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Sample records for viable cell density

  1. Increasing Vero viable cell densities for yellow fever virus production in stirred-tank bioreactors using serum-free medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattos, Diogo A; Silva, Marlon V; Gaspar, Luciane P; Castilho, Leda R

    2015-08-20

    In this work, changes in Vero cell cultivation methods have been employed in order to improve cell growth conditions to obtain higher viable cell densities and to increase viral titers. The propagation of the 17DD yellow fever virus (YFV) in Vero cells grown on Cytodex I microcarriers was evaluated in 3-L bioreactor vessels. Prior to the current changes, Vero cells were repeatedly displaying insufficient microcarrier colonization. A modified cultivation process with four changes has resulted in higher cell densities and higher virus titers than previously observed for 17DD YFV. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Viable Cell Culture Banking for Biodiversity Characterization and Conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryder, Oliver A; Onuma, Manabu

    2018-02-15

    Because living cells can be saved for indefinite periods, unprecedented opportunities for characterizing, cataloging, and conserving biological diversity have emerged as advanced cellular and genetic technologies portend new options for preventing species extinction. Crucial to realizing the potential impacts of stem cells and assisted reproductive technologies on biodiversity conservation is the cryobanking of viable cell cultures from diverse species, especially those identified as vulnerable to extinction in the near future. The advent of in vitro cell culture and cryobanking is reviewed here in the context of biodiversity collections of viable cell cultures that represent the progress and limitations of current efforts. The prospects for incorporating collections of frozen viable cell cultures into efforts to characterize the genetic changes that have produced the diversity of species on Earth and contribute to new initiatives in conservation argue strongly for a global network of facilities for establishing and cryobanking collections of viable cells.

  3. High speed flow cytometric separation of viable cells

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    Sasaki, Dennis T.; Van den Engh, Gerrit J.; Buckie, Anne-Marie

    1995-01-01

    Hematopoietic cell populations are separated to provide cell sets and subsets as viable cells with high purity and high yields, based on the number of original cells present in the mixture. High-speed flow cytometry is employed using light characteristics of the cells to separate the cells, where high flow speeds are used to reduce the sorting time.

  4. Surface Charge Visualization at Viable Living Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, David; Paulose Nadappuram, Binoy; Momotenko, Dmitry; Voyias, Philip D; Page, Ashley; Tripathi, Gyanendra; Frenguelli, Bruno G; Unwin, Patrick R

    2016-03-09

    Scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) is demonstrated to be a powerful technique for quantitative nanoscale surface charge mapping of living cells. Utilizing a bias modulated (BM) scheme, in which the potential between a quasi-reference counter electrode (QRCE) in an electrolyte-filled nanopipette and a QRCE in bulk solution is modulated, it is shown that both the cell topography and the surface charge present at cellular interfaces can be measured simultaneously at high spatial resolution with dynamic potential measurements. Surface charge is elucidated by probing the properties of the diffuse double layer (DDL) at the cellular interface, and the technique is sensitive at both low-ionic strength and under typical physiological (high-ionic strength) conditions. The combination of experiments that incorporate pixel-level self-referencing (calibration) with a robust theoretical model allows for the analysis of local surface charge variations across cellular interfaces, as demonstrated on two important living systems. First, charge mapping at Zea mays root hairs shows that there is a high negative surface charge at the tip of the cell. Second, it is shown that there are distinct surface charge distributions across the surface of human adipocyte cells, whose role is the storage and regulation of lipids in mammalian systems. These are new features, not previously recognized, and their implications for the functioning of these cells are highlighted.

  5. Inkjet printing of viable human dental follicle stem cells

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    Mau Robert

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Inkjet printing technology has the potential to be used for seeding of viable cells for tissue engineering approaches. For this reason, a piezoelectrically actuated, drop-on-demand inkjet printing system was applied to deliver viable human dental follicle stem cells (hDFSC of sizes of about 15 μm up to 20 μm in diameter. The purpose of these investigations was to verify the stability of the printing process and to evaluate cell viability post printing. Using a Nanoplotter 2.1 (Gesim, Germany equipped with the piezoelectric printhead NanoTip HV (Gesim, Germany, a concentration of 6.6 ×106 cells ml−1 in DMEM with 10% fetal calf serum (FCS could be dispensed. The piezoelectric printhead has a nominal droplet volume of ~ 400 pl and was set to a voltage of 75 V and a pulse of 50 μs while dosing 50 000 droplets over a time of 100 seconds. The volume and trajectory of the droplet were checked by a stroboscope test right before and after the printing process. It was found that the droplet volume decreases significantly by 35% during printing process, while the trajectory of the droplets remains stable with only an insignificant number of degrees deviation from the vertical line. It is highly probable that some cell sedimentations or agglomerations affect the printing performance. The cell viability post printing was assessed by using the Trypan Blue dye exclusion test. The printing process was found to have no significant influence on cell survival. In conclusion, drop-on-demand inkjet printing can be a potent tool for the seeding of viable cells.

  6. IN-VITRO BIOREDUCTION OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM BY VIABLE WHOLE CELLS OF Arthrobacter sp. SUK 1201

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    Satarupa Dey

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A chromium resistant and reducing bacterium Arthrobacter sp. SUK 1201 was isolated from chromite mine overburden dumps of Orissa, India. Viable whole cells of this isolate was capable of completely reducing 100 µM Cr(VI in chemically defined MS medium within 28 h of incubation under batch cultivation. Reduction of chromate increased with increased cell density and was maximum at a density of 1010 cells/ml, but the reduction potential of the suspended cells decreased with increase in Cr(VI concentration in the medium. Chromate reducing efficiency was promoted when glycerol and glucose was used as electron donors, while the optimum pH and temperature of Cr(VI reduction was found to be 7.0 and 35°C respectively. The reduction process was inhibited by divalent cations Ni, Co and Cd, but not by Cu and Fe. Similarly, carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP, N,N,-Di cyclohexyl carboiimide (DCC, sodium azide and sodium fluoride were inhibitory to chromate reduction, while in presence of 2,4 dinitrophenol (2,4 DNP chromate reduction by SUK 1201 cells remained unaffected.

  7. The molecularly crowded cytoplasm of bacterialcCells : Dividing cells contrasted with viable but non-culturable (VBNC) bacterial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trevors, J. T.; van Elsas, J. D.; Bej, A. K.

    2013-01-01

    In this perspective, we discuss the cytoplasm in actively growing bacterial cells contrasted with viable but non-culturable (VBNC) cells. Actively growing bacterial cells contain a more molecularly crowded and organized cytoplasm, and are capable of completing their cell cycle resulting in cell

  8. Non-viable antagonist cells are associated with reduced biocontrol performance by viable cells of the yeast Papiliotrema flavescens against Fusarium head blight of wheat.

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    Microbially-based plant disease control products have achieved commercial market success, but the efficacy of such biocontrol products is sometimes deemed inconsistent. Improper processing of harvested microbial biomass or long-term storage can reduce the proportion of viable cells and necessitate t...

  9. Modelling the number of viable vegetative cells of Bacillus cereus passing through the stomach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnands, L.M.; Pielaat, A.; Dufrenne, J.B.; Zwietering, M.H.; Leusden, van F.M.

    2009-01-01

    Aims: Model the number of viable vegetative cells of B. cereus surviving the gastric passage after experiments in simulated gastric conditions. Materials and Methods: The inactivation of stationary and exponential phase vegetative cells of twelve different strains of Bacillus cereus, both mesophilic

  10. Correlations between cyanobacterial density and bacterial transformation to the viable but nonculturable (VBNC) state in four freshwater water bodies.

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    Chen, Huirong; Shen, Ju; Pan, Gaoshan; Liu, Jing; Li, Jiancheng; Hu, Zhangli

    2015-10-01

    Nutrient concentrations, phytoplankton density and community composition, and the viable but nonculturable (VBNC) state of heterotrophic bacteria were investigated in three connected reservoirs and a small isolated lake in South China to study the relationship between biotic and abiotic factors and the VBNC state in bacteria. Nutrient concentrations in the reservoirs increased in the direction of water flow, whereas Wenshan Lake was more eutrophic. Cyanobacterial blooms occurred in all four water bodies, with differing seasonal trends and dominant species. In Xili and Tiegang Reservoirs, the VBNC ratio (percent of VBNC state bacteria over total viable bacteria) was high for most of the year and negatively correlated with cyanobacterial density. Laboratory co-culture experiments were performed with four heterotrophic bacterial species isolated from Wenshan Lake (Escherichia coli, Klebsiella peneumoniae, Bacillus megaterium and Bacillus cereus) and the dominant cyanobacterial species (Microcystis aeruginosa). For the first three bacterial species, the presence of M. aeruginosa induced the VBNC state and the VBNC ratio was positively correlated with M. aeruginosa density. However, B. cereus inhibited M. aeruginosa growth. These results demonstrate that cyanobacteria could potentially regulate the transformation to the VBNC state of waterborne bacteria, and suggest a role for bacteria in cyanobacterial bloom initiation and termination.

  11. Combining ethidium monoazide treatment with real-time PCR selectively quantifies viable Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis cells.

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    Blooi, Mark; Martel, An; Vercammen, Francis; Pasmans, Frank

    2013-02-01

    Detection of the lethal amphibian fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis relies on PCR-based techniques. Although highly accurate and sensitive, these methods fail to distinguish between viable and dead cells. In this study a novel approach combining the DNA intercalating dye ethidium monoazide (EMA) and real-time PCR is presented that allows quantification of viable B. dendrobatidis cells without the need for culturing. The developed method is able to suppress real-time PCR signals of heat-killed B. dendrobatidis zoospores by 99.9 % and is able to discriminate viable from heat-killed B. dendrobatidis zoospores in mixed samples. Furthermore, the novel approach was applied to assess the antifungal activity of the veterinary antiseptic F10(®) Antiseptic Solution. This disinfectant killed B. dendrobatidis zoospores effectively within 1 min at concentrations as low as 1:6400. Copyright © 2013 The British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A simple way to identify non-viable cells within living plant tissue using confocal microscopy

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    Truernit Elisabeth

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant cell death is a normal process during plant development. Mutant plants may exhibit misregulation of this process, which can lead to severe growth defects. Simple ways of visualising cell death in living plant tissues can aid the study of plant development and physiology. Results Spectral variants of the fluorescent SYTOX dyes were tested for their usefulness for the detection of non-viable cells within plant embryos and roots using confocal laser-scanning microscopy. The dyes were selective for non-viable cells and showed very little background staining in living cells. Simultaneous detection of SYTOX dye and fluorescent protein (e.g. GFP fluorescence was possible. Conclusion The fluorescent SYTOX dyes are useful for an easy and quick first assay of plant cell viability in living plant samples using fluorescence and confocal laser-scanning microscopy.

  13. Separable Bilayer Microfiltration Device for Viable Label-free Enrichment of Circulating Tumour Cells

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    Zhou, Ming-Da; Hao, Sijie; Williams, Anthony J.; Harouaka, Ramdane A.; Schrand, Brett; Rawal, Siddarth; Ao, Zheng; Brennaman, Randall; Gilboa, Eli; Lu, Bo; Wang, Shuwen; Zhu, Jiyue; Datar, Ram; Cote, Richard; Tai, Yu-Chong; Zheng, Si-Yang

    2014-12-01

    The analysis of circulating tumour cells (CTCs) in cancer patients could provide important information for therapeutic management. Enrichment of viable CTCs could permit performance of functional analyses on CTCs to broaden understanding of metastatic disease. However, this has not been widely accomplished. Addressing this challenge, we present a separable bilayer (SB) microfilter for viable size-based CTC capture. Unlike other single-layer CTC microfilters, the precise gap between the two layers and the architecture of pore alignment result in drastic reduction in mechanical stress on CTCs, capturing them viably. Using multiple cancer cell lines spiked in healthy donor blood, the SB microfilter demonstrated high capture efficiency (78-83%), high retention of cell viability (71-74%), high tumour cell enrichment against leukocytes (1.7-2 × 103), and widespread ability to establish cultures post-capture (100% of cell lines tested). In a metastatic mouse model, SB microfilters successfully enriched viable mouse CTCs from 0.4-0.6 mL whole mouse blood samples and established in vitro cultures for further genetic and functional analysis. Our preliminary studies reflect the efficacy of the SB microfilter device to efficiently and reliably enrich viable CTCs in animal model studies, constituting an exciting technology for new insights in cancer research.

  14. Use of propidium monoazide for selective profiling of viable microbial cells during Gouda cheese ripening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erkus, O.; Jager, V.C. de; Geene, R.T.; Alen-Boerrigter, I.J. van; Hazelwood, L.; Hijum, S.A.F.T. van; Kleerebezem, M; Smid, E.J.

    2016-01-01

    DNA based microbial community profiling of food samples is confounded by the presence of DNA derived from membrane compromised (dead or injured) cells. Selective amplification of DNA from viable (intact) fraction of the community by propidium monoazide (PMA) treatment could circumvent this problem.

  15. In vitro and in vivo bioluminescent quantification of viable stem cells in engineered constructs.

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    Logeart-Avramoglou, Delphine; Oudina, Karim; Bourguignon, Marianne; Delpierre, Laetitia; Nicola, Marie-Anne; Bensidhoum, Morad; Arnaud, Eric; Petite, Herve

    2010-06-01

    Bioluminescent quantification of viable cells inside three-dimensional porous scaffolds was performed in vitro and in vivo. The assay quantified the bioluminescence of murine stem (C3H10T1/2) cells tagged with the luciferase gene reporter and distributed inside scaffolds of either soft, translucent, AN69 polymeric hydrogel or hard, opaque, coral ceramic materials. Quantitative evaluation of bioluminescence emitted from tagged cells adhering to these scaffolds was performed in situ using either cell lysates and a luminometer or intact cells and a bioluminescence imaging system. Despite attenuation of the signal when compared to cells alone, the bioluminescence correlated with the number of cells (up to 1.5 x 10(5)) present on each material scaffold tested, both in vitro and noninvasively in vivo (subcutaneous implants in the mouse model). The noninvasive bioluminescence measurement technique proved to be comparable to the cell-destructive bioluminescence measurement technique. Monitoring the kinetics of luciferase expression via bioluminescence enabled real-time assessment of cell survival and proliferation on the scaffolds tested over prolonged (up to 59 days) periods of time. This novel, sensitive, easy, fast-to-implement, quantitative bioluminescence assay has great, though untapped, potential for screening and determining noninvasively the presence of viable cells on biomaterial constructs in the tissue engineering and tissue regeneration fields.

  16. Mobilization of Viable Tumor Cells Into the Circulation During Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Olga A. [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Molecular Radiation Biology Laboratory, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); The Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Anderson, Robin L. [The Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Metastasis Research Laboratory, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Russell, Prudence A. [Department of Anatomical Pathology, St. Vincent Hospital, Fitzroy, VIC (Australia); Ashley Cox, R. [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Ivashkevich, Alesia [Molecular Radiation Biology Laboratory, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Laboratory of DNA Repair and Genomics, Centre for Innate Immunity and Infectious Disease, Monash Institute for Medical Research, Monash University, Clayton, VIC (Australia); Swierczak, Agnieszka; Doherty, Judy P. [Metastasis Research Laboratory, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Jacobs, Daphne H.M. [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Smith, Jai [Molecular Radiation Biology Laboratory, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Siva, Shankar; Daly, Patricia E. [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Ball, David L. [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); The Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC (Australia); and others

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: To determine whether radiation therapy (RT) could mobilize viable tumor cells into the circulation of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Methods and Materials: We enumerated circulating tumor cells (CTCs) by fluorescence microscopy of blood samples immunostained with conventional CTC markers. We measured their DNA damage levels using γ-H2AX, a biomarker for radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks, either by fluorescence-activated cell sorting or by immunofluorescence microscopy. Results: Twenty-seven RT-treated NSCLC patients had blood samples analyzed by 1 or more methods. We identified increased CTC numbers after commencement of RT in 7 of 9 patients treated with palliative RT, and in 4 of 8 patients treated with curative-intent RT. Circulating tumor cells were also identified, singly and in clumps in large numbers, during RT by cytopathologic examination (in all 5 cases studied). Elevated γ-H2AX signal in post-RT blood samples signified the presence of CTCs derived from irradiated tumors. Blood taken after the commencement of RT contained tumor cells that proliferated extensively in vitro (in all 6 cases studied). Circulating tumor cells formed γ-H2AX foci in response to ex vivo irradiation, providing further evidence of their viability. Conclusions: Our findings provide a rationale for the development of strategies to reduce the concentration of viable CTCs by modulating RT fractionation or by coadministering systemic therapies.

  17. Sorting cells by their density.

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    Nazila Norouzi

    Full Text Available Sorting cells by their type is an important capability in biological research and medical diagnostics. However, most cell sorting techniques rely on labels or tags, which may have limited availability and specificity. Sorting different cell types by their different physical properties is an attractive alternative to labels because all cells intrinsically have these physical properties. But some physical properties, like cell size, vary significantly from cell to cell within a cell type; this makes it difficult to identify and sort cells based on their sizes alone. In this work we continuously sort different cells types by their density, a physical property with much lower cell-to-cell variation within a cell type (and therefore greater potential to discriminate different cell types than other physical properties. We accomplish this using a 3D-printed microfluidic chip containing a horizontal flowing micron-scale density gradient. As cells flow through the chip, Earth's gravity makes each cell move vertically to the point where the cell's density matches the surrounding fluid's density. When the horizontal channel then splits, cells with different densities are routed to different outlets. As a proof of concept, we use our density sorter chip to sort polymer microbeads by their material (polyethylene and polystyrene and blood cells by their type (white blood cells and red blood cells. The chip enriches the fraction of white blood cells in a blood sample from 0.1% (in whole blood to nearly 98% (in the output of the chip, a 1000x enrichment. Any researcher with access to a 3D printer can easily replicate our density sorter chip and use it in their own research using the design files provided as online Supporting Information. Additionally, researchers can simulate the performance of a density sorter chip in their own applications using the Python-based simulation software that accompanies this work. The simplicity, resolution, and throughput of this

  18. Sorting cells by their density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norouzi, Nazila; Bhakta, Heran C; Grover, William H

    2017-01-01

    Sorting cells by their type is an important capability in biological research and medical diagnostics. However, most cell sorting techniques rely on labels or tags, which may have limited availability and specificity. Sorting different cell types by their different physical properties is an attractive alternative to labels because all cells intrinsically have these physical properties. But some physical properties, like cell size, vary significantly from cell to cell within a cell type; this makes it difficult to identify and sort cells based on their sizes alone. In this work we continuously sort different cells types by their density, a physical property with much lower cell-to-cell variation within a cell type (and therefore greater potential to discriminate different cell types) than other physical properties. We accomplish this using a 3D-printed microfluidic chip containing a horizontal flowing micron-scale density gradient. As cells flow through the chip, Earth's gravity makes each cell move vertically to the point where the cell's density matches the surrounding fluid's density. When the horizontal channel then splits, cells with different densities are routed to different outlets. As a proof of concept, we use our density sorter chip to sort polymer microbeads by their material (polyethylene and polystyrene) and blood cells by their type (white blood cells and red blood cells). The chip enriches the fraction of white blood cells in a blood sample from 0.1% (in whole blood) to nearly 98% (in the output of the chip), a 1000x enrichment. Any researcher with access to a 3D printer can easily replicate our density sorter chip and use it in their own research using the design files provided as online Supporting Information. Additionally, researchers can simulate the performance of a density sorter chip in their own applications using the Python-based simulation software that accompanies this work. The simplicity, resolution, and throughput of this technique make

  19. Desiccation induces viable but Non-Culturable cells in Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021.

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    Vriezen, Jan Ac; de Bruijn, Frans J; Nüsslein, Klaus R

    2012-01-20

    Sinorhizobium meliloti is a microorganism commercially used in the production of e.g. Medicago sativa seed inocula. Many inocula are powder-based and production includes a drying step. Although S. meliloti survives drying well, the quality of the inocula is reduced during this process. In this study we determined survival during desiccation of the commercial strains 102F84 and 102F85 as well as the model strain USDA1021.The survival of S. meliloti 1021 was estimated during nine weeks at 22% relative humidity. We found that after an initial rapid decline of colony forming units, the decline slowed to a steady 10-fold reduction in colony forming units every 22 days. In spite of the reduction in colony forming units, the fraction of the population identified as viable (42-54%) based on the Baclight live/dead stain did not change significantly over time. This change in the ability of viable cells to form colonies shows (i) an underestimation of the survival of rhizobial cells using plating methods, and that (ii) in a part of the population desiccation induces a Viable But Non Culturable (VBNC)-like state, which has not been reported before. Resuscitation attempts did not lead to a higher recovery of colony forming units indicating the VBNC state is stable under the conditions tested. This observation has important consequences for the use of rhizobia. Finding methods to resuscitate this fraction may increase the quality of powder-based seed inocula.

  20. Mathematical modelling of the viable epidermis: impact of cell shape and vertical arrangement

    KAUST Repository

    Wittum, Rebecca

    2017-12-07

    In-silico methods are valuable tools for understanding the barrier function of the skin. The key benefit is that mathematical modelling allows the interplay between cell shape and function to be elucidated. This study focuses on the viable (living) epidermis. For this region, previous works suggested a diffusion model and an approximation of the cells by hexagonal prisms. The work at hand extends this in three ways. First, the extracellular space is treated with full spatial resolution. This induces a decrease of permeability by about 10%. Second, cells of tetrakaidecahedral shape are considered, in addition to the original hexagonal prisms. For both cell types, the resulting membrane permeabilities are compared. Third, for the first time, the influence of cell stacking in the vertical direction is considered. This is particularly important for the stratum granulosum, where tight junctions are present.

  1. Progress in biocatalysis with immobilized viable whole cells: systems development, reaction engineering and applications.

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    Polakovič, Milan; Švitel, Juraj; Bučko, Marek; Filip, Jaroslav; Neděla, Vilém; Ansorge-Schumacher, Marion B; Gemeiner, Peter

    2017-05-01

    Viable microbial cells are important biocatalysts in the production of fine chemicals and biofuels, in environmental applications and also in emerging applications such as biosensors or medicine. Their increasing significance is driven mainly by the intensive development of high performance recombinant strains supplying multienzyme cascade reaction pathways, and by advances in preservation of the native state and stability of whole-cell biocatalysts throughout their application. In many cases, the stability and performance of whole-cell biocatalysts can be highly improved by controlled immobilization techniques. This review summarizes the current progress in the development of immobilized whole-cell biocatalysts, the immobilization methods as well as in the bioreaction engineering aspects and economical aspects of their biocatalytic applications.

  2. Trypan blue dye enters viable cells incubated with the pore-forming toxin HlyII of Bacillus cereus.

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    Seav-Ly Tran

    Full Text Available Trypan blue is a dye that has been widely used for selective staining of dead tissues or cells. Here, we show that the pore-forming toxin HlyII of Bacillus cereus allows trypan blue staining of macrophage cells, despite the cells remaining viable and metabolically active. These findings suggest that the dye enters viable cells through the pores. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration that trypan blue may enter viable cells. Consequently, the use of trypan blue staining as a marker of vital status should be interpreted with caution. The blue coloration does not necessarily indicate cell lysis, but may rather indicate pore formation in the cell membranes and more generally increased membrane permeability.

  3. Viable bacteria associated with red blood cells and plasma in freshly drawn blood donations.

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    Christian Damgaard

    Full Text Available Infection remains a leading cause of post-transfusion mortality and morbidity. Bacterial contamination is, however, detected in less than 0.1% of blood units tested. The aim of the study was to identify viable bacteria in standard blood-pack units, with particular focus on bacteria from the oral cavity, and to determine the distribution of bacteria revealed in plasma and in the red blood cell (RBC-fraction.Cross-sectional study. Blood were separated into plasma and RBC-suspensions, which were incubated anaerobically or aerobically for 7 days on trypticase soy blood agar (TSA or blue lactose plates. For identification colony PCR was performed using primers targeting 16S rDNA.Blood donors attending Capital Region Blood Bank, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Hvidovre, Denmark, October 29th to December 10th 2013.60 donors (≥50 years old, self-reported medically healthy.Bacterial growth was observed on plates inoculated with plasma or RBCs from 62% of the blood donations. Growth was evident in 21 (35% of 60 RBC-fractions and in 32 (53% of 60 plasma-fractions versus 8 of 60 negative controls (p = 0.005 and p = 2.6x10-6, respectively. Propionibacterium acnes was found in 23% of the donations, and Staphylococcus epidermidis in 38%. The majority of bacteria identified in the present study were either facultative anaerobic (59.5% or anaerobic (27.8% species, which are not likely to be detected during current routine screening.Viable bacteria are present in blood from donors self-reported as medically healthy, indicating that conventional test systems employed by blood banks insufficiently detect bacteria in plasma. Further investigation is needed to determine whether routine testing for anaerobic bacteria and testing of RBC-fractions for adherent bacteria should be recommended.

  4. A Novel Application for Low Frequency Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy as an Online Process Monitoring Tool for Viable Cell Concentrations

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    Christoph Slouka

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available New approaches in process monitoring during industrial fermentations are not only limited to classical pH, dO2 and offgas analysis, but use different in situ and online sensors based on different physical principles to determine biomass, product quality, lysis and far more. One of the very important approaches is the in situ accessibility of viable cell concentration (VCC. This knowledge provides increased efficiency in monitoring and controlling strategies during cultivations. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy—EIS—is used to monitor biomass in a fermentation of E. coli BL21(DE3, producing a recombinant protein using a fed batch-based approach. Increases in the double layer capacitance (Cdl, determined at frequencies below 1 kHz, are proportional to the increase of biomass in the batch and fed batch phase, monitored in offline and online modes for different cultivations. A good correlation of Cdl with cell density is found and in order to get an appropriate verification of this method, different state-of-the-art biomass measurements are performed and compared. Since measurements in this frequency range are largely determined by the double layer region between the electrode and media, rather minor interferences with process parameters (aeration, stirring are to be expected. It is shown that impedance spectroscopy at low frequencies is a powerful tool for cultivation monitoring.

  5. Cellular bone matrices: viable stem cell-containing bone graft substitutes.

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    Skovrlj, Branko; Guzman, Javier Z; Al Maaieh, Motasem; Cho, Samuel K; Iatridis, James C; Qureshi, Sheeraz A

    2014-11-01

    Advances in the field of stem cell technology have stimulated the development and increased use of allogenic bone grafts containing live mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), also known as cellular bone matrices (CBMs). It is estimated that CBMs comprise greater than 17% of all bone grafts and bone graft substitutes used. To critically evaluate CBMs, specifically their technical specifications, existing published data supporting their use, US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulation, cost, potential pitfalls, and other aspects pertaining to their use. Areview of literature. A series of Ovid, Medline, and Pubmed-National Library of Medicine/National Institutes of Health (www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov) searches were performed. Only articles in English journals or published with English language translations were included. Level of evidence of the selected articles was assessed. Specific technical information on each CBM was obtained by direct communication from the companies marketing the individual products. Five different CBMs are currently available for use in spinal fusion surgery. There is a wide variation between the products with regard to the average donor age at harvest, total cellular concentration, percentage of MSCs, shelf life, and cell viability after defrosting. Three retrospective studies evaluating CBMs and fusion have shown fusion rates ranging from 90.2% to 92.3%, and multiple industry-sponsored trials are underway. No independent studies evaluating spinal fusion rates with the use of CBMs exist. All the commercially available CBMs claim to meet the FDA criteria under Section 361, 21 CFR Part 1271, and are not undergoing FDA premarket review. The CBMs claim to provide viable MSCs and are offered at a premium cost. Numerous challenges exist in regard to MSCs' survival, function, osteoblastic potential, and cytokine production once implanted into the intended host. Cellular bone matrices may be a promising bone augmentation technology in spinal fusion surgery

  6. Combined bromodeoxyuridine immunohistochemistry and Masson trichrome staining: facilitated detection of cell proliferation in viable vs. infarcted myocardium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarous, D F; Shou, M; Unger, E F

    1992-09-01

    Cells in the S-phase of the cell cycle can be identified in tissue sections by immunohistochemical localization of the thymidine analogue bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU). Generally, a single counterstain is used to visualize the underlying tissue; however, interpretation of morphologic detail is often difficult. We have utilized BrdU to localize proliferating cells in myocardium exposed to angiogenic mitogens. To facilitate identification of labelled nuclei in the context of infarcted vs. viable myocardium, BrdU immunohistochemistry was followed by a modified Masson trichrome stain. The time of exposure to the counterstains and the wash protocol were re-revised, permitting clear identification of the labelled brown nuclei against a background of red viable myocardium vs. blue infarct. The combined technique also provides color contrast suitable for computer-based image analysis.

  7. Quantitative assessment of viable cells of Lactobacillus plantarum strains in single, dual and multi-strain biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Ramírez, Mónica D; Kostopoulos, Ioannis; Smid, Eddy J; Nierop Groot, Masja N; Abee, Tjakko

    2017-03-06

    Biofilms of Lactobacillus plantarum are a potential source for contamination and recontamination of food products. Although biofilms have been mostly studied using single species or even single strains, it is conceivable that in a range of environmental settings including food processing areas, biofilms are composed of multiple species with each species represented by multiple strains. In this study six spoilage related L. plantarum strains FBR1-FBR6 and the model strain L. plantarum WCFS1 were characterised in single, dual and multiple strain competition models. A quantitative PCR approach was used with added propidium monoazide (PMA) enabling quantification of intact cells in the biofilm, representing the viable cell fraction that determines the food spoilage risk. Our results show that the performance of individual strains in multi-strain cultures generally correlates with their performance in pure culture, and relative strain abundance in multi-strain biofilms positively correlated with the relative strain abundance in suspended (planktonic) cultures. Performance of individual strains in dual-strain biofilms was highly influenced by the presence of the secondary strain, and in most cases no correlation between the relative contributions of viable planktonic cells and viable cells in the biofilm was noted. The total biofilm quantified by CV staining of the dual and multi-strain biofilms formed was mainly correlated to CV values of the dominant strain obtained in single strain studies. However, the combination of strain FBR5 and strain WCFS1 showed significantly higher CV values compared to the individual performances of both strains indicating that total biofilm formation was higher in this specific condition. Notably, L. plantarum FBR5 was able to outgrow all other strains and showed the highest relative abundance in dual and multi-strain biofilms. All the dual and multi-strain biofilms contained a considerable number of viable cells, representing a potential

  8. A multimodality imaging model to track viable breast cancer cells from single arrest to metastasis in the mouse brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkins, Katie M.; Hamilton, Amanda M.; Makela, Ashley V.; Chen, Yuanxin; Foster, Paula J.; Ronald, John A.

    2016-10-01

    Cellular MRI involves sensitive visualization of iron-labeled cells in vivo but cannot differentiate between dead and viable cells. Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) measures cellular viability, and thus we explored combining these tools to provide a more holistic view of metastatic cancer cell fate in mice. Human breast carcinoma cells stably expressing Firefly luciferase were loaded with iron particles, injected into the left ventricle, and BLI and MRI were performed on days 0, 8, 21 and 28. The number of brain MR signal voids (i.e., iron-loaded cells) on day 0 significantly correlated with BLI signal. Both BLI and MRI signals decreased from day 0 to day 8, indicating a loss of viable cells rather than a loss of iron label. Total brain MR tumour volume on day 28 also correlated with BLI signal. Overall, BLI complemented our sensitive cellular MRI technologies well, allowing us for the first time to screen animals for successful injections, and, in addition to MR measures of cell arrest and tumor burden, provided longitudinal measures of cancer cell viability in individual animals. We predict this novel multimodality molecular imaging framework will be useful for evaluating the efficacy of emerging anti-cancer drugs at different stages of the metastatic cascade.

  9. A Viable Electrode Material for Use in Microbial Fuel Cells for Tropical Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Offei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrode materials are critical for microbial fuel cells (MFC since they influence the construction and operational costs. This study introduces a simple and efficient electrode material in the form of palm kernel shell activated carbon (AC obtained in tropical regions. The novel introduction of this material is also targeted at introducing an inexpensive and durable electrode material, which can be produced in rural communities to improve the viability of MFCs. The maximum voltage and power density obtained (under 1000 Ω load using an H-shaped MFC with AC as both anode and cathode electrode material was 0.66 V and 1.74 W/m3, respectively. The power generated by AC was as high as 86% of the value obtained with the extensively used carbon paper. Scanning electron microscopy and Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE analysis of AC anode biofilms confirmed that electrogenic bacteria were present on the electrode surface for substrate oxidation and the formation of nanowires.

  10. Viable cell yield from active dry yeast products and effects of storage temperature and diluent on yeast cell viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, M L; Bradford, B J

    2011-01-01

    Active dry yeast (ADY) products are commonly fed in the dairy industry, but research regarding quality control for such products is limited. The objectives of this study were to determine yeast viability in field samples relative to manufacturers' guarantees (experiment 1), measure the effects of high-temperature storage on yeast viability (experiment 1), and determine the effect of vitamin-trace mineral (VTM) premix on yeast viability (experiment 2). Commercially available ADY products were acquired in triplicate through normal distribution channels and stored at 4°C upon receipt. Initial samples were evaluated for colony-forming units and compared with product label guarantees. Only 1 of the 6 products sampled in experiment 1 met product guarantees for all 3 samples. To determine effects of storage temperature and duration on viability, ADY samples were stored in an incubator at 40°C with ambient humidity for 1, 2, and 3 mo. High-temperature storage significantly decreased viability over the 3-mo period; approximately 90% of viable cells were lost each month. Three of the 5 products sampled in experiment 2 met product guarantees. Fresh samples of 4 of these 5 ADY products were mixed in duplicate with ground corn (GC) or a VTM premix to achieve a target concentration of 2.2×10(8) cfu/g. For each product, GC and VTM samples were stored at ambient temperature (22°C) and at an elevated temperature (40°C) for 2 wk. No differences in viable yeast count were observed between GC and VTM samples immediately after mixing or after storage at ambient temperature. Yeast viability in GC and VTM samples decreased during storage at an elevated temperature. There also was a significant interaction of diluent and storage temperature; VTM samples had higher cell viability than GC samples when subjected to high-temperature storage. Results suggest that (1) ADY products failed to consistently meet product guarantees; (2) viability of ADY products was greatly diminished during

  11. Sensitive and Specific Biomimetic Lipid Coated Microfluidics to Isolate Viable Circulating Tumor Cells and Microemboli for Cancer Detection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Yang Chen

    Full Text Available Here we presented a simple and effective membrane mimetic microfluidic device with antibody conjugated supported lipid bilayer (SLB "smart coating" to capture viable circulating tumor cells (CTCs and circulating tumor microemboli (CTM directly from whole blood of all stage clinical cancer patients. The non-covalently bound SLB was able to promote dynamic clustering of lipid-tethered antibodies to CTC antigens and minimized non-specific blood cells retention through its non-fouling nature. A gentle flow further flushed away loosely-bound blood cells to achieve high purity of CTCs, and a stream of air foam injected disintegrate the SLB assemblies to release intact and viable CTCs from the chip. Human blood spiked cancer cell line test showed the ~95% overall efficiency to recover both CTCs and CTMs. Live/dead assay showed that at least 86% of recovered cells maintain viability. By using 2 mL of peripheral blood, the CTCs and CTMs counts of 63 healthy and colorectal cancer donors were positively correlated with the cancer progression. In summary, a simple and effective strategy utilizing biomimetic principle was developed to retrieve viable CTCs for enumeration, molecular analysis, as well as ex vivo culture over weeks. Due to the high sensitivity and specificity, it is the first time to show the high detection rates and quantity of CTCs in non-metastatic cancer patients. This work offers the values in both early cancer detection and prognosis of CTC and provides an accurate non-invasive strategy for routine clinical investigation on CTCs.

  12. Viable cell sorting of dinoflagellates by multi-parametric flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Electronic cell sorting for isolation and culture of dinoflagellates and other marine eukaryotic phytoplankton was compared to the traditional method of manually picking of cells using a micropipette. Trauma to electronically sorted cells was not a limiting factor as fragile dinoflagellates, such a...

  13. Fuel cells are a commercially viable alternative for the production of "clean" energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niakolas, Dimitris K; Daletou, Maria; Neophytides, Stylianos G; Vayenas, Constantinos G

    2016-01-01

    Fuel cells present a highly efficient and environmentally friendly alternative technology for decentralized energy production. The scope of the present study is to provide an overview of the technological and commercialization readiness level of fuel cells. Specifically, there is a brief description of their general advantages and weaknesses in correlation with various technological actions and political strategies, which are adopted towards their proper positioning in the global market. Some of the most important key performance indicators are also discussed, alongside with a few examples of broad commercialization. It is concluded that the increasing number of companies which utilize and invest on this technology, in combination with the supply chain improvements and the concomitant technological maturity and recognition, reinforce the fuel cell industry so as to become well-aligned for global success.

  14. A viable electrode material for use in microbial fuel cells for tropical regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Offei, Felix; Thygesen, Anders; Mensah, Moses

    2016-01-01

    Electrode materials are critical for microbial fuel cells (MFC) since they influence the construction and operational costs. This study introduces a simple and efficient electrode material in the form of palm kernel shell activated carbon (AC) obtained in tropical regions. The novel introduction...

  15. Progress in emerging techniques for characterization of immobilized viable whole-cell biocatalysts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bučko, M.; Vikartovská, A.; Schenkmayerová, A.; Tkáč, J.; Filip, J.; Chorvát Jr., D.; Neděla, Vilém; Ansorge-Schumacher, M.B.; Gemeiner, P.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 71, č. 11 (2017), s. 2309-2324 ISSN 0366-6352 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : bioelectrocatalysis * imaging techniques * immobilized whole- cell biocatalyst * multienzyme cascade reactions * online kinetics Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.258, year: 2016

  16. Progress in biocatalysis with immobilized viable whole cells: systems development, reaction engineering and applications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Polakovič, M.; Švitel, J.; Bučko, M.; Filip, J.; Neděla, Vilém; Ansorge-Schumacher, M.B.; Gemeiner, P.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 39, č. 5 (2017), s. 667-683 ISSN 0141-5492 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : biocatalysis * immobilization methods * immobilized whole-cell biocatalyst * multienzyme cascade reactions * process economics * reaction engineering Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.730, year: 2016

  17. Identifying viable regulatory and innovation pathways for regenerative medicine: a case study of cultured red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittra, J; Tait, J; Mastroeni, M; Turner, M L; Mountford, J C; Bruce, K

    2015-01-25

    The creation of red blood cells for the blood transfusion markets represents a highly innovative application of regenerative medicine with a medium term (5-10 year) prospect for first clinical studies. This article describes a case study analysis of a project to derive red blood cells from human embryonic stem cells, including the systemic challenges arising from (i) the selection of appropriate and viable regulatory protocols and (ii) technological constraints related to stem cell manufacture and scale up to clinical Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) standard. The method used for case study analysis (Analysis of Life Science Innovation Systems (ALSIS)) is also innovative, demonstrating a new approach to social and natural science collaboration to foresight product development pathways. Issues arising along the development pathway include cell manufacture and scale-up challenges, affected by regulatory demands emerging from the innovation ecosystem (preclinical testing and clinical trials). Our discussion reflects on the efforts being made by regulators to adapt the current pharmaceuticals-based regulatory model to an allogeneic regenerative medicine product and the broader lessons from this case study for successful innovation and translation of regenerative medicine therapies, including the role of methodological and regulatory innovation in future development in the field. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Real-Time PCR Methodology for Selective Detection of Viable Escherichia coli O157:H7 Cells by Targeting Z3276 as a Genetic Marker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jin-Qiang

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study was to develop a sensitive, specific, and accurate method for the selective detection of viable Escherichia coli O157:H7 cells in foods. A unique open reading frame (ORF), Z3276, was identified as a specific genetic marker for the detection of E. coli O157:H7. We developed a real-time PCR assay with primers and probe targeting ORF Z3276 and confirmed that this assay was sensitive and specific for E. coli O157:H7 strains (n = 298). Using this assay, we can detect amounts of genomic DNA of E. coli O157:H7 as low as a few CFU equivalents. Moreover, we have developed a new propidium monoazide (PMA)–real-time PCR protocol that allows for the clear differentiation of viable from dead cells. In addition, the protocol was adapted to a 96-well plate format for easy and consistent handling of a large number of samples. Amplification of DNA from PMA-treated dead cells was almost completely inhibited, in contrast to the virtually unaffected amplification of DNA from PMA-treated viable cells. With beef spiked simultaneously with 8 × 107 dead cells/g and 80 CFU viable cells/g, we were able to selectively detect viable E. coli O157:H7 cells with an 8-h enrichment. In conclusion, this PMA–real-time PCR assay offers a sensitive and specific means to selectively detect viable E. coli O157:H7 cells in spiked beef. It also has the potential for high-throughput selective detection of viable E. coli O157:H7 cells in other food matrices and, thus, will have an impact on the accurate microbiological and epidemiological monitoring of food safety and environmental sources. PMID:22635992

  19. Viable Bacteria Associated with Red Blood Cells and Plasma in Freshly Drawn Blood Donations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Christian; Magnussen, Karin; Enevold, Christian

    2015-01-01

    the oral cavity, and to determine the distribution of bacteria revealed in plasma and in the red blood cell (RBC)-fraction. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. Blood were separated into plasma and RBC-suspensions, which were incubated anaerobically or aerobically for 7 days on trypticase soy blood agar (TSA......), self-reported medically healthy. RESULTS: Bacterial growth was observed on plates inoculated with plasma or RBCs from 62% of the blood donations. Growth was evident in 21 (35%) of 60 RBC-fractions and in 32 (53%) of 60 plasma-fractions versus 8 of 60 negative controls (p = 0.005 and p = 2.6x10...... of RBC-fractions for adherent bacteria should be recommended....

  20. Response of Listeria monocytogenes to disinfection stress at the single-cell and population levels as monitored by intracellular pH measurements and viable-cell counts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastbjerg, Vicky Gaedt; Nielsen, Dennis S.; Arneborg, Nils

    2009-01-01

    .05). The protective effect of NaCl was reflected by viable-cell counts at a higher concentration of Incimaxx (0.0031%), where the salt-grown population survived better than the population grown without NaCl (P ... that a population of L. monocytogenes cells, whether planktonic or attached, is homogenous with respect to sensitivity to an acidic disinfectant studied on the single-cell level. Hence a major subpopulation more tolerant to disinfectants, and hence more persistent, does not appear to be present....

  1. A factor converting viable but nonculturable Vibrio cholerae to a culturable state in eukaryotic cells is a human catalase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senoh, Mitsutoshi; Hamabata, Takashi; Takeda, Yoshifumi

    2015-08-01

    In our previous work, we demonstrated that viable but nonculturable (VBNC) Vibrio cholerae O1 and O139 were converted to culturable by coculture with eukaryotic cells. Furthermore, we isolated a factor converting VBNC V. cholerae to culturable (FCVC) from a eukaryotic cell line, HT-29. In this study, we purified FCVC by successive column chromatographies comprising UNO Q-6 anion exchange, Bio-Scale CHT2-1 hydroxyapatite, and Superdex 200 10/300 GL. Homogeneity of the purified FCVC was demonstrated by SDS-PAGE. Nano-LC MS/MS analysis showed that the purified FCVC was a human catalase. An experiment of RNAi knockdown of catalase mRNA from HT-29 cells and treatment of the purified FCVC with a catalase inhibitor, 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole confirmed that the FCVC was a catalase. A possible role of the catalase in converting a VBNC V. cholerae to a culturable state in the human intestine is discussed. © 2015 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Drugs with anti-oxidant properties can interfere with cell viability measurements by assays that rely on the reducing property of viable cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenoy, Niraj; Stenson, Mary; Lawson, Joshua; Abeykoon, Jithma; Patnaik, Mrinal; Wu, Xiaosheng; Witzig, Thomas

    2017-02-27

    Cell viability assays such as Cell Titer Blue and Alamar Blue rely on the reducing property of viable cells to reduce the reagent dye to a product which gives a fluorescent signal. The current manufacture-recommended protocols do not take into account the possibility of the reagent substrate being reduced directly to the fluorescent product by drugs with an anti-oxidant property. After suspecting spurious results while determining the cytotoxic potential of a drug of interest (DOI) with known anti-oxidant property against a renal cell cancer (RCC) cell line, we aimed to establish that drugs with anti-oxidant property can indeed cause false-negative results with the current protocols of these assays by direct reduction of the reagent substrate. We also aimed to counter the same with a simple modification added to the protocol. Through our experiments, we conclusively demonstrate that drugs with anti-oxidant properties can indeed interfere with cell viability measurements by assays that rely on the reducing property of viable cells. A simple modification in the protocol, as elaborated in the manuscript, can prevent spurious results with these otherwise convenient assays.Laboratory Investigation advance online publication, 27 February 2017; doi:10.1038/labinvest.2017.18.

  3. A viable foal obtained by equine somatic cell nuclear transfer using oocytes recovered from immature follicles of live mares.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Young-Ho; Norris, Jody D; Velez, Isabel C; Jacobson, Candace C; Hartman, David L; Hinrichs, Katrin

    2013-03-15

    The presence of heterogenous mitochondria from the host ooplast affects the acceptance of offspring obtained by somatic cell nuclear transfer. This might be avoided by obtaining oocytes from selected females, but is then complicated by low numbers of available oocytes. We examined the efficiency of equine somatic cell nuclear transfer using oocytes recovered by transvaginal aspiration of immature follicles from 11 mares. Use of metaphase I oocytes as cytoplasts and of scriptaid (a histone deacetylase inhibitor) treatment during oocyte activation were evaluated to determine if these approaches would increase blastocyst production. In experiment 1, blastocyst development was 0/14 for metaphase I oocytes and 4/103 (4%) for metaphase II oocytes. Three blastocysts were transferred to recipient mares, resulting in two pregnancies and one live foal, which died shortly after birth. In experiment 2, blastocyst development was 2/47 (4%) for control oocytes and 1/83 (1%) for scriptaid-treated oocytes. No foals were born from two blastocysts transferred in the control group. The blastocyst from the scriptaid treatment resulted in birth of a live foal. In conclusion, this is apparently the first report of production of a viable cloned foal from oocytes collected from immature follicles of live mares, supporting the possibility of cloning using oocytes from selected mares. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Clinical validation of an ultra high-throughput spiral microfluidics for the detection and enrichment of viable circulating tumor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bee Luan Khoo

    Full Text Available Circulating tumor cells (CTCs are cancer cells that can be isolated via liquid biopsy from blood and can be phenotypically and genetically characterized to provide critical information for guiding cancer treatment. Current analysis of CTCs is hindered by the throughput, selectivity and specificity of devices or assays used in CTC detection and isolation.Here, we enriched and characterized putative CTCs from blood samples of patients with both advanced stage metastatic breast and lung cancers using a novel multiplexed spiral microfluidic chip. This system detected putative CTCs under high sensitivity (100%, n = 56 (Breast cancer samples: 12-1275 CTCs/ml; Lung cancer samples: 10-1535 CTCs/ml rapidly from clinically relevant blood volumes (7.5 ml under 5 min. Blood samples were completely separated into plasma, CTCs and PBMCs components and each fraction were characterized with immunophenotyping (Pan-cytokeratin/CD45, CD44/CD24, EpCAM, fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH (EML4-ALK or targeted somatic mutation analysis. We used an ultra-sensitive mass spectrometry based system to highlight the presence of an EGFR-activating mutation in both isolated CTCs and plasma cell-free DNA (cf-DNA, and demonstrate concordance with the original tumor-biopsy samples.We have clinically validated our multiplexed microfluidic chip for the ultra high-throughput, low-cost and label-free enrichment of CTCs. Retrieved cells were unlabeled and viable, enabling potential propagation and real-time downstream analysis using next generation sequencing (NGS or proteomic analysis.

  5. Quantitation of viable Coxiella burnetii in milk using an integrated cell culture-polymerase chain reaction (ICC-PCR) assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Diana; Shieh, Y-Carol; Tortorello, Mary; Kukreja, Ankush; Shazer, Arlette; Schlesser, Joseph

    2015-11-01

    The obligate intracellular pathogen Coxiella burnetii has long been considered the most heat resistant pathogen in raw milk, making it the reference pathogen for determining pasteurisation conditions for milk products. New milk formulations and novel non-thermal processes require validation of effectiveness which requires a more practical method for analysis than using the currently used animal model for assessing Coxiella survival. Also, there is an interest in better characterising thermal inactivation of Coxiella in various milk formulations. To avoid the use of the guinea pig model for evaluating Coxiella survival, an Integrated Cell Culture-PCR (ICC-PCR) method was developed for determining Coxiella viability in milk. Vero cell cultures were directly infected from Coxiella-contaminated milk in duplicate 24-well plates. Viability of the Coxiella in milk was shown by a ≥ 0.5 log genome equivalent (ge)/ml increase in the quantity of IS111a gene from the baseline post-infection (day 0) level after 9-11 d propagation. Coxiella in skim, 2%, and whole milk, and half and half successfully infected Vero cells and increased in number by at least 2 logs using a 48-h infection period followed by 9-d propagation time. As few as 125 Coxiella ge/ml in whole milk was shown to infect and propagate at least 2 logs in the optimised ICC-PCR assay, though variable confirmation of propagation was shown for as low as 25 Coxiella ge/ml. Applicability of the ICC-PCR method was further proven in an MPN format to quantitate the number of viable Coxiella remaining in whole milk after 60 °C thermal treatment at 0, 20, 40, 60 and 90 min.

  6. High power density carbonate fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuh, C.; Johnsen, R.; Doyon, J.; Allen, J. [Energy Research Corp., Danbury, CT (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Carbonate fuel cell is a highly efficient and environmentally clean source of power generation. Many organizations worldwide are actively pursuing the development of the technology. Field demonstration of multi-MW size power plant has been initiated in 1996, a step toward commercialization before the turn of the century, Energy Research Corporation (ERC) is planning to introduce a 2.85MW commercial fuel cell power plant with an efficiency of 58%, which is quite attractive for distributed power generation. However, to further expand competitive edge over alternative systems and to achieve wider market penetration, ERC is exploring advanced carbonate fuel cells having significantly higher power densities. A more compact power plant would also stimulate interest in new markets such as ships and submarines where space limitations exist. The activities focused on reducing cell polarization and internal resistance as well as on advanced thin cell components.

  7. Polyelectrolyte Complex Beads by Novel Two-Step Process for Improved Performance of Viable Whole-Cell Baeyer-Villiger Monoxygenase by Immobilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomáš Krajčovič

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A novel immobilization matrix for the entrapment of viable whole-cell Baeyer–Villiger monooxygenase was developed. Viable recombinant Escherichia coli cells overexpressing cyclohexanone monooxygenase were entrapped in polyelectrolyte complex beads prepared by a two-step reaction of oppositely-charged polymers including highly defined cellulose sulphate. Immobilized cells exhibited higher operational stability than free cells during 10 repeated cycles of Baeyer–Villiger biooxidations of rac-bicyclo[3.2.0]hept-2-en-6-one to the corresponding lactones (1R,5S-3-oxabicyclo-[3.3.0]oct-6-en-3-one and (1S,5R-2-oxabicyclo-[3.3.0]oct-6-en-3-one. The morphology of polyelectrolyte complex beads was characterised by environmental scanning electron microscopy; the spatial distribution of polymers in the beads and cell viability were examined using confocal laser scanning microscopy, and the texture was characterised by the mechanical resistance measurements.

  8. Enhanced inhibition of murine prostatic carcinoma growth by immunization with or administration of viable human umbilical vein endothelial cells and CRM197

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Huiyong

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Vaccination with xenogeneic and syngeneic endothelial cells is effective for inhibiting tumor growth. Nontoxic diphtheria toxin (CRM197, as an immunogen or as a specific inhibitor of heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor, has shown promising antitumor activity. Therefore, immunization with or administration of viable human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs combined with CRM197 could have an enhanced antitumor effect. Six-week-old C57BL/6J male mice were vaccinated with viable HUVECs, 1 x 10(6 viable HUVECs combined with 100 μg CRM197, or 100 μg CRM197 alone by ip injections once a week for 4 consecutive weeks. RM-1 cells (5 x 10(5 were inoculated by sc injection as a preventive procedure. During the therapeutic procedure, 6-week-old male C57BL/6J mice were challenged with 1 x 10(5 RM-1 cells, then injected sc with 1 x 10(6 viable HUVECs, 1 x 10(6 viable HUVECs + 100 μg CRM197, and 100 μg CRM197 alone twice a week for 4 consecutive weeks. Tumor volume and life span were monitored. We also investigated the effects of immunization with HUVECs on the aortic arch wall and on wound healing. Vaccination with or administration of viable HUVECs+CRM197 enhanced the inhibition of RM-1 prostatic carcinoma by 24 and 29%, respectively, and prolonged the life span for 3 and 4 days, respectively, compared with those of only vaccination or administration with viable HUVECs of tumor-bearing C57BL/6J mice. Furthermore, HUVEC immunization caused some damage to the aortic arch wall but did not have remarkable effects on the rate of wound healing; the wounds healed in approximately 13 days. Treatment with CRM197 in combination with viable HUVECs resulted in a marked enhancement of the antitumor effect in the preventive or therapeutic treatment for prostatic carcinoma in vivo, suggesting a novel combination for anti-cancer therapy.

  9. Nanostructured magnesium increases bone cell density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Lucy; Webster, Thomas J

    2012-12-07

    Magnesium has attracted some attention in orthopedics due to its biodegradability and mechanical properties. Since magnesium is an essential natural mineral for bone growth, it can be expected that as a biomaterial, it would support bone formation. However, upon degradation in the body, magnesium releases OH(-) which results in an alkaline pH that can be detrimental to cell density (for example, osteoblasts or bone forming cells). For this reason, modification of magnesium may be necessary to compensate for such detrimental effects to cells. This study created biologically inspired nanoscale surface features on magnesium by soaking magnesium in various concentrations of NaOH (from 1 to 10 N) and for various periods of time (from 10 to 30 min). The results provided the first evidence of increased roughness, surface energy, and consequently greater osteoblast adhesion, after 4 h as well as density up to 7 days on magnesium treated with any concentration of NaOH for any length of time compared to untreated controls. For these reasons, this study suggests that soaking magnesium in NaOH could be an inexpensive, simple and effective manner to promote osteoblast functions for numerous orthopedic applications and, thus, should be further studied.

  10. Assessing prognosis and optimizing treatment in patients with postchemotherapy viable nonseminomatous germ-cell tumors (NSGCT): results of the sCR2 international study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fizazi, K.; Oldenburg, J.; Dunant, A.

    2008-01-01

    malignant cells, and a good International Germ Cell Consensus Classification group at presentation. Patients were assigned to one of three risk groups defined in sCR1: no risk factor (good risk), one risk factor (intermediate risk) and two to three risk factors (poor risk group). The 5-year PFS rate was 92...... with surveillance and treatment only at relapse. CONCLUSION: In patients with postchemotherapy viable NSGCT, a complete resection of residual masses should be rigorously pursued. These data validate the sCR1 prognostic index. Given their excellent outcome, patients in the favorable group may not require......BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to validate a prognostic index [surgical complete response 1 (sCR1)] in patients with postchemotherapy viable nonseminomatous germ-cell tumors (NSGCT). PATIENTS AND METHODS: Data and specimens from 61 patients with normalized tumor markers...

  11. Effect of monocular deprivation on rabbit neural retinal cell densities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Maseghe Mwachaka

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: In this rabbit model, monocular deprivation resulted in activity-dependent changes in cell densities of the neural retina in favour of the non-deprived eye along with reduced cell densities in the deprived eye.

  12. Viable Cancer Cells in the Remnant Stomach are a Potential Source of Peritoneal Metastasis after Curative Distal Gastrectomy for Gastric Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Tsuyoshi; Kaida, Sachiko; Ishida, Mitsuaki; Kodama, Hirokazu; Takebayashi, Katsushi; Shimizu, Tomoharu; Miyake, Toru; Tani, Tohru; Kushima, Ryoji; Tani, Masaji

    2016-09-01

    The mechanisms underlying peritoneal metastasis (PM) after curative gastrectomy for gastric cancer (GC) are not well elucidated. This study assessed whether viable cancer cells, including cancer stemlike cells (CSCs), were present in the remnant stomach immediately before gastrointestinal (GI) tract reconstruction because these could be a source of PM after gastrectomy. Saline fluid used for remnant stomach lumen irrigation before GI reconstruction was prospectively collected from 142 consecutive patients undergoing distal gastrectomy for GC and cytologically examined. Proliferative activity (Ki67 staining) and stemness (expression of the CSC surface markers CD44s or CD44v6) were evaluated in detected cancer cells. Viable cancer cells were detected in 33 (23.2 %) of the 142 remnant stomachs. These cells formed clusters and stained positively for Ki67, indicating proliferation. Cancer cells in remnant stomachs and surface cancer cells in primary GCs from 10 (30.3 %) of these 33 cases also stained positively for CD44s or CD44v6. In a multiple logistic regression analysis, advanced cancer (odds ratio [OR], 4.65; 95 % confidence interval [CI], 1.32-16.4; P = 0.017), tumor size of 40 mm or larger (OR, 3.78; 95 % CI, 1.12-12.8; P = 0.033), and histologic differentiation (OR, 3.10; 95 % CI, 1.30-7.40; P = 0.011) were associated independently with the presence of cancer cells in the remnant stomach. Viable, proliferative, and clustered cancer cells, including CSCs, were found in remnant gastric lumens immediately before GI reconstruction, indicating a possible cellular source of PM after curative gastrectomy for GC. Dissemination of gastric contents into the peritoneal cavity should be avoided during GI reconstruction.

  13. The influence of cellular seeding density in the microencapsulation of hybridoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arús, L; Orive, G; Hernández, R; Rodriguez, A; Rojas, A; Pedraz, J L

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the influence of different seeding densities on the function of hybridoma cells (clone 1B5, IgG 2alpha) producing an anti-angiogenic monoclonal antibody (mAb), microencapsulated using a high-voltage electrostatic field. Viable cells were microencapsulated in alginate/poly-L-lysine/alginate (APA) capsules and maintained in tissue culture. Cellular growth rates, production and release of mAb from the capsules were assessed. This study shows that hybridoma cells survive, proliferate and remain functionally competent for over one month in vitro after microencapsulation in APA capsules generated in an electrostatic field. However, the cell seeding density had to be at least 10(7) cells/ml for the microencapsulated cells to be viable and to produce and release mAb through the capsule membrane. The maximum monoclonal antibody concentration in this culture was 29.1 microg/ml by day 17, with a tendency to increase, but capsule breakage impeded the follow-up of this determination.

  14. Designing primers and evaluation of the efficiency of propidium monoazide – Quantitative polymerase chain reaction for counting the viable cells of Lactobacillus gasseri and Lactobacillus salivarius

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chieh-Hsien Lai

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficiency of using propidium monoazide (PMA real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR to count the viable cells of Lactobacillus gasseri and Lactobacillus salivarius in probiotic products. Based on the internal transcription spacer and 23S rRNA genes, two primer sets specific for these two Lactobacillus species were designed. For a probiotic product, the total deMan Rogosa Sharpe plate count was 8.65±0.69 log CFU/g, while for qPCR, the cell counts of L. gasseri and L. salivarius were 8.39±0.14 log CFU/g and 8.57±0.24 log CFU/g, respectively. Under the same conditions, for its heat-killed product, qPCR counts for L. gasseri and L. salivarius were 6.70±0.16 log cells/g and 7.67±0.20 log cells/g, while PMA-qPCR counts were 5.33±0.18 log cells/g and 5.05±0.23 log cells/g, respectively. For cell dilutions with a viable cell count of 8.5 log CFU/mL for L. gasseri and L. salivarius, after heat killing, the PMA-qPCR count for both Lactobacillus species was near 5.5 log cells/mL. When the PMA-qPCR counts of these cell dilutions were compared before and after heat killing, although some DNA might be lost during the heat killing, significant qPCR signals from dead cells, i.e., about 4–5 log cells/mL, could not be reduced by PMA treatment. Increasing PMA concentrations from 100 μM to 200 μM or light exposure time from 5 minutes to 15 minutes had no or, if any, only minor effect on the reduction of qPCR signals from their dead cells. Thus, to differentiate viable lactic acid bacterial cells from dead cells using the PMA-qPCR method, the efficiency of PMA to reduce the qPCR signals from dead cells should be notable.

  15. Designing primers and evaluation of the efficiency of propidium monoazide - Quantitative polymerase chain reaction for counting the viable cells of Lactobacillus gasseri and Lactobacillus salivarius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chieh-Hsien; Wu, Sih-Rong; Pang, Jen-Chieh; Ramireddy, Latha; Chiang, Yu-Cheng; Lin, Chien-Ku; Tsen, Hau-Yang

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficiency of using propidium monoazide (PMA) real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) to count the viable cells of Lactobacillus gasseri and Lactobacillus salivarius in probiotic products. Based on the internal transcription spacer and 23S rRNA genes, two primer sets specific for these two Lactobacillus species were designed. For a probiotic product, the total deMan Rogosa Sharpe plate count was 8.65±0.69 log CFU/g, while for qPCR, the cell counts of L. gasseri and L. salivarius were 8.39±0.14 log CFU/g and 8.57±0.24 log CFU/g, respectively. Under the same conditions, for its heat-killed product, qPCR counts for L. gasseri and L. salivarius were 6.70±0.16 log cells/g and 7.67±0.20 log cells/g, while PMA-qPCR counts were 5.33±0.18 log cells/g and 5.05±0.23 log cells/g, respectively. For cell dilutions with a viable cell count of 8.5 log CFU/mL for L. gasseri and L. salivarius, after heat killing, the PMA-qPCR count for both Lactobacillus species was near 5.5 log cells/mL. When the PMA-qPCR counts of these cell dilutions were compared before and after heat killing, although some DNA might be lost during the heat killing, significant qPCR signals from dead cells, i.e., about 4-5 log cells/mL, could not be reduced by PMA treatment. Increasing PMA concentrations from 100 μM to 200 μM or light exposure time from 5 minutes to 15 minutes had no or, if any, only minor effect on the reduction of qPCR signals from their dead cells. Thus, to differentiate viable lactic acid bacterial cells from dead cells using the PMA-qPCR method, the efficiency of PMA to reduce the qPCR signals from dead cells should be notable. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Not single but periodic injections of synovial mesenchymal stem cells maintain viable cells in knees and inhibit osteoarthritis progression in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozeki, N; Muneta, T; Koga, H; Nakagawa, Y; Mizuno, M; Tsuji, K; Mabuchi, Y; Akazawa, C; Kobayashi, E; Matsumoto, K; Futamura, K; Saito, T; Sekiya, I

    2016-06-01

    We investigated the effects of single or repetitive intra-articular injections of synovial mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) on a rat osteoarthritis (OA) model, and elucidated the behaviors and underlying mechanisms of the stem cells after the injection. One week after the transection of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) of wild type Lewis rats, one million synovial MSCs were injected into the knee joint every week. Cartilage degeneration was evaluated with safranin-o staining after the first injection. To analyze cell kinetics or MSC properties, luciferase, LacZ, and GFP expressing synovial MSCs were used. To confirm the role of MSCs, species-specific microarray and PCR analyses were performed using human synovial MSCs. Histological analysis for femoral and tibial cartilage showed that a single injection was ineffective but weekly injections had significant chondroprotective effects for 12 weeks. Histological and flow-cytometric analyses of LacZ and GFP expressing synovial MSCs revealed that injected MSCs migrated mainly into the synovium and most of them retained their undifferentiated MSC properties though the migrated cells rapidly decreased. In vivo imaging analysis revealed that MSCs maintained in knees while weekly injection. Species-specific microarray and PCR analyses showed that the human mRNAs on day 1 for 21 genes increased over 50-fold, and increased the expressions of PRG-4, BMP-2, and BMP-6 genes encoding chondroprotective proteins, and TSG-6 encoding an anti-inflammatory one. Not single but periodic injections of synovial MSCs maintained viable cells without losing their MSC properties in knees and inhibited osteoarthritis (OA) progression by secretion of trophic factors. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Macrophage conditioned medium induced cellular network formation in MCF-7 cells through enhanced tunneling nanotube formation and tunneling nanotube mediated release of viable cytoplasmic fragments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patheja, Pooja, E-mail: pooja.patheja8@gmail.com [Laser Biomedical Applications Section, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452013, Madhya Pradesh (India); Homi Bhabha National Institute, Training School Complex, Anushaktinagar, Mumbai 400094, Maharashtra (India); Sahu, Khageswar [Laser Biomedical Applications Section, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452013, Madhya Pradesh (India)

    2017-06-15

    Infiltrating macrophages in tumor microenvironment, through their secreted cytokines and growth factors, regulate several processes of cancer progression such as cancer cell survival, proliferation, invasion, metastasis and angiogenesis. Recently, intercellular cytoplasmic bridges between cancer cells referred as tunneling nanotubes (TNTs) have been recognized as novel mode of intercellular communication between cancer cells. In this study, we investigated the effect of inflammatory mediators present in conditioned medium derived from macrophages on the formation of TNTs in breast adenocarcinoma cells MCF-7. Results show that treatment with macrophage conditioned medium (MφCM) not only enhanced TNT formation between cells but also stimulated the release of independently migrating viable cytoplasmic fragments, referred to as microplasts, from MCF-7 cells. Time lapse microscopy revealed that microplasts were released from parent cancer cells in extracellular space through formation of TNT-like structures. Mitochondria, vesicles and cytoplasm could be transferred from parent cell body to microplasts through connecting TNTs. The microplasts could also be resorbed into the parent cell body by retraction of the connecting TNTs. Microplast formation inhibited in presence cell migration inhibitor, cytochalasin-B. Notably by utilizing migratory machinery within microplasts, distantly located MCF-7 cells formed several TNT based intercellular connections, leading to formation of physically connected network of cells. Together, these results demonstrate novel role of TNTs in microplast formation, novel modes of TNT formation mediated by microplasts and stimulatory effect of MφCM on cellular network formation in MCF-7 cells mediated through enhanced TNT and microplast formation.

  18. Bacillus subtilis mutants with knockouts of the genes encoding ribonucleases RNase Y and RNase J1 are viable, with major defects in cell morphology, sporulation, and competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figaro, Sabine; Durand, Sylvain; Gilet, Laetitia; Cayet, Nadège; Sachse, Martin; Condon, Ciarán

    2013-05-01

    The genes encoding the ribonucleases RNase J1 and RNase Y have long been considered essential for Bacillus subtilis cell viability, even before there was concrete knowledge of their function as two of the most important enzymes for RNA turnover in this organism. Here we show that this characterization is incorrect and that ΔrnjA and Δrny mutants are both viable. As expected, both strains grow relatively slowly, with doubling times in the hour range in rich medium. Knockout mutants have major defects in their sporulation and competence development programs. Both mutants are hypersensitive to a wide range of antibiotics and have dramatic alterations to their cell morphologies, suggestive of cell envelope defects. Indeed, RNase Y mutants are significantly smaller in diameter than wild-type strains and have a very disordered peptidoglycan layer. Strains lacking RNase J1 form long filaments in tight spirals, reminiscent of mutants of the actin-like proteins (Mre) involved in cell shape determination. Finally, we combined the rnjA and rny mutations with mutations in other components of the degradation machinery and show that many of these strains are also viable. The implications for the two known RNA degradation pathways of B. subtilis are discussed.

  19. Effects of the oral administration of viable and heat-killed Streptococcus bovis HC5 cells to pre-sensitized BALB/c mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline D Paiva

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides have been suggested as an alternative to classical antibiotics in livestock production and bacteriocin-producing bacteria could be added to animal feeds to deliver bacteriocins in the gastrointestinal (GI tract of ruminant and monogastric animals. In this study, viable (V and heat-killed (HK Streptococcus bovis HC5 cells were orally administered to pre-sensitized mice in order to assess the effects of a bacteriocin-producing bacteria on histological parameters and the immune response of the GI tract of monogastric animals. The administration of V and HK S. bovis HC5 cells during 58 days to BALB/c mice did not affect weight gain, but an increase in gut permeability was detected in animals receiving the HK cells. Viable and heat killed cells caused similar morphological alterations in the GI tract of the animals, but the most prominent effects were detected in the small intestine. The oral administration of S. bovis HC5 also influenced cytokine production in the small intestine, and the immune-mediated activity differed between V and HK cells. The relative expression of IL-12 and INF-γ was significantly higher in the small intestine of mice treated with V cells, while an increase in IL-5, IL-13 and TNF-α expression was only detected in mice treated with HK cells. Considering that even under a condition of severe challenge (pre-sensitization followed by daily exposure to the same bacterial immunogen the general health of the animals was maintained, it appears that oral administration of S. bovis HC5 cells could be a useful route to deliver bacteriocin in the GI tract of livestock animals.

  20. Three-dimensional printing of stem cell-laden hydrogels submerged in a hydrophobic high-density fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte Campos, Daniela F; Blaeser, Andreas; Weber, Michael; Jäkel, Jörg; Neuss, Sabine; Jahnen-Dechent, Wilhelm; Fischer, Horst

    2013-03-01

    Over the last decade, bioprinting technologies have begun providing important tissue engineering strategies for regenerative medicine and organ transplantation. The major drawback of past approaches has been poor or inadequate material-printing device and substrate combinations, as well as the relatively small size of the printed construct. Here, we hypothesise that cell-laden hydrogels can be printed when submerged in perfluorotributylamine (C(12)F(27)N), a hydrophobic high-density fluid, and that these cells placed within three-dimensional constructs remain viable allowing for cell proliferation and production of extracellular matrix. Human mesenchymal stem cells and MG-63 cells were encapsulated into agarose hydrogels, and subsequently printed in high aspect ratio in three dimensional structures that were supported in high density fluorocarbon. Three-dimensional structures with various shapes and sizes were manufactured and remained stable for more than six months. Live/dead and DAPI stainings showed viable cells 24 h after the printing process, as well as after 21 days in culture. Histological and immunohistochemical analyses after 14 and 21 days revealed viable cells with marked matrix production and signs of proliferation. The compressive strength values of the printed gels consequently increased during the two weeks in culture, revealing encouraging results for future applications in regenerative medicine.

  1. A non-aggressive, highly efficient, enzymatic method for dissociation of human brain-tumors and brain-tissues to viable single-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volovitz, Ilan; Shapira, Netanel; Ezer, Haim; Gafni, Aviv; Lustgarten, Merav; Alter, Tal; Ben-Horin, Idan; Barzilai, Ori; Shahar, Tal; Kanner, Andrew; Fried, Itzhak; Veshchev, Igor; Grossman, Rachel; Ram, Zvi

    2016-06-01

    Conducting research on the molecular biology, immunology, and physiology of brain tumors (BTs) and primary brain tissues requires the use of viably dissociated single cells. Inadequate methods for tissue dissociation generate considerable loss in the quantity of single cells produced and in the produced cells' viability. Improper dissociation may also demote the quality of data attained in functional and molecular assays due to the presence of large quantities cellular debris containing immune-activatory danger associated molecular patterns, and due to the increased quantities of degraded proteins and RNA. Over 40 resected BTs and non-tumorous brain tissue samples were dissociated into single cells by mechanical dissociation or by mechanical and enzymatic dissociation. The quality of dissociation was compared for all frequently used dissociation enzymes (collagenase, DNase, hyaluronidase, papain, dispase) and for neutral protease (NP) from Clostridium histolyticum. Single-cell-dissociated cell mixtures were evaluated for cellular viability and for the cell-mixture dissociation quality. Dissociation quality was graded by the quantity of subcellular debris, non-dissociated cell clumps, and DNA released from dead cells. Of all enzymes or enzyme combinations examined, NP (an enzyme previously not evaluated on brain tissues) produced dissociated cell mixtures with the highest mean cellular viability: 93 % in gliomas, 85 % in brain metastases, and 89 % in non-tumorous brain tissue. NP also produced cell mixtures with significantly less cellular debris than other enzymes tested. Dissociation using NP was non-aggressive over time-no changes in cell viability or dissociation quality were found when comparing 2-h dissociation at 37 °C to overnight dissociation at ambient temperature. The use of NP allows for the most effective dissociation of viable single cells from human BTs or brain tissue. Its non-aggressive dissociative capacity may enable ambient

  2. Relationships between blood cell counts and the density of malaria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The findings depicted a negative correlation between parasite load and haemoglobin concentration [Hb], mean cell volume (MCV), and mean cell haemoglobin (MCH); a positive correlation of parasite density with white blood cell counts (WBC), red blood cell counts (RBC), and the differential white blood cell counts ...

  3. Prognostic impact of the number of viable circulating cells with high telomerase activity in gastric cancer patients: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Hiroaki; Inoue, Haruhiro; Kimura, Satoshi; Ohmori, Tohru; Ishikawa, Fumihiro; Gohda, Keigo; Sato, Jun

    2014-07-01

    The identification of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in peripheral blood is a useful approach to estimate prognosis, monitor disease progression and measure treatment effects in several types of malignancies. We have previously used OBP-401, a telomerase-specific, replication-selective, oncolytic adenoviral agent carrying the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene. GFP-positive cells (GFP+ cells) were counted under a fluorescence microscope. Our results showed that the number of at least 7.735 µm in diameter GFP+ cells (L-GFP+ cells) in the peripheral blood was a significant marker of prognosis in gastric cancer patients. However, tumor cells undergoing epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) have been reported to be smaller in size than cells without EMT features; thus, CTCs undergoing EMT may escape detection with this technique. Therefore, in this study, we analyzed the relationship between patient outcome and the number of GFP+ cells of any size. We obtained peripheral blood samples from 65 patients with gastric cancer. After infection of OBP-401, GFP+ cells were counted and measured. The relationship between the number of GFP+ cells and surgical outcome was analyzed. The median follow-up period of the surviving patients was 36 months. A significant difference in overall survival was found between patients with 0-5 and patients with ≥6 L-GFP+ cells. No clear relationship was established between the number of small-sized GFP+ cells and patient prognosis. The number of L-GFP+ cells was significantly related to overall survival in patients with gastric cancer. The detection of L-GFP+ cells using OBP-401 may be a useful prognostic marker in gastric cancer.

  4. Binding of CLL subset 4 B-cell receptor immunoglobulins to viable human memory B lymphocytes requires a distinctive IGKV somatic mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catera, Rosa; Liu, Yun; Gao, Chao; Yan, Xiao-Jie; Magli, Amanda; Allen, Steven L; Kolitz, Jonathan E; Rai, Kanti R; Chu, Charles C; Feizi, Ten; Stamatopoulos, Kostas; Chiorazzi, Nicholas

    2017-01-12

    Amino acid replacement mutations in certain CLL stereotyped B-cell receptor (BCR) immunoglobulins (IGs) at defined positions within antigen-binding sites strongly imply antigen selection. Prime examples of this are CLL subset 4 BCR IGs using IGHV4-34/IGHD5-18/IGHJ6 and IGKV2-30/IGKJ2 rearrangements. Conspicuously and unlike most CLL IGs, subset 4 IGs do not bind apoptotic cells. By testing the (auto)antigenic reactivities of subset 4 IGs toward viable lymphoid-lineage cells and specific autoantigens typically bound by IGHV4-34+ IGs, we found IGs from both subset 4 and non-subset 4 IGHV4-34-expressing CLL cases bind naïve B cells. However, only subset 4 IGs react with memory B cells. Furthermore, subset 4 IGs do not bind DNA nor i or I carbohydrate antigens, common targets of IGHV4-34-utilizing antibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus and cold agglutinin disease, respectively. Notably, we found that subset 4 IG binding to memory B lymphocytes depends on an aspartic acid at position 66 of FR3 in the rearranged IGKV2-30 gene; this amino acid residue is acquired by somatic mutation. Our findings illustrate the importance of positive and negative selection criteria for structural elements in CLL IGs and suggest that autoantigens driving normal B cells to become subset 4 CLL cells differ from those driving IGHV4-34+ B cells in other diseases.

  5. Fluorescence Quenching Property of C-Phycocyanin from Spirulina platensis and its Binding Efficacy with Viable Cell Components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paswan, Meenakshi B; Chudasama, Meghna M; Mitra, Madhusree; Bhayani, Khushbu; George, Basil; Chatterjee, Shruti; Mishra, Sandhya

    2016-03-01

    Phycocyanin is a natural brilliant blue colored, fluorescent protein, which is commonly present in cyanobacteria. In this study, C-phycocyanin was extracted and purified from Spirulina platensis, which are multicellular and filamentous cyanobacteria of greater importance because of its various biological and pharmacological potential. It was analyzed for its binding affinity towards blood cells, algal cells, genomic DNA of microalgae, and bacteria at different temperature and incubation time. It showed good binding affinity with these components even at low concentration of 2.5 μM. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the applicability of C-phycocyanin as a green fluorescent dye substituting carcinogenic chemical dyes.

  6. Very high cell density perfusion of CHO cells anchored in a non-woven matrix-based bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Stobbe, Per; Silvander, Christian Orrego; Chotteau, Véronique

    2015-11-10

    Recombinant Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells producing IgG monoclonal antibody were cultivated in a novel perfusion culture system CellTank, integrating the bioreactor and the cell retention function. In this system, the cells were harbored in a non-woven polyester matrix perfused by the culture medium and immersed in a reservoir. Although adapted to suspension, the CHO cells stayed entrapped in the matrix. The cell-free medium was efficiently circulated from the reservoir into- and through the matrix by a centrifugal pump placed at the bottom of the bioreactor resulting in highly homogenous concentrations of the nutrients and metabolites in the whole system as confirmed by measurements from different sampling locations. A real-time biomass sensor using the dielectric properties of living cells was used to measure the cell density. The performances of the CellTank were studied in three perfusion runs. A very high cell density measured as 200 pF/cm (where 1 pF/cm is equivalent to 1 × 10(6)viable cells/mL) was achieved at a perfusion rate of 10 reactor volumes per day (RV/day) in the first run. In the second run, the effect of cell growth arrest by hypothermia at temperatures lowered gradually from 37 °C to 29 °C was studied during 13 days at cell densities above 100 pF/cm. Finally a production run was performed at high cell densities, where a temperature shift to 31 °C was applied at cell density 100 pF/cm during a production period of 14 days in minimized feeding conditions. The IgG concentrations were comparable in the matrix and in the harvest line in all the runs, indicating no retention of the product of interest. The cell specific productivity was comparable or higher than in Erlenmeyer flask batch culture. During the production run, the final harvested IgG production was 35 times higher in the CellTank compared to a repeated batch culture in the same vessel volume during the same time period. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All

  7. Managing Viable Knowledge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achterbergh, J.M.I.M.; Vriens, D.J.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, Beer's Viable System Model (VSM) is applied to knowledge management. Based on the VSM, domains of knowledge are identified that an organization should possess to maintain its viability. The logic of the VSM is also used to support the diagnosis, design and implementation of the

  8. Determination of Viable Salmonella Typhimurium Cells in Heat Treated Milk By PMA/Real-Time PCR Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zülal Kesmen

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Applying different technological processes during the production of food has a lethal effect on the bacteria but DNA of these bacterial strains may cause false positive results when detected by real time PCR technique because they preserve their existence for a certain period of time. To overcome this shortcoming of the real time PCR technique, a new method has been developed in recent years, based on the removal of dead cell DNA from the medium by treatment with Propodium Monoazide (PMA before DNA extraction. In this study, real-time PCR method was combined with PMA application for the detection of live cells of Salmonella Typhimurium in heat treated milk samples. For this purpose, milk samples inoculated with S. Tyhimurium were heat treated at different temperatures (60, 65, 70 and 75°C and times (15, 60, 300, 900 sec and number of live bacteria was determined comparatively by direct real-time PCR, PMA/real-time PCR and conventional cultural method. As a result, unlike the direct real time PCR technique, PMA/real-time PCR method prevents to a certain extent of false positive results from dead cells at all tested temperatures and times but higher results were obtained from PMA/real-time PCR method when compared to conventional cultural results. Therefore, further studies should be carried out to optimize the conditions of the PMA application in order to eliminate the high positive results detected by the PMA / real-time PCR method

  9. Advances toward regenerative medicine in the central nervous system: challenges in making stem cell therapy a viable clinical strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoll, Elizabeth A

    2014-01-01

    Over recent years, there has been a great deal of interest in the prospects of stem cell-based therapies for the treatment of nervous system disorders. The eagerness of scientists, clinicians, and spin-out companies to develop new therapies led to premature clinical trials in human patients, and now the initial excitement has largely turned to skepticism. Rather than embracing a defeatist attitude or pressing blindly ahead, I argue it is time to evaluate the challenges encountered by regenerative medicine in the central nervous system and the progress that is being made to solve these problems. In the twenty years since the adult brain was discovered to have an endogenous regenerative capacity, much basic research has been done to elucidate mechanisms controlling proliferation and cellular identity; how stem cells may be directed into neuronal lineages; genetic, pharmacological, and behavioral interventions that modulate neurogenic activity; and the exact nature of limitations to regeneration in the adult, aged, diseased and injured CNS. These findings should prove valuable in designing realistic clinical strategies to improve the prospects of stem cell-based therapies. In this review, I discuss how basic research continues to play a critical role in identifying both barriers and potential routes to regenerative therapy in the CNS.

  10. Induction of Viable but Nonculturable Salmonella in Exponentially Grown Cells by Exposure to a Low-Humidity Environment and Their Resuscitation by Catalase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishige, Yuta; Koike, Atsushi; Tamura-Ueyama, Ai; Amano, Fumio

    2017-02-01

    Salmonella is a major cause of foodborne disease that sometimes occurs in massive outbreaks around the world. This pathogen is tolerant of low-humidity conditions. We previously described a method for induction of viable but nonculturable (VBNC) Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis by treatment with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and subsequent resuscitation with 0.3 mM sodium pyruvate. Here, we report a new method for the induction of the VBNC state in Salmonella Enteritidis cells, one involving dehydration. Exposure of Salmonella Enteritidis cells to dehydration stress under poor nutritional conditions (0.9% [wt/vol] NaCl) and 10 to 20% relative humidity at room temperature decreased the presence of culturable population to 0.0067%, but respiratory and glucose uptake active populations were maintained at 0.46 and 1.12%, respectively, meaning that approximately 1% may have entered the VBNC state. Furthermore, these VBNC cells could be resuscitated to acquire culturability by incubation with catalase in M9 minimal medium without glucose in a manner dependent on the dose of catalase but not sodium pyruvate. These results suggest that a low-humidity environment could cause Salmonella Enteritidis cells to enter the VBNC state and the cells could then be resuscitated for growth by treatment with catalase, suggesting a potential risk of Salmonella Enteritidis to survive in low water activity foods in the VBNC state and to start regrowth for foodborne illness.

  11. Freezing Nitrogen Ethanol Composite May be a Viable Approach for Cryotherapy of Human Giant Cell Tumor of Bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Po-Kuei; Chen, Cheng-Fong; Wang, Jir-You; Chen, Paul Chih-Hsueh; Chang, Ming-Chau; Hung, Shih-Chieh; Chen, Wei-Ming

    2017-06-01

    Liquid nitrogen has been used as adjuvant cryotherapy for treating giant cell tumor (GCT) of bone. However, the liquid phase and ultrafreezing (-196° C) properties increase the risk of damage to the adjacent tissues and may lead to perioperative complications. A novel semisolid cryogen, freezing nitrogen ethanol composite, might mitigate these shortcomings because of less-extreme freezing. We therefore wished to evaluate freezing nitrogen ethanol composite as a coolant to determine its properties in tumor cryoablation. (1) Is freezing nitrogen ethanol composite-mediated freezing effective for tumor cryoablation in an ex vivo model, and if yes, is apoptosis involved in the tumor-killing mechanism? (2) Does freezing nitrogen ethanol composite treatment block neovascularization and neoplastic progression of the grafted GCTs and is it comparable to that of liquid nitrogen in an in vivo chicken model? (3) Can use of freezing nitrogen ethanol composite as an adjuvant to curettage result in successful short-term treatment, defined as absence of GCT recurrence at a minimum of 1 year in a small proof-of-concept clinical series? The cryogenic effect on bone tissue mediated by freezing nitrogen ethanol composite and liquid nitrogen was verified by thermal measurement in a time-course manner. Cryoablation on human GCT tissue was examined ex vivo for effect on morphologic features (cell shrinkage) and DNA fragmentation (apoptosis). The presumed mechanism was investigated by molecular analysis of apoptosis regulatory proteins including caspases 3, 8, and 9 and Bax/Bcl-2. Chicken chorioallantoic membrane was used as an in vivo model to evaluate the effects of freezing nitrogen ethanol composite and liquid nitrogen treatment on GCT-derived neovascularization and tumor neoplasm. A small group of patients with GCT of bone was treated by curettage and adjuvant freezing nitrogen ethanol composite cryotherapy in a proof-of-concept study. Tumor recurrence and perioperative

  12. Microvessel and mast cell densities in malignant laryngeal neoplasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balica Nicolae Constantin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Laryngeal neoplasm contributes to 30-40% of carcinomas of the head and neck. Mast cells are normal connective tissue residents, well represented in the respiratory tract. Experimental evidence suggests that the growth of a tumor beyond a certain size requires angiogenesis, which may also permit metastasis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlation between mast cell density, microvascular density, histopathological type and histological grade. Our study included 38 laryngeal carcinomas as follows: adenoid cystic carcinoma (2 cases, malignant papilloma (2 cases and squamous cell carcinoma (34 cases. The combined technique of CD 34-alcian blue safranin (ABS was used to identify microvessel and mast cell density, which was quantified by the hot spot method. A significant correlation was found between both mast cell and microvascular density, and G1/G2 histological grade (p=0.002 and p=0.004, respectively. Squamous cell carcinoma was significantly correlated with mast cell density (p=0.003, but not with microvascular density (p=0.454.

  13. Quality of raw cow milk in Republic of Macedonia determined through the testing of somatic cell count and total viable count

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelovski Ljupco

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Somatic cells count and total viable count are criteria used to estimate the compliance of raw cow milk with the Book of rules for demands for safety and hygiene and procedures for official controls of milk and milk products, Official Gazette of RM 157/2007. According to the given demands, raw milk operators are obliged to conduct all procedures and to guarantee that milk is in compliance with the criteria laid down in Book of rules. At the same time, Republic of Macedonia have to fulfill EU criteria laid down in Directive 92/46 (Council directive 92/46/EEC laying down the health rules for the production and placing on the market of raw milk, heat-treated milk and milkbased products for quality of raw milk as part of implementation of community legislation and milk production. The independent laboratory for milk quality control at FVM-Skopje, in frame of its activities in the period February- August 2008 has conducted a study for obtaining preliminary results for the situation with raw milk quality produced in R. of Macedonia for somatic cells counts and total viable count. In the study we analyzed 2065 samples for TVC and 1625 samples for SCC of raw milk samples produced in different parts of the country. From the tested samples only 41,8% fulfill criteria for SCC and 41,45% criteria for TVC lay down in Book of rules for 2008. Assessment of the results in light of Council Directive it is obvious that only 42,7% of the samples for SCC and 10,7% for TVC fulfill the criteria of Council Directive having in mind different requirements vs. Book of rules.

  14. Biologic properties of viable deletion mutants of simian virus 40 (SV40) rescued from the cells of an SV40-induced hamster lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamandopoulos, G T; Carmichael, G

    1983-12-01

    A lymphocytic leukemia induced by the oncogenic DNA simian virus 40 (SV40) in an inbred LSH/SsLak Syrian golden hamster was evoked to produce infectious SV40 by fusion of the leukemia cells with grivet monkey kidney (GMK) cells and by exposure of the leukemia cells to the chemical inducers mitomycin C and cycloheximide. Plaque-purified viable substrains of the rescued SV40 when studied by restriction endonuclease digestion of viral DNA were found to contain small deletions within the Hind III restriction fragment C. These deletions lay near the viral origin of DNA replication. Ten plaque-purified substrains of the rescued virus identified by immunofluorescence as being SV40 were found, when compared to the wild-type SV40, to replicate slowly and to form small plaques. Although these substrains transformed NIH/3T3 cells as efficiently as the wild-type SV40 in tissue culture, they were generally less oncogenic in vivo--7 of the 10 failed to induce tumors. The 3 oncogenic SV40-rescued substrains were not found to exhibit "lymphocytotropism," i.e., the capacity to infect and neoplastically transform preferentially hamster lymphocytes. Thus the hamster lymphocytic leukemia originally induced by the wild-type SV40 was most likely a chance-stochastic event rather than the result of tropism-determinism mediated by the virus, as is usually the case with leukemogenic RNA viruses.

  15. Stability of high cell density brewery fermentations during serial repitching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbelen, Pieter J; Dekoninck, Tinne M L; Van Mulders, Sebastiaan E; Saerens, Sofie M G; Delvaux, Filip; Delvaux, Freddy R

    2009-11-01

    The volumetric productivity of the beer fermentation process can be increased by using a higher pitching rate (i.e. higher inoculum size). However, the decreased yeast net growth observed in these high cell density brewery fermentations can adversely affect the physiological stability throughout subsequent yeast generations. Therefore, different O(2) conditions (wort aeration and yeast preoxygenation) were applied to high cell density fermentation and eight generations of fermentations were evaluated together with conventional fermentations. Freshly propagated high cell density populations adapted faster to the fermentative conditions than normal cell density populations. Preoxygenating the yeast was essential for the yeast physiological and beer flavor compound stability of high cell density fermentations during serial repitching. In contrast, the use of non-preoxygenated yeast resulted in inadequate growth which caused (1) insufficient yield of biomass to repitch all eight generations, (2) a 10% decrease in viability, (3) a moderate increase of yeast age, (4) and a dramatic increase of the unwanted flavor compounds acetaldehyde and total diacetyl during the sequence of fermentations. Therefore, to achieve sustainable high cell density fermentations throughout the economical valuable process of serial repitching, adequate yeast growth is essential.

  16. Effect of Monocular Deprivation on Rabbit Neural Retinal Cell Densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwachaka, Philip Maseghe; Saidi, Hassan; Odula, Paul Ochieng; Mandela, Pamela Idenya

    2015-01-01

    To describe the effect of monocular deprivation on densities of neural retinal cells in rabbits. Thirty rabbits, comprised of 18 subject and 12 control animals, were included and monocular deprivation was achieved through unilateral lid suturing in all subject animals. The rabbits were observed for three weeks. At the end of each week, 6 experimental and 3 control animals were euthanized, their retinas was harvested and processed for light microscopy. Photomicrographs of the retina were taken and imported into FIJI software for analysis. Neural retinal cell densities of deprived eyes were reduced along with increasing period of deprivation. The percentage of reductions were 60.9% (P < 0.001), 41.6% (P = 0.003), and 18.9% (P = 0.326) for ganglion, inner nuclear, and outer nuclear cells, respectively. In non-deprived eyes, cell densities in contrast were increased by 116% (P < 0.001), 52% (P < 0.001) and 59.6% (P < 0.001) in ganglion, inner nuclear, and outer nuclear cells, respectively. In this rabbit model, monocular deprivation resulted in activity-dependent changes in cell densities of the neural retina in favour of the non-deprived eye along with reduced cell densities in the deprived eye.

  17. Expansion of Endothelial Progenitor Cells in High Density Dot Culture of Rat Bone Marrow Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ling; Kretlow, James D.; Zhou, Guangdong; Cao, Yilin; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Wen Jie

    2014-01-01

    In vitro expansion of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) remains a challenge in stem cell research and its application. We hypothesize that high density culture is able to expand EPCs from bone marrow by mimicking cell-cell interactions of the bone marrow niche. To test the hypothesis, rat bone marrow cells were either cultured in high density (2×105 cells/cm2) by seeding total 9×105 cells into six high density dots or cultured in regular density (1.6×104 cells/cm2) with the same total number of cells. Flow cytometric analyses of the cells cultured for 15 days showed that high density cells exhibited smaller cell size and higher levels of marker expression related to EPCs when compared to regular density cultured cells. Functionally, these cells exhibited strong angiogenic potentials with better tubal formation in vitro and potent rescue of mouse ischemic limbs in vivo with their integration into neo-capillary structure. Global gene chip and ELISA analyses revealed up-regulated gene expression of adhesion molecules and enhanced protein release of pro-angiogenic growth factors in high density cultured cells. In summary, high density cell culture promotes expansion of bone marrow contained EPCs that are able to enhance tissue angiogenesis via paracrine growth factors and direct differentiation into endothelial cells. PMID:25254487

  18. Anorexia Reduces GFAP+ Cell Density in the Rat Hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Reyes-Haro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Anorexia nervosa is an eating disorder observed primarily in young women. The neurobiology of the disorder is unknown but recently magnetic resonance imaging showed a volume reduction of the hippocampus in anorexic patients. Dehydration-induced anorexia (DIA is a murine model that mimics core features of this disorder, including severe weight loss due to voluntary reduction in food intake. The energy supply to the brain is mediated by astrocytes, but whether their density is compromised by anorexia is unknown. Thus, the aim of this study was to estimate GFAP+ cell density in the main regions of the hippocampus (CA1, CA2, CA3, and dentate gyrus in the DIA model. Our results showed that GFAP+ cell density was significantly reduced (~20% in all regions of the hippocampus, except in CA1. Interestingly, DIA significantly reduced the GFAP+ cells/nuclei ratio in CA2 (−23% and dentate gyrus (−48%. The reduction of GFAP+ cell density was in agreement with a lower expression of GFAP protein. Additionally, anorexia increased the expression of the intermediate filaments vimentin and nestin. Accordingly, anorexia increased the number of reactive astrocytes in CA2 and dentate gyrus more than twofold. We conclude that anorexia reduces the hippocampal GFAP+ cell density and increases vimentin and nestin expression.

  19. Anorexia Reduces GFAP+ Cell Density in the Rat Hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Haro, Daniel; Labrada-Moncada, Francisco Emmanuel; Varman, Durairaj Ragu; Krüger, Janina; Morales, Teresa; Miledi, Ricardo; Martínez-Torres, Ataúlfo

    2016-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa is an eating disorder observed primarily in young women. The neurobiology of the disorder is unknown but recently magnetic resonance imaging showed a volume reduction of the hippocampus in anorexic patients. Dehydration-induced anorexia (DIA) is a murine model that mimics core features of this disorder, including severe weight loss due to voluntary reduction in food intake. The energy supply to the brain is mediated by astrocytes, but whether their density is compromised by anorexia is unknown. Thus, the aim of this study was to estimate GFAP+ cell density in the main regions of the hippocampus (CA1, CA2, CA3, and dentate gyrus) in the DIA model. Our results showed that GFAP+ cell density was significantly reduced (~20%) in all regions of the hippocampus, except in CA1. Interestingly, DIA significantly reduced the GFAP+ cells/nuclei ratio in CA2 (-23%) and dentate gyrus (-48%). The reduction of GFAP+ cell density was in agreement with a lower expression of GFAP protein. Additionally, anorexia increased the expression of the intermediate filaments vimentin and nestin. Accordingly, anorexia increased the number of reactive astrocytes in CA2 and dentate gyrus more than twofold. We conclude that anorexia reduces the hippocampal GFAP+ cell density and increases vimentin and nestin expression.

  20. High volumetric power density, non-enzymatic, glucose fuel cells

    OpenAIRE

    Oncescu, Vlad; Erickson, David

    2013-01-01

    The development of new implantable medical devices has been limited in the past by slow advances in lithium battery technology. Non-enzymatic glucose fuel cells are promising replacement candidates for lithium batteries because of good long-term stability and adequate power density. The devices developed to date however use an ?oxygen depletion design? whereby the electrodes are stacked on top of each other leading to low volumetric power density and complicated fabrication protocols. Here we...

  1. Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells: Degradation at High Current Densities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knibbe, Ruth; Traulsen, Marie Lund; Hauch, Anne

    2010-01-01

    The degradation of Ni/yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ)-based solid oxide electrolysis cells operated at high current densities was studied. The degradation was examined at 850°C, at current densities of −1.0, −1.5, and −2.0 A/cm2, with a 50:50 (H2O:H2) gas supplied to the Ni/YSZ hydrogen electrode...

  2. Waves in cell monolayer without proliferation: density determines cell velocity and wave celerity

    CERN Document Server

    Tlili, S; Li, B; Cardoso, O; Ladoux, B; Delanoë-Ayari, H; Graner, F

    2016-01-01

    Collective cell migration contributes to morphogenesis, wound healing or tumor metastasis. Culturing epithelial monolayers on a substrate is an in vitro configuration suitable to quantitatively characterize such tissue migration by measuring cell velocity, density and cell-substrate interaction force. Inhibiting cell division, we limit cell density increase and favor steady cell migration, while by using long narrow strips we stabilise the migrating front shape, so that we observe migration over a day or more. In the monolayer bulk, the cell velocity is a function of the cell density, namely it increases as a linear function of the cell radius. At least ten periods of propagating velocity waves are detected with a high signal-to-noise ratio, enabling for their quantitative spatio-temporal analysis. Cell density displays waves, in phase opposition with the velocity, as predicted by mass conservation; similarly, cell-substrate force appear to display small amplitude waves, in phase quadrature with respect to ve...

  3. Primordial germ cell-mediated chimera technology produces viable pure-line Houbara bustard offspring: potential for repopulating an endangered species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Wernery

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The Houbara bustard (Chlamydotis undulata is a wild seasonal breeding bird populating arid sandy semi-desert habitats in North Africa and the Middle East. Its population has declined drastically during the last two decades and it is classified as vulnerable. Captive breeding programmes have, hitherto, been unsuccessful in reviving population numbers and thus radical technological solutions are essential for the long term survival of this species. The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of primordial germ cell-mediated chimera technology to produce viable Houbara bustard offspring.Embryonic gonadal tissue was dissected from Houbara bustard embryos at eight days post-incubation. Subsequently, Houbara tissue containing gonadal primordial germ cells (gPGCs was injected into White Leghorn chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus embryos, producing 83/138 surviving male chimeric embryos, of which 35 chimeric roosters reached sexual maturity after 5 months. The incorporation and differentiation of Houbara gPGCs in chimeric chicken testis were assessed by PCR with Houbara-specific primers and 31.3% (5/16 gonads collected from the injected chicken embryos showed the presence of donor Houbara cells. A total of 302 semen samples from 34 chimeric roosters were analyzed and eight were confirmed as germline chimeras. Semen samples from these eight roosters were used to artificially inseminate three female Houbara bustards. Subsequently, 45 Houbara eggs were obtained and incubated, two of which were fertile. One egg hatched as a male live born Houbara; the other was female but died before hatching. Genotyping confirmed that the male chick was a pure-line Houbara derived from a chimeric rooster.This study demonstrates for the first time that Houbara gPGCs can migrate, differentiate and eventually give rise to functional sperm in the chimeric chicken testis. This approach may provide a promising tool for propagation and conservation of endangered avian

  4. Effects of water-filtered infrared-A and of heat on cell death, inflammation, antioxidative potential and of free radical formation in viable skin--first results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazena, Helmut; Pittermann, Wolfgang; Müller, Werner; Jung, Katinka; Kelleher, Debra K; Herrling, Thomas; Meffert, Peter; Uebelhack, Ralf; Kietzmann, Manfred

    2014-09-05

    The effects of water-filtered infrared-A (wIRA) and of convective heat on viability, inflammation, inducible free radicals and antioxidative power were investigated in natural and viable skin using the ex vivo Bovine Udder System (BUS) model. Therefore, skin samples from differently treated parts of the udder of a healthy cow were analyzed using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) test, by prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) measurement and by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. Neither cell viability, the inflammation status, the radical status or the antioxidative defence systems of the skin were significantly affected by wIRA applied within 30 min by using an irradiance of 1900 W m(-2) which is of relevance for clinical use, but which exceeded the maximum solar IR-A irradiance at the Earth's surface more than 5 times and which resulted in a skin surface temperature of about 45 °C without cooling and of about 37 °C with convective cooling by air ventilation. No significant effects on viability and on inflammation were detected when convective heat was applied alone under equivalent conditions in terms of the resulting skin surface temperatures and exposure time. As compared with untreated skin, free radical formation was almost doubled, whereas the antioxidative power was reduced to about 50% after convective heating to about 45 °C. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Of energy and survival incognito: a relationship between viable but non-culturable cells formation and inorganic polyphosphate and formate metabolism in Campylobacter jejuni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassem, Issmat I; Chandrashekhar, Kshipra; Rajashekara, Gireesh

    2013-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a Gram-negative food-borne bacterium that can cause mild to serious diseases in humans. A variety of stress conditions including exposure to formic acid, a weak organic acid, can cause C. jejuni to form viable but non-culturable cells (VBNC), which was proposed as a potential survival mechanism. The inability to detect C. jejuni VBNC using standard culturing techniques may increase the risk of exposure to foods contaminated with this pathogen. However, little is known about the cellular mechanisms and triggers governing VBNC formation. Here, we discuss novel mechanisms that potentially affect VBNC formation in C. jejuni and emphasize the impact of formic acid on this process. Specifically, we highlight findings that show that impairing inorganic polyphosphate (poly-P) metabolism reduces the ability of C. jejuni to form VBNC in a medium containing formic acid. We also discuss the potential effect of poly-P and formate metabolism on energy homeostasis and cognate VBNC formation. The relationship between poly-P metabolism and VBNC formation under acid stress has only recently been identified and may represent a breakthrough in understanding this phenomenon and its impact on food safety.

  6. Shape-controlled high cell-density microcapsules by electrodeposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zeyang; Takeuchi, Masaru; Nakajima, Masahiro; Hasegawa, Yasuhisa; Huang, Qiang; Fukuda, Toshio

    2016-06-01

    Cell encapsulation within alginate-poly-l-lysine (PLL) microcapsules has been developed to provide a miniaturized three-dimensional (3D) microenvironment with an aqueous core while promoting development of encapsulated cells into high cell-density structures. In this paper, a novel method for fabricating shape-controlled alginate-PLL microcapsules to construct 3D cell structures based on electrodeposition method is provided. Two-dimensional Ca-alginate cell-laden gel membranes were electrodeposited onto a micro-patterned electrode and further detached from the electrode. The PLL was coated onto the gel structures to form alginate-PLL complex as an outer shell and sodium citric solution was utilized to melt the internal alginate to achieve miniaturized 3D microcapsules (sphere, cuboid, and rod shape). By this proposed method, rat liver cells (RLC-18) formed multi-cellular aggregates with high cell-density after cultivation for 2weeks. The use of alginate-poly-l-lysine (PLL) microcapsules has shown great potential in fabricating 3D cell structures with high cell density. Despite their success related to their ability to provide a miniaturized microenvironment with an aqueous core, alginate-PLL microcapsules has drawback such as a limited shape-control ability. Because of the mechanism of Ca-induced alginate gel formation, it is still difficult to precisely control the gelation process to produce alginate-PLL microcapsules with specific shape. The present study provides an electrodeposition-based method to generate shape-controlled microcapsules for 3D cell structures. Sphere, cuboid, and rod shaped microcapsules of RLC-18 cells were produced for long-term culture to obtain desired morphologies of cell aggregates. Copyright © 2016 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. High Energy Density Regenerative Fuel Cell Systems for Terrestrial Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Kenneth A.

    1999-01-01

    Regenerative Fuel Cell System (RFCS) technology for energy storage has been a NASA power system concept for many years. Compared to battery-based energy storage systems, RFCS has received relatively little attention or resources for development because the energy density and electrical efficiency were not sufficiently attractive relative to advanced battery systems. Even today, RFCS remains at a very low technology readiness level (TRL of about 2 indicating feasibility has been demonstrated). Commercial development of the Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cells for automobiles and other terrestrial applications and improvements in lightweight pressure vessel design to reduce weight and improve performance make possible a high energy density RFCS energy storage system. The results from this study of a lightweight RFCS energy storage system for a remotely piloted, solar-powered, high altitude aircraft indicate an energy density up to 790 w-h/kg with electrical efficiency of 53.4% is attainable. Such an energy storage system would allow a solar-powered aircraft to carry hundreds of kilograms of payload and remain in flight indefinitely for use in atmospheric research, earth observation, resource mapping. and telecommunications. Future developments in the areas of hydrogen and oxygen storage, pressure vessel design, higher temperature and higher- pressure fuel cell operation, unitized regenerative fuel cells, and commercial development of fuel cell technology will improve both the energy density and electrical efficiency of the RFCS.

  8. Measuring density and compressibility of white blood cells and prostate cancer cells by microchannel acoustophoresis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barnkob, Rune; Augustsson, Per; Magnusson, Cecilia

    2011-01-01

    to determine the density and compressibility of individual cells enables the prediction and alteration of the separation outcome for a given cell mixture. We apply the method on white blood cells (WBCs) and DU145 prostate cancer cells (DUCs) aiming to improve isolation of circulating tumor cells from blood......, an emerging tool in the monitoring and characterizing of metastatic cancer....

  9. Any Defining Role of Mast Cell or Mast Cell Density in Oral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mast Cell Density in. Oral Squamous Cell. Carcinoma? Dear Sir,. I read an article by Zaidi et al. titled to “A study on assessment of mast cell (MCs) in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC)” with great interest.[1] We are concerned about ... ovarian cancer.[11] Furthermore, chymase induces apoptosis in different types of cells ...

  10. High volumetric power density, non-enzymatic, glucose fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oncescu, Vlad; Erickson, David

    2013-01-01

    The development of new implantable medical devices has been limited in the past by slow advances in lithium battery technology. Non-enzymatic glucose fuel cells are promising replacement candidates for lithium batteries because of good long-term stability and adequate power density. The devices developed to date however use an “oxygen depletion design” whereby the electrodes are stacked on top of each other leading to low volumetric power density and complicated fabrication protocols. Here we have developed a novel single-layer fuel cell with good performance (2 μW cm−2) and stability that can be integrated directly as a coating layer on large implantable devices, or stacked to obtain a high volumetric power density (over 16 μW cm−3). This represents the first demonstration of a low volume non-enzymatic fuel cell stack with high power density, greatly increasing the range of applications for non-enzymatic glucose fuel cells. PMID:23390576

  11. Regional alterations in purkinje cell density in patients with autism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerry Skefos

    Full Text Available Neuropathological studies, using a variety of techniques, have reported a decrease in Purkinje cell (PC density in the cerebellum in autism. We have used a systematic sampling technique that significantly reduces experimenter bias and variance to estimate PC densities in the postmortem brains of eight clinically well-documented individuals with autism, and eight age- and gender-matched controls. Four cerebellar regions were analyzed: a sensorimotor area comprised of hemispheric lobules IV-VI, crus I & II of the posterior lobe, and lobule X of the flocculonodular lobe. Overall PC density was thus estimated using data from all three cerebellar lobes and was found to be lower in the cases with autism as compared to controls, an effect that was most prominent in crus I and II (p<0.05. Lobule X demonstrated a trend towards lower PC density in only the males with autism (p = 0.05. Brain weight, a correlate of tissue volume, was found to significantly contribute to the lower lobule X PC density observed in males with autism, but not to the finding of lower PC density in crus I & II. Therefore, lower crus I & II PC density in autism is more likely due to a lower number of PCs. The PC density in lobule X was found to correlate with the ADI-R measure of the patient's use of social eye contact (R² = -0.75, p = 0.012. These findings support the hypothesis that abnormal PC density may contribute to selected clinical features of the autism phenotype.

  12. Effect of cell density on adipogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Hongxu [Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); Biomaterials Center, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Guo, Likun [Biomaterials Center, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); National Engineering Research Center for Biomaterials, Sichuan University, 29 Wangjiang Road, Chengdu 610064 (China); Wozniak, Michal J. [Biomaterials Center, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Kawazoe, Naoki [Biomaterials Center, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (MANA), National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Tateishi, Tetsuya [Biomaterials Center, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Zhang, Xingdong [National Engineering Research Center for Biomaterials, Sichuan University, 29 Wangjiang Road, Chengdu 610064 (China); Chen, Guoping, E-mail: Guoping.CHEN@nims.go.jp [Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); Biomaterials Center, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (MANA), National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan)

    2009-04-10

    The effect of cell density on the adipogenic differentiation of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) was investigated by using a patterning technique to induce the formation of a cell density gradient on a micropatterned surface. The adipogenic differentiation of MSCs at a density gradient from 5 x 10{sup 3} to 3 x 10{sup 4} cells/cm{sup 2} was examined. Lipid vacuoles were observed at all cell densities after 1-3 weeks of culture in adipogenic differentiation medium although the lipid vacuoles were scarce at the low cell density and abundant at the high cell density. Real-time RT-PCR analysis showed that adipogenesis marker genes encoding peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma}2 (PPAR{gamma}2), lipoprotein lipase (LPL), and fatty acid binding protein-4 (FABP4) were detected in the MSCs cultured at all cell densities. The results suggest that there was no apparent effect of cell density on the adipogenic differentiation of human MSCs.

  13. Corneal endothelial cell density and morphology in normal Iranian eyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fallah Mohammad

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We describe corneal endothelial cell density and morphology in normal Iranian eyes and compare endothelial cell characteristics in the Iranian population with data available in the literature for American and Indian populations. Methods Specular microscopy was performed in 525 eyes of normal Iranian people aged 20 to 85 years old. The studied parameters including mean endothelial cell density (MCD, mean cell area (MCA and coefficient of variation (CV in cell area were analyzed in all of the 525 eyes. Results MCD was 1961 ± 457 cell/mm2 and MCA was 537.0 ± 137.4 μm2. There was no statistically significant difference in MCD, MCA and CV between genders (Student t-test, P = 0.85, P = 0.97 and P = 0.15 respectively. There was a statistically significant decrease in MCD with age (P r = -0.64. The rate of cell loss was 0.6% per year. There was also a statistically significant increase in MCA (P r = 0.56 and CV (P r = 0.30 from 20 to 85 years of age. Conclusion The first normative data for the endothelium of Iranian eyes seems to confirm that there are no differences in MCD, MCA and CV between genders. Nevertheless, the values obtained in Iranian eyes seem to be different to those reported by the literature in Indian and American populations.

  14. Nanofiber density determines endothelial cell behavior on hydrogel matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berti, Fernanda V., E-mail: fernanda@intelab.ufsc.br [Department of Chemical and Food Engineering, Federal University of Santa Catarina, 88040-900 Florianópolis, SC (Brazil); Rambo, Carlos R. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Federal University of Santa Catarina, 88040-900 Florianópolis, SC (Brazil); Dias, Paulo F. [Department of Cell Biology, Embryology and Genetics, Federal University of Santa Catarina, 88040-900 Florianópolis, SC (Brazil); Porto, Luismar M. [Department of Chemical and Food Engineering, Federal University of Santa Catarina, 88040-900 Florianópolis, SC (Brazil)

    2013-12-01

    When cultured under static conditions, bacterial cellulose pellicles, by the nature of the polymer synthesis that involves molecular oxygen, are characterized by two distinct surface sides. The upper surface is denser in fibers (entangled) than the lower surface that shows greater surface porosity. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were used to exploit how the microarchitecture (i.e., surface porosity, fiber network structure, surface topology, and fiber density) of bacterial cellulose pellicle surfaces influence cell–biomaterial interaction and therefore cell behavior. Adhesion, cell ingrowth, proliferation, viability and cell death mechanisms were evaluated on the two pellicle surface sides. Cell behavior, including secondary necrosis, is influenced only by the microarchitecture of the surface, since the biomaterial is extremely pure (constituted of cellulose and water only). Cell–cellulose fiber interaction is the determinant signal in the cell–biomaterial responses, isolated from other frequently present interferences such as protein and other chemical traces usually present in cell culture matrices. Our results suggest that microarchitecture of hydrogel materials might determine the performance of biomedical products, such as bacterial cellulose tissue engineering constructs (BCTECs). - Highlights: • Topography of BC pellicle is relevant to determine endothelial cells' fate. • Cell–biomaterial response is affected by the topography of BC-pellicle surface. • Endothelial cells exhibit different behavior depending on the BC topography. • Apoptosis and necrosis of endothelial cells were affected by the BC topography.

  15. Effect of Monocular Deprivation on Rabbit Neural Retinal Cell Densities

    OpenAIRE

    Philip Maseghe Mwachaka; Hassan Saidi; Paul Ochieng Odula; Pamela Idenya Mandela

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the effect of monocular deprivation on densities of neural retinal cells in rabbits. Methods: Thirty rabbits, comprised of 18 subject and 12 control animals, were included and monocular deprivation was achieved through unilateral lid suturing in all subject animals. The rabbits were observed for three weeks. At the end of each week, 6 experimental and 3 control animals were euthanized, their retinas was harvested and processed for light microscopy. Photomicrographs of ...

  16. T cells, mast cells and microvascular density in diffuse large B cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinaccio, Christian; Ingravallo, Giuseppe; Gaudio, Francesco; Perrone, Tommasina; Ruggieri, Simona; Opinto, Giuseppina; Nico, Beatrice; Maiorano, Eugenio; Specchia, Giorgina; Ribatti, Domenico

    2016-08-01

    Diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is recognized as the most common form of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), accounting for about 40 % of all cases of NHL. Among the cellular components of the tumor inflammatory infiltrate, T cells and mast cells have been demonstrated to be correlated with tumor angiogenesis. In this report, we have investigated CD3 and tryptase expression and their relationship with microvascular density (MVD) in DLBCL patients. Moreover, we determined the significance of CD3 expression in bulky and non-bulky disease. CD3 expression was significantly lower in bulky disease patients when compared to non-bulky ones. CD3 showed a positive correlation with tryptase and MVD, while multiple regression analysis efficaciously predicted MVD depending on CD3 and tryptase as predictors, supporting a complex interplay between these cells in sustaining tumor angiogenesis in DLBCL patients.

  17. Does corneal hysteresis correlate with endothelial cell density?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akova-Budak, Berna; Kıvanç, Sertaç Argun

    2015-05-21

    Our aim was to determine if there is a correlation between corneal biomechanical properties, endothelial cell count, and corneal pachymetry in healthy corneas. Ninety-two eyes of all subjects underwent complete ocular examination, including intraocular pressure measurement by Goldmann applanation tonometer, objective refraction, and slit-lamp biomicroscopy. Topographic measurements and corneal pachymetry were performed using a Scheimpflug-based (Pentacam, Oculus, Germany) corneal topographer. Corneal hysteresis (CH) and corneal resistance factor (CRF) were measured with an Ocular Response Analyzer (ORA, Reichert Ophthalmic Instruments, Buffalo, NY). Endothelial cell count measurement was done using a specular microscope (CellChek, Konan, USA). Right eye values of the subjects were taken for the study. The mean CH was 11.5±1.7 mmHg and the mean CRF was 11.2±1.4 mmHg. Mean intraocular pressure was 15.3±2.3 mmHg. The mean endothelial cell count was 2754±205 cells/mm2. No correlation was found between biomechanical properties of cornea and endothelial cell count. There was a significant positive correlation between CH, CRF, and corneal thickness (pcorneal biomechanical properties significantly correlated with corneal thickness. We found no correlation between CH and CRF with the endothelial cell density in normal subjects.

  18. Where Do All the Phytoplankton Go? Challenges in Keeping Track of Viable Cells in Phytoplankton Communities Using Flow Cytometry and Cell Staining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, L. J.; Fobbe, D. J.; Berges, J. A.

    2016-02-01

    Understanding the dynamics of phytoplankton communities has traditionally focused on differences in growth and related processes among taxa. It is now appreciated that differences in mortality could be equally important in contributing to these dynamics. Studying mortality in communities is difficult, especially on relevant time scales, which could be as short as hours to days. Flow cytometry can potentially provide solutions, because it can allow discrimination of different taxa, and when combined with staining, distinguish live and dead cells. We applied flow cytometry and staining to phytoplankton communities in a model system: a small, well-studied, urban pond in southeastern Wisconsin. Using flow cytometry, it was possible to resolve up to six dominant taxa (most stain also affected other fluorescence channels, requiring compensation. Correlations of numbers of dead cells with environmental factors (e.g. temperature, nutrient concentrations, irradiance) were generally poor, suggesting the greater importance of biotic versus abiotic variables in community mortality dynamics. Ongoing work is focusing on the effects of viral pathogens, grazing and allelopathic interactions using experimental manipulations and individual-based modeling.

  19. Co-infusion of autologous adipose tissue derived neuronal differentiated mesenchymal stem cells and bone marrow derived hematopoietic stem cells, a viable therapy for post-traumatic brachial plexus injury: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umang G Thakkar

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell therapy is emerging as a viable approach in regenerative medicine. A 31-year-old male with brachial plexus injury had complete sensory-motor loss since 16 years with right pseudo-meningocele at C5-D1 levels and extra-spinal extension up to C7-D1, with avulsion on magnetic resonance imaging and irreversible damage. We generated adipose tissue derived neuronal differentiated mesenchymal stem cells (N-AD-MSC and bone marrow derived hematopoietic stem cells (HSC-BM. Neuronal stem cells expressed β-3 tubulin and glial fibrillary acid protein which was confirmed on immunofluorescence. On day 14, 2.8 ml stem cell inoculum was infused under local anesthesia in right brachial plexus sheath by brachial block technique under ultrasonography guidance with a 1.5-inch-long 23 gauge needle. Nucleated cell count was 2 × 10 4 /μl, CD34+ was 0.06%, and CD45-/90+ and CD45-/73+ were 41.63% and 20.36%, respectively. No untoward effects were noted. He has sustained recovery with re-innervation over a follow-up of 4 years documented on electromyography-nerve conduction velocity study.

  20. Potential of Escherichia coli 0157:H7 to persist and form viable but non-culturable cells on a food-contact surface subjected to cycles of soiling and chemical treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marouani-Gadri, Nesrine; Firmesse, Olivier; Chassaing, Danielle

    2010-01-01

    only, a further increase in this proportion occurred 24 h after the CT, suggesting that some of the surviving viable but non-culturable cells finally died. This study shows that conditions leading to E. coli O157:H7 persistence are not likely to arise when good refrigeration and hygiene practices...... no longer detectable after the first week. However, on 66-hour biofilms with 6.7 log CFU/cm², after initially decreasing, E. coli numbers reached 6.6 log CFU/cm² and 8.3 log viable cells/cm² on the 11th day. When E. coli was cultured with a Comamonas testosteroni previously shown to increase E. coli biofilm...

  1. Immunohistochemical analysis of mast cell infiltrates and microvessel density in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyziak, L; Stasikowska-Kanicka, O; Danilewicz, M; Wągrowska-Danilewicz, M

    2013-12-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate mast cell concentration and microvessel density in perilesional and intralesional regions of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and furthermore to assess the possible relationship between the above-mentioned parameters. Paraffin-embedded specimens from 47 cases of OSCC and 12 cases of normal mucosa were investigated immunohistochemically with anti-CD-31 antibody to stain microvessels and anti-tryptase antibody to visualize mast cells. The degree of vascularization and mast cell infiltration was measured with an image analysis system. The study revealed considerably increased microvessel density and mast cell abundance in intralesional and perilesional regions of OSCCs in comparison to normal mucosa. There was a significant positive correlation between microvessel density and mast cell concentration in both localizations of OSCCs (p therapeutic significance which require further research.

  2. Cell density modulates intracellular mass transport in neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cintora, Patricia; Arikkath, Jyothi; Kandel, Mikhail; Popescu, Gabriel; Best-Popescu, Catherine

    2017-05-01

    In order to fully understand brain connectivity and elucidate the mechanisms involved in central nervous system disease, the field of neuroscience depends on quantitative studies of neuronal structure and function. Cell morphology and neurite (axonal and dendritic) arborization are typically studied by immunohistochemical and fluorescence techniques. However, dry mass content and intracellular mass transport rates have largely been under-investigated given the inherent difficulties in their measurement. Here, spatial light interference microscopy (SLIM) and dispersion-relation phase spectroscopy (DPS) were used to measure pathlength fluctuations that report on the dry mass and transport within cultured primary neurons across low, medium, and high cell density conditions. It was found that cell density (confluence) affects significantly both the growth rate and mass transport. The analysis method is label-free and does not require neuronal tracing, particle tracking, or neuron reconstruction. Since SLIM can upgrade any existing phase contrast microscope and the imaging and analysis are high-throughput, we anticipate that this approach will be embraced by neuroscientists for broad scale studies. © 2017 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. © 2017 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  3. Cell density-dependent differential proliferation of neural stem cells on omnidirectional nanopore-arrayed surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Kyoung Je; Kong, Sun-Young; Lee, Ji Soo; Kim, Hyung Woo; Shin, Jae-Yeon; La, Moonwoo; Han, Byung Woo; Kim, Dong Sung; Kim, Hyun-Jung

    2017-10-12

    Recently, the importance of surface nanotopography in the determination of stem cell fate and behavior has been revealed. In the current study, we generated polystyrene cell-culture dishes with an omnidirectional nanopore arrayed surface (ONAS) (diameter: 200 nm, depth: 500 nm, center-to-center distance: 500 nm) and investigated the effects of nanotopography on rat neural stem cells (NSCs). NSCs cultured on ONAS proliferated better than those on the flat surface when cell density was low and showed less spontaneous differentiation during proliferation in the presence of mitogens. Interestingly, NSCs cultured on ONAS at clonal density demonstrated a propensity to generate neurospheres, whereas those on the flat surface migrated out, proliferated as individuals, and spread out to attach to the surface. However, the differential patterns of proliferation were cell density-dependent since the distinct phenomena were lost when cell density was increased. ONAS modulated cytoskeletal reorganization and inhibited formation of focal adhesion, which is generally observed in NSCs grown on flat surfaces. ONAS appeared to reinforce NSC-NSC interaction, restricted individual cell migration and prohibited NSC attachment to the nanopore surface. These data demonstrate that ONAS maintains NSCs as undifferentiated while retaining multipotency and is a better topography for culturing low density NSCs.

  4. Corneal endothelial cell density and morphology in Phramongkutklao Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narumon Sopapornamorn

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Narumon Sopapornamorn1, Manapon Lekskul1, Suthee Panichkul21Department of Ophthalmology, Phramongkutklao Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand; 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Phramongkutklao College of Medicine, Bangkok, ThailandObjective: To describe the corneal endothelial density and morphology in patients of Phramongkutklao Hospital and the relationship between endothelial cell parameters and other factors.Methods: Four hundred and four eyes of 202 volunteers were included. Noncontact specular microscopy was performed after taking a history and testing the visual acuity, intraocular pressure measurement, Schirmer’s test and routine eye examination by slit lamp microscope. The studied parameters included mean endothelial cell density (MCD, coefficient of variation (CV, and percentage of hexagonality.Results: The mean age of volunteers was 45.73 years; the range being 20 to 80 years old. Their MCD (SD, mean percentage of CV (SD and mean (SD percentage of hexagonality were 2623.49(325 cell/mm2, 39.43(8.23% and 51.50(10.99%, respectively. Statistically, MCD decreased significantly with age (p < 0.01. There was a significant difference in the percentage of CV between genders. There was no statistical significance between parameters and other factors.Conclusion: The normative data of the corneal endothelium of Thai eyes indicated that, statistically, MCD decreased significantly with age. Previous studies have reported no difference in MCD, percentage of CV, and percentage of hexagonality between gender. Nevertheless, significantly different percentages of CV between genders were presented in this study.Keywords: Corneal endothelial cell, parameters, age, gender, smoking, Thailand

  5. High power density proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Oliver J.; Hitchens, G. Duncan; Manko, David J.

    1993-01-01

    Proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells use a perfluorosulfonic acid solid polymer film as an electrolyte which simplifies water and electrolyte management. Their thin electrolyte layers give efficient systems of low weight, and their materials of construction show extremely long laboratory lifetimes. Their high reliability and their suitability for use in a microgravity environment makes them particularly attractive as a substitute for batteries in satellites utilizing high-power, high energy-density electrochemical energy storage systems. In this investigation, the Dow experimental PEM (XUS-13204.10) and unsupported high platinum loading electrodes yielded very high power densities, of the order of 2.5 W cm(exp -2). A platinum black loading of 5 mg per cm(exp 2) was found to be optimum. On extending the three-dimensional reaction zone of fuel cell electrodes by impregnating solid polymer electrolyte into the electrode structures, Nafion was found to give better performance than the Dow experimental PEM. The depth of penetration of the solid polymer electrolyte into electrode structures was 50-70 percent of the thickness of the platinum-catalyzed active layer. However, the degree of platinum utilization was only 16.6 percent and the roughness factor of a typical electrode was 274.

  6. Assessment of Microbial Fuel Cell Configurations and Power Densities

    KAUST Repository

    Logan, Bruce E.

    2015-07-30

    Different microbial electrochemical technologies are being developed for a many diverse applications, including wastewater treatment, biofuel production, water desalination, remote power sources, and as biosensors. Current and energy densities will always be limited relative to batteries and chemical fuel cells, but these technologies have other advantages based on the self-sustaining nature of the microorganisms that can donate or accept electrons from an electrode, the range of fuels that can be used, and versatility in the chemicals that can be produced. The high cost of membranes will likely limit applications of microbial electrochemical technologies that might require a membrane. For microbial fuel cells, which do not need a membrane, questions remain on whether larger-scale systems can produce power densities similar to those obtained in laboratory-scale systems. It is shown here that configuration and fuel (pure chemicals in laboratory media versus actual wastewaters) remain the key factors in power production, rather than the scale of the application. Systems must be scaled up through careful consideration of electrode spacing and packing per unit volume of reactor.

  7. Measuring density and compressibility of white blood cells and prostate cancer cells by microchannel acoustophoresis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barnkob, Rune; Augustsson, Per; Magnusson, Cecilia

    2011-01-01

    We present a novel method for the determination of density and compressibility of individual particles and cells undergoing microchannel acoustophoresis in an arbitrary 2D acoustic field. Our method is a critical advancement within acoustophoretic separation of biological cells, as the ability to...

  8. High-Density Droplet Microarray of Individually Addressable Electrochemical Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huijie; Oellers, Tobias; Feng, Wenqian; Abdulazim, Tarik; Saw, En Ning; Ludwig, Alfred; Levkin, Pavel A; Plumeré, Nicolas

    2017-06-06

    Microarray technology has shown great potential for various types of high-throughput screening applications. The main read-out methods of most microarray platforms, however, are based on optical techniques, limiting the scope of potential applications of such powerful screening technology. Electrochemical methods possess numerous complementary advantages over optical detection methods, including its label-free nature, capability of quantitative monitoring of various reporter molecules, and the ability to not only detect but also address compositions of individual compartments. However, application of electrochemical methods for the purpose of high-throughput screening remains very limited. In this work, we develop a high-density individually addressable electrochemical droplet microarray (eDMA). The eDMA allows for the detection of redox-active reporter molecules irrespective of their electrochemical reversibility in individual nanoliter-sized droplets. Orthogonal band microelectrodes are arranged to form at their intersections an array of three-electrode systems for precise control of the applied potential, which enables direct read-out of the current related to analyte detection. The band microelectrode array is covered with a layer of permeable porous polymethacrylate functionalized with a highly hydrophobic-hydrophilic pattern, forming spatially separated nanoliter-sized droplets on top of each electrochemical cell. Electrochemical characterization of single droplets demonstrates that the underlying electrode system is accessible to redox-active molecules through the hydrophilic polymeric pattern and that the nonwettable hydrophobic boundaries can spatially separate neighboring cells effectively. The eDMA technology opens the possibility to combine the high-throughput biochemical or living cell screenings using the droplet microarray platform with the sequential electrochemical read-out of individual droplets.

  9. The effect of 193 nm excimer laser radiation on the human corneal endothelial cell density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isager, P.; Hjortdal, J.Oe.; Ehlers, N. [Aarhus Univ. Hospital, Dept. of Ophthalmology, Aarhus (Denmark)

    1996-06-01

    The effect of 193 nm excimer laser radiation on human corneal endothelial cell density was examined. Fifty-five eyes from 35 patients underwent photorefractive keratectomy for myopia. Photomicrographs of the endothelium were taken a short time before the operation and on an average of 7 months postoperatively with a specular microscope. The average endothelial cell densities were preoperatively 3375 {+-} 266 cells/mm{sup 2} (means {+-} SD) and postoperatively 3348 {+-} 287 cells/mm{sup 2}, corresponding to a fall of 27 cells/mm{sup 2} (N = 55). This fall in endothelial cell density was not statistically significant. A significant correlation between the change in cell density and age of the patient was found, with older patients losing more cells (N = 35, 2p < 0.05). The magnification of the specular microscope was found to change with corneal thickness. The importance of correcting the endothelial cell densities for corneal thickness is discussed. (au) 14 refs.

  10. Cell culture density affects the proliferation activity of human adipose tissue stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae Seong; Lee, Myoung Woo; Ko, Young Jong; Chun, Yong Hoon; Kim, Hyung Joon; Sung, Ki Woong; Koo, Hong Hoe; Yoo, Keon Hee

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the effect of cell density on the proliferation activity of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived from adipose tissue (AT-MSCs) over time in culture. Passage #4 (P4) and #12 (P12) AT-MSCs from two donors were plated at a density of 200 (culture condition 1, CC1) or 5000 (culture condition 2, CC2) cells cm(-2) . After 7 days of incubation, P4 and P12 AT-MSCs cultured in CC1 were thin and spindle-shaped, whereas those cultured in CC2 had extensive cell-to-cell contacts and an expanded cell volume. In addition, P4 and P12 AT-MSCs in CC1 divided more than three times, while those in CC2 divided less than once on average. Flow cytometric analysis using 5(6)-carboxyfluorescein diacetate N-succinimidyl ester dye showed that the fluorescence intensity of AT-MSCs was lower in CC1 than in CC2. Furthermore, expression of proliferation-associated genes, such as CDC45L, CDC20A and KIF20A, in P4 AT-MSCs was higher in CC1 than in CC2, and this difference was also observed in P12 AT-MSCs. These data demonstrated that cell culture density affects the proliferation activity of MSCs, suggesting that it is feasible to design a strategy to prepare suitable MSCs using specific culture conditions. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Smooth muscle myosin regulation by serum and cell density in cultured rat lung connective tissue cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babij, P; Zhao, J; White, S; Woodcock-Mitchell, J; Mitchell, J; Absher, M; Baldor, L; Periasamy, M; Low, R B

    1993-08-01

    RNA and protein analyses were used to detect expression of SM1 and SM2 smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (MHC) in cultured adult rat lung connective tissue cells (RL-90). Smooth muscle MHC mRNA expression in confluent cells grown in 10% serum was approximately 50% of the level in adult stomach. Similar results were obtained in cells cultured at low density (25% confluency) in 1% serum. However, in low-density cultures transferred to 10% serum for 24 h, the level of MHC mRNA decreased to approximately 20% of that in adult stomach. Smooth muscle alpha-actin showed a pattern of expression similar to that for smooth muscle MHC. Expression of nonmuscle MHC-A mRNA was higher in all culture conditions compared to stomach. MHC-A mRNA expression was less in low-density cultures in low serum and increased when low-density cultures were transferred to 10% serum for 24 h. MHC-B mRNA expression was less in low- vs. high-density cultures. In contrast to MHC-A, however, MHC-B mRNA expression in low-density cultures was higher in low serum. Immunofluorescence and immunoblotting with SM1-specific antibody demonstrated the presence of the SM1 protein isoform as well as reactivity to a protein band migrating slightly faster than SM2. These results demonstrate that cultured rat lung connective tissue cells express smooth muscle MHC and that expression is modulated by culture conditions.

  12. Tumor-selective replication herpes simplex virus-based technology significantly improves clinical detection and prognostication of viable circulating tumor cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Wen; Bao, Li; Yang, Shaoxing

    2016-01-01

    Detection of circulating tumor cells remains a significant challenge due to their vast physical and biological heterogeneity. We developed a cell-surface-marker-independent technology based on telomerase-specific, replication-selective oncolytic herpes-simplex-virus-1 that targets telomerase...

  13. High cell density production of Deinococcus radiodurans under optimized conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yi

    2009-04-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans is a bacterium being investigated for mechanisms of extreme radiation resistance and for bioremediation of environmental radioactive waste sites. In both fundamental and applied research settings, methods for large-scale production of D. radiodurans are needed. In this study, a systematic investigation was carried out to optimize D. radiodurans production at the 20-L fermentor scale. In defined medium, the phosphate buffer typically used was found to be inhibitory to D. radiodurans growth, and caused cell aggregation. Substitution of HEPES and MOPS buffers for phosphate buffer improved D. radiodurans growth characteristics. Several antifoaming agents were investigated to support large-scale production with submerged aeration, and the defoamer KFO 673 was chosen based on its ability to prevent foaming without affecting D. radiodurans growth. The conventional undefined rich medium tryptone/glucose/yeast extract (TGY) maximally supported D. radiodurans growth to an OD(600) of 10. Using a 'design of experiments' approach, we found glucose, Mg and Mn to be critical in supporting high-density growth of D. radiodurans. The optimal pH and temperature for D. radiodurans growth in large-scale preparations were 7.0 and 37 degrees C, respectively. Growth was carried out in a 20-L fermentor using the newly developed media under the optimal conditions. With addition of 10 g/L glucose, 0.5 g/L MgSO(4) . 7H(2)O, 5 microM MnCl(2) into TGY media, an OD(600) of 40 was achieved.

  14. High cell density cultivation of probiotics and lactic acid production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiraldi, Chiara; Adduci, Vincenzo; Valli, Vivien; Maresca, Carmelina; Giuliano, Mariateresa; Lamberti, Monica; Cartenì, Maria; De Rosa, Mario

    2003-04-20

    The commercial interest in functional foods that contain live microorganisms, also named probiotics, is paralleled by the increasing scientific attention to their functionality in the digestive tract. This is especially true of yogurts that contain strains of lactic-acid bacteria of intestinal origin, among these, Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus is extensively used in the dairy industry and it has been demonstrated to be a probiotic strain. In this work we describe high cell density cultivations of this microorganism also focusing on the stereospecific production of lactic acid. Key parameters such as medium composition (bactocasitone concentration) and diverse aeration conditions were explored. The results showed that the final concentration of biomass in anaerobic fermentation was lower than the one obtained in microaerophilic conditions, while it gave a very high productivity of lactic acid which was present as a racemic mixture in the permeate. Fermentation experiments carried out with air sparging, even at very low flow-rate, led to the production of the sole L(+) lactic acid giving sevenfold increase in biomass yield in respect to the batch cultivation. Finally, a mathematical model was developed to describe the microfiltration bioprocess applied in this research considering an inhibition kinetic and enucleating a suitable mathematical description for the decrease of the transmembrane flux. Copyright 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Enzymatic isolation of viable human odontoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuffaro, H M; Pääkkönen, V; Tjäderhane, L

    2016-05-01

    To improve an enzymatic method previously used for isolation of rat odontoblasts to isolate viable mature human odontoblasts. Collagenase I, collagenase I/hyaluronidase mixture and hyaluronidase were used to extract mature human odontoblasts from the pulp chamber. Detachment of odontoblasts from dentine was determined with field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and to analyse the significance of differences in tubular diameter, and the t-test was used. MTT-reaction was used to analyse cell viability, and nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney post hoc tests were used to analyse the data. Immunofluorescent staining of dentine sialoprotein (DSP), aquaporin-4 (AQP4) and matrix metalloproteinase-20 (MMP-20) and quantitative PCR (qPCR) of dentine sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) were used to confirm the odontoblastic nature of the cells. MTT-reaction and FESEM demonstrated collagenase I/hyaluronidase resulted in more effective detachment and higher viability than collagenase I alone. Hyaluronidase alone was not able to detach odontoblasts. Immunofluorescence revealed the typical odontoblastic-morphology with one process, and DSP, AQP4 and MMP-20 were detected. Quantitative PCR of DSPP confirmed that the isolated cells expressed this odontoblast-specific gene. The isolation of viable human odontoblasts was successful. The cells demonstrated morphology typical for odontoblasts and expressed characteristic odontoblast-type genes and proteins. This method will enable new approaches, such as apoptosis analysis, for studies using fully differentiated odontoblasts. © 2015 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Human endothelial progenitor cells internalize high-density lipoprotein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaemisa Srisen

    Full Text Available Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs originate either directly from hematopoietic stem cells or from a subpopulation of monocytes. Controversial views about intracellular lipid traffic prompted us to analyze the uptake of human high density lipoprotein (HDL, and HDL-cholesterol in human monocytic EPCs. Fluorescence and electron microscopy were used to investigate distribution and intracellular trafficking of HDL and its associated cholesterol using fluorescent surrogates (bodipy-cholesterol and bodipy-cholesteryl oleate, cytochemical labels and fluorochromes including horseradish peroxidase and Alexa Fluor® 568. Uptake and intracellular transport of HDL were demonstrated after internalization periods from 0.5 to 4 hours. In case of HDL-Alexa Fluor® 568, bodipy-cholesterol and bodipy-cholesteryl oleate, a photooxidation method was carried out. HDL-specific reaction products were present in invaginations of the plasma membrane at each time of treatment within endocytic vesicles, in multivesicular bodies and at longer periods of uptake, also in lysosomes. Some HDL-positive endosomes were arranged in form of "strings of pearl"- like structures. HDL-positive multivesicular bodies exhibited intensive staining of limiting and vesicular membranes. Multivesicular bodies of HDL-Alexa Fluor® 568-treated EPCs showed multilamellar intra-vacuolar membranes. At all periods of treatment, labeled endocytic vesicles and organelles were apparent close to the cell surface and in perinuclear areas around the Golgi apparatus. No HDL-related particles could be demonstrated close to its cisterns. Electron tomographic reconstructions showed an accumulation of HDL-containing endosomes close to the trans-Golgi-network. HDL-derived bodipy-cholesterol was localized in endosomal vesicles, multivesicular bodies, lysosomes and in many of the stacked Golgi cisternae and the trans-Golgi-network Internalized HDL-derived bodipy-cholesteryl oleate was channeled into the lysosomal

  17. Estimation of immune cell densities in immune cell conglomerates: an approach for high-throughput quantification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels Halama

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Determining the correct number of positive immune cells in immunohistological sections of colorectal cancer and other tumor entities is emerging as an important clinical predictor and therapy selector for an individual patient. This task is usually obstructed by cell conglomerates of various sizes. We here show that at least in colorectal cancer the inclusion of immune cell conglomerates is indispensable for estimating reliable patient cell counts. Integrating virtual microscopy and image processing principally allows the high-throughput evaluation of complete tissue slides. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: For such large-scale systems we demonstrate a robust quantitative image processing algorithm for the reproducible quantification of cell conglomerates on CD3 positive T cells in colorectal cancer. While isolated cells (28 to 80 microm(2 are counted directly, the number of cells contained in a conglomerate is estimated by dividing the area of the conglomerate in thin tissues sections (< or =6 microm by the median area covered by an isolated T cell which we determined as 58 microm(2. We applied our algorithm to large numbers of CD3 positive T cell conglomerates and compared the results to cell counts obtained manually by two independent observers. While especially for high cell counts, the manual counting showed a deviation of up to 400 cells/mm(2 (41% variation, algorithm-determined T cell numbers generally lay in between the manually observed cell numbers but with perfect reproducibility. CONCLUSION: In summary, we recommend our approach as an objective and robust strategy for quantifying immune cell densities in immunohistological sections which can be directly implemented into automated full slide image processing systems.

  18. The binding of rhBMP-2 to the receptors of viable MC3T3-E1 cells and the question of cooperativity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiemann, M.; Rumpf, H.M.; Bingmann, D.; Jennissen, H.P. [Universitaetsklinikum Essen (Germany). Inst. fuer Physiologie; Universitaetsklinikum Essen (Germany). Inst. fuer Physiologiesche Chemie

    2001-12-01

    The binding of rhBMP-2 to its receptors, the signal transduction cascade and the final responses of bone cells, osteoprogenitor cells and derived cell lines is of high fundamental and clinical interest. In this report concentration-response curves of the osteoblast cell line MC3T3-E1 under influence of rhBMP-2 was investigated. The biological response of the cells (corresponding to a down-stream effect of the receptor state-function) was monitored in pilot experiments by the MC3T3-cell alkaline phosphatase-induction test (MC3T3-cell ALP-induction test). It is shown that the MC3T3-cell ALP-induction test is a good tool for measuring biologically active recombinant human BMP-2 (rhBMP-2) in crude extracts of E. coli as well as in highly purified form. In addition this test is very sensitive to chemically induced structural changes of rhBMP-2 such as those resulting from a radiolabeling of rhBMP-2 by the Bolton-Hunter procedure. The latter procedure reduces the biological activity of rhBMP-2 by a factor of 3-4. The measured concentration-response curves could all be non-linearly fitted to a rectangular hyperbola. The half-maximal saturation, K{sub 0.5}, is found between 30-100 nM rhBMP-2 (= 0.8-2.5 {mu}g/ml). The effect of rhBMP-2 shows a plateau i.e. maximal response at ca. 300-1000 nM rhBMP-2 (= 8-25 {mu}g/ml). The data thus indicate a non-cooperative binding-response behavior. This was unexpected since BMP-2 binds simultaneously to two cooperating receptors of type 1 and type 2. However in the very low concentration range of employed rhBMP-2 a variable response of the cells was measured so that a full exclusion of cooperativity cannot be concluded at the present time. This will be clarified by future experiments. (orig.)

  19. Information in a Network of Neuronal Cells: Effect of Cell Density and Short-Term Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Onesto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurons are specialized, electrically excitable cells which use electrical to chemical signals to transmit and elaborate information. Understanding how the cooperation of a great many of neurons in a grid may modify and perhaps improve the information quality, in contrast to few neurons in isolation, is critical for the rational design of cell-materials interfaces for applications in regenerative medicine, tissue engineering, and personalized lab-on-a-chips. In the present paper, we couple an integrate-and-fire model with information theory variables to analyse the extent of information in a network of nerve cells. We provide an estimate of the information in the network in bits as a function of cell density and short-term depression time. In the model, neurons are connected through a Delaunay triangulation of not-intersecting edges; in doing so, the number of connecting synapses per neuron is approximately constant to reproduce the early time of network development in planar neural cell cultures. In simulations where the number of nodes is varied, we observe an optimal value of cell density for which information in the grid is maximized. In simulations in which the posttransmission latency time is varied, we observe that information increases as the latency time decreases and, for specific configurations of the grid, it is largely enhanced in a resonance effect.

  20. Information in a Network of Neuronal Cells: Effect of Cell Density and Short-Term Depression

    KAUST Repository

    Onesto, Valentina

    2016-05-10

    Neurons are specialized, electrically excitable cells which use electrical to chemical signals to transmit and elaborate information. Understanding how the cooperation of a great many of neurons in a grid may modify and perhaps improve the information quality, in contrast to few neurons in isolation, is critical for the rational design of cell-materials interfaces for applications in regenerative medicine, tissue engineering, and personalized lab-on-a-chips. In the present paper, we couple an integrate-and-fire model with information theory variables to analyse the extent of information in a network of nerve cells. We provide an estimate of the information in the network in bits as a function of cell density and short-term depression time. In the model, neurons are connected through a Delaunay triangulation of not-intersecting edges; in doing so, the number of connecting synapses per neuron is approximately constant to reproduce the early time of network development in planar neural cell cultures. In simulations where the number of nodes is varied, we observe an optimal value of cell density for which information in the grid is maximized. In simulations in which the posttransmission latency time is varied, we observe that information increases as the latency time decreases and, for specific configurations of the grid, it is largely enhanced in a resonance effect.

  1. Enumeration of viable and non-viable larvated Ascaris eggs with quantitative PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raynal, Maria; Villegas, Eric N; Nelson, Kara L

    2012-12-01

    The goal of this study was to further develop an incubation-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) method for quantifying viable Ascaris eggs by characterizing the detection limit and number of template copies per egg, determining the specificity of the method, and testing the method with viable and inactivated larvated eggs. The number of template copies per cell was determined by amplifying DNA from known numbers of eggs at different development stages; the value was estimated to be 32 copies. The specificity of the method was tested against a panel of bacteria, fungi, protozoa and helminths, and no amplification was found with non-target DNA. Finally, fully larvated eggs were inactivated by four different treatments: 254 nm ultraviolet light, 2,000 ppm NH(3)-N at pH 9, moderate heat (48 °C) and high heat (70 °C). Concentrations of treated eggs were measured by direct microscopy and incubation-qPCR. The qPCR signal decreased following all four treatments, and was in general agreement with the decrease in viable eggs determined by microscopy. The incubation-qPCR method for enumerating viable Ascaris eggs is a promising approach that can produce results faster than direct microscopy, and may have benefits for applications such as assessing biosolids.

  2. Assessment of the hydration state of sickle cells by phthalate ester density distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurantsin-Mills, J; Jacobs, H M; Lessin, L S

    1987-04-01

    Intracellular hemoglobin S (Hb SS) concentration, a function of cell hydration, has a major influence on the rate of Hb SS polymerization and, therefore, cellular sickling. To determine the density distribution of homozygous sickle hemoglobin cells as a function of cell hydration, cells were incubated in autologous plasma buffer mixtures with final osmolalities ranging from 195 to 490 mosm/kg at ambient Po2. The density distribution of the cells was determined by differential flotation on 20 mixtures of di-n-butyl and dimethyl phthalates with specific gravities of 1.062 to 1.142. Mean cell hemoglobin concentration (MCHC) and mean cell volume (MCV) were determined by standard manual procedures. Cell shape was assessed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the axial ratio (L/W) of the elliptical dense cell fraction measured by an image analyzer interfaced with a computer. The density distribution of normal red blood cells lies within a narrow 1.090 to 1.118 gm/ml density band with the middle or transitional 60% (T60) of the cells occupying a density range of 0.0067 +/- 0.0007 gm/ml (+/- SD). The density distribution of sickle cells shows a broader density band of 1.064 to 1.134 gm/ml, and the T60 was 0.0139 +/- 0.0022 gm/ml. The mean T60 did not change with osmotic variation but the mean T60 of Hb SS cells was significantly greater (P less than 0.005). MCHC and 1/MCV varied directly with the median density of the density distribution. By linear regression analysis and Ponder's osmotic equation, it is evident that sickle cells exhibit restricted volume increases in hypotonic media.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Performance of conversion efficiency of a crystalline silicon solar cell with base doping density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gokhan Sahin

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigate theoretically the electrical parameters of a crystalline silicon solar cell in steady state. Based on a one-dimensional modeling of the cell, the short circuit current density, the open circuit voltage, the shunt and series resistances and the conversion efficiency are calculated, taking into account the base doping density. Either the I-V characteristic, series resistance, shunt resistance and conversion efficiency are determined and studied versus base doping density. The effects applied of base doping density on these parameters have been studied. The aim of this work is to show how short circuit current density, open circuit voltage and parasitic resistances are related to the base doping density and to exhibit the role played by those parasitic resistances on the conversion efficiency of the crystalline silicon solar. Keywords: Crystalline silicon solar cell, Base doping density, Series resistance, Shunt resistance, Conversion efficiency

  4. The Chemically Synthesized Ageladine A-Derivative LysoGlow84 Stains Lysosomes in Viable Mammalian Brain Cells and Specific Structures in the Marine Flatworm Macrostomum lignano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorsten Mordhorst

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Based on the chemical structure and the known chemical synthesis of the marine sponge alkaloid ageladine A, we synthesized the ageladine A-derivative 4-(naphthalene-2-yl-1H-imidazo[4,5-c]pyridine trifluoroacetate (LysoGlow84. The two-step synthesis started with the Pictet-Spengler reaction of histamine and naphthalene-2-carbaldehyde to a tetrahydropyridine intermediate, which was dehydrogenated with activated manganese (IV oxide to LysoGlow84. Structure and purity of the synthesized LysoGlow84 were confirmed by NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The fluorescence intensity emitted by LysoGlow84 depended strongly on the pH of the solvent with highest fluorescence intensity recorded at pH 4. The fluorescence maximum (at 315 nm excitation was observed at 440 nm. Biocompatibility of LysoGlow84 was investigated using cultured rat brain astrocytes and the marine flatworm Macrostomum lignano. Exposure of the astrocytes for up to 6 h to micromolar concentrations of LysoGlow84 did not compromise cell viability, as demonstrated by several viability assays, but revealed a promising property of this compound for staining of cellular vesicles. Conventional fluorescence microscopy as well as confocal scanning microscopy of LysoGlow84-treated astrocytes revealed co-localization of LysoGlow84 fluorescence with that of LysoTracker® Red DND-99. LysoGlow84 stained unclear structures in Macrostomum lignano, which were identified as lysosomes by co-staining with LysoTracker. Strong fluorescence staining by LysoGlow84 was further observed around the worms’ anterior gut and the female genital pore which were not counterstained by LysoTracker Red. Thus, LysoGlow84 is a new promising dye that stains lysosomes and other acidic compartments in cultured cells and in worms.

  5. The chemically synthesized ageladine A-derivative LysoGlow84 stains lysosomes in viable mammalian brain cells and specific structures in the marine flatworm Macrostomum lignano.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordhorst, Thorsten; Awal, Sushil; Jordan, Sebastian; Petters, Charlotte; Sartoris, Linda; Dringen, Ralf; Bickmeyer, Ulf

    2015-02-11

    Based on the chemical structure and the known chemical synthesis of the marine sponge alkaloid ageladine A, we synthesized the ageladine A-derivative 4-(naphthalene-2-yl)-1H-imidazo[4,5-c]pyridine trifluoroacetate (LysoGlow84). The two-step synthesis started with the Pictet-Spengler reaction of histamine and naphthalene-2-carbaldehyde to a tetrahydropyridine intermediate, which was dehydrogenated with activated manganese (IV) oxide to LysoGlow84. Structure and purity of the synthesized LysoGlow84 were confirmed by NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The fluorescence intensity emitted by LysoGlow84 depended strongly on the pH of the solvent with highest fluorescence intensity recorded at pH 4. The fluorescence maximum (at 315 nm excitation) was observed at 440 nm. Biocompatibility of LysoGlow84 was investigated using cultured rat brain astrocytes and the marine flatworm Macrostomum lignano. Exposure of the astrocytes for up to 6 h to micromolar concentrations of LysoGlow84 did not compromise cell viability, as demonstrated by several viability assays, but revealed a promising property of this compound for staining of cellular vesicles. Conventional fluorescence microscopy as well as confocal scanning microscopy of LysoGlow84-treated astrocytes revealed co-localization of LysoGlow84 fluorescence with that of LysoTracker® Red DND-99. LysoGlow84 stained unclear structures in Macrostomum lignano, which were identified as lysosomes by co-staining with LysoTracker. Strong fluorescence staining by LysoGlow84 was further observed around the worms' anterior gut and the female genital pore which were not counterstained by LysoTracker Red. Thus, LysoGlow84 is a new promising dye that stains lysosomes and other acidic compartments in cultured cells and in worms.

  6. Collagen Matrix Density Drives the Metabolic Shift in Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett A. Morris

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Increased breast density attributed to collagen I deposition is associated with a 4–6 fold increased risk of developing breast cancer. Here, we assessed cellular metabolic reprogramming of mammary carcinoma cells in response to increased collagen matrix density using an in vitro 3D model. Our initial observations demonstrated changes in functional metabolism in both normal mammary epithelial cells and mammary carcinoma cells in response to changes in matrix density. Further, mammary carcinoma cells grown in high density collagen matrices displayed decreased oxygen consumption and glucose metabolism via the tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle compared to cells cultured in low density matrices. Despite decreased glucose entry into the TCA cycle, levels of glucose uptake, cell viability, and ROS were not different between high and low density matrices. Interestingly, under high density conditions the contribution of glutamine as a fuel source to drive the TCA cycle was significantly enhanced. These alterations in functional metabolism mirrored significant changes in the expression of metabolic genes involved in glycolysis, oxidative phosphorylation, and the serine synthesis pathway. This study highlights the broad importance of the collagen microenvironment to cellular expression profiles, and shows that changes in density of the collagen microenvironment can modulate metabolic shifts of cancer cells.

  7. Estimation of current density distribution of PAFC by analysis of cell exhaust gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, S.; Seya, A. [Fuji Electric Co., Ltd., Ichihara-shi (Japan); Asano, A. [Fuji Electric Corporate, Ltd., Yokosuka-shi (Japan)

    1996-12-31

    To estimate distributions of Current densities, voltages, gas concentrations, etc., in phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) stacks, is very important for getting fuel cells with higher quality. In this work, we leave developed a numerical simulation tool to map out the distribution in a PAFC stack. And especially to Study Current density distribution in the reaction area of the cell, we analyzed gas composition in several positions inside a gas outlet manifold of the PAFC stack. Comparing these measured data with calculated data, the current density distribution in a cell plane calculated by the simulation, was certified.

  8. Cells determine cell density using a small protein bound to a unique tissue-specific phospholipid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J. Petzold

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Cell density is the critical parameter controlling tendon morphogenesis. Knowing its neighbors allows a cell to regulate correctly its proliferation and collagen production. A missing link to understanding this process is a molecular description of the sensing mechanism. Previously, this mechanism was shown in cell culture to rely on a diffusible factor (SNZR [sensor] with an affinity for the cell layer. This led to purifying conditioned medium over 4 columns and analyzing the final column fractions for band intensity on SDS gels versus biological activity – a 16 kD band strongly correlated between assays. N-terminal sequencing – EPLAVVDL – identified a large gene (424 AA, extremely conserved between chicken and human. In this paper we probe whether this is the correct gene. Can the predicted large protein be cleaved to a smaller protein? EPLAVVDL occurs towards the C-terminus and cleavage would create a small 94 AA protein. This protein would run at ∼10 kD, so what modifications or cofactor binding accounts for its running at 16 kD on SDS gels? This protein has no prominent hydrophobic regions, so can it be secreted? To validate its role, the chicken cDNA for this gene was tagged with myc and his and transfected into a human osteosarcoma cell line (U2OS. U2OS cells expressed the gene but not passively: differentiating into structures resembling spongy bone and expressing alkaline phosphatase, an early bone marker. Intracellularly, two bands were observed by Western blotting: the full length protein and a smaller form (26 kD. Outside the cell, a small band (28 kD was detected, although it was 40% larger than expected, as well as multiple larger bands. These larger forms could be converted to the predicted smaller protein (94 AA + tags by changing salt concentrations and ultrafiltering – releasing a cofactor to the filtrate while leaving a protein factor in the retentate. Using specific degradative enzymes and mass spectrometry, the

  9. Density, proportion, and dendritic coverage of retinal ganglion cells of the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus jacchus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.L. Gomes

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available We performed a quantitative analysis of M and P cell mosaics of the common-marmoset retina. Ganglion cells were labeled retrogradely from optic nerve deposits of Biocytin. The labeling was visualized using horseradish peroxidase (HRP histochemistry and 3-3'diaminobenzidine as chromogen. M and P cells were morphologically similar to those found in Old- and New-World primates. Measurements were performed on well-stained cells from 4 retinas of different animals. We analyzed separate mosaics for inner and outer M and P cells at increasing distances from the fovea (2.5-9 mm of eccentricity to estimate cell density, proportion, and dendritic coverage. M cell density decreased towards the retinal periphery in all quadrants. M cell density was higher in the nasal quadrant than in other retinal regions at similar eccentricities, reaching about 740 cells/mm² at 2.5 mm of temporal eccentricity, and representing 8-14% of all ganglion cells. P cell density increased from peripheral to more central regions, reaching about 5540 cells/mm² at 2.5 mm of temporal eccentricity. P cells represented a smaller proportion of all ganglion cells in the nasal quadrant than in other quadrants, and their numbers increased towards central retinal regions. The M cell coverage factor ranged from 5 to 12 and the P cell coverage factor ranged from 1 to 3 in the nasal quadrant and from 5 to 12 in the other quadrants. These results show that central and peripheral retinal regions differ in terms of cell class proportions and dendritic coverage, and their properties do not result from simply scaling down cell density. Therefore, differences in functional properties between central and peripheral vision should take these distinct regional retinal characteristics into account.

  10. Anorexia Reduces GFAP+ Cell Density in the Rat Hippocampus

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel Reyes-Haro; Francisco Emmanuel Labrada-Moncada; Durairaj Ragu Varman; Janina Krüger; Teresa Morales; Ricardo Miledi; Ataúlfo Martínez-Torres

    2016-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa is an eating disorder observed primarily in young women. The neurobiology of the disorder is unknown but recently magnetic resonance imaging showed a volume reduction of the hippocampus in anorexic patients. Dehydration-induced anorexia (DIA) is a murine model that mimics core features of this disorder, including severe weight loss due to voluntary reduction in food intake. The energy supply to the brain is mediated by astrocytes, but whether their density is compromised by a...

  11. Viable Syntax: Rethinking Minimalist Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Safir

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Hauser et al. (2002 suggest that the human language faculty emerged as a genetic innovation in the form of what is called here a ‘keystone factor’—a single, simple, formal mental capability that, interacting with the pre-existing faculties of hominid ancestors, caused a cascade of effects resulting in the language faculty in modern humans. They take Merge to be the keystone factor, but instead it is posited here that Merge is the pre-existing mechanism of thought made viable by a principle that permits relations interpretable at the interfaces to be mapped onto c-command. The simplified minimalist architecture proposed here respects the keystone factor as closely as possible, but is justified on the basis of linguistic analyses it makes available, including a relativized intervention theory applicable across Case, scope, agreement, selection and linearization, a derivation of the A/A’-distinction from Case theory, and predictions such as why in situ wh-interpretation is island-insensitive, but susceptible to intervention effects.

  12. Density of founder cells affects spatial pattern formation and cooperation in Bacillus subtilis biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gestel, Jordi; Weissing, Franz J; Kuipers, Oscar P; Kovács, Ákos T

    2014-01-01

    In nature, most bacteria live in surface-attached sedentary communities known as biofilms. Biofilms are often studied with respect to bacterial interactions. Many cells inhabiting biofilms are assumed to express ‘cooperative traits', like the secretion of extracellular polysaccharides (EPS). These traits can enhance biofilm-related properties, such as stress resilience or colony expansion, while being costly to the cells that express them. In well-mixed populations cooperation is difficult to achieve, because non-cooperative individuals can reap the benefits of cooperation without having to pay the costs. The physical process of biofilm growth can, however, result in the spatial segregation of cooperative from non-cooperative individuals. This segregation can prevent non-cooperative cells from exploiting cooperative neighbors. Here we examine the interaction between spatial pattern formation and cooperation in Bacillus subtilis biofilms. We show, experimentally and by mathematical modeling, that the density of cells at the onset of biofilm growth affects pattern formation during biofilm growth. At low initial cell densities, co-cultured strains strongly segregate in space, whereas spatial segregation does not occur at high initial cell densities. As a consequence, EPS-producing cells have a competitive advantage over non-cooperative mutants when biofilms are initiated at a low density of founder cells, whereas EPS-deficient cells have an advantage at high cell densities. These results underline the importance of spatial pattern formation for competition among bacterial strains and the evolution of microbial cooperation. PMID:24694715

  13. Effect of bone graft density on in vitro cell behavior with enamel matrix derivative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miron, Richard J; Caluseru, Oana M; Guillemette, Vincent; Zhang, Yufeng; Buser, Daniel; Chandad, Fatiha; Sculean, Anton

    2015-09-01

    Bone replacement grafting materials play an important role in regenerative dentistry. Despite a large array of tested bone-grafting materials, little information is available comparing the effects of bone graft density on in vitro cell behavior. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to compare the effects of cells seeded on bone grafts at low and high density in vitro for osteoblast adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation. The response of osteoblasts to the presence of a growth factor (enamel matrix derivative, (EMD)) in combination with low (8 mg per well) or high (100 mg per well) bone grafts (BG; natural bone mineral, Bio-Oss®) density, was studied and compared for osteoblast cell adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation as assessed by real-time PCR. Standard tissue culture plastic was used as a control with and without EMD. The present study demonstrates that in vitro testing of bone-grafting materials is largely influenced by bone graft seeding density. Osteoblast adhesion was up to 50 % lower when cells were seeded on high-density BG when compared to low-density BG and control tissue culture plastic. Furthermore, proliferation was affected in a similar manner whereby cell proliferation on high-density BG (100 mg/well) was significantly increased when compared to that on low-density BG (8 mg/well). In contrast, cell differentiation was significantly increased on high-density BG as assessed by real-time PCR for markers collagen 1 (Col 1), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and osteocalcin (OC) as well as alizarin red staining. The effects of EMD on osteoblast adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation further demonstrated that the bone graft seeding density largely controls in vitro results. EMD significantly increased cell attachment only on high-density BG, whereas EMD was able to further stimulate cell proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts on control culture plastic and low-density BG when compared to high-density BG. The results

  14. Experimental design for the optimization of propidium monoazide treatment to quantify viable and non-viable bacteria in piggery effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desneux, Jérémy; Chemaly, Marianne; Pourcher, Anne-Marie

    2015-08-16

    Distinguishing between viable and dead bacteria in animal and urban effluents is a major challenge. Among existing methods, propidium monoazide (PMA)-qPCR is a promising way to quantify viable cells. However, its efficiency depends on the composition of the effluent, particularly on total suspended solids (TSS)) and on methodological parameters. The aim of this study was evaluate the influence of three methodological factors (concentration of PMA, incubation time and photoactivation time) on the efficiency of PMA-qPCR to quantify viable and dead cells of Listeria monocytogenes used as a microorganism model, in two piggery effluents (manure and lagoon effluent containing 20 and 0.4 TSS g.kg(-1), respectively). An experimental design strategy (Doehlert design and desirability function) was used to identify the experimental conditions to achieve optimal PMA-qPCR results. The quantification of viable cells of L. monocytogenes was mainly influenced by the concentration of PMA in the manure and by the duration of photoactivation in the lagoon effluent. Optimal values differed with the matrix: 55 μM PMA, 5 min incubation and 56 min photoactivation for manure and 20 μM PMA, 20 min incubation and 30 min photoactivation for lagoon effluent. Applied to five manure and four lagoon samples, these conditions resulted in satisfactory quantification of viable and dead cells. PMA-qPCR can be used on undiluted turbid effluent with high levels of TSS, provided preliminary tests are performed to identify the optimal conditions.

  15. Effects of laser peripheral iridotomy on corneal endothelial cell density and cell morphology in primary angle closure suspect subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Jamali

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: In PACS eyes, we did not find a decline in corneal endothelial cell density or a change in cell morphological characteristics, including cell hexagonality and CV, in the central, nasal, and temporal regions of the cornea in any of our subjects over a one-year follow-up period.

  16. Age-related decrease in rod bipolar cell density of the human retina ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    During normal ageing, the rods (and other neurones) undergo a significant decrease in density in the human retina from the fourth decade of life onward. Since the rods synapse with the rod bipolar cells in the outer plexiform layer, a decline in rod density (mainly due to death) may ultimately cause an associated decline of ...

  17. Cell density and actomyosin contractility control the organization of migrating collectives within an epithelium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loza, Andrew J.; Koride, Sarita; Schimizzi, Gregory V.; Li, Bo; Sun, Sean X.; Longmore, Gregory D.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying collective migration are important for understanding development, wound healing, and tumor invasion. Here we focus on cell density to determine its role in collective migration. Our findings show that increasing cell density, as might be seen in cancer, transforms groups from broad collectives to small, narrow streams. Conversely, diminishing cell density, as might occur at a wound front, leads to large, broad collectives with a distinct leader–follower structure. Simulations identify force-sensitive contractility as a mediator of how density affects collectives, and guided by this prediction, we find that the baseline state of contractility can enhance or reduce organization. Finally, we test predictions from these data in an in vivo epithelium by using genetic manipulations to drive collective motion between predicted migratory phases. This work demonstrates how commonly altered cellular properties can prime groups of cells to adopt migration patterns that may be harnessed in health or exploited in disease. PMID:27605707

  18. Improving accuracy of cell and chromophore concentration measurements using optical density

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    John A Myers; Brandon S Curtis; Wayne R Curtis

    2013-01-01

      Doc number: 4 Abstract Background: UV-vis spectrophotometric optical density (OD) is the most commonly-used technique for estimating chromophore formation and cell concentration in liquid culture...

  19. Initial cell seeding density influences pancreatic endocrine development during in vitro differentiation of human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gage, Blair K; Webber, Travis D; Kieffer, Timothy J

    2013-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) have the ability to form cells derived from all three germ layers, and as such have received significant attention as a possible source for insulin-secreting pancreatic beta-cells for diabetes treatment. While considerable advances have been made in generating hESC-derived insulin-producing cells, to date in vitro-derived glucose-responsive beta-cells have remained an elusive goal. With the objective of increasing the in vitro formation of pancreatic endocrine cells, we examined the effect of varying initial cell seeding density from 1.3 x 10(4) cells/cm(2) to 5.3 x 10(4) cells/cm(2) followed by a 21-day pancreatic endocrine differentiation protocol. Low density-seeded cells were found to be biased toward the G2/M phases of the cell cycle and failed to efficiently differentiate into SOX17-CXCR4 co-positive definitive endoderm cells leaving increased numbers of OCT4 positive cells in day 4 cultures. Moderate density cultures effectively formed definitive endoderm and progressed to express PDX1 in approximately 20% of the culture. High density cultures contained approximately double the numbers of PDX1 positive pancreatic progenitor cells and also showed increased expression of MNX1, PTF1a, NGN3, ARX, and PAX4 compared to cultures seeded at moderate density. The cultures seeded at high density displayed increased formation of polyhormonal pancreatic endocrine cell populations co-expressing insulin, glucagon and somatostatin. The maturation process giving rise to these endocrine cell populations followed the expected cascade of pancreatic progenitor marker (PDX1 and MNX1) expression, followed by pancreatic endocrine specification marker expression (BRN4, PAX4, ARX, NEUROD1, NKX6.1 and NKX2.2) and then pancreatic hormone expression (insulin, glucagon and somatostatin). Taken together these data suggest that initial cell seeding density plays an important role in both germ layer specification and pancreatic progenitor commitment, which

  20. A direct viable count method for the enumeration of attached bacteria and assessment of biofilm disinfection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, F. P.; Pyle, B. H.; McFeters, G. A.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes the adaptation of an in situ direct viable count (in situ DVC) method in biofilm disinfection studies. The results obtained with this technique were compared to two other enumeration methods, the plate count (PC) and conventional direct viable count (c-DVC). An environmental isolate (Klebsiella pneumoniae Kp1) was used to form biofilms on stainless steel coupons in a stirred batch reactor. The in situ DVC method was applied to directly assess the viability of bacteria in biofilms without disturbing the integrity of the interfacial community. As additional advantages, the results were observed after 4 h instead of the 24 h incubation time required for colony formation and total cell numbers that remained on the substratum were enumerated. Chlorine and monochloramine were used to determine the susceptibilities of attached and planktonic bacteria to disinfection treatment using this novel analytical approach. The planktonic cells in the reactor showed no significant change in susceptibility to disinfectants during the period of biofilm formation. In addition, the attached cells did not reveal any more resistance to disinfection than planktonic cells. The disinfection studies of young biofilms indicated that 0.25 mg/l free chlorine (at pH 7.2) and 1 mg/l monochloramine (at pH 9.0) have comparable disinfection efficiencies at 25 degrees C. Although being a weaker disinfectant, monochloramine was more effective in removing attached bacteria from the substratum than free chlorine. The in situ DVC method always showed at least one log higher viable cell densities than the PC method, suggesting that the in situ DVC method is more efficient in the enumeration of biofilm bacteria. The results also indicated that the in situ DVC method can provide more accurate information regarding the cell numbers and viability of bacteria within biofilms following disinfection.

  1. Sorption and precipitation of Mn2+ by viable and autoclaved Shewanella putrefaciens: Effect of contact time

    KAUST Repository

    Chubar, Natalia

    2013-01-01

    The sorption of Mn(II) by viable and inactivated cells of Shewanella putrefaciens, a non-pathogenic, facultative anaerobic, gram-negative bacterium characterised as a Mn(IV) and Fe(III) reducer, was studied under aerobic conditions, as a function of pH, bacterial density and metal loading. During a short contact time (3-24h), the adsorptive behaviour of live and dead bacteria toward Mn(II) was sufficiently similar, an observation that was reflected in the studies on adsorption kinetics at various metal loadings, effects of pH, bacteria density, isotherms and drifting of pH during adsorption. Continuing the experiment for an additional 2-30days demonstrated that the Mn(II) sorption by suspensions of viable and autoclaved cells differed significantly from one another. The sorption to dead cells was characterised by a rapid equilibration and was described by an isotherm. In contrast, the sorption (uptake) to live bacteria exhibited a complex time-dependent uptake. This uptake began as adsorption and ion exchange processes followed by bioprecipitation, and it was accompanied by the formation of polymeric sugars (EPS) and the release of dissolved organic substances. FTIR, EXAFS/XANES and XPS demonstrated that manganese(II) phosphate was the main precipitate formed in 125ml batches, which is the first evidence of the ability of microbes to synthesise manganese phosphates. XPS and XANES spectra did not detect Mn(II) oxidation. Although the release of protein-like compounds by the viable bacteria increased in the presence of Mn2+ (and, by contrast, the release of carbohydrates did not change), electrochemical analyses did not indicate any aqueous complexation of Mn(II) by the organic ligands. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Intratumoral Immune Cell Densities Are Associated with Lung Adenocarcinoma Gene Alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansuet-Lupo, Audrey; Alifano, Marco; Pécuchet, Nicolas; Biton, Jérôme; Becht, Etienne; Goc, Jeremy; Germain, Claire; Ouakrim, Hanane; Régnard, Jean-François; Cremer, Isabelle; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Dieu-Nosjean, Marie-Caroline; Blons, Hélène; Damotte, Diane

    2016-12-01

    Tumor-infiltrating immune cells affect lung cancer outcome. However, the factors that influence the composition and function of the tumor immune environment remain poorly defined and need investigation, particularly in the era of immunotherapy. To determine whether the tumoral immune environment is related to lung adenocarcinoma mutations. This retrospective cohort included 316 consecutive patients with lung adenocarcinoma (225 men; 258 smokers) studied from 2001 to 2005 in a single center. We investigated the association of densities of intratumoral mature dendritic cells (mDCs), CD8(+) T cells, neutrophils, and macrophages with clinical and pathological variables and tumor cell mutation profiles obtained by next-generation sequencing. In 282 tumors, we found 460 mutations, mainly in TP53 (59%), KRAS (40%), STK11 (24%), and EGFR (14%). Intratumoral CD8(+) T-cell density was high in smokers (P = 0.02) and TP53-mutated tumors (P = 0.02) and low in BRAF-mutated tumors (P = 0.005). Intratumoral mDC density was high with low pathological tumor stage (P = 0.01) and low with STK11 mutation (P = 0.004). Intratumoral neutrophil density was high and low with BRAF mutation (P = 0.04) and EGFR mutation (P = 0.02), respectively. Intratumoral macrophage density was low with EGFR mutation (P = 0.01). Intratumoral CD8(+) T-cell and mDC densities remained strong independent markers of overall survival (P = 0.001 and P = 0.02, respectively). Intratumoral immune cell densities (mDCs, CD8(+) T cells, neutrophils, macrophages) were significantly associated with molecular alterations in adenocarcinoma underlying the interactions between cancer cells and their microenvironment.

  3. The relative importance of topography and RGD ligand density for endothelial cell adhesion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Le Saux

    Full Text Available The morphology and function of endothelial cells depends on the physical and chemical characteristics of the extracellular environment. Here, we designed silicon surfaces on which topographical features and surface densities of the integrin binding peptide arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD could be independently controlled. We used these surfaces to investigate the relative importance of the surface chemistry of ligand presentation versus surface topography in endothelial cell adhesion. We compared cell adhesion, spreading and migration on surfaces with nano- to micro-scaled pyramids and average densities of 6×10(2-6×10(11 RGD/mm(2. We found that fewer cells adhered onto rough than flat surfaces and that the optimal average RGD density for cell adhesion was 6×10(5 RGD/mm(2 on flat surfaces and substrata with nano-scaled roughness. Only on surfaces with micro-scaled pyramids did the topography hinder cell migration and a lower average RGD density was optimal for adhesion. In contrast, cell spreading was greatest on surfaces with 6×10(8 RGD/mm(2 irrespectively of presence of feature and their size. In summary, our data suggest that the size of pyramids predominately control the number of endothelial cells that adhere to the substratum but the average RGD density governs the degree of cell spreading and length of focal adhesion within adherent cells. The data points towards a two-step model of cell adhesion: the initial contact of cells with a substratum may be guided by the topography while the engagement of cell surface receptors is predominately controlled by the surface chemistry.

  4. Tuning the Density of Poly(ethylene glycol Chains to Control Mammalian Cell and Bacterial Attachment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Al-Ani

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Surface modification of biomaterials with polymer chains has attracted great attention because of their ability to control biointerfacial interactions such as protein adsorption, cell attachment and bacterial biofilm formation. The aim of this study was to control the immobilisation of biomolecules on silicon wafers using poly(ethylene glycol(PEG chains by a “grafting to” technique. In particular, to control the polymer chain graft density in order to capture proteins and preserve their activity in cell culture as well as find the optimal density that would totally prevent bacterial attachment. The PEG graft density was varied by changing the polymer solubility using an increasing salt concentration. The silicon substrates were initially modified with aminopropyl-triethoxysilane (APTES, where the surface density of amine groups was optimised using different concentrations. The results showed under specific conditions, the PEG density was highest with grafting under “cloud point” conditions. The modified surfaces were characterised with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, ellipsometry, atomic force microscopy (AFM and water contact angle measurements. In addition, all modified surfaces were tested with protein solutions and in cell (mesenchymal stem cells and MG63 osteoblast-like cells and bacterial (Pseudomonas aeruginosa attachment assays. Overall, the lowest protein adsorption was observed on the highest polymer graft density, bacterial adhesion was very low on all modified surfaces, and it can be seen that the attachment of mammalian cells gradually increased as the PEG grafting density decreased, reaching the maximum attachment at medium PEG densities. The results demonstrate that, at certain PEG surface coverages, mammalian cell attachment can be tuned with the potential to optimise their behaviour with controlled serum protein adsorption.

  5. A viable dark fluid model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkhateeb, Esraa

    2018-01-01

    We consider a cosmological model based on a generalization of the equation of state proposed by Nojiri and Odintsov (2004) and Štefančić (2005, 2006). We argue that this model works as a dark fluid model which can interpolate between dust equation of state and the dark energy equation of state. We show how the asymptotic behavior of the equation of state constrained the parameters of the model. The causality condition for the model is also studied to constrain the parameters and the fixed points are tested to determine different solution classes. Observations of Hubble diagram of SNe Ia supernovae are used to further constrain the model. We present an exact solution of the model and calculate the luminosity distance and the energy density evolution. We also calculate the deceleration parameter to test the state of the universe expansion.

  6. Multilevel SOT-MRAM Cell with a Novel Sensing Scheme for High-Density Memory Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeinali, Behzad; Madsen, Jens Kargaard; Moradi, Farshad

    in high-density memory application. To deal with this obstacle, we propose a multilevel cell which stores two bits per memory cell. In addition, we propose a novel sensing scheme to read out the stored data in the multilevel SOT-MRAM cell. Our simulation results show that the proposed cell can achieve 3X......This paper presents a multilevel spin-orbit torque magnetic random access memory (SOT-MRAM). The conventional SOT-MRAMs enables a reliable and energy efficient write operation. However, these cells require two access transistors per cell, hence the efficiency of the SOTMRAMs can be questioned...

  7. Detection of viable toxigenic Vibrio cholerae and virulent Shigella ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A rapid and sensitive assay was developed for the detection of low numbers of viable Vibrio cholerae and Shigella spp. cells in environmental and drinking water samples. Water samples were filtered, and the filters were enriched in a non-selective medium. The enrichment cultures were prepared for polymerase chain ...

  8. Detection of viable toxigenic Vibrio cholerae and virulent Shigella ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DRINIE

    2003-04-02

    Apr 2, 2003 ... A rapid and sensitive assay was developed for the detection of low numbers of viable Vibrio cholerae and Shigella spp. cells in environmental and drinking water samples. Water samples were filtered, and the filters were enriched in a non-selective medium. The enrichment cultures were prepared for ...

  9. Insulin-like growth factor-II receptors in cultured rat hepatocytes: regulation by cell density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, C.D.; Baxter, R.C.

    1987-12-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II) receptors in primary cultures of adult rat hepatocytes were characterized and their regulation by cell density examined. In hepatocytes cultured at 5 X 10(5) cells per 3.8 cm2 plate (/sup 125/I)IGF-II bound to specific, high affinity receptors (Ka = 4.4 +/- 0.5 X 10(9) l/mol). Less than 1% cross-reactivity by IGF-I and no cross-reactivity by insulin were observed. IGF-II binding increased when cells were permeabilized with 0.01% digitonin, suggesting the presence of an intracellular receptor pool. Determined by Scatchard analysis and by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis after affinity labeling, the higher binding was due solely to an increase in binding sites present on 220 kDa type II IGF receptors. In hepatocytes cultured at low densities, the number of cell surface receptors increased markedly, from 10-20,000 receptors per cell at a culture density of 6 X 10(5) cells/well to 70-80,000 receptors per cell at 0.38 X 10(5) cells/well. The increase was not due simply to the exposure of receptors from the intracellular pool, as a density-related increase in receptors was also seen in cells permeabilized with digitonin. There was no evidence that IGF binding proteins, either secreted by hepatocytes or present in fetal calf serum, had any effect on the measurement of receptor concentration or affinity. We conclude that rat hepatocytes in primary culture contain specific IGF-II receptors and that both cell surface and intracellular receptors are regulated by cell density.

  10. Expansion of adipose mesenchymal stromal cells is affected by human platelet lysate and plating density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cholewa, Dominik; Stiehl, Thomas; Schellenberg, Anne; Bokermann, Gudrun; Joussen, Sylvia; Koch, Carmen; Walenda, Thomas; Pallua, Norbert; Marciniak-Czochra, Anna; Suschek, Christoph V; Wagner, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    The composition of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) changes in the course of in vitro culture expansion. Little is known how these cell preparations are influenced by culture media, plating density, or passaging. In this study, we have isolated MSCs from human adipose tissue in culture medium supplemented with either fetal calf serum (FCS) or human platelet lysate (HPL). In addition, culture expansion was simultaneously performed at plating densities of 10 or 10,000 cells/cm(2). The use of FCS resulted in larger cells, whereas HPL significantly enhanced proliferation. Notably, HPL also facilitated expansion for more population doublings than FCS (43 ± 3 vs. 22 ± 4 population doubling; p < 0.001), while plating density did not have a significant effect on long-term growth curves. To gain further insight into population dynamics, we conceived a cellular automaton model to simulate expansion of MSCS. It is based on the assumptions that the number of cell divisions is limited and that due to contact inhibition proliferation occurs only at the rim of colonies. The model predicts that low plating densities result in more heterogeneity with regard to cell division history, and favor subpopulations of higher migratory activity. In summary, HPL is a suitable serum supplement for isolation of MSC from adipose tissue and facilitates more population doublings than FCS. Cellular automaton computer simulations provided additional insights into how complex population dynamics during long-term expansion are affected by plating density and migration.

  11. Effect of Cell Seeding Density and Inflammatory Cytokines on Adipose Tissue-Derived Stem Cells: an in Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukho, Panithi; Kirpensteijn, Jolle; Hesselink, Jan Willem; van Osch, Gerjo J V M; Verseijden, Femke; Bastiaansen-Jenniskens, Yvonne M

    2017-04-01

    Adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ASCs) are known to be able to promote repair of injured tissue via paracrine factors. However, the effect of cell density and inflammatory cytokines on the paracrine ability of ASCs remains largely unknown. To investigate these effects, ASCs were cultured in 8000 cells/cm2, 20,000 cells/cm2, 50,000 cells/cm2, and 400,000 cells/cm2 with and without 10 or 20 ng/ml tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) and 25 or 50 ng/ml interferon gamma (IFNγ). ASC-sheets formed at 400,000 cells/cm2 after 48 h of culture. With increasing concentrations of TNFα and IFNγ, ASC-sheets with 400,000 cells/cm2 had increased production of angiogenic factors Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor and Fibroblast Growth Factor and decreased expression of pro-inflammatory genes TNFA and Prostaglandin Synthase 2 (PTGS2) compared to lower density ASCs. Moreover, the conditioned medium of ASC-sheets with 400,000 cells/cm2 stimulated with the low concentration of TNFα and IFNγ enhanced endothelial cell proliferation and fibroblast migration. These results suggest that a high cell density enhances ASC paracrine function might beneficial for wound repair, especially in pro-inflammatory conditions.

  12. Beyond LCDM: a viable alternative?

    CERN Document Server

    Gough, Michael Paul

    2016-01-01

    We are encouraged to look beyond LCDM as there are still no satisfactory explanations for either dark energy or dark matter. A data centred phenomenological approach supports an alternative explanation in which dark energy is not a universe-wide constant energy density, but the Holographic Dark Information Energy, HDIE, naturally centred around galaxies. HDIE can explain many of the effects attributed separately to Lambda and CDM. HDIE mimics Lambda with sufficient overall total energy and an equation of state parameter, w = -1.03+-0.05 for z 1.35, HDIE was phantom, w = -1.82+-0.08, providing a clear prediction that will enable the model to be verified or falsified. HDIE is shown to fit Planck dark energy wo-wa plots at least as well as Lambda, and to be consistent with other results that suggest dark energy was phantom at earlier times. A new w parameterisation is proposed here, as the usual CPL parameterisation is found to be biased and unsuitable for distinguishing between the HDIE/baryon and LCDM models.

  13. CELL-DENSITY MODULATES GROWTH, EXTRACELLULAR-MATRIX, AND PROTEIN-SYNTHESIS OF CULTURED RAT MESANGIAL CELLS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WOLTHUIS, A; BOES, A

    1993-01-01

    Mesangial cell (MC) hyperplasia and accumulation of extracellular matrix are hallmarks of chronic glomerular disease. The present in vitro study examined the effects of cell density on growth, extracellular matrix formation, and protein synthesis of cultured rat MCs. A negative linear relationship

  14. Microfluidic Adaptation of Density-Gradient Centrifugation for Isolation of Particles and Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuxi Sun

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Density-gradient centrifugation is a label-free approach that has been extensively used for cell separations. Though elegant, this process is time-consuming (>30 min, subjects cells to high levels of stress (>350 g and relies on user skill to enable fractionation of cells that layer as a narrow band between the density-gradient medium and platelet-rich plasma. We hypothesized that microfluidic adaptation of this technique could transform this process into a rapid fractionation approach where samples are separated in a continuous fashion while being exposed to lower levels of stress (<100 g for shorter durations of time (<3 min. To demonstrate proof-of-concept, we designed a microfluidic density-gradient centrifugation device and constructed a setup to introduce samples and medium like Ficoll in a continuous, pump-less fashion where cells and particles can be exposed to centrifugal force and separated via different outlets. Proof-of-concept studies using binary mixtures of low-density polystyrene beads (1.02 g/cm3 and high-density silicon dioxide beads (2.2 g/cm3 with Ficoll–Paque (1.06 g/cm3 show that separation is indeed feasible with >99% separation efficiency suggesting that this approach can be further adapted for separation of cells.

  15. Induction of xylanases by sugar cane bagasse at different cell densities of Cellulomonas flavigena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaya-Delgado, L; Vega-Estrada, J; Flores-Cotera, L B; Dendooven, L; Hidalgo-Lara, M E; Montes-Horcasitas, M C

    2006-04-01

    The effect of cell density on xylanolytic activity and productivity of Cellulomonas flavigena was evaluated under two different culturing conditions: fed-batch culture with discontinuous feed of sugar cane bagasse (SCB; condition 1) and glycerol fed-batch culture followed by addition of SBC as xylanases inducer (condition 2). The enzymatic profile of xylanases was similar in both systems, regardless of the initial cell density at time of induction. However, the xylanolytic activity changed with initial cell density at the time of induction (condition 2). The maximum volumetric xylanase activity increased with increased initial cell density from 4 to 34 g l(-1) but decreased above this value. The largest total volumetric xylanase productivity under condition 2 (1.3 IU ml(-1) h(-1)) was significantly greater compared to condition 1 (maximum 0.6 IU ml(-1) h(-1)). Consequently, induction of xylanase activity by SCB after growing of C. flavigena on glycerol at intermediate cell density can be a feasible alternative to improve activity and productivity of xylanolytic enzymes.

  16. Resistance of human brain microvascular endothelial cells in culture to methylmercury: cell-density-dependent defense mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirooka, Takashi; Fujiwara, Yasuyuki; Shinkai, Yasuhiro; Yamamoto, Chika; Yasutake, Akira; Satoh, Masahiko; Eto, Komyo; Kaji, Toshiyuki

    2010-06-01

    Vascular toxicity is important for understanding the neurotoxicity of methylmercury, because microvessels strongly influence the construction of microenvironment around neurons. Previously, we found that low density-human brain microvascular pericytes are markedly susceptible to methylmercury cytotoxicity due to high expression levels of the L-type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT-1) that transports methylmercury into the cells. Although LAT-1 can be, in general, highly expressed in sparse cells that require amino acids for growth, we found that human brain microvascular endothelial cells, regardless of cell density, were resistant to methylmercury cytotoxicity. To investigate the mechanisms underlying this resistance, we exposed the endothelial cells at low and high cell densities to methylmercury and determined the extent of nonspecific cell damage, intracellular accumulation of methylmercury, expression of LAT-1 and LAT-2 mRNAs, and intracellular expression of reduced glutathione and metallothionein. These experiments indicate that sparse endothelial cells intracellularly accumulate more methylmercury via the highly expressed LAT-1, but are resistant to methylmercury cytotoxicity by higher expression of the protective sulfhydryl peptides, namely, reduced glutathione and metallothionein. It is suggested that both nonspecific and functional damage is caused in pericytes, whereas functional abnormalities rather than nonspecific damage may occur to a greater extent in the endothelial cells in the brain microvessels exposed to methylmercury. The previous and present data also suggest that methylmercury exhibits toxicity in endothelial cells in a manner different from that in pericytes in the brain microvessels.

  17. Modelling and simulation of double chamber microbial fuel cell. Cell voltage, power density and temperature variation with process parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shankar, Ravi; Mondal, Prasenjit; Chand, Shri [Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Uttaranchal (India). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2013-11-01

    In the present paper steady state models of a double chamber glucose glutamic acid microbial fuel cell (GGA-MFC) under continuous operation have been developed and solved using Matlab 2007 software. The experimental data reported in a recent literature has been used for the validation of the models. The present models give prediction on the cell voltage and cell power density with 19-44% errors, which is less (up to 20%) than the errors on the prediction of cell voltage made in some recent literature for the same MFC where the effects of the difference in pH and ionic conductivity between anodic and cathodic solutions on cell voltage were not incorporated in model equations. It also describes the changes in anodic and cathodic chamber temperature due to the increase in substrate concentration and cell current density. Temperature profile across the membrane thickness has also been studied. (orig.)

  18. High-density polymer microarrays: identifying synthetic polymers that control human embryonic stem cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Anne; Mjoseng, Heidi K; Zhang, Rong; Kalloudis, Michail; Koutsos, Vasileios; de Sousa, Paul A; Bradley, Mark

    2014-06-01

    The fabrication of high-density polymer microarray is described, allowing the simultaneous and efficient evaluation of more than 7000 different polymers in a single-cellular-based screen. These high-density polymer arrays are applied in the search for synthetic substrates for hESCs culture. Up-scaling of the identified hit polymers enables long-term cellular cultivation and promoted successful stem-cell maintenance. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Intrinsic cardiac adrenergic (ICA) cell density and MAO-A activity in failing rat hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Eif, Vincent W W; Bogaards, Sylvia J P; van der Laarse, Willem J

    2014-02-01

    The efficiency (work/oxygen consumption) of isolated papillary muscles from failing hearts is reduced. We investigated whether this can be due to an increase of intrinsic cardiac adrenergic (ICA) cell density. The number of ICA cells in the septum and both ventricular walls was determined by tyrosine hydroxylase immunohistochemistry in rats with monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension. We found that the number of ICA cells is about 200,000 per rat heart. ICA cell density was significantly lower in right ventricular myocardium of hypertrophied hearts (P ICA cell density and MAO-A activity was absent. Clorgyline (2 μM) decreased the basal rate of oxygen consumption of right ventricular papillary muscles by 65 μM O(2)/s (P = 0.027). This rate can only be maintained for several seconds judging from the catecholamine content of the preparations reported previously. High ICA cell activity rather than density and/or recycling of oxidized catecholamines are discussed as alternative explanations for the low myocardial efficiency in experimental pulmonary hypertension.

  20. Epithelial cell density in cataractous lenses of patients with diabetes: association with erythrocyte aldose reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumamoto, Yuko; Takamura, Yoshihiro; Kubo, Eri; Tsuzuki, Syousai; Akagi, Yoshio

    2007-09-01

    In the present study we evaluated the cell density of lens epithelium and its relation to the degree of erythrocyte aldose reductase (AR) in patients with type 2 diabetes. This prospective clinical study included 46 eyes of patients with type 2 diabetes and 48 eyes of patients without diabetes mellitus (DM). Flat preparations of lens epithelial cells (LECs) attached to the anterior capsule were studied. Multiple regression analysis was performed to evaluate the association between lens cell density and age, gender, type of cataract, duration of diabetes, diabetic retinopathy (DR), the levels of glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and erythrocyte AR. The mean density of LECs of patients with type 2 diabetes was 4,141+/-508cells/mm(2), which was significantly lower than that of patients without DM (4,560+/-458cells/mm(2); p6.5%) or with DR. These results suggest that the polyol pathway via AR may be associated with the reduction of epithelial cell density in the eyes of patients with DM.

  1. Tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase production by human dental pulp stromal cells is enhanced by high density cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, Matthew J; Dennis, Caitriona; Yang, Xuebin B; Kirkham, Jennifer

    2015-08-01

    The cell surface hydrolase tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) (also known as MSCA-1) is used to identify a sub-population of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) with high mineralising potential and is found on subsets of cells within the dental pulp. We aim to determine whether TNAP is co-expressed by human dental pulp stromal cells (hDPSCs) alongside a range of BMSC markers, whether this is an active form of the enzyme and the effects of culture duration and cell density on its expression. Cells from primary dental pulp and culture expanded hDPSCs expressed TNAP. Subsequent analyses revealed persistent TNAP expression and co-expression with BMSC markers such as CD73 and CD90. Flow cytometry and biochemical assays showed that increased culture durations and cell densities enhanced TNAP expression by hDPSCs. Arresting the hDPSC cell cycle also increased TNAP expression. These data confirm that TNAP is co-expressed by hDPSCs together with other BMSC markers and show that cell density affects TNAP expression levels. We conclude that TNAP is a potentially useful marker for hDPSC selection especially for uses in mineralised tissue regenerative therapies.

  2. Microstructure characterisation of solid oxide electrolysis cells operated at high current density

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bowen, Jacob R.; Bentzen, Janet Jonna; Chen, Ming

    High temperature solid oxide cells can be operated either as fuel cells or electrolysis cells for efficient power generation or production of hydrogen from steam or synthesis gas (H2 + CO) from steam and CO2 respectively. When operated under harsh conditions, they often exhibit microstructural......, microstructure evolution of the Ni-yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) is followed as a function of galvanostatic steam electrolysis testing at current densities between -0.5 and -1.0 A cm-2 for periods of up to 750 hours at 800 °C. The volume fraction and size of the percolating Ni particles was statistically...... quantified using the mean linear intercept method as a function of current density and correlated to increases in serial resistance. The above structural changes are then compared in terms of electrode degradation observed during the co-electrolysis of steam and CO2 at current densities up to -1.5 A cm-2...

  3. Cell damage from radiation-induced bystander effects for different cell densities simulated by a mathematical model via cellular automata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meireles, Sincler P. de; Santos, Adriano M.; Grynberg, Suely Epsztein, E-mail: spm@cdtn.b, E-mail: amsantos@cdtn.b, E-mail: seg@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Nunes, Maria Eugenia S., E-mail: mariaeugenia@iceb.ufop.b [Universidade Federal de Ouro Preto (UFOP), MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    During recent years, there has been a shift from an approach focused entirely on DNA as the main target of ionizing radiation to a vision that considers complex signaling pathways in cells and among cells within tissues. Several newly recognized responses were classified as the so-called non-target responses in which the biological effects are not directly related to the amount of energy deposited in the DNA of cells that were traversed by radiation. In 1992 the bystander effect was described referring to a series of responses such as death, chromosomal instability or other abnormalities that occur in non-irradiated cells that came into contact with irradiated cells or medium from irradiated cells. In this work, we have developed a mathematical model via cellular automata, to quantify cell death induced by the bystander effect. The model is based on experiments with irradiated cells conditioned medium which suggests that irradiated cells secrete molecules in the medium that are capable of damaging other cells. The computational model consists of two-dimensional cellular automata which is able to simulate the transmission of bystander signals via extrinsic route and via Gap junctions. The model has been validated by experimental results in the literature. The time evolution of the effect and the dose-response curves were obtained in good accordance to them. Simulations were conducted for different values of bystander and irradiated cell densities with constant dose. From this work, we have obtained a relationship between cell density and effect. (author)

  4. Novel method for continuous cell separation by density gradient centrifugation: evaluation of a miniature separation column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiono, Hiroyuki; Ito, Yoichiro

    2003-05-01

    A compact bench-top model of the centrifuge enables continuous cell separation based on density differences. The apparatus holds a small separation disk equipped with a circular channel (8 mL capacity) separated by a septum. A set of isotonic Percoll media with different densities is continuously introduced at one terminal and collected from the other. Under a centrifugal force field, cell suspension introduced into the proximal portion of the channel results in continuous separation of cells according to their densities. The performance of the apparatus was demonstrated with the separation of human buffy coat containing nucleated cells (>10(8)) among a large population (10(10)) of RBC. The results indicated that the method is capable of separating a large number of nucleated cells, with minimum damage, for a few hours of operation wherein neutrophils are well resolved from lymphocytes. The method may be applied to other types of samples including cord blood, blood from small animals, cultured cells, pancreatic beta cell islets, malaria parasites, sperm cells, etc.

  5. LTE Micro-cell Deployment for High-Density Railway Areas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sniady, Aleksander; Kassab, Mohamed; Soler, José

    2014-01-01

    Long Term Evolution (LTE) is a serious candidate for the future releases of the European Rail Traffic Management System (ERTMS). LTE offers more capacity and supports new communication-based applications and services for railways. Nevertheless, even with this technology, the classical macro......-cell radio deployments reach overload, especially in high-density areas, such as major train stations. In this paper, an LTE micro-cell deployment is investigated in high-density railway areas. Copenhagen Main Station is considered as a realistic deployment study case, with a set of relevant railway...

  6. Density of states measurements in a p-i-n solar cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crandall, R.S.; Wang, Q. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1996-05-01

    The authors describe results of density of states (DOS) profiling in p-i-n solar-cell devices using drive-level capacitance (DLC) techniques. Near the p-i interface the defect density is high, decreasing rapidly into the interior, reaching low values in the central region of the cell, and rising rapidly again at the n-i interface. They show that the states in the central region are neutral dangling-bond defects, whereas those near the interfaces with the doped layers are charged dangling bonds.

  7. Increased bacterial cell density and recombinant protein yield using a commercial microbial cultivation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, Grantley R; Bowden, Timothy R; Shiell, Brian J; Michalski, Wojtek P

    2014-01-01

    EnBase (BioSilta, Finland) is a microbial cultivation system that replicates fed-batch systems through sustained release of glucose by enzymatic degradation of a polymeric substrate. Achievable bacterial cell densities and recombinant capripoxvirus protein expression levels, solubility, and antigenicity using the EnBase system were assessed. BL21-AI Escherichia coli expressing capripoxvirus proteins achieved up to eightfold higher cell densities when grown in EnBase media compared with standard media. Greater yields of capripoxvirus proteins were attained using EnBase media, either through increases in the amount of expressed protein per cell in conjunction with higher cell density or through the increase in cell density alone. Addition of EnBase booster enhanced protein yield for one of the proteins tested but reduced yield for the other. However, the amount of soluble forms of the capripoxvirus proteins tested was not different from that observed from cultures grown under standard conditions. Purified capripoxvirus proteins expressed using EnBase or standard media were assessed for their performance by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and were shown to be equally capable of specifically binding capripoxvirus antibodies.

  8. The effects of daily wear contact lenses on goblet cell density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, C G; Campbell, J B; Steel, S A; Burke, J H

    1994-11-01

    Some patients can wear contact lenses with a low tear breakup time while others with an identical tear breakup time cannot wear lenses. This suggests the current method of tear film assessment is inadequate at differentiating between these two types of patients. The study attempts to expand our knowledge of the tear film with special attention directed to a critical yet little studied component: mucin. Mucin is vital to maintenance of the tear film and functions as a tear film stabilizer. The condition of the precorneal tear film is a major determinant in the success of contact lens wear. Eighteen subjects free of ocular surface disease who had never worn contact lenses had the goblet cell density of their inferior bulbar conjunctiva determined by impression cytology. The subjects were then fit in a 38 percent water polymacon lens and their goblet cell density determined on a monthly basis for 6 months. Nearly a 2-fold increase in goblet cell density was observed in 88 percent of the subjects over the 6-month period. The first statistically significant increase occurred 5 months after the initiation of lens wear when the goblet cell density rose from 4.19-7.84 percent. We speculate the increase in goblet cells is an adaptive response of the ocular surface to a coated daily wear contact lens.

  9. Pure Quantum Interpretations Are not Viable

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmelzer, I.

    2011-02-01

    Pure interpretations of quantum theory, which throw away the classical part of the Copenhagen interpretation without adding new structure to its quantum part, are not viable. This is a consequence of a non-uniqueness result for the canonical operators.

  10. Spontaneous oscillations of cell voltage, power density, and anode exit CO concentration in a PEM fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hui; Rihko-Struckmann, Liisa; Sundmacher, Kai

    2011-10-28

    The spontaneous oscillations of the cell voltage and output power density of a PEMFC (with PtRu/C anode) using CO-containing H(2) streams as anodic fuels have been observed during galvanostatic operating. It is ascribed to the dynamic coupling of the CO adsorption (poisoning) and the electrochemical CO oxidation (reactivating) processes in the anode chamber of the single PEMFC. Accompanying the cell voltage and power density oscillations, the discrete CO concentration oscillations at the anode outlet of the PEMFC were also detected, which directly confirms the electrochemical CO oxidation taking place in the anode chamber during galvanostatic operating. This journal is © the Owner Societies 2011

  11. Degradation of Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells Operated at High Current Densities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tao, Youkun; Ebbesen, Sune Dalgaard; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2014-01-01

    In this work the durability of solid oxide cells for co-electrolysis of steam and carbon dioxide (45 % H2O + 45 % CO2 + 10 % H2) at high current densities was investigated. The tested cells are Ni-YSZ electrode supported, with a YSZ electrolyte and either a LSM-YSZ or LSCF-CGO oxygen electrode....... A current density of -1.5 and -2.0 A/cm2 was applied to the cell and the gas conversion was 45 % and 60 %, respectively. The cells were operated for a period of up to 700 hours. The electrochemical analysis revealed significant performance degradation for the ohmic process, oxygen ion interfacial transfer...

  12. Enzyme controlled glucose auto-delivery for high cell density cultivations in microplates and shake flasks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casteleijn Marco G

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Here we describe a novel cultivation method, called EnBase™, or enzyme-based-substrate-delivery, for the growth of microorganisms in millilitre and sub-millilitre scale which yields 5 to 20 times higher cell densities compared to standard methods. The novel method can be directly applied in microwell plates and shake flasks without any requirements for additional sensors or liquid supply systems. EnBase is therefore readily applicable for many high throughput applications, such as DNA production for genome sequencing, optimisation of protein expression, production of proteins for structural genomics, bioprocess development, and screening of enzyme and metagenomic libraries. Results High cell densities with EnBase are obtained by applying the concept of glucose-limited fed-batch cultivation which is commonly used in industrial processes. The major difference of the novel method is that no external glucose feed is required, but glucose is released into the growth medium by enzymatic degradation of starch. To cope with the high levels of starch necessary for high cell density cultivation, starch is supplied to the growing culture suspension by continuous diffusion from a storage gel. Our results show that the controlled enzyme-based supply of glucose allows a glucose-limited growth to high cell densities of OD600 = 20 to 30 (corresponding to 6 to 9 g l-1 cell dry weight without the external feed of additional compounds in shake flasks and 96-well plates. The final cell density can be further increased by addition of extra nitrogen during the cultivation. Production of a heterologous triosphosphate isomerase in E. coli BL21(DE3 resulted in 10 times higher volumetric product yield and a higher ratio of soluble to insoluble product when compared to the conventional production method. Conclusion The novel EnBase method is robust and simple-to-apply for high cell density cultivation in shake flasks and microwell plates. The

  13. A mathematical model of the current density distribution in electrochemical cells - AUTHORS’ REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PREDRAG M. ŽIVKOVIĆ

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available An approach based on the equations of electrochemical kinetics for the estimation of the current density distribution in electrochemical cells is presented. This approach was employed for a theoretical explanation of the phenomena of the edge and corner effects. The effects of the geometry of the system, the kinetic parameters of the cathode reactions and the resistivity of the solution are also discussed. A procedure for a complete analysis of the current distribution in electrochemical cells is presented.

  14. Inverse Relationship Between Leydig Cell Density and Metastatic Potential of Prostatic Adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. John Wang

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Evaluate the relationship between metastatic potential of prostatic adenocarcinoma (PC and testicular Leydig cell density. Materials and methods: Tissue samples from 111 men, age 52–85, with PC and bilateral orchiectomy were evaluated for Leydig cell density. The patients were divided into two groups: Group A were patients with metastasis (n=36 and Group B were patients without metastasis (n=75. Leydig cell density was determined by direct manual microscopic cell count on the tissue sections. The means of cell counts by four pathologists, expressed as cell/0.78 mm2 were used for analysis. The normally distributed data were analyzed by two‐tail Student’s t‐test. Thirty‐eight age‐compatible autopsy cases who died of unrelated causes served as normal controls. Results: The mean of Leydig cell count in group A patients was 14.43 (14.43 ± 1.19 SE. Mean of Group B was 47.05 (47.05 ± 4.05 SE whereas normal controls displayed a mean of 48.66 (48.66 ± 2.94 SE. Group A was significantly different from control (p0.75. Conclusions: Patients with metastatic adenocarcinoma of prostate, as a group, have a significantly lower Leydig cell density than patients without metastasis or patients without PC in compatible age groups. The hormonal relationship between this observation is however unknown. One possible explanation is that PC subpopulation with metastatic potential may require different level of endogenous androgen or are androgen‐independent.

  15. Absolute choline concentration measured by quantitative proton MR spectroscopy correlates with cell density in meningioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yue, Qiang [University of Tsukuba, Department of Neurosurgery, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Tsukuba Science City, Ibaraki (Japan)]|[West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Huaxi MR Research Center, Department of Radiology, Chengdu (China); Shibata, Yasushi; Kawamura, Hiraku; Matsumura, Akira [University of Tsukuba, Department of Neurosurgery, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Tsukuba Science City, Ibaraki (Japan); Isobe, Tomonori [Kitasato University, Department of Medical Technology, School of Allied Health Sciences, Minato, Tokyo (Japan); Anno, Izumi [University of Tsukuba, Department of Radiology, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Gong, Qi-Yong [West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Huaxi MR Research Center, Department of Radiology, Chengdu (China)]|[University of Liverpool, Division of Medical Imaging, Faculty of Medicine, Liverpool (United Kingdom)

    2009-01-15

    This study was aimed to investigate the relationship between quantitative proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) and pathological changes in meningioma. Twenty-two meningioma cases underwent single voxel 1H-MRS (point-resolved spectroscopy sequence, repetition time/echo time = 2,000 ms/68, 136, 272 ms). Absolute choline (Cho) concentration was calculated using tissue water as the internal reference and corrected according to intra-voxel cystic/necrotic parts. Pathological specimens were stained with MIB-1 antibody to measure cell density and proliferation index. Correlation analysis was performed between absolute Cho concentration and cell density and MIB-1 labeled proliferation index. Average Cho concentration of all meningiomas before correction was 2.95 {+-} 0.86 mmol/kg wet weight. It was increased to 3.23 {+-} 1.15 mmol/kg wet weight after correction. Average cell density of all meningiomas was 333 {+-} 119 cells/HPF, and average proliferation index was 2.93 {+-} 5.72%. A linear, positive correlation between cell density and Cho concentration was observed (r = 0.650, P = 0.001). After correction of Cho concentration, the correlation became more significant (r = 0.737, P < 0.001). However, no significant correlation between Cho concentration and proliferation index was found. There seemed to be a positive correlation trend after correction of Cho concentration but did not reach significant level. Absolute Cho concentration, especially Cho concentration corrected according to intra-voxel cystic/necrotic parts, reflects cell density of meningioma. (orig.)

  16. Disabled cell density sensing leads to dysregulated cholesterol synthesis in glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kambach, Diane M; Halim, Alan S; Cauer, A Gesine; Sun, Qian; Tristan, Carlos A; Celiku, Orieta; Kesarwala, Aparna H; Shankavaram, Uma; Batchelor, Eric; Stommel, Jayne M

    2017-02-28

    A hallmark of cellular transformation is the evasion of contact-dependent inhibition of growth. To find new therapeutic targets for glioblastoma, we looked for pathways that are inhibited by high cell density in astrocytes but not in glioma cells. Here we report that glioma cells have disabled the normal controls on cholesterol synthesis. At high cell density, astrocytes turn off cholesterol synthesis genes and have low cholesterol levels, but glioma cells keep this pathway on and maintain high cholesterol. Correspondingly, cholesterol pathway upregulation is associated with poor prognosis in glioblastoma patients. Densely-plated glioma cells increase oxygen consumption, aerobic glycolysis, and the pentose phosphate pathway to synthesize cholesterol, resulting in a decrease in reactive oxygen species, TCA cycle intermediates, and ATP. This constitutive cholesterol synthesis is controlled by the cell cycle, as it can be turned off by cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors and it correlates with disabled cell cycle control though loss of p53 and RB. Finally, glioma cells, but not astrocytes, are sensitive to cholesterol synthesis inhibition downstream of the mevalonate pathway, suggesting that specifically targeting cholesterol synthesis might be an effective treatment for glioblastoma.

  17. Ultra-high cell-density silicon photomultipliers with high detection efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acerbi, Fabio; Gola, Alberto; Regazzoni, Veronica; Paternoster, Giovanni; Borghi, Giacomo; Piemonte, Claudio; Zorzi, Nicola

    2017-05-01

    Silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) are arrays of many single-photon avalanche diodes (SPADs), all connected in parallel. Each SPAD is sensitive to single photons and the SiPM gives an output proportional to the number of detected photons. These sensors are becoming more and more popular in different applications, from high-energy physics to spectroscopy, and they have been significantly improved over last years, decreasing the noise, increasing the cell fill-factor (FF) and thus achieving very high photon-detection efficiency (PDE). In FBK (Trento, Italy), we developed new SiPM technologies with high-density (HD) and, more recently, ultra-high-density (UHD) of cells (i.e. density of SPADs). These technologies employ deep-trenches between cells, for electrical and optical isolation. As an extreme case the smallest-cell, SiPM, i.e. with 5μm cell pitch, has about 40000 SPADs per squared millimeter. Such small SPAD dimensions gives a significantly high dynamic range to the SiPM. These small-cells SiPM have a lower correlated noise (including lower afterpulsing probability) and a faster recharge time (in the order of few nanoseconds), and they also preserve a very good detection efficiency (despite the small SPAD dimension).

  18. Cell openness manipulation of low density polyurethane foam for efficient sound absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyuk Park, Ju; Suh Minn, Kyung; Rae Lee, Hyeong; Hyun Yang, Sei; Bin Yu, Cheng; Yeol Pak, Seong; Sung Oh, Chi; Seok Song, Young; June Kang, Yeon; Ryoun Youn, Jae

    2017-10-01

    Satisfactory sound absorption using a low mass density foam is an intriguing desire for achieving high fuel efficiency of vehicles. This issue has been dealt with a microcellular geometry manipulation. In this study, we demonstrate the relationship between cell openness of polyurethane (PU) foam and sound absorption behaviors, both theoretically and experimentally. The objective of this work is to mitigate a threshold of mass density by rendering a sound absorber which shows a satisfactory performance. The cell openness, which causes the best sound absorption performance in all cases considered, was estimated as 15% by numerical simulation. Cell openness of PU foam was experimentally manipulated into desired ranges by adjusting rheological properties in a foaming reaction. Microcellular structures of the fabricated PU foams were observed and sound absorption coefficients were measured using a B&K impedance tube. The fabricated PU foam with the best cell openness showed better sound absorption performance than the foam with double mass density. We envisage that this study can help the manufacture of low mass density sound absorbing foams more efficiently and economically.

  19. Corneal endothelial cell density and morphology in low and moderate myopic Chinese eyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Mei Chun

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To describe and compare the corneal endothelial cell density and morphology in young, low and moderate myopic Chinese adults in Malaysian Chinese population.METHODS: Non-contact specular microscopy (Topcon SP3000P, Tokyo, Japan was performed in low (n=78; 21.22±1.51 years and moderate (n=78; 21.82±1.40 years myopic subjects. The mean of three consecutive measurements of endothelial cell density (MCD, coefficient of variation (CV in the cell size, and hexagonal appearance of the cell were obtained.RESULTS: In low myopic eyes the MCD was 3 063.0±176.2/mm2, the mean CV was 33.4±4.0% and the mean hexagonal appearance of the cell was 57.9±2.7%. In moderate myopic eyes the MCD was 2961.6±159.0/mm2, the mean CV was 33.9±3.6% and mean hexagonal appearance of the cell was 56.2±4.7%. There were statistically significant differences in MCD (PPCONCLUSION:The corneal endothelial cell layer in more myopic eyes tends to have less MCD and cell hexagonality compared to lower myopic eyes. Nevertheless, there is no significant difference in CV between low and moderate myopic eyes.

  20. A figure of merit to evaluate transparent conductor oxides for solar cells using photonic flux density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendez-Gamboa, J.A., E-mail: jmendez@uady.mx [Engineering School, University of Yucatan, AP 150 Cordemex, 97310 Mérida, Yucatán (Mexico); Castro-Rodriguez, R. [Applied Physics Department, CINVESTAV-IPN Mérida, C.P. 97310, Mérida, Yucatán (Mexico); Perez-Quintana, I.V.; Medina-Esquivel, R.A.; Martel-Arbelo, A. [Engineering School, University of Yucatan, AP 150 Cordemex, 97310 Mérida, Yucatán (Mexico)

    2016-01-29

    We report an alternative method to evaluate transparent conductor oxides (TCO) from their photonic flux density (PFD(hυ)) to be used in solar cells. From the transmittance spectrum (T(hυ)) in the visible region, we calculate the PFD(hυ) and the solar photon flux-weighted transmittance (T{sub SW}) of one specific TCO with potential application in solar cells. The photo-current density (J{sub PH}) in mA/cm{sup 2} of one specific TCO when exposed to white light is evaluated when PFD(hυ) is integrated over the whole solar electromagnetic spectrum. Finally, we define a figure of merit as J{sub PH} over the TCO film sheet resistance to find the best equilibrium between the transmission and its electrical resistance. To carry out this work, a bibliographical search of investigations about development of TCOs was extensively made to evaluate its T(hυ), T{sub SW,} PFD(hυ), J{sub PH} and the figure of merit that we propose. From our results, we consider that the proposed method is a good tool for a fine comparison of transparent conductive films in solar cell development. - Highlights: • A figure of merit is presented for the evaluation of TCO used in solar cells. • It is defined as the ratio of photo-current density over TCO sheet resistance. • It is a tool for a fine comparison of TCO films in solar cell development.

  1. Noninvasive prenatal diagnosis. Use of density gradient centrifugation, magnetically activated cell sorting and in situ hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campagnoli, C; Multhaupt, H A; Ludomirski, A

    1997-01-01

    cells recovered did not differ. Seven of seven male pregnancies were correctly identified. One case of trisomy 21 was detected. CONCLUSION: The in situ hybridization analysis of fetal nucleated erythrocytes isolated from maternal blood using single density gradient centrifugation, anti-CD71/anti...... of the isolated cells were subjected to in situ hybridization with specific DNA probes for the Y chromosome and chromosome 21 to confirm the fetal origin. RESULTS: After MiniMACS the enrichment factors for the CD71/GPA- and CD36/GPA-positive cells from maternal blood were similar, and the percentages of fetal...

  2. In vitro culture of cell aggregates of rye (Secale cereale L.) at low densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mottley, J; Sybenga, J

    1988-05-01

    The growth of cell aggregates from a rye suspension culture was tested at low density in three culture systems. Mass seeding was the most supportive system, followed by agarose droplets. Microdroplet culture using Cuprak dishes was the least effective system. Growth was stimulated by the presence of a feeder layer of suspension cells but only if the feeder contact with the nursed cells was via a liquid and not a gaseous phase. Plating efficiences were enhanced by the feeder effect, whereas the subsequent growth rates were less affected. The techniques described should prove useful in programs aimed at the in vitro genetic manipulation of rye or other cereals.

  3. A High Power-Density Mediator-Free Microfluidic Biophotovoltaic Device for Cyanobacterial Cells

    CERN Document Server

    Bombelli, Paolo; Herling, Therese W; Howe, Christopher J; Knowles, Tuomas P J

    2014-01-01

    Biophotovoltaics has emerged as a promising technology for generating renewable energy since it relies on living organisms as inexpensive, self-repairing and readily available catalysts to produce electricity from an abundant resource - sunlight. The efficiency of biophotovoltaic cells, however, has remained significantly lower than that achievable through synthetic materials. Here, we devise a platform to harness the large power densities afforded by miniaturised geometries. To this effect, we have developed a soft-lithography approach for the fabrication of microfluidic biophotovoltaic devices that do not require membranes or mediators. Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 cells were injected and allowed to settle on the anode, permitting the physical proximity between cells and electrode required for mediator-free operation. We demonstrate power densities of above 100 mW/m2 for a chlorophyll concentration of 100 {\\mu}M under white light, a high value for biophotovoltaic devices without extrinsic supply of additional...

  4. The role of oxygen in yeast metabolism during high cell density brewery fermentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbelen, P J; Saerens, S M G; Van Mulders, S E; Delvaux, F; Delvaux, F R

    2009-04-01

    The volumetric productivity of the beer fermentation process can be increased by using a higher pitching rate (i.e., higher inoculum size). However, the decreased yeast net growth observed in these high cell density fermentations can have a negative impact on the physiological stability throughout subsequent yeast generations. The use of different oxygen conditions (wort aeration, wort oxygenation, yeast preoxygenation) was investigated to improve the growth yield during high cell density fermentations and yeast metabolic and physiological parameters were assessed systematically. Together with a higher extent of growth (dependent on the applied oxygen conditions), the fermentation power and the formation of unsaturated fatty acids were also affected. Wort oxygenation had a significant decreasing effect on the formation of esters, which was caused by a decreased expression of the alcohol acetyl transferase gene ATF1, compared with the other conditions. Lower glycogen and trehalose levels at the end of fermentation were observed in case of the high cell density fermentations with oxygenated wort and the reference fermentation. The expression levels of BAP2 (encoding the branched chain amino acid permease), ERG1 (encoding squalene epoxidase), and the stress responsive gene HSP12 were predominantly influenced by the high cell concentrations, while OLE1 (encoding the fatty acid desaturase) and the oxidative stress responsive genes SOD1 and CTT1 were mainly affected by the oxygen availability per cell. These results demonstrate that optimisation of high cell density fermentations could be achieved by improving the oxygen conditions, without drastically affecting the physiological condition of the yeast and beer quality.

  5. A high parasite density environment induces transcriptional changes and cell death in Plasmodium falciparum blood stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Evelyn S; Abidi, Sabia Z; Teye, Marian; Leliwa-Sytek, Aleksandra; Rask, Thomas S; Cobbold, Simon A; Tonkin-Hill, Gerry Q; Subramaniam, Krishanthi S; Sexton, Anna E; Creek, Darren J; Daily, Johanna P; Duffy, Michael F; Day, Karen P

    2017-12-27

    Transient regulation of Plasmodium numbers below the density that induces fever has been observed in chronic malaria infections in humans. This species transcending control cannot be explained by immunity alone. Using an in vitro system we have observed density dependent regulation of malaria population size as a mechanism to possibly explain these in vivo observations. Specifically, Plasmodium falciparum blood stages from a high but not low-density environment exhibited unique phenotypic changes during the late trophozoite (LT) and schizont stages of the intraerythrocytic cycle. These included in order of appearance: failure of schizonts to mature and merozoites to replicate, apoptotic-like morphological changes including shrinking, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, and blebbing with eventual release of aberrant parasites from infected erythrocytes. This unique death phenotype was triggered in a stage-specific manner by sensing of a high-density culture environment. Conditions of glucose starvation, nutrient depletion, and high lactate could not induce the phenotype. A high-density culture environment induced rapid global changes in the parasite transcriptome including differential expression of genes involved in cell remodeling, clonal antigenic variation, metabolism, and cell death pathways including an apoptosis-associated metacaspase gene. This transcriptional profile was also characterized by concomitant expression of asexual and sexual stage-specific genes. The data show strong evidence to support our hypothesis that density sensing exists in P. falciparum. They indicate that an apoptotic-like mechanism may play a role in P. falciparum density regulation, which, as in yeast, has features quite distinguishable from mammalian apoptosis. Gene expression data are available in the GEO databases under the accession number GSE91188. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  6. Anatomical Mapping and Density of Merkel Cells in Skin and Mucosae of the Dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, Gustavo A; Rodríguez, Francisco; Quesada, Óscar; Herráez, Pedro; Fernández, Antonio; Espinosa-de-Los-Monteros, Antonio

    2016-09-01

    Merkel cells (MCs) are specialized cutaneous receptor cells involved with tactile sense. Although the distribution of MCs has been extensively studied in humans and rodents, their precise distribution and density throughout skin in the dog has not previously been determined. Knowledge of their distribution could facilitate understanding of their functions. By using of immunohistochemistry, density, and anatomical mapping of the MCs population in the dog skin was determined. Assessment of the MCs innervation was also achieved. Different patterns were noted in epidermis, hair follicles, or mucosa, including variable-sized clusters, linear or horse-shaped arrangements, and scattered and individualized cells. MCs revealed great variations in density and distribution over the body surface, with the highest numbers in oral mucosa and facial skin. There was no correlation of MCs density with age, sex, type of breed, coat type or pigmentation. Between 41 and 65% of MCs in hairy and glabrous skin and 8-18% of MCs in oral mucosa were in intimate contact with intraepithelial axon terminals. These findings indicate that canine MCs are numerous in sensory receptive areas and may be associated with the tactile sense in the dog. The present article enhances the knowledge of the skin structure in this species. Anat Rec, 299:1157-1164, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Direct alcohol fuel cells: toward the power densities of hydrogen-fed proton exchange membrane fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanxin; Bellini, Marco; Bevilacqua, Manuela; Fornasiero, Paolo; Lavacchi, Alessandro; Miller, Hamish A; Wang, Lianqin; Vizza, Francesco

    2015-02-01

    A 2 μm thick layer of TiO2 nanotube arrays was prepared on the surface of the Ti fibers of a nonwoven web electrode. After it was doped with Pd nanoparticles (1.5 mgPd  cm(-2) ), this anode was employed in a direct alcohol fuel cell. Peak power densities of 210, 170, and 160 mW cm(-2) at 80 °C were produced if the cell was fed with 10 wt % aqueous solutions of ethanol, ethylene glycol, and glycerol, respectively, in 2 M aqueous KOH. The Pd loading of the anode was increased to 6 mg cm(-2) by combining four single electrodes to produce a maximum peak power density with ethanol at 80 °C of 335 mW cm(-2) . Such high power densities result from a combination of the open 3 D structure of the anode electrode and the high electrochemically active surface area of the Pd catalyst, which promote very fast kinetics for alcohol electro-oxidation. The peak power and current densities obtained with ethanol at 80 °C approach the output of H2 -fed proton exchange membrane fuel cells. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. A device to facilitate preparation of high-density neural cell cultures in MEAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mok, S Y; Lim, Y M; Goh, S Y

    2009-05-15

    A device to facilitate high-density seeding of dissociated neural cells on planar multi-electrode arrays (MEAs) is presented in this paper. The device comprises a metal cover with two concentric cylinders-the outer cylinder fits tightly on to the external diameter of a MEA to hold it in place and an inner cylinder holds a central glass tube for introducing a cell suspension over the electrode area of the MEA. An O-ring is placed at the bottom of the inner cylinder and the glass tube to provide a fluid-tight seal between the glass tube and the MEA electrode surface. The volume of cell suspension in the glass tube is varied according to the desired plating density. After plating, the device can be lifted from the MEA without leaving any residue on the contact surface. The device has enabled us to increase and control the plating density of neural cell suspension with low viability, and to prepare successful primary cultures from cryopreserved neurons and glia. The cultures of cryopreserved dissociated cortical neurons that we have grown in this manner remained spontaneously active over months, exhibited stable development and similar network characteristics as reported by other researchers.

  9. Modeling Bubble Flow and Current Density Distribution in an Alkaline Electrolysis Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravichandra S. Jupudi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of bubbles on the current density distribution over the electrodes of an alkaline electrolyzer cell is studied using a two-dimensional computational fluid dynamics model. Model includes Eulerian-Eulerian two-phase flow methodology to model the multiphase flow of Hydrogen and Oxygen with water and the behavior of each phase is accounted for using first principle. Hydrogen/Oxygen evolution, flow field and current density distribution are incorporated in the model to account for the complicated physics involved in the process. Fluent 6.2 is used to solve two-phase flow and electrochemistry is incorporated using UDF (User Defined Function feature of Fluent. Model is validated with mesh refinement study and by comparison with experimental measurements. Model is found to replicate the effect of cell voltage and inter-electrode gap (distance between the electrodes on current density accurately. Further, model is found to capture the existence of optimum cell height. The validated model is expected to be a very useful tool in the design and optimization of alkaline electrolyzer cells.

  10. The invasive microalga Chrysophaeum taylorii: Interactive stressors regulate cell density and mucilage production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caronni, Sarah; Calabretti, Chiara; Cavagna, Gianluca; Ceccherelli, Giulia; Delaria, Maria Anna; Macri, Giovanni; Navone, Augusto; Panzalis, Pieraugusto

    2017-08-01

    The benthic mucilage producing microalga Chrysophaeum taylorii Lewis and Bryan (Pelagophyceae) has recently received attention for its rapid spread in the Mediterranean Sea, where its blooms have remarkable detrimental effects. So far no information on C. taylorii response to multiple stressors, especially in terms of mucilage hyperproduction, is available in the literature yet, and a manipulative field experiment in this topic was designed in Tavolara Punta Coda Cavallo Marine Protected Area. The aim of the study was to test the effects of nutrient enrichment (addition of nutrients), mechanical disturbance (partial and total benthic organisms removal) and hydrodynamics (increased water turbulence) on C. taylorii cell density and mucilage abundance. To the purpose, the three above mentioned stressors were simulated and the three treatments were assigned to 20 × 20 cm plots following a full-factorial design (n = 3). Interactive effects of the three stressors affected significantly both benthic C. taylorii cell density and mucilage cover although differently. Mechanical disturbance and high hydrodynamics produced consistent effects on cell density and mucilage production (i.e. the former factor enhancing and the latter decreasing). Nutrient enrichment on the contrary led to contrasting effects, promoting cell abundance and inhibiting mucilage production. Therefore, important mucilage blooms are expected in oligotrophic sheltered coastal locations where barren areas are present. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Increased cell proliferation and mucocyte density in the sea anemone Aiptasia pallida recovering from bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fransolet, David; Roberty, Stéphane; Herman, Anne-Catherine; Tonk, Linda; Hoegh-Guldberg, Ove; Plumier, Jean-Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Recovery of coral after bleaching episodes is a critical period for the health of the reef ecosystem. While events such as symbiont (genus Symbiodinium) shifting/shuffling or tissue apoptosis have been demonstrated to occur following bleaching, little is known concerning tissue recovery or cell proliferation. Here, we studied the sea anemone Aiptasia pallida exposed to a transient elevation of water temperature combined with high illumination (33°C and 1900 µmol photons x m(-2) x s(-1) for 30 h). Following such treatment bleached anemones showed a significant reduction of their Symbiodinium density. Cell proliferation in the ectodermis and gastrodermis was determined by assessing the densities of cells labeled with a thymidine analogue (EdU). Cell proliferation significantly increased during the first day following stress in both tissue types. This increased cell proliferation returned to pre-stress values after one week. Although cell proliferation was higher in the ectodermis in absence of stress, it was relatively more pronounced in the gastrodermis of stressed anemones. In addition, the ratio of ectodermal mucocytes significantly increased three weeks after induced stress. These results suggest that thermal/photic stress coupled with the loss of the symbionts is able to enhance cell proliferation in both gastrodermis and ectodermis of cnidarians. While new cells formed in the gastrodermis are likely to host new Symbiodinium, the fate of new cells in the ectodermis was only partially revealed. Some new ectodermal cells may, in part, contribute to the increased number of mucocytes which could eventually help strengthen the heterotrophic state until restoration of the symbiosis.

  12. Increased cell proliferation and mucocyte density in the sea anemone Aiptasia pallida recovering from bleaching.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Fransolet

    Full Text Available Recovery of coral after bleaching episodes is a critical period for the health of the reef ecosystem. While events such as symbiont (genus Symbiodinium shifting/shuffling or tissue apoptosis have been demonstrated to occur following bleaching, little is known concerning tissue recovery or cell proliferation. Here, we studied the sea anemone Aiptasia pallida exposed to a transient elevation of water temperature combined with high illumination (33°C and 1900 µmol photons x m(-2 x s(-1 for 30 h. Following such treatment bleached anemones showed a significant reduction of their Symbiodinium density. Cell proliferation in the ectodermis and gastrodermis was determined by assessing the densities of cells labeled with a thymidine analogue (EdU. Cell proliferation significantly increased during the first day following stress in both tissue types. This increased cell proliferation returned to pre-stress values after one week. Although cell proliferation was higher in the ectodermis in absence of stress, it was relatively more pronounced in the gastrodermis of stressed anemones. In addition, the ratio of ectodermal mucocytes significantly increased three weeks after induced stress. These results suggest that thermal/photic stress coupled with the loss of the symbionts is able to enhance cell proliferation in both gastrodermis and ectodermis of cnidarians. While new cells formed in the gastrodermis are likely to host new Symbiodinium, the fate of new cells in the ectodermis was only partially revealed. Some new ectodermal cells may, in part, contribute to the increased number of mucocytes which could eventually help strengthen the heterotrophic state until restoration of the symbiosis.

  13. Significance of Mast Cell Density and Distribution in Various Histopathological Lesions of Leprosy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh .L Munde

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Leprosy also known as Hansen’s disease (HD, is a chronic infection caused by the Mycobacterium leprae. Mast cells in leprosy have been investigated in the recent past and are being examined as a basis for future studies. Materials and Methods: 119 leprosy cases and 14 control biopsies stained with toluidine blue were assessed for density and distribution of mast cells. 38 cases had undergone treatment. Results: Significantly higher mast cell count was obtained in the skin lesions of borderline lepromatous leprosy. On comparison with controls lower counts were observed in polar tuberculoid and indeterminate leprosy whereas higher values were observed in all other groups. The mast cell count in leprosy is probably determined by the pattern of cytokines released by the T lymphocytes. Mast cell density assessed after treatment was reduced in borderline tuberculoid and borderline lepromatous cases however in indeterminate group, the counts were increased. Conclusion: The distribution of mast cells in leprosy is a variable feature and there is no constant site or predilection for a particular type of leprosy.

  14. Grazing of particle-associated bacteria-an elimination of the non-viable fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonsalves, Maria-Judith; Fernandes, Sheryl Oliveira; Priya, Madasamy Lakshmi; LokaBharathi, Ponnapakkam Adikesavan

    Quantification of bacteria being grazed by microzooplankton is gaining importance since they serve as energy subsidies for higher trophic levels which consequently influence fish production. Hence, grazing pressure on viable and non-viable fraction of free and particle-associated bacteria in a tropical estuary controlled mainly by protist grazers was estimated using the seawater dilution technique. In vitro incubations over a period of 42h showed that at the end of 24h, growth coefficient (k) of particle-associated bacteria was 9 times higher at 0.546 than that of free forms. Further, 'k' value of viable cells on particles was double that of free forms at 0.016 and 0.007, respectively. While bacteria associated with particles were grazed (coefficient of removal (g)=0.564), the free forms were relatively less grazed indicating that particle-associated bacteria were exposed to grazers in these waters. Among the viable and non-viable forms, 'g' of non-viable fraction (particle-associated bacteria=0.615, Free=0.0086) was much greater than the viable fraction (particle-associated bacteria=0.056, Free=0.068). Thus, grazing on viable cells was relatively low in both the free and attached states. These observations suggest that non-viable forms of particle-associated bacteria were more prone to grazing and were weeded out leaving the viable cells to replenish the bacterial standing stock. Particle colonization could thus be a temporary refuge for the "persistent variants" where the viable fraction multiply and release their progeny. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Microbiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  15. Enzymatically Modified Low-Density Lipoprotein Promotes Foam Cell Formation in Smooth Muscle Cells via Macropinocytosis and Enhances Receptor-Mediated Uptake of Oxidized Low-Density Lipoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chellan, Bijoy; Reardon, Catherine A; Getz, Godfrey S; Hofmann Bowman, Marion A

    2016-06-01

    Enzyme-modified nonoxidized low-density lipoprotein (ELDL) is present in human atherosclerotic lesions. Our objective is to understand the mechanisms of ELDL uptake and its effects on vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC). Transformation of murine aortic SMCs into foam cells in response to ELDL was analyzed. ELDL, but not acetylated or oxidized LDL, was potent in inducing SMC foam cell formation. Inhibitors of macropinocytosis (LY294002, wortmannin, amiloride) attenuated ELDL uptake. In contrast, inhibitors of receptor-mediated endocytosis (dynasore, sucrose) and inhibitor of caveolae-/lipid raft-mediated endocytosis (filipin) had no effect on ELDL uptake in SMC, suggesting that macropinocytosis is the main mechanism of ELDL uptake by SMC. Receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is not obligatory for ELDL-induced SMC foam cell formation, but primes SMC for the uptake of oxidized LDL in a RAGE-dependent manner. ELDL increased intracellular reactive oxygen species, cytosolic calcium, and expression of lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 in wild-type SMC but not in RAGE(-/-) SMC. The macropinocytotic uptake of ELDL is regulated predominantly by intracellular calcium because ELDL uptake was completely inhibited by pretreatment with the calcium channel inhibitor lacidipine in wild-type and RAGE(-/-) SMC. This is in contrast to pretreatment with PI3 kinase inhibitors which completely prevented ELDL uptake in RAGE(-/-) SMC, but only partially in wild-type SMC. ELDL is highly potent in inducing foam cells in murine SMC. ELDL endocytosis is mediated by calcium-dependent macropinocytosis. Priming SMC with ELDL enhances the uptake of oxidized LDL. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. Results of Current Density Distribution Mapping in PEM Fuel Cells Dependent on Operation Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zbigniew A. Styczynski

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents in situ measurements of a newly developed current density measurement system for proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC. While the functional principle and technical evaluation of the measurement system were presented in a previous paper, this paper analyzes the influence of various operation parameters, including multiple start-stop operation, at the anode, cathode and cooling locations on the distribution and long-term development of the current density. The system was operated for 500 h over two years with long periods of inactivity between measurements. The measurement results are evaluated and provide additional information on how to optimize the operation modes of fuel cells, including the start and stop of such systems as well as the water balance.

  17. Using Generic Examples to Make Viable Arguments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Anne E.; Ely, Rob; Yopp, David

    2017-01-01

    The twenty-first century has seen an increased call to train students to craft mathematical arguments. The third of the Common Core's (CCSS) Standards for Mathematical Practice (SMP 3) (CCSSI 2010) calls for all mathematically proficient students to "construct viable arguments" to support the truth of their ideas and to "critique…

  18. High cell density strategy for poly(3-hydroxybutyrate production by Cupriavidus necator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Ienczak

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate (P(3HB is a carbon and intracellular storage source for different microorganisms and its production can achieve high productivities by means of high cell density cultures. The aim of this study was to propose a high cell density strategy for P(3HB production by Cupriavidus necator. The exponential growth phase demands an accurate control of the oxygen transfer system in the bioreactor, due to maximum specific growth rate (µXr, and, consequently, a maximum specific oxygen uptake rate (QO2, in addition to significant residual biomass (Xr growth in high cell density cultures. In this context, this work investigated the strategy for obtaining high cell density, with the inclusion of a linear growth phase for P(3HB production by C. necator in a fed-batch culture. The linear growth phase was included between the exponential growth phase and the P(3HB production phase as a strategy to reduce the specific growth rate (µXr and specific oxygen uptake rate (QO2, with constant residual biomass growth rate (d(V.Xr/dt = k = constant and linear increase of biomass. Three strategies of culture were performed. The results showed that a high residual biomass concentration (30 gXr.L-1 can be reached by the inclusion of the linear growth strategy and specific growth rates (µXr between 0.08 and 0.05 h-1, at the beginning of the production phase, are necessary to attain a high P(3HB productivity.

  19. Best practices in heterotrophic high-cell-density microalgal processes: achievements, potential and possible limitations

    OpenAIRE

    Bumbak, Fabian; Cook, Stella; Zachleder, Vilém; Hauser, Silas; Kovar, Karin

    2011-01-01

    Microalgae of numerous heterotrophic genera (obligate or facultative) exhibit considerable metabolic versatility and flexibility but are currently underexploited in the biotechnological manufacturing of known plant-derived compounds, novel high-value biomolecules or enriched biomass. Highly efficient production of microalgal biomass without the need for light is now feasible in inexpensive, well-defined mineral medium, typically supplemented with glucose. Cell densities of more than 100 g l−1...

  20. "Bleaching" glycerol in a microfluidic fuel cell to produce high power density at minimal cost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Cauê A; Ibrahim, Omar A; Pei, Pei; Kjeang, Erik

    2018-01-07

    Glycerol/bleach flow-through microfluidic fuel cells are presented. Carbon paper-modified Pt/C nanoparticles were used as the anode and cathode. Glycerol oxidation in alkaline medium was tested against hypochlorite reduction in alkaline and acidic media. The mixed media system displayed a power density of 315 mW cm-2 and an open circuit voltage of 1.9-2.0 V.

  1. Systems biology. Conditional density-based analysis of T cell signaling in single-cell data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnaswamy, Smita; Spitzer, Matthew H; Mingueneau, Michael; Bendall, Sean C; Litvin, Oren; Stone, Erica; Pe'er, Dana; Nolan, Garry P

    2014-11-28

    Cellular circuits sense the environment, process signals, and compute decisions using networks of interacting proteins. To model such a system, the abundance of each activated protein species can be described as a stochastic function of the abundance of other proteins. High-dimensional single-cell technologies, such as mass cytometry, offer an opportunity to characterize signaling circuit-wide. However, the challenge of developing and applying computational approaches to interpret such complex data remains. Here, we developed computational methods, based on established statistical concepts, to characterize signaling network relationships by quantifying the strengths of network edges and deriving signaling response functions. In comparing signaling between naïve and antigen-exposed CD4(+) T lymphocytes, we find that although these two cell subtypes had similarly wired networks, naïve cells transmitted more information along a key signaling cascade than did antigen-exposed cells. We validated our characterization on mice lacking the extracellular-regulated mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) ERK2, which showed stronger influence of pERK on pS6 (phosphorylated-ribosomal protein S6), in naïve cells as compared with antigen-exposed cells, as predicted. We demonstrate that by using cell-to-cell variation inherent in single-cell data, we can derive response functions underlying molecular circuits and drive the understanding of how cells process signals. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  2. Removal of viable bacteria and endotoxins by Electro Deionization (EDI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Norimitsu; Otomo, Teruo; Watabe, Tomoichi; Ase, Tomonobu; Takemura, Takuto; Sato, Toshio

    2011-09-01

    Viable bacteria and endotoxins in water sometimes cause problems for human health. Endotoxins are major components of the outer cell wall of gram-negative bacteria (lipopolysaccharides). In medical procedures, especially haemodialysis (HD) and related therapies (haemodiafiltration (HDF), haemofiltration (HF)), endotoxins in the water for haemodialysis can permeate through the haemodialysis membrane and cause microinflammation or various haemodialysis-related illnesses. To decrease such a biological risk, RO and UF membranes are generally used. Also, hot water disinfection or the chemical disinfection is regularly executed to kill bacteria which produce endotoxins. However, simple treatment methods and equipment may be able to decrease the biological risk more efficiently. In our experiments, we confirmed that viable bacteria and endotoxins were removed by Electro Deionization (EDI) technology and also clarified the desorption mechanisms.

  3. Evaluation of Mast Cell and Blood Vessel Density in Inflammatory Periapical Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safoura Seifi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Radicular cystsand periapical granulomas are the most common periapical inflammatory lesions. However, the role of cellular immunity and microvessels in their pathogenesis remains unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate the mast cell density (MCD, mircovessel density (MVD and investigating the correlation between their densities with each other in the above mentioned lesions.Materials & Methods: In this descriptive cross-sectional study, 40 paraffin blocks of mentioned lesions were selected from achieves of School of Dentistry, Babol University of Medical Sciences. Three sections were prepared from each block and stained by hematoxylin-eosin, toluidine blue, and immunohistochemically for CD34 to determine the score of inflammation, presence of mast cells and degranulatedmast cells (DMCs, and MVD, respectively. The correlation between MCD and either inflammatory infiltrate or MVD was evaluated. Data analyzed by t student, Mann-Whitney and Spearman test.Results: Mast cells were present in all periapical inflammatory lesions; 15.4±14.8 for MCD, 7.2±6.1 for DMCs, and the ratio of DMCs to total number of MCs was 0.354±0.166 and 14.8+4.44 for blood vessel density in radicular cyst and 8.52±6.75, 2.91±2.1, 0.196±0.194 and 13±8.02 in periapical granulomas, respectively. There was a positive correlation between MCD and MVD in radicular cyst (P=0.03, r=0.341, but not in periapical granulomas (P=0.6, r=0.124. MCD and MVD increased with the score of inflammation in radicular cyst (P=0.001, r=0.7 and periapical granuloma (P=0.012, r=0.54.Conclusion: Mast cells and microvessels play a role in pathogenesis of periapical inflammatory lesions. In this study, the density of mast cells and DMCs in radicular cyst was higher than periapical granulomas, but no difference was observed regarding MVD in periapical inflammatory lesions. It seems that the relationship between MCD and MVD is different based on the clinical stage of periapical

  4. Microvascular density, CD68 and tryptase expression in human diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinaccio, Christian; Ingravallo, Giuseppe; Gaudio, Francesco; Perrone, Tommasina; Nico, Beatrice; Maoirano, Eugenio; Specchia, Giorgina; Ribatti, Domenico

    2014-11-01

    Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common form of Non-Hodgkin lymphoma characterized by clinical and biological heterogeneity attributable both to the tumor cells and the complex tumor-microenvironment surrounding them. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) and mast cells are two major components of the tumor inflammatory infiltrate with a definite role in enhancing tumor angiogenesis. In this study, we have investigated CD68 and tryptase expression and their relationship with microvascular density (MVD) in chemo-resistant and chemosensitive patients affected by DLBCL. CD68 and tryptase expression as well as MVD were increased in chemo-resistant patients when compared with chemosensitive patients. Tryptase expression showed a positive correlation with MVD, supporting a role for mast cell in DLBCL tumor angiogenesis, while CD68 correlation with MVD was not significant, indicating a different role for TAMs than angiogenesis in DLBCL. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Production of nattokinase by high cell density fed-batch culture of Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Eun-Yeong; Kim, Kyung Mi; Kim, Mi Kyoung; Lee, In Young; Kim, Beom Soo

    2011-09-01

    Bacillus subtilis was cultivated to high cell density for nattokinase production by pH-stat fed-batch culture. A concentrated mixture solution of glucose and peptone was automatically added by acid-supplying pump when culture pH rose above high limit. Effect of the ratio of glucose to peptone in feeding solution was investigated on cell growth and nattokinase production by changing the ratio from 0.2 to 5 g glucose/g peptone. The highest cell concentration was 77 g/L when the ratio was 0.2 g glucose/g peptone. Cell concentration decreased with increasing the ratio of glucose to peptone in feeding solution, while the optimum condition existed for nattokinase production. The highest nattokinase activity was 14,500 unit/mL at a ratio of 0.33 g glucose/g peptone, which was 4.3 times higher than that in batch culture.

  6. Low density lipoprotein inhibits accumulation of nitrites in murine brain endothelial cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereta, M; Bereta, J; Cohen, S; Cohen, M C

    1992-07-15

    Endothelial cells produce nitric oxide which is considered to serve as a major source of endothelial derived relaxing factor activity. It has been demonstrated that activation of mouse brain endothelium by TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma led to accumulation of nitrite which is presumably formed by oxidation of nitric oxide. A number of studies suggest that reactive oxygen species produced by cytokine-activated cells are involved in the conversion of nitric oxide to nitrites and nitrates. We investigated whether low density lipoprotein (LDL), acting as a radical scavenger, is able to inhibit nitrite accumulation in mouse brain endothelial cell cultures and in a cell-free system in which sodium nitroprusside was used as a source of nitric oxide. A comparison of these two models indicates the active involvement of LDL in suppressing nitrite accumulation in murine endothelial cultures.

  7. Relationship of mast cell density with lymphangiogenesis and prognostic parameters in breast carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keser, Sevinc H; Kandemir, Nilufer O; Ece, Dilek; Gecmen, Gonca G; Gul, Aylin E; Barisik, Nagehan O; Sensu, Sibel; Buyukuysal, Cagatay; Barut, Figen

    2017-04-01

    In many cancers, mast cell density (MCD) in the tumor microenvironment is associated with tumor progression and, to a greater extent, angiogenesis. Our study was designed to investigate the correlation between MCD, tumor lymphangiogenesis, and several well-established prognostic parameters in breast cancer. One hundred and four cases of invasive breast carcinoma diagnosed in our clinic between 2007 and 2011 were included. Mast cells and lymphatic vessels were stained with toluidine blue and D2-40, respectively, and their densities were calculated in various areas of tumors and lymph nodes. The variables of MCD and lymphatic vessel density (LVD) were compared using prognostic parameters as well as with each other. As tumor size and volume increased, MCD increased comparably in metastatic lymph nodes; intratumoral and peritumoral LVD also increased. Lymphovascular invasion, lymphatic invasion, perineural invasion, and estrogen receptor positivity were positively related to intratumoral MCD. The relationship between peritumoral MCD and nontumoral breast tissue MCD was statistically significant. Stage was correlated with MCD in metastatic lymph nodes. Metastatic lymph node MCD and intratumoral MCD were also significantly related. Stage, lymphatic invasion, perineural invasion, lymphovascular invasion, and metastatic lymph node MCD were all correlated with intratumoral and/or peritumoral LVD. As nuclear grade increased, intratumoral LVD became higher. In breast carcinoma, MCD, depending on its location, was related to several prognostic parameters. Notably, mast cells may have at least some effect on lymphangiogenesis, which appears to be a predictor of tumor progression. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  8. Cheese whey-induced high-cell-density production of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neubauer Peter

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Use of lactose-rich concentrates from dairy processes for the induction of recombinant gene's expression has not received much attention although they are interesting low cost substrates for production of recombinant enzymes. Applicability of dairy waste for induction of recombinant genes in Escherichia coli was studied. Clones expressing Lactobacillus phage muramidase and Lactobacillus alcohol dehydrogenase were used for the experiments. Results Shake flask cultivations in mineral salt medium showed that cheese whey or deproteinised whey induced gene expression as efficiently as IPTG (isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactopyranoside or pure lactose. Addition of yeast extract or proteolytically degraded whey proteins did not improve the recombinant protein yield. In contrast, addition of yeast extract to the well-balanced mineral salt medium decreased the product yield. Feeding with glycerol provided sufficient amount of easily assimilable carbon source during the induction period without preventing lactose intake and induction by lactose. High-cell-density fed-batch cultivations showed that product yields comparable to IPTG-induction can be achieved by feeding bacteria with a mixture of glycerol and concentrated whey permeate during the induction. Conclusion Whey and concentrated whey permeate can be applied as an alternative inducer in recombinant high-cell-density fed-batch fermentations. The yield of the recombinant product was comparable to fermentations induced by IPTG. In low-cell-density shake flask experiments the yield was higher with whey or whey permeate than with IPTG.

  9. A Semianalytical Model Using MODIS Data to Estimate Cell Density of Red Tide Algae (Aureococcus anophagefferens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingling Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A multiband and a single-band semianalytical model were developed to predict algae cell density distribution. The models were based on cell density (N dependent parameterizations of the spectral backscattering coefficients, bb(λ, obtained from in situ measurements. There was a strong relationship between bb(λ and N, with a minimum regression coefficient of 0.97 at 488 nm and a maximum value of 0.98 at other bands. The cell density calculated by the multiband inversion model was similar to the field measurements of the coastal waters (the average relative error was only 8.9%, but it could not accurately discern the red tide from mixed pixels, and this led to overestimation of the area affected by the red tide. While the single-band inversion model is less precise than the former model in the high chlorophyll water, it could eliminate the impact of the suspended sediments and make more accurate estimates of the red tide area. We concluded that the two models both have advantages and disadvantages; these methods lay the foundation for developing a remote sensing forecasting system for red tides.

  10. Relationship of mast cell density with lymphangiogenesis and prognostic parameters in breast carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevinc H. Keser

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In many cancers, mast cell density (MCD in the tumor microenvironment is associated with tumor progression and, to a greater extent, angiogenesis. Our study was designed to investigate the correlation between MCD, tumor lymphangiogenesis, and several well-established prognostic parameters in breast cancer. One hundred and four cases of invasive breast carcinoma diagnosed in our clinic between 2007 and 2011 were included. Mast cells and lymphatic vessels were stained with toluidine blue and D2-40, respectively, and their densities were calculated in various areas of tumors and lymph nodes. The variables of MCD and lymphatic vessel density (LVD were compared using prognostic parameters as well as with each other. As tumor size and volume increased, MCD increased comparably in metastatic lymph nodes; intratumoral and peritumoral LVD also increased. Lymphovascular invasion, lymphatic invasion, perineural invasion, and estrogen receptor positivity were positively related to intratumoral MCD. The relationship between peritumoral MCD and nontumoral breast tissue MCD was statistically significant. Stage was correlated with MCD in metastatic lymph nodes. Metastatic lymph node MCD and intratumoral MCD were also significantly related. Stage, lymphatic invasion, perineural invasion, lymphovascular invasion, and metastatic lymph node MCD were all correlated with intratumoral and/or peritumoral LVD. As nuclear grade increased, intratumoral LVD became higher. In breast carcinoma, MCD, depending on its location, was related to several prognostic parameters. Notably, mast cells may have at least some effect on lymphangiogenesis, which appears to be a predictor of tumor progression.

  11. The role of cell size in density gradient electrophoretic separation of mouse leukemia cells according to position in the cell cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plank, L. D.; Kunze, M. E.; Todd, P. W.

    1985-01-01

    Cultured mouse leukemia cells line L5178Y were subjected to upward electrophoresis in a density gradient and the slower migrating cell populations were enriched in G2 cells. It is indicated that this cell line does not change electrophoretic mobility through the cell cycle. The possibility that increased sedimentation downward on the part of the larger G2 cells caused this separation was explored. Two different cell populations were investigated. The log phase population was found to migrate upward faster than the G2 population, and a similar difference between their velocities and calculated on the basis of a 1 um diameter difference between the two cell populations. The G2 and G1 enriched populations were isolated by Ficoll density gradient sedimentation. The bottom fraction was enriched in G2 cells and the top fraction was enriched with G1 cells, especially when compared with starting materials. The electrophoretic mobilities of these two cell populations did not differ significantly from one another. Cell diameter dependent migration curves were calculated and were found to be different. Families of migration curves that differ when cell size is considered as a parameter are predicted.

  12. Effect of purified fractions from cell culture supernate of high-density pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells (ALL3) on the growth of ALL3 cells at low density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sapan J; Darie, Costel C; Clarkson, Bayard D

    2017-02-01

    The mechanisms underlying the aberrant growth and interactions between cells are not understood very well. The pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells directly obtained from an adult patient grow very poorly or do not grow at all at low density (LD), but grow better at high starting cell density (HD). We found that the LD ALL3 cells can be stimulated to grow in the presence of diffusible, soluble factors secreted by ALL3 cells themselves growing at high starting cell density. We then developed a biochemical purification procedure that allowed us to purify the factor(s) with stimulatory activity and analyzed them by nanoliquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (nanoLC-MS/MS). Using nanoLC-MS/MS we have identified several proteins which were further processed using various bioinformatics tools. This resulted in eight protein candidates which might be responsible for the growth activity on non-growing LD ALL3 cells and their involvement in the stimulatory activity are discussed. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Current Density Distribution Mapping in PEM Fuel Cells as An Instrument for Operational Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Geske

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available A newly developed measurement system for current density distribution mapping has enabled a new approach for operational measurements in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC. Taking into account previously constructed measurement systems, a method based on a multi layer printed circuit board was chosen for the development of the new system. This type of system consists of a sensor, a special electronic device and the control and visualization PC. For the acquisition of the current density distribution values, a sensor device was designed and installed within a multilayer printed circuit board with integrated shunt resistors. Varying shunt values can be taken into consideration with a newly developed and evaluated calibration method. The sensor device was integrated in a PEM fuel cell stack to prove the functionality of the whole measurement system. A software application was implemented to visualize and save the measurement values. Its functionality was verified by operational measurements within a PEMFC system. Measurement accuracy and possible negative reactions of the sensor device during PEMFC operation are discussed in detail in this paper. The developed system enables operational measurements for different operating phases of PEM fuel cells. Additionally, this can be seen as a basis for new opportunities of optimization for fuel cell design and operation modes.

  14. Controlling Side Chain Density of Electron Donating Polymers for Improving VOC in Polymer Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, B. J.; Kim, K. H.; Cho, C. H.; Kang, H.; Yoon, S. C.

    2012-02-01

    The ability to tune the LUMO/HOMO levels of electroactive materials in active layer of polymer solar cells is critical in controlling their optical and electrochemical properties because the HOMO and LUMO offsets between the polymer donor and the electron acceptor strongly affect charge separation and the open circuit voltage (VOC) of a solar cell. Here, we developed two series of electroactive materials for improving VOC in polymer solar cells. First, we enable facile control over the number of solubilizing groups ultimately tethered to the fullerene by tuning the molar ratio between reactants from 1:1 to 1:3, thus producing o-xylenyl C60 mono-, bis-, and tris-adducts (OXCMA, OXCBA, and OXCTA) as electron acceptors with different LUMO levels. As the number of solubilizing groups increased, VOC values of the P3HT-based BHJ solar cells increased from 0.63, 0.83, to 0.98 V. Second, we present a series of novel poly[3-(4-n-octyl)phenylthiophene] (POPT) derivatives (POPT, POPTT, and POTQT) as electron donors with different side-chain density. As a result of lower HOMO levels by decrease in the side-chain density of the polymers, the devices consisting of POPT, POPTT, and POPQT with PCBM showed increased VOC values of 0.58, 0.63, and 0.75 V, respectively.

  15. Comparative analysis of two colorimetric assays in dental pulp cell density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedel, F.; Soki, F.N.; Conde, M.C.M.; Zeitlin, B.D.; Tarquinio, S.B.C.; Nör, J.E.; Seixas, F.K.; Demarco, F.F.

    2013-01-01

    Aim To compare and contrast two colorimetric assays used for measurement of proliferation using two dental pulp cell types: dental pulp stem cells (DPSC) and human dental pulp fibroblasts (HDPF). Methodology DPSC or HDPF were seeded at 0.25 × 104 cells/well in 96-well plates. Cell proliferation was evaluated after 24-72 hours. At the end of the experimental period, the Sulforhodamine B (SRB) assay or a water-soluble tetrazolium salt (WST-1) assay was performed. Optical densities were determined in a microplate reader (Genius; TECAN). Data were analyzed by Student’s t-test (comparison between cell types), and one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey test (time point intervals). Pearson’ correlation tests were performed to compare the two assays for each cell line. Results Both assays showed that DPSC had higher proliferation rates than HDPF. A positive significant correlation between the two colorimetric assays tested for both cell types DPSC (Pearson’s Correlation Coefficient=0.847; passay is therefore one of practical application. SRB stained plates may be dried and stored so may have utility in laboratories where data may require review or when access to analytical equipment is limited. WST-1 assays have the benefit of both ease and speed and may have utility in laboratories requiring either high throughput or rapid analyses. PMID:20880134

  16. Monotone viable trajectories for functional differential inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Georges

    This paper is a study on functional differential inclusions with memory which represent the multivalued version of retarded functional differential equations. The main result gives a necessary and sufficient equations. The main result gives a necessary and sufficient condition ensuring the existence of viable trajectories; that means trajectories remaining in a given nonempty closed convex set defined by given constraints the system must satisfy to be viable. Some motivations for this paper can be found in control theory where F( t, φ) = { f( t, φ, u)} uɛU is the set of possible velocities of the system at time t, depending on the past history represented by the function φ and on a control u ranging over a set U of controls. Other motivations can be found in planning procedures in microeconomics and in biological evolutions where problems with memory do effectively appear in a multivalued version. All these models require viability constraints represented by a closed convex set.

  17. Enhanced photocurrent density of HTM-free perovskite solar cells by carbon quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Haiyuan; Guo, Daipeng; He, Bowen; Yu, Jiaguo; Fan, Ke

    2018-02-01

    Full-printable and hole transport material (HTM)-free perovskite solar cells (PSCs) with carbon counter electrodes feature high stability and low cost. However, the perovskite film prepared by conventional one-step solution-coating method always shows a relatively poor coverage on the substrate, leading to the limit of the photocurrent density. In this study, we incorporated carbon quantum dots (CQDs) in the perovskite films, and investigated their effects on the performance of TiO2 nanosheet-based and HTM-free PSCs. It was found that the addition of CQDs to the perovskite film can enhance the photocurrent density of PSCs, and the optimal PSC with 0.1% CQDs evolved 60% higher photocurrent density than the pristine one. The improved photocurrent density was attributed to the heterogeneous nuclei derived from CQDs during perovskite crystallization, which would increase amount of perovskite nuclei and form a fine perovskite grain, leading to a better coverage on the substrate. Moreover, due to the excellent conductivity, CQDs in perovskite films could efficiently transport the photo-excited electrons, accelerating the separation and mobilization of charge carriers. This study presents the incorporation of CQDs in perovskite as an efficient approach to promote the performance of HTM-free PSCs.

  18. Assessment of corneal endothelial cell density in patients with keratoconus not using contact lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timucin, Ozgur Bulent; Karadag, Mehmet Fatih; Cinal, Adnan; Asker, Muntecep; Asker, Selvi; Timucin, Damla

    2013-04-01

    To assess the corneal endothelial cell density (ECD) in keratoconus patients with no history of contact lens use. Yuzuncu Yil University, School of Medicine and Van Training and Research Hospital, Department of Ophthalmology, Van, Turkey. Cross-sectional controlled study. The eyes of 65 patients with the diagnosis of keratoconus with no history of contact lens wear and the eyes of 40 healthy controls were prospectively examined using the Heidelberg Retinal Tomography Rostock Cornea Module (HRT3/RCM). The average ECD from the two groups were then compared. Of the cases with keratoconus, 44 (67.7%) were men and 21 (32.3%) were women. The mean age was 20.9±6.8 (range=10-41) years. Of the controls, 28 (70%) were men and 12 (30%) were women. The mean age was 23.9±5.8 (range=14-35) years. Of the 65 eyes with keratoconus, 19 (29.2%) had mild keratoconus, 21 (32.3%) had moderate keratoconus, and 25 (38.5%) had severe keratoconus. The mean ECD was 2731.6±303.2 cells/mm2 in cases with keratoconus and 2664.9±319.5 cells/mm2 in controls. There was no difference between the densities (unpaired t-test, P=0.4). No significant relationships were found between the ECD data and central corneal thickness or steepest keratometric. Endothelial cell density was unaltered in keratoconic patients without a history of contact lens use when compared with healthy controls. Change in ECD is independent from the central corneal thickness and the stage of keratoconus. Copyright © 2012 British Contact Lens Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Plasma membrane temperature gradients and multiple cell permeabilization induced by low peak power density femtosecond lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen L. Garner

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Calculations indicate that selectively heating the extracellular media induces membrane temperature gradients that combine with electric fields and a temperature-induced reduction in the electropermeabilization threshold to potentially facilitate exogenous molecular delivery. Experiments by a wide-field, pulsed femtosecond laser with peak power density far below typical single cell optical delivery systems confirmed this hypothesis. Operating this laser in continuous wave mode at the same average power permeabilized many fewer cells, suggesting that bulk heating alone is insufficient and temperature gradients are crucial for permeabilization. This work suggests promising opportunities for a high throughput, low cost, contactless method for laser mediated exogenous molecule delivery without the complex optics of typical single cell optoinjection, for potential integration into microscope imaging and microfluidic systems.

  20. Low-density open-cell foams in the NiTi system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grummon, David S.; Shaw, John A.; Gremillet, Antoine

    2003-04-01

    It is shown that open-cell metallic foams having very low density, and that display martensite transformations required for shape memory and superelastic behavior, can be fabricated using a powder-metallurgy technique. Results are presented on experiments in which a polymeric precursor foam was coated with an equiatomic NiTi powder slurry and subsequently sintered to yield foams with relative densities as low as 0.039. Although contaminated with interstitial impurities, they displayed unambiguous calorimetric signature of the B2→B19' transformation. The results are of considerable significance to potential applications requiring ultralightweight structures with the unusual dissipative and strain-recovery properties of NiTi shape-memory materials.

  1. Analysis of electronic models for solar cells including energy resolved defect densities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glitzky, Annegret

    2010-07-01

    We introduce an electronic model for solar cells including energy resolved defect densities. The resulting drift-diffusion model corresponds to a generalized van Roosbroeck system with additional source terms coupled with ODEs containing space and energy as parameters for all defect densities. The system has to be considered in heterostructures and with mixed boundary conditions from device simulation. We give a weak formulation of the problem. If the boundary data and the sources are compatible with thermodynamic equilibrium the free energy along solutions decays monotonously. In other cases it may be increasing, but we estimate its growth. We establish boundedness and uniqueness results and prove the existence of a weak solution. This is done by considering a regularized problem, showing its solvability and the boundedness of its solutions independent of the regularization level. (orig.)

  2. Modeling quorum sensing trade-offs between bacterial cell density and system extension from open boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marenda, Mattia; Zanardo, Marina; Trovato, Antonio; Seno, Flavio; Squartini, Andrea

    2016-12-01

    Bacterial communities undergo collective behavioural switches upon producing and sensing diffusible signal molecules; a mechanism referred to as Quorum Sensing (QS). Exemplarily, biofilm organic matrices are built concertedly by bacteria in several environments. QS scope in bacterial ecology has been debated for over 20 years. Different perspectives counterpose the role of density reporter for populations to that of local environment diffusivity probe for individual cells. Here we devise a model system where tubes of different heights contain matrix-embedded producers and sensors. These tubes allow non-limiting signal diffusion from one open end, thereby showing that population spatial extension away from an open boundary can be a main critical factor in QS. Experimental data, successfully recapitulated by a comprehensive mathematical model, demonstrate how tube height can overtake the role of producer density in triggering sensor activation. The biotic degradation of the signal is found to play a major role and to be species-specific and entirely feedback-independent.

  3. Distribution of the Current Density in Electrolyte of the Pem Fuel Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugeniusz Kurgan

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper water management in proton exchange membrane (PEM fuel cell is considered. Firt mass convervation law for water is applied. Next proton transport is described by the Nernst-Planck equation and liqid water convection velocity is eliminated by the Schlogl equation. Electro-osmotic drag coefficient is related to hydrogen index and experimentally determined swelling coefficient. Three partial differential equations for molar water concentration Cw, electric potential ϕ and water pressure Pw are formulated. Current density vector i is derived from proton flux expression. These equations together with adequate boundary conditions were solved using finite element method. The distribution of electric potential and current density in function of geometrical parametres is investigated. At the end some illustrative example is given.

  4. Modeling quorum sensing trade-offs between bacterial cell density and system extension from open boundaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marenda, Mattia; Zanardo, Marina; Trovato, Antonio; Seno, Flavio; Squartini, Andrea

    2016-12-14

    Bacterial communities undergo collective behavioural switches upon producing and sensing diffusible signal molecules; a mechanism referred to as Quorum Sensing (QS). Exemplarily, biofilm organic matrices are built concertedly by bacteria in several environments. QS scope in bacterial ecology has been debated for over 20 years. Different perspectives counterpose the role of density reporter for populations to that of local environment diffusivity probe for individual cells. Here we devise a model system where tubes of different heights contain matrix-embedded producers and sensors. These tubes allow non-limiting signal diffusion from one open end, thereby showing that population spatial extension away from an open boundary can be a main critical factor in QS. Experimental data, successfully recapitulated by a comprehensive mathematical model, demonstrate how tube height can overtake the role of producer density in triggering sensor activation. The biotic degradation of the signal is found to play a major role and to be species-specific and entirely feedback-independent.

  5. Plasmin promotes foam cell formation by increasing macrophage catabolism of aggregated low-density lipoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haka, Abigail S; Grosheva, Inna; Singh, Rajesh K; Maxfield, Frederick R

    2013-08-01

    The plasmin/plasminogen system is involved in atherosclerosis. However, the mechanisms by which it stimulates disease are not fully defined. A key event in atherogenesis is the deposition of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) on arterial walls where it is modified, aggregated, and retained. Macrophages are recruited to clear the lipoproteins, and they become foam cells. The goal of this study was to assess the role of plasmin in macrophage uptake of aggregated LDL and foam cell formation. Plasminogen treatment of macrophages catabolizing aggregated LDL significantly accelerated foam cell formation. Macrophage interaction with aggregated LDL increased the surface expression of urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor and plasminogen activator activity, resulting in increased ability to generate plasmin at the cell surface. The high local level of plasmin cleaves cell-associated aggregated LDL, allowing a portion of the aggregate to become sequestered in a nearly sealed, yet extracellular, acidic compartment. The low pH in the plasmin-induced compartment allows lysosomal enzymes, delivered via lysosome exocytosis, greater activity, resulting in more efficient cholesteryl ester hydrolysis and delivery of a large cholesterol load to the macrophage, thereby promoting foam cell formation. These findings highlight a critical role for plasmin in the catabolism of aggregated LDL by macrophages and provide a new context for considering the atherogenic role of plasmin.

  6. Non-invasive optoacoustic probing of the density and stiffness of single biological cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehoux, T.; Audoin, B.

    2012-12-01

    Recently, the coherent generation of GHz acoustic waves using ultrashort laser pulses has demonstrated the ability to probe the sound velocity in vegetal cells and in cell-mimicking soft micro-objects with micrometer resolution, opening tremendous potentialities for single-cell biology. However, manipulating biological media in physiological conditions is often a technical challenge when using a laser-based setup. In this article, we present a new opto-acoustic bio-transducer composed of a thin metal film sputtered on a transparent heat sink that allows reducing importantly the laser-induced cellular stresses, and offers a wide variety of optical configurations. In particular, by exploiting the acoustic reflection coefficient at the sample-transducer interface and the photoacoustic interaction inside the transparent sample, the density and compressibility of the sample can be probed simultaneously. Using an ad hoc signal analysis based on Hilbert and wavelet transforms, these quantities are measured accurately for a reference fluid. Similar analysis performed in a single vegetal cell also suggests high sensitivity to the state of the transducer-cell interface, and notably to the presence of the plasma membrane that encloses the cell vacuole.

  7. Interdependence of initial cell density, drug concentration and exposure time revealed by real-time impedance spectroscopic cytotoxicity assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caviglia, Claudia; Zor, Kinga; Canepa, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    between the rate of cell death and the initial cell seeding density was found at 2.5 μM doxorubicin concentration, whereas this was not observed at 5 or 100 μM. By sensing the changes in the cell–substrate interaction using impedance spectroscopy under static conditions, the onset of cytotoxicity......We investigated the combined effect of the initial cell density (12 500, 35 000, 75 000, and 100 000 cells cm−2) and concentration of the anti-cancer drug doxorubicin on HeLa cells by performing timedependent cytotoxicity assays using real-time electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. A correlation...

  8. Genetic characterization of the hdrRM operon: a novel high-cell-density-responsive regulator in Streptococcus mutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, Justin; Zheng, Lanyan; Shi, Wenyuan; Qi, Fengxia

    2007-08-01

    Many species of bacteria can adhere to surfaces and grow as sessile communities. The continued accumulation of bacteria can eventually lead to the extremely high-cell-density environment characteristic of many biofilms or cell colonies. This is the normal habitat of the cariogenic species Streptococcus mutans, which normally resides in the high-cell-density, multispecies community commonly referred to as dental plaque. Previous work has demonstrated that the transcription of two separate bacteriocins can be activated by the high-cell-density conditions created through the centrifugation and incubation of cell pellets. In this study, we identified an uncharacterized two-gene operon that was induced >10-fold by conditions of high cell density. The genes of the operon encode a putative transcription regulator and a membrane protein, which were renamed as hdrR and hdrM, respectively. A transcription fusion to the hdrRM operon confirmed its induction by high cell density. Mutation of hdrM abolished bacteriocin production, greatly increased natural competence, reduced the growth rate, and severely affected biofilm formation. Interestingly, no obvious phenotypes were observed from a non-polar mutation of hdrR or mutations affecting the entire operon. These data suggest that the hdrRM operon may constitute a novel regulatory system responsible for mediating a cellular response to a high-cell-density environment.

  9. Best practices in heterotrophic high-cell-density microalgal processes: achievements, potential and possible limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bumbak, Fabian; Cook, Stella; Zachleder, Vilém; Hauser, Silas; Kovar, Karin

    2011-07-01

    Microalgae of numerous heterotrophic genera (obligate or facultative) exhibit considerable metabolic versatility and flexibility but are currently underexploited in the biotechnological manufacturing of known plant-derived compounds, novel high-value biomolecules or enriched biomass. Highly efficient production of microalgal biomass without the need for light is now feasible in inexpensive, well-defined mineral medium, typically supplemented with glucose. Cell densities of more than 100 g l(-1) cell dry weight have been achieved with Chlorella, Crypthecodinium and Galdieria species while controlling the addition of organic sources of carbon and energy in fedbatch mode. The ability of microalgae to adapt their metabolism to varying culture conditions provides opportunities to modify, control and thereby maximise the formation of targeted compounds with non-recombinant microalgae. This review outlines the critical aspects of cultivation technology and current best practices in the heterotrophic high-cell-density cultivation of microalgae. The primary topics include (1) the characteristics of microalgae that make them suitable for heterotrophic cultivation, (2) the appropriate chemical composition of mineral growth media, (3) the different strategies for fedbatch cultivations and (4) the principles behind the customisation of biomass composition. The review confirms that, although fundamental knowledge is now available, the development of efficient, economically feasible large-scale bioprocesses remains an obstacle to the commercialisation of this promising technology.

  10. High cell density cultivation of six fungal strains efficient in azo dye bioremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd El-Rahim, Wafaa M; Mostafa, Enas M; Moawad, Hassan

    2016-12-01

    This work aims at optimizing the high cell density fungal cultivation for producing large quantities of fungal biomass to be used in azo dye residues bioremediation. In our previous studies the efficacy of using certain fungal strains to decolorize a range of commercial textile dyes of different structures (azo, disazo) were investigated. Several promising fungal strains belonging to Aspergillus tubigenesis, Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus terreus, and Aspergillus fumigates demonstrated high capacity in decolorizing various azo dyes. This study focuses on the high cell density cultivation of the fungal strains identified as potential bioremediation agents. The study includes the optimization of all parameters involved in bioprocess development for high cell density cultivation of six promising fungal strains. The growth of the fungal strains was tested on the sucrose medium in 7 l-fermenter. The growth of these fungal strains having the capacity to accumulate large quantities of biomass was also tested in medium containing molasses as a cheap substrate. The residual molasses, biomass dry weight and protein content of the six fungal strains showed that the strains 20 and 2 were marked by the highest protein content. In this study a comparative analysis between the results of dry weight, residual molasses and protein content of geowth of the strains 20, 5 and 2 under uncontrolled and controlled pH of media in batch fermentation was studied to follow the accumulation of biomass and protein production in the growth media. The results indicate that the dry weight accumulated by strains No. 20, 5 and 2 grown on molasses was better than those of strains grown on sucrose. Fungal strain No. 5 had the highest biomass dry weight accumulation. The study shows that the molasses as cheaper sugar sources were better than sucrose for growing fungal biomass.

  11. High cell density cultivation of six fungal strains efficient in azo dye bioremediation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wafaa M. Abd El-Rahim

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This work aims at optimizing the high cell density fungal cultivation for producing large quantities of fungal biomass to be used in azo dye residues bioremediation. In our previous studies the efficacy of using certain fungal strains to decolorize a range of commercial textile dyes of different structures (azo, disazo were investigated. Several promising fungal strains belonging to Aspergillus tubigenesis, Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus terreus, and Aspergillus fumigates demonstrated high capacity in decolorizing various azo dyes. This study focuses on the high cell density cultivation of the fungal strains identified as potential bioremediation agents. The study includes the optimization of all parameters involved in bioprocess development for high cell density cultivation of six promising fungal strains. The growth of the fungal strains was tested on the sucrose medium in 7 l-fermenter. The growth of these fungal strains having the capacity to accumulate large quantities of biomass was also tested in medium containing molasses as a cheap substrate. The residual molasses, biomass dry weight and protein content of the six fungal strains showed that the strains 20 and 2 were marked by the highest protein content. In this study a comparative analysis between the results of dry weight, residual molasses and protein content of geowth of the strains 20, 5 and 2 under uncontrolled and controlled pH of media in batch fermentation was studied to follow the accumulation of biomass and protein production in the growth media. The results indicate that the dry weight accumulated by strains No. 20, 5 and 2 grown on molasses was better than those of strains grown on sucrose. Fungal strain No. 5 had the highest biomass dry weight accumulation. The study shows that the molasses as cheaper sugar sources were better than sucrose for growing fungal biomass.

  12. [Correlation with MRI features, cell density and the expression of immunohistochemistry of pure mucinous breast carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Y; Kong, Q C; Zhu, Y Q; Liu, C L; He, H; Zhang, J E; Yang, R M; Jiang, X Q

    2017-05-09

    Objective: To explore the MRI features of the pure mucinous breast carcinoma(PMBC) and the correlation with cell density and the expression of immunohistochemistry. Methods: MRI features of 35 pure mucinous carcinomas were retrospectively analyzed from January 2011 to May 2016 in Guangdong General Hospital. MR images were reviewed for shape, margin, the signal intensity, enhancement patterns of tumors and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) features and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value. All the patients were detected by immunohistochemical staining with expression of ER, PR, CerbB-2, Ki-67 and Her-2. Correlations between MRI features of PMBC and cell density and the expression of immunohistochemistry were analyzed. Results: A total of 16 oval masses(16/35, 45.7%) and 10 round masses(10/35, 28.6%)were found in 35 PMBC with clear boundary(26/35, 74.3%) and lobulated shape(31/35, 88.6%). Very high signal intensity on T(2)-weighted images was found in 33 PMBC (33/35, 94.3%) and early enhancement rate was 115%±9% for PMBC. 28 PMBC demonstrated persistent enhancing pattern on time-signal intensity curve and 7 PMBC demonstrated plateau pattern.Mean ADC value was (1.91±0.06)×10(-3)mm(2)/s for PMBC. There was significant difference with early enhancement rate and ADC value between PMBC with more or less quantities of cellular mucin (P2, Her-2 and Ki-67 expression between PMBC with more or less quantities of cellular mucin (all P>0.05). Conclusions: PMBC has distinctive MRI features. The prognosis of PMBC is better from correlation between MRI features, cell density and the expression of immunohistochemistry.

  13. Improving accuracy of cell and chromophore concentration measurements using optical density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, John A; Curtis, Brandon S; Curtis, Wayne R

    2013-04-22

    UV-vis spectrophotometric optical density (OD) is the most commonly-used technique for estimating chromophore formation and cell concentration in liquid culture. OD wavelength is often chosen with little thought given to its effect on the quality of the measurement. Analysis of the contributions of absorption and scattering to the measured optical density provides a basis for understanding variability among spectrophotometers and enables a quantitative evaluation of the applicability of the Beer-Lambert law. This provides a rational approach for improving the accuracy of OD measurements used as a proxy for direct dry weight (DW), cell count, and pigment levels. For pigmented organisms, the choice of OD wavelength presents a tradeoff between the robustness and the sensitivity of the measurement. The OD at a robust wavelength is primarily the result of light scattering and does not vary with culture conditions; whereas, the OD at a sensitive wavelength is additionally dependent on light absorption by the organism's pigments. Suitably robust and sensitive wavelengths are identified for a wide range of organisms by comparing their spectra to the true absorption spectra of dyes. The relative scattering contribution can be reduced either by measurement at higher OD, or by the addition of bovine serum albumin. Reduction of scattering or correlation with off-peak light attenuation provides for more accurate assessment of chromophore levels within cells. Conversion factors between DW, OD, and colony-forming unit density are tabulated for 17 diverse organisms to illustrate the scope of variability of these correlations. Finally, an inexpensive short pathlength LED-based flow cell is demonstrated for the online monitoring of growth in a bioreactor at culture concentrations greater than 5 grams dry weight per liter which would otherwise require off-line dilutions to obtain non-saturated OD measurements. OD is most accurate as a time-saving proxy measurement for biomass

  14. Comparison of manual & automated analysis methods for corneal endothelial cell density measurements by specular microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jianyan; Maram, Jyotsna; Tepelus, Tudor C; Modak, Cristina; Marion, Ken; Sadda, SriniVas R; Chopra, Vikas; Lee, Olivia L

    2017-08-07

    To determine the reliability of corneal endothelial cell density (ECD) obtained by automated specular microscopy versus that of validated manual methods and factors that predict such reliability. Sharp central images from 94 control and 106 glaucomatous eyes were captured with Konan specular microscope NSP-9900. All images were analyzed by trained graders using Konan CellChek Software, employing the fully- and semi-automated methods as well as Center Method. Images with low cell count (input cells number <100) and/or guttata were compared with the Center and Flex-Center Methods. ECDs were compared and absolute error was used to assess variation. The effect on ECD of age, cell count, cell size, and cell size variation was evaluated. No significant difference was observed between the Center and Flex-Center Methods in corneas with guttata (p=0.48) or low ECD (p=0.11). No difference (p=0.32) was observed in ECD of normal controls <40 yrs old between the fully-automated method and manual Center Method. However, in older controls and glaucomatous eyes, ECD was overestimated by the fully-automated method (p=0.034) and semi-automated method (p=0.025) as compared to manual method. Our findings show that automated analysis significantly overestimates ECD in the eyes with high polymegathism and/or large cell size, compared to the manual method. Therefore, we discourage reliance upon the fully-automated method alone to perform specular microscopy analysis, particularly if an accurate ECD value is imperative. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  15. Goblet cell density estimate differences in impression cytology samples varies with different magnification of images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doughty, Michael J

    2017-12-04

    To assess the impact of using different microscope magnifications for the goblet cell density (GCD) estimates from conjunctival impression cytology (CIC) samples from healthy individuals METHODS: In a prospective study, CIC specimens were collected from the superior bulbar conjunctiva (12 o'clock, 5mm from limbus) of 20 adult subjects (average age 22 years) onto Millicell-CM membranes and Giemsa stained. A region from each CIC filter containing reasonably high numbers of goblet cells was imaged by light microscopy at a final magnification of 400X and then the same region assessed at 200X and then 100X. The images were enlarged, the goblet cells marked and counted and GCD values/sq mm calculated. The mean GCD estimates at 400X magnification, 200X and 100X were 644±180, 405±72 and 365±81 cells/sq mm respectively, and these values were statistically different (pmicroscope field (HPF) that appears to include a moderate number of goblet cells will have a probability (by at least 20:1) that the GCD estimates will likely be higher compared to those at 200X or 100X, and the probability for higher GCD values is at least 15:1 comparing assessments made at 200X to 100X. Investigators should use only one magnification, with that of a medium power field (200X final magnification) likely being the most useful. Copyright © 2017 British Contact Lens Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. High-energy-density hydrogen-halogen fuel cells for advanced military applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balko, E. N.; McElroy, J. F.

    It is pointed out that hydrogen-halogen fuel cell systems are particularly suited for an employment as ground power sources for military applications. The large cell potential and reversible characteristics of the H2/Cl2 and H2/Br2 couples permit high energy storage density and efficient energy conversion. When used as flow batteries, the fluid nature of the reactants in the hydrogen-halogen systems has several advantages over power sources which involve solid phases. Very deep discharge is possible without degradation of subsequent performance, and energy storage capacity is limited only by the external reactant storage volume. Very rapid chemical recharging is possible through replenishment of the reactant supply. A number of H2/Cl2 and H2/Br2 fuel cell systems have been studied. These systems use the same solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) cell technology originally developed for H2/O2 fuel cells. The results of the investigation are illustrated with the aid of a number of graphs.

  17. Bone mineral density, growth, pubertal development and other parameters in Brazilian children and young adults with sickle cell anaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meeuwes, M.; Souza de Carvalho, T. F.; Cipolotti, R.; Gurgel, R. Q.; Ferrão, T. O.; Peters, M.; Agyemang, C.

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the occurrence of low bone mineral density (BMD) and its relationship with clinical and laboratorial characteristics in children and young adults with sickle cell anaemia living in Northeast-Brazil, and to assess the role of radiography in diagnosing low BMD. Bone mineral density of

  18. Air-spore in Cartagena, Spain: viable and non-viable sampling methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elvira-Rendueles, Belen; Moreno, Jose; Garcia-Sanchez, Antonio; Vergara, Nuria; Martinez-Garcia, Maria Jose; Moreno-Grau, Stella

    2013-01-01

    In the presented study the airborne fungal spores of the semiarid city of Cartagena, Spain, are identified and quantified by means of viable or non-viable sampling methods. Airborne fungal samples were collected simultaneously using a filtration method and a pollen and particle sampler based on the Hirst methodology. This information is very useful for elucidating geographical patterns of hay fever and asthma. The qualitative results showed that when the non-viable methodology was employed, Cladosporium, Ustilago, and Alternaria were the most abundant spores identified in the atmosphere of Cartagena, while the viable methodology showed that the most abundant taxa were: Cladosporium, Penicillium, Aspergillus and Alternaria. The quantitative results of airborne fungal spores identified by the Hirst-type air sampler (non-viable method), showed that Deuteromycetes represented 74% of total annual spore counts, Cladosporium being the major component of the fungal spectrum (62.2%), followed by Alternaria (5.3%), and Stemphylium (1.3%). The Basidiomycetes group represented 18.9% of total annual spore counts, Ustilago (7.1%) being the most representative taxon of this group and the second most abundant spore type. Ascomycetes accounted for 6.9%, Nectria (2.3%) being the principal taxon. Oomycetes (0.2%) and Zygomycestes and Myxomycestes (0.06%) were scarce. The prevailing species define our bioaerosol as typical of dry air. The viable methodology was better at identifying small hyaline spores and allowed for the discrimination of the genus of some spore types. However, non-viable methods revealed the richness of fungal types present in the bioaerosol. Thus, the use of both methodologies provides a more comprehensive characterization of the spore profile.

  19. An escort for GPCRs: implications for regulation of receptor density at the cell surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achour, Lamia; Labbé-Jullié, Catherine; Scott, Mark G H; Marullo, Stefano

    2008-10-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are dynamically regulated by various mechanisms that tune their response to external stimuli. Modulation of their plasma membrane density, via trafficking between subcellular compartments, constitutes an important process in this context. Substantial information has been accumulated on cellular pathways that remove GPCRs from the cell surface for subsequent degradation or recycling. In comparison, much less is known about the mechanisms controlling trafficking of neo-synthesized GPCRs from intracellular compartments to the cell surface. Although GPCR export to the plasma membrane is commonly considered to mostly implicate the default, unregulated secretory pathway, an increasing number of observations indicate that trafficking to the plasma membrane from the endoplasmic reticulum might be tightly regulated and involve specific protein partners. Moreover, a new paradigm is emerging in some cellular contexts, in which stocks of functional receptors retained within intracellular compartments can be rapidly mobilized to the plasma membrane to maintain sustained physiological responsiveness.

  20. Mesenchymal stem cell attachment to peptide density gradients on porous silicon generated by electrografting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clements, Lauren R. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, Bedford Park, SA (Australia); CSIRO Molecular and Health Technologies, Bayview Avenue, Clayton, VIC (Australia); Wang, Peng-Yuan; Tsai, Wei-Bor [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei (China); Harding, Frances; Voelcker, Nicolas H. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, Bedford Park, SA (Australia); Thissen, Helmut [CSIRO Molecular and Health Technologies, Bayview Avenue, Clayton, VIC (Australia)

    2011-06-15

    Chemical gradients of ethyl-6-bromohexanoate (EBH) were generated over porous silicon (pSi) substrates via electrochemical attachment. Immobilised ester moieties were hydrolysed and activated to produce a gradient of functional carboxylic acid groups. After subsequent immobilisation of cyclic RGD (cRGD), the surfaces were used to screen the extent of rat mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) attachment. Mapping of surface chemistry was carried out by means of infrared microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). MSC culture studies showed that short-term cell attachment responded to the cRGD density present on the gradient surface. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  1. Fast wave experiments in LAPD: RF sheaths, convective cells and density modifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, T. A.; van Compernolle, B.; Martin, M.; Gekelman, W.; Pribyl, P.; van Eester, D.; Crombe, K.; Perkins, R.; Lau, C.; Martin, E.; Caughman, J.; Tripathi, S. K. P.; Vincena, S.

    2017-10-01

    An overview is presented of recent work on ICRF physics at the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) at UCLA. The LAPD has typical plasma parameters ne 1012 -1013 cm-3, Te 1 - 10 eV and B 1000 G. A new high-power ( 150 kW) RF system and fast wave antenna have been developed for LAPD. The source runs at a frequency of 2.4 MHz, corresponding to 1 - 7fci , depending on plasma parameters. Evidence of rectified RF sheaths is seen in large increases ( 10Te) in the plasma potential on field lines connected to the antenna. The rectified potential scales linearly with antenna current. The rectified RF sheaths set up convective cells of local E × B flows, measured indirectly by potential measurements, and measured directly with Mach probes. At high antenna powers substantial modifications of the density profile were observed. The plasma density profile initially exhibits transient low frequency oscillations (10 kHz). The amplitude of the fast wave fields in the core plasma is modulated at the same low frequency, suggesting fast wave coupling is affected by the density rearrangement. Work performed at the Basic Plasma Science Facility, supported jointly by the National Science Foundation and the Department of Energy.

  2. Parejas viables que perduran en el tiempo

    OpenAIRE

    Juan José Cuervo Rodríguez

    2013-01-01

    El presente artículo científico presenta resultados del proceso llevado a cabo en el proyecto de investigación docente "Mecanismos de autorregulación en parejas viables que perduran en el tiempo". Se soporta en una mirada compleja de la psicología basada en una epistemología de la construcción. En el ámbito metodológico, se inscribe en los estudios de terapia familiar desde una perspectiva de la comunicación humana como un todo integrado. Participaron nueve parejas. Los criterios de inclusión...

  3. Ceruloplasmin enhances smooth muscle cell- and endothelial cell-mediated low density lipoprotein oxidation by a superoxide-dependent mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, C. K.; Ehrenwald, E.; Fox, P. L.

    1996-01-01

    Cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC) and endothelial cells (EC) stimulate low density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation by free radical-mediated, transition metal-dependent mechanisms. The physiological source(s) of metal ions is not known; however, purified ceruloplasmin, a plasma protein containing 7 coppers, oxidizes LDL in vitro. We now show that ceruloplasmin also increases LDL oxidation by vascular cells. In metal ion-free medium, human ceruloplasmin increased bovine aortic SMC- and EC-mediated LDL oxidation by up to 30- and 15-fold, respectively. The maximal response was at 100-300 microg ceruloplasmin/ml, a level at or below the unevoked physiological plasma concentration. Oxidant activity was dependent on protein structure as a specific proteolytic cleavage or removal of one of the seven ceruloplasmin copper atoms inhibited activity. Three lines of evidence indicated a critical role for cellular superoxide (O2.) in ceruloplasmin-stimulated oxidation. First, the rate of production of O2. by cells correlated with their rates of LDL oxidation. Second, superoxide dismutase effectively blocked ceruloplasmin-stimulated oxidation by both cell types. Finally, O2. production by SMC quantitatively accounted for the observed rate of LDL oxidation. To show this, the course of O2. production by SMC was simulated by repeated addition of xanthine and xanthine oxidase to culture medium under cell-free conditions. Neither ceruloplasmin nor O2. alone increased LDL oxidation, but together they completely reconstituted the oxidation rate of ceruloplasmin-stimulated SMC. These results are the first to show that ceruloplasmin stimulates EC- and SMC-mediated oxidation of LDL and that cell-derived O2. accounts quantitatively for metal-dependent, free radical-initiated oxidation of LDL by these cells.

  4. Corneal endothelial cell density and morphology and central corneal thickness in Guangxi Maonan and Han adolescent students of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Liang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To investigate the corneal endothelial cell density and morphology and central corneal thickness in the Guangxi Maonan and Han adolescent students of China.METHODS:Noncontact specular microscope (Topcon SP3000P, Tokyo, Japan was performed in 133 adolescent students of Maonan nationality (M:F 54:79 and 105 adolescent students of Han nationality (M:F 50:55, 5 to 20y of age, who were randomly selected from 3 schools in Huanjiang Maonan Autonomous County of Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region of China. Parameters studied included endothelial cell density, mean cell area, coefficient of variation in cell size, percentage hexagonality and central corneal thickness.RESULTS:Endothelial cell density, mean cell area, coefficient of variation in cell size, percentage hexagonality and central corneal thickness in the study population were (2969.50±253.93 cells/mm2, (339.23±29.44 µm2, (29.96±4.07 %, (64.58±9.41 % and (523.71±32.82 µm in Maonan and (2998.26±262.65 cells/mm2, (336.11±30.07 µm2, (29.89±5.03 %, (64.91±11.64 % and (524.39±33.15 µm in Han, respectively. No significant differences were observed in endothelial cell density, mean cell area, coefficient of variation in cell size, percentage hexagonality and central corneal thickness between Maonan and Han (P=0.615, 0.659, 0.528, 0.551, 0.999. In Maonan and Han, we found age was negatively correlated with endothelial cell density and percentage hexagonality and positively correlated with mean cell area and coefficient of variation in cell size. Negative correlation was also found between central corneal thickness and age in Han, whereas no correlation was found in Maonan.CONCLUSION:There were no differences between Maonan and Han in corneal endothelial cell density and morphology and central corneal thickness. In these two nationalities, there were statistically significant decrease in endothelial cell density and percentage hexagonality with increasing age and statistically significant

  5. A rapid biosensor for viable B. anthracis spores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeumner, Antje J; Leonard, Barbara; McElwee, John; Montagna, Richard A

    2004-09-01

    A simple membrane-strip-based biosensor assay has been combined with a nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) reaction for rapid (4 h) detection of a small number (ten) of viable B. anthracis spores. The biosensor is based on identification of a unique mRNA sequence from one of the anthrax toxin genes, the protective antigen ( pag), encoded on the toxin plasmid, pXO1, and thus provides high specificity toward B. anthracis. Previously, the anthrax toxins activator ( atxA) mRNA had been used in our laboratory for the development of a biosensor for the detection of a single B. anthracis spore within 12 h. Changing the target sequence to the pag mRNA provided the ability to shorten the overall assay time significantly. The vaccine strain of B. anthracis (Sterne strain) was used in all experiments. A 500-microL sample containing as few as ten spores was mixed with 500 microL growth medium and incubated for 30 min for spore germination and mRNA production. Thus, only spores that are viable were detected. Subsequently, RNA was extracted from lysed cells, selectively amplified using NASBA, and rapidly identified by the biosensor. While the biosensor assay requires only 15 min assay time, the overall process takes 4 h for detection of ten viable B. anthracis spores, and is shortened significantly if more spores are present. The biosensor is based on an oligonucleotide sandwich-hybridization assay format. It uses a membrane flow-through system with an immobilized DNA probe that hybridizes with the target sequence. Signal amplification is provided when the target sequence hybridizes to a second DNA probe that has been coupled to liposomes encapsulating the dye sulforhodamine B. The amount of liposomes captured in the detection zone can be read visually or quantified with a hand-held reflectometer. The biosensor can detect as little as 1 fmol target mRNA (1 nmol L(-1)). Specificity analysis revealed no cross-reactivity with 11 organisms tested, among them closely

  6. Higher-Density Culture in Human Embryonic Stem Cells Results in DNA Damage and Genome Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Kurt; Zambelli, Filippo; Mertzanidou, Afroditi; Smolders, Ilse; Geens, Mieke; Nguyen, Ha Thi; Barbé, Lise; Sermon, Karen; Spits, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Summary Human embryonic stem cells (hESC) show great promise for clinical and research applications, but their well-known proneness to genomic instability hampers the development to their full potential. Here, we demonstrate that medium acidification linked to culture density is the main cause of DNA damage and genomic alterations in hESC grown on feeder layers, and this even in the short time span of a single passage. In line with this, we show that increasing the frequency of the medium refreshments minimizes the levels of DNA damage and genetic instability. Also, we show that cells cultured on laminin-521 do not present this increase in DNA damage when grown at high density, although the (long-term) impact on their genomic stability remains to be elucidated. Our results explain the high levels of genome instability observed over the years by many laboratories worldwide, and show that the development of optimal culture conditions is key to solving this problem. PMID:26923824

  7. Durability of Low Platinum Fuel Cells Operating at High Power Density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polevaya, Olga [Nuvera Fuel Cells Inc.; Blanchet, Scott [Nuvera Fuel Cells Inc.; Ahluwalia, Rajesh [Argonne National Lab; Borup, Rod [Los-Alamos National Lab; Mukundan, Rangachary [Los-Alamos National Lab

    2014-03-19

    Understanding and improving the durability of cost-competitive fuel cell stacks is imperative to successful deployment of the technology. Stacks will need to operate well beyond today’s state-of-the-art rated power density with very low platinum loading in order to achieve the cost targets set forth by DOE ($15/kW) and ultimately be competitive with incumbent technologies. An accelerated cost-reduction path presented by Nuvera focused on substantially increasing power density to address non-PGM material costs as well as platinum. The study developed a practical understanding of the degradation mechanisms impacting durability of fuel cells with low platinum loading (≤0.2mg/cm2) operating at high power density (≥1.0W/cm2) and worked out approaches for improving the durability of low-loaded, high-power stack designs. Of specific interest is the impact of combining low platinum loading with high power density operation, as this offers the best chance of achieving long-term cost targets. A design-of-experiments approach was utilized to reveal and quantify the sensitivity of durability-critical material properties to high current density at two levels of platinum loading (the more conventional 0.45 mgPt.cm–1 and the much lower 0.2 mgPt.cm–2) across several cell architectures. We studied the relevance of selected component accelerated stress tests (AST) to fuel cell operation in power producing mode. New stress tests (NST) were designed to investigate the sensitivity to the addition of electrical current on the ASTs, along with combined humidity and load cycles and, eventually, relate to the combined city/highway drive cycle. Changes in the cathode electrochemical surface area (ECSA) and average oxygen partial pressure on the catalyst layer with aging under AST and NST protocols were compared based on the number of completed cycles. Studies showed elevated sensitivity of Pt growth to the potential limits and the initial particle size distribution. The ECSA loss

  8. Vitreoscilla hemoglobin expression in engineered Escherichia coli: improved performance in high cell-density batch cultivations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pablos, Tania E; Mora, Eugenio Meza; Le Borgne, Sylvie; Ramírez, Octavio T; Gosset, Guillermo; Lara, Alvaro R

    2011-08-01

    High cell-density cultivations are the preferred system for biomolecules production by Escherichia coli. It has been previously demonstrated that a strain of E. coli with a modified substrate transport system is able to attain high cell densities in batch mode, due to the very low overflow metabolism displayed. The use of elevated amounts of glucose from the beginning of the cultivation, eliminates the existence of substrate gradients due to deficient mixing at large-scale. However, the large amounts of oxygen demanded resulted in microaerobic conditions after some hours of cultivation, even at small-scale. In this work, the effect of expressing the Vitreoscilla hemoglobin (VHb) in the engineered strain during batch cultures using high-glucose concentrations was tested. Together, the expression of VHb and the modified substrate transport system resulted in a 33% increase of biomass production compared to the parental strain (W3110) lacking the VHb in batch cultivations using 25 g/L of glucose. When 50 g/L of glucose were used, expression of VHb in the modified strain led to 11% higher biomass production compared to W3110. The VHb also increased the growth rates of the strains by about 30% in the aerobic phase and more than 200% in the microaerobic phase of batch cultivation. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Kinetic modeling of rhamnolipid production by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 including cell density-dependent regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henkel, Marius; Schmidberger, Anke; Vogelbacher, Markus; Kühnert, Christian; Beuker, Janina; Bernard, Thomas; Schwartz, Thomas; Syldatk, Christoph; Hausmann, Rudolf

    2014-08-01

    The production of rhamnolipid biosurfactants by Pseudomonas aeruginosa is under complex control of a quorum sensing-dependent regulatory network. Due to a lack of understanding of the kinetics applicable to the process and relevant interrelations of variables, current processes for rhamnolipid production are based on heuristic approaches. To systematically establish a knowledge-based process for rhamnolipid production, a deeper understanding of the time-course and coupling of process variables is required. By combining reaction kinetics, stoichiometry, and experimental data, a process model for rhamnolipid production with P. aeruginosa PAO1 on sunflower oil was developed as a system of coupled ordinary differential equations (ODEs). In addition, cell density-based quorum sensing dynamics were included in the model. The model comprises a total of 36 parameters, 14 of which are yield coefficients and 7 of which are substrate affinity and inhibition constants. Of all 36 parameters, 30 were derived from dedicated experimental results, literature, and databases and 6 of them were used as fitting parameters. The model is able to describe data on biomass growth, substrates, and products obtained from a reference batch process and other validation scenarios. The model presented describes the time-course and interrelation of biomass, relevant substrates, and products on a process level while including a kinetic representation of cell density-dependent regulatory mechanisms.

  10. Tailoring the rate-sensitivity of low density polyurea foams through cell wall aperture size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, B. J.; Kingstedt, O. T.; Crum, R.; Gamez, C.; Gupta, V.

    2017-06-01

    The plateau stress and energy absorption of low density (≤300 kg/m3) polyurea (PU) foams and expanded polystyrene (EPS) were measured at deformation rates ranging from 0.004 s-1 to 5000 s-1. Low (≤10-1 s-1) strain rate testing was performed using an Instron load frame, intermediate (101-102 s-1) strain rates using a drop-weight impact tower, and high (≥103 s-1) strain rate conditions using a modified split-Hopkinson pressure bar. The plateau stress and energy absorption of low density PU foams exhibit a strong rate dependence across all deformation rates. This result has been previously unreported for low density polymer foams under low and intermediate strain rates. The strain rate sensitivity of PU foams was found to be strongly dependent on cell size for low strain rates and cell wall aperture size for intermediate and high strain rates. EPS type foam, however, remained nearly insensitive to strain rate. At low and intermediate strain rates, the plastic crushing in the EPS and the high plateau stress yield a much higher energy absorption capability than the viscoelastic dissipation in the PU foams. However, PU foams were found to display similar energy absorption properties as EPS based foams under high strain rates. Thus, controlling the strain rate sensitivity of PU foams through aperture diameter can lead to an increase in energy absorption properties at high strain rates, while simultaneously maintaining the peak stress below certain injury thresholds. Additionally, unlike EPS, which undergo plastic crushing after first impact, flexible polyurea foams will recover fully after each impact and thus will have multiple hit capabilities. This will allow these materials to have a wide range of applications, in advance body armors and protective headgears to use in low-cost protection systems for a wide range of military platforms, civilian, and space applications.

  11. Feeding strategies enhance high cell density cultivation and protein expression in milliliter scale bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faust, Georg; Janzen, Nils H; Bendig, Christoph; Römer, Lin; Kaufmann, Klaus; Weuster-Botz, Dirk

    2014-10-01

    Miniature bioreactors under parallel fed-batch operations are not only useful screening tools for bioprocess development but also provide a suitable basis for eventual scale-up. In this study, three feeding strategies were investigated: besides the established intermittent feeding by a liquid handler, an optimized microfluidic device and a new enzymatic release system were applied for parallel fed-batch cultivation of Escherichia coli HMS174(DE3) and BL21(DE3) strains in stirred-tank bioreactors on a 10 mL scale. Lower fluctuation in dissolved oxygen (DO) and higher optical densities were measured in fed-batch processes applying the microfluidic device or the enzymatic glucose/fructose release system (conversion of intermittently added sucrose by an invertase), but no difference in dry cell weights (DCW) were observed. With all three feeding strategies high cell densities were realized on a milliliter scale with final optical density measured at 600 nm (OD600 ) of 114-133 and final DCW concentrations of 69-70 g L(-1) . The effect of feeding strategies on the expression of two heterologous proteins was investigated. Whereas no impact was observed on the expression of the spider silk protein eADF4(C16), the fluorescence of enhanced green fluorescence protein (eGFP) was reproducibly lower, if an intermittent glucose feed was applied. Thus, the impact of feeding strategy on expression is strongly dependent on the E. coli strain and/or expressed protein. As a completely continuous feed supply is difficult to realize in miniature bioreactors, the enzymatic release approach from this study can be easily applied in all microfluidic system to reduce fluctuations of glucose supply and DO concentrations. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. [A Modified Procedure to Isolate Synchronous Cells from Yeasts with Continuous Percoll Density Gradient and Their Raman Discrimination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shu-shi; Lai, Jun-zhuo; Lu, Ming-qian; Cheng, Qin; Liao, Wei; Chen, Li-mei

    2015-08-01

    A modified procedure of Percoll density gradient centrifugation was developed to isolate and fractionate synchronous cells from stationary phase (sp) cultures of different yeast strains, as well as Raman spectra discrimination of single yeast cells was reported. About 1.75 mL Percoll solution in 2 mL polypropylene centrifugal tube was centrifuged at 19,320 g, 20 °C with an angle rotor for 15 min to form continuous densities gradient (1.00~1.31 g · mL(-1)), approximately 100 μL sample was overlaid onto the preformed continuous density gradient carefully, subsequently, centrifuged at 400 g for 60 min in a tabletop centrifuge equipped with a angle rotor at 25 °C. Yeast samples could be observed that the suspensions were separated into two cell fractions obviously. Both fractions of different yeast strains were respectively determined by differential interference contrast (DIC), phase contrast microscope and synchronous culture to distinguish their morphological and growth trait. The results showed that the lower fraction cells were unbudded, mostly unicellular, highly refractive, homogeneous and uniform in size, and represented growth characteristic synchronously; Their protoplasm had relatively high density, and contained significant concentrations of glycogen; all of which were accordant with description of quiescent yeast cells and G0 cells in previously published paper. It was shown that lower fraction was quiescent cells, synchronous G0 cells as well. A Raman tweezers setup was used to investigate the differences between two fractions, G0 cells and non G0 cells, at a single cell level. The result showed that both G0 cells and the non G0 cells had the same characteristic peaks corresponding biological macromolecules including proteins, carbohydrates and nucleic acids, but all characteristic peak intensities of G0 cells were higher than that of non G0 cells, implied that the macromolecular substance content of G0 cells was more higher. Principal component

  13. Low Mast Cell Density Predicts Poor Prognosis in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Reduces Survival in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attramadal, Cecilie Gjøvaag; Kumar, Sheeba; Gao, Jian; Boysen, Morten Ebbe; Halstensen, Trond Sundby; Bryne, Magne

    2016-10-01

    The cellular composition of the tumor microenvironment (TME) at the invading front of oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCCs) may reflect biologically important cancer features and host responses, and thus be related to disease progression. The TME density of mast cells (MCs), macrophages, cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and endothelial cells were quantified at the invasive front and analyzed regarding their relation to disease recurrence in patients with small T1/2N0M0 OSCCs. mRNA for MC-specific proteins were analyzed in a second patient cohort with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Samples from 62 patients with T1/2N0M0 OSCC were immunohistochemically stained and scored for the cellular expression of mast/stem cell growth factor receptor (c-KIT) (MCs), CD68 (macrophages), α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) (CAFs) and CD31 (endothelial cells) and this was analyzed according to disease recurrence. Data from The Cancer Genome Atlas database were used to examine mRNA expression profiles and clinical data of patients with 399 HNSCC. Increased MC density at the invasive front was significantly associated with reduced disease recurrence, as none of the patients with high MC density experienced relapse. Moreover, increased expression of mRNA for MC specific markers as c-KIT, and α-, β-, and δ-tryptases and the MC-stimulating factor, stem cell factor (SCF), was significantly associated with good prognosis in patients with HNSCC. Decreased MC density at the invasive front may reflect tumor biology related to disease progression and prognosis. Counting MCs seems to be an easy and practical tool, that could be utilized for prognostic evaluation. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  14. Enhanced photocurrent density in graphene/Si based solar cell (GSSC) by optimizing active layer thickness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosikhin, Ahmad, E-mail: a.rosikhin86@yahoo.co.id; Hidayat, Aulia Fikri; Syuhada, Ibnu; Winata, Toto, E-mail: toto@fi.itb.ac.id [Department of physics, physics of electronic materials research division Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132, Jawa Barat – Indonesia (Indonesia)

    2015-12-29

    Thickness dependent photocurrent density in active layer of graphene/Si based solar cell has been investigated via analytical – simulation study. This report is a preliminary comparison of experimental and analytical investigation of graphene/Si based solar cell. Graphene sheet was interfaced with Si thin film forming heterojunction solar cell that was treated as a device model for photocurrent generator. Such current can be enhanced by optimizing active layer thickness and involving metal oxide as supporting layer to shift photons absorption. In this case there are two type of devices model with and without TiO{sub 2} in which the silicon thickness varied at 20 – 100 nm. All of them have examined and also compared with each other to obtain an optimum value. From this calculation it found that generated currents almost linear with thickness but there are saturated conditions that no more enhancements will be achieved. Furthermore TiO{sub 2} layer is effectively increases photon absorption but reducing device stability, maximum current is fluctuates enough. This may caused by the disturbance of excitons diffusion and resistivity inside each layer. Finally by controlling active layer thickness, it is quite useful to estimate optimization in order to develop the next solar cell devices.

  15. Enhanced photocurrent density in graphene/Si based solar cell (GSSC) by optimizing active layer thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosikhin, Ahmad; Hidayat, Aulia Fikri; Syuhada, Ibnu; Winata, Toto

    2015-12-01

    Thickness dependent photocurrent density in active layer of graphene/Si based solar cell has been investigated via analytical - simulation study. This report is a preliminary comparison of experimental and analytical investigation of graphene/Si based solar cell. Graphene sheet was interfaced with Si thin film forming heterojunction solar cell that was treated as a device model for photocurrent generator. Such current can be enhanced by optimizing active layer thickness and involving metal oxide as supporting layer to shift photons absorption. In this case there are two type of devices model with and without TiO2 in which the silicon thickness varied at 20 - 100 nm. All of them have examined and also compared with each other to obtain an optimum value. From this calculation it found that generated currents almost linear with thickness but there are saturated conditions that no more enhancements will be achieved. Furthermore TiO2 layer is effectively increases photon absorption but reducing device stability, maximum current is fluctuates enough. This may caused by the disturbance of excitons diffusion and resistivity inside each layer. Finally by controlling active layer thickness, it is quite useful to estimate optimization in order to develop the next solar cell devices.

  16. Metal based gas diffusion layers for enhanced fuel cell performance at high current densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Nabeel; Van Steen, Eric; Tanaka, Shiro; Levecque, Pieter

    2017-01-01

    The gas diffusion layer strongly influences the performance and durability of polymer electrolyte fuel cells. A major drawback of current carbon fiber based GDLs is the non-controlled variation in porosity resulting in a random micro-structure. Moreover, when subjected to compression these materials show significant reduction in porosity and permeability leading to water management problems and mass transfer losses within the fuel cell. This study investigated the use of uniform perforated metal sheets as GDLs in conjunction with microchannel flowfields. A metal sheet design with a pitch of 110 μm and a hole diameter of 60 μm in combination with an MPL showed superior performance in the high current density region compared to a commercially available carbon paper based GDL in a single cell environment. Fuel cell testing with different oxidants (air, heliox and oxygen) indicate that the metal sheet offers both superior diffusion and reduced flooding in comparison to the carbon based GDL. The presence of the MPL has been found to be critical to the functionality of the metal sheet suggesting that the MPL design may represent an important optimisation parameter for further improvements in performance.

  17. Prospective clinical and radiographic evaluation of an allogeneic bone matrix containing stem cells (Trinity Evolution® Viable Cellular Bone Matrix) in patients undergoing two-level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peppers, Timothy A; Bullard, Dennis E; Vanichkachorn, Jed S; Stanley, Scott K; Arnold, Paul M; Waldorff, Erik I; Hahn, Rebekah; Atkinson, Brent L; Ryaby, James T; Linovitz, Raymond J

    2017-04-26

    Trinity Evolution® (TE), a viable cellular bone allograft, previously demonstrated high fusion rates and no safety-related concerns after single-level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) procedures. This prospective multicenter clinical study was performed to assess the radiographic and clinical outcomes of TE in subjects undergoing two-level ACDF procedures. In a prospective, multicenter study, 40 subjects that presented with symptomatic cervical degeneration at two adjacent vertebral levels underwent instrumented ACDF using TE autograft substitute in a polyetherethereketone (PEEK) cage. At 12 months, radiographic fusion status was evaluated by dynamic motion plain radiographs and thin cut CT with multiplanar reconstruction by a panel that was blinded to clinical outcome. Fusion success was defined by angular motion (≤4°) and the presence of bridging bone across the adjacent vertebral endplates. Clinical pain and function assessments included the Neck Disability Index (NDI), neck and arm pain as evaluated by visual analog scales (VAS), and SF-36 at both 6 and 12 months. At both 6 and 12 months, all clinical outcome scores (SF-36, NDI, and VAS pain) improved significantly (p Trinity Evolution in Anterior Cervical Disectomy and Fusion (ACDF) NCT00951938.

  18. Common pediatric cerebellar tumors: correlation between cell densities and apparent diffusion coefficient metrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koral, Korgün; Mathis, Derek; Gimi, Barjor; Gargan, Lynn; Weprin, Bradley; Bowers, Daniel C; Margraf, Linda

    2013-08-01

    To test whether there is correlation between cell densities and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) metrics of common pediatric cerebellar tumors. This study was reviewed for issues of patient safety and confidentiality and was approved by the Institutional Review Board of the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center and was compliant with HIPAA. The need for informed consent was waived. Ninety-five patients who had preoperative magnetic resonance imaging and surgical pathologic findings available between January 2003 and June 2011 were included. There were 37 pilocytic astrocytomas, 34 medulloblastomas (23 classic, eight desmoplastic-nodular, two large cell, one anaplastic), 17 ependymomas (13 World Health Organization [WHO] grade II, four WHO grade III), and seven atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors. ADCs of solid tumor components and normal cerebellum were measured. Tumor-to-normal brain ADC ratios (hereafter, ADC ratio) were calculated. The medulloblastomas and ependymomas were subcategorized according to the latest WHO classification, and tumor cellularity was calculated. Correlation was sought between cell densities and mean tumor ADCs, minimum tumor ADCs, and ADC ratio. When all tumors were considered together, negative correlation was found between cellularity and mean tumor ADCs (ρ = -0.737, P correlation between cellularity and ADC ratio. Negative correlation was found between cellularity and minimum tumor ADC in atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors (ρ = -0.786, P correlation was found between cellularity and mean tumor ADC and ADC ratio. There was no correlation between the ADC metrics and cellularity of the pilocytic astrocytomas, medulloblastomas, and ependymomas. Negative correlation was found between cellularity and ADC metrics of common pediatric cerebellar tumors. Although ADC metrics are useful in the preoperative diagnosis of common pediatric cerebellar tumors and this utility is generally attributed to differences in cellularity of tumors

  19. Cell Density Effects of Frog Skin Bacteria on Their Capacity to Inhibit Growth of the Chytrid Fungus, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasumiba, Kiyomi; Bell, Sara; Alford, Ross

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial symbionts on frog skin can reduce the growth of the chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) through production of inhibitory metabolites. Bacteria can be effective at increasing the resistance of amphibians to chytridiomycosis when added to amphibian skin, and isolates can be screened for production of metabolites that inhibit Bd growth in vitro. However, some bacteria use density-dependent mechanism such as quorum sensing to regulate metabolite production. It is therefore important to consider cell density effects when evaluating bacteria as possible candidates for bioaugmentation. The aim of our study was to evaluate how the density of cutaneous bacteria affects their inhibition of Bd growth in vitro. We sampled cutaneous bacteria isolated from three frog species in the tropical rainforests of northern Queensland, Australia, and selected ten isolates that were inhibitory to Bd in standardised pilot trials. We grew each isolate in liquid culture at a range of initial dilutions, sub-sampled each dilution at a series of times during the first 48 h of growth and measured spectrophotometric absorbance values, cell counts and Bd-inhibitory activity of cell-free supernatants at each time point. The challenge assay results clearly demonstrated that the inhibitory effects of most isolates were density dependent, with relatively low variation among isolates in the minimum cell density needed to inhibit Bd growth. We suggest the use of minimum cell densities and fast-growing candidate isolates to maximise bioaugmentation efforts.

  20. PMA-Linked Fluorescence for Rapid Detection of Viable Bacterial Endospores

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaDuc, Myron T.; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Mohapatra, Bidyut

    2012-01-01

    The most common approach for assessing the abundance of viable bacterial endospores is the culture-based plating method. However, culture-based approaches are heavily biased and oftentimes incompatible with upstream sample processing strategies, which make viable cells/spores uncultivable. This shortcoming highlights the need for rapid molecular diagnostic tools to assess more accurately the abundance of viable spacecraft-associated microbiota, perhaps most importantly bacterial endospores. Propidium monoazide (PMA) has received a great deal of attention due to its ability to differentiate live, viable bacterial cells from dead ones. PMA gains access to the DNA of dead cells through compromised membranes. Once inside the cell, it intercalates and eventually covalently bonds with the double-helix structures upon photoactivation with visible light. The covalently bound DNA is significantly altered, and unavailable to downstream molecular-based manipulations and analyses. Microbiological samples can be treated with appropriate concentrations of PMA and exposed to visible light prior to undergoing total genomic DNA extraction, resulting in an extract comprised solely of DNA arising from viable cells. This ability to extract DNA selectively from living cells is extremely powerful, and bears great relevance to many microbiological arenas.

  1. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein-induced apoptotic dendritic cells as a novel therapy for atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frodermann, Vanessa; van Puijvelde, Gijs H M; Wierts, Laura; Lagraauw, H Maxime; Foks, Amanda C; van Santbrink, Peter J; Bot, Ilze; Kuiper, Johan; de Jager, Saskia C A

    2015-03-01

    Modulation of immune responses may form a powerful approach to treat atherosclerosis. It was shown that clearance of apoptotic cells results in tolerance induction to cleared Ags by dendritic cells (DCs); however, this seems impaired in atherosclerosis because Ag-specific tolerance is lacking. This could result, in part, from decreased emigration of DCs from atherosclerotic lesions because of the high-cholesterol environment. Nonetheless, local induction of anti-inflammatory responses by apoptotic cell clearance seems to dampen atherosclerosis, because inhibition of apoptotic cell clearance worsens atherosclerosis. In this study, we assessed whether i.v. administration of oxLDL-induced apoptotic DCs (apop(ox)-DCs) and, as a control, unpulsed apoptotic DCs could modulate atherosclerosis by inducing tolerance. Adoptive transfer of apop(ox)-DCs into low-density lipoprotein receptor knockout mice either before or during feeding of a Western-type diet resulted in increased numbers of CD103(+) tolerogenic splenic DCs, with a concomitant increase in regulatory T cells. Interestingly, both types of apoptotic DCs induced an immediate 40% decrease in Ly-6C(hi) monocyte numbers and a 50% decrease in circulating CCL2 levels, but only apop(ox)-DC treatment resulted in long-term effects on monocytes and CCL2 levels. Although initial lesion development was reduced by 40% in both treatment groups, only apop(ox)-DC treatment prevented lesion progression by 28%. Moreover, progressed lesions of apop(ox)-DC-treated mice showed a robust 45% increase in collagen content, indicating an enhanced stability of lesions. Our findings clearly show that apoptotic DC treatment significantly decreases lesion development, but only apop(ox)-DCs can positively modulate lesion progression and stability. These findings may translate into a safe treatment for patients with established cardiovascular diseases using patient-derived apop(ox)-DCs. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of

  2. High density lipoprotein (HDL promotes glucose uptake in adipocytes and glycogen synthesis in muscle cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qichun Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: High density lipoprotein (HDL was reported to decrease plasma glucose and promote insulin secretion in type 2 diabetes patients. This investigation was designed to determine the effects and mechanisms of HDL on glucose uptake in adipocytes and glycogen synthesis in muscle cells. METHODS AND RESULTS: Actions of HDL on glucose uptake and GLUT4 translocation were assessed with 1-[(3H]-2-deoxyglucose and plasma membrane lawn, respectively, in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Glycogen analysis was performed with amyloglucosidase and glucose oxidase-peroxidase methods in normal and palmitate-treated L6 cells. Small interfering RNA was used to observe role of scavenger receptor type I (SR-BI in glucose uptake of HDL. Corresponding signaling molecules were detected by immunoblotting. HDL stimulated glucose uptake in a time- and concentration-dependent manner in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. GLUT4 translocation was significantly increased by HDL. Glycogen deposition got enhanced in L6 muscle cells paralleling with elevated glycogen synthase kinase3 (GSK3 phosphorylation. Meanwhile, increased phosphorylations of Akt-Ser473 and AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK α were detected in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Glucose uptake and Akt-Ser473 activation but not AMPK-α were diminished in SR-BI knock-down 3T3-L1 cells. CONCLUSIONS: HDL stimulates glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes through enhancing GLUT4 translocation by mechanisms involving PI3K/Akt via SR-BI and AMPK signaling pathways, and increases glycogen deposition in L6 muscle cells through promoting GSK3 phosphorylation.

  3. Engineering biomechanically functional neocartilage derived from expanded articular chondrocytes through the manipulation of cell-seeding density and dexamethasone concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Brian J; Huey, Daniel J; Hu, Jerry C; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A

    2017-08-01

    Recent work has established methods to engineer self-assembled, scaffold-free neocartilage from an expanded articular chondrocyte (AC) cell source. In continuing such work, the objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of cell-seeding density and dexamethasone concentration on these neocartilage constructs. Neocartilage discs (5 mm diameter) were formed by self-assembling passaged leporine articular chondrocytes into non-adherent agarose moulds. The cell-seeding densities (2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 million cells/construct) and dexamethasone concentrations (10 and 100 nm) in the culture medium were varied in a full-factorial study. After 4 weeks, the neocartilage constructs were assessed for morphological, biochemical and biomechanical properties. The cell-seeding density profoundly affected neocartilage properties. The two dexamethasone concentrations explored did not induce overall significant differences. Constructs formed using lower cell-seeding densities possessed much higher biochemical and biomechanical properties than constructs seeded with higher cell densities. Notably, the 2 million cells/construct group formed hyaline-like neocartilage with a collagen wet weight (WW) content of ~7% and a Young's modulus of ~4 MPa, representing the high end of values achieved in self-assembled neocartilage. Excitingly, the mechanical properties of these constructs were on a par with that of native cartilage tissues tested under similar conditions. Through optimization of cell-seeding density, this study shows for the first time the use of expanded ACs to form homogeneous self-assembled neocartilage with exceptionally high tensile strength. With such functional properties, these engineered neocartilage constructs provide a promising alternative for treating articular lesions. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Roots of success: cultivating viable community forestry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacQueen, Duncan

    2009-05-15

    Is community forestry emerging from the shadows? The evidence shows that locally controlled enterprises can be economically viable, and often build on stronger social and environmental foundations than the big private-sector players. Certainly this is an industry in need of a shakeup. Many forests have become flashpoints where agro-industry, large-scale logging concerns and conservation interests clash, while forest-dependent communities are left out in the cold. Meanwhile, governments – driven by concerns over the climate impacts of deforestation – are having to gear up for legal, sustainable forestry production. Community forestry could be crucial to solving many of these challenges. By building on local core capabilities and developing strategic partnerships, they are forging key new business models that could transform the sector.

  5. Impact of Pancreatic Rat Islet Density on Cell Survival during Hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rodriguez-Brotons

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In bioartificial pancreases (BP, the number of islets needed to restore normoglycaemia in the diabetic patient is critical. However, the confinement of a high quantity of islets in a limited space may impact islet survival, particularly in regard to the low oxygen partial pressure (PO2 in such environments. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact of islet number in a confined space under hypoxia on cell survival. Rat islets were seeded at three different concentrations (150, 300, and 600 Islet Equivalents (IEQ/cm2 and cultured in normal atmospheric pressure (160 mmHg as well as hypoxic conditions (15 mmHg for 24 hours. Cell viability, function, hypoxia-induced changes in gene expression, and cytokine secretion were then assessed. Notably, hypoxia appeared to induce a decrease in viability and increasing islet density exacerbated the observed increase in cellular apoptosis as well as the loss of function. These changes were also associated with an increase in inflammatory gene transcription. Taken together, these data indicate that when a high number of islets are confined to a small space under hypoxia, cell viability and function are significantly impacted. Thus, in order to improve islet survival in this environment during transplantation, oxygenation is of critical importance.

  6. Whole-cell analysis of low-density lipoprotein uptake by macrophages using STEM tomography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Pierre Baudoin

    Full Text Available Nanoparticles of heavy materials such as gold can be used as markers in quantitative electron microscopic studies of protein distributions in cells with nanometer spatial resolution. Studying nanoparticles within the context of cells is also relevant for nanotoxicological research. Here, we report a method to quantify the locations and the number of nanoparticles, and of clusters of nanoparticles inside whole eukaryotic cells in three dimensions using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM tomography. Whole-mount fixed cellular samples were prepared, avoiding sectioning or slicing. The level of membrane staining was kept much lower than is common practice in transmission electron microscopy (TEM, such that the nanoparticles could be detected throughout the entire cellular thickness. Tilt-series were recorded with a limited tilt-range of 80° thereby preventing excessive beam broadening occurring at higher tilt angles. The 3D locations of the nanoparticles were nevertheless determined with high precision using computation. The obtained information differed from that obtained with conventional TEM tomography data since the nanoparticles were highlighted while only faint contrast was obtained on the cellular material. Similar as in fluorescence microscopy, a particular set of labels can be studied. This method was applied to study the fate of sequentially up-taken low-density lipoprotein (LDL conjugated to gold nanoparticles in macrophages. Analysis of a 3D reconstruction revealed that newly up-taken LDL-gold was delivered to lysosomes containing previously up-taken LDL-gold thereby forming onion-like clusters.

  7. Automated computation of arbor densities: a step toward identifying neuronal cell types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uygar eSümbül

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The shape and position of a neuron convey information regarding its molecular and functional identity. The identification of cell types from structure, a classic method, relies on the time-consuming step of arbor tracing. However, as genetic tools and imaging methods make data-driven approaches to neuronal circuit analysis feasible, the need for automated processing increases. Here, we first establish that mouse retinal ganglion cell types can be as precise about distributing their arbor volumes across the inner plexiform layer as they are about distributing the skeletons of the arbors. Then, we describe an automated approach to computing the spatial distribution of the dendritic arbors, or arbor density, with respect to a global depth coordinate based on this observation. Our method involves three-dimensional reconstruction of neuronal arbors by a supervised machine learning algorithm, post-processing of the enhanced stacks to remove somata and isolate the neuron of interest, and registration of neurons to each other using automatically detected arbors of the starburst amacrine interneurons as fiducial markers. In principle, this method could be generalizable to other structures of the CNS, provided that they allow sparse labeling of the cells and contain a reliable axis of spatial reference.

  8. Polymerase chain reaction-based discrimination of viable from non-viable Mycoplasma gallisepticum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching Giap Tan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The present study was based on the reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR of the 16S ribosomal nucleic acid (rRNA of Mycoplasma for detection of viable Mycoplasma gallisepticum. To determine the stability of M. gallisepticum 16S rRNA in vitro, three inactivation methods were used and the suspensions were stored at different temperatures. The 16S rRNA of M. gallisepticum was detected up to approximately 20–25 h at 37 °C, 22–25 h at 16 °C, and 23–27 h at 4 °C. The test, therefore, could detect viable or recently dead M. gallisepticum (< 20 h. The RT-PCR method was applied during an in vivo study of drug efficacy under experimental conditions, where commercial broiler-breeder eggs were inoculated with M. gallisepticum into the yolk. Hatched chicks that had been inoculated in ovo were treated with Macrolide 1. The method was then applied in a flock of day 0 chicks with naturally acquired vertical transmission of M. gallisepticum, treated with Macrolide 2. Swabs of the respiratory tract were obtained for PCR and RT-PCR evaluations to determine the viability of M. gallisepticum. This study proved that the combination of both PCR and RT-PCR enables detection and differentiation of viable from non-viable M. gallisepticum.

  9. The Impact of Cathode Material and Shape on Current Density in an Aluminum Electrolysis Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yang; Peng, Jianping; Di, Yuezhong; Wang, Yaowu; Li, Baokuan; Feng, Naixiang

    2016-02-01

    A finite element model was developed to determine the impact of cathode material and shape on current density in an aluminum electrolysis cell. For the cathode material, results show that increased electrical resistivity leads to a higher cathode voltage drop; however, the horizontal current is reduced in the metal. The horizontal current magnitude for six different cathode materials in decreasing order is graphitized, semi-graphitized, full graphitic, 50% anthracite (50% artificial graphite), 70% anthracite (30% artificial graphite), 100% anthracite. The modified cathode shapes with an inclined cathode surface, higher collector bar and cylindrical protrusions are intended to improve horizontal current and flow resistance. Compared to a traditional cathode, modified collector bar sizes of 70 mm × 230 mm and 80 mm × 270 mm can reduce horizontal current density component Jx by 10% and 19%, respectively, due to better conductivity of the steel. The horizontal current in the metal decreases with increase of cathode inclination. The peak value of Jx can be approximately reduced by 20% for a 2° change in inclination. Cylindrical protrusions lead to local horizontal current increase on their tops, but the average current is less affected and the molten metal is effectively slowed down.

  10. Isolation of Peroxisomes from Rat Liver and Cultured Hepatoma Cells by Density Gradient Centrifugation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manner, Andreas; Islinger, Markus

    2017-01-01

    Subcellular fractionation is still a valuable technique to unravel organelle-specific proteomes, validate the location of uncharacterized proteins, or to functionally analyze import and metabolism in individual subcellular compartments. In this respect, density gradient centrifugation still represents a very classic, indispensable technique to isolate and analyze peroxisomes. Here, we present two independent protocols for the purification of peroxisomes from either liver tissue or the HepG2 hepatoma cell line. While the former permits the isolation of highly pure peroxisomes suitable for, e.g., subcellular proteomics experiments, the latter protocol yields peroxisomal fractions from considerably less purity but allows to easily modify metabolic conditions in the culture medium or to genetically manipulate the peroxisomal compartment. In this respect, both purification methods represent alternative tools to be applied in experiments investigating peroxisome physiology.

  11. Control of microbial activity by flow injection analysis during high cell density cultivation of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, T; Bilitewski, U; Schmid, R D; Korz, D J; Sanders, E A

    1993-01-01

    The application of an automated flow injection analysis (FIA) system for on-line determination of microbial activity, during high cell density cultivations of Escherichia coli is reported. Based on a bioelectrochemical principle, the FIA method used a redox mediator (potassium hexacyanoferrate(III)) to facilitate electron transfer from the microorganisms to an electrochemical detector. Assays were carried out using a new sampling device which provided aseptic operation by use of a valve and chemical sterilisation. No sample dilution or pretreatment was necessary for biomass concentrations up to approx. 40 g l-1. The sample volume was 0.5 ml and the overall analysis time was 5 min. FIA signals were found to correlate well with the oxygen uptake rate (OUR). Changes in metabolic activity due to low substrate levels or high inhibitor concentrations in the cultivation medium became obvious from the FIA signals.

  12. Leptin deficiency-induced obesity affects the density of mast cells in abdominal fat depots and lymph nodes in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altintas Mehmet M

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mast cells are implicated in the pathogenesis of obesity and insulin resistance. Here, we explored the effects of leptin deficiency-induced obesity on the density of mast cells in metabolic (abdominal fat depots, skeletal muscle, and liver and lymphatic (abdominal lymph nodes, spleen, and thymus organs. Fourteen-week-old male leptin-deficient ob/ob mice and their controls fed a standard chow were studied. Tissue sections were stained with toluidine blue to determine the density of mast cells. CD117/c-kit protein expression analysis was also carried out. Furthermore, mast cells containing immunoreactive tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, a proinflammatory cytokine involved in obesity-linked insulin resistance, were identified by immunostaining. Results ob/ob mice demonstrated adiposity and insulin resistance. In abdominal fat depots, mast cells were distributed differentially. While most prevalent in subcutaneous fat in controls, mast cells were most abundant in epididymal fat in ob/ob mice. Leptin deficiency-induced obesity was accompanied by a 20-fold increase in the density of mast cells in epididymal fat, but a 13-fold decrease in subcutaneous fat. This finding was confirmed by CD117/c-kit protein expression analysis. Furthermore, we found that a subset of mast cells in epididymal and subcutaneous fat were immunoreactive for TNF-α. The proportion of mast cells immunoreactive for TNF-α was higher in epididymal than in subcutaneous fat in both ob/ob and control mice. Mast cells were also distributed differentially in retroperitoneal, mesenteric, and inguinal lymph nodes. In both ob/ob mice and lean controls, mast cells were more prevalent in retroperitoneal than in mesenteric and inguinal lymph nodes. Leptin deficiency-induced obesity was accompanied by increased mast cell density in all lymph node stations examined. No significant difference in the density of mast cells in skeletal muscle, liver, spleen, and thymus was

  13. Possible Prognostic and Therapeutic Significance of c-Kit Expression, Mast Cell Count and Microvessel Density in Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Marech

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Renal cell carcinoma (RCC is the most frequent renal tumor and its incidence is increasing worldwide. Tumor angiogenesis is known to play a crucial role in the etiopathogenesis of RCC and over the last few years an even deeper knowledge of its contribution in metastatic RCC development has led to the development of numerous molecular targeting agents (such as sunitinib, sorafenib, pazopanib, axitinib, tivozanib, and dovitinib. The above agents are principally directed against vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR members and also against c-Kit receptor (c-KitR. The role of c-kitR inhibition on clear cell RCC (ccRCC, the main RCC subtype, is less well established. Whether c-kitR activation through its ligand, stem cell factor (SCF contributes significantly to the effects of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs treatment remains to be established. It is important to underscore that the c-KitR is expressed on mast cells (MCs and cancer cells. After an examination of the c-KitR/SCF pathway, we review here the principal studies that have evaluated c-Kit expression in RCC. Moreover, we summarize some investigations that have observed the distribution of MCs in primary renal cancer and in adjacent normal tissue with appropriate histological immunohistochemical techniques. We also focus on few studies that have evaluated the correlation between RCC proliferation, MC count and microvessel density (MVD, as hallmarks of tumor angiogenesis. Thus, the aim of this review of the literature is to clarify if c-KitR expression, MC count and MVD could have prognostic significance and the possible predictive therapeutic implications in RCC.

  14. High-Density and Very-Low-Density Lipoprotein Have Opposing Roles in Regulating Tumor-Initiating Cells and Sensitivity to Radiation in Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolfe, Adam R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Research Program and Clinic, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Atkinson, Rachel L. [Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Research Program and Clinic, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Reddy, Jay P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Debeb, Bisrat G.; Larson, Richard; Li, Li [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Clinical Cancer Prevention, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Masuda, Hiroko; Brewer, Takae [Department of Clinical Cancer Prevention, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Atkinson, Bradley J. [Department of Clinical Pharmacy Services, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Brewster, Abeena [Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Research Program and Clinic, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Ueno, Naoto T. [Department of Clinical Cancer Prevention, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Woodward, Wendy A., E-mail: wwoodward@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Clinical Cancer Prevention, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: We previously demonstrated that cholesterol-lowering agents regulate radiation sensitivity of inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) cell lines in vitro and are associated with less radiation resistance among IBC patients who undergo postmastectomy radiation. We hypothesized that decreasing IBC cellular cholesterol induced by treatment with lipoproteins would increase radiation sensitivity. Here, we examined the impact of specific transporters of cholesterol (ie lipoproteins) on the responses of IBC cells to self-renewal and to radiation in vitro and on clinical outcomes in IBC patients. Methods and Materials: Two patient-derived IBC cell lines, SUM 149 and KPL4, were incubated with low-density lipoproteins (LDL), very-low-density lipoproteins (VLDL), or high-density lipoproteins (HDL) for 24 hours prior to irradiation (0-6 Gy) and mammosphere formation assay. Cholesterol panels were examined in a cohort of patients with primary IBC diagnosed between 1995 and 2011 at MD Anderson Cancer Center. Lipoprotein levels were then correlated to patient outcome, using the log rank statistical model, and examined in multivariate analysis using Cox regression. Results: VLDL increased and HDL decreased mammosphere formation compared to untreated SUM 149 and KPL4 cells. Survival curves showed enhancement of survival in both of the IBC cell lines when pretreated with VLDL and, conversely, radiation sensitization in all cell lines when pretreated with HDL. In IBC patients, higher VLDL values (>30 mg/dL) predicted a lower 5-year overall survival rate than normal values (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.9 [95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.05-3.45], P=.035). Lower-than-normal patient HDL values (<60 mg/dL) predicted a lower 5-year overall survival rate than values higher than 60 mg/dL (HR = 3.21 [95% CI: 1.25-8.27], P=.015). Conclusions: This study discovered a relationship among the plasma levels of lipoproteins, overall patient response, and radiation resistance in IBC patients

  15. Increased COX-2 expression in epithelial and stromal cells of high mammographic density tissues and in a xenograft model of mammographic density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, G L; Huo, C W; Huang, D; Hill, P; Cawson, J; Frazer, H; Hopper, J L; Haviv, I; Henderson, M A; Britt, K; Thompson, E W

    2015-08-01

    Mammographic density (MD) adjusted for age and body mass index is one of the strongest known risk factors for breast cancer. Given the high attributable risk of MD for breast cancer, chemoprevention with a safe and available agent that reduces MD and breast cancer risk would be beneficial. Cox-2 has been implicated in MD-related breast cancer risk, and was increased in stromal cells in high MD tissues in one study. Our study assessed differential Cox-2 expression in epithelial and stromal cells in paired samples of high and low MD human breast tissue, and in a validated xenograft biochamber model of MD. We also examined the effects of endocrine treatment upon Cox-2 expression in high and low MD tissues in the MD xenograft model. Paired high and low MD human breast tissue samples were immunostained for Cox-2, then assessed for differential expression and staining intensity in epithelial and stromal cells. High and low MD human breast tissues were separately maintained in biochambers in mice treated with Tamoxifen, oestrogen or placebo implants, then assessed for percentage Cox-2 staining in epithelial and stromal cells. Percentage Cox-2 staining was greater for both epithelial (p = 0.01) and stromal cells (p tissues. In high MD biochamber tissues, percentage Cox-2 staining was greater in stromal cells of oestrogen-treated versus placebo-treated tissues (p = 0.05).

  16. Cell density dependence of Microcystis aeruginosa responses to copper algaecide concentrations: Implications for microcystin-LR release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinley, Ciera M; Iwinski, Kyla J; Hendrikse, Maas; Geer, Tyler D; Rodgers, John H

    2017-11-01

    Along with mechanistic models, predictions of exposure-response relationships for copper are often derived from laboratory toxicity experiments with standardized experimental exposures and conditions. For predictions of copper toxicity to algae, cell density is a critical factor often overlooked. For pulse exposures of copper-based algaecides in aquatic systems, cell density can significantly influence copper sorbed by the algal population, and consequent responses. A cyanobacterium, Microcystis aeruginosa, was exposed to a copper-based algaecide over a range of cell densities to model the density-dependence of exposures, and effects on microcystin-LR (MC-LR) release. Copper exposure concentrations were arrayed to result in a gradient of MC-LR release, and masses of copper sorbed to algal populations were measured following exposures. While copper exposure concentrations eliciting comparable MC-LR release ranged an order of magnitude (24-h EC50s 0.03-0.3mg Cu/L) among cell densities of 10 6 through 10 7 cells/mL, copper doses (mg Cu/mg algae) were similar (24-h EC50s 0.005-0.006mg Cu/mg algae). Comparisons of MC-LR release as a function of copper exposure concentrations and doses provided a metric of the density dependence of algal responses in the context of copper-based algaecide applications. Combined with estimates of other site-specific factors (e.g. water characteristics) and fate processes (e.g. dilution and dispersion, sorption to organic matter and sediments), measuring exposure-response relationships for specific cell densities can refine predictions for in situ exposures and algal responses. These measurements can in turn decrease the likelihood of amending unnecessary copper concentrations to aquatic systems, and minimize risks for non-target aquatic organisms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Goat and sheep ovarian tissue cryopreservation: Effects on the morphology and development of primordial follicles and density of stromal cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faustino, L R; Santos, R R; Silva, C M G; Pinto, L C; Celestino, J J H; Campello, C C; Figueiredo, J R; Rodrigues, A P R

    2010-10-01

    The effect of exposure to cryoprotectant and cryopreservation of goat and sheep ovarian cortical fragments on the morphology of primordial follicles, stromal cell density and follicular development was performed. Goat and sheep ovarian fragments were exposed to 1.0 or 1.5M ethylene glycol (EG) for 5, 10 or 20min, followed or not by conventional cryopreservation. Follicular morphology and stromal cell density were evaluated by means of classical histological analysis. In addition, ovarian fragments were cultured for 1 or 7 days after cryopreservation to evaluate follicular development. Both exposure to cryoprotectant and cryopreservation of goat and sheep ovarian tissue did affect the morphology of primordial follicles and stromal cell density, except when goat ovarian tissue was exposed to EG for 5min. Although exposure time did not influence follicular morphology in both species, increase in the exposure time from 5 to 20min did reduce goat stromal cell density. Increase in EG concentration from 1.0 to 1.5M did result in the decrease of the percentage of goat morphologically normal primordial follicles evaluated after exposure only. In vitro culture of frozen-thawed goat and sheep ovarian tissue showed that exposure to 1.0M, for 10min, before freezing of goat and sheep ovarian tissue does not impair follicular developmental capacity. In addition, stromal cell density may play a role in follicular survival and development after cryopreservation of ovarian tissue. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Reverse transcriptase real-time PCR for detection and quantification of viable Campylobacter jejuni directly from poultry faecal samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bui, Thanh Xuan; Wolff, Anders; Madsen, Mogens

    2012-01-01

    and quantification of viable Campylobacter jejuni directly from chicken faecal samples. The results of this method anda DNA-based quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) method were compared with those of a bacterial culture method. Using bacterial culture andRT-qPCR methods, viable C. jejuni cells could be detected...

  19. Edaravone attenuates monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells induced by oxidized low-density lipoprotein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zhijuan, E-mail: zjlee038@163.com; Cheng, Jianxin; Wang, Liping

    2015-10-30

    Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) plays a vital role in recruitment of monocytes to endothelial cells, which is important during early stages of atherosclerosis development. Edaravone, a potent and novel scavenger of free radicals inhibiting hydroxyl radicals, has been clinically used to reduce the neuronal damage following ischemic stroke. In the present study, Edaravone was revealed to markedly reduce oxLDL-induced monocyte adhesion to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). The inhibitory mechanism of Edaravone was associated with suppression of the chemokine MCP-1 and adhesion molecule VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 expression. In addition, luciferase reporter assay results revealed that administration of Edaravone attenuated the increase in NF-κB transcriptional activity induced by oxLDL. Notably, it's also shown that Edaravone treatment blocked oxLDL induced p65 nuclear translocation in HUVECs. Results indicate that Edaravone negatively regulates endothelial inflammation. - Highlights: • Edaravone reduces oxLDL-induced monocyte adhesion to HUVECs. • Edaravone attenuates oxLDL-induced expression of MCP-1, VCAM-1, and ICAM-1. • Edaravone reduces NF-κB transcriptional activity and p65 nuclear translocation.

  20. Paralytic shellfish toxin concentration and cell density changes in Pyrodinium bahamense -Noctiluca scintillans feeding experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azanza, Rhodora V; Cruz, Lourdes J; Cariño, Flerida A; Blanco, Alelea G; Butardo, Vito M

    2010-05-01

    For the first time the potential of Noctiluca scintillans, a non-toxic mixotrophic dinoflagellate, in bioconverting and/or excreting saxitoxin has been illustrated, thus contributing to the limited knowledge on the aspects of toxin pathways in the food chain/web and predator-prey preferences. Noctiluca growth rate increased with higher Pyrodinium concentration but the ratio of Noctiluca to Pyrodinium should at least be 1:250 cells per mL. Noctiluca fed with Pyrodinium alone was found to decrease in number suggesting that the nutrients from this prey were insufficient. This was confirmed by the improved cell density of Noctiluca upon addition of 0.01% casitone to the Pyrodinium-fed Noctiluca. The alternative prey (Gymnodinium sanguineum) slowed down the grazing impact of Noctiluca on Pyrodinium. Noctiluca depleted Gymnodinium earlier than Pyrodinium showing preference over a prey with less saxitoxin. After the feeding experiments, total saxitoxin levels decreased to 72% in the Noctiluca-Pyrodinium setup whereas no saxitoxin was detected in the Noctiluca culture fed with Pyrodinium and G. sanguineum. It is possible that Gymnodinium can provide some nutrients needed to make Noctiluca more efficient in bioconverting saxitoxin. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Optimized LTE cell planning for multiple user density subareas using meta-heuristic algorithms

    KAUST Repository

    Ghazzai, Hakim

    2014-09-01

    Base station deployment in cellular networks is one of the most fundamental problems in network design. This paper proposes a novel method for the cell planning problem for the fourth generation 4G-LTE cellular networks using meta heuristic algorithms. In this approach, we aim to satisfy both coverage and cell capacity constraints simultaneously by formulating a practical optimization problem. We start by performing a typical coverage and capacity dimensioning to identify the initial required number of base stations. Afterwards, we implement a Particle Swarm Optimization algorithm or a recently-proposed Grey Wolf Optimizer to find the optimal base station locations that satisfy both problem constraints in the area of interest which can be divided into several subareas with different user densities. Subsequently, an iterative approach is executed to eliminate eventual redundant base stations. We have also performed Monte Carlo simulations to study the performance of the proposed scheme and computed the average number of users in outage. Results show that our proposed approach respects in all cases the desired network quality of services even for large-scale dimension problems.

  2. Optimized LTE Cell Planning with Varying Spatial and Temporal User Densities

    KAUST Repository

    Ghazzai, Hakim

    2015-03-09

    Base station deployment in cellular networks is one of the fundamental problems in network design. This paper proposes a novel method for the cell planning problem for the fourth generation (4G) cellular networks using meta-heuristic algorithms. In this approach, we aim to satisfy both cell coverage and capacity constraints simultaneously by formulating an optimization problem that captures practical planning aspects. The starting point of the planning process is defined through a dimensioning exercise that captures both coverage and capacity constraints. Afterwards, we implement a meta-heuristic algorithm based on swarm intelligence (e.g., particle swarm optimization or the recently-proposed grey wolf optimizer) to find suboptimal base station locations that satisfy both problem constraints in the area of interest which can be divided into several subareas with different spatial user densities. Subsequently, an iterative approach is executed to eliminate eventual redundant base stations. We also perform Monte Carlo simulations to study the performance of the proposed scheme and compute the average number of users in outage. Next, the problems of green planning with regards to temporal traffic variation and planning with location constraints due to tight limits on electromagnetic radiations are addressed, using the proposed method. Finally, in our simulation results, we apply our proposed approach for different scenarios with different subareas and user distributions and show that the desired network quality of service targets are always reached even for large-scale problems.

  3. High-density lipoprotein-mediated transcellular cholesterol transport in mouse aortic endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, LiXia; Okoro, Emmanuel U; Cao, ZhiJan; Yang, Hong; Motley-Johnson, Evangeline; Guo, Zhongmao

    2015-09-18

    Accumulation of unesterified cholesterol-rich lipid vesicles in the subendothelial space contributes to atherogenesis. Transport of cholesterol from the subendothelial intima back to the circulating blood inhibits atherosclerosis development; however, the mechanism for this process has not been fully defined. Using cultured mouse aortic endothelial cells (MAECs), we observed that unesterified cholesterol can be transported across the endothelial cell monolayer from the basolateral to the apical compartment. Administration of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) or apolipoprotein AI (apoAI) to the apical compartment enhanced transendothelial cholesterol transport in a concentration-dependent manner. Knockdown of ATP-binding cassette transporter G1 (ABCG1) or scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-B1), or inhibition of SR-B1 diminished HDL-induced transendothelial cholesterol transport; while knockdown of ABCA1 reduced apoAI-mediated cholesterol transport. HDL enhanced phosphorylation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and Akt in MAECs. However, inhibition of PI3K or Akt did not reduce HDL-induced transendothelial cholesterol transport. These results suggest that HDL enhances transendothelial cholesterol transport by activation of a mechanism involving ABCA1, ABCG1 and SR-B1 but not involving PI3K and Akt. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. High cell-density production of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) in a membrane bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Cornelia; El-Najjar, Tarek; Virgolini, Nikolaus; Smerilli, Marina; Neureiter, Markus

    2017-07-25

    Agro-industrial residues with a low carbon content, such as whey, stillage or wastewater from plant oil mills are abundant and cheap. However, they cannot be used directly in highly productive industrial poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (P3HB) production, as the classical fed-batch fermentation strategy requires highly concentrated feed streams. This problem has been circumvented in this report by retaining the cells during the fermentation in the bioreactor using an external microfiltration module. Synthetic medium containing a glucose concentration of 50g/L was continuously fed to Cupriavidus necator, which converted the sugar to P3HB. With this setup we were able to achieve high productivities (3.10g P3HB/(Lh)) and reach high cell densities (148g/L) containing 76% P3HB, and obtained good yields (0.33g P3HB/g added glucose). The added sugar from the feed was instantly consumed by the bacteria, resulting in a negligible loss of sugar to the permeate. This approach creates the possibility of polyhydroxyalkanoate production from a range of cheap and easily available substrates, for which only waste water treatment or biogas production has been cost-competitive until now. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Increased extracellular matrix density decreases MCF10A breast cell acinus formation in 3D culture conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lance, Amanda; Yang, Chih-Chao; Swamydas, Muthulekha; Dean, Delphine; Deitch, Sandy; Burg, Karen J L; Dréau, Didier

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) contributes to the generation and dynamic of normal breast tissue, in particular to the generation of polarized acinar and ductal structures. In vitro 3D culture conditions, including variations in the composition of the ECM, have been shown to directly influence the formation and organization of acinus-like and duct-like structures. Furthermore, the density of the ECM appears to also play a role in the normal mammary tissue and tumour formation. Here we show that the density of the ECM directly influences the number, organization and function of breast acini. Briefly, non-malignant human breast MCF10A cells were incubated in increasing densities of a Matrigel®-collagen I matrix. Elastic moduli near and distant to the acinus structures were measured by atomic force microscopy, and the number of acinus structures was determined. Immunochemistry was used to investigate the expression levels of E-cadherin, laminin, matrix metalloproteinase-14 and ß-casein in MCF10A cells. The modulus of the ECM was significantly increased near the acinus structures and the number of acinus structures decreased with the increase in Matrigel-collagen I density. As evaluated by the expression of laminin, the organization of the acinus structures present was altered as the density of the ECM increased. Increases in both E-cadherin and MMP14 expression by MCF10A cells as ECM density increased were also observed. In contrast, MCF10A cells expressed lower ß-casein levels as the ECM density increased. Taken together, these observations highlight the key role of ECM density in modulating the number, organization and function of breast acini. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. The Conceptual Mechanism for Viable Organizational Learning Based on Complex System Theory and the Viable System Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Dia; You, Yeongmahn; Song, Ji Hoon

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to explore the possibility of viable learning organizations based on identifying viable organizational learning mechanisms. Two theoretical foundations, complex system theory and viable system theory, have been integrated to provide the rationale for building the sustainable organizational learning mechanism. The…

  7. Deletion of ultraconserved elements yields viable mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahituv, Nadav; Zhu, Yiwen; Visel, Axel; Holt, Amy; Afzal, Veena; Pennacchio, Len A.; Rubin, Edward M.

    2007-07-15

    Ultraconserved elements have been suggested to retainextended perfect sequence identity between the human, mouse, and ratgenomes due to essential functional properties. To investigate thenecessities of these elements in vivo, we removed four non-codingultraconserved elements (ranging in length from 222 to 731 base pairs)from the mouse genome. To maximize the likelihood of observing aphenotype, we chose to delete elements that function as enhancers in amouse transgenic assay and that are near genes that exhibit markedphenotypes both when completely inactivated in the mouse as well as whentheir expression is altered due to other genomic modifications.Remarkably, all four resulting lines of mice lacking these ultraconservedelements were viable and fertile, and failed to reveal any criticalabnormalities when assayed for a variety of phenotypes including growth,longevity, pathology and metabolism. In addition more targeted screens,informed by the abnormalities observed in mice where genes in proximityto the investigated elements had been altered, also failed to revealnotable abnormalities. These results, while not inclusive of all thepossible phenotypic impact of the deleted sequences, indicate thatextreme sequence constraint does not necessarily reflect crucialfunctions required for viability.

  8. Is Greenberg's "Macro-Carib" viable?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spike Gildea

    Full Text Available In his landmark work Language in the Americas, Greenberg (1987 proposed that Macro-Carib was one of the major low-level stocks of South America, which together with Macro-Panoan and Macro-Ge-Bororo were claimed to comprise the putative Ge-Pano-Carib Phylum. His Macro-Carib includes the isolates Andoke and Kukura, and the Witotoan, Peba-Yaguan, and Cariban families. Greenberg's primary evidence came from person-marking paradigms in individual languages, plus scattered words from individual languages collected into 79 Macro-Carib 'etymologies' and another 64 Amerind 'etymologies'. The goal of this paper is to re-evaluate Greenberg's Macro-Carib claim in the light of the much more extensive and reliable language data that has become available largely since 1987. Based on full person-marking paradigms for Proto-Cariban, Yagua, Bora and Andoke, we conclude that Greenberg's morphological claims are unfounded. For our lexical comparison, we created lexical lists for Proto-Cariban, Proto-Witotoan, Yagua and Andoke, for both Greenberg's 143 putative etymologies and for the Swadesh 100 list. From both lists, a total of 23 potential cognates were found, but no consonantal correspondences were repeated even once. We conclude that our greatly expanded and improved database does not provide sufficient evidence to convince the skeptic that the Macro-Carib hypothesis is viable

  9. Economically viable large-scale hydrogen liquefaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardella, U.; Decker, L.; Klein, H.

    2017-02-01

    The liquid hydrogen demand, particularly driven by clean energy applications, will rise in the near future. As industrial large scale liquefiers will play a major role within the hydrogen supply chain, production capacity will have to increase by a multiple of today’s typical sizes. The main goal is to reduce the total cost of ownership for these plants by increasing energy efficiency with innovative and simple process designs, optimized in capital expenditure. New concepts must ensure a manageable plant complexity and flexible operability. In the phase of process development and selection, a dimensioning of key equipment for large scale liquefiers, such as turbines and compressors as well as heat exchangers, must be performed iteratively to ensure technological feasibility and maturity. Further critical aspects related to hydrogen liquefaction, e.g. fluid properties, ortho-para hydrogen conversion, and coldbox configuration, must be analysed in detail. This paper provides an overview on the approach, challenges and preliminary results in the development of efficient as well as economically viable concepts for large-scale hydrogen liquefaction.

  10. Nicotine-induced expression of low-density lipoprotein receptor in oral epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Ito

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nicotine use is one of the most important risk factors for the development of cardiovascular and periodontal diseases. Numerous reports have suggested the possible contribution of disturbed lipid metabolism for the development of both disease groups. Despite these observations, little is known about the relationship between tobacco smoking and the development of these diseases. Our previous microarray data revealed that nicotine induced low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR expression in oral epithelial cells (OECs. The aim of the present study was to confirm nicotine-mediated LDLR induction and to elucidate the signaling mechanisms leading to the augmented expression of LDLR in OECs. METHODS AND RESULTS: LDLR and nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR subunit expression was detected by real-time PCR. The production of LDLR was demonstrated by immunofluorescence staining. nAChR-mediated LDLR induction was examined by pre-incubation of the cells with its specific inhibitor, α-bungarotoxin (α-BTX. The functional importance of transcription factor specific protein 1 (Sp1 was examined by luciferase assay, mithramycin pre-incubation or by small interfering RNA (siRNA transfection. The specific binding of Sp1 to R3 region of LDLR 5'-untranslated region was demonstrated with electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA and streptavidin-agarose precipitation assay followed by western blotting. The results confirmed that nicotine induced LDLR expression at the transcriptional level. Nicotine was sensed by nAChR and the signal was transduced by Sp1 which bound to the R3 region of LDLR gene. Augmented production of LDLR in the gingival epithelial cells was further demonstrated by immunofluorescence staining using the gingival tissues obtained from the smoking patients. CONCLUSIONS: Taken together, the results suggested that nicotine might contribute to the development of both cardiovascular and periodontal diseases by inducing the LDLR in

  11. Plasmodium falciparum exhibits markers of regulated cell death at high population density in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelbrecht, Dewaldt; Coetzer, Thérèsa Louise

    2016-12-01

    The asexual erythrocytic cycle of the protozoan parasite Plasmodium falciparum is responsible for the pathogenesis of malaria and causes the overwhelming majority of malaria deaths. Rapidly increasing parasitaemia during this 48hour cycle threatens the survival of the human host and the parasite prior to transmission of the slow-maturing sexual stages to the mosquito host. The parasite may utilise regulated cell death (RCD) to control the burden of infection on the host and thus aid its own survival and transmission. The occurrence of RCD in P. falciparum remains a controversial topic. We provide strong evidence for the occurrence of an apoptosis-like phenotype of RCD in P. falciparum under conditions of high parasite density. P. falciparum was maintained in vitro and stressed by allowing growth to an unrestricted peak parasitaemia. Cell death markers, including morphological changes, DNA fragmentation, mitochondrial polarisation and phosphatidylserine externalisation were used to characterise parasite death at the time of peak parasitaemia and 24h later. At peak parasitaemia, mitochondrial depolarisation was observed, together with phosphatidylserine externalisation in both parasitised- and neighbouring non-infected erythrocytes. DNA fragmentation coincided with a decline in parasitaemia. Fewer merozoites were observed in mature schizonts at peak parasitaemia. Growth recovery to near-peak parasitaemia was noted within two intraerythrocytic cycles. The combination and chronological order of the biochemical markers of cell death suggest the occurrence of an apoptosis-like phenotype. The identification of a RCD pathway in P. falciparum may provide novel drug targets, particularly if the pathway differs from the host machinery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Serum amyloid A stimulates macrophage foam cell formation via lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor 1 upregulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ha Young, E-mail: hayoung@skku.edu [Department of Biological Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Mitochondria Hub Regulation Center, Dong-A University, Busan 602-714 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sang Doo [Department of Biological Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Baek, Suk-Hwan [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Medicine, Yeungnam University, Daegu 705-717 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Joon Hyuk [Department of Pathology, College of Medicine, Yeungnam University, Daegu 705-717 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Kyung-Hyun [School of Biotechnology, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan 712-749 (Korea, Republic of); Zabel, Brian A. [Palo Alto Institute for Research and Education, Veterans Affairs Hospital, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Bae, Yoe-Sik, E-mail: yoesik@skku.edu [Department of Biological Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Mitochondria Hub Regulation Center, Dong-A University, Busan 602-714 (Korea, Republic of); Samsung Advanced Institute for Health Sciences and Technology, Sungkyunkwan University, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-03-29

    Highlights: ► SAA induced macrophage foam cell formation. ► SAA stimulated upregulation of lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor 1 (LOX1). ► SAA-induced LOX1 expression and foam cell formation is mediated by JNK/NF-κB signaling. ► HDL-conjugated SAA also stimulates foam cell formation via LOX1 upregulation. ► The finding reveals a novel mechanism of action of SAA in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. -- Abstract: Elevated levels of serum amyloid A (SAA) is a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, however, the role of SAA in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis remains unclear. Here we show that SAA induced macrophage foam cell formation. SAA-stimulated foam cell formation was mediated by c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling. Moreover, both SAA and SAA-conjugated high density lipoprotein stimulated the expression of the important scavenger receptor lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor 1 (LOX1) via nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). A LOX1 antagonist carrageenan significantly blocked SAA-induced foam cell formation, indicating that SAA promotes foam cell formation via LOX1 expression. Our findings therefore suggest that SAA stimulates foam cell formation via LOX1 induction, and thus likely contributes to atherogenesis.

  13. Prefrontal cortical parvalbumin and somatostatin expression and cell density increase during adolescence and are modified by BDNF and sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, X; Serena, K; Hwang, W; Grech, A M; Wu, Y W C; Schroeder, A; Hill, R A

    2018-02-03

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is known to play a critical role early in the development of cortical GABAergic interneurons. Recently our laboratory and others have shown protracted development of specific subpopulations of GABAergic interneurons extending into adolescence. BDNF expression also changes significantly across adolescent development. However the role of BDNF in regulating GABAergic changes across adolescence remains unclear. Here, we performed a week-by-week analysis of the protein expression and cell density of three major GABAergic interneurons, parvalbumin (PV), somatostatin (SST) and calretinin (Cal) in the medial prefrontal cortex from prepubescence (week 3) to adulthood (week 12). In order to assess how BDNF and sex might influence the adolescent trajectory of GABAergic interneurons we compared WT as well as BDNF heterozygous (+/-) male and female mice. In both males and females PV expression increases during adolescent development in the mPFC. Compared to wild-types, PV expression was reduced in male but not female BDNF+/- mice throughout adolescent development. This reduction in protein expression corresponded with reduced cell density, specifically within the infralimbic prefrontal cortex. SST expression increased in early adolescent WT females and this upregulation was delayed in BDNF+/-. SST cell density also increased in early adolescent mPFC of WT female mice, with BDNF+/- again showing a reduced pattern of expression. Cal protein expression was also sex-dependently altered across adolescence with WT males showing a steady decline but that of BDNF+/- remaining unaltered. Reduced cell density in on the other hand was observed particularly in male BDNF+/- mice. In females, Cal protein expression and cell density remained largely stable. Our results show that PV, SST and calretinin interneurons are indeed still developing into early adolescence in the mPFC and that BDNF plays a critical, sex-specific role in mediating expression and

  14. Stomatal and pavement cell density linked to leaf internal CO2 concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santrůček, Jiří; Vráblová, Martina; Simková, Marie; Hronková, Marie; Drtinová, Martina; Květoň, Jiří; Vrábl, Daniel; Kubásek, Jiří; Macková, Jana; Wiesnerová, Dana; Neuwithová, Jitka; Schreiber, Lukas

    2014-08-01

    Stomatal density (SD) generally decreases with rising atmospheric CO2 concentration, Ca. However, SD is also affected by light, air humidity and drought, all under systemic signalling from older leaves. This makes our understanding of how Ca controls SD incomplete. This study tested the hypotheses that SD is affected by the internal CO2 concentration of the leaf, Ci, rather than Ca, and that cotyledons, as the first plant assimilation organs, lack the systemic signal. Sunflower (Helianthus annuus), beech (Fagus sylvatica), arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and garden cress (Lepidium sativum) were grown under contrasting environmental conditions that affected Ci while Ca was kept constant. The SD, pavement cell density (PCD) and stomatal index (SI) responses to Ci in cotyledons and the first leaves of garden cress were compared. (13)C abundance (δ(13)C) in leaf dry matter was used to estimate the effective Ci during leaf development. The SD was estimated from leaf imprints. SD correlated negatively with Ci in leaves of all four species and under three different treatments (irradiance, abscisic acid and osmotic stress). PCD in arabidopsis and garden cress responded similarly, so that SI was largely unaffected. However, SD and PCD of cotyledons were insensitive to Ci, indicating an essential role for systemic signalling. It is proposed that Ci or a Ci-linked factor plays an important role in modulating SD and PCD during epidermis development and leaf expansion. The absence of a Ci-SD relationship in the cotyledons of garden cress indicates the key role of lower-insertion CO2 assimilation organs in signal perception and its long-distance transport. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. High power density microbial fuel cell with flexible 3D graphene-nickel foam as anode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hanyu; Wang, Gongming; Ling, Yichuan; Qian, Fang; Song, Yang; Lu, Xihong; Chen, Shaowei; Tong, Yexiang; Li, Yat

    2013-11-07

    The structure and electrical conductivity of anode play a significant role in the power generation of microbial fuel cells (MFCs). In this study, we developed a three-dimensional (3D) reduced graphene oxide-nickel (denoted as rGO-Ni) foam as an anode for MFC through controlled deposition of rGO sheets onto the nickel foam substrate. The loading amount of rGO sheets and electrode surface area can be controlled by the number of rGO loading cycles. 3D rGO-Ni foam anode provides not only a large accessible surface area for microbial colonization and electron mediators, but also a uniform macro-porous scaffold for effective mass diffusion of the culture medium. Significantly, at a steady state of the power generation, the MFC device with flexible rGO-Ni electrodes produced an optimal volumetric power density of 661 W m(-3) calculated based on the volume of anode material, or 27 W m(-3) based on the volume of the anode chamber. These values are substantially higher than that of plain nickel foam, and other conventional carbon based electrodes (e.g., carbon cloth, carbon felt, and carbon paper) measured in the same conditions. To our knowledge, this is the highest volumetric power density reported for mL-scale MFC device with a pure strain of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. We also demonstrated that the MFC device can be operated effectively in a batch-mode at least for a week. These new 3D rGO-Ni electrodes show great promise for improving the power generation of MFC devices.

  16. Is telomerase a viable target in cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buseman, C.M.; Wright, W.E.; Shay, J.W.

    2012-01-01

    The ideal cancer treatment would specifically target cancer cells yet have minimal or no adverse effects on normal somatic cells. Telomerase, the ribonucleoprotein reverse transcriptase that maintains the ends of human chromosome, is an attractive cancer therapeutic target for exactly this reason [1]. Telomerase is expressed in more than 85% of cancer cells, making it a nearly universal cancer marker, while the majority of normal somatic cells are telomerase negative. Telomerase activity confers limitless replicative potential to cancer cells, a hallmark of cancer which must be attained for the continued growth that characterizes almost all advanced neoplasms [2]. In this review we will summarize the role of telomeres and telomerase in cancer cells, and how properties of telomerase are being exploited to create targeted cancer therapies including telomerase inhibitors, telomerase-targeted immunotherapies and telomerase-driven virotherapies. A frank and balanced assessment of the current state of telomerase inhibitors with caveats and potential limitations will be included. PMID:21802433

  17. A mathematical model of the maximum power density attainable in an alkaline hydrogen/oxygen fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimble, Michael C.; White, Ralph E.

    1991-01-01

    A mathematical model of a hydrogen/oxygen alkaline fuel cell is presented that can be used to predict the polarization behavior under various power loads. The major limitations to achieving high power densities are indicated and methods to increase the maximum attainable power density are suggested. The alkaline fuel cell model describes the phenomena occurring in the solid, liquid, and gaseous phases of the anode, separator, and cathode regions based on porous electrode theory applied to three phases. Fundamental equations of chemical engineering that describe conservation of mass and charge, species transport, and kinetic phenomena are used to develop the model by treating all phases as a homogeneous continuum.

  18. Mycobacterial Cultures Contain Cell Size and Density Specific Sub-populations of Cells with Significant Differential Susceptibility to Antibiotics, Oxidative and Nitrite Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijay, Srinivasan; Nair, Rashmi Ravindran; Sharan, Deepti; Jakkala, Kishor; Mukkayyan, Nagaraja; Swaminath, Sharmada; Pradhan, Atul; Joshi, Niranjan V.; Ajitkumar, Parthasarathi

    2017-01-01

    The present study shows the existence of two specific sub-populations of Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis cells differing in size and density, in the mid-log phase (MLP) cultures, with significant differential susceptibility to antibiotic, oxidative, and nitrite stress. One of these sub-populations (~10% of the total population), contained short-sized cells (SCs) generated through highly-deviated asymmetric cell division (ACD) of normal/long-sized mother cells and symmetric cell divisions (SCD) of short-sized mother cells. The other sub-population (~90% of the total population) contained normal/long-sized cells (NCs). The SCs were acid-fast stainable and heat-susceptible, and contained high density of membrane vesicles (MVs, known to be lipid-rich) on their surface, while the NCs possessed negligible density of MVs on the surface, as revealed by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Percoll density gradient fractionation of MLP cultures showed the SCs-enriched fraction (SCF) at lower density (probably indicating lipid-richness) and the NCs-enriched fraction (NCF) at higher density of percoll fractions. While live cell imaging showed that the SCs and the NCs could grow and divide to form colony on agarose pads, the SCF, and NCF cells could independently regenerate MLP populations in liquid and solid media, indicating their full genomic content and population regeneration potential. CFU based assays showed the SCF cells to be significantly more susceptible than NCF cells to a range of concentrations of rifampicin and isoniazid (antibiotic stress), H2O2 (oxidative stress),and acidified NaNO2 (nitrite stress). Live cell imaging showed significantly higher susceptibility of the SCs of SC-NC sister daughter cell pairs, formed from highly-deviated ACD of normal/long-sized mother cells, to rifampicin and H2O2, as compared to the sister daughter NCs, irrespective of their comparable growth rates. The SC-SC sister daughter cell pairs, formed

  19. Parejas viables que perduran en el tiempo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan José Cuervo Rodríguez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available El presente artículo científico presenta resultados del proceso llevado a cabo en el proyecto de investigación docente "Mecanismos de autorregulación en parejas viables que perduran en el tiempo". Se soporta en una mirada compleja de la psicología basada en una epistemología de la construcción. En el ámbito metodológico, se inscribe en los estudios de terapia familiar desde una perspectiva de la comunicación humana como un todo integrado. Participaron nueve parejas. Los criterios de inclusión fueron: cinco o más años de convivencia, participación voluntaria, no presentar (ni haber presentado problemáticas especiales que ameriten intervención psicoterapéutica y la obtención de un porcentaje significativo en el uso de estrategias de comunicación asertiva en la resolución de conflictos. El método general utilizado fue el análisis de la comunicación en tarea de conversación. Los principales hallazgos señalan una estrecha relación entre el contexto de desarrollo de las parejas, la emergencia de códigos comunicacionales propios y la posibilidad de perdurar en el tiempo; también, se resalta el tipo de comunicación asertiva o constructiva, la construcción de valores como el respeto y la aceptación de las diferencias, y el deseo por vivir y construir bienestar común, como elementos constitutivos de su identidad como pareja.

  20. Functional evaluation of corneal endothelium by combined measurement of corneal volume alteration and cell density after phacoemulsification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Hisaharu; Oki, Kotaro; Takahashi, Keizo; Shiwa, Toshihiko; Takahashi, Hiroshi

    2007-12-01

    To assess a new method of functional evaluation of corneal endothelium using combined measurement of corneal volume alteration and cell density (CD) after phacoemulsification. Nippon Medical School Hospital, Tokyo, Japan. Phacoemulsification was performed in 28 cases. The corneal volume within 3.0 mm and 10.0 mm circles of the cornea was measured using Scheimpflug imaging (Pentacam, Oculus, Inc.) and the cell density, using specular microscopy (Noncon Robo, Konan Medical). The volume stress index (VSI), a parameter for measuring functional evaluation, was calculated by dividing the volume increase within the 3.0 mm circle (preoperative corneal volume - corneal volume at time of measurement) by the central cell density value. The resulting value is indicative of the amount of postoperative increase in corneal volume with which each corneal endothelial cell should be able to cope. Three months after surgery, the 3.0 mm corneal volume returned to preoperative values, while the 10.0 mm corneal volume remained significantly higher than preoperatively. The cell density values did not significantly change throughout the study. The VSI showed a significant decrease by 7 days after surgery followed by a gradual decrease until the end of the study. At 3 months, the VSI value was significantly smaller than at 1 day. The corneal volume increase after surgery may be indicative of the degree of the endothelial damage in the area; thus, the VSI may be useful in the functional assessment of the corneal endothelium.

  1. Cell-density-dependent regulation of expression and glycosylation of dopachrome tautomerase/tyrosinase-related protein-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornyak, T J; Hayes, D J; Ziff, E B

    2000-07-01

    The expression of the dopachrome tautomerase gene (Dct) and its protein product, tyrosinase-related protein-2, was studied in the cultured, phorbol-ester-dependent murine melanocyte cell line melan-a. Increased cell density was found to stimulate Dct expression both in cells stably transfected with a Dct promoter-lacZ construct and endogenously in nontransfected cells. Increased Dct expression under these conditions corresponds to increased tyrosinase-related protein-2 production. Tyrosinase-related protein-2 was found to exist in two distinct glycoforms with different endoglycosidase sensitivities. Density-dependent expression of tyrosinase-related protein-2 was independent of time of cell growth, cell proliferation, and soluble factors, implying that cell-cell contact is the important determinant governing increased Dct expression under these conditions. Tyrp1 gene expression and tyrosinase-related protein-1 production were also induced under similar conditions. The results show that cell-cell contact between melanocytes induces a coordinated response at both transcriptional and nontranscriptional levels that induces production of the tyrosinase-related proteins that have a significant role in melanization.

  2. Low track height standard-cells enable high-placement density and low-BEOL cost (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debacker, Peter; Matti, Luca; Sherazi, Syed M. Y.; Baert, Rogier; Gerousis, Vassilios; Nauts, Claire; Raghavan, Praveen; Ryckaert, Julien; Kim, Ryoung-Han; Verkest, Diederik

    2017-04-01

    Making standards cells smaller by lowering the cell height from 7.5 tracks to 6 tracks for the same set of ground rules is an efficient way to reduce area for high density digital IP blocks without increasing wafer cost. Denser cells however also imply a higher pin density and possible more routing congestion because of that. In Place and Route phase, this limits the cell density (a.k.a. utilization) that can be reached without design rule violations. This study shows that 6-track cells (192nm high) and smart routing results in up to 60% lower area than 7.5-track cells in N5 technology. Standard cells have been created for 7.5T and 6T cells in N5 technology (poly pitch 42nm, metal pitch 32nm). The cells use a first horizontal routing layer (Mint) and vertical M1 for 1D intra-cell routing as much as possible. Place and route was performed on an opencores LDPC decoder. Various cell architectures and place and route optimizations are used to scale down the cell area and improve density. Most are not process optimizations, but optimized cell architectures and routing methods: • Open M1: M1 is removed as much as possible. This allows the router to use M1 for inter-cell routing in dense areas. • Routing in Mint: With open M1 the router can also use Mint to extend pins to access nearby free M1 tracks in congested areas. • Outbound rail: The 7.5T cells have inbound VDD/VSS rails in Mint for easy supply tapping. Moving the Mint rail outbound and shared between cells is required to enable lower track height cells. • Vertical Power distribution network (PDN): in 6T cells too many horizontal tracks would be consumed by the wide M2 rail. Mint is used instead combined with a vertical PDN in M1. • Self-Aligned Gate Contact allows to contact the gate on top of active fins. Any Mint track then can contact a gate, reducing cell area considerably. • Partially landing Mint Via trench: In 6T cells, a continuous Via trench underneath the Mint rail is used. This via partially

  3. Lipid Droplets Characterization in Adipocyte Differentiated 3T3-L1 Cells: Size and Optical Density Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzatti, V.; Boschi, F.; Pedrotti, M.; Zoico, E.; Sbarbati, A.; Zamboni, M.

    2013-01-01

    The 3T3-L1 cell line, derived from 3T3 cells, is widely used in biological research on adipose tissue. 3T3-L1 cells have a fibroblast-like morphology, but, under appropriate conditions, they differentiate into an adipocyte-like phenotype. During the differentiation process, 3T3-L1 cells increase the synthesis of triglycerides and acquire the behavior of adipose cells. In particular, triglycerides accumulate in lipid droplets (LDs) embedded in the cytoplasm. The number and the size distribution of the LDs is often correlated with obesity and many other pathologies linked with fat accumulation. The integrated optical density (IOD) of the LDs is related with the amount of triglycerides in the droplets. The aim of this study is the attempt to characterize the size distribution and the IOD of the LDs in 3T3-L1 differentiated cells. The cells were differentiated into adipocytes for 5 days with a standard procedure, stained with Oil Red O and observed with an optical microscope. The diameter, area, optical density of the LDs were measured. We found an asymmetry of the kernel density distribution of the maximum Feret’s diameter of the LDs with a tail due to very large LDs. More information regarding the birth of the LDs could help in finding the best mathematical model in order to analyze fat accumulation in adipocytes. PMID:24085273

  4. Production of savinase and population viability of Bacillus clausii during high-cell-density fed-batch cultivations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Torben; Michaelsen, S.; Wumpelmann, M.

    2003-01-01

    The growth and product formation of a Savinase-producing Bacillus clausii were investigated in high-cell-density fed-batch cultivations with both linear and exponential feed profiles. The highest specific productivity of Savinase was observed shortly after the end of the initial batch phase for all....... The physiological state of the cells was monitored during the cultivations using a flow cytometry assay based on the permeability of the cell membrane to propidium iodide. In the latter parts of the fed-batch cultures with a linear feed profile, a large portion of the cell population was found to have a permeable...

  5. Intratumoral CD3 and CD8 T-cell Densities Associated with Relapse-Free Survival in HCC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrielson, Andrew; Wu, Yunan; Wang, Hongkun; Jiang, Jiji; Kallakury, Bhaskar; Gatalica, Zoran; Reddy, Sandeep; Kleiner, David; Fishbein, Thomas; Johnson, Lynt; Island, Eddie; Satoskar, Rohit; Banovac, Filip; Jha, Reena; Kachhela, Jaydeep; Feng, Perry; Zhang, Tiger; Tesfaye, Anteneh; Prins, Petra; Loffredo, Christopher; Marshall, John; Weiner, Louis; Atkins, Michael; He, Aiwu Ruth

    2016-05-01

    Immune cells that infiltrate a tumor may be a prognostic factor for patients who have had surgically resected hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The density of intratumoral total (CD3(+)) and cytotoxic (CD8(+)) T lymphocytes was measured in the tumor interior and in the invasive margin of 65 stage I to IV HCC tissue specimens from a single cohort. Immune cell density in the interior and margin was converted to a binary score (0, low; 1, high), which was correlated with tumor recurrence and relapse-free survival (RFS). In addition, the expression of programmed death 1 (PD-1) and programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) was correlated with the density of CD3(+) and CD8(+) cells and clinical outcome. High densities of both CD3(+) and CD8(+) T cells in both the interior and margin, along with corresponding Immunoscores, were significantly associated with a low rate of recurrence (P = 0.007) and a prolonged RFS (P = 0.002). In multivariate logistic regression models adjusted for vascular invasion and cellular differentiation, both CD3(+) and CD8(+) cell densities predicted recurrence, with odds ratios of 5.8 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.6-21.8] for CD3(+) and 3.9 (95% CI, 1.1-14.1) for CD8(+) Positive PD-L1 staining was correlated with high CD3 and CD8 density (P = 0.024 and 0.005, respectively) and predicted a lower rate of recurrence (P = 0.034), as well as prolonged RFS (P = 0.029). Immunoscore and PD-L1 expression, therefore, are useful prognostic markers in patients with HCC who have undergone primary tumor resection. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(5); 419-30. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  6. Argyrophil cell density in the oxyntic mucosa is higher in female than in male morbidly obese patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.A.N. Maksud

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a multifactorial disorder often associated with many important diseases such as diabetes, hypertension and other metabolic syndrome conditions. Argyrophil cells represent almost the total population of endocrine cells of the human gastric mucosa and some reports have described changes of specific types of these cells in patients with obesity and metabolic syndrome. The present study was designed to evaluate the global population of argyrophil cells of the gastric mucosa of morbidly obese and dyspeptic non-obese patients. Gastric biopsies of antropyloric and oxyntic mucosa were obtained from 50 morbidly obese patients (BMI >40 and 50 non-obese patients (17 dyspeptic overweight and 33 lean individuals and processed for histology and Grimelius staining for argyrophil cell demonstration. Argyrophil cell density in the oxyntic mucosa of morbidly obese patients was higher in female (238.68 ± 83.71 cells/mm2 than in male patients (179.31 ± 85.96 cells/mm2 and also higher in female (214.20 ± 50.38 cells/mm2 than in male (141.90 ± 61.22 cells/mm2 morbidly obese patients with metabolic syndrome (P = 0.01 and P = 0.02, respectively. In antropyloric mucosa, the main difference in argyrophil cell density was observed between female morbidly obese patients with (167.00 ± 69.30 cells/mm2 and without (234.00 ± 69.54 cells/mm2 metabolic syndrome (P = 0.001. In conclusion, the present results show that the number of gastric argyrophil cells could be under gender influence in patients with morbid obesity. In addition, gastric argyrophil cells seem to behave differently among female morbidly obese patients with and without metabolic syndrome.

  7. Argyrophil cell density in the oxyntic mucosa is higher in female than in male morbidly obese patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.A.N. Maksud

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a multifactorial disorder often associated with many important diseases such as diabetes, hypertension and other metabolic syndrome conditions. Argyrophil cells represent almost the total population of endocrine cells of the human gastric mucosa and some reports have described changes of specific types of these cells in patients with obesity and metabolic syndrome. The present study was designed to evaluate the global population of argyrophil cells of the gastric mucosa of morbidly obese and dyspeptic non-obese patients. Gastric biopsies of antropyloric and oxyntic mucosa were obtained from 50 morbidly obese patients (BMI >40 and 50 non-obese patients (17 dyspeptic overweight and 33 lean individuals and processed for histology and Grimelius staining for argyrophil cell demonstration. Argyrophil cell density in the oxyntic mucosa of morbidly obese patients was higher in female (238.68 ± 83.71 cells/mm2 than in male patients (179.31 ± 85.96 cells/mm2 and also higher in female (214.20 ± 50.38 cells/mm2 than in male (141.90 ± 61.22 cells/mm2 morbidly obese patients with metabolic syndrome (P = 0.01 and P = 0.02, respectively. In antropyloric mucosa, the main difference in argyrophil cell density was observed between female morbidly obese patients with (167.00 ± 69.30 cells/mm2 and without (234.00 ± 69.54 cells/mm2 metabolic syndrome (P = 0.001. In conclusion, the present results show that the number of gastric argyrophil cells could be under gender influence in patients with morbid obesity. In addition, gastric argyrophil cells seem to behave differently among female morbidly obese patients with and without metabolic syndrome.

  8. Argyrophil cell density in the oxyntic mucosa is higher in female than in male morbidly obese patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maksud, F.A.N. [Laboratório de Patologia Digestiva e Neuroendócrina, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal de Ouro Preto, Ouro Preto, MG (Brazil); Kakehasi, A.M. [Laboratório de Patologia Digestiva e Neuroendócrina, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Barbosa, A.J.A. [Laboratório de Patologia Digestiva e Neuroendócrina, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Instituto Alfa de Gastroenterologia, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2013-04-05

    Obesity is a multifactorial disorder often associated with many important diseases such as diabetes, hypertension and other metabolic syndrome conditions. Argyrophil cells represent almost the total population of endocrine cells of the human gastric mucosa and some reports have described changes of specific types of these cells in patients with obesity and metabolic syndrome. The present study was designed to evaluate the global population of argyrophil cells of the gastric mucosa of morbidly obese and dyspeptic non-obese patients. Gastric biopsies of antropyloric and oxyntic mucosa were obtained from 50 morbidly obese patients (BMI >40) and 50 non-obese patients (17 dyspeptic overweight and 33 lean individuals) and processed for histology and Grimelius staining for argyrophil cell demonstration. Argyrophil cell density in the oxyntic mucosa of morbidly obese patients was higher in female (238.68 ± 83.71 cells/mm{sup 2}) than in male patients (179.31 ± 85.96 cells/mm{sup 2}) and also higher in female (214.20 ± 50.38 cells/mm{sup 2}) than in male (141.90 ± 61.22 cells/mm{sup 2}) morbidly obese patients with metabolic syndrome (P = 0.01 and P = 0.02, respectively). In antropyloric mucosa, the main difference in argyrophil cell density was observed between female morbidly obese patients with (167.00 ± 69.30 cells/mm{sup 2}) and without (234.00 ± 69.54 cells/mm{sup 2}) metabolic syndrome (P = 0.001). In conclusion, the present results show that the number of gastric argyrophil cells could be under gender influence in patients with morbid obesity. In addition, gastric argyrophil cells seem to behave differently among female morbidly obese patients with and without metabolic syndrome.

  9. Enhanced xylose fermentation by engineered yeast expressing NADH oxidase through high cell density inoculums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guo-Chang; Turner, Timothy L; Jin, Yong-Su

    2017-03-01

    Accumulation of reduced byproducts such as glycerol and xylitol during xylose fermentation by engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae hampers the economic production of biofuels and chemicals from cellulosic hydrolysates. In particular, engineered S. cerevisiae expressing NADPH-linked xylose reductase (XR) and NAD + -linked xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH) produces substantial amounts of the reduced byproducts under anaerobic conditions due to the cofactor difference of XR and XDH. While the additional expression of a water-forming NADH oxidase (NoxE) from Lactococcus lactis in engineered S. cerevisiae with the XR/XDH pathway led to reduced glycerol and xylitol production and increased ethanol yields from xylose, volumetric ethanol productivities by the engineered yeast decreased because of growth defects from the overexpression of noxE. In this study, we introduced noxE into an engineered yeast strain (SR8) exhibiting near-optimal xylose fermentation capacity. To overcome the growth defect caused by the overexpression of noxE, we used a high cell density inoculum for xylose fermentation by the SR8 expressing noxE. The resulting strain, SR8N, not only showed a higher ethanol yield and lower byproduct yields, but also exhibited a high ethanol productivity during xylose fermentation. As noxE overexpression elicits a negligible growth defect on glucose conditions, the beneficial effects of noxE overexpression were substantial when a mixture of glucose and xylose was used. Consumption of glucose led to rapid cell growth and therefore enhanced the subsequent xylose fermentation. As a result, the SR8N strain produced more ethanol and fewer byproducts from a mixture of glucose and xylose than the parental SR8 strain without noxE overexpression. Our results suggest that the growth defects from noxE overexpression can be overcome in the case of fermenting lignocellulose-derived sugars such as glucose and xylose.

  10. Investigation of the Electron Acceleration by a High-Power Laser and a Density-Tapered Mixed-Gas Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinju; Phung, Vanessa L. J.; Kim, Minseok; Hur, Min-Sup; Suk, Hyyong

    2017-10-01

    Plasma-based accelerators can generate about 1000 times stronger acceleration field compared with RF-based conventional accelerators, which can be done by high power laser and plasma. There are many issues in this research and one of them is development of a good plasma source for higher electron beam energy. For this purpose, we are investigating a special type of plasma source, which is a density-tapered gas cell with a mixed-gas for easy injection. By this type of special gas cell, we expect higher electron beam energies with easy injection in the wakefield. In this poster, some experimental results for electron beam generation with the density-tapered mixed-gas cell are presented. In addition to the experimental results, CFD (Computational-Fluid-Dynamics) and PIC (Particle-In-Cell) simulation results are also presented for comparison studies.

  11. Expression of low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4 (Lrp4) gene in the mouse germ cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Yasuka L; Tanaka, Satomi S; Kasa, Miyuki; Yasuda, Kunio; Tam, Patrick P L; Matsui, Yasuhisa

    2006-08-01

    The low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4 gene (Lrp4) was identified by subtractive screening of cDNAs of the migratory primordial germ cells (PGCs) of E8.5-9.5 embryo and E3.5 blastocysts. Lrp4 is expressed in PGCs in the hindgut and the dorsal mesentery of E9.5 embryos, and in germ cells in the genital ridges of male and female E10.5-13.5 embryos. Lrp4 is also expressed in spermatogonia of the neonatal and adult testes and in the immature oocytes and follicular cells of the adult ovary. The absence of Lrp4 expression in the blastocyst, embryonic stem cells and embryonic germ cells suggests the Lrp4 is a molecular marker that distinguishes the germ cells from embryo-derived pluripotent stem cells.

  12. LOW-TEMPERATURE, ANODE-SUPPORTED HIGH POWER DENSITY SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELLS WITH NANOSTRUCTURED ELECTRODES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Professor Anil V. Virkar

    2003-05-23

    This report summarizes the work done during the entire project period, between October 1, 1999 and March 31, 2003, which includes a six-month no-cost extension. During the project, eight research papers have, either been, published, accepted for publication, or submitted for publication. In addition, several presentations have been made in technical meetings and workshops. The project also has provided support for four graduate students working towards advanced degrees. The principal technical objective of the project was to analyze the role of electrode microstructure on solid oxide fuel cell performance. Prior theoretical work conducted in our laboratory demonstrated that the particle size of composite electrodes has a profound effect on cell performance; the finer the particle size, the lower the activation polarization, the better the performance. The composite cathodes examined consisted of electronically conducting perovskites such as Sr-doped LaMnO{sub 3} (LSM) or Sr-doped LaCoO{sub 3} (LSC), which is also a mixed conductor, as the electrocatalyst, and yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) or rare earth oxide doped CeO{sub 2} as the ionic conductor. The composite anodes examined were mixtures of Ni and YSZ. A procedure was developed for the synthesis of nanosize YSZ by molecular decomposition, in which unwanted species were removed by leaching, leaving behind nanosize YSZ. Anode-supported cells were made using the as-synthesized powders, or using commercially acquired powders. The electrolyte was usually a thin ({approx}10 microns), dense layer of YSZ, supported on a thick ({approx}1 mm), porous Ni + YSZ anode. The cathode was a porous mixture of electrocatalyst and an ionic conductor. Most of the cell testing was done at 800 C with hydrogen as fuel and air as the oxidant. Maximum power densities as high as 1.8 W/cm{sup 2} were demonstrated. Polarization behavior of the cells was theoretically analyzed. A limited amount of cell testing was done using liquid

  13. Secretory expression of functional barley limit dextrinase by Pichia pastoris using high cell-density fermentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vester-Christensen, Malene Bech; Abou Hachem, Maher; Næsted, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    Heterologous production of large multidomain proteins from higher plants is often cumbersome. Barley limit dextrinase (LD), a 98 kDa multidomain starch and alpha-limit dextrin debranching enzyme, plays a major role in starch mobilization during seed germination and is possibly involved in starch ...... catalytic coefficient, k(cat,app)/K-m,K-app = 488 +/- 23 mL/(mg s) is 3.5-fold higher than for barley malt LD. Surface plasmon resonance analysis showed alpha-, beta-, and gamma-cyclodextrin binding to LD with K-d of 27.2, 0.70, and 34.7 mu M, respectively.......Heterologous production of large multidomain proteins from higher plants is often cumbersome. Barley limit dextrinase (LD), a 98 kDa multidomain starch and alpha-limit dextrin debranching enzyme, plays a major role in starch mobilization during seed germination and is possibly involved in starch...... biosynthesis by trimming of intermediate branched alpha-glucan structures. Highly active barley LD is obtained by secretory expression during high cell-density fermentation of Pichia pastoris. The LD encoding gene fragment without signal peptide was subcloned in-frame with the Saccharomyces cerevisiae alpha...

  14. Cryoprotective effects of low-density lipoproteins, trehalose and soybean lecithin on murine spermatogonial stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Li, Ying; Hu, Xiao-Chen; Cai, Xiao-Li; Hou, Li-Peng; Wang, Yan-Feng; Hu, Jian-Hong; Li, Qing-Wang; Suo, Li-Juan; Fan, Zhi-Guo; Zhang, Bo

    2014-05-01

    Spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) have the ability to self-renew and offer a pathway for genetic engineering of the male germ line. Cryopreservation of SSCs has potential value for the treatment of male infertility, spermatogonial transplantation, and so on. In order to investigate the cryopreservation effects of different cryoprotectants on murine SSCs, 0.2 M of low-density lipoproteins (LDL), trehalose and soybean lecithin were added to the cryoprotective medium, respectively, and the murine SSCs were frozen at -80°C or -196°C. The results indicated that the optimal recovery rates of murine SSCs in the cryoprotective medium supplemented with LDL, trehalose and soybean lecithin were 92.53, 76.35 and 75.48% at -80°C, respectively. Compared with freezing at -196°C, the optimum temperature for improvement of recovery rates of frozen murine SSCs, cryopreservation in three different cryoprotectants at -80°C, were 17.11, 6.68 and 10.44% respectively. The recovery rates of murine SSCs in the cryoprotective medium supplemented with 0.2 M LDL were significantly higher than that of other cryoprotectants (P membranes. However, more research is needed to evaluate and understand the precise role of LDL during the freezing-thawing of SSCs.

  15. Shewanella oneidensis Hfq promotes exponential phase growth, stationary phase culture density, and cell survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brennan Christopher M

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hfq is an RNA chaperone protein that has been broadly implicated in sRNA function in bacteria. Here we describe the construction and characterization of a null allele of the gene that encodes the RNA chaperone Hfq in Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1, a dissimilatory metal reducing bacterium. Results Loss of hfq in S. oneidensis results in a variety of mutant phenotypes, all of which are fully complemented by addition of a plasmid-borne copy of the wild type hfq gene. Aerobic cultures of the hfq∆ mutant grow more slowly through exponential phase than wild type cultures, and hfq∆ cultures reach a terminal cell density in stationary phase that is ~2/3 of that observed in wild type cultures. We have observed a similar growth phenotype when the hfq∆ mutant is cultured under anaerobic conditions with fumarate as the terminal electron acceptor, and we have found that the hfq∆ mutant is defective in Cr(VI reduction. Finally, the hfq∆ mutant exhibits a striking loss of colony forming units in extended stationary phase and is highly sensitive to oxidative stress induced by H2O2 or methyl viologen (paraquat. Conclusions The hfq mutant in S. oneidensis exhibits pleiotropic phenotypes, including a defect in metal reduction. Our results also suggest that hfq mutant phenotypes in S. oneidensis may be at least partially due to increased sensitivity to oxidative stress.

  16. PORTSMOUTH ON-SITE DISPOSAL CELL HIGH DENSITY POLYETHYLENE GEOMEMBRANE LONGEVITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phifer, M.

    2012-01-31

    It is anticipated that high density polyethylene (HDPE) geomembranes will be utilized within the liner and closure cap of the proposed On-Site Disposal Cell (OSDC) at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The likely longevity (i.e. service life) of HDPE geomembranes in OSDC service is evaluated within the following sections of this report: (1) Section 2.0 provides an overview of HDPE geomembranes, (2) Section 3.0 outlines potential HDPE geomembranes degradation mechanisms, (3) Section 4.0 evaluates the applicability of HDPE geomembrane degradation mechanisms to the Portsmouth OSDC, (4) Section 5.0 provides a discussion of the current state of knowledge relative to the longevity (service life) of HDPE geomembranes, including the relation of this knowledge to the Portsmouth OSDC, and (5) Section 6.0 provides summary and conclusions relative to the anticipated service life of HDPE geomembranes in OSDC service. Based upon this evaluation it is anticipated that the service life of HDPE geomembranes in OSDC service would be significantly greater than the 200 year service life assumed for the OSDC closure cap and liner HDPE geomembranes. That is, a 200 year OSDC HDPE geomembrane service life is considered a conservative assumption.

  17. Systematic development and optimization of chemically defined medium supporting high cell density growth of Bacillus coagulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu; Dong, Fengqing; Wang, Yonghong

    2016-09-01

    With determined components and experimental reducibility, the chemically defined medium (CDM) and the minimal chemically defined medium (MCDM) are used in many metabolism and regulation studies. This research aimed to develop the chemically defined medium supporting high cell density growth of Bacillus coagulans, which is a promising producer of lactic acid and other bio-chemicals. In this study, a systematic methodology combining the experimental technique with flux balance analysis (FBA) was proposed to design and simplify a CDM. The single omission technique and single addition technique were employed to determine the essential and stimulatory compounds, before the optimization of their concentrations by the statistical method. In addition, to improve the growth rationally, in silico omission and addition were performed by FBA based on the construction of a medium-size metabolic model of B. coagulans 36D1. Thus, CDMs were developed to obtain considerable biomass production of at least five B. coagulans strains, in which two model strains B. coagulans 36D1 and ATCC 7050 were involved.

  18. Time dependent – density functional theory characterization of organic dyes for dye-sensitized solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Hilal, Rifaat

    2017-06-19

    We aim at providing better insight into the parameters that govern the intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) and photo-injection processes in dyes for dye-sensitised solar cells (DSSC). Density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) calculations are utilized to study the geometry, electronic structure, electrostatic potential (ESP) and absorption spectrum, for a representative donor-π bridge-acceptor (D–π–A) dye for DSSC. The coplanar geometry of the dye (D1) facilitates strong conjugation and considerable delocalization originating the π CT interaction from donor to acceptor orbitals and the hyper-conjugative interactions involving Rydberg states. A model simulating the adsorption of the dye on the TiO surface is utilized to estimate binding energies. The effect of fluorine substituents in the π-spacer on the quantum efficiency of DSSCs was investigated. Gibb’s free energy values, redox potentials, excited state lifetime, non-linear optical properties (NLO) and driving forces for D1 and its fluorinated derivatives were computed.

  19. Bone mineral density, vitamin D, and nutritional status of children submitted to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Denise Johnsson; Boguszewski, César Luiz; Funke, Vaneuza Araujo Moreira; Bonfim, Carmem Maria Sales; Kulak, Carolina Aguiar Moreira; Pasquini, Ricardo; Borba, Victória Zeghbi Cochenski

    2014-06-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) on bone mineral density (BMD), serum vitamin D levels, and nutritional status of 50 patients between ages 4 and 20 y. We conducted pre-HSCT and 6-mo post-HSCT evaluations. We measured BMD at the lumbar spine (LS) and total body (TB) by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA); body composition by bioimpedance analysis, and dietary intakes of calcium and vitamin D using the 24-h recall and semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire methods. We observed a significant reduction in BMD 6 mo post-HSCT. Nearly half (48%) of patients had reductions at the LS (average -9.6% ± 6.0%), and patients who developed graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) had the greatest reductions (-5.6% versus 1.2%, P nutritional status, and vitamin D levels. We suggest that early routine assessment be done to permit prevention and treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of orientation and density of hydroxide precursor films on performance of dye-sensitized ZnO solar cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    KAJIHARA, Hisasuke; HAGIWARA, Manabu; FUJIHARA, Shinobu

    2016-01-01

    .... The increase in the film density resulted in the improvement of the open-circuit voltage and the fill factor of dye-sensitized solar cells using N719-loaded ZnO films as photoanodes. The light-to-electricity conversion efficiency of 3.49% was obtained in the DSSC using the present ZnO film.

  1. Secretory otitis. Histopathology and goblet-cell density in the Eustachian tube and middle ear in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tos, M; Bak-Pedersen, K

    1976-05-01

    The histological changes in the middle ear of four children with incipient or mild chronic secretory otitis are described. They consist in vascular dilatation and proliferation, round-cell infiltration, epithelial metaplasia into pseudostratified, columnar, ciliated epithelium posteriorly in the middle ear, formation of abnormal mucous tubular glands, and an increase in goblet-cell density in the osseous tube and middle ear. The causes of these changes were presumably long-lasting tubal occlusion due to a permanent nasogastric tube and protracted catarrhal diseases. The density of goblet cells was determined in various parts of the Eustachian tube and middle ear. The findings were analysed statistically and compared with the density in prematures and newborns, normal children, and normal adults. In the tympanic orifice and in the osseous Eustachian tube the goblet-cell density was greatly increased, whereas the increase in the middle ear varied individually, but was in conformity with the other findings. These cases illustrate that the histopathological changes in the middle-ear mucosa in secretory otitis must be regarded not only from a qualitative, but certainly also from a quantitative point of view.

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Detection of Tumor Cells by Targeting Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptors with Gd-Loaded Low-Density Lipoprotein Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simonetta Geninatti Crich

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Gd-DO3A-diph and Gd-AAZTAC17 are lipophilic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI agents that display high affinity for low-density lipoprotein (LDL particles. However, on binding to LDL, Gd-DO3A-diph shows a decreased hydration that results in a lower enhancement of water proton relaxation rate. Conversely, GdAAZTAC17 displays a strong relaxation enhancement at the imaging fields. Each LDL particle can load up to 100 and 400 UNITS of Gd-DO3A-diph and Gd-AAZTAC17, respectively. Their LDL adducts are taken up by human hepatoblastoma G2 (HepG2 and melanoma B16 tumor cells when added to the incubation medium. T, measurements of the labeled cells indicate that Gd-AAZTAC17 is significantly more efficient than Gd-DO3A-diph. Furthermore, it has been found that HepG2 hepatoma cells can internalize higher amounts of Gd-AAZTAC17 than B16 cells and the involvement of LDL receptors (LDLRs has been demonstrated in competition assays with free LDL. Gd-AAZTAC17/LDL adduct proved to be an efficient probe in the magnetic resonance (MR visualization of subcutaneous tumors in animal models obtained by injecting B16 melanoma cells into the right flank of mice. Finally, confocal microscopy validation of the distribution of LDL-based probes in the tumor has been obtained by doping the Gd-AAZTAC17/LDL adduct with a fluorescent phospholipid moiety.

  3. 3D characterization of EMT cell density in developing cardiac cushions using optical coherence tomography (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Siyao; Gu, Shi; Zhao, Xiaowei; Liu, Yehe; Jenkins, Michael W.; Watanabe, Michiko; Rollins, Andrew M.

    2017-02-01

    Congenital heart defects (CHDs) are the most common birth defect, affecting between 4 and 75 per 1,000 live births depending on the inclusion criteria. Many of these defects can be traced to defects of cardiac cushions, critical structures during development that serve as precursors to many structures in the mature heart, including the atrial and ventricular septa, and all four sets of cardiac valves. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is the process through which cardiac cushions become populated with cells. Altered cushion size or altered cushion cell density has been linked to many forms of CHDs, however, quantitation of cell density in the complex 3D cushion structure poses a significant challenge to conventional histology. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a technique capable of 3D imaging of the developing heart, but typically lacks the resolution to differentiate individual cells. Our goal is to develop an algorithm to quantitatively characterize the density of cells in the developing cushion using 3D OCT imaging. First, in a heart volume, the atrioventricular (AV) cushions were manually segmented. Next, all voxel values in the region of interest were pooled together to generate a histogram. Finally, two populations of voxels were classified using either K-means classification, or a Gaussian mixture model (GMM). The voxel population with higher values represents cells in the cushion. To test the algorithm, we imaged and evaluated avian embryonic hearts at looping stages. As expected, our result suggested that the cell density increases with developmental stages. We validated the technique against scoring by expert readers.

  4. Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells Upregulate Extracellular Catabolism of Aggregated Low-Density Lipoprotein on Maturation, Leading to Foam Cell Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haka, Abigail S; Singh, Rajesh K; Grosheva, Inna; Hoffner, Haley; Capetillo-Zarate, Estibaliz; Chin, Harvey F; Anandasabapathy, Niroshana; Maxfield, Frederick R

    2015-10-01

    Although dendritic cells are known to play a role in atherosclerosis, few studies have examined the contribution of the wide variety of dendritic cell subsets. Accordingly, their roles in atherogenesis remain largely unknown. We investigated the ability of different dendritic cell subsets to become foam cells after contact with aggregated low-density lipoprotein (LDL; the predominant form of LDL found in atherosclerotic plaques). We demonstrate that both murine and human monocyte-derived dendritic cells use exophagy to degrade aggregated LDL, leading to foam cell formation, whereas monocyte-independent dendritic cells are unable to clear LDL aggregates by this mechanism. Exophagy is a catabolic process in which objects that cannot be internalized by phagocytosis (because of their size or association with extracellular structures) are initially digested in an extracellular acidic lytic compartment. Surprisingly, we found that monocyte-derived dendritic cells upregulate exophagy on maturation. This contrasts various forms of endocytic internalization in dendritic cells, which decrease on maturation. Finally, we show that our in vitro results are consistent with dendritic cell lipid accumulation in plaques of an ApoE(-/-) mouse model of atherosclerosis. Our results show that monocyte-derived dendritic cells use exophagy to degrade aggregated LDL and become foam cells, whereas monocyte-independent dendritic cells are unable to clear LDL deposits. Furthermore, we find that exophagy is upregulated on dendritic cell maturation. Thus, exophagy-mediated foam cell formation in monocyte-derived dendritic cells could play a significant role in atherogenesis. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. Towards viable cosmological models of disformal theories of gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakstein, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    The late-time cosmological dynamics of disformal gravity are investigated using dynamical systems methods. It is shown that in the general case there are no stable attractors that screen fifth forces locally and simultaneously describe a dark energy dominated universe. Viable scenarios have late-time properties that are independent of the disformal parameters and are identical to the equivalent conformal quintessence model. Our analysis reveals that configurations where the Jordan frame metric becomes singular are only reached in the infinite future, thus explaining the natural pathology resistance observed numerically by several previous works. The viability of models where this can happen is discussed in terms of both the cosmological dynamics and local phenomena. We identify a special parameter tuning such that there is a new fixed point that can match the presently observed dark energy density and equation of state. This model is unviable when the scalar couples to the visible sector but may provide a good candidate model for theories where only dark matter is disformally coupled.

  6. NG2 Proteoglycan Ablation Reduces Foam Cell Formation and Atherogenesis via Decreased Low-Density Lipoprotein Retention by Synthetic Smooth Muscle Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    She, Zhi-Gang; Chang, Yunchao; Pang, Hong-Bo; Han, Wenlong; Chen, Hou-Zao; Smith, Jeffrey W; Stallcup, William B

    2016-01-01

    Obesity and hyperlipidemia are critical risk factors for atherosclerosis. Because ablation of NG2 proteoglycan in mice leads to hyperlipidemia and obesity, we investigated the impact of NG2 ablation on atherosclerosis in apoE null mice. Immunostaining indicates that NG2 expression in plaque, primarily by synthetic smooth muscle cells, increases during atherogenesis. NG2 ablation unexpectedly results in decreased (30%) plaque development, despite aggravated obesity and hyperlipidemia. Mechanistic studies reveal that NG2-positive plaque synthetic smooth muscle cells in culture can sequester low-density lipoprotein to enhance foam-cell formation, processes in which NG2 itself plays direct roles. In agreement with these observations, low-density lipoprotein retention and lipid accumulation in the NG2/ApoE knockout aorta is 30% less than that seen in the control aorta. These results indicate that synthetic smooth muscle cell-dependent low-density lipoprotein retention and foam cell formation outweigh obesity and hyperlipidemia in promoting mouse atherogenesis. Our study sheds new light on the role of synthetic smooth muscle cells during atherogenesis. Blocking plaque NG2 or altering synthetic smooth muscle cells function may be promising therapeutic strategies for atherosclerosis. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. Determination of viable Salmonellae from potable and source water through PMA assisted qPCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gulshan; Vajpayee, Poornima; Bhatti, Saurabh; Ronnie, Nirmala; Shah, Nimish; McClure, Peter; Shanker, Rishi

    2013-07-01

    Resource constrained countries identified as endemic zones for pathogenicity of Salmonella bear an economic burden due to recurring expenditure on medical treatment. qPCR used for Salmonella detection could not discriminate between viable and nonviable cells. Propidium monoazide (PMA) that selectively penetrates nonviable cells to cross-link their DNA, was coupled with ttr gene specific qPCR for quantifying viable salmonellae in source/potable waters collected from a north Indian city. Source water (raw water for urban potable water supply) and urban potable water exhibited viable salmonellae in the range of 2.1×10(4)-2.6×10(6) and 2-7160CFU/100mL, respectively. Potable water at water works exhibited DNA from dead cells but no viable cells were detected. PMA assisted qPCR could specifically detect low numbers of live salmonellae in Source and potable waters. This strategy can be used in surveillance of urban potable water distribution networks to map contamination points for better microbial risk management. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Asouzu's Complementary Ontology as a Foundation for a Viable ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper on “Asouzu's Complementary Ontology as a foundation for a viable Ethic of the Environment”, posits that an ethic of the environment can be seen as viable if it considers the whole of reality as ontologically relevant. This point of view would free environmental ethics of anthropocentric bias and its attendant ...

  9. Density and morphology of corneal endothelial cell after phacoemulsification using Ringer lactate versus balanced salt solution as irrigating solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farahdina Rahmawati

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To compare the difference in corneal endothelial cell density and morphology after phacoemulsification using Ringer lactate(RLand balanced salt solution(BSSirrigating solutions.METHODS: The prospective randomized controlled trial study was conducted between February 2017 and April 2017 in Dr. YAP Eye Hospital, Yogyakarta, Indonesia. There were a total of 52 subjects(52 eyeswho were senile cataract patients further grouped into two, 26 patients undergoing the phacoemulsification procedure using RL irrigating solution and the other 26 patients with BSS irrigating solution, both conducted by one operator. On the 1, 7, and 28d post operative, an evaluation was done to measure the density and corneal endothelial cell morphology, as well as the variable of inflammation in the two groups.RESULTS: Fifty-two eyes had undergone phacoemulsification with posterior intraocular lens implantation. Both groups were evaluated for the endothelial cell reduction and corneal endothelial cell morphology change, along with post-operative inflammation. On the 28d post-operative, endothelial cell reduction in the BSS group(173.96 cell/mm2, 8.12%was lower than the RL group(253.20 cell/mm2, 10.25%, percentage of corneal endothelial cell variation coefficient increase in the BSS group(2.92%, 8.36%was lower compared to the RL group(3.42%, 9.96%, decrease of hexagonal cells of corneal endothelium cells presentation percentage in the BSS group(4.30%, 8.17%was lower compared to the RL group(4.84%, 8.97%, and the percentage increase of central corneal thickness in the BSS group(4.69 μm, 0.89%was almost equal to the RL group(4.53 μm, 0.90%. All of the results regarding difference in density and corneal cell endothelium morphology between the two groups did not reveal any statistically significant difference(P>0.05. Inflammatory variable in the two groups were even.CONCLUSION: BSS and RL were equal in their capability of maintaining endothelial cell loss and endothelial

  10. A Breast Cell Atlas: Organelle analysis of the MDA-MB-231 cell line by density-gradient fractionation using isotopic marking and label-free analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne Sandin

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Protein translocation between organelles in the cell is an important process that regulates many cellular functions. However, organelles can rarely be isolated to purity so several methods have been developed to analyse the fractions obtained by density gradient centrifugation. We present an analysis of the distribution of proteins amongst organelles in the human breast cell line, MDA-MB-231 using two approaches: an isotopic labelling and a label-free approach.

  11. The role of cell body density in ruminant retina mechanics assessed by atomic force and Brillouin microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Isabell; Yun, Seok-Hyun; Scarcelli, Guillano; Franze, Kristian

    2017-04-13

    Cells in the central nervous system (CNS) respond to the stiffness of their environment. CNS tissue is mechanically highly heterogeneous, thus providing motile cells with region-specific mechanical signals. While CNS mechanics has been measured with a variety of techniques, reported values of tissue stiffness vary greatly, and the morphological structures underlying spatial changes in tissue stiffness remain poorly understood. We here exploited two complementary techniques, contact-based atomic force microscopy and contact-free Brillouin microscopy, to determine the mechanical properties of ruminant retinae, which are built up by different tissue layers. As in all vertebrate retinae, layers of high cell body densities ('nuclear layers') alternate with layers of low cell body densities ('plexiform layers'). Different tissue layers varied significantly in their mechanical properties, with the photoreceptor layer being the stiffest region of the retina, and the inner plexiform layer belonging to the softest regions. As both techniques yielded similar results, our measurements allowed us to calibrate the Brillouin microscopy measurements and convert the Brillouin shift into a quantitative assessment of elastic tissue stiffness with optical resolution. Similar as in the mouse spinal cord and the developing Xenopus brain, we found a strong correlation between nuclear densities and tissue stiffness. Hence, the cellular composition of retinae appears to strongly contribute to local tissue stiffness, and Brillouin microscopy shows a great potential for the application in vivo to measure the mechanical properties of transparent tissues. © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  12. The role of cell body density in ruminant retina mechanics assessed by atomic force and Brillouin microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Isabell P.; Yun, Seok Hyun; Scarcelli, Giuliano; Franze, Kristian

    2017-12-01

    Cells in the central nervous system (CNS) respond to the stiffness of their environment. CNS tissue is mechanically highly heterogeneous, thus providing motile cells with region-specific mechanical signals. While CNS mechanics has been measured with a variety of techniques, reported values of tissue stiffness vary greatly, and the morphological structures underlying spatial changes in tissue stiffness remain poorly understood. We here exploited two complementary techniques, contact-based atomic force microscopy and contact-free Brillouin microscopy, to determine the mechanical properties of ruminant retinae, which are built up by different tissue layers. As in all vertebrate retinae, layers of high cell body densities (‘nuclear layers’) alternate with layers of low cell body densities (‘plexiform layers’). Different tissue layers varied significantly in their mechanical properties, with the photoreceptor layer being the stiffest region of the retina, and the inner plexiform layer belonging to the softest regions. As both techniques yielded similar results, our measurements allowed us to calibrate the Brillouin microscopy measurements and convert the Brillouin shift into a quantitative assessment of elastic tissue stiffness with optical resolution. Similar as in the mouse spinal cord and the developing Xenopus brain, we found a strong correlation between nuclear densities and tissue stiffness. Hence, the cellular composition of retinae appears to strongly contribute to local tissue stiffness, and Brillouin microscopy shows a great potential for the application in vivo to measure the mechanical properties of transparent tissues.

  13. Separation of viable and non-viable tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) seeds using single seed near-infrared spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shrestha, Santosh; Deleuran, Lise Christina; Gislum, René

    2017-01-01

    -viable tomato seeds of two cultivars using chemometrics. The data exploration were performed by principal component analysis (PCA). Subsequently, viable and non-viable seeds were classified by partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) and interval PLS-DA (iPLS-DA). The indication of clustering...... of viable and non-viable seeds were observed in the PCA of each cultivar and the pooled samples. However, the PCA did not exhibit a pattern of separation among the early, normal and late germinated tomato seeds. The NIR spectral regions of 1160–1170, 1383–1397, 1647–1666, 1860–1884 and 1915–1940 nm were...... identified as important for classification of viable and non-viable tomato seeds by iPLS-DA. The sensitivity i.e. ability to correctly identify the positive samples and specificity i.e. ability to reject the negative samples of the (iPLS-DA) model on identified spectral regions for prediction of viable...

  14. Dissecting the actin cortex density and membrane-cortex distance in living cells by super-resolution microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, M. P.; Colin-York, H.; Schneider, Falk

    2017-01-01

    and accurately measure the density distribution of the cortical actin cytoskeleton and the distance between the actin cortex and the membrane in live Jurkat T-cells. We found an asymmetric cortical actin density distribution with a mean width of 230 (+105/-125) nm. The spatial distances measured between......Nanoscale spacing between the plasma membrane and the underlying cortical actin cytoskeleton profoundly modulates cellular morphology, mechanics, and function. Measuring this distance has been a key challenge in cell biology. Current methods for dissecting the nanoscale spacing either limit...... themselves to complex survey design using fixed samples or rely on diffraction-limited fluorescence imaging whose spatial resolution is insufficient to quantify distances on the nanoscale. Using dual-color super-resolution STED (stimulated-emission-depletion) microscopy, we here overcome this challenge...

  15. The role of surface charge density in cationic liposome-promoted dendritic cell maturation and vaccine-induced immune responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yifan; Zhuang, Yan; Xie, Xiaofang; Wang, Ce; Wang, Fei; Zhou, Dongmei; Zeng, Jianqiang; Cai, Lintao

    2011-05-01

    Cationic liposomes have emerged as a novel adjuvant and antigen delivery system to enhance vaccine efficacy. However, the role of surface charge density in cationic liposome-regulated immune responses has not yet been elucidated. In the present study, we prepared a series of DOTAP/DOPC cationic liposomes with different surface densities by incorporating varying amounts of DOPC (a neutral lipid) into DOTAP (a cationic lipid). The results showed that DOTAP/DOPC cationic liposome-regulated immune responses relied on the surface charge density, and might occur through ROS signaling. The liposomes with a relatively high charge density, such as DOTAP/DOPC 5 : 0 and 4 : 1 liposomes, potently enhanced dendritic cell maturation, ROS generaion, antigen uptake, as well as the production of OVA-specific IgG2a and IFN-γ. In contrast, low-charge liposomes, such as DOTAP/DOPC 1 : 4 liposome, failed to promote immune responses even at high concentrations, confirming that the immunoregulatory effect of cationic liposomes is mostly attributable to their surface charge density. Moreover, the DOTAP/DOPC 1 : 4 liposome suppressed anti-OVA antibody responses in vivo. Overall, maintaining an appropriate surface charge is crucial for optimizing the adjuvant effect of cationic liposomes and enhancing the efficacy of liposome-based vaccines.

  16. Processing of acetylated human low-density lipoprotein by parenchymal and non-parenchymal liver cells. Involvement of calmodulin?

    OpenAIRE

    Van Berkel, Theo J.C.; Nagelkerke, Jan F.; Harkes, Leen; Kruijt, Johan K.

    1982-01-01

    1. Modified lipoproteins have been implicated to play a significant role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. In view of this we studied the fate and mechanism of uptake in vivo of acetylated human low-density lipoprotein (acetyl-LDL). Injected intravenously into rats, acetyl-LDL is rapidly cleared from the blood. At 10min after intravenous injection, 83% of the injected dose is recovered in liver. Separation of the liver into a parenchymal and non-parenchymal cell fraction indicates that ...

  17. Distribution and density of CD1a+ and CD83+ dendritic cells in HPV-associated laryngeal papillomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalenko, Sergey; Lukashenko, Polina; Romanovskaya, Alesia; Soldatski, Iouri L; Bakanov, Sergey I; Pfister, Herbert; Gerein, Valentin

    2009-02-01

    Respiratory papillomatosis associated with human papilloma virus (HPV) infection is the most common benign laryngeal neoplasm. The age of patients at disease onset, HPV type, number of surgeries are well known prognostic factors of the disease course. The correlation between dendritic cell (DC) density in tumor tissue and clinical prognosis was established. The aim of our study was to estimate the density of DC in laryngeal papillomas associated with HPV types 6/11 infection and to evaluate the relationship between the number of DC and the disease severity. Our study included 40 randomly selected biopsy specimens from patients with HPV-positive laryngeal papillomatosis aged from 1.7 to 20 year. DC were immunohistochemically labelled with anti-CD1a antibodies and anti-CD83 antibodies. The density of DC was analysed in epithelial layer and lamina propria. In the epithelial layer of papillomas the number of CD1a+ and CD83+ DC was 86.2 (47.5-119.9) cells/mm(2) and 2.6 (0.6-7.9) cells/mm(2), respectively. In lamina propria - 15.3 (5.1-27.9) and 16.0 (6.7-33.2) cells/mm(2). For subgroups of patients with high number of operations (more than 3), early disease onset (children under 3 years of age) and lingering duration of disease (more than 1 year) we detected an increase of CD83+ DC in the epithelial layer. However, our data did not demonstrate a statistically significant difference in CD1a+ DC count neither in the epithelium nor in the lamina propria. Probably, the increase of CD83+ DC density in epithelial layer of patients with severe course of disease can be an evidence of impaired migration of matured DC.

  18. High energy efficiency and high power density proton exchange membrane fuel cells: Electrode kinetics and mass transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Supramaniam; Velev, Omourtag A.; Parthasathy, Arvind; Manko, David J.; Appleby, A. John

    1991-01-01

    The development of proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell power plants with high energy efficiencies and high power densities is gaining momentum because of the vital need of such high levels of performance for extraterrestrial (space, underwater) and terrestrial (power source for electric vehicles) applications. Since 1987, considerable progress has been made in achieving energy efficiencies of about 60 percent at a current density of 200 mA/sq cm and high power densities (greater than 1 W/sq cm) in PEM fuel cells with high (4 mg/sq cm) or low (0.4 mg/sq cm) platinum loadings in electrodes. The following areas are discussed: (1) methods to obtain these high levels of performance with low Pt loading electrodes - by proton conductor impregnation into electrodes, localization of Pt near front surface; (2) a novel microelectrode technique which yields electrode kinetic parameters for oxygen reduction and mass transport parameters; (3) demonstration of lack of water transport from anode to cathode; (4) modeling analysis of PEM fuel cell for comparison with experimental results and predicting further improvements in performance; and (5) recommendations of needed research and development for achieving the above goals.

  19. [Effect of drugs with acid-neutralizing and acid-suppressive effect on parietal cell function and on gastrin and somatostatin cell density of the stomach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, R; Koop, H; Nesslinger, A; Schwarting, H

    1983-03-01

    4 weeks treatment of healthy volunteers with Magaldrate (Al-Mg-containing antacid) is followed by an increase of basal serum gastrin, and a decrease of the antral G-cell density. Gastric acid secretion remained unchanged. In contrast, during maintenance therapy of duodenal ulcer patients with 400 mg cimetidine an increase of the postprandial gastrin output can be observed after 12 months treatment, whereas basal serum gastrin, antral G-cell density and gastric acid secretion remained unchanged. These results suggest that the effects observed during antacid treatment can not be related to an increase in gastric pH and may rather reflect a pH independent direct action of Magaldrate on the antral G-cell.

  20. Low Temperature, High Energy Density Micro Thin Film Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A new type of solid oxide fuel cell based on thin film technology and ultra-thin electrolyte is being proposed to develop to realize major reductions in fuel cell...

  1. Mast Cells Density in Fibrotic Capsule of Enchondroma and Well-Differentiated Chondrosarcoma: A Method for Histopathologic Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Javad Kharazi Fard

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: An enchondroma is a benign and a well-differentiated chondrosarcoma is an invasive chondroid tumor with high recurrence potential. In spite of biologic differences, these two tumors have very similar histopathologic appearance. It has been shown that the biologic nature of the connective tissue around benign and malignant tumors varies in the number of mast cells. The aim of this study was to study the histopathologic distinction of enchondroma and well-differentiated chondrosarcoma using the density of the mast cells in fibrotic capsule. Methods: Twelve enchondroma and 15 well-differentiated chondrosarcoma were collected from Pathology department of Cancer Institute and Central Pathology department of Imam Khomeini Hospital in Tehran. 3 micron paraffin embedded tissue sections were stained by toluidine blue for mast cells counting. Mast cells were counted in fibrous capsule of all cases. Mast cells counts were accomplished in 10 high power fields .The average number of mast cells in 10HPF was determined as an index for each lesion. Mann-Whitney U test was used for statistical analysis. Results: Mean index in enchondroma and well-differentiated chondrosarcoma groups were 0.1±0.12 and 0.31±0.33 respectively, showing a significant difference between number of mast cells in the fibrotic capsule in these two lesions (p=0.028. Comparison of the corresponding points in ROC curve, showed a cut-off point = 0.15, with positive predictive value of 61%, negative predictive value 71%, specificity of 33.3% and sensitivity of 66.7%, (p=0.025. Conclusion: Average density of the mast cells in the surrounding fibrotic capsules of enchondroma and well-differentiated chondrosarcoma along with other criterions, could be a beneficial factor for histologically differentiation between these two lesions.

  2. Mechanical Stimulation in Preventing Bone Density Loss in Patients Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-05

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Disseminated Neuroblastoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Poor Prognosis Metastatic Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Primary Myelofibrosis; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved

  3. Forming high-efficiency silicon solar cells using density-graded anti-reflection surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Hao-Chih; Branz, Howard M.; Page, Matthew R.

    2015-07-07

    A method (50) is provided for processing a graded-density AR silicon surface (14) to provide effective surface passivation. The method (50) includes positioning a substrate or wafer (12) with a silicon surface (14) in a reaction or processing chamber (42). The silicon surface (14) has been processed (52) to be an AR surface with a density gradient or region of black silicon. The method (50) continues with heating (54) the chamber (42) to a high temperature for both doping and surface passivation. The method (50) includes forming (58), with a dopant-containing precursor in contact with the silicon surface (14) of the substrate (12), an emitter junction (16) proximate to the silicon surface (14) by doping the substrate (12). The method (50) further includes, while the chamber is maintained at the high or raised temperature, forming (62) a passivation layer (19) on the graded-density silicon anti-reflection surface (14).

  4. Forming high efficiency silicon solar cells using density-graded anti-reflection surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Hao-Chih; Branz, Howard M.; Page, Matthew R.

    2014-09-09

    A method (50) is provided for processing a graded-density AR silicon surface (14) to provide effective surface passivation. The method (50) includes positioning a substrate or wafer (12) with a silicon surface (14) in a reaction or processing chamber (42). The silicon surface (14) has been processed (52) to be an AR surface with a density gradient or region of black silicon. The method (50) continues with heating (54) the chamber (42) to a high temperature for both doping and surface passivation. The method (50) includes forming (58), with a dopant-containing precursor in contact with the silicon surface (14) of the substrate (12), an emitter junction (16) proximate to the silicon surface (14) by doping the substrate (12). The method (50) further includes, while the chamber is maintained at the high or raised temperature, forming (62) a passivation layer (19) on the graded-density silicon anti-reflection surface (14).

  5. Characterization of the Viable but Nonculturable (VBNC State in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Salma

    Full Text Available The Viable But Non Culturable (VBNC state has been thoroughly studied in bacteria. In contrast, it has received much less attention in other microorganisms. However, it has been suggested that various yeast species occurring in wine may enter in VBNC following sulfite stress.In order to provide conclusive evidences for the existence of a VBNC state in yeast, the ability of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to enter into a VBNC state by applying sulfite stress was investigated. Viable populations were monitored by flow cytometry while culturable populations were followed by plating on culture medium. Twenty-four hours after the application of the stress, the comparison between the culturable population and the viable population demonstrated the presence of viable cells that were non culturable. In addition, removal of the stress by increasing the pH of the medium at different time intervals into the VBNC state allowed the VBNC S. cerevisiae cells to "resuscitate". The similarity between the cell cycle profiles of VBNC cells and cells exiting the VBNC state together with the generation rate of cells exiting VBNC state demonstrated the absence of cellular multiplication during the exit from the VBNC state. This provides evidence of a true VBNC state. To get further insight into the molecular mechanism pertaining to the VBNC state, we studied the involvement of the SSU1 gene, encoding a sulfite pump in S. cerevisiae. The physiological behavior of wild-type S. cerevisiae was compared to those of a recombinant strain overexpressing SSU1 and null Δssu1 mutant. Our results demonstrated that the SSU1 gene is only implicated in the first stages of sulfite resistance but not per se in the VBNC phenotype. Our study clearly demonstrated the existence of an SO2-induced VBNC state in S. cerevisiae and that the stress removal allows the "resuscitation" of VBNC cells during the VBNC state.

  6. Non-viable Borrelia burgdorferi induce inflammatory mediators and apoptosis in human oligodendrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parthasarathy, Geetha; Fevrier, Helene B; Philipp, Mario T

    2013-11-27

    In previous studies, exposure to live Borrelia burgdorferi was shown to induce inflammation and apoptosis of human oligodendrocytes. In this study we assessed the ability of non-viable bacteria (heat killed or sonicated) to induce inflammatory mediators and cell death. Both heat-killed and sonicated bacteria induced release of CCL2, IL-6, and CXCL8 from oligodendrocytes in a dose dependent manner. In addition, non-viable B. burgdorferi also induced cell death as evaluated by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) and another cell viability assay. These results suggest that spirochetal residues left after bacterial demise, due to treatment or otherwise, may continue to be pathogenic to the central nervous system. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Towards High Power Density Metal Supported Solid Oxide Fuel Cell for Mobile Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jimmi; Persson, Åsa Helen; Muhl, Thuy

    2017-01-01

    For use of metal supported SOFC in mobile applications it is important to reduce the thermal mass to enable fast start up, increase stack power density in terms of weight and volume and reduce costs. In the present study, we report on the effect of reducing the support layer thickness of 313 μm...

  8. Effect of coating density on oxidation resistance and Cr vaporization from solid oxide fuel cell interconnects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Talic, Belma; Falk-Windisch, Hannes; Venkatachalam, Vinothini

    2017-01-01

    •Protective action of dense and porous spinel coatings on Crofer 22 APU was compared. •Reduction and re-oxidation produces denser coatings than heat treating in air only. •Coating density has minor influence on oxidation resistance at 800 °C in air. •Dense coating resulted in three times lower Cr...

  9. Cosmic constraint on massive neutrinos in viable f( R) gravity with producing Λ CDM background expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jianbo; Liu, Molin; Wu, Yabo; Wang, Yan; Yang, Weiqiang

    2016-12-01

    Tensions between several cosmic observations were found recently, such as the inconsistent values of H0 (or σ 8) were indicated by the different cosmic observations. Introducing the massive neutrinos in Λ CDM could potentially solve the tensions. Viable f( R) gravity producing Λ CDM background expansion with massive neutrinos is investigated in this paper. We fit the current observational data: Planck-2015 CMB, RSD, BAO, and SNIa to constrain the mass of neutrinos in viable f( R) theory. The constraint results at 95% confidence level are: Σ m_ν case, m_{ν , sterile}^effcase. For the effects due to the mass of the neutrinos, the constraint results on model parameter at 95% confidence level become f_{R0}× 10^{-6}> -1.89 and f_{R0}× 10^{-6}> -2.02 for two cases, respectively. It is also shown that the fitting values of several parameters much depend on the neutrino properties, such as the cold dark matter density, the cosmological quantities at matter-radiation equality, the neutrino density and the fraction of baryonic mass in helium. Finally, the constraint result shows that the tension between direct and CMB measurements of H_0 gets slightly weaker in the viable f( R) model than that in the base Λ CDM model.

  10. Quantitative Imaging of Cell Membrane-associated Effective Mass Density Using Photonic Crystal Enhanced Microscopy (PCEM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Yue; Choi, Ji Sun; Marin, Thibault; Yu, Hojeong; Harley, Brendan A; Cunningham, Brian T

    2016-11-01

    Adhesion is a critical cellular process that contributes to migration, apoptosis, differentiation, and division. It is followed by the redistribution of cellular materials at the cell membrane or at the cell-surface interface for cells interacting with surfaces, such as basement membranes. Dynamic and quantitative tracking of changes in cell adhesion mass redistribution is challenging because cells are rapidly moving, inhomogeneous, and nonequilibrium objects, whose physical and mechanical properties are difficult to measure or predict. Here, we report a novel biosensor based microscopy approach termed Photonic Crystal Enhanced Microscopy (PCEM) that enables the movement of cellular materials at the plasma membrane of individual live cells to be dynamically monitored and quantitatively imaged. PCEM utilizes a photonic crystal biosensor surface, which can be coated with arbitrary extracellular matrix materials to facilitate cellular interactions, within a modified brightfield microscope with a low intensity non-coherent light source. Benefiting from the high sensitivity, narrow resonance peak, and tight spatial confinement of the evanescent field atop the photonic crystal biosensor, PCEM enables label-free live cell imaging with high sensitivity and high lateral and axial spatial-resolution, thereby allowing dynamic adhesion phenotyping of single cells without the use of fluorescent tags or stains. We apply PCEM to investigate adhesion and the early stage migration of different types of stem cells and cancer cells. By applying image processing algorithms to analyze the complex spatiotemporal information generated by PCEM, we offer insight into how the plasma membrane of anchorage dependent cells is dynamically organized during cell adhesion. The imaging and analysis results presented here provide a new tool for biologists to gain a deeper understanding of the fundamental mechanisms involved with cell adhesion and concurrent or subsequent migration events.

  11. Quantitative Imaging of Cell Membrane-associated Effective Mass Density Using Photonic Crystal Enhanced Microscopy (PCEM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Yue; Choi, Ji Sun; Marin, Thibault; Yu, Hojeong; Harley, Brendan A.; Cunningham, Brian T.

    2017-01-01

    Adhesion is a critical cellular process that contributes to migration, apoptosis, differentiation, and division. It is followed by the redistribution of cellular materials at the cell membrane or at the cell-surface interface for cells interacting with surfaces, such as basement membranes. Dynamic and quantitative tracking of changes in cell adhesion mass redistribution is challenging because cells are rapidly moving, inhomogeneous, and nonequilibrium objects, whose physical and mechanical properties are difficult to measure or predict. Here, we report a novel biosensor based microscopy approach termed Photonic Crystal Enhanced Microscopy (PCEM) that enables the movement of cellular materials at the plasma membrane of individual live cells to be dynamically monitored and quantitatively imaged. PCEM utilizes a photonic crystal biosensor surface, which can be coated with arbitrary extracellular matrix materials to facilitate cellular interactions, within a modified brightfield microscope with a low intensity non-coherent light source. Benefiting from the high sensitivity, narrow resonance peak, and tight spatial confinement of the evanescent field atop the photonic crystal biosensor, PCEM enables label-free live cell imaging with high sensitivity and high lateral and axial spatial-resolution, thereby allowing dynamic adhesion phenotyping of single cells without the use of fluorescent tags or stains. We apply PCEM to investigate adhesion and the early stage migration of different types of stem cells and cancer cells. By applying image processing algorithms to analyze the complex spatiotemporal information generated by PCEM, we offer insight into how the plasma membrane of anchorage dependent cells is dynamically organized during cell adhesion. The imaging and analysis results presented here provide a new tool for biologists to gain a deeper understanding of the fundamental mechanisms involved with cell adhesion and concurrent or subsequent migration events. PMID

  12. Natural dye extracted from karkadah and its application in dye-sensitized solar cells: experimental and density functional theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reda, S M; Soliman, K A

    2016-02-01

    This work presents an experimental and theoretical study of cyanidin natural dye as a sensitizer for ZnO dye-sensitized solar cells. ZnO nanoparticles were prepared using ammonia and oxalic acid as a capping agent. The calculated average size of the synthesized ZnO with different capping agents was found to be 32.1 nm. Electronic properties of cyanidin and delphinidin dye were studied using density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT with a B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) level. By comparing the theoretical results with the experimental data, the cyanidin dye can be used as a sensitizer in dye-sensitized solar cells. An efficiency of 0.006% under an AM-1.5 illumination at 100  mW/cm(2) was attained. The influence of dye adsorption time on the solar cell performance is discussed.

  13. PMA-PhyloChip DNA Microarray to Elucidate Viable Microbial Community Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkateswaran, Kasthuri J.; Stam, Christina N.; Andersen, Gary L.; DeSantis, Todd

    2011-01-01

    Since the Viking missions in the mid-1970s, traditional culture-based methods have been used for microbial enumeration by various NASA programs. Viable microbes are of particular concern for spacecraft cleanliness, for forward contamination of extraterrestrial bodies (proliferation of microbes), and for crew health/safety (viable pathogenic microbes). However, a "true" estimation of viable microbial population and differentiation from their dead cells using the most sensitive molecular methods is a challenge, because of the stability of DNA from dead cells. The goal of this research is to evaluate a rapid and sensitive microbial detection concept that will selectively estimate viable microbes. Nucleic acid amplification approaches such as the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) have shown promise for reducing time to detection for a wide range of applications. The proposed method is based on the use of a fluorescent DNA intercalating agent, propidium monoazide (PMA), which can only penetrate the membrane of dead cells. The PMA-quenched reaction mixtures can be screened, where only the DNA from live cells will be available for subsequent PCR reaction and microarray detection, and be identified as part of the viable microbial community. An additional advantage of the proposed rapid method is that it will detect viable microbes and differentiate from dead cells in only a few hours, as opposed to less comprehensive culture-based assays, which take days to complete. This novel combination approach is called the PMA-Microarray method. DNA intercalating agents such as PMA have previously been used to selectively distinguish between viable and dead bacterial cells. Once in the cell, the dye intercalates with the DNA and, upon photolysis under visible light, produces stable DNA adducts. DNA cross-linked in this way is unavailable for PCR. Environmental samples suspected of containing a mixture of live and dead microbial cells/spores will be treated with PMA, and then incubated

  14. New stopping cell capabilities : RF carpet performance at high gas density and cryogenic operation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ranjan, M.; Purushothaman, S.; Dickel, T.; Geissel, H.; Plass, W. R.; Schaefer, D.; Scheidenberger, C.; Van de Walle, J.; Weick, H.; Dendooven, P.

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a stopping cell to be used at the FRS and Super-FRS (Superconducting FRagment Separator) at the GSI Helmholtz Centre for Heavy-Ion Research and the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR), both in Darmstadt, Germany. The cell has a stopping volume with a length of 1m and a

  15. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein-induced apoptotic dendritic cells as a novel therapy for atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frodermann, Vanessa; van Puijvelde, Gijs H M; Wierts, Laura; Lagraauw, H Maxime; Foks, Amanda C; van Santbrink, Peter J; Bot, Ilze; Kuiper, Johan; de Jager, Saskia C A

    2015-01-01

    Modulation of immune responses may form a powerful approach to treat atherosclerosis. It was shown that clearance of apoptotic cells results in tolerance induction to cleared Ags by dendritic cells (DCs); however, this seems impaired in atherosclerosis because Ag-specific tolerance is lacking. This

  16. Age-related decrease in rod bipolar cell density of the human retina ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH

    Retinal bipolar cells situated in the inner nuclear layer are predominantly involved in mediating the transfer of signals from the photoreceptors to the ganglion cells. Their synapses are located both at the level of the outer and inner plexiform layers. In the former, their dendritic processes synapse with photoreceptors in the ...

  17. "allometry" Deterministic Approaches in Cell Size, Cell Number and Crude Fiber Content Related to the Physical Quality of Kangkong (Ipomoea reptans) Grown Under Different Plant Density Pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selamat, A.; Atiman, S. A.; Puteh, A.; Abdullah, N. A. P.; Mohamed, M. T. M.; Zulkeefli, A. A.; Othman, S.

    Kangkong, especially the upland type (Ipomoea reptans) is popularly consumed as a vegetable dish in the South East Asian countries for its quality related to Vitamins (A and C) and crude fiber contents. Higher fiber contents would prevent from the occurrence of colon cancer and diverticular disease. With young stem edible portion, its cell number and size contribute to the stem crude fiber content. The mathematical approach of allometry of cell size, number, and fiber content of stem could be used in determining the 'best' plant density pressure in producing the quality young stem to be consumed. Basically, allometry is the ratio of relative increment (growth or change) rates of two parameters, or the change rate associated to the log of measured variables relationship. Kangkog grown equal or lower than 55 plants m-2 produced bigger individual plant and good quality (physical) kangkong leafy vegetable, but with lower total yield per unit area as compared to those grown at higher densities.

  18. Autonomous Bacterial Localization and Gene Expression Based on Nearby Cell Receptor Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-22

    Paradigm for industrial strain improvement identifies sodium acetate tolerance loci in Zymomonas mobilis and Saccharomyces cerevisiae . Proc Natl Acad Sci USA...epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). This represents a new type of controller for targeted drug delivery as actuation (synthesis and delivery) depends...surrogate) based on a threshold density of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). This represents a newtype of controller for targeted drug delivery

  19. Comparative density of CCK- and PV-GABA cells within the cortex and hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul David Whissell

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Cholecystokinin (CCK- and parvalbumin (PV-expressing neurons constitute the two major populations of perisomatic GABAergic neurons in the cortex and the hippocampus. As CCK- and PV-GABA neurons differ in an array of morphological, biochemical and electrophysiological features, it has been proposed that they form distinct inhibitory ensembles which differentially contribute to network oscillations and behaviour. However, the relationship and balance between CCK- and PV-GABA neurons in the inhibitory networks of the brain is currently unclear as the distribution of these cells has never been compared on a large scale. Here, we systemically investigated the distribution of CCK- and PV-GABA cells across a wide number of discrete forebrain regions using an intersectional genetic approach. Our analysis revealed several novel trends in the distribution of these cells. While PV-GABA cells were more abundant overall, CCK-GABA cells outnumbered PV-GABA cells in several subregions of the hippocampus, medial prefrontal cortex and ventrolateral temporal cortex. Interestingly, CCK-GABA cells were relatively more abundant in secondary/association areas of the cortex (V2, S2, M2, and AudD/AudV than they were in corresponding primary areas (V1, S1, M1 and Aud1. The reverse trend was observed for PV-GABA cells. Our findings suggest that the balance between CCK- and PV-GABA cells in a given cortical region is related to the type of processing that area performs; inhibitory networks in the secondary cortex tend to favour the inclusion of CCK-GABA cells more than networks in the primary cortex. The intersectional genetic labelling approach employed in the current study expands upon the ability to study molecularly defined subsets of GABAergic neurons. This technique can be applied to the investigation of neuropathologies which involve disruptions to the GABAergic system, including schizophrenia, stress, maternal immune activation and autism.

  20. The Measurement of High-Density Lipoprotein Mediated Cholesterol Efflux from Macrophage Cells by Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mo Wang

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Studies have shown a negative association between macrophage cholesterol efflux and atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases (CVD. However, the current methods for measuring cholesterol efflux require a radioactive tracer and involve a variety of cell treatments, making the measurement of macrophage cholesterol efflux impractical for use in clinical laboratories. In this study, we developed a non-radioactive and precise LC/MS/MS method for the measurement of high-density lipoprotein (HDL mediated cholesterol efflux from J774 macrophages. Methods: J774 cells were seeded on 12-well plates at a density of 1.5×105 cells/ml in H-DMEM medium, and when the cells were approximately 80% confluent, they were incubated with H-DMEM medium containing 2% FBS, 0.5 μg/ml ACAT inhibitor Sandoz 58-035, and 20 μg/ml [3,4-13C]cholesterol for 6 h. After washing and equilibrating the cells, HDL samples were added at a final concentration of 7% and incubated for 8 h. The cells were lysed, and [3,4-13C]cholesterol and cholesterol were measured by LC/MS/MS. Cholesterol efflux was expressed as the percent decrease of cell [3,4-13C]cholesterol mass during the incubation. Results: When incubated with [3,4-13C]cholesterol enriched J774 cells, HDL mediated higher cell cholesterol efflux than influx compared to serum and isolated LDL; therefore, HDL was used as the extracellular acceptor. The results from healthy volunteers showed that the rate of cholesterol efflux was negatively correlated with weight, BMI, blood pressure, and FERHDL and positively correlated with HDL-C, HDL2-C, and apoAI levels. Conclusions: A LC/MS/MS method for the measurement of HDL mediated cholesterol efflux from macrophage cells has been established. This method is non-radioactive, precise and reliable and is potentially useful for the assessment of HDL function and cardiovascular disease risks.

  1. Tanshindiol C inhibits oxidized low-density lipoprotein induced macrophage foam cell formation via a peroxiredoxin 1 dependent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuyu; Li, Xueyan; Peng, Liying; An, Lin; Sun, Ningyuan; Hu, Xuewen; Zhou, Ping; Xu, Yong; Li, Ping; Chen, Jun

    2018-03-01

    NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) has been shown to be protective in atherosclerosis. The loss of Nrf2 in macrophages enhances foam cell formation and promotes early atherogenesis. Tanshindiol C (Tan C) is isolated from the root of Salvia miltiorrhiza Bge., a traditional Chinese medicine that has been used for the treatment of several cardiovascular diseases for many years. This study was aimed to test the potential role of Tan C against macrophage foam cell formation and to explore the underlying mechanism. Firstly, we observed that Tan C markedly suppressed oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) induced macrophage foam cell formation. Then, we found that Tan C was an activator of both Nrf2 and Sirtuin 1 (Sirt1) in macrophages. Nrf2 and Sirt1 synergistically activated the transcription of anti-oxidant peroxiredoxin 1 (Prdx1) after Tan C treatment. More important, we demonstrated that silencing of Prdx1 promoted oxLDL-induced macrophage foam cell formation. Prdx1 upregulated adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette (ABC) transporter A1 (ABCA1) expression and decreased intracellular lipid accumulation. Furthermore, Tan C ameliorated oxLDL induced macrophage foam cell formation in a Prdx1-dependent manner. These observations suggest that Tan C protects macrophages from oxLDL induced foam cell formation via activation of Prdx1/ABCA1 signaling and that Prdx1 may be a novel target for therapeutic intervention of atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Fate of viable but non-culturable Listeria monocytogenes in pig manure microcosms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy eDesneux

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The fate of two strains of L. monocytogenes and their ability to become viable but non-culturable (VBNC was investigated in microcosms containing piggery effluents (two raw manures and two biologically treated manures stored for two months at 8°C and 20°C. Levels of L. monocytogenes were estimated using the culture method, qPCR, and propidium monoazide treatment combined with qPCR (qPCRPMA. The chemical composition and the microbial community structure of the manures were also analysed. The strains showed similar decline rates and persisted up to 63 days. At day zero, the percentage of VBNC cells among viable cells was higher in raw manures (81.5-94.8% than in treated manures (67.8-79.2%. The changes in their proportion over time depended on the temperature and on the type of effluent: the biggest increase was observed in treated manures at 20°C and the smallest increase in raw manures at 8°C. The chemical parameters had no influence on the behaviour of the strains, but decrease of the persistence of viable cells was associated with an increase in the microbial richness of the manures. This study demonstrated that storing manure altered the culturability of L. monocytogenes, which rapidly entered the VBNC state, and underlines the importance of including VBNC cells when estimating the persistence of the pathogens in farm effluents.

  3. Glioma Surgical Aspirate: A Viable Source of Tumor Tissue for Experimental Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perry F. Bartlett

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Brain cancer research has been hampered by a paucity of viable clinical tissue of sufficient quality and quantity for experimental research. This has driven researchers to rely heavily on long term cultured cells which no longer represent the cancers from which they were derived. Resection of brain tumors, particularly at the interface between normal and tumorigenic tissue, can be carried out using an ultrasonic surgical aspirator (CUSA that deposits liquid (blood and irrigation fluid and resected tissue into a sterile bottle for disposal. To determine the utility of CUSA-derived glioma tissue for experimental research, we collected 48 CUSA specimen bottles from glioma patients and analyzed both the solid tissue fragments and dissociated tumor cells suspended in the liquid waste fraction. We investigated if these fractions would be useful for analyzing tumor heterogeneity, using IHC and multi-parameter flow cytometry; we also assessed culture generation and orthotopic xenograft potential. Both cell sources proved to be an abundant, highly viable source of live tumor cells for cytometric analysis, animal studies and in-vitro studies. Our findings demonstrate that CUSA tissue represents an abundant viable source to conduct experimental research and to carry out diagnostic analyses by flow cytometry or other molecular diagnostic procedures.

  4. A cell spot microarray method for production of high density siRNA transfection microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mpindi John-Patrick

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High-throughput RNAi screening is widely applied in biological research, but remains expensive, infrastructure-intensive and conversion of many assays to HTS applications in microplate format is not feasible. Results Here, we describe the optimization of a miniaturized cell spot microarray (CSMA method, which facilitates utilization of the transfection microarray technique for disparate RNAi analyses. To promote rapid adaptation of the method, the concept has been tested with a panel of 92 adherent cell types, including primary human cells. We demonstrate the method in the systematic screening of 492 GPCR coding genes for impact on growth and survival of cultured human prostate cancer cells. Conclusions The CSMA method facilitates reproducible preparation of highly parallel cell microarrays for large-scale gene knockdown analyses. This will be critical towards expanding the cell based functional genetic screens to include more RNAi constructs, allow combinatorial RNAi analyses, multi-parametric phenotypic readouts or comparative analysis of many different cell types.

  5. Alterations of monocarboxylate transporter densities during hypoxia in brain and breast tumour cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheng, Chang; Edin, Nina F Jeppesen; Lauritzen, Knut H

    2012-01-01

    Tumour cells are characterized by aerobic glycolysis, which provides biomass for tumour proliferation and leads to extracellular acidification through efflux of lactate via monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs). Deficient and spasm-prone tumour vasculature causes variable hypoxia, which favours tum...... tumour cell survival and metastases. Brain metastases frequently occur in patients with advanced breast cancer.Effective treatment strategies are therefore needed against brain metastasis from breast carcinoma.......Tumour cells are characterized by aerobic glycolysis, which provides biomass for tumour proliferation and leads to extracellular acidification through efflux of lactate via monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs). Deficient and spasm-prone tumour vasculature causes variable hypoxia, which favours...

  6. In situ cannulation, microgrid follow-up and low-density plating provide first passage endothelial cell masscultures for in vitro lining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilla, P; Fasol, R; Dudeck, U; Siedler, S; Preiss, P; Fischlein, T; Müller-Glauser, W; Baitella, G; Sanan, D; Odell, J

    1990-08-01

    A rapid and reliable harvest and culture technique was developed to provide a sufficient number of autologous endothelial cells for the confluent in vitro lining of cardiovascular prostheses. Enzymatic endothelial cell detachment was achieved by the in situ application of collagenase to short vessel segments. This harvest technique resulted in a complete lack of contaminating smooth muscle cells in all of 124 cultures from nonhuman primates and 13 cultures from human adults. The use of a microgrid technique enabled the daily in situ quantification of available endothelial cells. To assess ideal plating densities after passage the population doubling time was continuously related to the cell density. Surprisingly, a low plating density of 1.5 X 10(3) endothelial cells/cm2 achieved 43% shorter cell cycles than the usual plating density of 1.0 X 10(4) endothelial cells/cm2. Moreover, low density plating enabled mass cultures after one single cell passage, thereby reducing the cell damaging effect of trypsin. When the growth characteristics of endothelial cells from five anatomically different vessel sites were compared, the external jugular vein--which would be easily accessible and dispensable in each patient--proved to be an excellent source for endothelial cell cultures. By applying in situ administration of collagenase, low density plating and microgrid follow-up to adult human saphenous vein endothelial cells, 14,000,000 first passage endothelial cells--sufficient for the in vitro lining of long vascular prostheses--were obtained 26.2 days after harvest. (95% confidence interval:22.3 to 32.2 days).

  7. Supercritical CO2 foaming of radiation crosslinked polypropylene/high-density polyethylene blend: Cell structure and tensile property

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chenguang; Xing, Zhe; Zhang, Mingxing; Zhao, Quan; Wang, Mouhua; Wu, Guozhong

    2017-12-01

    A blend of isotactic polypropylene (PP) with high-density polyethylene (HDPE) in different PP/HDPE ratios was irradiated by γ-ray to induce cross-linking and then foamed using supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) as a blowing agent. Radiation effect on the melting point and crystallinity were analyzed in detail. The average cell diameter and cell density were compared for PP/HDPE foams prepared under different conditions. The optimum absorbed dose for the scCO2 foaming of PP/HDPE in terms of foaming ability and cell structure was 20 kGy. Tensile measurements showed that the elongation at break and tensile strength at break of the crosslinked PP/HDPE foams were higher than the non-crosslinked ones. Of particular interest was the increase in the foaming temperature window from 4 ℃ for pristine PP to 8-12 ℃ for the radiation crosslinked PP/HDPE blends. This implies much easier handling of scCO2 foaming of crosslinked PP with the addition of HDPE.

  8. Antagonism of Secreted PCSK9 Increases Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor Expression in HepG2 Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNutt, Markey C.; Kwon, Hyock Joo; Chen, Chiyuan; Chen, Justin R.; Horton, Jay D.; Lagace, Thomas A.; (USMC); (UTSMC)

    2009-07-10

    PCSK9 is a secreted protein that degrades low density lipoprotein receptors (LDLRs) in liver by binding to the epidermal growth factor-like repeat A (EGF-A) domain of the LDLR. It is not known whether PCSK9 causes degradation of LDLRs within the secretory pathway or following secretion and reuptake via endocytosis. Here we show that a mutation in the LDLR EGF-A domain associated with familial hypercholesterolemia, H306Y, results in increased sensitivity to exogenous PCSK9-mediated cellular degradation because of enhanced PCSK9 binding affinity. The crystal structure of the PCSK9-EGF-A(H306Y) complex shows that Tyr-306 forms a hydrogen bond with Asp-374 in PCSK9 at neutral pH, which strengthens the interaction with PCSK9. To block secreted PCSK9 activity, LDLR (H306Y) subfragments were added to the medium of HepG2 cells stably overexpressing wild-type PCSK9 or gain-of-function PCSK9 mutants associated with hypercholesterolemia (D374Y or S127R). These subfragments blocked secreted PCSK9 binding to cell surface LDLRs and resulted in the recovery of LDLR levels to those of control cells. We conclude that PCSK9 acts primarily as a secreted factor to cause LDLR degradation. These studies support the concept that pharmacological inhibition of the PCSK9-LDLR interaction extracellularly will increase hepatic LDLR expression and lower plasma low density lipoprotein levels.

  9. Larval Survivorship and Settlement of Crown-of-Thorns Starfish (Acanthaster cf. solaris at Varying Algal Cell Densities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan S. Pratchett

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The dispersal potential of crown-of-thorns starfish (CoTS larvae is important in understanding both the initiation and spread of population outbreaks, and is fundamentally dependent upon how long larvae can persist while still retaining the capacity to settle. This study quantified variation in larval survivorship and settlement rates for CoTS maintained at three different densities of a single-celled flagellate phytoplankton, Proteomonas sulcata (1 × 103, 1 × 104, and 1 × 105 cells/mL. Based on the larval starvation hypothesis, we expected that low to moderate levels of phytoplankton prey would significantly constrain both survival and settlement. CoTS larvae were successfully maintained for up to 50 days post-fertilization, but larval survival differed significantly between treatments. Survival was greatest at intermediate food levels (1 × 104 cells/mL, and lowest at high (1 × 105 cells/mL food levels. Rates of settlement were also highest at intermediate food levels and peaked at 22 days post-fertilization. Peak settlement was delayed at low food levels, probably reflective of delayed development, but there was no evidence of accelerated development at high chlorophyll concentrations. CoTS larvae were recorded to settle 17–43 days post-fertilization, but under optimum conditions with intermediate algal cell densities, peak settlement occurred at 22 days post-fertilization. Natural fluctuations in nutrient concentrations and food availability may affect the number of CoTS that effectively settle, but seem unlikely to influence dispersal dynamics.

  10. Plasmin promotes foam cell formation by increasing macrophage catabolism of aggregated low density lipoprotein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haka, Abigail S.; Grosheva, Inna; Singh, Rajesh K.; Maxfield, Frederick R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The plasmin/plasminogen system is involved in atherosclerosis. However, the mechanisms by which it stimulates disease are not fully defined. A key event in atherogenesis is the deposition of LDL on arterial walls where it is modified, aggregated and retained. Macrophages are recruited to clear the lipoproteins, and they become foam cells. The goal of this study was to assess the role of plasmin in macrophage uptake of aggregated LDL and foam cell formation. Approach and Results Plasminogen treatment of macrophages catabolizing aggregated LDL significantly accelerated foam cell formation. Macrophage interaction with aggregated LDL increased the surface expression of urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor and plasminogen activator activity, resulting in increased ability to generate plasmin at the cell surface. The high local level of plasmin cleaves cell-associated aggregated LDL, allowing a portion of the aggregate to become sequestered in a nearly sealed, yet extracellular, acidic compartment. The low pH in the plasmin-induced compartment allows lysosomal enzymes, delivered via lysosome exocytosis, greater activity, resulting in more efficient cholesteryl ester hydrolysis and delivery of a large cholesterol load to the macrophage, thereby promoting foam cell formation. Conclusion These findings highlight a critical role for plasmin in the catabolism of aggregated LDL by macrophages and provide a new context for considering the atherogenic role of plasmin. PMID:23702659

  11. Transport studies in polymer electrolyte fuel cell with porous metallic flow field at ultra high current density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srouji, Abdul-Kader

    Achieving cost reduction for polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFC) requires a simultaneous effort in increasing power density while reducing precious metal loading. In PEFCs, the cathode performance is often limiting due to both the slow oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), and mass transport limitation caused by limited oxygen diffusion and liquid water flooding at high current density. This study is motivated by the achievement of ultra-high current density through the elimination of the channel/land (C/L) paradigm in PEFC flow field design. An open metallic element (OME) flow field capable of operating at unprecedented ultra-high current density (3 A/cm2) introduces new advantages and limitations for PEFC operation. The first part of this study compares the OME with a conventional C/L flow field, through performance and electrochemical diagnostic tools such as electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The results indicate the uniqueness of the OME's mass transport improvement. No sign of operation limitation due to flooding is noted. The second part specifically examines water management at high current density using the OME flow field. A unique experimental setup is developed to measure steady-state and transient net water drag across the membrane, in order to characterize the fundamental aspects of water transport at high current density with the OME. Instead of flooding, the new limitation is identified to be anode side dry-out of the membrane, caused by electroosmotic drag. The OME improves water removal from the cathode, which immediately improves oxygen transport and performance. However, the low water content in the cathode reduces back diffusion of water to the membrane, and electroosmotic drag dominates at high current density, leading to dry-out. The third part employs the OME flow field as a tool that avoids C/L effects endemic to a typical flow field, in order to study oxygen transport resistance at the catalyst layer of a PEFC. In open literature, a

  12. Simultaneous enhancement of open-circuit voltage, short-circuit current density, and fill factor in polymer solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Zhicai; Zhong, Chengmei; Wu, Hongbin; Su, Shijian; Cao, Yong [Institute of Polymer Optoelectronic Materials and Devices, State Key Laboratory of Luminescent Materials and Devices, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Huang, Xun; Chen, Liwei [Suzhou Institute of Nano-Tech and Nano-Bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 398 Ruoshui Road, Suzhou Industrial Park, Suzhou 215123 (China); Wong, Wai-Yeung [Institute of Molecular Functional Materials (Areas of Excellence Scheme, University Grants Committee, Hong Kong) and Department of Chemistry and Centre for Advanced Luminescence Materials, Hong Kong Baptist University, Waterloo Road, Hong Kong (China)

    2011-10-25

    Simultaneous enhancement of open-circuit voltage, short-circuit current density, and fill factor in highly efficient polymer solar cells by incorporating an alcohol/water-soluble conjugated polymer as cathode interlayer is domonstrated. When combined with a low-bandgap polymer PTB7 as the electron donor material, the power efficiency of the devices is improved to certified 8.370%. Due to drastic improvement in efficiency and easy utilization, this method opens new opportunities for PSCs from various material systems to improve towards 10% efficiency. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  13. Electron-Ion Dynamics with Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory: Towards Predictive Solar Cell Modeling: Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maitra, Neepa [Hunter College City University of New York, New York, NY (United States)

    2016-07-14

    This project investigates the accuracy of currently-used functionals in time-dependent density functional theory, which is today routinely used to predict and design materials and computationally model processes in solar energy conversion. The rigorously-based electron-ion dynamics method developed here sheds light on traditional methods and overcomes challenges those methods have. The fundamental research undertaken here is important for building reliable and practical methods for materials discovery. The ultimate goal is to use these tools for the computational design of new materials for solar cell devices of high efficiency.

  14. Allicin prevents oxidized low-density lipoprotein-induced endothelial cell injury by inhibiting apoptosis and oxidative stress pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoshu; Pang, Sunian; Lin, Jianfeng; Xia, Jianlan; Wang, Yi

    2016-05-20

    Vascular endothelial apoptosis is significantly associated with atherosclerosis and cardiovascular diseases, for which oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) is a major risk factor. Allicin, the primary active ingredient of garlic, has been found to have cardiovascular protective effect by changing the fatty-acid composition, but its effect on ox-LDL-induced vascular endothelial injury remains unclear. We investigated the protective effect of allicin on cell viability, LDH release, apoptosis and apoptotic signaling in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). In cultured HUVEC cell line, ox-LDL induced injury was investigated. The cell viability and injury were evaluated by using cell proliferation Assay kit and LDH release assay. The apoptosis was evaluated by the Annexin V-FITC kit. The activity of caspase-3 was assessed using a colorimetric caspase-3 assay kit. The ROS production was evaluated by fluorometric assay and NADPH oxidase activity was assessed with a GENMED kit. Exposure of HUVECs to ox-LDL (150 μg/ml) reduced cell viability, induced apoptosis and increased activity of caspase-3, NADPH oxidase, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. The pretreatment with allicin (30 and 100 μM) significantly rescued the cell viability, inhibited ox-LDL-induced apoptosis and activity of caspase-3, NADPH oxidase and ROS production in HUVECs, and the protective effect is concentration-dependent. The allicin (100 μM) alone did not show significant difference from control. Our study demonstrated that allicin protected HUVECs from ox-LDL-induced endothelial injury by reducing the apoptosis, mediated by inhibition of caspase-3 and NADPH oxidase related apoptotic signaling. Allicin prevents ox-LDL-induced endothelial cell injury by inhibiting apoptosis and oxidative stress pathway.

  15. Galectin-3-induced oxidized low-density lipoprotein promotes the phenotypic transformation of vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Lei; Chen, Kan; Cao, Jiatian; Han, Zhihua; Gao, Lin; Wang, Yue; Fan, Yuqi; Wang, Changqian

    2015-10-01

    Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) is involved in the pathological phenotypic transformation of vascular smooth muscle cells in atherosclerosis. Galectin‑3 also has an important role in atherosclerosis. However, little is currently known regarding the effects of galectin‑3 on the oxLDL‑induced phenotypic transformation of vascular smooth muscle cells. In the present study, primary culture human umbilical vascular smooth muscle cells were treated with various oxLDL concentrations (0‑50 µg/ml) for 72 h, and phenotypic changes were subsequently recorded. The results of the present study suggested that oxLDL increases the expression levels of galectin‑3, and induces the phenotypic transformation of vascular smooth muscle cells. The oxLDL‑induced cells exhibited increased expression levels of osteopontin, a smooth muscle synthetic protein, and calponin and α‑actin, smooth muscle contractile proteins. The oxLDL‑induced changes in cellular phenotype were associated with increased migration, proliferation, and phagocytosis. Concordant with these results, oxLDL‑treated smooth muscle cells exhibited activation of canonical Wnt signaling, as determined by an increase in the protein expression levels of β‑catenin. Silencing of galectin‑3 by small interfering RNA reversed the phenotypic transformation and functional changes observed in the oxLDL‑treated cells, suggesting these changes were dependent on the activation of galectin‑3. In addition, galectin‑3 knockdown decreased the protein expression levels of β‑catenin in both the cytoplasm and nucleus; however, the mRNA expression levels of β‑catenin remained unchanged. These results suggest that galectin‑3 is responsible for the phenotypic transformation of human umbilical vascular smooth muscle cells, and the canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway may be involved in this process.

  16. Mitochondrial respiration in human viable platelets-Methodology and influence of gender, age and storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjövall, Fredrik; Ehinger, Johannes K H; Marelsson, Sigurður E

    2013-01-01

    Studying whole cell preparations with intact mitochondria and respiratory complexes has a clear benefit compared to isolated or disrupted mitochondria due to the dynamic interplay between mitochondria and other cellular compartments. Platelet mitochondria have a potential to serve as a source...... of human viable mitochondria when studying mitochondrial physiology and pathogenic mechanisms, as well as for the diagnostics of mitochondrial diseases. The objective of the present study was to perform a detailed evaluation of platelet mitochondrial respiration using high-resolution respirometry. Further...

  17. Evaluation of a low density DNA microarray for small B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma differential diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillet, Jean-Pierre; Molina, Thierry Jo; Jamart, Jacques; Gaulard, Philippe; Leroy, Karen; Briere, Josette; Theate, Ivan; Thieblemont, Catherine; Bosly, Andre; Herin, Michel; Hamels, Jacques; Remacle, Jose

    2009-03-01

    Lymphomas are classified according to the World Health Organisation (WHO) classification which defines subtypes on the basis of clinical, morphological, immunophenotypic, molecular and cytogenetic criteria. Differential diagnosis of the subtypes is sometimes difficult, especially for small B-cell lymphoma (SBCL). Standardisation of molecular genetic assays using multiple gene expression analysis by microarrays could be a useful complement to the current diagnosis. The aim of the present study was to develop a low density DNA microarray for the analysis of 107 genes associated with B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma and to evaluate its performance in the diagnosis of SBCL. A predictive tool based on Fisher discriminant analysis using a training set of 40 patients including four different subtypes (follicular lymphoma n = 15, mantle cell lymphoma n = 7, B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia n = 6 and splenic marginal zone lymphoma n = 12) was designed. A short additional preliminary analysis to gauge the accuracy of this signature was then performed on an external set of nine patients. Using this model, eight of nine of those samples were classified successfully. This pilot study demonstrates that such a microarray tool may be a promising diagnostic approach for small B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

  18. Effects of increasing carbon nanofiber density in polyurethane composites for inhibiting bladder cancer cell functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Melissa; Chun, Young Wook; Im, Yeon Min; Khang, Dongwoo; Webster, Thomas J

    2011-07-01

    Polyurethane (PU) is a versatile elastomer that is commonly used in biomedical applications. In turn, materials derived from nanotechnology, specifically carbon nanofibers (CNFs), have received increasing attention for their potential use in biomedical applications. Recent studies have shown that the dispersion of CNFs in PU significantly enhances composite nanoscale surface roughness, tensile properties, and thermal stability. Although there have been studies concerning normal primary cell functions on such nanocomposites, there have been few studies detailing cancer cell responses. Since many patients who require bladder transplants have suffered from bladder cancer, the ideal bladder prosthetic material should not only promote normal primary human urothelial cell (HUC) function, but also inhibit the return of bladder cancerous cell activity. This study examined the correlation between transitional (UMUC) and squamous (or SCaBER) urothelial carcinoma cells and HUC on PU:CNF nanocomposites of varying PU and CNF weight ratios (from pure PU to 4:1 [PU:CNF volume ratios], 2:1, 1:1, 1:2, and 1:4 composites to pure CNF). Composites were characterized for mechanical properties, wettability, surface roughness, and chemical composition by atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and goniometry. The adhesion and proliferation of UMUC and SCaBER cancer cells were assessed by MTS assays. Cellular responses were further quantified by measuring the amounts of nuclear mitotic protein 22 (NMP-22), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and tumor necrosis factor alpha. Results demonstrated that both UMUC and SCaBER cell proliferation rates decreased over time on substrates with increased CNF in PU. In addition, with the exception of VEGF from UMUC (which was the same across all materials), composites containing the most CNF activated cancer cells (UMUC and SCaBER) the least, as shown by

  19. Flow Cytometric Quantification of Peripheral Blood Cell β-Adrenergic Receptor Density and Urinary Endothelial Cell-Derived Microparticles in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan A Rose

    Full Text Available Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH is a heterogeneous disease characterized by severe angiogenic remodeling of the pulmonary artery wall and right ventricular hypertrophy. Thus, there is an increasing need for novel biomarkers to dissect disease heterogeneity, and predict treatment response. Although β-adrenergic receptor (βAR dysfunction is well documented in left heart disease while endothelial cell-derived microparticles (Ec-MPs are established biomarkers of angiogenic remodeling, methods for easy large clinical cohort analysis of these biomarkers are currently absent. Here we describe flow cytometric methods for quantification of βAR density on circulating white blood cells (WBC and Ec-MPs in urine samples that can be used as potential biomarkers of right heart failure in PAH. Biotinylated β-blocker alprenolol was synthesized and validated as a βAR specific probe that was combined with immunophenotyping to quantify βAR density in circulating WBC subsets. Ec-MPs obtained from urine samples were stained for annexin-V and CD144, and analyzed by a micro flow cytometer. Flow cytometric detection of alprenolol showed that βAR density was decreased in most WBC subsets in PAH samples compared to healthy controls. Ec-MPs in urine was increased in PAH compared to controls. Furthermore, there was a direct correlation between Ec-MPs and Tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE in PAH patients. Therefore, flow cytometric quantification of peripheral blood cell βAR density and urinary Ec-MPs may be useful as potential biomarkers of right ventricular function in PAH.

  20. A high density of tertiary lymphoid structure B cells in lung tumors is associated with increased CD4+ T cell receptor repertoire clonality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wei; Germain, Claire; Liu, Zheng; Sebastian, Yinong; Devi, Priyanka; Knockaert, Samantha; Brohawn, Philip; Lehmann, Kim; Damotte, Diane; Validire, Pierre; Yao, Yihong; Valge-Archer, Viia; Hammond, Scott A; Dieu-Nosjean, Marie-Caroline; Higgs, Brandon W

    2015-12-01

    T and B cell receptor (TCR and BCR, respectively) Vβ or immunoglobulin heavy chain complementarity-determining region 3 sequencing allows monitoring of repertoire changes through recognition, clonal expansion, affinity maturation, and T or B cell activation in response to antigen. TCR and BCR repertoire analysis can advance understanding of antitumor immune responses in the tumor microenvironment. TCR and BCR repertoires of sorted CD4+, CD8+ or CD19+ cells in tumor, non-tumoral distant tissue (NT), and peripheral compartments (blood/draining lymph node [P]) from 47 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients (agemedian = 68 y) were sequenced. The clonotype spectra were assessed among different tissues and correlated with clinical and immunological parameters. In all tissues, CD4+ and CD8+ TCR repertoires had greater clonality relative to CD19+ BCR. CD4+ T cells exhibited greater clonality in NT compared to tumor (p = 0.002) and P (p 68). Younger patients exhibited greater CD4+ T cell diversity in P compared to older patients (p = 0.05), and greater CD4+ T cell clonality in tumor relative to P (p cell clonality in tumor and P, respectively (both p = 0.05), correlated with high density of tumor-associated tertiary lymphoid structure (TLS) B cells, a biomarker of higher overall survival in NSCLC. Results indicate distinct adaptive immune responses in NSCLC, where peripheral T cell diversity is modulated by age, and tumor T cell clonal expansion is favored by the presence of TLSs in the tumor microenvironment.

  1. Degradation of solid oxide cells during co-electrolysis of steam and carbon dioxide at high current densities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tao, Youkun; Ebbesen, Sune Dalgaard; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2016-01-01

    In this work, the durability of Ni–YSZ based solid oxide cells was investigated during co-electrolysis of steam and carbon dioxide (45% H2O + 45% CO2 + 10% H2) at current density of −1.5 or −2.0 A cm−2. The cell consists of ∼300 μm Ni–YSZ support, ∼10 μm Ni–YSZ electrode, ∼10 μm YSZ electrolyte...... and ∼15 μm LSM–YSZ oxygen electrode. The gas conversion was 45% at −1.5 A cm−2 and 60% at −2.0 A cm−2, and the operating durations were up to 700 h. The detailed electrochemical analysis revealed significant increase of the ohmic resistance, oxide ion transport resistance in the Ni–YSZ composite...

  2. Low-density lipoprotein apheresis for proteinuria in lupus nephritis with intraglomerular foam cells containing cholesterol crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, Naoki; Kitamura, Kenichiro; Hayata, Manabu; Ogata, Tomohiro; Tajiri-Okamura, Keiko; Nakayama, Yushi; Kohda, Yukimasa; Tomita, Kimio; Mukoyama, Masashi

    2015-03-01

    A 28-year-old woman with systemic lupus erythematosus was referred to our hospital due to nephrotic-level proteinuria despite approximately 1 year of treatment with 50 to 60 mg/d of prednisolone and 100 to 150 mg/d of cyclosporine with methylprednisolone pulse therapy. Kidney biopsy showed diffuse global lupus nephritis (World Health Organization class 4-G A/C) with many intraglomerular foam cells containing cholesterol crystals. Surprisingly, proteinuria diminished after only 5 low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol apheresis sessions. This case demonstrated the potential of LDL apheresis to exhibit a remarkable effect on not only focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, but also other types of nephritis, particularly nephritis with intraglomerular foam cells. Copyright © 2015 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Density of founder cells affects spatial pattern formation and cooperation in Bacillus subtilis biofilms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gestel, Jordi; Weissing, Franz J.; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Kovacs, Akos T.

    2014-01-01

    In nature, most bacteria live in surface-attached sedentary communities known as biofilms. Biofilms are often studied with respect to bacterial interactions. Many cells inhabiting biofilms are assumed to express 'cooperative traits', like the secretion of extracellular polysaccharides (EPS). These

  4. Highly conductive anion exchange membrane for high power density fuel-cell performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xiaoming; Price, Samuel C; Jackson, Aaron C; Pomerantz, Natalie; Beyer, Frederick L

    2014-08-27

    Anion exchange membrane fuel cells (AEMFCs) are regarded as a new generation of fuel cell technology that has the potential to overcome many obstacles of the mainstream proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) in cost, catalyst stability, efficiency, and system size. However, the low ionic conductivity and poor thermal stability of current anion exchange membranes (AEMs) have been the key factors limiting the performance of AEMFCs. In this study, an AEM made of styrenic diblock copolymer with a quaternary ammonium-functionalized hydrophilic block and a cross-linkable hydrophobic block and possessing bicontinuous phases of a hydrophobic network and hydrophilic conduction paths was found to have high ionic conductivity at 98 mS cm(-1) and controlled membrane swelling with water uptake at 117 wt % at 22 °C. Membrane characterizations and fuel cell tests of the new AEM were carried out together with a commercial AEM, Tokuyama A201, for comparison. The high ionic conductivity and water permeability of the new membrane reported in this study is attributed to the reduced torturosity of the ionic conduction paths, while the hydrophobic network maintains the membrane mechanical integrity, preventing excessive water uptake.

  5. Transmural changes in mast cell density in rat heart after infarct induction in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engels, W.; Reiters, P. H.; Daemen, M. J.; Smits, J. F.; van der Vusse, G. J.

    1995-01-01

    The cardiac distribution of mast cells was investigated after the induction of acute myocardial infarction in the rat. The left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) was occluded by ligation in the infarct group, whereas in sham rats only a superficial ligature was placed beside the LAD. Rats of

  6. Transport dynamics of a high-power-density matrix-type hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokopius, P. R.; Hagedorn, N. H.

    1974-01-01

    Experimental transport dynamics tests were made on a space power fuel cell of current design. Various operating transients were introduced and transport-related response data were recorded with fluidic humidity sensing instruments. Also, sampled data techniques were developed for measuring the cathode-side electrolyte concentration during transient operation.

  7. Oxidized low density lipoprotein increases RANKL level in human vascular cells. Involvement of oxidative stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazière, Cécile, E-mail: maziere.cecile@chu-amiens.fr [Biochemistry Laboratory, South Hospital University, René Laennec Avenue, Amiens 80000 (France); Salle, Valéry [Internal Medicine, North Hospital University, Place Victor Pauchet, Amiens 80000 (France); INSERM U1088 (EA 4292), SFR CAP-Santé (FED 4231), University of Picardie – Jules Verne (France); Gomila, Cathy; Mazière, Jean-Claude [Biochemistry Laboratory, South Hospital University, René Laennec Avenue, Amiens 80000 (France)

    2013-10-18

    Highlights: •Oxidized LDL enhances RANKL level in human smooth muscle cells. •The effect of OxLDL is mediated by the transcription factor NFAT. •UVA, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and buthionine sulfoximine also increase RANKL level. •All these effects are observed in human fibroblasts and endothelial cells. -- Abstract: Receptor Activator of NFκB Ligand (RANKL) and its decoy receptor osteoprotegerin (OPG) have been shown to play a role not only in bone remodeling but also in inflammation, arterial calcification and atherosclerotic plaque rupture. In human smooth muscle cells, Cu{sup 2+}-oxidized LDL (CuLDL) 10–50 μg/ml increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) and RANKL level in a dose-dependent manner, whereas OPG level was not affected. The lipid extract of CuLDL reproduced the effects of the whole particle. Vivit, an inhibitor of the transcription factor NFAT, reduced the CuLDL-induced increase in RANKL, whereas PKA and NFκB inhibitors were ineffective. LDL oxidized by myeloperoxidase (MPO-LDL), or other pro-oxidant conditions such as ultraviolet A (UVA) irradiation, incubation with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} or with buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), an inhibitor of glutathione synthesis{sub ,} also induced an oxidative stress and enhanced RANKL level. The increase in RANKL in pro-oxidant conditions was also observed in fibroblasts and endothelial cells. Since RANKL is involved in myocardial inflammation, vascular calcification and plaque rupture, this study highlights a new mechanism whereby OxLDL might, by generation of an oxidative stress, exert a deleterious effect on different cell types of the arterial wall.

  8. Stability of vision, topography, and endothelial cell density from 1 year to 2 years after deep lamellar endothelial keratoplasty surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ousley, Paula J; Terry, Mark A

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate whether the visual, topographic, and endothelial cell count results observed 1 year after deep lamellar endothelial keratoplasty (DLEK) surgery remain stable up to 2 years after surgery. Prospective, noncomparative, interventional case series. Twenty eyes of 20 patients with corneal edema from Fuchs' endothelial dystrophy. Deep lamellar endothelial keratoplasty endothelial replacement surgery, with a 9.0-mm or 9.5-mm scleral access incision and a specialized intrastromal trephine, was performed. Snellen visual acuities, corneal topography, and endothelial cell counts were prospectively measured preoperatively and 1 year and 2 years after DLEK. Uncorrected and best spectacle-corrected visual acuity (BSCVA), refractive and topographic astigmatism, mean corneal curvature, topographic regularity and symmetry, and endothelial cell density. At 1 year postoperatively, BSCVA averaged 20/50 (range, 20/25-20/200), spherical equivalents (SE) averaged -0.194+/-1.521 diopters (D), manifest refraction (MR) astigmatism averaged 2.04+/-1.05 D (range, 0.0-4.0 D), topographic astigmatism averaged 2.3+/-1.1 D, mean corneal curvature was 43.2+/-1.8 D, the surface regularity index (SRI) averaged 1.16+/-0.41, and the surface asymmetry index (SAI) averaged 1.05+/-1.09. At 2 years postoperatively, BSCVA averaged 20/48 (range, 20/25-20/200), SE averaged -0.369+/-1.267 D, MR astigmatism averaged 1.76+/-0.66 D (range, 0.75-3.0 D), topographic astigmatism averaged 2.4+/-1.1 D, mean corneal curvature was 43.6+/-1.8 D, the SRI averaged 1.13+/-0.44, and the SAI averaged 0.76+/-0.59. There was no significant change in visual or topographic parameters between 1 year and 2 years postoperatively (P>0.05). Endothelial cell counts averaged 2335+/-468 cells/mm(2) at 1 year and 2151+/-457 cells/mm(2) at 2 years postoperatively (P = 0.041). Deep lamellar endothelial keratoplasty provides stable refractions, corneal topography, and endothelial cell densities as long as 2 years after surgery

  9. Oxygen reduction on a Pt(111 catalyst in HT-PEM fuel cells by density functional theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Sun

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The oxygen reduction reaction plays an important role in the performance of high-temperature proton exchange membrane (HT-PEM fuel cells. In this study, a molecular dynamics model, which is based on the density functional theory and couples the system’s energy, the exchange-correlation energy functional, the charge density distribution function, and the simplified Kohn–Sham equation, was developed to simulate the oxygen reduction reaction on a Pt(111 surface. Additionally, an electrochemical reaction system on the basis of a four-electron reaction mechanism was also developed for this simulation. The reaction path of the oxygen reduction reaction, the product structure of each reaction step and the system’s energy were simulated. It is found that the first step reaction of the first hydrogen ion with the oxygen molecule is the controlling step of the overall reaction. Increasing the operating temperature speeds up the first step reaction rate and slightly decreases its reaction energy barrier. Our results provide insight into the working principles of HT-PEM fuel cells.

  10. Oxygen reduction on a Pt(111) catalyst in HT-PEM fuel cells by density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hong; Li, Jie; Almheiri, Saif; Xiao, Jianyu

    2017-08-01

    The oxygen reduction reaction plays an important role in the performance of high-temperature proton exchange membrane (HT-PEM) fuel cells. In this study, a molecular dynamics model, which is based on the density functional theory and couples the system's energy, the exchange-correlation energy functional, the charge density distribution function, and the simplified Kohn-Sham equation, was developed to simulate the oxygen reduction reaction on a Pt(111) surface. Additionally, an electrochemical reaction system on the basis of a four-electron reaction mechanism was also developed for this simulation. The reaction path of the oxygen reduction reaction, the product structure of each reaction step and the system's energy were simulated. It is found that the first step reaction of the first hydrogen ion with the oxygen molecule is the controlling step of the overall reaction. Increasing the operating temperature speeds up the first step reaction rate and slightly decreases its reaction energy barrier. Our results provide insight into the working principles of HT-PEM fuel cells.

  11. Requirements for sulfur in cell density-independent induction of luminescence in Vibrio fischeri under nutrient-starved conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabei, Yosuke; Era, Mariko; Ogawa, Akane; Morita, Hiroshi

    2012-04-01

    Despite the universal requirement for sulfur in living organisms, it is not known whether the luminescence of Vibrio fischeri is sulfur-dependent and how sulfur affects the intensity of its luminescence. In this study, we investigated the requirement for sulfur in V. fischeri luminescence under nutrient-starved conditions. Full induction of V. fischeri luminescence required MgSO(4); in artificial seawater cultures that lacked sufficient MgSO(4), its luminescence was not fully induced. This induction of luminescence was not dependent on autoinduction because the cell density of V. fischeri did not reach the critical threshold concentration. In addition to MgSO(4), this cell density-independent luminescence was induced or maintained by nontoxic concentrations of l-cysteine, sulfate, sulfite, and thiosulfate. Moreover, the addition of N -3-oxo-hexanoyl homoserine lactone and N -octanoyl homoserine lactone, which are known autoinducers in V. fischeri, did not induce luminescence under these conditions. This result suggested that the underlying mechanism of luminescence may be different from the known autoinduction mechanism. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Current density and catalyst-coated membrane resistance distribution of hydro-formed metallic bipolar plate fuel cell short stack with 250 cm2 active area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haase, S.; Moser, M.; Hirschfeld, J. A.; Jozwiak, K.

    2016-01-01

    An automotive fuel cell with an active area of 250 cm2 is investigated in a 4-cell short stack with a current and temperature distribution device next to the bipolar plate with 560 current and 140 temperature segments. The electrical conductivities of the bipolar plate and gas diffusion layer assembly are determined ex-situ with this current scan shunt module. The applied fuel cell consists of bipolar plates constructed of 75-μm-thick, welded stainless-steel foils and a graphitic coating. The electrical conductivities of the bipolar plate and gas diffusion layer assembly are determined ex-situ with this module with a 6% deviation in in-plane conductivity. The current density distribution is evaluated up to 2.4 A cm-2. The entire cell's investigated volumetric power density is 4.7 kW l-1, and its gravimetric power density is 4.3 kW kg-1 at an average cell voltage of 0.5 V. The current density distribution is determined without influencing the operating cell. In addition, the current density distribution in the catalyst-coated membrane and its effective resistivity distribution with a finite volume discretisation of Ohm's law are evaluated. The deviation between the current density distributions in the catalyst-coated membrane and the bipolar plate is determined.

  13. Detection of viable Salmonella in lettuce by propidium monoazide real-time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Ningjian; Dong, Jin; Luo, Laixin; Li, Yong

    2011-05-01

    Contamination of lettuce by Salmonella has caused serious public health problems. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) allows rapid detection of pathogenic bacteria in food, but it is inaccurate as it might amplify DNA from dead target cells as well. This study aimed to investigate the stability of DNA of dead Salmonella cells in lettuce and to develop an approach to detecting viable Salmonella in lettuce. Salmonella-free lettuce was inoculated with heat-killed Salmonella Typhimurium cells and stored at 4 °C. Bacterial DNA extracted from the sample was amplified by real-time PCR targeting the invA gene. Our results indicate that DNA from the dead cells remained stable in lettuce for at least 8 d. To overcome this limitation, propidium monoazide (PMA), a dye that can selectively penetrate dead bacterial cells and cross-link their DNA upon light exposure, was combined with real-time PCR. Lettuce samples inoculated with different levels of dead or viable S. Typhimurium cells were treated or untreated with PMA before DNA extraction. Real-time PCR suggests that PMA treatment effectively prevented PCR amplification from as high as 10(8) CFU/g dead S. Typhimurium cells in lettuce. The PMA real-time PCR assay could detect viable Salmonella at as low as 10(2) CFU/mL in pure culture and 10(3) CFU/g in lettuce. With 12-h enrichment, S. Typhimurium of 10(1) CFU/g in lettuce was detectable. In conclusion, the PMA real-time PCR assay provides an alternative to real-time PCR assay for accurate detection of Salmonella in food. © 2011 Institute of Food Technologists®

  14. An advanced PCR method for the specific detection of viable total coliform bacteria in pasteurized milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soejima, Takashi; Minami, Jun-ichi; Yaeshima, Tomoko; Iwatsuki, Keiji

    2012-07-01

    Pasteurized milk is a complex food that contains various inhibitors of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and may contain a large number of dead bacteria, depending on the milking conditions and environment. Ethidium monoazide bromide (EMA)-PCR is occasionally used to distinguish between viable and dead bacteria in foods other than pasteurized milk. EMA is a DNA-intercalating dye that selectively permeates the compromised cell membranes of dead bacteria and cleaves DNA. Usually, EMA-PCR techniques reduce the detection of dead bacteria by up to 3.5 logs compared with techniques that do not use EMA. However, this difference may still be insufficient to suppress the amplification of DNA from dead Gram-negative bacteria (e.g., total coliform bacteria) if they are present in pasteurized milk in large numbers. Thus, false positives may result. We developed a new method that uses real-time PCR targeting of a long DNA template (16S-23S rRNA gene, principally 2,451 bp) following EMA treatment to completely suppress the amplification of DNA of up to 7 logs (10(7) cells) of dead total coliforms. Furthermore, we found that a low dose of proteinase K (25 U/ml) removed PCR inhibitors and simultaneously increased the signal from viable coliform bacteria. In conclusion, our simple protocol specifically detects viable total coliforms in pasteurized milk at an initial count of ≥1 colony forming unit (CFU)/2.22 ml within 7.5 h of total testing time. This detection limit for viable cells complies with the requirements for the analysis of total coliforms in pasteurized milk set by the Japanese Sanitation Act (which specifies <1 CFU/2.22 ml).

  15. Evaluation of the Endothelial Cell Density and the Central Corneal Thickness in Pseudoexfoliation Syndrome and Pseudoexfoliation Glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bożydar T. Tomaszewski

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Evaluation of central corneal thickness (CCT and endothelial cell density (ECD in patients with senile cataract and coexisting pseudoexfoliation (PEX syndrome with glaucoma (PEXG and without glaucoma using specular microscopy. Participants and Methods. The study included 122 patients (217 eyes. In this group of patients we identified 133 eyes with PEX syndrome (65 with glaucoma, 68 without glaucoma and 84 eyes without PEX syndrome. ECD and CCT were measured in each eye by specular microscopy. Results. ECD in eyes with PEX syndrome without glaucoma (2297 ± 359 cell/mm2 and in eyes with PEXG (2241 ± 363 cell/mm2 was lower than in the control group (2503 ± 262 cell/mm2 (P<0.001. CCT in eyes with PEXG (508.2 ± 32.6 μm was thinner than in eyes with PEX syndrome without glaucoma (529.7 ± 30.3 μm and control group (527.7 ± 29.4 μm (P<0.001. Conclusions. This research shows that in eyes with PEX syndrome, both with and without glaucoma, ECD was statistically significantly lower than in the control group. In patients with PEXG, CCT was statistically significantly thinner than in the PEX syndrome and control group.

  16. Cost-Effective Live Cell Density Determination of Liquid Cultured Microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutschera, Alexander; Lamb, Jacob J

    2017-10-11

    Live monitoring of microorganisms growth in liquid medium is a desired parameter for many research fields. A wildly used approach for determining microbial liquid growth quantification is based on light scattering as the result of the physical interaction of light with microbial cells. These measurements are generally achieved using costly table-top instruments; however, a live, reliable, and straight forward instrument constructed using parts that are inexpensive may provide opportunities for many researchers. Here, such an instrument has been constructed and tested. It consists of modular test tube holding chambers, each with a low power monochromatic light-emitting diode, and a monolithic photodiode. A microcontroller connects to all modular chambers to control the diodes, and send the live data to either an LCD screen, or a computer. This work demonstrate that this modular instrument can determine precise cell concentrations for the bacteria Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000, as well as Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast.

  17. Caffeine enhances osteoclast differentiation from bone marrow hematopoietic cells and reduces bone mineral density in growing rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shing Hwa; Chen, Chinliang; Yang, Rong Sen; Yen, Yuan Peng; Yang, Ya Ting; Tsai, Chingmin

    2011-06-01

    Caffeine-containing beverage consumption has been associated with low bone mass and increased fracture risk in some, but not most, observational studies. The effects of caffeine on bone metabolism are still controversial. We investigated the effects of caffeine on the differentiation of bone progenitor cells and bone mineral density (BMD) by in vitro and in vivo experiments. Low-concentration caffeine (0.005-0.1 mM) did not affect the bone marrow cell viability and alkaline phosphatase activity during osteoblast differentiation from bone marrow stromal cells, but it effectively enhanced the osteoclastogenesis from bone marrow hematopoietic cells and the bone resorption activity by pit formation assay. Moreover, caffeine effectively enhanced the receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL), but reduced the osteoprotegerin protein expressions in osteoblast MC3T3-E1 cells. Caffeine could also increase the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) protein expression and prostaglandin (PG)E(2) production in cultured neonatal mouse calvariae. In animal study, BMD in lumbar vertebra, femur, or tibia was significantly lowered in growing rats supplemented with 0.2% caffeine in diets for 20 weeks compared with the control group. The calcium contents in tibia and femur of caffeine-treated rats were also lower than that in the control group. The osteoclastogenesis of bone marrow cells isolated from caffeine-treated rats was markedly enhanced as compared with the control group. Taken together, these results suggest that caffeine may reduce BMD in growing rats through the enhancement in osteoclastogenesis. Caffeine may possess the ability to enhance a COX-2/PGE(2) -regulated RANKL-mediated osteoclastogenesis. Copyright © 2011 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  18. Optical quantification of cellular mass, volume and density of circulating tumor cells identified in an ovarian cancer patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Gregory Phillips

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Clinical studies have demonstrated that circulating tumor cells (CTCs are present in the blood of cancer patients with known metastatic disease across the major types of epithelial malignancies. Recent studies have shown that the concentration of CTCs in the blood is prognostic of overall survival in breast, prostate, colorectal and non-small cell lung cancer. This study characterizes CTCs identified using the high-definition (HD-CTC assay in an ovarian cancer patient with stage IIIC disease. We characterized the physical properties of 31 HD-CTCs and 50 normal leukocytes from a single blood draw taken just prior to the initial debulking surgery. We utilized a non-interferometric quantitative phase microscopy technique using brightfield imagery to measure cellular dry mass. Next we used a quantitative differential interference contrast microscopy technique to measure cellular volume. These techniques were combined to determine cellular dry mass density. We found that HD-CTCs were more massive than leukocytes: 33.6 ± 3.2 pg (HD-CTC compared to 18.7 ± 0.6 pg (leukocytes, p < 0.001; had greater volumes: 518.3 ± 24.5 fL (HD-CTC compared to 230.9 ± 78.5 fL (leukocyte, p<0.001; and possessed a decreased dry mass density with respect to leukocytes: 0.065 ± 0.006 pg/fL (HD-CTC compared to 0.085 ± 0.004 pg/fL (leukocyte, p < 0.006. Quantification of HD-CTC dry mass content and volume provide key insights into the fluid dynamics of cancer, and may provide the rationale for strategies to isolate, monitor or target CTCs based on their physical properties. The parameters reported here can also be incorporated into blood cell flow models to better understand metastasis.

  19. The Effects of Physicochemical Factors and Cell Density on Nitrite Transformation in a Lipid-Rich Chlorella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Fang; Du, Kui; Wen, Xiaobin; Luo, Liming; Geng, Yahong; Li, Yeguang

    2015-12-28

    To understand the effects of physicochemical factors on nitrite transformation by microalgae, a lipid-rich Chlorella with high nitrite tolerance was cultured with 8 mmol/l sodium nitrite as sole nitrogen source under different conditions. The results showed that nitrite transformation was mainly dependent on the metabolic activities of algal cells rather than oxidation of nitrite by dissolved oxygen. Light intensity, temperature, pH, NaHCO3 concentrations, and initial cell densities had significant effects on the rate of nitrite transformation. Single-factor experiments revealed that the optimum conditions for nitrite transformation were light intensity: 300 μmol/m(2); temperature: 30°C; pH: 7-8; NaHCO3 concentration: 2.0 g/l; and initial cell density: 0.15 g/l; and the highest nitrite transformation rate of 1.36 mmol/l/d was achieved. There was a positive correlation between nitrite transformation rate and the growth of Chlorella. The relationship between nitrite transformation rate (mg/l/d) and biomass productivity (g/l/d) could be described by the regression equation y = 61.3x (R(2) = 0.9665), meaning that 61.3 mg N element was assimilated by 1.0 g dry biomass on average, which indicated that the nitrite transformation is a process of consuming nitrite as nitrogen source by Chlorella. The results demonstrated that the Chlorella suspension was able to assimilate nitrite efficiently, which implied the feasibility of using flue gas for mass production of Chlorella without preliminary removal of NOX.

  20. Microfiltration of enzyme treated egg whites for accelerated detection of viable Salmonella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Seockmo; Ximenes, Eduardo; Kreke, Thomas; Foster, Kirk; Deering, Amanda J; Ladisch, Michael R

    2016-11-01

    We report detection of egg white within 7 h by concentrating the bacteria using microfiltration through 0.2-μm cutoff polyethersulfone hollow fiber membranes. A combination of enzyme treatment, controlled cross-flow on both sides of the hollow fibers, and media selection were key to controlling membrane fouling so that rapid concentration and the subsequent detection of low numbers of microbial cells were achieved. We leveraged the protective effect of egg white proteins and peptone so that the proteolytic enzymes did not attack the living cells while hydrolyzing the egg white proteins responsible for fouling. The molecular weight of egg white proteins was reduced from about 70 kDa to 15 kDa during hydrolysis. This enabled a 50-fold concentration of the cells when a volume of 525 mL of peptone and egg white, containing 13 CFU of Salmonella, was decreased to a 10 mL volume in 50 min. A 10-min microcentrifugation step further concentrated the viable Salmonella cells by 10×. The final cell recovery exceeded 100%, indicating that microbial growth occurred during the 3-h processing time. The experiments leading to rapid concentration, recovery, and detection provided further insights on the nature of membrane fouling enabling fouling effects to be mitigated. Unlike most membrane processes where protein recovery is the goal, recovery of viable microorganisms for pathogen detection is the key measure of success, with modification of cell-free proteins being both acceptable and required to achieve rapid microfiltration of viable microorganisms. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:1464-1471, 2016. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  1. The search for viable local government system in Nigeria: an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The history of the Nigerian local government system has been one long episode of trails and errors aimed at achieving viable local government institution without much success. Local government in the country began its long series of reforms from the colonial period when the colonial government attempted to ...

  2. Comment: Towards a Viable Local Government Structure in Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Local governments are principally established for development at the grassroots and they must be structured in a manner that makes them viable and capable of achieving this purpose. The objective of this comment is to appraise the current local government structure under the Nigerian constitutional framework with a view ...

  3. Cultivation and multiplication of viable axenic Trypanosoma vivax in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-09-01

    Sep 1, 2009 ... Cultivation and multiplication of viable axenic. Trypanosoma vivax in vitro and in vivo. O. A. Idowu, A. B. Idowu, C. F. Mafiana and S. O. Sam-Wobo*. Parasitology Laboratory, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Agriculture, Abeokuta, Nigeria. Accepted 13 April, 2006. Trypanosoma vivax was ...

  4. Investigation on the Effect of Chemical Foaming agent and Wood Flour content on Mechanical Properties, Density and Cell morphology of HDPE/EVA/ Wood Flour Hybrid Foamed Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Pourabbasi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this research, the effects of chemical foaming agent and wood flour content on cell morphology, density and mechanical properties of HDPE/EVA/ Wood Flour hybrid foamed composites were investigated. For this aim, composites were prepared via melt mixing in an internal mixer, then foamed using single-stage batch foaming method. Then mechanical properties such as flexural strength, flexural and tensile modulus and density were measured. Morphology of the samples was also evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The results of this study have indicated that the flexural strength, flexural and tensile modulus and density increases with the increase of wood flour content. However, with addition of chemical foaming agent content and EVA content, mechanical properties and density of foamed composites decreased. Moreover, wood fiber acted as nucleating agents that substantially reduced cell size and increased cell density. In addition, EVA plays an important role in foaming process by increasing the melt viscosity of the polymer matrix, in a way that samples with higher content of EVA have the highest cell density and the lowest cell size.

  5. The putative bZIP transcription factor BzpN slows proliferation and functions in the regulation of cell density by autocrine signals in Dictyostelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan E Phillips

    Full Text Available The secreted proteins AprA and CfaD function as autocrine signals that inhibit cell proliferation in Dictyostelium discoideum, thereby regulating cell numbers by a negative feedback mechanism. We report here that the putative basic leucine zipper transcription factor BzpN plays a role in the inhibition of proliferation by AprA and CfaD. Cells lacking BzpN proliferate more rapidly than wild-type cells but do not reach a higher stationary density. Recombinant AprA inhibits wild-type cell proliferation but does not inhibit the proliferation of cells lacking BzpN. Recombinant CfaD also inhibits wild-type cell proliferation, but promotes the proliferation of cells lacking BzpN. Overexpression of BzpN results in a reduced cell density at stationary phase, and this phenotype requires AprA, CfaD, and the kinase QkgA. Conditioned media from high-density cells stops the proliferation of wild-type but not bzpN(- cells and induces a nuclear localization of a BzpN-GFP fusion protein, though this localization does not require AprA or CfaD. Together, the data suggest that BzpN is necessary for some but not all of the effects of AprA and CfaD, and that BzpN may function downstream of AprA and CfaD in a signal transduction pathway that inhibits proliferation.

  6. The putative bZIP transcription factor BzpN slows proliferation and functions in the regulation of cell density by autocrine signals in Dictyostelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Jonathan E; Huang, Eryong; Shaulsky, Gad; Gomer, Richard H

    2011-01-01

    The secreted proteins AprA and CfaD function as autocrine signals that inhibit cell proliferation in Dictyostelium discoideum, thereby regulating cell numbers by a negative feedback mechanism. We report here that the putative basic leucine zipper transcription factor BzpN plays a role in the inhibition of proliferation by AprA and CfaD. Cells lacking BzpN proliferate more rapidly than wild-type cells but do not reach a higher stationary density. Recombinant AprA inhibits wild-type cell proliferation but does not inhibit the proliferation of cells lacking BzpN. Recombinant CfaD also inhibits wild-type cell proliferation, but promotes the proliferation of cells lacking BzpN. Overexpression of BzpN results in a reduced cell density at stationary phase, and this phenotype requires AprA, CfaD, and the kinase QkgA. Conditioned media from high-density cells stops the proliferation of wild-type but not bzpN(-) cells and induces a nuclear localization of a BzpN-GFP fusion protein, though this localization does not require AprA or CfaD. Together, the data suggest that BzpN is necessary for some but not all of the effects of AprA and CfaD, and that BzpN may function downstream of AprA and CfaD in a signal transduction pathway that inhibits proliferation.

  7. The Putative bZIP Transcripton Factor BzpN Slows Proliferation and Functions in the Regulation of Cell Density by Autocrine Signals in Dictyostelium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Jonathan E.; Huang, Eryong; Shaulsky, Gad; Gomer, Richard H.

    2011-01-01

    The secreted proteins AprA and CfaD function as autocrine signals that inhibit cell proliferation in Dictyostelium discoideum, thereby regulating cell numbers by a negative feedback mechanism. We report here that the putative basic leucine zipper transcription factor BzpN plays a role in the inhibition of proliferation by AprA and CfaD. Cells lacking BzpN proliferate more rapidly than wild-type cells but do not reach a higher stationary density. Recombinant AprA inhibits wild-type cell proliferation but does not inhibit the proliferation of cells lacking BzpN. Recombinant CfaD also inhibits wild-type cell proliferation, but promotes the proliferation of cells lacking BzpN. Overexpression of BzpN results in a reduced cell density at stationary phase, and this phenotype requires AprA, CfaD, and the kinase QkgA. Conditioned media from high-density cells stops the proliferation of wild-type but not bzpN− cells and induces a nuclear localization of a BzpN-GFP fusion protein, though this localization does not require AprA or CfaD. Together, the data suggest that BzpN is necessary for some but not all of the effects of AprA and CfaD, and that BzpN may function downstream of AprA and CfaD in a signal transduction pathway that inhibits proliferation. PMID:21760904

  8. Enhancement of thermoalkaliphilic xylanase production by Pichia pastoris through novel fed-batch strategy in high cell-density fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Tingting; Si, Dayong; Zhang, Dongyan; Liu, Xuhui; Zhao, Longmei; Hu, Cong; Fu, Yu; Zhang, Rijun

    2017-06-21

    Xylanase degrades xylan into monomers of various sizes by catalyzing the endohydrolysis of the 1,4-β-D-xylosidic linkage randomly, possessing potential in wide industrial applications. Most of xylanases are susceptible to be inactive when suffering high temperature and high alkaline process. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a high amount of effective thermoalkaliphilic xylanases. This study aims to enhance thermoalkaliphilic xylanase production in Pichia pastoris through fermentation parameters optimization and novel efficient fed-batch strategy in high cell-density fermentation. Recombinant xylanase activity increased 12.2%, 7.4%, 12.0% and 9.9% by supplementing the Pichia pastoris culture with 20 g/L wheat bran, 5 mg/L L-histidine, 10 mg/L L-tryptophan and 10 mg/L L-methionine in shake flasks, respectively. Investigation of nutritional fermentation parameters, non-nutritional fermentation parameters and feeding strategies in 1 L bioreactor and 1 L shake flask revealed that glycerol and methanol feeding strategies were the critical factors for high cell density and xylanase activity. In 50 L bioreactor, a novel glycerol feeding strategy and a four-stage methanol feeding strategy with a stepwise increase in feeding rate were developed to enhance recombinant xylanase production. In the initial 72 h of methanol induction, the linear dependence of xylanase activity on methanol intake was observed (R 2  = 0.9726). The maximum xylanase activity was predicted to be 591.2 U/mL, while the actual maximum xylanase activity was 560.7 U/mL, which was 7.05 times of that in shake flask. Recombinant xylanase retained 82.5% of its initial activity after pre-incubation at 80 °C for 50 min (pH 8.0), and it exhibited excellent stability in the broad temperature (60-80 °C) and pH (pH 8.0-11.0) ranges. Efficient glycerol and methanol fed-batch strategies resulting in desired cell density and xylanase activity should be applied in other P. pastoris

  9. Molecular approaches for viable bacterial population and transcriptional analyses in a rodent model of dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, M I; Scott-Anne, K M; Gregoire, S; Rosalen, P L; Koo, H

    2012-10-01

    Culturing methods are the primary approach for microbiological analysis of plaque biofilms in rodent models of dental caries. In this study, we developed strategies for the isolation of DNA and RNA from plaque biofilms formed in vivo to analyse the viable bacterial population and gene expression. Plaque biofilm samples from rats were treated with propidium monoazide to isolate DNA from viable cells, and the purified DNA was used to quantify total bacteria and the Streptococcus mutans population via quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and specific primers; the same samples were also analysed by counting colony-forming units (CFU). In parallel, RNA was isolated from plaque-biofilm samples (from the same animals) and used for transcriptional analyses via reverse transcription-qPCR. The viable populations of both S. mutans and total bacteria assessed by qPCR were positively correlated with the CFU data (P  0.8). However, the qPCR data showed higher bacterial cell counts, particularly for total bacteria (vs. CFU). Moreover, S. mutans proportion in the plaque biofilm determined by qPCR analysis showed strong correlation with incidence of smooth-surface caries (P = 0.0022, r = 0.71). The purified RNAs presented high RNA integrity numbers (> 7), which allowed measurement of the expression of genes that are critical for S. mutans virulence (e.g. gtfB and gtfC). Our data show that the viable microbial population and the gene expression can be analysed simultaneously, providing a global assessment of the infectious aspect of dental caries. Our approach could enhance the value of the current rodent model in further understanding the pathophysiology of this disease and facilitating the exploration of novel anti-caries therapies. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  10. Concurrent detection of other respiratory viruses in children shedding viable human respiratory syncytial virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliardi, T B; Paula, F E; Iwamoto, M A; Proença-Modena, J L; Santos, A E; Camara, A A; Cervi, M C; Cintra, O A L; Arruda, E

    2013-10-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) is an important cause of respiratory disease. The majority of studies addressing the importance of virus co-infections to the HRSV-disease have been based on the detection of HRSV by RT-PCR, which may not distinguish current replication from prolonged shedding of remnant RNA from previous HRSV infections. To assess whether co-detections of other common respiratory viruses are associated with increased severity of HRSV illnesses from patients who were shedding viable-HRSV, nasopharyngeal aspirates from children younger than 5 years who sought medical care for respiratory infections in Ribeirão Preto (Brazil) were tested for HRSV by immunofluorescence, RT-PCR and virus isolation in cell culture. All samples with viable-HRSV were tested further by PCR for other respiratory viruses. HRSV-disease severity was assessed by a clinical score scale. A total of 266 samples from 247 children were collected and 111 (42%) were HRSV-positive. HRSV was isolated from 70 (63%), and 52 (74%) of them were positive for at least one additional virus. HRSV-positive diseases were more severe than HRSV-negative ones, but there was no difference in disease severity between patients with viable-HRSV and those HRSV-positives by RT-PCR. Co-detection of other viruses did not correlate with increased disease severity. HRSV isolation in cell culture does not seem to be superior to RT-PCR to distinguish infections associated with HRSV replication in studies of clinical impact of HRSV. A high rate of co-detection of other respiratory viruses was found in samples with viable-HRSV, but this was not associated with more severe HRSV infection. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Activation of sonic hedgehog signaling attenuates oxidized low-density lipoprotein-stimulated brain microvascular endothelial cells dysfunction in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiu-Long; Chen, Ting; Zhang, Xu

    2015-01-01

    The study was performed to investigate the role of sonic hedgehog (SHH) in the oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL)-induced blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption. The primary mouse brain microvascular endothelial cells (MBMECs) were exposed to oxLDL. The results indicated that treatment of MBMECs with oxLDL decreased the cell viability, and oxidative stress was involved in oxLDL-induce MBMECs dysfunction with increasing intracellular ROS and MDA formation as well as decreasing NO release and eNOS mRNA expression. In addition, SHH signaling components, such as SHH, Smo and Gli1, mRNA and protein levels were significantly decreased after incubation with increasing concentrations of oxLDL. Treatment with oxLDL alone or SHH loss-of-function significantly increased the permeability of MBMECs, and overexpression of SHH attenuated oxLDL-induced elevation of permeability in MBMECs. Furthermore, SHH gain-of-function could reverse oxLDL-induced apoptosis through inhibition caspase3 and caspase8 levels in MBMECs. Taken together, these results demonstrated that the suppression of SHH in MBMECs might contribute to the oxLDL-induced disruption of endothelial barrier. However, the overexpression of SHH could reverse oxLDL-induced endothelial cells dysfunction in vitro.

  12. Crystal Engineering for Low Defect Density and High Efficiency Hybrid Chemical Vapor Deposition Grown Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Annie; Ren, Zhiwei; Shen, Qian; Cheung, Sin Hang; Gokkaya, Huseyin Cem; So, Shu Kong; Djurišić, Aleksandra B; Wan, Yangyang; Wu, Xiaojun; Surya, Charles

    2016-12-07

    Synthesis of high quality perovskite absorber is a key factor in determining the performance of the solar cells. We demonstrate that hybrid chemical vapor deposition (HCVD) growth technique can provide high level of versatility and repeatability to ensure the optimal conditions for the growth of the perovskite films as well as potential for batch processing. It is found that the growth ambient and degree of crystallization of CH3NH3PbI3 (MAPI) have strong impact on the defect density of MAPI. We demonstrate that HCVD process with slow postdeposition cooling rate can significantly reduce the density of shallow and deep traps in the MAPI due to enhanced material crystallization, while a mixed O2/N2 carrier gas is effective in passivating both shallow and deep traps. By careful control of the perovskite growth process, a champion device with power conversion efficiency of 17.6% is achieved. Our work complements the existing theoretical studies on different types of trap states in MAPI and fills the gap on the theoretical analysis of the interaction between deep levels and oxygen. The experimental results are consistent with the theoretical predictions.

  13. Correlations Between the Density of Tryptase Positive Mast Cells (DMCT and that of New Blood Vessels (CD105+ in Patients with Gastric Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Micu Gianina Viorica

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Mast cells proteases, tryptase and chymase are directly involved in the growth and progression of solid tumors due to their important role in tumor angiogenesis. We examined the density of tryptase positive mast cells and the mean density of new blood vessels in gastric malignant tumors of patients with and without Helicobacter pylori infection, using immunohistochemical staining for tryptase (for mast cells and CD 105 (for new vessels. Tryptase and CD 105 expression was detected in gastrectomy specimens. In this study, mast cell density correlates with angiogenesis and the growth and progression of gastric cancer. It also shows that the participation of Helicobacter pylori infection in the growth and progress of gastric neoplasia is due to an increase of peritumoral angiogenesis, with subsequent local and distant tumor spread and perivascular growth, but without perineural and nodal involvement.

  14. Botulinum hemagglutinin-mediated in situ break-up of human induced pluripotent stem cell aggregates for high-density suspension culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Suman C; Tokura, Tomohiro; Kim, Mee-Hae; Kino-Oka, Masahiro

    2018-04-01

    Large numbers of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) are required for making stable cell bank. Although suspension culture yields high cell numbers, there remain unresolved challenges for obtaining high-density of hiPSCs because large size aggregates exhibit low growth rates. Here, we established a simple method for hiPSC aggregate break-up using botulinum hemagglutinin (HA), which specifically bound with E-cadherin and disrupted cell-cell connections in hiPSC aggregates. HA showed temporary activity for disrupting the E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell connections to facilitate the break-up of aggregates into small sizes only 9 hr after HA addition. The transportation of HA into the aggregates was mediated by transcellular and paracellular way after HA addition to the culture medium. hiPSC aggregates broken up by HA showed a higher number of live cells, higher cell density, and higher expansion fold compared to those of aggregates dissociated with enzymatic digestion. Moreover, a maximum cell density of 4.5 ± 0.2 × 10 6 cells ml -1 was obtained by aggregate break-up into small ones, which was three times higher than that with the conventional culture without aggregate break-up. Therefore, the temporary activity of HA for disrupting E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell connection was key to establishing a simple in situ method for hiPSC aggregate break-up in bioreactors, leading to high cell density in suspension culture. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Selective detection of viable seed-borne Acidovorax citrulli by real-time PCR with propidium monoazide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Qian; Feng, Jian-jun; Hu, Jie; Zhao, Wen-jun

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, use of the DNA-intercalating dye propidium monoazide (PMA) in real-time PCR has been reported as a novel method to detect viable bacteria in different types of samples, such as food, environmental, and microbiological samples. In this study, viable cells of Acidovorax citrulli, the causal agent of bacterial seedling blight and fruit blotch, were selectively detected and differentiated from dead cells by real-time fluorescent polymerase chain reaction amplification after the bacterial solution was treated with the DNA-binding dye PMA. The primers and TaqMan probe were based on the A. citrulli genome (Aave_1909, Gene ID: 4669443) and were highly specific for A. citrulli. The detection threshold of this assay was 103 colony-forming units per mL (CFU/mL) in pure cell suspensions containing viable and dead cells and infected watermelon seeds. Application of this assay enables the selective detection of viable cells of A. citrulli and facilitates monitoring of the pathogen in watermelon and melon seeds. PMID:27739469

  16. Biofilms in Full-Scale Drinking Water Ozone Contactors Contribute Viable Bacteria to Ozonated Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotlarz, Nadine; Rockey, Nicole; Olson, Terese M; Haig, Sarah-Jane; Sanford, Larry; LiPuma, John J; Raskin, Lutgarde

    2018-02-13

    Concentrations of viable microbial cells were monitored using culture-based and culture-independent methods across multichamber ozone contactors in a full-scale drinking water treatment plant. Membrane-intact and culturable cell concentrations in ozone contactor effluents ranged from 1200 to 3750 cells/mL and from 200 to 3850 colony forming units/mL, respectively. Viable cell concentrations decreased significantly in the first ozone contact chamber, but rose, even as ozone exposure increased, in subsequent chambers. Our results implicate microbial detachment from biofilms on contactor surfaces, and from biomass present within lime softening sediments in a hydraulic dead zone, as a possible reason for increasing cell concentrations in water samples from sequential ozone chambers. Biofilm community structures on baffle walls upstream and downstream from the dead zone were significantly different from each other (p = 0.017). The biofilms downstream of the dead zone contained a significantly (p = 0.036) higher relative abundance of bacteria of the genera Mycobacterium and Legionella than the upstream biofilms. These results have important implications as the effluent from ozone contactors is often treated further in biologically active filters and bacteria in ozonated water continuously seed filter microbial communities.

  17. Survival Strategy of Erwinia amylovora against Copper: Induction of the Viable-but-Nonculturable State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordax, Mónica; Marco-Noales, Ester; López, María M.; Biosca, Elena G.

    2006-01-01

    Copper compounds, widely used to control plant-pathogenic bacteria, have traditionally been employed against fire blight, caused by Erwinia amylovora. However, recent studies have shown that some phytopathogenic bacteria enter into the viable-but-nonculturable (VBNC) state in the presence of copper. To determine whether copper kills E. amylovora or induces the VBNC state, a mineral medium without copper or supplemented with 0.005, 0.01, or 0.05 mM Cu2+ was inoculated with 107 CFU/ml of this bacterium and monitored over 9 months. Total and viable cell counts were determined by epifluorescence microscopy using the LIVE/DEAD kit and by flow cytometry with 5-cyano-2,3-ditolyl tetrazolium chloride and SYTO 13. Culturable cells were counted on King's B nonselective solid medium. Changes in the bacterial morphology in the presence of copper were observed by scanning electron microscopy. E. amylovora entered into the VBNC state at all three copper concentrations assayed, much faster when the copper concentration increased. The addition of different agents which complex copper allowed the resuscitation (restoration of culturability) of copper-induced VBNC cells. Finally, copper-induced VBNC cells were virulent only for the first 5 days, while resuscitated cells always regained their pathogenicity on immature fruits over 9 months. These results have shown, for the first time, the induction of the VBNC state in E. amylovora as a survival strategy against copper. PMID:16672494

  18. Determination of viable wine yeast using DNA binding dyes and quantitative PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andorrà, Imma; Esteve-Zarzoso, Braulio; Guillamón, José M; Mas, Albert

    2010-12-15

    The detection and quantification of wine yeast can be misleading due to under or overestimation of these microorganisms. Underestimation may be caused by variable growing rates of different microorganisms in culture media or the presence of viable but non-cultivable microorganisms. Overestimation may be caused by the lack of discrimination between live and dead microorganisms if quantitative PCR is used to quantify with DNA as the template. However, culture-independent methods that use dyes have been described to remove the DNA from dead cells and then quantify the live microorganisms. Two dyes have been studied in this paper: ethidium monoazide bromide (EMA) and propidium monoazide bromide (PMA). The technique was applied to grape must fermentation and ageing wines. Both dyes presented similar results on yeast monitoring. Membrane cell recovery was necessary when yeasts were originated from ethanol-containing media. When applied to grape must fermentation, differences of up to 1 log unit were seen between the QPCR estimation with or without the dye during the stationary phase. In ageing wines, good agreement was found between plating techniques and QPCR. Most of the viable cells were also culturable and no differences were observed with the methods, except for Zygosaccharomyces bailii and Dekkera bruxellensis where much higher counts were occasionally detected by QPCR. The presence of excess dead cells did not interfere with the quantification of live cells with either of the dyes. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Lymph node density as a prognostic predictor in patients with betel nut-related oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Wei-Chin; Lin, Chun-Shu; Yang, Cheng-Yu; Lin, Chih-Kung; Chen, Yuan-Wu

    2017-10-17

    Lymph node metastasis in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is a poor prognostic factor. The histopathologic stage (e.g., pN) is used to evaluate the severity of lymph node metastasis; however, the current staging system insufficiently predicts survival and recurrence. We investigated clinical outcomes and lymph node density (LND) in betel nut-chewing individuals. We retrospectively analyzed 389 betel nut-exposed patients with primary OSCC who underwent surgical resection in 2002-2015. The prognostic significance of LND was evaluated by overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) using the Kaplan-Meier method. Kaplan-Meier analyses showed that the 5-year OS and DFS rates in all patients were 60.9 and 48.9%, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that variables independently prognostic for OS were aged population (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.6, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] = 1.1-2.5; P = .025), and cell differentiation classification (HR = 2.4, 95% CI = 1.4-4.2; P = .002). In pathologic N-positive patients, a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve for OS was used and indicated the best cutoff of 0.05, and the multivariate analysis showed that LND was an independent predictor of OS (HR = 2.2, 95% CI = 1.3-3.7; P = .004). Lymph node density, at a cutoff of 0.05, was an independent predictor of OS and DFS. OS and DFS underwent multiple analyses, and LND remained significant. The pathologic N stage had no influence in the OS analysis. LND is a more reliable predictor of survival in betel nut-chewing patients for further post operation adjuvant treatment, such as reoperation or adjuvant radiotherapy.

  20. Correlation of corneal thickness, endothelial cell density and anterior chamber depth with ocular surface temperature in normal subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattmöller, Johanna; Wang, Jiong; Zemova, Elena; Seitz, Berthold; Eppig, Timo; Langenbucher, Achim; Szentmáry, Nóra

    2015-09-01

    To analyze corneal surface temperature profile in a young and healthy study population and to determine the impact of corneal thickness (CT), anterior chamber depth (ACD), and endothelial cell density (ECD) on surface temperature. In this prospective, single-center study 61 healthy right eyes of 61 subjects without tear film pathologies (mean age 24.9 ± 6.7 years) were recruited. Ocular surface temperature (OST) was measured with the Ocular Surface Thermographer TG-1000. From Pentacam HR CT and ACD, and from specular microscopy ECD and central corneal thickness (CCT) were acquired. From the raw measurement data (OST, CT and ACD) we extracted a) local OST the corneal center and 3mm away from the center at the 3, 6, and 9 o'clock positions, and b) Zernike parameters Z1, Z2 and Z3 to evaluate the general temperature profile within a 6mm circular area around the center. Overall, there was no correlation between OST and CT, ACD or ECD. Local OST did not correlate with CT at any measurement position. On average local OST was highest at measurement positions where CT was lowest, but without reaching statistical significance. Baseline OST was highest at thin corneal regions and temperature decay over time was smallest in those regions. Z1, Z2 and Z3 correlated well with CT. In healthy subjects corneal thickness, endothelial cell density and anterior chamber depth have no effect on corneal surface temperature. The general temperature profile seems to be influenced by the corneal thickness profile effecting a higher temperature and lower decay at thinner corneal regions. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  1. Immunohistochemical detection of tumour cell proliferation and intratumoural microvessel density in canine malignant mammary tumours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sennazli Gulbin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the correlation between different histological types and grades of canine malignant mammary tumours, tumour cell proliferation and their angiogenic activity using immunohistochemical markers. Mammary tissue samples from 47 bitches with mammary cancer were evaluated. The expression of cellular proliferation marker Ki-67 and endothelial marker Von Willebrand’s factor (vWF were immunohistochemically demonstrated. The tumours with the highest Ki-67 and vWF expressions were found to share similar histomorphological features. Simple solid carcinoma had the highest levels of Ki-67, vWF, and higher histological grade while complex carcinomas, osteosarcomas, and carcinosarcomas had the lowest ones. The differences between the expressions of Ki-67 and vWF in different tumour types were considered to be of great importance in determination of biological behaviour and prognosis of these tumours. This study is one of the few studies that evaluate these differences among the subtypes of malignant canine mammary tumours

  2. Histone deacetylase 3 depletion in osteo/chondroprogenitor cells decreases bone density and increases marrow fat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David F Razidlo

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Histone deacetylase (Hdac3 is a nuclear enzyme that contributes to epigenetic programming and is required for embryonic development. To determine the role of Hdac3 in bone formation, we crossed mice harboring loxP sites around exon 7 of Hdac3 with mice expressing Cre recombinase under the control of the osterix promoter. The resulting Hdac3 conditional knockout (CKO mice were runted and had severe deficits in intramembranous and endochondral bone formation. Calvarial bones were significantly thinner and trabecular bone volume in the distal femur was decreased 75% in the Hdac3 CKO mice due to a substantial reduction in trabecular number. Hdac3-CKO mice had fewer osteoblasts and more bone marrow adipocytes as a proportion of tissue area than their wildtype or heterozygous littermates. Bone formation rates were depressed in both the cortical and trabecular regions of Hdac3 CKO femurs. Microarray analyses revealed that numerous developmental signaling pathways were affected by Hdac3-deficiency. Thus, Hdac3 depletion in osterix-expressing progenitor cells interferes with bone formation and promotes bone marrow adipocyte differentiation. These results demonstrate that Hdac3 inhibition is detrimental to skeletal health.

  3. Differential cytotoxic effects of 7-dehydrocholesterol-derived oxysterols on cultured retina-derived cells: Dependence on sterol structure, cell type, and density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeffer, Bruce A; Xu, Libin; Porter, Ned A; Rao, Sriganesh Ramachandra; Fliesler, Steven J

    2016-04-01

    Tissue accumulation of 7-dehydrocholesterol (7DHC) is a hallmark of Smith-Lemli-Opitz Syndrome (SLOS), a human inborn error of the cholesterol (CHOL) synthesis pathway. Retinal 7DHC-derived oxysterol formation occurs in the AY9944-induced rat model of SLOS, which exhibits a retinal degeneration characterized by selective loss of photoreceptors and associated functional deficits, Müller cell hypertrophy, and engorgement of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) with phagocytic inclusions. We evaluated the relative effects of four 7DHC-derived oxysterols on three retina-derived cell types in culture, with respect to changes in cellular morphology and viability. 661W (photoreceptor-derived) cells, rMC-1 (Müller glia-derived) cells, and normal diploid monkey RPE (mRPE) cells were incubated for 24 h with dose ranges of either 7-ketocholesterol (7kCHOL), 5,9-endoperoxy-cholest-7-en-3β,6α-diol (EPCD), 3β,5α-dihydroxycholest-7-en-6-one (DHCEO), or 4β-hydroxy-7-dehydrocholesterol (4HDHC); CHOL served as a negative control (same dose range), along with appropriate vehicle controls, while staurosporine (Stsp) was used as a positive cytotoxic control. For 661W cells, the rank order of oxysterol potency was: EPCD > 7kCHOL > DHCEO > 4HDHC ≈ CHOL. EC50 values were higher for confluent vs. subconfluent cultures. 661W cells exhibited much higher sensitivity to EPCD and 7kCHOL than either rMC-1 or mRPE cells, with the latter being the most robust when challenged, either at confluence or in sub-confluent cultures. When tested on rMC-1 and mRPE cells, EPCD was again an order of magnitude more potent than 7kCHOL in compromising cellular viability. Hence, 7DHC-derived oxysterols elicit differential cytotoxicity that is dose-, cell type-, and cell density-dependent. These results are consistent with the observed progressive, photoreceptor-specific retinal degeneration in the rat SLOS model, and support the hypothesis that 7DHC-derived oxysterols are causally linked to that

  4. Bioreactors for high cell density and continuous multi-stage cultivations: options for process intensification in cell culture-based viral vaccine production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia, Felipe; Vázquez-Ramírez, Daniel; Genzel, Yvonne; Reichl, Udo

    2016-03-01

    With an increasing demand for efficacious, safe, and affordable vaccines for human and animal use, process intensification in cell culture-based viral vaccine production demands advanced process strategies to overcome the limitations of conventional batch cultivations. However, the use of fed-batch, perfusion, or continuous modes to drive processes at high cell density (HCD) and overextended operating times has so far been little explored in large-scale viral vaccine manufacturing. Also, possible reductions in cell-specific virus yields for HCD cultivations have been reported frequently. Taking into account that vaccine production is one of the most heavily regulated industries in the pharmaceutical sector with tough margins to meet, it is understandable that process intensification is being considered by both academia and industry as a next step toward more efficient viral vaccine production processes only recently. Compared to conventional batch processes, fed-batch and perfusion strategies could result in ten to a hundred times higher product yields. Both cultivation strategies can be implemented to achieve cell concentrations exceeding 10(7) cells/mL or even 10(8) cells/mL, while keeping low levels of metabolites that potentially inhibit cell growth and virus replication. The trend towards HCD processes is supported by development of GMP-compliant cultivation platforms, i.e., acoustic settlers, hollow fiber bioreactors, and hollow fiber-based perfusion systems including tangential flow filtration (TFF) or alternating tangential flow (ATF) technologies. In this review, these process modes are discussed in detail and compared with conventional batch processes based on productivity indicators such as space-time yield, cell concentration, and product titers. In addition, options for the production of viral vaccines in continuous multi-stage bioreactors such as two- and three-stage systems are addressed. While such systems have shown similar virus titers compared to

  5. Spatio-temporal dependence of the signaling response in immune-receptor trafficking networks regulated by cell density: a theoretical model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar García-Peñarrubia

    Full Text Available Cell signaling processes involve receptor trafficking through highly connected networks of interacting components. The binding of surface receptors to their specific ligands is a key factor for the control and triggering of signaling pathways. In most experimental systems, ligand concentration and cell density vary within a wide range of values. Dependence of the signal response on cell density is related with the extracellular volume available per cell. This dependence has previously been studied using non-spatial models which assume that signaling components are well mixed and uniformly distributed in a single compartment. In this paper, a mathematical model that shows the influence exerted by cell density on the spatio-temporal evolution of ligands, cell surface receptors, and intracellular signaling molecules is developed. To this end, partial differential equations were used to model ligand and receptor trafficking dynamics through the different domains of the whole system. This enabled us to analyze several interesting features involved with these systems, namely: a how the perturbation caused by the signaling response propagates through the system; b receptor internalization dynamics and how cell density affects the robustness of dose-response curves upon variation of the binding affinity; and c that enhanced correlations between ligand input and system response are obtained under conditions that result in larger perturbations of the equilibrium ligand + surface receptor [Please see text] ligand - receptor complex. Finally, the results are compared with those obtained by considering that the above components are well mixed in a single compartment.

  6. Uptake of low density lipoproteins by human leukemic cells in vivo: relation to plasma lipoprotein levels and possible relevance for selective chemotherapy.

    OpenAIRE

    Vitols, S; Angelin, B; Ericsson, S; Gahrton, G.; Juliusson, G.; Masquelier, M.; Paul, C; Peterson, C; Rudling, M; Söderberg-Reid, K

    1990-01-01

    The success of cancer chemotherapy is dependent on the possibility to utilize biological differences between malignant and normal cells to selectively destroy the tumor cells. One such difference may be that of receptor-mediated cellular uptake of low density lipoproteins (LDLs). Previous studies have shown that leukemic cells from patients with acute myelogenous leukemia have elevated receptor-mediated uptake and degradation rates of plasma LDL in vitro compared to normal white blood and bon...

  7. Viable group A streptococci in macrophages during acute soft tissue infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pontus Thulin

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Group A streptococcal severe soft tissue infections, such as necrotizing fasciitis, are rapidly progressive infections associated with high mortality. Group A streptococcus is typically considered an extracellular pathogen, but has been shown to reside intracellularly in host cells.We characterized in vivo interactions between group A streptococci (GAS and cells involved in innate immune responses, using human biopsies (n = 70 collected from 17 patients with soft tissue infections. Immunostaining and in situ image analysis revealed high amounts of bacteria in the biopsies, even in those collected after prolonged antibiotic therapy. Viability of the streptococci was assessed by use of a bacterial viability stain, which demonstrated viable bacteria in 74% of the biopsies. GAS were present both extracellularly and intracellularly within phagocytic cells, primarily within macrophages. Intracellular GAS were predominantly noted in biopsies from newly involved tissue characterized by lower inflammation and bacterial load, whereas purely extracellular GAS or a combination of intra- and extracellular GAS dominated in severely inflamed tissue. The latter tissue was also associated with a significantly increased amount of the cysteine protease streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin SpeB. In vitro studies confirmed that macrophages serve as reservoirs for viable GAS, and infection with a speB-deletion mutant produced significantly lower frequencies of cells with viable GAS following infection as compared to the wild-type bacteria.This is the first study to demonstrate that GAS survive intracellularly in macrophages during acute invasive infections. This intracellular presence may have evolved as a mechanism to avoid antibiotic eradication, which may explain our finding that high bacterial load is present even in tissue collected after prolonged intravenous antibiotic therapy. This new insight into the pathogenesis of streptococcal soft tissue infections

  8. Viable Group A Streptococci in Macrophages during Acute Soft Tissue Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Group A streptococcal severe soft tissue infections, such as necrotizing fasciitis, are rapidly progressive infections associated with high mortality. Group A streptococcus is typically considered an extracellular pathogen, but has been shown to reside intracellularly in host cells. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We characterized in vivo interactions between group A streptococci (GAS and cells involved in innate immune responses, using human biopsies (n = 70 collected from 17 patients with soft tissue infections. Immunostaining and in situ image analysis revealed high amounts of bacteria in the biopsies, even in those collected after prolonged antibiotic therapy. Viability of the streptococci was assessed by use of a bacterial viability stain, which demonstrated viable bacteria in 74% of the biopsies. GAS were present both extracellularly and intracellularly within phagocytic cells, primarily within macrophages. Intracellular GAS were predominantly noted in biopsies from newly involved tissue characterized by lower inflammation and bacterial load, whereas purely extracellular GAS or a combination of intra- and extracellular GAS dominated in severely inflamed tissue. The latter tissue was also associated with a significantly increased amount of the cysteine protease streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin SpeB. In vitro studies confirmed that macrophages serve as reservoirs for viable GAS, and infection with a speB-deletion mutant produced significantly lower frequencies of cells with viable GAS following infection as compared to the wild-type bacteria. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first study to demonstrate that GAS survive intracellularly in macrophages during acute invasive infections. This intracellular presence may have evolved as a mechanism to avoid antibiotic eradication, which may explain our finding that high bacterial load is present even in tissue collected after prolonged intravenous antibiotic therapy. This new insight into the pathogenesis

  9. Simultaneous visualization of oxygen partial pressure, current density, and water droplets in serpentine fuel cell during power generation for understanding reaction distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takanohashi, Kazuhiro; Suga, Takeo; Uchida, Makoto; Ueda, Toshihide; Nagumo, Yuzo; Inukai, Junji; Nishide, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Masahiro

    2017-03-01

    Understanding the reaction distributions inside a polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) is essential for the higher performance and durability. We have developed a new see-through cell and visualized the distributions of oxygen partial pressure and current density inside a running PEFC at the temperature of 40 and 80 °C and the relative humidity of 53%. The oxygen utilization was changed from 0% to 80% by changing the current density. At higher oxygen utilizations, the current density was higher and therefore the water generation. Generated water droplets in the flow channel were also visualized, allowing for the simultaneous visualization of the distribution of the oxygen partial pressure, current density, and water droplets. By combining the observations of all three parameters, the reactions inside a membrane-electrode assembly were discussed.

  10. Acupuntura un tratamiento viable para las adicciones en Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernán López Seuscún

    2013-07-01

    Los tratamientos con auriculoterapia, como el protocolo NADA (National Acupuncture Detoxification Association, son los métodos más usados para las adicciones en el mundo, y aunque no se ha logrado evidenciar su efectividad, por su costo, facilidad y el poco riesgo de efectos adversos se hace viable en un país con pocos recursos económicos como Colombia.

  11. Academic Pediatric Dentistry is a Rewarding, Financially Viable Career Path.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Janice A; Chi, Donald L

    2017-09-15

    Newly graduated pediatric dentists have unprecedented levels of debt. High levels of student debt may be perceived as an obstacle to pursue an academic career. However, opportunities exist through faculty compensation models and loan repayment programs that make an academic career financially viable. The purpose of this paper is to outline the benefits of a career in academic dentistry and provide examples of young pediatric dentistry faculty members who have been able to manage student debt while pursuing meaningful and rewarding careers.

  12. How Can We Prevent Violence Becoming a Viable Political Strategy?

    OpenAIRE

    Patricia Justino

    2009-01-01

    A basic issue that conflict analysis investigates is how non-peaceful ways of living and governing become viable political strategies. Macro-level studies provide some important insights but micro-level analysis is vital to understand the mechanisms that make violence possible. This briefing outlines some preliminary findings in this respect from MICROCON, a major research programme analysing violent conflict at the micro level. It also discusses their implications for policies aimed at preve...

  13. Dendritic immune cell densities in the central cornea associated with soft contact lens types and lens care solution types: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sindt CW

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Christine W Sindt1, Trudy K Grout1, D Brice Critser1, Jami R Kern2, David L Meadows21University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, IA; 2Alcon Research Ltd, Fort Worth, TX, USABackground: The purpose of this study was to assess whether differences in central corneal dendritic immune cell densities associated with combinations of soft contact lenses and lens care solutions could be detected by in vivo confocal microscopy.Methods: Participants were adults naïve to contact lens wear (n = 10 or who wore soft contact lenses habitually on a daily-wear schedule (n = 38 or on a study-assigned schedule for 30 days with daily disposable silicone hydrogel lenses (n = 15. Central corneas were scanned using an in vivo confocal microscope. Cell densities were compared among groups by demographic parameters, lens materials, and lens care solutions (polyhexamethylene biguanide [PHMB], polyquaternium-1 and myristamidopropyl dimethylamine [PQ/MAPD], peroxide, or blister pack solution [for daily disposable lenses].Results: Among lens wearers, no associations were observed between immune cell densities and age, gender, or years of lens-wearing experience. Mean cell density was significantly lower (P < 0.01 in nonwearers (29 ± 23 cells/mm2, n = 10 than in lens wearers (64 ± 71 cells/mm2, n = 53. Mean cell density was lower (P = 0.21 with traditional polymer lenses (47 ± 44 cells/mm2, n = 12 than with silicone hydrogel lenses (69 ± 77 cells/mm2, n = 41. Lowest to highest mean density of immune cells among lens wearers was as follows: PQ/MAPD solution (49 ± 28 cells/mm2, blister pack solution (63 ± 81 cells/mm2, PHMB solution (66 ± 44 cells/mm2, and peroxide solution (85 ± 112 cells/mm2.Conclusion: In this pilot study, in vivo confocal microscopy was useful for detecting an elevated immune response associated with soft contact lenses, and for identifying lens-related and solution-related immune responses that merit further research.Keywords: Clear Care

  14. Mice carrying a complete deletion of the talin2 coding sequence are viable and fertile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debrand, Emmanuel; Conti, Francesco J.; Bate, Neil; Spence, Lorraine; Mazzeo, Daniela; Pritchard, Catrin A.; Monkley, Susan J. [Department of Biochemistry, University of Leicester, Lancaster Road, Leicester LE1 9HN (United Kingdom); Critchley, David R., E-mail: drc@le.ac.uk [Department of Biochemistry, University of Leicester, Lancaster Road, Leicester LE1 9HN (United Kingdom)

    2012-09-21

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mice lacking talin2 are viable and fertile with only a mildly dystrophic phenotype. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Talin2 null fibroblasts show no major defects in proliferation, adhesion or migration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Maintaining a colony of talin2 null mice is difficult indicating an underlying defect. -- Abstract: Mice homozygous for several Tln2 gene targeted alleles are viable and fertile. Here we show that although the expression of talin2 protein is drastically reduced in muscle from these mice, other tissues continue to express talin2 albeit at reduced levels. We therefore generated a Tln2 allele lacking the entire coding sequence (Tln2{sup cd}). Tln2{sup cd/cd} mice were viable and fertile, and the genotypes of Tln2{sup cd/+} intercrosses were at the expected Mendelian ratio. Tln2{sup cd/cd} mice showed no major difference in body mass or the weight of the major organs compared to wild-type, although they displayed a mildly dystrophic phenotype. Moreover, Tln2{sup cd/cd} mouse embryo fibroblasts showed no obvious defects in cell adhesion, migration or proliferation. However, the number of Tln2{sup cd/cd} pups surviving to adulthood was variable suggesting that such mice have an underlying defect.

  15. [Testosterone suppresses oxidized low-density lipoprotein-induced vascular smooth muscle cell phenotypic transition and proliferation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wei; Liu, Wei; Liao, Hua; Cao, Zhe; Xie, Han; Zhang, Shaoying; Chen, Manhua

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the inhibitory effect of testosterone on oxidized low-density lipoproteins (ox-LDL)-stimulated phenotypic transition and proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in vitro, and explore its possible mechanisms. Rat VSMCs were cultured using serum starvation method to make cell synchronization. Cells in vitro were divided into control group, ox-LDL group (treated with 50 μg/mL ox-LDL), FBS group (treated with 100 mL/L fetal bovine serum), and testosterone groups (treated respectively with 5×10(-8) and 5×10(-7) mol/L testosterone for 12 hours, followed by incubation with 50 μg/mL ox-LDL). The effect of testosterone on the ox-LDL-induced proliferation of VSMCs was explored by WST-1 assay. The cell cycle distribution was determined using flow cytometry. Western blotting was used to detect the expressions of mitofusin 2 (Mfn2), phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (p-ERK1/2), proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and osteopontin (OPN). Compared with control group, the proliferation of VSMCs was promoted by ox-LDL, the number of VSMCs decreased in G0/G1 phase and increased in S phase significantly, the expression levels of Mfn2 and α-SMA were significant reduced, and the expression levels of p-ERK1/2, PCNA and OPN were significant raised in ox-LDL group. Compared with ox-LDL group, testosterone showed stronger inhibitory effect on the proliferation of VSMCs induced by ox-LDL, arrested most of the cells in the G0/G1 phase, ascended significantly the expression levels of Mfn2 and α-SMA, and descended significantly the expression levels of p-ERK1/2, PCNA and OPN in the two testosterone groups in a slight dose-dependent manner. Testosterone can inhibit phenotypic transition and proliferation of VSMCs induced by ox-LDL in vitro, which may be related to the up-regulated expression of Mfn2 and the suppression on ERK1/2 pathway.

  16. 2001 Volvo Award Winner in Basic Science Studies: Effect of nutrient supply on the viability of cells from the nucleus pulposus of the intervertebral disc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner, H A; Urban, J P

    2001-12-01

    Disc cell viability was analyzed in relation to nutrient supply and cellular demand in vitro in a diffusion chamber. To determine relations among nutrient supply, nutrient concentrations. and cell viability. Although a fall in nutrient supply has long been thought the cause of disc degeneration in vivo, little information exists about the effects of nutrient levels or supply on cell viability and metabolism. Isolated bovine nucleus cells were cultured in agarose gels in a diffusion chamber up to 13 days. Nutrients were supplied to the open sides of the chamber and diffused through the gel to the center, 12.5 mm away from the nutrient supply, in a configuration analogous to that of the disc in vivo. Profiles of cell viability and concentration of glycosaminoglycans across the chamber were measured in relation to cell density and medium composition. Cells remained viable across the chamber at low cell densities. However, at higher densities, cells in the center of the chamber died. The viable distance from the nutrient supply fell with an increase in cell density. Glucose was a critical nutrient. Survival was also poor at acidic pH (6.0). At 0% oxygen, disc cells survived up to 13 days with no loss of viability, but produced very little proteoglycan. The results support the idea that maximum cell density in the disc is regulated by nutritional constraints, and that a fall in nutrient supply reduces the number of viable cells in the disc and thus leads to degeneration.

  17. Existence of both culturable and viable but non culturable (VNC) E. coli populations with distinct settling velocities in karst aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, F.; Ratajczak, M.; Massei, N.; Lafite, R.; Clermont, O.; Denamur, E.; Berthe, T.

    2012-12-01

    The karst aquifers are particularly vulnerable to contamination by faecal pathogens mainly during rainfall event. In groundwater, the fate of E. coli is dependent on their ability to overcome environmental stresses and on their association with particles. Moreover, some strains can survive leading to the emergence of a sub-population of E. coli which failed to grow on laboratory media, while they were still alive thus designated as viable but non culturable (VNC). The aim of this study was to investigate (i) the structure of culturable E. coli population based on the survival ability, the distribution in four main phylo-groups (A, B1, B2, D) and the phenotypic characteristics; and, (ii) the fate of culturable and VNC E. coli, according to their settling velocities. This work was carried out on a karstic workshop-site for which the microbial quality of water was impaired related to livestock density and septic tanks overflows. Particles characterisation was performed by estimation of their settling velocities combined with electronic microscopy observation, and solid phase cytometry (ChemScan®RDI) was carried out to quantify the viable E. coli, and thus VNC E. coli. In the karst, different populations of E. coli were coexisting related to their survival, their culturability, and their association to particles. At the sinkhole, during a rainfall event with pasture, E. coli rapidly losing their culturability after 2 days have been more frequently isolated. These isolates are mainly multiresistant to antibiotics and harbor several virulence factors. In the same time, a population of VNC E. coli (79%), associated to the "non settleable particles" (settling velocities ranging between 10-5 to 10-2 mm.s-1), mainly corresponding to colloids and organic or organo-mineral microflocs was injected in the karst system, probably corresponding to the runoff of attached-bacteria originating from cowpats. Once in the karst, the relative contribution of culturable and VNC E. coli

  18. Enhanced lipid production with undetoxified corncob hydrolysate by Rhodotorula glutinis using a high cell density culture strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yating; Wang, Yanping; Liu, Hongjuan; Zhang, Jian'an

    2015-03-01

    In recent years, energy crisis and environmental issues such as greenhouse effect, global warming, etc. has roused peoples' concern. Biodiesel, as renewable energy, has attracted much attention to deal with such problems. This work studied the lipid production by Rhodotorula glutinis with undetoxified corncob hydrolysate. The results indicated that R. glutinis had high tolerance to the inhibitors in corncob hydrolysate and it could utilize undetoxified corncob hydrolysate directly for lipid production. The cell grew well with undetoxified hydrolysate in the batch culture of 5L fermentor with the optimized C/N ratio of 75, lipid titer and lipid content reached 5.5g/L and 36.4%, respectively. High cell density culture with two-stage nitrogen feeding strategy was studied to enhance the lipid production, biomass, lipid concentration and lipid content of 70.8, 33.5g/L and 47.2% were obtained. The results indicated the potential application for lipid production by R. glutinis with corncob hydrolysate directly. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Sphingomyelins and ceramides with VLCPUFAs are excluded from low-density raft-like domains in differentiating spermatogenic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago Valtierra, Florencia X; Mateos, Melina V; Aveldaño, Marta I; Oresti, Gerardo M

    2017-03-01

    Rat spermatogenic cells contain sphingomyelins (SMs) and ceramides (Cers) with very long-chain PUFAs (VLCPUFAs) in nonhydroxylated (n-V) and 2-hydroxylated (h-V) forms. How these atypical species distribute among membrane fractions during differentiation was investigated here using a detergent-free procedure to isolate a small light raft-like low-density fraction and a large heavy fraction, mostly derived from the plasma membrane of spermatocytes, round spermatids, and late spermatids. The light fraction contained cholesterol, glycerophospholipids (GPLs), and SM with the same saturated fatty acids in all three stages. In the heavy fraction, as PUFA increased in the GPL and VLCPUFA in SM from spermatocytes to spermatids, the concentration of cholesterol was also augmented. The heavy fraction had mostly n-V SM in spermatocytes, but accumulated h-V SM and h-V Cer in spermatids. A fraction containing intracellular membranes had less SM and more Cer than the latter, but in both fractions SM and Cer species with h-V increased over species with n-V with differentiation. This accretion of h-V was consistent with the differentiation-dependent expression of fatty acid 2-hydroxylase (Fa2h), as it increased significantly from spermatocytes to spermatids. The non-raft region of the plasma membrane is thus the main target of the dynamic lipid synthesis and remodeling that is involved in germ cell differentiation. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. The effect of intracellular amino acids on GSH production by high-cell-density cultivation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Miaomiao; Sun, Jingfeng; Xue, Feiyan; Shang, Fei; Wang, Zheng; Tan, Tianwei

    2012-09-01

    The present paper studies the effects of precursor amino acids, i.e., L-glutamic acid (Glu), L-glycine (Gly), and L-cysteine (Cys), on the glutathione (GSH) production. The three amino acids were added during the fermentations. The GSH production was analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). It was observed that the cell content of Cys reduced continually, Gly maintained a fairly constant concentration, while Glu remained at a high concentration compared with Cys and Gly. The synthesis of GSH was found to significantly increase after 28 h of fermentation upon addition of 6 mmol l(-1) of each of the three amino acids. Under these conditions, the GSH yields reached 2,250±50 mg l(-1) at 34 h from 1,050±50 mg l(-1) at 28 h. The GC-MS analyses on the effect caused by the addition of amino acids indicated that the addition of Glu was not necessary to improve the GSH production by high-cell-density cultivation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The addition of Cys or Gly individually enhances the production of GSH.

  1. Volume Density, Distribution, and Ultrastructure of Secretory and Basolateral Membranes and Mitochondria Predict Parietal Cell Secretory (Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian L. Miller

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Acid secretion in gastric parietal cells requires highly coordinated membrane transport and vesicle trafficking. Histologically, consensus defines acid secretion as the ratio of the volume density (Vd of canalicular and apical membranes (CAMs to tubulovesicular (TV membranes, a value which varies widely under normal conditions. Examination of numerous achlorhydric mice made it clear that this paradigm is discrepant when used to assess most mice with genetic mutations affecting acid secretion. Vd of organelles in parietal cells of 6 genetically engineered mouse strains was obtained to identify a stable histological phenotype of acid secretion. We confirmed that CAM to TV ratio fairly represented secretory activity in untreated and secretion-inhibited wild-type (WT mice and in NHE2−/− mice as well, though the response was significantly attenuated in the latter. However, high CAM to TV ratios wrongly posed as active acid secretion in AE2−/−, GHKA−/−, and NHE4−/− mice. Achlorhydric genotypes also had a significantly higher Vd of basolateral membrane than WT mice, and reduced Vd of mitochondria and canaliculi. The Vd of mitochondria, and ratio of the Vd of basolateral membranes/Vd of mitochondria were preferred predictors of the level of acid secretion. Alterations in acid secretion, then, cause significant changes not only in the Vd of secretory membranes but also in mitochondria and basolateral membranes.

  2. Volume density, distribution, and ultrastructure of secretory and basolateral membranes and mitochondria predict parietal cell secretory (dys)function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Marian L; Andringa, Anastasia; Zavros, Yana; Bradford, Emily M; Shull, Gary E

    2010-01-01

    Acid secretion in gastric parietal cells requires highly coordinated membrane transport and vesicle trafficking. Histologically, consensus defines acid secretion as the ratio of the volume density (Vd) of canalicular and apical membranes (CAMs) to tubulovesicular (TV) membranes, a value which varies widely under normal conditions. Examination of numerous achlorhydric mice made it clear that this paradigm is discrepant when used to assess most mice with genetic mutations affecting acid secretion. Vd of organelles in parietal cells of 6 genetically engineered mouse strains was obtained to identify a stable histological phenotype of acid secretion. We confirmed that CAM to TV ratio fairly represented secretory activity in untreated and secretion-inhibited wild-type (WT) mice and in NHE2-/- mice as well, though the response was significantly attenuated in the latter. However, high CAM to TV ratios wrongly posed as active acid secretion in AE2-/-, GHKAalpha-/-, and NHE4-/- mice. Achlorhydric genotypes also had a significantly higher Vd of basolateral membrane than WT mice, and reduced Vd of mitochondria and canaliculi. The Vd of mitochondria, and ratio of the Vd of basolateral membranes/Vd of mitochondria were preferred predictors of the level of acid secretion. Alterations in acid secretion, then, cause significant changes not only in the Vd of secretory membranes but also in mitochondria and basolateral membranes.

  3. Nanofiber-deposited porous platinum enables glucose fuel cell anodes with high current density in body fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frei, Maxi; Erben, Johannes; Martin, Julian; Zengerle, Roland; Kerzenmacher, Sven

    2017-09-01

    The poisoning of platinum anodes by body-fluid constituents such as amino acids is currently the main hurdle preventing the application of abiotic glucose fuel cells as battery-independent power supply for medical implants. We present a novel anode material that enables continuous operation of glucose oxidation anodes in horse serum for at least 30 days at a current density of (7.2 ± 1.9) μA cm-2. The fabrication process is based on the electro-deposition of highly porous platinum onto a 3-dimensional carbon nanofiber support, leading to approximately 2-fold increased electrode roughness factors (up to 16500 ± 2300). The material's superior performance is not only related to its high specific surface area, but also to an improved catalytic activity and/or poisoning resistance. Presumably, this results from the micro- and nanostructure of the platinum deposits. This represents a major step forward in the development of implantable glucose fuel cells based on long-term stable platinum electrodes.

  4. Prediction of lung density changes after radiotherapy by cone beam computed tomography response markers and pre-treatment factors for non-small cell lung cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernchou, Uffe; Hansen, Olfred; Schytte, Tine

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: This study investigates the ability of pre-treatment factors and response markers extracted from standard cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images to predict the lung density changes induced by radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. METHODS...... AND MATERIALS: Density changes in follow-up computed tomography scans were evaluated for 135 NSCLC patients treated with radiotherapy. Early response markers were obtained by analysing changes in lung density in CBCT images acquired during the treatment course. The ability of pre-treatment factors and CBCT...... markers to predict lung density changes induced by radiotherapy was investigated. RESULTS: Age and CBCT markers extracted at 10th, 20th, and 30th treatment fraction significantly predicted lung density changes in a multivariable analysis, and a set of response models based on these parameters were...

  5. Comparison between the collagen intensity and mast cell density in the lingual muscles and myocardium of autopsied chronic chagasic and nonchagasic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roldão, José A; Beghini, Marcela; Ramalho, Luciana S; Porto, Carla Souza; Rodrigues, Denise B R; Teixeira, Vicente P A; de Lima Pereira, Sanívia A

    2012-08-01

    In chronic Chagas' disease (CD), an increase in collagen intensity and mast cell density has been described individually in the myocardium and tongue muscles. The aim of this study was to compare the percentage of collagen, mast cell tryptase (MCT) density, and mast cell chymase (MCH) density in the lingual muscles and myocardium from autopsied chagasic (CP) and nonchagasic patients (NCP). The selected cases were divided into two groups: (1) CP (n = 10) and (2) NCP (n = 10). Fragments were removed from the tongue and heart. After histological processing, the slices were stained with picrosirius, and immunohistochemistry was performed for MCH and MCT. The CP group showed the highest MCH and MCT densities and the highest percentage of collagen in the lingual muscles and myocardium when compared with the NCP group (p myocardium of the CP group. Although there are no reports in the literature of MCT and MCH in CD, its higher densities as well as higher percentage of collagen were found in the lingual muscles and myocardium in the CP group, suggesting that tryptase and chymase are associated with the pathogenesis of CD in these organs. Furthermore, the positive and significant correlation between the percentage of collagen and MCH density in the myocardium of the CP group suggests that the chymase is associated with fibrosis in CD, as demonstrated in other diseases.

  6. In-plane structuring of proton exchange membrane fuel cell cathodes: Effect of ionomer equivalent weight structuring on performance and current density distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herden, Susanne; Riewald, Felix; Hirschfeld, Julian A.; Perchthaler, Markus

    2017-07-01

    Within the active area of a fuel cell inhomogeneous operating conditions occur, however, state of the art electrodes are homogenous over the complete active area. This study uses current density distribution measurements to analyze which ionomer equivalent weight (EW) shows locally the highest current densities. With this information a segmented cathode electrode is manufactured by decal transfer. The segmented electrode shows better performance especially at high current densities compared to homogenous electrodes. Furthermore this segmented catalyst coated membrane (CCM) performs optimal in wet as well as dry conditions, both operating conditions arise in automotive fuel cell applications. Thus, cathode electrodes with an optimized ionomer EW distribution might have a significant impact on future automotive fuel cell development.

  7. Controlling Blend Morphology for Ultra-High Current Density in Non-Fullerene Acceptor Based Organic Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Song, Xin

    2018-01-23

    Due to the high absorption coefficient and modulated band gap of non-fullerene small molecule acceptors (NFAs), photons can be utilized more efficiently in near-infrared (NIR) range. In this report, we highlight a system with a well-known polymer donor (PTB7-Th) blended with a narrow bandgap non-fullerene acceptor (IEICO-4F) as active layer and 1-chloronaphthalene (CN) as the solvent additive. The optimization of the photoactive layer nanomorphology yields short-circuit current density value (Jsc) of 27.3 mA/cm2, one of the highest value in OSCs reported to date, which competes with other types of solution processed solar cells such as perovskite or quantum dot devices. Along with decent open-circuit voltage (0.71V) and fill factor values (66%), a power conversion efficiency of 12.8% is achieved for the champion devices. Grazing incidence wide-angle X-ray scattering (GIWAXS) patterns and resonant soft X-ray scattering (R-SoXS) elucidate that the origin of this high photocurrent is mainly due to increased π-π coherence length of the acceptor, the domain spacing as well as the mean-square composition variation of the blend. Optoelectronic measurements confirm a balanced hole and electron mobility and reduced trap-assisted recombination for the best devices. These findings unveil the relevant solvent processing-nanostructure-electronic properties correlation in low band gap non-fullerene based solar cells, which provide a helpful guide for maximizing photocurrent that can pave the way for high efficiency organic solar cells.

  8. Differential surface density and modulatory effects of presynaptic GABAB receptors in hippocampal cholecystokinin and parvalbumin basket cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booker, Sam A; Althof, Daniel; Degro, Claudius E; Watanabe, Masahiko; Kulik, Ákos; Vida, Imre

    2017-11-01

    The perisomatic domain of cortical neurons is under the control of two major GABAergic inhibitory interneuron types: regular-spiking cholecystokinin (CCK) basket cells (BCs) and fast-spiking parvalbumin (PV) BCs. CCK and PV BCs are different not only in their intrinsic physiological, anatomical and molecular characteristics, but also in their presynaptic modulation of their synaptic output. Most GABAergic terminals are known to contain GABAB receptors (GABABR), but their role in presynaptic inhibition and surface expression have not been comparatively characterized in the two BC types. To address this, we performed whole-cell recordings from CCK and PV BCs and postsynaptic pyramidal cells (PCs), as well as freeze-fracture replica-based quantitative immunogold electron microscopy of their synapses in the rat hippocampal CA1 area. Our results demonstrate that while both CCK and PV BCs contain functional presynaptic GABABRs, their modulatory effects and relative abundance are markedly different at these two synapses: GABA release is dramatically inhibited by the agonist baclofen at CCK BC synapses, whereas a moderate reduction in inhibitory transmission is observed at PV BC synapses. Furthermore, GABABR activation has divergent effects on synaptic dynamics: paired-pulse depression (PPD) is enhanced at CCK BC synapses, but abolished at PV BC synapses. Consistent with the quantitative differences in presynaptic inhibition, virtually all CCK BC terminals were found to contain GABABRs at high densities, but only 40% of PV BC axon terminals contain GABABRs at detectable levels. These findings add to an increasing list of differences between these two interneuron types, with implications for their network functions.

  9. Activation of Yes-Associated Protein in Low-Grade Meningiomas Is Regulated by Merlin, Cell Density, and Extracellular Matrix Stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanahashi, Kuniaki; Natsume, Atsushi; Ohka, Fumiharu; Motomura, Kazuya; Alim, Adiljan; Tanaka, Ichidai; Senga, Takeshi; Harada, Ichiro; Fukuyama, Ryuichi; Sumiyoshi, Naoyuki; Sekido, Yoshitaka; Wakabayashi, Toshihiko

    2015-07-01

    The NF2 gene product Merlin is a protein containing ezrin, radixin, and moesin domains; it is a member of the 4.1 protein superfamily associated with the membrane cytoskeleton and also interacts with cell surface molecules. The mammalian Hippo cascade, a downstream signaling cascade of merlin, inactivates the Yes-associated protein (YAP). Yes-associated protein is activated by loss of the NF2 gene and functions as an oncogene in meningioma cells; however, the factors controlling YAP expression, phosphorylation, and subcellular localization in meningiomas have not been fully elucidated. Here, we demonstrate that merlin expression is heterogeneous in 1 NF2 gene-negative and 3 NF2 gene-positive World Health Organization grade I meningiomas. In the NF2 gene-positive meningiomas, regions with low levels of merlin (tumor rims) had greater numbers of cells with nuclear YAP versus regions with high merlin levels (tumor cores). Merlin expression and YAP phosphorylation were also affected by cell density in the IOMM-Lee and HKBMM human meningioma cell lines; nuclear localization of YAP was regulated by cell density and extracellular matrix (ECM) stiffness in IOMM-Lee cells. These results suggest that cell density and ECM stiffness may contribute to the heterogeneous loss of merlin and increased nuclear YAP expression in human meningiomas.

  10. Laminin-5 gamma 2 chain expression is associated with intensity of tumor budding and density of stromal myofibroblasts in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marangon Junior, Helvécio; Rocha, Valéria Nazaré; Leite, Camila Ferreira; de Aguiar, Maria Cássia Ferreira; Souza, Paulo Eduardo Alencar; Horta, Martinho Campolina Rebello

    2014-03-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is one of the most prevalent cancers worldwide. Laminin-5 gamma 2 chain (laminin-5 γ2) is a protein associated to a migratory phenotype in epithelial neoplastic cells. Stromal myofibroblasts also play a significant role in tumor invasion, due to its ability to modify the extracellular matrix. Tumor budding is a morphologic marker of tumor invasion. The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression of laminin-5 γ2 in OSCC and its association with intensity of tumor budding and density of stromal myofibroblasts. Paraffin-embedded archival samples of 57 OSCC patients were evaluated. Immunohistochemistry was employed to detect laminin-5 γ2, alpha smooth muscle actin (marker of stromal myofibroblasts), and multicytokeratin (to identify OSCC cells in tumor budding evaluation). Laminin-5 γ2 expression and its association with intensity of tumor budding and density of stromal myofibroblasts were analyzed. Association among intensity of tumor budding and density of stromal myofibroblasts was also evaluated. Higher laminin-5 γ2 expression was associated with high-intensity tumor budding (P tumor budding was associated with higher density of stromal myofibroblasts (P tumor budding and with higher density of stromal myofibroblasts, suggesting that this expression is related to the establishment of an invasive phenotype of neoplastic cells and a permissive environment for tumor invasion in this neoplasia. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. In search of a viable reaction pathway in the chelation of a metallo-protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Frisco; Hodak, Miroslav; Bernholc, Jerry

    2010-03-01

    Misfolded metallo-proteins are potential causal agents in the onset of neuro-degenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's Diseases (PD). Experimental results involving metal chelation have shown significant promise in symptom reduction and misfolding reversal. We explore, through atomistic simulations, potential reaction pathways for the chelation of Cu^2+ from the metal binding site in our representation of a partially misfolded α-synuclein, the protein implicated in PD. Our ab initio simulations use Density Functional Theory (DFT) and nudged elastic band to obtain the minimized energy coordinates of this reaction. Our simulations include ab initio water at the interaction site and in its first solvation shells, while the remainder is fully solvated with orbital-free DFT water representation [1]. Our ongoing studies of viable chelation agents include nicotine, caffeine and other potential reagents, we will review the best case agents in this presentation. [4pt] [1] Hodak M, Lu W, Bernholc J. Hybrid ab initio Kohn-Sham density functional theory/frozen-density orbital-free density functional theory simulation method suitable for biological systems. J. Chem. Phys. 2008 Jan;128(1):014101-9.

  12. Reconstruction of Cell Surface Densities of Ion Pumps, Exchangers, and Channels from mRNA Expression, Conductance Kinetics, Whole-Cell Calcium, and Current-Clamp Voltage Recordings, with an Application to Human Uterine Smooth Muscle Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolene Atia

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Uterine smooth muscle cells remain quiescent throughout most of gestation, only generating spontaneous action potentials immediately prior to, and during, labor. This study presents a method that combines transcriptomics with biophysical recordings to characterise the conductance repertoire of these cells, the 'conductance repertoire' being the total complement of ion channels and transporters expressed by an electrically active cell. Transcriptomic analysis provides a set of potential electrogenic entities, of which the conductance repertoire is a subset. Each entity within the conductance repertoire was modeled independently and its gating parameter values were fixed using the available biophysical data. The only remaining free parameters were the surface densities for each entity. We characterise the space of combinations of surface densities (density vectors consistent with experimentally observed membrane potential and calcium waveforms. This yields insights on the functional redundancy of the system as well as its behavioral versatility. Our approach couples high-throughput transcriptomic data with physiological behaviors in health and disease, and provides a formal method to link genotype to phenotype in excitable systems. We accurately predict current densities and chart functional redundancy. For example, we find that to evoke the observed voltage waveform, the BK channel is functionally redundant whereas hERG is essential. Furthermore, our analysis suggests that activation of calcium-activated chloride conductances by intracellular calcium release is the key factor underlying spontaneous depolarisations.

  13. Liquid biopsy in cancer patients: advances in capturing viable CTCs for functional studies using the EPISPOT assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alix-Panabières, Catherine; Pantel, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in the blood of cancer patients have received increasing attention as new diagnostic tool enabling 'liquid biopsies'. In contrast to the wealth of descriptive studies demonstrating the clinical relevance of CTCs as biomarkers, the extremely low concentration of CTCs in the peripheral blood of most cancer patients challenges further functional studies. This article discusses the current possibilities to enrich and, in particular, detect viable CTCs with emphasis on the EPithelial ImmunoSPOT technology. This functional assay detects viable CTCs at the single-cell level and has been used on hundreds of patients with different tumor types including epithelial tumors (breast, prostate and colon cancer) and melanomas. Moreover, the article summarizes recent advances in the in vitro and in vivo expansion of CTCs from cancer patients. These functional analyses will contribute to identifying the biological properties of metastatic cells and reveal new therapeutic targets against disseminating cancer cells.

  14. Direct relationship between cell density and FDG uptake in asymptomatic aortic aneurysm close to surgical threshold: an in vivo and in vitro study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marini, Cecilia [CNR Institute of Bioimaging and Molecular Physiology, Milan, Genoa Section, Genoa (Italy); Oftalmologia e Genetica dell' Universita di Genova, Dipartimento di Neuroscienze, Genoa (Italy); Morbelli, Silvia; Armonino, Riccardo; Riondato, Mattia; Massollo, Michela; Augeri, Carla; Fiz, Francesco; Sambuceti, Gianmario [University of Genoa, Department Internal Medicine, Chair of Nuclear Medicine, Genoa (Italy); Spinella, Giovanni; Pane, Bianca; Palmieri, Daniela; Palombo, Domenico [San Martino University Hospital, University of Genoa, Division of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, Genoa (Italy); Sarocchi, Francesca; Abete, Luca; Fulcheri, Ezio [University of Genoa, Department of Surgical and Diagnostic Sciences, Pathology, Genoa (Italy); Ghigliotti, Giorgio [University of Genoa, Department of Internal Medicine, Chair of Cardiology, Genoa (Italy); Cittadini, Giuseppe [Hospital San Martino, Department of Radiology, Genoa (Italy)

    2012-01-15

    Conflicting results have been reported about the clinical value of fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) imaging in predicting the risk of rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). The present study tests the hypothesis that FDG uptake is low in asymptomatic noninflammatory AAA due to the low cell density in aneurysmal walls. Positron emission tomography (PET)/CT imaging was performed in 12 consecutive candidates for AAA surgical repair and in 12 age- and sex-matched controls. At intervention, aneurysmal walls were cut into three sequential blocks. Block A was frozen to cut three 5-{mu}m slices for incubation with 2-3 MBq of FDG for 5 min. Block C was first incubated with the same tracer solution for the same time and subsequently frozen to cut three 5-{mu}m slices. Autoradiographic images were coregistered with immunohistochemical pictures of cell density, type and DNA synthesis as assessed on block B. No visible uptake in abdominal aorta occurred in any patient or control subject. Immunohistochemistry documented a severe loss of wall structure, with low numbers of cells. Tracer retention directly correlated with overall cell density and with prevalence of cells synthesizing DNA. The metabolic nature of FDG uptake was confirmed by the selective effect of preliminary freezing that decreased tracer content by 90% in regions with high cell density and only by 34% in cold acellular areas. The loss of tissue structure and the marked decrease in cell density account for the low prevalence of positive findings at FDG PET imaging, at least in asymptomatic patients bearing AAAs whose diameter is close to surgical indication. (orig.)

  15. Modulation of the endocannabinoid system in viable and non-viable first trimester pregnancies by pregnancy-related hormones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor Anthony H

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In early pregnancy, increased plasma levels of the endocannabinoid anandamide (AEA are associated with miscarriage through mechanisms that might affect the developing placenta or maternal decidua. Methods In this study, we compare AEA levels in failed and viable pregnancies with the levels of the trophoblastic hormones (beta-human chorionic gonadotrophin (beta-hCG, progesterone (P4 and (pregnancy-associated placental protein-A (PAPP-A essential for early pregnancy success and relate that to the expression of the cannabinoid receptors and enzymes that modulate AEA levels. Results The median plasma AEA level in non-viable pregnancies (1.48 nM; n = 20 was higher than in viable pregnancies (1.21 nM; n = 25; P = 0.013, as were progesterone and beta-hCG levels (41.0 vs 51.5 ng/mL; P = 0.052 for P4 and 28,650 vs 6,560 mIU/L; P = 0.144 for beta-hCG, respectively, but were not statistically significant. Serum PAPP-A levels in the viable group were approximately 6.8 times lower than those in the non-viable group (1.82 vs 12.25 mg/L; P = 0.071, but again these differences were statistically insignificant. In the spontaneous miscarriage group, significant correlations between P4 and beta-hCG, P4 and PAPP-A and AEA and PAPP-A levels were observed. Simultaneously, immunohistochemical distributions of the two main cannabinoid receptors and the AEA-modifying enzymes, fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH and N-acylphosphatidylethanolamine-phospholipase D (NAPE-PLD, changed within both the decidua and trophoblast. Conclusions The association of higher AEA levels with early pregnancy failure and with beta-hCG and PAPP-A, but not with progesterone concentrations suggest that plasma AEA levels and pregnancy failure are linked via a mechanism that may involve trophoblastic beta-hCG, and PAPP-A, but not, progesterone production. Although the trophoblast, decidua and embryo contain receptors for AEA, the main AEA target in early pregnancy failure

  16. Membraneless, room-temperature, direct borohydride/cerium fuel cell with power density of over 0.25 W/cm2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Mota, Nicolas; Finkelstein, David A; Kirtland, Joseph D; Rodriguez, Claudia A; Stroock, Abraham D; Abruña, Héctor D

    2012-04-11

    The widespread adoption and deployment of fuel cells as an alternative energy technology have been hampered by a number of formidable technical challenges, including the cost and long-term stability of electrocatalyst and membrane materials. We present a microfluidic fuel cell that overcomes many of these obstacles while achieving power densities in excess of 250 mW/cm(2). The poisoning and sluggish reaction rate associated with CO-contaminated H(2) and methanol, respectively, are averted by employing the promising, high-energy density fuel borohydride. The high-overpotential reaction of oxygen gas at the cathode is supplanted by the high-voltage reduction of cerium ammonium nitrate. Expensive, ineffective membrane materials are replaced with laminar flow and a nonselective, porous convection barrier to separate the fuel and oxidant streams. The result is a Nafion-free, room-temperature fuel cell that has the highest power density per unit mass of Pt catalyst employed for a non-H(2) fuel cell, and exceeds the power density of a typical H(2) fuel cell by 50%. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  17. Removal of viable bioaerosol particles with a low-efficiency HVAC filter enhanced by continuous emission of unipolar air ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, R; Agranovski, I; Pyankov, O; Grinshpun, S

    2008-04-01

    Continuous emission of unipolar ions has been shown to improve the performance of respirators and stationary filters challenged with non-biological particles. In this study, we investigated the ion-induced enhancement effect while challenging a low-efficiency heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) fil