy of Lauric Arginate against Listeria monocytogenes Present on the Surface of Frankfurters

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Taormina, P.J; Dorsa, W.J

    2009-01-01

    The antimicrobial lauric arginate (LAE) alone or in combination with an antimicrobial liquid smoke extract was studied as a postlethality treatment against Listeria monocytogenes on vacuum-packaged frankfurters...

  1. Detection of Listeria monocytogenes in ready-to-eat food by Step One real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pochop, Jaroslav; Kačániová, Miroslava; Hleba, Lukáš; Lopasovský, L'ubomír; Bobková, Alica; Zeleňáková, Lucia; Stričík, Michal

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to follow contamination of ready-to-eat food with Listeria monocytogenes by using the Step One real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). We used the PrepSEQ Rapid Spin Sample Preparation Kit for isolation of DNA and MicroSEQ® Listeria monocytogenes Detection Kit for the real-time PCR performance. In 30 samples of ready-to-eat milk and meat products without incubation we detected strains of Listeria monocytogenes in five samples (swabs). Internal positive control (IPC) was positive in all samples. Our results indicated that the real-time PCR assay developed in this study could sensitively detect Listeria monocytogenes in ready-to-eat food without incubation.

  2. Evaluation of Listeria Monocytogenes Based Vaccines for HER-2/neu in Mouse Transgenic Models of Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Singh, Reshma

    2006-01-01

    ...% of all breast cancers. Five Listeria monocytogenes vaccines have been made consisting of fragments of HER-2/neu that are capable of stopping the growth of transplantable tumors in wild type FVB/N mice and can cause...

  3. Listeria monocytogenes Meningitis in an Immunosuppressed Patient with Autoimmune Hepatitis and IgG4 Subclass Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahin Gaini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 51-year-old Caucasian woman with Listeria monocytogenes meningitis was treated and discharged after an uncomplicated course. Her medical history included immunosuppressive treatment with prednisolone and azathioprine for autoimmune hepatitis. A diagnostic work-up after the meningitis episode revealed that she had low levels of the IgG4 subclass. To our knowledge, this is the first case report describing a possible association between autoimmune hepatitis and the occurrence of Listeria monocytogenes meningitis, describing a possible association between Listeria monocytogenes meningitis and deficiency of the IgG4 subclass and finally describing a possible association between Listeria monocytogenes meningitis and immunosuppressive therapy with prednisolone and azathioprine.

  4. Draft genome sequences of six listeria monocytogenes strains isolated from dairy products from a processing plant in Southern Italy

    OpenAIRE

    Chiara, M.; D'Erchia, A.M.; Manzari, C.; Minotto, A.; Montagna, C.; Addante, N.; Santagada, G.; Latorre, L.; Pesole, G.; Horner, D.S.; Parisi, A.

    2014-01-01

    Here we announce the draft genome sequences of 6 Listeria monocytogenes strains from ricotta cheese produced in a dairy processing plant located in southern Italy and potentially involved in a multistate outbreak of listeriosis in the United States.

  5. The species-specific mode of action of the antimicrobial peptide subtilosin against Listeria monocytogenes Scott A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijk, van S.J.A.; Noll, K.S.; Chikindas, M.L.

    2012-01-01

    Aims: To elucidate the molecular mechanism of action of the antimicrobial peptide subtilosin against the foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes Scott A. Methods and Results: Subtilosin was purified from a culture of Bacillus amylliquefaciens. The minimal inhibitory concentration of subtilosin

  6. Inactivation of Salmonella enterica and Listeria monocytogenes in cantaloupe puree by high hydrostatic pressure with/without added ascorbic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sudarsan; Sokorai, Kimberly; Ukuku, Dike; Fan, Xuetong; Juneja, Vijay; Sites, Joseph; Cassidy, Jennifer

    2016-10-17

    The objective of this research was to evaluate and develop a method for inactivation of Salmonella enterica and Listeria monocytogenes in cantaloupe puree (CP) by high hydrostatic pressure (HHP). Cantaloupe being the most netted varieties of melons presents a greater risk of pathogen transmission. Freshly prepared CP with or without 0.1% ascorbic acid (AA) was inoculated with a bacterial cocktail composed of a three serotype mixture of S. enterica (S. Poona, S. Newport H1275 and S. Stanley H0558) and a mixture of three strains of L. monocytogenes (Scott A, 43256 and 51742) to a population of ca. 10(8)CFU/g. Double sealed and double bagged inoculated CP (ca. 5g) were pressure treated at 300, 400 and 500MPa at 8°C and 15°C for 5min. Data indicated increased inactivation of both Salmonella and Listeria spp. with higher pressure. Log reduction for CP at 300MPa, 8°C for 5min was 2.4±0.2 and 1.6±0.5logCFU/g for Salmonella and Listeria, respectively. Survivability of the pathogens was significantly compromised at 400MPa and 8°C, inactivating 4.5±0.3logCFU/g of Salmonella and 3.0±0.4logCFU/g of Listeria spp. Complete inactivation of the pathogens in the puree (log reduction >6.7logCFU/g), with or without AA, was achieved when the pressure was further increased to 500MPa, except that for Listeria containing no AA at 8°C. Listeria presented higher resistance to pressure treatment compared to Salmonella spp. Initial temperatures (8 and 15°C) had no significant influence on Salmonella log reductions. Log reduction of pathogens increased but not significantly with increase of temperature. AA did not show any significant antimicrobial activity. Viable counts were about 0.2-0.4logCFU/g less in presence of 0.1% AA. These data validate that HHP can be used as an effective method for decontamination of cantaloupe puree. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Listeria monocytogenes contamination in dairy plants: evaluation of Listeria monocytogenes environmental contamination in two cheese-making plants using sheeps milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michela Ibba

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes harbouring niches established in the processing plant support post-process contamination of dairy products made from pasteurised or thermised milk. The present study investigated L. monocytogenes environmental contamination in two sheep’s milk cheese-making plants. Persistence of contamination in the area at higher risk was also investigated. During a one-year survey 7 samplings were carried out in each dairy plant, along the production lines of Pecorino Romano and ricotta salata cheese. A total of 613 environmental samples collected from food contact and non-food contact surfaces were analysed according to ISO 11290-1:2005 standard method. Identification of the isolated strains was carried out by polymerase chain reaction. L. monocytogenes prevalence was 23.2% in dairy A and 13.1% in dairy B, respectively. The higher prevalence rate was found in the following areas: salting, products washing, packaging, ricotta salata storage and Pecorino Romano ripening rooms. L. monocytogenes was never found in the cheese-making area. The probability of observing samples positive for the presence of L. monocytogenes was asso- ciated with dairy plant, sampling area and the period of cheese-making (P<0.001. The greater persistence of contamination over time was observed in the washing, salting, and Pecorino Romano ripening areas. The control of persistent environmental contamination relies on the identification of L. monocytogenes niches within the processing environment and the prevention of harborage sites formation. The importance of strict cleaning and sanitising procedure in controlling L. monocytogenes environmental contamination is confirmed by the lower level of contamination observed after these procedures were correctly implemented.

  8. Inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes and Yersinia enterocolitica in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The inhibitory effects of some plant extracts such as rosemary, thyme and garlic applied to minced beef were determined on L. monocytogenes and Y. enterocolitica at concentrations 105 cfu/g and 6×105 cfu/g, respectively and stored at 5oC for 16 days. The results showed that L. monocytogenes was more sensitive to ...

  9. International Life Sciences Institute North America Listeria monocytogenes strain collection: development of standard Listeria monocytogenes strain sets for research and validation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fugett, Eric; Fortes, Esther; Nnoka, Catherine; Wiedmann, Martin

    2006-12-01

    Research and development efforts on bacterial foodborne pathogens, including the development of novel detection and subtyping methods, as well as validation studies for intervention strategies can greatly be enhanced through the availability and use of standardized strain collections. These types of strain collections are available for some foodborne pathogens, such as Salmonella and Escherichia coli. We have developed a standard Listeria monocytogenes strain collection that has not been previously available. The strain collection includes (i) a diversity set of 25 isolates chosen to represent a genetically diverse set of L. monocytogenes isolates as well as a single hemolytic Listeria innocua strain and (ii) an outbreak set, which includes 21 human and food isolates from nine major human listeriosis outbreaks that occurred between 1981 and 2002. The diversity set represents all three genetic L. monocytogenes lineages (I, n = 9; II, n = 9; and III, n = 6) as well as nine different serotypes. Molecular subtyping by EcoRI automated ribotyping and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) with AscI and ApaI separated the 25 isolates in the diversity set into 23 ribotypes and 25 PFGE types, confirming that this isolate set represents considerable genetic diversity. Molecular subtyping of isolates in the outbreak set confirmed that human and food isolates were identical by ribotype and PFGE, except for human and food isolates for two outbreaks, which displayed related but distinct PFGE patterns. Subtype and source data for all isolates in this strain collection are available on the Internet and are linked to the PathogenTracker database (www.pathogentracker.com), which allows the addition of new, relevant information on these isolates, including links to publications that have used isolates from this collection. We have thus developed a core L. monocytogenes strain collection, which will provide a resource for L. monocytogenes research and development efforts with

  10. Expression of virulence genes by Listeria monocytogenes J0161 in natural environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prem Saran Tirumalai

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Majority of studies concerning the gene expression of Listeria monocytogenes have been done on pure culture states. Our objective was to study L.monocytogenes in a co-cultured state and to understand if microbes in their natural state of existence are different in their expression than that of the purely cultured lab grown forms. For a long period discussions have been on the expression of prfA, (which is a virulence gene regulator in a mammalian host and its role in causing the switch from a saprophytic to pathogenic form of L.monocytogenes. We, in this paper for the first time report the expression of prfA and other virulence genes by L.monocytogenes under different extracellular conditions, and also as a pure culture biofilms, that is different from the previous reports. We also report that the expression of prfA seems to vary considerably when co-cultured with Bacillus subtilis.

  11. Antimicrobial effect of Thai spices against Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella typhimurium DT104.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thongson, Chitsiri; Davidson, P Michael; Mahakarnchanakul, Warapa; Vibulsresth, Preeya

    2005-10-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the potential antimicrobial activity of extracts and essential oils of spices from Thailand against foodborne pathogenic bacteria. The antimicrobial efficacy of ginger (Zingiber officinale), fingerroot (Boesenbergia pandurata), and turmeric (Curcuma longa) was evaluated against five strains of Listeria monocytogenes and four strains of Salmonella enterica ssp. enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104. Antimicrobial activity was investigated in microbiological media by using an agar dilution assay and enumeration over time and a model food system, apple juice, by monitoring growth over time. In the agar dilution assay, water extracts of the three spices had no effect on L. monocytogenes. Similarly, 50% ethanol extracts of ginger or turmeric had no effect. In contrast, ethanolic fingerroot extracts at 5 to 10% (vol/ vol) inhibited most L. monocytogenes strains for 24 h in the agar dilution assay. Commercial essential oils (EO) of ginger or turmeric inhibited all L. monocytogenes at pathogens in food systems.

  12. Inhibitory effect of liposome-entrapped lemongrass oil on the growth of Listeria monocytogenes in cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, H Y; Wu, J; Lin, L

    2016-08-01

    Listeria monocytogenes infection in dairy products is of mounting public concern. To inhibit bacterial growth, we engineered stimuli-responsive liposomes containing lemongrass oil for this study. The controlled release of liposome-entrapped lemongrass oil is triggered by listerolysin O, secreted by L. monocytogenes. We investigated the antibiotic activities of lemongrass oil liposomes against L. monocytogenes in cheese. We also assessed their possible effects on the quality of the cheese. Liposomes containing lemongrass oil (5.0mg/mL) presented the optimal polydispersity index (0.246), zeta-potential (-58.9mV) and entrapment efficiency (25.7%). The liposomes displayed satisfactory antibiotic activity against L. monocytogenes in cheese over the storage period at 4°C. We observed no effects on the physical and sensory properties of the cheese after the liposome treatment. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Effects of prebiotics on the infective potential of Listeria monocytogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebersbach, Tine

    % xylooligosaccharides (XOS), galactooligosaccharides (GOS), inulin, apple pectin or polydextrose for three weeks before oral challenge with L. monocytogenes. XOS and GOS significantly improved resistance of guinea pigs to L. monocytogenes, while inulin and apple pectin decreased the resistance. No significant effect...... on resistance to L. monocytogenes was seen after feeding with polydextrose. To further explore the mechanisms behind these in vivo observations, microbiota independent effects of four of the carbohydrates (XOS, GOS, inulin and polydextrose) on the adhesive and infective potential of L. monocytogenes....... monocytogenes to Caco-2 cells. No effect on adhesion was seen for either GOS, inulin or polydextrose. Adherence to the intestinal epithelium is considered a very important step in the infection cycle for most of the pathogenic bacteria. Without adherence the pathogenic bacteria are rapidly eliminated from...

  14. Effect of the inoculum size on Listeria monocytogenes growth in structured media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnanou Besse, Nathalie; Audinet, Nelly; Barre, Lena; Cauquil, Alexandra; Cornu, Marie; Colin, Pierre

    2006-07-01

    Obtaining quantitative data concerning the relative impact of various factors that may influence bacterial growth is of great importance for microbial risk assessment and predictive microbiology. The objective of this work was to investigate the effect of the initial Listeria monocytogenes density on all the growth parameters of this pathogen (lag phase duration, growth rate and maximum population density attained) on a sterile solid model system mimicking smoked fishery products, and in real cold-smoked salmon, a product likely to be contaminated with L. monocytogenes. Growth of the pathogen was monitored using a sensitive enumeration method, recently developed, based on membrane filtration followed by the transfer of the filter on a selective media [Gnanou Besse, N., Audinet, N., Beaufort, A., Colin, P., Cornu, M. and Lombard, B., 2004. A contribution to the improvement of Listeria monocytogenes enumeration in smoked salmon. International Journal of Food Microbiology, 91, 119-127.]. Depending on the experimental conditions, we found a significant effect of the inoculum size, both on lag phase duration, and on the maximal population attained. Moreover, the effect of the inoculum size on the growth of L. monocytogenes was dependent on a complex set of interactions. Factors which have appeared to impact on this effect include the cells physiological state, the background microflora, the texture of the media and the packaging system. It is important to understand how these interactions affect the growth of Listeria in order to predict and control its development in food.

  15. Identification of Listeria monocytogenes from unpasteurized apple juice using rapid test kits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sado, P N; Jinneman, K C; Husby, G J; Sorg, S M; Omiecinski, C J

    1998-09-01

    A microbiological survey of 50 retail juices was conducted in the fall of 1996. These juices were analyzed for Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella, coliforms, fecal coliforms, and pH. Two unpasteurized juices were positive for L. monocytogenes: an apple juice and an apple raspberry blend with a pH of 3.78 and 3.75, respectively. Three L. monocytogenes isolates were characterized. The colonies were typical for Listeria sp. on Oxford and lithium chloride-phenylethanol-moxalactam agars and were beta-hemolytic on sheep blood agar. The isolates required 5 days of incubation at 35 degrees C to produce a positive rhamnose reaction in a phenol red carbohydrate broth. This slow rhamnose utilization resulted in these isolates not being identified using the Micro-ID test strip (Organon Technika). However, the isolates were positive for L. monocytogenes using the API Listeria strip (BioMerieux) and a multiplex polymerase chain reaction for detection of the hemolysis (hyla) and invasion-associated protein (iap) genes.

  16. [Brainstem encephalitis and myelitis due to Listeria monocytogenes: a case report and literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Aracelly; Hernández, Olga Helena; Uribe, Carlos Santiago; Guerra, Alejandro; Urueña, Piedad

    2013-01-01

    Brainstem encephalitis caused by Listeria monocytogenes is an uncommon form of central nervous system listeriosis; however, it is the most common presentation in immunocompetent individuals. Here, we describe an even more rare combination of rhombencephalitis with severe myelitis caused by L. monocytogenes in an immunocompetent patient. We report the case of a 21-year-old immunocompetent patient who consumed unpasteurized dairy products and experienced headache and vomiting that progressed to an impaired general condition, altered consciousness and ultimately death. The patient had presented to the Neurological Institute of Colombia (INDEC in Spanish) for consultation and was diagnosed with brainstem encephalitis and myelitis caused by Listeria monocytogenes . The differences between this particular case and those reported in the literature will be discussed. It is advisable to initiate antibiotic treatment for Listeria monocytogenes if a patient shows signs of brainstem compromise of possible infectious origin and quickly intensify treatment if there is no or minimal response. It is also necessary to extend radiological assessment to include the spinal column to rule out spinal cord involvement.

  17. Molecular characterization and antibiogram of Listeria monocytogenes isolated from chicken and mutton of retail markets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinay Kumar B. N., Nadeem Fairoze , Madhavaprasad C. B.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To isolate Listeria monocytogenes from chicken and mutton meat sold at retail outlets and to characterize isolates for virulence determinants. Methods: Listeria monocytogenes was isolated from chicken and mutton meat samples using ISO: 11290 method. Multiplex PCR was performed for the detection of virulence associated genes. Results: Out of 198 retail meat samples (72 chicken and 126 mutton analyzed, Listeria monocytogenes was isolated from 4.5% (8.3% chicken and 2.3% mutton samples. All the 9 isolates (6 from chicken and 3 from mutton belonged to 1/2a servar and carried virulence genes viz. haemolysin (hlyA, phosphatidylinositol phospholipase (plcA, actin polymerization protein (actA and invasive associative protein p60 (Iap. Conclusion: L. monocytogenes is an organism of food safety and public health significance, its recovery from the meat sold at retail outlets indicated breach in the quality assurance. J Microbiol Infect Dis 2016;6(2: 65-68

  18. New perspectives on the gastrointestinal mode of transmission in invasive Listeria monocytogenes infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlech, W.F. III

    1984-01-01

    The route or mechanism of transmission of Listeria monocytogenes from its rural veterinary reservoir to newborn and older human populations has been obscure. Anecdotal reports of milk-borne infection from cows with Listeria mastitis have been published, but intensive investigations of small outbreaks of L. monocytogenes infections in humans have not supported a gastrointestinal mode of infection. Several recent studies, however, strongly suggest this possibility, and case-control studies of epidemic listeriosis in the Canadian Maritime provinces in 1981 documented an association between ingestion of uncooked vegetables and the development of illness (p = 0.02). In that study, coleslaw from a regional producer which was distributed throughout the Maritimes was considered to be the vehicle of transmission. Cabbage, the raw product in the production of coleslaw, was contaminated at a farm prior to arrival at the plant. Contamination occurred through fertilization with raw manure from a flock of sheep known to harbor L. monocytogenes. Therefore, an indirect link was established between Listeria monocytogenes infection of sheep on a cabbage farm and subsequent development of invasive listeriosis in humans. This study supports findings from other epidemiologic studies of human listeriosis and is consistent with results of investigations into the mode of transmission of natural and laboratory-acquired listeriosis in animals. 34 references.

  19. Mode of action of leucocin K7 produced by Leuconostoc mesenteroides K7 against Listeria monocytogenes and its potential in milk preservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Feng; Wang, Yanwei; Li, Yongfu; Wang, Xiaoyuan

    2016-09-01

    To investigate the mode of action of leucocin K7 against Listeria monocytogenes and to assess its inhibitory effect on Lis. monocytogenes in refrigerated milk. A bacteriocin-producing strain, Leuconostoc mesenteroides K7, was isolated from a fermented pickle. The bacteriocin, leucocin K7, exhibited antagonistic activity against Lis. monocytogenes with an MIC of 28 µg/ml. It was sensitive to proteaseS and displayed good thermal stability and broad active pH range. Leucocin K7 had no effect on the efflux of ATP from Lis. monocytogenes but triggered the efflux of K(+) and the intracellular hydrolysis of ATP. It also dissipated the transmembrane electrical potential completely and transmembrane pH gradient partially. It 80 AU/ml inhibited the growth of Lis. monocytogenes by 2.3-3.9 log units in milk; when combined with glycine (5 mg/ml), it completely eliminated viable Lis. monocytogenes over 7 days Leucocin K7 shows different mode of action from nisin and may have potential application in milk preservation.

  20. Detection and characterization of Listeria monocytogenes in Sao Jorge (Portugal) cheese production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongo, J M; Malcata, F X; Ho, A J; Wiedmann, M

    2006-11-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne pathogen that can cause serious invasive disease in humans. Because human listeriosis cases have previously been linked to consumption of contaminated cheese, control of this pathogen throughout the cheese production chain is of particular concern. To understand the potential for L. monocytogenes transmission via São Jorge cheese, a Portuguese artisanal cheese variety that bears a Protected Denomination of Origin classification, 357 raw milk, curd, natural whey starter, and cheese samples representative of the production chain of this cheese were collected over one year and tested for the presence of L. monocytogenes and selected physicochemical parameters. Although neither L. monocytogenes nor other Listeria spp. were detected in whey, curd, or cheese samples, 2 of the 105 raw milk samples analyzed were positive for L. monocytogenes. These 2 raw milk isolates represented a ribotype that has previously been linked to multiple human listeriosis outbreaks and cases elsewhere, indicating the potential of these isolates to cause human listeriosis. On average, physicochemical parameters of São Jorge cheese ripened for 4 mo presented values that likely minimize the risk of L. monocytogenes outgrowth during ripening and storage (mean pH = 5.48; mean moisture = 37.79%; mean NaCl concentration = 4.73%). However, some cheese samples evaluated in this study were characterized by physicochemical parameters that may allow growth and survival of L. monocytogenes. Even though our results indicate that raw milk used for São Jorge cheese manufacture as well as finished products is rarely contaminated with L. monocytogenes, continued efforts to control the presence of this pathogen in the São Jorge cheese production chain are urged and are critical to ensure the safety of this product.

  1. Factors contributes to spontaneous abortion caused by Listeria monocytogenes, in Tehran, Iran, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourkaveh, B; Ahmadi, M; Eslami, G; Gachkar, L

    2016-08-29

    Spontaneous abortion is the loss of a fetus before the 20th week of pregnancy, when occurring naturally without any surgical or pharmaceutical intervention. On the other hand, Listeria monocytogenes, as one of the foodborne pathogens, is a causative agent of listeriosis. The transfer of L. monocytogenes in pregnant women occurs as self-limited flu-like symptoms which may result in abortion, stillbirth or premature birth of infected infants. The purpose of this study was the identification of Listeria monocytogenes risk factors in women with spontaneous abortion admitted to Tehran Province health care centers in 2015. In this cross-sectional study, 317 women were examined for L. monocytogenes using Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) and the related risk factors. Two questionnaires on "L. monocytogenes Probable Risk Factors" and "Socio Economic Factors" were completed. Out of 317 samples of vaginal swabs, 54 (17%) isolates of L. monocytogenes were identified. In addition significant differences in terms of age of mother and her husband, mother and the husband's level of education , house prices, place of residence, gestational age of first abortion, gestational age of current abortion, gestational age of second abortion, consumption of unpasteurized dairy products, consumption of feta and soft cheese, consumption of smoked see food products, consumption of processed meat products and half-cooked meat products, consumption of ready-to-eat vegetables, history of contact with domestic animals three month before pregnancy and during pregnancy and consumption of smoked meat products during pregnancy were studied between two groups of patients positive and negative with L. monocytogens (P < 0.001). Based on the study, the detection of L. monocytogens risk factor during pregnancy as well as taking the issue into account while giving information and counseling in pregnancy can be vital to reduce the incidence of this bacterium and subsequently its side effects during

  2. Listeria monocytogenes strains isolated from dry milk samples in Mexico: occurrence and antibiotic sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodas-Suárez, O R; Quiñones-Ramírez, E I; Fernández, F J; Vázquez-Salinas, C

    2013-09-01

    Dry milk is a particular concern in Mexico, as approximately 150,000 metric tons of dry milk are imported every year at a cost of around $250 million. Dry milk is used to make many products, most of which are dairy products widely distributed among the population covered by welfare programs. The purpose of the study described in this article was to determine the presence of Listeria spp. in imported dry milk samples in Mexico, and to determine the sensitivity of the Listeria monocytogenes isolates to different antimicrobial agents. Listeria isolates (7.8% of 550 bacterial isolates) were identified as L. monocytogenes (53.49%), L. innocua (30.23%), L. seeligeri (13.95%), and L. ivanovii (2.33%). L. monocytogenes strains isolated showed multiresistance to ampicillin, erythromycin, tetracycline, dicloxacillin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (9%-14%). The results provide additional evidence of the emergence of multiresistant Listeria strains both in nature and in widely consumed dairy products, representing a potential threat to human health.

  3. Listeria monocytogenes and diet during pregnancy; balancing nutrient intake adequacy v. adverse pregnancy outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezdirc, Kristine B; Hure, Alexis J; Blumfield, Michelle L; Collins, Clare E

    2012-12-01

    To evaluate the impact of adherence to public health recommendations on Listeria monocytogenes food safety to limit exposure to potential food sources on micronutrient intakes of pregnant women and whether more frequent consumption of 'high-risk' foods increases risk for adverse pregnancy outcomes. A cohort study in women assessing Listeria exposure from an FFQ based on consumption of potential Listeria-containing food sources, the Listeria Food Exposure Score (LFES). Pregnancy status was defined as pregnant, trying to conceive, had a baby within the previous 12 months, or other. Nutrient intakes were compared with Nutrient Reference Values and self-reported pregnancy outcome history three years later. Australia. Women aged 25-30 years (n 7486) participating in the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health. There were weak positive correlations (r = 0.13-0.37, P monocytogenes is associated with higher nutrient intakes, but an increased risk of miscarriage. L. monocytogenes pregnancy recommendations require review and should include the list of 'risky' food items in addition to low-risk alternatives that would adequately replace nutrient intakes which may be reduced through avoidance strategies.

  4. A novel Listeria monocytogenes-based DNA delivery system for cancer gene therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    van Pijkeren, Jan Peter

    2012-01-31

    Bacteria-mediated transfer of plasmid DNA to mammalian cells (bactofection) has been shown to have significant potential as an approach to express heterologous proteins in various cell types. This is achieved through entry of the entire bacterium into cells, followed by release of plasmid DNA. In a murine model, we show that Listeria monocytogenes can invade and spread in tumors, and establish the use of Listeria to deliver genes to tumors in vivo. A novel approach to vector lysis and release of plasmid DNA through antibiotic administration was developed. Ampicillin administration facilitated both plasmid transfer and safety control of vector. To further improve on the gene delivery system, we selected a Listeria monocytogenes derivative that is more sensitive to ampicillin, and less pathogenic than the wild-type strain. Incorporation of a eukaryotic-transcribed lysin cassette in the plasmid further increased bacterial lysis. Successful gene delivery of firefly luciferase to growing tumors in murine models and to patient breast tumor samples ex vivo was achieved. The model described encompasses a three-phase treatment regimen, involving (1) intratumoral administration of vector followed by a period of vector spread, (2) systemic ampicillin administration to induce vector lysis and plasmid transfer, and (3) systemic administration of combined moxifloxacin and ampicillin to eliminate systemic vector. For the first time, our results reveal the potential of Listeria monocytogenes for in vivo gene delivery.

  5. Listeria monocytogenes mutants defective in gallbladder replication represent safety-enhanced vaccine delivery platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowd, Georgina C; Bahey-El-Din, Mohammed; Casey, Pat G; Joyce, Susan A; Hill, Colin; Gahan, Cormac G M

    2016-08-02

    The Gram positive intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes represents a promising vaccine or therapeutic DNA delivery vector that has been successfully administered to humans in clinical trials. However in generating Listeria mutants with therapeutic potential it is important to balance safety attenuation with efficacy. Here we show that L. monocytogenes mutants with a reduced capacity for murine gallbladder replication are capable of stimulating T cell responses in mice and protecting vaccinated animals from secondary challenge. Mutation of L. monocytogenes genes lmo2566 or lmo0598 resulted in significant attenuation in the murine model yet mutants retained a capacity for intracellular growth and stimulation of T cell responses against key Listeria epitopes (LLO91-99 and P60217-225). Importantly the mutants showed a reduced capacity for growth in the gallbladders of vaccinated mice as well as significantly reduced faecal shedding indicating that this approach generates live Listeria-based vector delivery systems with a reduced capacity for the spread of live genetically modified microorganisms into the natural environment.

  6. Bovine mastitis caused by Listeria monocytogenes: characteristics of natural and experimental infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourry, A; Poutrel, B; Rocourt, J

    1995-08-01

    Experimental mastitis induced with a single intramammary injection of Listeria monocytogenes was compared with two naturally occurring cases. Four strains of L. monocytogenes, two of serotype 1/2a and two of serotype 4b were used for the experimental infections and two diametrically opposed quarters of four cows were inoculated with 300 cfu. Bacteriological examination and somatic cell counts of quarter foremilk samples were performed weekly for at least 6 months after challenge. All the inoculated quarters developed chronic subclinical mastitis with occasional clinical episodes. The results were similar to those observed in natural listeria mastitis. Four experimentally infected quarters were treated during lactation (gentamicin and cloxacillin) or at "drying-off" (cloxacillin), or at both times. Only one of four quarters was cured after treatment only at "drying-off". All experimental and naturally infected animals were slaughtered and bacteriological examination was performed on liver, spleen and supramammary, iliac and mesenteric lymph nodes. L. monocytogenes strains were isolated from the supramammary lymph nodes of two experimentally and two naturally infected cows and from an iliac lymph node from one of the naturally infected cows. The epidemiological data were supported by serotyping, lysotyping and DNA macro-restriction analysis. The experimental model of listeria mastitis mimics spontaneous cases and should be useful in further studies of listeria mastitis.

  7. Modeling the effect of temperature on survival rate of Listeria monocytogenes in yogurt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczawiński, J; Szczawińska, M E; Łobacz, A; Jackowska-Tracz, A

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to (i) evaluate the behavior of Listeria monocytogenes in a commercially produced yogurt, (ii) determine the survival/inactivation rates of L. monocytogenes during cold storage of yogurt and (iii) to generate primary and secondary mathematical models to predict the behavior of these bacteria during storage at different temperatures. The samples of yogurt were inoculated with the mixture of three L. monocytogenes strains and stored at 3, 6, 9, 12 and 15°C for 16 days. The number of listeriae was determined after 0, 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 9, 12, 14 and 16 days of storage. From each sample a series of decimal dilutions were prepared and plated onto ALOA agar (agar for Listeria according to Ottaviani and Agosti). It was found that applied temperature and storage time significantly influenced the survival rate of listeriae (pyogurt stored under temperature range from 3 to 15°C, however, the polynomial model gave a better fit to the experimental data.

  8. Peritonitis bacteriana espontánea por Listeria monocytogenes, en un paciente con cirrosis hepática: Caso clínico

    OpenAIRE

    Espinoza-Gómez,Francisco; Newton-Sánchez, Oscar; Melnikov,Valery; Pinzón S,Luis

    2006-01-01

    Infections caused by Listeria monocytogenes are usually found in cattle and occasionally appear in humans, particularly pregnant women and immunocompromised individuals. Peritonitis by Listeria monocytogenes is a rare but dangerous condition that must be recognized early, since it requires a specific treatment. We report a 31 year-old male with alcoholic cirrhosis that developed ascites with abdominal pain and fever. The peritoneal fluid culture yielded Listeria monocytogenes. The patients wa...

  9. Magnetic bead based immuno-detection of Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria ivanovii from infant formula and leafy green vegetables using the Bio-Plex suspension array system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, J B; Basavanna, U

    2015-04-01

    Listeriosis, a disease contracted via the consumption of foods contaminated with pathogenic Listeria species, can produce severe symptoms and high mortality in susceptible people and animals. The development of molecular methods and immuno-based techniques for detection of pathogenic Listeria in foods has been challenging due to the presence of assay inhibiting food components. In this study, we utilize a macrophage cell culture system for the isolation and enrichment of Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria ivanovii from infant formula and leafy green vegetables for subsequent identification using the Luminex xMAP technique. Macrophage monolayers were exposed to infant formula, lettuce and celery contaminated with L. monocytogenes or L. ivanovii. Magnetic microspheres conjugated to Listeria specific antibody were used to capture Listeria from infected macrophages and then analyzed using the Bio-Plex 200 analyzer. As few as 10 CFU/mL or g of L. monocytogenes was detected in all foods tested. The detection limit for L. ivanovii was 10 CFU/mL in infant formula and 100 CFU/g in leafy greens. Microsphere bound Listeria obtained from infected macrophage lysates could also be isolated on selective media for subsequent confirmatory identification. This method presumptively identifies L. monocytogenes and L. ivanovii from infant formula, lettuce and celery in less than 28 h with confirmatory identifications completed in less than 48 h. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Human heat-shock protein 60 receptor-coated paramagnetic beads show improved capture of Listeria monocytogenes in the presence of other Listeria in food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, O K; Aroonnual, A; Bhunia, A K

    2011-07-01

    To investigate the suitability of human Hsp60, a receptor for Listeria adhesion protein (LAP), on paramagnetic beads (PMB) to capture Listeria monocytogenes from food in the presence of other Listeria to facilitate rapid and specific detection of this pathogen. Commercially available streptavidin-coated PMBs were linked with biotinylated Hsp60 (PMB-Hsp60), and the bacterial capture efficiency from pure culture and meat samples was determined. Capture rate was also compared with the monoclonal antibody (MAb)-C11E9-coated beads (PMB-C11E9) and the commercial Dynabeads anti-Listeria. Captured cells were detected and quantified by plating on selective medium, quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) and a light-scattering sensor. Overall, all ligand-coated beads had similar capture efficiency (varied from 1·8 to 9·2%) for L. monocytogenes under the conditions employed, and the minimum cell number required to achieve such capture was 10³ CFU ml⁻¹. PMB-Hsp60 had significantly greater capture efficiency for pathogenic Listeria (P Listeria. In contrast, PMB-C11E9 and Dynabeads anti-Listeria had similar capture efficiency for both. The efficacy of all PMBs to capture L. monocytogenes in the presence of Listeria innocua from food matrices was compared. Although Dynabeads anti-Listeria had the overall best capture efficiency, PMB-Hsp60 was able to selectively capture L. monocytogenes even in the presence of 10-100-fold more L. innocua cells from enriched meat samples. Data show that the human cell receptor, Hsp60, is suitable for the capture of pathogenic Listeria on PMB in the presence of other Listeria in food. As pathogen interaction with host cells is highly specific, host cell receptors could be used as alternate capture molecules on PMB to aid in specific detection of pathogens. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2011 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  11. Processing plant persistent strains of Listeria monocytogenes appear to have a lower virulence potential than clinical strains in selected virulence models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anne; Thomsen, L.E.; Jørgensen, R.L.

    2008-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is an important foodborne bacterial pathogen that can colonize food processing equipment. One group of genetically similar L. monocytogenes strains (RAPID type 9) was recently shown to reside in several independent fish processing plants. Persistent strains are likely...

  12. Molecular ecology of Listeria monocytogenes and other Listeria species in small and very small ready-to-eat meat processing plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Shanna K; Roof, Sherry; Boyle, Elizabeth A; Burson, Dennis; Thippareddi, Harshavardhan; Geornaras, Ifigenia; Sofos, John N; Wiedmann, Martin; Nightingale, Kendra

    2011-01-01

    A longitudinal study was conducted to track Listeria contamination patterns in ready-to-eat meats from six small or very small meat processing plants located in three states over 1 year. A total of 688 environmental sponge samples were collected from nonfood contact surfaces during bimonthly visits to each plant. Overall, L. monocytogenes was isolated from 42 (6.1%) environmental samples, and its prevalence ranged from 1.7 to 10.8% across different plants. Listeria spp., other than L. monocytogenes, were isolated from 9.5% of samples overall, with the prevalence ranging from 1.5 to 18.3% across different plants. The prevalence of L. monocytogenes correlated well with that of other Listeria spp. for some but not all plants. One L. monocytogenes isolate representing each positive sample was characterized by molecular serotyping, EcoRI ribotyping, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis typing. Seven sample sites tested positive for L. monocytogenes on more than one occasion, and the same ribotype was detected more than once at five of these sites. Partial sigB sequencing was used to speciate other Listeria spp. isolates and assign an allelic type to each isolate. Other Listeria spp. were isolated more than once from 14 sample sites, and the same sigB allelic type was recovered at least twice from seven of these sites. One plant was colonized by an atypical hemolytic L. innocua strain. Our findings indicate that small and very small meat processing plants that produce ready-to-eat meat products are characterized by a varied prevalence of Listeria, inconsistent correlation between contamination by L. monocytogenes and other Listeria spp., and a unique Listeria molecular ecology.

  13. Effect of acidified sorbate solutions on the lag phase durations and growth rates of Listeria monocytogenes on meat surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    The surfaces of ready-to-eat meats are susceptible to post-processing contamination by Listeria monocytogenes. This study quantified the lag phase durations (LPD) and growth rates (GR) of L. monocytogenes on the surfaces of cooked ham as affected by sorbate solutions of different concentrations and...

  14. Draft Genome Sequences of Listeria monocytogenes Strains from Listeriosis Outbreaks Linked to Soft Cheese in Washington State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhen; Marsland, Paula A; Meek, Roxanne T; Eckmann, Kaye; Allard, Marc W; Pérez-Osorio, Ailyn C

    2017-09-07

    Listeria monocytogenes has caused listeriosis outbreaks linked to soft cheese. Here, we report the draft genome sequences of seven L. monocytogenes isolates from two possibly related outbreaks caused by soft cheese products in Washington State. Copyright © 2017 Li et al.

  15. Stochastic modelling of Listeria monocytogenes single cell growth in cottage cheese with mesophilic lactic acid bacteria from aroma producing cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Nina Bjerre; Christiansen, Lasse Engbo; Dalgaard, Paw

    2015-01-01

    . 2014. Modelling the effect of lactic acid bacteria from starter- and aroma culture on growth of Listeria monocytogenes in cottage cheese. International Journal of Food Microbiology. 188, 15-25]. Growth of L. monocytogenes single cells, using lag time distributions corresponding to three different...

  16. Population Genetic Structure of Listeria monocytogenes Strains as Determined by Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis and Multilocus Sequence Typing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henri, Clémentine; Félix, Benjamin; Guillier, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a ubiquitous bacterium that may cause the foodborne illness listeriosis. Only a small amount of data about the population genetic structure of strains isolated from food is available. This study aimed to provide an accurate view of the L. monocytogenes food strain...

  17. Determining If Phylogenetic Relatedness of Listeria Monocytogenes Isolates Corresponds to Persistence in Poultry Processing Plants Using Whole-Genome Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introduction: Controlling Listeria monocytogenes on ready-to-eat meat and poultry products and in food processing facilities is challenging. Surveys have found that some L. monocytogenes types are more persistent in processing facilities than others, but the reason is unknown. It is possible persist...

  18. Self-contained chlorine dioxide generation and delivery pods for controlling Listeria monocytogenes in model floor drains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne pathogen that has been associated with poultry products. This organism is ubiquitous in nature and has been found to enter poultry further processing plants on incoming raw product. Once in the plant, L. monocytogenes can become a long term persistent colonize...

  19. Modelling and predicting the simultaneous growth of Listeria monocytogenes and spoilage micro-organisms in cold-smoked salmon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gimenez, B.; Dalgaard, Paw

    2004-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate and model the simultaneous growth of Listeria monocytogenes and spoilage micro-organisms in cold-smoked salmon.Methods and Results: Growth kinetics of L. monocytogenes, lactic acid bacteria (LAB), Enterobacteriaceae, enterococci and Photobacterium phosphoreum were determined...

  20. Spatial and Temporal Factors Associated with an Increased Prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes in Spinach Fields in New York State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, Daniel; Wiedmann, Martin

    2015-01-01

    While rain and irrigation events have been associated with an increased prevalence of foodborne pathogens in produce production environments, quantitative data are needed to determine the effects of various spatial and temporal factors on the risk of produce contamination following these events. This study was performed to quantify these effects and to determine the impact of rain and irrigation events on the detection frequency and diversity of Listeria species (including L. monocytogenes) and L. monocytogenes in produce fields. Two spinach fields, with high and low predicted risks of L. monocytogenes isolation, were sampled 24, 48, 72, and 144 to 192 h following irrigation and rain events. Predicted risk was a function of the field's proximity to water and roads. Factors were evaluated for their association with Listeria species and L. monocytogenes isolation by using generalized linear mixed models (GLMMs). In total, 1,492 (1,092 soil, 334 leaf, 14 fecal, and 52 water) samples were collected. According to the GLMM, the likelihood of Listeria species and L. monocytogenes isolation from soil samples was highest during the 24 h immediately following an event (odds ratios [ORs] of 7.7 and 25, respectively). Additionally, Listeria species and L. monocytogenes isolates associated with irrigation events showed significantly lower sigB allele type diversity than did isolates associated with precipitation events (P = monocytogenes contamination. Small changes in management practices (e.g., not irrigating fields before harvest) may therefore reduce the risk of L. monocytogenes contamination of fresh produce. PMID:26116668

  1. Directed evolution and targeted mutagenesis to murinize Listeria monocytogenes internalin A for enhanced infectivity in the murine oral infection model.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Monk, Ian R

    2010-01-01

    Internalin A (InlA) is a critical virulence factor which mediates the initiation of Listeria monocytogenes infection by the oral route in permissive hosts. The interaction of InlA with the host cell ligand E-cadherin efficiently stimulates L. monocytogenes entry into human enterocytes, but has only a limited interaction with murine cells.

  2. Effect of salt, smoke compound and temperature on the survival of Listeria monocytogenes in salmon during simulated smoking processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    In smoked fish processes, smoking is the only step that is capable of inactivating pathogens, such as Listeria monocytogenes, that contaminate the raw fish. The objectives of this study were to examine and develop a model to describe the survival of L. monocytogenes in salmon as affected by salt, s...

  3. Physiology and genetics of Listeria monocytogenes survival and growth at cold temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Yvonne C; Wiedmann, Martin

    2009-03-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne pathogen that can cause serious invasive human illness in susceptible patients, notably immunocompromised, pregnant women, and adults > 65 years old. Most human listeriosis cases appear to be caused by consumption of refrigerated ready-to-eat foods that are contaminated with high levels of L. monocytogenes. While initial L. monocytogenes levels in contaminated foods are usually low, the ability of L. monocytogenes to survive and multiply at low temperatures allows it to reach levels high enough to cause human disease, particularly if contaminated foods that allow for L. monocytogenes growth are stored for prolonged times under refrigeration. In this review, relevant knowledge on the physiology and genetics of L. monocytogenes' ability to adapt to and multiply at low temperature will be summarized and discussed, including selected relevant findings on the physiology and genetics of cold adaptation in other Gram-positive bacteria. Further improvement in our understanding of the physiology and genetics of L. monocytogenes cold growth will hopefully enhance our ability to design successful intervention strategies for this foodborne pathogen.

  4. Growth, survival, proliferation and pathogenesis of Listeria monocytogenes under low oxygen or anaerobic conditions: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lungu, B; Ricke, S C; Johnson, M G

    2009-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram positive facultative anaerobe that causes listeriosis, a disease that mainly affects the immune-compromised, the elderly, infants and pregnant women. In the susceptible immune challenged population, listeriosis is very severe and has a fatality rate of up to 30%. Control of L. monocytogenes is difficult due to its: 1) widespread presence in the environment, 2) intrinsic physiological resistance, 3) ability to adapt to external stresses and 4) ability to grow at a wide range of temperatures. L. monocytogenes encounters anaerobic conditions in the external environment as well as during pathogenesis. Although L. monocytogenes is a facultative anaerobe, the differential effects of O(2) and oxidation-reduction potential on the multiplication of L. monocytogenes have not been established. In addition, most laboratory studies to determine the growth, survival and persistence of this pathogen in foods as well as in the environment have emphasized the response of this pathogen under aerobic conditions. Consequently, this has led to a limited understanding of the metabolic and physiological responses of L. monocytogenes in low oxygen environments. Therefore, the objective of our review was to highlight the progress that has been made in L. monocytogenes research with emphasis on the role of low oxygen and/or anaerobiosis in the growth, survival and proliferation of this pathogen in the environment as well as during pathogenesis.

  5. Prevalence and contamination patterns of Listeria monocytogenes in Flammulina velutipes plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Moutong; Wu, Qingping; Zhang, Jumei; Guo, Weipeng; Wu, Shi; Yang, Xiaobing

    2014-08-01

    Four mushroom (Flammulina velutipes) production plants were sampled to investigate the prevalence and contamination source of Listeria monocytogenes. Among 295 samples, the prevalence of L. monocytogenes was 18.6%; the contamination appeared to originate from the mycelium-scraping machinery, contaminating both the product and upstream packaging equipment. Of 55 L. monocytogenes isolates, lineages I.1 (1/2a-3a) and II.2 (1/2b-3b-7) accounted for 65.5% and 34.5%, respectively. In addition, lineage I.1 formed significantly thicker biofilms than those within lineage II.2, as determined by crystal violet staining and scanning electron microscopy. Genotype analyses of L. monocytogenes isolates using enterobacteria repetitive intergenic consensus-polymerase chain reaction, and random amplified polymorphic DNA revealed that the surfaces of mycelium-scraping machinery may serve as the main source of L. monocytogenes contamination in three of the four plants. This study was the first report to explore the potential contamination sources of L. monocytogenes in the mushroom production chain, thereby providing baseline information for adopting prophylactic measures for critical control points during production in mushroom plants to avoid L. monocytogenes contamination.

  6. A Predictive Model for the Growth of Listeria monocytogenes in Commercial Blue Crab (Callinectes sapidus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parveen, Salina; White, Channel; Tamplin, Mark L

    2017-10-13

    During the processing and handling of commercial blue crab (Callinectes sapidus), Listeria monocytogenes can potentially contaminate cooked meat and grow to hazardous levels. To manage this risk, predictive models are useful tools for designing and implementing preventive controls; however, no model specific for blue crab meat has been published or evaluated. In this study, a cocktail of L. monocytogenes strains was added to pasteurized blue crab meat, which was incubated at storage temperatures from 0 to 35°C. At selected time intervals, L. monocytogenes was enumerated by direct plating onto modified Oxford agar. A primary model was fitted to kinetic data to estimate the lag-phase duration (LPD) and growth rate (GR). Listeria monocytogenes replicated from 0 to 35°C, with GR ranging from 0.004 to 0.518 log CFU/h. Overall, the LPD decreased with increasing temperature, displaying a maximum value of 187 h at 0°C; however, this trend was not consistent. The LPD was not detected at 10°C, and it occurred inconsistently from trial to trial. A secondary GR model (R 2 = 0.9892) for pasteurized crab meat was compared with the L. monocytogenes GR in fresh crab meat, demonstrating bias and accuracy factors of 0.98 and 1.36, respectively. The model estimates varied from other published data and models, especially at temperatures ≥5°C, supporting the need for a specific predictive tool for temperature deviations.

  7. Chemical Composition, Antioxidant and Antimicrobial Activities of Thymus capitata Essential Oil with Its Preservative Effect against Listeria monocytogenes Inoculated in Minced Beef Meat

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    El Abed, Nariman; Kaabi, Belhassen; Smaali, Mohamed Issam; Chabbouh, Meriem; Habibi, Kamel; Mejri, Mondher; Marzouki, Mohamed Nejib; Ben Hadj Ahmed, Sami

    2014-01-01

    The chemical composition, antioxidant and antimicrobial activities, and the preservative effect of Thymus capitata essential oil against Listeria monocytogenes inoculated in minced beef meat were evaluated...

  8. Control of Listeria monocytogenes growth in a ready-to-eat poultry product using a bacteriophage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigot, B; Lee, W-J; McIntyre, L; Wilson, T; Hudson, J A; Billington, C; Heinemann, J A

    2011-12-01

    A bacteriophage (phage) that infected strains of the species Listeria monocytogenes as well as Listeria ivanovii and Listeria welshimeri, but not Listeria grayi or Listeria innocua, was isolated from sheep faeces. The phage had a contractile tail and an icosohedral head indicating that it was a myovirus, and was morphologically similar to phage A511. At 30 °C, phages added at 5.2 × 10⁷ PFU ml⁻¹ prevented the growth in broth of L. monocytogenes present at approximately twice this concentration for 7 h, but re-growth occurred such that the concentration after 24 h incubation was similar in both control and phage-treated cultures. At the same temperature, but on the surface of vacuum-packed ready-to-eat chicken breast roll, there was an immediate 2.5 log₁₀ CFU cm⁻² reduction in pathogen concentration following addition of phages and then re-growth. However, at a temperature reflecting that at which a chilled food might be held (5 °C), this re-growth was prevented over 21 days incubation. The data suggest a dose-dependent rapid reduction in pathogen concentration followed by no continued phage-mediated effect. These results, alongside other published data, indicate that a high concentration of phages per unit area is required to ensure significant inactivation of target pathogens on food surfaces. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Survival of Listeria monocytogenes in Fruit Juices During Refrigerated and Temperature-Abusive Storage

    OpenAIRE

    Piotrowski, Christine Lelia

    2003-01-01

    Survival of Listeria monocytogenes in apple, orange, red grape, and white grape juice was evaluated. A six-strain cocktail of L. monocytogenes was used to inoculate (approx. 7 log cfu/ml) fruit juices, which were stored at 4, 10 and 24°C for up to 61 days. Inoculated red grape juice was stored for up to 5 hours only. Samples were withdrawn at appropriate intervals, neutralized with 1.0 N NaOH, serially diluted in 0.1% peptone water, and surface plated onto Tryptic Soy Agar + 0.6% Yeast E...

  10. Produção de biofilme por Listeria monocytogenes isoladas de diferentes alimentos

    OpenAIRE

    Bonsaglia, Erika Carolina Romão [UNESP

    2012-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes é uma bactéria frequentemente encontrada em vários alimentos crus, como carne, queijo e legumes. Está amplamente distribuída no ambiente causando a contaminação de alimentos durante seu processamento. Atualmente, a contaminação por L. monocytogenes nas indústrias alimentícias é considerada um dos maiores problemas de segurança alimentar, pois uma vez presente na linha de processamento à bactéria dificilmente é eliminada pela grande capacidade em formar biofilme. A forma...

  11. Prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes in ready-to-eat food of animal origin

    OpenAIRE

    Borović, Branka; Baltić, Tatjana; Lakićević, Brankica; Janković, Vesna; Mitrović, Radmila; Jovanović, Jelena; Lilić, Slobodan

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the presence of Listeria monocytogenes in ready- to- eat meat, milk and fish products has been investigated. In addition, the presence of L. monocytogenes on food - contact surfaces, as a potential source of food contamination, has been investigated as well. Samples were analyzed by fluorescent immunoenzyme assay on miniVidas® device and by standard microbiological SRPS EN ISO 11290-1: 2010 and SRPS EN ISO 11290-2: 2010 methods. Out of 881 food samples tested, 12,25% were Liste...

  12. Desiccation of adhering and biofilm Listeria monocytogenes on stainless steel: Survival and transfer to salmon products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lisbeth Truelstrup; Vogel, Birte Fonnesbech

    2011-01-01

    The foodborne bacterial pathogen, Listeria monocytogenes, commonly contaminates foods during processing, where the microorganisms are potentially subjected to low relative humidity (RH) conditions for extended periods of time. The objective of this study was to examine survival during desiccation...... (43% RH and 15°C) of biofilm L. monocytogenes N53-1 cells on stainless steel coupons and to assess subsequent transfer to salmon products. Formation of static biofilm (2days at 100% RH and 15°C) prior to desiccation for 23days significantly (P...

  13. Whole-Genome Sequencing Allows for Improved Identification of Persistent Listeria monocytogenes in Food-Associated Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Stasiewicz, Matthew J.; Oliver, Haley F.; Wiedmann, Martin; den Bakker, Henk C.

    2015-01-01

    While the food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes can persist in food associated environments, there are no whole-genome sequence (WGS) based methods to differentiate persistent from sporadic strains. Whole-genome sequencing of 188 isolates from a longitudinal study of L. monocytogenes in retail delis was used to (i) apply single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based phylogenetics for subtyping of L. monocytogenes, (ii) use SNP counts to differentiate persistent from repeatedly reintroduced ...

  14. Factors associated with Listeria monocytogenes contamination of cold-smoked pork products produced in Latvia and Lithuania.

    OpenAIRE

    Berzins,-A; Horman,-A; Lunden,-J; Korkeala,-H

    2007-01-01

    A total of 312 samples of sliced, vacuum packaged, cold-smoked pork from 15 meat processing plants in Latvia and Lithuania, obtained over a 15-month period from 2003 until 2004, were analyzed for the presence of Listeria monocytogenes at the end of their shelf-life. Overall, 120 samples (38%) tested positive for L. monocytogenes. Despite the long storing period, the levels of L. monocytogenes in cold-smoked pork products were low. Manufacturing processes were studied at seven meat processing ...

  15. Listeria monocytogenes meningoencephalitis in an immunocompetent, previously healthy 20-month old female child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peer M

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Invasive listeriosis predominantly affects pregnant women, neonates, elderly and people with a compromised immune function. For more than 80 years since the discovery of Listeria in 1924, only a few reports of invasive listeriosis in humans have emerged from India, with all of them in patients having an underlying predisposition. We, however, report Listeria monocytogenes meningoencephalitis in an immunocompetent, previously healthy, 20-month-old female child with no underlying predisposition. The patient showed poor response to empirical treatment with vancomycin and ceftriaxone but improved dramatically after substitution with ampicillin and amikacin. She had a complete recovery other than left lateral rectus palsy that persisted.

  16. Listeria monocytogenes meningoencephalitis in an immunocompetent, previously healthy 20-month old female child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peer, M A; Nasir, R A; Kakru, D K; Fomda, B A; Wani, M A; Hakeem, Q N

    2010-01-01

    Invasive listeriosis predominantly affects pregnant women, neonates, elderly and people with a compromised immune function. For more than 80 years since the discovery of Listeria in 1924, only a few reports of invasive listeriosis in humans have emerged from India, with all of them in patients having an underlying predisposition. We, however, report Listeria monocytogenes meningoencephalitis in an immunocompetent, previously healthy, 20-month-old female child with no underlying predisposition. The patient showed poor response to empirical treatment with vancomycin and ceftriaxone but improved dramatically after substitution with ampicillin and amikacin. She had a complete recovery other than left lateral rectus palsy that persisted.

  17. Prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes in ready-to-eat seafood marketed in Thessaloniki (Northern Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Soultos

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim: In the current study, a contribution to the knowledge on the prevalence and level of contamination of Listeria monocytogenes in ready-to-eat (RTE seafood marketed in Thessaloniki (Northern Greece was provided; the serovar identity of the L. monocytogenes isolates was also determined. Materials and Methods: A total of 132 RTE seafood samples consisting of 74 smoked fish products, 18 salted fish products, 16 dried fish products, 9 raw marinated fish products, 10 cooked marinated cephalopods and 5 surimi crab stick products were analyzed. L. monocytogenes were isolated and enumerated based on ISO 11290-1/A1 and ISO 11290-2/A1 protocols, respectively, and identified using a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR system utilizing genus and species specific primers. For the identification of serotypes a second multiplex PCR assay was used which clusters L. monocytogenes strains into four major serogroups. Results: Of the samples examined, 11 (8.3% proved positive for Listeria spp. with 8 (6.1% yielding L. monocytogenes. Only in one sample of smoked mackerel the level of L. monocytogenes exceeded the legal safety limit of 100 cfu/g set out in Commission Regulation (EC No. 1441/2007. Serotyping showed higher percentages of isolates belonging to PCR serogroup 3:1/2b, 3b, 7 (46.7% and serogroup 1:1/2a, 3a (40% followed by serogroup 4:4b, 4d, 4e (13.3%. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that L. monocytogenes can be isolated from processed RTE seafood products at retail in Thessaloniki (Northern Greece in low concentrations. However, the presence of this human pathogen in RTE seafood should not be overlooked, but it should be considered as having significance public health implications, particularly among the persons who are at greater risk. Therefore, RTE seafood should be produced under appropriate hygienic and technological conditions since the product does not undergo any treatment before consumption.

  18. Listeria monocytogenes alters mast cell phenotype, mediator and osteopontin secretion in a listeriolysin-dependent manner.

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    Catherine E Jobbings

    Full Text Available Whilst mast cells participate in the immune defence against the intracellular bacterium Listeria monocytogenes, there is conflicting evidence regarding the ability of L. monocytogenes to infect mast cells. It is known that the pore-forming toxin listeriolysin (LLO is important for mast cell activation, degranulation and the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Mast cells, however, are a potential source of a wide range of cytokines, chemokines and other mediators including osteopontin, which contributes to the clearing of L. monocytogenes infections in vivo, although its source is unknown. We therefore aimed to resolve the controversy of mast cell infection by L. monocytogenes and investigated the extent of mediator release in response to the bacterium. In this paper we show that the infection of bone marrow-derived mast cells by L. monocytogenes is inefficient and LLO-independent. LLO, however, is required for calcium-independent mast cell degranulation as well as for the transient and selective downregulation of cell surface CD117 (c-kit on mast cells. We demonstrate that in addition to the key pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-6, mast cells release a wide range of other mediators in response to L. monocytogenes. Osteopontin, IL-2, IL-4, IL-13 and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF, and chemokines including CCL2, CCL3, CCL4 and CCL5 are released in a MyD88-dependent manner. The wide range of mediators released by mast cells in response to L. monocytogenes may play an important role in the recruitment and activation of a variety of immune cells in vivo. The cocktail of mediators, however, is unlikely to skew the immune response to a particular effector response. We propose that mast cells provide a hitherto unreported source of osteopontin, and may provide an important role in co-ordinating the immune response during Listeria infection.

  19. Growth of Listeria monocytogenes within a caramel-coated apple microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Kathleen A; Golden, Max C; Wanless, Brandon J; Bedale, Wendy; Czuprynski, Charles

    2015-10-13

    A 2014 multistate listeriosis outbreak was linked to consumption of caramel-coated apples, an unexpected and previously unreported vehicle for Listeria monocytogenes. This outbreak was unanticipated because both the pH of apples (Listeria growth. In this study, Granny Smith apples were inoculated with approximately 4 log10 CFU of L. monocytogenes (a cocktail of serotype 4b strains associated with the outbreak) on each apple's skin, stem, and calyx. Half of the apples had sticks inserted into the core, while the remaining apples were left intact. Apples were dipped into hot caramel and stored at either 7°C or 25°C for up to 11 or 28 days, respectively. Data revealed that apples with inserted sticks supported significantly more L. monocytogenes growth than apples without sticks under both storage conditions. Within 3 days at 25°C, L. monocytogenes populations increased >3 log10 in apples with sticks, whereas only a 1-log10 increase was observed even after 1 week for caramel-coated apples without sticks. When stored at 7°C, apples with sticks exhibited an approximately 1.5-log10 increase in L. monocytogenes levels at 28 days, whereas no growth was observed in apples without sticks. We infer that insertion of a stick into the apple accelerates the transfer of juice from the interior of the apple to its surface, creating a microenvironment at the apple-caramel interface where L. monocytogenes can rapidly grow to levels sufficient to cause disease when stored at room temperature. Neither caramel nor apples are a food where the pathogenic bacterium Listeria monocytogenes should grow, as caramel does not contain enough free water and apples are too acidic. Caramel-coated apples, however, were recently linked to a deadly outbreak of listeriosis. We hypothesized that inserting a stick into the apple releases juice to the interface between the apple and caramel, providing a more hospitable environment than either component alone. To test this hypothesis, apples

  20. Estudio mediante PCR múltiple de serotipos de Listeria monocytogenes aislados en Argentina Study by multiplex PCR of Listeria monocytogenes serotypes isolated in Argentine

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    R. Callejo

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Se comparó una PCR múltiple recientemente validada para la caracterización de serotipos de Listeria monocytogenes con el método tradicional de serotipificación. Se estudiaron 342 aislamientos de origen humano, alimentario, veterinario y ambiental obtenidos durante el período 1992-2005. La concordancia entre ambos métodos para los serotipos 1/2a, 1/2b y 1/2c fue del 100%, y para el serotipo 4b fue del 98%. La serotipificación constituye una herramienta importante como primer nivel de diferenciación de cepas de L. monocytogenes para llevar a cabo la vigilancia epidemiológica y, sobre todo, el estudio de brotes. La PCR múltiple es una técnica alternativa rápida, de bajo costo y fácilmente adaptable en laboratorios de bacteriología clínica y bromatología.A multiplex PCR assay, recently validated to characterize the serotypes of Listeria monocytogenes was evaluated in comparison to conventional serotyping. Three hundred forty two L. monocytogenes strains isolated from human, food, animal and environmental sources during the 1992-2005 period were assayed. The concordance between the two methods for serotypes 1/2a, 1/2b and 1/2c was 100%, whereas for serotype 4b it was 98%. Serotyping is a useful tool for first line strain differentiation during epidemiological surveillance and outbreaks. The multiplex PCR assay offers a fast and low-cost alternative, which is easily adaptable to clinical bacteriology and bromatology laboratories.

  1. Antibacterial efficiency of Spanish Satureja montana essential oil against Listeria monocytogenes among natural flora in minced pork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carramiñana, J J; Rota, C; Burillo, J; Herrera, A

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of winter savory (Satureja montana) essential oil (EO) for control of growth and survival of experimentally inoculated Listeria monocytogenes serovar 4b (10(4) CFU/g) among natural flora in minced pork. EOs of French thyme (Thymus vulgaris F) and rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) cultivated in the same region of Aragon (northeastern Spain) were used as reference ingredients. The EOs obtained by hydrodistillation were added at concentrations of 0.25, 0.5, 1, and 2.5 microl/g (vol/wt), and the samples were kept at 4 degrees C in air for up to 7 days. The populations of L. monocytogenes and total viable bacteria were determined in the control and treated samples at 0, 1, 3, 5, and 7 days. Moderate activity of S. montana EO against L. monocytogenes was observed (at 2.5 microl/g, reductions of 0.27 log CFU/g by day 3 and 0.61 log CFU/g by day 7), with higher activity against aerobic flora. The greatest reduction in aerobic flora was on day 3 (at 2.5 microl/g) from 1.10 to 1.45 log CFU/g. S. montana EO was comparable to T. vulgaris F EO in listericidal activity, but R. officinalis EO was ineffective against the L. monocytogenes and aerobic flora in the minced meat model. The approximately 3-log reduction in aerobic flora with T. vulgaris F EO at 0.25 to 2.5 microl/g after 5 days of storage was the most significant reduction. Depending on sensory considerations, the addition of active EOs in combination with other preservation techniques for synergistic effects may provide alternatives to synthetic chemical preservatives. Suggestions on relationships between chemical composition and biological activities of EOs are outlined.

  2. Epidemiological Survey of Listeria monocytogenes in a gravlax salmon processing line Epidemiologia de Listeria monocytogenes em uma linha de processamento de salmão gravlax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.D. Cruz

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes is a cause of concern to food industries, mainly for those producing ready-to-eat (RTE products. This microorganism can survive processing steps such as curing and cold smoking and is capable of growing under refrigeration temperatures. Its presence in RTE fish products with extended shelf life may be a risk to the susceptible population. One example of such a product is gravlax salmon; a refrigerated fish product not exposed to listericidal processes and was the subject of this study. In order to evaluate the incidence and dissemination of L. monocytogenes 415 samples were collected at different steps of a gravlax salmon processing line in São Paulo state, Brazil. L. monocytogenes was confirmed in salmon samples (41%, food contact surfaces (32%, non-food contact surfaces (43% and of food handlers' samples (34%, but could not be detected in any ingredient. 179 L. monocytogenes isolates randomly selected were serogrouped and typed by PFGE. Most of L. monocytogenes strains belonged to serogroup 1 (73%. 61 combined pulsotypes were found and a dendrogram identified six clusters: most of the strains (120 belonged to cluster A. It was suggested that strains arriving into the plant via raw material could establish themselves in the processing environment contaminating the final product. The wide dissemination of L. monocytogenes in this plant indicates that a great effort has to be taken to eliminate the microorganism from these premises, even though it was not observed multiplication of the microorganism in the final product stored at 4ºC up to 90 days.Listeria monocytogenes é um patógenode grande preocupação para as indústrias alimentícias, principalmente aquelas produtoras de alimentos prontos para consumo (RTE. Este microrganismo pode sobreviver às etapas de cura e defumação a frio, além de tolerar temperaturas de refrigeração. A presença de L. monocytogenes em pescados RTE com vida de prateleira longa

  3. [Listeria monocytogenes: report of a rise in pregnant women and literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noriega R, L Miguel; Ibáñez V, Sebastián; González A, Patricia; Yamamoto C, Masami; Astudillo D, Julio; González V, Marcelo; Riveros K, Rodrigo; Lira C, Fernando; Marcotti S, Alejandra; Pérez G, Jorge; Thompson M, Luis; Daza P, M Francisca; Espinosa I, Maximiliano; Pinochet V, Constanza; Vial C, Pablo A

    2008-10-01

    Listeria monocytogenes, rare pathogen in the general population, causes serious infections in patients at the extreme ages of life, pregnant woman, and those with immunosuppression. The clinical manifestations are essential to suspect the disease in patients at risk, allowing an early prescription of antimicrobial therapy, before the results of the cultures are available. Clinical course and prognosis depends on how early treatment is started and, in pregnant women, the gestational age. In Clínica Alemana, at Santiago, we detected a 15 fold rate rise of neonatal listeriosis between year 2007 and 2008. Ten cases were diagnosed between January and July 2008 and the seven cases occurring in pregnant women are reported here. All these patients were in their first pregnancy, which could be associated with similar lifestyle and food habits. Considering this new epidemiological scenario, it is important to educate the population, and to conduct an epidemiological study in order to determine the national situation of Listeria monocytogenes infection.

  4. RNA- and protein-mediated control of Listeria monocytogenes virulence gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebreton, Alice; Cossart, Pascale

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The model opportunistic pathogen Listeria monocytogenes has been the object of extensive research, aiming at understanding its ability to colonize diverse environmental niches and animal hosts. Bacterial transcriptomes in various conditions reflect this efficient adaptability. We review here our current knowledge of the mechanisms allowing L. monocytogenes to respond to environmental changes and trigger pathogenicity, with a special focus on RNA-mediated control of gene expression. We highlight how these studies have brought novel concepts in prokaryotic gene regulation, such as the ‘excludon’ where the 5′-UTR of a messenger also acts as an antisense regulator of an operon transcribed in opposite orientation, or the notion that riboswitches can regulate non-coding RNAs to integrate complex metabolic stimuli into regulatory networks. Overall, the Listeria model exemplifies that fine RNA tuners act together with master regulatory proteins to orchestrate appropriate transcriptional programmes. PMID:27217337

  5. Listeria monocytogenes has a functional chitinolytic system and an active lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paspaliari, Dafni Katerina; Loose, Jennifer S. M.; Larsen, Marianne Halberg

    2015-01-01

    Chitinases and chitin-active lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are most commonly associated with chitin metabolism, but are also reported as virulence factors in pathogenic bacteria. Listeria monocytogenes, a well-known virulent bacterium, possesses two chitinases (ChiA and ChiB) and a ......Chitinases and chitin-active lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are most commonly associated with chitin metabolism, but are also reported as virulence factors in pathogenic bacteria. Listeria monocytogenes, a well-known virulent bacterium, possesses two chitinases (ChiA and Chi......B) and a multi-modular lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase (LmLPMO10). These enzymes have been related to virulence and their role in chitin metabolism is poorly understood. It is thus of interest to functionally characterize the individual enzymes in order to shed light on their roles in vivo. Our results...

  6. Visualization of gold and platinum nanoparticles interacting with Salmonella enteritidis and Listeria monocytogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sawosz, Ewa; Chwalibog, André; Szeliga, Jacek

    2010-01-01

    -Au and nano-Pt respectively), with Salmonella Enteritidis (Gram-negative) and Listeria monocytogenes (Gram-positive), to reveal possibilities of constructing bacteria-nanoparticle vehicles. Methods: Hydrocolloids of nano-Au or nano-Pt were added to two bacteria suspensions in the following order: nano......, showed that nano-Au were aggregated within flagella or biofilm network and did not penetrate the bacterial cell. The analysis of morphological effects of interaction of nano-Pt with bacteria revealed that nano-Pt entered cells of Listeria monocytogenes and were removed from the cells. In the case...... of Salmonella Enteritidis, nano-Pt were seen inside bacteria cells, probably bound to DNA and partly left bacterial cells. After washing and centrifugation, some of the nano-Pt-DNA complexes were observed within Salmonella Enteritidis. Conclusion: The results indicate that the bacteria could be used...

  7. Growth kinetics of Listeria monocytogenes and spoilage microorganisms in fresh-cut cantaloupe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Ting; Liu, Yanhong; Huang, Lihan

    2013-05-01

    The main objective of this study was to investigate the growth kinetics of Listeria monocytogenes and background microorganisms in fresh-cut cantaloupe. Fresh-cut cantaloupe samples, inoculated with three main serotypes (1/2a, 1/2b, and 4b) of L. monocytogenes, were incubated at different temperatures, ranging from 4 to 43 °C, to develop kinetic growth models. During storage studies, the population of both background microorganisms and L. monocytogenes began to increase almost immediately, with little or no lag phase for most growth curves. All growth curves, except for two growth curves of L. monocytogenes 1/2a at 4 °C, developed to full curves (containing exponential and stationary phases), and can be described by a 3-parameter logistic model. There was no significant difference (P = 0.28) in the growth behaviors and the specific growth rates of three different serotypes of L. monocytogenes inoculated to fresh-cut cantaloupe. The effect of temperature on the growth of L. monocytogenes and spoilage microorganisms was evaluated using three secondary models. For L. monocytogenes, the minimum and maximum growth temperatures were estimated by both the Ratkowsky square-root and Cardinal parameter models, and the optimum temperature and the optimum specific growth rate by the Cardinal parameter model. An Arrhenius-type model provided more accurate estimation of the specific growth rate of L. monocytogenes at temperatures food processors for conducting risk assessment of L. monocytogenes in fresh-cut cantaloupe, and for estimating the shelf-life of fresh-cut products. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Matrix-assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS Can Precisely Discriminate the Lineages of Listeria monocytogenes and Species of Listeria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teruyo Ojima-Kato

    Full Text Available The genetic lineages of Listeria monocytogenes and other species of the genus Listeria are correlated with pathogenesis in humans. Although matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS has become a prevailing tool for rapid and reliable microbial identification, the precise discrimination of Listeria species and lineages remains a crucial issue in clinical settings and for food safety. In this study, we constructed an accurate and reliable MS database to discriminate the lineages of L. monocytogenes and the species of Listeria (L. monocytogenes, L. innocua, L. welshimeri, L. seeligeri, L. ivanovii, L. grayi, and L. rocourtiae based on the S10-spc-alpha operon gene encoded ribosomal protein mass spectrum (S10-GERMS proteotyping method, which relies on both genetic information (genomics and observed MS peaks in MALDI-TOF MS (proteomics. The specific set of eight biomarkers (ribosomal proteins L24, L6, L18, L15, S11, S9, L31 type B, and S16 yielded characteristic MS patterns for the lineages of L. monocytogenes and the different species of Listeria, and led to the construction of a MS database that was successful in discriminating between these organisms in MALDI-TOF MS fingerprinting analysis followed by advanced proteotyping software Strain Solution analysis. We also confirmed the constructed database on the proteotyping software Strain Solution by using 23 Listeria strains collected from natural sources.

  9. Matrix-assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) Can Precisely Discriminate the Lineages of Listeria monocytogenes and Species of Listeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojima-Kato, Teruyo; Yamamoto, Naomi; Takahashi, Hajime; Tamura, Hiroto

    2016-01-01

    The genetic lineages of Listeria monocytogenes and other species of the genus Listeria are correlated with pathogenesis in humans. Although matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has become a prevailing tool for rapid and reliable microbial identification, the precise discrimination of Listeria species and lineages remains a crucial issue in clinical settings and for food safety. In this study, we constructed an accurate and reliable MS database to discriminate the lineages of L. monocytogenes and the species of Listeria (L. monocytogenes, L. innocua, L. welshimeri, L. seeligeri, L. ivanovii, L. grayi, and L. rocourtiae) based on the S10-spc-alpha operon gene encoded ribosomal protein mass spectrum (S10-GERMS) proteotyping method, which relies on both genetic information (genomics) and observed MS peaks in MALDI-TOF MS (proteomics). The specific set of eight biomarkers (ribosomal proteins L24, L6, L18, L15, S11, S9, L31 type B, and S16) yielded characteristic MS patterns for the lineages of L. monocytogenes and the different species of Listeria, and led to the construction of a MS database that was successful in discriminating between these organisms in MALDI-TOF MS fingerprinting analysis followed by advanced proteotyping software Strain Solution analysis. We also confirmed the constructed database on the proteotyping software Strain Solution by using 23 Listeria strains collected from natural sources.

  10. Behavior of Listeria monocytogenes inoculated into raw tomatoes and processed tomato products.

    OpenAIRE

    Beuchat, L R; Brackett, R E

    1991-01-01

    Rates of death and growth of Listeria monocytogenes inoculated onto raw whole and into chopped tomatoes stored at 10 and 21 degrees C were not influenced by prior treatment of tomatoes with chlorine or packaging under an atmosphere of 3% O2 and 97% N2. Growth of the pathogen occurred in whole tomatoes held at 21 degrees C but not at 10 degrees C, while death occurred in chopped tomatoes stored at these temperatures. Likewise, growth patterns of mesophilic aerobic microorganisms, psychrotrophi...

  11. In vivo activity of Nisin A and Nisin V against Listeria monocytogenes in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Campion, Alicia; Casey, Pat G; Field, Des; Cotter, Paul D; Hill, Colin; Ross, R Paul

    2013-01-01

    Background: Lantibiotics are post-translationally modified antimicrobial peptides, of which nisin A is the most extensively studied example. Bioengineering of nisin A has resulted in the generation of derivatives with increased in vitro potency against Gram-positive bacteria. Of these, nisin V (containing a Met21Val change) is noteworthy by virtue of exhibiting enhanced antimicrobial efficacy against a wide range of clinical and food-borne pathogens, including Listeria monocytogenes. However,...

  12. Data on the effect of Cytopiloyne against Listeria monocytogenes infection in mice

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    Chih-Yao Chung

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cytopiloyne (CP, a novel polyacetylene compound extracted from B. pilosa, shows a multi-bioactivity, including immunomodulatory and antidiabetes. Here, we investigated the anti-Listeria effect of cytopiloyne in mice by assessing mortality, clearance of L. monocytogenes, and pathology examination. The data presented herein are supplemental to our research article entitled “Cytopiloyne, a polyacetylenic glucoside from Bidens pilosa, acts as a novel anticandidial agent via regulation of macrophages” [1].

  13. Biofilm formation by Listeria monocytogenes on stainless steel surface and biotransfer potential

    OpenAIRE

    de Oliveira, Ma?ra Maciel Mattos; Brugnera, Danilo Florisvaldo; Alves, Eduardo; Piccoli, Roberta Hilsdorf

    2010-01-01

    An experimental model was proposed to study biofilm formation by Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 19117 on AISI 304 (#4) stainless steel surface and biotransfer potential during this process. In this model, biofilm formation was conducted on the surface of stainless steel coupons, set on a stainless steel base with 4 divisions, each one supporting 21 coupons. Trypic Soy Broth was used as bacterial growth substrate, with incubation at 37 ºC and stirring of 50 rpm. The number of adhered cells was de...

  14. Identification and Characterization of an ATP Binding Cassette l-Carnitine Transporter in Listeria monocytogenes

    OpenAIRE

    Fraser, Katy R.; Harvie, Duncan; Coote, Peter J.; O'Byrne, Conor P.

    2000-01-01

    We identified an operon in Listeria monocytogenes EGD with high levels of sequence similarity to the operons encoding the OpuC and OpuB compatible solute transporters from Bacillus subtilis, which are members of the ATP binding cassette (ABC) substrate binding protein-dependent transporter superfamily. The operon, designated opuC, consists of four genes which are predicted to encode an ATP binding protein (OpuCA), an extracellular substrate binding protein (OpuCC), and two membrane-associated...

  15. 2-deoxy-D-glucose-induced metabolic stress enhances resistance to Listeria monocytogenes infection in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, E. S.; Bates, R. A.; Koebel, D. A.; Fuchs, B. B.; Sonnenfeld, G.

    1998-01-01

    Exposure to different forms of psychological and physiological stress can elicit a host stress response, which alters normal parameters of neuroendocrine homeostasis. The present study evaluated the influence of the metabolic stressor 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG; a glucose analog, which when administered to rodents, induces acute periods of metabolic stress) on the capacity of mice to resist infection with the facultative intracellular bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. Female BDF1 mice were injected with 2-DG (500 mg/kg b. wt.) once every 48 h prior to, concurrent with, or after the onset of a sublethal dose of virulent L. monocytogenes. Kinetics of bacterial growth in mice were not altered if 2-DG was applied concurrently or after the start of the infection. In contrast, mice exposed to 2-DG prior to infection demonstrated an enhanced resistance to the listeria challenge. The enhanced bacterial clearance in vivo could not be explained by 2-DG exerting a toxic effect on the listeria, based on the results of two experiments. First, 2-DG did not inhibit listeria replication in trypticase soy broth. Second, replication of L. monocytogenes was not inhibited in bone marrow-derived macrophage cultures exposed to 2-DG. Production of neopterin and lysozyme, indicators of macrophage activation, were enhanced following exposure to 2-DG, which correlated with the increased resistance to L. monocytogenes. These results support the contention that the host response to 2-DG-induced metabolic stress can influence the capacity of the immune system to resist infection by certain classes of microbial pathogens.

  16. Effect of Phenolic Compound Mixtures on the Viability of Listeria monocytogenes in Meat Model

    OpenAIRE

    María José Rodríguez Vaquero; María Cristina Manca de Nadra; Pedro Adrián Aredes Fernández

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate the synergistic antibacterial effect of phenolic compound mixtures against Listeria monocytogenes in brain heart infusion (BHI) medium, and to select the best mixture for testing their antibacterial activity in a meat model system. In BHI medium, the most effective mixtures were those of gallic and caffeic acids, gallic and protocatechuic acids, and rutin and quercetin. At the concentration of 200 mg/L, the mixtures of gallic and protocatechuic, then gal...

  17. Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Rhombencephalitis due to Listeria monocytogenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatipoglu, H.G.; Onbasioglu Gurbuz, M.; Sakman, B.; Yuksel, E. [Dept. of Radiology, Ankara Numune Education and Research Hospital, Ankara (Turkey)

    2007-04-15

    We present diffusion-weighted imaging findings of a case of rhombencephalitis due to Listeria monocytogenes. It is a rare, life-threatening disorder. The diagnosis is difficult by clinical findings only. In this report, we aim to draw attention to the role of conventional and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging findings. To our knowledge, this is the first case report in the literature with apparent diffusion coefficient values of diseased brain parenchyma.

  18. Interleukin-6-deficient mice are highly susceptible to Listeria monocytogenes infection: correlation with inefficient neutrophilia.

    OpenAIRE

    Dalrymple, S A; Lucian, L A; Slattery, R; McNeil, T; Aud, D M; Fuchino, S; Lee, F; Murray, R

    1995-01-01

    We have produced interleukin-6 (IL-6)-deficient mice to examine, in vivo, the wide variety of biological activities attributed to this multifunctional cytokine. To investigate the role of IL-6 during infectious disease, IL-6-deficient mice were challenged with sublethal doses of Listeria monocytogenes, a facultative intracellular bacterium. While normal control animals were able to clear the infection, mutant animals exhibited a high mortality rate and showed uncontrolled replication of the b...

  19. Real-Time Whole-Genome Sequencing for Surveillance of Listeria monocytogenes, France

    OpenAIRE

    Moura, Alexandra; Tourdjman, Mathieu; Leclercq, Alexandre; Hamelin, Estelle; Laurent, Edith; Fredriksen, Nathalie; Van Cauteren, Dieter; Bracq-Dieye, H?l?ne; Thouvenot, Pierre; Vales, Guillaume; Tessaud-Rita, Nathalie; Maury, Myl?ne M.; Alexandru, Andreea; Criscuolo, Alexis; Quevillon, Emmanuel

    2017-01-01

    During 2015?2016, we evaluated the performance of whole-genome sequencing (WGS) as a routine typing tool. Its added value for microbiological and epidemiologic surveillance of listeriosis was compared with that for pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), the current standard method. A total of 2,743 Listeria monocytogenes isolates collected as part of routine surveillance were characterized in parallel by PFGE and core genome multilocus sequence typing (cgMLST) extracted from WGS. We investi...

  20. Prospective Whole-Genome Sequencing Enhances National Surveillance of Listeria monocytogenes

    OpenAIRE

    Kwong, Jason C.; Mercoulia, Karolina; Tomita, Takehiro; Easton, Marion; Li, Hua Y.; Bulach, Dieter M.; Stinear, Timothy P.; Seemann, Torsten; Howden, Benjamin P.

    2016-01-01

    Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) has emerged as a powerful tool for comparing bacterial isolates in outbreak detection and investigation. Here we demonstrate that WGS performed prospectively for national epidemiologic surveillance of Listeria monocytogenes has the capacity to be superior to our current approaches using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), multilocus sequence typing (MLST), multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA), binary typing, and serotyping. Initially 423 ...

  1. Assessment of Listeria monocytogenes virulence in the Galleria mellonella insect larvae model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakic Martinez, Mira; Ferguson, Martine; Datta, Atin R.

    2017-01-01

    Several animal models have been used to understand the molecular basis of the pathogenicity, infectious dose and strain to strain variation of Listeria monocytogenes. The greater wax worm Galleria mellonella, as an alternative model, provides some useful advantages not available with other models and has already been described as suitable for the virulence assessment of various pathogens including L. monocytogenes. The objectives of this study are: 1) confirming the usefulness of this model with a wide panel of Listeria spp. including non-pathogenic L. innocua, L. seeligeri, L. welshimeri and animal pathogen L. ivanovii; 2) assessment of virulence of several isogenic in-frame deletion mutants in virulence and stress related genes of L. monocytogenes and 3) virulence assessment of paired food and clinical isolates of L. monocytogenes from 14 major listeriosis outbreaks occurred worldwide between 1980 and 2015. Larvae injected with different concentrations of Listeria were incubated at 37°C and monitored over seven days for time needed to kill 50% of larvae (LT50) and to determine change of bacterial population in G. mellonella, 2 and 24 hours post-inoculation. Non-pathogenic members of Listeria and L. ivanovii showed significantly (P < 0.05) higher LT50 (lower virulence) than the wild type L. monocytogenes strains. Isogenic mutants of L. monocytogenes with the deletions in prfA, plcA, hly, actA and virR genes, also showed significantly (P < 0.05) higher LT50 than the wild type strain at the inoculum of 106CFU/larva. Food isolates had significantly (P < 0.05) lower virulence than the paired clinical isolates, at all three inoculum concentrations. L. monocytogenes strains related to non-invasive (gastroenteritis) outbreaks of listeriosis showed significantly (P < 0.05) lower virulence than isolates of the same serotype obtained from outbreaks with invasive symptoms. The difference, however, was dose and strain- dependent. No significant differences in virulence were

  2. Assessment of Listeria monocytogenes virulence in the Galleria mellonella insect larvae model.

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    Mira Rakic Martinez

    Full Text Available Several animal models have been used to understand the molecular basis of the pathogenicity, infectious dose and strain to strain variation of Listeria monocytogenes. The greater wax worm Galleria mellonella, as an alternative model, provides some useful advantages not available with other models and has already been described as suitable for the virulence assessment of various pathogens including L. monocytogenes. The objectives of this study are: 1 confirming the usefulness of this model with a wide panel of Listeria spp. including non-pathogenic L. innocua, L. seeligeri, L. welshimeri and animal pathogen L. ivanovii; 2 assessment of virulence of several isogenic in-frame deletion mutants in virulence and stress related genes of L. monocytogenes and 3 virulence assessment of paired food and clinical isolates of L. monocytogenes from 14 major listeriosis outbreaks occurred worldwide between 1980 and 2015. Larvae injected with different concentrations of Listeria were incubated at 37°C and monitored over seven days for time needed to kill 50% of larvae (LT50 and to determine change of bacterial population in G. mellonella, 2 and 24 hours post-inoculation. Non-pathogenic members of Listeria and L. ivanovii showed significantly (P < 0.05 higher LT50 (lower virulence than the wild type L. monocytogenes strains. Isogenic mutants of L. monocytogenes with the deletions in prfA, plcA, hly, actA and virR genes, also showed significantly (P < 0.05 higher LT50 than the wild type strain at the inoculum of 106CFU/larva. Food isolates had significantly (P < 0.05 lower virulence than the paired clinical isolates, at all three inoculum concentrations. L. monocytogenes strains related to non-invasive (gastroenteritis outbreaks of listeriosis showed significantly (P < 0.05 lower virulence than isolates of the same serotype obtained from outbreaks with invasive symptoms. The difference, however, was dose and strain- dependent. No significant differences in

  3. Impact of nitrite on detection of Listeria monocytogenes in selected ready-to-eat (RTE) meat and seafood products.

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    Nyachuba, D G; Donnelly, C W; Howard, A B

    2007-09-01

    The impact of sodium nitrite (NaNO2) on detection and recovery of Listeria monocytogenes from select ready-to-eat (RTE) foods including smoked salmon, smoked ham, beef frankfurters, and beef bologna was assessed. Nitrite-containing (NC; 100 to 200 ppm NaNO2) or nitrite-free (NF) foods were inoculated with a 5-strain cocktail of L. monocytogenes by immersion into Butterfield's buffer solution containing 5.4 to 7.4 x 10(3) L. monocytogenes per milliliter. Inoculated products were vacuum-packaged and stored at 5 degrees C. A weekly comparative analysis was performed for presence of L. monocytogenes using 5 detection methods on products held at 5 degrees C for up to 8 wk. L. monocytogenes initially present at Listeria-positive food samples and were consistently superior to and significantly different (P Listeria from NC samples. Data show that nitrite-induced injury adversely affects detection and recovery of L. monocytogenes from NC food, confirming earlier findings that nitrite-induced injury masks L. monocytogenes detection in NC RTE food products. Nitrite-injured Listeria can subsequently repair upon nitrite depletion and grow to high levels over extended refrigerated storage.

  4. Investigating the control of Listeria monocytogenes on a ready-to-eat ham product using natural antimicrobial ingredients and postlethality interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavieri, Nicolas A; Sebranek, Joseph G; Brehm-Stecher, Byron F; Cordray, Joseph C; Dickson, James S; Horsch, Ashley M; Jung, Stephanie; Larson, Elaine M; Manu, David K; Mendonça, Aubrey F

    2014-06-01

    Ready-to-eat (RTE) meat and poultry products manufactured with natural or organic methods are at greater risk for Listeria monocytogenes growth, if contaminated, than their conventional counterparts due to the required absence of preservatives and antimicrobials. Thus, the objective of this study was to investigate the use of commercially available natural antimicrobials and postlethality interventions in the control of L. monocytogenes growth and recovery on a RTE ham product. Antimicrobials evaluated were cranberry powder (90MX), vinegar (DV), and vinegar/lemon juice concentrate (LV1X). Postlethality interventions studied were high hydrostatic pressure at 400 (HHP400) or 600 (HHP600) MPa, lauric arginate (LAE), octanoic acid (OA), and postpackaging thermal treatment (PPTT). Parameters evaluated through 98 days of storage at 4±1°C were residual nitrite concentrations, pH, a(w), and viable L. monocytogenes on modified Oxford (MOX) media. On day 1, OA, 90MX, DV, and LV1X yielded lower residual nitrite concentrations than the control, whereas HHP400, HHP600, and LAE did not. LAE, HHP400, and OA reduced L. monocytogenes population compared to the control after 1 day of storage by 2.38, 2.21, and 1.73 log10 colony-forming units per gram, respectively. PPTT did not achieve a significant reduction in L. monocytogenes populations. L. monocytogenes recovered and grew in all postlethality intervention treatments except HHP600. 90MX did not inhibit the growth of L. monocytogenes, while DV and LV1X did. Results of this study demonstrate the bactericidal properties of HHP, OA, and LAE and the bacteriostatic potential of natural antimicrobial ingredients such as DV and LV1X against L. monocytogenes.

  5. Listeria monocytogenes en alimentos: ¿son todos los aislamientos igual de virulentos? Foodborne Listeria monocytogenes: are all the isolates equally virulent?

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    V. López

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes es un patógeno humano que se transmite a través de los alimentos y que causa infecciones graves, con una alta tasa de mortalidad. A pesar de la ubicuidad del microorganismo, la tasa real de la enfermedad es bastante baja y se asocia casi siempre a condiciones predisponentes. Tradicionalmente se consideraba que los aislamientos presentes en los alimentos y en el ambiente tenían la misma capacidad patogénica que los aislamientos de origen clínico. Pero el análisis de mutaciones en los genes de determinados factores de virulencia (internalina, hemolisina, fosfolipasas, proteína de superficie ActA y proteína reguladora PrfA, los estudios cuantitativos realizados con cultivos celulares y la genética de poblaciones, están replanteando la discusión sobre la variabilidad de la virulencia de L. monocytogenes. A pesar de todos estos avances, no existe un único marcador que permita comprobar la virulencia de los aislamientos naturales de esta especie. Probablemente en el futuro, la combinación de diferentes marcadores moleculares permitirá detectar los alimentos contaminados sólo por los clones virulentos de L. monocytogenes, con lo que se mejorará la prevención de la listeriosis humana transmitida por alimentos.Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne human pathogen responsible for invasive infections presenting overall a high mortality. Despite the ubiquity of the microorganism, the actual disease rate is quite low and the disease is most often associated with an underlying predisposition. Foodborne and environmental isolates were traditionally considered of similar pathogenicity compared to clinical isolates. But the analysis of mutations in the genes encoding specific virulence factors (internalin, hemolysin, phospholipases, surface protein ActA and regulator protein PrfA, quantitative studies with cell cultures and population genetics have raised considerable concerns about virulence differences among L

  6. Behavior of Salmonella and Listeria monocytogenes in Raw Yellowfin Tuna during Cold Storage

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    Chengchu Liu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Behavior of Salmonella and Listeria monocytogenes in raw yellowfin tuna during refrigeration and frozen storage were studied. Growth of Salmonella was inhibited in tuna during refrigerated storage, while L. monocytogenes was able to multiply significantly during refrigerated storage. Populations of Salmonella in tuna were reduced by 1 to 2 log after 12 days of storage at 5–7 °C, regardless levels of contamination. However, populations of L. monocytogenes Scott A, M0507, and SFL0404 in inoculated tuna (104–105 CFU/g increased by 3.31, 3.56, and 3.98 log CFU/g, respectively, after 12 days of storage at 5–7 °C. Similar increases of L. monocytogenes cells were observed in tuna meat with a lower inoculation level (102–103 CFU/g. Populations of Salmonella and L. monocytogenes declined gradually in tuna samples over 84 days (12 weeks of frozen storage at −18 °C with Salmonella Newport 6962 being decreased to undetectable level (<10 CFU/g from an initial level of 103 log CFU/g after 42 days of frozen storage. These results demonstrate that tuna meat intended for raw consumption must be handled properly from farm to table to reduce the risks of foodborne illness caused by Salmonella and L. monocytogenes.

  7. Isolation of Listeria monocytogenes from milks used for Iranian traditional cheese in Lighvan cheese factories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosavy, Mir-Hassan; Esmaeili, Saber; Mostafavi, Ehsan; Bagheri Amiri, Fahimeh

    2014-01-01

    Traditional Lighvan cheese is a semi-hard cheese which has a popular market in Iran and neighboring countries. The aim of this study was evaluating the contamination of milks used for Lighvan cheese making with Listeria monocytogenes. Raw milk samples were randomly collected from different cheese producing factories (sampling carried out from large milk tanks used cheese making in factories). Isolation of L. monocytogenes was performed according to ISO 11290 and biochemical tests were done to identify and confirm L. monocytogenes. 9 samples (50%) of the 18 collected samples from milk tanks in Lighvan cheese producing factories were contaminated with L. monocytogenes. The concentration of L. monocytogenes in all 9 positive samples was 40 CFU/ml. This study is the first report of L. monocytogenes contamination in raw milks used for Lighvan cheese production in Iran. Regarding the fact that these cheeses are produced from raw milk and no heating process is performed on them its milk contamination can be a potential risk for consumers.

  8. Phenotypic and Genotypic Characteristics of Listeria monocytogenes Isolated From Dairy and Meat Products

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    Bahador

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne pathogen and a serious threat to the public health in the world. Consumption of traditional foods such as dairy and meat products can be a major reason for relative abundance and isolation of these bacteria. Objectives The purpose of this study was to determine the phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of L. monocytogenes strains isolated from dairy and meat products. Materials and Methods A total of 317 dairy products and meat-processed samples were collected. Antibiotic susceptibility test was performed on each sample by the disk diffusion method (Kirby Bauer. Five reference loci were used for typing of L. monocytogenes strains by MLVA (Multiple Locus VNTR Analysis Technique. Results A total of 24 L. monocytogenes isolates were collected from the dairy and meat products. Resistance of isolated L. monocytogenes strains to penicillin G were 54.54% (from dairy products and 46.15% (from processed meat. Genetic relatedness of isolates were assessed by MLVA. Out of 13 different types, type 2 with 6 strains and type 3 with 4 strains, were the most common types. Conclusions MLVA analysis showed that samples obtained from different sources could have similar genetic profile. As a result, administration of penicillin in patients with listeriosis (especially pregnant women and antibiotic susceptibility test are recommended. The fast and accurate methods such as MLVA for tracking of pollution sources of L. monocytogenes are recommended during outbreaks.

  9. Listeria monocytogenes: The Impact of Cell Death on Infection and Immunity

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    Courtney E. McDougal

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes has evolved exquisite mechanisms for invading host cells and spreading from cell-to-cell to ensure maintenance of its intracellular lifecycle. As such, it is not surprising that loss of the intracellular replication niche through induction of host cell death has significant implications on the development of disease and the subsequent immune response. Although L. monocytogenes can activate multiple pathways of host cell death, including necrosis, apoptosis, and pyroptosis, like most intracellular pathogens L. monocytogenes has evolved a series of adaptations that minimize host cell death to promote its virulence. Understanding how L. monocytogenes modulates cell death during infection could lead to novel therapeutic approaches. In addition, as L. monocytogenes is currently being developed as a tumor immunotherapy platform, understanding how cell death pathways influence the priming and quality of cell-mediated immunity is critical. This review will focus on the mechanisms by which L. monocytogenes modulates cell death, as well as the implications of cell death on acute infection and the generation of adaptive immunity.

  10. RsbV of Listeria monocytogenes contributes to regulation of environmental stress and virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zaichao; Meng, Qingling; Qiao, Jun; Yang, Lihong; Cai, Xuepeng; Wang, Guanglei; Chen, Chuangfu; Zhang, Lijuan

    2013-02-01

    SigmaB factor is an important regulatory factor for stress response in Gram-positive bacteria such as Listeria monocytogenes (L. monocytogenes), Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis. However, the activity of SigmaB factor is regulated by RsbV factor. Currently, the functional studies of RsbV factor are mostly focused on non-pathogenic B. subtilis, but the roles of RsbV factor in pathogenic L. monocytogenes during the regulation of environmental stress and virulence are still unclear. In the study, a ∆RsbV mutant of L. monocytogenes was constructed to explore the regulatory role of RsbV in environmental stress and virulence. The environmental stress experiments indicated that the growth and survival capability of ∆RsbV mutant obviously decreased in stress of low temperature, osmotic pressure, alcohol and acid, compared with EGD strain. The macrophage infection experiment indicated that ∆RsbV mutant had weaker survival capability than EGD strain, and the expression of PrfA, actA, PlcA and LLO was down-regulated in infected cells. Animal inoculation experiments indicated that RsbV deletion significantly reduced the pathogenicity of L. monocytogenes. Our data demonstrate that, in addition to regulating tolerance under environmental stress conditions, RsbV also contributes to regulation of L. monocytogenes virulence.

  11. The Listeria monocytogenes LPXTG surface protein Lmo1413 is an invasin with capacity to bind mucin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariscotti, Javier F; Quereda, Juan J; García-Del Portillo, Francisco; Pucciarelli, M Graciela

    2014-05-01

    Many Gram-positive bacterial pathogens use surface proteins covalently anchored to the peptidoglycan to cause disease. Bacteria of the genus Listeria have the largest number of surface proteins of this family. Every Listeria genome sequenced to date contains more than forty genes encoding surface proteins bearing anchoring-domains with an LPXTG motif that is recognized for covalent linkage to the peptidoglycan. About one-third of these proteins are present exclusively in pathogenic Listeria species, with some of them acting as adhesins or invasins that promote bacterial entry into eukaryotic cells. Here, we investigated two LPXTG surface proteins of the pathogen L. monocytogenes, Lmo1413 and Lmo2085, of unknown function and absent in non-pathogenic Listeria species. Lack of these two proteins does not affect bacterial adhesion or invasion of host cells using in vitro infection models. However, expression of Lmo1413 promotes entry of the non-invasive species L. innocua into non-phagocytic host cells, an effect not observed with Lmo2085. Moreover, overproduction of Lmo1413, but not Lmo2085, increases the invasion rate in non-phagocytic eukaryotic cells of an L. monocytogenes mutant deficient in the acting-binding protein ActA. Unexpectedly, production of full-length Lmo1413 and InlA exhibited opposite trends in a high percentage of L. monocytogenes isolates obtained from different sources. The idea of Lmo1413 playing a role as a new auxiliary invasin was also sustained by assays revealing that purified Lmo1413 binds to mucin via its MucBP domains. Taken together, these data indicate that Lmo1413, which we rename LmiA, for Listeria-mucin-binding invasin-A, may promote interaction of bacteria with adhesive host protective components and, in this manner, facilitate bacterial entry. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. Listeria monocytogenes behaviour in presence of non-UV-irradiated titanium dioxide nanoparticles.

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    Maria Grazia Ammendolia

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes is the agent of listeriosis, a food-borne disease. It represents a serious problem for the food industry because of its environmental persistence mainly due to its ability to form biofilm on a variety of surfaces. Microrganisms attached on the surfaces are a potential source of contamination for environment and animals and humans. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs are used in food industry in a variety of products and it was reported that daily exposure to these nanomaterials is very high. Anti-listerial activity of TiO2 NPs was investigated only with UV-irradiated nanomaterials, based on generation of reactive oxigen species (ROS with antibacterial effect after UV exposure. Since both Listeria monocytogenes and TiO2 NPs are veicolated with foods, this study explores the interaction between Listeria monocytogenes and non UV-irradiated TiO2 NPs, with special focus on biofilm formation and intestinal cell interaction. Scanning electron microscopy and quantitative measurements of biofilm mass indicate that NPs influence both production and structural architecture of listerial biofilm. Moreover, TiO2 NPs show to interfere with bacterial interaction to intestinal cells. Increased biofilm production due to TiO2 NPs exposure may favour bacterial survival in environment and its transmission to animal and human hosts.

  13. [Application and evaluation of loop-mediated isothermal amplification method for detecting of Listeria monocytogenes in food].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Zeng, Jing; Ma, Dan; Cheng, Jinxia; Zhang, Haiyu

    2014-03-01

    The loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) detection method was applied to detect Listeria monocytogenes in food. The specificity and sensitivity of this method were evaluated through comparing it with Real-time PCR and conventional detection method. The LAMP primers were designed based on hly gene of Listeria monocytogenes. The LAMP method was applied to detect 88 Listeria monocytogenes, 1 reference strain ATCC 15313 of Listeria monocytogenes and 33 non-targets bacteria strains; base-material addition test and practical food samples detection were also conducted. Both of Real-time PCR and ISO 11290-1 methods were used as parallel detection method in addition to LAMP. The three kinds of methods were compared by specificity, sensitivity, detection limit and the detection result of practical food samples. Both detection results of LAMP and Real-time PCR for 89 Listeria monocytogenes were positive (100%, 89/89), 33 non-targets bacteria strains were negative (100%, 33/33). The sensitivity of LAMP was 2 × 10² CFU/ml, which was consistent with Real-time PCR method (2 × 10² CFU/ml) and better than ISO 11290-1 method (2 × 10² CFU/ml). Base-material addition test result showed that the detection limit of the three kinds of methods were 3 CFU/25 g samples. And the result of practical food samples displayed the same detection rate of 4% in the three methods (2/45). The LAMP method of Listeria monocytogenes established in this study has good specificity and sensitivity, which can be applied to the rapid detection of Listeria monocytogenes.

  14. Listeria monocytogenes isolated in ready-to-eat food in South Bačka region of Vojvodina province, Serbia

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    Gusman Vera

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes is pathogenic bacterium that can contaminate food products during and after processing. As ready-to-eat food does not undergo any treatment to ensure its safety before consumption, the risk of foodborne disease must be considered if this pathogen is present in the food. As diseases caused by contaminated food are an important public health problem today, the aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes in different ready-to-eat food products. In the seven-month period from June 1 to December 31, 2011, a total of 1 380 food samples were examined in the Division of Sanitary Bacteriology, Center for Microbiology, Institute of Public Health of Vojvodina in Novi Sad. A total of 912 samples were analyzed for the presence of Listeria monocytogenes according to ISO 11290-2. The identity of suspected Listeria monocytogenes was confirmed using the VITEK 2 Compact system (BioMerieux, France. Out of 912 samples, Listeria monocytogenes was detected in 18 (1.97%. Listeria monocytogenes was mostly found in cooked meals (in 6 samples out of 18, sandwiches (4 samples and frozen food, such as ice-cream and frozen vegetables (4 samples. It was also found in tofu bread spreads (2 samples, cream cheese (1 sample and cakes (1 sample. The presence of Listeria monocytogenes in some ready-to-eat food could present a public health hazard, particularly to the high-risk population group, because of the high mortality rate associated with listeriosis and the widespread nature of the organism. Monitoring of listeriosis is essential to prevent foodborne outbreaks, and in assessing human health risk in ready-to-eat foods.

  15. Biocontrole de Listeria monocytogenes por Pediococcus acidilactici em couve minimamente processada Biocontrol of Listeria monocytogenes by Pediococcus acidilactici in fresh-cut kale

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    Wanessa Altimiras Costa

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo avaliou um sistema de biocontrole para inibição de Listeria monocytogenes em couve minimamente processada, objetivando sua segurança durante estocagem sob refrigeração e em condições de abuso de temperatura. O potencial inibitório de bactérias láticas tolerantes ao sal e psicrotróficas contaminantes naturais da couve e Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus delbrueckii ATCC 9649 e Lactobacillus casei CCT 1465 foram avaliadas contra L. monocytogenes. O isolado de couve identificado como P. acidilactici CCA3 inibiu L. monocytogenes a 10 e 15 °C em ágar MRS e foi selecionado como possível agente de biocontrole. O número de L. monocytogenes na couve minimamente processada aumentou 3,7 e 4,7 ciclos logarítmicos a 5 e 10 °C, respectivamente, após 20 dias de armazenamento e 4,6 ciclos logarítmicos após oito dias a 15 °C. Entretanto, quando 10(8 UFC.g-1 de P. acidilactici CCA3 foram inoculados no produto processado, o crescimento de L. monocytogenes reduziu 2,3 ciclos logarítmicos sob temperatura abusiva de 15 °C. A acidez titulável e as características sensoriais da couve não foram alteradas pela presença de CCA3 ao longo do período de vida útil. Estes resultados sugerem o potencial de aplicação dos bioconservantes na couve minimamente processada, que necessitam estar associados à refrigeração e sanitização para garantir segurança.This study evaluated a biological control system for the inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes in minimally processed kale focusing on its freshness under refrigeration and extreme temperatures. The inhibitory potential of salt and cold tolerant lactic bacteria from natural microflora of kale, Lactobacillus delbrueckii ATCC 9649, Lactobacillus plantarum, and Lactobacillus casei CCT 1465 strains were evaluated against L. monocytogenes. Pediococcus acidilactici CCA3 isolated from kale exhibited a large inhibition zone of L. monocytogenes at 10 and 15 °C in MRS agar and was

  16. Detección de Listeria spp. y Listeria monocytogenes en muestras de leche cruda y quesos artesanales respectivamente, mediante PCR en Tiempo Real

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    Viviana Pamela Chiluisa-Utreras

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. In Ecuador, studies about bacteria genre Listeria in artisanal cheeses are scarce, and in raw milk, practically nonexistent. Milk production is one of the main livestock activities in the province of Pichincha and it is essential to study these products. Since all the cantons that make up Pichincha are milk producers, three of them, Cayambe, Quito and Pedro Moncayo were randomly sampled. Objective. To determine Listeria spp. And Listeria monocytogenes in samples of raw milk and artisanal cheeses, respectively, using Real Time PCR. Methods. The application of the qPCR technique in the detection of microorganisms and especially of bacteria in food, is based on four fundamental aspects: its sensitivity, specificity, speed and processing capacity of large sample flow. It is possible to detect small amounts of pathogenic microorganisms, such as Listeria spp in raw milk, after extraction and quantification of total DNA. Results. In this study in raw milk, one positive was determined from a total of 60 samples, representing 1.6% of Listeria spp. and 16 positive samples of 45, representing 35.6% of Listeria monocytogenes in artisanal cheeses from three farms in the province of Pichincha. Conclusions. The results, according to the statistical analyzes carried out with the Kruskal - Wallis test, show that in Pichincha the bacterium is present in raw milk, but in non - representative quantities, whereas for Listeria monocytogenes there is statistical significance in the cheeses samples

  17. Prevalence of Listeria species in camel sausages from retail markets in Aydin province in Turkey and RAPD analysis of Listeria monocytogenes Isolates

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    Ozbey Gokben

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Samples were taken from 100 camel sausages from the different retail markets in Aydin province in the south-west of Turkey and they were tested for the presence of Listeria spp by biochemical methods. Samples were enriched using Listeria Enrichment Broth and they were inoculated onto Listeria Selective Agar. Listeria monocytogenes was isolated from nine samples (9%, Listeria innocua from 14 samples (14% and Listeria welshimeri from two samples(2%. A 701 bp fragment of listeriolysin O sequence for L. monocytogenes was amplified using specific primers by polymerase chain reaction (PCR for confirmation of the identification. A random primer (OPA-11 was used in a random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD assay. This detected five different band profiles amongst the L. monocytogenes isolates, indicating a relatively large amount of genetic heterogeneity amongst the nine isolates. The study has highlighted the need for improved strategies for food safety, in particular appropriate hygienic precautions to avoid contamination of sausage during the manufacturing process and appropriate preservation techniques during storage and transport, to prevent transmission of Listeria spp to consumers at home and abroad.

  18. An overview of Listeria monocytogenes contamination in ready to eat meat, dairy and fishery foods

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    Carla Susana Rodrigues

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Listeria monocytogenes is a relevant foodborne pathogen in public health, responsible for outbreaks of listeriosis often associated to the consumption of ready to eat meat, dairy and fishery products. Listeriosis is a serious disease that can lead to death and mainly affect children, the elderly and immunocompromised individuals. In pregnant women causes abortion or neonatal listeriosis. In Brazil, ready to eat food are appreciated and increasingly consumed by the population. Furthermore, products such as sausages, bologna, hams and cheeses have characteristics such as pH, Aw and sodium chloride content that favor the development of L. monocytogenes during their shelf life. The purpose of this paper was to present an overview of L. monocytogenes contamination in different meat, dairy and fishery products that are ready for consumption and thereby support the adoption of strategies to mitigate this risk, contributing to achieve the appropriate level protection for the consumers and thus strengthen Brazil's food safety system.

  19. Current knowledge and perspectives on biofilm formation: the case of Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Eliane Pereira; De Martinis, Elaine Cristina Pereira

    2013-02-01

    Listeriosis is a rare, serious, and mainly food-borne infection caused by the bacterium Listeria monocytogenes. This food-borne infection primarily affects pregnant women and immunologically compromised individuals. L. monocytogenes is recognized as a problem for the food industry, mainly due to its environmental persistence, attributed in part to its ability to form biofilms. Biofilms are microbial communities adhered to biotic or abiotic surfaces coated by self-produced extracellular polymers. These structures confer protection to bacterial cells and decrease the efficiency of cleaning and disinfection procedures. This article presents a brief review of current perspectives on the formation of biofilms, with emphasis on L. monocytogenes, highlighting the importance of cell-to-cell communication and structural composition of the microbial communities. The techniques currently used to study biofilms and the need to develop new strategies for the prevention and control of biofilm-forming pathogens are also discussed.

  20. Dose-response model for Listeria monocytogenes-induced stillbirths in nonhuman primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Mary Alice; Takeuchi, Kazue; Anderson, Gary; Ware, Glenn O; McClure, Harold M; Raybourne, Richard B; Mytle, Nutan; Doyle, Michael P

    2008-02-01

    A dose-response model using rhesus monkeys as a surrogate for pregnant women indicates that oral exposure to 10(7) CFU of Listeria monocytogenes results in about 50% stillbirths. Ten of 33 pregnant rhesus monkeys exposed orally to a single dose of 10(2) to 10(10) CFU of L. monocytogenes had stillbirths. A log-logistic model predicts a dose affecting 50% of animals at 10(7) CFU, comparable to an estimated 10(6) CFU based on an outbreak among pregnant women but much less than the extrapolated estimate (10(13) CFU) from the FDA-U.S. Department of Agriculture-CDC risk assessment using an exponential curve based on mouse data. Exposure and etiology of the disease are the same in humans and primates but not in mice. This information will aid in risk assessment, assist policy makers, and provide a model for mechanistic studies of L. monocytogenes-induced stillbirths.

  1. Listeria monocytogenes and other contaminants in fresh cheese and cream from Zagreb city area domestic production

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    Ksenija Markov

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research was to determine whether the cream cheese and cream that are produced in the traditional manner at home and are free to sale on Zagreb markets, meet microbiological requirements for foodstuffs (OG 46/94, 20/01, 40/01. Particular attention is given to research of bacteria Listeria monocytogenes presence in these foods, because of its exceptional hazards to human health. It was found that a majority of 64 (53 % from a total of 120 studied dairy products samples were contaminated with microbial pathogens, of which 16 % are waste in the cream cheese, and 37 % in cream samples. 39 samples of cheese and 50 samples of cream did not fulfil the conditions prescribed by the Croatian Guidelines, primarily due to the contamination with yeasts and moulds. In 10 cheese and cream samples where L. monocytogenes is proven by classical microbiological methods, PCR method confirmed L. monocytogenes in only one cream sample.

  2. Effect of starter cultures on survival of Listeria monocytogenes in Čajna sausage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bošković, M.; Tadić, V.; Đorđević, J.; Glišić, M.; Lakićević, B.; Dimitrijević, M.; Baltić, M. Ž.

    2017-09-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the survival of Listeria monocytogenes during the production of Čajna sausage with short maturation time. Sausage batter was inoculated with three different serotypes 4b and serotype 1/2a of L. monocytogenes. Control sausages were without any starter culture added; the second batch was inoculated with strains of Lactobacillus sakei, Staphylococcus carnosus and Staphylococcus xylosus, and the third batch was inoculated with strains of Debaryomyces hansenii, Lactobacillus sakei, Pediococcus acidilactici, Pediococcus pentosaceus, Staphylococcus carnosus and Staphylococcus xylosus. After 18 days of ripening, L. monocytogenes was not detected in any of the sausages, but during this fermentation and drying, the numbers of this pathogen was lower in the sausages inoculated with starter cultures.

  3. Infectious Dose of Listeria monocytogenes in Outbreak Linked to Ice Cream, United States, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouillot, Régis; Klontz, Karl C; Chen, Yi; Burall, Laurel S; Macarisin, Dumitru; Doyle, Matthew; Bally, Kären M; Strain, Errol; Datta, Atin R; Hammack, Thomas S; Van Doren, Jane M

    2016-12-01

    The relationship between the number of ingested Listeria monocytogenes cells in food and the likelihood of developing listeriosis is not well understood. Data from an outbreak of listeriosis linked to milkshakes made from ice cream produced in 1 factory showed that contaminated products were distributed widely to the public without any reported cases, except for 4 cases of severe illness in persons who were highly susceptible. The ingestion of high doses of L. monocytogenes by these patients infected through milkshakes was unlikely if possible additional contamination associated with the preparation of the milkshake is ruled out. This outbreak illustrated that the vast majority of the population did not become ill after ingesting a low level of L. monocytogenes but raises the question of listeriosis cases in highly susceptible persons after distribution of low-level contaminated products that did not support the growth of this pathogen.

  4. Optimizing the balance between host and environmental survival skills: lessons learned from Listeria monocytogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xayarath, Bobbi; Freitag, Nancy E

    2012-01-01

    Environmental pathogens – organisms that survive in the outside environment but maintain the capacity to cause disease in mammals – navigate the challenges of life in habitats that range from water and soil to the cytosol of host cells. The bacterium Listeria monocytogenes has served for decades as a model organism for studies of host–pathogen interactions and for fundamental paradigms of cell biology. This ubiquitous saprophy te has recently become a model for understanding how an environmental bacterium switches to life within human cells. This review describes how L. monocytogenes balances life in disparate environments with the help of a critical virulence regulator known as PrfA. Understanding L. monocytogenes survival strategies is important for gaining insight into how environmental microbes become pathogens. PMID:22827306

  5. Antibiotic treatment and mortality in patients with Listeria monocytogenes meningitis or bacteraemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thønnings, Sara; Knudsen, Jenny D; Schønheyder, Henrik C

    2016-01-01

    . monocytogenes infections including the efficacy of empiric and definitive antibiotic therapies. Demographic, clinical and biochemical findings, antibiotic treatment and 30-day mortality for all episodes of L. monocytogenes bacteraemia and/or meningitis were collected by retrospective medical record review......Invasive Listeria monocytogenes infections carry a high mortality despite antibiotic treatment. The rareness of the infection makes it difficult to improve antibiotic treatment through randomized clinical trials. This observational study investigated clinical features and outcome of invasive L...... in the North Denmark Region and the Capital Region of Denmark (17 hospitals) from 1997 to 2012. Risk factors for 30-day all-cause mortality were assessed by logistic regression. The study comprised 229 patients (median age: 71 years), 172 patients had bacteraemia, 24 patients had meningitis and 33 patients had...

  6. Listeria monocytogenes cross-contamination of cheese: risk throughout the food supply chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauders, B D; D'Amico, D J

    2016-10-01

    Listeria monocytogenes has been the most common microbial cause of cheese-related recalls in both the United States and Canada in recent years. Since L. monocytogenes is inactivated by pasteurization, the majority of these cases have been linked to environmental and cross-contamination of fresh-soft, soft-ripened, and semi-soft cheeses. Cross-contamination of foods with L. monocytogenes is a continuous risk throughout the food supply chain and presents unique challenges for subsequent illness and outbreak investigations. Reports on outbreaks of listeriosis attributed to cross-contamination downstream from primary processing help highlight the critical role of epidemiological investigation coupled with coordinated molecular subtyping and surveillance in the recognition and investigation of complex foodborne outbreaks. Despite their complexity, environmental sampling throughout the supply chain coupled with improved genotyping approaches and concomitant analysis of foodborne illness epidemiological exposure data are needed to help resolve these and similar cases more rapidly and with greater confidence.

  7. The use of Listeria monocytogenes as a DNA delivery vector for cancer gene therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tangney, Mark

    2012-01-31

    Listeria monocytogenes is an intracellular pathogen that lyses the phagosomal vacuole of infected cells, proliferates in the host cell cytoplasm and can actively enter adjacent cells. The pathogen is therefore well suited to exploitation as a vector for the delivery of DNA to target cells as the lifecycle favors cellular targeting with vector amplification and the potential for cell-to-cell spread. We have recently demonstrated DNA transfer by L. monocytogenes in growing tumors in murine models. Our approach exploited an ampicillin sensitive stain of L. monocytogenes which can be lysed through systemic administration of ampicillin to facilitate release of plasmid DNA for expression by infected mammalian cells. Here, we discuss the implications of this technology and the potential for future improvements of the system.

  8. Modeling the growth of Listeria monocytogenes in soft blue-white cheese

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosshaug, Per Sand; Detmer, Ann; Ingmer, Hanne

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a predictive model simulating growth over time of the pathogenic bacterium Listeria monocytogenes in a soft blue-white cheese. The physicochemical properties in a matrix such as cheese are essential controlling factors influencing the growth of L. monocytogenes....... We developed a predictive tertiary model of the bacterial growth of L. monocytogenes as a function of temperature, pH, NaCl, and lactic acid. We measured the variations over time of the physicochemical properties in the cheese. Our predictive model was developed based on broth data produced...... in previous studies. New growth data sets were produced to independently calibrate and validate the developed model. A characteristic of this tertiary model is that it handles dynamic growth conditions described in time series of temperature, pH, NaCl, and lactic acid. Supplying the model with realistic...

  9. Listeria monocytogenes Infection in a Sugar Glider (Petaurus breviceps) - New Mexico, 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, M; Takacs, N; Ragsdale, J; Levenson, D; Marquez, C; Roache, K; Tarr, C L

    2015-06-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive, facultative anaerobic, rod-shaped bacterium that can infect and cause disease in many species. In this case report, we describe a case of L. monocytogenes infection causing sepsis in a sugar glider (Petaurus breviceps). The sugar glider consumed a varied diet consisting of human food items, including cantaloupe. A nationwide outbreak of L. monocytogenes foodborne illness associated with cantaloupes occurred simultaneously with this incident case. In this case, the bacterial strains from the outbreak and glider were genetically distinct. Although rare, veterinarians should be aware of the emergence of foodborne pathogens' ability to infect exotic animals residing in domestic environments. © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  10. [Measuring the control and decrease in prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes species in foods of animal origin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplan, Marius Eduard

    2011-01-01

    A large distributed bacterium, Listeria monocytogenes has been isolated from water and fresh vegetables, raw meat and processed meat (all types), and raw, salted and smoked fish. L. monocytogenes grows at low oxygen concentrations and at low temperatures, surviving for a long time in the environment, in the processing plant, as well as on the equipment, instruments and during storage at the refrigeration temperature. L. monocytogenes causes invasive listeriosis, often affecting immunocompromised individuals. Epidemiologically, listeriosis appears as sporadic cases and outbreaks, with an incidence of 3-8 cases/1000000 inhabitants, run-down in most countries, reflecting the measures compulsory in food processing industry. The purpose of this review is to describe the measures regarding the implementation of Current Good Manufacturing Practice (CGMP), to protrude the integrity of cold chain through preparing, packing and holding food, including household refrigerating, and to increase a good communication, particularly for consumers at increased risk of listeriosis.

  11. Prevalence and populations of Listeria monocytogenes in meat products retailed in Sao Paulo, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristori, Christiane Asturiano; Rowlands, Ruth Estela Gravato; Martins, Cecília Geraldes; Barbosa, Maria Luisa; Yoshida, Júlia T U; Franco, Bernadette D G de Melo

    2014-12-01

    This study evaluated the prevalence of the populations and serotypes of Listeria monocytogenes in 552 refrigerated samples of ground beef, chicken leg, hot dog, and pork sausage collected in supermarkets in the city of Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil, between May 2008 and July 2009. The supermarkets were selected after stratification by geographical region and by random draw. Tests for presence and enumeration of L. monocytogenes were based on ISO 11290-1:1996/Amd.1:2004 and ISO 11290-2:1998 methods, respectively. Listeria spp. were detected in 469 (85.0%) of the studied meat products. The most frequently isolated species was L. innocua (64.1%), followed by L. monocytogenes (48.7%), L. welshimeri (13.4%), L. seeligeri (7.1%), L. ivanovii (0.2%), and L. grayi subspecies murrayi (0.2%). L. monocytogenes was detected in 269 (48.7%) samples, with highest prevalence in ground beef (59.4%) followed by chicken legs (58.0%), pork sausages (39.8%), and hot dogs (37.7%). The populations were pregnant women and immunocompromised individuals.

  12. The evolution and epidemiology of Listeria monocytogenes in Europe and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomonaco, Sara; Nucera, Daniele; Filipello, Virginia

    2015-10-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is an opportunistic food-borne pathogen responsible for listeriosis, a disease associated with high mortality rates. L. monocytogenes causes invasive syndromes and case-fatality can be as high as 30%, in specific high-risk population groups such as the elderly, immuno-compromised individuals, fetuses and newborns. Acquisition of the disease is mainly due to consumption of contaminated (predominantly ready-to-eat) food. We aimed to provide a state-of-the-art collection of different likely evolutionary models, based on recombination and positive selection, and the phylogenetic relationship between lineages of L. monocytogenes and between them and other Listeria species. We described the most recent findings in comparative pan-genomics, considering the core and accessory genome in relation to virulence and adaptation to different environments. Finally, this review illustrates L. monocytogenes epidemiology and transmission in humans, foods and animals, the surveillance systems of the European Union and United States and the application of molecular techniques as a core tool in epidemiological investigation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. A Dual Microscopy-Based Assay To Assess Listeria monocytogenes Cellular Entry and Vacuolar Escape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quereda, Juan J; Pizarro-Cerdá, Javier; Balestrino, Damien; Bobard, Alexandre; Danckaert, Anne; Aulner, Nathalie; Shorte, Spencer; Enninga, Jost; Cossart, Pascale

    2015-10-23

    Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive bacterium and a facultative intracellular pathogen that invades mammalian cells, disrupts its internalization vacuole, and proliferates in the host cell cytoplasm. Here, we describe a novel image-based microscopy assay that allows discrimination between cellular entry and vacuolar escape, enabling high-content screening to identify factors specifically involved in these two steps. We first generated L. monocytogenes and Listeria innocua strains expressing a β-lactamase covalently attached to the bacterial cell wall. These strains were then incubated with HeLa cells containing the Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) probe CCF4 in their cytoplasm. The CCF4 probe was cleaved by the bacterial surface β-lactamase only in cells inoculated with L. monocytogenes but not those inoculated with L. innocua, thereby demonstrating bacterial access to the host cytoplasm. Subsequently, we performed differential immunofluorescence staining to distinguish extracellular versus total bacterial populations in samples that were also analyzed by the FRET-based assay. With this two-step analysis, bacterial entry can be distinguished from vacuolar rupture in a single experiment. Our novel approach represents a powerful tool for identifying factors that determine the intracellular niche of L. monocytogenes. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  14. SUSCEPTIBILITY OF Listeria monocytogenes STRAINS ISOLATED FROM FOOD TO ANTIMICROBIAL AGENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Zanardi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the susceptibility of 40 L. monocytogenes strains isolated from seafood and processing environments to 19 antibiotics currently used in veterinary and human therapy. Susceptibility tests were performed by the automated system VITEK2. Apart from Penicillin, Ampicillin and Trimethoprim-Sulfamethoxazole, for which clinical breakpoint for Listeria susceptibility testing are defined according to the Clinical and Laboratory Standard Institute (CLSI, in the present study the CLSI criteria for staphylococci were applied. This study shows that isolated L. monocytogenes strains are susceptible to the antibiotics commonly used in veterinary and human listeriosis treatment. Very few strains (7,5% showed a resistance behaviour towards Oxacillin, whereas a variable pattern was showed for Ciprofloxacin and Moxifloxacin. Moreover, an increase in tetracycline resistance, reported by several authors, can not be confirmed in this study, probably due to the different sources of strains isolation. At last, the VITEK2 system represents a rapid and easy-to-use means for antimicrobial susceptibility test of Listeria monocytogenes. In conclusion, because of the increase of antimicrobial resistance showed by L. monocytogenes, a continuous surveillance of emerging antimicrobial resistance among this pathogen is important to ensure effective treatment of human listeriosis. These data can be used for improve background data on antibiotic resistance of strains isolated from food and food environment, even considering the lack of clinical breakpoint provided by the CLSI.

  15. EVALUATION OF LISTERIA MONOCYTOGENES CONTAMINATION IN RETAIL SMOKED SALMON

    OpenAIRE

    P. Serratore; A. Piano; J. Galletti; Trentini, M.; E. Zavatta; S. Piraccini

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the contamination levels of L. monocytogenes in retail smoked salmon of different geographical origin, comparing the performance of two isolation methods, ISO 11290-1 (qualitative) and ISO 11290-2 (quantitative), and also by molecular methods (16S rDNA sequencing, PCR with specific primers). Among 35 samples (7 batches, 5 samples per batch), only 1 sample from Denmark resulted positive for L. monocytogenes. The strains isolated on ALOA and Palcam Agar by th...

  16. Effect of vanillin on the fate of Listeria monocytogenes and Escherichia coli O157:H7 in a model apple juice medium and in apple juice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Kwang-Deog; Delaquis, Pascal; Toivonen, Peter; Stanich, Kareen

    2006-04-01

    The effects of vanillin on the fates of Listeria monocytogenes and Escherichia coli O157:H7 at pH values between 3.5 and 4.5 were verified in a model apple juice (MAJ) medium and in apple juice incubated at 4 or 15 degrees C. Viable E. coli O157:H7 cells were recovered from MAJ for up to 10 days, but L. monocytogenes did not survive at pH 3.5. Supplementation with 40 mm vanillin exerted a lethal effect that was species, concentration, pH and temperature dependant. E. coli O157:H7 was more sensitive to vanillin than L. monocytogenes, and viable cells could not be recovered after 2 days incubation at either temperature. L. monocytogenes and E. coli O157:H7 were inoculated (10(5) cfu/ml) in pH adjusted (pH 4.00) or unadjusted (pH 3.42) juice from Granny Smith apples that was supplemented with 40 mm vanillin. Neither species were recovered after 3 days incubation at 4 or 15 degrees C. These findings indicate that vanillin could be useful as a preservative for minimally processed apple products.

  17. Foci of contamination of Listeria monocytogenes in different cheese processing plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, G; Magalhães, R; Carneiro, L; Santos, I; Silva, J; Ferreira, V; Hogg, T; Teixeira, P

    2013-11-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a ubiquitous bacterium widely distributed in the environment that can cause a severe disease in humans when contaminated foods are ingested. Cheese has been implicated in sporadic cases and in outbreaks of listeriosis worldwide. Environmental contamination, in several occasions by persistent strains, has been considered an important source of finished product contamination. The objectives of this research were to (i) evaluate the presence of L. monocytogenes within the factory environments and cheeses of three processing plants, artisanal producer of raw ewe's milk cheeses (APC), small-scale industrial cheese producer (SSI) and industrial cheese producer (ICP) each producing a distinct style of cheese, all with history of contamination by L. monocytogenes (ii) and identify possible sources of contamination using different typing methods (arsenic and cadmium susceptibility, geno-serotyping, PFGE). The presence of markers specific for 3 epidemic clones (ECI-ECIII) of L. monocytogenes was also investigated. Samples were collected from raw milk (n = 179), whey (n = 3), cheese brining solution (n = 7), cheese brine sludge (n = 505), finished product (n = 3016), and environment (n = 2560) during, at least, a four-year period. Listeria monocytogenes was detected in environmental, raw milk and cheese samples, respectively, at 15.4%, 1.1% and 13.6% in APC; at 8.9%, 2.9% and 3.4% in SSI; and at 0%, 21.1% and 0.2% in ICP. Typing of isolates revealed that raw ewe's milk and the dairy plant environment are important sources of contamination, and that some strains persisted for at least four years in the environment. Although cheeses produced in the three plants investigated were never associated with any case or outbreak of listeriosis, some L. monocytogenes belonging to specific PFGE types that caused disease (including putative epidemic clone strains isolated from final products) were found in this study. © 2013.

  18. Lactobacillus plantarum inhibits growth of Listeria monocytogenes in an in vitro continuous flow gut model, but promotes invasion of L. monocytogenes in the gut of gnotobiotic rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernbom, Nete; Licht, Tine Rask; Saadbye, Peter

    2006-01-01

    The ability of the pediocin AcH producing Lactobacillus plantarum DDEN 11007 and its non-producing plasmid-cured isogenic variant, DDEN 12305 to prevent the persistence and growth of Listeria monocytogenes EP2 in two gastrointestinal (GI) tract models was examined. In vitro studies conducted in a....... monocytogenes invasion by an unknown mechanism. This observation is however not necessarily specifically related to L. plantarum, and should not be interpreted as the expected effect in animals carrying a conventional intestinal microflora....

  19. Dose-response of Listeria monocytogenes after oral exposure in pregnant guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Denita; Irvin, Elizabeth A; Chmielewski, Revis A; Frank, Joseph F; Smith, Mary A

    2007-05-01

    Listeriosis, a severe disease that results from exposure to the foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes, is responsible for approximately 2500 illnesses and 500 deaths in the United States each year. Pregnant women are 20 times more likely to develop listeriosis than the general population, with adverse pregnancy outcomes that include spontaneous abortions, stillbirths, and neonatal meningitis. The objective of this study was to determine an infective dose that resulted in stillbirths and infectivity of selected tissues in pregnant guinea pigs. Pregnant guinea pigs were exposed orally on gestation day 35 to 10(4) to 10(8) L. monocytogenes CFU in sterile whipping cream. L. monocytogenes was recovered at 64, 73, 90, and 100% from the livers of animals infected with 10(5), 10(6), 10(7), and 10(8) CFU, respectively. In dams exposed to > or =10(6) CFU, L. monocytogenes was cultured from 50% of the spleen samples and 33% of the gallbladder samples. Eleven of 34 dams infected with > or =10(6) CFU delivered stillborn pups. L. monocytogenes was cultured from the placenta, liver, and brain tissue of all stillbirths. Dams that delivered nonviable fetuses after treatment with > or =10(7) L. monocytogenes CFU had fecal samples positive for L. monocytogenes at every collection posttreatment. On the basis of a log-logistic model, the dose that adversely affected 50% of the pregnancies was approximately 10(7) L. monocytogenes CFU compared with that estimated from a human outbreak of 106 CFU. Listeriosis in pregnant guinea pigs can result in stillbirths, and the overall disease is similar to that described in nonhuman primates and in humans.

  20. In Vitro Evaluation of Bacteriocins Activity Against Listeria monocytogenes Biofilm Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, Anderson Carlos; de Paula, Otávio Almeida Lino; Todorov, Svetoslav Dimitrov; Nero, Luís Augusto

    2016-03-01

    The present study aimed to assess the activity of cell-free supernatant (CFS) containing bacteriocins on the formation and maintenance of biofilms developed by Listeria monocytogenes, and the associated effect of bacteriocins and ethylene-diamine-tetra-acetic acid (EDTA) on the formed biofilm. CFS from 9 lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains was tested for inhibitory activity against 85 L. monocytogenes isolates and 21 LAB strains. Then, 12 L. monocytogenes strains were selected based on genetic profiles and sensitivity to CFS and were subjected to an in vitro assay to assess biofilm formation in microtiter plates, considering different culture media and incubation conditions. Based on these results, 6 L. monocytogenes strains were subjected to the same in vitro procedure to assess biofilm formation, being co-inoculated with CFS. In addition, these strains were subjected to the same in vitro procedure, modified by adding the CFS after biofilm formation. Relevant decrease in biofilm formation was observed in the first experiment, but CFS added after biofilm formation did not eliminate them. CFS from Lactobacillus curvatus ET31 were selected due to its anti-biofilm activity, being associated to EDTA at different concentrations and tested for biofilm control of three strains of L. monocytogenes, using the same in vitro procedure described previously. Concentrated bacteriocin presented poor performance in eliminating formed biofilms, and EDTA concentration presented no evident interference on biofilm elimination. Twelve selected L. monocytogenes strains were positive for investigated virulence makers and negative for luxS gene, recognized as being involved in biofilm formation. Selected L. monocytogenes strains were able to produce biofilms under different conditions. CFSs have the potential to prevent biofilm formation, but they were not able to destroy already formed biofilms. Nevertheless, low concentrations of CFS combined with EDTA caused a relevant reduction in