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Sample records for viable cells present

  1. High speed flow cytometric separation of viable cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Dennis T.; Van den Engh, Gerrit J.; Buckie, Anne-Marie

    1995-01-01

    Hematopoietic cell populations are separated to provide cell sets and subsets as viable cells with high purity and high yields, based on the number of original cells present in the mixture. High-speed flow cytometry is employed using light characteristics of the cells to separate the cells, where high flow speeds are used to reduce the sorting time.

  2. SMA actuators: a viable practical technology (Presentation Video)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, Alan L.; Brown, Jeffrey; Hodgson, Darel E.

    2015-04-01

    Diverse products either based solely on or incorporating Shape Memory Alloys (SMA) have and are being made in a wide range of industries, and IP is being captured. Why then compared to SE (superelastic) Nitinol, and especially conventional technology, do so few ideas reach production? This presentation delves deeply into this topic in reaching the final assessment that SMA actuators are indeed now a viable practical technology. The presentation begins with an introduction to and description of the fundamental basis of SMA actuator technology. Examples of multiple commercially available geometric forms of SMA actuators are given and the functionalities that they provide are described. This is followed by examples of multiple commercial products incorporating such SMA actuators. Given that there are literally millions of commercial products incorporating conventional actuator technologies, indications are given as to why there are their less than 1000 that utilize SMA. Experience based challenges to the commercial use of SMA actuators are described. Besides having to compete with existing non-SMA technology which is quite mature additional challenges that are unique to SM actuators are indicated these including a wider than expected set of technical engineering problems and challenges and that a broader scope of dynamics is required.

  3. Surface Charge Visualization at Viable Living Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, David; Paulose Nadappuram, Binoy; Momotenko, Dmitry; Voyias, Philip D; Page, Ashley; Tripathi, Gyanendra; Frenguelli, Bruno G; Unwin, Patrick R

    2016-03-09

    Scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) is demonstrated to be a powerful technique for quantitative nanoscale surface charge mapping of living cells. Utilizing a bias modulated (BM) scheme, in which the potential between a quasi-reference counter electrode (QRCE) in an electrolyte-filled nanopipette and a QRCE in bulk solution is modulated, it is shown that both the cell topography and the surface charge present at cellular interfaces can be measured simultaneously at high spatial resolution with dynamic potential measurements. Surface charge is elucidated by probing the properties of the diffuse double layer (DDL) at the cellular interface, and the technique is sensitive at both low-ionic strength and under typical physiological (high-ionic strength) conditions. The combination of experiments that incorporate pixel-level self-referencing (calibration) with a robust theoretical model allows for the analysis of local surface charge variations across cellular interfaces, as demonstrated on two important living systems. First, charge mapping at Zea mays root hairs shows that there is a high negative surface charge at the tip of the cell. Second, it is shown that there are distinct surface charge distributions across the surface of human adipocyte cells, whose role is the storage and regulation of lipids in mammalian systems. These are new features, not previously recognized, and their implications for the functioning of these cells are highlighted.

  4. Viable Cell Culture Banking for Biodiversity Characterization and Conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryder, Oliver A; Onuma, Manabu

    2018-02-15

    Because living cells can be saved for indefinite periods, unprecedented opportunities for characterizing, cataloging, and conserving biological diversity have emerged as advanced cellular and genetic technologies portend new options for preventing species extinction. Crucial to realizing the potential impacts of stem cells and assisted reproductive technologies on biodiversity conservation is the cryobanking of viable cell cultures from diverse species, especially those identified as vulnerable to extinction in the near future. The advent of in vitro cell culture and cryobanking is reviewed here in the context of biodiversity collections of viable cell cultures that represent the progress and limitations of current efforts. The prospects for incorporating collections of frozen viable cell cultures into efforts to characterize the genetic changes that have produced the diversity of species on Earth and contribute to new initiatives in conservation argue strongly for a global network of facilities for establishing and cryobanking collections of viable cells.

  5. Inkjet printing of viable human dental follicle stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mau Robert

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Inkjet printing technology has the potential to be used for seeding of viable cells for tissue engineering approaches. For this reason, a piezoelectrically actuated, drop-on-demand inkjet printing system was applied to deliver viable human dental follicle stem cells (hDFSC of sizes of about 15 μm up to 20 μm in diameter. The purpose of these investigations was to verify the stability of the printing process and to evaluate cell viability post printing. Using a Nanoplotter 2.1 (Gesim, Germany equipped with the piezoelectric printhead NanoTip HV (Gesim, Germany, a concentration of 6.6 ×106 cells ml−1 in DMEM with 10% fetal calf serum (FCS could be dispensed. The piezoelectric printhead has a nominal droplet volume of ~ 400 pl and was set to a voltage of 75 V and a pulse of 50 μs while dosing 50 000 droplets over a time of 100 seconds. The volume and trajectory of the droplet were checked by a stroboscope test right before and after the printing process. It was found that the droplet volume decreases significantly by 35% during printing process, while the trajectory of the droplets remains stable with only an insignificant number of degrees deviation from the vertical line. It is highly probable that some cell sedimentations or agglomerations affect the printing performance. The cell viability post printing was assessed by using the Trypan Blue dye exclusion test. The printing process was found to have no significant influence on cell survival. In conclusion, drop-on-demand inkjet printing can be a potent tool for the seeding of viable cells.

  6. Combining ethidium monoazide treatment with real-time PCR selectively quantifies viable Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blooi, Mark; Martel, An; Vercammen, Francis; Pasmans, Frank

    2013-02-01

    Detection of the lethal amphibian fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis relies on PCR-based techniques. Although highly accurate and sensitive, these methods fail to distinguish between viable and dead cells. In this study a novel approach combining the DNA intercalating dye ethidium monoazide (EMA) and real-time PCR is presented that allows quantification of viable B. dendrobatidis cells without the need for culturing. The developed method is able to suppress real-time PCR signals of heat-killed B. dendrobatidis zoospores by 99.9 % and is able to discriminate viable from heat-killed B. dendrobatidis zoospores in mixed samples. Furthermore, the novel approach was applied to assess the antifungal activity of the veterinary antiseptic F10(®) Antiseptic Solution. This disinfectant killed B. dendrobatidis zoospores effectively within 1 min at concentrations as low as 1:6400. Copyright © 2013 The British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Viable Intrauterine Pregnancy and Coexisting Molar Pregnancy in a Bicornuate Uterus: A Rare Presentation

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    Kavitha Krishnamoorthy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A complete hydatidiform mole with a viable coexisting fetus (CMCF is a rare occurrence. Similarly, Mullerian anomalies such as a bicornuate uterus are uncommon variants of normal anatomy. We report a case of a 40-year-old female with a known bicornuate uterus presenting at 13 weeks gestation with vaginal bleeding. Ultrasound findings showed a healthy viable pregnancy in the right horn with complete molar pregnancy in the left horn. After extensive counseling, the patient desired conservative management, however, was unable to continue due to profuse vaginal bleeding. The patient underwent suction dilation and curettage under general anesthesia and evacuation of the uterine horns. Postoperatively, the patient was followed until serum beta-human chorionic gonadotropin (β-hCG level dropped to <5 mU. This is the first case of a CMCF reported in a bicornuate uterus, diagnosed with the use of ultrasound imaging.

  8. Separable Bilayer Microfiltration Device for Viable Label-free Enrichment of Circulating Tumour Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ming-Da; Hao, Sijie; Williams, Anthony J.; Harouaka, Ramdane A.; Schrand, Brett; Rawal, Siddarth; Ao, Zheng; Brennaman, Randall; Gilboa, Eli; Lu, Bo; Wang, Shuwen; Zhu, Jiyue; Datar, Ram; Cote, Richard; Tai, Yu-Chong; Zheng, Si-Yang

    2014-12-01

    The analysis of circulating tumour cells (CTCs) in cancer patients could provide important information for therapeutic management. Enrichment of viable CTCs could permit performance of functional analyses on CTCs to broaden understanding of metastatic disease. However, this has not been widely accomplished. Addressing this challenge, we present a separable bilayer (SB) microfilter for viable size-based CTC capture. Unlike other single-layer CTC microfilters, the precise gap between the two layers and the architecture of pore alignment result in drastic reduction in mechanical stress on CTCs, capturing them viably. Using multiple cancer cell lines spiked in healthy donor blood, the SB microfilter demonstrated high capture efficiency (78-83%), high retention of cell viability (71-74%), high tumour cell enrichment against leukocytes (1.7-2 × 103), and widespread ability to establish cultures post-capture (100% of cell lines tested). In a metastatic mouse model, SB microfilters successfully enriched viable mouse CTCs from 0.4-0.6 mL whole mouse blood samples and established in vitro cultures for further genetic and functional analysis. Our preliminary studies reflect the efficacy of the SB microfilter device to efficiently and reliably enrich viable CTCs in animal model studies, constituting an exciting technology for new insights in cancer research.

  9. In vitro and in vivo bioluminescent quantification of viable stem cells in engineered constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logeart-Avramoglou, Delphine; Oudina, Karim; Bourguignon, Marianne; Delpierre, Laetitia; Nicola, Marie-Anne; Bensidhoum, Morad; Arnaud, Eric; Petite, Herve

    2010-06-01

    Bioluminescent quantification of viable cells inside three-dimensional porous scaffolds was performed in vitro and in vivo. The assay quantified the bioluminescence of murine stem (C3H10T1/2) cells tagged with the luciferase gene reporter and distributed inside scaffolds of either soft, translucent, AN69 polymeric hydrogel or hard, opaque, coral ceramic materials. Quantitative evaluation of bioluminescence emitted from tagged cells adhering to these scaffolds was performed in situ using either cell lysates and a luminometer or intact cells and a bioluminescence imaging system. Despite attenuation of the signal when compared to cells alone, the bioluminescence correlated with the number of cells (up to 1.5 x 10(5)) present on each material scaffold tested, both in vitro and noninvasively in vivo (subcutaneous implants in the mouse model). The noninvasive bioluminescence measurement technique proved to be comparable to the cell-destructive bioluminescence measurement technique. Monitoring the kinetics of luciferase expression via bioluminescence enabled real-time assessment of cell survival and proliferation on the scaffolds tested over prolonged (up to 59 days) periods of time. This novel, sensitive, easy, fast-to-implement, quantitative bioluminescence assay has great, though untapped, potential for screening and determining noninvasively the presence of viable cells on biomaterial constructs in the tissue engineering and tissue regeneration fields.

  10. Mathematical modelling of the viable epidermis: impact of cell shape and vertical arrangement

    KAUST Repository

    Wittum, Rebecca

    2017-12-07

    In-silico methods are valuable tools for understanding the barrier function of the skin. The key benefit is that mathematical modelling allows the interplay between cell shape and function to be elucidated. This study focuses on the viable (living) epidermis. For this region, previous works suggested a diffusion model and an approximation of the cells by hexagonal prisms. The work at hand extends this in three ways. First, the extracellular space is treated with full spatial resolution. This induces a decrease of permeability by about 10%. Second, cells of tetrakaidecahedral shape are considered, in addition to the original hexagonal prisms. For both cell types, the resulting membrane permeabilities are compared. Third, for the first time, the influence of cell stacking in the vertical direction is considered. This is particularly important for the stratum granulosum, where tight junctions are present.

  11. The molecularly crowded cytoplasm of bacterialcCells : Dividing cells contrasted with viable but non-culturable (VBNC) bacterial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trevors, J. T.; van Elsas, J. D.; Bej, A. K.

    2013-01-01

    In this perspective, we discuss the cytoplasm in actively growing bacterial cells contrasted with viable but non-culturable (VBNC) cells. Actively growing bacterial cells contain a more molecularly crowded and organized cytoplasm, and are capable of completing their cell cycle resulting in cell

  12. Non-viable antagonist cells are associated with reduced biocontrol performance by viable cells of the yeast Papiliotrema flavescens against Fusarium head blight of wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microbially-based plant disease control products have achieved commercial market success, but the efficacy of such biocontrol products is sometimes deemed inconsistent. Improper processing of harvested microbial biomass or long-term storage can reduce the proportion of viable cells and necessitate t...

  13. Modelling the number of viable vegetative cells of Bacillus cereus passing through the stomach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnands, L.M.; Pielaat, A.; Dufrenne, J.B.; Zwietering, M.H.; Leusden, van F.M.

    2009-01-01

    Aims: Model the number of viable vegetative cells of B. cereus surviving the gastric passage after experiments in simulated gastric conditions. Materials and Methods: The inactivation of stationary and exponential phase vegetative cells of twelve different strains of Bacillus cereus, both mesophilic

  14. A simple way to identify non-viable cells within living plant tissue using confocal microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Truernit Elisabeth

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant cell death is a normal process during plant development. Mutant plants may exhibit misregulation of this process, which can lead to severe growth defects. Simple ways of visualising cell death in living plant tissues can aid the study of plant development and physiology. Results Spectral variants of the fluorescent SYTOX dyes were tested for their usefulness for the detection of non-viable cells within plant embryos and roots using confocal laser-scanning microscopy. The dyes were selective for non-viable cells and showed very little background staining in living cells. Simultaneous detection of SYTOX dye and fluorescent protein (e.g. GFP fluorescence was possible. Conclusion The fluorescent SYTOX dyes are useful for an easy and quick first assay of plant cell viability in living plant samples using fluorescence and confocal laser-scanning microscopy.

  15. Use of propidium monoazide for selective profiling of viable microbial cells during Gouda cheese ripening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erkus, O.; Jager, V.C. de; Geene, R.T.; Alen-Boerrigter, I.J. van; Hazelwood, L.; Hijum, S.A.F.T. van; Kleerebezem, M; Smid, E.J.

    2016-01-01

    DNA based microbial community profiling of food samples is confounded by the presence of DNA derived from membrane compromised (dead or injured) cells. Selective amplification of DNA from viable (intact) fraction of the community by propidium monoazide (PMA) treatment could circumvent this problem.

  16. Viable bacteria associated with red blood cells and plasma in freshly drawn blood donations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Damgaard

    Full Text Available Infection remains a leading cause of post-transfusion mortality and morbidity. Bacterial contamination is, however, detected in less than 0.1% of blood units tested. The aim of the study was to identify viable bacteria in standard blood-pack units, with particular focus on bacteria from the oral cavity, and to determine the distribution of bacteria revealed in plasma and in the red blood cell (RBC-fraction.Cross-sectional study. Blood were separated into plasma and RBC-suspensions, which were incubated anaerobically or aerobically for 7 days on trypticase soy blood agar (TSA or blue lactose plates. For identification colony PCR was performed using primers targeting 16S rDNA.Blood donors attending Capital Region Blood Bank, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Hvidovre, Denmark, October 29th to December 10th 2013.60 donors (≥50 years old, self-reported medically healthy.Bacterial growth was observed on plates inoculated with plasma or RBCs from 62% of the blood donations. Growth was evident in 21 (35% of 60 RBC-fractions and in 32 (53% of 60 plasma-fractions versus 8 of 60 negative controls (p = 0.005 and p = 2.6x10-6, respectively. Propionibacterium acnes was found in 23% of the donations, and Staphylococcus epidermidis in 38%. The majority of bacteria identified in the present study were either facultative anaerobic (59.5% or anaerobic (27.8% species, which are not likely to be detected during current routine screening.Viable bacteria are present in blood from donors self-reported as medically healthy, indicating that conventional test systems employed by blood banks insufficiently detect bacteria in plasma. Further investigation is needed to determine whether routine testing for anaerobic bacteria and testing of RBC-fractions for adherent bacteria should be recommended.

  17. Prediction of subsequent miscarriage risk in women who present with a viable pregnancy at the first early pregnancy scan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamatopoulos, Nicole; Lu, Chuan; Casikar, Ishwari; Reid, Shannon; Mongelli, Max; Hardy, Nigel; Condous, George

    2015-10-01

    To generate and evaluate a new prediction model for miscarriage in women who present with a viable intrauterine pregnancy (IUP) at the primary early pregnancy scan and to compare this new model to a previously published model. Data were collected prospectively from women presenting to the early pregnancy unit with a viable IUP between November 2006 and January 2013. More than 30 historical, clinical and ultrasonographic variables were recorded on a standardised datasheet at the first visit. Women were followed until the final outcome was known at the end of the first trimester: viable IUP or miscarriage. A new multinomial logistic regression model was developed retrospectively on training cases and tested prospectively on test cases. The performance of the new prediction model was evaluated using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves and compared to a previously published model. After removing cases with missing values for the model of Oates, the area under the ROC curve (AUC) was also calculated for the new model and the Oates model. A total of 1115 consecutive first-trimester women presented to the early pregnancy unit. Eight hundred and sixty-two women with a viable IUP at the first scan whose outcome was known at the end of the first trimester were included in the final analysis. Five hundred and sixty-six women were included in the training set and 296 in the test set. 92.1% were viable and 7.9% had miscarried at the end of the first trimester. The most significant independent prognostic variables for the logistic regression model were as follows: maternal age, embryonic heart rate (EHR), logarithm [gestational sac (GS) volume/crown-rump length (CRL)], CRL and the presence or absence of clots per vagina (PV) at presentation. The performance of the new model compared with the Oates model gave an AUC of 0.870 vs 0.847 for the training set and 0.783 vs 0.744 for the test set. After removing cases with missing values for the model of Oates 2013, the

  18. Mobilization of Viable Tumor Cells Into the Circulation During Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Olga A. [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Molecular Radiation Biology Laboratory, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); The Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Anderson, Robin L. [The Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Metastasis Research Laboratory, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Russell, Prudence A. [Department of Anatomical Pathology, St. Vincent Hospital, Fitzroy, VIC (Australia); Ashley Cox, R. [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Ivashkevich, Alesia [Molecular Radiation Biology Laboratory, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Laboratory of DNA Repair and Genomics, Centre for Innate Immunity and Infectious Disease, Monash Institute for Medical Research, Monash University, Clayton, VIC (Australia); Swierczak, Agnieszka; Doherty, Judy P. [Metastasis Research Laboratory, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Jacobs, Daphne H.M. [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Smith, Jai [Molecular Radiation Biology Laboratory, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Siva, Shankar; Daly, Patricia E. [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Ball, David L. [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); The Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC (Australia); and others

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: To determine whether radiation therapy (RT) could mobilize viable tumor cells into the circulation of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Methods and Materials: We enumerated circulating tumor cells (CTCs) by fluorescence microscopy of blood samples immunostained with conventional CTC markers. We measured their DNA damage levels using γ-H2AX, a biomarker for radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks, either by fluorescence-activated cell sorting or by immunofluorescence microscopy. Results: Twenty-seven RT-treated NSCLC patients had blood samples analyzed by 1 or more methods. We identified increased CTC numbers after commencement of RT in 7 of 9 patients treated with palliative RT, and in 4 of 8 patients treated with curative-intent RT. Circulating tumor cells were also identified, singly and in clumps in large numbers, during RT by cytopathologic examination (in all 5 cases studied). Elevated γ-H2AX signal in post-RT blood samples signified the presence of CTCs derived from irradiated tumors. Blood taken after the commencement of RT contained tumor cells that proliferated extensively in vitro (in all 6 cases studied). Circulating tumor cells formed γ-H2AX foci in response to ex vivo irradiation, providing further evidence of their viability. Conclusions: Our findings provide a rationale for the development of strategies to reduce the concentration of viable CTCs by modulating RT fractionation or by coadministering systemic therapies.

  19. Desiccation induces viable but Non-Culturable cells in Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vriezen, Jan Ac; de Bruijn, Frans J; Nüsslein, Klaus R

    2012-01-20

    Sinorhizobium meliloti is a microorganism commercially used in the production of e.g. Medicago sativa seed inocula. Many inocula are powder-based and production includes a drying step. Although S. meliloti survives drying well, the quality of the inocula is reduced during this process. In this study we determined survival during desiccation of the commercial strains 102F84 and 102F85 as well as the model strain USDA1021.The survival of S. meliloti 1021 was estimated during nine weeks at 22% relative humidity. We found that after an initial rapid decline of colony forming units, the decline slowed to a steady 10-fold reduction in colony forming units every 22 days. In spite of the reduction in colony forming units, the fraction of the population identified as viable (42-54%) based on the Baclight live/dead stain did not change significantly over time. This change in the ability of viable cells to form colonies shows (i) an underestimation of the survival of rhizobial cells using plating methods, and that (ii) in a part of the population desiccation induces a Viable But Non Culturable (VBNC)-like state, which has not been reported before. Resuscitation attempts did not lead to a higher recovery of colony forming units indicating the VBNC state is stable under the conditions tested. This observation has important consequences for the use of rhizobia. Finding methods to resuscitate this fraction may increase the quality of powder-based seed inocula.

  20. Progress in biocatalysis with immobilized viable whole cells: systems development, reaction engineering and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polakovič, Milan; Švitel, Juraj; Bučko, Marek; Filip, Jaroslav; Neděla, Vilém; Ansorge-Schumacher, Marion B; Gemeiner, Peter

    2017-05-01

    Viable microbial cells are important biocatalysts in the production of fine chemicals and biofuels, in environmental applications and also in emerging applications such as biosensors or medicine. Their increasing significance is driven mainly by the intensive development of high performance recombinant strains supplying multienzyme cascade reaction pathways, and by advances in preservation of the native state and stability of whole-cell biocatalysts throughout their application. In many cases, the stability and performance of whole-cell biocatalysts can be highly improved by controlled immobilization techniques. This review summarizes the current progress in the development of immobilized whole-cell biocatalysts, the immobilization methods as well as in the bioreaction engineering aspects and economical aspects of their biocatalytic applications.

  1. Sensitive and Specific Biomimetic Lipid Coated Microfluidics to Isolate Viable Circulating Tumor Cells and Microemboli for Cancer Detection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Yang Chen

    Full Text Available Here we presented a simple and effective membrane mimetic microfluidic device with antibody conjugated supported lipid bilayer (SLB "smart coating" to capture viable circulating tumor cells (CTCs and circulating tumor microemboli (CTM directly from whole blood of all stage clinical cancer patients. The non-covalently bound SLB was able to promote dynamic clustering of lipid-tethered antibodies to CTC antigens and minimized non-specific blood cells retention through its non-fouling nature. A gentle flow further flushed away loosely-bound blood cells to achieve high purity of CTCs, and a stream of air foam injected disintegrate the SLB assemblies to release intact and viable CTCs from the chip. Human blood spiked cancer cell line test showed the ~95% overall efficiency to recover both CTCs and CTMs. Live/dead assay showed that at least 86% of recovered cells maintain viability. By using 2 mL of peripheral blood, the CTCs and CTMs counts of 63 healthy and colorectal cancer donors were positively correlated with the cancer progression. In summary, a simple and effective strategy utilizing biomimetic principle was developed to retrieve viable CTCs for enumeration, molecular analysis, as well as ex vivo culture over weeks. Due to the high sensitivity and specificity, it is the first time to show the high detection rates and quantity of CTCs in non-metastatic cancer patients. This work offers the values in both early cancer detection and prognosis of CTC and provides an accurate non-invasive strategy for routine clinical investigation on CTCs.

  2. Trypan blue dye enters viable cells incubated with the pore-forming toxin HlyII of Bacillus cereus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seav-Ly Tran

    Full Text Available Trypan blue is a dye that has been widely used for selective staining of dead tissues or cells. Here, we show that the pore-forming toxin HlyII of Bacillus cereus allows trypan blue staining of macrophage cells, despite the cells remaining viable and metabolically active. These findings suggest that the dye enters viable cells through the pores. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration that trypan blue may enter viable cells. Consequently, the use of trypan blue staining as a marker of vital status should be interpreted with caution. The blue coloration does not necessarily indicate cell lysis, but may rather indicate pore formation in the cell membranes and more generally increased membrane permeability.

  3. IN-VITRO BIOREDUCTION OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM BY VIABLE WHOLE CELLS OF Arthrobacter sp. SUK 1201

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    Satarupa Dey

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A chromium resistant and reducing bacterium Arthrobacter sp. SUK 1201 was isolated from chromite mine overburden dumps of Orissa, India. Viable whole cells of this isolate was capable of completely reducing 100 µM Cr(VI in chemically defined MS medium within 28 h of incubation under batch cultivation. Reduction of chromate increased with increased cell density and was maximum at a density of 1010 cells/ml, but the reduction potential of the suspended cells decreased with increase in Cr(VI concentration in the medium. Chromate reducing efficiency was promoted when glycerol and glucose was used as electron donors, while the optimum pH and temperature of Cr(VI reduction was found to be 7.0 and 35°C respectively. The reduction process was inhibited by divalent cations Ni, Co and Cd, but not by Cu and Fe. Similarly, carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP, N,N,-Di cyclohexyl carboiimide (DCC, sodium azide and sodium fluoride were inhibitory to chromate reduction, while in presence of 2,4 dinitrophenol (2,4 DNP chromate reduction by SUK 1201 cells remained unaffected.

  4. Response of Listeria monocytogenes to disinfection stress at the single-cell and population levels as monitored by intracellular pH measurements and viable-cell counts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastbjerg, Vicky Gaedt; Nielsen, Dennis S.; Arneborg, Nils

    2009-01-01

    .05). The protective effect of NaCl was reflected by viable-cell counts at a higher concentration of Incimaxx (0.0031%), where the salt-grown population survived better than the population grown without NaCl (P ... that a population of L. monocytogenes cells, whether planktonic or attached, is homogenous with respect to sensitivity to an acidic disinfectant studied on the single-cell level. Hence a major subpopulation more tolerant to disinfectants, and hence more persistent, does not appear to be present....

  5. Increasing Vero viable cell densities for yellow fever virus production in stirred-tank bioreactors using serum-free medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattos, Diogo A; Silva, Marlon V; Gaspar, Luciane P; Castilho, Leda R

    2015-08-20

    In this work, changes in Vero cell cultivation methods have been employed in order to improve cell growth conditions to obtain higher viable cell densities and to increase viral titers. The propagation of the 17DD yellow fever virus (YFV) in Vero cells grown on Cytodex I microcarriers was evaluated in 3-L bioreactor vessels. Prior to the current changes, Vero cells were repeatedly displaying insufficient microcarrier colonization. A modified cultivation process with four changes has resulted in higher cell densities and higher virus titers than previously observed for 17DD YFV. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Cellular bone matrices: viable stem cell-containing bone graft substitutes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skovrlj, Branko; Guzman, Javier Z; Al Maaieh, Motasem; Cho, Samuel K; Iatridis, James C; Qureshi, Sheeraz A

    2014-11-01

    Advances in the field of stem cell technology have stimulated the development and increased use of allogenic bone grafts containing live mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), also known as cellular bone matrices (CBMs). It is estimated that CBMs comprise greater than 17% of all bone grafts and bone graft substitutes used. To critically evaluate CBMs, specifically their technical specifications, existing published data supporting their use, US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulation, cost, potential pitfalls, and other aspects pertaining to their use. Areview of literature. A series of Ovid, Medline, and Pubmed-National Library of Medicine/National Institutes of Health (www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov) searches were performed. Only articles in English journals or published with English language translations were included. Level of evidence of the selected articles was assessed. Specific technical information on each CBM was obtained by direct communication from the companies marketing the individual products. Five different CBMs are currently available for use in spinal fusion surgery. There is a wide variation between the products with regard to the average donor age at harvest, total cellular concentration, percentage of MSCs, shelf life, and cell viability after defrosting. Three retrospective studies evaluating CBMs and fusion have shown fusion rates ranging from 90.2% to 92.3%, and multiple industry-sponsored trials are underway. No independent studies evaluating spinal fusion rates with the use of CBMs exist. All the commercially available CBMs claim to meet the FDA criteria under Section 361, 21 CFR Part 1271, and are not undergoing FDA premarket review. The CBMs claim to provide viable MSCs and are offered at a premium cost. Numerous challenges exist in regard to MSCs' survival, function, osteoblastic potential, and cytokine production once implanted into the intended host. Cellular bone matrices may be a promising bone augmentation technology in spinal fusion surgery

  7. Assessing prognosis and optimizing treatment in patients with postchemotherapy viable nonseminomatous germ-cell tumors (NSGCT): results of the sCR2 international study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fizazi, K.; Oldenburg, J.; Dunant, A.

    2008-01-01

    malignant cells, and a good International Germ Cell Consensus Classification group at presentation. Patients were assigned to one of three risk groups defined in sCR1: no risk factor (good risk), one risk factor (intermediate risk) and two to three risk factors (poor risk group). The 5-year PFS rate was 92...... with surveillance and treatment only at relapse. CONCLUSION: In patients with postchemotherapy viable NSGCT, a complete resection of residual masses should be rigorously pursued. These data validate the sCR1 prognostic index. Given their excellent outcome, patients in the favorable group may not require......BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to validate a prognostic index [surgical complete response 1 (sCR1)] in patients with postchemotherapy viable nonseminomatous germ-cell tumors (NSGCT). PATIENTS AND METHODS: Data and specimens from 61 patients with normalized tumor markers...

  8. Combined bromodeoxyuridine immunohistochemistry and Masson trichrome staining: facilitated detection of cell proliferation in viable vs. infarcted myocardium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarous, D F; Shou, M; Unger, E F

    1992-09-01

    Cells in the S-phase of the cell cycle can be identified in tissue sections by immunohistochemical localization of the thymidine analogue bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU). Generally, a single counterstain is used to visualize the underlying tissue; however, interpretation of morphologic detail is often difficult. We have utilized BrdU to localize proliferating cells in myocardium exposed to angiogenic mitogens. To facilitate identification of labelled nuclei in the context of infarcted vs. viable myocardium, BrdU immunohistochemistry was followed by a modified Masson trichrome stain. The time of exposure to the counterstains and the wash protocol were re-revised, permitting clear identification of the labelled brown nuclei against a background of red viable myocardium vs. blue infarct. The combined technique also provides color contrast suitable for computer-based image analysis.

  9. Fuel cells are a commercially viable alternative for the production of "clean" energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niakolas, Dimitris K; Daletou, Maria; Neophytides, Stylianos G; Vayenas, Constantinos G

    2016-01-01

    Fuel cells present a highly efficient and environmentally friendly alternative technology for decentralized energy production. The scope of the present study is to provide an overview of the technological and commercialization readiness level of fuel cells. Specifically, there is a brief description of their general advantages and weaknesses in correlation with various technological actions and political strategies, which are adopted towards their proper positioning in the global market. Some of the most important key performance indicators are also discussed, alongside with a few examples of broad commercialization. It is concluded that the increasing number of companies which utilize and invest on this technology, in combination with the supply chain improvements and the concomitant technological maturity and recognition, reinforce the fuel cell industry so as to become well-aligned for global success.

  10. Quantitative assessment of viable cells of Lactobacillus plantarum strains in single, dual and multi-strain biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Ramírez, Mónica D; Kostopoulos, Ioannis; Smid, Eddy J; Nierop Groot, Masja N; Abee, Tjakko

    2017-03-06

    Biofilms of Lactobacillus plantarum are a potential source for contamination and recontamination of food products. Although biofilms have been mostly studied using single species or even single strains, it is conceivable that in a range of environmental settings including food processing areas, biofilms are composed of multiple species with each species represented by multiple strains. In this study six spoilage related L. plantarum strains FBR1-FBR6 and the model strain L. plantarum WCFS1 were characterised in single, dual and multiple strain competition models. A quantitative PCR approach was used with added propidium monoazide (PMA) enabling quantification of intact cells in the biofilm, representing the viable cell fraction that determines the food spoilage risk. Our results show that the performance of individual strains in multi-strain cultures generally correlates with their performance in pure culture, and relative strain abundance in multi-strain biofilms positively correlated with the relative strain abundance in suspended (planktonic) cultures. Performance of individual strains in dual-strain biofilms was highly influenced by the presence of the secondary strain, and in most cases no correlation between the relative contributions of viable planktonic cells and viable cells in the biofilm was noted. The total biofilm quantified by CV staining of the dual and multi-strain biofilms formed was mainly correlated to CV values of the dominant strain obtained in single strain studies. However, the combination of strain FBR5 and strain WCFS1 showed significantly higher CV values compared to the individual performances of both strains indicating that total biofilm formation was higher in this specific condition. Notably, L. plantarum FBR5 was able to outgrow all other strains and showed the highest relative abundance in dual and multi-strain biofilms. All the dual and multi-strain biofilms contained a considerable number of viable cells, representing a potential

  11. Viable Cancer Cells in the Remnant Stomach are a Potential Source of Peritoneal Metastasis after Curative Distal Gastrectomy for Gastric Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Tsuyoshi; Kaida, Sachiko; Ishida, Mitsuaki; Kodama, Hirokazu; Takebayashi, Katsushi; Shimizu, Tomoharu; Miyake, Toru; Tani, Tohru; Kushima, Ryoji; Tani, Masaji

    2016-09-01

    The mechanisms underlying peritoneal metastasis (PM) after curative gastrectomy for gastric cancer (GC) are not well elucidated. This study assessed whether viable cancer cells, including cancer stemlike cells (CSCs), were present in the remnant stomach immediately before gastrointestinal (GI) tract reconstruction because these could be a source of PM after gastrectomy. Saline fluid used for remnant stomach lumen irrigation before GI reconstruction was prospectively collected from 142 consecutive patients undergoing distal gastrectomy for GC and cytologically examined. Proliferative activity (Ki67 staining) and stemness (expression of the CSC surface markers CD44s or CD44v6) were evaluated in detected cancer cells. Viable cancer cells were detected in 33 (23.2 %) of the 142 remnant stomachs. These cells formed clusters and stained positively for Ki67, indicating proliferation. Cancer cells in remnant stomachs and surface cancer cells in primary GCs from 10 (30.3 %) of these 33 cases also stained positively for CD44s or CD44v6. In a multiple logistic regression analysis, advanced cancer (odds ratio [OR], 4.65; 95 % confidence interval [CI], 1.32-16.4; P = 0.017), tumor size of 40 mm or larger (OR, 3.78; 95 % CI, 1.12-12.8; P = 0.033), and histologic differentiation (OR, 3.10; 95 % CI, 1.30-7.40; P = 0.011) were associated independently with the presence of cancer cells in the remnant stomach. Viable, proliferative, and clustered cancer cells, including CSCs, were found in remnant gastric lumens immediately before GI reconstruction, indicating a possible cellular source of PM after curative gastrectomy for GC. Dissemination of gastric contents into the peritoneal cavity should be avoided during GI reconstruction.

  12. A multimodality imaging model to track viable breast cancer cells from single arrest to metastasis in the mouse brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkins, Katie M.; Hamilton, Amanda M.; Makela, Ashley V.; Chen, Yuanxin; Foster, Paula J.; Ronald, John A.

    2016-10-01

    Cellular MRI involves sensitive visualization of iron-labeled cells in vivo but cannot differentiate between dead and viable cells. Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) measures cellular viability, and thus we explored combining these tools to provide a more holistic view of metastatic cancer cell fate in mice. Human breast carcinoma cells stably expressing Firefly luciferase were loaded with iron particles, injected into the left ventricle, and BLI and MRI were performed on days 0, 8, 21 and 28. The number of brain MR signal voids (i.e., iron-loaded cells) on day 0 significantly correlated with BLI signal. Both BLI and MRI signals decreased from day 0 to day 8, indicating a loss of viable cells rather than a loss of iron label. Total brain MR tumour volume on day 28 also correlated with BLI signal. Overall, BLI complemented our sensitive cellular MRI technologies well, allowing us for the first time to screen animals for successful injections, and, in addition to MR measures of cell arrest and tumor burden, provided longitudinal measures of cancer cell viability in individual animals. We predict this novel multimodality molecular imaging framework will be useful for evaluating the efficacy of emerging anti-cancer drugs at different stages of the metastatic cascade.

  13. Viable cell yield from active dry yeast products and effects of storage temperature and diluent on yeast cell viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, M L; Bradford, B J

    2011-01-01

    Active dry yeast (ADY) products are commonly fed in the dairy industry, but research regarding quality control for such products is limited. The objectives of this study were to determine yeast viability in field samples relative to manufacturers' guarantees (experiment 1), measure the effects of high-temperature storage on yeast viability (experiment 1), and determine the effect of vitamin-trace mineral (VTM) premix on yeast viability (experiment 2). Commercially available ADY products were acquired in triplicate through normal distribution channels and stored at 4°C upon receipt. Initial samples were evaluated for colony-forming units and compared with product label guarantees. Only 1 of the 6 products sampled in experiment 1 met product guarantees for all 3 samples. To determine effects of storage temperature and duration on viability, ADY samples were stored in an incubator at 40°C with ambient humidity for 1, 2, and 3 mo. High-temperature storage significantly decreased viability over the 3-mo period; approximately 90% of viable cells were lost each month. Three of the 5 products sampled in experiment 2 met product guarantees. Fresh samples of 4 of these 5 ADY products were mixed in duplicate with ground corn (GC) or a VTM premix to achieve a target concentration of 2.2×10(8) cfu/g. For each product, GC and VTM samples were stored at ambient temperature (22°C) and at an elevated temperature (40°C) for 2 wk. No differences in viable yeast count were observed between GC and VTM samples immediately after mixing or after storage at ambient temperature. Yeast viability in GC and VTM samples decreased during storage at an elevated temperature. There also was a significant interaction of diluent and storage temperature; VTM samples had higher cell viability than GC samples when subjected to high-temperature storage. Results suggest that (1) ADY products failed to consistently meet product guarantees; (2) viability of ADY products was greatly diminished during

  14. Macrophage conditioned medium induced cellular network formation in MCF-7 cells through enhanced tunneling nanotube formation and tunneling nanotube mediated release of viable cytoplasmic fragments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patheja, Pooja, E-mail: pooja.patheja8@gmail.com [Laser Biomedical Applications Section, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452013, Madhya Pradesh (India); Homi Bhabha National Institute, Training School Complex, Anushaktinagar, Mumbai 400094, Maharashtra (India); Sahu, Khageswar [Laser Biomedical Applications Section, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452013, Madhya Pradesh (India)

    2017-06-15

    Infiltrating macrophages in tumor microenvironment, through their secreted cytokines and growth factors, regulate several processes of cancer progression such as cancer cell survival, proliferation, invasion, metastasis and angiogenesis. Recently, intercellular cytoplasmic bridges between cancer cells referred as tunneling nanotubes (TNTs) have been recognized as novel mode of intercellular communication between cancer cells. In this study, we investigated the effect of inflammatory mediators present in conditioned medium derived from macrophages on the formation of TNTs in breast adenocarcinoma cells MCF-7. Results show that treatment with macrophage conditioned medium (MφCM) not only enhanced TNT formation between cells but also stimulated the release of independently migrating viable cytoplasmic fragments, referred to as microplasts, from MCF-7 cells. Time lapse microscopy revealed that microplasts were released from parent cancer cells in extracellular space through formation of TNT-like structures. Mitochondria, vesicles and cytoplasm could be transferred from parent cell body to microplasts through connecting TNTs. The microplasts could also be resorbed into the parent cell body by retraction of the connecting TNTs. Microplast formation inhibited in presence cell migration inhibitor, cytochalasin-B. Notably by utilizing migratory machinery within microplasts, distantly located MCF-7 cells formed several TNT based intercellular connections, leading to formation of physically connected network of cells. Together, these results demonstrate novel role of TNTs in microplast formation, novel modes of TNT formation mediated by microplasts and stimulatory effect of MφCM on cellular network formation in MCF-7 cells mediated through enhanced TNT and microplast formation.

  15. Viable cell sorting of dinoflagellates by multi-parametric flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Electronic cell sorting for isolation and culture of dinoflagellates and other marine eukaryotic phytoplankton was compared to the traditional method of manually picking of cells using a micropipette. Trauma to electronically sorted cells was not a limiting factor as fragile dinoflagellates, such a...

  16. A Viable Electrode Material for Use in Microbial Fuel Cells for Tropical Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Offei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrode materials are critical for microbial fuel cells (MFC since they influence the construction and operational costs. This study introduces a simple and efficient electrode material in the form of palm kernel shell activated carbon (AC obtained in tropical regions. The novel introduction of this material is also targeted at introducing an inexpensive and durable electrode material, which can be produced in rural communities to improve the viability of MFCs. The maximum voltage and power density obtained (under 1000 Ω load using an H-shaped MFC with AC as both anode and cathode electrode material was 0.66 V and 1.74 W/m3, respectively. The power generated by AC was as high as 86% of the value obtained with the extensively used carbon paper. Scanning electron microscopy and Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE analysis of AC anode biofilms confirmed that electrogenic bacteria were present on the electrode surface for substrate oxidation and the formation of nanowires.

  17. A viable electrode material for use in microbial fuel cells for tropical regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Offei, Felix; Thygesen, Anders; Mensah, Moses

    2016-01-01

    Electrode materials are critical for microbial fuel cells (MFC) since they influence the construction and operational costs. This study introduces a simple and efficient electrode material in the form of palm kernel shell activated carbon (AC) obtained in tropical regions. The novel introduction...

  18. Progress in emerging techniques for characterization of immobilized viable whole-cell biocatalysts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bučko, M.; Vikartovská, A.; Schenkmayerová, A.; Tkáč, J.; Filip, J.; Chorvát Jr., D.; Neděla, Vilém; Ansorge-Schumacher, M.B.; Gemeiner, P.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 71, č. 11 (2017), s. 2309-2324 ISSN 0366-6352 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : bioelectrocatalysis * imaging techniques * immobilized whole- cell biocatalyst * multienzyme cascade reactions * online kinetics Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.258, year: 2016

  19. Progress in biocatalysis with immobilized viable whole cells: systems development, reaction engineering and applications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Polakovič, M.; Švitel, J.; Bučko, M.; Filip, J.; Neděla, Vilém; Ansorge-Schumacher, M.B.; Gemeiner, P.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 39, č. 5 (2017), s. 667-683 ISSN 0141-5492 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : biocatalysis * immobilization methods * immobilized whole-cell biocatalyst * multienzyme cascade reactions * process economics * reaction engineering Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.730, year: 2016

  20. Identifying viable regulatory and innovation pathways for regenerative medicine: a case study of cultured red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittra, J; Tait, J; Mastroeni, M; Turner, M L; Mountford, J C; Bruce, K

    2015-01-25

    The creation of red blood cells for the blood transfusion markets represents a highly innovative application of regenerative medicine with a medium term (5-10 year) prospect for first clinical studies. This article describes a case study analysis of a project to derive red blood cells from human embryonic stem cells, including the systemic challenges arising from (i) the selection of appropriate and viable regulatory protocols and (ii) technological constraints related to stem cell manufacture and scale up to clinical Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) standard. The method used for case study analysis (Analysis of Life Science Innovation Systems (ALSIS)) is also innovative, demonstrating a new approach to social and natural science collaboration to foresight product development pathways. Issues arising along the development pathway include cell manufacture and scale-up challenges, affected by regulatory demands emerging from the innovation ecosystem (preclinical testing and clinical trials). Our discussion reflects on the efforts being made by regulators to adapt the current pharmaceuticals-based regulatory model to an allogeneic regenerative medicine product and the broader lessons from this case study for successful innovation and translation of regenerative medicine therapies, including the role of methodological and regulatory innovation in future development in the field. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Real-Time PCR Methodology for Selective Detection of Viable Escherichia coli O157:H7 Cells by Targeting Z3276 as a Genetic Marker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jin-Qiang

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study was to develop a sensitive, specific, and accurate method for the selective detection of viable Escherichia coli O157:H7 cells in foods. A unique open reading frame (ORF), Z3276, was identified as a specific genetic marker for the detection of E. coli O157:H7. We developed a real-time PCR assay with primers and probe targeting ORF Z3276 and confirmed that this assay was sensitive and specific for E. coli O157:H7 strains (n = 298). Using this assay, we can detect amounts of genomic DNA of E. coli O157:H7 as low as a few CFU equivalents. Moreover, we have developed a new propidium monoazide (PMA)–real-time PCR protocol that allows for the clear differentiation of viable from dead cells. In addition, the protocol was adapted to a 96-well plate format for easy and consistent handling of a large number of samples. Amplification of DNA from PMA-treated dead cells was almost completely inhibited, in contrast to the virtually unaffected amplification of DNA from PMA-treated viable cells. With beef spiked simultaneously with 8 × 107 dead cells/g and 80 CFU viable cells/g, we were able to selectively detect viable E. coli O157:H7 cells with an 8-h enrichment. In conclusion, this PMA–real-time PCR assay offers a sensitive and specific means to selectively detect viable E. coli O157:H7 cells in spiked beef. It also has the potential for high-throughput selective detection of viable E. coli O157:H7 cells in other food matrices and, thus, will have an impact on the accurate microbiological and epidemiological monitoring of food safety and environmental sources. PMID:22635992

  2. Viable Bacteria Associated with Red Blood Cells and Plasma in Freshly Drawn Blood Donations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Christian; Magnussen, Karin; Enevold, Christian

    2015-01-01

    the oral cavity, and to determine the distribution of bacteria revealed in plasma and in the red blood cell (RBC)-fraction. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. Blood were separated into plasma and RBC-suspensions, which were incubated anaerobically or aerobically for 7 days on trypticase soy blood agar (TSA......), self-reported medically healthy. RESULTS: Bacterial growth was observed on plates inoculated with plasma or RBCs from 62% of the blood donations. Growth was evident in 21 (35%) of 60 RBC-fractions and in 32 (53%) of 60 plasma-fractions versus 8 of 60 negative controls (p = 0.005 and p = 2.6x10...... of RBC-fractions for adherent bacteria should be recommended....

  3. A factor converting viable but nonculturable Vibrio cholerae to a culturable state in eukaryotic cells is a human catalase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senoh, Mitsutoshi; Hamabata, Takashi; Takeda, Yoshifumi

    2015-08-01

    In our previous work, we demonstrated that viable but nonculturable (VBNC) Vibrio cholerae O1 and O139 were converted to culturable by coculture with eukaryotic cells. Furthermore, we isolated a factor converting VBNC V. cholerae to culturable (FCVC) from a eukaryotic cell line, HT-29. In this study, we purified FCVC by successive column chromatographies comprising UNO Q-6 anion exchange, Bio-Scale CHT2-1 hydroxyapatite, and Superdex 200 10/300 GL. Homogeneity of the purified FCVC was demonstrated by SDS-PAGE. Nano-LC MS/MS analysis showed that the purified FCVC was a human catalase. An experiment of RNAi knockdown of catalase mRNA from HT-29 cells and treatment of the purified FCVC with a catalase inhibitor, 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole confirmed that the FCVC was a catalase. A possible role of the catalase in converting a VBNC V. cholerae to a culturable state in the human intestine is discussed. © 2015 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Drugs with anti-oxidant properties can interfere with cell viability measurements by assays that rely on the reducing property of viable cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenoy, Niraj; Stenson, Mary; Lawson, Joshua; Abeykoon, Jithma; Patnaik, Mrinal; Wu, Xiaosheng; Witzig, Thomas

    2017-02-27

    Cell viability assays such as Cell Titer Blue and Alamar Blue rely on the reducing property of viable cells to reduce the reagent dye to a product which gives a fluorescent signal. The current manufacture-recommended protocols do not take into account the possibility of the reagent substrate being reduced directly to the fluorescent product by drugs with an anti-oxidant property. After suspecting spurious results while determining the cytotoxic potential of a drug of interest (DOI) with known anti-oxidant property against a renal cell cancer (RCC) cell line, we aimed to establish that drugs with anti-oxidant property can indeed cause false-negative results with the current protocols of these assays by direct reduction of the reagent substrate. We also aimed to counter the same with a simple modification added to the protocol. Through our experiments, we conclusively demonstrate that drugs with anti-oxidant properties can indeed interfere with cell viability measurements by assays that rely on the reducing property of viable cells. A simple modification in the protocol, as elaborated in the manuscript, can prevent spurious results with these otherwise convenient assays.Laboratory Investigation advance online publication, 27 February 2017; doi:10.1038/labinvest.2017.18.

  5. A Novel Application for Low Frequency Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy as an Online Process Monitoring Tool for Viable Cell Concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Slouka

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available New approaches in process monitoring during industrial fermentations are not only limited to classical pH, dO2 and offgas analysis, but use different in situ and online sensors based on different physical principles to determine biomass, product quality, lysis and far more. One of the very important approaches is the in situ accessibility of viable cell concentration (VCC. This knowledge provides increased efficiency in monitoring and controlling strategies during cultivations. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy—EIS—is used to monitor biomass in a fermentation of E. coli BL21(DE3, producing a recombinant protein using a fed batch-based approach. Increases in the double layer capacitance (Cdl, determined at frequencies below 1 kHz, are proportional to the increase of biomass in the batch and fed batch phase, monitored in offline and online modes for different cultivations. A good correlation of Cdl with cell density is found and in order to get an appropriate verification of this method, different state-of-the-art biomass measurements are performed and compared. Since measurements in this frequency range are largely determined by the double layer region between the electrode and media, rather minor interferences with process parameters (aeration, stirring are to be expected. It is shown that impedance spectroscopy at low frequencies is a powerful tool for cultivation monitoring.

  6. A viable foal obtained by equine somatic cell nuclear transfer using oocytes recovered from immature follicles of live mares.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Young-Ho; Norris, Jody D; Velez, Isabel C; Jacobson, Candace C; Hartman, David L; Hinrichs, Katrin

    2013-03-15

    The presence of heterogenous mitochondria from the host ooplast affects the acceptance of offspring obtained by somatic cell nuclear transfer. This might be avoided by obtaining oocytes from selected females, but is then complicated by low numbers of available oocytes. We examined the efficiency of equine somatic cell nuclear transfer using oocytes recovered by transvaginal aspiration of immature follicles from 11 mares. Use of metaphase I oocytes as cytoplasts and of scriptaid (a histone deacetylase inhibitor) treatment during oocyte activation were evaluated to determine if these approaches would increase blastocyst production. In experiment 1, blastocyst development was 0/14 for metaphase I oocytes and 4/103 (4%) for metaphase II oocytes. Three blastocysts were transferred to recipient mares, resulting in two pregnancies and one live foal, which died shortly after birth. In experiment 2, blastocyst development was 2/47 (4%) for control oocytes and 1/83 (1%) for scriptaid-treated oocytes. No foals were born from two blastocysts transferred in the control group. The blastocyst from the scriptaid treatment resulted in birth of a live foal. In conclusion, this is apparently the first report of production of a viable cloned foal from oocytes collected from immature follicles of live mares, supporting the possibility of cloning using oocytes from selected mares. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Clinical validation of an ultra high-throughput spiral microfluidics for the detection and enrichment of viable circulating tumor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bee Luan Khoo

    Full Text Available Circulating tumor cells (CTCs are cancer cells that can be isolated via liquid biopsy from blood and can be phenotypically and genetically characterized to provide critical information for guiding cancer treatment. Current analysis of CTCs is hindered by the throughput, selectivity and specificity of devices or assays used in CTC detection and isolation.Here, we enriched and characterized putative CTCs from blood samples of patients with both advanced stage metastatic breast and lung cancers using a novel multiplexed spiral microfluidic chip. This system detected putative CTCs under high sensitivity (100%, n = 56 (Breast cancer samples: 12-1275 CTCs/ml; Lung cancer samples: 10-1535 CTCs/ml rapidly from clinically relevant blood volumes (7.5 ml under 5 min. Blood samples were completely separated into plasma, CTCs and PBMCs components and each fraction were characterized with immunophenotyping (Pan-cytokeratin/CD45, CD44/CD24, EpCAM, fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH (EML4-ALK or targeted somatic mutation analysis. We used an ultra-sensitive mass spectrometry based system to highlight the presence of an EGFR-activating mutation in both isolated CTCs and plasma cell-free DNA (cf-DNA, and demonstrate concordance with the original tumor-biopsy samples.We have clinically validated our multiplexed microfluidic chip for the ultra high-throughput, low-cost and label-free enrichment of CTCs. Retrieved cells were unlabeled and viable, enabling potential propagation and real-time downstream analysis using next generation sequencing (NGS or proteomic analysis.

  8. Quantitation of viable Coxiella burnetii in milk using an integrated cell culture-polymerase chain reaction (ICC-PCR) assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Diana; Shieh, Y-Carol; Tortorello, Mary; Kukreja, Ankush; Shazer, Arlette; Schlesser, Joseph

    2015-11-01

    The obligate intracellular pathogen Coxiella burnetii has long been considered the most heat resistant pathogen in raw milk, making it the reference pathogen for determining pasteurisation conditions for milk products. New milk formulations and novel non-thermal processes require validation of effectiveness which requires a more practical method for analysis than using the currently used animal model for assessing Coxiella survival. Also, there is an interest in better characterising thermal inactivation of Coxiella in various milk formulations. To avoid the use of the guinea pig model for evaluating Coxiella survival, an Integrated Cell Culture-PCR (ICC-PCR) method was developed for determining Coxiella viability in milk. Vero cell cultures were directly infected from Coxiella-contaminated milk in duplicate 24-well plates. Viability of the Coxiella in milk was shown by a ≥ 0.5 log genome equivalent (ge)/ml increase in the quantity of IS111a gene from the baseline post-infection (day 0) level after 9-11 d propagation. Coxiella in skim, 2%, and whole milk, and half and half successfully infected Vero cells and increased in number by at least 2 logs using a 48-h infection period followed by 9-d propagation time. As few as 125 Coxiella ge/ml in whole milk was shown to infect and propagate at least 2 logs in the optimised ICC-PCR assay, though variable confirmation of propagation was shown for as low as 25 Coxiella ge/ml. Applicability of the ICC-PCR method was further proven in an MPN format to quantitate the number of viable Coxiella remaining in whole milk after 60 °C thermal treatment at 0, 20, 40, 60 and 90 min.

  9. Polyelectrolyte Complex Beads by Novel Two-Step Process for Improved Performance of Viable Whole-Cell Baeyer-Villiger Monoxygenase by Immobilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomáš Krajčovič

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A novel immobilization matrix for the entrapment of viable whole-cell Baeyer–Villiger monooxygenase was developed. Viable recombinant Escherichia coli cells overexpressing cyclohexanone monooxygenase were entrapped in polyelectrolyte complex beads prepared by a two-step reaction of oppositely-charged polymers including highly defined cellulose sulphate. Immobilized cells exhibited higher operational stability than free cells during 10 repeated cycles of Baeyer–Villiger biooxidations of rac-bicyclo[3.2.0]hept-2-en-6-one to the corresponding lactones (1R,5S-3-oxabicyclo-[3.3.0]oct-6-en-3-one and (1S,5R-2-oxabicyclo-[3.3.0]oct-6-en-3-one. The morphology of polyelectrolyte complex beads was characterised by environmental scanning electron microscopy; the spatial distribution of polymers in the beads and cell viability were examined using confocal laser scanning microscopy, and the texture was characterised by the mechanical resistance measurements.

  10. Enhanced inhibition of murine prostatic carcinoma growth by immunization with or administration of viable human umbilical vein endothelial cells and CRM197

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Huiyong

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Vaccination with xenogeneic and syngeneic endothelial cells is effective for inhibiting tumor growth. Nontoxic diphtheria toxin (CRM197, as an immunogen or as a specific inhibitor of heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor, has shown promising antitumor activity. Therefore, immunization with or administration of viable human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs combined with CRM197 could have an enhanced antitumor effect. Six-week-old C57BL/6J male mice were vaccinated with viable HUVECs, 1 x 10(6 viable HUVECs combined with 100 μg CRM197, or 100 μg CRM197 alone by ip injections once a week for 4 consecutive weeks. RM-1 cells (5 x 10(5 were inoculated by sc injection as a preventive procedure. During the therapeutic procedure, 6-week-old male C57BL/6J mice were challenged with 1 x 10(5 RM-1 cells, then injected sc with 1 x 10(6 viable HUVECs, 1 x 10(6 viable HUVECs + 100 μg CRM197, and 100 μg CRM197 alone twice a week for 4 consecutive weeks. Tumor volume and life span were monitored. We also investigated the effects of immunization with HUVECs on the aortic arch wall and on wound healing. Vaccination with or administration of viable HUVECs+CRM197 enhanced the inhibition of RM-1 prostatic carcinoma by 24 and 29%, respectively, and prolonged the life span for 3 and 4 days, respectively, compared with those of only vaccination or administration with viable HUVECs of tumor-bearing C57BL/6J mice. Furthermore, HUVEC immunization caused some damage to the aortic arch wall but did not have remarkable effects on the rate of wound healing; the wounds healed in approximately 13 days. Treatment with CRM197 in combination with viable HUVECs resulted in a marked enhancement of the antitumor effect in the preventive or therapeutic treatment for prostatic carcinoma in vivo, suggesting a novel combination for anti-cancer therapy.

  11. Presentation of lipid antigens to T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Lucia; De Libero, Gennaro

    2008-04-15

    T cells specific for lipid antigens participate in regulation of the immune response during infections, tumor immunosurveillance, allergy and autoimmune diseases. T cells recognize lipid antigens as complexes formed with CD1 antigen-presenting molecules, thus resembling recognition of MHC-peptide complexes. The biophysical properties of lipids impose unique mechanisms for their delivery, internalization into antigen-presenting cells, membrane trafficking, processing, and loading of CD1 molecules. Each of these steps is controlled at molecular and celular levels and determines lipid immunogenicity. Lipid antigens may derive from microbes and from the cellular metabolism, thus allowing the immune system to survey a large repertoire of immunogenic molecules. Recognition of lipid antigens facilitates the detection of infectious agents and the initiation of responses involved in immunoregulation and autoimmunity. This review focuses on the presentation mechanisms and specific recognition of self and bacterial lipid antigens and discusses the important open issues.

  12. Fluorescence Quenching Property of C-Phycocyanin from Spirulina platensis and its Binding Efficacy with Viable Cell Components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paswan, Meenakshi B; Chudasama, Meghna M; Mitra, Madhusree; Bhayani, Khushbu; George, Basil; Chatterjee, Shruti; Mishra, Sandhya

    2016-03-01

    Phycocyanin is a natural brilliant blue colored, fluorescent protein, which is commonly present in cyanobacteria. In this study, C-phycocyanin was extracted and purified from Spirulina platensis, which are multicellular and filamentous cyanobacteria of greater importance because of its various biological and pharmacological potential. It was analyzed for its binding affinity towards blood cells, algal cells, genomic DNA of microalgae, and bacteria at different temperature and incubation time. It showed good binding affinity with these components even at low concentration of 2.5 μM. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the applicability of C-phycocyanin as a green fluorescent dye substituting carcinogenic chemical dyes.

  13. Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis Presenting as Uncontrolled Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederic A. Rawlins

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH is an uncommon disorder affecting primarily young adult smokers. It is characterized by abnormal proliferation of Langerhans cells, specialized monocyte-macrophage lineage antigen-presenting cells. LCH can affect the lungs in isolation or as part of a systemic disease. Most commonly, the disease presents in the third or fourth decade without gender predominance. Symptoms typically include dyspnea and cough. Commonly, physical examination is unremarkable but cor pulmonale may be observed in advanced disease. The chest radiograph is typically abnormal with nodular or interstitial infiltrates and cystic changes. High-resolution computed tomography of the chest with these findings in the middle and upper lobes of an adult smoker is virtually diagnostic of LCH. Pulmonary function assessment is variable. Asthma has rarely been reported in association with this disorder. There are only three reported cases of the diagnosis of concomitant asthma which have been made in association with the diagnosis of LCH. We present a case in which our patient presented with signs and symptoms of asthma to include confirmatory findings of airway hyperresponsiveness. The diagnosis of LCH was established after the patient failed to respond to conventional treatment for asthma, and further evaluation was completed.

  14. The Antigen Presenting Cells Instruct Plasma Cell Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei eXu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The professional antigen presenting cells (APCs, including many subsets of dendritic cells and macrophages, not only mediate prompt but nonspecific response against microbes, but also bridge the antigen-specific adaptive immune response through antigen presentation. In the latter, typically activated B cells acquire cognate signals from T helper cells in the germinal center of lymphoid follicles to differentiate into plasma cells, which generate protective antibodies. Recent advances have revealed that many APC subsets provide not only signal 1 (the antigen, but also signal 2 to directly instruct the differentiation process of plasma cells in a T cell-independent manner. Herein, the different signals provided by these APC subsets to direct B cell proliferation, survival, class switching and terminal differentiation are discussed. We furthermore propose that the next generation of vaccines for boosting antibody response could be designed by targeting APCs.

  15. Designing primers and evaluation of the efficiency of propidium monoazide – Quantitative polymerase chain reaction for counting the viable cells of Lactobacillus gasseri and Lactobacillus salivarius

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chieh-Hsien Lai

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficiency of using propidium monoazide (PMA real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR to count the viable cells of Lactobacillus gasseri and Lactobacillus salivarius in probiotic products. Based on the internal transcription spacer and 23S rRNA genes, two primer sets specific for these two Lactobacillus species were designed. For a probiotic product, the total deMan Rogosa Sharpe plate count was 8.65±0.69 log CFU/g, while for qPCR, the cell counts of L. gasseri and L. salivarius were 8.39±0.14 log CFU/g and 8.57±0.24 log CFU/g, respectively. Under the same conditions, for its heat-killed product, qPCR counts for L. gasseri and L. salivarius were 6.70±0.16 log cells/g and 7.67±0.20 log cells/g, while PMA-qPCR counts were 5.33±0.18 log cells/g and 5.05±0.23 log cells/g, respectively. For cell dilutions with a viable cell count of 8.5 log CFU/mL for L. gasseri and L. salivarius, after heat killing, the PMA-qPCR count for both Lactobacillus species was near 5.5 log cells/mL. When the PMA-qPCR counts of these cell dilutions were compared before and after heat killing, although some DNA might be lost during the heat killing, significant qPCR signals from dead cells, i.e., about 4–5 log cells/mL, could not be reduced by PMA treatment. Increasing PMA concentrations from 100 μM to 200 μM or light exposure time from 5 minutes to 15 minutes had no or, if any, only minor effect on the reduction of qPCR signals from their dead cells. Thus, to differentiate viable lactic acid bacterial cells from dead cells using the PMA-qPCR method, the efficiency of PMA to reduce the qPCR signals from dead cells should be notable.

  16. Designing primers and evaluation of the efficiency of propidium monoazide - Quantitative polymerase chain reaction for counting the viable cells of Lactobacillus gasseri and Lactobacillus salivarius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chieh-Hsien; Wu, Sih-Rong; Pang, Jen-Chieh; Ramireddy, Latha; Chiang, Yu-Cheng; Lin, Chien-Ku; Tsen, Hau-Yang

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficiency of using propidium monoazide (PMA) real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) to count the viable cells of Lactobacillus gasseri and Lactobacillus salivarius in probiotic products. Based on the internal transcription spacer and 23S rRNA genes, two primer sets specific for these two Lactobacillus species were designed. For a probiotic product, the total deMan Rogosa Sharpe plate count was 8.65±0.69 log CFU/g, while for qPCR, the cell counts of L. gasseri and L. salivarius were 8.39±0.14 log CFU/g and 8.57±0.24 log CFU/g, respectively. Under the same conditions, for its heat-killed product, qPCR counts for L. gasseri and L. salivarius were 6.70±0.16 log cells/g and 7.67±0.20 log cells/g, while PMA-qPCR counts were 5.33±0.18 log cells/g and 5.05±0.23 log cells/g, respectively. For cell dilutions with a viable cell count of 8.5 log CFU/mL for L. gasseri and L. salivarius, after heat killing, the PMA-qPCR count for both Lactobacillus species was near 5.5 log cells/mL. When the PMA-qPCR counts of these cell dilutions were compared before and after heat killing, although some DNA might be lost during the heat killing, significant qPCR signals from dead cells, i.e., about 4-5 log cells/mL, could not be reduced by PMA treatment. Increasing PMA concentrations from 100 μM to 200 μM or light exposure time from 5 minutes to 15 minutes had no or, if any, only minor effect on the reduction of qPCR signals from their dead cells. Thus, to differentiate viable lactic acid bacterial cells from dead cells using the PMA-qPCR method, the efficiency of PMA to reduce the qPCR signals from dead cells should be notable. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Merkel cell carcinoma: A rare presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prosanta Kumar Bhattacharjee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 33-year-old man presented with a lump at the right side of chest wall of 4 months duration which started bleeding suddenly from an ulcer at its center. Examination revealed a globular ulcerated mass 2 cm in diameter, on the anterior axillary fold, with adherent clot at its center. No regional lymphadenopathy was noted. Wide local excision with 2 cm margin was done. Biopsy report revealed malignant small round-cell tumor. Immunohistochemistry showed it to be cytokeratin-20-positive and S100-negative, suggesting the diagnosis of Merkel cell carcinoma. The patient did not receive any other adjuvant therapy. He is being followed-up for the last 4 years and has shown no features of recurrence so far.

  18. Merkel cell carcinoma: A rare presentation

    OpenAIRE

    Prosanta Kumar Bhattacharjee; Shyamal Kumar Halder; Rajendra Prashad Ray

    2014-01-01

    A 33-year-old man presented with a lump at the right side of chest wall of 4 months duration which started bleeding suddenly from an ulcer at its center. Examination revealed a globular ulcerated mass 2 cm in diameter, on the anterior axillary fold, with adherent clot at its center. No regional lymphadenopathy was noted. Wide local excision with 2 cm margin was done. Biopsy report revealed malignant small round-cell tumor. Immunohistochemistry showed it to be cytokeratin-20-positive and S100-...

  19. Not single but periodic injections of synovial mesenchymal stem cells maintain viable cells in knees and inhibit osteoarthritis progression in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozeki, N; Muneta, T; Koga, H; Nakagawa, Y; Mizuno, M; Tsuji, K; Mabuchi, Y; Akazawa, C; Kobayashi, E; Matsumoto, K; Futamura, K; Saito, T; Sekiya, I

    2016-06-01

    We investigated the effects of single or repetitive intra-articular injections of synovial mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) on a rat osteoarthritis (OA) model, and elucidated the behaviors and underlying mechanisms of the stem cells after the injection. One week after the transection of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) of wild type Lewis rats, one million synovial MSCs were injected into the knee joint every week. Cartilage degeneration was evaluated with safranin-o staining after the first injection. To analyze cell kinetics or MSC properties, luciferase, LacZ, and GFP expressing synovial MSCs were used. To confirm the role of MSCs, species-specific microarray and PCR analyses were performed using human synovial MSCs. Histological analysis for femoral and tibial cartilage showed that a single injection was ineffective but weekly injections had significant chondroprotective effects for 12 weeks. Histological and flow-cytometric analyses of LacZ and GFP expressing synovial MSCs revealed that injected MSCs migrated mainly into the synovium and most of them retained their undifferentiated MSC properties though the migrated cells rapidly decreased. In vivo imaging analysis revealed that MSCs maintained in knees while weekly injection. Species-specific microarray and PCR analyses showed that the human mRNAs on day 1 for 21 genes increased over 50-fold, and increased the expressions of PRG-4, BMP-2, and BMP-6 genes encoding chondroprotective proteins, and TSG-6 encoding an anti-inflammatory one. Not single but periodic injections of synovial MSCs maintained viable cells without losing their MSC properties in knees and inhibited osteoarthritis (OA) progression by secretion of trophic factors. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. Endothelial cells present antigens in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tellides George

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Immune recognition of vascular endothelial cells (EC has been implicated in allograft rejection, protection against pathogens, and lymphocyte recruitment. However, EC pervade nearly all tissues and predominate in none, complicating any direct test of immune recognition. Here, we examined antigen presentation by EC in vivo by testing immune responses against E. coli β-galactosidase (β-gal in two lines of transgenic mice that express β-gal exclusively in their EC. TIE2-lacZ mice express β-gal in all EC and VWF-lacZ mice express β-gal in heart and brain microvascular EC. Results Transgenic and congenic wild type FVB mice immunized with β-gal expression vector DNA or β-gal protein generated high titer, high affinity antisera containing comparable levels of antigen-specific IgG1 and IgG2a isotypes, suggesting equivalent activation of T helper cell subsets. The immunized transgenic mice remained healthy, their EC continued to express β-gal, and their blood vessels showed no histological abnormalities. In response to β-gal in vitro, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from immunized transgenic and FVB mice proliferated, expressed CD25, and secreted IFN-γ. Infection with recombinant vaccinia virus encoding β-gal raised equivalent responses in transgenic and FVB mice. Hearts transplanted from transgenic mice into FVB mice continued to beat and the graft EC continued to express β-gal. These results suggested immunological ignorance of the transgene encoded EC protein. However, skin transplanted from TIE2-lacZ onto FVB mice lost β-gal+ EC and the hosts developed β-gal-specific antisera, demonstrating activation of host immune effector mechanisms. In contrast, skin grafted from TIE2-lacZ onto VWF-lacZ mice retained β-gal+ EC and no antisera developed, suggesting a tolerant host immune system. Conclusion Resting, β-gal+ EC in transgenic mice tolerize specific lymphocytes that would otherwise respond against β-gal expressed by EC within

  1. Bacillus subtilis mutants with knockouts of the genes encoding ribonucleases RNase Y and RNase J1 are viable, with major defects in cell morphology, sporulation, and competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figaro, Sabine; Durand, Sylvain; Gilet, Laetitia; Cayet, Nadège; Sachse, Martin; Condon, Ciarán

    2013-05-01

    The genes encoding the ribonucleases RNase J1 and RNase Y have long been considered essential for Bacillus subtilis cell viability, even before there was concrete knowledge of their function as two of the most important enzymes for RNA turnover in this organism. Here we show that this characterization is incorrect and that ΔrnjA and Δrny mutants are both viable. As expected, both strains grow relatively slowly, with doubling times in the hour range in rich medium. Knockout mutants have major defects in their sporulation and competence development programs. Both mutants are hypersensitive to a wide range of antibiotics and have dramatic alterations to their cell morphologies, suggestive of cell envelope defects. Indeed, RNase Y mutants are significantly smaller in diameter than wild-type strains and have a very disordered peptidoglycan layer. Strains lacking RNase J1 form long filaments in tight spirals, reminiscent of mutants of the actin-like proteins (Mre) involved in cell shape determination. Finally, we combined the rnjA and rny mutations with mutations in other components of the degradation machinery and show that many of these strains are also viable. The implications for the two known RNA degradation pathways of B. subtilis are discussed.

  2. Nanoscale artificial antigen presenting cells for T cell immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perica, Karlo; De León Medero, Andrés; Durai, Malarvizhi; Chiu, Yen Ling; Bieler, Joan Glick; Sibener, Leah; Niemöller, Michaela; Assenmacher, Mario; Richter, Anne; Edidin, Michael; Oelke, Mathias; Schneck, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Artificial antigen presenting cells (aAPC), which deliver stimulatory signals to cytotoxic lymphocytes, are a powerful tool for both adoptive and active immunotherapy. Thus far, aAPC have been synthesized by coupling T cell activating proteins such as CD3 or MHC-peptide to micron-sized beads. Nanoscale platforms have different trafficking and biophysical interaction properties and may allow development of new immunotherapeutic strategies. We therefore manufactured aAPC based on two types of nanoscale particle platforms: biocompatible iron-dextran paramagnetic particles (50-100 nm in diameter) and avidin-coated quantum dot nanocrystals (~30 nm). Nanoscale aAPC induced antigen-specific T cell proliferation from mouse splenocytes and human peripheral blood T cells. When injected in vivo, both iron-dextran particles and quantum dot nanocrystals enhanced tumor rejection in a subcutaneous mouse melanoma model. This is the first description of nanoscale aAPC that induce antigen-specific T cell proliferation in vitro and lead to effective T cell stimulation and inhibition of tumor growth in vivo. Artifical antigen presenting cells could revolutionize the field of cancer-directed immunotherapy. This team of investigators have manufactured two types of nanoscale particle platform-based aAPCs and demonstrates that both iron-dextran particles and quantum dot nanocrystals enhance tumor rejection in a melanoma model, providing the first description of nanoscale aAPCs that lead to effective T cell stimulation and inhibition of tumor growth. © 2013.

  3. Effects of the oral administration of viable and heat-killed Streptococcus bovis HC5 cells to pre-sensitized BALB/c mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline D Paiva

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides have been suggested as an alternative to classical antibiotics in livestock production and bacteriocin-producing bacteria could be added to animal feeds to deliver bacteriocins in the gastrointestinal (GI tract of ruminant and monogastric animals. In this study, viable (V and heat-killed (HK Streptococcus bovis HC5 cells were orally administered to pre-sensitized mice in order to assess the effects of a bacteriocin-producing bacteria on histological parameters and the immune response of the GI tract of monogastric animals. The administration of V and HK S. bovis HC5 cells during 58 days to BALB/c mice did not affect weight gain, but an increase in gut permeability was detected in animals receiving the HK cells. Viable and heat killed cells caused similar morphological alterations in the GI tract of the animals, but the most prominent effects were detected in the small intestine. The oral administration of S. bovis HC5 also influenced cytokine production in the small intestine, and the immune-mediated activity differed between V and HK cells. The relative expression of IL-12 and INF-γ was significantly higher in the small intestine of mice treated with V cells, while an increase in IL-5, IL-13 and TNF-α expression was only detected in mice treated with HK cells. Considering that even under a condition of severe challenge (pre-sensitization followed by daily exposure to the same bacterial immunogen the general health of the animals was maintained, it appears that oral administration of S. bovis HC5 cells could be a useful route to deliver bacteriocin in the GI tract of livestock animals.

  4. A non-aggressive, highly efficient, enzymatic method for dissociation of human brain-tumors and brain-tissues to viable single-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volovitz, Ilan; Shapira, Netanel; Ezer, Haim; Gafni, Aviv; Lustgarten, Merav; Alter, Tal; Ben-Horin, Idan; Barzilai, Ori; Shahar, Tal; Kanner, Andrew; Fried, Itzhak; Veshchev, Igor; Grossman, Rachel; Ram, Zvi

    2016-06-01

    Conducting research on the molecular biology, immunology, and physiology of brain tumors (BTs) and primary brain tissues requires the use of viably dissociated single cells. Inadequate methods for tissue dissociation generate considerable loss in the quantity of single cells produced and in the produced cells' viability. Improper dissociation may also demote the quality of data attained in functional and molecular assays due to the presence of large quantities cellular debris containing immune-activatory danger associated molecular patterns, and due to the increased quantities of degraded proteins and RNA. Over 40 resected BTs and non-tumorous brain tissue samples were dissociated into single cells by mechanical dissociation or by mechanical and enzymatic dissociation. The quality of dissociation was compared for all frequently used dissociation enzymes (collagenase, DNase, hyaluronidase, papain, dispase) and for neutral protease (NP) from Clostridium histolyticum. Single-cell-dissociated cell mixtures were evaluated for cellular viability and for the cell-mixture dissociation quality. Dissociation quality was graded by the quantity of subcellular debris, non-dissociated cell clumps, and DNA released from dead cells. Of all enzymes or enzyme combinations examined, NP (an enzyme previously not evaluated on brain tissues) produced dissociated cell mixtures with the highest mean cellular viability: 93 % in gliomas, 85 % in brain metastases, and 89 % in non-tumorous brain tissue. NP also produced cell mixtures with significantly less cellular debris than other enzymes tested. Dissociation using NP was non-aggressive over time-no changes in cell viability or dissociation quality were found when comparing 2-h dissociation at 37 °C to overnight dissociation at ambient temperature. The use of NP allows for the most effective dissociation of viable single cells from human BTs or brain tissue. Its non-aggressive dissociative capacity may enable ambient

  5. Red cell membrane: past, present, and future

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mohandas, Narla; Gallagher, Patrick G

    2008-01-01

    .... The non-nucleated red cell is unique among human cell type in that the plasma membrane, its only structural component, accounts for all of its diverse antigenic, transport, and mechanical characteristics...

  6. Prognostic impact of the number of viable circulating cells with high telomerase activity in gastric cancer patients: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Hiroaki; Inoue, Haruhiro; Kimura, Satoshi; Ohmori, Tohru; Ishikawa, Fumihiro; Gohda, Keigo; Sato, Jun

    2014-07-01

    The identification of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in peripheral blood is a useful approach to estimate prognosis, monitor disease progression and measure treatment effects in several types of malignancies. We have previously used OBP-401, a telomerase-specific, replication-selective, oncolytic adenoviral agent carrying the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene. GFP-positive cells (GFP+ cells) were counted under a fluorescence microscope. Our results showed that the number of at least 7.735 µm in diameter GFP+ cells (L-GFP+ cells) in the peripheral blood was a significant marker of prognosis in gastric cancer patients. However, tumor cells undergoing epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) have been reported to be smaller in size than cells without EMT features; thus, CTCs undergoing EMT may escape detection with this technique. Therefore, in this study, we analyzed the relationship between patient outcome and the number of GFP+ cells of any size. We obtained peripheral blood samples from 65 patients with gastric cancer. After infection of OBP-401, GFP+ cells were counted and measured. The relationship between the number of GFP+ cells and surgical outcome was analyzed. The median follow-up period of the surviving patients was 36 months. A significant difference in overall survival was found between patients with 0-5 and patients with ≥6 L-GFP+ cells. No clear relationship was established between the number of small-sized GFP+ cells and patient prognosis. The number of L-GFP+ cells was significantly related to overall survival in patients with gastric cancer. The detection of L-GFP+ cells using OBP-401 may be a useful prognostic marker in gastric cancer.

  7. Binding of CLL subset 4 B-cell receptor immunoglobulins to viable human memory B lymphocytes requires a distinctive IGKV somatic mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catera, Rosa; Liu, Yun; Gao, Chao; Yan, Xiao-Jie; Magli, Amanda; Allen, Steven L; Kolitz, Jonathan E; Rai, Kanti R; Chu, Charles C; Feizi, Ten; Stamatopoulos, Kostas; Chiorazzi, Nicholas

    2017-01-12

    Amino acid replacement mutations in certain CLL stereotyped B-cell receptor (BCR) immunoglobulins (IGs) at defined positions within antigen-binding sites strongly imply antigen selection. Prime examples of this are CLL subset 4 BCR IGs using IGHV4-34/IGHD5-18/IGHJ6 and IGKV2-30/IGKJ2 rearrangements. Conspicuously and unlike most CLL IGs, subset 4 IGs do not bind apoptotic cells. By testing the (auto)antigenic reactivities of subset 4 IGs toward viable lymphoid-lineage cells and specific autoantigens typically bound by IGHV4-34+ IGs, we found IGs from both subset 4 and non-subset 4 IGHV4-34-expressing CLL cases bind naïve B cells. However, only subset 4 IGs react with memory B cells. Furthermore, subset 4 IGs do not bind DNA nor i or I carbohydrate antigens, common targets of IGHV4-34-utilizing antibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus and cold agglutinin disease, respectively. Notably, we found that subset 4 IG binding to memory B lymphocytes depends on an aspartic acid at position 66 of FR3 in the rearranged IGKV2-30 gene; this amino acid residue is acquired by somatic mutation. Our findings illustrate the importance of positive and negative selection criteria for structural elements in CLL IGs and suggest that autoantigens driving normal B cells to become subset 4 CLL cells differ from those driving IGHV4-34+ B cells in other diseases.

  8. Unusual presentation of T-cell lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pandya Mona

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available A 56-year old woman developed multiple papules, plaques and erythema - multiforme (EM like lesions on palms, soles, abdomen, back, axillary and gluteal folds of one month duration. She also had erythematous plaques, painful necrotising ulcers and oro-genital ulcerations. Skin biopsy was suggestive of plaque stage of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.

  9. Managing Viable Knowledge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achterbergh, J.M.I.M.; Vriens, D.J.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, Beer's Viable System Model (VSM) is applied to knowledge management. Based on the VSM, domains of knowledge are identified that an organization should possess to maintain its viability. The logic of the VSM is also used to support the diagnosis, design and implementation of the

  10. Determination of Viable Salmonella Typhimurium Cells in Heat Treated Milk By PMA/Real-Time PCR Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zülal Kesmen

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Applying different technological processes during the production of food has a lethal effect on the bacteria but DNA of these bacterial strains may cause false positive results when detected by real time PCR technique because they preserve their existence for a certain period of time. To overcome this shortcoming of the real time PCR technique, a new method has been developed in recent years, based on the removal of dead cell DNA from the medium by treatment with Propodium Monoazide (PMA before DNA extraction. In this study, real-time PCR method was combined with PMA application for the detection of live cells of Salmonella Typhimurium in heat treated milk samples. For this purpose, milk samples inoculated with S. Tyhimurium were heat treated at different temperatures (60, 65, 70 and 75°C and times (15, 60, 300, 900 sec and number of live bacteria was determined comparatively by direct real-time PCR, PMA/real-time PCR and conventional cultural method. As a result, unlike the direct real time PCR technique, PMA/real-time PCR method prevents to a certain extent of false positive results from dead cells at all tested temperatures and times but higher results were obtained from PMA/real-time PCR method when compared to conventional cultural results. Therefore, further studies should be carried out to optimize the conditions of the PMA application in order to eliminate the high positive results detected by the PMA / real-time PCR method

  11. Advances toward regenerative medicine in the central nervous system: challenges in making stem cell therapy a viable clinical strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoll, Elizabeth A

    2014-01-01

    Over recent years, there has been a great deal of interest in the prospects of stem cell-based therapies for the treatment of nervous system disorders. The eagerness of scientists, clinicians, and spin-out companies to develop new therapies led to premature clinical trials in human patients, and now the initial excitement has largely turned to skepticism. Rather than embracing a defeatist attitude or pressing blindly ahead, I argue it is time to evaluate the challenges encountered by regenerative medicine in the central nervous system and the progress that is being made to solve these problems. In the twenty years since the adult brain was discovered to have an endogenous regenerative capacity, much basic research has been done to elucidate mechanisms controlling proliferation and cellular identity; how stem cells may be directed into neuronal lineages; genetic, pharmacological, and behavioral interventions that modulate neurogenic activity; and the exact nature of limitations to regeneration in the adult, aged, diseased and injured CNS. These findings should prove valuable in designing realistic clinical strategies to improve the prospects of stem cell-based therapies. In this review, I discuss how basic research continues to play a critical role in identifying both barriers and potential routes to regenerative therapy in the CNS.

  12. Induction of Viable but Nonculturable Salmonella in Exponentially Grown Cells by Exposure to a Low-Humidity Environment and Their Resuscitation by Catalase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishige, Yuta; Koike, Atsushi; Tamura-Ueyama, Ai; Amano, Fumio

    2017-02-01

    Salmonella is a major cause of foodborne disease that sometimes occurs in massive outbreaks around the world. This pathogen is tolerant of low-humidity conditions. We previously described a method for induction of viable but nonculturable (VBNC) Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis by treatment with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and subsequent resuscitation with 0.3 mM sodium pyruvate. Here, we report a new method for the induction of the VBNC state in Salmonella Enteritidis cells, one involving dehydration. Exposure of Salmonella Enteritidis cells to dehydration stress under poor nutritional conditions (0.9% [wt/vol] NaCl) and 10 to 20% relative humidity at room temperature decreased the presence of culturable population to 0.0067%, but respiratory and glucose uptake active populations were maintained at 0.46 and 1.12%, respectively, meaning that approximately 1% may have entered the VBNC state. Furthermore, these VBNC cells could be resuscitated to acquire culturability by incubation with catalase in M9 minimal medium without glucose in a manner dependent on the dose of catalase but not sodium pyruvate. These results suggest that a low-humidity environment could cause Salmonella Enteritidis cells to enter the VBNC state and the cells could then be resuscitated for growth by treatment with catalase, suggesting a potential risk of Salmonella Enteritidis to survive in low water activity foods in the VBNC state and to start regrowth for foodborne illness.

  13. Dye solar cell research: EU delegation presentation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Cummings, F

    2009-11-09

    Full Text Available Franscious Cummings Energy and Processes Materials Science and Manufacturing Council for Scientific and Industrial Research P.O. Box 395 Pretoria 0001, South Africa 13 November 2009 © CSIR 2007 www.csir.co.za CONTENT head2right...Background head2rightCSIR Dye Solar Cell Research head2rightCollaborations and Links head2rightAcknowledgements © CSIR 2007 www.csir.co.za BACKGROUND head2rightSA is dry: Annual rainfall average of 450 mm compared with a world average...

  14. Freezing Nitrogen Ethanol Composite May be a Viable Approach for Cryotherapy of Human Giant Cell Tumor of Bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Po-Kuei; Chen, Cheng-Fong; Wang, Jir-You; Chen, Paul Chih-Hsueh; Chang, Ming-Chau; Hung, Shih-Chieh; Chen, Wei-Ming

    2017-06-01

    Liquid nitrogen has been used as adjuvant cryotherapy for treating giant cell tumor (GCT) of bone. However, the liquid phase and ultrafreezing (-196° C) properties increase the risk of damage to the adjacent tissues and may lead to perioperative complications. A novel semisolid cryogen, freezing nitrogen ethanol composite, might mitigate these shortcomings because of less-extreme freezing. We therefore wished to evaluate freezing nitrogen ethanol composite as a coolant to determine its properties in tumor cryoablation. (1) Is freezing nitrogen ethanol composite-mediated freezing effective for tumor cryoablation in an ex vivo model, and if yes, is apoptosis involved in the tumor-killing mechanism? (2) Does freezing nitrogen ethanol composite treatment block neovascularization and neoplastic progression of the grafted GCTs and is it comparable to that of liquid nitrogen in an in vivo chicken model? (3) Can use of freezing nitrogen ethanol composite as an adjuvant to curettage result in successful short-term treatment, defined as absence of GCT recurrence at a minimum of 1 year in a small proof-of-concept clinical series? The cryogenic effect on bone tissue mediated by freezing nitrogen ethanol composite and liquid nitrogen was verified by thermal measurement in a time-course manner. Cryoablation on human GCT tissue was examined ex vivo for effect on morphologic features (cell shrinkage) and DNA fragmentation (apoptosis). The presumed mechanism was investigated by molecular analysis of apoptosis regulatory proteins including caspases 3, 8, and 9 and Bax/Bcl-2. Chicken chorioallantoic membrane was used as an in vivo model to evaluate the effects of freezing nitrogen ethanol composite and liquid nitrogen treatment on GCT-derived neovascularization and tumor neoplasm. A small group of patients with GCT of bone was treated by curettage and adjuvant freezing nitrogen ethanol composite cryotherapy in a proof-of-concept study. Tumor recurrence and perioperative

  15. Quality of raw cow milk in Republic of Macedonia determined through the testing of somatic cell count and total viable count

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelovski Ljupco

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Somatic cells count and total viable count are criteria used to estimate the compliance of raw cow milk with the Book of rules for demands for safety and hygiene and procedures for official controls of milk and milk products, Official Gazette of RM 157/2007. According to the given demands, raw milk operators are obliged to conduct all procedures and to guarantee that milk is in compliance with the criteria laid down in Book of rules. At the same time, Republic of Macedonia have to fulfill EU criteria laid down in Directive 92/46 (Council directive 92/46/EEC laying down the health rules for the production and placing on the market of raw milk, heat-treated milk and milkbased products for quality of raw milk as part of implementation of community legislation and milk production. The independent laboratory for milk quality control at FVM-Skopje, in frame of its activities in the period February- August 2008 has conducted a study for obtaining preliminary results for the situation with raw milk quality produced in R. of Macedonia for somatic cells counts and total viable count. In the study we analyzed 2065 samples for TVC and 1625 samples for SCC of raw milk samples produced in different parts of the country. From the tested samples only 41,8% fulfill criteria for SCC and 41,45% criteria for TVC lay down in Book of rules for 2008. Assessment of the results in light of Council Directive it is obvious that only 42,7% of the samples for SCC and 10,7% for TVC fulfill the criteria of Council Directive having in mind different requirements vs. Book of rules.

  16. Biologic properties of viable deletion mutants of simian virus 40 (SV40) rescued from the cells of an SV40-induced hamster lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamandopoulos, G T; Carmichael, G

    1983-12-01

    A lymphocytic leukemia induced by the oncogenic DNA simian virus 40 (SV40) in an inbred LSH/SsLak Syrian golden hamster was evoked to produce infectious SV40 by fusion of the leukemia cells with grivet monkey kidney (GMK) cells and by exposure of the leukemia cells to the chemical inducers mitomycin C and cycloheximide. Plaque-purified viable substrains of the rescued SV40 when studied by restriction endonuclease digestion of viral DNA were found to contain small deletions within the Hind III restriction fragment C. These deletions lay near the viral origin of DNA replication. Ten plaque-purified substrains of the rescued virus identified by immunofluorescence as being SV40 were found, when compared to the wild-type SV40, to replicate slowly and to form small plaques. Although these substrains transformed NIH/3T3 cells as efficiently as the wild-type SV40 in tissue culture, they were generally less oncogenic in vivo--7 of the 10 failed to induce tumors. The 3 oncogenic SV40-rescued substrains were not found to exhibit "lymphocytotropism," i.e., the capacity to infect and neoplastically transform preferentially hamster lymphocytes. Thus the hamster lymphocytic leukemia originally induced by the wild-type SV40 was most likely a chance-stochastic event rather than the result of tropism-determinism mediated by the virus, as is usually the case with leukemogenic RNA viruses.

  17. Giant cell arteritis presenting as facial swelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricketti, Anthony J; Cleri, Dennis J; Godyn, Janusz J; Shenk, Suzanne H; Vernaleo, John R

    2008-01-01

    Facial swelling is commonly ascribed to angioedema and a host of other causes. Temporal arteritis (TA), a disease most often diagnosed in patients over the age of 50 years, frequently presents with nonspecific and often ignored complaints (headache, symptoms of polymyalgia rheumatica, low-grade fever, fever of unknown origin, loss of appetite, depression, joint pains, weight loss, hair loss, and even respiratory symptoms). The diagnosis of TA is highly likely in the presence of new-onset headaches, polymyalgia rheumatica, and a tender, cord-like, or swollen temporal artery. Facial swelling must be appreciated as another presentation of TA, especially when accompanied by other nonspecific symptoms. High clinical suspicion, immediate treatment, and definitive diagnosis by temporal artery biopsy are necessary to prevent the most severe vascular complications of blindness and cerebrovascular accidents. Treatment with corticosteroids is most often successful. Because this treatment is fraught with all the risks of high-dose and prolonged steroid therapy, it should only be initiated in cases of significant clinical suspicion, followed by a timely temporal artery biopsy to confirm the diagnosis. Delay in therapy increases the risk of a vascular catastrophe. Delay in obtaining a temporal artery biopsy after therapy has been initiated decreases the diagnostic sensitivity of the test. Other modalities of immunosuppressive therapy remain either unsuccessful or unproven. Concomitant low-dose aspirin therapy appears to hold promise.

  18. Artificial antigen presenting cells for use in adoptive immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turtle, Cameron J.; Riddell, Stanley R.

    2010-01-01

    The observation that T cells can recognize and specifically eliminate cancer cells has spurred interest in the development of efficient methods to generate large numbers of T cells with specificity for tumor antigens that can be harnessed for use in cancer therapy. Recent studies have demonstrated that during encounter with tumor antigen, the signals delivered to T cells by professional antigen presenting cells can affect T cell programming and their subsequent therapeutic efficacy. This has stimulated efforts to develop artificial antigen presenting cells that allow optimal control over the signals provided to T cells. In this review, we will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of cellular and acellular artificial antigen presenting cell systems and their use in T cell adoptive immunotherapy for cancer. PMID:20693850

  19. Primordial germ cell-mediated chimera technology produces viable pure-line Houbara bustard offspring: potential for repopulating an endangered species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Wernery

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The Houbara bustard (Chlamydotis undulata is a wild seasonal breeding bird populating arid sandy semi-desert habitats in North Africa and the Middle East. Its population has declined drastically during the last two decades and it is classified as vulnerable. Captive breeding programmes have, hitherto, been unsuccessful in reviving population numbers and thus radical technological solutions are essential for the long term survival of this species. The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of primordial germ cell-mediated chimera technology to produce viable Houbara bustard offspring.Embryonic gonadal tissue was dissected from Houbara bustard embryos at eight days post-incubation. Subsequently, Houbara tissue containing gonadal primordial germ cells (gPGCs was injected into White Leghorn chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus embryos, producing 83/138 surviving male chimeric embryos, of which 35 chimeric roosters reached sexual maturity after 5 months. The incorporation and differentiation of Houbara gPGCs in chimeric chicken testis were assessed by PCR with Houbara-specific primers and 31.3% (5/16 gonads collected from the injected chicken embryos showed the presence of donor Houbara cells. A total of 302 semen samples from 34 chimeric roosters were analyzed and eight were confirmed as germline chimeras. Semen samples from these eight roosters were used to artificially inseminate three female Houbara bustards. Subsequently, 45 Houbara eggs were obtained and incubated, two of which were fertile. One egg hatched as a male live born Houbara; the other was female but died before hatching. Genotyping confirmed that the male chick was a pure-line Houbara derived from a chimeric rooster.This study demonstrates for the first time that Houbara gPGCs can migrate, differentiate and eventually give rise to functional sperm in the chimeric chicken testis. This approach may provide a promising tool for propagation and conservation of endangered avian

  20. Effects of water-filtered infrared-A and of heat on cell death, inflammation, antioxidative potential and of free radical formation in viable skin--first results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazena, Helmut; Pittermann, Wolfgang; Müller, Werner; Jung, Katinka; Kelleher, Debra K; Herrling, Thomas; Meffert, Peter; Uebelhack, Ralf; Kietzmann, Manfred

    2014-09-05

    The effects of water-filtered infrared-A (wIRA) and of convective heat on viability, inflammation, inducible free radicals and antioxidative power were investigated in natural and viable skin using the ex vivo Bovine Udder System (BUS) model. Therefore, skin samples from differently treated parts of the udder of a healthy cow were analyzed using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) test, by prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) measurement and by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. Neither cell viability, the inflammation status, the radical status or the antioxidative defence systems of the skin were significantly affected by wIRA applied within 30 min by using an irradiance of 1900 W m(-2) which is of relevance for clinical use, but which exceeded the maximum solar IR-A irradiance at the Earth's surface more than 5 times and which resulted in a skin surface temperature of about 45 °C without cooling and of about 37 °C with convective cooling by air ventilation. No significant effects on viability and on inflammation were detected when convective heat was applied alone under equivalent conditions in terms of the resulting skin surface temperatures and exposure time. As compared with untreated skin, free radical formation was almost doubled, whereas the antioxidative power was reduced to about 50% after convective heating to about 45 °C. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Of energy and survival incognito: a relationship between viable but non-culturable cells formation and inorganic polyphosphate and formate metabolism in Campylobacter jejuni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassem, Issmat I; Chandrashekhar, Kshipra; Rajashekara, Gireesh

    2013-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a Gram-negative food-borne bacterium that can cause mild to serious diseases in humans. A variety of stress conditions including exposure to formic acid, a weak organic acid, can cause C. jejuni to form viable but non-culturable cells (VBNC), which was proposed as a potential survival mechanism. The inability to detect C. jejuni VBNC using standard culturing techniques may increase the risk of exposure to foods contaminated with this pathogen. However, little is known about the cellular mechanisms and triggers governing VBNC formation. Here, we discuss novel mechanisms that potentially affect VBNC formation in C. jejuni and emphasize the impact of formic acid on this process. Specifically, we highlight findings that show that impairing inorganic polyphosphate (poly-P) metabolism reduces the ability of C. jejuni to form VBNC in a medium containing formic acid. We also discuss the potential effect of poly-P and formate metabolism on energy homeostasis and cognate VBNC formation. The relationship between poly-P metabolism and VBNC formation under acid stress has only recently been identified and may represent a breakthrough in understanding this phenomenon and its impact on food safety.

  2. Present and future cell therapies for pancreatic beta cell replenishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Bendala, Juan; Ricordi, Camillo

    2012-12-21

    If only at a small scale, islet transplantation has successfully addressed what ought to be the primary endpoint of any cell therapy: the functional replenishment of damaged tissue in patients. After years of less-than-optimal approaches to immunosuppression, recent advances consistently yield long-term graft survival rates comparable to those of whole pancreas transplantation. Limited organ availability is the main hurdle that stands in the way of the widespread clinical utilization of this pioneering intervention. Progress in stem cell research over the past decade, coupled with our decades-long experience with islet transplantation, is shaping the future of cell therapies for the treatment of diabetes. Here we review the most promising avenues of research aimed at generating an inexhaustible supply of insulin-producing cells for islet regeneration, including the differentiation of pluripotent and multipotent stem cells of embryonic and adult origin along the beta cell lineage and the direct reprogramming of non-endocrine tissues into insulin-producing cells.

  3. Receptor-mediated phagocytosis elicits cross-presentation in nonprofessional antigen-presenting cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giodini, Alessandra; Rahner, Christoph; Cresswell, Peter

    2009-03-03

    In cross-presentation by dendritic cells (DCs), internalized proteins are retrotranslocated into the cytosol, degraded by the proteasome, and the generated antigenic peptides bind to MHC class I molecules for presentation on the cell surface. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) contribution to phagosomal membranes is thought to provide antigen access to the ER-associated degradation (ERAD) machinery, allowing cytosolic dislocation. Because the ERAD pathway is present in all cell types and exogenous antigens encounter an ER-containing compartment during phagocytosis, we postulated that forcing phagocytosis in cell types other than DCs would render them competent for cross-presentation. Indeed, FcRgammaIIA expression endowed 293T cells with the capacity for both phagocytosis and ERAD-mediated cross-presentation of an antigen provided as an immune complex. The acquisition of this ability by nonprofessional antigen-presenting cells suggests that a function potentially available in all cell types has been adapted by DCs for presentation of exogenous antigens by MHC class I molecules.

  4. Professional differences in antigen presentation to iNKT cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Libero, Gennaro; Mori, Lucia

    2014-01-16

    Invariant natural killer T cells are preactivated lymphocytes that react upon recognition of CD1d-antigen complexes. Accordingly, any type of CD1d-positive cell could behave as antigen-presenting cell (APC). In this issue of Immunity, Arora et al. (2014), report that professional APCs still make the difference. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Activated Brain Endothelial Cells Cross-Present Malaria Antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howland, Shanshan W; Poh, Chek Meng; Rénia, Laurent

    2015-06-01

    In the murine model of cerebral malaria caused by P. berghei ANKA (PbA), parasite-specific CD8+ T cells directly induce pathology and have long been hypothesized to kill brain endothelial cells that have internalized PbA antigen. We previously reported that brain microvessel fragments from infected mice cross-present PbA epitopes, using reporter cells transduced with epitope-specific T cell receptors. Here, we confirm that endothelial cells are the population responsible for cross-presentation in vivo, not pericytes or microglia. PbA antigen cross-presentation by primary brain endothelial cells in vitro confers susceptibility to killing by CD8+ T cells from infected mice. IFNγ stimulation is required for brain endothelial cross-presentation in vivo and in vitro, which occurs by a proteasome- and TAP-dependent mechanism. Parasite strains that do not induce cerebral malaria were phagocytosed and cross-presented less efficiently than PbA in vitro. The main source of antigen appears to be free merozoites, which were avidly phagocytosed. A human brain endothelial cell line also phagocytosed P. falciparum merozoites. Besides being the first demonstration of cross-presentation by brain endothelial cells, our results suggest that interfering with merozoite phagocytosis or antigen processing may be effective strategies for cerebral malaria intervention.

  6. Activated Brain Endothelial Cells Cross-Present Malaria Antigen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanshan W Howland

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In the murine model of cerebral malaria caused by P. berghei ANKA (PbA, parasite-specific CD8+ T cells directly induce pathology and have long been hypothesized to kill brain endothelial cells that have internalized PbA antigen. We previously reported that brain microvessel fragments from infected mice cross-present PbA epitopes, using reporter cells transduced with epitope-specific T cell receptors. Here, we confirm that endothelial cells are the population responsible for cross-presentation in vivo, not pericytes or microglia. PbA antigen cross-presentation by primary brain endothelial cells in vitro confers susceptibility to killing by CD8+ T cells from infected mice. IFNγ stimulation is required for brain endothelial cross-presentation in vivo and in vitro, which occurs by a proteasome- and TAP-dependent mechanism. Parasite strains that do not induce cerebral malaria were phagocytosed and cross-presented less efficiently than PbA in vitro. The main source of antigen appears to be free merozoites, which were avidly phagocytosed. A human brain endothelial cell line also phagocytosed P. falciparum merozoites. Besides being the first demonstration of cross-presentation by brain endothelial cells, our results suggest that interfering with merozoite phagocytosis or antigen processing may be effective strategies for cerebral malaria intervention.

  7. Activated Brain Endothelial Cells Cross-Present Malaria Antigen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howland, Shanshan W.; Poh, Chek Meng; Rénia, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    In the murine model of cerebral malaria caused by P. berghei ANKA (PbA), parasite-specific CD8+ T cells directly induce pathology and have long been hypothesized to kill brain endothelial cells that have internalized PbA antigen. We previously reported that brain microvessel fragments from infected mice cross-present PbA epitopes, using reporter cells transduced with epitope-specific T cell receptors. Here, we confirm that endothelial cells are the population responsible for cross-presentation in vivo, not pericytes or microglia. PbA antigen cross-presentation by primary brain endothelial cells in vitro confers susceptibility to killing by CD8+ T cells from infected mice. IFNγ stimulation is required for brain endothelial cross-presentation in vivo and in vitro, which occurs by a proteasome- and TAP-dependent mechanism. Parasite strains that do not induce cerebral malaria were phagocytosed and cross-presented less efficiently than PbA in vitro. The main source of antigen appears to be free merozoites, which were avidly phagocytosed. A human brain endothelial cell line also phagocytosed P. falciparum merozoites. Besides being the first demonstration of cross-presentation by brain endothelial cells, our results suggest that interfering with merozoite phagocytosis or antigen processing may be effective strategies for cerebral malaria intervention. PMID:26046849

  8. Present and future of allogeneic natural killer cell therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okjae eLim

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells are innate lymphocytes that are capable of eliminating tumor cells and are therefore used for cancer therapy. Although many early investigators used autologous NK cells, including lymphokine-activated killer cells, the clinical efficacies were not satisfactory. Meanwhile, human leukocyte antigen (HLA-haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation revealed the anti-tumor effect of allogeneic NK cells, and HLA-haploidentical, killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR ligand-mismatched allogeneic NK cells are currently used for many protocols requiring NK cells. Moreover, allogeneic NK cells from non-HLA-related healthy donors have been recently used in cancer therapy. The use of allogeneic NK cells from non-HLA-related healthy donors allows the selection of donor NK cells with higher flexibility and to prepare expanded, cryopreserved NK cells for instant administration without delay for ex vivo expansion. In cancer therapy with allogeneic NK cells, optimal matching of donors and recipients is important to maximize the efficacy of the therapy. In this review, we summarize the present state of allogeneic NK cell therapy and its future directions.

  9. Pattern of presentations seen in sickle cell retinopathy patients at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To describe the pattern of presentation of sickle cell retinopathy patients who presented at the Eye Foundation Hospital Lagos, Nigeria between January 2002 and March 2003. Materials and Methods: The medical records of 27 patients who presented at the Eye Foundation Hospital with retinal changes due to ...

  10. Bioengineering of Artificial Antigen Presenting Cells and Lymphoid Organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Sun, Wujin; Ye, Yanqi; Bomba, Hunter N; Gu, Zhen

    2017-01-01

    The immune system protects the body against a wide range of infectious diseases and cancer by leveraging the efficiency of immune cells and lymphoid organs. Over the past decade, immune cell/organ therapies based on the manipulation, infusion, and implantation of autologous or allogeneic immune cells/organs into patients have been widely tested and have made great progress in clinical applications. Despite these advances, therapy with natural immune cells or lymphoid organs is relatively expensive and time-consuming. Alternatively, biomimetic materials and strategies have been applied to develop artificial immune cells and lymphoid organs, which have attracted considerable attentions. In this review, we survey the latest studies on engineering biomimetic materials for immunotherapy, focusing on the perspectives of bioengineering artificial antigen presenting cells and lymphoid organs. The opportunities and challenges of this field are also discussed.

  11. [Immunohistochemical presentation of fibromodulin during wound healing of periodontal cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Hong; Huang, Qun; Xiao, Yin

    2010-04-01

    To investigate immunohistochemical presentation of fibromodulin in vitro during wound healing of three types of periodontal cells and discuss the role of fibromodulin. Cultured periodontal cells were wounded and followed by observation up to 7 days. The immunohistochemical expression of fibromodulin in periodontal cells was observed. Immunohistochemical localization of fibromodulin during cellular wound healing showed that newly migrating periodontal cells toward the wound area were expressed strongly for fibromodulin at day 1 after wounding; thereafter, fibromodulin expression was noted stronger in newly migrating periodontal cells localized in the central part of the wound area than those around the wound area. These data suggest that fibromodulin may be involved in the early events of wound healing for periodontal cells.

  12. Where Do All the Phytoplankton Go? Challenges in Keeping Track of Viable Cells in Phytoplankton Communities Using Flow Cytometry and Cell Staining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, L. J.; Fobbe, D. J.; Berges, J. A.

    2016-02-01

    Understanding the dynamics of phytoplankton communities has traditionally focused on differences in growth and related processes among taxa. It is now appreciated that differences in mortality could be equally important in contributing to these dynamics. Studying mortality in communities is difficult, especially on relevant time scales, which could be as short as hours to days. Flow cytometry can potentially provide solutions, because it can allow discrimination of different taxa, and when combined with staining, distinguish live and dead cells. We applied flow cytometry and staining to phytoplankton communities in a model system: a small, well-studied, urban pond in southeastern Wisconsin. Using flow cytometry, it was possible to resolve up to six dominant taxa (most stain also affected other fluorescence channels, requiring compensation. Correlations of numbers of dead cells with environmental factors (e.g. temperature, nutrient concentrations, irradiance) were generally poor, suggesting the greater importance of biotic versus abiotic variables in community mortality dynamics. Ongoing work is focusing on the effects of viral pathogens, grazing and allelopathic interactions using experimental manipulations and individual-based modeling.

  13. Co-infusion of autologous adipose tissue derived neuronal differentiated mesenchymal stem cells and bone marrow derived hematopoietic stem cells, a viable therapy for post-traumatic brachial plexus injury: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umang G Thakkar

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell therapy is emerging as a viable approach in regenerative medicine. A 31-year-old male with brachial plexus injury had complete sensory-motor loss since 16 years with right pseudo-meningocele at C5-D1 levels and extra-spinal extension up to C7-D1, with avulsion on magnetic resonance imaging and irreversible damage. We generated adipose tissue derived neuronal differentiated mesenchymal stem cells (N-AD-MSC and bone marrow derived hematopoietic stem cells (HSC-BM. Neuronal stem cells expressed β-3 tubulin and glial fibrillary acid protein which was confirmed on immunofluorescence. On day 14, 2.8 ml stem cell inoculum was infused under local anesthesia in right brachial plexus sheath by brachial block technique under ultrasonography guidance with a 1.5-inch-long 23 gauge needle. Nucleated cell count was 2 × 10 4 /μl, CD34+ was 0.06%, and CD45-/90+ and CD45-/73+ were 41.63% and 20.36%, respectively. No untoward effects were noted. He has sustained recovery with re-innervation over a follow-up of 4 years documented on electromyography-nerve conduction velocity study.

  14. Potential of Escherichia coli 0157:H7 to persist and form viable but non-culturable cells on a food-contact surface subjected to cycles of soiling and chemical treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marouani-Gadri, Nesrine; Firmesse, Olivier; Chassaing, Danielle

    2010-01-01

    only, a further increase in this proportion occurred 24 h after the CT, suggesting that some of the surviving viable but non-culturable cells finally died. This study shows that conditions leading to E. coli O157:H7 persistence are not likely to arise when good refrigeration and hygiene practices...... no longer detectable after the first week. However, on 66-hour biofilms with 6.7 log CFU/cm², after initially decreasing, E. coli numbers reached 6.6 log CFU/cm² and 8.3 log viable cells/cm² on the 11th day. When E. coli was cultured with a Comamonas testosteroni previously shown to increase E. coli biofilm...

  15. Giant Cell Myocarditis: Not Always a Presentation of Cardiogenic Shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rose Tompkins

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell myocarditis is a rare and often fatal disease. The most obvious presentation often described in the literature is one of rapid hemodynamic deterioration due to cardiogenic shock necessitating urgent consideration of mechanical circulatory support and heart transplantation. We present the case of a 60-year-old man whose initial presentation was consistent with myopericarditis but who went on to develop a rapid decline in left ventricular systolic function without overt hemodynamic compromise or dramatic symptomatology. Giant cell myocarditis was confirmed via endomyocardial biopsy. Combined immunosuppression with corticosteroids and calcineurin inhibitor resulted in resolution of symptoms and sustained recovery of left ventricular function one year later. Our case highlights that giant cell myocarditis does not always present with cardiogenic shock and should be considered in the evaluation of new onset cardiomyopathy of uncertain etiology as a timely diagnosis has distinct clinical implications on management and prognosis.

  16. T-Cell Lymphomas Presenting as Colon Ulcers and Eosinophilia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping-Hsiu Wu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Primary gastrointestinal T-cell lymphoma is an uncommon entity and primary colon T-cell lymphoma is even rarer. The majority of enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphomas present predominantly as ulcers or strictures in the endoscopic examinations, while primary B-cell lymphomas commonly present as exophytic lesions. Ulcerative colon T-cell lymphoma may mimic Crohn's disease (CD, which is a chronic inflammatory disease of the intestines with ulcer and fistula formations difficult for clinicians to diagnose based on endoscopic observations alone. Like CD, T-cell lymphoma may be characterized by the presence of multiple skipped ulcers distributed from the terminal ileum to the descending colon. Furthermore, it is difficult to diagnose this unusual lymphoma by a single endoscopic biopsy. Typically, the histological composition of T-cell lymphoma is made of medium to large atypical cells located in the base of the ulcer with extension to the muscle layer and the adjacent mucosa. However, it is common that biopsy specimens show only mixed inflammatory changes where the lymphoma cells are hard to be identified. The differential diagnosis of malignant lymphoma must be considered when clinically diagnosed CD is refractory to the medical treatment or when its clinical behavior becomes aggressive. The current study presents a rare case of primary colon T-cell lymphoma in a 56-year-old male with marked recent weight loss, watery diarrhea and bilateral neck lymphadenopathy, who received a laboratory checkup and endoscopic workup for colon biopsy. The initial pathological report was consistent with mucosal inflammation and benign colon ulcers. Interestingly, the blood test showed a prominent eosinophilia. A biopsy of the enlarged neck lymph nodes done approximately 1 month after the colon biopsy unexpectedly showed T-cell lymphoma, which led to a review of the initial colonic biopsy specimens. Additional immunohistochemical stains were used accordingly, which

  17. The binding of rhBMP-2 to the receptors of viable MC3T3-E1 cells and the question of cooperativity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiemann, M.; Rumpf, H.M.; Bingmann, D.; Jennissen, H.P. [Universitaetsklinikum Essen (Germany). Inst. fuer Physiologie; Universitaetsklinikum Essen (Germany). Inst. fuer Physiologiesche Chemie

    2001-12-01

    The binding of rhBMP-2 to its receptors, the signal transduction cascade and the final responses of bone cells, osteoprogenitor cells and derived cell lines is of high fundamental and clinical interest. In this report concentration-response curves of the osteoblast cell line MC3T3-E1 under influence of rhBMP-2 was investigated. The biological response of the cells (corresponding to a down-stream effect of the receptor state-function) was monitored in pilot experiments by the MC3T3-cell alkaline phosphatase-induction test (MC3T3-cell ALP-induction test). It is shown that the MC3T3-cell ALP-induction test is a good tool for measuring biologically active recombinant human BMP-2 (rhBMP-2) in crude extracts of E. coli as well as in highly purified form. In addition this test is very sensitive to chemically induced structural changes of rhBMP-2 such as those resulting from a radiolabeling of rhBMP-2 by the Bolton-Hunter procedure. The latter procedure reduces the biological activity of rhBMP-2 by a factor of 3-4. The measured concentration-response curves could all be non-linearly fitted to a rectangular hyperbola. The half-maximal saturation, K{sub 0.5}, is found between 30-100 nM rhBMP-2 (= 0.8-2.5 {mu}g/ml). The effect of rhBMP-2 shows a plateau i.e. maximal response at ca. 300-1000 nM rhBMP-2 (= 8-25 {mu}g/ml). The data thus indicate a non-cooperative binding-response behavior. This was unexpected since BMP-2 binds simultaneously to two cooperating receptors of type 1 and type 2. However in the very low concentration range of employed rhBMP-2 a variable response of the cells was measured so that a full exclusion of cooperativity cannot be concluded at the present time. This will be clarified by future experiments. (orig.)

  18. Unusual presentation of ocular trauma in sickle cell trait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Nidhi

    2015-09-01

    Sickle cell trait is usually considered as a benign condition. However under certain adverse circumstances, it can give rise to vaso-occlusive features as in sickle cell disease. We present here two cases, both involving healthy young males, who developed retinal vaso-occlusive features following blunt ocular trauma. There was a rapid progression of the retinopathy with the development of proliferative changes in both patients and also vitreous hemorrhage in one patient, within 2 months of the trauma. The development of retinopathy was independent of raised intraocular pressure. Both patients were found to have sickle cell trait.

  19. Angiotropic large cell lymphoma presenting as fever of unknown origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuvliev, E; Glamour, T; Shekar, R; West, B C

    1999-04-01

    Fever has never before been described as the chief complaint and major finding in angiotropic large cell lymphoma (ALCL). ALCL is a rare and usually fatal intravascular tumor characterized by a widespread proliferation of malignant mononuclear cells within vessels of small caliber, causing their blockage. The majority present as high-grade, B-cell lymphomas with a predilection for the central nervous system and the skin. We report a 61-year-old woman who presented with a fever of unknown origin (FUO) that lasted 9 weeks from onset to death. To our knowledge, this is the first case of ALCL to present solely as a FUO, and the second case of ALCL to be diagnosed by muscle biopsy. We suggest that this rare malignancy (ALCL) be considered in the differential diagnosis of FUO.

  20. OCT4 pseudogenes present in human leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaoping; Tang, Yongmin

    2012-12-01

    The transcription factor OCT4 is expressed in embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and has been considered as a main regulator in maintaining pluripotency of ESCs. Several studies have showed OCT4 expression in human solid tumor and adult stem or progenitor cells. However, whether OCT4 is expressed in normal hematopoietic system including the peripheral blood and bone marrow remains controversial. Furthermore, the functional expression of OCT4 in leukemia cells and its potential significance in leukemia studies have been poorly defined. The aim of this study was to examine and analyze the genuine expression of OCT4 in human leukemia cells by means of RT-PCR, flow cytometry, PCR product sequencing and alignment with NCBI BLAST and DNAMAN software. The full lengths of the putative OCT4 genes were amplified in 2/9 leukemia cell lines and 7/49 leukemia patients' samples. However, many base mutations in putative OCT4 positive samples were found. Sequence alignment analysis showed a higher similarity between the putative OCT4 PCR products and the pseudogenes in chromosomes 1 and 8. The positive rates of OCT4 protein detected with flow cytometry were low, and almost all of them were less than 10% of positivity. A very small fraction of leukemia stem cells with OCT4 protein expression was found. We conclude that OCT4 pseudogenes in chromosomes 1 and 8 present in the panel of leukemia cells tested and the OCT4 protein is rarely detected with flow cytometry in leukemia cells.

  1. Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma to Jejunum: An Unusual Case Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Medic

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The small intestine is a very uncommon and peculiar site for metastasis from renal cell carcinoma (RCC. We present a clinical presentation of insidious and unusual development of a jejunal metastasis while having stable disease in a remainder of metastatic sites, in a patient undergoing immunotherapy with nivolumab. Due to the extreme rarity of metastatic renal cell carcinoma to the lumen of the small bowel, it is easy to overlook and misdiagnose symptoms of this pathologic entity, particularly when the remainder of metastatic disease responds well to ongoing therapy.

  2. Turning tumour cells into antigen presenting cells: The next step to improve cancer immunotherapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Charette, Marie; Marabelle, Aurélien; Houot, Roch

    2016-11-01

    Downregulation/loss of the antigen presentation is a major immune escape mechanism in cancer. It allows tumour cells to become 'invisible' and avoid immune attack by antitumour T cells. In tumour harbouring properties of professional antigen presenting cells (i.e. tumour B cells in lymphoma), downregulation/loss of the antigen presentation may also prevent direct priming of naïve T cells by tumour cells. Here, we review treatments that may induce/restore antigen presentation by the tumour cells. These treatments may increase the generation of antitumour T cells and/or their capacity to recognise and eliminate tumour cells. By forcing tumour cells to present their antigens, these treatments may sensitise patients to T cell-based immunotherapies, including checkpoint inhibitors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Chronic urticaria as a presenting sign of hairy cell leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clore, L S; Stafford, C T

    1999-01-01

    Chronic urticaria is a common clinical disorder that is idiopathic in over 75% of cases. Less commonly, urticaria may be the presenting manifestation of an allergic or infectious disease, endocrinopathy, inherited syndrome, or autoimmune disorder. Rarely, urticaria may be a sign of underlying malignancy, including leukemia. C.C. is a 48-year-old white female who was referred for evaluation of recurrent urticaria for 3 years. The pruritic, erythematous wheals were pinpoint, and appeared to be precipitated by heat, stress, and effort. Prick tests were negative except to D. pteronyssinus. CBCs over the past 5 years revealed WBCs of 2,300-5,000 cells/mm3. Skin biopsy revealed interstitial edema with infiltration of eosinophils and mast cells consistent with urticaria. The impression was probable cholinergic urticaria, for which hydroxyzine was prescribed with fair symptomatic control. One year later, she presented with bright red blood per rectum. Repeat physical examination revealed lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly. Subsequent laboratory studies showed pancytopenia. Endoscopy was normal except for small, nonbleeding hemorrhoids. Bone marrow biopsy revealed histologic evidence of hair, cell leukemia that was treated with 2-chlorodeoxyadenosine. Upon initiation of chemotherapy her pruritus and urticaria subsided. Recent CBC revealed Hgb 9.2 g/dL, platelets 290,000 cells/mm3, and WBC 4,100 cells/mm3. Peripheral blood smear showed no hairy cells.

  4. [Atypical presentation of a clinical case of giant cell arteritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosselló Aubach, L L; Torres Cortada, G; Cabau Rúbies, J; Aragón Sanz, M A; Oncins Torres, R

    2006-06-01

    We present a very unusual clinical case of giant cell arteritis with uterus involvement, in a women of 66 years old, that began clinical features of pain and functional limitation of shoulders and hip 3 mouth before been operated of uterus prolapse with hysterectomy. Biopsy of uterus found affected arterial vesels with wall sclerosis and granulomatous inflamation with giant cells, without necrosis, involving media and perivascular portions suggesting giant cell arteritis. In a previous reports review, we only found ten similar clinical cases. In that cases, clinical features were no suggestif of the disease. Although the well known tendency of arteritis to involve some specific vascular areas, the case we present is an example of the systemic course of the disease and his difficulty to diagnose.

  5. Extramedullary Myeloid Cell Tumour Presenting As Leukaemia Cutis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thappa Devinder Mohan

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available We herewith report a case of extramedullary myeloid cell tumour presenting as leukaemia cutis for its rarity. It occurred in a 50 year old male patient who presented to us with a 40 days history of painless raised solid skin swellings over the trunk. Histopathological examination of the skin biopsy and bone marrow biopsy showed features suggestive of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Immunophenotyping on skin biopsy specimens and bone marrow biopsy found tumour cells expressing CD43 and Tdt but were negative for CD3 and CD20. These features were consistent with extramedullary myeloid cell tumour involving skin and subcutis (cutaneous manifestation of acute myeloid leukaemia.

  6. Renal epithelioid angiomyolipoma presenting clinically as renal cell ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We describe a 22-year old female who presented with a 5-year history of a palpable, painless mass in the right flank. Computerized tomography demonstrated a solid renal mass measuring 18 cm × 13 cm with peripheral calcification, areas of vascularity and necrosis. The appearance suggested renal cell carcinoma or ...

  7. Thymic B Cells Are Licensed to Present Self Antigens for Central T Cell Tolerance Induction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yamano, Tomoyoshi; Nedjic, Jelena; Hinterberger, Maria; Steinert, Madlen; Koser, Sandra; Pinto, Sheena; Gerdes, Norbert; Lutgens, Esther; Ishimaru, Naozumi; Busslinger, Meinrad; Brors, Benedikt; Kyewski, Bruno; Klein, Ludger

    2015-01-01

    Thymic antigen-presenting cells (APCs) such as dendritic cells and medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs) use distinct strategies of self-antigen expression and presentation to mediate central tolerance. The thymus also harbors B cells; whether they also display unique tolerogenic features and

  8.  An Uncommon Presentation of Giant Cell Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopal Malhotra

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available  Giant Cell Tumors commonly occur at the ends of long bones. However in rare cases, they can occur in the bones of the hands and feet. Tumors in these locations occur in younger patients; in addition, these tumors are more commonly multifocal and are associated with a higher risk for local recurrence than tumors at the ends of long bones. Since lesions in the small bones may be multifocal, a patient with a giant cell tumor of the small bones should undergo a skeletal survey to exclude similar lesions elsewhere. Primary surgical treatment ranges from curettage or excision with or without bone grafting to amputation. The success of surgical treatment depends on the completeness with which the tumor was removed. We are presenting a case report of a 34 year old female, who presented with a swelling in the right hand, following trauma. X-ray of the hand showed an osteolytic expansile lesion at the base of the 1st metacarpal bone. The lesion was initially curetted and then treated by local resection with bone grafting. Histological examination revealed a typical benign giant cell tumor composed of closely packed stromal cells with a variable admixture of giant cells. Follow up at the end of one year did not reveal any recurrence of the tumor.

  9. Dendritic cell maturation and cross-presentation: timing matters!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alloatti, Andrés; Kotsias, Fiorella; Magalhaes, Joao Gamelas; Amigorena, Sebastian

    2016-07-01

    As a population, dendritic cells (DCs) appear to be the best cross-presenters of internalized antigens on major histocompatibility complex class I molecules in the mouse. To do this, DCs have developed a number of unique and dedicated means to control their endocytic and phagocytic pathways: among them, the capacity to limit acidification of their phagosomes, to prevent proteolytic degradation, to delay fusion of phagosomes to lysosomes, to recruit ER proteins to phagosomes, and to export phagocytosed antigens to the cytosol. The regulation of phagocytic functions, and thereby of antigen processing and presentation by innate signaling, represents a critical level of integration of adaptive and innate immune responses. Understanding how innate signals control antigen cross-presentation is critical to define effective vaccination strategies for CD8(+) T-cell responses. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Asymmetric Cell Division of T Cells Upon Antigen Presentation Utilizes Multiple Conserved Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliaro, Jane; Van Ham, Vanessa; Sacirbegovic, Faruk; Pasam, Anupama; Bomzon, Ze’ev; Pham, Kim; Ludford-Menting, Mandy J.; Waterhouse, Nigel J.; Bots, Michael; Hawkins, Edwin D.; Watt, Sally V.; Cluse, Leonie A.; Clarke, Chris J.P.; Izon, David J.; Chang, John T.; Thompson, Natalie; Gu, Min; Johnstone, Ricky W.; Smyth, Mark J.; Humbert, Patrick O.; Reiner, Steven L.; Russell, Sarah M.

    2013-01-01

    Asymmetric cell division is a potential means by which cell fate choices during an immune response are orchestrated. Defining the molecular mechanisms that underlie asymmetric division of T cells is paramount for determining the role of this process in the generation of effector and memory T cell subsets. In other cell types, asymmetric cell division is regulated by conserved polarity protein complexes that control the localization of cell fate determinants and spindle orientation during division. We have developed a tractable, in vitro model of naïve CD8+ T cells undergoing initial division while attached to dendritic cells during antigen presentation to investigate whether similar mechanisms might regulate asymmetric division of T cells. Using this system, we show that direct interactions with antigen presenting cells provide the cue for polarization of T cells. Interestingly, the immunological synapse disseminates before division even though the T cells retain contact with the antigen presenting cell. The cue from the antigen presenting cell is translated into polarization of cell fate determinants via the polarity network of the Par3 and Scribble complexes and orientation of the mitotic spindle during division is orchestrated by the Pins/G protein complex. These findings suggest that T cells have selectively adapted a number of evolutionarily conserved mechanisms to generate diversity through asymmetric cell division. PMID:20530266

  11. Multicentric Giant Cell Tumor of Bone: Synchronous and Metachronous Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reiner Wirbel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 27-year-old man treated 2.5 years ago for synchronous multicentric giant cell tumor of bone located at the right proximal humerus and the right 5th finger presented now with complaints of pain in his right hip and wrist of two-month duration. Radiology and magnetic resonance revealed multicentric giant cell tumor lesions of the right proximal femur, the left ileum, the right distal radius, and the left distal tibia. The patient has an eighteen-year history of a healed osteosarcoma of the right tibia that was treated with chemotherapy, resection, and allograft reconstruction. A literature review establishes this as the first reported case of a patient with synchronous and metachronous multicentric giant cell tumor who also has a history of osteosarcoma.

  12. CENTRAL GIANT CELL GRANULOMA OF THE MANDIBLE: A RARE PRESENTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virendra SINGH

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Central giant cell granuloma (CGCG is an intra-osseous lesion consisting of cellular fibrosis tissue containing multiple foci of hemorrhage, multinucleated giant cells and trabecules of woven bone. This lesion accounts for less than 7% of all benign jaw tumours. Jaffe considered it as a locally reparative reaction of bone, which can be possibly due to either an inflammatory response, hemorrhage or local trauma. Females are affected more frequently than males. It occurs over a wide age range.It has been reported that this lesion is diagnosed during the first two decades of life in approximately 48% of cases, and 60% of cases are evident before the age of 30. It is considerably more common in the mandible than in the maxilla. Most lesions occur in the molar and premolar area, some of these extending up to the ascending ramus. The presence of giant cell granuloma in the mandibular body area, the entire ramus, condyle and coronoid represents a therapeutic challenge for the oral and maxillofacial surgeons. The aim of this report is to describe an unusual presentation of central giant cell granuloma involving the mandibular body, ramus, condylar and coronoid processes, and to discuss the differentiated diagnosis, the radiographic presentation and the management of this lesion.

  13. Stratification of Antigen-presenting Cells within the Normal Cornea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jared E. Knickelbein

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The composition and location of professional antigen presenting cells (APC varies in different mucosal surfaces. The cornea, long considered an immune-privileged tissue devoid of APCs, is now known to host a heterogeneous network of bone marrow-derived cells. Here, we utilized transgenic mice that express enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP from the CD11c promoter (pCD11c in conjunction with immunohistochemical staining to demonstrate an interesting stratification of APCs within non-inflamed murine corneas. pCD11c+ dendritic cells (DCs reside in the basal epithelium, seemingly embedded in the basement membrane. Most DCs express MHC class II on at least some dendrites, which extend up to 50 µm in length and traverse up 20 µm tangentially towards the apical surface of the epithelium. The DC density diminishes from peripheral to central cornea. Beneath the DCs and adjacent to the stromal side of the basement membrane reside pCD11c-CD11b+ putative macrophages that express low levels of MHC class II. Finally, MHC class IIpCD11c-CD11b+ cells form a network throughout the remainder of the stroma. This highly reproducible stratification of bone marrow-derived cells is suggestive of a progression from an APC function at the exposed corneal surface to an innate immune barrier function deeper in the stroma.

  14. Impairments of Antigen-Presenting Cells in Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludmila V. Sakhno

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The phenotype and functional properties of antigen-presenting cells (APC, that is, circulating monocytes and generated in vitro macrophages and dendritic cells, were investigated in the patients with pulmonary tuberculosis (TB differing in lymphocyte reactivity to M. tuberculosis antigens (PPD-reactive versus PPD-anergic patients. We revealed the distinct impairments in patient APC functions. For example, the monocyte dysfunctions were displayed by low CD86 and HLA-DR expression, 2-fold increase in CD14+CD16+ expression, the high numbers of IL-10-producing cells, and enhanced IL-10 and IL-6 production upon LPS-stimulation. The macrophages which were in vitro generated from peripheral blood monocytes under GM-CSF were characterized by Th1/Th2-balance shifting (downproduction of IFN-γ coupled with upproduction of IL-10 and by reducing of allostimulatory activity in mixed lymphocyte culture. The dendritic cells (generated in vitro from peripheral blood monocytes upon GM-CSF + IFN-α were characterized by impaired maturation/activation, a lower level of IFN-γ production in conjunction with an enhanced capacity to produce IL-10 and IL-6, and a profound reduction of allostimulatory activity. The APC dysfunctions were found to be most prominent in PPD-anergic patients. The possible role of APC impairments in reducing the antigen-specific T-cell response to M. tuberculosis was discussed.

  15. Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm with absolute monocytosis at presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaworski JM

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Joseph M Jaworski,1,2 Vanlila K Swami,1 Rebecca C Heintzelman,1 Carrie A Cusack,3 Christina L Chung,3 Jeremy Peck,3 Matthew Fanelli,3 Micheal Styler,4 Sanaa Rizk,4 J Steve Hou1 1Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Hahnemann University Hospital/Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 2Department of Pathology, Mercy Fitzgerald Hospital, Darby, PA, USA; 3Department of Dermatology, Hahnemann University Hospital/Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 4Department of Hematology/Oncology, Hahnemann University Hospital/Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA Abstract: Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm is an uncommon malignancy derived from precursors of plasmacytoid dendritic cells. Nearly all patients present initially with cutaneous manifestations, with many having extracutaneous disease additionally. While response to chemotherapy initially is effective, relapse occurs in most, with a leukemic phase ultimately developing. The prognosis is dismal. While most of the clinical and pathologic features are well described, the association and possible prognostic significance between peripheral blood absolute monocytosis (>1.0 K/µL and blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm have not been reported. We report a case of a 68-year-old man who presented with a rash for 4–5 months. On physical examination, there were multiple, dull-pink, indurated plaques on the trunk and extremities. Complete blood count revealed thrombocytopenia, absolute monocytosis of 1.7 K/µL, and a negative flow cytometry study. Biopsy of an abdominal lesion revealed typical features of blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm. Patients having both hematologic and nonhematologic malignancies have an increased incidence of absolute monocytosis. Recent studies examining Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma patients have suggested that this is a negative prognostic factor. The association between

  16. Granulocytes: New Members of the Antigen-Presenting Cell Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ang Lin

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Granulocytes, the most abundant types of leukocytes, are the first line of defense against pathogen invasion. However, the plasticity and diversity of granulocytes have been increasingly revealed, especially with regard to their versatile functions in orchestrating adaptive immune responses. A substantial body of recent evidence demonstrates that granulocytes can acquire the function as antigen-presenting cells under pathological or inflammatory conditions. In addition, they can acquire surface expression of MHC class II and costimulatory molecules as well as T cell stimulatory behavior when cultured with selected cytokines. The classic view of granulocytes as terminally differentiated, short-lived phagocytes is therefore changing to phenotypically and functionally heterogeneous cells that are engaged in cross-talk with other leukocyte populations and provide an additional link between innate and adaptive immunity. In this brief review, we summarize the current knowledge on the antigen-presenting capacity of granulocyte subsets (neutrophils, eosinophils, and basophils. Underlying mechanisms, relevant physiological significance and potential controversies are also discussed.

  17. Large-cell Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Lung: Unusual Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Ángel Serra Valdés

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the leading cause of death among malignant tumors. Pulmonary neuroendocrine tumors encompass a broad spectrum of tumors including the large-cell neuroendocrine carcinoma. The case of a 57-year-old white housewife with a history of smoking, diabetes, hypothyroidism and hypertension who sought medical attention because of headache, vomiting, weight loss, neuropsychiatric symptoms and metastatic inguinal lymphadenopathy is presented. The symptoms resulted from the extrapulmonary metastases found. Imaging studies, histology and immunohistochemistry confirmed the diagnosis of large-cell carcinoma of the lung with neuroendocrine pattern. This type of highly aggressive tumor is usually diagnosed when there are already multiple metastases, which affects the short-term prognosis. The aim of this paper is to inform the medical community of this case due to the scarce reports in the literature.

  18. An atypical presentation and diagnostic dilemma of sickle cell disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mizanur Rahman

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A 5½ year old male child of a consanguineous couple presented with moderately high fever, hepatosplenomegaly and severe pain in the left upper quadrant of the abdomen for four days. On examination, the child was found severely anemic, ill-looking and mildly icteric but the abdomen was soft and non-tender. Radiological investigations and ultrasonography of the whole abdomen revealed the diagnosis of space occupying lesions which may be either due to splenic abscess/cyst or leukemia/lymphoma. However, blood film revealed the features of hereditary hemolytic anemia and later on hemoglobin electrophoresis initially commented as HbS–beta thalassemia but subsequent family screening of the patient turned out to a case of homozygous sickle cell anemia or sickle cell disease. To resolve such diagnostic dilemma, it is very much essential to analyze critically the history including family history, clinical and physical findings as well as investigational findings.

  19. Air-spore in Cartagena, Spain: viable and non-viable sampling methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elvira-Rendueles, Belen; Moreno, Jose; Garcia-Sanchez, Antonio; Vergara, Nuria; Martinez-Garcia, Maria Jose; Moreno-Grau, Stella

    2013-01-01

    In the presented study the airborne fungal spores of the semiarid city of Cartagena, Spain, are identified and quantified by means of viable or non-viable sampling methods. Airborne fungal samples were collected simultaneously using a filtration method and a pollen and particle sampler based on the Hirst methodology. This information is very useful for elucidating geographical patterns of hay fever and asthma. The qualitative results showed that when the non-viable methodology was employed, Cladosporium, Ustilago, and Alternaria were the most abundant spores identified in the atmosphere of Cartagena, while the viable methodology showed that the most abundant taxa were: Cladosporium, Penicillium, Aspergillus and Alternaria. The quantitative results of airborne fungal spores identified by the Hirst-type air sampler (non-viable method), showed that Deuteromycetes represented 74% of total annual spore counts, Cladosporium being the major component of the fungal spectrum (62.2%), followed by Alternaria (5.3%), and Stemphylium (1.3%). The Basidiomycetes group represented 18.9% of total annual spore counts, Ustilago (7.1%) being the most representative taxon of this group and the second most abundant spore type. Ascomycetes accounted for 6.9%, Nectria (2.3%) being the principal taxon. Oomycetes (0.2%) and Zygomycestes and Myxomycestes (0.06%) were scarce. The prevailing species define our bioaerosol as typical of dry air. The viable methodology was better at identifying small hyaline spores and allowed for the discrimination of the genus of some spore types. However, non-viable methods revealed the richness of fungal types present in the bioaerosol. Thus, the use of both methodologies provides a more comprehensive characterization of the spore profile.

  20. Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Vicente

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present edition of Significação – Scientific Journal for Audiovisual Culture and in the others to follow something new is brought: the presence of thematic dossiers which are to be organized by invited scholars. The appointed subject for the very first one of them was Radio and the invited scholar, Eduardo Vicente, professor at the Graduate Course in Audiovisual and at the Postgraduate Program in Audiovisual Media and Processes of the School of Communication and Arts of the University of São Paulo (ECA-USP. Entitled Radio Beyond Borders the dossier gathers six articles and the intention of reuniting works on the perspectives of usage of such media as much as on the new possibilities of aesthetical experimenting being build up for it, especially considering the new digital technologies and technological convergences. It also intends to present works with original theoretical approach and original reflections able to reset the way we look at what is today already a centennial media. Having broadened the meaning of “beyond borders”, four foreign authors were invited to join the dossier. This is the first time they are being published in this country and so, in all cases, the articles where either written or translated into Portuguese.The dossier begins with “Radio is dead…Long live to the sound”, which is the transcription of a thought provoking lecture given by Armand Balsebre (Autonomous University of Barcelona – one of the most influential authors in the world on the Radio study field. It addresses the challenges such media is to face so that it can become “a new sound media, in the context of a new soundscape or sound-sphere, for the new listeners”. Andrew Dubber (Birmingham City University regarding the challenges posed by a Digital Era argues for a theoretical approach in radio studies which can consider a Media Ecology. The author understands the form and discourse of radio as a negotiation of affordances and

  1. Enteroantigen-presenting B cells efficiently stimulate CD4(+) T cells in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Esben Gjerløff Wedebye; Kristensen, Nanna Ny; Claesson, Mogens Helweg

    2011-01-01

    Presentation of enterobacterial antigens by antigen-presenting cells and activation of enteroantigen-specific CD4(+) T cells are considered crucial steps in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) pathology. The detrimental effects of such CD4(+) T cells have been thoroughly demonstrated in models...... of colitis. Also, we have previously established an in vitro assay where murine enteroantigen-specific colitogenic CD4(+) CD25(-) T cells are activated by splenocytes pulsed with an enterobacterial extract....

  2. Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Presenting with Streptococcus intermedius Cerebral Abscess

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabih Nayfe

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Cerebral abscess is caused by inoculation of an organism into the brain parenchyma from a site distant from the central nervous system. Streptococcus intermedius (S. intermedius is a commensal organism that is normally present in the aerodigestive tract and was reported to be the cause of brain abscesses after esophageal dilatation or upper endoscopy. Case Presentation. We report the case of a 53-year-old female who presented with hematemesis and melena followed by left-sided weakness. Initially, her hemiplegia was found to be secondary to a right thalamic brain abscess caused by S. intermedius. Investigations led to the diagnosis of a mid-esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. We hypothesize that the cause of the abscess with this bacterium that naturally resides in the digestive tract and oral cavity is secondary to hematogenous spread from breach in the mucosal integrity from ulceration due to the cancer. Conclusion. To our knowledge, our case is the first in the literature to describe a brain abscess caused by S. intermedius in association with a previously undiagnosed esophageal squamous cell carcinoma without any prior esophageal intervention.

  3. T Cells Compete for Access to Antigen-Bearing Antigen-Presenting Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedl, Ross M.; Rees, William A.; Hildeman, David A.; Schaefer, Brian; Mitchell, Tom; Kappler, John; Marrack, Philippa

    2000-01-01

    These studies tested whether antigenic competition between T cells occurs. We generated CD8+ T cell responses in H-2b mice against the dominant ovalbumin epitope SIINFEKL (ova8) and subdominant epitope KRVVFDKL, using either vaccinia virus expressing ovalbumin (VV-ova) or peptide-pulsed dendritic cells. CD8+ T cell responses were visualized by major histocompatibility complex class I–peptide tetrameric molecules. Transfer of transgenic T cells with high affinity for ova8 (OT1 T cells) completely inhibited the response of host antigen-specific T cells to either antigen, demonstrating that T cells can directly compete with each other for response to antigen. OT1 cells also inhibited CD8+ T cell responses to an unrelated peptide, SIYRYGGL, providing it was presented on the same dendritic cells as ova8. These inhibitions were not due to a more rapid clearance of virus or antigen-presenting cells (APCs) by the OT1 cells. Rather, the inhibition was caused by competition for antigen and antigen-bearing cells, since it could be overcome by the injection of large numbers of antigen-pulsed dendritic cells. These results imply that common properties of T cell responses, such as epitope dominance and secondary response affinity maturation, are the result of competitive interactions between antigen-bearing APC and T cell subsets. PMID:11034600

  4. Langerhans cell histiocytosis: An uncommon presentation, successfully treated by thalidomide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Shahidi-Dadras

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH is a rare disease and generally affects children under 15 years of age. Adult onset form and cutaneous features at presentation are uncommon. There are some options for treatment of the skin lesions of LCH such as topical and intralesional corticosteroid, nitrogen mustard, etc., which are not completely curative. Herein, we report a case of perianal LCH in a 20-year-old man with one-year history of recalcitrant well-demarcated, erythematous, and ulcerated plaque surrounding the anal orifice, with pain and difficulty in defecation that was successfully treated with thalidomide.

  5. Optical cell stimulation for neuronal excitation (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannsmeier, Sonja; Heeger, Patrick; Terakawa, Mitsuhiro; Heisterkamp, Alexander; Ripken, Tammo; Heinemann, Dag

    2017-02-01

    Optical manipulation of cellular functions represents a growing field in biomedical sciences. The possibility to modulate specific targets with high spatial and temporal precision in a contactless manner allows a broad range of applications. Here, we present a study on stimulation of neuronal cells by optical means. As a long-term objective, we seek to improve the performance of current electric neurostimulation, especially in the context of cochlear implants. Firstly, we tested a gold nanoparticle mediated approach to modulate transmembrane conductivity by irradiation using a picosecond pulsed Nd:YAG laser at 532 nm for 40 ms in a neuroblastoma cell line (N2A) and primary murine neurons. The light absorption leads to a rapid temperature increase of the gold nanoparticles, which can induce an increased permeabilisation of the cellular membrane. Calcium transients were recorded as an indicator of neuronal activity. Although calcium signals were reliably detected upon laser irradiation, the temporal behavior did not resemble action potentials. The origin of these signals was investigated by an inhibitor study. These results indicate calcium induced calcium release (CICR) as the major source of the calcium transients. Consecutively, we tested alternative approaches for cell stimulation, such as glutamate release and optogenetics, and evaluated the potential of these methods for the application in a cochlear implant. Compared to the gold nanoparticle approach, both techniques induce less cellular stress and reliably produce action potentials.

  6. Phase imaging of mechanical properties of live cells (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wax, Adam

    2017-02-01

    The mechanisms by which cells respond to mechanical stimuli are essential for cell function yet not well understood. Many rheological tools have been developed to characterize cellular viscoelastic properties but these typically require direct mechanical contact, limiting their throughput. We have developed a new approach for characterizing the organization of subcellular structures using a label free, noncontact, single-shot phase imaging method that correlates to measured cellular mechanical stiffness. The new analysis approach measures refractive index variance and relates it to disorder strength. These measurements are compared to cellular stiffness, measured using the same imaging tool to visualize nanoscale responses to flow shear stimulus. The utility of the technique is shown by comparing shear stiffness and phase disorder strength across five cellular populations with varying mechanical properties. An inverse relationship between disorder strength and shear stiffness is shown, suggesting that cell mechanical properties can be assessed in a format amenable to high throughput studies using this novel, non-contact technique. Further studies will be presented which include examination of mechanical stiffness in early carcinogenic events and investigation of the role of specific cellular structural proteins in mechanotransduction.

  7. Connecting the dots: artificial antigen presenting cell-mediated modulation of natural killer T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wenji; Subrahmanyam, Priyanka B; East, James E; Webb, Tonya J

    2012-11-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells constitute an important subset of T cells that can both directly and indirectly mediate antitumor immunity. However, we and others have reported that cancer patients have a reduction in both NKT cell number and function. NKT cells can be stimulated and expanded with α-GalCer and cytokines and these expanded NKT cells retain their phenotype, remain responsive to antigenic stimulation, and display cytotoxic function against tumor cell lines. These data strongly favor the use of ex vivo expanded NKT cells in adoptive immunotherapy. NKT cell based-immunotherapy has been limited by the use of autologous antigen-presenting cells, which can vary substantially in their quantity and quality. A standardized system that relies on artificial antigen-presenting cells (aAPCs) could produce the stimulating effects of dendritic cell (DC) without the pitfalls of allo- or xenogeneic cells. In this review, we discuss the progress that has been made using CD1d-based aAPC and how this acellular antigen presenting system can be used in the future to enhance our understanding of NKT cell biology and to develop NKT cell-specific adoptive immunotherapeutic strategies.

  8. Tumor-selective replication herpes simplex virus-based technology significantly improves clinical detection and prognostication of viable circulating tumor cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Wen; Bao, Li; Yang, Shaoxing

    2016-01-01

    Detection of circulating tumor cells remains a significant challenge due to their vast physical and biological heterogeneity. We developed a cell-surface-marker-independent technology based on telomerase-specific, replication-selective oncolytic herpes-simplex-virus-1 that targets telomerase...

  9. Dendritic cells derived from bone marrow cells fail to acquire and present major histocompatibility complex antigens from other dendritic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedford, Penelope A; Burke, Fiona; Stagg, Andrew J; Knight, Stella C

    2008-01-01

    Dendritic cells stimulate primary T-cell responses and a major activation route is via presentation of antigens pre-processed by other dendritic cells. This presentation of pre-processed antigens most likely proceeds through transfer of functional major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigens through exosomes, ‘live nibbling’ or apoptotic vesicles. We hypothesized that not all dendritic cell populations may both donate MHC antigen to dendritic cells and present antigens acquired from other dendritic cells. All populations tested, including those derived from bone marrow precursor cells stimulated primary, allogeneic T-cell responses and acted as accessory cells for mitogen stimulation. Populations of responder type, splenic dendritic cells promoted allogeneic responses indirectly but those derived from bone marrow cells blocked rather than promoted T-cell proliferation. To identify mechanisms underlying this difference we studied transfer of I-A antigens between cells. Active, two-way transfer of allogeneic I-A occurred between splenic primary antigen presenting cells including CD8α+ lymphoid dendritic cells, CD8α− myeloid dendritic cells and B220+ cells; all these cell types donated as well as acquired MHC molecules. By contrast, the bone marrow-derived dendritic cells donated I-A antigens but acquired negligible amounts. Thus, dendritic cells derived directly from bone marrow cells may stimulate primary T-cell responses through transferring functional MHC to other dendritic cells but may not be able to acquire and present antigens from other dendritic cells. The evidence suggests that T-cell activation may be blocked by the presence of dendritic cells that have not matured through lymphoid tissues which are unable to acquire and present antigens pre-processed by other dendritic cells. PMID:18266716

  10. Intravascular large B-cell lymphoma with multi-organ failure presenting as a pancreatic mass: a case with atypical presentation and definite diagnosis postmortem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronny, Faisal Mahmudul Huq; Black, Margaret Ann; Arbini, Arnaldo A

    2017-01-01

    Intravascular large B-cell lymphoma (IVLBCL) is a very rare extra nodal lymphoma that tends to proliferate within small blood vessels, particularly capillaries and postcapillary venules while sparing the organ parenchyma. The cause of its affinity for the vascular bed remains unknown. Because of its rarity and unremarkable clinical presentation, a timely diagnosis of IVLBCL is very challenging. Here, we describe a case of IVLBCL presenting as pancreatic mass that was ultimately diagnosed at autopsy. A 71-year-old Caucasian female presented with a 3-month history of fatigue, abdominal pain, and weight loss. She was referred to the emergency room with a new diagnosis of portal vein thrombosis and lactic acidosis. During her hospital course she was found to have a 1.9 × 1.8 cm lesion in the pancreatic tail on imaging; The cytologic specimen on the mass showed a high-grade lymphoma. A bone marrow biopsy showed no involvement. The patient's condition rapidly deteriorated and she, later, died due to multi-organ failure. An autopsy revealed diffuse intravascular invasion in multiple organs by the lymphoma cells. Based on our literature review-and to the best of our knowledge-there are virtually no reports describing the presentation of this lymphoma with a discernible tissue mass and associated multi-organ failure. The immunophenotypic studies performed revealed de novo CD5+ intravascular large B-cell lymphoma, which is known to be aggressive with very poor prognosis. Although it is a very rare lymphoma, it should be considered as a potential cause of multi-organ failure when no other cause has been identified. A prompt tissue diagnosis, appropriate high-dose chemotherapy and stem cell transplantation remain the only viable alternative to achieve some kind of remission.

  11. Enzymatic isolation of viable human odontoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuffaro, H M; Pääkkönen, V; Tjäderhane, L

    2016-05-01

    To improve an enzymatic method previously used for isolation of rat odontoblasts to isolate viable mature human odontoblasts. Collagenase I, collagenase I/hyaluronidase mixture and hyaluronidase were used to extract mature human odontoblasts from the pulp chamber. Detachment of odontoblasts from dentine was determined with field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and to analyse the significance of differences in tubular diameter, and the t-test was used. MTT-reaction was used to analyse cell viability, and nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney post hoc tests were used to analyse the data. Immunofluorescent staining of dentine sialoprotein (DSP), aquaporin-4 (AQP4) and matrix metalloproteinase-20 (MMP-20) and quantitative PCR (qPCR) of dentine sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) were used to confirm the odontoblastic nature of the cells. MTT-reaction and FESEM demonstrated collagenase I/hyaluronidase resulted in more effective detachment and higher viability than collagenase I alone. Hyaluronidase alone was not able to detach odontoblasts. Immunofluorescence revealed the typical odontoblastic-morphology with one process, and DSP, AQP4 and MMP-20 were detected. Quantitative PCR of DSPP confirmed that the isolated cells expressed this odontoblast-specific gene. The isolation of viable human odontoblasts was successful. The cells demonstrated morphology typical for odontoblasts and expressed characteristic odontoblast-type genes and proteins. This method will enable new approaches, such as apoptosis analysis, for studies using fully differentiated odontoblasts. © 2015 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Stem Cell: Past, Present and Future- A Review Article | Avasthi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    having the potency to differentiate into wide range of adult cells. Self renewal and totipotency are characteristic of stem cells. Though totipotency is shown by very early embryonic stem cells, the adult stem cells possess multipotency and differential plasticity which can be exploited for future generation of therapeutic options.

  13. Asymmetric cell division of T cells upon antigen presentation uses multiple conserved mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliaro, Jane; Van Ham, Vanessa; Sacirbegovic, Faruk; Pasam, Anupama; Bomzon, Ze'ev; Pham, Kim; Ludford-Menting, Mandy J; Waterhouse, Nigel J; Bots, Michael; Hawkins, Edwin D; Watt, Sally V; Cluse, Leonie A; Clarke, Chris J P; Izon, David J; Chang, John T; Thompson, Natalie; Gu, Min; Johnstone, Ricky W; Smyth, Mark J; Humbert, Patrick O; Reiner, Steven L; Russell, Sarah M

    2010-07-01

    Asymmetric cell division is a potential means by which cell fate choices during an immune response are orchestrated. Defining the molecular mechanisms that underlie asymmetric division of T cells is paramount for determining the role of this process in the generation of effector and memory T cell subsets. In other cell types, asymmetric cell division is regulated by conserved polarity protein complexes that control the localization of cell fate determinants and spindle orientation during division. We have developed a tractable, in vitro model of naive CD8(+) T cells undergoing initial division while attached to dendritic cells during Ag presentation to investigate whether similar mechanisms might regulate asymmetric division of T cells. Using this system, we show that direct interactions with APCs provide the cue for polarization of T cells. Interestingly, the immunological synapse disseminates before division even though the T cells retain contact with the APC. The cue from the APC is translated into polarization of cell fate determinants via the polarity network of the Par3 and Scribble complexes, and orientation of the mitotic spindle during division is orchestrated by the partner of inscuteable/G protein complex. These findings suggest that T cells have selectively adapted a number of evolutionarily conserved mechanisms to generate diversity through asymmetric cell division.

  14. Artificial antigen presenting cell (aAPC) mediated activation and expansion of natural killer T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    East, James E; Sun, Wenji; Webb, Tonya J

    2012-12-29

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells are a unique subset of T cells that display markers characteristic of both natural killer (NK) cells and T cells(1). Unlike classical T cells, NKT cells recognize lipid antigen in the context of CD1 molecules(2). NKT cells express an invariant TCRα chain rearrangement: Vα14Jα18 in mice and Vα24Jα18 in humans, which is associated with Vβ chains of limited diversity(3-6), and are referred to as canonical or invariant NKT (iNKT) cells. Similar to conventional T cells, NKT cells develop from CD4-CD8- thymic precursor T cells following the appropriate signaling by CD1d (7). The potential to utilize NKT cells for therapeutic purposes has significantly increased with the ability to stimulate and expand human NKT cells with α-Galactosylceramide (α-GalCer) and a variety of cytokines(8). Importantly, these cells retained their original phenotype, secreted cytokines, and displayed cytotoxic function against tumor cell lines. Thus, ex vivo expanded NKT cells remain functional and can be used for adoptive immunotherapy. However, NKT cell based-immunotherapy has been limited by the use of autologous antigen presenting cells and the quantity and quality of these stimulator cells can vary substantially. Monocyte-derived DC from cancer patients have been reported to express reduced levels of costimulatory molecules and produce less inflammatory cytokines(9,10). In fact, murine DC rather than autologous APC have been used to test the function of NKT cells from CML patients(11). However, this system can only be used for in vitro testing since NKT cells cannot be expanded by murine DC and then used for adoptive immunotherapy. Thus, a standardized system that relies on artificial Antigen Presenting Cells (aAPC) could produce the stimulating effects of DC without the pitfalls of allo- or xenogeneic cells(12, 13). Herein, we describe a method for generating CD1d-based aAPC. Since the engagement of the T cell receptor (TCR) by CD1d-antigen complexes is

  15. Fetal stem cell transplantation: Past, present, and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Tetsuya; Eto, Koji

    2014-09-26

    Since 1928, human fetal tissues and stem cells have been used worldwide to treat various conditions. Although the transplantation of the fetal midbrain substantia nigra and dopaminergic neurons in patients suffering from Parkinson's disease is particularly noteworthy, the history of other types of grafts, such as those of the fetal liver, thymus, and pancreas, should be addressed as there are many lessons to be learnt for future stem cell transplantation. This report describes previous practices and complications that led to current clinical trials of isolated fetal stem cells and embryonic stem (ES) cells. Moreover, strategies for transplantation are considered, with a particular focus on donor cells, cell processing, and the therapeutic cell niche, in addition to ethical issues associated with fetal origin. With the advent of autologous induced pluripotent stem cells and ES cells, clinical dependence on fetal transplantation is expected to gradually decline due to lasting ethical controversies, despite landmark achievements.

  16. Human cell-based artificial antigen-presenting cells for cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Marcus O; Hirano, Naoto

    2014-01-01

    Adoptive T-cell therapy, where anti-tumor T cells are first prepared in vitro, is attractive since it facilitates the delivery of essential signals to selected subsets of anti-tumor T cells without unfavorable immunoregulatory issues that exist in tumor-bearing hosts. Recent clinical trials have demonstrated that anti-tumor adoptive T-cell therapy, i.e. infusion of tumor-specific T cells, can induce clinically relevant and sustained responses in patients with advanced cancer. The goal of adoptive cell therapy is to establish anti-tumor immunologic memory, which can result in life-long rejection of tumor cells in patients. To achieve this goal, during the process of in vitro expansion, T-cell grafts used in adoptive T-cell therapy must be appropriately educated and equipped with the capacity to accomplish multiple, essential tasks. Adoptively transferred T cells must be endowed, prior to infusion, with the ability to efficiently engraft, expand, persist, and traffic to tumor in vivo. As a strategy to consistently generate T-cell grafts with these capabilities, artificial antigen-presenting cells have been developed to deliver the proper signals necessary to T cells to enable optimal adoptive cell therapy. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Adult Langerhans cell histiocytosis presenting as metachronous colonic polyps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aloísio Felipe-Silva

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH is a rare disease characterized by proliferation of Langerhans-type cells that express CD1a, Langerin (CD207 and S100 protein. Birbeck granules are a hallmark by ultrastructural examination. LCH presents with a wide clinical spectrum, ranging from solitary lesions of a single site (usually bone or skin to multiple or disseminated multisystemic lesions, which can lead to severe organ dysfunction. Most cases occur in children. Gastrointestinal tract involvement is rare and has been associated with systemic illness and poor prognosis especially in children under the age of 2 years. Adult gastrointestinal LCH is very rare. We report a case of a previously healthy, nonsmoking 48-year-old male who was referred for routine screening colonoscopy. Two sessile, smooth, firm and yellowish LCH polyps measuring 0.2 cm and 0.3 cm were detected in the sigmoid colon. Fifteen months later a second colonoscopy found two histologically confirmed hyperplastic polyps at the sigmoid colon. No other LCH lesions were seen. A third colonoscopy after 28 months of follow-up found a submucosal 0.5 cm infiltrated and ulcerated LCH polyp in the cecum, close to the ostium of the appendix. The patient had been asymptomatic for all this period. Imaging investigation for systemic or multiorgan disease did not find any sign of extracolonic involvement. On histology all lesions showed typical LCH features and immunohistochemical analysis showed strong and diffuse staining for CD1a and CD207. This case illustrates two distinct clinicopathologic features not previously reported in this particular clinical setting: metachronous colonic involvement and positivity for CD207.

  18. Enumeration of viable and non-viable larvated Ascaris eggs with quantitative PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raynal, Maria; Villegas, Eric N; Nelson, Kara L

    2012-12-01

    The goal of this study was to further develop an incubation-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) method for quantifying viable Ascaris eggs by characterizing the detection limit and number of template copies per egg, determining the specificity of the method, and testing the method with viable and inactivated larvated eggs. The number of template copies per cell was determined by amplifying DNA from known numbers of eggs at different development stages; the value was estimated to be 32 copies. The specificity of the method was tested against a panel of bacteria, fungi, protozoa and helminths, and no amplification was found with non-target DNA. Finally, fully larvated eggs were inactivated by four different treatments: 254 nm ultraviolet light, 2,000 ppm NH(3)-N at pH 9, moderate heat (48 °C) and high heat (70 °C). Concentrations of treated eggs were measured by direct microscopy and incubation-qPCR. The qPCR signal decreased following all four treatments, and was in general agreement with the decrease in viable eggs determined by microscopy. The incubation-qPCR method for enumerating viable Ascaris eggs is a promising approach that can produce results faster than direct microscopy, and may have benefits for applications such as assessing biosolids.

  19. A rapid biosensor for viable B. anthracis spores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeumner, Antje J; Leonard, Barbara; McElwee, John; Montagna, Richard A

    2004-09-01

    A simple membrane-strip-based biosensor assay has been combined with a nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) reaction for rapid (4 h) detection of a small number (ten) of viable B. anthracis spores. The biosensor is based on identification of a unique mRNA sequence from one of the anthrax toxin genes, the protective antigen ( pag), encoded on the toxin plasmid, pXO1, and thus provides high specificity toward B. anthracis. Previously, the anthrax toxins activator ( atxA) mRNA had been used in our laboratory for the development of a biosensor for the detection of a single B. anthracis spore within 12 h. Changing the target sequence to the pag mRNA provided the ability to shorten the overall assay time significantly. The vaccine strain of B. anthracis (Sterne strain) was used in all experiments. A 500-microL sample containing as few as ten spores was mixed with 500 microL growth medium and incubated for 30 min for spore germination and mRNA production. Thus, only spores that are viable were detected. Subsequently, RNA was extracted from lysed cells, selectively amplified using NASBA, and rapidly identified by the biosensor. While the biosensor assay requires only 15 min assay time, the overall process takes 4 h for detection of ten viable B. anthracis spores, and is shortened significantly if more spores are present. The biosensor is based on an oligonucleotide sandwich-hybridization assay format. It uses a membrane flow-through system with an immobilized DNA probe that hybridizes with the target sequence. Signal amplification is provided when the target sequence hybridizes to a second DNA probe that has been coupled to liposomes encapsulating the dye sulforhodamine B. The amount of liposomes captured in the detection zone can be read visually or quantified with a hand-held reflectometer. The biosensor can detect as little as 1 fmol target mRNA (1 nmol L(-1)). Specificity analysis revealed no cross-reactivity with 11 organisms tested, among them closely

  20. Langerhans cell histiocytosis: A case presentation and literature ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a complete blood count with differential counts, renal and liver function tests, measurement of .... Langerhans cells express characteristic cell surface proteins called the CD1a protein and langerin. These cells can ... Hepatic involvement is defined as hepatic enlargement, liver function test abnormalities and/or histological ...

  1. Human natural killer cells promote cross-presentation of tumor cell-derived antigens by dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deauvieau, Florence; Ollion, Vincent; Doffin, Anne-Claire; Achard, Carole; Fonteneau, Jean-François; Verronese, Estelle; Durand, Isabelle; Ghittoni, Raffaella; Marvel, Jacqueline; Dezutter-Dambuyant, Colette; Walzer, Thierry; Vie, Henri; Perrot, Ivan; Goutagny, Nadège; Caux, Christophe; Valladeau-Guilemond, Jenny

    2015-03-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) cross-present antigen (Ag) to initiate T-cell immunity against most infections and tumors. Natural killer (NK) cells are innate cytolytic lymphocytes that have emerged as key modulators of multiple DC functions. Here, we show that human NK cells promote cross-presentation of tumor cell-derived Ag by DC leading to Ag-specific CD8(+) T-cell activation. Surprisingly, cytotoxic function of NK cells was not required. Instead, we highlight a critical and nonredundant role for IFN-γ and TNF-α production by NK cells to enhance cross-presentation by DC using two different Ag models. Importantly, we observed that NK cells promote cell-associated Ag cross-presentation selectively by monocytes-derived DC (Mo-DC) and CD34-derived CD11b(neg) CD141(high) DC subsets but not by myeloid CD11b(+) DC. Moreover, we demonstrate that triggering NK cell activation by monoclonal antibodies (mAbs)-coated tumor cells leads to efficient DC cross-presentation, supporting the concept that NK cells can contribute to therapeutic mAbs efficiency by inducing downstream adaptive immunity. Taken together, our findings point toward a novel role of human NK cells bridging innate and adaptive immunity through selective induction of cell-associated Ag cross-presentation by CD141(high) DC, a process that could be exploited to better harness Ag-specific cellular immunity in immunotherapy. © 2014 UICC.

  2. Imaging the Interactions Between B Cells and Antigen-Presenting Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jia C; Bolger-Munro, Madison; Gold, Michael R

    2018-01-01

    In vivo, B cells are often activated by antigens that are displayed on the surface of antigen-presenting cells (APCs). Binding of membrane-associated antigens to the B cell receptor (BCR) causes rapid cytoskeleton-dependent changes in the spatial organization of the BCR and other B cell membrane proteins, leading to the formation of an immune synapse. This process has been modeled using antigens attached to artificial planar lipid bilayers or to plasma membrane sheets. As a more physiological system for studying B cell-APC interactions, we have expressed model antigens in easily transfected adherent cell lines such as Cos-7 cells. The model antigens that we have used are a transmembrane form of a single-chain anti-Igκ antibody and a transmembrane form of hen egg lysozyme that is fused to a fluorescent protein. This has allowed us to study multiple aspects of B cell immune synapse formation including cytoskeletal reorganization, BCR microcluster coalescence, BCR-mediated antigen gathering, and BCR signaling. Here, we provide protocols for expressing these model antigens on the surface of Cos-7 cells, transfecting B cells with siRNAs or with plasmids encoding fluorescent proteins, using fixed cell and live cell fluorescence microscopy to image B cell-APC interactions, and quantifying APC-induced changes in BCR spatial organization and signaling.

  3. Janus particles as artificial antigen-presenting cells for T cell activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bo; Jia, Yilong; Gao, Yuan; Sanchez, Lucero; Anthony, Stephen M; Yu, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Here we show that the multifunctionality of Janus particles can be exploited for in vitro T cell activation. We engineer bifunctional Janus particles on which the spatial distribution of two ligands, anti-CD3 and fibronectin, mimics the "bull's eye" protein pattern formed in the membrane junction between a T cell and an antigen-presenting cell. Different levels of T cell activation can be achieved by simply switching the spatial distribution of the two ligands on the surfaces of the "bull's eye" particles. We find that the ligand pattern also affects clustering of intracellular proteins. This study demonstrates that anisotropic particles, such as Janus particles, can be developed as artificial antigen-presenting cells for modulating T cell activation.

  4. Mobile Applications in Cell Biology Present New Approaches for Cell Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Mayara Lustosa; Galembeck, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Cell biology apps were surveyed in order to identify whether there are new approaches for modelling cells allowed by the new technologies implemented in tablets and smartphones. A total of 97 apps were identified in 3 stores surveyed (Apple, Google Play and Amazon), they are presented as: education 48.4%, games 26.8% and medicine 15.4%. The apps…

  5. Cell fine structure and function - Past and present

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Moran, H.

    1970-01-01

    Electron microscopic studies of nerve membrane fine structure, discussing cell membrane multienzyme and macromolecular energy and information transduction, protein synthesis and nucleic acids interrelations

  6. The Chemically Synthesized Ageladine A-Derivative LysoGlow84 Stains Lysosomes in Viable Mammalian Brain Cells and Specific Structures in the Marine Flatworm Macrostomum lignano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorsten Mordhorst

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Based on the chemical structure and the known chemical synthesis of the marine sponge alkaloid ageladine A, we synthesized the ageladine A-derivative 4-(naphthalene-2-yl-1H-imidazo[4,5-c]pyridine trifluoroacetate (LysoGlow84. The two-step synthesis started with the Pictet-Spengler reaction of histamine and naphthalene-2-carbaldehyde to a tetrahydropyridine intermediate, which was dehydrogenated with activated manganese (IV oxide to LysoGlow84. Structure and purity of the synthesized LysoGlow84 were confirmed by NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The fluorescence intensity emitted by LysoGlow84 depended strongly on the pH of the solvent with highest fluorescence intensity recorded at pH 4. The fluorescence maximum (at 315 nm excitation was observed at 440 nm. Biocompatibility of LysoGlow84 was investigated using cultured rat brain astrocytes and the marine flatworm Macrostomum lignano. Exposure of the astrocytes for up to 6 h to micromolar concentrations of LysoGlow84 did not compromise cell viability, as demonstrated by several viability assays, but revealed a promising property of this compound for staining of cellular vesicles. Conventional fluorescence microscopy as well as confocal scanning microscopy of LysoGlow84-treated astrocytes revealed co-localization of LysoGlow84 fluorescence with that of LysoTracker® Red DND-99. LysoGlow84 stained unclear structures in Macrostomum lignano, which were identified as lysosomes by co-staining with LysoTracker. Strong fluorescence staining by LysoGlow84 was further observed around the worms’ anterior gut and the female genital pore which were not counterstained by LysoTracker Red. Thus, LysoGlow84 is a new promising dye that stains lysosomes and other acidic compartments in cultured cells and in worms.

  7. The chemically synthesized ageladine A-derivative LysoGlow84 stains lysosomes in viable mammalian brain cells and specific structures in the marine flatworm Macrostomum lignano.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordhorst, Thorsten; Awal, Sushil; Jordan, Sebastian; Petters, Charlotte; Sartoris, Linda; Dringen, Ralf; Bickmeyer, Ulf

    2015-02-11

    Based on the chemical structure and the known chemical synthesis of the marine sponge alkaloid ageladine A, we synthesized the ageladine A-derivative 4-(naphthalene-2-yl)-1H-imidazo[4,5-c]pyridine trifluoroacetate (LysoGlow84). The two-step synthesis started with the Pictet-Spengler reaction of histamine and naphthalene-2-carbaldehyde to a tetrahydropyridine intermediate, which was dehydrogenated with activated manganese (IV) oxide to LysoGlow84. Structure and purity of the synthesized LysoGlow84 were confirmed by NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The fluorescence intensity emitted by LysoGlow84 depended strongly on the pH of the solvent with highest fluorescence intensity recorded at pH 4. The fluorescence maximum (at 315 nm excitation) was observed at 440 nm. Biocompatibility of LysoGlow84 was investigated using cultured rat brain astrocytes and the marine flatworm Macrostomum lignano. Exposure of the astrocytes for up to 6 h to micromolar concentrations of LysoGlow84 did not compromise cell viability, as demonstrated by several viability assays, but revealed a promising property of this compound for staining of cellular vesicles. Conventional fluorescence microscopy as well as confocal scanning microscopy of LysoGlow84-treated astrocytes revealed co-localization of LysoGlow84 fluorescence with that of LysoTracker® Red DND-99. LysoGlow84 stained unclear structures in Macrostomum lignano, which were identified as lysosomes by co-staining with LysoTracker. Strong fluorescence staining by LysoGlow84 was further observed around the worms' anterior gut and the female genital pore which were not counterstained by LysoTracker Red. Thus, LysoGlow84 is a new promising dye that stains lysosomes and other acidic compartments in cultured cells and in worms.

  8. Surface-Engineering of Red Blood Cells as Artificial Antigen Presenting Cells Promising for Cancer Immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaoqi; Han, Xiao; Xu, Ligeng; Gao, Min; Xu, Jun; Yang, Rong; Liu, Zhuang

    2017-10-01

    The development of artificial antigen presenting cells (aAPCs) to mimic the functions of APCs such as dendritic cells (DCs) to stimulate T cells and induce antitumor immune responses has attracted substantial interests in cancer immunotherapy. In this work, a unique red blood cell (RBC)-based aAPC system is designed by engineering antigen peptide-loaded major histocompatibility complex-I and CD28 activation antibody on RBC surface, which are further tethered with interleukin-2 (IL2) as a proliferation and differentiation signal. Such RBC-based aAPC-IL2 (R-aAPC-IL2) can not only provide a flexible cell surface with appropriate biophysical parameters, but also mimic the cytokine paracrine delivery. Similar to the functions of matured DCs, the R-aAPC-IL2 cells can facilitate the proliferation of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells and increase the secretion of inflammatory cytokines. As a proof-of-concept, we treated splenocytes from C57 mice with R-aAPC-IL2 and discovered those splenocytes induced significant cancer-cell-specific lysis, implying that the R-aAPC-IL2 were able to re-educate T cells and induce adoptive immune response. This work thus presents a novel RBC-based aAPC system which can mimic the functions of antigen presenting DCs to activate T cells, promising for applications in adoptive T cell transfer or even in direct activation of circulating T cells for cancer immunotherapy. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. FUEL CELL PROTON EXCHANGE MEMBRANE - PRESENT AND PERSPECTIVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor CIUPINA

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The fuel cells could contribute to the reduction of the pollution emission and the fossil fuels due to the conversion efficiency which is higher than the other energy conversion systems. There are many possibilities to improve the efficiency and to reduce the weight of the fuel cells by the integration of new nanostructured materials.

  10. Renal epithelioid angiomyolipoma presenting clinically as renal cell ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    M.S. Johnson

    (AML) and its potentially malignant variant epithelioid angiomy- olipoma (EAML). PEComas are associated with the tuberous sclerosis complex and characterized by the World Health Organi- zation as a “proliferation of perivascular epithelioid cells (PECs)”. [1]. EAML is often confused with renal cell carcinoma (RCC) given.

  11. Polymerase chain reaction-based discrimination of viable from non-viable Mycoplasma gallisepticum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching Giap Tan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The present study was based on the reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR of the 16S ribosomal nucleic acid (rRNA of Mycoplasma for detection of viable Mycoplasma gallisepticum. To determine the stability of M. gallisepticum 16S rRNA in vitro, three inactivation methods were used and the suspensions were stored at different temperatures. The 16S rRNA of M. gallisepticum was detected up to approximately 20–25 h at 37 °C, 22–25 h at 16 °C, and 23–27 h at 4 °C. The test, therefore, could detect viable or recently dead M. gallisepticum (< 20 h. The RT-PCR method was applied during an in vivo study of drug efficacy under experimental conditions, where commercial broiler-breeder eggs were inoculated with M. gallisepticum into the yolk. Hatched chicks that had been inoculated in ovo were treated with Macrolide 1. The method was then applied in a flock of day 0 chicks with naturally acquired vertical transmission of M. gallisepticum, treated with Macrolide 2. Swabs of the respiratory tract were obtained for PCR and RT-PCR evaluations to determine the viability of M. gallisepticum. This study proved that the combination of both PCR and RT-PCR enables detection and differentiation of viable from non-viable M. gallisepticum.

  12. Parejas viables que perduran en el tiempo

    OpenAIRE

    Juan José Cuervo Rodríguez

    2013-01-01

    El presente artículo científico presenta resultados del proceso llevado a cabo en el proyecto de investigación docente "Mecanismos de autorregulación en parejas viables que perduran en el tiempo". Se soporta en una mirada compleja de la psicología basada en una epistemología de la construcción. En el ámbito metodológico, se inscribe en los estudios de terapia familiar desde una perspectiva de la comunicación humana como un todo integrado. Participaron nueve parejas. Los criterios de inclusión...

  13. Renal Cell Carcinoma Presenting with Cutaneous Metastasis: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilufer Onak Kandemir

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal cell carcinoma is the most common kidney tumor in adults. Cutaneous metastasis is a rare first symptom of the disease. This paper describes the diagnosis of a renal cell carcinoma that was indicated by cutaneous metastasis in the head and neck region, and considers the etiopathogenesis of such cases. A careful skin examination is important to detect cutaneous metastasis associated with renal cell carcinomas. Metastatic skin lesions in the head and neck region must be taken into consideration during a differential diagnosis.

  14. Renal Cell Carcinoma Presenting with Cutaneous Metastasis: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onak Kandemir, Nilufer; Barut, Figen; Yılmaz, Kıvanç; Tokgoz, Husnu; Hosnuter, Mubin; Ozdamar, Sukru Oguz

    2010-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma is the most common kidney tumor in adults. Cutaneous metastasis is a rare first symptom of the disease. This paper describes the diagnosis of a renal cell carcinoma that was indicated by cutaneous metastasis in the head and neck region, and considers the etiopathogenesis of such cases. A careful skin examination is important to detect cutaneous metastasis associated with renal cell carcinomas. Metastatic skin lesions in the head and neck region must be taken into consideration during a differential diagnosis. PMID:20811607

  15. Mast cells regulate CD4+ T cell differentiation in absence of antigen presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez Cetina Biefer, Hector; Heinbokel, Timm; Uehara, Hirofumi; Camacho, Virginia; Minami, Koichiro; Nian, Yeqi; Koduru, Suresh; El Fatimy, Rachid; Ghiran, Ionita; Trachtenberg, Alexander J; de la Fuente, Miguel A; Azuma, Haruhito; Akbari, Omid; Tullius, Stefan G; Vasudevan, Anju; Elkhal, Abdallah

    2018-02-19

    Given their unique capacity for antigen uptake, processing, and presentation, antigen presenting cells (APCs) are critical for initiating and regulating innate and adaptive immune responses. We have previously shown the role of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD + ) in T cell differentiation independently of the cytokine milieu, while the precise mechanisms remained unknown. The objective of this study is to further dissect the mechanism of actions of NAD + , and to determine the impact of APCs on NAD + -mediated T cell activation. Isolated dendritic cells and bone marrow-derived mast cells were used to characterize the mechanisms of action of NAD + on CD4 + T cell fate in vitro. Furthermore, NAD + -mediated CD4 + T cell differentiation was investigated in vivo using WT C57BL/6, Mast cell -/- , MHC class ll -/- , WASP -/- , 5C.C7 Rag2 -/- and CD11b-DTR transgenic mice. Finally, we tested the physiological impact of NAD + on the systemic immune response in the context of Listeria monocytogenes infection. Our in vivo and in vitro findings indicate that following NAD + administration MCs, exclusively, promote CD4 + T cell differentiation, both in absence of antigen and independently of major APCs. Moreover, we found that MCs mediated CD4 + T cell differentiation independently of MHC-II and TCR signaling machinery. More importantly, although treatment with NAD + resulted in a decreased MHC-II expression on CD11c + cells, MC-mediated CD4 + T cell differentiation rendered mice resistant to the administration of lethal doses of Listeria monocytogenes. Collectively, our study unravels a novel cellular and molecular pathway that regulates innate and adaptive immunity via MCs, exclusively, and underscores the therapeutic potential of NAD + in the context of primary immunodeficiencies and antimicrobial resistance. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Human thymic epithelial cells present superantigens to T-cell lines and thymocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jlrgensen, A; Nielsen, M; Svejgaard, A

    1996-01-01

    It is generally accepted that thymic epithelial cells (TEC) act as accessory cells in positive selection of pre-T cells. However, our knowledge of the antigen presentation and accessory cell function to human TEC is limited. Here we present results obtained by the use of serum-free cultured human...... TEC, showing that IFN-gamma-treated TEC are able to support T-cell-mediated responses to the bacterial superantigens (Sag) SEA and SEB, even at very low Sag concentrations. T-cell responses to TEC-presented Sags were dependent on the presence of the adhesion molecules ICAM-1, ICAM-2, LFA-1, and LFA-3......, but not on CD4 and CD8 molecules. There is a low but significant expression of B7 molecules on human TEC, and treatment of TEC with anti-B7.1 and anti-B7.2 antibodies before Sag pulsing leads to decreased Sag responses, indicating a significant importance of B7 molecules on TEC. Both CD4+ T-cell lines and CD4...

  17. HIV-1 Trans Infection of CD4+ T Cells by Professional Antigen Presenting Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldo, Charles R.

    2013-01-01

    Since the 1990s we have known of the fascinating ability of a complex set of professional antigen presenting cells (APCs; dendritic cells, monocytes/macrophages, and B lymphocytes) to mediate HIV-1 trans infection of CD4+ T cells. This results in a burst of virus replication in the T cells that is much greater than that resulting from direct, cis infection of either APC or T cells, or trans infection between T cells. Such APC-to-T cell trans infection first involves a complex set of virus subtype, attachment, entry, and replication patterns that have many similarities among APC, as well as distinct differences related to virus receptors, intracellular trafficking, and productive and nonproductive replication pathways. The end result is that HIV-1 can sequester within the APC for several days and be transmitted via membrane extensions intracellularly and extracellularly to T cells across the virologic synapse. Virus replication requires activated T cells that can develop concurrently with the events of virus transmission. Further research is essential to fill the many gaps in our understanding of these trans infection processes and their role in natural HIV-1 infection. PMID:24278768

  18. The Basics of Artificial Antigen Presenting Cells in T Cell-Based Cancer Immunotherapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Lillian R; Bailey, Stefanie R; Wyatt, Megan M; Bowers, Jacob S; Majchrzak, Kinga; Nelson, Michelle H; Haupt, Carl; Paulos, Chrystal M; Varela, Juan C

    2017-01-01

    Adoptive T cell transfer (ACT) can mediate objective responses in patients with advanced malignancies. There have been major advances in this field, including the optimization of the ex vivo generation of tumor-reactive lymphocytes to ample numbers for effective ACT therapy via the use of natural and artificial antigen presenting cells (APCs). Herein we review the basic properties of APCs and how they have been manufactured through the years to augment vaccine and T cell-based cancer therapies. We then discuss how these novel APCs impact the function and memory properties of T cells. Finally, we propose new ways to synthesize aAPCs to augment the therapeutic effectiveness of antitumor T cells for ACT therapy.

  19. Squamous cell carcinoma presenting as cutaneous horn in diabetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... not the horn itself, which is just dead keratin, but rather the nature of the underlying disease, although the horns are usually benign and that's why the case is reported. Keywords: Cutaneous horn; Cornu cutaneum; Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Diabetes Mellitus. Sudanese Journal of Dermatology Vol. 4 (2) 2006: pp. 86-91 ...

  20. Viable Syntax: Rethinking Minimalist Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Safir

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Hauser et al. (2002 suggest that the human language faculty emerged as a genetic innovation in the form of what is called here a ‘keystone factor’—a single, simple, formal mental capability that, interacting with the pre-existing faculties of hominid ancestors, caused a cascade of effects resulting in the language faculty in modern humans. They take Merge to be the keystone factor, but instead it is posited here that Merge is the pre-existing mechanism of thought made viable by a principle that permits relations interpretable at the interfaces to be mapped onto c-command. The simplified minimalist architecture proposed here respects the keystone factor as closely as possible, but is justified on the basis of linguistic analyses it makes available, including a relativized intervention theory applicable across Case, scope, agreement, selection and linearization, a derivation of the A/A’-distinction from Case theory, and predictions such as why in situ wh-interpretation is island-insensitive, but susceptible to intervention effects.

  1. Vγ9Vδ2-T cells as antigen presenting cells for iNKT cell based cancer immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werter, Inge M.; Schneiders, Famke L.; Scotet, Emmanuel; Verheul, Henk M.W.; de Gruijl, Tanja D.; van der Vliet, Hans J.

    2014-01-01

    CD1d-restricted invariant natural killer T cells (iNKT) constitute an important immunoregulatory T-cell subset involved in the induction of antitumor immune responses. Here, we provide a view on the recent observation that Vγ9Vδ2-T cells, through trogocytosis of CD1d-containing membrane fragments, have the capacity to act as antigen presenting cells for iNKT. PMID:25941612

  2. Summary: present and future challenges for stem cell research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, B L M

    2008-01-01

    Stem cell research is being driven forward at an intense pace by creative interactions among scientists working in different fields. These include developmental and reproductive biology, regeneration, genomics, live cell imaging, RNA biology, and cancer biology, to name a few. Numerous model systems and techniques are being exploited, and lab scientists are teaming up with bioengineers and clinicians. The ferment of ideas that makes the field so exciting was in full evidence throughout the Symposium. However, many challenges still need to be overcome to translate basic discoveries into therapeutic outcomes that will save lives and fulfill the promises that have been made. This chapter summarizes some of the highlights of the Symposium and indicates future directions that are being taken by leaders in the field.

  3. Gastrointestinal Stromal Cell Tumor (GIST) Presenting as an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) are rare mesenchymal tumors that may mimic ovarian tumor on presurgical testing. These tumors are usually asymptomatic, often discovered accidentally during endoscopic or radiologic examinations,. Case Presentations: In first case a 50 years old woman presented ...

  4. Langerhans cell histiocytosis: A case presentation and literature ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Once the diagnosis has been confirmed, all cases should be referred to a paediatric oncologist for risk stratification and further management. We present a case of a toddler with LCH with skeletal involvement, who primarily presented to an orthopaedic surgeon. Relevant knowledge about this condition is reviewed.

  5. Experimental design for the optimization of propidium monoazide treatment to quantify viable and non-viable bacteria in piggery effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desneux, Jérémy; Chemaly, Marianne; Pourcher, Anne-Marie

    2015-08-16

    Distinguishing between viable and dead bacteria in animal and urban effluents is a major challenge. Among existing methods, propidium monoazide (PMA)-qPCR is a promising way to quantify viable cells. However, its efficiency depends on the composition of the effluent, particularly on total suspended solids (TSS)) and on methodological parameters. The aim of this study was evaluate the influence of three methodological factors (concentration of PMA, incubation time and photoactivation time) on the efficiency of PMA-qPCR to quantify viable and dead cells of Listeria monocytogenes used as a microorganism model, in two piggery effluents (manure and lagoon effluent containing 20 and 0.4 TSS g.kg(-1), respectively). An experimental design strategy (Doehlert design and desirability function) was used to identify the experimental conditions to achieve optimal PMA-qPCR results. The quantification of viable cells of L. monocytogenes was mainly influenced by the concentration of PMA in the manure and by the duration of photoactivation in the lagoon effluent. Optimal values differed with the matrix: 55 μM PMA, 5 min incubation and 56 min photoactivation for manure and 20 μM PMA, 20 min incubation and 30 min photoactivation for lagoon effluent. Applied to five manure and four lagoon samples, these conditions resulted in satisfactory quantification of viable and dead cells. PMA-qPCR can be used on undiluted turbid effluent with high levels of TSS, provided preliminary tests are performed to identify the optimal conditions.

  6. Regulation of T Helper Cell Responses During Antigen Presentation by Norepinephrine-exposed Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Linghui; Ding, Wanhong; Stohl, Lori L; Zhou, Xi K; Azizi, Shayan; Chuang, Ethan; Lam, Jimmy; Wagner, John A; Granstein, Richard D

    2017-11-21

    Dermal blood vessels and regional lymph nodes are innervated by sympathetic nerves and, under stress, sympathetic nerves release norepinephrine (NE). Exposure of primary murine dermal microvascular endothelial cells (pDMECs) to NE followed by co-culture with Langerhans cells (LCs), responsive CD4+ T cells and antigen resulted in modulation of CD4+ T cell responses. NE-treatment of pDMECs induced increased production of interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-17A while downregulating interferon (IFN)-γ and IL-22 release. This effect did not require contact between pDMECs and LCs or T cells and depended on pDMEC production of IL-6. The presence of NE-treated pDMECs increased the proportion of CD4+ T cells expressing intracellular IL-17A and increased IL-17A mRNA while decreasing the proportion of IFN-γ- or IL-22-expressing CD4+ T cells and mRNA levels for those cytokines. Retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor gamma (RORγt) mRNA was significantly increased in CD4+ T cells while T-box transcription factor (T-bet) mRNA was decreased. Intradermal administration of NE prior to hapten immunization at the injection site produced a similar bias in draining lymph node CD4+ T cells toward IL-17A and away from IFN-γ and IL-22 production. Under stress, release of NE may have significant regulatory effects on the outcome of antigen presentation through actions on ECs as well as enhancement of inflammatory skin disorders involving IL-17/Th17 cells. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. Degradation mechanism of planar perovskite solar cells (Presentation Recording)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Chuanjiang; Matsushima, Toshinori; Adachi, Chihaya

    2015-10-01

    Organic-inorganic hybrid halide perovskites are an interesting class of materials that have excellent semiconductor properties, and demonstrated promising applications on many fields, such as solar cells, water photolysis, light emitting diodes, and amplified spontaneous emission. So far, the device lifetime is still short, and this is an important key issue faced for all researchers in this field.[1] The deep understanding of their durability and degradation mechanism is critical and necessary toward future applications. Towards development of efficient and long-term stable perovskite solar cells (PSCs), we firstly studied the relationship between crystallization, morphology, device architecture, efficiency and durability of encapsulated PSCs. Furthermore, the degradation mechanism of the devices was elucidated by different experimental methods. The well crystallized and fully covered perovskite layer improves not only power conversion efficiency but also long-time durability. Compared to a widely used silver counter electrode, lithium fluoride/aluminum and gold electrode-based PSCs demonstrated better durability owing to less chemical degradation and interface changing. We also confirmed that the amount of accumulated charge carriers induces the degradation of the PSCs, which was proved by a thermally stimulated current technique. Finally, we realized a planar PSC with excellent durability by improving device encapsulation and optimizing device structures. Reference: 1. M. Grätzel, Nature Materials 2014, 13, 838-842.

  8. Mitochondrial respiration in human viable platelets-Methodology and influence of gender, age and storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjövall, Fredrik; Ehinger, Johannes K H; Marelsson, Sigurður E

    2013-01-01

    Studying whole cell preparations with intact mitochondria and respiratory complexes has a clear benefit compared to isolated or disrupted mitochondria due to the dynamic interplay between mitochondria and other cellular compartments. Platelet mitochondria have a potential to serve as a source...... of human viable mitochondria when studying mitochondrial physiology and pathogenic mechanisms, as well as for the diagnostics of mitochondrial diseases. The objective of the present study was to perform a detailed evaluation of platelet mitochondrial respiration using high-resolution respirometry. Further...

  9. MHC class II antigen presentation by B cells in health and disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Souwer, Yuri

    2009-01-01

    MHC class II antigen presentation by B cells is important to activate CD4+ T cells that stimulate the B cell to produce antibodies. Besides this, disruption of MHC class II antigen presentation could play a role in immune escape by tumor cells. This thesis describes MHC class II antigen presentation

  10. Orbital mantle cell lymphoma presenting as myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlin, Justin; Peck, Travis; Prenshaw, Karyn; Portell, Craig A; Kirzhner, Maria

    2017-08-18

    A 69-year-old man, previously treated with pyridostigmine for myasthenia gravis (manifesting as ptosis and diplopia) was evaluated for several concomitant bilateral anterior orbital masses. Imaging revealed 3 discrete, solid masses within and around the orbits. An incisional biopsy demonstrated atypical lymphocytes positive for CD20 and Cyclin-D1, consistent with mantle cell lymphoma. The patient received induction chemotherapy with a rituximab-based regimen. He experienced resolution of his diplopia and ptosis after one cycle of chemotherapy and achieved complete remission of the orbital masses and myasthenia symptoms after 6 cycles. Myasthenia gravis is most commonly associated with thymoma, but may also be observed with other malignancies. Recognition that orbital lymphoma may coexist with myasthenia gravis will help in expediting the diagnosis of future cases and in guiding treatment decisions.

  11. Stem cell therapies for age-related macular degeneration: the past, present, and future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dang Y

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Yalong Dang,1–3 Chun Zhang,1,2 Yu Zhu31Department of Ophthalmology, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing, People’s Republic of China; 2Clinical Stem Cell Research Center, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Ophthalmology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan, People’s Republic of ChinaAbstract: In the developed world, age-related macular degeneration (AMD is one of the major causes of irreversible blindness in the elderly. Although management of neovascular AMD (wet AMD has dramatically progressed, there is still no effective treatment for nonneovascular AMD (dry AMD, which is characterized by retinal pigment epithelial (RPE cell death (or dysfunction and microenvironmental disruption in the retina. Therefore, RPE replacement and microenvironmental regulation represent viable treatments for dry AMD. Recent advances in cell biology have demonstrated that RPE cells can be easily generated from several cell types (pluripotent stem cells, multipotent stem cells, or even somatic cells by spontaneous differentiation, coculturing, defined factors or cell reprogramming, respectively. Additionally, in vivo studies also showed that the restoration of visual function could be obtained by transplanting functional RPE cells into the subretinal space of recipient. More importantly, clinical trials approved by the US government have shown promising prospects in RPE transplantation. However, key issues such as implantation techniques, immune rejection, and xeno-free techniques are still needed to be further investigated. This review will summarize recent advances in cell transplantation for dry AMD. The obstacles and prospects in this field will also be discussed.Keywords: stem cell, age-related macular degeneration, retinal pigment epithelium, cell reprogramming, clinical trial

  12. Biodegradable nanoellipsoidal artificial antigen presenting cells for antigen specific T-cell activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Randall A; Sunshine, Joel C; Perica, Karlo; Kosmides, Alyssa K; Aje, Kent; Schneck, Jonathan P; Green, Jordan J

    2015-04-01

    Non-spherical nanodimensional artificial antigen presenting cells (naAPCs) offer the potential to systemically induce an effective antigen-specific immune response. In this report it is shown biodegradable ellipsoidal naAPCs mimic the T-Cell/APC interaction better than equivalent spherical naAPCs. In addition, it is demonstrated ellipsoidal naAPCs offer reduced non-specific cellular uptake and a superior pharmacokinetic profile compared to spherical naAPCs. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. The ability of B cells and dendritic cells to present antigen increases during ontogeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthukkumar, S; Goldstein, J; Stein, K E

    2000-11-01

    The immune response to polysaccharide (PS) Ags in mice is delayed during ontogeny even when administered in a thymus-dependent (TD) form. In this study, Neisseria meningitidis group C PS-tetanus toxoid conjugate (MCPS-TT) vaccine was used to examine whether the delay in the development of Ab responses to TD PS conjugate vaccines in neonatal mice is due to defective Ag presentation. The results show that B cells and dendritic cells (DC) from 3- and 7-day-old mice were severely defective in presenting TT and MCPS-TT to Ag-specific T cell clones. The ability of these cells to present Ag reaches adult levels by 4 wk. The development of anti-MCPS and anti-TT Abs in neonatal mice parallels the functional ability of their APC to present Ag. DC from neonatal mice expressed very low levels of MHC class II, costimulatory molecules B7.1, B7.2, and CD11c but high levels of monocyte-specific markers F4/80 and CD11b and granulocyte marker, Ly6G. Significant changes in the expression of these markers were observed as the age of the mice increased. MHC class II, B7.1 and B7.2, and CD11c all increased with age, reaching adult levels between 3 and 4 wk, concurrent with the function of APC. These results demonstrate that one reason neonates fail to produce high titers of anti-PS Abs even when immunized in a TD form is that their B cells and DC are not fully functional.

  14. Interaction of colloidal nanoparticles with cells (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parak, Wolfgang J.

    2017-02-01

    What happens to inorganic nanoparticles (NPs), such as plasmonic gold or silver, superparamagnetic iron oxide, or fluorescent quantum dot NPs, after they have been administrated to an animal or a human being? The review discusses the integrity, biodistribution, and fate of NPs after in vivo administration. First the hybrid nature of the NPs is described, by conceptually dividing them into the inorganic NP core, an engineered surface coating around the core which comprises the ligand shell and optionally also bioconjugation, and into the corona of adsorbed biological molecules. It is shown that in vivo all of these three compounds may degrade individually and that each of them can drastically modify the life-cycle and biodistribution of the whole hetero-structure. The NPs thus may be disintegrated into different parts, of which biodistribution and fate would need to be analyzed individually. Multiple labelling and quantification strategies for such purpose will be discussed. All reviewed data indicate that in vivo NPs no longer should be considered as homogeneous entity, but should be seen as inorganic/organic/biological nano-hybrids with complex and intricately linked degradation pathways. References: M. Chanana, P. Rivera Gil, M. A. Correa-Duarte, L. M. Liz-Marzán. W. J. Parak, "Physicochemical Properties of Protein-Coated Gold Nanoparticles in Biological Fluids and Cells before and after Proteolytic Digestion", Angewandte Chemie International Edition 52, 4179-4183 (2013). W. G. Kreyling, A. M. Abdelmonem, Z. Ali, F. Alves, M. Geiser, N. Haberl, R. Hartmann, S. Hirn, K. Kantner, D. Jimenez de Aberasturi, G. Khadem-Saba, J.-M. Montenegro, J. Rejman, T. Rojo, I. Ruiz de Larramendi, R. Ufartes, A. Wenk, W. J. Parak, "In vivo integrity of polymer-coated gold nanoparticles", Nature Nanotechnology 10, 619-623 (2015).J. Clerk Maxwell, A Treatise on Electricity and Magnetism, 3rd ed., vol. 2. Oxford: Clarendon, 1892, pp.68-73.

  15. The effect of artificial antigen-presenting cells with preclustered anti-CD28/-CD3/-LFA-1 monoclonal antibodies on the induction of ex vivo expansion of functional human antitumor T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zappasodi, Roberta; Di Nicola, Massimo; Carlo-Stella, Carmelo; Mortarini, Roberta; Molla, Alessandra; Vegetti, Claudia; Albani, Salvatore; Anichini, Andrea; Gianni, Alessandro M

    2008-10-01

    Adoptive cell therapy with ex vivo expanded autologous antitumor cytotoxic T lymphocytes represents an important therapeutic option as an anticancer strategy. In order to identify a reliable method for producing adequate amounts of functional antitumor cytotoxic T lymphocytes with a potentially long in vivo lifespan, we tested the T-cell expansion efficiency of a new artificial antigen-presenting cell-based system. Our artificial antigen-presenting cells were generated with activating (anti-CD3), co-stimulating (anti-CD28) and adhesion (anti-LFA-1) biotinylated monoclonal antibodies preclustered in microdomains held on a liposome scaffold by neutravidin rafts. The co-localization of T-cell ligands in microdomains and the targeting of an adhesion protein, increasing the efficiency of immunological synapse formation, represent the novelties of our system. The activity of our artificial antigen-presenting cells was compared with that of anti-CD3/-CD28 coated immunomagnetic microbeads and immobilized anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody (OKT3 clone), the only two commercially available artificial systems. Our artificial antigen-presenting cells expanded both polyclonal T cells and MART-1-specific CD8(+) T cells in a more efficient manner than the other systems. Stimulation with artificial antigen-presenting cells allows for the generation of viable T cells displaying an immunophenotype consistent with in vivo potential for persistence, without increasing the frequency of regulatory T cells. The starting specificity of anti MART-1 CD8(+) T cells was preserved after stimulation with artificial antigen-presenting cells and it was statistically greater when compared to the activity of the same cells expanded with the other systems. Finally, our artificial antigen-presenting cells proved to be suitable for large-scale application, minimizing the volume and the costs of T-cell expansion. Our artificial antigen-presenting cells might represent an efficient tool to rapidly obtain a

  16. Selective transport of internalized antigens to the cytosol for MHC class I presentation in dendritic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodriguez, A; Regnault, A; Kleijmeer, M; Ricciardi-Castagnoli, P; Amigorena, S

    1999-01-01

    In order for cytotoxic T cells to initiate immune responses, peptides derived from internalized antigens must be presented to the cytotoxic T cells on major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules. Here we show that dendritic cells, the only antigen-presenting cells that initiate immune

  17. Detection of viable toxigenic Vibrio cholerae and virulent Shigella ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A rapid and sensitive assay was developed for the detection of low numbers of viable Vibrio cholerae and Shigella spp. cells in environmental and drinking water samples. Water samples were filtered, and the filters were enriched in a non-selective medium. The enrichment cultures were prepared for polymerase chain ...

  18. Detection of viable toxigenic Vibrio cholerae and virulent Shigella ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DRINIE

    2003-04-02

    Apr 2, 2003 ... A rapid and sensitive assay was developed for the detection of low numbers of viable Vibrio cholerae and Shigella spp. cells in environmental and drinking water samples. Water samples were filtered, and the filters were enriched in a non-selective medium. The enrichment cultures were prepared for ...

  19. Both conventional and interferon killer dendritic cells have antigen-presenting capacity during influenza virus infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.H. Geurts van Kessel (Corine); I.M. Bergen (Ingrid); F. Muskens (Femke); L. Boon (Louis); H.C. Hoogsteden (Henk); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus); B.N.M. Lambrecht (Bart)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractNatural killer cells are innate effector cells known for their potential to produce interferon-γ and kill tumour and virus-infected cells. Recently, B220+CD11cintNK1.1+ NK cells were found to also have antigen-presenting capacity like dendritic cells (DC), hence their name

  20. Comparison of microglia and infiltrating CD11c+ cells as antigen presenting cells for T cell proliferation and cytokine response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wlodarczyk, Agnieszka; Løbner, Morten; Cédile, Oriane

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tissue-resident antigen-presenting cells (APC) exert a major influence on the local immune environment. Microglia are resident myeloid cells in the central nervous system (CNS), deriving from early post-embryonic precursors, distinct from adult hematopoietic lineages. Dendritic cells...... (DC) and macrophages infiltrate the CNS during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Microglia are not considered to be as effective APC as DC or macrophages. METHODS: In this work we compared the antigen presenting capacity of CD11c+ and CD11c- microglia subsets with infiltrating CD11c......+ APC, which include DC. The microglial subpopulations (CD11c- CD45dim CD11b+ and CD11c+ CD45dim CD11b+) as well as infiltrating CD11c+ CD45high cells were sorted from CNS of C57BL/6 mice with EAE. Sorted cells were characterised by flow cytometry for surface phenotype and by quantitative real-time PCR...

  1. Prospective clinical and radiographic evaluation of an allogeneic bone matrix containing stem cells (Trinity Evolution® Viable Cellular Bone Matrix) in patients undergoing two-level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peppers, Timothy A; Bullard, Dennis E; Vanichkachorn, Jed S; Stanley, Scott K; Arnold, Paul M; Waldorff, Erik I; Hahn, Rebekah; Atkinson, Brent L; Ryaby, James T; Linovitz, Raymond J

    2017-04-26

    Trinity Evolution® (TE), a viable cellular bone allograft, previously demonstrated high fusion rates and no safety-related concerns after single-level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) procedures. This prospective multicenter clinical study was performed to assess the radiographic and clinical outcomes of TE in subjects undergoing two-level ACDF procedures. In a prospective, multicenter study, 40 subjects that presented with symptomatic cervical degeneration at two adjacent vertebral levels underwent instrumented ACDF using TE autograft substitute in a polyetherethereketone (PEEK) cage. At 12 months, radiographic fusion status was evaluated by dynamic motion plain radiographs and thin cut CT with multiplanar reconstruction by a panel that was blinded to clinical outcome. Fusion success was defined by angular motion (≤4°) and the presence of bridging bone across the adjacent vertebral endplates. Clinical pain and function assessments included the Neck Disability Index (NDI), neck and arm pain as evaluated by visual analog scales (VAS), and SF-36 at both 6 and 12 months. At both 6 and 12 months, all clinical outcome scores (SF-36, NDI, and VAS pain) improved significantly (p Trinity Evolution in Anterior Cervical Disectomy and Fusion (ACDF) NCT00951938.

  2. B-Cell Cross-Presentation of Autologous Antigen Precipitates Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariño, Eliana; Tan, Bernice; Binge, Lauren; Mackay, Charles R.; Grey, Shane T.

    2012-01-01

    For autoimmune conditions like type 1 diabetes to progress, self-reactive CD8+ T cells would need to interact with peptide–antigen cross-presented on the surface of antigen-presenting cells in a major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-restricted fashion. However, the mechanisms by which autoantigen is cross-presented remain to be identified. In this study, we show cross-presentation of islet-derived autoantigens by B cells. B cells engage self-reactive CD8+ T cells in the pancreatic lymph node, driving their proliferative expansion and differentiation into granzyme B+interferon-γ+lysosomal-associated membrane protein 1+ effector cells. B-cell cross-presentation of insulin required proteolytic cleavage and endosomal localization and was sensitive to inhibitors of protein trafficking. Absent B-cell MHC class I, or B-cell receptor restriction to an irrelevant specificity, blunted the expansion of self-reactive CD8+ T cells, suggesting B-cell antigen capture and presentation are critical in vivo events for CD8 activation. Indeed, the singular loss of B-cell MHC class I subverted the conversion to clinical diabetes in NOD mice, despite the presence of a pool of activated, and B cell–dependent, interleukin-21–expressing Vβ4+CD4+ T cells. Thus, B cells govern the transition from clinically silent insulitis to frank diabetes by cross-presenting autoantigen to self-reactive CD8+ T cells. PMID:22829452

  3. CD40 Ligand-activated, antigen-specific B cells are comparable to mature dendritic cells in presenting protein antigens and major histocompatibility complex class I- and class II-binding peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Tahamtan; Flies, Amanda; Efebera, Yvonne; Sherr, David H

    2008-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are increasingly exploited for cell-based immunotherapy. However, limitations in ex vivo DC growth and DC functional heterogeneity have motivated development of complementary antigen-presenting cell sources. Here, the ability of CD40 ligand (CD40L)-activated B cells to fulfil that role was investigated. We demonstrate for the first time that non-specific or antigen-specific murine B cells can be grown for extended periods of time by stimulation with CD40L. These cells rapidly up-regulate and maintain high levels of co-stimulatory molecules. In a head-to-head comparison with DC, CD40L-expanded B cells were comparable to DC in the presentation of peptides to CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. While DC were superior to antigen non-specific CD40L-activated B cells with regard to whole protein (NP-BSA) processing and presentation, CD40L-expanded B cells from NP-BSA-immunized mice were comparable to DC when presenting BSA or NP-BSA to primed primary T cells or when presenting NP linked to an unrelated carrier, CGG, to naïve T cells. Thus, the combination of CD40L activation, which supports B-cell growth and augments intracellular protein processing, and antigen uptake via the B-cell receptor, allows for efficient uptake, processing, and presentation of whole protein antigens in a fashion comparable to that observed with mature DC. Like DC, CD40L-activated B cells efficiently home to secondary lymphoid organs in vivo. This system represents a unique tool for studying primary antigen-specific B cells and the results suggest that the outgrowth of large numbers of highly activated B cells represents a viable and practical complement to DC for cell-based immunotherapy. PMID:18067555

  4. Particle shape dependence of CD8+ T cell activation by artificial antigen presenting cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunshine, Joel C; Perica, Karlo; Schneck, Jonathan P; Green, Jordan J

    2014-01-01

    Previous work developing particle-based acellular, artificial antigen presenting cells (aAPCs) has focused exclusively on spherical platforms. To explore the role of shape, we generated ellipsoidal PLGA microparticles with varying aspect ratios (ARs) and synthesized aAPCs from them. The ellipsoidal biomimetic aAPCs with high-AR showed significantly enhanced in vitro and in vivo activity above spherical aAPCs with particle volume and antigen content held constant. Confocal imaging indicates that CD8+ T cells preferentially migrate to and are activated by interaction with the long axis of the aAPC. Importantly, enhanced activity of high-AR aAPCs was seen in a mouse melanoma model, with high-AR aAPCs improving melanoma survival compared to non-cognate aAPCs (p = 0.004) and cognate spherical aAPCs (p = 0.05). These findings indicate that particle geometry is a critical design criterion in the generation of aAPCs, and may offer insight into the essential role of geometry in the interaction between CD8+ T cells and biological APCs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Uptake and presentation of myelin basic protein by normal human b cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brimnes, Marie Klinge; Hansen, Bjarke Endel; Nielsen, Leif Kofoed

    2014-01-01

    B cells may play both pathogenic and protective roles in T-cell mediated autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS). These functions relate to the ability of B cells to bind and present antigens. Under serum-free conditions we observed that 3-4% of circulating B cells from healthy donors...... were capable of binding the MS-associated self-antigen myelin basic protein (MBP) and of presenting the immunodominant peptide MBP85-99, as determined by staining with the mAb MK16 recognising the peptide presented by HLA-DR15-positive cells. In the presence of serum, however, the majority of B cells....... The mechanisms described here refute the general assumption that B-cell presentation of self-antigens requires uptake via specific B-cell receptors, and may be important for maintenance of tolerance as well as for driving T-cell responses in autoimmune diseases....

  6. Skewing to the LFA-3 adhesion pathway by influenza infection of antigen-presenting cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kemenade, F. J.; Kuijpers, K. C.; de Waal-Malefijt, R.; van Lier, R. A.; Miedema, F.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of influenza (FLU) infection on heterotypic conjugate formation between antigen-presenting cells and T lymphocytes has been studied with FLU-specific T cell clones and FLU-infected B-lymphoblastoid cells (B-LCL). Conjugate formation between FLU-infected B-LCL (FLU+ B-LCL) and T cells was

  7. Artificial human antigen-presenting cells are superior to dendritic cells at inducing cytotoxic T-cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hua; Shao, Shengwen; Cai, Jianshu; Burner, Danielle; Lu, Lingeng; Chen, Qiuqiang; Minev, Boris; Ma, Wenxue

    2017-11-01

    Peptide recognition through the MHC class I molecule by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) leads to the killing of cancer cells. A potential challenge for T-cell immunotherapy is that dendritic cells (DCs) are exposed to the MHC class I-peptide complex for an insufficient amount of time. To improve tumour antigen presentation to T cells and thereby initiate a more effective T-cell response, we generated artificial antigen-presenting cells (aAPCs) by incubating human immature DCs (imDCs) with poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid nanoparticles (PLGA-NPs) encapsulating tumour antigenic peptides, followed by maturation with lipopolysaccharide. Tumour antigen-specific CTLs were then induced using either peptide-loaded mature DCs (mDCs) or aAPCs, and their activities were analysed using both ELISpot and cytotoxicity assays. We found that the aAPCs induced significantly stronger tumour antigen-specific CTL responses than the controls, which included both mDCs and aAPCs loaded with empty nanoparticles. Moreover, frozen CTLs that were generated by exposure to aAPCs retained the capability to eradicate HLA-A2-positive tumour antigen-bearing cancer cells. These results indicated that aAPCs are superior to DCs when inducing the CTL response because the former are capable of continuously presenting tumour antigens to T cells in a sustained manner. The development of aAPCs with PLGA-NPs encapsulating tumour antigenic peptides is a promising approach for the generation of effective CTL responses in vitro and warrants further assessments in clinical trials. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. A viable dark fluid model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkhateeb, Esraa

    2018-01-01

    We consider a cosmological model based on a generalization of the equation of state proposed by Nojiri and Odintsov (2004) and Štefančić (2005, 2006). We argue that this model works as a dark fluid model which can interpolate between dust equation of state and the dark energy equation of state. We show how the asymptotic behavior of the equation of state constrained the parameters of the model. The causality condition for the model is also studied to constrain the parameters and the fixed points are tested to determine different solution classes. Observations of Hubble diagram of SNe Ia supernovae are used to further constrain the model. We present an exact solution of the model and calculate the luminosity distance and the energy density evolution. We also calculate the deceleration parameter to test the state of the universe expansion.

  9. Uptake and presentation of myelin basic protein by normal human B cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Klinge Brimnes

    Full Text Available B cells may play both pathogenic and protective roles in T-cell mediated autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS. These functions relate to the ability of B cells to bind and present antigens. Under serum-free conditions we observed that 3-4% of circulating B cells from healthy donors were capable of binding the MS-associated self-antigen myelin basic protein (MBP and of presenting the immunodominant peptide MBP85-99, as determined by staining with the mAb MK16 recognising the peptide presented by HLA-DR15-positive cells. In the presence of serum, however, the majority of B cells bound MBP in a complement-dependent manner, and almost half of the B cells became engaged in presentation of MBP85-99. Even though complement receptor 1 (CR1, CD35 and CR2 (CD21 both contributed to binding of MBP to B cells, only CR2 was important for the subsequent presentation of MBP85-99. A high proportion of MBP85-99 presenting B cells expressed CD27, and showed increased expression of CD86 compared to non-presenting B cells. MBP-pulsed B cells induced a low frequency of IL-10-producing CD4+ T cells in 3 out of 6 donors, indicating an immunoregulatory role of B cells presenting MBP-derived peptides. The mechanisms described here refute the general assumption that B-cell presentation of self-antigens requires uptake via specific B-cell receptors, and may be important for maintenance of tolerance as well as for driving T-cell responses in autoimmune diseases.

  10. Pure Quantum Interpretations Are not Viable

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmelzer, I.

    2011-02-01

    Pure interpretations of quantum theory, which throw away the classical part of the Copenhagen interpretation without adding new structure to its quantum part, are not viable. This is a consequence of a non-uniqueness result for the canonical operators.

  11. An advanced PCR method for the specific detection of viable total coliform bacteria in pasteurized milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soejima, Takashi; Minami, Jun-ichi; Yaeshima, Tomoko; Iwatsuki, Keiji

    2012-07-01

    Pasteurized milk is a complex food that contains various inhibitors of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and may contain a large number of dead bacteria, depending on the milking conditions and environment. Ethidium monoazide bromide (EMA)-PCR is occasionally used to distinguish between viable and dead bacteria in foods other than pasteurized milk. EMA is a DNA-intercalating dye that selectively permeates the compromised cell membranes of dead bacteria and cleaves DNA. Usually, EMA-PCR techniques reduce the detection of dead bacteria by up to 3.5 logs compared with techniques that do not use EMA. However, this difference may still be insufficient to suppress the amplification of DNA from dead Gram-negative bacteria (e.g., total coliform bacteria) if they are present in pasteurized milk in large numbers. Thus, false positives may result. We developed a new method that uses real-time PCR targeting of a long DNA template (16S-23S rRNA gene, principally 2,451 bp) following EMA treatment to completely suppress the amplification of DNA of up to 7 logs (10(7) cells) of dead total coliforms. Furthermore, we found that a low dose of proteinase K (25 U/ml) removed PCR inhibitors and simultaneously increased the signal from viable coliform bacteria. In conclusion, our simple protocol specifically detects viable total coliforms in pasteurized milk at an initial count of ≥1 colony forming unit (CFU)/2.22 ml within 7.5 h of total testing time. This detection limit for viable cells complies with the requirements for the analysis of total coliforms in pasteurized milk set by the Japanese Sanitation Act (which specifies <1 CFU/2.22 ml).

  12. T-cell dysfunction in HIV infection: anergy due to defective antigen-presenting cell function?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meyaard, L.; Schuitemaker, H.; Miedema, F.

    1993-01-01

    Before CD4+ T cells are depleted, T cells in asymptomatic HIV-infected individuals are functionally abnormal. These T cells are programmed for death, are non-responsive and fail to produce interleukin-2 after antigenic stimulation. Our view is that these different T-cell abnormalities are explained

  13. Despite disorganized synapse structure, Th2 cells maintain directional delivery of CD40L to antigen-presenting B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardell, Jennifer L; Parker, David C

    2017-01-01

    Upon recognition of peptide displayed on MHC molecules, Th1 and Th2 cells form distinct immunological synapse structures. Th1 cells have a bull's eye synapse structure with TCR/ MHC-peptide interactions occurring central to a ring of adhesion molecules, while Th2 cells have a multifocal synapse with small clusters of TCR/MHC interactions throughout the area of T cell/antigen-presenting cell interaction. In this study, we investigated whether this structural difference in the immunological synapse affects delivery of T cell help. The immunological synapse is thought to ensure antigen-specific delivery of cytolytic granules and killing of target cells by NK cells and cytolytic T cells. In helper T cells, it has been proposed that the immunological synapse may direct delivery of other effector molecules including cytokines. CD40 ligand (CD40L) is a membrane-bound cytokine essential for antigen-specific T cell help for B cells in the antibody response. We incubated Th1 and Th2 cells overnight with a mixture of antigen-presenting and bystander B cells, and the delivery of CD40L to B cells and subsequent B cell responses were compared. Despite distinct immunological synapse structures, Th1 and Th2 cell do not differ in their ability to deliver CD40L and T cell help in an antigen-specific fashion, or in their susceptibility to inhibition of help by a blocking anti-CD40L antibody.

  14. TAP-deficient human iPS cell-derived myeloid cell lines as unlimited cell source for dendritic cell-like antigen-presenting cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haruta, M; Tomita, Y; Yuno, A; Matsumura, K; Ikeda, T; Takamatsu, K; Haga, E; Koba, C; Nishimura, Y; Senju, S

    2013-05-01

    We previously reported a method to generate dendritic cell (DC)-like antigen-presenting cells (APC) from human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. However, the method is relatively complicated and laborious. In the current study, we attempted to establish a method through which we could obtain a large number of functional APC with a simple procedure. We transduced iPS cell-derived CD11b(+) myeloid cells with genes associated with proliferative or anti-senescence effects, enabling the cells to propagate for more than 4 months in a macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF)-dependent manner while retaining their capacity to differentiate into functional APC. We named these iPS cell-derived proliferating myeloid cells 'iPS-ML', and the iPS-ML-derived APC 'ML-DC'. In addition, we generated TAP2-deficient iPS cell clones by zinc finger nuclease-aided targeted gene disruption. TAP2-deficient iPS cells and iPS-ML avoided recognition by pre-activated allo-reactive CD8(+) T cells. TAP2-deficient ML-DC expressing exogenously introduced HLA-A2 genes stimulated HLA-A2-restricted MART-1-specific CD8(+) T cells obtained from HLA-A2-positive allogeneic donors, resulting in generation of MART-1-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) lines. TAP-deficient iPS-ML introduced with various HLA class I genes may serve as an unlimited source of APC for vaccination therapy. If administered into allogeneic patients, ML-DC with appropriate genetic modifications may survive long enough to stimulate antigen-specific CTL and, after that, be completely eliminated. Based on the present study, we propose an APC-producing system that is simple, safe and applicable to all patients irrespective of their HLA types.

  15. Germinal center B cells regulate their capability to present antigen by modulation of HLA-DO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazier, Kim S; Hake, Sandra B; Tobin, Helen M; Chadburn, Amy; Schattner, Elaine J; Denzin, Lisa K

    2002-04-15

    Peptide acquisition by MHC class II molecules is catalyzed by HLA-DM (DM). In B cells, HLA-DO (DO) inhibits or modifies the peptide exchange activity of DM. We show here that DO protein levels are modulated during B cell differentiation. Remarkably, germinal center (GC) B cells, which have low levels of DO relative to naive and memory B cells, are shown to have enhanced antigen presentation capabilities. DM protein levels also were somewhat reduced in GC B cells; however, the ratio of DM to DO in GC B cells was substantially increased, resulting in more free DM in GC B cells. We conclude that modulation of DM and DO in distinct stages of B cell differentiation represents a mechanism by which B cells regulate their capacity to function as antigen-presenting cells. Efficient antigen presentation in GC B cells would promote GC B cell-T cell interactions that are essential for B cells to survive positive selection in the GC.

  16. Media presentation and public understanding of stem cells and stem cell research in Hungary

    OpenAIRE

    Vicsek, Lilla; Gergely, Júlia

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on a research project which examined media coverage and audience perceptions of stem cells and stem cell research in Hungary, using focus groups and a media analysis. A background study was also conducted on the Hungarian legal, social and political situation linked to stem cell research, treatment and storage. Our data shows how stem cell research/treatments were framed by the focus group members in terms of medical results/cures and human interest stories – mirroring the ...

  17. Functionally diverse human T cells recognize non-microbial antigens presented by MR1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepore, Marco; Kalinichenko, Artem; Calogero, Salvatore; Kumar, Pavanish; Paleja, Bhairav; Schmaler, Mathias; Narang, Vipin; Zolezzi, Francesca; Poidinger, Michael; Mori, Lucia; De Libero, Gennaro

    2017-05-18

    MHC class I-related molecule MR1 presents riboflavin- and folate-related metabolites to mucosal-associated invariant T cells, but it is unknown whether MR1 can present alternative antigens to other T cell lineages. In healthy individuals we identified MR1-restricted T cells (named MR1T cells) displaying diverse TCRs and reacting to MR1-expressing cells in the absence of microbial ligands. Analysis of MR1T cell clones revealed specificity for distinct cell-derived antigens and alternative transcriptional strategies for metabolic programming, cell cycle control and functional polarization following antigen stimulation. Phenotypic and functional characterization of MR1T cell clones showed multiple chemokine receptor expression profiles and secretion of diverse effector molecules, suggesting functional heterogeneity. Accordingly, MR1T cells exhibited distinct T helper-like capacities upon MR1-dependent recognition of target cells expressing physiological levels of surface MR1. These data extend the role of MR1 beyond microbial antigen presentation and indicate MR1T cells are a normal part of the human T cell repertoire.

  18. Intrinsic Variability Present in Wharton’s Jelly Mesenchymal Stem Cells and T Cell Responses May Impact Cell Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Vieira Paladino

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Wharton’s jelly mesenchymal stem cells (WJ-MSC exhibit immunomodulatory effects on T cell response. WJ-MSC are easy to collect, process, and proliferate rapidly in culture, but information on the variability of individual cell samples impacting upon in vitro expansion, immunomodulatory potential, and aging processes is still lacking. We propose to evaluate the immunomodulatory cytokine profile and capacity to inhibit T cell proliferation of WJ-MSC progressing to replicative senescence in order to analyze if expected responses are affected. Our results show that the gene expression of immunomodulatory molecules varied among samples with no specific pattern present. In coculture, all WJ-MSC were capable of inhibiting mitogen-activated CD3+ T cell proliferation, although to different degrees, and each PBMC responded with a different level of inhibition. Thus, we suggest that each WJ-MSC displays unique behavior, differing in patterns of cytokine mRNA expression and immunomodulatory capacity. We believe that variability between samples may play a role in the effectiveness of WJ-MSC employed therapeutically.

  19. Removal of viable bioaerosol particles with a low-efficiency HVAC filter enhanced by continuous emission of unipolar air ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, R; Agranovski, I; Pyankov, O; Grinshpun, S

    2008-04-01

    Continuous emission of unipolar ions has been shown to improve the performance of respirators and stationary filters challenged with non-biological particles. In this study, we investigated the ion-induced enhancement effect while challenging a low-efficiency heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) filter with viable bacterial cells, bacterial and fungal spores, and viruses. The aerosol concentration was measured in real time. Samples were also collected with a bioaerosol sampler for viable microbial analysis. The removal efficiency of the filter was determined, respectively, with and without an ion emitter. The ionization was found to significantly enhance the filter efficiency in removing viable biological particles from the airflow. For example, when challenged with viable bacteria, the filter efficiency increased as much as four- to fivefold. For viable fungal spores, the ion-induced enhancement improved the efficiency by a factor of approximately 2. When testing with virus-carrying liquid droplets, the original removal efficiency provided by the filter was rather low: 9.09 +/- 4.84%. While the ion emission increased collection about fourfold, the efficiency did not reach 75-100% observed with bacteria and fungi. These findings, together with our previously published results for non-biological particles, demonstrate the feasibility of a new approach for reducing aerosol particles in HVAC systems used for indoor air quality control. Recirculated air in HVAC systems used for indoor air quality control in buildings often contains considerable number of viable bioaerosol particles because of limited efficiency of the filters installed in these systems. In the present study, we investigated - using aerosolized bacterial cells, bacterial and fungal spores, and virus-carrying particles - a novel idea of enhancing the performance of a low-efficiency HVAC filter utilizing continuous emission of unipolar ions in the filter vicinity. The findings described in

  20. Molecular approaches for viable bacterial population and transcriptional analyses in a rodent model of dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, M I; Scott-Anne, K M; Gregoire, S; Rosalen, P L; Koo, H

    2012-10-01

    Culturing methods are the primary approach for microbiological analysis of plaque biofilms in rodent models of dental caries. In this study, we developed strategies for the isolation of DNA and RNA from plaque biofilms formed in vivo to analyse the viable bacterial population and gene expression. Plaque biofilm samples from rats were treated with propidium monoazide to isolate DNA from viable cells, and the purified DNA was used to quantify total bacteria and the Streptococcus mutans population via quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and specific primers; the same samples were also analysed by counting colony-forming units (CFU). In parallel, RNA was isolated from plaque-biofilm samples (from the same animals) and used for transcriptional analyses via reverse transcription-qPCR. The viable populations of both S. mutans and total bacteria assessed by qPCR were positively correlated with the CFU data (P  0.8). However, the qPCR data showed higher bacterial cell counts, particularly for total bacteria (vs. CFU). Moreover, S. mutans proportion in the plaque biofilm determined by qPCR analysis showed strong correlation with incidence of smooth-surface caries (P = 0.0022, r = 0.71). The purified RNAs presented high RNA integrity numbers (> 7), which allowed measurement of the expression of genes that are critical for S. mutans virulence (e.g. gtfB and gtfC). Our data show that the viable microbial population and the gene expression can be analysed simultaneously, providing a global assessment of the infectious aspect of dental caries. Our approach could enhance the value of the current rodent model in further understanding the pathophysiology of this disease and facilitating the exploration of novel anti-caries therapies. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  1. Biofilms in Full-Scale Drinking Water Ozone Contactors Contribute Viable Bacteria to Ozonated Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotlarz, Nadine; Rockey, Nicole; Olson, Terese M; Haig, Sarah-Jane; Sanford, Larry; LiPuma, John J; Raskin, Lutgarde

    2018-02-13

    Concentrations of viable microbial cells were monitored using culture-based and culture-independent methods across multichamber ozone contactors in a full-scale drinking water treatment plant. Membrane-intact and culturable cell concentrations in ozone contactor effluents ranged from 1200 to 3750 cells/mL and from 200 to 3850 colony forming units/mL, respectively. Viable cell concentrations decreased significantly in the first ozone contact chamber, but rose, even as ozone exposure increased, in subsequent chambers. Our results implicate microbial detachment from biofilms on contactor surfaces, and from biomass present within lime softening sediments in a hydraulic dead zone, as a possible reason for increasing cell concentrations in water samples from sequential ozone chambers. Biofilm community structures on baffle walls upstream and downstream from the dead zone were significantly different from each other (p = 0.017). The biofilms downstream of the dead zone contained a significantly (p = 0.036) higher relative abundance of bacteria of the genera Mycobacterium and Legionella than the upstream biofilms. These results have important implications as the effluent from ozone contactors is often treated further in biologically active filters and bacteria in ozonated water continuously seed filter microbial communities.

  2. Determination of viable wine yeast using DNA binding dyes and quantitative PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andorrà, Imma; Esteve-Zarzoso, Braulio; Guillamón, José M; Mas, Albert

    2010-12-15

    The detection and quantification of wine yeast can be misleading due to under or overestimation of these microorganisms. Underestimation may be caused by variable growing rates of different microorganisms in culture media or the presence of viable but non-cultivable microorganisms. Overestimation may be caused by the lack of discrimination between live and dead microorganisms if quantitative PCR is used to quantify with DNA as the template. However, culture-independent methods that use dyes have been described to remove the DNA from dead cells and then quantify the live microorganisms. Two dyes have been studied in this paper: ethidium monoazide bromide (EMA) and propidium monoazide bromide (PMA). The technique was applied to grape must fermentation and ageing wines. Both dyes presented similar results on yeast monitoring. Membrane cell recovery was necessary when yeasts were originated from ethanol-containing media. When applied to grape must fermentation, differences of up to 1 log unit were seen between the QPCR estimation with or without the dye during the stationary phase. In ageing wines, good agreement was found between plating techniques and QPCR. Most of the viable cells were also culturable and no differences were observed with the methods, except for Zygosaccharomyces bailii and Dekkera bruxellensis where much higher counts were occasionally detected by QPCR. The presence of excess dead cells did not interfere with the quantification of live cells with either of the dyes. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Viable group A streptococci in macrophages during acute soft tissue infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pontus Thulin

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Group A streptococcal severe soft tissue infections, such as necrotizing fasciitis, are rapidly progressive infections associated with high mortality. Group A streptococcus is typically considered an extracellular pathogen, but has been shown to reside intracellularly in host cells.We characterized in vivo interactions between group A streptococci (GAS and cells involved in innate immune responses, using human biopsies (n = 70 collected from 17 patients with soft tissue infections. Immunostaining and in situ image analysis revealed high amounts of bacteria in the biopsies, even in those collected after prolonged antibiotic therapy. Viability of the streptococci was assessed by use of a bacterial viability stain, which demonstrated viable bacteria in 74% of the biopsies. GAS were present both extracellularly and intracellularly within phagocytic cells, primarily within macrophages. Intracellular GAS were predominantly noted in biopsies from newly involved tissue characterized by lower inflammation and bacterial load, whereas purely extracellular GAS or a combination of intra- and extracellular GAS dominated in severely inflamed tissue. The latter tissue was also associated with a significantly increased amount of the cysteine protease streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin SpeB. In vitro studies confirmed that macrophages serve as reservoirs for viable GAS, and infection with a speB-deletion mutant produced significantly lower frequencies of cells with viable GAS following infection as compared to the wild-type bacteria.This is the first study to demonstrate that GAS survive intracellularly in macrophages during acute invasive infections. This intracellular presence may have evolved as a mechanism to avoid antibiotic eradication, which may explain our finding that high bacterial load is present even in tissue collected after prolonged intravenous antibiotic therapy. This new insight into the pathogenesis of streptococcal soft tissue infections

  4. Viable Group A Streptococci in Macrophages during Acute Soft Tissue Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Group A streptococcal severe soft tissue infections, such as necrotizing fasciitis, are rapidly progressive infections associated with high mortality. Group A streptococcus is typically considered an extracellular pathogen, but has been shown to reside intracellularly in host cells. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We characterized in vivo interactions between group A streptococci (GAS and cells involved in innate immune responses, using human biopsies (n = 70 collected from 17 patients with soft tissue infections. Immunostaining and in situ image analysis revealed high amounts of bacteria in the biopsies, even in those collected after prolonged antibiotic therapy. Viability of the streptococci was assessed by use of a bacterial viability stain, which demonstrated viable bacteria in 74% of the biopsies. GAS were present both extracellularly and intracellularly within phagocytic cells, primarily within macrophages. Intracellular GAS were predominantly noted in biopsies from newly involved tissue characterized by lower inflammation and bacterial load, whereas purely extracellular GAS or a combination of intra- and extracellular GAS dominated in severely inflamed tissue. The latter tissue was also associated with a significantly increased amount of the cysteine protease streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin SpeB. In vitro studies confirmed that macrophages serve as reservoirs for viable GAS, and infection with a speB-deletion mutant produced significantly lower frequencies of cells with viable GAS following infection as compared to the wild-type bacteria. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first study to demonstrate that GAS survive intracellularly in macrophages during acute invasive infections. This intracellular presence may have evolved as a mechanism to avoid antibiotic eradication, which may explain our finding that high bacterial load is present even in tissue collected after prolonged intravenous antibiotic therapy. This new insight into the pathogenesis

  5. Macropinocytosis in phagocytes: regulation of MHC class-II-restricted antigen presentation in dendritic cells

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Zhenzhen; Roche, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    AbstractDendritic cells (DCs) are outstanding antigen presenting cells (APCs) due to their robust ability to internalize extracellular antigens using endocytic processes such as receptor-mediated endocytosis, phagocytosis, and macropinocytosis. Macropinocytosis mediates the non-specific uptake of soluble antigens and occurs in DCs constitutively. Macropinocytosis plays a key role in DC-mediated antigen presentation to T cells against pathogens and the efficiency of macropinocytosis in antigen...

  6. Biologically Inspired Design of Nanoparticle Artificial Antigen-Presenting Cells for Immunomodulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, John W; Vicente, Fernando P; Howard, Gregory P; Mao, Hai-Quan; Schneck, Jonathan P

    2017-10-10

    Particles engineered to engage and interact with cell surface ligands and to modulate cells can be harnessed to explore basic biological questions as well as to devise cellular therapies. Biology has inspired the design of these particles, such as artificial antigen-presenting cells (aAPCs) for use in immunotherapy. While much has been learned about mimicking antigen presenting cell biology, as we decrease the size of aAPCs to the nanometer scale, we need to extend biomimetic design to include considerations of T cell biology-including T-cell receptor (TCR) organization. Here we describe the first quantitative analysis of particle size effect on aAPCs with both Signals 1 and 2 based on T cell biology. We show that aAPCs, larger than 300 nm, activate T cells more efficiently than smaller aAPCs, 50 nm. The 50 nm aAPCs require saturating doses or require artificial magnetic clustering to activate T cells. Increasing ligand density alone on the 50 nm aAPCs did not increase their ability to stimulate CD8+ T cells, confirming the size-dependent phenomenon. These data support the need for multireceptor ligation and activation of T-cell receptor (TCR) nanoclusters of similar sizes to 300 nm aAPCs. Quantitative analysis and modeling of a nanoparticle system provides insight into engineering constraints of aAPCs for T cell immunotherapy applications and offers a case study for other cell-modulating particles.

  7. Presentation of an immunodominant immediate-early CD8+ T cell epitope resists human cytomegalovirus immunoevasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Ameres

    Full Text Available Control of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV depends on CD8+ T cell responses that are shaped by an individual's repertoire of MHC molecules. MHC class I presentation is modulated by a set of HCMV-encoded proteins. Here we show that HCMV immunoevasins differentially impair T cell recognition of epitopes from the same viral antigen, immediate-early 1 (IE-1, that are presented by different MHC class I allotypes. In the presence of immunoevasins, HLA-A- and HLA-B-restricted T cell clones were ineffective, but HLA-C*0702-restricted T cell clones recognized and killed infected cells. Resistance of HLA-C*0702 to viral immunoevasins US2 and US11 was mediated by the alpha3 domain and C-terminal region of the HLA heavy chain. In healthy donors, HLA-C*0702-restricted T cells dominated the T cell response to IE-1. The same HLA-C allotype specifically protected infected cells from attack by NK cells that expressed a corresponding HLA-C-specific KIR. Thus, allotype-specific viral immunoevasion allows HCMV to escape control by NK cells and HLA-A- and HLA-B-restricted T cells, while the virus becomes selectively vulnerable to an immunodominant population of HLA-C-restricted T cells. Our work identifies a T cell population that may be of particular efficiency in HCMV-specific immunotherapy.

  8. Presentation of antigen to T lymphocytes by non-immune B-cell hybridoma clones: evidence for specific and non-specific presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohly, H. H.; Morrison, D. R.; Zouhair Atassi, M. Z.

    1989-01-01

    Non-immune SJL (H-2s) spleen cells were fused with non-secreting, non-antigen presenting (H-2d) Balb/c 653-myeloma cells and the hybridomas were cloned by two limiting dilutions. The resulting hybrid B-cell clones were tested for their antigen presentation capability to SJL T-cell lines that were specific for either lysozyme or myoglobin. In proliferative assays, 53% of the antigen presenting B-cell clones presented both myoglobin and lysozyme (general presenters) while the other 47% presented specifically either myoglobin or lysozyme (specific presenters). The ability to selectively present either myoglobin or lysozyme indicates that antigen presentation at the clonal level can be specific or non-specific depending on the particular B-cell clone.

  9. Downregulation of integrin β4 decreases the ability of airway epithelial cells to present antigens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi Liu

    Full Text Available Airway epithelial cells have been demonstrated to be accessory antigen presentation cells (APC capable of activating T cells and may play an important role in the development of allergic airway inflammation of asthma. In asthmatic airways, loss of expression of the adhesion molecule integrin β4 (ITGB4 and an increase in Th2 inflammation bias has been observed in our previous study. Given that ITGB4 is engaged in multiple signaling pathways, we studied whether disruption of ITGB4-mediated cell adhesion may contribute to the adaptive immune response of epithelial cells, including their ability to present antigens, induce the activate and differentiate of T cells. We silenced ITGB4 expression in bronchial epithelial cells with an effective siRNA vector and studied the effects of ITGB4 silencing on the antigen presentation ability of airway epithelial cells. T cell proliferation and cytokine production was investigated after co-culturing with ITGB4-silenced epithelial cells. Surface expression of B7 homologs and the major histocompatibility complex (MHC class II was also detected after ITGB4 was silenced. Our results demonstrated that silencing of ITGB4 resulted in impaired antigen presentation processes and suppressed T cell proliferation. Meanwhile, decrease in Th1 cytokine production and increase in Th17 cytokine production was induced after co-culturing with ITGB4-silenced epithelial cells. Moreover, HLA-DR was decreased and the B7 homologs expression was different after ITGB4 silencing. Overall, this study suggested that downregulation of ITGB4 expression in airway epithelial cells could impair the antigen presentation ability of these cells, which further regulate airway inflammation reaction in allergic asthma.

  10. Choroidal dendritic cells require activation to present antigen and resident choroidal macrophages potentiate this response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester, J V; Lumsden, L; Duncan, L; Dick, A D

    2005-03-01

    The uveal compartment of the eye contains extensive networks of resident macrophages and dendritic cells. These cells are now recognised to have a role in many ocular pathologies. The aim of this study was to isolate, characterise, and compare the function of ciliary body/choroid dendritic cells and macrophages from the normal eye. Explants of rat and human ciliary body/choroid were cultured in vitro for various periods of time and cells harvested either from the supernatant fluid or from enzyme digested and washed explants. The cells were then phenotyped by microscopy and flow cytometry, examined by video time lapse photomicroscopy, and analysed functionally in a series of immunoassays. Two main types of dendritic cell were identified: large veil-like MHC class II(mid) motile but relatively non-translocatory cells and small MHC class II(hi) motile and rapidly translocating cells. Tissue macrophages mainly remained associated with the explants in culture but gradually lost their resident tissue marker (ED2) and detached from the explants as clusters of low density, large, CR3 (ED7)(+) cells, some of which underwent apoptosis. Video time lapse studies showed dendritic cells constantly interacting with large single cells and cell clusters by traversing the interstices of the cell clusters. In functional studies, freshly isolated dendritic cells were poor presenters of antigen and required activation by short term culture for acquisition of antigen presenting function. In contrast, dendritic cell depleted choroidal cell preparations containing macrophages and other cells failed to present antigen even after short term culture but augmented the antigen presenting function of dendritic cells when tested in co-culture. At least two types of dendritic cells are present in the normal ciliary body/choroid layer of the eye. It is likely that these cells have different functions based on their motility and potential to migrate to secondary lymphoid tissue either during normal

  11. Live birth potential of good morphology and vitrified blastocysts presenting abnormal cell divisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzarello, Antonino; Hoest, Thomas; Hay-Schmidt, Anders; Mikkelsen, Anne Lis

    2017-06-01

    This study included 238 good morphology blastocysts, which were transferred after vitrification-warming to 152 women by single blastocyst transfer in Holbæk Fertility Clinic, Denmark. Time-lapse recordings of transferred good morphology blastocysts were reassessed to recognize every abnormal cell division (ACD) from the 1st to the 4th cell cycle. ACDs were distinguished as failed cell divisions and multi-cell divisions. ACDs were recognized in 37.0% (no. 88/238) of good morphology blastocysts that were vitrified-warmed and transferred in our clinic. Good morphology blastocysts with ACDs showed a lower live birth rate (17.0%) than blastocyst with solely regular cell divisions (29.3%). ACDs could occur at more than one cell division in the same good morphology blastocyst. Reported as independent events, we observed ACDs occurring more frequently at the later cell cycles (1st: 1.3%; 2nd: 8.0%; 3rd: 18.5%; 4th: 18.1%). More blastocysts presented failed cell divisions (no. 95) than multi-cell divisions (no. 14). Live births were achieved from blastocysts showing multi-cell divisions at any cell cycle and failed cell divisions from the 2nd cell cycle. Analyses of the subgroup of first blastocyst transferred to each patient showed similar to results. In conclusion, good morphology blastocysts presenting ACDs can result in live birth although lower compared to blastocysts with solely regular cell division. Pre-implantation embryos in vitro may undergo self-selection or correcting processes. This supports the transfer of blastocysts instead of cleavage stage embryos, giving first priority to blastocyst showing solely regular cell divisions, and giving second priority to blastocysts presenting ACDs at any cell cycle. Copyright © 2017 Society for Biology of Reproduction & the Institute of Animal Reproduction and Food Research of Polish Academy of Sciences in Olsztyn. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  12. Chloroquine inhibits accessory cell presentation of soluble natural and synthetic protein antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, S; Werdelin, O

    1984-01-01

    We have studied the in vitro effect of the lysosomotrophic agent, chloroquine, on the presentation of soluble protein antigens by guinea pig accessory cells. Chloroquine inhibited the capacity of antigen-pulsed accessory cells to stimulate proliferation in appropriately primed T cells. The effect...... acts on an early event in the antigen handling by accessory cells. Chloroquine is a well known inhibitor of lysosomal proteolysis, and it is likely that its effect on antigen presentation is caused by an inhibition of antigen degradation....... was time- and dose-dependent. A brief treatment solely of the accessory cells with the drug compromised their ability to stimulate primed T cells in a subsequent culture provided the accessory cells were treated with chloroquine before their exposure to the antigen. These results suggest that chloroquine...

  13. The perivascular phagocyte of the mouse pineal gland: An antigen-presenting cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Morten; Rath, Martin F; Klein, David C

    2006-01-01

    The perivascular space of the rat pineal gland is known to contain phagocytic cells that are immunoreactive for leukocyte antigens, and thus they appear to belong to the macrophage/microglial cell line. These cells also contain MHC class II proteins. We investigated this cell type in the pineal...... gland of mice. Actively phagocytosing cells with a prominent lysosomal system were found in the pericapillary spaces of the mouse pineal gland following intravenous injection of horseradish peroxidase. The cells also exhibited strong acid phosphatase activity. Perivascular cells were immunopositive...... for MHC class II protein and for CD68, a marker of monocytes/phagocytes. This study verifies that perivascular phagocytes with antigen-presenting properties are present in the mouse pineal gland....

  14. The brain microvascular endothelium supports T cell proliferation and has potential for alloantigen presentation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Wheway

    Full Text Available Endothelial cells (EC form the inner lining of blood vessels and are positioned between circulating lymphocytes and tissues. Hypotheses have formed that EC may act as antigen presenting cells based on the intimate interactions with T cells, which are seen in diseases like multiple sclerosis, cerebral malaria (CM and viral neuropathologies. Here, we investigated how human brain microvascular EC (HBEC interact with and support the proliferation of T cells. We found HBEC to express MHC II, CD40 and ICOSL, key molecules for antigen presentation and co-stimulation and to take up fluorescently labeled antigens via macropinocytosis. In co-cultures, we showed that HBEC support and promote the proliferation of CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells, which both are key in CM pathogenesis, particularly following T cell receptor activation and co-stimulation. Our findings provide novel evidence that HBEC can trigger T cell activation, thereby providing a novel mechanism for neuroimmunological complications of infectious diseases.

  15. Parejas viables que perduran en el tiempo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan José Cuervo Rodríguez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available El presente artículo científico presenta resultados del proceso llevado a cabo en el proyecto de investigación docente "Mecanismos de autorregulación en parejas viables que perduran en el tiempo". Se soporta en una mirada compleja de la psicología basada en una epistemología de la construcción. En el ámbito metodológico, se inscribe en los estudios de terapia familiar desde una perspectiva de la comunicación humana como un todo integrado. Participaron nueve parejas. Los criterios de inclusión fueron: cinco o más años de convivencia, participación voluntaria, no presentar (ni haber presentado problemáticas especiales que ameriten intervención psicoterapéutica y la obtención de un porcentaje significativo en el uso de estrategias de comunicación asertiva en la resolución de conflictos. El método general utilizado fue el análisis de la comunicación en tarea de conversación. Los principales hallazgos señalan una estrecha relación entre el contexto de desarrollo de las parejas, la emergencia de códigos comunicacionales propios y la posibilidad de perdurar en el tiempo; también, se resalta el tipo de comunicación asertiva o constructiva, la construcción de valores como el respeto y la aceptación de las diferencias, y el deseo por vivir y construir bienestar común, como elementos constitutivos de su identidad como pareja.

  16. Grazing of particle-associated bacteria-an elimination of the non-viable fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonsalves, Maria-Judith; Fernandes, Sheryl Oliveira; Priya, Madasamy Lakshmi; LokaBharathi, Ponnapakkam Adikesavan

    Quantification of bacteria being grazed by microzooplankton is gaining importance since they serve as energy subsidies for higher trophic levels which consequently influence fish production. Hence, grazing pressure on viable and non-viable fraction of free and particle-associated bacteria in a tropical estuary controlled mainly by protist grazers was estimated using the seawater dilution technique. In vitro incubations over a period of 42h showed that at the end of 24h, growth coefficient (k) of particle-associated bacteria was 9 times higher at 0.546 than that of free forms. Further, 'k' value of viable cells on particles was double that of free forms at 0.016 and 0.007, respectively. While bacteria associated with particles were grazed (coefficient of removal (g)=0.564), the free forms were relatively less grazed indicating that particle-associated bacteria were exposed to grazers in these waters. Among the viable and non-viable forms, 'g' of non-viable fraction (particle-associated bacteria=0.615, Free=0.0086) was much greater than the viable fraction (particle-associated bacteria=0.056, Free=0.068). Thus, grazing on viable cells was relatively low in both the free and attached states. These observations suggest that non-viable forms of particle-associated bacteria were more prone to grazing and were weeded out leaving the viable cells to replenish the bacterial standing stock. Particle colonization could thus be a temporary refuge for the "persistent variants" where the viable fraction multiply and release their progeny. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Microbiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  17. Oligopeptide antigens of the angiotensin lineage compete for presentation by paraformaldehyde-treated accessory cells to T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, S; Werdelin, O

    1986-01-01

    The heptapeptide antigen angiotensin III can be presented to guinea pig T cells by paraformaldehyde-treated antigen-presenting cells, which are incapable of processing antigens and presumably cannot even ingest them. We demonstrate here that the decapeptide angiotensin I can outcompete angiotensi...... of competition between antigens for presentation; but since they presumably are active also in untreated cells, they may play a physiologic role in the normal immune response.......The heptapeptide antigen angiotensin III can be presented to guinea pig T cells by paraformaldehyde-treated antigen-presenting cells, which are incapable of processing antigens and presumably cannot even ingest them. We demonstrate here that the decapeptide angiotensin I can outcompete angiotensin...

  18. Regulatory B cells present in lymph nodes draining a murine tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Maglioco

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In cancer, B cells have been classically associated with antibody secretion, antigen presentation and T cell activation. However, a possible role for B lymphocytes in impairing antitumor response and collaborating with tumor growth has been brought into focus. Recent reports have described the capacity of B cells to negatively affect immune responses in autoimmune diseases. The highly immunogenic mouse tumor MCC loses its immunogenicity and induces systemic immune suppression and tolerance as it grows. We have previously demonstrated that MCC growth induces a distinct and progressive increase in B cell number and proportion in the tumor draining lymph nodes (TDLN, as well as a less prominent increase in T regulatory cells. The aim of this research was to study B cell characteristics and function in the lymph node draining MCC tumor and to analyze whether these cells may be playing a role in suppressing antitumor response and favoring tumor progression. Results indicate that B cells from TDLN expressed increased CD86 and MHCII co-stimulatory molecules indicating activated phenotype, as well as intracellular IL-10, FASL and Granzyme B, molecules with regulatory immunosuppressive properties. Additionally, B cells showed high inhibitory upon T cell proliferation ex vivo, and a mild capacity to secrete antibodies. Our conclusion is that even when evidence of B cell-mediated activity of the immune response is present, B cells from TDLN exhibit regulatory phenotype and inhibitory activity, probably contributing to the state of immunological tolerance characteristic of the advanced tumor condition.

  19. The exonuclease domain of Lassa virus nucleoprotein is involved in antigen-presenting-cell-mediated NK cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russier, Marion; Reynard, Stéphanie; Carnec, Xavier; Baize, Sylvain

    2014-12-01

    Lassa virus is an Old World Arenavirus which causes Lassa hemorrhagic fever in humans, mostly in West Africa. Lassa fever is an important public health problem, and a safe and effective vaccine is urgently needed. The infection causes immunosuppression, probably due to the absence of activation of antigen-presenting cells (dendritic cells and macrophages), low type I interferon (IFN) production, and deficient NK cell function. However, a recombinant Lassa virus carrying D389A and G392A substitutions in the nucleoprotein that abolish the exonuclease activity and IFN activation loses its inhibitory activity and induces strong type I IFN production by dendritic cells and macrophages. We show here that during infection by this mutant Lassa virus, antigen-presenting cells trigger efficient human NK cell responses in vitro, including production of IFN-γ and cytotoxicity. NK cell activation involves close contact with both antigen-presenting cells and soluble factors. We report that infected dendritic cells and macrophages express the NKG2D ligands major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-related chains A and B and that they may produce interleukin-12 (IL-12), IL-15, and IL-18, all involved in NK cell functions. NK cell degranulation is significantly increased in cocultures, suggesting that NK cells seem to kill infected dendritic cells and macrophages. This work confirms the inhibitory function of Lassa virus nucleoprotein. Importantly, we demonstrate for the first time that Lassa virus nucleoprotein is involved in the inhibition of antigen-presenting cell-mediated NK cell responses. The pathogenesis and immune responses induced by Lassa virus are poorly known. Recently, an exonuclease domain contained in the viral nucleoprotein has been shown to be able to inhibit the type I IFN response by avoiding the recognition of viral RNA by cell sensors. Here, we studied the responses of NK cells to dendritic cells and macrophages infected with a recombinant Lassa virus in

  20. Investigating the Effect of Pyridine Vapor Treatment on Perovskite Solar Cells - Oral Presentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ong, Alison J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-08-25

    Perovskite photovoltaics have recently come to prominence as a viable alternative to crystalline silicon based solar cells. In an effort to create consistent and high-quality films, we studied the effect of various annealing conditions as well as the effect of pyridine vapor treatment on mixed halide methylammonium lead perovskite films. Of six conditions tested, we found that annealing at 100 degree Celsius for 90 minutes followed by 120 degree Celsius for 15 minutes resulted in the purest perovskite. Perovskite films made using that condition were treated with pyridine for various amounts of time, and the effects on perovskite microstructure were studied using x-ray diffraction, UV-Vis spectroscopy, and time-resolved photoluminescence lifetime analysis (TRPL). A previous study found that pyridine vapor caused perovskite films to have higher photoluminescence intensity and become more homogenous. In this study we found that the effects of pyridine are more complex: while films appeared to become more homogenous, a decrease in bulkphotoluminescence lifetime was observed. In addition, the perovskite bandgap appeared to decrease with increased pyridine treatment time. Finally, X-ray diffraction showed that pyridine vapor treatment increased the perovskite (110) peak intensity but also often gave rise to new unidentified peaks, suggesting the formation of a foreign species. It was observed that the intensity of this unknown species had an inverse correlation with the increase in perovskite peak intensity, and also seemed to be correlated with the decrease in TRPL lifetime.

  1. Using Generic Examples to Make Viable Arguments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Anne E.; Ely, Rob; Yopp, David

    2017-01-01

    The twenty-first century has seen an increased call to train students to craft mathematical arguments. The third of the Common Core's (CCSS) Standards for Mathematical Practice (SMP 3) (CCSSI 2010) calls for all mathematically proficient students to "construct viable arguments" to support the truth of their ideas and to "critique…

  2. Antigen presentation by non-immune B-cell hybridoma clones: presentation of synthetic antigenic sites reveals clones that exhibit no specificity and clones that present only one epitope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohly, H. H.; Morrison, D. R.; Atassi, M. Z.

    1989-01-01

    Recently, we reported the preparation and antigen-presenting properties of hybridoma B-cell clones obtained after fusing non-secreting, non-antigen presenting Balb/c 653-myeloma cells with non-immune SJL spleen cells. It was found that antigen presentation at the clonal level can be specific or non-specific, depending on the particular B-cell clone. In the present work, one specific and one general presenter B-cell clones were tested for their epitope presentation ability to SJL T-cells that were specific to lysozyme or myoglobin. B-cell clone A1G12, a general presenter which presented both lysozyme and myoglobin to their respective T-cell lines, was found to present all five myoglobin epitopes while clone A1L16, a lysozyme specific presenter presented only one of the three epitopes of lysozyme. The latter reveals a hitherto unknown submolecular specificity (to a given epitope within a protein) for antigen presenting cells at the clonal level. Therefore, the specificity of T-cell recognition does not only derive from the T-cell but may also be dependent on the epitope specificity of the antigen-presenting B-cell.

  3. Removal of viable bacteria and endotoxins by Electro Deionization (EDI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Norimitsu; Otomo, Teruo; Watabe, Tomoichi; Ase, Tomonobu; Takemura, Takuto; Sato, Toshio

    2011-09-01

    Viable bacteria and endotoxins in water sometimes cause problems for human health. Endotoxins are major components of the outer cell wall of gram-negative bacteria (lipopolysaccharides). In medical procedures, especially haemodialysis (HD) and related therapies (haemodiafiltration (HDF), haemofiltration (HF)), endotoxins in the water for haemodialysis can permeate through the haemodialysis membrane and cause microinflammation or various haemodialysis-related illnesses. To decrease such a biological risk, RO and UF membranes are generally used. Also, hot water disinfection or the chemical disinfection is regularly executed to kill bacteria which produce endotoxins. However, simple treatment methods and equipment may be able to decrease the biological risk more efficiently. In our experiments, we confirmed that viable bacteria and endotoxins were removed by Electro Deionization (EDI) technology and also clarified the desorption mechanisms.

  4. B lymphocytes as direct antigen-presenting cells for anti-tumor DNA vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colluru, Viswa Teja; McNeel, Douglas G.

    2016-01-01

    In spite of remarkable preclinical efficacy, DNA vaccination has demonstrated low immunogenicity in humans. While efforts have focused on increasing cross-presentation of DNA-encoded antigens, efforts to increase DNA vaccine immunogenicity by targeting direct presentation have remained mostly unexplored. In these studies, we compared the ability of different APCs to present antigen to T cells after simple co-culture with plasmid DNA. We found that human primary peripheral B lymphocytes, and not monocytes or in vitro derived dendritic cells (DCs), were able to efficiently encode antigen mRNA and expand cognate tumor antigen-specific CD8 T cells ex vivo. Similarly, murine B lymphocytes co-cultured with plasmid DNA, and not DCs, were able to prime antigen-specific T cells in vivo. Moreover, B lymphocyte-mediated presentation of plasmid antigen led to greater Th1-biased immunity and was sufficient to elicit an anti-tumor effect in vivo. Surprisingly, increasing plasmid presentation by B cells, and not cross presentation of peptides by DCs, further augmented traditional plasmid vaccination. Together, these data suggest that targeting plasmid DNA to B lymphocytes, for example through transfer of ex vivo plasmidloaded B cells, may be novel means to achieve greater T cell immunity from DNA vaccines. PMID:27661128

  5. Extranodal interdigitating dendritic cell sarcoma presenting in the pleura: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hye-Suk; Lee, Ok-Jun; Lim, Sung-nam; An, Jin Young; Lee, Ki Man; Choe, Kang Hyeon; Lee, Ki Hyeong; Kim, Seung Taik

    2011-02-01

    Interdigitating dendritic cell sarcoma (IDCS) is an extremely rare neoplasm arising from the antigen-presenting cells of the immune system. This disease usually involves the lymph nodes, and rarely, extranodal sites may be affected. The authors report a case of extranodal IDCS presenting in the pleura. A 32-yr-old man presented with progressive chest pain. Imaging studies showed diffuse pleural thickening with pleural effusion. Morphological and immunohistochemical analysis of an incisional biopsy of the pleura were consistent with a diagnosis of IDCS; tumor cells were positive for S100 and CD45, but negative for CD1a, CD21, CD35, B cell and T cell markers. The patient was administered chemotherapy, but died of progressive disease. Although its incidence is extremely rare, this case suggests that extranodal IDCS should be considered in the differential diagnosis of undifferentiated neoplasms and that immunohistochemical staining be performed using appropriate markers.

  6. Antigen-presenting cells transfected with Hsp65 messenger RNA fail to treat experimental tuberculosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocha, C.D.; Trombone, A.P.F.; Lorenzi, J.C.C.; Almeida, L.P.; Gembre, A.F.; Padilha, E. [Departamento de Bioquímica e Imunologia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Ramos, S.G. [Departamento de Patologia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Silva, C.L.; Coelho-Castelo, A.A.M. [Departamento de Bioquímica e Imunologia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2012-09-21

    In the last several years, the use of dendritic cells has been studied as a therapeutic strategy against tumors. Dendritic cells can be pulsed with peptides or full-length protein, or they can be transfected with DNA or RNA. However, comparative studies suggest that transfecting dendritic cells with messenger RNA (mRNA) is superior to other antigen-loading techniques in generating immunocompetent dendritic cells. In the present study, we evaluated a new therapeutic strategy to fight tuberculosis using dendritic cells and macrophages transfected with Hsp65 mRNA. First, we demonstrated that antigen-presenting cells transfected with Hsp65 mRNA exhibit a higher level of expression of co-stimulatory molecules, suggesting that Hsp65 mRNA has immunostimulatory properties. We also demonstrated that spleen cells obtained from animals immunized with mock and Hsp65 mRNA-transfected dendritic cells were able to generate a mixed Th1/Th2 response with production not only of IFN-γ but also of IL-5 and IL-10. In contrast, cells recovered from mice immunized with Hsp65 mRNA-transfected macrophages were able to produce only IL-5. When mice were infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and treated with antigen-presenting cells transfected with Hsp65 mRNA (therapeutic immunization), we did not detect any decrease in the lung bacterial load or any preservation of the lung parenchyma, indicating the inability of transfected cells to confer curative effects against tuberculosis. In spite of the lack of therapeutic efficacy, this study reports for the first time the use of antigen-presenting cells transfected with mRNA in experimental tuberculosis.

  7. Killer artificial antigen-presenting cells: the synthetic embodiment of a ‘guided missile’

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütz, Christian; Oelke, Mathias; Schneck, Jonathan P; Mackensen, Andreas; Fleck, Martin

    2010-01-01

    At present, the treatment of T-cell-dependent autoimmune diseases relies exclusively on strategies leading to nonspecific suppression of the immune systems causing a substantial reduced ability to control concomitant infections or malignancies. Furthermore, long-term treatment with most drugs is accompanied by several serious adverse effects and does not consequently result in cure of the primary immunological malfunction. By contrast, antigen-specific immunotherapy offers the potential to achieve the highest therapeutic efficiency in accordance with minimal adverse effects. Therefore, several studies have been performed utilizing antigen-presenting cells specifically engineered to deplete allo- or antigen-specific T cells (‘guided missiles’). Many of these strategies take advantage of the Fas/Fas ligand signaling pathway to efficiently induce antigen-presenting cell-mediated apoptosis in targeted T cells. In this article, we discuss the advantages and shortcomings of a novel non-cell-based ‘killer artificial antigen-presenting cell’ strategy, developed to overcome obstacles related to current cell-based approaches for the treatment of T-cell-mediated autoimmunity. PMID:20636007

  8. Analysis Results for ARRA Projects: Enabling Fuel Cell Market Transformation (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurtz, J.; Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Ramsden, T.; Ainscough, C.; Saur, G.

    2012-06-01

    This presentation discusses analysis results for American Recovery and Reinvestment Act early market fuel cell deployments and describes the objective of the project and its relevance to the Department of Energy Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program; NREL's analysis approach; technical accomplishments including publication of a fourth set of composite data products; and collaborations and future work.

  9. Lymph node tuberculosis after allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation: an atypical presentation of an uncommon complication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Sánchez, Guillermo; Drake-Pérez, Marta; Rodriguez, José Luis; Yañez, Lucrecia; Insunza, Andrés; Richard, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis infections are uncommon complications in the haematopoietic stem cell post-transplant period. Most cases are reactivations of latent infections affecting the lung. We present an atypical case of isolated lymph node tuberculosis after an allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation, which highlights the importance of having a high suspicion index, even in non-endemic countries.

  10. Phosphoantigen Presentation to TCR γδ Cells, a Conundrum Getting Less Gray Zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Libero, Gennaro; Lau, Sze-Yi; Mori, Lucia

    2014-01-01

    The mechanistic requirements of antigen recognition by T cells expressing a γδ TCR has revealed important differences with those of αβ TCR cells and, despite impressive new data generated in the very recent years, they remain poorly understood. Based on the structure of the TCR chains and the tissue distribution, γδ cells are represented in a variety of populations. The major subset of human peripheral blood γδ cells express Vγ9Vδ2 TCR heterodimers and are all stimulated by phosphorylated metabolites (commonly called phosphoantigens). Phosphoantigens are molecules with a very small mass and only stimulate Vγ9Vδ2 cells in the presence of antigen-presenting cells, suggesting a strict requirement for dedicated antigen-presenting molecules. Recent studies have identified butyrophilin (BTN) 3A1 as the molecule necessary to stimulate Vγ9Vδ2 cells. BTN3A1 extracellular, transmembrane, and cytoplasmic domains have different functions, including cognate interaction with the Vγ9Vδ2 TCR, binding of the phosphoantigens, and interaction with cytoplasmic proteins. This review mainly discusses the known molecular mechanisms of BTN3A1-mediated antigen presentation to γδ cells and proposes a model of phosphoantigen presentation, which integrates past and recent studies.

  11. Measuring dynamic membrane fluctuations in cell membrane using quantitative phase imaging (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, SangYun; Kim, Kyoohyun; Park, YongKeun

    2017-02-01

    There is a strong correlation between the dynamic membrane fluctuations and the biomechanical properties of living cells. The dynamic membrane fluctuation consists of submicron displacements, and can be altered by changing the cells' pathophysiological conditions. These results have significant relevance to the understanding of RBC biophysics and pathology, as follows. RBCs must withstand large mechanical deformations during repeated passages through the microvasculature and the fenestrated walls of the splenic sinusoids. This essential ability is diminished with senescence, resulting in physiological destruction of the aging RBCs. Pathological destruction of the red cells, however, occurs in cells affected by a host of diseases such as spherocytosis, malaria, and Sickle cell disease, as RBCs depart from their normal discoid shape and lose their deformability. Therefore, quantifying the RBC deformability insight into a variety of problems regarding the interplay of cell structure, dynamics, and function. Furthermore, the ability to monitor mechanical properties of RBCs is of vital interest in monitoring disease progression or response to treatment as molecular and pharmaceutical approaches for treatment of chronic diseases. Here, we present the measurements of dynamic membrane fluctuations in live cells using quantitative phase imaging techniques. Measuring both the 3-D refractive index maps and the dynamic phase images of live cells are simultaneously measured, from which dynamic membrane fluctuation and deformability of cells are precisely calculated. We also present its applications to various diseases ranging from sickle cell diseases, babesiosis, and to diabetes.

  12. Expanded human blood-derived γδT cells display potent antigen-presentation functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Wajid Ali Khan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Cell-based immunotherapy strategies target tumors directly (via cytolytic effector cells or aim at mobilizing endogenous anti-tumor immunity. The latter approach includes dendritic cells (DC, most frequently in the form of in vitro cultured peripheral blood monocytes-derived DC. Human blood γδT cells are selective for a single class of non-peptide agonists (phosphoantigens and develop into potent antigen-presenting cells (APC, termed γδT-APC, within 1-3 days of in vitro culture. Availability of large numbers of γδT-APC would be advantageous for use as a novel cellular vaccine. We here report optimal γδT cell expansion (>107 cells/ml blood when peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC from healthy individuals and melanoma patients were stimulated with zoledronate and then cultured for 14 days in the presence of IL-2 and IL-15, yielding γδT cell cultures of variable purity (77±21% and 56±26%, respectively. They resembled effector-memory αβT (TEM cells and retained full functionality as assessed by in vitro tumor cell killing as well as secretion of proinflammatory cytokines (IFNγ, TNFα and cell proliferation in response to stimulation with phosphoantigens. Importantly, day 14 γδT cells expressed numerous APC-related cell surface markers and, in agreement, displayed potent in vitro APC functions. Day 14 γδT cells from PBMC of patients with cancer were equally effective as their counterparts derived from blood of healthy individuals and triggered potent CD8+ αβT cell responses following processing and cross-presentation of simple (influenza M1 and complex (tuberculin purified protein derivative protein antigens. Of note, and in clear contrast to peripheral blood γδT cells, the ability of day 14 γδT cells to trigger antigen-specific αβT cell responses did not depend on re-stimulation. We conclude that day 14 γδT cell cultures provide a convenient source of autologous APC for use in immunotherapy of

  13. Differential use of autophagy by primary dendritic cells specialized in cross-presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mintern, Justine D; Macri, Christophe; Chin, Wei Jin; Panozza, Scott E; Segura, Elodie; Patterson, Natalie L; Zeller, Peter; Bourges, Dorothee; Bedoui, Sammy; McMillan, Paul J; Idris, Adi; Nowell, Cameron J; Brown, Andrew; Radford, Kristen J; Johnston, Angus PR; Villadangos, Jose A

    2015-01-01

    Antigen-presenting cells survey their environment and present captured antigens bound to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules. Formation of MHC-antigen complexes occurs in specialized compartments where multiple protein trafficking routes, still incompletely understood, converge. Autophagy is a route that enables the presentation of cytosolic antigen by MHC class II molecules. Some reports also implicate autophagy in the presentation of extracellular, endocytosed antigen by MHC class I molecules, a pathway termed “cross-presentation.” The role of autophagy in cross-presentation is controversial. This may be due to studies using different types of antigen presenting cells for which the use of autophagy is not well defined. Here we report that active use of autophagy is evident only in DC subtypes specialized in cross-presentation. However, the contribution of autophagy to cross-presentation varied depending on the form of antigen: it was negligible in the case of cell-associated antigen or antigen delivered via receptor-mediated endocytosis, but more prominent when the antigen was a soluble protein. These findings highlight the differential use of autophagy and its machinery by primary cells equipped with specific immune function, and prompt careful reassessment of the participation of this endocytic pathway in antigen cross-presentation. PMID:25950899

  14. Pros and Cons of Antigen-Presenting Cell Targeted Tumor Vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleo Goyvaerts

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In therapeutic antitumor vaccination, dendritic cells play the leading role since they decide if, how, when, and where a potent antitumor immune response will take place. Since the disentanglement of the complexity and merit of different antigen-presenting cell subtypes, antitumor immunotherapeutic research started to investigate the potential benefit of targeting these subtypes in situ. This review will discuss which antigen-presenting cell subtypes are at play and how they have been targeted and finally question the true meaning of targeting antitumor-based vaccines.

  15. Pros and Cons of Antigen-Presenting Cell Targeted Tumor Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyvaerts, Cleo; Breckpot, Karine

    2015-01-01

    In therapeutic antitumor vaccination, dendritic cells play the leading role since they decide if, how, when, and where a potent antitumor immune response will take place. Since the disentanglement of the complexity and merit of different antigen-presenting cell subtypes, antitumor immunotherapeutic research started to investigate the potential benefit of targeting these subtypes in situ. This review will discuss which antigen-presenting cell subtypes are at play and how they have been targeted and finally question the true meaning of targeting antitumor-based vaccines. PMID:26583156

  16. Pros and Cons of Antigen-Presenting Cell Targeted Tumor Vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyvaerts, Cleo; Breckpot, Karine

    2015-01-01

    In therapeutic antitumor vaccination, dendritic cells play the leading role since they decide if, how, when, and where a potent antitumor immune response will take place. Since the disentanglement of the complexity and merit of different antigen-presenting cell subtypes, antitumor immunotherapeutic research started to investigate the potential benefit of targeting these subtypes in situ. This review will discuss which antigen-presenting cell subtypes are at play and how they have been targeted and finally question the true meaning of targeting antitumor-based vaccines.

  17. Monotone viable trajectories for functional differential inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Georges

    This paper is a study on functional differential inclusions with memory which represent the multivalued version of retarded functional differential equations. The main result gives a necessary and sufficient equations. The main result gives a necessary and sufficient condition ensuring the existence of viable trajectories; that means trajectories remaining in a given nonempty closed convex set defined by given constraints the system must satisfy to be viable. Some motivations for this paper can be found in control theory where F( t, φ) = { f( t, φ, u)} uɛU is the set of possible velocities of the system at time t, depending on the past history represented by the function φ and on a control u ranging over a set U of controls. Other motivations can be found in planning procedures in microeconomics and in biological evolutions where problems with memory do effectively appear in a multivalued version. All these models require viability constraints represented by a closed convex set.

  18. Dendritic Cells and Their Role in Allergy: Uptake, Proteolytic Processing and Presentation of Allergens

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    Piotr Humeniuk

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs are the most important antigen presenting cells to activate naïve T cells, which results in the case of Type 1 allergies in a Type 2 helper T cell (Th2-driven specific immune response towards allergens. So far, a number of different subsets of specialized DCs in different organs have been identified. In the recent past methods to study the interaction of DCs with allergenic proteins, their different uptake and processing mechanisms followed by the presentation to T cells were developed. The following review aims to summarize the most important characteristics of DC subsets in the context of allergic diseases, and highlights the recent findings. These detailed studies can contribute to a better understanding of the pathomechanisms of allergic diseases and contribute to the identification of key factors to be addressed for therapeutic interventions.

  19. Skin-resident antigen-presenting cells: Instruction manual for vaccine development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia M. Fehres

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The induction of antigen-specific effector T cells is driven by proper antigen presentation and co-stimulation by dendritic cells (DCs. For this reason strategies have been developed to instruct DCs for the induction of CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses. Since DCs are localized, amongst other locations, in peripheral tissues such as the skin, new vaccines are aiming at targeting antigens to DCs in situ. Optimal skin-DC targeting in combination with adequate adjuvant delivery facilitates DC maturation and migration to draining lymph nodes and enhances antigen cross-presentation and T cell priming. In this review we describe what DC subsets populate the human skin, as well as current vaccination strategies based on targeting strategies and alternative administration for the induction of robust long-lived anti-cancer effector T cells.

  20. Conjunctival mass as an initial presentation of mantle cell lymphoma: a case report

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    Khanlari Mahsa

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To describe a rare manifestation of mantle cell lymphoma (MCL in conjunctiva, with clinical, hisologic, immunohistologic and genetic findings together with review of the Literature. Case presentation Most ocular adnexal lymphomas are extranodal marginal zone B-cell lymphomas of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT. A few cases of ocular adnexal mantle cell lymphomas have been reported in the literature. We present a case of mantle cell lymphoma presenting as right conjunctival mass of at least three months duration in a 64-year-old man. Histopathologic examination showed a proliferation of monomorphous small-to-medium-sized lymphoid cells with cleaved nuclei in the subconjunctiva. By immunohistochemistry, the infiltrate was positive for CD20, CD5, BCL-2, cyclin D1, and the transcription factor SOX11. Fluorescent in situ hybridization demonstrated the presence of IGH-CCND1 fusion indicating t(11;14. Conclusion A rigorous approach to initial diagnosis and staging of small cell lymphomas of the ocular adnexa is needed. The recognition of ocular MCL requires appropriate immunohistochemical staining and/or genetic confirmation to differentiate this rare form of presentation of MCL from other more frequent small cell lymphomas.

  1. A patient presenting with a perivascular epithelioid cell tumor in the broad ligament: a case report

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    Ross Claire

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Perivascular epithelioid cell tumors are a family of rare mesenchymal tumors composed of histologically and immunohistochemically distinctive perivascular epithelioid cells. They can originate in any visceral organ or soft tissue and include a range of lesions such as angiomyolipoma, clear cell 'sugar' tumor of the lung, lymphangioleiomyomatosis and clear cell myomelanocytic tumors of the falciparum ligament/ligament teres. Due to their rarity and varied sites and presentation, management of these tumors remains highly challenging. Case Presentation A 46-year-old para 2 Caucasian woman initially presented to the general surgeons at our hospital in North West London with abdominal pain. Laparoscopy revealed a right broad ligament hematoma, which was thought to be iatrogenic in origin, from insertion of the Veress needle at the time of surgery, and was managed conservatively. Upon her re-presentation two months later with severe pain, ultrasound scanning revealed the hematoma had increased in size and she underwent a total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. Histology results from necrotic tissue from the hematoma led to a diagnosis of perivascular epithelioid cell tumor. She was then referred to a tertiary oncology center, where she underwent several further operations in an attempt to debulk the tumor for symptomatic relief of her pain, with limited success. She is now taking the immunosuppressive drug sirolimus, which has produced a modest reduction in tumor size. She is now 47 months on from initial presentation. Conclusions A literature search has revealed only six other case reports of broad ligament perivascular epithelioid cell tumors, with varied presentations and management. The longest duration of follow-up was 21 months. Only five other cases of perivascular epithelioid cell tumor managed with sirolimus have been reported. We therefore feel that this report highlights some of the

  2. Linking form to function: Biophysical aspects of artificial antigen presenting cell design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perica, Karlo; Kosmides, Alyssa K; Schneck, Jonathan P

    2015-04-01

    Artificial antigen presenting cells (aAPCs) are engineered platforms for T cell activation and expansion, synthesized by coupling T cell activating proteins to the surface of cell lines or biocompatible particles. They can serve both as model systems to study the basic aspects of T cell signaling and translationally as novel approaches for either active or adoptive immunotherapy. Historically, these reductionist systems have not been designed to mimic the temporally and spatially complex interactions observed during endogenous T cell-APC contact, which include receptor organization at both micro- and nanoscales and dynamic changes in cell and membrane morphologies. Here, we review how particle size and shape, as well as heterogenous distribution of T cell activating proteins on the particle surface, are critical aspects of aAPC design. In doing so, we demonstrate how insights derived from endogenous T cell activation can be applied to optimize aAPC, and in turn how aAPC platforms can be used to better understand endogenous T cell stimulation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Nanoscale membrane organisation and signalling. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Investigating the interaction forces between T cells and antigen-presenting cells using an optical trapping system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Amanda J.; Benson, Robert A.; Bowman, Richard W.; Gibson, Graham M.; Padgett, Miles J.; Girkin, John M.; Brewer, James; Garside, Paul

    2011-10-01

    The interactions between T cells and antigen-presenting cells (APCs) are crucial in triggering a successful antigenspecific, adaptive immune response leading to protection against a particular pathogen or disease. At present very little is known about the magnitudes of the forces involved in these interactions. We present results showing for the first time that optical tweezers can be used to measure these cell-cell interaction forces. We were able to see a significant difference in the force distributions taken with and without antigen, as evidenced by a Mann-Whitney U-test. The T cells of interest were trapped directly and no exogenous beads were added to the sample. Interaction forces between T cells and APCs in the presence of specific antigen ranged from 0-6.5 pN, whereas, when the specific antigen was absent the interaction forces ranged from 0-1.5 pN. The accuracy of the system will be discussed in terms of how we tracked the position of the optically trapped cell and the methods we used to minimise cell roll.

  4. Measuring antigen presentation in mouse brain endothelial cells ex vivo and in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howland, Shanshan W; Gun, Sin Yee; Claser, Carla; Poh, Chek Meng; Rénia, Laurent

    2015-12-01

    We have recently demonstrated that brain endothelial cells cross-present parasite antigen during mouse experimental cerebral malaria (ECM). Here we describe a 2-d protocol to detect cross-presentation by isolating the brain microvessels and incubating them with a reporter cell line that expresses lacZ upon detection of the relevant peptide-major histocompatibility complex. After X-gal staining, a typical positive result consists of hundreds of blue spots, compared with fewer than 20 spots from a naive brain. The assay is generalizable to other disease contexts by using reporter cells that express appropriate specific T cell receptors. Also described is the protocol for culturing endothelial cells from brain microvessels isolated from naive mice. After 7-10 d, an in vitro cross-presentation assay can be performed by adding interferon-γ, antigen (e.g., Plasmodium berghei-infected red blood cells) and reporter cells in sequence over 3 d. This is useful for comparing different antigen forms or for probing the effects of various interventions.

  5. Primary Colonic Signet Ring Cell Carcinoma Presenting Carcinocythemia: An Autopsy Case

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    Ryosuke Misawa

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Primary colorectal signet ring cell carcinoma (SRCC is a rare but distinctive type of mucin-producing adenocarcinoma of the large intestine with still controversial clinicopathological features and prognosis. We encountered primary colonic SRCC in a 51-year-old Japanese man with extensive bone metastasis ultimately leading to carcinocythemia before the initiation of chemotherapy and surgical intervention. Three days before death, besides progressive disseminated intravascular coagulation that had been present on admission, hematological examination showed sudden leukocytosis with nonhematopoietic cells that subsequently turned out to be signet ring cells (SRCs. Carcinocythemia, the presence of circulating cancer cells in peripheral blood, is considered to be a rare but an ominous phenomenon occurring in the advanced stage of certain types of cancers, particularly mammary lobular carcinoma. It can be assumed that carcinoma cells lacking intercellular cohesiveness and polarized cell membrane organization, including SRCs as well as lobular carcinoma cells, can readily get access to the peripheral circulation; however, to our knowledge, this is the first report of primary colorectal SRCC that presented carcinocythemia. Extensive bone metastatic sites, in the present case, may have functioned as a reservoir of circulating SRCs.

  6. Antigen presenting cells costimulatory signaling during pre-implantation pregnancy 

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    Anna Sławek

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available  Success of pregnancy depends on many factors. Three phenomena inducing immune tolerance against semi-allogeneic conceptus may play a crucial role in the pre-implantation period of pregnancy: influence of sex hormones in sex cycle, presence of oocyte or embryo and the presence of semen in the female reproductive tract. On the other hand dendritic cells are the most effective antigen-presenting cells in regulation of immune phenomena and also are considered as potent participants in inducing immune tolerance in the pregnancy. They communicate with T cells in cell contact-dependent manner or via cytokines. During cell-cell contacts, costimulatory molecules play a key role and their expression is often dependent on cytokines milieu. Both costimulatory molecules and cytokines influence generation of T regulatory cells. Interactions of these molecules are closely related. In this paper we would like to pay attention to the importance of antigen presenting cells costimulatory potency in immune regulation during a pre-implantation period of pregnancy.

  7. Primary cilia are present on human blood and bone marrow cells and mediate Hedgehog signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mohan; Chaudhry, Parvesh; Merchant, Akil A

    2016-12-01

    Primary cilia are nonmotile, microtubule-based organelles that are present on the cellular membrane of all eukaryotic cells. Functional cilia are required for the response to developmental signaling pathways such as Hedgehog (Hh) and Wnt/β-catenin. Although the Hh pathway has been shown to be active in leukemia and other blood cancers, there have been no reports describing the presence of primary cilia in human blood or leukemia cells. In the present study, we show that nearly all human blood and bone marrow cells have primary cilia (97-99%). In contrast, primary cilia on AML cell lines (KG1, KG1a, and K562) were less frequent (10-36% of cells) and were often shorter and dysmorphic, with less well-defined basal bodies. Finally, we show that treatment of blood cells with the Hh pathway ligand Sonic Hedgehog (SHh) causes translocation of Smoothened (SMO) to the primary cilia and activation of Hh target genes, demonstrating that primary cilia in blood cells are functional and participate in Hh signaling. Loss of primary cilia on leukemia cells may have important implications for aberrant pathway activation and response to SMO inhibitors currently in clinical development. Copyright © 2016 ISEH - International Society for Experimental Hematology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Live cell imaging using Au-NNP (Nanobridged Nanogap Particles) (Presentation Recording)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Yung Doug

    2015-08-01

    Single-particle tracking Live-Cell imaging using Au-NNP(Nanobridged Nanogap Particles) will be presented. Due to a stable plasmonic amplification of Raman signal from the intra-nanogap of Au-NNP, we have a stable and strong Raman signal enough for single particle imaging of Au-NNP in live cell. Multiplex imaging by encoding different Raman dyes into this nanogap and its application will be also discussed.

  9. Repopulated antigen presenting cells induced an imbalanced differentiation of the helper T cells in whole body gamma irradiated mice

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    Park, Hae Ran; Jo, Sung Kee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Paik, Sang Kee [Chungnam National University, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    Therapeutic irradiation of cancer patients, although it may be protected by several antioxidant agents against free radicals, often induces chronic sequelae such as inflammation (allergic inflammation). This is a limiting factor for radiotherapy. Following radiotherapy, the inflammation or injury can occur in any organ with a high radiosensitivity such as the lung, bladder, kidney, liver, stomach and intestine. The mechanism by which ionizing radiation initiates inflammation is, however, poorly understood. In recent studies, it was suggested that a factor for irradiation-induced inflammation might be the over production of IL-4 that enhances fibroblast proliferation and collagen synthesis. During the early stages after irradiation, type 2 of the helper T cells might be the major source of IL-4, and later on there seems to be an activation of the other IL-4 producing cell types, e.q. macrophages or mast cells. This is interesting because inflammation is classically seen to be dominated by Th1 cells secreting IFN-{gamma}. In the previous study, we were interested in the enhancement of the IL-4 and the IgE production during the development of immune cells after {gamma}-irradiation. We were able to deduce that IL-4 production was increased because of the shifted differentiation of the naive Th cells by the repopulated antigen presenting cells after irradiation. The aim of the present study was to precisely define whether antigen-presenting cells (APCs) of whole body irradiation-treated mice could influence the shifted differentiation of the Th cells. This view can be demonstrated by confirming that the shifted functional status of the Th cells is induced by the altered function of the repopulated macrophages after whole body irradiation (WBI)

  10. Graphene oxide, but not fullerenes, targets immunoproteasomes and suppresses antigen presentation by dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkach, Alexey V; Yanamala, Naveena; Stanley, Shyla; Shurin, Michael R; Shurin, Galina V; Kisin, Elena R; Murray, Ashley R; Pareso, Samantha; Khaliullin, Timur; Kotchey, Gregg P; Castranova, Vincent; Mathur, Sanjay; Fadeel, Bengt; Star, Alexander; Kagan, Valerian E; Shvedova, Anna A

    2013-05-27

    Graphene oxide (GO) and C60 - or C60 -TRIS fullerenes, internalized by murine dendritic cells (DCs), differently affect their abilities to present antigens to T-cells. While C60 -fullerenes stimulate the ovalbumin-specific MHC class I-restricted T-cell response, GO impairs the stimulatory potential of DCs. In contrast to C60 -fullerenes, GO decreases the intracellular levels of LMP7 immunoproteasome subunits required for processing of protein antigens. This is important for the development of DC-based vaccines. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. "Person in the barrel" syndrome: Unusual heralding presentation of squamous cell carcinoma of the lung

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    Rajesh Verma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes (PNS are rare and relatively unusual in day to day clinical practice. Occasionally, PNS may be the heralding manifestation of the malignancy. Paraneoplastic syndromes are most commonly associated with small cell lung carcinoma and are rarely seen with non small cell lung carcinoma. In this case, we report a non-smoker, middle aged lady, who presented with "person in the barrel" syndrome due to myelo radiculoplexopathy as the first clinical manifestation of squamous cell carcinoma of the lung.

  12. Solid oxide fuels cells past present and future perspectives for SOFC technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Irvine, John TS

    2012-01-01

    Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) operate at high temperatures allowing more fuel flexibility and also useful heat output and so increase total efficiency, but does give some interesting engineering challenges. Solid Oxide Fuels Cells: Facts and Figures provides clear and accurate data for a selection of SOFC topics from the specific details of Ni cermet anodes, chemical expansion in materials, and the measuring and modelling of mechanical stresses, to the broader scope of the history and present design of cells, to SOFC systems and the future of SOFC. Celebrating Ulf Bossel s work on Solid Oxide

  13. Small Cell Carcinoma of the Ovary: Report of a Case with Unusual and Aggressive Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Sadat Najib

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Small cell carcinoma of the ovary is an aggressive malignant tumor with no standard treatment. Despite surgery, chemotherapy and radiation, this tumor has a poor prognosis with rapid progression. The authors report a case of small cell carcinoma of the ovary in a 37-year-old woman who presented twice with an acute abdomen and unstable hemodynamics which led to two urgent laparatomies. The patient died two months after her diagnosis of small cell carcinoma of the ovary and one course of chemotherapy.

  14. Atypical presentation of isolated peripheral T-cell lymphoma in the hand: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kung, Theodore A; Smith, Lauren B; Chung, Kevin C

    2014-04-01

    Peripheral T-cell lymphoma is a rare malignancy that characteristically demonstrates generalized lymphadenopathy and extranodal involvement. We describe an atypical case of peripheral T-cell lymphoma manifesting as isolated hand swelling without evidence of nodal disease or systemic symptoms. This report emphasizes the highly variable clinical presentation of T-cell lymphomas and the importance of expeditious incisional biopsy in the setting of an undiagnosed hand mass. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Paediatric anaplastic large cell lymphoma with leukaemic presentation in children: a report of nine French cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegel, Alexandra; Paillard, Catherine; Ducassou, Stephane; Perel, Yves; Plantaz, Dominique; Strullu, Marion; Eischen, Alice; Lutz, Patrick; Lamant, Laurence; Le Deley, Marie-Cécile; Brugières, Laurence

    2014-05-01

    This study aimed to describe the clinical features and outcome of anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) with leukaemic presentation in children. Among 267 patients included in the French paediatric ALCL database between 1989 and 2012, nine (3%) were described as having cytologically detectable circulating tumour cells. Clinical features combined fever (8/9), nodal and extra-nodal disease (9/9), including hepato-splenic (9/9) and lung involvement (7/9). The level of hyperleucocytosis ranged from 30 to 120 × 10(9) /l, with 12-90% of tumour cells. Diagnosis relied on a lymph node biopsy, with a positive ALK+ antibody immunostain in all nine cases, a T-cell immunophenotype in 7/9 cases and CD3 positivity in 5/9 cases. A small cell component was present in 6/9 cases. Only four patients achieved a complete remission with first-line therapy and 3/4 relapsed. Four patients are alive with a median follow-up of 31 months, two of them after allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), and five patients died, two of them of disease. In conclusion, ALCL with leukaemic presentation is very unusual and should be considered as high-risk lymphoma requiring new therapeutic strategies. The respective role of new agents and allogeneic HSCT in first complete remission still has to be assessed. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. An unusual Case of Transitional Cell Carcinoma of Renal Pelvis Presenting with Brain Metastases

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    MR Razzaghi

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Introduction & Objective: Transitional cell carcinoma of renal pelvis presenting with brain metastases is a very rare case which should be diagnosed and treated in order to prevent further damages. Case: We report a rare case, who had presented with a constellation of neurological symptoms (due to multiple brain metastases, but without any urological symptoms. During evaluation of patient, we found transitional cell carcinoma (TCC of left renal pelvis, for which palliative radical nephroureterectomy was performed . Conclusion: Although transitional cell carcinoma of renal pelvis presenting with brain metastases is a very rare case, but the patient was managed with gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery for the metastatic lesions. Afterward he received four cycles of paclitaxel and carboplatin chemotherapy. The patient is alive with stable disease at 32- months’ follow-up.

  17. Viral sequestration of antigen subverts cross presentation to CD8(+ T cells.

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    Eric F Tewalt

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Virus-specific CD8(+ T cells (T(CD8+ are initially triggered by peptide-MHC Class I complexes on the surface of professional antigen presenting cells (pAPC. Peptide-MHC complexes are produced by two spatially distinct pathways during virus infection. Endogenous antigens synthesized within virus-infected pAPC are presented via the direct-presentation pathway. Many viruses have developed strategies to subvert direct presentation. When direct presentation is blocked, the cross-presentation pathway, in which antigen is transferred from virus-infected cells to uninfected pAPC, is thought to compensate and allow the generation of effector T(CD8+. Direct presentation of vaccinia virus (VACV antigens driven by late promoters does not occur, as an abortive infection of pAPC prevents production of these late antigens. This lack of direct presentation results in a greatly diminished or ablated T(CD8+ response to late antigens. We demonstrate that late poxvirus antigens do not enter the cross-presentation pathway, even when identical antigens driven by early promoters access this pathway efficiently. The mechanism mediating this novel means of viral modulation of antigen presentation involves the sequestration of late antigens within virus factories. Early antigens and cellular antigens are cross-presented from virus-infected cells, as are late antigens that are targeted to compartments outside of the virus factories. This virus-mediated blockade specifically targets the cross-presentation pathway, since late antigen that is not cross-presented efficiently enters the MHC Class II presentation pathway. These data are the first to describe an evasion mechanism employed by pathogens to prevent entry into the cross-presentation pathway. In the absence of direct presentation, this evasion mechanism leads to a complete ablation of the T(CD8+ response and a potential replicative advantage for the virus. Such mechanisms of viral modulation of antigen presentation

  18. Survival and signaling changes in antigen presenting cell subsets after radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Jennifer Janell

    Radiation therapy is a widely used cancer treatment that has the potential to influence anti-tumor immune responses. Both myeloablative and non-myeloablative radiation are often used as part of preparatory regimens for hematopoetic stem cell transplantation, in combination with other chemotherapy or immuno-modulatory (e.g. Anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG)) therapies for both cytotoxic and immune modulatory purposes. However, the mechanisms responsible for the effect of radiation on antigen presenting cell (APC) responsiveness and radioresistance are poorly understood. The first studies described in this thesis were designed to identify and characterize early radiation-induced signaling changes in antigen presenting cells and to determine the effects of these signaling changes on APC receptor expression and function. The NFkappaB pathway in antigen presenting cells was chosen for study because it is activated by radiation in a wide range of other cell types and plays a vital role in the maintenance and regulation of the immune system. The effects of therapeutically relevant doses radiation (2 and 20 Gy) were compared at various timepoints in the human monocytic cell line (U937) using phospho-flow cytometry staining methods and cytometric analysis. These studies demonstrated that radiation-induced changes in the phosphorylation state of NFkappaB family members that were p53 independent. However, these changes were dependent upon activation of ATM in response to single or double-stranded breaks in DNA, as shown in experiments using an inhibitor of ATM and ATM siRNA knockdown U937 cells. In addition, studies examining the effect of radiation on co-stimulatory receptors with and without inhibition of the NFkappaB pathway via phospho-flow cytometry revealed that radiation-induced phosphorylation of NEMO promoted the activation and functional maturation of U937 cells. Furthermore, functional studies using both phospho-flow cytometry and/or mixed lymphocyte reactions to

  19. The Effect of Socio-Economic Status on Severity of Periocular Basal Cell Carcinoma at Presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Lik Thai; Agarwal, Pankaj K; Young, David; Ah-Kee, Elliott Yann; Diaper, Charles J M

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the influence of socio-economic factors on size of periocular basal cell carcinoma at presentation. All periocular basal cell carcinoma cases receiving treatment from the oculoplastics team in South Glasgow Hospitals NHS Trust, Glasgow, between 1999 and 2009, were identified retrospectively. Information collected included demographic details of patients, side and site of lesions, type of lesions, and size of lesions. The size of lesion was defined as small for any dimension not exceeding 5 mm, medium for dimensions between 6 mm and 10 mm, and large for dimensions exceeding 11 mm. Home address was used to determine the Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation rank. The demographics, size of lesion, and Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation rank were investigated using the general linear regression modelling. Of the 67 cases, 24 were men and 43 were women. The mean age was 71.5 years. There were a total of 67 identified cases, of which 38 presented with small-size lesions, 24 with medium-size lesions, and 5 with large-size lesions. Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation is related to the presenting incidence of basal cell carcinoma, with the lower ranks presenting more frequently. Socio-economic deprivation is associated with larger and more frequent presentation of periocular basal cell carcinoma. This highlights the importance of raising awareness among populations of the more deprived areas of the significance of lumps and bumps within the periocular regions.

  20. Breast Cancer Mimic: Cutaneous B-Cell Lymphoma Presenting as an Isolated Breast Mass

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    Margaret Taghavi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Primary cutaneous B-cell lymphoma typically localizes to the skin, and dissemination to internal organs is rare. Lymphomatous involvement of the breasts is also rare. We describe the clinical and radiological findings of an unusual case of primary cutaneous B-cell lymphoma presenting as an isolated breast mass without associated skin changes. Case Presentation: The patient was a 55-year-old Caucasian female who initially presented with cutaneous B-cell lymphoma around her eyes and forehead with recurrence involving the skin between her breasts. Three years after terminating treatment due to a lack of symptoms, she presented for an annual screening mammogram that found a new mass in her upper inner right breast without imaging signs of cutaneous extension. On physical examination, there were no corresponding skin findings. Due to the suspicious imaging features of the mass that caused concern for primary breast malignancy, she underwent a core biopsy which revealed cutaneous B-cell lymphoma. Conclusion: When evaluating patients with a systemic disease who present with findings atypical for that process, it is important to still consider the systemic disease as a potential etiology, particularly with lymphoma given its reputation as a great mimicker.

  1. Frequency patterns of T-cell exposed motifs in immunoglobulin heavy chain peptides presented by MHCs

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    Robert D. Bremel

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Immunoglobulins are highly diverse protein sequences that are processed and presented to T-cells by B-cells and other antigen presenting cells. We examined a large dataset of immunoglobulin heavy chain variable regions (IGHV to assess the diversity of T-cell exposed motifs (TCEM. TCEM comprise those amino acids in a MHC-bound peptide which face outwards, surrounded by the MHC histotope, and which engage the T-cell receptor. Within IGHV there is a distinct pattern of predicted MHC class II binding and a very high frequency of re-use of the TCEMs. The re-use frequency indicates that only a limited number of different cognate T-cells are required to engage many different clonal B-cells. The amino acids in each outward-facing TCEM are intercalated with the amino acids of inward-facing MHC groove-exposed motifs (GEM. Different GEM may have differing, allele-specific, MHC binding affinities. The intercalation of TCEM and GEM in a peptide allows for a vast combinatorial repertoire of epitopes, each eliciting a different response. Outcome of T-cell receptor binding is determined by overall signal strength, which is a function of the number of responding T-cells and the duration of engagement. Hence, the frequency of T-cell exposed motif re-use appears to be an important determinant of whether a T-cell response is stimulatory or suppressive. The frequency distribution of TCEMs implies that somatic hypermutation is followed by clonal expansion that develop along repeated pathways. The observations of TCEM and GEM derived from immunoglobulins suggest a relatively simple, yet powerful, mechanism to correlate T-cell polyspecificity, through re-use of TCEMs, with a very high degree of specificity achieved by combination with a diversity of GEMs. The frequency profile of TCEMs also points to an economical mechanism for maintaining T-cell memory, recall, and self-discrimination based on an endogenously generated profile of motifs.

  2. Polyamines are present in mast cell secretory granules and are important for granule homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Faroldi, Gianni; Rodríguez, Carlos E; Urdiales, José L; Pérez-Pomares, José M; Dávila, José C; Pejler, Gunnar; Sánchez-Jiménez, Francisca; Fajardo, Ignacio

    2010-11-30

    Mast cell secretory granules accommodate a large number of components, many of which interact with highly sulfated serglycin proteoglycan (PG) present within the granules. Polyamines (putrescine, spermidine and spermine) are absolutely required for the survival of the vast majority of living cells. Given the reported ability of polyamines to interact with PGs, we investigated the possibility that polyamines may be components of mast cell secretory granules. Spermidine was released by mouse bone marrow derived mast cells (BMMCs) after degranulation induced by IgE/anti-IgE or calcium ionophore A23187. Additionally, both spermidine and spermine were detected in isolated mouse mast cell granules. Further, depletion of polyamines by culturing BMMCs with α-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) caused aberrant secretory granule ultrastructure, impaired histamine storage, reduced serotonin levels and increased β-hexosaminidase content. A proteomic approach revealed that DFMO-induced polyamine depletion caused an alteration in the levels of a number of proteins, many of which are connected either with the regulated exocytosis or with the endocytic system. Taken together, our results show evidence that polyamines are present in mast cell secretory granules and, furthermore, indicate an essential role of these polycations during the biogenesis and homeostasis of these organelles.

  3. Polyamines are present in mast cell secretory granules and are important for granule homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianni García-Faroldi

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Mast cell secretory granules accommodate a large number of components, many of which interact with highly sulfated serglycin proteoglycan (PG present within the granules. Polyamines (putrescine, spermidine and spermine are absolutely required for the survival of the vast majority of living cells. Given the reported ability of polyamines to interact with PGs, we investigated the possibility that polyamines may be components of mast cell secretory granules.Spermidine was released by mouse bone marrow derived mast cells (BMMCs after degranulation induced by IgE/anti-IgE or calcium ionophore A23187. Additionally, both spermidine and spermine were detected in isolated mouse mast cell granules. Further, depletion of polyamines by culturing BMMCs with α-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO caused aberrant secretory granule ultrastructure, impaired histamine storage, reduced serotonin levels and increased β-hexosaminidase content. A proteomic approach revealed that DFMO-induced polyamine depletion caused an alteration in the levels of a number of proteins, many of which are connected either with the regulated exocytosis or with the endocytic system.Taken together, our results show evidence that polyamines are present in mast cell secretory granules and, furthermore, indicate an essential role of these polycations during the biogenesis and homeostasis of these organelles.

  4. Regulation of hematopoietic stem cell behavior by the nanostructured presentation of extracellular matrix components.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Anna Muth

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs are maintained in stem cell niches, which regulate stem cell fate. Extracellular matrix (ECM molecules, which are an essential part of these niches, can actively modulate cell functions. However, only little is known on the impact of ECM ligands on HSCs in a biomimetic environment defined on the nanometer-scale level. Here, we show that human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC adhesion depends on the type of ligand, i.e., the type of ECM molecule, and the lateral, nanometer-scaled distance between the ligands (while the ligand type influenced the dependency on the latter. For small fibronectin (FN-derived peptide ligands such as RGD and LDV the critical adhesive interligand distance for HSPCs was below 45 nm. FN-derived (FN type III 7-10 and osteopontin-derived protein domains also supported cell adhesion at greater distances. We found that the expression of the ECM protein thrombospondin-2 (THBS2 in HSPCs depends on the presence of the ligand type and its nanostructured presentation. Functionally, THBS2 proved to mediate adhesion of HSPCs. In conclusion, the present study shows that HSPCs are sensitive to the nanostructure of their microenvironment and that they are able to actively modulate their environment by secreting ECM factors.

  5. Parotid small cell carcinoma presenting with long-term survival after surgery alone: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanazawa Takeharu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Primary involvement of the salivary glands in small cell carcinoma is rare, and has one of the worst prognoses of salivary gland neoplasms. However, it has been reported that some cases have a favorable outcome, although the prognostic factors are still under consideration. Multidisciplinary therapy was usually required to achieve long-term survival. Recently, a resemblance of some small cell carcinomas of the salivary gland to cutaneous Merkel cell carcinoma was suggested; the latter have the potential for spontaneous regression, which is related to a favorable clinical outcome. Case presentation We present a locoregional advanced parotid small cell carcinoma with multiple lymph node metastases in an 87-year-old Asian woman. The tumor was controlled by surgery alone, and nine-year disease-free survival was achieved without any adjunctive therapy. To the best of our knowledge, this is the longest reported follow-up of head and neck small cell carcinoma. Conclusion We believe this to be the first case of small cell carcinoma with involvement of the salivary glands reported in the literature with a good outcome after surgery alone without any adjunctive therapy.

  6. IgE-mediated enhancement of CD4+ T cell responses in mice requires antigen presentation by CD11c+ cells and not by B cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frida Henningsson

    Full Text Available IgE antibodies, administered to mice together with their specific antigen, enhance antibody and CD4(+ T cell responses to this antigen. The effect is dependent on the low affinity receptor for IgE, CD23, and the receptor must be expressed on B cells. In vitro, IgE-antigen complexes are endocytosed via CD23 on B cells, which subsequently present the antigen to CD4(+ T cells. This mechanism has been suggested to explain also IgE-mediated enhancement of immune responses in vivo. We recently found that CD23(+ B cells capture IgE-antigen complexes in peripheral blood and rapidly transport them to B cell follicles in the spleen. This provides an alternative explanation for the requirement for CD23(+ B cells. The aim of the present study was to determine whether B-cell mediated antigen presentation of IgE-antigen complexes explains the enhancing effect of IgE on immune responses in vivo. The ability of spleen cells, taken from mice 1-4 h after immunization with IgE-antigen, to present antigen to specific CD4(+ T cells was analyzed. Antigen presentation was intact when spleens were depleted of CD19(+ cells (i.e., primarily B cells but was severely impaired after depletion of CD11c(+ cells (i.e., primarily dendritic cells. In agreement with this, the ability of IgE to enhance proliferation of CD4(+ T cells was abolished in CD11c-DTR mice conditionally depleted of CD11c(+ cells. Finally, the lack of IgE-mediated enhancemen of CD4(+ T cell responses in CD23(-/- mice could be rescued by transfer of MHC-II-compatible as well as by MHC-II-incompatible CD23(+ B cells. These findings argue against the idea that IgE-mediated enhancement of specific CD4(+ T cell responses in vivo is caused by increased antigen presentation by B cells. A model where CD23(+ B cells act as antigen transporting cells, delivering antigen to CD11c(+ cells for presentation to T cells is consistent with available experimental data.

  7. Ectopic expression of HLA-DO in mouse dendritic cells diminishes MHC class II antigen presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallas, Jennifer L; Tobin, Helen M; Lou, Olivia; Guo, Donglin; Sant'Angelo, Derek B; Denzin, Lisa K

    2004-08-01

    The MHC class II-like molecule HLA-DM (DM) (H-2M in mice) catalyzes the exchange of CLIP for antigenic peptides in the endosomes of APCs. HLA-DO (DO) (H-2O in mice) is another class II-like molecule that is expressed in B cells, but not in other APCs. Studies have shown that DO impairs or modifies the peptide exchange activity of DM. To further evaluate the role of DO in Ag processing and presentation, we generated transgenic mice that expressed the human HLA-DOA and HLA-DOB genes under the control of a dendritic cell (DC)-specific promoter. Our analyses of DCs from these mice showed that as DO levels increased, cell surface levels of A(b)-CLIP also increased while class II-peptide levels decreased. The presentation of some, but not all, exogenous Ags to T cells or T hybridomas was significantly inhibited by DO. Surprisingly, H-2M accumulated in DO-expressing DCs and B cells, suggesting that H-2O/DO prolongs the half-life of H-2M. Overall, our studies showed that DO expression impaired H-2M function, resulting in Ag-specific down-modulation of class II Ag processing and presentation.

  8. Antigen cross-presentation by dendritic cell subsets: one general or all sergeants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nierkens, Stefan; Tel, Jurjen; Janssen, Edith; Adema, Gosse J.

    2015-01-01

    Antigen cross-presentation describes the process through which dendritic cells (DCs) acquire exogenous antigens for presentation on MHC class I molecules. The ability to cross-present has been thought of as a feature of specialized DC subsets. Emerging data, however, suggest that the cross-presenting ability of each DC subset is tuned by and dependent on several factors, such as DC location and activation status, and the type of antigen and inflammatory signals. Thus, we argue that capacity of cross-presentation is not an exclusive trait of one or several distinct DC subtypes, but rather a common feature of the DC family in both mice and humans. Understanding DC subset activation and antigen-presentation pathways might yield improved tools and targets to exploit the unique cross-presenting capacity of DCs in immunotherapy. PMID:23540650

  9. The Paracoccidioides cell wall: past and present layers towards understanding interaction with the host

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosana ePuccia

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The cell wall of pathogenic fungi plays import roles in interaction with the host, so that its composition and structure may determine the course of infection. Here we present an overview of the current and past knowledge on the cell wall constituents of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and P. lutzii. These are temperature-dependent dimorphic fungi that cause paracoccidioidomycosis, a systemic granulomatous and debilitating disease. Focus is given on cell wall carbohydrate and protein contents, their immune-stimulatory features, adhesion properties, drug target characteristics, and morphological phase specificity. We offer a journey towards the future understanding of the dynamic life that takes place in the cell wall and of the changes that it may suffer when living in the human host.

  10. Mantle Cell Lymphoma of Intestine Presenting as Multiple Lymphomatous Polyposis with Intussusception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meena N. Jadhav

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mantle Cell Lymphoma (MCL is a distinct clinicopathological subtype of B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL accounting for 2-10% of all NHL cases. Gastrointestinal tract (GIT is the predominant site of extranodal MCL which commonly presents as Multiple Lymphomatous Polyposis (MLP. A 60 year old male presented with pain abdomen, diarrhea and weight loss of two months duration. On colonoscopy multiple polyps were found in the entire colon and rectum. Computed tomography revealed ileo-colic intussusception with nodularity in the lead point. Histopathology suggested features of MCL. On immunohistochemistry, the tumor cells were positive for CD20, CD5, Cyclin D1, negative for CD3, CD10, CD23, and CD45 RO

  11. Primary Pure Squamous Cell Carcinoma of Gallbladder Presenting as Acute Cholecystitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massood Hosseinzadeh

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Squamous cell carcinoma of the gallbladder is rare and constitutes only 0.5-3% of all malignancies of this organ. Most of the reported cases have had a component of adenocarcinoma. We report a 70-year-old man who presented with acute onset right upper quadrant pain. He operated on based on a presumptive diagnosis of acute cholecystitis according to clinical and ultrasonographic findings. Histopathological examination of the infiltrating mass of the gallbladder revealed well differentiated keratinized squamous cell carcinoma invading full wall thickness. Thorough evaluations revealed no other primary site for the tumor. Pure primary squamous cell carcinoma of the gallbladder is rarely reported. Clinicians and pathologists must be aware of its vague clinical presentations.

  12. Macropinocytosis in Phagocytes: Regulation of MHC Class-II-Restricted Antigen Presentation in Dendritic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenzhen eLiu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractDendritic cells (DCs are outstanding antigen presenting cells (APCs due to their robust ability to internalize extracellular antigens using endocytic processes such as receptor-mediated endocytosis, phagocytosis, and macropinocytosis. Macropinocytosis mediates the non-specific uptake of soluble antigens and occurs in DCs constitutively. Macropinocytosis plays a key role in DC-mediated antigen presentation to T cells against pathogens and the efficiency of macropinocytosis in antigen capture is regulated during the process of DC maturation. Here, we review the methods to study macropinocytosis, describe our current knowledge of the regulatory mechanisms of antigen uptake via macropinocytosis and the intracellular trafficking route followed by macropinocytosed antigens, and discuss the significance of macropinocytosis for DC function.

  13. Macropinocytosis in phagocytes: regulation of MHC class-II-restricted antigen presentation in dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhenzhen; Roche, Paul A

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are outstanding antigen presenting cells (APCs) due to their robust ability to internalize extracellular antigens using endocytic processes such as receptor-mediated endocytosis, phagocytosis, and macropinocytosis. Macropinocytosis mediates the non-specific uptake of soluble antigens and occurs in DCs constitutively. Macropinocytosis plays a key role in DC-mediated antigen presentation to T cells against pathogens and the efficiency of macropinocytosis in antigen capture is regulated during the process of DC maturation. Here, we review the methods to study macropinocytosis, describe our current knowledge of the regulatory mechanisms of antigen uptake via macropinocytosis and the intracellular trafficking route followed by macropinocytosed antigens, and discuss the significance of macropinocytosis for DC function.

  14. A homodimeric complex of HLA-G on normal trophoblast cells modulates antigen-presenting cells via LILRB1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apps, Richard; Gardner, Lucy; Sharkey, Andrew M; Holmes, Nick; Moffett, Ashley

    2007-07-01

    In healthy individuals, the non-classical MHC molecule HLA-G is only expressed on fetal trophoblast cells that invade the decidua during placentation. We show that a significant proportion of HLA-G at the surface of normal human trophoblast cells is present as a disulphide-linked homodimer of the conventional beta(2)m-associated HLA-I complex. HLA-G is a ligand for leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptors (LILR), which bind much more efficiently to dimeric HLA-G than to conventional HLA-I molecules. We find that a LILRB1-Fc fusion protein preferentially binds the dimeric form of HLA-G on trophoblast cells. We detect LILRB1 expression on decidual myelomonocytic cells; therefore, trophoblast HLA-G may modulate the function of these cells. Co-culture with HLA-G(+) cells does not inhibit monocyte-derived dendritic cell up-regulation of HLA-DR and costimulatory molecules on maturation, but did increase production of IL-6 and IL-10. Furthermore, proliferation of allogeneic lymphocytes was inhibited by HLA-G binding to LILRB1/2 on responding antigen-presenting cells (APC). As HLA-G is the only HLA-I molecule that forms beta(2)m-associated dimers with increased avidity for LILRB1, this interaction could represent a placental-specific signal to decidual APC. We suggest that the placenta is modulating maternal immune responses locally in the uterus through HLA-G, a trophoblast-specific, monomorphic signal present in almost every pregnancy. See accompanying commentary: (http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eji.200737515).

  15. Antigen-presenting cells in human cutaneous leishmaniasis due to Leishmania major

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    ElHassan, A M; Gaafar, A; Theander, T G

    1995-01-01

    In this study biopsies from skin lesions and draining lymph nodes of patients suffering from cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania major were examined by immunohistochemistry, and by light and electron microscopy to identify the types of antigen-presenting cells (APC) and their location. APC...

  16. Morbidity and CD4+ Cell Counts at Initial Presentation of a Cohort of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To describe the CD4+ cell counts, opportunistic infections and laboratory parameters of a cohort of HIV positive, HAART-naive patients at first presentation. Design: Cross sectional, prospective, descriptive, consecutive entry study. Setting: Kisumu District Hospital wards (medical, surgical) and medical outpatient ...

  17. Red Dot Basal Cell Carcinoma: Report of Cases and Review of This Unique Presentation of Basal Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Philip R

    2017-03-22

    Red dot basal cell carcinoma is a unique variant of basal cell carcinoma. Including the three patients described in this report, red dot basal cell carcinoma has only been described in seven individuals. This paper describes the features of two males and one female with red dot basal cell carcinoma and reviews the characteristics of other patients with this clinical subtype of basal cell carcinoma. A 70-year-old male developed a pearly-colored papule with a red dot in the center on his nasal tip. A 71-year-old male developed a red dot surrounded by a flesh-colored papule on his left nostril. Lastly, a 74-year-old female developed a red dot within an area of erythema on her left mid back. Biopsy of the lesions all showed nodular and/or superficial basal cell carcinoma. Correlation of the clinical presentation and pathology established the diagnosis of red dot basal cell carcinoma. The tumors were treated by excision using the Mohs surgical technique. Pubmed was searched with the keyword: basal, cell, cancer, carcinoma, dot, red, and skin. The papers generated by the search and their references were reviewed. Red dot basal cell carcinoma has been described in three females and two males; the gender was not reported in two patients. The tumor was located on the nose (five patients), back (one patient) and thigh (one patient). Cancer presented as a solitary small red macule or papule; often, the carcinoma was surrounded by erythema or a flesh-colored papule. Although basal cell carcinomas usually do not blanch after a glass microscope slide is pressed against them, the red dot basal cell carcinoma blanched after diascopy in two of the patients, resulting in a delay of diagnosis in one of these individuals. Dermoscopy may be a useful non-invasive modality for evaluating skin lesions when the diagnosis of red dot basal cell carcinoma is considered. Mohs surgery is the treatment of choice; in some of the patients, the ratio of the area of the postoperative wound to that

  18. Red Dot Basal Cell Carcinoma: Report of Cases and Review of This Unique Presentation of Basal Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Red dot basal cell carcinoma is a unique variant of basal cell carcinoma. Including the three patients described in this report, red dot basal cell carcinoma has only been described in seven individuals. This paper describes the features of two males and one female with red dot basal cell carcinoma and reviews the characteristics of other patients with this clinical subtype of basal cell carcinoma. A 70-year-old male developed a pearly-colored papule with a red dot in the center on his nasal tip. A 71-year-old male developed a red dot surrounded by a flesh-colored papule on his left nostril. Lastly, a 74-year-old female developed a red dot within an area of erythema on her left mid back. Biopsy of the lesions all showed nodular and/or superficial basal cell carcinoma. Correlation of the clinical presentation and pathology established the diagnosis of red dot basal cell carcinoma. The tumors were treated by excision using the Mohs surgical technique. Pubmed was searched with the keyword: basal, cell, cancer, carcinoma, dot, red, and skin. The papers generated by the search and their references were reviewed. Red dot basal cell carcinoma has been described in three females and two males; the gender was not reported in two patients. The tumor was located on the nose (five patients), back (one patient) and thigh (one patient). Cancer presented as a solitary small red macule or papule; often, the carcinoma was surrounded by erythema or a flesh-colored papule. Although basal cell carcinomas usually do not blanch after a glass microscope slide is pressed against them, the red dot basal cell carcinoma blanched after diascopy in two of the patients, resulting in a delay of diagnosis in one of these individuals. Dermoscopy may be a useful non-invasive modality for evaluating skin lesions when the diagnosis of red dot basal cell carcinoma is considered. Mohs surgery is the treatment of choice; in some of the patients, the ratio of the area of the postoperative wound to that

  19. Novel in vivo flow cytometry platform for early prognosis of metastatic activity of circulating tumor cells (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Jacqueline; Cai, Chenzhoung; Nedosekin, Dmitry A.; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2017-02-01

    Approximately 8 million people lose their lives due to cancer each year. Metastatic disease is responsible for 90% of those cancer-related deaths. Only viable circulating tumor cells (CTCs) that can survive in the blood circulation can create secondary tumors. Thus, real-time enumeration of CTCs and assessment of their viability in vivo has great biological significance. However, little progress has been made in this field. Conventional flow cytometry is the current technique being used for the assessment of cell viability, but there are many limitations to this technique: 1) cell properties may be altered during the extraction and processing method; 2) collection of cells from blood prevents the long-term study of individual cells in their natural biological environment; and 3) there are time-consuming preparation procedures. Whether it be for the assessment of antitumor drugs, where induction of apoptosis or necrosis is the preferred event, or the identification of nanoparticle-induced toxicity during nanotherapeutic treatment, it is clear that new approaches for assessment of the viability circulating blood cells and CTCs are urgently needed. We have developed a novel high speed, multicolor in vivo flow cytometry (FC) platform that integrates photoacoustic (PA) and fluorescence FC (PAFFC) and demonstrate its ability to enumerate rare circulating normal and abnormal (e.g. tumor) cells and assess their viability (e.g. apoptotic and necrotic) in a mouse model.

  20. Cinnamon extract suppresses experimental colitis through modulation of antigen-presenting cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Ho-Keun; Hwang, Ji-Sun; Lee, Choong-Gu; So, Jae-Seon; Sahoo, Anupama; Im, Chang-Rok; Jeon, Won Kyung; Ko, Byoung Seob; Lee, Sung Haeng; Park, Zee Yong; Im, Sin-Hyeog

    2011-02-28

    To investigate the anti-inflammatory effects of cinnamon extract and elucidate its mechanisms for targeting the function of antigen presenting cells. Cinnamon extract was used to treat murine macrophage cell line (Raw 264.7), mouse primary antigen-presenting cells (APCs, MHCII(+)) and CD11c(+) dendritic cells to analyze the effects of cinnamon extract on APC function. The mechanisms of action of cinnamon extract on APCs were investigated by analyzing cytokine production, and expression of MHC antigens and co-stimulatory molecules by quantitative real-time PCR and flow cytometry. In addition, the effect of cinnamon extract on antigen presentation capacity and APC-dependent T-cell differentiation were analyzed by [H(3)]-thymidine incorporation and cytokine analysis, respectively. To confirm the anti-inflammatory effects of cinnamon extract in vivo, cinnamon or PBS was orally administered to mice for 20 d followed by induction of experimental colitis with 2,4,6 trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid. The protective effects of cinnamon extract against experimental colitis were measured by checking clinical symptoms, histological analysis and cytokine expression profiles in inflamed tissue. Treatment with cinnamon extract inhibited maturation of MHCII(+) APCs or CD11c(+) dendritic cells (DCs) by suppressing expression of co-stimulatory molecules (B7.1, B7.2, ICOS-L), MHCII and cyclooxygenase (COX)-2. Cinnamon extract induced regulatory DCs (rDCs) that produce low levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines [interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-12, interferon (IFN)-γ and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α] while expressing high levels of immunoregulatory cytokines (IL-10 and transforming growth factor-β). In addition, rDCs generated by cinnamon extract inhibited APC-dependent T-cell proliferation, and converted CD4(+) T cells into IL-10(high) CD4(+) T cells. Furthermore, oral administration of cinnamon extract inhibited development and progression of intestinal colitis by inhibiting expression

  1. Establishment and characterization of a cell based artificial antigen-presenting cell for expansion and activation of CD8+ T cells ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Weijuan; Ji, Mingchun; Cao, Zhengfeng; Wang, Liheng; Qian, Yayun; Hu, Maozhi; Qian, Li; Pan, Xingyuan

    2008-02-01

    Artificial antigen-presenting cells are expected to stimulate the expansion and acquisition of optimal therapeutic features of T cells before infusion. Here CD32 that binds to a crystallizable fragment of IgG monoclonal antibody was genetically expressed on human K562 leukemia cells to provide a ligand for T-cell receptor. CD86 and 4-1BBL, which are ligands of co-stimulating receptors of CD28 and 4-1BB, respectively, were also expressed on K562 cells. Then we accomplished the artificial antigen-presenting cells by coupling K32/CD86/4-1BBL cell with OKT3 monoclonal antibody against CD3, named K32/CD86/4-1BBL/OKT3 cells. These artificial modified cells had the abilities of inducing CD8+ T cell activation, promoting CD8+ T cell proliferation, division, and long-term growth, inhibiting CD8+ T cell apoptosis, and enhancing CD8+ T cell secretion of IFN-gamma and perforin. Furthermore, antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes could be retained in the culture stimulated with K32/CD86/4-1BBL/OKT3 cells at least within 28 days. This approach was robust, simple, reproducible and economical for expansion and activation of CD8+ T cells and may have important therapeutic implications for adoptive immunotherapy.

  2. Exploiting absorption-induced self-heating in solar cells (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullbrich, Sascha; Fischer, Axel; Erdenebileg, Enkhtur; Koerner, Christian; Reineke, Sebastian; Leo, Karl; Vandewal, Koen

    2017-04-01

    Absorption of light inevitably leads to a self-heating of each type of solar cell, either due to the excess energy of absorbed photons or non-radiative recombination of charge carriers. Although the effect of temperature on solar cell parameters such as the open-circuit voltage are well known, it is often ignored in Suns-Voc measurements [1]. This measurement technique enables direct access to the diode ideality factor without an influence by series resistance. A frequently seen decrease of the ideality factor or a saturation of the open-circuit voltage at high illumination intensities is often attributed solely to surface recombination [2], the shape of the density of states (DOS) [3], or the quality of the back contact in inorganic solar cells [4]. In this work, we present an analytical model for taking into account absorption induced self-heating in Suns-Voc measurements and validate it for various solar cell technologies such as small molecule organic solar cells, perovskite solar cells, and inorganic solar cells. Furthermore, with an adapted Suns-Voc technique, we are able to not only correctly determine the ideality factor, but also the relevant energy gap of the solar cell, which is especially of interest in the field of novel solar cell technologies. [1] R.A. Sinton and A. Cuevas, EU PVSEC, 1152-1155 (2000) [2] K. Tvingstedt and C. Deibel, Adv. Energy Mater. 6, 1502230 (2016) [3] T. Kirchartz and J. Nelson, Phys. Rev. B 86, 165201 (2012) [4] S. Glunz, J. Nekarda, H. Maeckel et al., EU PVSEC, 849-853 (2007)

  3. The caspase-8/RIPK3 signaling axis in antigen presenting cells controls the inflammatory arthritic response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez, Salina; Montgomery, Anna B; Haines, G Kenneth; Bloomfield, Christina L; Cuda, Carla M

    2017-10-04

    Caspase-8 is a well-established initiator of apoptosis and suppressor of necroptosis, but maintains functions beyond cell death that involve suppression of receptor-interacting serine-threonine kinases (RIPKs). A genome-wide association study meta-analysis revealed an SNP associated with risk of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) development within the locus containing the gene encoding for caspase-8. Innate immune cells, like macrophages and dendritic cells, are gaining momentum as facilitators of autoimmune disease pathogenesis, and, in particular, RA. Therefore, we examined the involvement of caspase-8 within these antigen-presenting cell populations in the pathogenesis of an arthritis model that resembles the RA effector phase. Cre LysM Casp8 flox/flox and Cre CD11c Casp8 flox/flox mice were bred via a cross between Casp8 flox/flox and Cre LysM or Cre CD11c mice. RIPK3 -/- Cre LysM Casp8 flox/flox and RIPK3 -/- Cre CD11c Casp8 flox/flox mice were generated to assess RIPK3 contribution. Mice were subjected to K/BxN serum-transfer-induced arthritis. Luminex-based assays were used to measure cytokines/chemokines. Histological analyses were utilized to examine joint damage. Mixed bone marrow chimeras were generated to assess synovial cell survival. Flow cytometric analysis was employed to characterize cellular distribution. For arthritis, differences between the groups were assessed using two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) for repeated measurements. All other data were compared by the Mann-Whitney test. We show that intact caspase-8 signaling maintains opposing roles in lysozyme-M- and CD11c-expressing cells in the joint; namely, caspase-8 is crucial in CD11c-expressing cells to delay arthritis induction, while caspase-8 in lysozyme M-expressing cells hinders arthritis resolution. Caspase-8 is also implicated in the maintenance of synovial tissue-resident macrophages that can limit arthritis. Global loss of RIPK3 in both caspase-8 deletion constructs causes the response

  4. PMA-Linked Fluorescence for Rapid Detection of Viable Bacterial Endospores

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaDuc, Myron T.; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Mohapatra, Bidyut

    2012-01-01

    The most common approach for assessing the abundance of viable bacterial endospores is the culture-based plating method. However, culture-based approaches are heavily biased and oftentimes incompatible with upstream sample processing strategies, which make viable cells/spores uncultivable. This shortcoming highlights the need for rapid molecular diagnostic tools to assess more accurately the abundance of viable spacecraft-associated microbiota, perhaps most importantly bacterial endospores. Propidium monoazide (PMA) has received a great deal of attention due to its ability to differentiate live, viable bacterial cells from dead ones. PMA gains access to the DNA of dead cells through compromised membranes. Once inside the cell, it intercalates and eventually covalently bonds with the double-helix structures upon photoactivation with visible light. The covalently bound DNA is significantly altered, and unavailable to downstream molecular-based manipulations and analyses. Microbiological samples can be treated with appropriate concentrations of PMA and exposed to visible light prior to undergoing total genomic DNA extraction, resulting in an extract comprised solely of DNA arising from viable cells. This ability to extract DNA selectively from living cells is extremely powerful, and bears great relevance to many microbiological arenas.

  5. Mannosylation of virus-like particles enhances internalization by antigen presenting cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farah Al-Barwani

    Full Text Available Internalization of peptides by antigen presenting cells is crucial for the initiation of the adaptive immune response. Mannosylation has been demonstrated to enhance antigen uptake through mannose receptors, leading to improved immune responses. In this study we test the effect of surface mannosylation of protein-based virus-like particles (VLP derived from Rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV on uptake by murine and human antigen presenting cells. A monomannoside and a novel dimannoside were synthesized and successfully conjugated to RHDV VLP capsid protein, providing approximately 270 mannose groups on the surface of each virus particle. VLP conjugated to the mannoside or dimannoside exhibited significantly enhanced binding and internalization by murine dendritic cells, macrophages and B cells as well as human dendritic cells and macrophages. This uptake was inhibited by the inclusion of mannan as a specific inhibitor of mannose specific uptake, demonstrating that mannosylation of VLP targets mannose receptor-based uptake. Consistent with mannose receptor-based uptake, partial retargeting of the intracellular processing of RHDV VLP was observed, confirming that mannosylation of VLP provides both enhanced uptake and modified processing of associated antigens.

  6. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome presenting with neck pits and café au lait patches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasundram, Sathesh; Kovilpillai, Ferdinand Jesudian; Hopper, Colin

    2010-01-01

    A 10- year-old patient presented with a slow growing jaw swelling. The initial general examination did not reveal any significant findings. Conservative enucleation of the cyst confirmed it to be an odontogenic keratocyst. The patient remained asymptomatic for the following 2 years and subsequently presented cystic lesions in jaws with displaced teeth. These cysts were enucleated and were confirmed to be odontogenic keratocysts . The patient has been on regular follow up since then and subsequent scans have shown further occurrence of cysts in the jaws with displacement of the third molars. Clinical examination also revealed macrocephaly, fronto-parietal bossing, pitting on palmar and plantar surfaces, calcification of falx cerebri and splayed ribs, confirming the diagnosis of nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. He also presented with a cafi au lait patch and skin pits on the neck. The family history was negative for features of nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome is a condition that can cause significant morbidity if not detected early. Over the years this syndrome has presented with many other non specific phenotype presentation, of which the current finding may be one of This calls for meticulous assessment and examination of patients and a standardized protocol in screening and managing these patients that may facilitate a more beneficial outcome for the patient.

  7. Biomimetic Magnetosomes as Versatile Artificial Antigen-Presenting Cells to Potentiate T-Cell-Based Anticancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qianmei; Wei, Wei; Wang, Peilin; Zuo, Liping; Li, Feng; Xu, Jin; Xi, Xiaobo; Gao, Xiaoyong; Ma, Guanghui; Xie, Hai-Yan

    2017-09-20

    Adoptive T-cell transfer for cancer therapy relies on both effective ex vivo T-cell expansion and in vivo targeting performance. One promising but challenging method for accomplishing this purpose is to construct multifunctional artificial antigen-presenting cells (aAPCs). We herein developed biomimetic magnetosomes as versatile aAPCs, wherein magnetic nanoclusters were coated with azide-engineered leucocyte membranes and then decorated with T-cell stimuli through copper-free click chemistry. These nano aAPCs not only exhibited high performance for antigen-specific cytotoxic T-cell (CTL) expansion and stimulation but also visually and effectively guided reinfused CTLs to tumor tissues through magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic control. The persisting T cells were able to delay tumor growth in a murine lymphoma model, while the systemic toxicity was not notable. These results together demonstrated the excellent potential of this "one-but-all" aAPC platform for T-cell-based anticancer immunotherapy.

  8. Towards efficient cancer immunotherapy: advances in developing artificial antigen-presenting cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggermont, Loek J.; Paulis, Leonie E.; Tel, Jurjen; Figdor, Carl G.

    2014-01-01

    Active anti-cancer immune responses depend on efficient presentation of tumor antigens and co-stimulatory signals by antigen-presenting cells (APCs). Therapy with autologous natural APCs is costly and time-consuming and results in variable outcomes in clinical trials. Therefore, development of artificial APCs (aAPCs) has attracted significant interest as an alternative. We discuss the characteristics of various types of acellular aAPCs, and their clinical potential in cancer immunotherapy. The size, shape, and ligand mobility of aAPCs and their presentation of different immunological signals can all have significant effects on cytotoxic T cell activation. Novel optimized aAPCs, combining carefully tuned properties, may lead to efficient immunomodulation and improved clinical responses in cancer immunotherapy. PMID:24998519

  9. Mechanisms of lipid-antigen generation and presentation to T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Libero, Gennaro; Mori, Lucia

    2006-10-01

    The presentation of lipid antigens by CD1 molecules follows precise rules imposed by the biochemical nature of lipids. The structures of CD1-lipid complexes are elucidating how T-cell receptors interact with hydrophobic antigens. The mechanism of lipid uptake and the pathways followed by lipids embedded in the cell membrane contribute to the efficient presentation of exogenous and self-lipids. Lipid presentation is further regulated by the trafficking route of CD1 proteins and their precise membrane localization within endosomal vesicles. Moreover, the generation of immunogenic lipids might require adequate processing, which occurs in the presence of lipid-binding proteins, including CD1e. Here, we review recent experimental evidence that has revealed new protagonists involved in generating immunogenic lipids and has indicated unexpected biological mechanisms contributing to immune recognition.

  10. Intravascular large B-cell lymphoma presenting with fulminant pseudomembranous colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Ghaffar, Hasan; Grin, Andrea

    2013-05-01

    Intravascular large B-cell lymphoma is a rare entity that usually presents in late stages with non-specific symptoms. We present a case of an incidentally discovered intravascular large B-cell lymphoma in a 78-year-old man who underwent colectomy for medically refractory pseudomembranous colitis. The malignant lymphocytes were preferentially localized to small colonic submucosal vasculature, without any evidence of an extravascular tumor mass. The gastrointestinal system is an exceeding rare initial diagnostic site for intravascular lymphoma, and presentation with pseudomembranous colitis has not been previously reported. We discuss the current definition of intravascular lymphoma, clinicopathological variants, differential diagnoses, as well as current therapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. Acute secondary adrenal insufficiency as the presenting manifestation of small-cell lung carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Kinjal K; Anderson, Robert J

    2014-02-14

    A 66-year-old man, chronic smoker, presented with episodes of syncope, hypotension and constitutional symptoms. Initial evaluation revealed pre-renal azotaemia and acute secondary adrenal insufficiency.MRI performed was interpreted as a pituitary macroadenoma with enlargement of the infundibulum (stalk). Further endocrinological tests performed suggested central hypothyroidism and hypogonadism. Subsequent development of haemoptysis, headache and diplopia warranted further investigations, which revealed stage IV small-cell lung carcinoma with adrenal metastases. Subsequent brain imaging showed lesions in the brain parenchyma, pituitary and stalk, characteristic of metastases. Thus, we present a very atypical case of pituitary metastases presenting with acute secondary adrenal insufficiency.

  12. Human Invariant Natural Killer T Cells Respond to Antigen-Presenting Cells Exposed to Lipids from Olea europaea Pollen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abos Gracia, Beatriz; López Relaño, Juan; Revilla, Ana; Castro, Lourdes; Villalba, Mayte; Martín Adrados, Beatriz; Regueiro, Jose Ramon; Fernández-Malavé, Edgar; Martínez Naves, Eduardo; Gómez Del Moral, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    Allergic sensitization might be influenced by the lipids present in allergens, which can be recognized by natural killer T (NKT) cells on antigen-presenting cells (APCs). The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of olive pollen lipids in human APCs, including monocytes as well as monocyte-derived macrophages (Mϕ) and dendritic cells (DCs). Lipids were extracted from olive (Olea europaea) pollen grains. Invariant (i)NKT cells, monocytes, Mϕ, and DCs were obtained from buffy coats of healthy blood donors, and their cell phenotype was determined by flow cytometry. iNKT cytotoxicity was measured using a lactate dehydrogenase assay. Gene expression of CD1A and CD1D was performed by RT-PCR, and the production of IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, and TNF-α cytokines by monocytes, Mϕ, and DCs was measured by ELISA. Our results showed that monocytes and monocyte-derived Mϕ treated with olive pollen lipids strongly activate iNKT cells. We observed several phenotypic modifications in the APCs upon exposure to pollen-derived lipids. Both Mϕ and monocytes treated with olive pollen lipids showed an increase in CD1D gene expression, whereas upregulation of cell surface CD1d protein occurred only in Mϕ. Furthermore, DCs differentiated in the presence of human serum enhance their surface CD1d expression when exposed to olive pollen lipids. Finally, olive pollen lipids were able to stimulate the production of IL-6 but downregulated the production of lipopolysaccharide- induced IL-10 by Mϕ. Olive pollen lipids alter the phenotype of monocytes, Mϕ, and DCs, resulting in the activation of NKT cells, which have the potential to influence allergic immune responses. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. A DEFICIENCY OF ANTIGEN-PRESENTING CELLS IN PATIENTS WITH PULMONARY TUBERCULOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Sakhno

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. The phenotype and functional properties of antigen-presenting cells (APCs: blood monocytes and in vitro generated macrophages/dendritic cells were investigated in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis (TB, n = 192 with different levels of proliferative response to M. tuberculosis antigens (PPD-responsive vs PPD - anergic patients, n = 118 and 74, respectively. A functional deficiency of all 3 types of APCs was revealed in patients with TB. I.e., a monocyte disfunction was displayed by low CD86 and HLA-DR expression, 2-fold increase of CD14+CD16+ subset, high level of FasL+ and IL-10+ cells, and enhanced IL-10 and IL-6 production upon LPS-stimulation. The in vitro generated macrophages from blood monocytes challenged with GM-CSF, were characterized by shifted Th1/Th2 balance (down-regulated production of IFNγ and IL-18 combined with up-regulation of IL-6 and IL-10, and reduced allostimulatory activity in mixed lymphocyte culture. The dendritic cells were characterized by decrease of mature, activated CD25+ cells, low level of IFNγ production in conjunction with enhanced capacity to produce IL - 10 and IL-6, and profound reduction of functional (allostimulatory activity. The APC disfunction of were most prominent in PPD-anergic patients. A possible role of APC disfunctions in disturbed antigen-specific T-cell response to M. tuberculosis is discussed.

  14. Small Cell Lung Cancer Presenting as Severe Thrombocytopenia and Refractory Hypokalemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohan Mandaliya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 70-year-old female with a history of mild cirrhosis was referred by her primary care provider for a platelet count of 36,000/μL which had dropped from 47,000/μL in a week along with mild pain in extremities. Serum potassium was low (2.9 mEq/L in spite of the patient being recently started on potassium supplement on outpatient for hypokalemia. Initially thrombocytopenia was attributed to cirrhosis. However, platelet counts continued to drop to a nadir of 9000/μL in spite of several platelet transfusions. Hypokalemia was refractory to potassium supplements. Subsequent bone marrow biopsy revealed extensive marrow necrosis with a focus of small cell tumor cells of pulmonary origin. CT scan of the chest showed a spiculated left lung mass. The ACTH level was high, with normal rennin and aldosterone levels. The patient likely had ectopic ACTH syndrome from small cell lung cancer. She died within few days of diagnosis. Severe thrombocytopenia and refractory hypokalemia can rarely be initial presentations of small cell lung cancer. Thrombocytopenia should prompt an evaluation for bone marrow metastases and a search for undiagnosed systemic malignancy. In severe cases of metastases, bone marrow necrosis can be present. Refractory hypokalemia can be the sole presentation of ectopic ACTH production.

  15. Unique presentation of blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm: a single-center experience and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paluri, Ravi; Nabell, Lisle; Borak, Samuel; Peker, Deniz

    2015-12-01

    Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm (BPDCN) is a rare and highly aggressive hematological malignancy derived from precursors of plasmacytoid dendritic cells. Very few cases of BPDCN have been described with lack of skin manifestations at the time of diagnosis. Here we report two rare non-cutaneous presentations of BPDCN without obvious skin lesions at our institution and also the literature review. Our first patient had a unique presentation of BPDCN confined to the sinonasal region with central nervous system involvement. The second patient we report is also atypical with regard to widespread disease that uncharacteristically spared the skin and bone marrow. BPDCN is a rare hematological malignancy involving immature plasmacytoid dendritic cells. It poses a diagnostic challenge requiring multidisciplinary approach to manage this disease. It is important to identify effective therapies for both cutaneous and non-cutaneous presentations of BPDCN, since most cases are uniformly fatal with conventional chemotherapy alone. High-dose induction therapy based on acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) regimens, to achieve complete remission followed by allo-hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from related or unrelated donors is recommended to improve long-term survival in these patients. Larger scale studies are warranted to understand the pathophysiology of the disease and the important prognostic indicators for optimal management. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Interaction of T-cell and antigen presenting cell co-stimulatory genes in childhood IgE.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bottema, R.W.B.; Postma, D.S.; Reijmerink, N.E.; Thijs, C.; Stelma, F.F.; Smit, H.A.; van Schayck, C.P.; Brunekreef, B.; Koppelman, G.H.; Kerkhof, M.

    2010-01-01

    It is likely that multiple genes contribute to immunoglobulin (Ig)E production. Co-stimulatory molecules are crucial for the cross-talk between antigen presenting cells and T-lymphocytes which drives the IgE response. We evaluated gene-gene interactions of haplotype tagging polymorphisms in a

  17. Interaction of T-cell and antigen presenting cell co-stimulatory genes in childhood IgE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bottema, R. W. B.; Postma, D. S.; Reijmerink, N. E.; Thijs, C.; Stelma, F. F.; Simit, H. A.; van Schayck, C. P.; Brunekreef, B.; Koppelman, G. H.; Kerkhof, M.

    It is likely that multiple genes contribute to immunoglobulin (Ig)E production. Costimulatory molecules are crucial for the cross-talk between antigen presenting cells and T-lymphocytes which drives the IgE response. We evaluated gene-gene interactions of haplotype tagging polymorphisms in a pathway

  18. Langerhans' cell histiocytosis presenting with an intracranial epidural hematoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, K.-W. [Department of Pediatrics, Loma Linda Children' s Hospital and University Medical Center, Loma Linda, CA (United States); McLeary, M.S. [Div. of Pediatric Radiology, Loma Linda Children' s Hospital and University Medical Center, Loma Linda, CA (United States); Zuppan, C.W. [Dept. of Pathology, Loma Linda Children' s Hospital and University Medical Center, Loma Linda, CA (United States); Won, D.J. [Div. of Pediatric Neurosurgery, Loma Linda University Children' s Hospital, Loma Linda, CA (United States)

    2000-05-01

    An 8-year-old boy developed vomiting and severe headache following minor head trauma. A CT scan of the head demonstrated a lytic lesion of the skull and adjacent epidural hematoma. Surgical evacuation and removal of the skull lesion and hematoma were carried out, and pathologic evaluation resulted in a diagnosis of Langerhans' cell histiocytosis (LCH). Epidural involvement of Langerhans' cell histiocytosis is very rare, and we report the first case of LCH presenting as an intracranial epidural hematoma. (orig.)

  19. ImmunoChip Study Implicates Antigen Presentation to T Cells in Narcolepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faraco, Juliette; Lin, Ling; Kornum, Birgitte Rahbek

    2013-01-01

    receptor alpha (TRA@), variants in two additional narcolepsy loci, Cathepsin H (CTSH) and Tumor necrosis factor (ligand) superfamily member 4 (TNFSF4, also called OX40L), attained genome-wide significance. These findings underline the importance of antigen presentation by HLA Class II to T cells...... with hypocretin-deficient narcolepsy and 10,421 controls, all of European ancestry, using a custom genotyping array (ImmunoChip). Three loci located outside the Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) region on chromosome 6 were significantly associated with disease risk. In addition to a strong signal in the T cell...

  20. Roots of success: cultivating viable community forestry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacQueen, Duncan

    2009-05-15

    Is community forestry emerging from the shadows? The evidence shows that locally controlled enterprises can be economically viable, and often build on stronger social and environmental foundations than the big private-sector players. Certainly this is an industry in need of a shakeup. Many forests have become flashpoints where agro-industry, large-scale logging concerns and conservation interests clash, while forest-dependent communities are left out in the cold. Meanwhile, governments – driven by concerns over the climate impacts of deforestation – are having to gear up for legal, sustainable forestry production. Community forestry could be crucial to solving many of these challenges. By building on local core capabilities and developing strategic partnerships, they are forging key new business models that could transform the sector.

  1. An in silico analysis of nanoparticle/cell diffusive transfer: application to nano-artificial antigen-presenting cell:T-cell interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labowsky, Michael; Lowenthal, Justin; Fahmy, Tarek M

    2015-05-01

    Polymeric nanoparticles (nano-paAPCs) modified with T-cell antigens and encapsulating immunostimulatory or immunoinhibitory factors may act as artificial antigen-presenting cells to circulating immune cells, improving the selective delivery of encapsulated drug or cytokine to antigen-specific T-cells. Paracrine delivery of encapsulated agents from these nanoparticles to adjacent cells facilitate sustained delivery lowering the overall administered dose, thus enhancing the overall drug efficacy while reducing toxicity of pleiotropic factors. Little is known mathematically regarding the local concentration of released agent that accumulates around a nanoparticle that is near or embeds in a cell. These concentration fields are calculated here in an attempt to understand paracrine efficacy of these nano-paAPC systems. The significant factor accumulation that can occur if the particles were to embed in the cell membrane may explain observed experimental data regarding enhanced T-cell activation and nanoparticle-mediated improvement in the drug delivery process to non-internalizing cellular targets. In this interesting article, the authors utilized nanosized polymeric artificial presenting cells (nano-paAPC) that released cytokine to study the effects after interaction with T cells. It was found that nano-paAPC were able to embed into cell membrane, with subsequent enhanced T-cell activation. The findings provide further understanding of immune cell interaction and are considered to be important for designing nanoparticles engineered to deliver cytokines or immumodulatory factors to specific immune cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Silent Crooke's cell corticotroph adenoma of the pituitary gland presenting as delayed puberty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giri, Dinesh; Roncaroli, Federico; Sinha, Ajay; Didi, Mohammed; Senniappan, Senthil

    2017-01-01

    Corticotroph adenomas are extremely rare in children and adolescents. We present a 15-year-old boy who was investigated for delayed puberty (A1P2G1, bilateral testicular volumes of 3 mL each). There was no clinical or laboratory evidence suggestive of chronic illness, and the initial clinical impression was constitutional delay in puberty. Subsequently, MRI scan of the brain revealed the presence of a mixed cystic and solid pituitary lesion slightly displacing the optic chiasma. The lesion was removed by transphenoidal surgery and the biopsy confirmed the lesion to be pituitary adenoma. Furthermore, the adenoma cells also had Crooke's hyaline changes and were intensely positive for ACTH. However there was no clinical/biochemical evidence of ACTH excess. There was a spontaneous pubertal progression twelve months after the surgery (A2P4G4, with bilateral testicular volume of 8 mL). Crooke's cell adenoma is an extremely rare and aggressive variant of corticotroph adenoma that can uncommonly present as a silent corticotroph adenoma in adults. We report for the first time Crooke's cell adenoma in an adolescent boy presenting with delayed puberty. Constitutional delay of growth and puberty (CDGP) is a diagnosis of exclusion; hence a systematic and careful review should be undertaken while assessing boys with delayed puberty.Crooke's cell adenomas are a group of corticotroph adenomas that can rarely present in childhood and adolescence with delayed puberty.Crooke's cell adenomas can be clinically silent but are potentially aggressive tumours that require careful monitoring.

  3. CD47 Enhances In Vivo Functionality of Artificial Antigen-Presenting Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruns, Heiko; Bessell, Catherine; Varela, Juan Carlos; Haupt, Carl; Fang, Jerry; Pasemann, Shirin; Mackensen, Andreas; Oelke, Mathias; Schneck, Jonathan P; Schütz, Christian

    2015-05-01

    Artificial antigen-presenting cells, aAPC, have successfully been used to stimulate antigen-specific T-cell responses in vitro as well as in vivo. Although aAPC compare favorably with autologous dendritic cells in vitro, their effect in vivo might be diminished through rapid clearance by macrophages. Therefore, to prevent uptake and minimize clearance of aAPC by macrophages, thereby increasing in vivo functionality, we investigated the efficiency of "don't eat me" three-signal aAPC compared with classical two-signal aAPC. To generate "don't eat me" aAPC, CD47 was additionally immobilized onto classical aAPC (aAPC(CD47+)). aAPC and aAPC(CD47+) were analyzed in in vitro human primary T-cell and macrophage cocultures. In vivo efficiency was compared in a NOD/SCID T-cell proliferation and a B16-SIY melanoma model. This study demonstrates that aAPC(CD47+) in coculture with human macrophages show a CD47 concentration-dependent inhibition of phagocytosis, whereas their ability to generate and expand antigen-specific T cells was not affected. Furthermore, aAPC(CD47+)-generated T cells displayed equivalent killing abilities and polyfunctionality when compared with aAPC-generated T cells. In addition, in vivo studies demonstrated an enhanced stimulatory capacity and tumor inhibition of aAPC(CD47+) over normal aAPC in conjunction with diverging biodistribution in different organs. Our data for the first time show that aAPC functionalized with CD47 maintain their stimulatory capacity in vitro and demonstrate enhanced in vivo efficiency. Thus, these next-generation aAPC(CD47+) have a unique potential to enhance the application of the aAPC technology for future immunotherapy approaches. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  4. Molar Pregnancy with a Co-Existing Viable Fetus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruya Deveer

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available     The aim of this study was to report the clinical features, management, and outcome of a case of molar pregnancy with a coexisting viable fetus and to review the literature. In this article, we report a case of pregnancy with diffuse placental molar change and a normal fetus which presented with hyperemesis gravidarum and hyperthyroidism. Genetic amniocentesis showed normal fetal karyotype. A healthy full-term live male infant was delivered by cesarean section. In molar pregnancies with a normal karyotype fetus, with intensive maternal follow-up, continuation of pregnancy can be suggested.

  5. EBV driven natural killer cell disease of the central nervous system presenting as subacute cognitive decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brett, Francesca M; Flavin, Richard; Chen, Daphne; Loftus, Teresa; Looby, Seamus; McCarthy, Allan; de Gascun, Cillian; Jaffe, Elaine S; Nor, Nurul; Javadpour, Mohsen; McCabe, Dominick

    2017-11-01

    Brain biopsy in patients presenting with subacute encephalopathyis never straightforward and only undertaken when a 'treatable condition' is a realistic possibility. This 63 year old right handed, immunocompetent Caucasian woman presented with an 8 month history of rapidly progressive right-sided hearing impairment, a 4 month history of intermittent headaches, tinnitus, 'dizziness', dysphagia, nausea and vomiting, with the subsequent evolution of progressive gait ataxia and a subacute global encephalopathy. The possibility of CJD was raised. Brain biopsy was carried out. Western blot for prion protein was negative. She died 9 days later and autopsy brain examination confirmed widespread subacute infarction due to an EBV positive atypical NK/T-cell infiltrate with positivity for CD3, CD56, granzyme B, perforin and EBER with absence of CD4, CD5 and CD8 expression. Molecular studies for T-cell clonality were attempted but failed due to insufficient DNA quality. Serology was consistent with past EBV infection (EBV VCA and EBNA IgG Positive). There was no evidence of disease outside the CNS. Primary central nervous system NK/T-cell lymphoma is extremely rare. The rare reported cases all present with a discrete intracranial mass, unlike the diffuse infiltrative pattern in this case. Whilst the diffuse interstitial pattern is reminiscent of chronic active EBV infection (CAEBV) seen in other organ systems such as the liver and bone marrow, the clinical presentation and epidemiologic profile are not typical for CAEBV.

  6. Differential alteration of lipid antigen presentation to NKT cells due to imbalances in lipid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schümann, Jens; Facciotti, Federica; Panza, Luigi; Michieletti, Mario; Compostella, Federica; Collmann, Anthony; Mori, Lucia; De Libero, Gennaro

    2007-06-01

    Deficiencies in enzymes of the lysosomal glycosphingolipid degradation pathway or in lysosomal lipid transfer proteins cause an imbalance in lipid metabolism and induce accumulation of certain lipids. A possible impact of such an imbalance on the presentation of lipid antigens to lipid-reactive T cells has only been hypothesized but not extensively studied so far. Here we demonstrate that presentation of lipid antigens to, and development of, lipid-reactive CD1d-restricted NKT cells, are impaired in mice deficient in the lysosomal enzyme beta-galactosidase (betaGal) or the lysosomal lipid transfer protein Niemann-Pick C (NPC) 2. Importantly, the residual populations of NKT cells selected in betaGal-/- and NPC2-/- mice showed differential TCR and CD4 repertoire characteristics, suggesting that differential selecting CD1d:lipid antigen complexes are formed. Furthermore, we provide direct evidence that accumulation of lipids impairs lipid antigen presentation in both cases. However, the mechanisms by which imbalanced lipid metabolism affected lipid antigen presentation were different. Based on these results, the impact of lipid accumulation should be generally considered in the interpretation of immunological deficiencies found in mice suffering from lipid metabolic disorders.

  7. Dexamethasone inhibits the antigen presentation of dendritic cells in MHC class II pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, J; Ju, D; Wang, Q; Zhang, M; Xia, D; Zhang, L; Yu, H; Cao, X

    2001-04-02

    Glucocorticoids (GC) are physiological inhibitors of inflammatory responses and are widely used as anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive agents in treatment of many autoimmune and allergic diseases. In the present study, we demonstrated that one of the mechanisms by which GC can suppress the immune responses is to inhibit the differentiation and antigen presentation of dendritic cells (DC). DC were differentiated from murine bone marrow hematopoietic progenitor cells by culture with GM-CSF and IL-4 with or without dexamethasone (Dex). Our data showed that Dex, in a dose dependent manner, down-regulated surface expression of CD86, CD40, CD54 and MHC class II molecules by DC, but the expression of MHC class I, CD80, CD95 and CD95L were not affected. In addition, Dex-treated DC showed an impaired function to activate alloreactive T cells and to secrete IL-Ibeta and IL-12p70. Moreover, Dex inhibited DC to present antigen by MHC class II pathway. However, the endocytotic activity of DC was not affected. The inhibitory effect of Dex on the expression of costimulatory molecules and the antigen-presenting capacity of DC could be blocked by the addition of RU486, a potent steroid hormone antagonist, suggesting the requirement of binding to cytosolic receptors in the above-described action of Dex. Since DC have the unique property to present antigen to responding naive T cells and are required in the induction of a primary response, the functional suppression of DC by Dex may be one of the mechanisms by which GC regulate immune responses in vivo.

  8. A case of squamous cell carcinoma of lung presenting with paraneoplastic type of acanthosis nigricans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhasis Mukherjee

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A 70-years-old male presented with blackening of both hands and face for last six months which was progressive and attended dermatology outpatients department. Dermatologist opined the skin lesions as acanthosis nigricans. He was referred to our department to evaluate for any underlying internal malignancy as he was a smoker. His chest X-ray revealed right sided hilar prominence with a mid zone cavity with fluid level. Fibreoptic bronchoscopy was done, there was one ulcerative growth in right middle lobe bronchus. Biopsy from the ulcer revealed probable squamous cell carcinoma. CT scan of thorax was also done and CT guided FNAC of Rt lung lesion yielded non small cell carcinoma. His skin lesions were also biopsied and diagnosis of acanthosis nigricans was confirmed. Here we report a case of acanthosis nigricans associated with non-small cell cancer of lung.

  9. Renal epithelioid angiomyolipoma presenting clinically as renal cell carcinoma – A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.S. Johnson

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We describe a 22-year old female who presented with a 5-year history of a palpable, painless mass in the right flank. Computerized tomography demonstrated a solid renal mass measuring 18 cm × 13 cm with peripheral calcification, areas of vascularity and necrosis. The appearance suggested renal cell carcinoma or nephroblastoma, but percutaneous renal biopsy suggested an adrenal origin. At right radical nephrectomy, the adrenal gland was completely normal. Histology showed sheets and nests of epithelioid cells with abundant eosinophilic to clear cytoplasm, confirming a diagnosis of epithelioid angiomyolipoma (EAML, a rare mesenchymal tumor belonging to the perivascular epithelioid cell tumor family (PEComas. At 33 months followup, there was no evidence of recurrence or metastases.

  10. Human macrophages and dendritic cells can equally present MART-1 antigen to CD8(+ T cells after phagocytosis of gamma-irradiated melanoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Marcela Barrio

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DC can achieve cross-presentation of naturally-occurring tumor-associated antigens after phagocytosis and processing of dying tumor cells. They have been used in different clinical settings to vaccinate cancer patients. We have previously used gamma-irradiated MART-1 expressing melanoma cells as a source of antigens to vaccinate melanoma patients by injecting irradiated cells with BCG and GM-CSF or to load immature DC and use them as a vaccine. Other clinical trials have used IFN-gamma activated macrophage killer cells (MAK to treat cancer patients. However, the clinical use of MAK has been based on their direct tumoricidal activity rather than on their ability to act as antigen-presenting cells to stimulate an adaptive antitumor response. Thus, in the present work, we compared the fate of MART-1 after phagocytosis of gamma-irradiated cells by clinical grade DC or MAK as well as the ability of these cells to cross present MART-1 to CD8(+ T cells. Using a high affinity antibody against MART-1, 2A9, which specifically stains melanoma tumors, melanoma cell lines and normal melanocytes, the expression level of MART-1 in melanoma cell lines could be related to their ability to stimulate IFN-gamma production by a MART-1 specific HLA-A*0201-restricted CD8(+ T cell clone. Confocal microscopy with Alexa Fluor®(647-labelled 2A9 also showed that MART-1 could be detected in tumor cells attached and/or fused to phagocytes and even inside these cells as early as 1 h and up to 24 h or 48 h after initiation of co-cultures between gamma-irradiated melanoma cells and MAK or DC, respectively. Interestingly, MART-1 was cross-presented to MART-1 specific T cells by both MAK and DC co-cultured with melanoma gamma-irradiated cells for different time-points. Thus, naturally occurring MART-1 melanoma antigen can be taken-up from dying melanoma cells into DC or MAK and both cell types can induce specific CD8(+ T cell cross-presentation thereafter.

  11. Challenges Considering the Degradation of Cell Components in Commercial Lithium-Ion Cells: A Review and Evaluation of Present Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleiner, Karin; Ehrenberg, Helmut

    2017-06-01

    individual cell components. Although the degradation of materials is the key consideration in achieving lower costs, a higher safety standard, higher energy densities and a longer lifetime, the degradation of the individual cell components in dependence on the operation conditions has hardly been investigated and is poorly understood. The present work reviews known material degradations in commercial lithium-ion cells, shows a way to analyze such degradations in dependence on the operation conditions and describes how these degradation processes lead to observed performance drops.

  12. Stressful Presentations: Mild Chronic Cold Stress in Mice Influences Baseline Properties of Dendritic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen Marie Kokolus

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The ability of dendritic cells to stimulate and regulate T cells is critical to effective anti-tumor immunity. Therefore, it is important to fully recognize any inherent factors which may influence DC function under experimental conditions, especially in laboratory mice since they are used so heavily to study immune responses. Physiological stress is well recognized to impair several arms of immune protection. The goals of this report are to briefly summarize previous work revealing how DCs respond to various forms of physiologically relevant stress and to present new data highlighting the potential for chronic mild cold stress inherent in mice housed at standard ambient temperatures required for laboratory mice to influence baseline DCs properties. Since recent data from our group shows that CD8+ T cell function is altered by mild chronic cold stress and since DC function is crucial for CD8+ T cell activation, we wondered whether mild cold stress may also be influencing DC properties. We found increased numbers of splenic DCs (CD11c+ in cold stressed mice compared to mice housed at a thermoneutral temperature, which significantly reduces cold stress. However, many of the DCs which are expanded in cold stressed mice express an immature phenotype. We also found that antigen presentation and ability of splenocytes to activate T cells were impaired compared to that seen in DCs isolated from mice at thermoneutrality. The new data presented here strongly suggest that the housing temperature of mice can affect fundamental properties of DC function which in turn could be influencing the response of DCs to added experimental stressors or other treatments.

  13. A homodimeric complex of HLA-G on normal trophoblast cells modulates antigen-presenting cells via LILRB1

    OpenAIRE

    Apps, Richard; Gardner, Lucy; Sharkey, Andrew M.; Holmes, Nick; Moffett, Ashley

    2007-01-01

    In healthy individuals, the non-classical MHC molecule HLA-G is only expressed on fetal trophoblast cells that invade the decidua during placentation. We show that a significant proportion of HLA-G at the surface of normal human trophoblast cells is present as a disulphide-linked homodimer of the conventional ?2m-associated HLA-I complex. HLA-G is a ligand for leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptors (LILR), which bind much more efficiently to dimeric HLA-G than to conventional HLA-I molecules...

  14. Large Cell Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Rectum Presenting with Extensive Metastatic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinay Minocha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Rectal large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma (LCNEC is a poorly differentiated neoplasm that is very rare and belongs within the poorest prognostic subgroup among primary colorectal neoplasms. Here, we describe a case of LCNEC of the rectum, which highlights the aggressive clinical course and poor prognosis associated with this disease. Case Presentation. We report a case of a 63-year-old male who presented to our hospital with a one-month history of lower abdominal pain, constipation, and weight loss. A computed tomography (CT scan of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis revealed a rectal mass as well as metastatic disease of the liver and lung. Flexible sigmoidoscopy revealed a fungating, ulcerated and partially obstructing rectal mass located 6 cm from the anal verge. This mass was biopsied and pathological examination of the resected specimen revealed features consistent with a large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma. Conclusion. Rectal large cell neuroendocrine carcinomas are rare and have a significantly worse prognosis than adenocarcinomas. At diagnosis, a higher stage and metastatic disease are likely to be found. It is important to differentiate large cell, poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas from adenocarcinomas of the colon and rectum pathologically because patients may benefit from alternative cytotoxic chemotherapeutic regimens.

  15. Effects of aspirin on small-cell lung cancer mortality and metastatic presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddison, Paul

    2017-04-01

    Although meta-analysis data have shown that taking regular aspirin may reduce lung cancer mortality, individual trial data results are conflicting, and the data on the effects of aspirin on different histological subtypes of lung tumours, in particular small-cell lung cancer, are sparse. We conducted a prospective observational study of 313 patients with a new diagnosis of small-cell lung cancer and recorded use of aspirin before and after tumour diagnosis. Seventy-one (23%) patients were taking regular daily aspirin for more than 2 years at the time of tumour diagnosis. We found that regular use of aspirin had no effect on survival nor metastatic presentation compared to data from small-cell lung cancer patients not taking aspirin. The lack of survival benefit in patients with small-cell lung cancer taking long-term aspirin may be due to the low expression of cyclooxygenase-2 in small-cell lung cancer tissue. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Intravascular Large B-Cell Lymphoma Presenting as Interstitial Lung Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Vali Khojeini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Intravascular large B-cell lymphoma (IVLBL is a rare subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma that resides in the lumen of blood vessels. Patients typically present with nonspecific findings, particularly bizarre neurologic symptoms, fever, and skin lesions. A woman presented with shortness of breath and a chest CT scan showed diffuse interstitial thickening and ground glass opacities suggestive of an interstitial lung disease. On physical exam she was noted to have splenomegaly. The patient died and at autopsy was found to have an IVLBL in her lungs as well as nearly all her organs that were sampled. Although rare, IVLBL should be included in the differential diagnosis of interstitial lung disease and this case underscores the importance of the continuation of autopsies.

  17. An unusual co-presentation of rhinolithiasis and squamous cell carcinoma in the nasal cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özdemir, Süleyman; Görgülü, Orhan; Akbaş, Yücel; Selçuk, Tahsin; Sayar, Hamide; Tarkan, Özgür

    2012-07-01

    Rhinoliths are nasal stones that result from mineralisation of salts around an endogenous or exogenous nidus within the nasal cavity. They are uncommon nasal masses and usually unilateral and single, situated in the floor of the nose. The patient typically presents with nasal obstruction, facial pain and foul-smelling nasal secretion. To the best of our knowledge, the occurrence of squamous cell carcinoma with rhinolithiasis has not been previously reported in the English-language literature. In this article, we present a 63-year-old man, who had unilateral rhinolithiasis with squamous cell carcinoma within the nasal cavity. Copyright © 2011 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Laryngeal Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis Presenting with Neck Mass in an Adult Woman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesam Jahandideh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH is a very rare condition that commonly affects the head and neck region. There are very few cases of isolated laryngeal involvement by LCH, mostly reported in pediatric patients. Here, we report a case of laryngeal LCH in a 62-year-old woman presenting with a neck mass several weeks ago. The clinical and histopathological findings are reported with a brief discussion about the disease.

  19. Collective Genetic Interaction Effects and the Role of Antigen Presenting Cells in Autoimmune Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-12

    information contained within genome-wide associa- tion studies to improve individual prediction of complex disease risk. Hum Mol Genet . 2009; 18 (18):3525–31...Rosenstiel P, Albrecht M, Stenzel A, et al. Sarcoidosis is associated with a truncating splice site mutation in BTNL2. Nat Genet . 2005; 37(4):357–64. Epub...RESEARCH ARTICLE Collective Genetic Interaction Effects and the Role of Antigen-Presenting Cells in Autoimmune Diseases Hyung Jun Woo*, Chenggang Yu

  20. Small cell carcinoma of prostate presenting with Cushing′s syndrome

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    Selahattin Çaliskan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Small cell carcinoma of prostate (SCPCa was initially described by Wenk et al. in 1977. SCPCa is a very rare cancer that accounts for only 0.5-2% of all prostate carcinomas. Although, this pathology is usually accompanied with prostate adenocarcinomas, there are a few hypotheses about the origin of SCPCa. Poorly differentiated acinar adenocarcinoma must be distinguished from SCPCa in histopathological examination. These patients may present with different paraneoplastic syndromes. Early diagnosis is very important because of the aggressive tumor behavior. Here, we report a patient who presented with Cushing syndrome and thereafter diagnosed with SCPCa.

  1. Thermal Conductivity of Compounds Present in the Side Ledge in Aluminium Electrolysis Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheribi, Aïmen E.; Chartrand, Patrice

    2017-11-01

    This paper presents a database for the temperature-dependent thermal conductivity of compounds potentially present in the side ledge formed in aluminium electrolysis cells, between the molten electrolyte used to dissolve the alumina and the side wall. The database is given in the form of an analytical model with sets of parameters for each compound. To determine the model parameters, we considered a robust optimisation approach based on reliable models derived from fundamental physics. Where data are missing, first-principles calculations are utilized to estimate the parameters directly. For all compounds for which data are available, the model's predictions are found to be in very good agreement with reported experimental data.

  2. EBV driven natural killer cell disease of the central nervous system presenting as subacute cognitive decline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca M. Brett

    2017-11-01

    This 63 year old right handed, immunocompetent Caucasian woman presented with an 8 month history of rapidly progressive right-sided hearing impairment, a 4 month history of intermittent headaches, tinnitus, ‘dizziness’, dysphagia, nausea and vomiting, with the subsequent evolution of progressive gait ataxia and a subacute global encephalopathy. The possibility of CJD was raised. Brain biopsy was carried out. Western blot for prion protein was negative. She died 9 days later and autopsy brain examination confirmed widespread subacute infarction due to an EBV positive atypical NK/T-cell infiltrate with positivity for CD3, CD56, granzyme B, perforin and EBER with absence of CD4, CD5 and CD8 expression. Molecular studies for T-cell clonality were attempted but failed due to insufficient DNA quality. Serology was consistent with past EBV infection (EBV VCA and EBNA IgG Positive. There was no evidence of disease outside the CNS. Primary central nervous system NK/T-cell lymphoma is extremely rare. The rare reported cases all present with a discrete intracranial mass, unlike the diffuse infiltrative pattern in this case. Whilst the diffuse interstitial pattern is reminiscent of chronic active EBV infection (CAEBV seen in other organ systems such as the liver and bone marrow, the clinical presentation and epidemiologic profile are not typical for CAEBV.

  3. Silent Crooke’s cell corticotroph adenoma of the pituitary gland presenting as delayed puberty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh Giri

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Corticotroph adenomas are extremely rare in children and adolescents. We present a 15-year-old boy who was investigated for delayed puberty (A1P2G1, bilateral testicular volumes of 3 mL each. There was no clinical or laboratory evidence suggestive of chronic illness, and the initial clinical impression was constitutional delay in puberty. Subsequently, MRI scan of the brain revealed the presence of a mixed cystic and solid pituitary lesion slightly displacing the optic chiasma. The lesion was removed by transphenoidal surgery and the biopsy confirmed the lesion to be pituitary adenoma. Furthermore, the adenoma cells also had Crooke’s hyaline changes and were intensely positive for ACTH. However there was no clinical/biochemical evidence of ACTH excess. There was a spontaneous pubertal progression twelve months after the surgery (A2P4G4, with bilateral testicular volume of 8 mL. Crooke’s cell adenoma is an extremely rare and aggressive variant of corticotroph adenoma that can uncommonly present as a silent corticotroph adenoma in adults. We report for the first time Crooke’s cell adenoma in an adolescent boy presenting with delayed puberty.

  4. Reverse transcriptase real-time PCR for detection and quantification of viable Campylobacter jejuni directly from poultry faecal samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bui, Thanh Xuan; Wolff, Anders; Madsen, Mogens

    2012-01-01

    and quantification of viable Campylobacter jejuni directly from chicken faecal samples. The results of this method anda DNA-based quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) method were compared with those of a bacterial culture method. Using bacterial culture andRT-qPCR methods, viable C. jejuni cells could be detected...

  5. Immune tolerance maintained by cooperative interactions between T cells and antigen presenting cells shapes a diverse TCR repertoire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharine eBest

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The T cell population in an individual needs to avoid harmful activation by self-peptides while maintaining the ability to respond to an unknown set of foreign peptides. This property is acquired by a combination of thymic and extra-thymic mechanisms. We extend current models for the development of self/non-self discrimination to consider the acquisition of self-tolerance as an emergent system level property of the overall T cell receptor repertoire. We propose that tolerance is established at the level of the antigen presenting cell/T cell cluster, which facilitates and integrates co-operative interactions between T cells of different specificity. The threshold for self-reactivity is therefore imposed at a population level, and not at the level of the individual T cell/antigen encounter. Mathematically, the model can be formulated as a linear programming optimisation problem, which can be implemented as a multiplicative update algorithm which shows a rapid convergence to a stable state. The model constrains self-reactivity within a predefined threshold, but maintains the diversity and cross reactivity which are key characteristics of human T cell immunity. We show further that the size of individual clones in the model repertoire remains heterogeneous, and that new clones can establish themselves even when the repertoire is stable. Our study combines the salient features of the danger model of self/non-self discrimination with the concepts of quorum sensing, and extends repertoire generation models to encompass the establishment of tolerance. Furthermore, the dynamic and continuous repertoire reshaping which underlies tolerance in this model suggests opportunities for therapeutic intervention to achieve long-term tolerance following transplantation.

  6. Three-day dendritic cells for vaccine development: Antigen uptake, processing and presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schendel Dolores J

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antigen-loaded dendritic cells (DC are capable of priming naïve T cells and therefore represent an attractive adjuvant for vaccine development in anti-tumor immunotherapy. Numerous protocols have been described to date using different maturation cocktails and time periods for the induction of mature DC (mDC in vitro. For clinical application, the use of mDC that can be generated in only three days saves on the costs of cytokines needed for large scale vaccine cell production and provides a method to produce cells within a standard work-week schedule in a GMP facility. Methods In this study, we addressed the properties of antigen uptake, processing and presentation by monocyte-derived DC prepared in three days (3d mDC compared with conventional DC prepared in seven days (7d mDC, which represent the most common form of DC used for vaccines to date. Results Although they showed a reduced capacity for spontaneous antigen uptake, 3d mDC displayed higher capacity for stimulation of T cells after loading with an extended synthetic peptide that requires processing for MHC binding, indicating they were more efficient at antigen processing than 7d DC. We found, however, that 3d DC were less efficient at expressing protein after introduction of in vitro transcribed (ivtRNA by electroporation, based on published procedures. This deficit was overcome by altering electroporation parameters, which led to improved protein expression and capacity for T cell stimulation using low amounts of ivtRNA. Conclusions This new procedure allows 3d mDC to replace 7d mDC for use in DC-based vaccines that utilize long peptides, proteins or ivtRNA as sources of specific antigen.

  7. The Conceptual Mechanism for Viable Organizational Learning Based on Complex System Theory and the Viable System Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Dia; You, Yeongmahn; Song, Ji Hoon

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to explore the possibility of viable learning organizations based on identifying viable organizational learning mechanisms. Two theoretical foundations, complex system theory and viable system theory, have been integrated to provide the rationale for building the sustainable organizational learning mechanism. The…

  8. Precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia presenting as obstructive jaundice: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awasum Michael

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Acute leukemias very rarely present with jaundice. Herein we report a case of precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia that presented with jaundice in an adult. Case presentation A 44-year-old Hispanic man presented with right upper quadrant abdominal pain and jaundice. His initial blood work revealed pancytopenia and hyperbilirubinemia. Direct bilirubin was more than 50% of the total. His imaging studies were unremarkable except for hepatomegaly. All blood screening tests for various hepatocellular etiologies were normal. A diagnosis of precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia was made upon liver biopsy. It also showed lymphocytic infiltration of the hepatic parenchyma leading to bile stasis. The diagnosis was subsequently confirmed upon bone marrow biopsy. The patient was treated with a hyperfractionated cyclophosphamide/vincristine/doxorubicin/dexamethasone regimen. Conclusion Acute lymphoblastic leukemia should be one of the differential diagnoses that should be considered when initial work-up for jaundice is inconclusive. Some cases of acute lymphoblastic leukemia have been reported in both adults and children to have presented with the initial manifestation of jaundice, but only a few had no radiographic evidence of biliary obstruction. Such presentation can pose a serious diagnostic dilemma for clinicians. This manuscript attempts to highlight it. Moreover, we believe that if acute lymphoblastic leukemia presentations similar to this case continue to be reported in adults or children, a specific immunophenotypic expression and cytogenetic abnormality may be found to be associated with hepatic infiltration by leukemia. This may substantially contribute to the further understanding of the pathophysiology of this hematologic disease.

  9. Renal Cell Carcinoma Metastatic to Thyroid Gland, Presenting Like Anaplastic Carcinoma of Thyroid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid Riaz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Renal cell carcinoma (RCC has unpredictable and diverse behavior. The classic triad of hematuria, loin pain, and abdominal mass is uncommon. At time of diagnosis, 25%–30% of patients are found to have metastases. Bones, lungs, liver, and brain are the frequent sites of metastases. RCC with metastasis to the head and neck region and thyroid gland is the rarest manifestation and anaplastic carcinoma behaving metastatic thyroid mass is an extremely rare presentation of RCC. Case Presentation. A 56-year-old Saudi man with past history of right radical nephrectomy 5 years back presented with 3 months history of rapid increasing neck mass with dysphagia, presenting like anaplastic thyroid carcinoma. Tru-cut biopsy turned out to be metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Patient was treated with radiation therapy 30 Gy in 10 fractions to mass. Patient died 4 months after the discovery of anaplastic thyroid looking metastasis. Conclusion. Rapidly progressing thyroid metastases secondary to RCC are rare and found often unresectable which are not amenable to surgery. Palliative radiotherapy can be considered for such patients.

  10. The effect of CpG-ODN on antigen presenting cells of the foal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaminio, M Julia BF; Borges, Alexandre S; Nydam, Daryl V; Horohov, David W; Hecker, Rolf; Matychak, Mary Beth

    2007-01-01

    Background Cytosine-phosphate-guanosine oligodeoxynucleotide (CpG-ODN) has been used successfully to induce immune responses against viral and intracellular organisms in mammals. The main objective of this study was to test the effect of CpG-ODN on antigen presenting cells of young foals. Methods Peripheral blood monocytes of foals (n = 7) were isolated in the first day of life and monthly thereafter up to 3 months of life. Adult horse (n = 7) monocytes were isolated and tested once for comparison. Isolated monocytes were stimulated with IL-4 and GM-CSF (to obtain dendritic cells, DC) or not stimulated (to obtain macrophages). Macrophages and DCs were stimulated for 14–16 hours with either CpG-ODN, LPS or not stimulated. The stimulated and non-stimulated cells were tested for cell surface markers (CD86 and MHC class II) using flow cytometry, mRNA expression of cytokines (IL-12, IFNα, IL-10) and TLR-9 using real time quantitative RT-PCR, and for the activation of the transcription factor NF-κB p65 using a chemiluminescence assay. Results The median fluorescence of the MHC class II molecule in non-stimulated foal macrophages and DCs at birth were 12.5 times and 11.2 times inferior, respectively, than adult horse cells (p = 0.009). That difference subsided at 3 months of life (p = 0.3). The expression of the CD86 co-stimulatory molecule was comparable in adult horse and foal macrophages and DCs, independent of treatment. CpG-ODN stimulation induced IL-12p40 (53 times) and IFNα (23 times) mRNA expression in CpG-ODN-treated adult horse DCs (p = 0.078), but not macrophages, in comparison to non-stimulated cells. In contrast, foal APCs did not respond to CpG-ODN stimulation with increased cytokine mRNA expression up to 3 months of age. TLR-9 mRNA expression and NF-kB activation (NF-kB p65) in foal DCs and macrophages were comparable (p > 0.05) to adult horse cells. Conclusion CpG-ODN treatment did not induce specific maturation and cytokine expression in foal

  11. Deletion of ultraconserved elements yields viable mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahituv, Nadav; Zhu, Yiwen; Visel, Axel; Holt, Amy; Afzal, Veena; Pennacchio, Len A.; Rubin, Edward M.

    2007-07-15

    Ultraconserved elements have been suggested to retainextended perfect sequence identity between the human, mouse, and ratgenomes due to essential functional properties. To investigate thenecessities of these elements in vivo, we removed four non-codingultraconserved elements (ranging in length from 222 to 731 base pairs)from the mouse genome. To maximize the likelihood of observing aphenotype, we chose to delete elements that function as enhancers in amouse transgenic assay and that are near genes that exhibit markedphenotypes both when completely inactivated in the mouse as well as whentheir expression is altered due to other genomic modifications.Remarkably, all four resulting lines of mice lacking these ultraconservedelements were viable and fertile, and failed to reveal any criticalabnormalities when assayed for a variety of phenotypes including growth,longevity, pathology and metabolism. In addition more targeted screens,informed by the abnormalities observed in mice where genes in proximityto the investigated elements had been altered, also failed to revealnotable abnormalities. These results, while not inclusive of all thepossible phenotypic impact of the deleted sequences, indicate thatextreme sequence constraint does not necessarily reflect crucialfunctions required for viability.

  12. Is Greenberg's "Macro-Carib" viable?

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    Spike Gildea

    Full Text Available In his landmark work Language in the Americas, Greenberg (1987 proposed that Macro-Carib was one of the major low-level stocks of South America, which together with Macro-Panoan and Macro-Ge-Bororo were claimed to comprise the putative Ge-Pano-Carib Phylum. His Macro-Carib includes the isolates Andoke and Kukura, and the Witotoan, Peba-Yaguan, and Cariban families. Greenberg's primary evidence came from person-marking paradigms in individual languages, plus scattered words from individual languages collected into 79 Macro-Carib 'etymologies' and another 64 Amerind 'etymologies'. The goal of this paper is to re-evaluate Greenberg's Macro-Carib claim in the light of the much more extensive and reliable language data that has become available largely since 1987. Based on full person-marking paradigms for Proto-Cariban, Yagua, Bora and Andoke, we conclude that Greenberg's morphological claims are unfounded. For our lexical comparison, we created lexical lists for Proto-Cariban, Proto-Witotoan, Yagua and Andoke, for both Greenberg's 143 putative etymologies and for the Swadesh 100 list. From both lists, a total of 23 potential cognates were found, but no consonantal correspondences were repeated even once. We conclude that our greatly expanded and improved database does not provide sufficient evidence to convince the skeptic that the Macro-Carib hypothesis is viable

  13. Economically viable large-scale hydrogen liquefaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardella, U.; Decker, L.; Klein, H.

    2017-02-01

    The liquid hydrogen demand, particularly driven by clean energy applications, will rise in the near future. As industrial large scale liquefiers will play a major role within the hydrogen supply chain, production capacity will have to increase by a multiple of today’s typical sizes. The main goal is to reduce the total cost of ownership for these plants by increasing energy efficiency with innovative and simple process designs, optimized in capital expenditure. New concepts must ensure a manageable plant complexity and flexible operability. In the phase of process development and selection, a dimensioning of key equipment for large scale liquefiers, such as turbines and compressors as well as heat exchangers, must be performed iteratively to ensure technological feasibility and maturity. Further critical aspects related to hydrogen liquefaction, e.g. fluid properties, ortho-para hydrogen conversion, and coldbox configuration, must be analysed in detail. This paper provides an overview on the approach, challenges and preliminary results in the development of efficient as well as economically viable concepts for large-scale hydrogen liquefaction.

  14. Detection and quantification of viable Bacillus cereus group species in milk by propidium monoazide quantitative real-time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattani, Fernanda; Barth, Valdir C; Nasário, Jéssica S R; Ferreira, Carlos A S; Oliveira, Sílvia D

    2016-04-01

    The Bacillus cereus group includes important spore-forming bacteria that present spoilage capability and may cause foodborne diseases. These microorganisms are traditionally evaluated in food using culturing methods, which can be laborious and time-consuming, and may also fail to detect bacteria in a viable but nonculturable state. The purpose of this study was to develop a quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) combined with a propidium monoazide (PMA) treatment to analyze the contamination of UHT milk by B. cereus group species viable cells. Thirty micrograms per milliliter of PMA was shown to be the most effective concentration for reducing the PCR amplification of extracellular DNA and DNA from dead cells. The quantification limit of the PMA-qPCR assay was 7.5 × 10(2) cfu/mL of milk. One hundred thirty-five UHT milk samples were analyzed to evaluate the association of PMA to qPCR to selectively detect viable cells. The PMA-qPCR was able to detect B. cereus group species in 44 samples (32.6%), whereas qPCR without PMA detected 78 positive samples (57.8%). Therefore, the PMA probably inhibited the amplification of DNA from cells that were killed during UHT processing, which avoided an overestimation of bacterial cells when using qPCR and, thus, did not overvalue potential health risks. A culture-based method was also used to detect and quantify B. cereus sensu stricto in the same samples and showed positive results in 15 (11.1%) samples. The culture method and PMA-qPCR allowed the detection of B. cereus sensu stricto in quantities compatible with the infective dose required to cause foodborne disease in 3 samples, indicating that, depending on the storage conditions, even after UHT treatment, infective doses may be reached in ready-to-consume products. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Coloring semitransparent room-temperature fabricated perovskite solar cells via dielectric mirrors (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez Quiroz, César Omar; Bronnbauer, Carina; Levchuk, Ievgen; Salvador, Michael; Hou, Yi; Forberich, Karen K.; Brabec, Christoph J.

    2016-09-01

    While the development of perovskite-based semitransparent solar cells with competitive levels of transparency and efficiency offer a promising perspective towards building integrated photovoltaics, the color perception of perovskite films is of limited visual aesthetics, compromising their applicability to facades and windows. In the present work, we develop a technique to grow crystalline, ultrathin perovskite films through a solvent-solvent extraction process featuring full crystallization within few seconds at RT and under 45%RH environmental conditions. As a result we obtained the highest combination of efficiency and transparency to date for perovskite solar cells. We further improved the visual aesthetics of our devices by implementing dielectric mirrors. EQE and UV-Vis spectroscopic measurements are performed to fully characterize the device stacks featuring four different dielectric mirror configurations. By customizing the mirror to the near-IR absorption region of the perovskite, we could increase the Jsc by 18.7%, yielding a light blue appearance and showing 31.4% transparency at 3.5% electrical power efficiency. Both, the solar cells and the dielectric mirrors are fully-solution processed under ambient conditions and are easily transferable to roll-to-roll upscaling. Optical simulations support our experimental findings and provide a global perspective emulating full device stack appearance covering all the colors in the visible spectra. Transparency, photocurrent density contribution and chromaticity are finally simulated and analyzed. Based on the detailed analysis, we give an outlook on the performance - color - transparency roadmap for perovskite solar cells.

  16. An overview of crystalline silicon solar cell technology: Past, present, and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopian, K.; Cheow, S. L.; Zaidi, S. H.

    2017-09-01

    Crystalline silicon (c-Si) solar cell, ever since its inception, has been identified as the only economically and environmentally sustainable renewable resource to replace fossil fuels. Performance c-Si based photovoltaic (PV) technology has been equal to the task. Its price has been reduced by a factor of 250 over last twenty years (from ˜ 76 USD to ˜ 0.3 USD); its market growth is expected to reach 100 GWP by 2020. Unfortunately, it is still 3-4 times higher than carbon-based fuels. With the matured PV manufacturing technology as it exists today, continuing price reduction poses stiff challenges. Alternate manufacturing approaches in combination with thin wafers, low (< 10 x) optical enhancement with Fresnel lenses, band-gap engineering for enhanced optical absorption, and newer, advanced solar cell configurations including partially transparent bifacial and back contact solar cells will be required. This paper will present a detailed, cost-based analysis of advanced solar cell manufacturing technologies aimed at higher (˜ 22 %) efficiency with existing equipment and processes.

  17. Engineered Hydrogen-Bonded Glycopolymer Capsules and Their Interactions with Antigen Presenting Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempe, Kristian; Xiang, Sue D; Wilson, Paul; Rahim, Md Arifur; Ju, Yi; Whittaker, Michael R; Haddleton, David M; Plebanski, Magdalena; Caruso, Frank; Davis, Thomas P

    2017-02-22

    Hollow glycopolymer microcapsules were fabricated by hydrogen-bonded layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly, and their interactions with a set of antigen presenting cells (APCs), including dendritic cells (DCs), macrophages (MACs), and myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), were investigated. The glycopolymers were obtained by cascade postpolymerization modifications of poly(oligo(2-ethyl-2-oxazoline methacrylate)-stat-glycidyl methacrylate) involving the modification of the glycidyl groups with propargylamine and the subsequent attachment of mannose azide by copper(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC). Multilayer assembly of the hydrogen-bonding pair (glycopolymer/poly(methacrylic acid) (PMA)) onto planar and particulate supports (SiO2 particles, d = 1.16 μm) yielded stable glycopolymer films upon cross-linking by CuAAC. The silica (SiO2) particle templates were removed yielding hollow monodisperse capsules, as demonstrated by fluorescence and scanning electron microscopy. Cellular uptake studies using flow cytometry revealed the preferential uptake of the capsules by DCs when compared to MACs or MDSCs. Mannosylated capsules showed a cytokine independent cis-upregulation of CD80 specifically on DCs and a trans-downregulation of PDL-1 on MDSCs. Thus, the glycopolymer capsules may have potential as vaccine carriers, as they are able to upregulate costimulatory molecules for immune cell stimulation on DCs and at the same time downregulate immune inhibitory receptors on suppressor APC such as MDSCs.

  18. Selective susceptibility of human skin antigen presenting cells to productive dengue virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Cerny

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Dengue is a growing global concern with 390 million people infected each year. Dengue virus (DENV is transmitted by mosquitoes, thus host cells in the skin are the first point of contact with the virus. Human skin contains several populations of antigen-presenting cells which could drive the immune response to DENV in vivo: epidermal Langerhans cells (LCs, three populations of dermal dendritic cells (DCs, and macrophages. Using samples of normal human skin we detected productive infection of CD14(+ and CD1c(+ DCs, LCs and dermal macrophages, which was independent of DC-SIGN expression. LCs produced the highest viral titers and were less sensitive to IFN-β. Nanostring gene expression data showed significant up-regulation of IFN-β, STAT-1 and CCL5 upon viral exposure in susceptible DC populations. In mice infected intra-dermally with DENV we detected parallel populations of infected DCs originating from the dermis and migrating to the skin-draining lymph nodes. Therefore dermal DCs may simultaneously facilitate systemic spread of DENV and initiate the adaptive anti-viral immune response.

  19. Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Presenting as a Paranasal Sinus Mass: The Importance of Differential Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Ralli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Metastases in the paranasal sinuses are rare; renal cell carcinoma is the most common cancer that metastasizes to this region. We present the case of a patient with a 4-month history of a rapidly growing mass of the nasal pyramid following a nasal trauma, associated with spontaneous epistaxis and multiple episodes of hematuria. Cranial CT scan and MRI showed an ethmoid mass extending to the choanal region, the right orbit, and the right frontal sinus with an initial intracranial extension. Patient underwent surgery with a trans-sinusal frontal approach using a bicoronal incision combined with an anterior midfacial degloving; histological exam was compatible with a metastasis of clear cell renal cell carcinoma. Following histological findings, a total body CT scan showed a solitary 6 cm mass in the upper posterior pole of the left kidney identified as the primary tumor. Although rare, metastatic renal cell carcinoma should always be suspected in patients with nasal or paranasal masses, especially if associated with symptoms suggestive of a systemic involvement such as hematuria. A correct early-stage diagnosis of metastatic RCC can considerably improve survival rate in these patients; preoperative differential diagnosis with contrast-enhanced imaging is fundamental for the correct treatment and follow-up strategy.

  20. Engineering tolerance using biomaterials to target and control antigen presenting cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tostanoski, Lisa H; Gosselin, Emily A; Jewell, Christopher M

    2016-05-01

    Autoimmune diseases occur when cells of the adaptive immune system incorrectly recognize and attack "self" tissues. Importantly, the proliferation and differentiation of these cells is triggered and controlled by interactions with antigen presenting cells (APCs), such as dendritic cells. Thus, modulating the signals transduced by APCs (e.g., cytokines, costimulatory surface proteins) has emerged as a promising strategy to promote tolerance for diseases such as multiple sclerosis, type 1 diabetes, and lupus. However, many approaches have been hindered by non-specific activity of immunosuppressive or immunoregulatory cues, following systemic administration of soluble factors via traditional injections routes (e.g., subcutaneous, intravenous). Biomaterials offer a unique opportunity to control the delivery of tolerogenic signals in vivo via properties such as controlled particle size, tunable release kinetics, and co-delivery of multiple classes of cargo. In this review, we highlight recent reports that exploit these properties of biomaterials to target APCs and promote tolerance via three strategies, i) passive or active targeting of particulate carriers to APCs, ii) biomaterial-mediated control over antigen localization and processing, and iii) targeted delivery of encapsulated or adsorbed immunomodulatory signals. These reports represent exciting advances toward the goal of more effective therapies for autoimmune diseases, without the broad suppressive effects associated with current clinically-approved therapies.

  1. Development of the Nanobody display technology to target lentiviral vectors to antigen-presenting cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyvaerts, C; De Groeve, K; Dingemans, J; Van Lint, S; Robays, L; Heirman, C; Reiser, J; Zhang, X-Y; Thielemans, K; De Baetselier, P; Raes, G; Breckpot, K

    2012-12-01

    Lentiviral vectors (LVs) provide unique opportunities for the development of immunotherapeutic strategies, as they transduce a variety of cells in situ, including antigen-presenting cells (APCs). Engineering LVs to specifically transduce APCs is required to promote their translation towards the clinic. We report on the Nanobody (Nb) display technology to target LVs to dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages. This innovative approach exploits the budding mechanism of LVs to incorporate an APC-specific Nb and a binding-defective, fusion-competent form of VSV.G in the viral envelope. In addition to production of high titer LVs, we demonstrated selective, Nb-dependent transduction of mouse DCs and macrophages both in vitro and in situ. Moreover, this strategy was translated to a human model in which selective transduction of in vitro generated or lymph node (LN)-derived DCs and macrophages, was demonstrated. In conclusion, the Nb display technology is an attractive approach to generate LVs targeted to specific cell types.

  2. Improved transfection of spleen-derived antigen-presenting cells in culture using TATp-liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappalardo, Juan Sebastián; Quattrocchi, Valeria; Langellotti, Cecilia; Di Giacomo, Sebastián; Gnazzo, Victoria; Olivera, Valeria; Calamante, Gabriela; Zamorano, Patricia I; Levchenko, Tatyana S; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2009-02-20

    Antigen presenting cells (APC) are among the most important cells of the immune system since they link the innate and the adaptative immune responses, directing the type of immune response to be elicited. To modulate the immune response in immune preventing or treating therapies, gene delivery into immunocompetent cells could be used. However, APC are very resistant to transfection. To increase the efficiency of APC transfection, we have used liposome-based lipoplexes additionally modified with cell-penetrating TAT peptide (TATp) for better intracellular delivery of a model plasmid encoding for the enhanced-green fluorescent protein (pEGFP). pEGFP-bearing lipoplexes made of a mixture of PC:Chol:DOTAP (60:30:10 molar ratio) with the addition of 2% mol of polyethylene glycol-phosphatidylethanolamine (PEG-PE) conjugate (plain-L) or TATp-PEG-PE (TATp-L) were shown to effectively protect the incorporated DNA from degradation. Uptake assays of rhodamine-labeled lipoplexes and transfections with the EGFP reporter gene were performed with APC derived from the mouse spleen. TATp-L-based lipoplexes allowed for significantly enhanced both, the uptake and transfection in APC. Such a tool could be used for the APC transfection as a first step in immune therapy.

  3. Benzophenone guttiferone A from Garcinia achachairu Rusby (Clusiaceae presents genotoxic effects in different cells of mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peterson Menezes Terrazas

    Full Text Available Benzophenones from natural sources and those of synthetic analogues present several reports of potent biological properties, and Guttiferone A represents a promising medicinal natural compound with analgesic and gastroprotective profiles. Considering that there are no reports that assess the genetic toxicity of Guttiferone A, the present study was undertaken to investigate the genotoxic potential of this benzophenone isolated from seeds of Garcinia achachairu in terms of DNA damage in different cells of Swiss albino mice using the comet assay, and its clastogenic/aneugenic effects in bone marrow cells in vivo by the micronucleus test. Cytotoxicity was assessed by scoring polychromatic (PCE and normochromatic (NCE erythrocytes ratio. Guttiferone A was administered by oral gavage at doses of 15, 30 and 60 mg/kg. The results showed that Guttiferone A produced genotoxic effects in leukocytes, liver, bone marrow, brain and testicle cells and clastogenic/aneugenic effects in bone marrow erythrocytes of mice. The PCE/NCE ratio indicated no cytotoxicity. Since guttiferone A is harmful to the genetic material we suggest caution in its use by humans.

  4. Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma Presenting with Tumoral Bleeding: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Young; Lee, Kyung-Hwa; Kim, Seul-Kee

    2017-01-01

    We report a rare case of subependymal giant cell astrocytoma (SEGA) associated with tumoral bleeding in a pediatric patient without tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). A 10-year-old girl presented with a 2-week history of an increasingly aggravating headache. Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed an approximately 3.6-cm, well-defined, heterogeneously enhancing mass with multistage hemorrhages on the right-sided foramen of Monro. The tumor was completely resected using a transcallosal approach. Intraoperatively, the mass presented as a gray-colored firm tumor associated with acute and subacute hemorrhages. The origin of the mass was identified as the ventricular septum adjacent to the foramen of Monro. A pathological analysis revealed pleomorphic multinucleated eosinophilic tumor cells with abundant cytoplasm. These cells showed positive staining for the glial fibrillary acidic protein and S100 protein. A diagnosis of SEGA was established. The patient recovered without any neurological symptoms. There was no evidence of TSC. The radiological follow-up showed no recurrence for 2 years. This was a case of SEGA with intratumoral hemorrhage, for which a favorable outcome was achieved, without any neurological deficit after tumoral resection. PMID:28516078

  5. Apple polyphenols suppress antigen presentation of ovalbumin by THP-1-derived dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, Shigeru; Kukita, Takuya; Ishikawa, Eri; Nakashima, Syohei; Masuda, Susumu; Kanda, Tomomasa; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Teshima, Reiko; Nakamura, Soichiro

    2013-06-01

    Apple polyphenol extract (AP) and procyanidin contained in AP were investigated for their immunomodulatory effects using THP-1-derived human dendritic cells (TDDCs). The expression levels of HLA-DR (MHC class II) and CD86 (costimulatory molecule) were measured as an indicator of antigen presentation in TDDCs. A significant decrease in HLA-DR expression was observed in the AP and fractionated procyanidin-treated cells in the presence of ovalbumin (OVA), but no effect on CD86 expression was observed. The uptake of OVA was not inhibited by AP treatment, and the gene expression of membrane-associated RING-CH ubiquitin E3 ligase, MARCH1, was up-regulated by AP treatment. It can therefore be presumed that AP suppresses HLA-DR expression via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Furthermore, the up-regulation of IL-12 and TNF-α was found in the procyanidin trimers-treated cells in the presence of OVA. These results suggest that apple polyphenols would be an effective factor for the development of immunomodulatory agents with suppressive effects of antigen presentation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Subacute bacterial endocarditis presenting as polymyalgia rheumatica or giant cell arteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auzary, C; Le Thi Huong, D; Delarbre, X; Sbai, A; Lhote, F; Papo, T; Wechsler, B; Cacoub, P; Martin-Hunyadi, C; Piette, J-C

    2006-01-01

    To report on several patients with subacute bacterial endocarditis who were initially presumed, incorrectly, to have polymyalgia rheumatica or giant cell arteritis. We report 3 cases of subacute streptococcal endocarditis mimicking giant cell arteritis in 2 cases and polymyalgia rheumatica in one. We reviewed the literature through Medline search of French and English-language articles published between 1966 and 2005 and found 5 similar cases. Shoulder and/or pelvic girdle pain was associated with neck or back pain in all patients. Scalp tenderness, bilateral jaw pain, amaurosis fugax were present in 2 patients. One patient had no fever. Two patients were treated with corticosteroids with initial good clinical response in one. Appropriate antibiotic therapy resulted in the rapid disappearance of rheumatic complaints in 2 patients and achieved a definitive cure of endocarditis in all cases. Rheumatologic symptoms may hinder the correct diagnosis of infective endocarditis in patients who present with a clinical picture suggesting polymyalgia rheumatica or giant cell arteritis. In such cases, blood cultures should be systematically drawn.

  7. Competition of chemically related antigens for presentation by accessory cells to T cells requires expenditure of metabolic energy by the accessory cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werdelin, O; Buus, S

    1983-01-01

    antigens for presentation by accessory cells. Furthermore, the two antigens do not compete for presentation when the accessory cells are exposed to them at 1 degree C, suggesting that endocytosis and/or other energy-requiring cellular events are necessary for the competition....... incapable of presenting DNP-PLL to responsive T cells in assays for proliferation, by in vitro exposure of the cells to GL before and during their exposure to DNP-PLL. We demonstrate here that the presence of anti-Ia antibody in the cultures does not interfere with the apparent competition of the two......The immune responsiveness of guinea pigs both to dinitrophenyl-poly-L-lysine (DNP-PLL) and to the lysine-rich random copolymer of L-glutamic acid and L-lysine (GL) is controlled by the 'poly-L-lysine gene'. We have previously demonstrated that accessory cells of responder strains can be made...

  8. Intracranial non-Langerhans cell histiocytosis presenting as an isolated intraparenchymal lesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajaram, Smitha; Shackley, Fiona; Raghavan, Ashok [Western Bank, Sheffield Children' s Hospital, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Wharton, Stephen B. [University of Sheffield, Department of Neurosciences, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Connolly, Daniel J.A. [Western Bank, Sheffield Children' s Hospital, Sheffield (United Kingdom); University of Sheffield, Academic Radiology, Sheffield (United Kingdom)

    2010-12-15

    Non-Langerhans cell histiocytosis in the absence of cutaneous or other organ involvement is very rare. A Caucasian boy age 3 years 11 months presented with episodes of recurrent right-side seizures over 2 weeks. Brain CT and MR imaging showed a single enhancing left frontal lobe lesion. Stereotactic biopsy was performed and histological examination showed diffuse infiltrate of macrophages with foamy cytoplasm. Four months later there was recurrence of seizure activity despite anti-epileptic medication and a repeat MR scan showed a persistent enhancing lesion in the left frontal lobe. Histological examination of the resection specimen resembled juvenile xanthogranuloma (JXG) involving the central nervous system. In the absence of skin lesions a diagnosis of non-Langerhans cell histiocytosis was made. The child made a full recovery following surgery with resolution of his symptoms. (orig.)

  9. Oligometastatic Disease at Presentation or Recurrence for Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel R. Gomez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Oligometastatic Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC presents a unique opportunity for potential curative therapy. Improved cancer staging using PET/CT, MRI, and future cellular and molecular staging with circulating tumor cells and/or molecular markers will identify more patients with truly oligometastasis disease that will benefit from definitive local treatment. Recent development of noninvasive local ablative therapy such as stereotactic radiotherapy makes it possible to eradicate multiple local diseases with minimal side effect. Novel systemic therapy may also control systemic spread and therefore make it possible to improve survival by eliminating local diseases. More research, particularly prospective studies, is ideally randomized studies are needed to validate the concept of oligometastasis.

  10. ImmunoChip Study Implicates Antigen Presentation to T Cells in Narcolepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornum, Birgitte Rahbek; Kenny, Eimear E.; Trynka, Gosia; Einen, Mali; Rico, Tom J.; Lichtner, Peter; Dauvilliers, Yves; Arnulf, Isabelle; Lecendreux, Michel; Javidi, Sirous; Geisler, Peter; Mayer, Geert; Pizza, Fabio; Poli, Francesca; Plazzi, Giuseppe; Overeem, Sebastiaan; Lammers, Gert Jan; Kemlink, David; Sonka, Karel; Nevsimalova, Sona; Rouleau, Guy; Desautels, Alex; Montplaisir, Jacques; Frauscher, Birgit; Ehrmann, Laura; Högl, Birgit; Jennum, Poul; Bourgin, Patrice; Peraita-Adrados, Rosa; Iranzo, Alex; Bassetti, Claudio; Chen, Wei-Min; Concannon, Patrick; Thompson, Susan D.; Damotte, Vincent; Fontaine, Bertrand; Breban, Maxime; Gieger, Christian; Klopp, Norman; Deloukas, Panos; Wijmenga, Cisca; Hallmayer, Joachim; Onengut-Gumuscu, Suna; Rich, Stephen S.; Winkelmann, Juliane; Mignot, Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in the identification of susceptibility genes and environmental exposures provide broad support for a post-infectious autoimmune basis for narcolepsy/hypocretin (orexin) deficiency. We genotyped loci associated with other autoimmune and inflammatory diseases in 1,886 individuals with hypocretin-deficient narcolepsy and 10,421 controls, all of European ancestry, using a custom genotyping array (ImmunoChip). Three loci located outside the Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) region on chromosome 6 were significantly associated with disease risk. In addition to a strong signal in the T cell receptor alpha (TRA@), variants in two additional narcolepsy loci, Cathepsin H (CTSH) and Tumor necrosis factor (ligand) superfamily member 4 (TNFSF4, also called OX40L), attained genome-wide significance. These findings underline the importance of antigen presentation by HLA Class II to T cells in the pathophysiology of this autoimmune disease. PMID:23459209

  11. Plasma Cell Leukemia Presenting as a Chest Wall Mass: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Ali

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Plasma cell leukemia (PCL is an uncommon neoplasm of plasma cells, with an aggressive clinical course and poor outcome, even with current standard of care. It can occur either de novo (primary PCL or as a progression of multiple myeloma (MM. This disease has unique diagnostic criteria but certain genetic markers and clinical features may overlap with MM. Due to the low prevalence of PCL, guidelines on its management are extrapolated from the management of MM and based on small retrospective studies and cases reports/series. We present an interesting case of PCL in a middle-aged African-American male, who was diagnosed incidentally after chest wall imaging for an unrelated complaint. The diagnostic approach, management and outcomes of PCL are discussed.

  12. Bilateral presentation of pleural desmoplastic small round cell tumors: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Won, You Sun; Park, Jai Soung; Jeong, Sun Hye; Paik, Sang Hyun; Lee, Heon; Cha, Jang Gyu; Koh, Eun Suk [Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Bucheon Hospital, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    Desmoplastic small round cell tumor (DSRCT) is a highly aggressive malignant small cell neoplasm occurring mainly in the abdominal cavity, but it is extremely rare in the pleura. In this case, a 15-year-old male presented with a 1-month history of left chest pain. Chest radiographs revealed pleural thickening in the left hemithorax and chest computed tomography showed multifocal pleural thickening with enhancement in both hemithoraces. A needle biopsy of the left pleural lesion was performed and the final diagnosis was DSRCT of the pleura. We report this unusual case arising from the pleura bilaterally. The pleural involvement of this tumor supports the hypothesis that it typically occurs in mesothelial-lined surfaces.

  13. ImmunoChip study implicates antigen presentation to T cells in narcolepsy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliette Faraco

    Full Text Available Recent advances in the identification of susceptibility genes and environmental exposures provide broad support for a post-infectious autoimmune basis for narcolepsy/hypocretin (orexin deficiency. We genotyped loci associated with other autoimmune and inflammatory diseases in 1,886 individuals with hypocretin-deficient narcolepsy and 10,421 controls, all of European ancestry, using a custom genotyping array (ImmunoChip. Three loci located outside the Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA region on chromosome 6 were significantly associated with disease risk. In addition to a strong signal in the T cell receptor alpha (TRA@, variants in two additional narcolepsy loci, Cathepsin H (CTSH and Tumor necrosis factor (ligand superfamily member 4 (TNFSF4, also called OX40L, attained genome-wide significance. These findings underline the importance of antigen presentation by HLA Class II to T cells in the pathophysiology of this autoimmune disease.

  14. Is telomerase a viable target in cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buseman, C.M.; Wright, W.E.; Shay, J.W.

    2012-01-01

    The ideal cancer treatment would specifically target cancer cells yet have minimal or no adverse effects on normal somatic cells. Telomerase, the ribonucleoprotein reverse transcriptase that maintains the ends of human chromosome, is an attractive cancer therapeutic target for exactly this reason [1]. Telomerase is expressed in more than 85% of cancer cells, making it a nearly universal cancer marker, while the majority of normal somatic cells are telomerase negative. Telomerase activity confers limitless replicative potential to cancer cells, a hallmark of cancer which must be attained for the continued growth that characterizes almost all advanced neoplasms [2]. In this review we will summarize the role of telomeres and telomerase in cancer cells, and how properties of telomerase are being exploited to create targeted cancer therapies including telomerase inhibitors, telomerase-targeted immunotherapies and telomerase-driven virotherapies. A frank and balanced assessment of the current state of telomerase inhibitors with caveats and potential limitations will be included. PMID:21802433

  15. Precursor T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia presenting with bone marrow necrosis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khoshnaw Najmaddin SH

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Bone marrow necrosis is a clinicopathological condition diagnosed most often at postmortem examination, but it is also seen during the course of malignancy and is not always associated with a poor prognosis. The morphological features of bone marrow necrosis are disruption of the normal marrow architecture and necrosis of myeloid tissue and medullary stroma. Non-malignant conditions associated with bone marrow necrosis are sickle cell anemia, infections, drugs (sulfasalazine, interferon α, all-trans retinoic acid, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and fludarabine, disseminated intravascular coagulation, antiphospholipid antibody syndrome and acute graft versus host diseases. The malignant causes are leukemia, lymphoma and metastatic carcinomas. Herein we report the case of a patient with precursor T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and bone marrow necrosis at initial presentation. Case presentation A 10-year-old Kurdish boy was presented with generalized bone pain and fever of 1 month’s duration which was associated with sweating, easy fatigability, nose bleeding, breathlessness and severe weight loss. On examination, we observed pallor, tachypnea, tachycardia, low blood pressure, fever, petechial hemorrhage, ecchymoses, tortuous dilated veins over the chest and upper part of abdomen, multiple small cervical lymph node enlargements, mildly enlarged spleen, palpable liver and gross abdominal distention. Blood analysis revealed pancytopenia and elevated lactate dehydrogenase and erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Imaging results showed mediastinal widening on a planar chest X-ray and diffuse focal infiltration of the axial bone marrow on magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbosacral vertebrae. Bone marrow aspiration and biopsy examination showed extensive bone marrow necrosis. Immunophenotyping analysis of the bone marrow biopsy confirmed T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, as CD3 and terminal deoxynucleotidyl

  16. Efficient electroluminescent cooling with a light-emitting diode coupled to a photovoltaic cell (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Tianyao P.; Chen, Kaifeng; Santhanam, Parthiban; Fan, Shanhui; Yablonovitch, Eli

    2017-02-01

    The new breakthrough in photovoltaics, exemplified by the slogan "A great solar cell has to be a great light-emitting diode (LED)", has led to all the major new solar cell records, while also leading to extraordinary LED efficiency. As an LED becomes very efficient in converting its electrical input into light, the device cools as it operates because the photons carry away entropy as well as energy. If these photons are absorbed in a photovoltaic (PV) cell, the generated electricity can be used to provide part of the electrical input that drives the LED. Indeed, the LED/PV cell combination forms a new type of heat engine with light as the working fluid. The electroluminescent refrigerator requires only a small amount of external electricity to provide cooling, leading to a high coefficient of performance. We present the theoretical performance of such a refrigerator, in which the cool side (LED) is radiatively coupled to the hot side (PV) across a vacuum gap. The coefficient of performance is maximized by using a highly luminescent material, such as GaAs, together with device structures that optimize extraction of the luminescence. We consider both a macroscopic vacuum gap and a sub-wavelength gap; the latter allows for evanescent coupling of photons between the devices, potentially providing a further enhancement to the efficiency of light extraction. Using device assumptions based on the current record-efficiency solar cells, we show that electroluminescent cooling can, in certain regimes of cooling power, achieve a higher coefficient of performance than thermoelectric cooling.

  17. Primary signet-ring cell carcinoma of vermiform appendix clinically and pathologically presenting as acute appendicitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadashi Terada, MD, PhD

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Primary signet-ring cell carcinoma (SRCC of vermiform appendix is extremely rare; only three cases have been reported in the English literature. An 89-year-old man suddenly presented right lower abdominal pain, and transferred to a hospital, where he was diagnosed with acute appendicitis by physical data, blood data, and CT. He was further transferred to our hospital for emergency operation. Physical examination showed positive abdominal pain, Blunberg sign, and Rosenstein sign. Blood test showed leukocytosis and increased C-reactive protein. An appendectomy was performed. Gross examination during operation showed inflamed appendix, appendiceal adhesion, and acute peritonitis. Gross pathological examination showed no apparent tumor, but the proximal appendix showed wall thickening and luminal occlusion. The appendix was cut into three sections, and was observed under microscopically. Nests of carcinoma cells were seen in the proximal appendix. The carcinoma was composed of SRCC (70% and mucinous carcinoma (30%. The size of carcinoma was 6 × 7 mm. The carcinoma cells invaded into muscular layer. No lymphovascular permeation was seen. The cut margins were negative for carcinoma cells. Immunohistochemically, SRCC cells were positive for cytokeratin (CK AE1/3, CK CAM5.2, CK8, CK18, CK19, CK20, EMA, CEA, CA19-9, p53, Ki-67 (labeling = 30%, CDX2, MUC2, and MUC5AC. They were negative for CK34PE1, CK5/6, CK7, CK14, p63, vimentin, TTF-1, MUC1, MUC 5AC, NSE, synaptophysin, chromogranin, and CD56. No further treatments were performed, because the appendiceal carcinoma was small, the surgical margins were negative and the patient was very old. He was followed up by various imaging modalities. No recurrence or metastasis is found 17 months after the operation.

  18. Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm presenting as leukemia without cutaneous involvement in a 25 years male patient: Unusual presentation of a rare entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumaira Qayoom

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm (BPDCN is a rare, aggressive neoplasm classified under "acute myeloid leukemia (AML and related precursor neoplasm" by current WHO classification. Elderly male are commonly affected with cutaneous lesion being the hallmark of disease presentation. The disease progresses rapidly and sooner or later involves bone marrow and peripheral blood. Cases presenting primarily as leukemia without cutaneous involvement is a rarity with about 29 cases reported in literature till date. Characteristic immunophenotype of CD4 + /CD56 +/− cells expressing antigens associated with plasmacytoid dendritic cells like CD123, TCL1, BDCA2/CD303, cutaneous lymphocyte-associated and interferon dependent molecule MxA, in absence of any other lineage specific marker confirms the diagnosis. The disease has a poor survival and no standardized therapeutic strategy in the current scenario. A case of 25-year-male presenting with leukemic BPDCN without cutaneous involvement is presented here, who was treated with AML like protocol followed by hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, but succumbed to the disease within 8 months of diagnosis. The present case is being first to be reported from India.

  19. Antigen-presenting capacity of macrophages and dendritic cells in the peritoneal cavity of patients treated with peritoneal dialysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Betjes, M. G.; Tuk, C. W.; Struijk, D. G.; Krediet, R. T.; Arisz, L.; Beelen, R. H.

    1993-01-01

    In this study the antigen-presenting capacity of human peritoneal cells and the influence of continuous ambulant peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) were studied. On average 6% of the peritoneal cells were dendritic cells (DC), with no difference between CAPD and control peritoneal cells. DC were enriched by

  20. Low numbers of FOXP3 positive regulatory T cells are present in all developmental stages of human atherosclerotic lesions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Onno J.; van der Meer, Jelger J.; Teeling, Peter; van der Loos, Chris M.; van der Wal, Allard C.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: T cell mediated inflammation contributes to atherogenesis and the onset of acute cardiovascular disease. Effector T cell functions are under a tight control of a specialized T cell subset, regulatory T cells (Treg). At present, nothing is known about the in situ presence of Treg in human

  1. Variable presentation of anaplastic large-cell lymphoma in patients with breast implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, Michelle B; Lofts, Julian

    2017-10-01

    Anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL) has recently been reported in women with breast implants. The incidence of breast implant-related ALCL is extremely rare and most surgeons would not expect to see this disease in their career. However, the senior author has had three women present to his practice with ALCL over a 2-year period. The three patients and their presentation were reviewed to establish the presenting complaint in each case of subsequently diagnosed ALCL. Literature was reviewed to establish appropriate treatment protocols for any subsequent patients. The average time between first implant placement and presentation with breast implant-associated ALCL was 13.3 years (range: 10-16 years) and age at presentation was 49 years (range: 45-53 years). Each presentation was somewhat different, being a palpable mass, a painless seroma and a painful seroma. Both patients with seroma underwent ultrasound-guided aspiration of fluid which confirmed ALCL. All patients underwent implant removal and complete capsulectomy. The patient with a mass at presentation initially declined adjuvant treatment but subsequently developed an ALCL-associated seroma and was treated with surgery and post-operative chemotherapy. Patients with breast implant-associated ALCL can present with different clinical signs and symptoms. Late seroma is a relatively common presentation of breast implant-associated ALCL. While firm guidelines for the management of breast implant-related ALCL are lacking, we suggest that any late seroma in the absence of infection should be managed with aspiration and cytological analysis of the fluid. © 2015 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  2. Metastatic Sarcomatoid Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Cervix Presenting with Chest Mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilit Karapetyan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Sarcomatoid squamous cell carcinoma is a rare and aggressive form of cervical cancer. We report a case of metastatic sarcomatoid squamous cell carcinoma (SSCC of cervix that presented with an anterior chest wall mass. Case. A 43-year-old Hispanic female presented with a two-month history of a central chest wall mass. The patient’s only past medical history was SSCC of the cervix, stage IIB, diagnosed two years priorly. She underwent neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (CRT with cisplatin followed by radical hysterectomy. Surgical margins were positive which led to adjuvant CRT with carboplatin and paclitaxel. PET scan 4 months after the postoperative treatment was negative for recurrence and metastatic disease. On current presentation, the CT chest revealed anterior mediastinal destructive soft tissue mass involving sternum, and the biopsy showed SSCC. The patient received palliative radiation therapy to her chest with improvement in pain and ability to swallow. After discussing the prognosis she refused further chemotherapy and decided on hospice care. Conclusion. Despite good response to first-line therapy, SSCC tends to recur early and does not respond to second-line therapy. Radiation therapy seems to be the most effective modality for treatment, but randomized controlled trials of therapy are impractical.

  3. Aquamous cell carcinomas of the lung which presented as numerous polypoid nodules in the tracheobronchial tree: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyun Gyu; Choi, Yo Won; Yoon, Hyun Jung; Paik, Seung Sam [Hanyang University Hospital, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    We report a case of squamous cell carcinomas of the lung, which presented as numerous polypoid nodules in the tracheobronchial tree. They occurred at two years and 7 months after resection of squamous cell carcinoma, which presented as a lung nodule in the left lower lobe, and at 7 months after resection of tracheal squamous cell carcinoma.

  4. Myeloid derived suppressor cells are present at high frequency in neonates and suppress in vitro T cell responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Gervassi

    Full Text Available Over 4 million infants die each year from infections, many of which are vaccine-preventable. Young infants respond relatively poorly to many infections and vaccines, but the basis of reduced immunity in infants is ill defined. We sought to investigate whether myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC represent one potential impediment to protective immunity in early life, which may help inform strategies for effective vaccination prior to pathogen exposure. We enrolled healthy neonates and children in the first 2 years of life along with healthy adult controls to examine the frequency and function of MDSC, a cell population able to potently suppress T cell responses. We found that MDSC, which are rarely seen in healthy adults, are present in high numbers in neonates and their frequency rapidly decreases during the first months of life. We determined that these neonatal MDSC are of granulocytic origin (G-MDSC, and suppress both CD4+ and CD8+ T cell proliferative responses in a contact-dependent manner and gamma interferon production. Understanding the role G-MDSC play in infant immunity could improve vaccine responsiveness in newborns and reduce mortality due to early-life infections.

  5. Myeloid derived suppressor cells are present at high frequency in neonates and suppress in vitro T cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gervassi, Ana; Lejarcegui, Nicholas; Dross, Sandra; Jacobson, Amanda; Itaya, Grace; Kidzeru, Elvis; Gantt, Soren; Jaspan, Heather; Horton, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Over 4 million infants die each year from infections, many of which are vaccine-preventable. Young infants respond relatively poorly to many infections and vaccines, but the basis of reduced immunity in infants is ill defined. We sought to investigate whether myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) represent one potential impediment to protective immunity in early life, which may help inform strategies for effective vaccination prior to pathogen exposure. We enrolled healthy neonates and children in the first 2 years of life along with healthy adult controls to examine the frequency and function of MDSC, a cell population able to potently suppress T cell responses. We found that MDSC, which are rarely seen in healthy adults, are present in high numbers in neonates and their frequency rapidly decreases during the first months of life. We determined that these neonatal MDSC are of granulocytic origin (G-MDSC), and suppress both CD4+ and CD8+ T cell proliferative responses in a contact-dependent manner and gamma interferon production. Understanding the role G-MDSC play in infant immunity could improve vaccine responsiveness in newborns and reduce mortality due to early-life infections.

  6. Facial Nerve Palsy: An Unusual Presenting Feature of Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozcan Yildiz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the second most common type of cancer in the world and is the most common cause of cancer-related death in men and women; it is responsible for 1.3 million deaths annually worldwide. It can metastasize to any organ. The most common site of metastasis in the head and neck region is the brain; however, it can also metastasize to the oral cavity, gingiva, tongue, parotid gland and lymph nodes. This article reports a case of small cell lung cancer presenting with metastasis to the facial nerve.

  7. Tumefactive intracranial presentation of precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forester, Craig M. [University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Braunreiter, Chi L. [University of Utah, Division of Pediatric Hematology Oncology, Primary Children' s Medical Center, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Helen DeVos Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatric Hematology Oncology, Grand Rapids, MI (United States); Yaish, Hasan; Afify, Zeinab [University of Utah, Division of Pediatric Hematology Oncology, Primary Children' s Medical Center, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Hedlund, Gary L. [Primary Children' s Medical Center, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2009-11-15

    In children, leukemia is the most common malignancy, and approximately 75% of leukemias are acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Central nervous system leukemia is found at diagnosis in fewer than 5% of children with ALL. Leukemic intracranial masses have been described with acute myeloid leukemia, but ALL presenting as a mass lesion is rare. We describe a unique case of an intracranial confirmed precursor B cell (pre-B) ALL mass in a 13-year-old girl that was diagnosed by brain CT, MRI and cerebral angiography, and confirmed by biopsy. This report details pertinent history and distinguishing imaging features of an intracranial ALL tumefaction. (orig.)

  8. Extensive Presentation of Penile Carcinoma Cuniculatum a Variant of Squamous Cell Carcinoma With Low Malignant Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohabe A. Vinson

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Carcinoma cuniculatum is an uncommon variation of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC has been documented in a few cases at various locations of the body such as penis, foot, jaw, oropharynx and esophagus. In this case, a 79-year-old male presents with a penile mass, which he underwent a total penectomy. Histology of the mass was defined as carcinoma cuniculatum with negative margins and no lymphovascular invasion. This variant of SCC rarely metastasizes. A joint decision was made to observe lymph nodes. It is important to differentiate the different SCC because patient care can be guided based on the pathology.

  9. Giant Cell Arteritis in a 12-Year-Old Girl Presenting with Nephrotic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeinab A. El-Sayed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell arteritis (GCA is rare in children. The kidneys are generally spared. We present a case of GCA in a 12-year-old girl with severe headache and tender scalp especially over the right temporal area. The right superficial temporal artery was cord like and nodular and the pulsations were barely felt. Several small tender nodular swellings were felt in the occipital area. She had been previously diagnosed as a case of nephrotic syndrome due to underlying membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis. This report is aimed at drawing attention to this rare form of vasculitis in children aiming at decreasing its morbidities.

  10. Cutaneous Vasculitis: An Unusual Presentation of a Biclonal Nodal Plasma Cell Dyscrasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Swan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe an unusual case of a biclonal nodal plasma cell dyscrasia, presenting with a vasculitic rash, end-organ damage, and cytopenias. Serum protein electrophoresis demonstrated a biclonal kappa-restricted paraprotein, with a negative skeletal survey and no bone marrow disease. Fluorodeoxyglucose-PET-CT (FDG-PET-CT revealed nodal involvement, which was not appreciable clinically, and facilitated biopsy, confirming the diagnosis of a nodal plasmacytoma. Complete biochemical response and resolution of the vasculitic rash were achieved with bortezomib-based therapy.

  11. Dysphagia Caused by Spindle Cell Lipoma of Hypopharynx: Presentation of Clinical Case and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Peña-Valenzuela

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Spindle cell lipoma of the hypopharynx is an extremely rare entity. Here, we present the first case of this lesion originated in the cricopharyngeal region, with symptoms of chronic progressive dysphagia, which can be confused with other pathologies; endoscopic and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI evaluation are the methods of choice for its diagnostic approach. The best therapeutic approach is endoscopic resection with rapid recovery and few complications. Long-term followup is recommended, either endoscopic or imaging, given that it can be confused with an undiagnosed liposarcoma; additionally, its long-term behavior is unknown.

  12. Articular Cartilage Repair Using Marrow Stimulation Augmented with a Viable Chondral Allograft: 9-Month Postoperative Histological Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James K. Hoffman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Marrow stimulation is frequently employed to treat focal chondral defects of the knee. However, marrow stimulation typically results in fibrocartilage repair tissue rather than healthy hyaline cartilage, which, over time, predisposes the repair to failure. Recently, a cryopreserved viable chondral allograft was developed to augment marrow stimulation. The chondral allograft is comprised of native viable chondrocytes, chondrogenic growth factors, and extracellular matrix proteins within the superficial, transitional, and radial zones of hyaline cartilage. Therefore, host mesenchymal stem cells that infiltrate the graft from the underlying bone marrow following marrow stimulation are provided with the optimal microenvironment to undergo chondrogenesis. The present report describes treatment of a trochlear defect with marrow stimulation augmented with this novel chondral allograft, along with nine month postoperative histological results. At nine months, the patient demonstrated complete resolution of pain and improvement in function, and the repair tissue consisted of 85% hyaline cartilage. For comparison, a biopsy obtained from a patient 8.2 months after treatment with marrow stimulation alone contained only 5% hyaline cartilage. These outcomes suggest that augmenting marrow stimulation with the viable chondral allograft can eliminate pain and improve outcomes, compared with marrow stimulation alone.

  13. A Rare Case of Non-Small Cell Carcinoma of Lung Presenting as Miliary Mottling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ballaekere Jayaram Subhashchandra

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Miliary mottling on chest radiography is seen in miliary tuberculosis, certain fungal infections, sarcoidosis, coal miner’s pneumoconiosis, silicosis, hemosiderosis, fibrosing alveolitis, acute extrinsic allergic alveolitis, pulmonary eosinophilic syndrome, pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, and rarely in hematogenous metastases from the primary cancers of the thyroid, kidney, trophoblasts, and some sarcomas. Although very infrequent, miliary mottling can be seen in primary lung cancers. Herein, we report the case of a 28-year-old female with chest X-ray showing miliary mottling. Thoracic computed tomography (CT features were suggestive of tuberculoma with miliary tuberculosis. CT-guided fine needle aspiration cytology confirmed the diagnosis as lower-lobe, left lung non-small cell carcinoma (adenocarcinoma. It is rare for the non-small cell carcinoma of the lung to present as miliary mottling. The rarity of our case lies in the fact that a young, non-smoking female with miliary mottling was diagnosed with non-small cell carcinoma of the lung.

  14. Full 3D opto-electronic simulation tool for nanotextured solar cells (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michallon, Jérôme; Collin, Stéphane

    2017-04-01

    Increasing efforts on the photovoltaics research have recently been devoted to material savings, leading to the emergence of new designs based on nanotextured and nanowire-based solar cells. The use of small absorber volumes, light-trapping nanostructures and unconventional carrier collection schemes (radial nanowire junctions, point contacts in planar structures,…) increases the impact of surfaces recombination and induces homogeneity in the photogenerated carrier concentrations. The investigation of their impacts on the device performances need to be addressed using full 3D coupled opto-electrical modeling. In this context, we have developed a new tool for full 3D opto-electrical simulation using the most advanced optical and electrical simulation techniques. We will present an overview of its simulation capabilities and the key issues that have been solved to make it fully operational and reliable. We will provide various examples of opto-electronic simulation of (i) nanostructured solar cells with localized contacts and (ii) nanowire solar cells. We will also show how opto-electronic simulation can be used to simulate light- and electron-beam induced current (LBIC/EBIC) experiments, targeting quantitative analysis of the passivation properties of surfaces.

  15. Fibulin-2 is present in murine vascular lesions and is important for smooth muscle cell migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ström, A.; Olin, A. I.; Aspberg, A.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The vascular extracellular matrix (ECM) can affect smooth muscle cell (SMC) adhesion, migration and proliferation-events that are important during the atherosclerotic process. Fibulin-2 is a member of the ECM protein family of fibulins and has been found to cross-link versican/hyaluron......Objective: The vascular extracellular matrix (ECM) can affect smooth muscle cell (SMC) adhesion, migration and proliferation-events that are important during the atherosclerotic process. Fibulin-2 is a member of the ECM protein family of fibulins and has been found to cross-link versican...... migration was studied in the presence of two inhibiting peptides (FN III 3-5 and aggrecan C-type lectin-like domain). Results: Fibulin-2 is expressed in SMC rich regions of atherosclerotic lesions where it colocalises with versican and hyaluronan. It is also present in injury-induced vascular lesions...... and is upregulated during SMC phenotypic modulation in cell culture. Moreover, treatments with peptides that block the interaction between versican and fibulin-2 inhibit SMC migration in vitro. Conclusions: Fibulin-2 can be produced by SMC as a response to injury and may participate in the ECM organisation...

  16. Leukemia cutis in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia presenting as an episodic papulovesicular eruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosman, Ilana S; Nunley, Kara S; Lu, Dongsi

    2011-09-15

    A 53-year-old man presented with a recurrent pruritic eruption accompanied by oral sores. His past medical history was significant for subclinical B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), which had never been treated. On exam, there were erythematous papules and plaques studded with vesicles on the neck, trunk, and upper extremities. Two skin biopsies showed common features of a perivascular and periadnexal lymphocytic infiltrate in the superficial to mid-dermis. Immunohistochemical staining of the lymphocytes showed co-expression of CD20, CD23, CD5, and CD43, consistent with a diagnosis of cutaneous involvement by the patient's CLL. This case highlights the importance of considering leukemia cutis in patients with underlying CLL presenting with unusual clinical features.

  17. SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA IN TWO SNOW LEOPARDS (UNCIA UNCIA) WITH UNUSUAL AURICULAR PRESENTATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintard, Benoît; Greunz, Eva Maria; Lefaux, Brice; Lemberger, Karin; Leclerc, Antoine

    2017-06-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is well documented in snow leopards ( Uncia uncia ) and most common locations are oral, facial, or pedal. These two cases illustrate an unusual auricular presentation, which is more often reported in white domestic cats. The animals were aged and presented clinical signs of otitis such as head shaking and ear scratching. Clinical examinations showed auricular canal masses with chronic purulent otitis. In both cases, clinical deterioration led to euthanasia and histology of the ear canal was consistent with SCC and showed numerous vascular emboli. These cases illustrate an unreported aggressive localization for SCC in snow leopards, which should be included in the differential diagnosis of otitis in this species. Auricular SCC may be underdiagnosed as the ear canal is infrequently sampled for histopathology. This auricular localization should be considered when metastases are found upon necropsy without internal primary tumor.

  18. Purpura of the Face and Neck: An Atypical Clinical Presentation Revealing a Hepatosplenic T Cell Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François Kuonen

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hepatosplenic T cell lymphoma (HSTL is a rare but very aggressive peripheral T cell lymphoma whose initial silent clinical presentation unfortunately delays the diagnosis and worsens the prognosis of patient survival. Efforts should be aimed at early recognition and treatment. Methods: We describe a case of a 62-year-old woman who presented at our clinic with a non-palpable purpuric eruption of the face. Investigations revealed thrombocytopenia with hepatosplenomegaly, which showed rapid progression together with accentuation of the purpura. Two months later, a bone marrow biopsy revealed the diagnosis of a HSTL. Results: The patient received six cycles of CHOP chemotherapy (vincristine, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, methylprednisolone followed by a well-tolerated autologous bone marrow graft. Normalization of the platelet count resulted in regression of the purpuric rash. Conclusion: To our knowledge, this is the first report of a facial thrombocytopenic purpura as the inaugural symptom of HSTL. It emphasizes the privileged position of the dermatologist for early recognition of potentially lethal HSTL.

  19. Extranodal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma presenting as orbital cellulitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuhaimy, Hanis; Aziz, Hayati Abdul; Vasudevan, Suresh; Hui Hui, Siah

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To report an aggressive case of extranodal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma (NKTCL) of the ethmoid sinus presenting as orbital cellulitis Method: Case report Results: A 56-year-old male presented with right eye redness, reduced vision, and periorbital swelling for 5 weeks duration associated with a two-month history of blocked nose. The visual acuity of the right eye was 6/18. The eye was proptosed with periorbital oedema and conjunctival chemosis. The pupil was mid-dilated but there was no relative afferent pupillary defect. The fundus was normal. The extraocular movements were restricted in all directions of gaze. Nasal endoscopy revealed pansinusitis that corresponded with CT scan orbit and paranasal sinuses findings. Despite treatment, he showed no clinical improvement. Ethmoidal sinus biopsies performed revealed extranodal NKTCL. Further imaging showed involvement of the right orbital contents and its adnexa with intracranial extension into the right cavernous sinus and meninges over right temporal fossa. The patient underwent chemotherapy. However he succumbed to his illness two months after the diagnosis. Conclusion: Extranodal NKTCL is a great mimicker. This case demonstrated how an acute initial presentation of extranodal NKTCL can present as orbital cellulitis with pansinusitis.

  20. Influence of Musculoskeletal Manifestations as the Only Presenting Symptom in B-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Seungcheol; Im, Ho Joon; Bae, Kunhyung; Park, Soo-Sung

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate the clinical and prognostic impact of musculoskeletal manifestations as the only initial presenting symptom in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). We retrospectively reviewed 158 children with precursor B-cell type ALL who were followed up for >2 years. The patients were assigned to the groups musculoskeletal manifestations (n = 24) or nonmusculoskeletal manifestations (n = 134) based on initial presenting symptom. The symptom duration (regarding any initial presenting symptom) and the leukemic symptom duration (regarding symptoms of systemic manifestation, such as fever, bleeding, or pallor) were assessed, along with other clinical characteristics. The musculoskeletal manifestations group exhibited a longer symptom duration than the nonmusculoskeletal manifestations group (43 days vs 22 days, P = .006), but overall survival did not significantly differ between the groups. Multivariate analysis indicated that a longer symptom duration did not affect prognosis but that a longer leukemic symptom duration was associated with a poorer prognosis (hazard ratio, 7.720; P = .048). Musculoskeletal manifestations are associated significantly with diagnostic delay, but this delay does not affect the prognosis. Diagnostic delay after the onset of leukemic symptoms, however, does appear to affect the prognosis. Intensive evaluations for hematologic malignancies may be unnecessary in children who complain of limb pain without any definite cause, unless they also present with accompanying leukemic symptoms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. HLA-DR-presented peptide repertoires derived from human monocyte-derived dendritic cells pulsed with blood coagulation factor VIII

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Haren, Simon D.; Herczenik, Eszter; ten Brinke, Anja; Mertens, Koen; Voorberg, Jan; Meijer, Alexander B.

    2011-01-01

    Activation of T-helper cells is dependent upon the appropriate presentation of antigen-derived peptides on MHC class II molecules expressed on antigen presenting cells. In the current study we explored the repertoire of peptides presented on MHC class II molecules on human monocyte derived dendritic

  2. Superantigen presentation by human retinal pigment epithelial cells to T cells is dependent on CD2-CD58 and CD18-CD54 molecule interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, A; Junker, N; Kaestel, C G

    2001-01-01

    Human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells are capable of presenting bacterial superantigens (SAg) to T cells in vitro by ligation of MHC class II molecules on RPE cells with the T cell receptor. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the involvement of adhesion molecules in presentation...... of SAg. Cultured human fetal and adult RPE cells were treated with interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma, 500 U ml(-1) for 72 hr) and afterwards pulsed with the SAg staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA, 500 ng ml(-1) for 2 hr) followed by coculture with freshly obtained T cells isolated from peripheral blood....... Proliferation was measured by (3)H-thymidine incorporation assay. In selected experiments, either RPE or T cells were pre-treated with blocking antibodies specific for cell surface molecules. For comparison, dendritic cells were used as superantigen presenting cells for T cells. This study showed...

  3. Corruption of dendritic cell antigen presentation during acute GVHD leads to regulatory T-cell failure and chronic GVHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leveque-El Mouttie, Lucie; Koyama, Motoko; Le Texier, Laetitia; Markey, Kate A; Cheong, Melody; Kuns, Rachel D; Lineburg, Katie E; Teal, Bianca E; Alexander, Kylie A; Clouston, Andrew D; Blazar, Bruce R; Hill, Geoffrey R; MacDonald, Kelli P A

    2016-08-11

    Chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) is a major cause of late mortality following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) and is characterized by tissue fibrosis manifesting as scleroderma and bronchiolitis obliterans. The development of acute GVHD (aGVHD) is a powerful clinical predictor of subsequent cGVHD, suggesting that aGVHD may invoke the immunologic pathways responsible for cGVHD. In preclinical models in which sclerodermatous cGVHD develops after a preceding period of mild aGVHD, we show that antigen presentation within major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II of donor dendritic cells (DCs) is markedly impaired early after BMT. This is associated with a failure of regulatory T-cell (Treg) homeostasis and cGVHD. Donor DC-restricted deletion of MHC class II phenocopied this Treg deficiency and cGVHD. Moreover, specific depletion of donor Tregs after BMT also induced cGVHD, whereas adoptive transfer of Tregs ameliorated it. These data demonstrate that the defect in Treg homeostasis seen in cGVHD is a causative lesion and is downstream of defective antigen presentation within MHC class II that is induced by aGVHD. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  4. Dendritic cells cross-present HIV antigens from live as well as apoptotic infected CD4+ T lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marañón, Concepción; Desoutter, Jean-François; Hoeffel, Guillaume; Cohen, William; Hanau, Daniel; Hosmalin, Anne

    2004-04-20

    A better understanding of the antigen presentation pathways that lead to CD8(+) T cell recognition of HIV epitopes in vivo is needed to achieve better immune control of HIV replication. Here, we show that cross-presentation of very small amounts of HIV proteins from apoptotic infected CD4(+) T lymphocytes by dendritic cells to CD8(+) T cells is much more efficient than other known HIV presentation pathways, i.e., direct presentation of infectious virus or cross-presentation of defective virus. Unexpectedly, dendritic cells also take up actively antigens into endosomes from live infected CD4(+) T lymphocytes and cross-present them as efficiently as antigens derived from apoptotic infected cells. Moreover, live infected CD4(+) T cells costimulate cross-presenting dendritic cells in the process. Therefore, dendritic cells can present very small amounts of viral proteins from infected T cells either after apoptosis, which is frequent during HIV infection, or not. Thus, if HIV expression is transiently induced while costimulation is enhanced (for instance after IL-2 and IFNalpha immune therapy), this HIV antigen presentation pathway could be exploited to eradicate latently infected reservoirs, which are poorly recognized by patients' immune systems.

  5. Amorphous silica nanoparticles enhance cross-presentation in murine dendritic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirai, Toshiro [Laboratory of Toxicology and Safety Science, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Osaka University, 1-6 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Yoshioka, Yasuo, E-mail: yasuo@phs.osaka-u.ac.jp [Laboratory of Toxicology and Safety Science, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Osaka University, 1-6 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Takahashi, Hideki; Ichihashi, Ko-ichi; Yoshida, Tokuyuki; Tochigi, Saeko [Laboratory of Toxicology and Safety Science, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Osaka University, 1-6 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Nagano, Kazuya [Laboratory of Biopharmaceutical Research, National Institute of Biomedical Innovation, 7-6-8 Saitoasagi, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0085 (Japan); Abe, Yasuhiro [Cancer Biology Research Center, Sanford Research/USD, 2301 E. 60th Street N, Sioux Falls, SD 57104 (United States); Kamada, Haruhiko; Tsunoda, Shin-ichi [Laboratory of Biopharmaceutical Research, National Institute of Biomedical Innovation, 7-6-8 Saitoasagi, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0085 (Japan); The Center for Advanced Medical Engineering and Informatics, Osaka University, 1-6 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Nabeshi, Hiromi [Division of Foods, National Institute of Health Sciences, 1-18-1 Kamiyoga, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 158-8501 (Japan); Yoshikawa, Tomoaki [Laboratory of Toxicology and Safety Science, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Osaka University, 1-6 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Tsutsumi, Yasuo, E-mail: ytsutsumi@phs.osaka-u.ac.jp [Laboratory of Toxicology and Safety Science, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Osaka University, 1-6 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Laboratory of Biopharmaceutical Research, National Institute of Biomedical Innovation, 7-6-8 Saitoasagi, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0085 (Japan); The Center for Advanced Medical Engineering and Informatics, Osaka University, 1-6 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silica nanoparticles enhanced cross-presentation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silica nanoparticles induced endosomal release of exogenous antigens. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silica nanoparticle-induced cross-presentation was mediated by scavenger receptors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Surface-modification may enable the manufacture of safer silica nanoparticles. -- Abstract: Nanomaterials (NMs) exhibit unique physicochemical properties and innovative functions, and they are increasingly being used in a wide variety of fields. Ensuring the safety of NMs is now an urgent task. Recently, we reported that amorphous silica nanoparticles (nSPs), one of the most widely used NMs, enhance antigen-specific cellular immune responses and may therefore aggravate immune diseases. Thus, to ensure the design of safer nSPs, investigations into the effect of nSPs on antigen presentation in dendritic cells, which are central orchestrators of the adaptive immune response, are now needed. Here, we show that nSPs with diameters of 70 and 100 nm enhanced exogenous antigen entry into the cytosol from endosomes and induced cross-presentation, whereas submicron-sized silica particles (>100 nm) did not. Furthermore, we show that surface modification of nSPs suppressed cross-presentation. Although further studies are required to investigate whether surface-modified nSPs suppress immune-modulating effects in vivo, the current results indicate that appropriate regulation of the characteristics of nSPs, such as size and surface properties, will be critical for the design of safer nSPs.

  6. An Unusual Presentation of Plasma Cells – Castleman Disease: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihăilă Mariana

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We present the case of a 76 year old female patient admitted in the Department of Cardiology for physical asthenia, profuse sweating and dyspnea with orthopnea for about one month. Clinical and paraclinical assessments performed at admission confirmed the diagnosis of cardiac tamponade. Surgical intervention was performed and 400 mL of clear effusion were drained. Post-operative evolution was marked by recurrence of symptoms, requiring after 3 weeks a new drainage of 600 mL of clear effusion, and biopsy of the pericardium was performed. Pathological exam described serous pericarditis with chronic inflammatory infiltrate, xanthogranulomatous reaction intricated in the pericardium and mesothelial hyperplasia. The patient was subsequently transferred to the Department of Internal Medicine for further investigations. Physical examination showed a patient with altered general status, pallor, vesicular murmur absent in both bases, presenting cutaneous hyperpigmentation at the level of the right hemi-abdomen and hip with posterior extension, and a peripheral indurated erythematous plaque. The patient presented nodular masses of 3 cm in the right latero-cervical and bilateral axillary regions, non-adherent to the superficial structures, as well as adenopathic blocks in both inguinal regions. CT scan of the thorax and abdomen showed moderate bilateral pleuresia, minimal pericardial effusion (15 mm and multiple adenopathies on both sides of the diaphragm. Skin biopsy was performed, as well as bone marrow aspirate and excision of a right axillary lymph node. Pathological exams and immunohistochemistry tests confirmed the diagnosis of Plasma Cells Castleman disease.

  7. Concurrent presentation of erythrodermic lichen planus and squamous cell carcinoma: Coincidence or malignant transformation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neema M Ali

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lichen planus is a common papulosquamous disorder affecting about 1-2% of the population, neoplastic transformation of cutaneous lichen planus lesions occurs very rarely. A 40 year old female patient presented with a 1 year history of developing multiple, itchy, pigmented lesions over both lower legs which gradually spread to involve the whole body. A few tense bullae were seen on the extremities. An erythematous fleshy lesion was seen on the upper aspect of the left buttock. Skin biopsy from a plaque on the right forearm showed features suggestive of lichen planus. Skin biopsy of a bullae showed a sub epidermal bulla filled with a mixed inflammatory infiltrate. Direct immunofluorescence revealed no immunoreactants along the basement membrane zone. A diagnosis of erythrodermic lichen planus with bullous lichen planus was made. Biopsy of fleshy lesion of left buttock revealed a moderately differentiated squamous cell carcinoma. Erythrodermic lichen planus with bullous lesions and secondary squamous cell carcinoma; these occurences in a single patient is extremely rare and has not been previously reported to the best of our knowledge.

  8. Concurrent Presentation of Erythrodermic Lichen Planus and Squamous Cell Carcinoma: Coincidence or Malignant Transformation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Neema M; Bhat, Ramesh; Rao, Shwetha B

    2015-01-01

    Lichen planus is a common papulosquamous disorder affecting about 1-2% of the population, neoplastic transformation of cutaneous lichen planus lesions occurs very rarely. A 40 year old female patient presented with a 1 year history of developing multiple, itchy, pigmented lesions over both lower legs which gradually spread to involve the whole body. A few tense bullae were seen on the extremities. An erythematous fleshy lesion was seen on the upper aspect of the left buttock. Skin biopsy from a plaque on the right forearm showed features suggestive of lichen planus. Skin biopsy of a bullae showed a sub epidermal bulla filled with a mixed inflammatory infiltrate. Direct immunofluorescence revealed no immunoreactants along the basement membrane zone. A diagnosis of erythrodermic lichen planus with bullous lichen planus was made. Biopsy of fleshy lesion of left buttock revealed a moderately differentiated squamous cell carcinoma. Erythrodermic lichen planus with bullous lesions and secondary squamous cell carcinoma; these occurences in a single patient is extremely rare and has not been previously reported to the best of our knowledge.

  9. Acute Acquired Demyelinating Polyneuropathy:An Initial Presentation of Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munira Shabbir-Moosajee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurological signs and symptoms are commonly associated with both Hodgkin’s and non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma and are mostly attributed to either direct lymphomatous involvement of the nervous system, either as a result of extension to the spinal cord or nerves, or due to infiltration by lymphoma cells and drug toxicity. Guillain-Barre syndrome and its variants have been reported very infrequently in the literature. We present the case of a 70-year-old male admitted to the hospital for evaluation of uncontrolled hypertension. Incidentally, he was noted to have a low platelet count and a leukoerythroblastic picture in the peripheral blood. Two days into admission, he developed bilateral symmetrical ascending paresis consistent with acute acquired demyelinating polyneuropathy, a common variant of Guillain-Barre syndrome. At about the same time he developed worsening cytopenia and was diagnosed with diffuse large B cell lymphoma according to a bone marrow biopsy. The patient was treated with intravenous immunoglobulin for Guillain-Barre syndrome with significant improvement in muscle strength and subsequently treated with chemotherapy for his lymphoma.

  10. Present State of the Coacervate-Incoacervate Theory - Origin and Evolution of Cell Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Vladimir J. A.

    1984-12-01

    In agreement with the views of Oparin, Fox, Dose etc., the theory assumes that coacervation of protein-like polyaminoacids began with their accumulation along the coasts of the Archaic water basins. Unlike the above authors, however, the present author views the original coacervates as a suitable “culture medium” from which the first polynucleotides orginated and their partial replication started. Their base sequence was not fortuitous, but determined by the proteinoids on the basis of their mutual affinity. The polyfunctional enzymic activity of the proteinoids catalyzed their replication as well as other activities. Around the replicating DNA molecules secondary coacervates (coacervates in coacervates) accumulated which developed gradually to the first prokaryotic cells. Their most probable evolution to the first eukaryotic organisms is discussed on the basis of the modified Studitsky's synbacteriogenesis theory.

  11. Primary Bone Marrow Large B-cell Lymphoma Presenting with Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sin-Syue Li

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Primary bone marrow lymphoma is an extremely rare disease. Its unusual clinical manifestations, such as hemophagocytic syndrome, frequently delay correct disease diagnosis, thus postponing treatment. Here, we reported a 76-year-old woman presenting with intermittent night fever and jaundice for 2 weeks, accompanied with hepatosplenomegaly and pancytopenia. Despite antibiotics treatment, the patient's fever persisted. Computed tomography showed hepatosplenomegaly without lymphadenopathy, and bone marrow aspiration and biopsy revealed a large B-cell lymphoma (LBCL with hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH. After chemotherapy with rituximab, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, and prednisolone, both jaundice and pancytopenia recovered to normal. After 6 cycles of chemotherapy, the patient remained in complete remission for 18 months after diagnosis. Our experience indicates that clinicians should consider performing a timely bone marrow examination on patients with unknown fever and pancytopenia, particularly given that delayed diagnosis of primary bone marrow lymphoma can make treatment of this rare disease substantially more challenging.

  12. Direct presentation is sufficient for an efficient anti-viral CD8+ T cell response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ren-Huan; Remakus, Sanda; Ma, Xueying; Roscoe, Felicia; Sigal, Luis J

    2010-02-12

    The extent to which direct- and cross-presentation (DP and CP) contribute to the priming of CD8(+) T cell (T(CD8+)) responses to viruses is unclear mainly because of the difficulty in separating the two processes. Hence, while CP in the absence of DP has been clearly demonstrated, induction of an anti-viral T(CD8+) response that excludes CP has never been purposely shown. Using vaccinia virus (VACV), which has been used as the vaccine to rid the world of smallpox and is proposed as a vector for many other vaccines, we show that DP is the main mechanism for the priming of an anti-viral T(CD8+) response. These findings provide important insights to our understanding of how one of the most effective anti-viral vaccines induces immunity and should contribute to the development of novel vaccines.

  13. FasL Mediates T-Cell Eradication of Tumor Cells Presenting Low Levels of Antigens | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    One approach to cancer immunotherapy, as opposed to therapeutic vaccination, is the transfusion of large numbers of tumor-specific killer T cells (cytotoxic T cells or CTLs) into patients. The body’s own defense killer T cells are a subgroup of T lymphocytes (a type of white blood cells) that are capable of inducing death in tumor cells. CTLs can cause the death of target cells either by releasing granules containing toxic molecules including perforin, or by producing a membrane protein called Fas ligand (FasL) which on interaction with the tumor cell results in cell death.

  14. Antigen-presenting cells containing bacterial peptidoglycan in synovial tissues of rheumatoid arthritis patients coexpress costimulatory molecules and cytokines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrijver, I. A.; Melief, M. J.; Tak, P. P.; Hazenberg, M. P.; Laman, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by intimal lining hyperplasia and massive infiltration of the synovial sublining by antigen-presenting cells (APCs), lymphocytes, and plasma cells. Peptidoglycan (PG), a major cell wall component of gram-positive bacteria,

  15. Gum hypertrophy - an unusual presenting feature in a case of precursor T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Premalata, Chennagiri Srinivasamurthy; Madhumati, Davanam Satyanarayana; Lakshmidevi, Vishweshwariah; Pradeep, Rudramurthy; Appaji, Lingappa; Mukherjee, Geetashree

    2008-01-01

    ... and the central nervous system. We present a rare case of precursor T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma with initial oral manifestation, presenting with the unusual features of gum hypertrophy and involvement of upper jaw...

  16. Near infrared photoimmunotherapy rapidly elicits specific host immunity against cancer cells (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Hisataka

    2017-02-01

    Near infrared photoimmunotherapy (NIR-PIT) is a new molecularly-targeted cancer photo-therapy based on conjugating a near infrared silica-phthalocyanine dye, IR700, to a monoclonal antibody (mAb) targeting cell-surface molecules. When exposed to NIR light, the conjugate induces a highly-selective necrotic/immunogenic cell death (ICD) only in target-positive, mAb-IR700-bound cancer cells. This cell death occurs as early as 1 minute after exposure to NIR light. Meanwhile, immediately adjacent target-negative cells are unharmed. Dynamic 3D-microscopy of live tumor cells undergoing NIR-PIT showed rapid swelling in treated cells immediately after light exposure, followed by irreversible morphologic changes such as bleb formation, and rupture of vesicles within several minutes. Furthermore, biological markers of ICD including relocation of HSP70/90 and calreticulin, and release of ATP and High Mobility Group Box 1 (HMGB1), were clearly detected immediately after NIR-PIT. When NIR-PIT was performed in a mixture of cancer cells and immature dendritic cells, maturation of immature dendritic cells was strongly induced rapidly after NIR-PIT. Alternatively, NIR-PIT can also target negative regulatory immune cells such as Treg only in the tumor bed. Treg targeting NIR-PIT against CD25 can deplete >80% of Treg in tumor bed within 20 min that induces activation of tumor cell-specific CD8+-T and NK cells within 1.5 hour, and then these activated cells killed cancer cells in local tumor within 1 day and also in distant tumors of the same cell origin within 2 days. In summary, cancer cell-targeting and immuno-suppressor cell-targeting NIR-PITs effectively induce innate and acquired immunity specifically against cancer cells growing in patients, respectively.

  17. Determination of viable Salmonellae from potable and source water through PMA assisted qPCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gulshan; Vajpayee, Poornima; Bhatti, Saurabh; Ronnie, Nirmala; Shah, Nimish; McClure, Peter; Shanker, Rishi

    2013-07-01

    Resource constrained countries identified as endemic zones for pathogenicity of Salmonella bear an economic burden due to recurring expenditure on medical treatment. qPCR used for Salmonella detection could not discriminate between viable and nonviable cells. Propidium monoazide (PMA) that selectively penetrates nonviable cells to cross-link their DNA, was coupled with ttr gene specific qPCR for quantifying viable salmonellae in source/potable waters collected from a north Indian city. Source water (raw water for urban potable water supply) and urban potable water exhibited viable salmonellae in the range of 2.1×10(4)-2.6×10(6) and 2-7160CFU/100mL, respectively. Potable water at water works exhibited DNA from dead cells but no viable cells were detected. PMA assisted qPCR could specifically detect low numbers of live salmonellae in Source and potable waters. This strategy can be used in surveillance of urban potable water distribution networks to map contamination points for better microbial risk management. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Loss of proliferation and antigen presentation activity following internalization of polydispersed carbon nanotubes by primary lung epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandavi Kumari

    Full Text Available Interactions between poly-dispersed acid functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes (AF-SWCNTs and primary lung epithelial (PLE cells were studied. Peritoneal macrophages (PMs, known phagocytic cells were used as positive controls in this study. Recovery of live cells from cultures of PLE cells and PMs was significantly reduced in the presence of AF-SWCNTs, in a time and dose dependent manner. Both PLE cells as well as PMs could take up fluorescence tagged AF-SWCNTs in a time dependent manner and this uptake was significantly blocked by cytochalasin D, an agent that blocks the activity of acto-myosin fibers and therefore the phagocytic activity of cells. Confocal microscopic studies confirmed that AF-SWCNTs were internalized by both PLE cells and PMs. Intra-trachially instilled AF-SWCNTs could also be taken up by lung epithelial cells as well as alveolar macrophages. Freshly isolated PLE cells had significant cell division activity and cell cycling studies indicated that treatment with AF-SWCNTs resulted in a marked reduction in S-phase of the cell cycle. In a previously standardized system to study BCG antigen presentation by PLE cells and PMs to sensitized T helper cells, AF-SWCNTs could significantly lower the antigen presentation ability of both cell types. These results show that mouse primary lung epithelial cells can efficiently internalize AF-SWCNTs and the uptake of nanotubes interfered with biological functions of PLE cells including their ability to present BCG antigens to sensitized T helper cells.

  19. Adult Multisystem Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis Presenting with Central Diabetes Insipidus Successfully Treated with Chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Eun Choi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We report the rare case of an adult who was diagnosed with recurrent multisystem Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH involving the pituitary stalk and lung who present with central diabetes insipidus and was successfully treated with systemic steroids and chemotherapy. A 49-year-old man visited our hospital due to symptoms of polydipsia and polyuria that started 1 month prior. Two years prior to presentation, he underwent excision of right 6th and 7th rib lesions for the osteolytic lesion and chest pain, which were later confirmed to be LCH on pathology. After admission, the water deprivation test was done and the result indicated that he had central diabetes insipidus. Sella magnetic resonance imaging showed a mass on the pituitary stalk with loss of normal bright spot at the posterior lobe of the pituitary. Multiple patchy infiltrations were detected in both lung fields by computed tomography (CT. He was diagnosed with recurrent LCH and was subsequently treated with inhaled desmopressin, systemic steroids, vinblastine, and mercaptopurine. The pituitary mass disappeared after two months and both lungs were clear on chest CT after 11 months. Although clinical remission in multisystem LCH in adults is reportedly rare, our case of adult-onset multisystem LCH was treated successfully with systemic chemotherapy using prednisolone, vinblastine, and 6-mercaptopurine, which was well tolerated.

  20. Human Leukocyte Antigen F Presents Peptides and Regulates Immunity through Interactions with NK Cell Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulberger, Charles L; McMurtrey, Curtis P; Hölzemer, Angelique; Neu, Karlynn E; Liu, Victor; Steinbach, Adriana M; Garcia-Beltran, Wilfredo F; Sulak, Michael; Jabri, Bana; Lynch, Vincent J; Altfeld, Marcus; Hildebrand, William H; Adams, Erin J

    2017-06-20

    Evidence is mounting that the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecule HLA-F (human leukocyte antigen F) regulates the immune system in pregnancy, infection, and autoimmunity by signaling through NK cell receptors (NKRs). We present structural, biochemical, and evolutionary analyses demonstrating that HLA-F presents peptides of unconventional length dictated by a newly arisen mutation (R62W) that has produced an open-ended groove accommodating particularly long peptides. Compared to empty HLA-F open conformers (OCs), HLA-F tetramers bound with human-derived peptides differentially stained leukocytes, suggesting peptide-dependent engagement. Our in vitro studies confirm that NKRs differentiate between peptide-bound and peptide-free HLA-F. The complex structure of peptide-loaded β2m-HLA-F bound to the inhibitory LIR1 revealed similarities to high-affinity recognition of the viral MHC-I mimic UL18 and a docking strategy that relies on contacts with HLA-F as well as β2m, thus precluding binding to HLA-F OCs. These findings provide a biochemical framework to understand how HLA-F could regulate immunity via interactions with NKRs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Examining racial differences in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma presentation and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowers, Christopher R; Shenoy, Pareen J; Borate, Uma; Bumpers, Kevin; Douglas-Holland, Tanyanika; King, Nassoma; Brawley, Otis W; Lipscomb, Joseph; Lechowicz, Mary Jo; Sinha, Rajni; Grover, Rajinder S; Bernal-Mizrachi, Leon; Kowalski, Jeanne; Donnellan, Will; The, Angelina; Reddy, Vishnu; Jaye, David L; Foran, James

    2013-02-01

    We performed a retrospective cohort analysis of 701 (533 white and 144 black) patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) treated at two referral centers in southern United States between 1981 and 2010. Median age of diagnosis for blacks was 50 years vs. 57 years for whites (p < 0.001). A greater percentage of blacks presented with elevated lactate dehydrogenase levels, B-symptoms and performance status ≥ 2. More whites (8%) than blacks (3%) had a positive family history of lymphoma (p = 0.048). There were no racial differences in the use of R-CHOP (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, prednisone; 52% black vs. 47% white, p = 0.73). While black race predicted worse survival among patients treated with CHOP (hazard ratio [HR] 1.8, p < 0.001), treatment with R-CHOP was associated with improved survival irrespective of race (HR 0.61, p = 0.01). Future studies should examine biological differences that may underlie the observed racial differences in presentation and outcome.

  2. High performance solar cells: It's all about the optics (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yablonovitch, Eli

    2016-09-01

    For solar cells at 25%, good electron-hole transport is already a given. Further improvements of efficiency above 25% are all about the photon management! Our mantra is: "A good solar cell has to be a good LED; A great solar cell has to be a great LED! It has been found that thin-film cells are more efficient than the best wafer cells. Even more counter-intuitively, solar cells perform best when some of the solar photons are returned as external fluorescence. That is, the external luminescence yield ext, should be maximized. Good external fluorescence produces record output voltage.

  3. The ELAM-1 ligand sialosyl-Le(X) is present on Langerhans cells isolated from stratified epithelium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nylander, K; Larsen, J K; Larsen, J

    1992-01-01

    In this study we show the expression of the newly identified carbohydrate ligand, sialosyl-Le(X) on Langerhans cells. The receptor for sialosyl-Le(X) is the endothelial leukocyte adhesion molecule-1 (ELAM-1) present on activated endothelial cells. Using flow cytometry, Langerhans cells were...... at investigating the importance of adhesion between sialosyl Le(X) and ELAM-1 in epithelial recruitment of Langerhans cells....

  4. Granuloma cells in chronic inflammation express CD205 (DEC205) antigen and harbor proliferating T lymphocytes: similarity to antigen-presenting cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtani, Haruo

    2013-02-01

    Granulomas are classified as immune or foreign body granulomas. Of these, the immune granulomas, a hallmark of granulomatous inflammation, are closely related to cell-mediated immune responses. The aim of the present study is to characterize immune granuloma cells in 33 patients with granulomatous inflammation focusing on the expression of CD205 (DEC205), a cell surface marker of antigen presenting cells, and their spatial relationship to T cells. CD205 was frequently expressed by immune granuloma cells, in contrast to foreign body granuloma cells that lacked CD205 expression. T cells were not only distributed in a lymphocyte collar around the granuloma, but also present among the granuloma cells (termed 'intra-granuloma T cells'). Intra-granuloma T cells stained positive for Ki-67 (median positivity = 9.4%) by double immunostaining for CD3 and Ki-67. This indicated the presence of proliferative stimuli within the granuloma that could activate the intra-granuloma T cells. The labeling index of Ki-67 in intra-granuloma T cells was significantly higher than that of T cells in the lymphocyte collar (P granulomas and antigen presenting cells. © 2013 The Author. Pathology International © 2013 Japanese Society of Pathology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  5. Asouzu's Complementary Ontology as a Foundation for a Viable ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper on “Asouzu's Complementary Ontology as a foundation for a viable Ethic of the Environment”, posits that an ethic of the environment can be seen as viable if it considers the whole of reality as ontologically relevant. This point of view would free environmental ethics of anthropocentric bias and its attendant ...

  6. Stage Presentation, Care Patterns, and Treatment Outcomes for Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Penis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burt, Lindsay M.; Shrieve, Dennis C.; Tward, Jonathan D., E-mail: Jonathan.Tward@hci.utah.edu

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Penile squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is a rare entity, with few published series on outcomes. We evaluated the stage distributions and outcomes for surgery and radiation therapy in a U.S. population database. Methods and Materials: Subjects with SCC of the penis were identified using the National Cancer Institute Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) Program database between 1988 and 2006. Descriptive statistics were performed, and cause-specific survival (CSS) was estimated using Kaplan-Meier analysis. Comparisons of treatment modalities were analyzed using multivariate Cox regression. Subjects were staged using American Joint Committee on Cancer, sixth edition, criteria. Results: There were 2458 subjects identified. The median age was 66.8 years (range, 17-102 years). Grade 2 disease was present in 94.5% of cases. T1, T2, T3, T4, and Tx disease was present in 64.8%, 17.1%, 9.5%, 2.1%, and 6.5% of cases, respectively. N0, N1, N2, N3, and Nx disease was noted in 61.6%, 6.9%, 4.0%, 3.7%, and 23.8% of cases, respectively. M1 disease was noted in 2.5% of subjects. Individuals of white ethnicity accounted for 85.1% of cases. Lymphadenectomy was performed in 16.7% of cases. The CSS for all patients at 5 and 10 years was 80.8% and 78.6%. By multivariable analysis grades 2 and 3 disease, T3 stage, and positive lymph nodes were adverse prognostic factors for CSS. Conclusion: SCC of the penis often presents as early-stage T1, N0, M0, grade 1, or grade 2 disease. The majority of patients identified were treated with surgery, and only a small fraction of patients received radiation therapy alone or as adjuvant therapy.

  7. Detection of Only Viable Bacterial Spores Using a Live/Dead Indicator in Mixed Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behar, Alberto E.; Stam, Christina N.; Smiley, Ronald

    2013-01-01

    This method uses a photoaffinity label that recognizes DNA and can be used to distinguish populations of bacterial cells from bacterial spores without the use of heat shocking during conventional culture, and live from dead bacterial spores using molecular-based methods. Biological validation of commercial sterility using traditional and alternative technologies remains challenging. Recovery of viable spores is cumbersome, as the process requires substantial incubation time, and the extended time to results limits the ability to quickly evaluate the efficacy of existing technologies. Nucleic acid amplification approaches such as PCR (polymerase chain reaction) have shown promise for improving time to detection for a wide range of applications. Recent real-time PCR methods are particularly promising, as these methods can be made at least semi-quantitative by correspondence to a standard curve. Nonetheless, PCR-based methods are rarely used for process validation, largely because the DNA from dead bacterial cells is highly stable and hence, DNA-based amplification methods fail to discriminate between live and inactivated microorganisms. Currently, no published method has been shown to effectively distinguish between live and dead bacterial spores. This technology uses a DNA binding photoaffinity label that can be used to distinguish between live and dead bacterial spores with detection limits ranging from 109 to 102 spores/mL. An environmental sample suspected of containing a mixture of live and dead vegetative cells and bacterial endospores is treated with a photoaffinity label. This step will eliminate any vegetative cells (live or dead) and dead endospores present in the sample. To further determine the bacterial spore viability, DNA is extracted from the spores and total population is quantified by real-time PCR. The current NASA standard assay takes 72 hours for results. Part of this procedure requires a heat shock step at 80 degC for 15 minutes before the

  8. Assessing genetic polymorphisms using DNA extracted from cells present in saliva samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nemoda Zsofia

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Technical advances following the Human Genome Project revealed that high-quality and -quantity DNA may be obtained from whole saliva samples. However, usability of previously collected samples and the effects of environmental conditions on the samples during collection have not been assessed in detail. In five studies we document the effects of sample volume, handling and storage conditions, type of collection device, and oral sampling location, on quantity, quality, and genetic assessment of DNA extracted from cells present in saliva. Methods Saliva samples were collected from ten adults in each study. Saliva volumes from .10-1.0 ml, different saliva collection devices, sampling locations in the mouth, room temperature storage, and multiple freeze-thaw cycles were tested. One representative single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP in the catechol-0-methyltransferase gene (COMT rs4680 and one representative variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR in the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR: serotonin transporter linked polymorphic region were selected for genetic analyses. Results The smallest tested whole saliva volume of .10 ml yielded, on average, 1.43 ± .77 μg DNA and gave accurate genotype calls in both genetic analyses. The usage of collection devices reduced the amount of DNA extracted from the saliva filtrates compared to the whole saliva sample, as 54-92% of the DNA was retained on the device. An "adhered cell" extraction enabled recovery of this DNA and provided good quality and quantity DNA. The DNA from both the saliva filtrates and the adhered cell recovery provided accurate genotype calls. The effects of storage at room temperature (up to 5 days, repeated freeze-thaw cycles (up to 6 cycles, and oral sampling location on DNA extraction and on genetic analysis from saliva were negligible. Conclusions Whole saliva samples with volumes of at least .10 ml were sufficient to extract good quality and quantity DNA. Using

  9. Assessing genetic polymorphisms using DNA extracted from cells present in saliva samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Technical advances following the Human Genome Project revealed that high-quality and -quantity DNA may be obtained from whole saliva samples. However, usability of previously collected samples and the effects of environmental conditions on the samples during collection have not been assessed in detail. In five studies we document the effects of sample volume, handling and storage conditions, type of collection device, and oral sampling location, on quantity, quality, and genetic assessment of DNA extracted from cells present in saliva. Methods Saliva samples were collected from ten adults in each study. Saliva volumes from .10-1.0 ml, different saliva collection devices, sampling locations in the mouth, room temperature storage, and multiple freeze-thaw cycles were tested. One representative single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the catechol-0-methyltransferase gene (COMT rs4680) and one representative variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) in the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR: serotonin transporter linked polymorphic region) were selected for genetic analyses. Results The smallest tested whole saliva volume of .10 ml yielded, on average, 1.43 ± .77 μg DNA and gave accurate genotype calls in both genetic analyses. The usage of collection devices reduced the amount of DNA extracted from the saliva filtrates compared to the whole saliva sample, as 54-92% of the DNA was retained on the device. An "adhered cell" extraction enabled recovery of this DNA and provided good quality and quantity DNA. The DNA from both the saliva filtrates and the adhered cell recovery provided accurate genotype calls. The effects of storage at room temperature (up to 5 days), repeated freeze-thaw cycles (up to 6 cycles), and oral sampling location on DNA extraction and on genetic analysis from saliva were negligible. Conclusions Whole saliva samples with volumes of at least .10 ml were sufficient to extract good quality and quantity DNA. Using 10 ng of DNA per

  10. Influence of lipid rafts on CD1d presentation by dendritic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peng, Wei; Martaresche, Cecile; Escande-Beillard, Nathalie

    2011-01-01

    Our main objective was to analyze the role of lipid rafts in the activation of Valpha-14(-) and Valpha-14(+) T hybridomas by dendritic cells. We showed that activation of Valpha-14(+) hybridomas by dendritic cells or other CD1d-expressing cells was altered by disruption of lipid rafts...

  11. Phenotype classification of single cells using SRS microscopy, RNA sequencing, and microfluidics (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streets, Aaron M.; Cao, Chen; Zhang, Xiannian; Huang, Yanyi

    2016-03-01

    Phenotype classification of single cells reveals biological variation that is masked in ensemble measurement. This heterogeneity is found in gene and protein expression as well as in cell morphology. Many techniques are available to probe phenotypic heterogeneity at the single cell level, for example quantitative imaging and single-cell RNA sequencing, but it is difficult to perform multiple assays on the same single cell. In order to directly track correlation between morphology and gene expression at the single cell level, we developed a microfluidic platform for quantitative coherent Raman imaging and immediate RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) of single cells. With this device we actively sort and trap cells for analysis with stimulated Raman scattering microscopy (SRS). The cells are then processed in parallel pipelines for lysis, and preparation of cDNA for high-throughput transcriptome sequencing. SRS microscopy offers three-dimensional imaging with chemical specificity for quantitative analysis of protein and lipid distribution in single cells. Meanwhile, the microfluidic platform facilitates single-cell manipulation, minimizes contamination, and furthermore, provides improved RNA-Seq detection sensitivity and measurement precision, which is necessary for differentiating biological variability from technical noise. By combining coherent Raman microscopy with RNA sequencing, we can better understand the relationship between cellular morphology and gene expression at the single-cell level.

  12. Neonatal colonisation expands a specific intestinal antigen-presenting cell subset prior to CD4 T-cell expansion, without altering T-cell repertoire.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte F Inman

    Full Text Available Interactions between the early-life colonising intestinal microbiota and the developing immune system are critical in determining the nature of immune responses in later life. Studies in neonatal animals in which this interaction can be examined are central to understanding the mechanisms by which the microbiota impacts on immune development and to developing therapies based on manipulation of the microbiome. The inbred piglet model represents a system that is comparable to human neonates and allows for control of the impact of maternal factors. Here we show that colonisation with a defined microbiota produces expansion of mucosal plasma cells and of T-lymphocytes without altering the repertoire of alpha beta T-cells in the intestine. Importantly, this is preceded by microbially-induced expansion of a signal regulatory protein α-positive (SIRPα(+ antigen-presenting cell subset, whilst SIRPα(-CD11R1(+ antigen-presenting cells (APCs are unaffected by colonisation. The central role of intestinal APCs in the induction and maintenance of mucosal immunity implicates SIRPα(+ antigen-presenting cells as orchestrators of early-life mucosal immune development.

  13. Measuring sickle cell morphology in flow using spectrally encoded flow cytometry (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kviatkovsky, Inna; Zeidan, Adel; Yeheskely-Hayon, Daniella; Dann, Eldad J.; Yelin, Dvir

    2017-02-01

    During a sickle cell crisis in sickle cell anemia patients, deoxygenated red blood cells may change their mechanical properties and block small blood vessels, causing pain, local tissue damage and even organ failure. Measuring these cellular structural and morphological changes is important for understanding the factors contributing to vessel blockage and developing an effective treatment. In this work, we use spectrally encoded flow cytometry for confocal, high-resolution imaging of flowing blood cells from sickle cell anemia patients. A wide variety of cell morphologies were observed by analyzing the interference patterns resulting from reflections from the front and back faces of the cells' membrane. Using numerical simulation for calculating the two-dimensional reflection pattern from the cells, we propose an analytical expression for the three-dimensional shape of a characteristic sickle cell and compare it to a previous from the literature. In vitro spectrally encoded flow cytometry offers new means for analyzing the morphology of sickle cells in stress-free environment, and could provide an effective tool for studying the unique physiological properties of these cells.

  14. Deconstructing autofluorescence: non-invasive detection and monitoring of biochemistry in cells and tissues (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldys, Ewa M.; Gosnell, Martin E.; Anwer, Ayad G.; Cassano, Juan C.; Sue, Carolyn M.; Mahbub, Saabah B.; Pernichery, Sandeep M.; Inglis, David W.; Adhikary, Partho P.; Jazayeri, Jalal A.; Cahill, Michael A.; Saad, Sonia; Pollock, Carol; Sutton-Mcdowall, Melanie L.; Thompson, Jeremy G.

    2016-03-01

    Automated and unbiased methods of non-invasive cell monitoring able to deal with complex biological heterogeneity are fundamentally important for biology and medicine. Label-free cell imaging provides information about endogenous fluorescent metabolites, enzymes and cofactors in cells. However extracting high content information from imaging of native fluorescence has been hitherto impossible. Here, we quantitatively characterise cell populations in different tissue types, live or fixed, by using novel image processing and a simple multispectral upgrade of a wide-field fluorescence microscope. Multispectral intrinsic fluorescence imaging was applied to patient olfactory neurosphere-derived cells, cell model of a human metabolic disease MELAS (mitochondrial myopathy, encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, stroke-like syndrome). By using an endogenous source of contrast, subtle metabolic variations have been detected between living cells in their full morphological context which made it possible to distinguish healthy from diseased cells before and after therapy. Cellular maps of native fluorophores, flavins, bound and free NADH and retinoids unveiled subtle metabolic signatures and helped uncover significant cell subpopulations, in particular a subpopulation with compromised mitochondrial function. The versatility of our method is further illustrated by detecting genetic mutations in cancer, non-invasive monitoring of CD90 expression, label-free tracking of stem cell differentiation, identifying stem cell subpopulations with varying functional characteristics, tissue diagnostics in diabetes, and assessing the condition of preimplantation embryos. Our optimal discrimination approach enables statistical hypothesis testing and intuitive visualisations where previously undetectable differences become clearly apparent.

  15. Live birth potential of good morphology and vitrified blastocysts presenting abnormal cell divisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azzarello, Antonino; Høst, Thomas; Hay-Schmidt, Anders

    2017-01-01

    This study included 238 good morphology blastocysts, which were transferred after vitrification-warming to 152 women by single blastocyst transfer in Holbæk Fertility Clinic, Denmark. Time-lapse recordings of transferred good morphology blastocysts were reassessed to recognize every abnormal cell...... division (ACD) from the 1st to the 4th cell cycle. ACDs were distinguished as failed cell divisions and multi-cell divisions. ACDs were recognized in 37.0% (no. 88/238) of good morphology blastocysts that were vitrified-warmed and transferred in our clinic. Good morphology blastocysts with ACDs showed...... a lower live birth rate (17.0%) than blastocyst with solely regular cell divisions (29.3%). ACDs could occur at more than one cell division in the same good morphology blastocyst. Reported as independent events, we observed ACDs occurring more frequently at the later cell cycles (1st: 1.3%; 2nd: 8.0%; 3rd...

  16. Methylated DNA-binding protein is present in various mammalian cell types

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Supakar, P.C.; Weist, D.; Zhang, D.; Inamdar, N.; Zhang, Xianyang; Khan, R.; Ehrlich, M. (Tulane Medical School, New Orleans, LA (USA)); Ehrlich, K.C. (Department of Agriculture, New Orleans, LA (USA))

    1988-08-25

    A DNA-binding protein from human placenta, methylated DNA-binding protein (MDBP), binds to certain DNA sequences only when they contain 5-methylcytosine (m{sup 5}C) residues at specific positions. The authors found a very similar DNA-binding activity in nuclear extracts of rat tissues, calf thymus, human embryonal carcinoma cells, HeLa cells, and mouse LTK cells. Like human placental MDBP, the analogous DNA-binding proteins from the above mammalian cell lines formed a number of different low-electrophoretic-mobility complexes with a 14-bp MDBP-specific oligonucleotide duplex. All of these complexes exhibited the same DNA methylation specificity and DNA sequence specificity. Although MDBP activity was found in various mammalian cell types, it was not detected in extracts of cultured mosquito cells and so may be associated only with cells with vertebrate-type DNA methylation.

  17. Making gametes from alternate sources of stem cells: past, present and future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepa Bhartiya

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Infertile couples including cancer survivors stand to benefit from gametes differentiated from embryonic or induced pluripotent stem (ES/iPS cells. It remains challenging to convert human ES/iPS cells into primordial germ-like cells (PGCLCs en route to obtaining gametes. Considerable success was achieved in 2016 to obtain fertile offspring starting with mouse ES/iPS cells, however the specification of human ES/iPS cells into PGCLCs in vitro is still not achieved. Human ES cells will not yield patient-specific gametes unless and until hES cells are derived by somatic cell nuclear transfer (therapeutic cloning whereas iPS cells retain the residual epigenetic memory of the somatic cells from which they are derived and also harbor genomic and mitochondrial DNA mutations. Thus, they may not be ideal starting material to produce autologus gametes, especially for aged couples. Pluripotent, very small embryonic-like stem cells (VSELs have been reported in adult tissues including gonads, are relatively quiescent in nature, survive oncotherapy and can be detected in aged, non-functional gonads. Being developmentally equivalent to PGCs (natural precursors to gametes, VSELs spontaneously differentiate into gametes in vitro. It is also being understood that gonadal stem cells niche is compromised by oncotherapy and with age. Improving the gonadal somatic niche could regenerate non-functional gonads from endogenous VSELs to restore fertility. Niche cells (Sertoli/mesenchymal cells can be directly transplanted and restore gonadal function by providing paracrine support to endogenous VSELs. This strategy has been successful in several mice studies already and resulted in live birth in a woman with pre-mature ovarian failure.

  18. Diagnostic value of PET/CT for giant cell arteritis combined with pulmonary embolism presenting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Xiaoming; Xu, Xiaoxiang; Peng, Qinglin; Lu, Xin; Ma, Li; Mi, Na; Wang, Guochun

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Giant cell arteritis (GCA) combined with concomitant pulmonary embolism (PE) is extremely difficult to diagnose because of its low incidence and atypical clinical presentations. Patient concerns: A 62-year-old male developed fever of unknown origin. Diagnoses: Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) revealed increased glucose metabolism in the vascular walls of the ascending and descending aorta and pulmonary artery, leading to a diagnosis of GCA combined with PE. Interventions: The patient did not respond to regular antiviral and antibacterial treatment but was remised after steroid treatment. Outcomes: No specific autoantibodies were positive for this patient, and the patient did not respond to regular antiviral and antibacterial treatment. After diagnosed by PET/CT, the patient responded well to steroid treatment. Literature review found 16 cases of GCA diagnosed by PET/CT. Their median age was 68.5 (range, 21–87) years and 13 cases were female. PET/CT showed significantly increased metabolism in the ascending and descending aorta, abdominal aorta, and carotid artery. In 4 cases (including our own case), the mean maximum standardized uptake value was 4.2 ± 1.7 (range, 2.5–7.2). Six cases of GCA also had PE and 5 (6/7, 85.7%) cases were females, and the current case is the first male case of GCA combined with PE. Steroid therapy was initiated in all 5 cases. Complete remission was achieved in 4 cases and 2 patients died and the outcome of 1 patient was unknown. Lessons: Our case and the review highlight the value of PET/CT in diagnosing GCA combined with PE, suggesting that PET/CT is the preferred diagnostic tool for atypical patients presenting with fever or muscle pain. PMID:28767581

  19. Herpes simplex virus antigens directly activate NK cells via TLR2, thus facilitating their presentation to CD4 T lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min; Osborne, Naomi R; Zeng, Weiguang; Donaghy, Heather; McKinnon, Kay; Jackson, David C; Cunningham, Anthony L

    2012-05-01

    NK cells infiltrate human herpetic lesions, but their role has been underexplored. HSV can stimulate innate immune responses via surface TLR2, which is expressed on monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) and NK cells. In this study, UV-inactivated HSV1/2 and immunodominant HSV2 glycoprotein D peptides conjugated to the TLR2 agonist dipalmitoyl-S-glyceryl cysteine stimulated CD4 T lymphocyte IFN-γ responses within PBMCs or in coculture with monocyte-derived DCs. NK cells contributed markedly to the PBMC responses. Furthermore, NK cells alone were activated directly by both Ags, also upregulating HLA-DR and HLA-DQ and then they activated autologous CD4 T lymphocytes. Using Transwells, Ag-stimulated NK cells and CD4 T lymphocytes were shown to interact through both cell-to-cell contact and cytokines, differing in relative importance in different donors. A distinct immunological synapse between Ag-stimulated NK cells and CD4 T lymphocytes was observed, indicating the significance of their cell-to-cell contact. A large proportion (57%) of NK cells was also in contact with CD4 T lymphocytes in the dermal infiltrate of human recurrent herpetic lesions. Thus, NK cells stimulated by TLR2-activating HSV Ags can present Ag alone or augment the role of DCs in vitro and perhaps in herpetic lesions or draining lymph nodes. In addition to DCs, NK cells should be considered as targets for adjuvants during HSV vaccine development.

  20. Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Presenting as Painful Chewing Successfully Treated with Combined Nivolumab and Sunitinib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Fade; Abdallah, Al-Ola; Arnaoutakis, Konstantinos; Makhoul, Issam

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) to the head and neck is rare. It is the third-most common cause of distant metastasis to the head and neck, after breast cancer and lung cancer. Several drugs are available to treat metastatic RCC including high-dose interleukin and targeted therapy. Immunotherapy with nivolumab was recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as a second-line treatment for patients with metastatic RCC. We present a case of metastatic RCC in a 71-year-old man with a single complaint of a 1-year history of pain while chewing food. Positron emission tomography-computed tomography showed diffuse metastatic disease. Nivolumab, off-label use before its recent FDA approval, was combined with sunitinib and resulted in an excellent and ongoing response. RCC is the third-most common cause of distant metastasis to the head and neck. The patient described in this case did not have any symptoms commonly seen in RCC, such as painless hematuria, weight loss, anorexia, fatigue, or anemia, despite the bulk of his disease. The other important aspect of this case is the almost complete response of his metastatic disease to the combination of nivolumab and sunitinib that was used off label before the FDA issued the approval. Future clinical trials should look at combining immunotherapy with targeted therapy in metastatic RCC.

  1. Small-cell carcinoma of the endometrium presenting as Cushing's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Haruhiro; Kanai, Genta; Kajiwara, Hiroshi; Itoh, Johbu; Osamura, Robert Yoshiyuki

    2010-01-01

    Small-cell carcinoma (SCC) of neuroendocrine type is an uncommon tumor of the endometrium. No previous report has documented Cushing's syndrome due to ectopic ACTH production by SCC of the endometrium. We describe a 56-year-old Japanese woman with SCC of the endometrium and multiple lung metastases presenting as Cushing's syndrome. The patient was referred to our hospital because of general fatigue with facial and leg edema, and multiple nodular lesions in the bilateral lungs on chest X-ray examination. A physical examination revealed that the patient had moon face, buffalo hump, and truncal obesity. Endocrinological examinations confirmed ACTH-dependent Cushing's syndrome. Thoracic computed tomography imaging showed multiple nodular lesions in the bilateral lungs. Abdominal magnetic resonance imaging suggested a malignant tumor of the uterus. The patient received a lung tumor biopsy and surgical hysterectomy. The endometrial carcinoma was histologically a SCC admixed with endometrioid adenocarcinoma. The SCC of the endometrium showed immunoreactivity for pro-opiomelanocortin, ACTH, and vimentin, but not for thyroid transcription factor-1. The lung biopsy specimen had the same features. These findings indicated that the SCC originated from the endometrium, and the ectopic ACTH-producing tumor caused Cushing's syndrome. This study provides the evidence that SCC of endometrial origin was an ectopic ACTH-producing tumor causing Cushing's syndrome.

  2. Separation of viable and non-viable tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) seeds using single seed near-infrared spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shrestha, Santosh; Deleuran, Lise Christina; Gislum, René

    2017-01-01

    -viable tomato seeds of two cultivars using chemometrics. The data exploration were performed by principal component analysis (PCA). Subsequently, viable and non-viable seeds were classified by partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) and interval PLS-DA (iPLS-DA). The indication of clustering...... of viable and non-viable seeds were observed in the PCA of each cultivar and the pooled samples. However, the PCA did not exhibit a pattern of separation among the early, normal and late germinated tomato seeds. The NIR spectral regions of 1160–1170, 1383–1397, 1647–1666, 1860–1884 and 1915–1940 nm were...... identified as important for classification of viable and non-viable tomato seeds by iPLS-DA. The sensitivity i.e. ability to correctly identify the positive samples and specificity i.e. ability to reject the negative samples of the (iPLS-DA) model on identified spectral regions for prediction of viable...

  3. Pay Cable: A Viable Advertising Medium?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krugman, Dean M.; Barban, Arnold M.

    Cable television, which cannot only clarify local signals to weak signal areas but can also bring in distant signals to areas which have been receiving few signals, has the capacity to present special television programs to customers for extra fees. The number of pay cable subscribers is growing and industry projections are that it will reach 20…

  4. Antigen Presenting Cells and Stromal Cells Trigger Human Natural Killer Lymphocytes to Autoreactivity: Evidence for the Involvement of Natural Cytotoxicity Receptors (NCR and NKG2D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Poggi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Human natural killer (NK lymphocytes should not damage autologous cells due to the engagement of inhibitory receptor superfamily (IRS members by HLA-I. Nevertheless, NK cells kill self cells expressing low levels or lacking HLA-I, as it may occur during viral infections (missing-self hypothesis. Herein, we show that human NK cells can be activated upon binding with self antigen presenting cells or stromal cells despite the expression of HLA-I. Indeed, NK cells can kill and produce pro-inflammatory and regulating cytokines as IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL10 during interaction with autologous dendritic cells or bone marrow stromal cells or skin fibroblasts. The killing of antigen presenting and stromal cells is dependent on LFA1/ICAM1 interaction. Further, the natural cytotoxicity receptors (NCR NKp30 and NKp46 are responsible for the delivery of lethal hit to DC, whereas NKG2D activating receptor, the ligand of the MHC-related molecule MIC-A and the UL16 binding protein, is involved in stromal cell killing. These findings indicate that different activating receptors are involved in cell to self cell interaction. Finally, NK cells can revert the veto effect of stromal cells on mixed lymphocyte reaction further supporting the idea that NK cells may alter the interaction between T lymphocytes and microenvironment leading to autoreactivity.

  5. Raman spectroscopy for discrimination of neural progenitor cells and their lineages (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Keren; Ong, William; Chew, Sing Yian; Liu, Quan

    2017-02-01

    Neurological diseases are one of the leading causes of adult disability and they are estimated to cause more deaths than cancer in the elderly population by 2040. Stem cell therapy has shown great potential in treating neurological diseases. However, before cell therapy can be widely adopted in the long term, a number of challenges need to be addressed, including the fundamental research about cellular development of neural progenitor cells. To facilitate the fundamental research of neural progenitor cells, many methods have been developed to identify neural progenitor cells. Although great progress has been made, there is still lack of an effective method to achieve fast, label-free and noninvasive differentiation of neural progenitor cells and their lineages. As a fast, label-free and noninvasive technique, spontaneous Raman spectroscopy has been conducted to characterize many types of stem cells including neural stem cells. However, to our best knowledge, it has not been studied for the discrimination of neural progenitor cells from specific lineages. Here we report the differentiation of neural progenitor cell from their lineages including astrocytes, oligodendrocytes and neurons using spontaneous Raman spectroscopy. Moreover, we also evaluate the influence of system parameters during spectral acquisition on the quality of measured Raman spectra and the accuracy of classification using the spectra, which yield a set of optimal system parameters facilitating future studies.

  6. Rapid quantification of viable Campylobacter bacteria on chicken carcasses, using real-time PCR and propidium monoazide treatment, as a tool for quantitative risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josefsen, M H; Löfström, C; Hansen, T B; Christensen, L S; Olsen, J E; Hoorfar, J

    2010-08-01

    A number of intervention strategies against Campylobacter-contaminated poultry focus on postslaughter reduction of the number of cells, emphasizing the need for rapid and reliable quantitative detection of only viable Campylobacter bacteria. We present a new and rapid quantitative approach to the enumeration of food-borne Campylobacter bacteria that combines real-time quantitative PCR (Q-PCR) with simple propidium monoazide (PMA) sample treatment. In less than 3 h, this method generates a signal from only viable and viable but nonculturable (VBNC) Campylobacter bacteria with an intact membrane. The method's performance was evaluated by assessing the contributions to variability by individual chicken carcass rinse matrices, species of Campylobacter, and differences in efficiency of DNA extraction with differing cell inputs. The method was compared with culture-based enumeration on 50 naturally infected chickens. The cell contents correlated with cycle threshold (C(T)) values (R(2) = 0.993), with a quantification range of 1 x 10(2) to 1 x 10(7) CFU/ml. The correlation between the Campylobacter counts obtained by PMA-PCR and culture on naturally contaminated chickens was high (R(2) = 0.844). The amplification efficiency of the Q-PCR method was not affected by the chicken rinse matrix or by the species of Campylobacter. No Q-PCR signals were obtained from artificially inoculated chicken rinse when PMA sample treatment was applied. In conclusion, this study presents a rapid tool for producing reliable quantitative data on viable Campylobacter bacteria in chicken carcass rinse. The proposed method does not detect DNA from dead Campylobacter bacteria but recognizes the infectious potential of the VBNC state and is thereby able to assess the effect of control strategies and provide trustworthy data for risk assessment.

  7. Retinoic acid-treated pluripotent stem cells undergoing neurogenesis present increased aneuploidy and micronuclei formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafaela C Sartore

    Full Text Available The existence of loss and gain of chromosomes, known as aneuploidy, has been previously described within the central nervous system. During development, at least one-third of neural progenitor cells (NPCs are aneuploid. Notably, aneuploid NPCs may survive and functionally integrate into the mature neural circuitry. Given the unanswered significance of this phenomenon, we tested the hypothesis that neural differentiation induced by all-trans retinoic acid (RA in pluripotent stem cells is accompanied by increased levels of aneuploidy, as previously described for cortical NPCs in vivo. In this work we used embryonal carcinoma (EC cells, embryonic stem (ES cells and induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells undergoing differentiation into NPCs. Ploidy analysis revealed a 2-fold increase in the rate of aneuploidy, with the prevalence of chromosome loss in RA primed stem cells when compared to naïve cells. In an attempt to understand the basis of neurogenic aneuploidy, micronuclei formation and survivin expression was assessed in pluripotent stem cells exposed to RA. RA increased micronuclei occurrence by almost 2-fold while decreased survivin expression by 50%, indicating possible mechanisms by which stem cells lose their chromosomes during neural differentiation. DNA fragmentation analysis demonstrated no increase in apoptosis on embryoid bodies treated with RA, indicating that cell death is not the mandatory fate of aneuploid NPCs derived from pluripotent cells. In order to exclude that the increase in aneuploidy was a spurious consequence of RA treatment, not related to neurogenesis, mouse embryonic fibroblasts were treated with RA under the same conditions and no alterations in chromosome gain or loss were observed. These findings indicate a correlation amongst neural differentiation, aneuploidy, micronuclei formation and survivin downregulation in pluripotent stem cells exposed to RA, providing evidence that somatically generated chromosomal

  8. Abacavir-reactive memory T cells are present in drug naïve individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Lucas

    Full Text Available Fifty-five percent of individuals with HLA-B*57:01 exposed to the antiretroviral drug abacavir develop a hypersensitivity reaction (HSR that has been attributed to naïve T-cell responses to neo-antigen generated by the drug. Immunologically confirmed abacavir HSR can manifest clinically in less than 48 hours following first exposure suggesting that, at least in some cases, abacavir HSR is due to re-stimulation of a pre-existing memory T-cell population rather than priming of a high frequency naïve T-cell population.To determine whether a pre-existing abacavir reactive memory T-cell population contributes to early abacavir HSR symptoms, we studied the abacavir specific naïve or memory T-cell response using HLA-B*57:01 positive HSR patients or healthy controls using ELISpot assay, intra-cellular cytokine staining and tetramer labelling.Abacavir reactive CD8+ T-cell responses were detected in vitro in one hundred percent of abacavir unexposed HLA-B*57:01 positive healthy donors. Abacavir-specific CD8+ T cells from such donors can be expanded from sorted memory, and sorted naïve, CD8+ T cells without need for autologous CD4+ T cells.We propose that these pre-existing abacavir-reactive memory CD8+ T-cell responses must have been primed by earlier exposure to another foreign antigen and that these T cells cross-react with an abacavir-HLA-B*57:01-endogenous peptide ligand complex, in keeping with the model of heterologous immunity proposed in transplant rejection.

  9. Detection of viable Helicobacter pylori inside free-living amoebae in wastewater and drinking water samples from Eastern Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Mesonero, Laura; Moreno, Yolanda; Alonso, José Luis; Ferrús, M Antonia

    2017-10-01

    Helicobacter pylori is one of the most concerning emerging waterborne pathogens. It has been suggested that it could survive in water inside free-living amoebae (FLA), but nobody has studied this relationship in the environment yet. Thus, we aimed to detect viable H. pylori cells from inside FLA in water samples. Sixty-nine wastewater and 31 drinking water samples were collected. FLA were purified and identified by PCR and sequencing. For exclusively detecting H. pylori inside FLA, samples were exposed to sodium hypochlorite and assayed by specific PMA-qPCR, DVC-FISH and culture. FLA were detected in 38.7% of drinking water and 79.7% of wastewater samples, even after disinfection. In wastewater, Acanthamoeba spp. and members of the family Vahlkampfiidae were identified. In drinking water, Acanthamoeba spp. and Echinamoeba and/or Vermamoeba were present. In 39 (58.2%) FLA-positive samples, H. pylori was detected by PMA-qPCR. After DVC-FISH, 21 (31.3%) samples harboured viable H. pylori internalized cells. H. pylori was cultured from 10 wastewater samples. To our knowledge, this is the first report that demonstrates that H. pylori can survive inside FLA in drinking water and wastewater, strongly supporting the hypothesis that FLA could play an important role in the transmission of H. pylori to humans. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Escherichia coli detection using mTEC agar and fluorescent antibody direct viable counting on coastal recreational water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, A M; Rebarchik, D M; Flowers, A R; Williams, J L; Grimes, D J

    2009-10-01

    Escherichia coli is the faecal indicator species recommended by the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) for monitoring fresh recreational water. Viable but nonculturable (VBNC) E. coli are living cells that are dormant and not culturable using standard microbiological cultivation methods. This study reports a comparison between the mTEC culture method recommended by USEPA for E. coli enumeration and a fluorescent antibody-direct viable count (FA-DVC) method to visualize living E. coli cells with a microscope. Escherichia coli, faecal coliforms and Enterococcus were detected using standard methods recommended by the USEPA. VBNC E. coli was visualized with FA-DVC. Results were analysed with standard statistical methods (Pearson correlation; paired-sample t-test). Significantly higher numbers of E. coli were detected using the FA-DVC method than using the mTEC method. Escherichia coli results were also compared with faecal coliform (mFC broth) and Enterococcus (mEI agar) counts in the same samples. The results of this comparative study demonstrate that E. coli can be present in higher numbers than what are detected with standard culture methods. This study re-emphasizes the need for a rapid, accurate and precise method for detecting health risks to humans who use recreational waters.

  11. FSAP-mediated nucleosome release from late apoptotic cells is inhibited by autoantibodies present in SLE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marsman, Gerben; Stephan, Femke; de Leeuw, Karina; Bulder, Ingrid; Ruinard, Jessica T; de Jong, Jan; Westra, Johanna; Bultink, Irene E M; Voskuyl, Alexandre E; Aarden, Lucien A; Luken, Brenda M; Kallenberg, Cees G M; Zeerleder, Sacha

    Inefficient clearance of apoptotic cells and the subsequent exposure of the immune system to nuclear contents are crucially involved in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Factor VII-activating protease (FSAP) is activated in serum upon contact with dead cells, and releases

  12. Renal cell carcinoma in an ectopic pelvic kidney in a patient presenting with acute urinary retention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabella Dash

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of renal cell carcinoma in a pelvic kidney is rare, and has only been described in a very small number of cases. We describe a case where an incidental ectopic kidney with invasive renal cell carcinoma was diagnosed during a separate emergency admission for acute urinary retention.

  13. Plasma membrane protein polarity and trafficking in RPE cells: past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Guillermo L; Benedicto, Ignacio; Philp, Nancy J; Rodriguez-Boulan, Enrique

    2014-09-01

    The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) comprises a monolayer of polarized pigmented epithelial cells that is strategically interposed between the neural retina and the fenestrated choroid capillaries. The RPE performs a variety of vectorial transport functions (water, ions, metabolites, nutrients and waste products) that regulate the composition of the subretinal space and support the functions of photoreceptors (PRs) and other cells in the neural retina. To this end, RPE cells display a polarized distribution of channels, transporters and receptors in their plasma membrane (PM) that is remarkably different from that found in conventional extra-ocular epithelia, e.g. intestine, kidney, and gall bladder. This characteristic PM protein polarity of RPE cells depends on the interplay of sorting signals in the RPE PM proteins and sorting mechanisms and biosynthetic/recycling trafficking routes in the RPE cell. Although considerable progress has been made in our understanding of the RPE trafficking machinery, most available data have been obtained from immortalized RPE cell lines that only partially maintain the RPE phenotype and by extrapolation of data obtained in the prototype Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cell line. The increasing availability of RPE cell cultures that more closely resemble the RPE in vivo together with the advent of advanced live imaging microscopy techniques provides a platform and an opportunity to rapidly expand our understanding of how polarized protein trafficking contributes to RPE PM polarity. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Defects in Antigen-Presenting Cells in the BB-DP Rat Model of Diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V. Sommandas (Vinod)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractType-1 diabetes is the result of a T cell mediated immune response against the insulin-producing β cells in the islet of Langerhans. In humans, until now, the disease is only clearly detectable at the onset of the disease. Therefore studies to identify initial factors involved in

  15. Giant cell tumors of the tendon sheath may present radiologically as intrinsic osseous lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schepper, A.M. de; Bloem, J.L. [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Albinusdreef 2, P.O. Box 9600, RC Leiden (Netherlands); Hogendoorn, P.C.W. [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Pathology, Albinusdreef 2, P.O. Box 9600, RC Leiden (Netherlands)

    2007-02-15

    The purpose of this study was to explain radiographic features of giant cell tumors of the tendon sheath (GCTTS), in particular, osseous extension, by correlating imaging findings with histology in order to increase the accuracy of radiological diagnosis. In a series of 200 consecutive osseous (pseudo) tumors of the hand, on radiography, six patients presented with an intrinsic osseous lesion caused by a histologically confirmed neighboring GCTTS. Available radiographs, computed tomography (CT), and contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) images were correlated with histology. Radiography showed osseous lesions consisting of well-defined cortical defects in four (one of whom also demonstrated cortical scalloping) and a slightly expansile, well-defined osteolytic lesion in two patients. MR obtained in four patients showed the extraosseous tumor invading/eroding bone and causing cortical scalloping (three and one patients, respectively). Extension depicted on MR was confirmed on the two available resection specimens. All lesions were polylobular (cauliflower or mushroom like) and neighbored tendon sheaths. Dense collagen and hemosiderin-loaded macrophages explained the high CT attenuation and the low MR signal intensity on T2-weighted images that was observed in all four MR and in all two CT scans. The high density of proliferative capillaries explained the marked enhancement observed in all four patients with gadolinium (Gd)-chelate-enhanced MR imaging. GCTTS is a soft tissue (pseudo) tumor that may invade bone and as a consequence mimick an intrinsic osseous lesion on radiographs. In such cases, specific MR and CT features that can be explained by histological findings can be used to suggest the correct diagnosis. (orig.)

  16. Characterization of the Viable but Nonculturable (VBNC State in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Salma

    Full Text Available The Viable But Non Culturable (VBNC state has been thoroughly studied in bacteria. In contrast, it has received much less attention in other microorganisms. However, it has been suggested that various yeast species occurring in wine may enter in VBNC following sulfite stress.In order to provide conclusive evidences for the existence of a VBNC state in yeast, the ability of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to enter into a VBNC state by applying sulfite stress was investigated. Viable populations were monitored by flow cytometry while culturable populations were followed by plating on culture medium. Twenty-four hours after the application of the stress, the comparison between the culturable population and the viable population demonstrated the presence of viable cells that were non culturable. In addition, removal of the stress by increasing the pH of the medium at different time intervals into the VBNC state allowed the VBNC S. cerevisiae cells to "resuscitate". The similarity between the cell cycle profiles of VBNC cells and cells exiting the VBNC state together with the generation rate of cells exiting VBNC state demonstrated the absence of cellular multiplication during the exit from the VBNC state. This provides evidence of a true VBNC state. To get further insight into the molecular mechanism pertaining to the VBNC state, we studied the involvement of the SSU1 gene, encoding a sulfite pump in S. cerevisiae. The physiological behavior of wild-type S. cerevisiae was compared to those of a recombinant strain overexpressing SSU1 and null Δssu1 mutant. Our results demonstrated that the SSU1 gene is only implicated in the first stages of sulfite resistance but not per se in the VBNC phenotype. Our study clearly demonstrated the existence of an SO2-induced VBNC state in S. cerevisiae and that the stress removal allows the "resuscitation" of VBNC cells during the VBNC state.

  17. BASAL CELL NEVUS SYNDROME PRESENTING AS EPIRETINAL MEMBRANE AND MYELINATED NERVE FIBER LAYER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, Nathan D; Sassalos, Thérèse M; Ober, Michael D

    2017-01-01

    To report a case of epiretinal membrane and myelinated nerve fiber layer, which preceded the diagnosis of basal cell nevus syndrome, in a young girl. Observational case report. A 12-year-old girl was referred for an asymptomatic epiretinal membrane. Examination revealed epiretinal membrane in the right eye without posterior vitreous separation or vitreous abnormality and bilateral myelinated nerve fiber layer. Subsequent workup yielded pathologic diagnosis of multiple skin basal cell carcinoma and odontogenic keratocysts in the jaw. Genetic testing revealed a frameshift mutation in the PTCH1 gene. Basal cell nevus syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant disease that affects multiple organ systems, including the eyes. Recognition of common ocular findings in children with basal cell nevus syndrome can lead to systemic diagnosis. Early diagnosis is critical to initiate early screening for known neoplastic associations and lifelong minimization of sun exposure to reduce the incidence and severity of basal cell carcinoma.

  18. How cancer cells dictate their microenvironment: present roles of extracellular vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naito, Yutaka; Yoshioka, Yusuke; Yamamoto, Yusuke; Ochiya, Takahiro

    2017-02-01

    Intercellular communication plays an important role in cancer initiation and progression through secretory molecules, including growth factors and cytokines. Recent advances have revealed that small membrane vesicles, termed extracellular vesicles (EVs), served as a regulatory agent in the intercellular communication of cancer. EVs enable the transfer of functional molecules, including proteins, mRNA and microRNAs (miRNAs), into recipient cells. Cancer cells utilize EVs to dictate the unique phenotype of surrounding cells, thereby promoting cancer progression. Against such "education" by cancer cells, non-tumoral cells suppress cancer initiation and progression via EVs. Therefore, researchers consider EVs to be important cues to clarify the molecular mechanisms of cancer biology. Understanding the functions of EVs in cancer progression is an important aspect of cancer biology that has not been previously elucidated. In this review, we summarize experimental data that indicate the pivotal roles of EVs in cancer progression.

  19. On the characteristic equation (Formula presented.) and its use in the context of a cell population model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diekmann, Odo; Getto, Philipp; Nakata, Yukihiko

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we characterize the stability boundary in the (Formula presented.) -plane, for fixed (Formula presented.) with (Formula presented.) , for the characteristic equation from the title. Subsequently we describe a nonlinear cell population model involving quiescence and show that this

  20. Active 3'-5' cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases are present in detergent-resistant membranes of mural granulosa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeron, Annick; Guillemette, Christine; Sirard, Marc-André; Richard, François J

    2016-01-04

    Lipids rafts are specialised membrane microdomains involved in cell signalling that can be isolated as detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs). The second messenger cyclic AMP (cAMP) has a central role in cell signalling in the ovary and its degradation is carried out by the phosphodiesterase (PDE) enzyme family. We hypothesised that PDEs could be functionally present in the lipid rafts of porcine mural granulosa cell membranes. PDE6C, PDE8A and PDE11A were detected by dot blot in the DRMs and the Triton-soluble fraction of the mural granulosa cells membrane and the cytosol. As shown by immunocytochemistry, PDEs showed clear immunostaining in mural granulosa cell membranes and the cytosol. Interestingly, cAMP-PDE activity was 18 times higher in the DRMs than in the Triton-soluble fraction of cell membranes and was 7.7 times higher in the cytosol than in the DRMs. cAMP-PDE activity in mural granulosa cells was mainly contributed by the PDE8 and PDE11 families. This study shows that PDEs from the PDE8 and PDE11 families are present in mural granulosa cells and that the cAMP-PDE activity is mainly contributed by the cytosol. In the cell membrane, the cAMP-PDE activity is mainly contributed by the DRMs. In addition, receptors for prostaglandin E2 and LH, two G-protein-coupled receptors, are present in lipid rafts and absent from the non-raft fraction of the granulosa cell membrane. These results suggest that in these cells, the lipid rafts exist as a cell-signalling platform and PDEs are one of the key enzyme families present in the raft.

  1. System for tracking transplanted limbal epithelial stem cells in the treatment of corneal stem cell deficiency (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boadi, Joseph; Matcher, Stephen; MacNeil, Sheila; Sangwan, Virender S.

    2016-04-01

    The prevailing hypothesis for the existence and healing of the avascular corneal epithelium is that this layer of cells are continually produced by stem cells in the limbus and transported onto the cornea to mature into corneal epithelium. In the event that the cornea is damaged and the limbal stem cell population is severely reduced, this condition known as Limbal Stem Cell Deficiency and can lead to blindness. There are numerous treatments but most have high long term failure rates. Most treatment methods include the transplantation of limbal stem cells into damaged limbus with hope of repopulating the region and regenerating at healthy corneal epithelium. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is well known for its high resolution in vivo images. A bespoke OCT has been built to investigate the trajectories of these limbal stem cells after transplantation to see whether if they do repopulate the damaged limbus or not. In the experimentation magneto-labelling was used to track the limbal stem cells. For the magneto-labelling a mixture of limbal stem cells and cornea epithelium are cultured with super paramagnetic iron (Fe3O4) nanoparticles (20-30nm in size) for 24hours, to allow for uptake. The cells are then transplanted onto the denuded cornea. The transplanted cell mixture with the encapsulated magnetic nanoparticles is actuated with an external magnetic field 0.08T leading to a phase modulation on the signal. A Phase sensitive Magneto-motive OCT is used to locate the transplanted cells. The location of the cells with embed SPIOs were located both in 2D and 3D.

  2. In Vitro-Generated Tc17 Cells Present a Memory Phenotype and Serve As a Reservoir of Tc1 Cells In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Flores-Santibáñez

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Memory CD8+ T cells are ideal candidates for cancer immunotherapy because they can mediate long-term protection against tumors. However, the therapeutic potential of different in vitro-generated CD8+ T cell effector subsets to persist and become memory cells has not been fully characterized. Type 1 CD8+ T (Tc1 cells produce interferon-γ and are endowed with high cytotoxic capacity, whereas IL-17-producing CD8+ T (Tc17 cells are less cytotoxic but display enhanced self-renewal capacity. We sought to evaluate the functional properties of in vitro-generated Tc17 cells and elucidate their potential to become long lasting memory cells. Our results show that in vitro-generated Tc17 cells display a greater in vivo persistence and expansion in response to secondary antigen stimulation compared to Tc1 cells. When transferred into recipient mice, Tc17 cells persist in secondary lymphoid organs, present a recirculation behavior consistent with central memory T cells, and can shift to a Tc1 phenotype. Accordingly, Tc17 cells are endowed with a higher mitochondrial spare respiratory capacity than Tc1 cells and express higher levels of memory-related molecules than Tc1 cells. Together, these results demonstrate that in vitro-generated Tc17 cells acquire a central memory program and provide a lasting reservoir of Tc1 cells in vivo, thus supporting the use of Tc17 lymphocytes in the design of novel and more effective therapies.

  3. Fluorescence exclusion: A simple versatile technique to calculate cell volumes and local heights (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thouvenin, Olivier; Fink, Mathias; Boccara, A. Claude

    2017-02-01

    Understanding volume regulation during mitosis is technically challenging. Indeed, a very sensitive non invasive imaging over time scales ranging from seconds to hours and over large fields is required. Therefore, Quantitative Phase Imaging (QPI) would be a perfect tool for such a project. However, because of asymmetric protein segregation during mitosis, an efficient separation of the refractive index and the height in the phase signal is required. Even though many strategies to make such a separation have been developed, they usually are difficult to implement, have poor sensitivity, or cannot be performed in living cells, or in a single shot. In this paper, we will discuss the use of a new technique called fluorescence exclusion to perform volume measurements. By coupling such technique with a simultaneous phase measurement, we were also able to recover the refractive index inside the cells. Fluorescence exclusion is a versatile and powerful technique that allows the volume measurement of many types of cells. A fluorescent dye, which cannot penetrate inside the cells, is mixed with the external medium in a confined environment. Therefore, the fluorescent signal depends on the inverse of the object's height. We could demonstrate both experimentally and theoretically that fluorescence exclusion can accurately measure cell volumes, even for cells much higher than the depth of focus of the objective. A local accurate height and RI measurement can also be obtained for smaller cells. We will also discuss the way to optimize the confinement of the observation chamber, either mechanically or optically.

  4. FSAP-mediated nucleosome release from late apoptotic cells is inhibited by autoantibodies present in SLE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsman, Gerben; Stephan, Femke; de Leeuw, Karina; Bulder, Ingrid; Ruinard, Jessica T; de Jong, Jan; Westra, Johanna; Bultink, Irene E M; Voskuyl, Alexandre E; Aarden, Lucien A; Luken, Brenda M; Kallenberg, Cees G M; Zeerleder, Sacha

    2016-03-01

    Inefficient clearance of apoptotic cells and the subsequent exposure of the immune system to nuclear contents are crucially involved in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Factor VII-activating protease (FSAP) is activated in serum upon contact with dead cells, and releases nucleosomes from late apoptotic cells into the extracellular environment. We investigated whether FSAP-mediated nucleosome release from late apoptotic cells is affected in SLE patients. Nucleosome release in sera of 27 SLE patients and 30 healthy controls was investigated by incubating late apoptotic Jurkat cells with serum and analyzing the remaining DNA content by flow cytometry. We found that nucleosome release in sera of SLE patients with high disease activity was significantly decreased when compared with that in SLE sera obtained during low disease activity or from healthy individuals. Upon removal of IgG/IgM antibodies from SLE sera, nucleosome release was restored. Similarly, monoclonal antinuclear antibodies inhibited nucleosome release in healthy donor serum or by plasma-purified FSAP. This inhibition was lost when Fab fragments were used, suggesting that antigen cross-linking is involved. In conclusion, FSAP-mediated nucleosome release from late apoptotic cells is greatly impaired in SLE patient sera, possibly hampering the clearance of these cells and thereby propagating inflammation. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Prolonged antigen presentation is required for optimal CD8+ T cell responses against malaria liver stage parasites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian A Cockburn

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Immunization with irradiated sporozoites is currently the most effective vaccination strategy against liver stages of malaria parasites, yet the mechanisms underpinning the success of this approach are unknown. Here we show that the complete development of protective CD8+ T cell responses requires prolonged antigen presentation. Using TCR transgenic cells specific for the malaria circumsporozoite protein, a leading vaccine candidate, we found that sporozoite antigen persists for over 8 weeks after immunization--a remarkable finding since irradiated sporozoites are incapable of replication and do not differentiate beyond early liver stages. Persisting antigen was detected in lymphoid organs and depends on the presence of CD11c+ cells. Prolonged antigen presentation enhanced the magnitude of the CD8+ T cell response in a number of ways. Firstly, reducing the time primed CD8+ T cells were exposed to antigen in vivo severely reduced the final size of the developing memory population. Secondly, fully developed memory cells expanded in previously immunized mice but not when transferred to naïve animals. Finally, persisting antigen was able to prime naïve cells, including recent thymic emigrants, to become functional effector cells capable of eliminating parasites in the liver. Together these data show that the optimal development of protective CD8+ T cell immunity against malaria liver stages is dependent upon the prolonged presentation of sporozoite-derived antigen.

  6. Achieving magneto-elasto-electroporation and cell transport using core-shell magnetoelectric nanoparticles (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betal, Soutik; Dutta, Moumita; Shrestha, Binita; Saha, Amit; Tang, Liang; Ramasubramanian, Ananad K.; Bhalla, Amar S.; Guo, Ruyan

    2016-09-01

    Magneto-Elasto-Electroporation (MEEP) is a magnetically controlled acoustic-electroporation observed while core-shell Magneto-electric nanoparticles interact with Biological Cells. The surface polarity change of the piezoelectric coating (BaTiO3) due to absorption of pressure created due magneto-striction of core (CoFe2O4) in AC magnetic field results in electric field (Uext) change at the external vicinity of the cell membrane when nanoparticles are nearby. This results in transmembrane Voltage (Um) change which is basically the difference in Cell's internal potential (Uint) and external potential. The nonlinear permeability change of cell membrane due to change in Um opens the nano-pores on the membrane. The magnetic moment of the nanoparticles further helps in penetration of the Magneto-electric nanoparticles inside the cell through these magneto-electrically controlled newly opened nano-pores on cell's membrane. MEEP is analyzed through in-vitro analysis and Mathematical equations are formulated for numerically expressing its fundamental effect. TEM imaging, XRD analysis, Zeta-potentiometer measurement and AFM imaging are confirming the coating of the piezoelectric layer on Magneto-stricitve nanoparticles, Acoustic measurements confirms the photo-acoustic and magneto-acoustic property of CoFe2O4 nanoparticles and Fluorescence microscopy as well as Confocal microscopy are confirming the penetration of particle inside the Human Epithelial cells (HEP2). Further on application of repulsive magnetic field, nanoparticles are observed to transport a group of cells in controlled boundary conditions in microfluidic chamber. Hence these nanoparticles can be used for accurate and efficient drug delivery as well as cell transport applications

  7. A rare case of male pelvic squamous cell carcinoma of unknown primary origin presenting as perineal abscess and urethral stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimiliano Creta

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Carcinomas of unknown primary origin (CUP represent a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. Squamous cell CUP located in the male pelvis are very rare. We describe a case of a locally advanced squamous cell CUP occurring in the male pelvis presenting as perineal abscess and urethral stenosis and diagnosed by means of transperineal needle biopsy.

  8. Microvesicle Cargo of Tumor-Associated MUC1 to Dendritic Cells Allows Cross-presentation and Specific Carbohydrate Processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rughetti, Aurelia; Rahimi, Hassan; Belleudi, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    . Here, we show that the form of the MUC1 antigen, i.e., soluble or as microvesicle cargo, influences MUC1 processing in dendritic cells. In fact, MUC1 carried by microvesicles translocates from the endolysosomal/HLA-II to the HLA-I compartment and is presented by dendritic cells to MUC1-specific CD8...

  9. Non-viable Borrelia burgdorferi induce inflammatory mediators and apoptosis in human oligodendrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parthasarathy, Geetha; Fevrier, Helene B; Philipp, Mario T

    2013-11-27

    In previous studies, exposure to live Borrelia burgdorferi was shown to induce inflammation and apoptosis of human oligodendrocytes. In this study we assessed the ability of non-viable bacteria (heat killed or sonicated) to induce inflammatory mediators and cell death. Both heat-killed and sonicated bacteria induced release of CCL2, IL-6, and CXCL8 from oligodendrocytes in a dose dependent manner. In addition, non-viable B. burgdorferi also induced cell death as evaluated by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) and another cell viability assay. These results suggest that spirochetal residues left after bacterial demise, due to treatment or otherwise, may continue to be pathogenic to the central nervous system. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Giant cell angiitis of the central nervous system with atypical presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciappetta, Pasqualino; D'Urso, Pietro Ivo; Colamaria, Antonio; Lauta, Enrico; Cimmino, Antonia; D'Urso, Oscar Fernando; Rossi, Roberta; Resta, Leonardo; Ingravallo, Giuseppe

    2010-08-01

    Giant cell angiitis of the CNS is an uncommon form of vasculitis. Neurological manifestations, both of the peripheral and CNS, are common. The most frequent manifestations are visual loss and stroke. Hemorrhagic onset is uncommon. Most cases have a fatal outcome and a tissue diagnosis is rarely established in life. We describe an unusual case of giant cell angiitis beginning as a hemorrhagic tumoral-like lesion. The results of the histological and ultrastructural analysis have also been reported. Our case illustrates that giant cell angiitis should be considered as a cause of intracerebral hemorrhage, particularly when associated with a relapsing and remitting disease of the CNS.

  11. Designing Viable Business Models for Living Labs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernhard R. Katzy

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Over 300 regions have integrated the concept of living labs into their economic development strategy since 2006, when the former Finnish Prime Minister Esko Aho launched the living lab innovation policy initiative during his term of European presidency. Despite motivating initial results, however, success cases of turning research into usable new products and services remain few and uncertainty remains on what living labs actually do and contribute. This practitioner-oriented article presents a business excellence model that shows processes of idea creation and team mobilization, new product development, user involvement, and entrepreneurship through which living labs deliver high-potential investment opportunities. Customers of living labs are identified as investors such as venture capitalists or industrial firms because living labs can generate revenue from them to create their own sustainable business model. The article concludes that living labs provide extensive support “lab” infrastructure and that it remains a formidable challenge to finance it, which calls for a more intensive debate.

  12. Isolation of viable human hepatic progenitors from adult livers is possible even after 48 hours of cold ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aupet, Sophie; Simoné, Gael; Heyd, Bruno; Bachellier, Philippe; Vidal, Isabelle; Richert, Lysiane; Martin, Hélène

    2013-07-01

    Liver transplantation, utilized routinely for end-stage liver disease, has been constrained by the paucity of organ donors, and is being complemented by alternative strategies such as liver cell transplantation. One of the most promising forms of liver cell transplantation is hepatic stem cell therapies, as the number of human hepatic stem cells (hHpSCs) and other early hepatic progenitor cells (HPCs) are sufficient to provide treatment for multiple patients from a single liver source. In the present study, human adult livers were exposed to cold ischemia and then processed after numbers, albeit somewhat lower, were obtained from those exposed to 48 h of cold ischemia. The yields are similar to those reported from livers with minimal exposure to ischemia. When cultured on plastic dishes and in Kubota's Medium, a serum-free medium designed for early lineage stage HPCs, colonies of rapidly expanding cells formed. They were confirmed to be probable hHpSCs by their ability to survive and expand on plastic and in Kubota's Medium for months, by co-expression of EpCAM and neural cell adhesion molecule, minimal if any albumin expression, with EpCAM found throughout the cells, and no expression of alpha-fetoprotein. The yields of viable EpCAM(+) cells were surprisingly large, and the numbers from a single donor liver are sufficient to treat approximately 50-100 patients given the numbers of EpCAM(+) cells currently used in hepatic stem cell therapies. Thus, cold ischemic livers for up to 48 h are a new source of cells that might be used for liver cell therapies.

  13. Sinks, suppressors and antigen presenters: how lymphodepletion enhances T cell-mediated tumor immunotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Klebanoff, Christopher A.; Khong, Hung T.; Antony, Paul A.; Palmer, Douglas C.; Restifo, Nicholas P.

    2005-01-01

    Lymphodepletion followed by adoptive cell transfer (ACT) of autologous, tumor-reactive T cells boosts antitumor immunotherapeutic activity in mouse and in humans. In the most recent clinical trials, lymphodepletion together with ACT has an objective response rate of 50% in patients with solid metastatic tumors. The mechanisms underlying this recent advance in cancer immunotherapy are beginning to be elucidated and include: the elimination of cellular cytokine ‘sinks’ for homeostatic γC-cytoki...

  14. Cathepsin K Is Present in Invasive Oral Tongue Squamous Cell Carcinoma In Vivo and In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitu, Carolina C.; Kauppila, Joonas H.; Bufalino, Andréia; Nurmenniemi, Sini; Teppo, Susanna; Keinänen, Meeri; Vilen, Suvi-Tuuli; Lehenkari, Petri; Nyberg, Pia; Coletta, Ricardo D.; Salo, Tuula

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Cathepsin K, a lysosomal cysteine protease, is expressed in the tumor microenvironment (TME) of skin carcinoma, but nothing is known about cathepsin K in oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma (OTSCC). Our aim was to describe the expression of cathepsin K in invasive OTSCC in vitro and in a series of clinical cancer specimens. Materials and Methods OTSCC invasion in vitro was studied using invasive HSC-3 tongue carcinoma cells in 3D organotypic models. In total, 121 mobile tongue OTSCCs and 10 lymph node metastases were analyzed for cathepsin K expression. The association between cathepsin K expression and clinicopathological factors was evaluated. Results Cysteine protease inhibitor E64 and cathepsin K silencing significantly (p<0.0001) reduced HSC-3 cell invasion in the 3D models. Cathepsin K was expressed in a majority of carcinoma and metastatic cells, but the expression pattern in carcinoma cells did not correlate with clinical parameters. Instead, the weak expression of cathepsin K in the invasive TME front correlated with increased overall recurrence (p<0.05), and in early-stage tumors this pattern predicted both cancer recurrence and cancer-specific mortality (p<0.05 and p<0.005, respectively). Conclusions Cathepsin K is expressed in OTSCC tissue in both carcinoma and TME cells. Although the diminished activity and expression in aggressive tongue HSC-3 cells reduced 3D invasion in vitro, the amount of cathepsin K in carcinoma cells was not associated with the outcome of cancer patients. Instead, cathepsin K in the invasive TME front seems to have a protective role in the complex progression of tongue cancer. PMID:23951042

  15. Cathepsin K is present in invasive oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma in vivo and in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina C Bitu

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Cathepsin K, a lysosomal cysteine protease, is expressed in the tumor microenvironment (TME of skin carcinoma, but nothing is known about cathepsin K in oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma (OTSCC. Our aim was to describe the expression of cathepsin K in invasive OTSCC in vitro and in a series of clinical cancer specimens. MATERIALS AND METHODS: OTSCC invasion in vitro was studied using invasive HSC-3 tongue carcinoma cells in 3D organotypic models. In total, 121 mobile tongue OTSCCs and 10 lymph node metastases were analyzed for cathepsin K expression. The association between cathepsin K expression and clinicopathological factors was evaluated. RESULTS: Cysteine protease inhibitor E64 and cathepsin K silencing significantly (p<0.0001 reduced HSC-3 cell invasion in the 3D models. Cathepsin K was expressed in a majority of carcinoma and metastatic cells, but the expression pattern in carcinoma cells did not correlate with clinical parameters. Instead, the weak expression of cathepsin K in the invasive TME front correlated with increased overall recurrence (p<0.05, and in early-stage tumors this pattern predicted both cancer recurrence and cancer-specific mortality (p<0.05 and p<0.005, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Cathepsin K is expressed in OTSCC tissue in both carcinoma and TME cells. Although the diminished activity and expression in aggressive tongue HSC-3 cells reduced 3D invasion in vitro, the amount of cathepsin K in carcinoma cells was not associated with the outcome of cancer patients. Instead, cathepsin K in the invasive TME front seems to have a protective role in the complex progression of tongue cancer.

  16. Langerhans cell scarcoma in two young children: Imaging findings on initial presentation and recurrence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Woong Do; Im, Soo Ah; Chung, Nak Gyun; Park, Gyeong Sin [Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, Callege of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-06-15

    Langerhans cell sarcoma (LCS) is a neoplastic proliferation of Langerhans cells with malignant cytological features and multi-organ involvement that typically has a poor prognosis. We experienced 2 cases of LCS in children less than 2 years of age and report them based primarily on CT and MR findings. Both children had findings of hepatosplenomegaly with low-attenuation nodular lesions, had multiple lymphadenopathy, and had shown recurrent lesions invading the skull during follow-up after chemotherapy.

  17. How Close We Are to Achieving Commercially Viable Large-Scale Photobiological Hydrogen Production by Cyanobacteria: A Review of the Biological Aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Hidehiro; Masukawa, Hajime; Kitashima, Masaharu; Inoue, Kazuhito

    2015-01-01

    Photobiological production of H2 by cyanobacteria is considered to be an ideal source of renewable energy because the inputs, water and sunlight, are abundant. The products of photobiological systems are H2 and O2; the H2 can be used as the energy source of fuel cells, etc., which generate electricity at high efficiencies and minimal pollution, as the waste product is H2O. Overall, production of commercially viable algal fuels in any form, including biomass and biodiesel, is challenging, and the very few systems that are operational have yet to be evaluated. In this paper we will: briefly review some of the necessary conditions for economical production, summarize the reports of photobiological H2 production by cyanobacteria, present our schemes for future production, and discuss the necessity for further progress in the research needed to achieve commercially viable large-scale H2 production. PMID:25793279

  18. Studying the relationship between redox and cell growth using quantitative phase imaging (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridharan, Shamira; Leslie, Matthew T.; Bapst, Natalya; Smith, John; Gaskins, H. Rex; Popescu, Gabriel

    2016-03-01

    Quantitative phase imaging has been used in the past to study the dry mass of cells and study cell growth under various treatment conditions. However, the relationship between cellular redox and growth rates has not yet been studied in this context. This study employed the recombinant Glrx-roGFP2 redox biosensor targeted to the mitochondrial matrix or cytosolic compartments of A549 lung epithelial carcinoma cells. The Glrx-roGFP2s biosensor consists of a modified GFP protein containing internal cysteine residues sensitive to the local redox environment. The formation/dissolution of sulfide bridges contorts the internal chromophore, dictating corresponding changes in florescence emission that provide direct measures of the local redox potential. Combining 2-channel florescent imaging of the redox sensor with quantitative phase imaging allowed observation of redox homeostasis alongside measurements of cellular mass during full cycles of cellular division. The results indicate that mitochondrial redox showed a stronger inverse correlation with cell growth than cytoplasmic redox states; although redox changes are restricted to a 5% range. We are now studying the relationship between mitochondrial redox and cell growth in an isogenic series of breast cell lines built upon the MCF-10A genetic background that vary both in malignancy and metastatic potential.

  19. Photoacoustic bio-quantification of graphene based nanomaterials at a single cell level (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedosekin, Dmitry A.; Nolan, Jacqueline; Biris, Alexandru S.; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2017-03-01

    Arkansas Nanomedicine Center at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences in collaboration with other Arkansas Universities and the FDA-based National Center of Toxicological Research in Jefferson, AR is developing novel techniques for rapid quantification of graphene-based nanomaterials (GBNs) in various biological samples. All-carbon GBNs have wide range of potential applications in industry, agriculture, food processing and medicine; however, quantification of GBNs is difficult in carbon reach biological tissues. The accurate quantification of GBNs is essential for research on material toxicity and the development of GBNs-based drug delivery platforms. We have developed microscopy and cytometry platforms for detection and quantification of GBNs in single cells, tissue and blood samples using photoacoustic contrast of GBNs. We demonstrated PA quantification of individual graphene uptake by single cells. High-resolution PA microscopy provided mapping of GBN distribution within live cells to establish correlation with intracellular toxic phenomena using apoptotic and necrotic assays. This new methodology and corresponding technical platform provide the insight on possible toxicological risks of GBNs at singe cells levels. In addition, in vivo PA image flow cytometry demonstrated the capability to monitor of GBNs pharmacokinetics in mouse model and to map the resulting biodistribution of GBNs in mouse tissues. The integrated PA platform provided an unprecedented sensitivity toward GBNs and allowed to enhance conventional toxicology research by providing a direct correlation between uptake of GBNs at a single cell level and cell viability status.

  20. Comparing Proteolytic Fingerprints of Antigen-Presenting Cells during Allergen Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi Hofer

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Endolysosomal processing has a critical influence on immunogenicity as well as immune polarization of protein antigens. In industrialized countries, allergies affect around 25% of the population. For the rational design of protein-based allergy therapeutics for immunotherapy, a good knowledge of T cell-reactive regions on allergens is required. Thus, we sought to analyze endolysosomal degradation patterns of inhalant allergens. Four major allergens from ragweed, birch, as well as house dust mites were produced as recombinant proteins. Endolysosomal proteases were purified by differential centrifugation from dendritic cells, macrophages, and B cells, and combined with allergens for proteolytic processing. Thereafter, endolysosomal proteolysis was monitored by protein gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. We found that the overall proteolytic activity of specific endolysosomal fractions differed substantially, whereas the degradation patterns of the four model allergens obtained with the different proteases were extremely similar. Moreover, previously identified T cell epitopes were assigned to endolysosomal peptides and indeed showed a good overlap with known T cell epitopes for all four candidate allergens. Thus, we propose that the degradome assay can be used as a predictor to determine antigenic peptides as potential T cell epitopes, which will help in the rational design of protein-based allergy vaccine candidates.

  1. Multicolor fluorescence microscopic imaging of cancer cells on the plasmonic chip (Presentation Recording)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawa, Keiko; Sasakawa, Chisato; Yamamura, Shohei; Shibata, Izumi; Kataoka, Masatoshi

    2015-09-01

    A plasmonic chip which is a metal coated substrate with grating structure can provide the enhanced fluorescence by the grating-coupled surface plasmon field. In our previous studies, bright epi-fluorescence microscopic imaging of neuron cells and sensitive immunosesnsing have been reported. In this study, two kinds of breast cancer cells, MCF-7 and MDA-MB231, were observed with epi-fluorescence microscope on the plasmonic chip with 2D hole-arrays . They were multicolor stained with 4', 6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) and allophycocyanin (APC)-labeled anti-epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) antibody. Our plasmonic chip provided the brighter fluorescence images of these cells compared with the glass slide. Even in the cells including few EpCAM, the distribution of EpCAM was clearly observed in the cell membrane. It was found that the plasmonic chip can be one of the powerful tools to detect the marker protein existing around the chip surface even at low concentration.

  2. Mechanical properties of organic semiconductors for mechanically stable and intrinsically stretchable solar cells (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipomi, Darren J.

    2016-09-01

    This presentation describes my group's efforts to understand the molecular and microstructural basis for the mechanical properties of organic semiconductors for organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices. Our work is motivated by two goals. The first goal is to mitigate mechanical forms of degradation of printed modules during roll-to-roll fabrication, installation, and environmental forces—i.e., wind, rain, snow, and thermal expansion and contraction. Mechanical stability is a prerequisite for inexpensive processing on flexible substrates: to encapsulate devices in glass is to surrender this advantage. The second goal is to enable the next generation of ultra-flexible and stretchable solar cells for collapsible, portable, and wearable applications, and as low-cost sources of energy—"solar tarps"—for disaster relief and for the developing world. It may seem that organic semiconductors, due to their carbon framework, are already sufficiently compliant for these applications. We have found, however, that the mechanical properties (stiffness and brittleness) occupy a wide range of values, and can be difficult to predict from molecular structure alone. We are developing an experimental and theoretical framework for how one can combine favorable charge-transport properties and mechanical compliance in organic semiconductor films. In particular, we have explored the roles of the backbone, alkyl side chain, microstructural order, the glass transition, molecular packing with fullerenes, plasticizing effects of additives, extent of separation of [60]PCBM and [70]PCBM, structural randomness in low-bandgap polymers, and reinforcement by encapsulation, on the mechanical compliance. We are exploring the applicability of semi-empirical "back-of-the-envelope" models, along with multi-scale molecular dynamics simulations, with the ultimate goal of designing electroactive organic materials whose mechanical properties can be dialed-in. We have used the insights we have developed to

  3. Pivotal Advance: Peritoneal cavity B-1 B cells have phagocytic and microbicidal capacities and present phagocytosed antigen to CD4+ T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, David; Rieger, Aja M.; Li, Jun; Zhang, Yong-An; Randall, Louise M.; Hunter, Christopher A.; Barreda, Daniel R.; Sunyer, J. Oriol

    2012-01-01

    Breaking the long-held paradigm that primary B cells are not phagocytic, several studies have demonstrated recently that B cells from fish, amphibians, and reptilians have a significant phagocytic capacity. Whether such capacity has remained conserved in certain mammalian B cell subsets is presently an enigma. Here, we report a previously unrecognized ability of PerC B-1a and B-1b lymphocytes to phagocytose latex beads and bacteria. In contrast, B-2 lymphocytes had an almost negligible ability to internalize these particles. Upon phagocytosis, B-1a and B-1b cells were able to mature their phagosomes into phagolysosomes and displayed the ability to kill internalized bacteria. Importantly, B-1a and B-1b cells effectively present antigen recovered from phagocytosed particles to CD4+ T cells. However, these cells showed a much lower competence to present soluble antigen or antigen from large, noninternalized particles. B-1 B cells presented particulate and soluble antigen to CD4+ T cells more efficiently than macrophages, whereas DCs were the most potent APCs. The novel phagocytic and microbicidal abilities identified in B-1 B lymphocytes strengthen the innate nature that has long been attributed to these cells. In the context of adaptive immunity, we show that these innate immune processes are relevant, as they enable B-1 B cells to present phagocytosable particulate antigen. These capacities position these cells at the crossroads that link innate with adaptive immune processes. In a broader context, these newly identified capacities of B-1 B cells further support the previously recognized functional, developmental, and evolutionary relationships between these cells and macrophages. PMID:22058420

  4. Frequency Patterns of T-Cell Exposed Amino Acid Motifs in Immunoglobulin Heavy Chain Peptides Presented by MHCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremel, Robert D; Homan, E Jane

    2014-01-01

    Immunoglobulins are highly diverse protein sequences that are processed and presented to T-cells by B-cells and other antigen presenting cells. We examined a large dataset of immunoglobulin heavy chain variable regions (IGHV) to assess the diversity of T-cell exposed motifs (TCEMs). TCEM comprise those amino acids in a MHC-bound peptide, which face outwards, surrounded by the MHC histotope, and which engage the T-cell receptor. Within IGHV there is a distinct pattern of predicted MHC class II binding and a very high frequency of re-use of the TCEMs. The re-use frequency indicates that only a limited number of different cognate T-cells are required to engage many different clonal B-cells. The amino acids in each outward-facing TCEM are intercalated with the amino acids of inward-facing MHC groove-exposed motifs (GEM). Different GEM may have differing, allele-specific, MHC binding affinities. The intercalation of TCEM and GEM in a peptide allows for a vast combinatorial repertoire of epitopes, each eliciting a different response. Outcome of T-cell receptor binding is determined by overall signal strength, which is a function of the number of responding T-cells and the duration of engagement. Hence, the frequency of TCEM re-use appears to be an important determinant of whether a T-cell response is stimulatory or suppressive. The frequency distribution of TCEMs implies that somatic hypermutation is followed by T-cell clonal expansion that develops along repeated pathways. The observations of TCEM and GEM derived from immunoglobulins suggest a relatively simple, yet powerful, mechanism to correlate T-cell polyspecificity, through re-use of TCEMs, with a very high degree of specificity achieved by combination with a diversity of GEMs. The frequency profile of TCEMs also points to an economical mechanism for maintaining T-cell memory, recall, and self-discrimination based on an endogenously generated profile of motifs.

  5. Ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging to monitor ocular stem cell delivery and tissue regeneration (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubelick, Kelsey; Snider, Eric; Yoon, Heechul; Ethier, C. Ross; Emelianov, Stanislav Y.

    2017-03-01

    Glaucoma is associated with dysfunction of the trabecular meshwork (TM), a fluid drainage tissue in the anterior eye. A promising treatment involves delivery of stem cells to the TM to restore tissue function. Currently histology is the gold standard for tracking stem cell delivery and differentiation. To expedite clinical translation, non-invasive longitudinal monitoring in vivo is desired. Our current research explores a technique combining ultrasound (US) and photoacoustic (PA) imaging to track mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) after intraocular injection. Adipose-derived MSCs were incubated with gold nanospheres to label cells (AuNS-MSCs) for PA imaging. Successful labeling was first verified with in vitro phantom studies. Next, MSC delivery was imaged ex vivo in porcine eyes, while intraocular pressure was hydrostatically clamped to maintain a physiological flow rate through the TM. US/PA imaging was performed before, during, and after AuNS-MSC delivery. Additionally, spectroscopic PA imaging was implemented to isolate PA signals from AuNS-MSCs. In vitro cell imaging showed AuNS-MSCs produce strong PA signals, suggesting that MSCs can be tracked using PA imaging. While the cornea, sclera, iris, and TM region can be visualized with US imaging, pigmented tissues also produce PA signals. Both modalities provide valuable anatomical landmarks for MSC localization. During delivery, PA imaging can visualize AuNS-MSC motion and location, creating a unique opportunity to guide ocular cell delivery. Lastly, distinct spectral signatures of AuNS-MSCs allow unmixing, with potential for quantitative PA imaging. In conclusion, results show proof-of-concept for monitoring MSC ocular delivery, raising opportunities for in vivo image-guided cell delivery.

  6. Multi-color phase imaging and sickle cell anemia (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Poorya; Zhou, Renjie; Yaqoob, Zahid; So, Peter T. C.

    2016-03-01

    Quantitative phase measurements at multiple wavelengths has created an opportunity for exploring new avenues in phase microscopy such as enhancing imaging-depth (1), measuring hemoglobin concentrations in erythrocytes (2), and more recently in tomographic mapping of the refractive index of live cells (3). To this end, quantitative phase imaging has been demonstrated both at few selected spectral points as well as with high spectral resolution (4,5). However, most of these developed techniques compromise imaging speed, field of view, or the spectral resolution to perform interferometric measurements at multiple colors. In the specific application of quantitative phase in studying blood diseases and red blood cells, current techniques lack the required sensitivity to quantify biological properties of interest at individual cell level. Recently, we have set out to develop a stable quantitative interferometric microscope allowing for measurements of such properties for red cells without compromising field of view or speed of the measurements. The feasibility of the approach will be initially demonstrated in measuring dispersion curves of known solutions, followed by measuring biological properties of red cells in sickle cell anemia. References: 1. Mann CJ, Bingham PR, Paquit VC, Tobin KW. Quantitative phase imaging by three-wavelength digital holography. Opt Express. 2008;16(13):9753-64. 2. Park Y, Yamauchi T, Choi W, Dasari R, Feld MS. Spectroscopic phase microscopy for quantifying hemoglobin concentrations in intact red blood cells. Opt Lett. 2009;34(23):3668-70. 3. Hosseini P, Sung Y, Choi Y, Lue N, Yaqoob Z, So P. Scanning color optical tomography (SCOT). Opt Express. 2015;23(15):19752-62. 4. Jung J-H, Jang J, Park Y. Spectro-refractometry of individual microscopic objects using swept-source quantitative phase imaging. Anal Chem. 2013;85(21):10519-25. 5. Rinehart M, Zhu Y, Wax A. Quantitative phase spectroscopy. Biomed Opt Express. 2012;3(5):958-65.

  7. The Belem Framework for Action: Harnessing the Power and Potential of Adult Learning and Education for a Viable Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adult Learning, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the Belem Framework for Action. This framework focuses on harnessing the power and potential of adult learning and education for a viable future. This framework begins with a preamble on adult education and towards lifelong learning.

  8. Defect internalization and tyrosine kinase activation in Aire deficient antigen presenting cells exposed to Candida albicans antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brännström, Johan; Hässler, Signe; Peltonen, Leena; Herrmann, Björn; Winqvist, Ola

    2006-12-01

    Patients with Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type I (APS I) present with multiple endocrine failures due to organ-specific autoimmune disease, thought to be T-cell-mediated. Paradoxically, APS I patients suffer from chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis. The mutated gene has been identified as the Autoimmune regulator (AIRE). Aire is expressed in medullary epithelial cells of the thymus and in antigen presenting cells in the periphery. T cells from Aire deficient mice and men displayed an enhanced proliferative response against Candida antigen in vitro, suggesting that Aire deficient T cells are competent in recognizing Candida albicans. In contrast, monocytes from APS I patients displayed a decreased and delayed internalization of zymosan. Furthermore, Candida antigen activated monocytes from APS I patients show decreased and altered phoshotyrosine kinase activation. In conclusion, Aire deficient APCs have a defect receptor mediated internalization of Candida which affects kinase activation, likely altering the innate Candida immune response.

  9. Optimum design of amphiphilic polymers bearing hydrophobic groups for both cell surface ligand presentation and intercellular cross-linking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeo, Masafumi; Li, Cuicui; Matsuda, Masayoshi; Nagai, Hiroko; Hatanaka, Wataru; Yamamoto, Tatsuhiro; Kishimura, Akihiro; Mori, Takeshi; Katayama, Yoshiki

    2015-01-01

    Amphiphilic polymers bearing hydrophobic alkyl groups are expected to be applicable for both ligand presentation on the cell surface and intercellular crosslinking. To explore the optimum design for each application, we synthesized eight different acyl-modified dextrans with varying molecular weight, alkyl length, and alkyl modification degree. We found that the behenate-modified polymers retained on the cell surface longer than the palmitate-modified ones. Since the polymers were also modified with biotin, streptavidin can be presented on the cell surface through biotin-streptavidin recognition. The duration of streptavidin on the cell surface is longer in the behenate-modified polymer than the palmitate-modified one. As for the intercellular crosslinking, the palmitate-modified polymers were more efficient than the behenate-modified polymers. The findings in this research will be helpful to design the acyl-modified polymers for the cell surface engineering.

  10. Photovoltaic reciprocity and quasi-Fermi level splitting in nanostructure-based solar cells (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aeberhard, Urs

    2017-04-01

    The photovoltaic reciprocity theory relates the electroluminescence spectrum of a solar cell under applied bias to the external photovoltaic quantum efficiency of the device as measured at short circuit conditions [1]. So far, the theory has been verified for a wide range of devices and material systems and forms the basis of a growing number of luminesecence imaging techniques used in the characterization of photovoltaic materials, cells and modules [2-5]. However, there are also some examples where the theory fails, such as in the case of amorphous silicon. In our contribution, we critically assess the assumptions made in the derivation of the theory and compare its predictions with rigorous formal relations as well as numerical computations in the framework of a comprehensive quantum-kinetic theory of photovoltaics [6] as applied to ultra-thin absorber architectures [7]. One of the main applications of the photovoltaic reciprocity relation is the determination of quasi-Fermi level splittings (QFLS) in solar cells from the measurement of luminescence. In nanostructure-based photovoltaic architectures, the determination of QFLS is challenging, but instrumental to assess the performance potential of the concepts. Here, we use our quasi-Fermi level-free theory to investigate existence and size of QFLS in quantum well and quantum dot solar cells. [1] Uwe Rau. Reciprocity relation between photovoltaic quantum efficiency and electrolumines- cent emission of solar cells. Phys. Rev. B, 76(8):085303, 2007. [2] Thomas Kirchartz and Uwe Rau. Electroluminescence analysis of high efficiency cu(in,ga)se2 solar cells. J. Appl. Phys., 102(10), 2007. [3] Thomas Kirchartz, Uwe Rau, Martin Hermle, Andreas W. Bett, Anke Helbig, and Jrgen H. Werner. Internal voltages in GaInP-GaInAs-Ge multijunction solar cells determined by electro- luminescence measurements. Appl. Phys. Lett., 92(12), 2008. [4] Thomas Kirchartz, Anke Helbig, Wilfried Reetz, Michael Reuter, Jürgen H. Werner, and

  11. Superparamagnetic poly(methyl methacrylate) nanoparticles surface modified with folic acid presenting cell uptake mediated by endocytosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feuser, Paulo Emilio [Federal University of Santa Catarina, Department of Chemical Engineering and Food Engineering (Brazil); Jacques, Amanda Virtuoso [Federal University of Santa Catarina, Department of Clinical Analyses (Brazil); Arévalo, Juan Marcelo Carpio; Rocha, Maria Eliane Merlin [Federal University of Paraná, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (Brazil); Santos-Silva, Maria Claudia dos [Federal University of Santa Catarina, Department of Clinical Analyses (Brazil); Sayer, Claudia; Araújo, Pedro H. Hermes de, E-mail: pedro.h.araujo@ufsc.br [Federal University of Santa Catarina, Department of Chemical Engineering and Food Engineering (Brazil)

    2016-04-15

    The encapsulation of superparamagnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) in polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) with modified surfaces can improve targeted delivery and induce cell death by hyperthermia. The goals of this study were to synthesize and characterize surface modified superparamagnetic poly(methyl methacrylate) with folic acid (FA) prepared by miniemulsion polymerization (MNPsPMMA-FA) and to evaluate their in vitro cytotoxicity and cellular uptake in non-tumor cells, murine fibroblast (L929) cells and tumor cells that overexpressed folate receptor (FR) β, and chronic myeloid leukemia cells in blast crisis (K562). Lastly, hemolysis assays were performed on human red blood cells. MNPsPMMA-FA presented an average mean diameter of 135 nm and a saturation magnetization (Ms) value of 37 emu/g of iron oxide, as well as superparamagnetic behavior. The MNPsPMMA-FA did not present cytotoxicity in L929 and K562 cells. Cellular uptake assays showed a higher uptake of MNPsPMMA-FA than MNPsPMMA in K562 cells when incubated at 37 °C. On the other hand, MNPsPMMA-FA showed a low uptake when endocytosis mechanisms were blocked at low temperature (4 °C), suggesting that the MNPsPMMA-FA uptake was mediated by endocytosis. High concentrations of MNPsPMMA-FA showed hemocompatibility when incubated for 24 h in human red blood cells. Therefore, our results suggest that these carrier systems can be an excellent alternative in targeted drug delivery via FR.

  12. Identification of two Melan-A CD4+ T cell epitopes presented by frequently expressed MHC class II alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godefroy, Emmanuelle; Scotto, Luigi; Souleimanian, Naira E; Ritter, Gerd; Old, Lloyd J; Jotereau, Francine; Valmori, Danila; Ayyoub, Maha

    2006-10-01

    Because of its expression pattern restricted to cells of the melanocytic lineage and to melanoma cells, Melan-A is an important target of immunotherapeutic approaches for the treatment of melanoma. Identification of Melan-A derived sequences recognized by specific T cells is therefore of great interest for the development of these therapeutic strategies. Using circulating CD4(+) T cells from healthy donors, we identified two Melan-A-derived CD4(+) T cell epitopes mapping to the 1-20 and 91-110 regions of the protein and restricted by HLA-DR11 and HLA-DR52 molecules, respectively. CD4(+) T cells specific for the identified epitopes were able to recognize the native antigen when endogenously expressed by antigen presenting cells and tumor cells. In addition, CD4(+) T cells specific for Melan-A 91-110 recognized the epitope after exogenous processing and presentation of Melan-A recombinant protein. Identification of these epitopes will be instrumental for the evaluation of the immune response to Melan-A in cancer patients.

  13. Superparamagnetic poly(methyl methacrylate) nanoparticles surface modified with folic acid presenting cell uptake mediated by endocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuser, Paulo Emilio; Jacques, Amanda Virtuoso; Arévalo, Juan Marcelo Carpio; Rocha, Maria Eliane Merlin; dos Santos-Silva, Maria Claudia; Sayer, Claudia; de Araújo, Pedro H. Hermes

    2016-04-01

    The encapsulation of superparamagnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) in polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) with modified surfaces can improve targeted delivery and induce cell death by hyperthermia. The goals of this study were to synthesize and characterize surface modified superparamagnetic poly(methyl methacrylate) with folic acid (FA) prepared by miniemulsion polymerization (MNPsPMMA-FA) and to evaluate their in vitro cytotoxicity and cellular uptake in non-tumor cells, murine fibroblast (L929) cells and tumor cells that overexpressed folate receptor (FR) β, and chronic myeloid leukemia cells in blast crisis (K562). Lastly, hemolysis assays were performed on human red blood cells. MNPsPMMA-FA presented an average mean diameter of 135 nm and a saturation magnetization (Ms) value of 37 emu/g of iron oxide, as well as superparamagnetic behavior. The MNPsPMMA-FA did not present cytotoxicity in L929 and K562 cells. Cellular uptake assays showed a higher uptake of MNPsPMMA-FA than MNPsPMMA in K562 cells when incubated at 37 °C. On the other hand, MNPsPMMA-FA showed a low uptake when endocytosis mechanisms were blocked at low temperature (4 °C), suggesting that the MNPsPMMA-FA uptake was mediated by endocytosis. High concentrations of MNPsPMMA-FA showed hemocompatibility when incubated for 24 h in human red blood cells. Therefore, our results suggest that these carrier systems can be an excellent alternative in targeted drug delivery via FR.

  14. Application of stem cell-derived retinal pigmented epithelium in retinal degenerative diseases: present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Mingyue; Chen, Youxin

    2018-01-01

    As a constituent of blood-retinal barrier and retinal outer segment (ROS) scavenger, retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) is fundamental to normal function of retina. Malfunctioning of RPE contributes to the onset and advance of retinal degenerative diseases. Up to date, RPE replacement therapy is the only possible method to completely reverse retinal degeneration. Transplantation of human RPE stem cell-derived RPE (hRPESC-RPE) has shown some good results in animal models. With promising results in terms of safety and visual improvement, human embryonic stem cell-derived RPE (hESC-RPE) can be expected in clinical settings in the near future. Despite twists and turns, induced pluripotent stem cell-derived RPE (iPSC-RPE) is now being intensely investigated to overcome genetic and epigenetic instability. By far, only one patient has received iPSC-RPE transplant, which is a hallmark of iPSC technology development. During follow-up, no major complications such as immunogenicity or tumorigenesis have been observed. Future trials should keep focusing on the safety of stem cell-derived RPE (SC-RPE) especially in long period, and better understanding of the nature of stem cell and the molecular events in the process to generate SC-RPE is necessary to the prosperity of SC-RPE clinical application.

  15. PMA-PhyloChip DNA Microarray to Elucidate Viable Microbial Community Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkateswaran, Kasthuri J.; Stam, Christina N.; Andersen, Gary L.; DeSantis, Todd

    2011-01-01

    Since the Viking missions in the mid-1970s, traditional culture-based methods have been used for microbial enumeration by various NASA programs. Viable microbes are of particular concern for spacecraft cleanliness, for forward contamination of extraterrestrial bodies (proliferation of microbes), and for crew health/safety (viable pathogenic microbes). However, a "true" estimation of viable microbial population and differentiation from their dead cells using the most sensitive molecular methods is a challenge, because of the stability of DNA from dead cells. The goal of this research is to evaluate a rapid and sensitive microbial detection concept that will selectively estimate viable microbes. Nucleic acid amplification approaches such as the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) have shown promise for reducing time to detection for a wide range of applications. The proposed method is based on the use of a fluorescent DNA intercalating agent, propidium monoazide (PMA), which can only penetrate the membrane of dead cells. The PMA-quenched reaction mixtures can be screened, where only the DNA from live cells will be available for subsequent PCR reaction and microarray detection, and be identified as part of the viable microbial community. An additional advantage of the proposed rapid method is that it will detect viable microbes and differentiate from dead cells in only a few hours, as opposed to less comprehensive culture-based assays, which take days to complete. This novel combination approach is called the PMA-Microarray method. DNA intercalating agents such as PMA have previously been used to selectively distinguish between viable and dead bacterial cells. Once in the cell, the dye intercalates with the DNA and, upon photolysis under visible light, produces stable DNA adducts. DNA cross-linked in this way is unavailable for PCR. Environmental samples suspected of containing a mixture of live and dead microbial cells/spores will be treated with PMA, and then incubated

  16. Probiotic metabolites from Bacillus coagulans GanedenBC30™ support maturation of antigen-presenting cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Kathleen F; Redman, Kimberlee A; Carter, Steve G; Keller, David; Farmer, Sean; Endres, John R; Jensen, Gitte S

    2012-04-28

    To study the effects of probiotic metabolites on maturation stage of antigen-presenting immune cells. Ganeden Bacillus coagulans 30 (GBC30) bacterial cultures in log phase were used to isolate the secreted metabolite (MET) fraction. A second fraction was made to generate a crude cell-wall-enriched fraction, by centrifugation and lysis, followed by washing. A preparation of MET was subjected to size exclusion centrifugation, generating three fractions: monoclonal antibodies towards CD14, CD16, CD80 and CD86 and analyzed by flow cytometry. Treatment of PBMC with MET supported maturation of mononuclear phagocytes toward both macrophage and dendritic cell phenotypes. The biological activity unique to the metabolites included a reduction of CD14+ CD16+ pro-inflammatory cells, and this property was associated with the high molecular weight metabolite fraction. Changes were also seen for the dendritic cell maturation markers CD80 and CD86. On CD14(dim) cells, an increase in both CD80 and CD86 expression was seen, in contrast to a selective increase in CD86 expression on CD14(bright) cells. The co-expression of CD80 and CD86 indicates effective antigen presentation to T cells and support of T helper cell differentiation. The selective expression of CD86 in the absence of CD80 points to a role in generating T regulatory cells. The data show that a primary mechanism of action of GBC30 metabolites involves support of more mature phenotypes of antigen-presenting cells, important for immunological decision-making.

  17. A Francisella tularensis live vaccine strain that improves stimulation of antigen-presenting cells does not enhance vaccine efficacy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deanna M Schmitt

    Full Text Available Vaccination is a proven strategy to mitigate morbidity and mortality of infectious diseases. The methodology of identifying and testing new vaccine candidates could be improved with rational design and in vitro testing prior to animal experimentation. The tularemia vaccine, Francisella tularensis live vaccine strain (LVS, does not elicit complete protection against lethal challenge with a virulent type A Francisella strain. One factor that may contribute to this poor performance is limited stimulation of antigen-presenting cells. In this study, we examined whether the interaction of genetically modified LVS strains with human antigen-presenting cells correlated with effectiveness as tularemia vaccine candidates. Human dendritic cells infected with wild-type LVS secrete low levels of proinflammatory cytokines, fail to upregulate costimulatory molecules, and activate human T cells poorly in vitro. One LVS mutant, strain 13B47, stimulated higher levels of proinflammatory cytokines from dendritic cells and macrophages and increased costimulatory molecule expression on dendritic cells compared to wild type. Additionally, 13B47-infected dendritic cells activated T cells more efficiently than LVS-infected cells. A deletion allele of the same gene in LVS displayed similar in vitro characteristics, but vaccination with this strain did not improve survival after challenge with a virulent Francisella strain. In vivo, this mutant was attenuated for growth and did not stimulate T cell responses in the lung comparable to wild type. Therefore, stimulation of antigen-presenting cells in vitro was improved by genetic modification of LVS, but did not correlate with efficacy against challenge in vivo within this model system.

  18. Low numbers of FOXP3 positive regulatory T cells are present in all developmental stages of human atherosclerotic lesions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onno J de Boer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: T cell mediated inflammation contributes to atherogenesis and the onset of acute cardiovascular disease. Effector T cell functions are under a tight control of a specialized T cell subset, regulatory T cells (Treg. At present, nothing is known about the in situ presence of Treg in human atherosclerotic tissue. In the present study we investigated the frequency of naturally occurring Treg cells in all developmental stages of human atherosclerotic lesions including complicated thrombosed plaques. METHODOLOGY: Normal arteries, early lesions (American Heart Association classification types I, II, and III, fibrosclerotic plaques (types Vb and Vc and 'high risk' plaques (types IV, Va and VI were obtained at surgery and autopsy. Serial sections were immunostained for markers specific for regulatory T cells (FOXP3 and GITR and the frequency of these cells was expressed as a percentage of the total numbers of CD3+ T cells. Results were compared with Treg counts in biopsies of normal and inflammatory skin lesions (psoriasis, spongiotic dermatitis and lichen planus. PRINCIPLE FINDINGS: In normal vessel fragments T cells were virtually absent. Treg were present in the intima during all stages of plaque development (0.5-5%. Also in the adventitia of atherosclerotic vessels Treg were encountered, in similar low amounts. High risk lesions contained significantly increased numbers of Treg compared to early lesions (mean: 3.9 and 1.2%, respectively. The frequency of FOXP3+ cells in high risk lesions was also higher compared to stable lesions (1.7%, but this difference was not significant. The mean numbers of intimal FOXP3 positive cells in atherosclerotic lesions (2.4% was much lower than those in normal (24.3% or inflammatory skin lesions (28%. CONCLUSION: Low frequencies of Treg in all developmental stages of human plaque formation could explain the smoldering chronic inflammatory process that takes place throughout the longstanding course of

  19. Unusual Presentation of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma in a Young Woman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diurianne CC França

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC is the most common oral malignant neoplasm, mainly affecting individuals over 50 years old with a history of tobacco and alcohol use. The occurrence of this oral cancer in individuals under 40 years old is unusual and, when it does occur, shows a weaker relation to those risk factors and a more aggressive clinical course. Due to the paucity of reports in this population, it is difficult to prove its increasing trend. A case of oral squamous cell carcinoma in a 39-year-old woman with no history of tobacco or alcohol use is reported. Clinical and histopathological findings, aetiology, and treatment are discussed. The increasing trend of oral squamous cell carcinoma in young women without known risk factors highlights the need for clinicians to be prepared to diagnose this lesion quickly and precisely, providing a better prognosis, chance of survival, and quality of life for the patient.

  20. Organometallic perovskite solar cells: a study of temperature effect (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mingkui

    2017-02-01

    It is highly desirable to develop new solar cells to operate at temperatures higher and lower than standard operational conditions for space and near space applications in future. Herein, we communicate an experimental investigation on temperature-dependent photovoltaic efficiency for perovskite solar cells based on mesoscopic TiO2/Al2O3/NiO/carbon architecture. This perovskite device shows impressive 5% power conversion efficiency at low temperature of 80 K. Therefore, the perovskite solar cells can be precisely characterized in a wide temperature range, which enables unequivocal identification of the contribution of CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite to construction of the built-in electric field, and thus, the temperature dependent photovoltaic parameters. The latter, particularly the open-circuit voltage, shows a strong dependence on the dielectric constant of CH3NH3PbI3.