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Sample records for viable cell concentration

  1. A Novel Application for Low Frequency Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy as an Online Process Monitoring Tool for Viable Cell Concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Slouka

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available New approaches in process monitoring during industrial fermentations are not only limited to classical pH, dO2 and offgas analysis, but use different in situ and online sensors based on different physical principles to determine biomass, product quality, lysis and far more. One of the very important approaches is the in situ accessibility of viable cell concentration (VCC. This knowledge provides increased efficiency in monitoring and controlling strategies during cultivations. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy—EIS—is used to monitor biomass in a fermentation of E. coli BL21(DE3, producing a recombinant protein using a fed batch-based approach. Increases in the double layer capacitance (Cdl, determined at frequencies below 1 kHz, are proportional to the increase of biomass in the batch and fed batch phase, monitored in offline and online modes for different cultivations. A good correlation of Cdl with cell density is found and in order to get an appropriate verification of this method, different state-of-the-art biomass measurements are performed and compared. Since measurements in this frequency range are largely determined by the double layer region between the electrode and media, rather minor interferences with process parameters (aeration, stirring are to be expected. It is shown that impedance spectroscopy at low frequencies is a powerful tool for cultivation monitoring.

  2. Inkjet printing of viable human dental follicle stem cells

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    Mau Robert

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Inkjet printing technology has the potential to be used for seeding of viable cells for tissue engineering approaches. For this reason, a piezoelectrically actuated, drop-on-demand inkjet printing system was applied to deliver viable human dental follicle stem cells (hDFSC of sizes of about 15 μm up to 20 μm in diameter. The purpose of these investigations was to verify the stability of the printing process and to evaluate cell viability post printing. Using a Nanoplotter 2.1 (Gesim, Germany equipped with the piezoelectric printhead NanoTip HV (Gesim, Germany, a concentration of 6.6 ×106 cells ml−1 in DMEM with 10% fetal calf serum (FCS could be dispensed. The piezoelectric printhead has a nominal droplet volume of ~ 400 pl and was set to a voltage of 75 V and a pulse of 50 μs while dosing 50 000 droplets over a time of 100 seconds. The volume and trajectory of the droplet were checked by a stroboscope test right before and after the printing process. It was found that the droplet volume decreases significantly by 35% during printing process, while the trajectory of the droplets remains stable with only an insignificant number of degrees deviation from the vertical line. It is highly probable that some cell sedimentations or agglomerations affect the printing performance. The cell viability post printing was assessed by using the Trypan Blue dye exclusion test. The printing process was found to have no significant influence on cell survival. In conclusion, drop-on-demand inkjet printing can be a potent tool for the seeding of viable cells.

  3. Viable Cell Culture Banking for Biodiversity Characterization and Conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryder, Oliver A; Onuma, Manabu

    2018-02-15

    Because living cells can be saved for indefinite periods, unprecedented opportunities for characterizing, cataloging, and conserving biological diversity have emerged as advanced cellular and genetic technologies portend new options for preventing species extinction. Crucial to realizing the potential impacts of stem cells and assisted reproductive technologies on biodiversity conservation is the cryobanking of viable cell cultures from diverse species, especially those identified as vulnerable to extinction in the near future. The advent of in vitro cell culture and cryobanking is reviewed here in the context of biodiversity collections of viable cell cultures that represent the progress and limitations of current efforts. The prospects for incorporating collections of frozen viable cell cultures into efforts to characterize the genetic changes that have produced the diversity of species on Earth and contribute to new initiatives in conservation argue strongly for a global network of facilities for establishing and cryobanking collections of viable cells.

  4. High speed flow cytometric separation of viable cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Dennis T.; Van den Engh, Gerrit J.; Buckie, Anne-Marie

    1995-01-01

    Hematopoietic cell populations are separated to provide cell sets and subsets as viable cells with high purity and high yields, based on the number of original cells present in the mixture. High-speed flow cytometry is employed using light characteristics of the cells to separate the cells, where high flow speeds are used to reduce the sorting time.

  5. Surface Charge Visualization at Viable Living Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, David; Paulose Nadappuram, Binoy; Momotenko, Dmitry; Voyias, Philip D; Page, Ashley; Tripathi, Gyanendra; Frenguelli, Bruno G; Unwin, Patrick R

    2016-03-09

    Scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) is demonstrated to be a powerful technique for quantitative nanoscale surface charge mapping of living cells. Utilizing a bias modulated (BM) scheme, in which the potential between a quasi-reference counter electrode (QRCE) in an electrolyte-filled nanopipette and a QRCE in bulk solution is modulated, it is shown that both the cell topography and the surface charge present at cellular interfaces can be measured simultaneously at high spatial resolution with dynamic potential measurements. Surface charge is elucidated by probing the properties of the diffuse double layer (DDL) at the cellular interface, and the technique is sensitive at both low-ionic strength and under typical physiological (high-ionic strength) conditions. The combination of experiments that incorporate pixel-level self-referencing (calibration) with a robust theoretical model allows for the analysis of local surface charge variations across cellular interfaces, as demonstrated on two important living systems. First, charge mapping at Zea mays root hairs shows that there is a high negative surface charge at the tip of the cell. Second, it is shown that there are distinct surface charge distributions across the surface of human adipocyte cells, whose role is the storage and regulation of lipids in mammalian systems. These are new features, not previously recognized, and their implications for the functioning of these cells are highlighted.

  6. Combining ethidium monoazide treatment with real-time PCR selectively quantifies viable Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blooi, Mark; Martel, An; Vercammen, Francis; Pasmans, Frank

    2013-02-01

    Detection of the lethal amphibian fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis relies on PCR-based techniques. Although highly accurate and sensitive, these methods fail to distinguish between viable and dead cells. In this study a novel approach combining the DNA intercalating dye ethidium monoazide (EMA) and real-time PCR is presented that allows quantification of viable B. dendrobatidis cells without the need for culturing. The developed method is able to suppress real-time PCR signals of heat-killed B. dendrobatidis zoospores by 99.9 % and is able to discriminate viable from heat-killed B. dendrobatidis zoospores in mixed samples. Furthermore, the novel approach was applied to assess the antifungal activity of the veterinary antiseptic F10(®) Antiseptic Solution. This disinfectant killed B. dendrobatidis zoospores effectively within 1 min at concentrations as low as 1:6400. Copyright © 2013 The British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Mobilization of Viable Tumor Cells Into the Circulation During Radiation Therapy

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    Martin, Olga A. [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Molecular Radiation Biology Laboratory, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); The Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Anderson, Robin L. [The Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Metastasis Research Laboratory, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Russell, Prudence A. [Department of Anatomical Pathology, St. Vincent Hospital, Fitzroy, VIC (Australia); Ashley Cox, R. [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Ivashkevich, Alesia [Molecular Radiation Biology Laboratory, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Laboratory of DNA Repair and Genomics, Centre for Innate Immunity and Infectious Disease, Monash Institute for Medical Research, Monash University, Clayton, VIC (Australia); Swierczak, Agnieszka; Doherty, Judy P. [Metastasis Research Laboratory, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Jacobs, Daphne H.M. [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Smith, Jai [Molecular Radiation Biology Laboratory, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Siva, Shankar; Daly, Patricia E. [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Ball, David L. [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); The Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC (Australia); and others

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: To determine whether radiation therapy (RT) could mobilize viable tumor cells into the circulation of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Methods and Materials: We enumerated circulating tumor cells (CTCs) by fluorescence microscopy of blood samples immunostained with conventional CTC markers. We measured their DNA damage levels using γ-H2AX, a biomarker for radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks, either by fluorescence-activated cell sorting or by immunofluorescence microscopy. Results: Twenty-seven RT-treated NSCLC patients had blood samples analyzed by 1 or more methods. We identified increased CTC numbers after commencement of RT in 7 of 9 patients treated with palliative RT, and in 4 of 8 patients treated with curative-intent RT. Circulating tumor cells were also identified, singly and in clumps in large numbers, during RT by cytopathologic examination (in all 5 cases studied). Elevated γ-H2AX signal in post-RT blood samples signified the presence of CTCs derived from irradiated tumors. Blood taken after the commencement of RT contained tumor cells that proliferated extensively in vitro (in all 6 cases studied). Circulating tumor cells formed γ-H2AX foci in response to ex vivo irradiation, providing further evidence of their viability. Conclusions: Our findings provide a rationale for the development of strategies to reduce the concentration of viable CTCs by modulating RT fractionation or by coadministering systemic therapies.

  8. The molecularly crowded cytoplasm of bacterialcCells : Dividing cells contrasted with viable but non-culturable (VBNC) bacterial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trevors, J. T.; van Elsas, J. D.; Bej, A. K.

    2013-01-01

    In this perspective, we discuss the cytoplasm in actively growing bacterial cells contrasted with viable but non-culturable (VBNC) cells. Actively growing bacterial cells contain a more molecularly crowded and organized cytoplasm, and are capable of completing their cell cycle resulting in cell

  9. Non-viable antagonist cells are associated with reduced biocontrol performance by viable cells of the yeast Papiliotrema flavescens against Fusarium head blight of wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microbially-based plant disease control products have achieved commercial market success, but the efficacy of such biocontrol products is sometimes deemed inconsistent. Improper processing of harvested microbial biomass or long-term storage can reduce the proportion of viable cells and necessitate t...

  10. IN-VITRO BIOREDUCTION OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM BY VIABLE WHOLE CELLS OF Arthrobacter sp. SUK 1201

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    Satarupa Dey

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A chromium resistant and reducing bacterium Arthrobacter sp. SUK 1201 was isolated from chromite mine overburden dumps of Orissa, India. Viable whole cells of this isolate was capable of completely reducing 100 µM Cr(VI in chemically defined MS medium within 28 h of incubation under batch cultivation. Reduction of chromate increased with increased cell density and was maximum at a density of 1010 cells/ml, but the reduction potential of the suspended cells decreased with increase in Cr(VI concentration in the medium. Chromate reducing efficiency was promoted when glycerol and glucose was used as electron donors, while the optimum pH and temperature of Cr(VI reduction was found to be 7.0 and 35°C respectively. The reduction process was inhibited by divalent cations Ni, Co and Cd, but not by Cu and Fe. Similarly, carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP, N,N,-Di cyclohexyl carboiimide (DCC, sodium azide and sodium fluoride were inhibitory to chromate reduction, while in presence of 2,4 dinitrophenol (2,4 DNP chromate reduction by SUK 1201 cells remained unaffected.

  11. Modelling the number of viable vegetative cells of Bacillus cereus passing through the stomach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnands, L.M.; Pielaat, A.; Dufrenne, J.B.; Zwietering, M.H.; Leusden, van F.M.

    2009-01-01

    Aims: Model the number of viable vegetative cells of B. cereus surviving the gastric passage after experiments in simulated gastric conditions. Materials and Methods: The inactivation of stationary and exponential phase vegetative cells of twelve different strains of Bacillus cereus, both mesophilic

  12. A simple way to identify non-viable cells within living plant tissue using confocal microscopy

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    Truernit Elisabeth

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant cell death is a normal process during plant development. Mutant plants may exhibit misregulation of this process, which can lead to severe growth defects. Simple ways of visualising cell death in living plant tissues can aid the study of plant development and physiology. Results Spectral variants of the fluorescent SYTOX dyes were tested for their usefulness for the detection of non-viable cells within plant embryos and roots using confocal laser-scanning microscopy. The dyes were selective for non-viable cells and showed very little background staining in living cells. Simultaneous detection of SYTOX dye and fluorescent protein (e.g. GFP fluorescence was possible. Conclusion The fluorescent SYTOX dyes are useful for an easy and quick first assay of plant cell viability in living plant samples using fluorescence and confocal laser-scanning microscopy.

  13. Separable Bilayer Microfiltration Device for Viable Label-free Enrichment of Circulating Tumour Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ming-Da; Hao, Sijie; Williams, Anthony J.; Harouaka, Ramdane A.; Schrand, Brett; Rawal, Siddarth; Ao, Zheng; Brennaman, Randall; Gilboa, Eli; Lu, Bo; Wang, Shuwen; Zhu, Jiyue; Datar, Ram; Cote, Richard; Tai, Yu-Chong; Zheng, Si-Yang

    2014-12-01

    The analysis of circulating tumour cells (CTCs) in cancer patients could provide important information for therapeutic management. Enrichment of viable CTCs could permit performance of functional analyses on CTCs to broaden understanding of metastatic disease. However, this has not been widely accomplished. Addressing this challenge, we present a separable bilayer (SB) microfilter for viable size-based CTC capture. Unlike other single-layer CTC microfilters, the precise gap between the two layers and the architecture of pore alignment result in drastic reduction in mechanical stress on CTCs, capturing them viably. Using multiple cancer cell lines spiked in healthy donor blood, the SB microfilter demonstrated high capture efficiency (78-83%), high retention of cell viability (71-74%), high tumour cell enrichment against leukocytes (1.7-2 × 103), and widespread ability to establish cultures post-capture (100% of cell lines tested). In a metastatic mouse model, SB microfilters successfully enriched viable mouse CTCs from 0.4-0.6 mL whole mouse blood samples and established in vitro cultures for further genetic and functional analysis. Our preliminary studies reflect the efficacy of the SB microfilter device to efficiently and reliably enrich viable CTCs in animal model studies, constituting an exciting technology for new insights in cancer research.

  14. Use of propidium monoazide for selective profiling of viable microbial cells during Gouda cheese ripening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erkus, O.; Jager, V.C. de; Geene, R.T.; Alen-Boerrigter, I.J. van; Hazelwood, L.; Hijum, S.A.F.T. van; Kleerebezem, M; Smid, E.J.

    2016-01-01

    DNA based microbial community profiling of food samples is confounded by the presence of DNA derived from membrane compromised (dead or injured) cells. Selective amplification of DNA from viable (intact) fraction of the community by propidium monoazide (PMA) treatment could circumvent this problem.

  15. Melanin concentrating hormone receptor 1 (MCHR1) antagonists - Still a viable approach for obesity treatment?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Högberg, T.; Frimurer, T.M.; Sasmal, P.K.

    2012-01-01

    Obesity is a global epidemic associated with multiple severe diseases. Several pharmacotherapies have been investigated including the melanin concentrating hormone (MCH) and its receptor 1. The development of MCHR1 antagonists are described with a specific perspective on different chemotypes...

  16. In vitro and in vivo bioluminescent quantification of viable stem cells in engineered constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logeart-Avramoglou, Delphine; Oudina, Karim; Bourguignon, Marianne; Delpierre, Laetitia; Nicola, Marie-Anne; Bensidhoum, Morad; Arnaud, Eric; Petite, Herve

    2010-06-01

    Bioluminescent quantification of viable cells inside three-dimensional porous scaffolds was performed in vitro and in vivo. The assay quantified the bioluminescence of murine stem (C3H10T1/2) cells tagged with the luciferase gene reporter and distributed inside scaffolds of either soft, translucent, AN69 polymeric hydrogel or hard, opaque, coral ceramic materials. Quantitative evaluation of bioluminescence emitted from tagged cells adhering to these scaffolds was performed in situ using either cell lysates and a luminometer or intact cells and a bioluminescence imaging system. Despite attenuation of the signal when compared to cells alone, the bioluminescence correlated with the number of cells (up to 1.5 x 10(5)) present on each material scaffold tested, both in vitro and noninvasively in vivo (subcutaneous implants in the mouse model). The noninvasive bioluminescence measurement technique proved to be comparable to the cell-destructive bioluminescence measurement technique. Monitoring the kinetics of luciferase expression via bioluminescence enabled real-time assessment of cell survival and proliferation on the scaffolds tested over prolonged (up to 59 days) periods of time. This novel, sensitive, easy, fast-to-implement, quantitative bioluminescence assay has great, though untapped, potential for screening and determining noninvasively the presence of viable cells on biomaterial constructs in the tissue engineering and tissue regeneration fields.

  17. Desiccation induces viable but Non-Culturable cells in Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vriezen, Jan Ac; de Bruijn, Frans J; Nüsslein, Klaus R

    2012-01-20

    Sinorhizobium meliloti is a microorganism commercially used in the production of e.g. Medicago sativa seed inocula. Many inocula are powder-based and production includes a drying step. Although S. meliloti survives drying well, the quality of the inocula is reduced during this process. In this study we determined survival during desiccation of the commercial strains 102F84 and 102F85 as well as the model strain USDA1021.The survival of S. meliloti 1021 was estimated during nine weeks at 22% relative humidity. We found that after an initial rapid decline of colony forming units, the decline slowed to a steady 10-fold reduction in colony forming units every 22 days. In spite of the reduction in colony forming units, the fraction of the population identified as viable (42-54%) based on the Baclight live/dead stain did not change significantly over time. This change in the ability of viable cells to form colonies shows (i) an underestimation of the survival of rhizobial cells using plating methods, and that (ii) in a part of the population desiccation induces a Viable But Non Culturable (VBNC)-like state, which has not been reported before. Resuscitation attempts did not lead to a higher recovery of colony forming units indicating the VBNC state is stable under the conditions tested. This observation has important consequences for the use of rhizobia. Finding methods to resuscitate this fraction may increase the quality of powder-based seed inocula.

  18. Cellular bone matrices: viable stem cell-containing bone graft substitutes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skovrlj, Branko; Guzman, Javier Z; Al Maaieh, Motasem; Cho, Samuel K; Iatridis, James C; Qureshi, Sheeraz A

    2014-11-01

    Advances in the field of stem cell technology have stimulated the development and increased use of allogenic bone grafts containing live mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), also known as cellular bone matrices (CBMs). It is estimated that CBMs comprise greater than 17% of all bone grafts and bone graft substitutes used. To critically evaluate CBMs, specifically their technical specifications, existing published data supporting their use, US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulation, cost, potential pitfalls, and other aspects pertaining to their use. Areview of literature. A series of Ovid, Medline, and Pubmed-National Library of Medicine/National Institutes of Health (www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov) searches were performed. Only articles in English journals or published with English language translations were included. Level of evidence of the selected articles was assessed. Specific technical information on each CBM was obtained by direct communication from the companies marketing the individual products. Five different CBMs are currently available for use in spinal fusion surgery. There is a wide variation between the products with regard to the average donor age at harvest, total cellular concentration, percentage of MSCs, shelf life, and cell viability after defrosting. Three retrospective studies evaluating CBMs and fusion have shown fusion rates ranging from 90.2% to 92.3%, and multiple industry-sponsored trials are underway. No independent studies evaluating spinal fusion rates with the use of CBMs exist. All the commercially available CBMs claim to meet the FDA criteria under Section 361, 21 CFR Part 1271, and are not undergoing FDA premarket review. The CBMs claim to provide viable MSCs and are offered at a premium cost. Numerous challenges exist in regard to MSCs' survival, function, osteoblastic potential, and cytokine production once implanted into the intended host. Cellular bone matrices may be a promising bone augmentation technology in spinal fusion surgery

  19. Mathematical modelling of the viable epidermis: impact of cell shape and vertical arrangement

    KAUST Repository

    Wittum, Rebecca

    2017-12-07

    In-silico methods are valuable tools for understanding the barrier function of the skin. The key benefit is that mathematical modelling allows the interplay between cell shape and function to be elucidated. This study focuses on the viable (living) epidermis. For this region, previous works suggested a diffusion model and an approximation of the cells by hexagonal prisms. The work at hand extends this in three ways. First, the extracellular space is treated with full spatial resolution. This induces a decrease of permeability by about 10%. Second, cells of tetrakaidecahedral shape are considered, in addition to the original hexagonal prisms. For both cell types, the resulting membrane permeabilities are compared. Third, for the first time, the influence of cell stacking in the vertical direction is considered. This is particularly important for the stratum granulosum, where tight junctions are present.

  20. Monitoring of yeast cell concentration using a micromachined impedance sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krommenhoek, E.E.; Gardeniers, Johannes G.E.; Bomer, Johan G.; van den Berg, Albert; Li, X.; Ottens, M.; van der Wielen, L.A.M.; van Dedem, G.W.K.; van Leeuwen, M.; van Gulik, W.M.; Heijnen, J.J.

    2005-01-01

    The paper describes the design, modelling and experimental characterization of a micromachined impedance sensor for on-line monitoring of the viable yeast cell concentration (biomass) in a miniaturized cell assay. Measurements in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell culture show that the permittivity of

  1. Monitoring of yeast cell concentration using a micromachnined impedance sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krommenhoek, E.E.; Gardeniers, Johannes G.E.; Bomer, Johan G.; van den Berg, Albert; Li, X.; Li, X.; Ottens, M.; van der Wielen, L.A.M.; van Dedem, G.W.K.; van Leeuwen, M.; van Gulik, W.M.; Heijnen, J.J.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the design, modeling and experimental characterization of a micromachined impedance sensor for on-line monitoring of the viable yeast cell concentration (biomass) in a miniaturized cell assay. Measurements in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell culture show that the characteristic

  2. Response of Listeria monocytogenes to disinfection stress at the single-cell and population levels as monitored by intracellular pH measurements and viable-cell counts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastbjerg, Vicky Gaedt; Nielsen, Dennis S.; Arneborg, Nils

    2009-01-01

    .05). The protective effect of NaCl was reflected by viable-cell counts at a higher concentration of Incimaxx (0.0031%), where the salt-grown population survived better than the population grown without NaCl (P ... that a population of L. monocytogenes cells, whether planktonic or attached, is homogenous with respect to sensitivity to an acidic disinfectant studied on the single-cell level. Hence a major subpopulation more tolerant to disinfectants, and hence more persistent, does not appear to be present....

  3. Progress in biocatalysis with immobilized viable whole cells: systems development, reaction engineering and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polakovič, Milan; Švitel, Juraj; Bučko, Marek; Filip, Jaroslav; Neděla, Vilém; Ansorge-Schumacher, Marion B; Gemeiner, Peter

    2017-05-01

    Viable microbial cells are important biocatalysts in the production of fine chemicals and biofuels, in environmental applications and also in emerging applications such as biosensors or medicine. Their increasing significance is driven mainly by the intensive development of high performance recombinant strains supplying multienzyme cascade reaction pathways, and by advances in preservation of the native state and stability of whole-cell biocatalysts throughout their application. In many cases, the stability and performance of whole-cell biocatalysts can be highly improved by controlled immobilization techniques. This review summarizes the current progress in the development of immobilized whole-cell biocatalysts, the immobilization methods as well as in the bioreaction engineering aspects and economical aspects of their biocatalytic applications.

  4. Concentrations of viable oil-degrading microorganisms are increased in feces from Calanus finmarchicus feeding in petroleum oil dispersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Størdal, Ingvild Fladvad; Olsen, Anders Johny; Jenssen, Bjørn Munro; Netzer, Roman; Hansen, Bjørn Henrik; Altin, Dag; Brakstad, Odd Gunnar

    2015-09-15

    Zooplankton are suggested to be biotic contributors to the transport and weathering of oil in marine environments due to their ingestion of oil. In the present experiment, feeding activity and microbial communities in feces from Calanus finmarchicus feeding in oil dispersions were characterized. Feeding activity was significantly reduced in oil dispersions. The microbial communities in clean and oil-containing copepod feces were dominated by Rhodobacteraceae family bacteria (Lesingera, Phaeobacter, Rugeria, and Sulfitobacter), which were suggested to be indigenous to copepod feces. The results also indicated that these bacteria were metabolizing oil compounds, as a significant increase in the concentrations of viable oil degrading microorganisms was observed in oil-containing feces. This study shows that bacteria in feces from copepods feeding in dilute oil dispersions have capacity for degradation of oil. Zooplankton may therefore contribute to weathering of oil by excreting feces with microbial communities already adapted to degradation of oil. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Viable cell yield from active dry yeast products and effects of storage temperature and diluent on yeast cell viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, M L; Bradford, B J

    2011-01-01

    Active dry yeast (ADY) products are commonly fed in the dairy industry, but research regarding quality control for such products is limited. The objectives of this study were to determine yeast viability in field samples relative to manufacturers' guarantees (experiment 1), measure the effects of high-temperature storage on yeast viability (experiment 1), and determine the effect of vitamin-trace mineral (VTM) premix on yeast viability (experiment 2). Commercially available ADY products were acquired in triplicate through normal distribution channels and stored at 4°C upon receipt. Initial samples were evaluated for colony-forming units and compared with product label guarantees. Only 1 of the 6 products sampled in experiment 1 met product guarantees for all 3 samples. To determine effects of storage temperature and duration on viability, ADY samples were stored in an incubator at 40°C with ambient humidity for 1, 2, and 3 mo. High-temperature storage significantly decreased viability over the 3-mo period; approximately 90% of viable cells were lost each month. Three of the 5 products sampled in experiment 2 met product guarantees. Fresh samples of 4 of these 5 ADY products were mixed in duplicate with ground corn (GC) or a VTM premix to achieve a target concentration of 2.2×10(8) cfu/g. For each product, GC and VTM samples were stored at ambient temperature (22°C) and at an elevated temperature (40°C) for 2 wk. No differences in viable yeast count were observed between GC and VTM samples immediately after mixing or after storage at ambient temperature. Yeast viability in GC and VTM samples decreased during storage at an elevated temperature. There also was a significant interaction of diluent and storage temperature; VTM samples had higher cell viability than GC samples when subjected to high-temperature storage. Results suggest that (1) ADY products failed to consistently meet product guarantees; (2) viability of ADY products was greatly diminished during

  6. Trypan blue dye enters viable cells incubated with the pore-forming toxin HlyII of Bacillus cereus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seav-Ly Tran

    Full Text Available Trypan blue is a dye that has been widely used for selective staining of dead tissues or cells. Here, we show that the pore-forming toxin HlyII of Bacillus cereus allows trypan blue staining of macrophage cells, despite the cells remaining viable and metabolically active. These findings suggest that the dye enters viable cells through the pores. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration that trypan blue may enter viable cells. Consequently, the use of trypan blue staining as a marker of vital status should be interpreted with caution. The blue coloration does not necessarily indicate cell lysis, but may rather indicate pore formation in the cell membranes and more generally increased membrane permeability.

  7. Viable bacteria associated with red blood cells and plasma in freshly drawn blood donations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Damgaard

    Full Text Available Infection remains a leading cause of post-transfusion mortality and morbidity. Bacterial contamination is, however, detected in less than 0.1% of blood units tested. The aim of the study was to identify viable bacteria in standard blood-pack units, with particular focus on bacteria from the oral cavity, and to determine the distribution of bacteria revealed in plasma and in the red blood cell (RBC-fraction.Cross-sectional study. Blood were separated into plasma and RBC-suspensions, which were incubated anaerobically or aerobically for 7 days on trypticase soy blood agar (TSA or blue lactose plates. For identification colony PCR was performed using primers targeting 16S rDNA.Blood donors attending Capital Region Blood Bank, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Hvidovre, Denmark, October 29th to December 10th 2013.60 donors (≥50 years old, self-reported medically healthy.Bacterial growth was observed on plates inoculated with plasma or RBCs from 62% of the blood donations. Growth was evident in 21 (35% of 60 RBC-fractions and in 32 (53% of 60 plasma-fractions versus 8 of 60 negative controls (p = 0.005 and p = 2.6x10-6, respectively. Propionibacterium acnes was found in 23% of the donations, and Staphylococcus epidermidis in 38%. The majority of bacteria identified in the present study were either facultative anaerobic (59.5% or anaerobic (27.8% species, which are not likely to be detected during current routine screening.Viable bacteria are present in blood from donors self-reported as medically healthy, indicating that conventional test systems employed by blood banks insufficiently detect bacteria in plasma. Further investigation is needed to determine whether routine testing for anaerobic bacteria and testing of RBC-fractions for adherent bacteria should be recommended.

  8. Increasing Vero viable cell densities for yellow fever virus production in stirred-tank bioreactors using serum-free medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattos, Diogo A; Silva, Marlon V; Gaspar, Luciane P; Castilho, Leda R

    2015-08-20

    In this work, changes in Vero cell cultivation methods have been employed in order to improve cell growth conditions to obtain higher viable cell densities and to increase viral titers. The propagation of the 17DD yellow fever virus (YFV) in Vero cells grown on Cytodex I microcarriers was evaluated in 3-L bioreactor vessels. Prior to the current changes, Vero cells were repeatedly displaying insufficient microcarrier colonization. A modified cultivation process with four changes has resulted in higher cell densities and higher virus titers than previously observed for 17DD YFV. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Advanced high efficiency concentrator cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gale, R. (Varian Associates, Inc., Palo Alto, CA (United States). Varian Research Center)

    1992-06-01

    This report describes research to develop the technology needed to demonstrate a monolithic, multijunction, two-terminal, concentrator solar cell with a terrestrial power conversion efficiency greater than 35%. Under three previous subcontracts, Varian developed many of the aspects of a technology needed to fabricate very high efficiency concentrator cells. The current project was aimed at exploiting the new understanding of high efficiency solar cells. Key results covered in this report are as follows. (1) A 1.93-eV AlGaAs/1.42-eV GaAs metal-interconnected cascade cell was manufactured with a one-sun efficiency at 27.6% at air mass 1.5 (AM1.5) global. (2) A 1.0eV InGaAs cell was fabricated on the reverse'' side of a low-doped GaAs substrate with a one-sun efficiency of 2.5% AM1.5 diffuse and a short-circuit current of 14.4 mA/cm{sup 2}. (3) Small-scale manufacturing of GaAs p/n concentrator cells was attempted and obtained an excellent yield of high-efficiency cells. (4) Grown-in tunnel junction cell interconnects that are transparent and thermally stable using C and Si dopants were developed. 10 refs.

  10. Combined bromodeoxyuridine immunohistochemistry and Masson trichrome staining: facilitated detection of cell proliferation in viable vs. infarcted myocardium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarous, D F; Shou, M; Unger, E F

    1992-09-01

    Cells in the S-phase of the cell cycle can be identified in tissue sections by immunohistochemical localization of the thymidine analogue bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU). Generally, a single counterstain is used to visualize the underlying tissue; however, interpretation of morphologic detail is often difficult. We have utilized BrdU to localize proliferating cells in myocardium exposed to angiogenic mitogens. To facilitate identification of labelled nuclei in the context of infarcted vs. viable myocardium, BrdU immunohistochemistry was followed by a modified Masson trichrome stain. The time of exposure to the counterstains and the wash protocol were re-revised, permitting clear identification of the labelled brown nuclei against a background of red viable myocardium vs. blue infarct. The combined technique also provides color contrast suitable for computer-based image analysis.

  11. Quantitative assessment of viable cells of Lactobacillus plantarum strains in single, dual and multi-strain biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Ramírez, Mónica D; Kostopoulos, Ioannis; Smid, Eddy J; Nierop Groot, Masja N; Abee, Tjakko

    2017-03-06

    Biofilms of Lactobacillus plantarum are a potential source for contamination and recontamination of food products. Although biofilms have been mostly studied using single species or even single strains, it is conceivable that in a range of environmental settings including food processing areas, biofilms are composed of multiple species with each species represented by multiple strains. In this study six spoilage related L. plantarum strains FBR1-FBR6 and the model strain L. plantarum WCFS1 were characterised in single, dual and multiple strain competition models. A quantitative PCR approach was used with added propidium monoazide (PMA) enabling quantification of intact cells in the biofilm, representing the viable cell fraction that determines the food spoilage risk. Our results show that the performance of individual strains in multi-strain cultures generally correlates with their performance in pure culture, and relative strain abundance in multi-strain biofilms positively correlated with the relative strain abundance in suspended (planktonic) cultures. Performance of individual strains in dual-strain biofilms was highly influenced by the presence of the secondary strain, and in most cases no correlation between the relative contributions of viable planktonic cells and viable cells in the biofilm was noted. The total biofilm quantified by CV staining of the dual and multi-strain biofilms formed was mainly correlated to CV values of the dominant strain obtained in single strain studies. However, the combination of strain FBR5 and strain WCFS1 showed significantly higher CV values compared to the individual performances of both strains indicating that total biofilm formation was higher in this specific condition. Notably, L. plantarum FBR5 was able to outgrow all other strains and showed the highest relative abundance in dual and multi-strain biofilms. All the dual and multi-strain biofilms contained a considerable number of viable cells, representing a potential

  12. Designing primers and evaluation of the efficiency of propidium monoazide – Quantitative polymerase chain reaction for counting the viable cells of Lactobacillus gasseri and Lactobacillus salivarius

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chieh-Hsien Lai

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficiency of using propidium monoazide (PMA real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR to count the viable cells of Lactobacillus gasseri and Lactobacillus salivarius in probiotic products. Based on the internal transcription spacer and 23S rRNA genes, two primer sets specific for these two Lactobacillus species were designed. For a probiotic product, the total deMan Rogosa Sharpe plate count was 8.65±0.69 log CFU/g, while for qPCR, the cell counts of L. gasseri and L. salivarius were 8.39±0.14 log CFU/g and 8.57±0.24 log CFU/g, respectively. Under the same conditions, for its heat-killed product, qPCR counts for L. gasseri and L. salivarius were 6.70±0.16 log cells/g and 7.67±0.20 log cells/g, while PMA-qPCR counts were 5.33±0.18 log cells/g and 5.05±0.23 log cells/g, respectively. For cell dilutions with a viable cell count of 8.5 log CFU/mL for L. gasseri and L. salivarius, after heat killing, the PMA-qPCR count for both Lactobacillus species was near 5.5 log cells/mL. When the PMA-qPCR counts of these cell dilutions were compared before and after heat killing, although some DNA might be lost during the heat killing, significant qPCR signals from dead cells, i.e., about 4–5 log cells/mL, could not be reduced by PMA treatment. Increasing PMA concentrations from 100 μM to 200 μM or light exposure time from 5 minutes to 15 minutes had no or, if any, only minor effect on the reduction of qPCR signals from their dead cells. Thus, to differentiate viable lactic acid bacterial cells from dead cells using the PMA-qPCR method, the efficiency of PMA to reduce the qPCR signals from dead cells should be notable.

  13. Designing primers and evaluation of the efficiency of propidium monoazide - Quantitative polymerase chain reaction for counting the viable cells of Lactobacillus gasseri and Lactobacillus salivarius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chieh-Hsien; Wu, Sih-Rong; Pang, Jen-Chieh; Ramireddy, Latha; Chiang, Yu-Cheng; Lin, Chien-Ku; Tsen, Hau-Yang

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficiency of using propidium monoazide (PMA) real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) to count the viable cells of Lactobacillus gasseri and Lactobacillus salivarius in probiotic products. Based on the internal transcription spacer and 23S rRNA genes, two primer sets specific for these two Lactobacillus species were designed. For a probiotic product, the total deMan Rogosa Sharpe plate count was 8.65±0.69 log CFU/g, while for qPCR, the cell counts of L. gasseri and L. salivarius were 8.39±0.14 log CFU/g and 8.57±0.24 log CFU/g, respectively. Under the same conditions, for its heat-killed product, qPCR counts for L. gasseri and L. salivarius were 6.70±0.16 log cells/g and 7.67±0.20 log cells/g, while PMA-qPCR counts were 5.33±0.18 log cells/g and 5.05±0.23 log cells/g, respectively. For cell dilutions with a viable cell count of 8.5 log CFU/mL for L. gasseri and L. salivarius, after heat killing, the PMA-qPCR count for both Lactobacillus species was near 5.5 log cells/mL. When the PMA-qPCR counts of these cell dilutions were compared before and after heat killing, although some DNA might be lost during the heat killing, significant qPCR signals from dead cells, i.e., about 4-5 log cells/mL, could not be reduced by PMA treatment. Increasing PMA concentrations from 100 μM to 200 μM or light exposure time from 5 minutes to 15 minutes had no or, if any, only minor effect on the reduction of qPCR signals from their dead cells. Thus, to differentiate viable lactic acid bacterial cells from dead cells using the PMA-qPCR method, the efficiency of PMA to reduce the qPCR signals from dead cells should be notable. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. A multimodality imaging model to track viable breast cancer cells from single arrest to metastasis in the mouse brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkins, Katie M.; Hamilton, Amanda M.; Makela, Ashley V.; Chen, Yuanxin; Foster, Paula J.; Ronald, John A.

    2016-10-01

    Cellular MRI involves sensitive visualization of iron-labeled cells in vivo but cannot differentiate between dead and viable cells. Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) measures cellular viability, and thus we explored combining these tools to provide a more holistic view of metastatic cancer cell fate in mice. Human breast carcinoma cells stably expressing Firefly luciferase were loaded with iron particles, injected into the left ventricle, and BLI and MRI were performed on days 0, 8, 21 and 28. The number of brain MR signal voids (i.e., iron-loaded cells) on day 0 significantly correlated with BLI signal. Both BLI and MRI signals decreased from day 0 to day 8, indicating a loss of viable cells rather than a loss of iron label. Total brain MR tumour volume on day 28 also correlated with BLI signal. Overall, BLI complemented our sensitive cellular MRI technologies well, allowing us for the first time to screen animals for successful injections, and, in addition to MR measures of cell arrest and tumor burden, provided longitudinal measures of cancer cell viability in individual animals. We predict this novel multimodality molecular imaging framework will be useful for evaluating the efficacy of emerging anti-cancer drugs at different stages of the metastatic cascade.

  15. Development of concentrator solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-01

    A limited pilot production run on PESC silicon solar cells for use at high concentrations (200 to 400 suns) is summarized. The front contact design of the cells was modified for operation without prismatic covers. The original objective of the contract was to systematically complete a process consolidation phase, in which all the, process improvements developed during the contract would be combined in a pilot production run. This pilot run was going to provide, a basis for estimating cell costs when produced at high throughput. Because of DOE funding limitations, the Photovoltaic Concentrator Initiative is on hold, and Applied Solar`s contract was operated at a low level of effort for most of 1993. The results obtained from the reduced scope pilot run showed the effects of discontinuous process optimization and characterization. However, the run provided valuable insight into the technical areas that can be optimized to achieve the original goals of the contract.

  16. Sensitive and Specific Biomimetic Lipid Coated Microfluidics to Isolate Viable Circulating Tumor Cells and Microemboli for Cancer Detection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Yang Chen

    Full Text Available Here we presented a simple and effective membrane mimetic microfluidic device with antibody conjugated supported lipid bilayer (SLB "smart coating" to capture viable circulating tumor cells (CTCs and circulating tumor microemboli (CTM directly from whole blood of all stage clinical cancer patients. The non-covalently bound SLB was able to promote dynamic clustering of lipid-tethered antibodies to CTC antigens and minimized non-specific blood cells retention through its non-fouling nature. A gentle flow further flushed away loosely-bound blood cells to achieve high purity of CTCs, and a stream of air foam injected disintegrate the SLB assemblies to release intact and viable CTCs from the chip. Human blood spiked cancer cell line test showed the ~95% overall efficiency to recover both CTCs and CTMs. Live/dead assay showed that at least 86% of recovered cells maintain viability. By using 2 mL of peripheral blood, the CTCs and CTMs counts of 63 healthy and colorectal cancer donors were positively correlated with the cancer progression. In summary, a simple and effective strategy utilizing biomimetic principle was developed to retrieve viable CTCs for enumeration, molecular analysis, as well as ex vivo culture over weeks. Due to the high sensitivity and specificity, it is the first time to show the high detection rates and quantity of CTCs in non-metastatic cancer patients. This work offers the values in both early cancer detection and prognosis of CTC and provides an accurate non-invasive strategy for routine clinical investigation on CTCs.

  17. Viable cell sorting of dinoflagellates by multi-parametric flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Electronic cell sorting for isolation and culture of dinoflagellates and other marine eukaryotic phytoplankton was compared to the traditional method of manually picking of cells using a micropipette. Trauma to electronically sorted cells was not a limiting factor as fragile dinoflagellates, such a...

  18. Fuel cells are a commercially viable alternative for the production of "clean" energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niakolas, Dimitris K; Daletou, Maria; Neophytides, Stylianos G; Vayenas, Constantinos G

    2016-01-01

    Fuel cells present a highly efficient and environmentally friendly alternative technology for decentralized energy production. The scope of the present study is to provide an overview of the technological and commercialization readiness level of fuel cells. Specifically, there is a brief description of their general advantages and weaknesses in correlation with various technological actions and political strategies, which are adopted towards their proper positioning in the global market. Some of the most important key performance indicators are also discussed, alongside with a few examples of broad commercialization. It is concluded that the increasing number of companies which utilize and invest on this technology, in combination with the supply chain improvements and the concomitant technological maturity and recognition, reinforce the fuel cell industry so as to become well-aligned for global success.

  19. A viable electrode material for use in microbial fuel cells for tropical regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Offei, Felix; Thygesen, Anders; Mensah, Moses

    2016-01-01

    Electrode materials are critical for microbial fuel cells (MFC) since they influence the construction and operational costs. This study introduces a simple and efficient electrode material in the form of palm kernel shell activated carbon (AC) obtained in tropical regions. The novel introduction...

  20. Progress in emerging techniques for characterization of immobilized viable whole-cell biocatalysts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bučko, M.; Vikartovská, A.; Schenkmayerová, A.; Tkáč, J.; Filip, J.; Chorvát Jr., D.; Neděla, Vilém; Ansorge-Schumacher, M.B.; Gemeiner, P.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 71, č. 11 (2017), s. 2309-2324 ISSN 0366-6352 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : bioelectrocatalysis * imaging techniques * immobilized whole- cell biocatalyst * multienzyme cascade reactions * online kinetics Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.258, year: 2016

  1. Progress in biocatalysis with immobilized viable whole cells: systems development, reaction engineering and applications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Polakovič, M.; Švitel, J.; Bučko, M.; Filip, J.; Neděla, Vilém; Ansorge-Schumacher, M.B.; Gemeiner, P.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 39, č. 5 (2017), s. 667-683 ISSN 0141-5492 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : biocatalysis * immobilization methods * immobilized whole-cell biocatalyst * multienzyme cascade reactions * process economics * reaction engineering Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.730, year: 2016

  2. Identifying viable regulatory and innovation pathways for regenerative medicine: a case study of cultured red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittra, J; Tait, J; Mastroeni, M; Turner, M L; Mountford, J C; Bruce, K

    2015-01-25

    The creation of red blood cells for the blood transfusion markets represents a highly innovative application of regenerative medicine with a medium term (5-10 year) prospect for first clinical studies. This article describes a case study analysis of a project to derive red blood cells from human embryonic stem cells, including the systemic challenges arising from (i) the selection of appropriate and viable regulatory protocols and (ii) technological constraints related to stem cell manufacture and scale up to clinical Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) standard. The method used for case study analysis (Analysis of Life Science Innovation Systems (ALSIS)) is also innovative, demonstrating a new approach to social and natural science collaboration to foresight product development pathways. Issues arising along the development pathway include cell manufacture and scale-up challenges, affected by regulatory demands emerging from the innovation ecosystem (preclinical testing and clinical trials). Our discussion reflects on the efforts being made by regulators to adapt the current pharmaceuticals-based regulatory model to an allogeneic regenerative medicine product and the broader lessons from this case study for successful innovation and translation of regenerative medicine therapies, including the role of methodological and regulatory innovation in future development in the field. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Real-Time PCR Methodology for Selective Detection of Viable Escherichia coli O157:H7 Cells by Targeting Z3276 as a Genetic Marker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jin-Qiang

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study was to develop a sensitive, specific, and accurate method for the selective detection of viable Escherichia coli O157:H7 cells in foods. A unique open reading frame (ORF), Z3276, was identified as a specific genetic marker for the detection of E. coli O157:H7. We developed a real-time PCR assay with primers and probe targeting ORF Z3276 and confirmed that this assay was sensitive and specific for E. coli O157:H7 strains (n = 298). Using this assay, we can detect amounts of genomic DNA of E. coli O157:H7 as low as a few CFU equivalents. Moreover, we have developed a new propidium monoazide (PMA)–real-time PCR protocol that allows for the clear differentiation of viable from dead cells. In addition, the protocol was adapted to a 96-well plate format for easy and consistent handling of a large number of samples. Amplification of DNA from PMA-treated dead cells was almost completely inhibited, in contrast to the virtually unaffected amplification of DNA from PMA-treated viable cells. With beef spiked simultaneously with 8 × 107 dead cells/g and 80 CFU viable cells/g, we were able to selectively detect viable E. coli O157:H7 cells with an 8-h enrichment. In conclusion, this PMA–real-time PCR assay offers a sensitive and specific means to selectively detect viable E. coli O157:H7 cells in spiked beef. It also has the potential for high-throughput selective detection of viable E. coli O157:H7 cells in other food matrices and, thus, will have an impact on the accurate microbiological and epidemiological monitoring of food safety and environmental sources. PMID:22635992

  4. Viable Bacteria Associated with Red Blood Cells and Plasma in Freshly Drawn Blood Donations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Christian; Magnussen, Karin; Enevold, Christian

    2015-01-01

    the oral cavity, and to determine the distribution of bacteria revealed in plasma and in the red blood cell (RBC)-fraction. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. Blood were separated into plasma and RBC-suspensions, which were incubated anaerobically or aerobically for 7 days on trypticase soy blood agar (TSA......), self-reported medically healthy. RESULTS: Bacterial growth was observed on plates inoculated with plasma or RBCs from 62% of the blood donations. Growth was evident in 21 (35%) of 60 RBC-fractions and in 32 (53%) of 60 plasma-fractions versus 8 of 60 negative controls (p = 0.005 and p = 2.6x10...... of RBC-fractions for adherent bacteria should be recommended....

  5. A Viable Electrode Material for Use in Microbial Fuel Cells for Tropical Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Offei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrode materials are critical for microbial fuel cells (MFC since they influence the construction and operational costs. This study introduces a simple and efficient electrode material in the form of palm kernel shell activated carbon (AC obtained in tropical regions. The novel introduction of this material is also targeted at introducing an inexpensive and durable electrode material, which can be produced in rural communities to improve the viability of MFCs. The maximum voltage and power density obtained (under 1000 Ω load using an H-shaped MFC with AC as both anode and cathode electrode material was 0.66 V and 1.74 W/m3, respectively. The power generated by AC was as high as 86% of the value obtained with the extensively used carbon paper. Scanning electron microscopy and Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE analysis of AC anode biofilms confirmed that electrogenic bacteria were present on the electrode surface for substrate oxidation and the formation of nanowires.

  6. A factor converting viable but nonculturable Vibrio cholerae to a culturable state in eukaryotic cells is a human catalase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senoh, Mitsutoshi; Hamabata, Takashi; Takeda, Yoshifumi

    2015-08-01

    In our previous work, we demonstrated that viable but nonculturable (VBNC) Vibrio cholerae O1 and O139 were converted to culturable by coculture with eukaryotic cells. Furthermore, we isolated a factor converting VBNC V. cholerae to culturable (FCVC) from a eukaryotic cell line, HT-29. In this study, we purified FCVC by successive column chromatographies comprising UNO Q-6 anion exchange, Bio-Scale CHT2-1 hydroxyapatite, and Superdex 200 10/300 GL. Homogeneity of the purified FCVC was demonstrated by SDS-PAGE. Nano-LC MS/MS analysis showed that the purified FCVC was a human catalase. An experiment of RNAi knockdown of catalase mRNA from HT-29 cells and treatment of the purified FCVC with a catalase inhibitor, 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole confirmed that the FCVC was a catalase. A possible role of the catalase in converting a VBNC V. cholerae to a culturable state in the human intestine is discussed. © 2015 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Drugs with anti-oxidant properties can interfere with cell viability measurements by assays that rely on the reducing property of viable cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenoy, Niraj; Stenson, Mary; Lawson, Joshua; Abeykoon, Jithma; Patnaik, Mrinal; Wu, Xiaosheng; Witzig, Thomas

    2017-02-27

    Cell viability assays such as Cell Titer Blue and Alamar Blue rely on the reducing property of viable cells to reduce the reagent dye to a product which gives a fluorescent signal. The current manufacture-recommended protocols do not take into account the possibility of the reagent substrate being reduced directly to the fluorescent product by drugs with an anti-oxidant property. After suspecting spurious results while determining the cytotoxic potential of a drug of interest (DOI) with known anti-oxidant property against a renal cell cancer (RCC) cell line, we aimed to establish that drugs with anti-oxidant property can indeed cause false-negative results with the current protocols of these assays by direct reduction of the reagent substrate. We also aimed to counter the same with a simple modification added to the protocol. Through our experiments, we conclusively demonstrate that drugs with anti-oxidant properties can indeed interfere with cell viability measurements by assays that rely on the reducing property of viable cells. A simple modification in the protocol, as elaborated in the manuscript, can prevent spurious results with these otherwise convenient assays.Laboratory Investigation advance online publication, 27 February 2017; doi:10.1038/labinvest.2017.18.

  8. A viable foal obtained by equine somatic cell nuclear transfer using oocytes recovered from immature follicles of live mares.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Young-Ho; Norris, Jody D; Velez, Isabel C; Jacobson, Candace C; Hartman, David L; Hinrichs, Katrin

    2013-03-15

    The presence of heterogenous mitochondria from the host ooplast affects the acceptance of offspring obtained by somatic cell nuclear transfer. This might be avoided by obtaining oocytes from selected females, but is then complicated by low numbers of available oocytes. We examined the efficiency of equine somatic cell nuclear transfer using oocytes recovered by transvaginal aspiration of immature follicles from 11 mares. Use of metaphase I oocytes as cytoplasts and of scriptaid (a histone deacetylase inhibitor) treatment during oocyte activation were evaluated to determine if these approaches would increase blastocyst production. In experiment 1, blastocyst development was 0/14 for metaphase I oocytes and 4/103 (4%) for metaphase II oocytes. Three blastocysts were transferred to recipient mares, resulting in two pregnancies and one live foal, which died shortly after birth. In experiment 2, blastocyst development was 2/47 (4%) for control oocytes and 1/83 (1%) for scriptaid-treated oocytes. No foals were born from two blastocysts transferred in the control group. The blastocyst from the scriptaid treatment resulted in birth of a live foal. In conclusion, this is apparently the first report of production of a viable cloned foal from oocytes collected from immature follicles of live mares, supporting the possibility of cloning using oocytes from selected mares. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Clinical validation of an ultra high-throughput spiral microfluidics for the detection and enrichment of viable circulating tumor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bee Luan Khoo

    Full Text Available Circulating tumor cells (CTCs are cancer cells that can be isolated via liquid biopsy from blood and can be phenotypically and genetically characterized to provide critical information for guiding cancer treatment. Current analysis of CTCs is hindered by the throughput, selectivity and specificity of devices or assays used in CTC detection and isolation.Here, we enriched and characterized putative CTCs from blood samples of patients with both advanced stage metastatic breast and lung cancers using a novel multiplexed spiral microfluidic chip. This system detected putative CTCs under high sensitivity (100%, n = 56 (Breast cancer samples: 12-1275 CTCs/ml; Lung cancer samples: 10-1535 CTCs/ml rapidly from clinically relevant blood volumes (7.5 ml under 5 min. Blood samples were completely separated into plasma, CTCs and PBMCs components and each fraction were characterized with immunophenotyping (Pan-cytokeratin/CD45, CD44/CD24, EpCAM, fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH (EML4-ALK or targeted somatic mutation analysis. We used an ultra-sensitive mass spectrometry based system to highlight the presence of an EGFR-activating mutation in both isolated CTCs and plasma cell-free DNA (cf-DNA, and demonstrate concordance with the original tumor-biopsy samples.We have clinically validated our multiplexed microfluidic chip for the ultra high-throughput, low-cost and label-free enrichment of CTCs. Retrieved cells were unlabeled and viable, enabling potential propagation and real-time downstream analysis using next generation sequencing (NGS or proteomic analysis.

  10. Quantitation of viable Coxiella burnetii in milk using an integrated cell culture-polymerase chain reaction (ICC-PCR) assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Diana; Shieh, Y-Carol; Tortorello, Mary; Kukreja, Ankush; Shazer, Arlette; Schlesser, Joseph

    2015-11-01

    The obligate intracellular pathogen Coxiella burnetii has long been considered the most heat resistant pathogen in raw milk, making it the reference pathogen for determining pasteurisation conditions for milk products. New milk formulations and novel non-thermal processes require validation of effectiveness which requires a more practical method for analysis than using the currently used animal model for assessing Coxiella survival. Also, there is an interest in better characterising thermal inactivation of Coxiella in various milk formulations. To avoid the use of the guinea pig model for evaluating Coxiella survival, an Integrated Cell Culture-PCR (ICC-PCR) method was developed for determining Coxiella viability in milk. Vero cell cultures were directly infected from Coxiella-contaminated milk in duplicate 24-well plates. Viability of the Coxiella in milk was shown by a ≥ 0.5 log genome equivalent (ge)/ml increase in the quantity of IS111a gene from the baseline post-infection (day 0) level after 9-11 d propagation. Coxiella in skim, 2%, and whole milk, and half and half successfully infected Vero cells and increased in number by at least 2 logs using a 48-h infection period followed by 9-d propagation time. As few as 125 Coxiella ge/ml in whole milk was shown to infect and propagate at least 2 logs in the optimised ICC-PCR assay, though variable confirmation of propagation was shown for as low as 25 Coxiella ge/ml. Applicability of the ICC-PCR method was further proven in an MPN format to quantitate the number of viable Coxiella remaining in whole milk after 60 °C thermal treatment at 0, 20, 40, 60 and 90 min.

  11. Fluorescence Quenching Property of C-Phycocyanin from Spirulina platensis and its Binding Efficacy with Viable Cell Components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paswan, Meenakshi B; Chudasama, Meghna M; Mitra, Madhusree; Bhayani, Khushbu; George, Basil; Chatterjee, Shruti; Mishra, Sandhya

    2016-03-01

    Phycocyanin is a natural brilliant blue colored, fluorescent protein, which is commonly present in cyanobacteria. In this study, C-phycocyanin was extracted and purified from Spirulina platensis, which are multicellular and filamentous cyanobacteria of greater importance because of its various biological and pharmacological potential. It was analyzed for its binding affinity towards blood cells, algal cells, genomic DNA of microalgae, and bacteria at different temperature and incubation time. It showed good binding affinity with these components even at low concentration of 2.5 μM. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the applicability of C-phycocyanin as a green fluorescent dye substituting carcinogenic chemical dyes.

  12. Polyelectrolyte Complex Beads by Novel Two-Step Process for Improved Performance of Viable Whole-Cell Baeyer-Villiger Monoxygenase by Immobilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomáš Krajčovič

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A novel immobilization matrix for the entrapment of viable whole-cell Baeyer–Villiger monooxygenase was developed. Viable recombinant Escherichia coli cells overexpressing cyclohexanone monooxygenase were entrapped in polyelectrolyte complex beads prepared by a two-step reaction of oppositely-charged polymers including highly defined cellulose sulphate. Immobilized cells exhibited higher operational stability than free cells during 10 repeated cycles of Baeyer–Villiger biooxidations of rac-bicyclo[3.2.0]hept-2-en-6-one to the corresponding lactones (1R,5S-3-oxabicyclo-[3.3.0]oct-6-en-3-one and (1S,5R-2-oxabicyclo-[3.3.0]oct-6-en-3-one. The morphology of polyelectrolyte complex beads was characterised by environmental scanning electron microscopy; the spatial distribution of polymers in the beads and cell viability were examined using confocal laser scanning microscopy, and the texture was characterised by the mechanical resistance measurements.

  13. Concentrated sunlight for organic solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tromholt, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Concentrated sunlight provides a novel approach to the study of the physical and electrical parameters of organic solar cells. The study of performance of organic solar cells at high solar concentrations provides insight into the physics, which cannot be studied with conventional solar simulators....... A high solar intensity study of inverted P3HT:PCBM solar cells is presented. Performance peak positions were found to be in the range of 1-5 suns, with smaller cells peaking at higher solar concentrations. Additionally, concentrated sunlight is demonstrated as a practical tool for accelerated stability...... studies of polymers for organic solar cells. Degradation was monitored by the evolution of the UV-vis absorption over time. Varying the solar intensity from 1 to 200 suns, the degradation rates were increased by more than a factor of 100 relative to degradation at 1 simulated sun. 5 different polymers...

  14. Enhanced inhibition of murine prostatic carcinoma growth by immunization with or administration of viable human umbilical vein endothelial cells and CRM197

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Huiyong

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Vaccination with xenogeneic and syngeneic endothelial cells is effective for inhibiting tumor growth. Nontoxic diphtheria toxin (CRM197, as an immunogen or as a specific inhibitor of heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor, has shown promising antitumor activity. Therefore, immunization with or administration of viable human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs combined with CRM197 could have an enhanced antitumor effect. Six-week-old C57BL/6J male mice were vaccinated with viable HUVECs, 1 x 10(6 viable HUVECs combined with 100 μg CRM197, or 100 μg CRM197 alone by ip injections once a week for 4 consecutive weeks. RM-1 cells (5 x 10(5 were inoculated by sc injection as a preventive procedure. During the therapeutic procedure, 6-week-old male C57BL/6J mice were challenged with 1 x 10(5 RM-1 cells, then injected sc with 1 x 10(6 viable HUVECs, 1 x 10(6 viable HUVECs + 100 μg CRM197, and 100 μg CRM197 alone twice a week for 4 consecutive weeks. Tumor volume and life span were monitored. We also investigated the effects of immunization with HUVECs on the aortic arch wall and on wound healing. Vaccination with or administration of viable HUVECs+CRM197 enhanced the inhibition of RM-1 prostatic carcinoma by 24 and 29%, respectively, and prolonged the life span for 3 and 4 days, respectively, compared with those of only vaccination or administration with viable HUVECs of tumor-bearing C57BL/6J mice. Furthermore, HUVEC immunization caused some damage to the aortic arch wall but did not have remarkable effects on the rate of wound healing; the wounds healed in approximately 13 days. Treatment with CRM197 in combination with viable HUVECs resulted in a marked enhancement of the antitumor effect in the preventive or therapeutic treatment for prostatic carcinoma in vivo, suggesting a novel combination for anti-cancer therapy.

  15. Uniform sunlight concentration reflectors for photovoltaic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabady, Rabi Ibrahim

    2014-03-20

    Sunlight concentration is essential to reach high temperatures of a working fluid in solar-thermal applications and to reduce the cost of photovoltaic (PV) electricity generation systems. Commonly, sunlight concentration is realized by parabolic or cylindrical reflectors, which do not provide uniform concentration on the receiver finite surface. Uniform concentration of sunlight is favored especially for the PV conversion applications since it not only enhances the conversion efficiency of sunlight but also reduces the thermal variations along the receiving PV cell, which can be a performance and life-span limiting factor. In this paper a reflector profile that uniformly infiltrates the concentrated sunlight into the receiving unit is attempted. The new design accounts for all factors that contribute to the nonuniform concentration, like the reflector curvature, which spatially reflects the sunlight nonuniformly, and the angular dependency of both the reflector reflectivity and the sunlight transmission through the PV cell.

  16. Assessing prognosis and optimizing treatment in patients with postchemotherapy viable nonseminomatous germ-cell tumors (NSGCT): results of the sCR2 international study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fizazi, K.; Oldenburg, J.; Dunant, A.

    2008-01-01

    malignant cells, and a good International Germ Cell Consensus Classification group at presentation. Patients were assigned to one of three risk groups defined in sCR1: no risk factor (good risk), one risk factor (intermediate risk) and two to three risk factors (poor risk group). The 5-year PFS rate was 92...... with surveillance and treatment only at relapse. CONCLUSION: In patients with postchemotherapy viable NSGCT, a complete resection of residual masses should be rigorously pursued. These data validate the sCR1 prognostic index. Given their excellent outcome, patients in the favorable group may not require......BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to validate a prognostic index [surgical complete response 1 (sCR1)] in patients with postchemotherapy viable nonseminomatous germ-cell tumors (NSGCT). PATIENTS AND METHODS: Data and specimens from 61 patients with normalized tumor markers...

  17. Viable Cancer Cells in the Remnant Stomach are a Potential Source of Peritoneal Metastasis after Curative Distal Gastrectomy for Gastric Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Tsuyoshi; Kaida, Sachiko; Ishida, Mitsuaki; Kodama, Hirokazu; Takebayashi, Katsushi; Shimizu, Tomoharu; Miyake, Toru; Tani, Tohru; Kushima, Ryoji; Tani, Masaji

    2016-09-01

    The mechanisms underlying peritoneal metastasis (PM) after curative gastrectomy for gastric cancer (GC) are not well elucidated. This study assessed whether viable cancer cells, including cancer stemlike cells (CSCs), were present in the remnant stomach immediately before gastrointestinal (GI) tract reconstruction because these could be a source of PM after gastrectomy. Saline fluid used for remnant stomach lumen irrigation before GI reconstruction was prospectively collected from 142 consecutive patients undergoing distal gastrectomy for GC and cytologically examined. Proliferative activity (Ki67 staining) and stemness (expression of the CSC surface markers CD44s or CD44v6) were evaluated in detected cancer cells. Viable cancer cells were detected in 33 (23.2 %) of the 142 remnant stomachs. These cells formed clusters and stained positively for Ki67, indicating proliferation. Cancer cells in remnant stomachs and surface cancer cells in primary GCs from 10 (30.3 %) of these 33 cases also stained positively for CD44s or CD44v6. In a multiple logistic regression analysis, advanced cancer (odds ratio [OR], 4.65; 95 % confidence interval [CI], 1.32-16.4; P = 0.017), tumor size of 40 mm or larger (OR, 3.78; 95 % CI, 1.12-12.8; P = 0.033), and histologic differentiation (OR, 3.10; 95 % CI, 1.30-7.40; P = 0.011) were associated independently with the presence of cancer cells in the remnant stomach. Viable, proliferative, and clustered cancer cells, including CSCs, were found in remnant gastric lumens immediately before GI reconstruction, indicating a possible cellular source of PM after curative gastrectomy for GC. Dissemination of gastric contents into the peritoneal cavity should be avoided during GI reconstruction.

  18. Experimental design for the optimization of propidium monoazide treatment to quantify viable and non-viable bacteria in piggery effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desneux, Jérémy; Chemaly, Marianne; Pourcher, Anne-Marie

    2015-08-16

    Distinguishing between viable and dead bacteria in animal and urban effluents is a major challenge. Among existing methods, propidium monoazide (PMA)-qPCR is a promising way to quantify viable cells. However, its efficiency depends on the composition of the effluent, particularly on total suspended solids (TSS)) and on methodological parameters. The aim of this study was evaluate the influence of three methodological factors (concentration of PMA, incubation time and photoactivation time) on the efficiency of PMA-qPCR to quantify viable and dead cells of Listeria monocytogenes used as a microorganism model, in two piggery effluents (manure and lagoon effluent containing 20 and 0.4 TSS g.kg(-1), respectively). An experimental design strategy (Doehlert design and desirability function) was used to identify the experimental conditions to achieve optimal PMA-qPCR results. The quantification of viable cells of L. monocytogenes was mainly influenced by the concentration of PMA in the manure and by the duration of photoactivation in the lagoon effluent. Optimal values differed with the matrix: 55 μM PMA, 5 min incubation and 56 min photoactivation for manure and 20 μM PMA, 20 min incubation and 30 min photoactivation for lagoon effluent. Applied to five manure and four lagoon samples, these conditions resulted in satisfactory quantification of viable and dead cells. PMA-qPCR can be used on undiluted turbid effluent with high levels of TSS, provided preliminary tests are performed to identify the optimal conditions.

  19. Not single but periodic injections of synovial mesenchymal stem cells maintain viable cells in knees and inhibit osteoarthritis progression in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozeki, N; Muneta, T; Koga, H; Nakagawa, Y; Mizuno, M; Tsuji, K; Mabuchi, Y; Akazawa, C; Kobayashi, E; Matsumoto, K; Futamura, K; Saito, T; Sekiya, I

    2016-06-01

    We investigated the effects of single or repetitive intra-articular injections of synovial mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) on a rat osteoarthritis (OA) model, and elucidated the behaviors and underlying mechanisms of the stem cells after the injection. One week after the transection of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) of wild type Lewis rats, one million synovial MSCs were injected into the knee joint every week. Cartilage degeneration was evaluated with safranin-o staining after the first injection. To analyze cell kinetics or MSC properties, luciferase, LacZ, and GFP expressing synovial MSCs were used. To confirm the role of MSCs, species-specific microarray and PCR analyses were performed using human synovial MSCs. Histological analysis for femoral and tibial cartilage showed that a single injection was ineffective but weekly injections had significant chondroprotective effects for 12 weeks. Histological and flow-cytometric analyses of LacZ and GFP expressing synovial MSCs revealed that injected MSCs migrated mainly into the synovium and most of them retained their undifferentiated MSC properties though the migrated cells rapidly decreased. In vivo imaging analysis revealed that MSCs maintained in knees while weekly injection. Species-specific microarray and PCR analyses showed that the human mRNAs on day 1 for 21 genes increased over 50-fold, and increased the expressions of PRG-4, BMP-2, and BMP-6 genes encoding chondroprotective proteins, and TSG-6 encoding an anti-inflammatory one. Not single but periodic injections of synovial MSCs maintained viable cells without losing their MSC properties in knees and inhibited osteoarthritis (OA) progression by secretion of trophic factors. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. Macrophage conditioned medium induced cellular network formation in MCF-7 cells through enhanced tunneling nanotube formation and tunneling nanotube mediated release of viable cytoplasmic fragments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patheja, Pooja, E-mail: pooja.patheja8@gmail.com [Laser Biomedical Applications Section, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452013, Madhya Pradesh (India); Homi Bhabha National Institute, Training School Complex, Anushaktinagar, Mumbai 400094, Maharashtra (India); Sahu, Khageswar [Laser Biomedical Applications Section, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452013, Madhya Pradesh (India)

    2017-06-15

    Infiltrating macrophages in tumor microenvironment, through their secreted cytokines and growth factors, regulate several processes of cancer progression such as cancer cell survival, proliferation, invasion, metastasis and angiogenesis. Recently, intercellular cytoplasmic bridges between cancer cells referred as tunneling nanotubes (TNTs) have been recognized as novel mode of intercellular communication between cancer cells. In this study, we investigated the effect of inflammatory mediators present in conditioned medium derived from macrophages on the formation of TNTs in breast adenocarcinoma cells MCF-7. Results show that treatment with macrophage conditioned medium (MφCM) not only enhanced TNT formation between cells but also stimulated the release of independently migrating viable cytoplasmic fragments, referred to as microplasts, from MCF-7 cells. Time lapse microscopy revealed that microplasts were released from parent cancer cells in extracellular space through formation of TNT-like structures. Mitochondria, vesicles and cytoplasm could be transferred from parent cell body to microplasts through connecting TNTs. The microplasts could also be resorbed into the parent cell body by retraction of the connecting TNTs. Microplast formation inhibited in presence cell migration inhibitor, cytochalasin-B. Notably by utilizing migratory machinery within microplasts, distantly located MCF-7 cells formed several TNT based intercellular connections, leading to formation of physically connected network of cells. Together, these results demonstrate novel role of TNTs in microplast formation, novel modes of TNT formation mediated by microplasts and stimulatory effect of MφCM on cellular network formation in MCF-7 cells mediated through enhanced TNT and microplast formation.

  1. Bacillus subtilis mutants with knockouts of the genes encoding ribonucleases RNase Y and RNase J1 are viable, with major defects in cell morphology, sporulation, and competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figaro, Sabine; Durand, Sylvain; Gilet, Laetitia; Cayet, Nadège; Sachse, Martin; Condon, Ciarán

    2013-05-01

    The genes encoding the ribonucleases RNase J1 and RNase Y have long been considered essential for Bacillus subtilis cell viability, even before there was concrete knowledge of their function as two of the most important enzymes for RNA turnover in this organism. Here we show that this characterization is incorrect and that ΔrnjA and Δrny mutants are both viable. As expected, both strains grow relatively slowly, with doubling times in the hour range in rich medium. Knockout mutants have major defects in their sporulation and competence development programs. Both mutants are hypersensitive to a wide range of antibiotics and have dramatic alterations to their cell morphologies, suggestive of cell envelope defects. Indeed, RNase Y mutants are significantly smaller in diameter than wild-type strains and have a very disordered peptidoglycan layer. Strains lacking RNase J1 form long filaments in tight spirals, reminiscent of mutants of the actin-like proteins (Mre) involved in cell shape determination. Finally, we combined the rnjA and rny mutations with mutations in other components of the degradation machinery and show that many of these strains are also viable. The implications for the two known RNA degradation pathways of B. subtilis are discussed.

  2. Effects of the oral administration of viable and heat-killed Streptococcus bovis HC5 cells to pre-sensitized BALB/c mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline D Paiva

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides have been suggested as an alternative to classical antibiotics in livestock production and bacteriocin-producing bacteria could be added to animal feeds to deliver bacteriocins in the gastrointestinal (GI tract of ruminant and monogastric animals. In this study, viable (V and heat-killed (HK Streptococcus bovis HC5 cells were orally administered to pre-sensitized mice in order to assess the effects of a bacteriocin-producing bacteria on histological parameters and the immune response of the GI tract of monogastric animals. The administration of V and HK S. bovis HC5 cells during 58 days to BALB/c mice did not affect weight gain, but an increase in gut permeability was detected in animals receiving the HK cells. Viable and heat killed cells caused similar morphological alterations in the GI tract of the animals, but the most prominent effects were detected in the small intestine. The oral administration of S. bovis HC5 also influenced cytokine production in the small intestine, and the immune-mediated activity differed between V and HK cells. The relative expression of IL-12 and INF-γ was significantly higher in the small intestine of mice treated with V cells, while an increase in IL-5, IL-13 and TNF-α expression was only detected in mice treated with HK cells. Considering that even under a condition of severe challenge (pre-sensitization followed by daily exposure to the same bacterial immunogen the general health of the animals was maintained, it appears that oral administration of S. bovis HC5 cells could be a useful route to deliver bacteriocin in the GI tract of livestock animals.

  3. A non-aggressive, highly efficient, enzymatic method for dissociation of human brain-tumors and brain-tissues to viable single-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volovitz, Ilan; Shapira, Netanel; Ezer, Haim; Gafni, Aviv; Lustgarten, Merav; Alter, Tal; Ben-Horin, Idan; Barzilai, Ori; Shahar, Tal; Kanner, Andrew; Fried, Itzhak; Veshchev, Igor; Grossman, Rachel; Ram, Zvi

    2016-06-01

    Conducting research on the molecular biology, immunology, and physiology of brain tumors (BTs) and primary brain tissues requires the use of viably dissociated single cells. Inadequate methods for tissue dissociation generate considerable loss in the quantity of single cells produced and in the produced cells' viability. Improper dissociation may also demote the quality of data attained in functional and molecular assays due to the presence of large quantities cellular debris containing immune-activatory danger associated molecular patterns, and due to the increased quantities of degraded proteins and RNA. Over 40 resected BTs and non-tumorous brain tissue samples were dissociated into single cells by mechanical dissociation or by mechanical and enzymatic dissociation. The quality of dissociation was compared for all frequently used dissociation enzymes (collagenase, DNase, hyaluronidase, papain, dispase) and for neutral protease (NP) from Clostridium histolyticum. Single-cell-dissociated cell mixtures were evaluated for cellular viability and for the cell-mixture dissociation quality. Dissociation quality was graded by the quantity of subcellular debris, non-dissociated cell clumps, and DNA released from dead cells. Of all enzymes or enzyme combinations examined, NP (an enzyme previously not evaluated on brain tissues) produced dissociated cell mixtures with the highest mean cellular viability: 93 % in gliomas, 85 % in brain metastases, and 89 % in non-tumorous brain tissue. NP also produced cell mixtures with significantly less cellular debris than other enzymes tested. Dissociation using NP was non-aggressive over time-no changes in cell viability or dissociation quality were found when comparing 2-h dissociation at 37 °C to overnight dissociation at ambient temperature. The use of NP allows for the most effective dissociation of viable single cells from human BTs or brain tissue. Its non-aggressive dissociative capacity may enable ambient

  4. Enumeration of viable and non-viable larvated Ascaris eggs with quantitative PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raynal, Maria; Villegas, Eric N; Nelson, Kara L

    2012-12-01

    The goal of this study was to further develop an incubation-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) method for quantifying viable Ascaris eggs by characterizing the detection limit and number of template copies per egg, determining the specificity of the method, and testing the method with viable and inactivated larvated eggs. The number of template copies per cell was determined by amplifying DNA from known numbers of eggs at different development stages; the value was estimated to be 32 copies. The specificity of the method was tested against a panel of bacteria, fungi, protozoa and helminths, and no amplification was found with non-target DNA. Finally, fully larvated eggs were inactivated by four different treatments: 254 nm ultraviolet light, 2,000 ppm NH(3)-N at pH 9, moderate heat (48 °C) and high heat (70 °C). Concentrations of treated eggs were measured by direct microscopy and incubation-qPCR. The qPCR signal decreased following all four treatments, and was in general agreement with the decrease in viable eggs determined by microscopy. The incubation-qPCR method for enumerating viable Ascaris eggs is a promising approach that can produce results faster than direct microscopy, and may have benefits for applications such as assessing biosolids.

  5. Prognostic impact of the number of viable circulating cells with high telomerase activity in gastric cancer patients: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Hiroaki; Inoue, Haruhiro; Kimura, Satoshi; Ohmori, Tohru; Ishikawa, Fumihiro; Gohda, Keigo; Sato, Jun

    2014-07-01

    The identification of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in peripheral blood is a useful approach to estimate prognosis, monitor disease progression and measure treatment effects in several types of malignancies. We have previously used OBP-401, a telomerase-specific, replication-selective, oncolytic adenoviral agent carrying the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene. GFP-positive cells (GFP+ cells) were counted under a fluorescence microscope. Our results showed that the number of at least 7.735 µm in diameter GFP+ cells (L-GFP+ cells) in the peripheral blood was a significant marker of prognosis in gastric cancer patients. However, tumor cells undergoing epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) have been reported to be smaller in size than cells without EMT features; thus, CTCs undergoing EMT may escape detection with this technique. Therefore, in this study, we analyzed the relationship between patient outcome and the number of GFP+ cells of any size. We obtained peripheral blood samples from 65 patients with gastric cancer. After infection of OBP-401, GFP+ cells were counted and measured. The relationship between the number of GFP+ cells and surgical outcome was analyzed. The median follow-up period of the surviving patients was 36 months. A significant difference in overall survival was found between patients with 0-5 and patients with ≥6 L-GFP+ cells. No clear relationship was established between the number of small-sized GFP+ cells and patient prognosis. The number of L-GFP+ cells was significantly related to overall survival in patients with gastric cancer. The detection of L-GFP+ cells using OBP-401 may be a useful prognostic marker in gastric cancer.

  6. Binding of CLL subset 4 B-cell receptor immunoglobulins to viable human memory B lymphocytes requires a distinctive IGKV somatic mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catera, Rosa; Liu, Yun; Gao, Chao; Yan, Xiao-Jie; Magli, Amanda; Allen, Steven L; Kolitz, Jonathan E; Rai, Kanti R; Chu, Charles C; Feizi, Ten; Stamatopoulos, Kostas; Chiorazzi, Nicholas

    2017-01-12

    Amino acid replacement mutations in certain CLL stereotyped B-cell receptor (BCR) immunoglobulins (IGs) at defined positions within antigen-binding sites strongly imply antigen selection. Prime examples of this are CLL subset 4 BCR IGs using IGHV4-34/IGHD5-18/IGHJ6 and IGKV2-30/IGKJ2 rearrangements. Conspicuously and unlike most CLL IGs, subset 4 IGs do not bind apoptotic cells. By testing the (auto)antigenic reactivities of subset 4 IGs toward viable lymphoid-lineage cells and specific autoantigens typically bound by IGHV4-34+ IGs, we found IGs from both subset 4 and non-subset 4 IGHV4-34-expressing CLL cases bind naïve B cells. However, only subset 4 IGs react with memory B cells. Furthermore, subset 4 IGs do not bind DNA nor i or I carbohydrate antigens, common targets of IGHV4-34-utilizing antibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus and cold agglutinin disease, respectively. Notably, we found that subset 4 IG binding to memory B lymphocytes depends on an aspartic acid at position 66 of FR3 in the rearranged IGKV2-30 gene; this amino acid residue is acquired by somatic mutation. Our findings illustrate the importance of positive and negative selection criteria for structural elements in CLL IGs and suggest that autoantigens driving normal B cells to become subset 4 CLL cells differ from those driving IGHV4-34+ B cells in other diseases.

  7. Managing Viable Knowledge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achterbergh, J.M.I.M.; Vriens, D.J.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, Beer's Viable System Model (VSM) is applied to knowledge management. Based on the VSM, domains of knowledge are identified that an organization should possess to maintain its viability. The logic of the VSM is also used to support the diagnosis, design and implementation of the

  8. Determination of Viable Salmonella Typhimurium Cells in Heat Treated Milk By PMA/Real-Time PCR Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zülal Kesmen

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Applying different technological processes during the production of food has a lethal effect on the bacteria but DNA of these bacterial strains may cause false positive results when detected by real time PCR technique because they preserve their existence for a certain period of time. To overcome this shortcoming of the real time PCR technique, a new method has been developed in recent years, based on the removal of dead cell DNA from the medium by treatment with Propodium Monoazide (PMA before DNA extraction. In this study, real-time PCR method was combined with PMA application for the detection of live cells of Salmonella Typhimurium in heat treated milk samples. For this purpose, milk samples inoculated with S. Tyhimurium were heat treated at different temperatures (60, 65, 70 and 75°C and times (15, 60, 300, 900 sec and number of live bacteria was determined comparatively by direct real-time PCR, PMA/real-time PCR and conventional cultural method. As a result, unlike the direct real time PCR technique, PMA/real-time PCR method prevents to a certain extent of false positive results from dead cells at all tested temperatures and times but higher results were obtained from PMA/real-time PCR method when compared to conventional cultural results. Therefore, further studies should be carried out to optimize the conditions of the PMA application in order to eliminate the high positive results detected by the PMA / real-time PCR method

  9. Advances toward regenerative medicine in the central nervous system: challenges in making stem cell therapy a viable clinical strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoll, Elizabeth A

    2014-01-01

    Over recent years, there has been a great deal of interest in the prospects of stem cell-based therapies for the treatment of nervous system disorders. The eagerness of scientists, clinicians, and spin-out companies to develop new therapies led to premature clinical trials in human patients, and now the initial excitement has largely turned to skepticism. Rather than embracing a defeatist attitude or pressing blindly ahead, I argue it is time to evaluate the challenges encountered by regenerative medicine in the central nervous system and the progress that is being made to solve these problems. In the twenty years since the adult brain was discovered to have an endogenous regenerative capacity, much basic research has been done to elucidate mechanisms controlling proliferation and cellular identity; how stem cells may be directed into neuronal lineages; genetic, pharmacological, and behavioral interventions that modulate neurogenic activity; and the exact nature of limitations to regeneration in the adult, aged, diseased and injured CNS. These findings should prove valuable in designing realistic clinical strategies to improve the prospects of stem cell-based therapies. In this review, I discuss how basic research continues to play a critical role in identifying both barriers and potential routes to regenerative therapy in the CNS.

  10. Induction of Viable but Nonculturable Salmonella in Exponentially Grown Cells by Exposure to a Low-Humidity Environment and Their Resuscitation by Catalase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishige, Yuta; Koike, Atsushi; Tamura-Ueyama, Ai; Amano, Fumio

    2017-02-01

    Salmonella is a major cause of foodborne disease that sometimes occurs in massive outbreaks around the world. This pathogen is tolerant of low-humidity conditions. We previously described a method for induction of viable but nonculturable (VBNC) Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis by treatment with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and subsequent resuscitation with 0.3 mM sodium pyruvate. Here, we report a new method for the induction of the VBNC state in Salmonella Enteritidis cells, one involving dehydration. Exposure of Salmonella Enteritidis cells to dehydration stress under poor nutritional conditions (0.9% [wt/vol] NaCl) and 10 to 20% relative humidity at room temperature decreased the presence of culturable population to 0.0067%, but respiratory and glucose uptake active populations were maintained at 0.46 and 1.12%, respectively, meaning that approximately 1% may have entered the VBNC state. Furthermore, these VBNC cells could be resuscitated to acquire culturability by incubation with catalase in M9 minimal medium without glucose in a manner dependent on the dose of catalase but not sodium pyruvate. These results suggest that a low-humidity environment could cause Salmonella Enteritidis cells to enter the VBNC state and the cells could then be resuscitated for growth by treatment with catalase, suggesting a potential risk of Salmonella Enteritidis to survive in low water activity foods in the VBNC state and to start regrowth for foodborne illness.

  11. Freezing Nitrogen Ethanol Composite May be a Viable Approach for Cryotherapy of Human Giant Cell Tumor of Bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Po-Kuei; Chen, Cheng-Fong; Wang, Jir-You; Chen, Paul Chih-Hsueh; Chang, Ming-Chau; Hung, Shih-Chieh; Chen, Wei-Ming

    2017-06-01

    Liquid nitrogen has been used as adjuvant cryotherapy for treating giant cell tumor (GCT) of bone. However, the liquid phase and ultrafreezing (-196° C) properties increase the risk of damage to the adjacent tissues and may lead to perioperative complications. A novel semisolid cryogen, freezing nitrogen ethanol composite, might mitigate these shortcomings because of less-extreme freezing. We therefore wished to evaluate freezing nitrogen ethanol composite as a coolant to determine its properties in tumor cryoablation. (1) Is freezing nitrogen ethanol composite-mediated freezing effective for tumor cryoablation in an ex vivo model, and if yes, is apoptosis involved in the tumor-killing mechanism? (2) Does freezing nitrogen ethanol composite treatment block neovascularization and neoplastic progression of the grafted GCTs and is it comparable to that of liquid nitrogen in an in vivo chicken model? (3) Can use of freezing nitrogen ethanol composite as an adjuvant to curettage result in successful short-term treatment, defined as absence of GCT recurrence at a minimum of 1 year in a small proof-of-concept clinical series? The cryogenic effect on bone tissue mediated by freezing nitrogen ethanol composite and liquid nitrogen was verified by thermal measurement in a time-course manner. Cryoablation on human GCT tissue was examined ex vivo for effect on morphologic features (cell shrinkage) and DNA fragmentation (apoptosis). The presumed mechanism was investigated by molecular analysis of apoptosis regulatory proteins including caspases 3, 8, and 9 and Bax/Bcl-2. Chicken chorioallantoic membrane was used as an in vivo model to evaluate the effects of freezing nitrogen ethanol composite and liquid nitrogen treatment on GCT-derived neovascularization and tumor neoplasm. A small group of patients with GCT of bone was treated by curettage and adjuvant freezing nitrogen ethanol composite cryotherapy in a proof-of-concept study. Tumor recurrence and perioperative

  12. Quality of raw cow milk in Republic of Macedonia determined through the testing of somatic cell count and total viable count

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelovski Ljupco

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Somatic cells count and total viable count are criteria used to estimate the compliance of raw cow milk with the Book of rules for demands for safety and hygiene and procedures for official controls of milk and milk products, Official Gazette of RM 157/2007. According to the given demands, raw milk operators are obliged to conduct all procedures and to guarantee that milk is in compliance with the criteria laid down in Book of rules. At the same time, Republic of Macedonia have to fulfill EU criteria laid down in Directive 92/46 (Council directive 92/46/EEC laying down the health rules for the production and placing on the market of raw milk, heat-treated milk and milkbased products for quality of raw milk as part of implementation of community legislation and milk production. The independent laboratory for milk quality control at FVM-Skopje, in frame of its activities in the period February- August 2008 has conducted a study for obtaining preliminary results for the situation with raw milk quality produced in R. of Macedonia for somatic cells counts and total viable count. In the study we analyzed 2065 samples for TVC and 1625 samples for SCC of raw milk samples produced in different parts of the country. From the tested samples only 41,8% fulfill criteria for SCC and 41,45% criteria for TVC lay down in Book of rules for 2008. Assessment of the results in light of Council Directive it is obvious that only 42,7% of the samples for SCC and 10,7% for TVC fulfill the criteria of Council Directive having in mind different requirements vs. Book of rules.

  13. Biologic properties of viable deletion mutants of simian virus 40 (SV40) rescued from the cells of an SV40-induced hamster lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamandopoulos, G T; Carmichael, G

    1983-12-01

    A lymphocytic leukemia induced by the oncogenic DNA simian virus 40 (SV40) in an inbred LSH/SsLak Syrian golden hamster was evoked to produce infectious SV40 by fusion of the leukemia cells with grivet monkey kidney (GMK) cells and by exposure of the leukemia cells to the chemical inducers mitomycin C and cycloheximide. Plaque-purified viable substrains of the rescued SV40 when studied by restriction endonuclease digestion of viral DNA were found to contain small deletions within the Hind III restriction fragment C. These deletions lay near the viral origin of DNA replication. Ten plaque-purified substrains of the rescued virus identified by immunofluorescence as being SV40 were found, when compared to the wild-type SV40, to replicate slowly and to form small plaques. Although these substrains transformed NIH/3T3 cells as efficiently as the wild-type SV40 in tissue culture, they were generally less oncogenic in vivo--7 of the 10 failed to induce tumors. The 3 oncogenic SV40-rescued substrains were not found to exhibit "lymphocytotropism," i.e., the capacity to infect and neoplastically transform preferentially hamster lymphocytes. Thus the hamster lymphocytic leukemia originally induced by the wild-type SV40 was most likely a chance-stochastic event rather than the result of tropism-determinism mediated by the virus, as is usually the case with leukemogenic RNA viruses.

  14. Where Do All the Phytoplankton Go? Challenges in Keeping Track of Viable Cells in Phytoplankton Communities Using Flow Cytometry and Cell Staining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, L. J.; Fobbe, D. J.; Berges, J. A.

    2016-02-01

    Understanding the dynamics of phytoplankton communities has traditionally focused on differences in growth and related processes among taxa. It is now appreciated that differences in mortality could be equally important in contributing to these dynamics. Studying mortality in communities is difficult, especially on relevant time scales, which could be as short as hours to days. Flow cytometry can potentially provide solutions, because it can allow discrimination of different taxa, and when combined with staining, distinguish live and dead cells. We applied flow cytometry and staining to phytoplankton communities in a model system: a small, well-studied, urban pond in southeastern Wisconsin. Using flow cytometry, it was possible to resolve up to six dominant taxa (most stain also affected other fluorescence channels, requiring compensation. Correlations of numbers of dead cells with environmental factors (e.g. temperature, nutrient concentrations, irradiance) were generally poor, suggesting the greater importance of biotic versus abiotic variables in community mortality dynamics. Ongoing work is focusing on the effects of viral pathogens, grazing and allelopathic interactions using experimental manipulations and individual-based modeling.

  15. Primordial germ cell-mediated chimera technology produces viable pure-line Houbara bustard offspring: potential for repopulating an endangered species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Wernery

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The Houbara bustard (Chlamydotis undulata is a wild seasonal breeding bird populating arid sandy semi-desert habitats in North Africa and the Middle East. Its population has declined drastically during the last two decades and it is classified as vulnerable. Captive breeding programmes have, hitherto, been unsuccessful in reviving population numbers and thus radical technological solutions are essential for the long term survival of this species. The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of primordial germ cell-mediated chimera technology to produce viable Houbara bustard offspring.Embryonic gonadal tissue was dissected from Houbara bustard embryos at eight days post-incubation. Subsequently, Houbara tissue containing gonadal primordial germ cells (gPGCs was injected into White Leghorn chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus embryos, producing 83/138 surviving male chimeric embryos, of which 35 chimeric roosters reached sexual maturity after 5 months. The incorporation and differentiation of Houbara gPGCs in chimeric chicken testis were assessed by PCR with Houbara-specific primers and 31.3% (5/16 gonads collected from the injected chicken embryos showed the presence of donor Houbara cells. A total of 302 semen samples from 34 chimeric roosters were analyzed and eight were confirmed as germline chimeras. Semen samples from these eight roosters were used to artificially inseminate three female Houbara bustards. Subsequently, 45 Houbara eggs were obtained and incubated, two of which were fertile. One egg hatched as a male live born Houbara; the other was female but died before hatching. Genotyping confirmed that the male chick was a pure-line Houbara derived from a chimeric rooster.This study demonstrates for the first time that Houbara gPGCs can migrate, differentiate and eventually give rise to functional sperm in the chimeric chicken testis. This approach may provide a promising tool for propagation and conservation of endangered avian

  16. Effects of water-filtered infrared-A and of heat on cell death, inflammation, antioxidative potential and of free radical formation in viable skin--first results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazena, Helmut; Pittermann, Wolfgang; Müller, Werner; Jung, Katinka; Kelleher, Debra K; Herrling, Thomas; Meffert, Peter; Uebelhack, Ralf; Kietzmann, Manfred

    2014-09-05

    The effects of water-filtered infrared-A (wIRA) and of convective heat on viability, inflammation, inducible free radicals and antioxidative power were investigated in natural and viable skin using the ex vivo Bovine Udder System (BUS) model. Therefore, skin samples from differently treated parts of the udder of a healthy cow were analyzed using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) test, by prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) measurement and by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. Neither cell viability, the inflammation status, the radical status or the antioxidative defence systems of the skin were significantly affected by wIRA applied within 30 min by using an irradiance of 1900 W m(-2) which is of relevance for clinical use, but which exceeded the maximum solar IR-A irradiance at the Earth's surface more than 5 times and which resulted in a skin surface temperature of about 45 °C without cooling and of about 37 °C with convective cooling by air ventilation. No significant effects on viability and on inflammation were detected when convective heat was applied alone under equivalent conditions in terms of the resulting skin surface temperatures and exposure time. As compared with untreated skin, free radical formation was almost doubled, whereas the antioxidative power was reduced to about 50% after convective heating to about 45 °C. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Of energy and survival incognito: a relationship between viable but non-culturable cells formation and inorganic polyphosphate and formate metabolism in Campylobacter jejuni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassem, Issmat I; Chandrashekhar, Kshipra; Rajashekara, Gireesh

    2013-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a Gram-negative food-borne bacterium that can cause mild to serious diseases in humans. A variety of stress conditions including exposure to formic acid, a weak organic acid, can cause C. jejuni to form viable but non-culturable cells (VBNC), which was proposed as a potential survival mechanism. The inability to detect C. jejuni VBNC using standard culturing techniques may increase the risk of exposure to foods contaminated with this pathogen. However, little is known about the cellular mechanisms and triggers governing VBNC formation. Here, we discuss novel mechanisms that potentially affect VBNC formation in C. jejuni and emphasize the impact of formic acid on this process. Specifically, we highlight findings that show that impairing inorganic polyphosphate (poly-P) metabolism reduces the ability of C. jejuni to form VBNC in a medium containing formic acid. We also discuss the potential effect of poly-P and formate metabolism on energy homeostasis and cognate VBNC formation. The relationship between poly-P metabolism and VBNC formation under acid stress has only recently been identified and may represent a breakthrough in understanding this phenomenon and its impact on food safety.

  18. Phenotypic modifications in Staphylococcus aureus cells exposed to high concentrations of vancomycin and teicoplanin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio D.A. Gonçalves

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial cells are known to change the fatty acid composition of the phospholipids as a phenotypic response to environmental conditions and to the presence of toxic compounds such as antibiotics. In the present study, Staphylococcus aureus cells collected during the exponential growth phase were challenged with 50 and 100 mg/L of vancomycin and teicoplanin, which are concentrations high enough to kill the large majority of the cell population. Colony-forming unit counts showed biphasic killing kinetics, typical for persister cell enrichment, in both antibiotics and concentrations tested. However, fluorescence microscopy showed the existence of viable but non-culturable (VBNC cells in a larger number than that of possible persister cells.The analysis of the fatty acid composition of the cells showed that, following antibiotic exposure up to 6 h, the survivor cells have an increased percentage of saturated fatty acids, a significant reduced percentage of branched fatty acids and an increased iso/anteiso branched fatty acid ratio when compared to cells exhibiting a regular phenotype. This should result in lower membrane fluidity. However, cells exposed for 8-24 h presented an increased branched/saturated and lower iso/anteiso branched fatty acid ratios, and thus increased membrane fluidity. Furthermore, the phenotypic changes were transmitted to daughter cells grown in drug-free media. The fact that VBNC cells presented nearly the same fatty acid composition as those obtained after cell growth in drug-free media, which could only be the result of growth of persister cells, suggest that VBNC and persister phenotypes share the same type of response to antibiotics at the lipid level.

  19. The binding of rhBMP-2 to the receptors of viable MC3T3-E1 cells and the question of cooperativity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiemann, M.; Rumpf, H.M.; Bingmann, D.; Jennissen, H.P. [Universitaetsklinikum Essen (Germany). Inst. fuer Physiologie; Universitaetsklinikum Essen (Germany). Inst. fuer Physiologiesche Chemie

    2001-12-01

    The binding of rhBMP-2 to its receptors, the signal transduction cascade and the final responses of bone cells, osteoprogenitor cells and derived cell lines is of high fundamental and clinical interest. In this report concentration-response curves of the osteoblast cell line MC3T3-E1 under influence of rhBMP-2 was investigated. The biological response of the cells (corresponding to a down-stream effect of the receptor state-function) was monitored in pilot experiments by the MC3T3-cell alkaline phosphatase-induction test (MC3T3-cell ALP-induction test). It is shown that the MC3T3-cell ALP-induction test is a good tool for measuring biologically active recombinant human BMP-2 (rhBMP-2) in crude extracts of E. coli as well as in highly purified form. In addition this test is very sensitive to chemically induced structural changes of rhBMP-2 such as those resulting from a radiolabeling of rhBMP-2 by the Bolton-Hunter procedure. The latter procedure reduces the biological activity of rhBMP-2 by a factor of 3-4. The measured concentration-response curves could all be non-linearly fitted to a rectangular hyperbola. The half-maximal saturation, K{sub 0.5}, is found between 30-100 nM rhBMP-2 (= 0.8-2.5 {mu}g/ml). The effect of rhBMP-2 shows a plateau i.e. maximal response at ca. 300-1000 nM rhBMP-2 (= 8-25 {mu}g/ml). The data thus indicate a non-cooperative binding-response behavior. This was unexpected since BMP-2 binds simultaneously to two cooperating receptors of type 1 and type 2. However in the very low concentration range of employed rhBMP-2 a variable response of the cells was measured so that a full exclusion of cooperativity cannot be concluded at the present time. This will be clarified by future experiments. (orig.)

  20. PMA-Linked Fluorescence for Rapid Detection of Viable Bacterial Endospores

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaDuc, Myron T.; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Mohapatra, Bidyut

    2012-01-01

    The most common approach for assessing the abundance of viable bacterial endospores is the culture-based plating method. However, culture-based approaches are heavily biased and oftentimes incompatible with upstream sample processing strategies, which make viable cells/spores uncultivable. This shortcoming highlights the need for rapid molecular diagnostic tools to assess more accurately the abundance of viable spacecraft-associated microbiota, perhaps most importantly bacterial endospores. Propidium monoazide (PMA) has received a great deal of attention due to its ability to differentiate live, viable bacterial cells from dead ones. PMA gains access to the DNA of dead cells through compromised membranes. Once inside the cell, it intercalates and eventually covalently bonds with the double-helix structures upon photoactivation with visible light. The covalently bound DNA is significantly altered, and unavailable to downstream molecular-based manipulations and analyses. Microbiological samples can be treated with appropriate concentrations of PMA and exposed to visible light prior to undergoing total genomic DNA extraction, resulting in an extract comprised solely of DNA arising from viable cells. This ability to extract DNA selectively from living cells is extremely powerful, and bears great relevance to many microbiological arenas.

  1. Fundamental limits to collective concentration sensing in cell populations

    CERN Document Server

    Fancher, Sean

    2016-01-01

    The precision of concentration sensing is improved when cells communicate. Here we derive the physical limits to concentration sensing for cells that communicate over short distances by directly exchanging small molecules (juxtacrine signaling), or over longer distances by secreting and sensing a diffusive messenger molecule (autocrine signaling). In the latter case, we find that the optimal cell spacing can be large, due to a tradeoff between maintaining communication strength and reducing signal cross-correlations. This leads to the surprising result that autocrine signaling allows more precise sensing than juxtacrine signaling for sufficiently large populations. We compare our results to data from a wide variety of communicating cell types.

  2. Performance of planar heterojunction perovskite solar cells under light concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaesha Alnuaimi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we present 2D simulation of planar heterojunction perovskite solar cells under high concentration using physics-based TCAD. The performance of planar perovskite heterojunction solar cells is examined up to 1000 suns. We analyze the effect of HTM mobility and band structure, surface recombination velocities at interfaces and the effect of series resistance under concentrated light. The simulation results revealed that the low mobility of HTM material limits the improvement in power conversation efficiency of perovskite solar cells under concentration. In addition, large band offset at perovskite/HTM interface contributes to the high series resistance. Moreover, losses due to high surface recombination at interfaces and the high series resistance deteriorate significantly the performance of perovskite solar cells under concentration.

  3. High concentration photovoltaic systems applying III-V cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zubi, Ghassan; Bernal-Agustin, Jose L. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Zaragoza, Calle Maria de Luna 3, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Fracastoro, Gian Vincenzo [Department of Energetics, Politecnico of Turin, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy)

    2009-12-15

    High concentration systems make use of the direct solar beam and therefore are suitable for application in regions with high annual direct irradiation values. III-V PV cells with a nominal efficiency of up to 39% are readily available in today's market, with further efficiency improvements expected in the years ahead. The relatively high cost of III-V cells limits their terrestrial use to applications under high concentration, usually above 400 suns. In this way the relatively high cell cost is compensated through the low amount for cells needed per kW nominal system output. This paper presents a state of the art of high concentration photovoltaics using III-V cells. This PV field accounts already for more than 20 developed systems, which are commercially available or shortly before market introduction. (author)

  4. Co-infusion of autologous adipose tissue derived neuronal differentiated mesenchymal stem cells and bone marrow derived hematopoietic stem cells, a viable therapy for post-traumatic brachial plexus injury: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umang G Thakkar

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell therapy is emerging as a viable approach in regenerative medicine. A 31-year-old male with brachial plexus injury had complete sensory-motor loss since 16 years with right pseudo-meningocele at C5-D1 levels and extra-spinal extension up to C7-D1, with avulsion on magnetic resonance imaging and irreversible damage. We generated adipose tissue derived neuronal differentiated mesenchymal stem cells (N-AD-MSC and bone marrow derived hematopoietic stem cells (HSC-BM. Neuronal stem cells expressed β-3 tubulin and glial fibrillary acid protein which was confirmed on immunofluorescence. On day 14, 2.8 ml stem cell inoculum was infused under local anesthesia in right brachial plexus sheath by brachial block technique under ultrasonography guidance with a 1.5-inch-long 23 gauge needle. Nucleated cell count was 2 × 10 4 /μl, CD34+ was 0.06%, and CD45-/90+ and CD45-/73+ were 41.63% and 20.36%, respectively. No untoward effects were noted. He has sustained recovery with re-innervation over a follow-up of 4 years documented on electromyography-nerve conduction velocity study.

  5. Potential of Escherichia coli 0157:H7 to persist and form viable but non-culturable cells on a food-contact surface subjected to cycles of soiling and chemical treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marouani-Gadri, Nesrine; Firmesse, Olivier; Chassaing, Danielle

    2010-01-01

    only, a further increase in this proportion occurred 24 h after the CT, suggesting that some of the surviving viable but non-culturable cells finally died. This study shows that conditions leading to E. coli O157:H7 persistence are not likely to arise when good refrigeration and hygiene practices...... no longer detectable after the first week. However, on 66-hour biofilms with 6.7 log CFU/cm², after initially decreasing, E. coli numbers reached 6.6 log CFU/cm² and 8.3 log viable cells/cm² on the 11th day. When E. coli was cultured with a Comamonas testosteroni previously shown to increase E. coli biofilm...

  6. Multijunction solar cells for conversion of concentrated sunlight to electricity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtz, Sarah; Geisz, John

    2010-04-26

    Solar-cell efficiencies have exceeded 40% in recent years. The keys to achieving these high efficiencies include: 1) use of multiple materials that span the solar spectrum, 2) growth of these materials with near-perfect quality by using epitaxial growth on single-crystal substrates, and 3) use of concentration. Growth of near-perfect semiconductor materials is possible when the lattice constants of the materials are matched or nearly matched to that of a single-crystal substrate. Multiple material combinations have now demonstrated efficiencies exceeding 40%, motivating incorporation of these cells into concentrator systems for electricity generation. The use of concentration confers several key advantages.

  7. Common Student Misconceptions in Electrochemistry: Galvanic, Electrolytic, and Concentration Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanger, Michael J.; Greenbowe, Thomas J.

    1997-01-01

    Investigates student (N=16) misconceptions concerning electrochemistry related to galvanic, electrolytic, and concentration cells. Findings indicate that most students demonstrating misconceptions were still able to calculate cell potentials correctly. Discusses common misconceptions and possible sources of these. Contains 33 references.…

  8. Large scintillation cells for high sensitivity radon concentration measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, B. L.; El Ganayni, M.; Cohen, E. S.

    1983-07-01

    Methods for improving the sensitivity of scintillation cells for radon concentration measurements were studied with emphasis on improving light collection efficiency. This allows the length and hence the volume of the cell to be increased. Variables studied were choice of scintillator material, its method of application and thickness, length of cell, cell material, type and configuration of reflectors, choice of photomultipliers, and factors affecting background. Response from various areas of the cell surface was studied with an alpha source and with radon filling. Coating the window with phosphor was found to be counter-productive. The optimum results obtained were with the inside of the cell (other than the window) covered with a thick layer of ZnS(Ag), or with a thick layer of reflective material coated with a thin layer of phosphor. With it, a 10 cm diameter plexiglass cell can be extended to at least 50 cm length without difficulty from insufficient pulse height.

  9. The Chemically Synthesized Ageladine A-Derivative LysoGlow84 Stains Lysosomes in Viable Mammalian Brain Cells and Specific Structures in the Marine Flatworm Macrostomum lignano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorsten Mordhorst

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Based on the chemical structure and the known chemical synthesis of the marine sponge alkaloid ageladine A, we synthesized the ageladine A-derivative 4-(naphthalene-2-yl-1H-imidazo[4,5-c]pyridine trifluoroacetate (LysoGlow84. The two-step synthesis started with the Pictet-Spengler reaction of histamine and naphthalene-2-carbaldehyde to a tetrahydropyridine intermediate, which was dehydrogenated with activated manganese (IV oxide to LysoGlow84. Structure and purity of the synthesized LysoGlow84 were confirmed by NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The fluorescence intensity emitted by LysoGlow84 depended strongly on the pH of the solvent with highest fluorescence intensity recorded at pH 4. The fluorescence maximum (at 315 nm excitation was observed at 440 nm. Biocompatibility of LysoGlow84 was investigated using cultured rat brain astrocytes and the marine flatworm Macrostomum lignano. Exposure of the astrocytes for up to 6 h to micromolar concentrations of LysoGlow84 did not compromise cell viability, as demonstrated by several viability assays, but revealed a promising property of this compound for staining of cellular vesicles. Conventional fluorescence microscopy as well as confocal scanning microscopy of LysoGlow84-treated astrocytes revealed co-localization of LysoGlow84 fluorescence with that of LysoTracker® Red DND-99. LysoGlow84 stained unclear structures in Macrostomum lignano, which were identified as lysosomes by co-staining with LysoTracker. Strong fluorescence staining by LysoGlow84 was further observed around the worms’ anterior gut and the female genital pore which were not counterstained by LysoTracker Red. Thus, LysoGlow84 is a new promising dye that stains lysosomes and other acidic compartments in cultured cells and in worms.

  10. The chemically synthesized ageladine A-derivative LysoGlow84 stains lysosomes in viable mammalian brain cells and specific structures in the marine flatworm Macrostomum lignano.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordhorst, Thorsten; Awal, Sushil; Jordan, Sebastian; Petters, Charlotte; Sartoris, Linda; Dringen, Ralf; Bickmeyer, Ulf

    2015-02-11

    Based on the chemical structure and the known chemical synthesis of the marine sponge alkaloid ageladine A, we synthesized the ageladine A-derivative 4-(naphthalene-2-yl)-1H-imidazo[4,5-c]pyridine trifluoroacetate (LysoGlow84). The two-step synthesis started with the Pictet-Spengler reaction of histamine and naphthalene-2-carbaldehyde to a tetrahydropyridine intermediate, which was dehydrogenated with activated manganese (IV) oxide to LysoGlow84. Structure and purity of the synthesized LysoGlow84 were confirmed by NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The fluorescence intensity emitted by LysoGlow84 depended strongly on the pH of the solvent with highest fluorescence intensity recorded at pH 4. The fluorescence maximum (at 315 nm excitation) was observed at 440 nm. Biocompatibility of LysoGlow84 was investigated using cultured rat brain astrocytes and the marine flatworm Macrostomum lignano. Exposure of the astrocytes for up to 6 h to micromolar concentrations of LysoGlow84 did not compromise cell viability, as demonstrated by several viability assays, but revealed a promising property of this compound for staining of cellular vesicles. Conventional fluorescence microscopy as well as confocal scanning microscopy of LysoGlow84-treated astrocytes revealed co-localization of LysoGlow84 fluorescence with that of LysoTracker® Red DND-99. LysoGlow84 stained unclear structures in Macrostomum lignano, which were identified as lysosomes by co-staining with LysoTracker. Strong fluorescence staining by LysoGlow84 was further observed around the worms' anterior gut and the female genital pore which were not counterstained by LysoTracker Red. Thus, LysoGlow84 is a new promising dye that stains lysosomes and other acidic compartments in cultured cells and in worms.

  11. Influence of initial glycerol concentration upon bacterial cells ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    that the performances of the submerged aerobic fixed-film reactor were influenced by the initial substrate concentration. ... Key words: Submerged aerobic fixed-film reactor, adaptability, biodegradation kinetics, packing, synthetic wastewater, chemical ... byproducts, it releases also energy, necessary to bac- terial cells ...

  12. Subinhibitory concentrations of cell wall synthesis inhibitors promote biofilm formation of Enterococcus faecalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wen; Hallinen, Kelsey; Wood, Kevin

    Enterococcus faecalis are commonly associated with hospital acquired infections, because they readily form biofilms on instruments and medical devices. Biofilms are inherently more resistant to killing by antibiotics compared to planktonic bacteria, in part because of their heterogeneous spatial structure. Surprisingly, however, subminimal inhibitory concentrations (sub-MICs) of some antibiotics can actually promote biofilm formation. Unfortunately, much is still unknown about how low drug doses affect the composition and spatial structure of the biofilm. In this work, we investigate the effects of sub-MICs of ampicillin on the formation of E. faecalis biofilms. First, we quantified biofilm mass using crystal violet staining in polystyrene microtiter plates. We found that total biofilm mass is increased over a narrow range of ampicillin concentrations before ultimately declining at higher concentrations. Second, we show that sub-MICs of ampicillin can increase mass of E. faecalis biofilms while simultaneously increasing extracellular DNA/RNA and changing total number of viable cells under confocal microscopy. Further, we use RNA-seq to identify genes differentially expressed under sub-MICs of ampicillin. Finally, we show a mathematical model to explain this phenomenon. This work was funded by The Hartwell Foundation Individual Biomedical Research Award and NSF CAREER 1553208 to KBW.

  13. Reversible degradation of inverted organic solar cells by concentrated sunlight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tromholt, Thomas; Manor, Assaf; Katz, Eugene A

    2011-01-01

    Concentrated sunlight was used to study the performance response of inverted P3HT:PCBM organic solar cells after exposure to high intensity sunlight. Correlations of efficiency as a function of solar intensity were established in the range of 0.5–15 suns at three different stages: for a pristine...... cell, after 30 min exposure at 5 suns and after 30 min of rest in the dark. High intensity exposure introduced a major performance decrease for all solar intensities, followed by a partial recovery of the lost performance over time: at 1 sun only 6% of the initial performance was conserved after....... The transient state is believed to be a result of the breakdown of the diode behaviour of the ZnO electron transport layer by O2 desorption, increasing the hole conductivity. These results imply that accelerated degradation of organic solar cells by concentrated sunlight is not a straightforward process...

  14. Is Low Non-Lethal Concentration of Methylmercury Really Safe? A Report on Genotoxicity with Delayed Cell Proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo-Lopez, María Elena; Costa-Malaquias, Allan; Oliveira, Edivaldo H. C.; Miranda, Moysés S.; Arrifano, Gabriela P. F.; Souza-Monteiro, José R.; Sagica, Fernanda Espirito-Santo; Fontes-Junior, Enéas A.; Maia, Cristiane S. F.; Macchi, Barbarella M.; do Nascimento, José Luiz M.

    2016-01-01

    Human exposure to relatively low levels of methylmercury is worrying, especially in terms of its genotoxicity. It is currently unknown as to whether exposure to low levels of mercury (below established limits) is safe. Genotoxicity was already shown in lymphocytes, but studies with cells of the CNS (as the main target organ) are scarce. Moreover, disturbances in the cell cycle and cellular proliferation have previously been observed in neuronal cells, but no data are presently available for glial cells. Interestingly, cells of glial origin accumulate higher concentrations of methylmercury than those of neuronal origin. Thus, the aim of this work was to analyze the possible genotoxicity and alterations in the cell cycle and cell proliferation of a glioma cell line (C6) exposed to a low, non-lethal and non-apoptotic methylmercury concentration. Biochemical (mitochondrial activity) and morphological (integrity of the membrane) assessments confirmed the absence of cell death after exposure to 3 μM methylmercury for 24 hours. Even without promoting cell death, this treatment significantly increased genotoxicity markers (DNA fragmentation, micronuclei, nucleoplasmic bridges and nuclear buds). Changes in the cell cycle profile (increased mitotic index and cell populations in the S and G2/M phases) were observed, suggesting arrest of the cycle. This delay in the cycle was followed, 24 hours after methylmercury withdrawal, by a decrease number of viable cells, reduced cellular confluence and increased doubling time of the culture. Our work demonstrates that exposure to a low sublethal concentration of MeHg considered relatively safe according to current limits promotes genotoxicity and disturbances in the proliferation of cells of glial origin with sustained consequences after methylmercury withdrawal. This fact becomes especially important, since this cellular type accumulates more methylmercury than neurons and displays a vital role protecting the CNS, especially in

  15. Technique for Outdoor Test on Concentrating Photovoltaic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Sansoni

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Outdoor experimentation of solar cells is essential to maximize their performance and to assess utilization requirements and limits. More generally tests with direct exposure to the sun are useful to understand the behavior of components and new materials for solar applications in real working conditions. Insolation and ambient factors are uncontrollable but can be monitored to know the environmental situation of the solar exposure experiment. A parallel characterization of the photocells can be performed in laboratory under controllable and reproducible conditions. A methodology to execute solar exposure tests is proposed and practically applied on photovoltaic cells for a solar cogeneration system. The cells are measured with concentrated solar light obtained utilizing a large Fresnel lens mounted on a sun tracker. Outdoor measurements monitor the effects of the exposure of two multijunction photovoltaic cells to focused sunlight. The main result is the continuous acquisition of the V-I (voltage-current curve for the cells in different conditions of solar concentration and temperature of exercise to assess their behavior. The research investigates electrical power extracted, efficiency, temperatures reached, and possible damages of the photovoltaic cell.

  16. An optimized top contact design for solar cell concentrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desalvo, Gregory C.; Barnett, Allen M.

    A new grid optimization scheme is developed for point focus solar cell concentrators which employs a separated grid and busbar concept. Ideally, grid lines act as the primary current collectors and receive all of the current from the semiconductor region. Busbars are the secondary collectors which pick up current from the grids and carry it out of the active region of the solar cell. This separation of functions leads to a multithickness metallization design, where the busbars are made larger in cross section than the grids. This enables the busbars to carry more current per unit area of shading, which is advantageous under high solar concentration where large current densities are generated. Optimized grid patterns using this multilayer concept can provide a 1.6 to 20 percent increase in output power efficiency over optimized single thickness grids.

  17. An optimized top contact design for solar cell concentrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desalvo, Gregory C.; Barnett, Allen M.

    1985-01-01

    A new grid optimization scheme is developed for point focus solar cell concentrators which employs a separated grid and busbar concept. Ideally, grid lines act as the primary current collectors and receive all of the current from the semiconductor region. Busbars are the secondary collectors which pick up current from the grids and carry it out of the active region of the solar cell. This separation of functions leads to a multithickness metallization design, where the busbars are made larger in cross section than the grids. This enables the busbars to carry more current per unit area of shading, which is advantageous under high solar concentration where large current densities are generated. Optimized grid patterns using this multilayer concept can provide a 1.6 to 20 percent increase in output power efficiency over optimized single thickness grids.

  18. Tumor-selective replication herpes simplex virus-based technology significantly improves clinical detection and prognostication of viable circulating tumor cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Wen; Bao, Li; Yang, Shaoxing

    2016-01-01

    Detection of circulating tumor cells remains a significant challenge due to their vast physical and biological heterogeneity. We developed a cell-surface-marker-independent technology based on telomerase-specific, replication-selective oncolytic herpes-simplex-virus-1 that targets telomerase...

  19. Coupling of Luminescent Solar Concentrators to Plasmonic Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shu-Yi

    To make inexpensive solar cells is a continuous goal for solar photovoltaic (PV) energy industry. Thin film solar cells of various materials have been developed and continue to emerge in order to replace bulk silicon solar cells. A thin film solar cell not only uses less material but also requires a less expensive refinery process. In addition, other advantages coming along with small thickness are higher open circuit voltage and higher conversion efficiency. However, thin film solar cells, especially those made of silicon, have significant optical losses. In order to address this problem, this thesis investigates the spectral coupling of thin films PV to luminescent solar concentrators (LSC). LSC are passive devices, consisting of plastic sheets embedded with fluorescent dyes which absorb part of the incoming radiation spectrum and emit at specific wavelength. The emitted light is concentrated by total internal reflection to the edge of the sheet, where the PVs are placed. Since the light emitted from the LSC edge is usually in a narrow spectral range, it is possible to employ diverse strategies to enhance PV absorption at the peak of the emission wavelength. Employing plasmonic nanostructures has been shown to enhance absorption of thin films via forward scattering, diffraction and localized surface plasmon. These two strategies are theoretically investigated here for improving the absorption and elevating the output power of a thin film solar cell. First, the idea of spectral coupling of luminescent solar concentrators to plasmonic solar cells is introduced to assess its potential for increasing the power output. This study is carried out employing P3HT/PC60BM organic solar cells and LSC with Lumogen Red dyes. A simplified spectral coupling analysis is employed to predict the power density, considering the output spectrum of the LSC equivalent to the emission spectrum of the dye and neglecting any angular dependence. Plasmonic tuning is conducted to enhance

  20. Determination of bacterial cell concentrations by electrical measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, T G; Goldschmidt, M C

    1975-01-01

    An instrument was developed to measure the concentration of bacterial suspensions by their electrical characteristics. It employed a square-wave signal generator, a tetra-polar electrode probe, and a voltage detector in the form of an oscilloscope. When electrical measurements were made on washed bacteria obtained from cultures or urine specimens, there was a direct relationship between the concentration of the cells and the electrical characteristics of the system as reflected by voltage changes. As little as 10(3) organisms per ml could be detected. The resolution between readings taken on samples containing 10(3) to 10(9) cells per ml was found to be a function of the input frequency. The maximal resolution between concentration readings was obtained at a input frequency of 10 Hz. Thus, with relatively simple instrumentation, bacterial concentrations could be determined within a few minutes. This technique, therefore, eliminates the more lengthy laboratory procedures as plate counts or the accumulation of measurable metabolic changes (such as the utilization of radioactive or other substrates). This method can efficiently monitor clinical urine specimens when a bacteriuria is suspected.

  1. An advanced space photovoltaic concentrator array using Fresnel lenses, gallium arsenide cells, and prismatic cell covers

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Mark J.; Piszczor, Michael F.

    1988-01-01

    The current status of a space concentrator array which uses refractive optics, gallium arsenide cells, and prismatic cell covers to achieve excellent performance at a very low array mass is documented. The prismatically covered cells have established records for space cell performance (24.2 percent efficient at 100 AM0 suns and 25 C) and terrestrial single-junction cell performance (29.3 percent efficient at 200 AM1.5 suns and 25 C).

  2. Enzymatic isolation of viable human odontoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuffaro, H M; Pääkkönen, V; Tjäderhane, L

    2016-05-01

    To improve an enzymatic method previously used for isolation of rat odontoblasts to isolate viable mature human odontoblasts. Collagenase I, collagenase I/hyaluronidase mixture and hyaluronidase were used to extract mature human odontoblasts from the pulp chamber. Detachment of odontoblasts from dentine was determined with field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and to analyse the significance of differences in tubular diameter, and the t-test was used. MTT-reaction was used to analyse cell viability, and nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney post hoc tests were used to analyse the data. Immunofluorescent staining of dentine sialoprotein (DSP), aquaporin-4 (AQP4) and matrix metalloproteinase-20 (MMP-20) and quantitative PCR (qPCR) of dentine sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) were used to confirm the odontoblastic nature of the cells. MTT-reaction and FESEM demonstrated collagenase I/hyaluronidase resulted in more effective detachment and higher viability than collagenase I alone. Hyaluronidase alone was not able to detach odontoblasts. Immunofluorescence revealed the typical odontoblastic-morphology with one process, and DSP, AQP4 and MMP-20 were detected. Quantitative PCR of DSPP confirmed that the isolated cells expressed this odontoblast-specific gene. The isolation of viable human odontoblasts was successful. The cells demonstrated morphology typical for odontoblasts and expressed characteristic odontoblast-type genes and proteins. This method will enable new approaches, such as apoptosis analysis, for studies using fully differentiated odontoblasts. © 2015 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. ITABIRITE IRON ORE CONCENTRATION BY PNEUMATIC FLOTATION CELL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Quintiliano Nunes da Silva

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The main iron ore processing plants in Brazil operate through reverse cationic flotation. Many studies have been conducted in order to improve flotation efficiency by optimization process variables. The pneumatic flotation cell stands out due to the simplicity to and to the intense contact particle/bubble promoted by the pulp feeding system. In this study, laboratory scale and pilot were conducted using a sample of itabirite iron ore. The objectives are evaluating the performance of this device using low grade iron ore, and drawing a comparison with laboratory scale tests on conventional flotation cell. The results indicate the potential application of pneumatic flotation cell to the ore tested. Adjustments in the feed particle size and process optimizations can be performed on the concentrate, reaching Fe and SiO2 grades used by the industry

  4. Microfiltration of enzyme treated egg whites for accelerated detection of viable Salmonella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Seockmo; Ximenes, Eduardo; Kreke, Thomas; Foster, Kirk; Deering, Amanda J; Ladisch, Michael R

    2016-11-01

    We report detection of egg white within 7 h by concentrating the bacteria using microfiltration through 0.2-μm cutoff polyethersulfone hollow fiber membranes. A combination of enzyme treatment, controlled cross-flow on both sides of the hollow fibers, and media selection were key to controlling membrane fouling so that rapid concentration and the subsequent detection of low numbers of microbial cells were achieved. We leveraged the protective effect of egg white proteins and peptone so that the proteolytic enzymes did not attack the living cells while hydrolyzing the egg white proteins responsible for fouling. The molecular weight of egg white proteins was reduced from about 70 kDa to 15 kDa during hydrolysis. This enabled a 50-fold concentration of the cells when a volume of 525 mL of peptone and egg white, containing 13 CFU of Salmonella, was decreased to a 10 mL volume in 50 min. A 10-min microcentrifugation step further concentrated the viable Salmonella cells by 10×. The final cell recovery exceeded 100%, indicating that microbial growth occurred during the 3-h processing time. The experiments leading to rapid concentration, recovery, and detection provided further insights on the nature of membrane fouling enabling fouling effects to be mitigated. Unlike most membrane processes where protein recovery is the goal, recovery of viable microorganisms for pathogen detection is the key measure of success, with modification of cell-free proteins being both acceptable and required to achieve rapid microfiltration of viable microorganisms. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:1464-1471, 2016. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  5. Towards operating direct methanol fuel cells with highly concentrated fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, T. S.; Yang, W. W.; Chen, R.; Wu, Q. X.

    A significant advantage of direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) is the high specific energy of the liquid fuel, making it particularly suitable for portable and mobile applications. Nevertheless, conventional DMFCs have to be operated with excessively diluted methanol solutions to limit methanol crossover and the detrimental consequences. Operation with diluted methanol solutions significantly reduces the specific energy of the power pack and thereby prevents it from competing with advanced batteries. In view of this fact, there exists a need to improve conventional DMFC system designs, including membrane electrode assemblies and the subsystems for supplying/removing reactants/products, so that both the cell performance and the specific energy can be simultaneously maximized. This article provides a comprehensive review of past efforts on the optimization of DMFC systems that operate with concentrated methanol. Based on the discussion of the key issues associated with transport of the reactants/products, the strategies to manage the supply/removal of the reactants/products in DMFC operating with highly concentrated methanol are identified. With these strategies, the possible approaches to achieving the goal of concentrated fuel operation are then proposed. Past efforts in the management of the reactants/products for implementing each of the approaches are also summarized and reviewed.

  6. Biofilms in Full-Scale Drinking Water Ozone Contactors Contribute Viable Bacteria to Ozonated Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotlarz, Nadine; Rockey, Nicole; Olson, Terese M; Haig, Sarah-Jane; Sanford, Larry; LiPuma, John J; Raskin, Lutgarde

    2018-02-13

    Concentrations of viable microbial cells were monitored using culture-based and culture-independent methods across multichamber ozone contactors in a full-scale drinking water treatment plant. Membrane-intact and culturable cell concentrations in ozone contactor effluents ranged from 1200 to 3750 cells/mL and from 200 to 3850 colony forming units/mL, respectively. Viable cell concentrations decreased significantly in the first ozone contact chamber, but rose, even as ozone exposure increased, in subsequent chambers. Our results implicate microbial detachment from biofilms on contactor surfaces, and from biomass present within lime softening sediments in a hydraulic dead zone, as a possible reason for increasing cell concentrations in water samples from sequential ozone chambers. Biofilm community structures on baffle walls upstream and downstream from the dead zone were significantly different from each other (p = 0.017). The biofilms downstream of the dead zone contained a significantly (p = 0.036) higher relative abundance of bacteria of the genera Mycobacterium and Legionella than the upstream biofilms. These results have important implications as the effluent from ozone contactors is often treated further in biologically active filters and bacteria in ozonated water continuously seed filter microbial communities.

  7. High concentration methanol fuel cells: Design and theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Christian E.; Wang, Chao-Yang

    Use of highly concentrated methanol fuel is required for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) to compete with the energy density of Li-ion batteries. Because one mole of H 2O is needed to oxidize one mole of methanol (CH 3OH) in the anode, low water crossover to the cathode or even water back flow from the cathode into the anode is a prerequisite for using highly concentrated methanol. It has previously been demonstrated that low or negative water crossover can be realized by the incorporation of a low-α membrane electrode assembly (MEA), which is essentially an MEA designed for optimal water management, using, e.g. hydrophobic anode and cathode microporous layers (aMPL and cMPL). In this paper we extend the low-α MEA concept to include an anode transport barrier (aTB) between the backing layer and hydrophobic aMPL. The main role of the aTB is to act as a barrier to CH 3OH and H 2O diffusion between a water-rich anode catalyst layer (aCL) and a methanol-rich fuel feed. The primary role of the hydrophobic aMPL in this MEA is to facilitate a low (or negative) water crossover to the cathode. Using a previously developed 1D, two-phase DMFC model, we show that this novel design yields a cell with low methanol crossover (i.e. high fuel efficiency, ∼80%, at a typical operating current density of ∼80-90% of the cell limiting current density), while directly feeding high concentration methanol fuel into the anode. The physics of how the aTB and aMPL work together to accomplish this is fully elucidated. We further show that a thicker, more hydrophilic, more permeable aTB, and thicker, more hydrophobic, and less permeable aMPL are most effective in accomplishing low CH 3OH and H 2O crossover.

  8. Photodynamic Treatment of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cells with Low Curcumin Concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Kim; Nikfarjam, Frangis; Butting, Manuel; Meissner, Markus; König, Anke; Ramirez Bosca, Ana; Kaufmann, Roland; Heidemann, Detlef; Bernd, August; Kippenberger, Stefan; Zöller, Nadja

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Curcumin is known for its anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory and anti-tumorigenic qualities at concentrations ranging from 3.7µg/ml to 55µg/ml. Therefore it is pre-destined for tumour therapy. Due to high oral doses that have to be administered and the low bioavailability of curcumin new therapy concepts have to be developed. One of these therapy concepts is the combination of low curcumin concentrations and UVA or visible light. Aim of our study was to investigate the influence of this treatment regime on oral squamous cell carcinoma cells. Materials and Methods: A human oral squamous cell carcinoma cell line (HN) was pre-incubated with low curcumin concentrations (0.01µg/ml to 1µg/ml). Thereafter cell cultures were either left un-irradiated or were irradiated either with 1J/cm2 UVA or for 5min with visible light. Quantitative analysis of proliferation, membrane integrity, oxidative potential and DNA fragmentation were done. Results: It could be shown that low curcumin concentrations neither influenced proliferation, nor cell morphology, nor cell integrity nor apoptosis. When combining these curcumin concentrations with UVA or visible light irradiation cell proliferation as well as development of reactive oxygen species was reduced whereas DNA fragmentation was increased. Concentration as well as light entity specific effects could be observed. Conclusions: The present findings substantiate the potential of the combination of low curcumin concentrations and light as a new therapeutic concept to increase the efficacy of curcumin in the treatment of cancer of the oral mucosa.

  9. Mechanism for multiplicity of steady states with distinct cell concentration in continuous culture of mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yongky, Andrew; Lee, Jongchan; Le, Tung; Mulukutla, Bhanu Chandra; Daoutidis, Prodromos; Hu, Wei-Shou

    2015-07-01

    Continuous culture for the production of biopharmaceutical proteins offers the possibility of steady state operations and thus more consistent product quality and increased productivity. Under some conditions, multiplicity of steady states has been observed in continuous cultures of mammalian cells, wherein with the same dilution rate and feed nutrient composition, steady states with very different cell and product concentrations may be reached. At those different steady states, cells may exhibit a high glycolysis flux with high lactate production and low cell concentration, or a low glycolysis flux with low lactate and high cell concentration. These different steady states, with different cell concentration, also have different productivity. Developing a mechanistic understanding of the occurrence of steady state multiplicity and devising a strategy to steer the culture toward the desired steady state is critical. We establish a multi-scale kinetic model that integrates a mechanistic intracellular metabolic model and cell growth model in a continuous bioreactor. We show that steady state multiplicity exists in a range of dilution rate in continuous culture as a result of the bistable behavior in glycolysis. The insights from the model were used to devise strategies to guide the culture to the desired steady state in the multiple steady state region. The model provides a guideline principle in the design of continuous culture processes of mammalian cells. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Pathway to 50% Efficient Inverted Metamorphic Concentrator Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geisz, John F [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Steiner, Myles A [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Jain, Nikhil [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Schulte, Kevin L [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); France, Ryan M [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); McMahon, William E [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Perl, Emmett [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Horowitz, Kelsey A [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Friedman, Daniel J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-09-06

    Series-connected five (5J) and six junction (6J) concentrator solar cell strategies have the realistic potential to exceed 50% efficiency to enable low-cost CPV systems. We propose three strategies for developing a practical 6J device. We have overcome many of the challenges required to build such concentrator solar cell devices: We have developed 2.1 eV AlGaInP, 1.7 eV AlGaAs, and 1.7 eV GaInAsP junctions with external radiative efficiency greater than 0.1%. We have developed a transparent tunnel junction that absorbs minimal light intended for the second junction yet resists degradation under thermal load. We have developed metamorphic grades from the GaAs to the InP lattice constant that are transparent to sub-GaAs bandgap light. We have grown and compared low bandgap junctions (0.7eV - 1.2 eV) using metamorphic GaInAs, metamorphic GaInAsP, and GaInAsP lattice-matched to InP. And finally, we have demonstrated excellent performance in a high voltage, low current 4 junction inverted metamorphic device using 2.1, 1.7, 1.4, and 1.1 eV junctions with over 8.7 mA/cm2 one-sun current density that operates up to 1000 suns without tunnel junction failure.

  11. Building a Six-Junction Inverted Metamorphic Concentrator Solar Cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geisz, John F [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Steiner, Myles A [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Jain, Nikhil [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Schulte, Kevin L [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); France, Ryan M [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); McMahon, William E [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Perl, Emmett [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Friedman, Daniel J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-12-02

    We propose practical six-junction (6J) inverted metamorphic multijunction (IMM) concentrator solar cell designs with the potential to exceed 50% efficiency using moderately high quality junction materials. We demonstrate the top three junctions and their monolithic integration lattice matched to GaAs using 2.1-eV AlGaInP, 1.7-eV AlGaAs or GaInAsP, and 1.4-eV GaAs with external radiative efficiencies >0.1%. We demonstrate tunnel junctions with peak tunneling current >400 A/cm2 that are transparent to <2.1-eV light. We compare the bottom three GaInAs(p) junctions with bandgaps of 1.2, 1.0, and 0.7 eV grown on InP and transparent metamorphic grades with low dislocation densities. The solution to an integration challenge resulting from Zn diffusion in the GaAs junction is illustrated in a five-junction IMM. Excellent 1-sun performance is demonstrated in a complete 6J IMM device with VOC = 5.15 V, and a promising pathway toward >50% efficiency at high concentrations is presented.

  12. Silicon concentrator cells in a two-stage photovoltaic system with a concentration factor of 300x

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohr, A.

    2005-06-15

    In this work a rear contacted silicon concentrator cell was developed for an application in a two stage concentrator photovoltaic system. This system was developed at Fraunhofer ISE some years ago. The innovation of this one-axis tracked system is that it enables a high geometrical concentration of 300x in combination with a high optical efficiency (around 78%) and a large acceptance angle of {+-}23.5 all year through. For this, the system uses a parabolic mirror (40.4x) and a three dimensional second stage consisting of compound parabolic concentrators (CPCs, 7.7x). For the concentrator concept and particularly for an easy cell integration, the rear line contacted concentrator (RLCC) cells with a maximum efficiency of 25% were developed and a hybrid mounting concept for the RLCC cells is presented. The optical performance of different CPC materials was tested and analysed in this work. Finally, small modules consisting of six series interconnected RLCC cells and six CPCs were integrated into the concentrator system and tested outdoor. A system efficiency of 16.2% was reached at around 800 W/m2 direct irradiance under realistic outdoor conditions. (orig.)

  13. Viable Syntax: Rethinking Minimalist Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Safir

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Hauser et al. (2002 suggest that the human language faculty emerged as a genetic innovation in the form of what is called here a ‘keystone factor’—a single, simple, formal mental capability that, interacting with the pre-existing faculties of hominid ancestors, caused a cascade of effects resulting in the language faculty in modern humans. They take Merge to be the keystone factor, but instead it is posited here that Merge is the pre-existing mechanism of thought made viable by a principle that permits relations interpretable at the interfaces to be mapped onto c-command. The simplified minimalist architecture proposed here respects the keystone factor as closely as possible, but is justified on the basis of linguistic analyses it makes available, including a relativized intervention theory applicable across Case, scope, agreement, selection and linearization, a derivation of the A/A’-distinction from Case theory, and predictions such as why in situ wh-interpretation is island-insensitive, but susceptible to intervention effects.

  14. Survival Strategy of Erwinia amylovora against Copper: Induction of the Viable-but-Nonculturable State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordax, Mónica; Marco-Noales, Ester; López, María M.; Biosca, Elena G.

    2006-01-01

    Copper compounds, widely used to control plant-pathogenic bacteria, have traditionally been employed against fire blight, caused by Erwinia amylovora. However, recent studies have shown that some phytopathogenic bacteria enter into the viable-but-nonculturable (VBNC) state in the presence of copper. To determine whether copper kills E. amylovora or induces the VBNC state, a mineral medium without copper or supplemented with 0.005, 0.01, or 0.05 mM Cu2+ was inoculated with 107 CFU/ml of this bacterium and monitored over 9 months. Total and viable cell counts were determined by epifluorescence microscopy using the LIVE/DEAD kit and by flow cytometry with 5-cyano-2,3-ditolyl tetrazolium chloride and SYTO 13. Culturable cells were counted on King's B nonselective solid medium. Changes in the bacterial morphology in the presence of copper were observed by scanning electron microscopy. E. amylovora entered into the VBNC state at all three copper concentrations assayed, much faster when the copper concentration increased. The addition of different agents which complex copper allowed the resuscitation (restoration of culturability) of copper-induced VBNC cells. Finally, copper-induced VBNC cells were virulent only for the first 5 days, while resuscitated cells always regained their pathogenicity on immature fruits over 9 months. These results have shown, for the first time, the induction of the VBNC state in E. amylovora as a survival strategy against copper. PMID:16672494

  15. Multiple paths of electron flow to current in microbial electrolysis cells fed with low and high concentrations of propionate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hari, Ananda Rao; Katuri, Krishna P; Gorron, Eduardo; Logan, Bruce E; Saikaly, Pascal E

    2016-07-01

    Microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) provide a viable approach for bioenergy generation from fermentable substrates such as propionate. However, the paths of electron flow during propionate oxidation in the anode of MECs are unknown. Here, the paths of electron flow involved in propionate oxidation in the anode of two-chambered MECs were examined at low (4.5 mM) and high (36 mM) propionate concentrations. Electron mass balances and microbial community analysis revealed that multiple paths of electron flow (via acetate/H2 or acetate/formate) to current could occur simultaneously during propionate oxidation regardless of the concentration tested. Current (57-96 %) was the largest electron sink and methane (0-2.3 %) production was relatively unimportant at both concentrations based on electron balances. At a low propionate concentration, reactors supplemented with 2-bromoethanesulfonate had slightly higher coulombic efficiencies than reactors lacking this methanogenesis inhibitor. However, an opposite trend was observed at high propionate concentration, where reactors supplemented with 2-bromoethanesulfonate had a lower coulombic efficiency and there was a greater percentage of electron loss (23.5 %) to undefined sinks compared to reactors without 2-bromoethanesulfonate (11.2 %). Propionate removal efficiencies were 98 % (low propionate concentration) and 78 % (high propionate concentration). Analysis of 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing revealed the dominance of sequences most similar to Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA and G. sulfurreducens subsp. ethanolicus. Collectively, these results provide new insights on the paths of electron flow during propionate oxidation in the anode of MECs fed with low and high propionate concentrations.

  16. Multiple paths of electron flow to current in microbial electrolysis cells fed with low and high concentrations of propionate

    KAUST Repository

    Rao, Hari Ananda

    2016-03-03

    Microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) provide a viable approach for bioenergy generation from fermentable substrates such as propionate. However, the paths of electron flow during propionate oxidation in the anode of MECs are unknown. Here, the paths of electron flow involved in propionate oxidation in the anode of two-chambered MECs were examined at low (4.5 mM) and high (36 mM) propionate concentrations. Electron mass balances and microbial community analysis revealed that multiple paths of electron flow (via acetate/H2 or acetate/formate) to current could occur simultaneously during propionate oxidation regardless of the concentration tested. Current (57–96 %) was the largest electron sink and methane (0–2.3 %) production was relatively unimportant at both concentrations based on electron balances. At a low propionate concentration, reactors supplemented with 2-bromoethanesulfonate had slightly higher coulombic efficiencies than reactors lacking this methanogenesis inhibitor. However, an opposite trend was observed at high propionate concentration, where reactors supplemented with 2-bromoethanesulfonate had a lower coulombic efficiency and there was a greater percentage of electron loss (23.5 %) to undefined sinks compared to reactors without 2-bromoethanesulfonate (11.2 %). Propionate removal efficiencies were 98 % (low propionate concentration) and 78 % (high propionate concentration). Analysis of 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing revealed the dominance of sequences most similar to Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA and G. sulfurreducens subsp. ethanolicus. Collectively, these results provide new insights on the paths of electron flow during propionate oxidation in the anode of MECs fed with low and high propionate concentrations.

  17. PMA-PhyloChip DNA Microarray to Elucidate Viable Microbial Community Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkateswaran, Kasthuri J.; Stam, Christina N.; Andersen, Gary L.; DeSantis, Todd

    2011-01-01

    in the dark. Thereafter, the sample is exposed to visible light for five minutes, so that the DNA from dead cells will be cross-linked. Following this PMA treatment step, the sample is concentrated by centrifugation and washed (to remove excessive PMA) before DNA is extracted. The 16S rRNA gene fragments will be amplified by PCR to screen the total microbial community using PhyloChip DNA microarray analysis. This approach will detect only the viable microbial community since the PMA intercalated DNA from dead cells would be unavailable for PCR amplification. The total detection time including PCR reaction for low biomass samples will be a few hours. Numerous markets may use this technology. The food industry uses spore detection to validate new alternative food processing technologies, sterility, and quality. Pharmaceutical and medical equipment companies also detect spores as a marker for sterility. This system can be used for validating sterilization processes, water treatment systems, and in various public health and homeland security applications.

  18. Liquid biopsy in cancer patients: advances in capturing viable CTCs for functional studies using the EPISPOT assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alix-Panabières, Catherine; Pantel, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in the blood of cancer patients have received increasing attention as new diagnostic tool enabling 'liquid biopsies'. In contrast to the wealth of descriptive studies demonstrating the clinical relevance of CTCs as biomarkers, the extremely low concentration of CTCs in the peripheral blood of most cancer patients challenges further functional studies. This article discusses the current possibilities to enrich and, in particular, detect viable CTCs with emphasis on the EPithelial ImmunoSPOT technology. This functional assay detects viable CTCs at the single-cell level and has been used on hundreds of patients with different tumor types including epithelial tumors (breast, prostate and colon cancer) and melanomas. Moreover, the article summarizes recent advances in the in vitro and in vivo expansion of CTCs from cancer patients. These functional analyses will contribute to identifying the biological properties of metastatic cells and reveal new therapeutic targets against disseminating cancer cells.

  19. Vitrification by Ultra-fast Cooling at a Low Concentration of Cryoprotectants in a Quartz Microcapillary: A Study Using Murine Embryonic Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaoming; Park, Eric Y.H.; Fowler, Alex; Yarmush, Martin L.; Toner, Mehmet

    2009-01-01

    Conventional cryopreservation protocols for slow-freezing or vitrification involve cell injury due to ice formation/cell dehydration or toxicity of high cryoprotectant (CPA) concentrations, respectively. In this study, we developed a novel cryopreservation technique to achieve ultra-fast cooling rates using a quartz microcapillary (QMC). The QMC enabled vitrification of murine embryonic stem (ES) cells using an intracellular cryoprotectant concentration in the range used for slowing freezing (1–2 M). The cryoprotectants used included 2 M 1,2-propanediol (PROH, cell membrane permeable) and 0.5 M extracellular trehalose (cell membrane impermeable). More than 70% of the murine ES cells post-vitrification attached with respect to non-frozen control cells, and the proliferation rates of the two groups were similar. Preservation of undifferentiated properties of the pluripotent murine ES cells post vitrification cryopreservation was verified using three different types of assays: the expression of transcription factor Oct-4, the presentation of the membrane surface glycoprotein SSEA-1, and the elevated expression of the intracellular enzyme alkaline phosphatase. These results indicate that vitrification at a low concentration (2 M) of intracellular cryoprotectants is a viable and effective approach for the cryopreservation of murine embryonic stem cells. PMID:18462712

  20. Functional Concentrations of BMP4 on Differentiation of Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells to Primordial Germ Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatef Ghasemi Hamidabadi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4 has a significant role in primordial germ cells(PGCs differentiation from mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC. The aim of this study is to determinethe best concentration of BMP4 at a time of two days on differentiation PGCs from mESC.Materials and Methods: To differentiate PGCs, embryoid bodies (EBs from mESCs were culturedin concentrations of 0, 5 and 10 ng/ml BMP4 for two days. Germ cell markers Oct4 (Pou5f1, Stella(Dppa3 and Mvh (Ddx4 were analyzed by flow cytometry, immunocytochemistry and reversetranscriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR.Results: Flow cytometry data demonstrated most Mvh-positive cells were observed only in thetreated groups. Immunocytochemistry of EBs in the treated groups identified cells positive forMvh. PCR results showed expression of Oct4 in the control group and treated groups. Stella andMvh were expressed only in the treated groups.Conclusion: Low concentrations of BMP4 during two days had an optimal effect on differentiationof PGCs from mESC.

  1. Low-cost photovoltaics: Luminescent solar concentrators and colloidal quantum dot solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leow, Shin Woei

    Solar energy has long been lauded as an inexhaustible fuel source with more energy reaching the earth's surface in one hour than the global consumption for a year. Although capable of satisfying the world's energy requirements, solar energy remains an expensive technology that has yet to attain grid parity. Another drawback is that existing solar farms require large quantities of land in order to generate power at useful rates. In this work, we look to luminescent solar concentrator systems and quantum dot technology as viable solutions to lowering the cost of solar electricity production with the flexibility to integrate such technologies into buildings to achieve dual land use. Luminescent solar concentrator (LSC) windows with front-facing photovoltaic (PV) cells were built and their gain and power efficiency were investigated. Conventional LSCs employ a photovoltaic (PV) cell that is placed on the edge of the LSC, facing inward. This work describes a new design with the PV cells on the front-face allowing them to receive both direct solar irradiation and wave-guided photons emitted from a dye embedded in an acrylic sheet, which is optically coupled to the PV cells. Parameters investigated include the thickness of the waveguide, edge treatment of the window, cell width, and cell placement. The data allowed us to make projections that aided in designing windows for maximized overall efficiency. A gain in power of 2.2x over the PV cells alone was obtained with PV cell coverage of 5%, and a power conversion efficiency as high as 6.8% was obtained with a PV cell coverage of 31%. Balancing the trade-offs between gain and efficiency, the design with the lowest cost per watt attained a power efficiency of 3.8% and a gain of 1.6x. With the viability of the LSC demonstrated, a weighted Monte-Carlo Ray Tracing program was developed to study the transport of photons and loss mechanisms in the LSC to aid in design optimization. The program imports measured absorption

  2. Detection of viable toxigenic Vibrio cholerae and virulent Shigella ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A rapid and sensitive assay was developed for the detection of low numbers of viable Vibrio cholerae and Shigella spp. cells in environmental and drinking water samples. Water samples were filtered, and the filters were enriched in a non-selective medium. The enrichment cultures were prepared for polymerase chain ...

  3. Detection of viable toxigenic Vibrio cholerae and virulent Shigella ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DRINIE

    2003-04-02

    Apr 2, 2003 ... A rapid and sensitive assay was developed for the detection of low numbers of viable Vibrio cholerae and Shigella spp. cells in environmental and drinking water samples. Water samples were filtered, and the filters were enriched in a non-selective medium. The enrichment cultures were prepared for ...

  4. Cell cycle-dependent variations in protein concentration

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cookson, Natalie A; Cookson, Scott W; Tsimring, Lev S; Hasty, Jeff

    .... While most modeling techniques rely heavily on the concentrations of intracellular molecules, little attention has been paid to tracking and simulating the significant volume fluctuations that occur...

  5. Flexible thermal cycle test equipment for concentrator solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebert, Peter H [Glendale, CA; Brandt, Randolph J [Palmdale, CA

    2012-06-19

    A system and method for performing thermal stress testing of photovoltaic solar cells is presented. The system and method allows rapid testing of photovoltaic solar cells under controllable thermal conditions. The system and method presents a means of rapidly applying thermal stresses to one or more photovoltaic solar cells in a consistent and repeatable manner.

  6. The volumes and transcript counts of single cells reveal concentration homeostasis and capture biological noise.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kempe, H.; Schwabe, A.; Crémazy, F.; Verschure, P.J.; Bruggeman, F.J.

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional stochasticity can be measured by counting the number of mRNA molecules per cell. Cell-to-cell variability is best captured in terms of concentration rather than molecule counts, because reaction rates depend on concentrations. We combined single-molecule mRNA counting with

  7. Removal of viable bioaerosol particles with a low-efficiency HVAC filter enhanced by continuous emission of unipolar air ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, R; Agranovski, I; Pyankov, O; Grinshpun, S

    2008-04-01

    Continuous emission of unipolar ions has been shown to improve the performance of respirators and stationary filters challenged with non-biological particles. In this study, we investigated the ion-induced enhancement effect while challenging a low-efficiency heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) filter with viable bacterial cells, bacterial and fungal spores, and viruses. The aerosol concentration was measured in real time. Samples were also collected with a bioaerosol sampler for viable microbial analysis. The removal efficiency of the filter was determined, respectively, with and without an ion emitter. The ionization was found to significantly enhance the filter efficiency in removing viable biological particles from the airflow. For example, when challenged with viable bacteria, the filter efficiency increased as much as four- to fivefold. For viable fungal spores, the ion-induced enhancement improved the efficiency by a factor of approximately 2. When testing with virus-carrying liquid droplets, the original removal efficiency provided by the filter was rather low: 9.09 +/- 4.84%. While the ion emission increased collection about fourfold, the efficiency did not reach 75-100% observed with bacteria and fungi. These findings, together with our previously published results for non-biological particles, demonstrate the feasibility of a new approach for reducing aerosol particles in HVAC systems used for indoor air quality control. Recirculated air in HVAC systems used for indoor air quality control in buildings often contains considerable number of viable bioaerosol particles because of limited efficiency of the filters installed in these systems. In the present study, we investigated - using aerosolized bacterial cells, bacterial and fungal spores, and virus-carrying particles - a novel idea of enhancing the performance of a low-efficiency HVAC filter utilizing continuous emission of unipolar ions in the filter vicinity. The findings described in

  8. Pure Quantum Interpretations Are not Viable

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmelzer, I.

    2011-02-01

    Pure interpretations of quantum theory, which throw away the classical part of the Copenhagen interpretation without adding new structure to its quantum part, are not viable. This is a consequence of a non-uniqueness result for the canonical operators.

  9. Two-hundredfold volume concentration of dilute cell and particle suspensions using chip integrated multistage acoustophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordin, Maria; Laurell, Thomas

    2012-11-21

    Concentrating cells is a frequently performed step in cell biological assays and medical diagnostics. The commonly used centrifuge exhibits limitations when dealing with rare cell events and small sample volumes. Here, we present an acoustophoresis microfluidic chip utilising ultrasound to concentrate particles and cells into a smaller volume. The method is label-free, continuous and independent of suspending fluid, allowing for low cost and minimal preparation of the samples. Sequential concentration regions and two-dimensional acoustic standing wave focusing of cells and particles were found critical to accomplish concentration factors beyond one hundred times. Microparticles (5 μm in diameter) used to characterize the system were concentrated up to 194.2 ± 9.6 times with a recovery of 97.1 ± 4.8%. Red blood cells and prostate cancer cells were concentrated 145.0 ± 5.0 times and 195.7 ± 36.2 times, respectively, with recoveries of 97.2 ± 3.3% and 97.9 ± 18.1%. The data demonstrate that acoustophoresis is an effective technique for continuous flow-based concentration of cells and particles, offering a much needed intermediate step between sorting and detection of rare cell samples in lab-on-a-chip systems.

  10. ON-LINE MONITORING OF BIOMASS CONCENTRATION BASED ON A CAPACITANCE SENSOR: ASSESSING THE METHODOLOGY FOR DIFFERENT BACTERIA AND YEAST HIGH CELL DENSITY FED-BATCH CULTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. C. L. Horta

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The performance of an in-situ capacitance sensor for on-line monitoring of biomass concentration was evaluated for some of the most important microorganisms in the biotechnology industry: Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Pichia pastoris and Bacillus megaterium. A total of 33 batch and fed-batch cultures were carried out in a bench-scale bioreactor and biomass formation trends were followed by dielectric measurements during the growth phase as well as the induction phase, for 5 recombinant E. coli strains. Permittivity measurements and viable cellular concentrations presented a linear correlation for all the studied conditions. In addition, the permittivity signal was further used for inference of the cellular growth rate. The estimated specific growth rates mirrored the main trends of the metabolic states of the different cells and they can be further used for setting-up control strategies in fed-batch cultures.

  11. Tandem concentrator solar cells with 30 percent (AMO) power conversion efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, J. E.; Fraas, L. M.; Sundaram, V. S.; Brinker, David J.; Gee, J. M.; Oneill, Mark J.

    1991-01-01

    Very high efficiency concentrator solar panels are envisioned as economical and reliable electrical power subsystems for space based platforms of the future. GaAs concentrator cells with very high efficiencies and good sub-bandgap transmissions can be fabricated on standard wafers. GaSb booster cell development is progressing very well; performance characteristics are still improving dramatically. Consistent GaAs/GaSb stacked cell AMO efficiencies greater than 30 percent are expected.

  12. A propidium monoazide–quantitative PCR method for the detection and quantification of viable Enterococcus faecalis in large-volume samples of marine waters

    KAUST Repository

    Salam, Khaled W.

    2014-08-23

    The development of rapid detection assays of cell viability is essential for monitoring the microbiological quality of water systems. Coupling propidium monoazide with quantitative PCR (PMA-qPCR) has been successfully applied in different studies for the detection and quantification of viable cells in small-volume samples (0.25-1.00 mL), but it has not been evaluated sufficiently in marine environments or in large-volume samples. In this study, we successfully integrated blue light-emitting diodes for photoactivating PMA and membrane filtration into the PMA-qPCR assay for the rapid detection and quantification of viable Enterococcus faecalis cells in 10-mL samples of marine waters. The assay was optimized in phosphate-buffered saline and seawater, reducing the qPCR signal of heat-killed E. faecalis cells by 4 log10 and 3 log10 units, respectively. Results suggest that high total dissolved solid concentration (32 g/L) in seawater can reduce PMA activity. Optimal PMA-qPCR standard curves with a 6-log dynamic range and detection limit of 102 cells/mL were generated for quantifying viable E. faecalis cells in marine waters. The developed assay was compared with the standard membrane filter (MF) method by quantifying viable E. faecalis cells in seawater samples exposed to solar radiation. The results of the developed PMA-qPCR assay did not match that of the standard MF method. This difference in the results reflects the different physiological states of E. faecalis cells in seawater. In conclusion, the developed assay is a rapid (∼5 h) method for the quantification of viable E. faecalis cells in marine recreational waters, which should be further improved and tested in different seawater settings. © 2014 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  13. [Effects of energy controllable steep pulses on intracellular calcium concentration and cell membrane potential].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiao-Jing; Hu, Li-Na; Zhu, Yun-Shan; Hong, Chuan; Li, Cong; Luo, Xiao-Dong

    2009-09-01

    Our previous experiments showed that steep pulses could kill tumor cells, but the mechanism is unclear. This study was to probe the effects of different dosages of energy controllable steep pulses (ECSP) on intracellular concentration of dissociative calcium ion ([Ca2+]i) and cell membrane potential. The breast carcinoma MDA-MB-231 cells were divided into control group and five ECSP (different dosages) groups. Ca2+ was labeled by Fluo-3/AM and cell membrane potential was labeled by DiBAC4(3). The mean fluorescence intensity in MDA-MB-231 cells was observed by laser confocal microscopy after ECSP treatment. The changes of calcium concentration and cell membrane potential after ECSP treatment were analyzed. The changes of intracellular [Ca2+]i after ECSP treatment were also observed either with or without Ca2+ outside of the cells. Ca2+ outflow was observed when the cells were treated with lower dosage of pulse in quiet state; the outflow was enhanced with the dosage increase. In real-time kinetic detection, intracellular Ca2+ concentration was increased with the increase of pulse electric field intensity when cells were treated with lower dosages of ECSP. When the voltage was 285 V, frequency was 100 Hz, [Ca2+]i decreased obviously. The intracellular Ca2+ concentration was obviously lower in the cells without outside Ca2+ than in cells with outside Ca2+, but it still increased gradually. Low dosage of ECSP induced the increase of cell membrane potential, indicating the depolarization of cell membrane. With increase of the dosage, cell membrane potential was attenuated, indicating the superpolarization of cell membrane. Lower dosage of ECSP can induce the depolarization of cell membrane and the inflow of outside Ca2+; higher dosage of ECSP can directly destroy the cell membrane and induce the superpolarization of cell membrane, then induce the outflow of intracellular Ca2+ which causes the necrosis of tumor cells.

  14. FRET imaging of hemoglobin concentration in Plasmodium falciparum-infected red cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Esposito

    Full Text Available During its intraerythrocytic asexual reproduction cycle Plasmodium falciparum consumes up to 80% of the host cell hemoglobin, in large excess over its metabolic needs. A model of the homeostasis of falciparum-infected red blood cells suggested an explanation based on the need to reduce the colloid-osmotic pressure within the host cell to prevent its premature lysis. Critical for this hypothesis was that the hemoglobin concentration within the host cell be progressively reduced from the trophozoite stage onwards.The experiments reported here were designed to test this hypothesis by direct measurements of the hemoglobin concentration in live, infected red cells. We developed a novel, non-invasive method to quantify the hemoglobin concentration in single cells, based on Förster resonance energy transfer between hemoglobin molecules and the fluorophore calcein. Fluorescence lifetime imaging allowed the quantitative mapping of the hemoglobin concentration within the cells. The average fluorescence lifetimes of uninfected cohorts was 270+/-30 ps (mean+/-SD; N = 45. In the cytoplasm of infected cells the fluorescence lifetime of calcein ranged from 290+/-20 ps for cells with ring stage parasites to 590+/-13 ps and 1050+/-60 ps for cells with young trophozoites and late stage trophozoite/early schizonts, respectively. This was equivalent to reductions in hemoglobin concentration spanning the range from 7.3 to 2.3 mM, in line with the model predictions. An unexpected ancillary finding was the existence of a microdomain under the host cell membrane with reduced calcein quenching by hemoglobin in cells with mature trophozoite stage parasites.The results support the predictions of the colloid-osmotic hypothesis and provide a better understanding of the homeostasis of malaria-infected red cells. In addition, they revealed the existence of a distinct peripheral microdomain in the host cell with limited access to hemoglobin molecules indicating the

  15. Detection and Quantification of Viable and Nonviable Trypanosoma cruzi Parasites by a Propidium Monoazide Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancino-Faure, Beatriz; Fisa, Roser; Alcover, M. Magdalena; Jimenez-Marco, Teresa; Riera, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Molecular techniques based on real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) allow the detection and quantification of DNA but are unable to distinguish between signals from dead or live cells. Because of the lack of simple techniques to differentiate between viable and nonviable cells, the aim of this study was to optimize and evaluate a straightforward test based on propidium monoazide (PMA) dye action combined with a qPCR assay (PMA-qPCR) for the selective quantification of viable/nonviable epimastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi. PMA has the ability to penetrate the plasma membrane of dead cells and covalently cross-link to the DNA during exposure to bright visible light, thereby inhibiting PCR amplification. Different concentrations of PMA (50–200 μM) and epimastigotes of the Maracay strain of T. cruzi (1 × 105–10 parasites/mL) were assayed; viable and nonviable parasites were tested and quantified by qPCR with a TaqMan probe specific for T. cruzi. In the PMA-qPCR assay optimized at 100 μM PMA, a significant qPCR signal reduction was observed in the nonviable versus viable epimastigotes treated with PMA, with a mean signal reduction of 2.5 logarithm units and a percentage of signal reduction > 98%, in all concentrations of parasites assayed. This signal reduction was also observed when PMA-qPCR was applied to a mixture of live/dead parasites, which allowed the detection of live cells, except when the concentration of live parasites was low (10 parasites/mL). The PMA-qPCR developed allows differentiation between viable and nonviable epimastigotes of T. cruzi and could thus be a potential method of parasite viability assessment and quantification. PMID:27139452

  16. Concentration-dependent fluorescence live-cell imaging and tracking of intracellular nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Ji Hye; Joo, Sang-Woo [Department of Chemistry, Soongsil University, Seoul 156-743 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Keunchang [Logos Biosystems, Incorporated, Anyang 431-070 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, So Yeong, E-mail: leeso@snu.ac.kr, E-mail: sjoo@ssu.ac.kr [Laboratory of Pharmacology, College of Veterinary Medicine and Research Institute for Veterinary Science, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-06-10

    Using live-cell imaging techniques we investigated concentration-dependent intracellular movements of fluorescence nanoparticles (NPs) in real-time after their entry into HeLa cells via incubation. Intracellular particle traces appeared to be a mixture of both random and fairly unidirectional movements of the particles. At rather low concentrations of NPs, a majority of the non-random intracellular particle trajectories are assumed to mostly go along microtubule networks after endocytosis, as evidenced from the inhibition test with nocodazole. On the other hand, as the concentrations of NPs increased, random motions were more frequently observed inside the cells.

  17. Development of manufacturing capability for high-concentration, high-efficiency silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinton, R.A.; Verlinden, P.J.; Crane, R.A.; Swanson, R.N. [SunPower Corp., Sunnyvale, CA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    This report presents a summary of the major results from a program to develop a manufacturable, high-efficiency silicon concentrator solar cell and a cost-effective manufacturing facility. The program was jointly funded by the Electric Power Research Institute, Sandia National Laboratories through the Concentrator Initiative, and SunPower Corporation. The key achievements of the program include the demonstration of 26%-efficient silicon concentrator solar cells with design-point (20 W/cm{sup 2}) efficiencies over 25%. High-performance front-surface passivations; that were developed to achieve this result were verified to be absolutely stable against degradation by 475 days of field exposure at twice the design concentration. SunPower demonstrated pilot production of more than 1500 of these cells. This cell technology was also applied to pilot production to supply 7000 17.7-cm{sup 2} one-sun cells (3500 yielded wafers) that demonstrated exceptional quality control. The average efficiency of 21.3% for these cells approaches the peak efficiency ever demonstrated for a single small laboratory cell within 2% (absolute). Extensive cost models were developed through this program and calibrated by the pilot-production project. The production levels achieved indicate that SunPower could produce 7-10 MW of concentrator cells per year in the current facility based upon the cell performance demonstrated during the program.

  18. Grazing of particle-associated bacteria-an elimination of the non-viable fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonsalves, Maria-Judith; Fernandes, Sheryl Oliveira; Priya, Madasamy Lakshmi; LokaBharathi, Ponnapakkam Adikesavan

    Quantification of bacteria being grazed by microzooplankton is gaining importance since they serve as energy subsidies for higher trophic levels which consequently influence fish production. Hence, grazing pressure on viable and non-viable fraction of free and particle-associated bacteria in a tropical estuary controlled mainly by protist grazers was estimated using the seawater dilution technique. In vitro incubations over a period of 42h showed that at the end of 24h, growth coefficient (k) of particle-associated bacteria was 9 times higher at 0.546 than that of free forms. Further, 'k' value of viable cells on particles was double that of free forms at 0.016 and 0.007, respectively. While bacteria associated with particles were grazed (coefficient of removal (g)=0.564), the free forms were relatively less grazed indicating that particle-associated bacteria were exposed to grazers in these waters. Among the viable and non-viable forms, 'g' of non-viable fraction (particle-associated bacteria=0.615, Free=0.0086) was much greater than the viable fraction (particle-associated bacteria=0.056, Free=0.068). Thus, grazing on viable cells was relatively low in both the free and attached states. These observations suggest that non-viable forms of particle-associated bacteria were more prone to grazing and were weeded out leaving the viable cells to replenish the bacterial standing stock. Particle colonization could thus be a temporary refuge for the "persistent variants" where the viable fraction multiply and release their progeny. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Microbiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  19. Bone marrow concentrated cells and stromal vascular fraction cells injections for osteoarthritis treatment: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadalà, G; Papalia, R; La Verde, L; Russo, F; Denaro, V; Rosa, M A

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this systematic review is to examine current clinical evidences supporting the intraarticular injection of bone marrow concentrate cells (BMC) and adipose-derived stromal vascular fraction cells (SVF) for the treatment of osteoarthritis (OA). The research was performed on PubMed (Medline), EMBASE and Cochrane Library considering the English literature. Only clinical trials have been included. The systematic research identified twelve clinical trials. Articles included in the study, were one of level II, four of level III, six of level IV and one level V. Among clinical trials, none were randomized, four were comparative, seven were case series, and one was a case report. Seven studies were focused on the use of SVF (1332 patients) and five on the use of BMC (963 patients), with preliminary interesting findings in the OA treatment. Despite the growing interest in this biological approach for OA, knowledge on this topic is still preliminary. Randomized controlled trials are needed to support the potential of BMC and SVF injections and to evaluate advantages and disadvantages with respect to the available treatments.

  20. Using Generic Examples to Make Viable Arguments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Anne E.; Ely, Rob; Yopp, David

    2017-01-01

    The twenty-first century has seen an increased call to train students to craft mathematical arguments. The third of the Common Core's (CCSS) Standards for Mathematical Practice (SMP 3) (CCSSI 2010) calls for all mathematically proficient students to "construct viable arguments" to support the truth of their ideas and to "critique…

  1. Design and Operation of an Electrochemical Methanol Concentration Sensor for Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, S. R.; Valdez, T. I.; Chun, W.

    2000-01-01

    The development of a 150-Watt packaged power source based on liquid feed direct methanol fuel cells is being pursued currently at the Jet propulsion Laboratory for defense applications. In our studies we find that the concentration of methanol in the fuel circulation loop affects the electrical performance and efficiency the direct methanol fuel cell systems significantly. The practical operation of direct methanol fuel cell systems, therefore, requires accurate monitoring and control of methanol concentration. The present paper reports on the principle and demonstration of an in-house developed electrochemical sensor suitable for direct methanol fuel cell systems.

  2. Effects of heat treatment and concentration of fish serum on cell growth in adhesion culture of Chinese hamster ovary cells

    OpenAIRE

    Fujiwara, Masashi; Tsukada, Ryohei; Shioya, Itaru; Takagi, Mutsumi

    2009-01-01

    The effects of heat treatment and concentration of fish serum (FS) on cell growth and human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (hGM-CSF) production in an adhesion culture of recombinant Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, DR1000L4N, were investigated. The addition of heat treated FS instead of non-heat-treated FS improved cell growth in terms of cell density, which reached 60% that in 10% fetal calf serum (FCS)-containing medium (FCS medium). A decrease in FS concentration from 1...

  3. Removal of viable bacteria and endotoxins by Electro Deionization (EDI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Norimitsu; Otomo, Teruo; Watabe, Tomoichi; Ase, Tomonobu; Takemura, Takuto; Sato, Toshio

    2011-09-01

    Viable bacteria and endotoxins in water sometimes cause problems for human health. Endotoxins are major components of the outer cell wall of gram-negative bacteria (lipopolysaccharides). In medical procedures, especially haemodialysis (HD) and related therapies (haemodiafiltration (HDF), haemofiltration (HF)), endotoxins in the water for haemodialysis can permeate through the haemodialysis membrane and cause microinflammation or various haemodialysis-related illnesses. To decrease such a biological risk, RO and UF membranes are generally used. Also, hot water disinfection or the chemical disinfection is regularly executed to kill bacteria which produce endotoxins. However, simple treatment methods and equipment may be able to decrease the biological risk more efficiently. In our experiments, we confirmed that viable bacteria and endotoxins were removed by Electro Deionization (EDI) technology and also clarified the desorption mechanisms.

  4. Increasing Fuel Efficiency of Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Systems with Feedforward Control of the Operating Concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngseung Na

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Most of the R&D on fuel cells for portable applications concentrates on increasing efficiencies and energy densities to compete with other energy storage devices, especially batteries. To improve the efficiency of direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC systems, several modifications to system layouts and operating strategies are considered in this paper, rather than modifications to the fuel cell itself. Two modified DMFC systems are presented, one with an additional inline mixer and a further modification of it with a separate tank to recover condensed water. The set point for methanol concentration control in the solution is determined by fuel efficiency and varies with the current and other process variables. Feedforward concentration control enables variable concentration for dynamic loads. Simulation results were validated experimentally with fuel cell systems.

  5. A method for the control of alumina concentration in aluminum reduction cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens G. Balchen

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a new method for the control of the concentration of the alumina in electrolysis cells for the production of aluminium. The method is based upon the well known fact that apparent resistivity of the cell is a function of the alumina concentration so that the resistivity has the lowest value around the concentration of three per cent and increases in both directions. The method uses the cross correlation between a perturbation of the feed flow of alumina into the cell and the resulting response in measured voltage across the cell. The cross-correlation is proportional to the slope of the resistivity against concentration curve, making it possible to control the alumina flow, to achieve a desired slope. The method has much in common with other methods presently in use which require a much more complicated computation scheme.

  6. Improving accuracy of cell and chromophore concentration measurements using optical density

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    John A Myers; Brandon S Curtis; Wayne R Curtis

    2013-01-01

      Doc number: 4 Abstract Background: UV-vis spectrophotometric optical density (OD) is the most commonly-used technique for estimating chromophore formation and cell concentration in liquid culture...

  7. Real-time quantification of viable bacteria in liquid medium using infrared thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salaimeh, Ahmad A.; Campion, Jeffrey J.; Gharaibeh, Belal Y.; Evans, Martin E.; Saito, Kozo

    2011-11-01

    Quantifying viable bacteria in liquids is important in environmental, food processing, manufacturing, and medical applications. Since vegetative bacteria generate heat as a result of biochemical reactions associated with cellular functions, thermal sensing techniques, including infrared thermography (IRT), have been used to detect viable cells in biologic samples. We developed a novel method that extends the dynamic range and improves the sensitivity of bacterial quantification by IRT. The approach uses IRT video, thermodynamics laws, and heat transfer mechanisms to directly measure, in real-time, the amount of energy lost as heat from the surface of a liquid sample containing bacteria when the specimen cools to a lower temperature over 2 min. We show that the Energy Content ( EC) of liquid media containing as few as 120 colony-forming units (CFU) of Escherichia coli per ml was significantly higher than that of sterile media ( P method that provides real-time bacterial enumeration over a wide dynamic range without the need for sample concentration, modification, or destruction. The approach could be adapted to quantify other living cells in a liquid milieu and has the potential for automation and high throughput.

  8. Application of the wavelet image analysis technique to monitor cell concentration in bioprocesses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. J. R. Garófano

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The growth of cells of great practical interest, such as, the filamentous cells of bacterium Streptomyces clavuligerus, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the insect Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9 cell, cultivated in shaking flasks with complex media at appropriate temperatures and pHs, was quantified by the new wavelet transform technique. This image analysis tool was implemented using Matlab 5.2 software to process digital images acquired of samples taken of these three types of cells throughoot their cultivation. The values of the average wavelet coefficients (AWCs of simplified images were compared with experimental measurements of cell concentration and with computer-based densitometric measurements. AWCs were shown to be directly proportional to measurements of cell concentration and to densitometric measurements, making evident the great potential of the wavelet transform technique to quantitatively estimate the growth of several types of cells.

  9. Flat plate vs. concentrator solar photovoltaic cells - A manufacturing cost analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granon, L. A.; Coleman, M. G.

    1980-01-01

    The choice of which photovoltaic system (flat plate or concentrator) to use for utilizing solar cells to generate electricity depends mainly on the cost. A detailed, comparative manufacturing cost analysis of the two types of systems is presented. Several common assumptions, i.e., cell thickness, interest rate, power rate, factory production life, polysilicon cost, and direct labor rate are utilized in this analysis. Process sequences, cost variables, and sensitivity analyses have been studied, and results of the latter show that the most important parameters which determine manufacturing costs are concentration ratio, manufacturing volume, and cell efficiency. The total cost per watt of the flat plate solar cell is $1.45, and that of the concentrator solar cell is $1.85, the higher cost being due to the increased process complexity and material costs.

  10. The prognostic value of YKL-40 concentrations in nonmyeloablative conditioning allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørup, Anne Mette; Kornblit, Brian; Johansen, Julia S

    2011-01-01

    and plasma YKL-40 concentrations as prognostic biomarkers in a cohort of 149 patients treated with hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) after nonmyeloablative conditioning for hematologic malignancies. Recipients with pretransplant YKL-40 concentrations above the age-adjusted 95th percentile (high) had...

  11. Biological Effects of Osteoblast-Like Cells on Nanohydroxyapatite Particles at a Low Concentration Range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaochen Liu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The biological effects of osteoblast-like MG-63 cells on nanohydroxyapatite (n-HA at the low concentration range (5–25 g/mL for 5 days was investigated. The results showed the viability and actin cytoskeleton of the cells descended with the increase of the concentration of n-HA, and the actin cytoskeleton of cells was depolymerised and became more disordered. Apoptotic rate of cells (1.85%, 1.99%, and 2.29% increased with the increase of n-HA concentration (5, 15, and 25 g/mL and become significantly higher than the control. Total intracellular protein content decreased with n-HA concentration increase, showing significant difference between 25 g/mL and the control, and no significant change of ALP activity was observed at the 5th day. The results revealed that the cell growth was inhibited by n-HA in a concentration-dependent manner, and the obvious biological effects of MG-63 cells on n-HA existed at the low concentration range from 5 to 25 g/mL.

  12. Concentration-dependent effect of nerve growth factor on cell fate determination of neural progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Jiang, Hui; Hu, Zhengqing

    2011-10-01

    Stem cell-based spiral ganglion neuron (SGN) replacement therapy has been proposed to be a promising strategy to restore hearing either via replacing degenerated neurons or by improving the efficacy of cochlear implants which rely on functional neurons. However, lack of suitable donor cells and low survival rate of implanted cells are the major obstacles to successful implementation of therapeutic transplantation. The present study investigated the potential of mouse inner ear statoacoustic ganglion (SAG)-derived neural progenitors (NPs) to differentiate toward SGN-like glutamatergic cells and the influence to cell survival and differentiation when nerve growth factor (NGF) was supplied. We found that SAG-NPs could form neurospheres, proliferate, and differentiate into cells expressing neuronal protein neurofilament and β-III tubulin. NGF affected the cell fate of SAG-NP in a concentration-dependent manner in vitro. Low concentration of NGF (2-5 ng/mL) promoted cell proliferation. Medium concentration of NGF (20-40 ng/mL) stimulated cells to differentiate into bi-polar SGN-like cells expressing glutamatergic proteins. High concentration of NGF (100 ng/mL) could rescue cells from induced apoptosis. In the in vivo study, NGF (100 ng/mL) dramatically enhanced SAG-NP survival rate after implantation into adult mammalian inner ear. This finding raises the possibility to further induce these NPs to differentiate into SGN-like neurons in future in vivo study. In conclusion, given the capability of proliferation and differentiation into SGN-like cells with the supplement of NGF in vitro, SAG-NPs can serve as donor cells in stem cell-based SGN replacement therapy. NGF improved the survival of SAG-NPs not only in vitro but also in vivo.

  13. Absolute choline concentration measured by quantitative proton MR spectroscopy correlates with cell density in meningioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yue, Qiang [University of Tsukuba, Department of Neurosurgery, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Tsukuba Science City, Ibaraki (Japan)]|[West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Huaxi MR Research Center, Department of Radiology, Chengdu (China); Shibata, Yasushi; Kawamura, Hiraku; Matsumura, Akira [University of Tsukuba, Department of Neurosurgery, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Tsukuba Science City, Ibaraki (Japan); Isobe, Tomonori [Kitasato University, Department of Medical Technology, School of Allied Health Sciences, Minato, Tokyo (Japan); Anno, Izumi [University of Tsukuba, Department of Radiology, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Gong, Qi-Yong [West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Huaxi MR Research Center, Department of Radiology, Chengdu (China)]|[University of Liverpool, Division of Medical Imaging, Faculty of Medicine, Liverpool (United Kingdom)

    2009-01-15

    This study was aimed to investigate the relationship between quantitative proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) and pathological changes in meningioma. Twenty-two meningioma cases underwent single voxel 1H-MRS (point-resolved spectroscopy sequence, repetition time/echo time = 2,000 ms/68, 136, 272 ms). Absolute choline (Cho) concentration was calculated using tissue water as the internal reference and corrected according to intra-voxel cystic/necrotic parts. Pathological specimens were stained with MIB-1 antibody to measure cell density and proliferation index. Correlation analysis was performed between absolute Cho concentration and cell density and MIB-1 labeled proliferation index. Average Cho concentration of all meningiomas before correction was 2.95 {+-} 0.86 mmol/kg wet weight. It was increased to 3.23 {+-} 1.15 mmol/kg wet weight after correction. Average cell density of all meningiomas was 333 {+-} 119 cells/HPF, and average proliferation index was 2.93 {+-} 5.72%. A linear, positive correlation between cell density and Cho concentration was observed (r = 0.650, P = 0.001). After correction of Cho concentration, the correlation became more significant (r = 0.737, P < 0.001). However, no significant correlation between Cho concentration and proliferation index was found. There seemed to be a positive correlation trend after correction of Cho concentration but did not reach significant level. Absolute Cho concentration, especially Cho concentration corrected according to intra-voxel cystic/necrotic parts, reflects cell density of meningioma. (orig.)

  14. EFFECT OF PHOSPHORUS CONCENTRATION ON THE GROWTH OF CATTAIL CALLUS CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    This investigation examined the growth of Typha latifolia (cattail) callus cells grown in 5 different (0, 11, 22, 33, 44, jg/L(-1) phosphosur concentrations. The cells were grown for two successive subcultures on semi-solid media, and subsequently in suspension culture with the s...

  15. 3D-printed concentrator arrays for external light trapping on thin film solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, Lourens; Marcus, E. A. Pepijn; Oostra, A. Jolt; Schropp, Ruud E. I.; Di Vece, Marcel

    After our recent demonstration of a 3D-printed external light trap on a small solar cell, we now consider its potential for large solar panels. An external light trap consists of a parabolic concentrator and a spacer that redirects the photons that are reflected by the solar cell back towards the

  16. Thermal analysis of a multi-layer microchannel heat sink for cooling concentrator photovoltaic (CPV) cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siyabi, Idris Al; Shanks, Katie; Mallick, Tapas; Sundaram, Senthilarasu

    2017-09-01

    Concentrator Photovoltaic (CPV) technology is increasingly being considered as an alternative option for solar electricity generation. However, increasing the light concentration ratio could decrease the system output power due to the increase in the temperature of the cells. The performance of a multi-layer microchannel heat sink configuration was evaluated using numerical analysis. In this analysis, three dimensional incompressible laminar steady flow model was solved numerically. An electrical and thermal solar cell model was coupled for solar cell temperature and efficiency calculations. Thermal resistance, solar cell temperature and pumping power were used for the system efficiency evaluation. An increase in the number of microchannel layers exhibited the best overall performance in terms of the thermal resistance, solar cell temperature uniformity and pressure drop. The channel height and width has no effect on the solar cell maximum temperature. However, increasing channel height leads to a reduction in the pressure drop and hence less fluid pumping power.

  17. The effects of nonuniform illumination and temperature profiles on silicon solar cells under concentrated sunlight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, R. W.; Odonnel, D. T.; Backus, C. E.

    The independent effects of either nonuniform illumination or nonuniform temperature distribution on the performance of silicon solar cells under concentrated sunlight are examined. Results from both a theoretical model and experimental observations show that the electrical performance of the concentrator solar cell under nonuniform temperature is dependent on both the magnitude and the location of the nonuniform temperature profile. The model results, however, failed to predict the degree of bending of the open circuit voltage curve which was observed experimentally. For nonuniform illumination, experimental and theoretical results show that both the efficiency and the open circuit voltage are decreased compared with the uniform illumination case. The nonillumination profiles included step changes of illuminated to nonilluminated parts of the cell as well as continuously varying profiles across the geometry of the cell. It is found that the efficiency and the overall voltage of the cell can be increased by illuminating the cell closer to the busbar.

  18. An automated HPLC method to determine intracellular vincristine concentrations in mononuclear cells of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groninger, E; Koopmans, P; Kamps, W; Uges, D

    A method to determine intracellular vincristine concentrations in vivo in leukemic cells of patients is useful to investigate mechanisms of vincristine resistance. We developed a high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method to measure vincristine concentrations in human mononuclear cells

  19. Monotone viable trajectories for functional differential inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Georges

    This paper is a study on functional differential inclusions with memory which represent the multivalued version of retarded functional differential equations. The main result gives a necessary and sufficient equations. The main result gives a necessary and sufficient condition ensuring the existence of viable trajectories; that means trajectories remaining in a given nonempty closed convex set defined by given constraints the system must satisfy to be viable. Some motivations for this paper can be found in control theory where F( t, φ) = { f( t, φ, u)} uɛU is the set of possible velocities of the system at time t, depending on the past history represented by the function φ and on a control u ranging over a set U of controls. Other motivations can be found in planning procedures in microeconomics and in biological evolutions where problems with memory do effectively appear in a multivalued version. All these models require viability constraints represented by a closed convex set.

  20. Real-time optogenetic control of intracellular protein concentration in microbial cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melendez, Justin; Patel, Michael; Oakes, Benjamin L; Xu, Ping; Morton, Patrick; McClean, Megan N

    2014-03-01

    Perturbations in the concentration of a specific protein are often used to study and control biological networks. The ability to "dial-in" and programmatically control the concentration of a desired protein in cultures of cells would be transformative for applications in research and biotechnology. We developed a culturing apparatus and feedback control scheme which, in combination with an optogenetic system, allows us to generate defined perturbations in the intracellular concentration of a specific protein in microbial cell culture. As light can be easily added and removed, we can control protein concentration in culture more dynamically than would be possible with long-lived chemical inducers. Control of protein concentration is achieved by sampling individual cells from the culture apparatus, imaging and quantifying protein concentration, and adjusting the inducing light appropriately. The culturing apparatus can be operated as a chemostat, allowing us to precisely control microbial growth and providing cell material for downstream assays. We illustrate the potential for this technology by generating fixed and time-varying concentrations of a specific protein in continuous steady-state cultures of the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We anticipate that this technology will allow for quantitative studies of biological networks as well as external tuning of synthetic gene circuits and bioprocesses.

  1. On the use of the serial dilution culture method to enumerate viable phytoplankton in natural communities of plankton subjected to ballast water treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Cullen, John J.; MacIntyre, Hugh L.

    2015-01-01

    Discharge standards for ballast water treatment (BWT) systems are based on concentrations of living cells, for example, as determined with vital stains. Ultraviolet radiation (UV) stops the reproduction of microorganisms without killing them outright; they are living, but not viable, and ecologically as good as dead. Consequently, UV-treated discharge can be compliant with the intent of regulation while failing a live/dead test. An alternative evaluation of BWT can be proposed based on the as...

  2. Graded Carrier Concentration Absorber Profile for High Efficiency CIGS Solar Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Antonino Parisi; Riccardo Pernice; Vincenzo Rocca; Luciano Curcio; Salvatore Stivala; Cino, Alfonso C.; Giovanni Cipriani; Vincenzo Di Dio; Giuseppe Ricco Galluzzo; Rosario Miceli; Busacca, Alessandro C.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate an innovative CIGS-based solar cells model with a graded doping concentration absorber profile, capable of achieving high efficiency values. In detail, we start with an in-depth discussion concerning the parametrical study of conventional CIGS solar cells structures. We have used the wxAMPS software in order to numerically simulate cell electrical behaviour. By means of simulations, we have studied the variation of relevant physical and chemical parameters—characteristic of suc...

  3. Serum concentrations of mast cell tryptase are reduced in heavy drinkers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beceiro, Carmen; Campos, Joaquín; Valcarcel, Maria-Angeles

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Baseline serum tryptase concentrations are commonly used in clinical practice as a marker of the body's mast cell burden. This study aimed to investigate serum tryptase concentrations in heavy drinkers. METHODS: Serum tryptase concentrations were determined in 126 heavy drinkers (75...... test positivity) was not associated with serum tryptase concentrations in heavy drinkers. CONCLUSIONS: Serum concentrations of mast cell tryptase are lower in heavy drinkers than in healthy controls.......% males, median age 47 years) who were admitted to the hospital because of alcohol withdrawal syndrome (n = 60), general symptoms with abnormalities on biochemical tests that indicated acute liver disease (n = 19), complications of advanced liver disease (n = 33), and miscellaneous reasons (n = 14...

  4. Concepts for thin-film GaAs concentrator cells. [for solar photovoltaic space power systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitzer, M. B.; Gale, R. P.; Mcclelland, R.; King, B.; Dingle, J.

    1989-01-01

    The development of advanced GaAs concentrator solar cells, and in particular, the use of CLEFT (cleavage of lateral epitaxial films for transfer) processes for formation of thin-film structures is reported. The use of CLEFT has made possible processing of the back, and cells with back surface grids are discussed. Data on patterned junction development are presented; such junctions are expected to be useful in back surface applications requiring point contacts, grating structures, and interdigitated back contacts. CLEFT concentrator solar cells with grids on the front and back surfaces are reported here; these cells are 4 microns thick and are bonded to glass covers for support. Air mass zero efficiency of 18.8 percent has been obtained for a CLEFT concentrator operating at 18.5 suns.

  5. Concentration-dependent effects of narciclasine on cell cycle progression in Arabidopsis root tips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Xiaofan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Narciclasine (NCS is an Amaryllidaceae alkaloid isolated from Narcissus tazetta bulbs. NCS has inhibitory effects on a broad range of biological activities and thus has various potential practical applications. Here we examine how NCS represses plant root growth. Results Results showed that the inhibition of NCS on cell division in Arabidopsis root tips and its effects on cell differentiation are concentration-dependent; at low concentrations (0.5 and 1.0 μM NCS preferentially targets mitotic cell cycle specific/cyclin complexes, whereas at high concentration (5.0 μM the NCS-stimulated accumulation of Kip-related proteins (KRP1 and RP2 affects the CDK complexes with a role at both G1/S and G2/M phases. Conclusions Our findings suggest that NCS modulates the coordination between cell division and differentiation in Arabidopsis root tips and hence affects the postembryonic development of Arabidopsis seedlings.

  6. Concentration-dependent effects of narciclasine on cell cycle progression in Arabidopsis root tips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Xiaofan; Hu, Yanfeng; Yue, Kun; Lu, Hongxia; Jia, Pengfei; Wang, Huahua; Wang, Xiaomin; Bi, Yurong

    2011-12-28

    Narciclasine (NCS) is an Amaryllidaceae alkaloid isolated from Narcissus tazetta bulbs. NCS has inhibitory effects on a broad range of biological activities and thus has various potential practical applications. Here we examine how NCS represses plant root growth. Results showed that the inhibition of NCS on cell division in Arabidopsis root tips and its effects on cell differentiation are concentration-dependent; at low concentrations (0.5 and 1.0 μM) NCS preferentially targets mitotic cell cycle specific/cyclin complexes, whereas at high concentration (5.0 μM) the NCS-stimulated accumulation of Kip-related proteins (KRP1 and RP2) affects the CDK complexes with a role at both G1/S and G2/M phases. Our findings suggest that NCS modulates the coordination between cell division and differentiation in Arabidopsis root tips and hence affects the postembryonic development of Arabidopsis seedlings.

  7. Plateletpheresis concentrates produced with the COMTEC cell separator: the French experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffe, C; Benguella, M; Domy, M; Cottier, D; Guignier, F; N'gondara, J P; Carrère, A; Masse, M; Naegelen, C; Biggio, B; Tiberghien, P; Hervè, P; Bouzgarrou, R; Maurel, J P; Vezon, G; Vidal, M; Quainon, F; Benamara, A; Lamy, B; Beaumont, J L; Bierling, P; Gondrexon, G; Schooneman, F; Janot, C; Villard, F; Huart, J J

    2001-08-01

    The latest generation of cell separators such as Trima (Gambro), Amicus (Baxter) and AS-TEC 204 (Fresenius), allow the collection of leucocyte-reduced platelet concentrates without secondary filtration. Fresenius has recently developed the COMTEC cell separator whose performance has been evaluated by several teams in France. This new cell separator is an improved version of the Fresenius AS-TEC 204 cell separator, designed to allow more efficient platelet collections. This study reports on the experience of six French teams (from Bordeaux, Clermont-Ferrand, Creteil, Dijon, Lille and Nancy) who obtained 696 leucocyte-reduced plateletpheresis concentrates in the course of collection using the new Fresenius COMTEC cell separator. All healthy volunteer donors fulfilled French selection criteria for platelet apheresis. Donors were eligible if they had suitable venous accesses, if their bodyweight was *50 kg and if their pre-apheresis platelet count was >150 x 10(9) l(-1). Between 4606 and 5229 ml of blood were processed. The mean volume of the platelet concentrates was between 439 and 493 ml (mean 460 +/- 63 ml). The platelet yield was of the order of 5.18 +/- 1.02 x 10(11) with only one platelet concentrate below the norm of 2 x 10(11) platelets (0.91 x 10(11)). No plausible explanation for this was found. The residual leucocyte levels conform to current norms. The platelet concentrates contained less than 1 x 10(6) leucocytes per concentrate (mean 0.233 +/- 0.150 x 10(6) leucocytes) in more than 97% of the components produced with >95% statistical confidence. The efficacy of the cell separator (52.44 +/- 7.35%) is comparable to that of other separators. The Fresenius COMTEC cell separator makes it possible to obtain leucocyte-reduced platelet concentrates which comply with current standards both in terms of platelet content and residual leucocyte level.

  8. Vasopressin activates Akt/mTOR pathway in smooth muscle cells cultured in high glucose concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montes, Daniela K.; Brenet, Marianne; Muñoz, Vanessa C.; Burgos, Patricia V.; Villanueva, Carolina I. [Department of Physiology, Universidad Austral de Chile, Valdivia 509-9200 (Chile); Figueroa, Carlos D. [Department of Anatomy, Histology and Pathology, Universidad Austral de Chile, Valdivia 509-9200 (Chile); González, Carlos B., E-mail: cbgonzal@uach.cl [Department of Physiology, Universidad Austral de Chile, Valdivia 509-9200 (Chile); Department of Neuroscience and Cell Biology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555 (United States)

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: •AVP induces mTOR phosphorylation in A-10 cells cultured in high glucose concentration. •The mTOR phosphorylation is mediated by the PI3K/Akt pathway activation. •The AVP-induced mTOR phosphorylation inhibited autophagy and stimulated cell proliferation. -- Abstract: Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex is a key regulator of autophagy, cell growth and proliferation. Here, we studied the effects of arginine vasopressin (AVP) on mTOR activation in vascular smooth muscle cells cultured in high glucose concentration. AVP induced the mTOR phosphorylation in A-10 cells grown in high glucose, in contrast to cells cultured in normal glucose; wherein, only basal phosphorylation was observed. The AVP-induced mTOR phosphorylation was inhibited by a PI3K inhibitor. Moreover, the AVP-induced mTOR activation inhibited autophagy and increased thymidine incorporation in cells grown in high glucose. This increase was abolished by rapamycin which inhibits the mTORC1 complex formation. Our results suggest that AVP stimulates mTOR phosphorylation by activating the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway and, subsequently, inhibits autophagy and raises cell proliferation in A-10 cells maintained in high glucose concentration.

  9. Silicon Based Photovoltaic Cells For Concentration-Research And Development Progress In Laser Grooved Buried Contact Cell Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, A.; Baistow, I.; Brown, L.; Devenport, S.; Drew, K.; Heasman, K. C.; Morrison, D.; Bruton, T. M.; Serenelli, L.; De Iuliis, S.; Izzi, M.; Tucci, M.; Salza, E.; Pirozzi, L.

    2011-12-01

    The Laser grooved buried contact silicon solar cell (LGBC) process employed by Narec currently produces LGBC cells designed to operate at concentrations ranging from 1-100 suns and has demonstrated efficiencies at 50X of over 19% and at 100X of over 18.2% using 300 μm CZ silicon[1] wafers. As part of the LAB2LINE[1], APOLLON[2] and ASPIS[3] projects funded under the European Commission Framework Programs (FP6 and FP7) we have made improvements to the LGBC process to improve efficiency or make the cell technology more suitable for industrial CPV receiver manufacturing processes. We describe a process which hybridizes LGBC and more standard screen printing technologies which yields at least a 6% relative improvement at concentration when using more readily available 200 μm thick CZ wafers. We describe a pioneering front dicing technique (FDT). The FDT process is important in small cells where edge recombination effects are detrimental to the performance. We show that by using this new technique we can produce cells that perform better at concentration and improve the positioning of the front contact of the cell. We also describe a busbar technology that uses laser processing and electroless chemical plating to allow not only soldering to the front contact of the cell but also wire bonding. The advances in research and development of LGBC cells leading to improved cell performance may provide significant reductions in levilised cost of energy (LCOE) for low to medium CPV systems.

  10. Effect of culture age, protectants, and initial cell concentration on viability of freeze-dried cells of Metschnikowia pulcherrima.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spadaro, Davide; Ciavorella, Annalisa Alessandra; Lopez-Reyes, Jorge Giovanny; Garibaldi, Angelo; Gullino, Maria Lodovica

    2010-10-01

    The effect of freeze-drying using different lyoprotectants at different concentrations on the viability and biocontrol efficacy of Metschnikowia pulcherrima was evaluated. The effects of initial yeast cell concentration and culture age on viability were also considered. Yeast cells grown for 36 h were more resistant to freeze-drying than were 48 h cells. An initial concentration of 10⁸ cells·mL⁻¹ favoured the highest survival after freeze-drying. When maltose (25%, m/v) was used as protectant, a high cell viability was obtained (64.2%). Cells maintained a high viability after 6 months of storage at 4 °C. The biocontrol efficacy of freeze-dried cells was similar to the activity of fresh cells on 'Gala' apples and was slightly lower on 'Golden Delicious' apples. After optimizing freeze-drying conditions, the viability of M. pulcherrima cells was similar to that obtained in other studies. The results constitute a first step towards the commercial development of M. pulcherrima as a biocontrol agent.

  11. Energy Yield Determination of Concentrator Solar Cells using Laboratory Measurements: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geisz, John F.; Garcia, Ivan; McMahon, William E.; Steiner, Myles A.; Ochoa, Mario; France, Ryan M.; Habte, Aron; Friedman, Daniel J.

    2015-09-14

    The annual energy conversion efficiency is calculated for a four junction inverted metamorphic solar cell that has been completely characterized in the laboratory at room temperature using measurements fit to a comprehensive optoelectronic model of the multijunction solar cells. A simple model of the temperature dependence is used to predict the performance of the solar cell under varying temperature and spectra characteristic of Golden, CO for an entire year. The annual energy conversion efficiency is calculated by integrating the predicted cell performance over the entire year. The effects of geometric concentration, CPV system thermal characteristics, and luminescent coupling are highlighted. temperature and spectra characteristic of Golden, CO for an entire year. The annual energy conversion efficiency is calculated by integrating the predicted cell performance over the entire year. The effects of geometric concentration, CPV system thermal characteristics, and luminescent coupling are highlighted.

  12. Analyzing luminescent solar concentrators with front-facing photovoltaic cells using weighted Monte Carlo ray tracing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woei Leow, Shin; Corrado, Carley; Osborn, Melissa; Isaacson, Michael; Alers, Glenn; Carter, Sue A.

    2013-06-01

    Luminescent solar concentrators (LSC) collect ambient light from a broad range of angles and concentrate the captured light onto photovoltaic (PV) cells. LSCs with front-facing cells collect direct and indirect sunlight ensuring a gain factor greater than one. The flexible placement and percentage coverage of PV cells on the LSC panel allow for layout adjustments to be made in order to balance re-absorption losses and the level of light concentration desired. A weighted Monte Carlo ray tracing program was developed to study the transport of photons and loss mechanisms in the LSC to aid in design optimization. The program imports measured absorption/emission spectra of an organic luminescent dye (LR305), the transmission coefficient, and refractive index of acrylic as parameters that describe the system. Simulations suggest that for LR305, 8-10 cm of luminescent material surrounding the PV cell yields the highest increase in power gain per unit area of LSC added, thereby determining the ideal spacing between PV cells in the panel. For rectangular PV cells, results indicate that for each centimeter of PV cell width, an additional increase of 0.15 mm to the waveguide thickness is required to efficiently transport photon collected by the LSC to the PV cell with minimal loss.

  13. A dual small-molecule rheostat for precise control of protein concentration in Mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu Hsuan; Pratt, Matthew R

    2014-04-14

    One of the most successful strategies for controlling protein concentrations in living cells relies on protein destabilization domains (DD). Under normal conditions, a DD will be rapidly degraded by the proteasome. However, the same DD can be stabilized or "shielded" in a stoichiometric complex with a small molecule, enabling dose-dependent control of its concentration. This process has been exploited by several labs to post-translationally control the expression levels of proteins in vitro as well as in vivo, although the previous technologies resulted in permanent fusion of the protein of interest to the DD, which can affect biological activity and complicate results. We previously reported a complementary strategy, termed traceless shielding (TShld), in which the protein of interest is released in its native form. Here, we describe an optimized protein concentration control system, TTShld, which retains the traceless features of TShld but utilizes two tiers of small molecule control to set protein concentrations in living cells. These experiments provide the first protein concentration control system that results in both a wide range of protein concentrations and proteins free from engineered fusion constructs. The TTShld system has a greatly improved dynamic range compared to our previously reported system, and the traceless feature is attractive for elucidation of the consequences of protein concentration in cell biology. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Airborne viable fungi in school environments in different climatic regions - A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salonen, Heidi; Duchaine, Caroline; Mazaheri, Mandana; Clifford, Sam; Lappalainen, Sanna; Reijula, Kari; Morawska, Lidia

    2015-03-01

    Elevated levels of fungi in indoor environments have been linked with mould/moisture damage in building structures. However, there is a lack of information about "normal" concentrations and flora as well as guidelines of viable fungi in the school environment in different climatic conditions. We have reviewed existing guidelines for indoor fungi and the current knowledge of the concentrations and flora of viable fungi in different climatic areas, the impact of the local factors on concentrations and flora of viable fungi in school environments. Meta-regression was performed to estimate the average behaviour for each analysis of interest, showing wide variation in the mean concentrations in outdoor and indoor school environments (range: 101-103 cfu/m3). These concentrations were significantly higher for both outdoors and indoors in the moderate than in the continental climatic area, showing that the climatic condition was a determinant for the concentrations of airborne viable fungi. The most common fungal species both in the moderate and continental area were Cladosporium spp. and Penicillium spp. The suggested few quantitative guidelines for indoor air viable fungi for school buildings are much lower than for residential areas. This review provides a synthesis, which can be used to guide the interpretation of the fungi measurements results and help to find indications of mould/moisture in school building structures.

  15. High content analysis at single cell level identifies different cellular responses dependent on nanomaterial concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manshian, Bella B; Munck, Sebastian; Agostinis, Patrizia; Himmelreich, Uwe; Soenen, Stefaan J

    2015-09-08

    A mechanistic understanding of nanomaterial (NM) interaction with biological environments is pivotal for the safe transition from basic science to applied nanomedicine. NM exposure results in varying levels of internalized NM in different neighboring cells, due to variances in cell size, cell cycle phase and NM agglomeration. Using high-content analysis, we investigated the cytotoxic effects of fluorescent quantum dots on cultured cells, where all effects were correlated with the concentration of NMs at the single cell level. Upon binning the single cell data into different categories related to NM concentration, this study demonstrates, for the first time, that quantum dots activate both cytoprotective and cytotoxic mechanisms, resulting in a zero net result on the overall cell population, yet with significant effects in cells with higher cellular NM levels. Our results suggest that future NM cytotoxicity studies should correlate NM toxicity with cellular NM numbers on the single cell level, as conflicting mechanisms in particular cell subpopulations are commonly overlooked using classical toxicological methods.

  16. N- myc oncogene amplification is correlated to trace metal concentrations in neuroblastoma cultured cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouget, B.; Sergeant, C.; Benard, J.; Llabador, Y.; Simonoff, M.

    2000-10-01

    N- myc oncogene amplification is a powerful predictor of aggressive behavior of neuroblastoma (NB), the most common solid tumor of the early childhood. Since N- myc overexpression - subsequent to amplification - determines a phenotype of invasiveness and metastatic spreading, it is assumed that N- myc amplified neuroblasts synthesize zinc metalloenzymes leading to tumor invasion and formation of metastases. In order to test a possible relation between N- myc oncogene amplification and trace metal contents in human NB cells, Fe, Cu and Zn concentrations have been measured by nuclear microprobe analysis in three human neuroblastoma cell lines with various degrees of N- myc amplification. Elemental determinations show uniform distribution of trace metals within the cells, but variations of intracellular trace metal concentrations with respect to the degree of N- myc amplification are highly dependent on the nature of the element. Zinc concentration is higher in both N- myc amplified cell lines (IMR-32 and IGR-N-91) than in the non-amplified cells (SK-N-SH). In contrast, intracellular iron content is particularly low in N- myc amplified cell lines. Moreover, copper concentrations showed an increase with the degree of N- myc amplification. These results indicate that a relationship exists between intracellular trace metals and N- myc oncogene amplification. They further suggest that trace metals very probably play a determinant role in mechanisms of the neuroblastoma invasiveness.

  17. Lowering the concentration affects the migration and viability of intracerebroventricular-delivered human mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyeong Seop; Lee, Na Kyung; Yoo, Dongkyeom; Lee, Jeongmin; Choi, Soo Jin; Oh, Wonil; Chang, Jong Wook; Na, Duk L

    2017-11-04

    Due to their widely known therapeutic benefits, mesenchymal stem cells have been proposed as a novel treatment option for a wide range of diseases including Alzheimer's disease. To maximize these benefits, critical factors such as delivery route, cell viability, and cell migration must be accounted for. Out of the various delivery routes to the brain, the intracerebroventricular (ICV) route stands out due to the widespread distribution that can occur via cerebrospinal fluid flow. The major objective of this present study was to observe how altering cell concentration influences the migration and viability of human umbilical cord blood derived-mesenchymal stem cells (hUCB-MSCs), delivered via ICV injection, in the brains of wild-type (WT) mice. C3H/C57 WT mice were divided into three groups and were injected with 1 × 10(5) hUCB-MSCs suspended in varying volumes: high (3 μl), middle (5 μl), and low (7 μl) concentrations, respectively. Lowering the concentration increased the migratory capabilities and elevated the viability of hUCB-MSCs. These results suggest that cell concentration can affect the physiological state of hUCB-MSCs, and thus the extent of therapeutic efficacy that can be achieved. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. N-myc oncogene amplification is correlated to trace metal concentrations in neuroblastoma cultured cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gouget, B. E-mail: gouget@drecam.cea.fr; Sergeant, C.; Benard, J.; Llabador, Y.; Simonoff, M

    2000-10-01

    N-myc oncogene amplification is a powerful predictor of aggressive behavior of neuroblastoma (NB), the most common solid tumor of the early childhood. Since N-myc overexpression - subsequent to amplification - determines a phenotype of invasiveness and metastatic spreading, it is assumed that N-myc amplified neuroblasts synthesize zinc metalloenzymes leading to tumor invasion and formation of metastases. In order to test a possible relation between N-myc oncogene amplification and trace metal contents in human NB cells, Fe, Cu and Zn concentrations have been measured by nuclear microprobe analysis in three human neuroblastoma cell lines with various degrees of N-myc amplification. Elemental determinations show uniform distribution of trace metals within the cells, but variations of intracellular trace metal concentrations with respect to the degree of N-myc amplification are highly dependent on the nature of the element. Zinc concentration is higher in both N-myc amplified cell lines (IMR-32 and IGR-N-91) than in the non-amplified cells (SK-N-SH). In contrast, intracellular iron content is particularly low in N-myc amplified cell lines. Moreover, copper concentrations showed an increase with the degree of N-myc amplification. These results indicate that a relationship exists between intracellular trace metals and N-myc oncogene amplification. They further suggest that trace metals very probably play a determinant role in mechanisms of the neuroblastoma invasiveness.

  19. Effects of energy controllable steep pulses on intracellular calcium concentration and cell membrane potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, X-J; Luo, X-D; Xiong, L; Mi, Y; Hu, L-N

    2014-01-01

    Our previous experiments showed that steep pulses could kill tumor cells, but the mechanism is unclear yet. This study was to probe the effects of different dosages of energy controllable steep pulses on intracellular concentration of dissociative calcium ion ([Ca2+]i) and cell membrane potential. The mammary carcinoma cells MDA-MB-231 were divided into control group and 5 different dosages of Energy Controllable Steep Pulses (ECSP) treatment groups. The calcium ion in each group was labeled by Fluo-3/AM individually and the cell membrane potential was labeled by DiBAC4 (3). The mean fluorescence intensity of fluorescent probe in mammary carcinoma cells was observed in quiet state by laser confocal microscopy after ECSP treatment The changes of calcium concentration and cell membrane potential in cells after ECSP treatment were analyzed. The changes of intracellular [Ca2+]i after ECSP treatment were also observed with and without calcium ion outside of the cells. The calcium ion outside of cells influx with lower dosage of pulse in quiet state. With the dosage increase, the intracellular calcium ion outflow. In real time kinetic detection, the mean fluorescence intensity of intracellular calcium ion was increased with the pulse electric field intensity raised in the lower ECSP. When the voltage was 285V, frequency was 100Hz, the [Ca2+]i decreased. The increase of intracellular calcium ion concentration was decreased without calcium ion than with calcium ion outside of cells, but still raised gradually. The lower dosage of ECSP could induce the fluorescence intensity of DiBAC4 (3) in cells increase, which showed that the lower dosage of ECSP could induce the depolarization of cells. With the dosage raised, the fluorescence intensity of DiBAC4 (3) in cells attenuated. This dosage of ECSP could induce the superpolarization of cell membrane. The lower dosage of ECSP can induce the depolarization of cell membrane and induce the inter flow of calcium ion outside of cell

  20. Performance of minority carrier metal/insulator/semiconductor vertical solar cells in concentrated sunlight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shousha, A.H.M.

    1983-10-01

    The performance characteristics of minority carrier metal/insulator/semiconductor vertical solar cells in concentrated sunlight are investigated in terms of their physical parameters. The current density-voltage characteristics under very high level injection conditions are derived taking into consideration the effect of using a high-low junction at the cell back surface. The dependences of the short-circuit current density, open-circuit voltage and cell conversion efficiency on the illumination intensity, insulator layer thickness, carrier lifetime and surface recombination velocity are obtained and discussed. The degradation in cell performance with increasing temperature is also evaluated.

  1. Design requirements for high-efficiency high concentration ratio space solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauschenbach, H.; Patterson, R.

    1980-01-01

    A miniaturized Cassegrainian concentrator system concept was developed for low cost, multikilowatt space solar arrays. The system imposes some requirements on solar cells which are new and different from those imposed for conventional applications. The solar cells require a circular active area of approximately 4 mm in diameter. High reliability contacts are required on both front and back surfaces. The back area must be metallurgically bonded to a heat sink. The cell should be designed to achieve the highest practical efficiency at 100 AMO suns and at 80 C. The cell design must minimize losses due to nonuniform illumination intensity and nonnormal light incidence. The primary radiation concern is the omnidirectional proton environment.

  2. Pretreatment with hypertonic NaCl protects MDCK cells against high urea concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhofer, W; Müller, E; Burger-Kentischer, A; Fraek, M L; Thurau, K; Beck, F

    1998-02-01

    In antidiuresis, the cells of the renal medulla are exposed to high extracellular concentrations of NaCl and urea. Since urea equilibrates with the intracellular compartment and is known to perturb intracellular macromolecules, high urea concentrations may well disturb the structure and function of cell proteins. Two types of organic substances are believed to counteract the adverse effects of high intracellular urea concentrations: specific organic osmolytes of the trimethylamine family [betaine and glycerophosphorylcholine (GPC)], which accumulate in renal medullary cells during prolonged periods of antidiuresis and cytoprotective heat shock proteins (HSPs), the tissue content of two of which (HSPs 27 and 72) is much higher in the inner medulla than in the iso-osmotic renal cortex. To evaluate the contribution of trimethylamines and HSPs to cytoprotection in the presence of high urea concentrations, the effect of HSP induction and osmolyte accumulation prior to exposure to high urea concentrations was examined in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. Accumulation of organic osmolytes and synthesis of HSP27 and HSP72 was initiated by hypertonic stress (increasing the osmolality of the medium from 290 to 600 mosmol/kg H2O by NaCl addition). Control, non-conditioned cells remained in the isotonic medium for the same period. Upon subsequent exposure to an additional 600 mM urea in the medium for 24 h, 90% of the osmotically conditioned cells but only 15% of non-conditioned cells survived. The HSP72 and trimethylamine contents of the NaCl-conditioned MDCK cells, but not HSP27 content, correlated positively with cell survival. To separate the effects of organic osmolytes and HSP72, chronically NaCl-adapted MDCK cells were returned to isotonic medium for 1 or 2 days, so depleting them of trimethylamine osmolytes. HSP72, with its longer half life, remained elevated. Subsequent exposure of these cells to 600 mM urea in the medium resulted in about 80% survival. These

  3. Air-spore in Cartagena, Spain: viable and non-viable sampling methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elvira-Rendueles, Belen; Moreno, Jose; Garcia-Sanchez, Antonio; Vergara, Nuria; Martinez-Garcia, Maria Jose; Moreno-Grau, Stella

    2013-01-01

    In the presented study the airborne fungal spores of the semiarid city of Cartagena, Spain, are identified and quantified by means of viable or non-viable sampling methods. Airborne fungal samples were collected simultaneously using a filtration method and a pollen and particle sampler based on the Hirst methodology. This information is very useful for elucidating geographical patterns of hay fever and asthma. The qualitative results showed that when the non-viable methodology was employed, Cladosporium, Ustilago, and Alternaria were the most abundant spores identified in the atmosphere of Cartagena, while the viable methodology showed that the most abundant taxa were: Cladosporium, Penicillium, Aspergillus and Alternaria. The quantitative results of airborne fungal spores identified by the Hirst-type air sampler (non-viable method), showed that Deuteromycetes represented 74% of total annual spore counts, Cladosporium being the major component of the fungal spectrum (62.2%), followed by Alternaria (5.3%), and Stemphylium (1.3%). The Basidiomycetes group represented 18.9% of total annual spore counts, Ustilago (7.1%) being the most representative taxon of this group and the second most abundant spore type. Ascomycetes accounted for 6.9%, Nectria (2.3%) being the principal taxon. Oomycetes (0.2%) and Zygomycestes and Myxomycestes (0.06%) were scarce. The prevailing species define our bioaerosol as typical of dry air. The viable methodology was better at identifying small hyaline spores and allowed for the discrimination of the genus of some spore types. However, non-viable methods revealed the richness of fungal types present in the bioaerosol. Thus, the use of both methodologies provides a more comprehensive characterization of the spore profile.

  4. Parejas viables que perduran en el tiempo

    OpenAIRE

    Juan José Cuervo Rodríguez

    2013-01-01

    El presente artículo científico presenta resultados del proceso llevado a cabo en el proyecto de investigación docente "Mecanismos de autorregulación en parejas viables que perduran en el tiempo". Se soporta en una mirada compleja de la psicología basada en una epistemología de la construcción. En el ámbito metodológico, se inscribe en los estudios de terapia familiar desde una perspectiva de la comunicación humana como un todo integrado. Participaron nueve parejas. Los criterios de inclusión...

  5. Elevated CO2 concentration impacts cell wall polysaccharide composition of green microalgae of the genus Chlorella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Y-S; Labavitch, J M; VanderGheynst, J S

    2015-01-01

    The effect of CO2 concentration on the relative content of starch, lipid and cell wall carbohydrates in microalgal biomass was investigated for the four following Chlorella strains: C. vulgaris (UTEX 259), C. sorokiniana (UTEX 2805), C. minutissima (UTEX 2341) and C. variabilis (NC64A). Each strain had a different response to CO2 concentration. The starch content was higher in UTEX259 and NC64A cultured with 2% CO2 in the air supply than in cells cultured with ca. 0·04% CO2 (ambient air), while starch content was not affected for UTEX 2805 and UTEX 2341. The lipid content was higher in Chlorella minutissima UTEX 2341 cultured in 2% CO2 than in cells cultured in ambient air, but was unchanged for the other three strains. All four Chlorella strains tended to have a higher percentage of uronic acids and lower percentage of neutral sugars in their cell wall polysaccharide complement when grown with 2% CO2 supply. Although the percentage of neutral sugars in the cell walls varied with CO2 concentration, the relative proportions of different neutral sugar constituents remained constant for both CO2 conditions. The results demonstrate the importance of considering the effects of CO2 on the cell wall carbohydrate composition of microalgae. Microalgae have the potential to produce products that will reduce society's reliance on fossil fuels and address challenges related to food and feed production. An overlooked yet industrially relevant component of microalgae are their cell walls. Cell wall composition affects cell flocculation and the recovery of intracellular products. In this study, we show that increasing CO2 level results in greater cell wall polysaccharide and uronic acid content in the cell walls of three strains of microalgae. The results have implications on the management of systems for the capture of CO2 and production of fuels, chemicals and food from microalgae. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  6. Improved in-cell structure determination of proteins at near-physiological concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeya, Teppei; Hanashima, Tomomi; Hosoya, Saori; Shimazaki, Manato; Ikeda, Shiro; Mishima, Masaki; Güntert, Peter; Ito, Yutaka

    2016-12-02

    Investigating three-dimensional (3D) structures of proteins in living cells by in-cell nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy opens an avenue towards understanding the structural basis of their functions and physical properties under physiological conditions inside cells. In-cell NMR provides data at atomic resolution non-invasively, and has been used to detect protein-protein interactions, thermodynamics of protein stability, the behavior of intrinsically disordered proteins, etc. in cells. However, so far only a single de novo 3D protein structure could be determined based on data derived only from in-cell NMR. Here we introduce methods that enable in-cell NMR protein structure determination for a larger number of proteins at concentrations that approach physiological ones. The new methods comprise (1) advances in the processing of non-uniformly sampled NMR data, which reduces the measurement time for the intrinsically short-lived in-cell NMR samples, (2) automatic chemical shift assignment for obtaining an optimal resonance assignment, and (3) structure refinement with Bayesian inference, which makes it possible to calculate accurate 3D protein structures from sparse data sets of conformational restraints. As an example application we determined the structure of the B1 domain of protein G at about 250 μM concentration in living E. coli cells.

  7. Effects of cyclosporin at various concentrations on dexamethasone intracellular uptake in multidrug resistant cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maillefert, J; Duchamp, O; Solary, E; Genne, P; Tavernier, C

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—The multidrug resistance phenomenon results from the expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp), a drug-efflux pump. Corticosteroids are substrates for P-gp, whose function can be inhibited by cyclosporin. This study evaluates the ability of cyclosporin to modulate dexamethasone uptake in multidrug resistant cells.
METHODS—The K 562 cell line, which does not express P-gp and a P-gp expressing clone, K562/ADM, were used. Cells were incubated with H3-dexamethasone in the absence or presence of cyclosporin at various concentrations. Then, cells were washed, lysed, and radioactivity was measured.
RESULTS—The uptake of dexamethasone alone was higher in sensitive than in resistant cells. Addition of cyclosporin induced a dose dependent increase of dexamethasone uptake in resistant cells, whereas the drug did not influence dexamethasone uptake in parental cells.
CONCLUSION—Cyclosporin, at therapeutic concentrations induces a moderate, but significant increase in dexamethasone accumulation in multidrug resistant cells. Thus, cyclosporin might increase the intestinal absorption of corticosteroids or their accumulation in mononuclear cells, or both, thereby increasing their therapeutic efficacy.

 PMID:10666173

  8. A rapid biosensor for viable B. anthracis spores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeumner, Antje J; Leonard, Barbara; McElwee, John; Montagna, Richard A

    2004-09-01

    A simple membrane-strip-based biosensor assay has been combined with a nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) reaction for rapid (4 h) detection of a small number (ten) of viable B. anthracis spores. The biosensor is based on identification of a unique mRNA sequence from one of the anthrax toxin genes, the protective antigen ( pag), encoded on the toxin plasmid, pXO1, and thus provides high specificity toward B. anthracis. Previously, the anthrax toxins activator ( atxA) mRNA had been used in our laboratory for the development of a biosensor for the detection of a single B. anthracis spore within 12 h. Changing the target sequence to the pag mRNA provided the ability to shorten the overall assay time significantly. The vaccine strain of B. anthracis (Sterne strain) was used in all experiments. A 500-microL sample containing as few as ten spores was mixed with 500 microL growth medium and incubated for 30 min for spore germination and mRNA production. Thus, only spores that are viable were detected. Subsequently, RNA was extracted from lysed cells, selectively amplified using NASBA, and rapidly identified by the biosensor. While the biosensor assay requires only 15 min assay time, the overall process takes 4 h for detection of ten viable B. anthracis spores, and is shortened significantly if more spores are present. The biosensor is based on an oligonucleotide sandwich-hybridization assay format. It uses a membrane flow-through system with an immobilized DNA probe that hybridizes with the target sequence. Signal amplification is provided when the target sequence hybridizes to a second DNA probe that has been coupled to liposomes encapsulating the dye sulforhodamine B. The amount of liposomes captured in the detection zone can be read visually or quantified with a hand-held reflectometer. The biosensor can detect as little as 1 fmol target mRNA (1 nmol L(-1)). Specificity analysis revealed no cross-reactivity with 11 organisms tested, among them closely

  9. Optimized scalable stack of fluorescent solar concentrator systems with bifacial silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martínez Díez, Ana Luisa, E-mail: a.martinez@itma.es [Fundación ITMA, Parque Empresarial Principado de Asturias, C/Calafates, Parcela L-3.4, 33417 Avilés (Spain); Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems ISE, Heidenhofstr. 2, 79110 Freiburg (Germany); Gutmann, Johannes; Posdziech, Janina; Rist, Tim; Goldschmidt, Jan Christoph [Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems ISE, Heidenhofstr. 2, 79110 Freiburg (Germany); Plaza, David Gómez [Fundación ITMA, Parque Empresarial Principado de Asturias, C/Calafates, Parcela L-3.4, 33417 Avilés (Spain)

    2014-10-21

    In this paper, we present a concentrator system based on a stack of fluorescent concentrators (FCs) and a bifacial solar cell. Coupling bifacial solar cells to a stack of FCs increases the performance of the system and preserves its efficiency when scaled. We used an approach to optimize a fluorescent solar concentrator system design based on a stack of multiple fluorescent concentrators (FC). Seven individual fluorescent collectors (20 mm×20 mm×2 mm) were realized by in-situ polymerization and optically characterized in regard to their ability to guide light to the edges. Then, an optimization procedure based on the experimental data of the individual FCs was carried out to determine the stack configuration that maximizes the total number of photons leaving edges. Finally, two fluorescent concentrator systems were realized by attaching bifacial silicon solar cells to the optimized FC stacks: a conventional system, where FC were attached to one side of the solar cell as a reference, and the proposed bifacial configuration. It was found that for the same overall FC area, the bifacial configuration increases the short-circuit current by a factor of 2.2, which is also in agreement with theoretical considerations.

  10. Eradication of high viable loads of Listeria monocytogenes contaminating food-contact surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia ede Candia

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This study demonstrates the efficacy of cold gaseous ozone treatments at low concentrations in the eradication of high Listeria monocytogenes viable cell loads from glass, polypropylene, stainless steel and expanded polystyrene food-contact surfaces. Using a step by step approach, involving the selection of the most resistant strain-surface combinations, 11 Listeria spp. strains resulted inactivated by a continuous ozone flow at 1.07 mg m-3 after 24 or 48 h of cold incubation, depending on both strain and surface evaluated. Increasing the inoculum level to 9 log CFU coupon-1, the best inactivation rate was obtained after 48h of treatment at 3.21 mg m-3 ozone concentration when cells were deposited onto stainless steel and expanded polystyrene coupons, resulted the most resistant food-contact surfaces in the previous assays.The addition of naturally microbiologically contaminated meat extract to a high load of L. monocytogenes LMG 23775 cells, the most resistant strain out of the 11 assayed Listeria spp. strains, led to its complete inactivation after four days of treatment.To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report describing the survival of L. monocytogenes and the effect of ozone treatment under cold storage conditions on expanded polystyrene, a commonly-used material in food packaging. These results could be useful for reducing pathogen cross-contamination phenomena during cold food storage.

  11. Detection and quantification of viable Bacillus cereus group species in milk by propidium monoazide quantitative real-time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattani, Fernanda; Barth, Valdir C; Nasário, Jéssica S R; Ferreira, Carlos A S; Oliveira, Sílvia D

    2016-04-01

    The Bacillus cereus group includes important spore-forming bacteria that present spoilage capability and may cause foodborne diseases. These microorganisms are traditionally evaluated in food using culturing methods, which can be laborious and time-consuming, and may also fail to detect bacteria in a viable but nonculturable state. The purpose of this study was to develop a quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) combined with a propidium monoazide (PMA) treatment to analyze the contamination of UHT milk by B. cereus group species viable cells. Thirty micrograms per milliliter of PMA was shown to be the most effective concentration for reducing the PCR amplification of extracellular DNA and DNA from dead cells. The quantification limit of the PMA-qPCR assay was 7.5 × 10(2) cfu/mL of milk. One hundred thirty-five UHT milk samples were analyzed to evaluate the association of PMA to qPCR to selectively detect viable cells. The PMA-qPCR was able to detect B. cereus group species in 44 samples (32.6%), whereas qPCR without PMA detected 78 positive samples (57.8%). Therefore, the PMA probably inhibited the amplification of DNA from cells that were killed during UHT processing, which avoided an overestimation of bacterial cells when using qPCR and, thus, did not overvalue potential health risks. A culture-based method was also used to detect and quantify B. cereus sensu stricto in the same samples and showed positive results in 15 (11.1%) samples. The culture method and PMA-qPCR allowed the detection of B. cereus sensu stricto in quantities compatible with the infective dose required to cause foodborne disease in 3 samples, indicating that, depending on the storage conditions, even after UHT treatment, infective doses may be reached in ready-to-consume products. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Modulation of the endocannabinoid system in viable and non-viable first trimester pregnancies by pregnancy-related hormones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor Anthony H

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In early pregnancy, increased plasma levels of the endocannabinoid anandamide (AEA are associated with miscarriage through mechanisms that might affect the developing placenta or maternal decidua. Methods In this study, we compare AEA levels in failed and viable pregnancies with the levels of the trophoblastic hormones (beta-human chorionic gonadotrophin (beta-hCG, progesterone (P4 and (pregnancy-associated placental protein-A (PAPP-A essential for early pregnancy success and relate that to the expression of the cannabinoid receptors and enzymes that modulate AEA levels. Results The median plasma AEA level in non-viable pregnancies (1.48 nM; n = 20 was higher than in viable pregnancies (1.21 nM; n = 25; P = 0.013, as were progesterone and beta-hCG levels (41.0 vs 51.5 ng/mL; P = 0.052 for P4 and 28,650 vs 6,560 mIU/L; P = 0.144 for beta-hCG, respectively, but were not statistically significant. Serum PAPP-A levels in the viable group were approximately 6.8 times lower than those in the non-viable group (1.82 vs 12.25 mg/L; P = 0.071, but again these differences were statistically insignificant. In the spontaneous miscarriage group, significant correlations between P4 and beta-hCG, P4 and PAPP-A and AEA and PAPP-A levels were observed. Simultaneously, immunohistochemical distributions of the two main cannabinoid receptors and the AEA-modifying enzymes, fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH and N-acylphosphatidylethanolamine-phospholipase D (NAPE-PLD, changed within both the decidua and trophoblast. Conclusions The association of higher AEA levels with early pregnancy failure and with beta-hCG and PAPP-A, but not with progesterone concentrations suggest that plasma AEA levels and pregnancy failure are linked via a mechanism that may involve trophoblastic beta-hCG, and PAPP-A, but not, progesterone production. Although the trophoblast, decidua and embryo contain receptors for AEA, the main AEA target in early pregnancy failure

  13. Adsorption behavior of low concentration carbon monoxide on polymer electrolyte fuel cell anodes for automotive applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Yoshiyuki; Shimizu, Takahiro; Mitsushima, Shigenori

    2016-06-01

    The adsorption behavior of CO on the anode around the concentration of 0.2 ppm allowed by ISO 14687-2 is investigated in polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs). CO and CO2 concentrations in the anode exhaust are measured during the operation of a JARI standard single cell at 60 °C cell temperature and 1000 mA cm-2 current density. CO coverage is estimated from the gas analysis and CO stripping voltammetry. The cell voltage decrease as a result of 0.2 ppm CO is 29 mV and the CO coverage is 0.6 at the steady state with 0.11 mg cm-2 of anode platinum loading. The CO coverage as a function of CO concentration approximately follows a Temkin-type isotherm. Oxygen permeated to the anode through a membrane is also measured during fuel cell operation. The exhaust velocity of oxygen from the anode was shown to be much higher than the CO supply velocity. Permeated oxygen should play an important role in CO oxidation under low CO concentration conditions.

  14. Methods to homogenize electrochemical concentration cell (ECC ozonesonde measurements across changes in sensing solution concentration or ozonesonde manufacturer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Deshler

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Ozone plays a significant role in the chemical and radiative state of the atmosphere. For this reason there are many instruments used to measure ozone from the ground, from space, and from balloons. Balloon-borne electrochemical cell ozonesondes provide some of the best measurements of the ozone profile up to the mid-stratosphere, providing high vertical resolution, high precision, and a wide geographic distribution. From the mid-1990s to the late 2000s the consistency of long-term records from balloon-borne ozonesondes has been compromised by differences in manufacturers, Science Pump (SP and ENSCI (EN, and differences in recommended sensor solution concentrations, 1.0 % potassium iodide (KI and the one-half dilution: 0.5 %. To investigate these differences, a number of organizations have independently undertaken comparisons of the various ozonesonde types and solution concentrations, resulting in 197 ozonesonde comparison profiles. The goal of this study is to derive transfer functions to allow measurements outside of standard recommendations, for sensor composition and ozonesonde type, to be converted to a standard measurement and thus homogenize the data to the expected accuracy of 5 % (10 % in the stratosphere (troposphere. Subsets of these data have been analyzed previously and intermediate transfer functions derived. Here all the comparison data are analyzed to compare (1 differences in sensor solution composition for a single ozonesonde type, (2 differences in ozonesonde type for a single sensor solution composition, and (3 the World Meteorological Organization's (WMO and manufacturers' recommendations of 1.0 % KI solution for Science Pump and 0.5 % KI for ENSCI. From the recommendations it is clear that ENSCI ozonesondes and 1.0 % KI solution result in higher amounts of ozone sensed. The results indicate that differences in solution composition and in ozonesonde type display little pressure dependence at pressures

  15. Methods to homogenize electrochemical concentration cell (ECC) ozonesonde measurements across changes in sensing solution concentration or ozonesonde manufacturer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshler, Terry; Stübi, Rene; Schmidlin, Francis J.; Mercer, Jennifer L.; Smit, Herman G. J.; Johnson, Bryan J.; Kivi, Rigel; Nardi, Bruno

    2017-06-01

    Ozone plays a significant role in the chemical and radiative state of the atmosphere. For this reason there are many instruments used to measure ozone from the ground, from space, and from balloons. Balloon-borne electrochemical cell ozonesondes provide some of the best measurements of the ozone profile up to the mid-stratosphere, providing high vertical resolution, high precision, and a wide geographic distribution. From the mid-1990s to the late 2000s the consistency of long-term records from balloon-borne ozonesondes has been compromised by differences in manufacturers, Science Pump (SP) and ENSCI (EN), and differences in recommended sensor solution concentrations, 1.0 % potassium iodide (KI) and the one-half dilution: 0.5 %. To investigate these differences, a number of organizations have independently undertaken comparisons of the various ozonesonde types and solution concentrations, resulting in 197 ozonesonde comparison profiles. The goal of this study is to derive transfer functions to allow measurements outside of standard recommendations, for sensor composition and ozonesonde type, to be converted to a standard measurement and thus homogenize the data to the expected accuracy of 5 % (10 %) in the stratosphere (troposphere). Subsets of these data have been analyzed previously and intermediate transfer functions derived. Here all the comparison data are analyzed to compare (1) differences in sensor solution composition for a single ozonesonde type, (2) differences in ozonesonde type for a single sensor solution composition, and (3) the World Meteorological Organization's (WMO) and manufacturers' recommendations of 1.0 % KI solution for Science Pump and 0.5 % KI for ENSCI. From the recommendations it is clear that ENSCI ozonesondes and 1.0 % KI solution result in higher amounts of ozone sensed. The results indicate that differences in solution composition and in ozonesonde type display little pressure dependence at pressures ≥ 30 hPa, and thus the transfer

  16. Space Photovoltaic Concentrator Using Robust Fresnel Lenses, 4-Junction Cells, Graphene Radiators, and Articulating Receivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Mark; McDanal, A. J.; Brandhorst, Henry; Spence, Brian; Iqbal, Shawn; Sharps, Paul; McPheeters, Clay; Steinfeldt, Jeff; Piszczor, Michael; Myers, Matt

    2016-01-01

    At the 42nd PVSC, our team presented recent advances in our space photovoltaic concentrator technology. These advances include more robust Fresnel lenses for optical concentration, more thermally conductive graphene radiators for waste heat rejection, improved color-mixing lens technology to minimize chromatic aberration losses with 4-junction solar cells, and an articulating photovoltaic receiver enabling single-axis sun-tracking, while maintaining a sharp focal line despite large beta angles of incidence. In the past year, under a NASA Phase II SBIR program, our team has made much additional progress in the development of this new space photovoltaic concentrator technology, as described in this paper.

  17. Does the intracellular ionic concentration or the cell water content (cell volume) determine the activity of TonEBP in NIH3T3 cells?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rødgaard, Tina; Schou, Kenneth; Friis, Martin Barfred

    2008-01-01

    of the present investigation was to investigate whether cell shrinkage or high intracellular ionic concentration induced the activation of TonEBP. We designed a model system for isotonically shrinking cells over a prolonged period of time. Cells swelled in hypotonic medium and performed a regulatory volume...

  18. Effect of Temperature on the AlGaAs/GaAs Tandem Solar Cell for Concentrator Photovoltaic Performances

    OpenAIRE

    Hemmani Abderrahmane; B. Dennai; H. Khachab; A. Helmaoui

    2016-01-01

    Multijunction solar cells for concentrator photovoltaic (CPV) systems have attracted increasing attention in recent years for their very high conversion efficiencies. But there is a problem in this type of solar cells (CPV) is to increase the temperature if it has been augmenting the concentration ratio. In this paper, we studied the effect of the concentration photovoltaic in a high-efficiency double-junction devices solar cell on temperature solar cell and its impact on the photocurrent, th...

  19. Prospective clinical and radiographic evaluation of an allogeneic bone matrix containing stem cells (Trinity Evolution® Viable Cellular Bone Matrix) in patients undergoing two-level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peppers, Timothy A; Bullard, Dennis E; Vanichkachorn, Jed S; Stanley, Scott K; Arnold, Paul M; Waldorff, Erik I; Hahn, Rebekah; Atkinson, Brent L; Ryaby, James T; Linovitz, Raymond J

    2017-04-26

    Trinity Evolution® (TE), a viable cellular bone allograft, previously demonstrated high fusion rates and no safety-related concerns after single-level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) procedures. This prospective multicenter clinical study was performed to assess the radiographic and clinical outcomes of TE in subjects undergoing two-level ACDF procedures. In a prospective, multicenter study, 40 subjects that presented with symptomatic cervical degeneration at two adjacent vertebral levels underwent instrumented ACDF using TE autograft substitute in a polyetherethereketone (PEEK) cage. At 12 months, radiographic fusion status was evaluated by dynamic motion plain radiographs and thin cut CT with multiplanar reconstruction by a panel that was blinded to clinical outcome. Fusion success was defined by angular motion (≤4°) and the presence of bridging bone across the adjacent vertebral endplates. Clinical pain and function assessments included the Neck Disability Index (NDI), neck and arm pain as evaluated by visual analog scales (VAS), and SF-36 at both 6 and 12 months. At both 6 and 12 months, all clinical outcome scores (SF-36, NDI, and VAS pain) improved significantly (p Trinity Evolution in Anterior Cervical Disectomy and Fusion (ACDF) NCT00951938.

  20. Dissolved oxygen concentration in the medium during cell culture: Defects and improvements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kuan; Zhao, Tong; Huang, Xin; He, Yunlin; Zhou, Yanzhao; Wu, Liying; Wu, Kuiwu; Fan, Ming; Zhu, Lingling

    2016-03-01

    In vitro cell culture has provided a useful model to study the effects of oxygen on cellular behavior. However, it remains unknown whether the in vitro operations themselves affect the medium oxygen levels and the living states of cells. In addition, a prevailing controversy is whether reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is induced by continuous hypoxia or reoxygenation. In this study, we have measured the effects of different types of cell culture containers and the oxygen environment where medium replacement takes place on the actual oxygen tension in the medium. We found that the deviations of oxygen concentrations in the medium are much greater in 25-cm(2) flasks than in 24-well plates and 35-mm dishes. The dissolved oxygen concentrations in the medium were increased after medium replacement in normoxia, but remained unchanged in glove boxes in which the oxygen tension remained at a low level (11.4, 5.7, and 0.5% O2 ). We also found that medium replacement in normoxia increased the number of ROS-positive cells and reduced the cell viability; meanwhile, medium replacement in a glove box did not produce the above effects. Therefore, we conclude that the use of 25-cm(2) flasks should be avoided and demonstrate that continuous hypoxia does not produce ROS, whereas the reoxygenation that occurs during the harvesting of cells leads to ROS and induces cell death. © 2015 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  1. Improvement of embryonic stem cell line derivation efficiency with novel medium, glucose concentration, and epigenetic modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chul; Amano, Tomokazu; Park, Joonghoon; Carter, Mark G; Tian, Xiuchun; Yang, Xiangzhong

    2009-03-01

    Although the first mouse embryonic stem (ES) cell lines were derived 2 decades ago, and standard protocols for ES cell derivation are widely used today, the technical difficulty of these protocols still pose a challenge for many investigators attempting to produce large numbers of ES cell lines, and are limited to only a few mouse strains. Recently, glucose concentration was shown to have a significant effect on the efficiency of ES cell derivation, but the mechanism(s) mediating this effect are still the subject of debate. In this report, we investigated the effect of glucose concentration on ES cell derivation efficiency from blastocysts in the context of a new medium, Minimum Essential Medium alpha (MEMalpha). Furthermore, we propose novel methods to improve mouse ES cell derivation efficiency using in vitro epigenetic modifications during early passages, combined with detection of Oct4-expressing cells. Based on the results reported here, modified MEMalpha containing high glucose improves the efficiency of ES cell derivation remarkably, compared with Knockout Dulbecco's-Modified Eagle Media (KDMEM). Epigenetic modifications are able to improve the efficiency even further.

  2. Purifying, Separating, and Concentrating Cells From a Sample Low in Biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benardini, James N.; LaDuc, Myron T.; Diamond, Rochelle

    2012-01-01

    Frequently there is an inability to process and analyze samples of low biomass due to limiting amounts of relevant biomaterial in the sample. Furthermore, molecular biological protocols geared towards increasing the density of recovered cells and biomolecules of interest, by their very nature, also concentrate unwanted inhibitory humic acids and other particulates that have an adversarial effect on downstream analysis. A novel and robust fluorescence-activated cell-sorting (FACS)-based technology has been developed for purifying (removing cells from sampling matrices), separating (based on size, density, morphology), and concentrating cells (spores, prokaryotic, eukaryotic) from a sample low in biomass. The technology capitalizes on fluorescent cell-sorting technologies to purify and concentrate bacterial cells from a low-biomass, high-volume sample. Over the past decade, cell-sorting detection systems have undergone enhancements and increased sensitivity, making bacterial cell sorting a feasible concept. Although there are many unknown limitations with regard to the applicability of this technology to environmental samples (smaller cells, few cells, mixed populations), dogmatic principles support the theoretical effectiveness of this technique upon thorough testing and proper optimization. Furthermore, the pilot study from which this report is based proved effective and demonstrated this technology capable of sorting and concentrating bacterial endospore and bacterial cells of varying size and morphology. Two commercial off-the-shelf bacterial counting kits were used to optimize a bacterial stain/dye FACS protocol. A LIVE/DEAD BacLight Viability and Counting Kit was used to distinguish between the live and dead cells. A Bacterial Counting Kit comprising SYTO BC (mixture of SYTO dyes) was employed as a broad-spectrum bacterial counting agent. Optimization using epifluorescence microscopy was performed with these two dye/stains. This refined protocol was further

  3. Community structure dynamics during startup in microbial fuel cells - The effect of phosphate concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanuka-Golub, Keren; Reshef, Leah; Rishpon, Judith; Gophna, Uri

    2016-07-01

    For microbial fuel cells (MFCs) to become a cost-effective wastewater treatment technology, they must produce a stable electro-active microbial community quickly and operate under realistic wastewater nutrient conditions. The composition of the anodic-biofilm and planktonic-cells communities was followed temporally for MFCs operated under typical laboratory phosphate concentrations (134mgL(-1)P) versus wastewater phosphate concentrations (16mgL(-1)P). A stable peak voltage was attained two-fold faster in MFCs operating under lower phosphate concentration. All anodic-biofilms were composed of well-known exoelectrogenic bacterial families; however, MFCs showing faster startup and a stable voltage had a Desulfuromonadaceae-dominated-biofilm, while biofilms co-dominated by Desulfuromonadaceae and Geobacteraceae characterized slower or less stable MFCs. Interestingly,planktonic-cell concentrations of these bacteria followed a similar trend as the anodic-biofilm and could therefore serve as a biomarker for its formation. These results demonstrate that wastewater-phosphate concentrations do not compromise MFCs efficiency, and considerably speed up startup times. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A SIMPLE WAY OF ACHIEVING A HIGH CELL CONCENTRATION IN RECOMBINANT Escherichia coli CULTIVATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gombert A.K.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract - A cultivation strategy based on some previous knowledge of the metabolism of Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3 pLysS containing the troponin C gene cloned into plasmid pET was developed and applied through the use of simple fermentation equipment and a feed-forward control strategy in order to achieve a high cell concentration ¾ 92 g l-1 dry cell weight ¾ and a high cell productivity ¾ 3.7 g l-1 h-1.

  5. BIOCOMPATIBILITY OF LEUKOCYTE REMOVAL FILTERS DURING BEDSIDE LEUKOCYTE FILTRATION OF RED-CELL CONCENTRATES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    GU, YJ; OBSTER, R; DEHAAN, J; HUET, RCGG; VANOEVEREN, W

    1992-01-01

    The biocompatibility of leukocyte removal filters was evaluated in four different types of leukocyte filters made from different materials during bedside leukocyte filtration of red cell concentrates (RCC). Two units of banked RCC were filtrated through each leukocyte filter inserted into the

  6. Characterization of planar concentration gradients in a sequential-injection system for cell-perfusion studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollema, C H; Růzicka, J

    1993-10-01

    This paper describes the characterization of a perfusion chamber that is coupled with a sequential-injection system and is being designed for live-cell perfusion. The apparatus consists of a multi-port valve, a peristaltic pump, a perfusion chamber and an epifluorescence microscope. The entire system is computer controlled and temperature regulated. The parameters discussed are the concentration-time profiles with regard to the volume of reagent used and the position of the cell in the perfusion chamber. Other parameters discussed include the stopped-flow compliance, reproducibility and symmetry of the concentration gradients formed. The system is shown to be suitable for two modes of perfusion; the first in which all cells are exposed to the same concentration of reagent, and the second in which cells are exposed to a gradient of concentrations. All characterization is performed with use of bulk fluorescein as a tracer, and a correlation is made between the bulk flow and the response within the cellular environment by using 5-[N-(octadecanoyl)amino]fluorescein.

  7. A new cellulose acetate filter to remove leukocytes from buffy-coat-poor red cell concentrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pietersz, R. N.; Dekker, W. J.; Reesink, H. W.

    1989-01-01

    Transfusion of leukocyte-free red cell concentrates (RCC) prevents or delays HLA immunization in multitransfused patients. We investigated a new cellulose acetate filter which was recently introduced to remove leukocytes from buffy-coat-poor RCC. It was found that the filtration time was only 10 min

  8. Using amorphous silicon solar cells to boost the viability of luminescent solar concentrators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farrell, D.J.; van Sark, W.G.J.H.M.; Velthuijsen, S.; Schropp, R.E.I.

    2010-01-01

    We have, for the first time, designed and fabricated hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar cells to be used in conjunction with Luminescent Solar Concentrators (LSCs). LSCs are planar plastic sheets doped with organic dyes that absorb solar illumination and down shift the energy to narrowband

  9. [Decrease of phosphate concentration in the medium by Brevibacterium casei cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riazanova, L P; Smirnov, A V; Kulakovskaia, T V; Kulaev, I S

    2007-01-01

    Brevibacteria able to decrease phosphate concentration in the medium are of interest for the study of the role of bacteria in the phosphorus cycle and for development of biotechnology of phosphate removal from waste. Brevibacterium casei, Brevibacterium linens, and Brevibacterium epidermidis grown in media with initial phosphorus concentrations of 1-11 mM were shown to decrease its concentration by 90%. The composition of the incubation medium required for B. casei to carry out this process was established. This process occurs in the absence of glucose but requires the presence of Mg2+, NH4+, and alpha-ketoglutarate. The latter two components may be replaced by amino acids metabolized to NH4+ and alpha-ketoglutarate: histidine, arginine, glutamine, proline, or glutamic acid. No formation of insoluble phosphate salts was observed when the media were incubated under the same conditions with heat-inactivated cells or without cells at pH 7-8.5.

  10. Roots of success: cultivating viable community forestry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacQueen, Duncan

    2009-05-15

    Is community forestry emerging from the shadows? The evidence shows that locally controlled enterprises can be economically viable, and often build on stronger social and environmental foundations than the big private-sector players. Certainly this is an industry in need of a shakeup. Many forests have become flashpoints where agro-industry, large-scale logging concerns and conservation interests clash, while forest-dependent communities are left out in the cold. Meanwhile, governments – driven by concerns over the climate impacts of deforestation – are having to gear up for legal, sustainable forestry production. Community forestry could be crucial to solving many of these challenges. By building on local core capabilities and developing strategic partnerships, they are forging key new business models that could transform the sector.

  11. Concentration of carbon dioxide by a high-temperature electrochemical membrane cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, M. P.; Winnick, J.

    1985-01-01

    The performance of a molten carbonate carbon dioxide concentrator (MCCDC) cell, as a device for removal of CO2 from manned spacecraft cabins without fuel expenditure, is investigated. The test system consists of an electrochemical cell (with an Li2CO3-38 mol pct K2CO3 membrane contained in a LiAlO2 matrix), a furnace, and a flow IR analyzer for monitoring CO2. Operation of the MCCDC-driven cell was found to be suitable for the task of CO2 removal: the cell performed at extremely low CO2 partial pressures (at or above 0.1 mm Hg); cathode CO2 efficiencies of 97 percent were achieved with 0.25 CO2 inlet concentration at 19 mA sq cm, at temperatures near 873 K. Anode concentrations of up to 5.8 percent were obtained. Simple cathode and anode performance equations applied to correlate cell performance agreed well with those measured experimentally. A flow diagram for the process is included.

  12. Protective Effect of Silybum marianum and Silibinin on Endothelial Cells Submitted to High Glucose Concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomino, Olga M; Gouveia, Neire M; Ramos, Sonia; Martín, M Angeles; Goya, Luis

    2017-01-01

    Silybum marianum Gaertn. (Milk thistle) has been used since ancient times for the relief of liver diseases characterized by intense oxidative stress such as inflammatory liver disease and cirrhosis. As oxidative stress by hyperglycemia is involved in micro- and macrovascular complications of type 2 diabetes, our aim was to assess the protective effect of milk thistle seed extract against oxidative stress induced by a high glucose concentration on endothelial cells (EA.hy926 cells). High-performance liquid chromatographic analysis shows flavonolignans silychristin and silibinin A and B as major components. No cell toxicity was observed for concentrations up to 100 µg/mL of milk thistle extract for 24 h. Concentrations of 5-25 µg/mL of the extract were used to assess the protective effect on EA.hy926 cells treated with 30 mM glucose for 24 h. Oxidative damage by 30 mM glucose was shown as a significant decrease in reduced glutathione and a significant increase in protein carbonyls and antioxidant enzyme activities. S. marianum extract recovered reduced glutathione and balanced the elevated carbonyls and enzyme activity. Silibinin alone also recovered reduced glutathione and antioxidant enzymes. S. marianum protects endothelial cell against oxidative damage by modulating antioxidant enzyme activity, reduced glutathione, and protein carbonyl levels. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Microfluidic Concentric Gradient Generator Design for High-Throughput Cell-Based Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezra Tsur, Elishai; Zimerman, Michal; Maor, Idan; Elrich, Avner; Nahmias, Yaakov

    2017-01-01

    Gradients of diffusible signaling molecules play important role in various processes, ranging from cell differentiation to toxicological evaluation. Microfluidic technology provides an accurate control of tempospatial conditions. However, current microfluidic platforms are not designed to handle multiple gradients and cell populations simultaneously. Here, we demonstrate a rapidly adaptable microfluidic design able to expose multiple cell populations to an array of chemical gradients. Our design is based on pressure-equilibrated concentric channels and a pressure-dissipating control layer, facilitating the seeding of multiple cell populations in a single device. The design was numerically evaluated and experimentally validated. The device consists of 8 radiating stimuli channels and 12 circular cell culture channels, creating an array of 96 different continuous gradients that can be simultaneously monitored over time.

  14. Lightweight concentrator module with 30 percent AM0 efficient GaAs/GaSb tandem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, J. E.; Fraas, L. M.; Sundaram, V. S.; Mansoori, N.; Yerkes, J. W.; Brinker, D. J.; Curtis, H. B.; O'Neill, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    A concept is presented for an aerospace concentrator module with lightweight domed lenses and 30 percent AM0 efficient GaAs/GaSb tandem solar cell circuits. The performance of transparent GaAs cells is reviewed. NASA's high-altitude jet flight calibration data for recent GaSb cells assembled with bulk GaAs filters are reported, along with subsequent Boeing and NASA measurements of GaSb I-V performance at various light levels and temperatures. The expected performance of a basic two-terminal tandem concentrator circuit with three-to-one voltage matching is discussed. All of the necessary components being developed to assemble complete flight test coupons are shown. Straightforward interconnect and assembly techniques yield voltage matched circuits with near-optimum performance over a wide temperature range.

  15. Spectral and Concentration Sensitivity of Multijunction Solar Cells at High Temperature: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedman, Daniel J.; Steiner, Myles A.; Perl, Emmett E.; Simon, John

    2017-06-14

    We model the performance of two-junction solar cells at very high temperatures of ~400 degrees C and beyond for applications such as hybrid PV/solar-thermal power production, and identify areas in which the design and performance characteristics behave significantly differently than at more conventional near-room-temperature operating conditions. We show that high-temperature operation reduces the sensitivity of the cell efficiency to spectral content, but increases the sensitivity to concentration, both of which have implications for energy yield in terrestrial PV applications. For other high-temperature applications such as near-sun space missions, our findings indicate that concentration may be a useful tool to enhance cell efficiency.

  16. Estimating Of Etchant Copper Concentration In The Electrolytic Cell Using Artificial Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muzher M. Ibrahem

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In  this paper, Artificial Neural Networks (ANN, which are known for their ability to model nonlinear systems, provide accurate approximations of system behavior and are typically much more computationally efficient than phenomenological models  are used to predict the etchant copper concentration in the electrolytic cell in terms of electric potential, operating time, temperature of the electrolytic cell , ratio of surface area of poles per unit volume of solution  and the distance between poles. In this paper 350 sets of data are used to trained and test the network.. The best results were achieved using a model based on a feedforword Artificial Neural Network (ANN with one hidden layer and fifteen neurons in the hidden layer gives a very close prediction of the copper concentration in the electrolytic cell.

  17. Efficiency of tandem solar cell systems as function of temperature and solar energy concentration ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokcen, N. A.; Loferski, J. J.

    1979-01-01

    The results of a comprehensive theoretical analysis of tandem photovoltaic solar cells as a function of temperature and solar concentration ratio are presented. The overall efficiencies of tandem cell stacks consisting of as many as 24 cells having gaps in the 0.7 to 3.6 eV range were calculated for temperatures of 200, 300, 400, and 500 K and for illumination by an AMO solar spectrum having concentration ratios of 1, 100, 500, and 1000 suns. For ideal diodes (A = B = 1), the calculations show that the optimized overall efficiency has a limiting value eta sub opt of approximately 70 percent for T = 200 K and C = 1000; for T = 300 K and C = 1000, this limiting efficiency approaches 60 percent.

  18. Immunomodulatory effect of concentrated lime juice extract on activated human mononuclear cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharagozloo, M; Ghaderi, A

    2001-09-01

    In this study, the in vitro immunomodulatory effect of concentrated juice of Citrus aurantifolia cv. swingle (Lime) was investigated. Clarified fresh lime juice was concentrated by freeze-drying. After dialysis against phosphate buffered saline and sterilization by a Millipore filter, it was used for further experiments. Immunogenic property of the CLJ extract was documented by production of specific polyclonal antibodies in rabbits. The immunomodulatory effect of the extract was tested in mitogen activated cultured mononuclear cells. The culture results indicated that proliferation of phytohemagglutinin (PHA) activated mononuclear cells were significantly inhibited by 250 and 500 microg/ml of CLJ extract, whereas only 500 microg/ml of the extract could inhibit proliferation of staphylococcal protein A (SPA) activated mononuclear cells (Panti-CLJ antibody to the lymphocyte culture. Considering these data, it can be concluded that the CLJ extract possesses immunomodulatory principles, which may mainly be due to the protein components of the extract.

  19. Real-time direct cell concentration and viability determination using a fully automated microfluidic platform for standalone process monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodrigues de Sousa Nunes, Pedro André; Kjaerulff, S.; Dufva, Martin

    2015-01-01

    , and determining the total cell and dead cells concentrations, within a time frame of 10.3 min. The platform consists of custom made stepper motor actuated peristaltic pumps and valves, fluidic interconnections, sample to waste liquid management and image cytometry-based detection. The total concentration of cells...

  20. Therapeutic concentration of morphine reduces oxidative stress in glioma cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.B. Almeida

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Morphine is a potent analgesic opioid used extensively for pain treatment. During the last decade, global consumption grew more than 4-fold. However, molecular mechanisms elicited by morphine are not totally understood. Thus, a growing literature indicates that there are additional actions to the analgesic effect. Previous studies about morphine and oxidative stress are controversial and used concentrations outside the range of clinical practice. Therefore, in this study, we hypothesized that a therapeutic concentration of morphine (1 μM would show a protective effect in a traditional model of oxidative stress. We exposed the C6 glioma cell line to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 and/or morphine for 24 h and evaluated cell viability, lipid peroxidation, and levels of sulfhydryl groups (an indicator of the redox state of the cell. Morphine did not prevent the decrease in cell viability provoked by H2O2 but partially prevented lipid peroxidation caused by 0.0025% H2O2 (a concentration allowing more than 90% cell viability. Interestingly, this opioid did not alter the increased levels of sulfhydryl groups produced by exposure to 0.0025% H2O2, opening the possibility that alternative molecular mechanisms (a direct scavenging activity or the inhibition of NAPDH oxidase may explain the protective effect registered in the lipid peroxidation assay. Our results demonstrate, for the first time, that morphine in usual analgesic doses may contribute to minimizing oxidative stress in cells of glial origin. This study supports the importance of employing concentrations similar to those used in clinical practice for a better approximation between experimental models and the clinical setting.

  1. Carbon Nanofibers Modified Graphite Felt for High Performance Anode in High Substrate Concentration Microbial Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Youliang; Zhou, Yan; Chen, Shuiliang; Yang, Fangfang; Zheng, Suqi; Hou, Haoqing

    2014-01-01

    Carbon nanofibers modified graphite fibers (CNFs/GF) composite electrode was prepared for anode in high substrate concentration microbial fuel cells. Electrochemical tests showed that the CNFs/GF anode generated a peak current density of 2.42 mA cm−2 at a low acetate concentration of 20 mM, which was 54% higher than that from bare GF. Increase of the acetate concentration to 80 mM, in which the peak current density of the CNFs/GF anode greatly increased and was up to 3.57 mA cm−2, was seven times as that of GF anode. Morphology characterization revealed that the biofilms in the CNFs/GF anode were much denser than those in the bare GF. This result revealed that the nanostructure in the anode not only enhanced current generation but also could tolerate high substrate concentration. PMID:24883348

  2. Carbon nanofibers modified graphite felt for high performance anode in high substrate concentration microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Youliang; Zhou, Yan; Chen, Shuiliang; Yang, Fangfang; Zheng, Suqi; Hou, Haoqing

    2014-01-01

    Carbon nanofibers modified graphite fibers (CNFs/GF) composite electrode was prepared for anode in high substrate concentration microbial fuel cells. Electrochemical tests showed that the CNFs/GF anode generated a peak current density of 2.42 mA cm(-2) at a low acetate concentration of 20 mM, which was 54% higher than that from bare GF. Increase of the acetate concentration to 80 mM, in which the peak current density of the CNFs/GF anode greatly increased and was up to 3.57 mA cm(-2), was seven times as that of GF anode. Morphology characterization revealed that the biofilms in the CNFs/GF anode were much denser than those in the bare GF. This result revealed that the nanostructure in the anode not only enhanced current generation but also could tolerate high substrate concentration.

  3. Effect of initial salt concentrations on cell performance and distribution of internal resistance in microbial desalination cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Euntae; Choi, Mi-Jin; Kim, Kyoung-Yeol; Chae, Kyu-Jung; Kim, In S

    2015-01-01

    Microbial desalination cells (MDCs) are modified microbial fuel cells (MFCs) that concurrently produce electricity and desalinate seawater, but adding a desalination compartment and an ion-exchange membrane may increase the internal resistance (Ri), which can limit the cell performance. However, the effects of a desalination chamber and initial NaCl concentrations on the internal resistances and the cell performances (i.e. Coulombic efficiency (CE), current and power density) of MDCs have yet to be thoroughly explored; thus, the cell performance and Ri distributions of MDCs having different initial concentrations and an MFC having no desalination chamber were compared. In the MDCs, the current and power density generation increased from 2.82 mA and 158.2 mW/m2 to 3.17 mA and 204.5 mW/m2 when the initial NaCl concentrations were increased from 5 to 30 g/L, as a consequence of the internal resistances decreasing from 2432.0 to 2328.4 Ω. And even though the MFC has a lower Ri than the MDCs, lower cell performances (current: 2.59 mA; power density: 141.6 mW/m2 and CE: 62.1%) were observed; there was no effect of improved junction potential in the MFC. Thus, in the MDCs, the higher internal resistances due to the addition of a desalination compartment can be offset by reducing the electrolyte resistance and improving the junction potential at higher NaCl concentrations.

  4. Polymerase chain reaction-based discrimination of viable from non-viable Mycoplasma gallisepticum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching Giap Tan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The present study was based on the reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR of the 16S ribosomal nucleic acid (rRNA of Mycoplasma for detection of viable Mycoplasma gallisepticum. To determine the stability of M. gallisepticum 16S rRNA in vitro, three inactivation methods were used and the suspensions were stored at different temperatures. The 16S rRNA of M. gallisepticum was detected up to approximately 20–25 h at 37 °C, 22–25 h at 16 °C, and 23–27 h at 4 °C. The test, therefore, could detect viable or recently dead M. gallisepticum (< 20 h. The RT-PCR method was applied during an in vivo study of drug efficacy under experimental conditions, where commercial broiler-breeder eggs were inoculated with M. gallisepticum into the yolk. Hatched chicks that had been inoculated in ovo were treated with Macrolide 1. The method was then applied in a flock of day 0 chicks with naturally acquired vertical transmission of M. gallisepticum, treated with Macrolide 2. Swabs of the respiratory tract were obtained for PCR and RT-PCR evaluations to determine the viability of M. gallisepticum. This study proved that the combination of both PCR and RT-PCR enables detection and differentiation of viable from non-viable M. gallisepticum.

  5. “Deceived” Concentrated Immobilized Cells as Biocatalyst for Intensive Bacterial Cellulose Production from Various Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay Stepanov

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A new biocatalyst in the form of Komagataeibacter xylinum B-12429 cells immobilized in poly(vinyl alcohol cryogel for production of bacterial cellulose was demonstrated. Normally, the increased bacteria concentration causes an enlarged bacterial cellulose synthesis while cells push the polysaccharide out to pack themselves into this polymer and go into a stasis. Immobilization of cells into the poly(vinyl alcohol cryogel allowed “deceiving” them: bacteria producing cellulose pushed it out, which further passed through the pores of cryogel matrix and was accumulated in the medium while not covering the cells; hence, the latter were deprived of a possible transition to inactivity and worked on the synthesis of bacterial cellulose even more actively. The repeated use of immobilized cells retaining 100% of their metabolic activity for at least 10 working cycles (60 days was performed. The immobilized cells produce bacterial cellulose with crystallinity and porosity similar to polysaccharide of free cells, but having improved stiffness and tensile strength. Various media containing sugars and glycerol, based on hydrolysates of renewable biomass sources (aspen, Jerusalem artichoke, rice straw, microalgae were successfully applied for bacterial cellulose production by immobilized cells, and the level of polysaccharide accumulation was 1.3–1.8-times greater than suspended cells could produce.

  6. Concentrating optical system optimization for 3- and 4-junction solar cells: impact of illumination profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Pratibha; Wilkins, Matthew M.; Schriemer, Henry P.; Hinzer, Karin

    2017-01-01

    Optical component designs for concentrating photovoltaic systems with three different multijunction solar cells (MJSCs) are optimized to yield maximum system efficiencies under standard test conditions, specifically uniform illumination. Optimization uses an integrated optoelectrical approach with ray tracing of the optical train to generate an irradiance profile for input to the cell's distributed circuit model. These cells, a three-junction lattice-matched (3JLM) solar cell, a three-junction lattice-mismatched inverted metamorphic (3JIMM) solar cell, and a four-junction lattice-matched (4JLM) solar cell, were individually designed for maximum efficiency at 1000×. The optical train introduces losses, modifies the spectrum, and produces a spatially nonuniform profile across the cell. We decouple spectral modification from spatial nonuniformity to separately determine their individual impacts on system efficiencies, finding the optimal set of optical design parameters for each case. Spectral modification yields modest loss penalties (from 1.0% to 1.6%, relative to the MJSC), but the impact of nonuniformity is more significant and cell dependent, with relative loss penalties of 1.1%, 3.8%, and 2.3%, for 3JLM, 3JIMM, and 4JLM, respectively. While spectral modification does not significantly impact design parameters, spatial nonuniformity does, with absolute losses of 1% and 3.4% if 3JIMM and 4JLM cells are used in a 3JLM optimized system, respectively.

  7. Intracellular ATP and total adenylate concentrations are critical predictors of reovirus productivity from Vero cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgener, A; Coombs, K; Butler, M

    2006-07-05

    The productivity of reovirus type-3 Dearing was studied in cultures of Vero cells in serum-free media. Viral productivity was dependent upon the metabolic state of the cells rather than the phase of growth at which the cells were infected. Cells at different energy states were established by 24-h incubation in nutrient-depleted media. This resulted in variable intracellular nucleotide concentrations but high cellular viability was maintained. Of the nucleotides analyzed at the time of infection only the intracellular [ATP] and total adenylate nucleotides were positively correlated with viral productivity. The correlated data followed a sigmoidal plot with an equation defined by polynomial regression analysis. Apparent threshold values of 3.2 fmol/cell and 3.3 fmol/cell were established for ATP and total adenylate, respectively, at which the viral production was 50% the maximal value. Cultures with lower ATP and total adenylate levels at the time of infection resulted in as much as a 95% reduction in overall viral titer compared to the control. The adenylate energy charge (AEC) showed a negative correlation with viral production with an AEC value >0.97 resulting in low virus productivity. Intracellular ATP or total adenylate concentration at the point of infection may be used as a predictor of viral yield in bioprocesses designed for virus/vaccine production. (c) 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Nivalenol and deoxynivalenol affect rat intestinal epithelial cells: a concentration related study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Bianco

    Full Text Available The integrity of the gastrointestinal tract represents a crucial first level defence against ingested toxins. Among them, Nivalenol is a trichotecenes mycotoxin frequently found on cereals and processed grains; when it contaminates human food and animal feed it is often associated with another widespread contaminant, Deoxynivalenol. Following their ingestion, intestinal epithelial cells are exposed to concentrations of these trichothecenes high enough to cause mycotoxicosis. In this study we have investigated the effects of Nivalenol and Deoxynivalenol on intestinal cells in an in vitro model system utilizing the non-tumorigenic rat intestinal epithelial cell line IEC-6. Both Nivalenol and Deoxynivalenol (5-80 µM significantly affected IEC-6 viability through a pro-apoptotic process which mainly involved the following steps: (i Bax induction; (ii Bcl-2 inhibition, and (iii caspase-3 activation. Moreover, treatment with Nivalenol produced a significant cell cycle arrest of IEC-6 cells, primarily at the G(0/G(1 interphase and in the S phase, with a concomitant reduction in the fraction of cells in G(2. Interestingly, when administered at lower concentrations (0.1-2.5 µM, both Nivalenol and Deoxynivalenol affected epithelial cell migration (restitution, representing the initial step in gastrointestinal wound healing in the gut. This reduced motility was associated with significant remodelling of the actin cytoskeleton, and changes in expression of connexin-43 and focal adhesion kinase. The concentration range of Nivalenol or Deoxynivalenol we have tested is comparable with the mean estimated daily intake of consumers eating contaminated food. Thus, our results further highlight the risks associated with intake of even low levels of these toxins.

  9. A low nicotine concentration augments vesicle motion and exocytosis triggered by K(+) depolarisation of chromaffin cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Diego, Antonio M G; Tapia, Laura; Alvarez, Rocío M; Mosquera, Marta; Cortés, Lorena; López, Inmaculada; Gutiérrez, Luis M; Gandía, Luis; García, Antonio G

    2008-11-19

    Tobacco smokers have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease; this is likely associated to an enhanced catecholamine release by circulating nicotine. Here, we have explored how low concentrations of nicotine in the range of those found in the blood of tobacco smokers, might affect the release of catecholamines in bovine chromaffin cells. We have combined patch-clamp and Ca(2+) imaging techniques to study cell excitability, cytosolic Ca(2+) transients, vesicle movement, and secretory responses. We found that low concentrations of nicotine (1.5-3 microM) did not enhance catecholamine release by themselves. However, they drastically augmented the catecholamine release response triggered by a supramaximal K(+) depolarising pulse. Furthermore, low nicotine concentrations caused slight depolarisation with superimposed action potentials, a transient elevation of [Ca(2+)](c) and augmented Ca(2+)-dependent vesicle motion underneath the plasmalemma. We suggest that low nicotine concentrations overload the secretory machinery with secretory vesicles, which cause chromaffin cells to respond with an exaggerated adrenaline release into the circulation during stress. This might contribute to the higher cardiovascular risk of tobacco smokers.

  10. Effects of Spectral Error in Efficiency Measurements of GaInAs-Based Concentrator Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osterwald, C. R.; Wanlass, M. W.; Moriarty, T.; Steiner, M. A.; Emery, K. A.

    2014-03-01

    This technical report documents a particular error in efficiency measurements of triple-absorber concentrator solar cells caused by incorrect spectral irradiance -- specifically, one that occurs when the irradiance from unfiltered, pulsed xenon solar simulators into the GaInAs bottom subcell is too high. For cells designed so that the light-generated photocurrents in the three subcells are nearly equal, this condition can cause a large increase in the measured fill factor, which, in turn, causes a significant artificial increase in the efficiency. The error is readily apparent when the data under concentration are compared to measurements with correctly balanced photocurrents, and manifests itself as discontinuities in plots of fill factor and efficiency versus concentration ratio. In this work, we simulate the magnitudes and effects of this error with a device-level model of two concentrator cell designs, and demonstrate how a new Spectrolab, Inc., Model 460 Tunable-High Intensity Pulsed Solar Simulator (T-HIPSS) can mitigate the error.

  11. Limits to anaerobic energy and cytosolic concentration in the living cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paglietti, A.

    2015-11-01

    For many physical systems at any given temperature, the set of all states where the system's free energy reaches its largest value can be determined from the system's constitutive equations of internal energy and entropy, once a state of that set is known. Such an approach is fraught with complications when applied to a living cell, because the cell's cytosol contains thousands of solutes, and thus thousands of state variables, which makes determination of its state impractical. We show here that, when looking for the maximum energy that the cytosol can store and release, detailed information on cytosol composition is redundant. Compatibility with cell's life requires that a single variable that represents the overall concentration of cytosol solutes must fall between defined limits, which can be determined by dehydrating and overhydrating the cell to its maximum capacity. The same limits are shown to determine, in particular, the maximum amount of free energy that a cell can supply in fast anaerobic processes, starting from any given initial state. For a typical skeletal muscle in normal physiological conditions this energy, i.e., the maximum anaerobic capacity to do work, is calculated to be about 960 J per kg of muscular mass. Such energy decreases as the overall concentration of solutes in the cytosol is increased. Similar results apply to any kind of cell. They provide an essential tool to understand and control the macroscopic response of single cells and multicellular cellular tissues alike. The applications include sport physiology, cell aging, disease produced cell damage, drug absorption capacity, to mention the most obvious ones.

  12. Biopsy needle advancement during bone marrow aspiration increases mesenchymal stem cell concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne E Peters

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Point-of-care kits to concentrate bone marrow (BM derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are used clinically in horses. A maximal number of MSCs per ml of marrow aspirated might be desired prior to use of a point-of-care system to concentrate MSCs. Our objective was to test a method to increase the number of MSCs per ml of marrow collected. We collected 2 BM aspirates using 2 different collection techniques from 12 horses. The first collection technique was to aspirate BM from a single site without advancement of the biopsy needle. The second collection technique was to aspirate marrow from multiple sites within the same sternal puncture by advancing the needle 5 mm 3 times for BM aspiration from 4 sites. Numbers of MSCs in collected BM were assessed by total nucleated cell count (TNCC of BM after aspiration, total Colony-Forming-Unit-fibroblast (CFU-F assay, and total MSC number at each culture passage. The BM aspiration technique of 4 needle advancements during BM aspiration resulted in higher initial nucleated cell counts, more CFU-Fs, and more MSCs at the first passage. There were no differences in the number of MSCs at later passages. Multiple advancements of the BM needle during BM aspiration resulted in increased MSC concentration at the time of BM collection. If a point-of-care kit is used to concentrate MSCs, multiple advancements may result in higher MSC numbers in the BM concentrate after preparation by the point-of-care kit. For culture expanded MSCs beyond the first cell passage, the difference is of questionable clinical relevance.

  13. Heparin concentration is critical for cell culture with human platelet lysate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemeda, Hatim; Kalz, Jana; Walenda, Gudrun; Lohmann, Michael; Wagner, Wolfgang

    2013-09-01

    Culture media for mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are generally supplemented with fetal bovine serum. Human platelet lysate (hPL) has been proven to be a very effective alternative without the risk of xenogeneic infections or immune reactions. In contrast to fetal bovine serum, hPL comprises plasma, and anticoagulants-usually unfractionated heparin (UFH)-need to be added to prevent gel formation. Cultures of MSCs in hPL media with various concentrations of UFH and enoxaparin, a low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH), were systematically compared with regard to proliferation, fibroblastoid colony-forming unit frequency, immunophenotype and in vitro differentiation. At least 0.61 IU/mL UFH or 0.024 mg/mL LMWH was necessary for reliable prevention of coagulation of hPL pools used in this study. Higher concentrations impaired cellular proliferation in a dose-dependent manner even without benzyl alcohol, which is commonly added to heparins as a bacteriostatic agent. Colony-forming unit frequency was also reduced at higher heparin concentrations, particularly with LMWH, whereas no significant effect was observed on cellular morphology or immunophenotype. High concentrations of heparins reduced the in vitro differentiation toward adipogenic and osteogenic lineages. Heparin concentration is critical for culture of MSCs in hPL media; this is of particular relevance for cellular therapy where cell culture procedures need to be optimized and standardized. Copyright © 2013 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Concentration Sensing by the Moving Nucleus in Cell Fate Determination: A Computational Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varun Aggarwal

    Full Text Available During development of the vertebrate neuroepithelium, the nucleus in neural progenitor cells (NPCs moves from the apex toward the base and returns to the apex (called interkinetic nuclear migration at which point the cell divides. The fate of the resulting daughter cells is thought to depend on the sampling by the moving nucleus of a spatial concentration profile of the cytoplasmic Notch intracellular domain (NICD. However, the nucleus executes complex stochastic motions including random waiting and back and forth motions, which can expose the nucleus to randomly varying levels of cytoplasmic NICD. How nuclear position can determine daughter cell fate despite the stochastic nature of nuclear migration is not clear. Here we derived a mathematical model for reaction, diffusion, and nuclear accumulation of NICD in NPCs during interkinetic nuclear migration (INM. Using experimentally measured trajectory-dependent probabilities of nuclear turning, nuclear waiting times and average nuclear speeds in NPCs in the developing zebrafish retina, we performed stochastic simulations to compute the nuclear trajectory-dependent probabilities of NPC differentiation. Comparison with experimentally measured nuclear NICD concentrations and trajectory-dependent probabilities of differentiation allowed estimation of the NICD cytoplasmic gradient. Spatially polarized production of NICD, rapid NICD cytoplasmic consumption and the time-averaging effect of nuclear import/export kinetics are sufficient to explain the experimentally observed differentiation probabilities. Our computational studies lend quantitative support to the feasibility of the nuclear concentration-sensing mechanism for NPC fate determination in zebrafish retina.

  15. Biological effects of tritium on fish cells in the concentration range of international drinking water standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Marilyne; Festarini, Amy; Schleicher, Krista; Tan, Elizabeth; Kim, Sang Bog; Wen, Kendall; Gawlik, Jilian; Ulsh, Brant

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate whether the current Canadian tritium drinking water limit is protective of aquatic biota, an in vitro study was designed to assess the biological effects of low concentrations of tritium, similar to what would typically be found near a Canadian nuclear power station, and higher concentrations spanning the range of international tritium drinking water standards. Channel catfish peripheral blood B-lymphoblast and fathead minnow testis cells were exposed to 10-100,000 Bq l(-1) of tritium, after which eight molecular and cellular endpoints were assessed. Increased numbers of DNA strand breaks were observed and ATP levels were increased. There were no increases in γH2AX-mediated DNA repair. No differences in cell growth were noted. Exposure to the lowest concentrations of tritium were associated with a modest increase in the viability of fathead minnow testicular cells. Using the micronucleus assay, an adaptive response was observed in catfish B-lymphoblasts. Using molecular endpoints, biological responses to tritium in the range of Canadian and international drinking water standards were observed. At the cellular level, no detrimental effects were noted on growth or cycling, and protective effects were observed as an increase in cell viability and an induced resistance to a large challenge dose.

  16. Solar concentrator modules with silicone-on-glass Fresnel lens panels and multijunction cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumyantsev, Valery D

    2010-04-26

    High-efficiency multijunction (MJ) solar cells, being very expensive to manufacture, should only be used in combination with solar concentrators in terrestrial applications. An essential cost reduction of electric power produced by photovoltaic (PV) installations with MJ cells, may be expected by the creation of highly-effective, but inexpensive, elements for optical concentration and sun tracking. This article is an overview of the corresponding approach under development at the Ioffe Physical Technical Institute. The approach to R&D of the solar PV modules is based on the concepts of sunlight concentration by small-aperture area Fresnel lenses and "all-glass" module design. The small-aperture area lenses are arranged as a panel with silicone-on-glass structure where the glass plate serves as the front surface of a module. In turn, high-efficiency InGaP/(In)GaAs/Ge cells are arranged on a rear module panel mounted on a glass plate which functions as a heat sink and integrated protective cover for the cells. The developed PV modules and sun trackers are characterized by simple design, and are regarded as the prototypes for further commercialization.

  17. Solar concentrator modules with silicone-onglass Fresnel lens panels and multijunction cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumyantsev, Valery D

    2010-04-26

    High-efficiency multijunction (MJ) solar cells, being very expensive to manufacture, should only be used in combination with solar concentrators in terrestrial applications. An essential cost reduction of electric power produced by photovoltaic (PV) installations with MJ cells, may be expected by the creation of highly-effective, but inexpensive, elements for optical concentration and sun tracking. This article is an overview of the corresponding approach under development at the Ioffe Physical Technical Institute. The approach to R&D of the solar PV modules is based on the concepts of sunlight concentration by small-aperture area Fresnel lenses and "all-glass" module design. The small-aperture area lenses are arranged as a panel with silicone-on-glass structure where the glass plate serves as the front surface of a module. In turn, high-efficiency InGaP/(In)GaAs/Ge cells are arranged on a rear module panel mounted on a glass plate which functions as a heat sink and integrated protective cover for the cells. The developed PV modules and sun trackers are characterized by simple design, and are regarded as the prototypes for further commercialization.

  18. THE STRUCTURE AND CONCENTRATION OF SOLIDS IN PHOTORECEPTOR CELLS STUDIED BY REFRACTOMETRY AND INTERFERENCE MICROSCOPY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidman, Richard L.

    1957-01-01

    Fragments of freshly obtained retinas of several vertebrate species were studied by refractometry, with reference to the structure of the rods and cones. The findings allowed a reassessment of previous descriptions based mainly on fixed material. The refractometric method was used also to measure the refractice indices and to calculate the concentrations of solids and water in the various cell segments. The main quantitative data were confirmed by interference microscopy. When examined by the method of refractometry the outer segments of freshly prepared retinal rods appear homogeneous. Within a few minutes a single eccentric longitudinal fiber appears, and transverse striations may develop. These changes are attributed to imbibition of water and swelling in structures normally too small for detection by light microscopy. The central "core" of outer segments and the chromophobic disc between outer and inner segments appear to be artifacts resulting from shrinkage during dehydration. The fresh outer segments of cones, and the inner segments of rods and cones also are described and illustrated. The volumes, refractive indices, concentrations of solids, and wet and dry weights of various segments of the photoreceptor cells were tabulated. Rod outer segments of the different species vary more than 100-fold in volume and mass but all have concentrations of solids of 40 to 43 per cent. Cone outer segments contain only about 30 per cent solids. The myoids, paraboloids, and ellipsoids of the inner segments likewise have characteristic refractive indices and concentrations of solids. Some of the limitations and particular virtues of refractometry as a method for quantitative analysis of living cells are discussed in comparison with more conventional biochemical techniques. Also the shapes and refractive indices of the various segments of photoreceptor cells are considered in relation to the absorption and transmission of light. The Stiles-Crawford effect can be accounted

  19. Reverse transcriptase real-time PCR for detection and quantification of viable Campylobacter jejuni directly from poultry faecal samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bui, Thanh Xuan; Wolff, Anders; Madsen, Mogens

    2012-01-01

    and quantification of viable Campylobacter jejuni directly from chicken faecal samples. The results of this method anda DNA-based quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) method were compared with those of a bacterial culture method. Using bacterial culture andRT-qPCR methods, viable C. jejuni cells could be detected...

  20. Effects of Different Concentrations of Fluoride in Oral Mucosal Cells in Albino Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susik, M S Sushma; Prakash, P Ajay; Rao, T Madhusudhan

    2015-12-01

    Fluoride has been described to be physiologically essential for the normal development and growth of human beings. However, it is well known that excessive fluoride causes skeletal, nonskeletal and dental complications. Therefore, outlining the cytogenetic effects induced by fluorosis is necessary. To evaluate the cytomorphology of exfoliated oral mucosal cells among various concentrations of fluoride. Study group comprised of 12 Albino Wistar rats, categorized into A,B and C groups (fed with 25 ppm,50 ppm and 100 ppm concentration of NaF), each group consisting of 4 rats, with 4 controls (fed with 1ppm concentration of NaF in distilled water). Each group was fed for a period of 42 days. Cytological smears were taken from the buccal mucosa of each group after 42 days of fluoride administration. The samples were stained with the papanicolaou method and assessed for Cytomorphometrical changes in maximum diameter of nucleus, minimum diameter of nucleus, perimeter of the nucleus, maximum diameter of the cell, minimum diameter of the cell and perimeter of the cell by image analysis software and the results were statistically analysed using SPSS software. Mean values of maximum diameter, minimum diameter and perimeter of the nucleus increased in fluoride induced study groups when compared to controls and the results showed that p-value was statistically significant (p-value: 0.000, 0.001). Mean value of maximum diameter, minimum diameter and perimeter of the cell decreased in fluoride induced subjects when compared with controls which were statistically not significant (p-value: 0.791, 0.600 & 0.719). A continuous increase in the nuclear size and decrease in the cell size was identified in fluoride induced groups as compared to controls. The observations of our present study revealed that cellular changes occur with severity of fluorosis. These cellular morphological changes may possibly eventuate into dysplastic alterations, which can progress to malignant changes.

  1. Effect of low oxygen concentrations on trophoblast-like cell line invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lash, G E; Hornbuckle, J; Brunt, A; Kirkley, M; Searle, R F; Robson, S C; Bulmer, J N

    2007-01-01

    The applicability of trophoblast-like cell lines to the study of trophoblast function has been widely debated. The present study investigated the effect of oxygen on the invasiveness, apoptosis, proliferation and secreted proteases of four different trophoblast cell lines; HTR-8/SVneo, SGHPL-4, JEG3 and JAR. All experiments were performed at 20% and 3% oxygen for 24, 48 and 72h. Immunostaining for integrins alpha1, alpha6 and beta3, cytokeratin 7 and HLA-G was used to determine the phenotype of the different cell lines. Invasion was assessed using the Matrigel invasion assay. Immunostaining for M30 and Ki67 determined levels of apoptosis and proliferation, respectively. Gelatin and casein/plasminogen zymography were performed on conditioned media to determine levels of secreted matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 2 and MMP9 and urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), respectively. None of the cell lines immunostained for all markers normally expressed by extravillous trophoblast cells. Invasiveness of HTR-8/SVneo and JEG3 cells cultured in 3% oxygen was increased after 24h but was inhibited by 72h in culture. Invasion of SGHPL-4 cells was inhibited after culture in 3% oxygen for 24h. Invasion by JAR cells was not affected by changes in oxygen concentration. The different cell lines also displayed different responses to culture period in 3% oxygen with respect to apoptosis, proliferation and secreted proteases. Care should be taken before results obtained using cell lines as a model for EVT are extrapolated to extravillous trophoblast cell behaviour in vivo.

  2. Graded Carrier Concentration Absorber Profile for High Efficiency CIGS Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonino Parisi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate an innovative CIGS-based solar cells model with a graded doping concentration absorber profile, capable of achieving high efficiency values. In detail, we start with an in-depth discussion concerning the parametrical study of conventional CIGS solar cells structures. We have used the wxAMPS software in order to numerically simulate cell electrical behaviour. By means of simulations, we have studied the variation of relevant physical and chemical parameters—characteristic of such devices—with changing energy gap and doping density of the absorber layer. Our results show that, in uniform CIGS cell, the efficiency, the open circuit voltage, and short circuit current heavily depend on CIGS band gap. Our numerical analysis highlights that the band gap value of 1.40 eV is optimal, but both the presence of Molybdenum back contact and the high carrier recombination near the junction noticeably reduce the crucial electrical parameters. For the above-mentioned reasons, we have demonstrated that the efficiency obtained by conventional CIGS cells is lower if compared to the values reached by our proposed graded carrier concentration profile structures (up to 21%.

  3. Evidence for a bimodal distribution of Escherichia coli doubling times below a threshold initial cell concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Peter L; Nguyen, Ly-Huong T; Paoli, George C; Chen, Chin-Yi

    2010-08-02

    In the process of developing a microplate-based growth assay, we discovered that our test organism, a native E. coli isolate, displayed very uniform doubling times (tau) only up to a certain threshold cell density. Below this cell concentration (100 CFU mL-1), the tau values were distributed unimodally (mutau = 18 +/- 0.71 min; n = 174). Inclusion of a small amount of ethyl acetate to the LB caused a collapse of the bimodal to a unimodal form. Comparable bimodal tau distribution results were also observed using E. coli cells diluted from mid-log phase cultures. Similar results were also obtained when using either an E. coli O157:H7 or a Citrobacter strain. When sterile-filtered LB supernatants, which formerly contained relatively low concentrations of bacteria(1,000-10,000 CFU mL-1), were employed as a diluent, there was an evident shift of the two populations towards each other but the bimodal effect was still apparent using either stationary or log phase cells. These data argue that there is a dependence of growth rate on starting cell density.

  4. The Conceptual Mechanism for Viable Organizational Learning Based on Complex System Theory and the Viable System Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Dia; You, Yeongmahn; Song, Ji Hoon

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to explore the possibility of viable learning organizations based on identifying viable organizational learning mechanisms. Two theoretical foundations, complex system theory and viable system theory, have been integrated to provide the rationale for building the sustainable organizational learning mechanism. The…

  5. Cryopreservation of mobilized blood stem cells at a higher cell concentration without the use of a programmed freezer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawano, Yoshifumi; Lee, Chan Lee; Watanabe, Tsutomu; Abe, Takanori; Suzuya, Hiroko; Okamoto, Yasuhiro; Makimoto, Atsushi; Nakagawa, Ryuji; Watanabe, Hiroyoshi; Takaue, Yoichi

    2004-01-01

    Cryopreservation of peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) mobilized by chemotherapy combined with or without granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is an essential part of procedure for anti-cancer strategies. We evaluated whether a higher cell concentration (2 x 10(8)/ml) without the use of a programmed freezer was acceptable for the storage of mobilized PBSC in an autologous setting. Mobilized PBSC were enriched to mononuclear cells (MNC) by Percoll separation and then frozen at cell concentrations of 2-5 x 10(7)/ml (group I, n=20) or 2 x 10(8)/ml (group II, n=44) without the use of a programmed freezer using 5% DMSO, 6% hydroxy ethyl starch, and 4% autologous serum or human albumin. CD34+ cells purified by ISOLEX300 were frozen at 2 x 10(7)/ml (group III, n=22) using the same method. The median recovery rates of CD34+ cells and CFU-GM were, respectively, n.d. (not determined) and 88% in group I, 103 and 64% in group II, and 98 and 53% in group III. There was a statistical significance between the recovery rate of CFU-GM in group III and that in group I ( p=0.02). The median percentage of cell viability after thawing in each group was 89, 87, and 75%, respectively. The median numbers of days after PBSCT to achieve a WBC of >1.0 x 10(9)/l, an absolute neutrophil count of >0.5 x 10(9)/l, and a platelet count of >50 x 10(9)/l were, respectively, 11, 11 and 15 in group I; 12, 12 and 16 in group II; and 12, 12 and 27 in group III. These results suggest that enriched MNC from mobilized PBSC could be frozen at a higher cell concentration (2 x 10(8)/ml) without the use of a programmed freezer, leading to reduction of the toxicities associated with infusion of thawed cells and of costly space required for cell storage.

  6. Serum iron concentration and total iron binding capacity in patients of oral squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shakhawat Hossain, Motiur Rahman Molla and Mahmuda Akhter

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The serum iron concentration and Total Iron Binding Capacity (TIBC status of 24 patients of oral squamous cell carcinoma were compared with 13 healthy subjects. Biochemical evidence shows oral squamous cell carcinoma is found to have association with low serum iron level. More patients were found to be with significantly lower iron content in serum (p0.05. Irrespective of age, sex, smoking and betel nut chewing habit of subjects, low serum iron level significantly increase the risk of oral malignancy.

  7. Space concentrator solar cells based on multilayer LPE grown AlGaAs/GaAs heterostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khvostikov, V. P.; Larionov, V. R.; Paleeva, E. V.; Sorokina, S. V.; Chosta, O. I.; Shvarts, M. Z.; Zimogorova, N. S.

    1995-01-01

    The high efficiency solar cells based on multilayer AlGaAs/GaAs heterostructures, prepared by low temperature liquid phase epitaxy (LPE), were developed and tested. An investigation of the low temperature LPE process for the crystallization of AlGaAs heterostructures of as high as 24.0 to 24.7 percent under AMO conditions at concentration ratios of 20 to 100x, were reached. Developed solar cells show substantial radiation resistance to the damage induced by 3.75 MeV electrons.

  8. Biologic Options for Articular Cartilage Wear (Platelet-Rich Plasma, Stem Cells, Bone Marrow Aspirate Concentrate).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraeutler, Matthew J; Chahla, Jorge; LaPrade, Robert F; Pascual-Garrido, Cecilia

    2017-07-01

    Biological treatments for articular cartilage repair have gained in popularity in the past decade. Advantages of these therapies include minimal invasiveness, improved healing time, and faster recovery. Biological therapies for cartilage repair include platelet-rich plasma, bone marrow aspirate concentrate, and cell-based therapies. These methods have the added benefit of containing growth factors and/or stem cells that aid in recovery and regeneration. The purpose of this article is to review the current cartilage treatment options and the existing literature on outcomes, complications, and safety profile of these products for use in the knee and hip joints. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Spontaneous oscillations of cell voltage, power density, and anode exit CO concentration in a PEM fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hui; Rihko-Struckmann, Liisa; Sundmacher, Kai

    2011-10-28

    The spontaneous oscillations of the cell voltage and output power density of a PEMFC (with PtRu/C anode) using CO-containing H(2) streams as anodic fuels have been observed during galvanostatic operating. It is ascribed to the dynamic coupling of the CO adsorption (poisoning) and the electrochemical CO oxidation (reactivating) processes in the anode chamber of the single PEMFC. Accompanying the cell voltage and power density oscillations, the discrete CO concentration oscillations at the anode outlet of the PEMFC were also detected, which directly confirms the electrochemical CO oxidation taking place in the anode chamber during galvanostatic operating. This journal is © the Owner Societies 2011

  10. Deletion of ultraconserved elements yields viable mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahituv, Nadav; Zhu, Yiwen; Visel, Axel; Holt, Amy; Afzal, Veena; Pennacchio, Len A.; Rubin, Edward M.

    2007-07-15

    Ultraconserved elements have been suggested to retainextended perfect sequence identity between the human, mouse, and ratgenomes due to essential functional properties. To investigate thenecessities of these elements in vivo, we removed four non-codingultraconserved elements (ranging in length from 222 to 731 base pairs)from the mouse genome. To maximize the likelihood of observing aphenotype, we chose to delete elements that function as enhancers in amouse transgenic assay and that are near genes that exhibit markedphenotypes both when completely inactivated in the mouse as well as whentheir expression is altered due to other genomic modifications.Remarkably, all four resulting lines of mice lacking these ultraconservedelements were viable and fertile, and failed to reveal any criticalabnormalities when assayed for a variety of phenotypes including growth,longevity, pathology and metabolism. In addition more targeted screens,informed by the abnormalities observed in mice where genes in proximityto the investigated elements had been altered, also failed to revealnotable abnormalities. These results, while not inclusive of all thepossible phenotypic impact of the deleted sequences, indicate thatextreme sequence constraint does not necessarily reflect crucialfunctions required for viability.

  11. Is Greenberg's "Macro-Carib" viable?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spike Gildea

    Full Text Available In his landmark work Language in the Americas, Greenberg (1987 proposed that Macro-Carib was one of the major low-level stocks of South America, which together with Macro-Panoan and Macro-Ge-Bororo were claimed to comprise the putative Ge-Pano-Carib Phylum. His Macro-Carib includes the isolates Andoke and Kukura, and the Witotoan, Peba-Yaguan, and Cariban families. Greenberg's primary evidence came from person-marking paradigms in individual languages, plus scattered words from individual languages collected into 79 Macro-Carib 'etymologies' and another 64 Amerind 'etymologies'. The goal of this paper is to re-evaluate Greenberg's Macro-Carib claim in the light of the much more extensive and reliable language data that has become available largely since 1987. Based on full person-marking paradigms for Proto-Cariban, Yagua, Bora and Andoke, we conclude that Greenberg's morphological claims are unfounded. For our lexical comparison, we created lexical lists for Proto-Cariban, Proto-Witotoan, Yagua and Andoke, for both Greenberg's 143 putative etymologies and for the Swadesh 100 list. From both lists, a total of 23 potential cognates were found, but no consonantal correspondences were repeated even once. We conclude that our greatly expanded and improved database does not provide sufficient evidence to convince the skeptic that the Macro-Carib hypothesis is viable

  12. Economically viable large-scale hydrogen liquefaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardella, U.; Decker, L.; Klein, H.

    2017-02-01

    The liquid hydrogen demand, particularly driven by clean energy applications, will rise in the near future. As industrial large scale liquefiers will play a major role within the hydrogen supply chain, production capacity will have to increase by a multiple of today’s typical sizes. The main goal is to reduce the total cost of ownership for these plants by increasing energy efficiency with innovative and simple process designs, optimized in capital expenditure. New concepts must ensure a manageable plant complexity and flexible operability. In the phase of process development and selection, a dimensioning of key equipment for large scale liquefiers, such as turbines and compressors as well as heat exchangers, must be performed iteratively to ensure technological feasibility and maturity. Further critical aspects related to hydrogen liquefaction, e.g. fluid properties, ortho-para hydrogen conversion, and coldbox configuration, must be analysed in detail. This paper provides an overview on the approach, challenges and preliminary results in the development of efficient as well as economically viable concepts for large-scale hydrogen liquefaction.

  13. Production of precursors for micro-concentrator solar cells by femtosecond laser-induced forward transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andree, Stefan; Heidmann, Berit; Ringleb, Franziska; Eylers, Katharina; Bonse, Jörn; Boeck, Torsten; Schmid, Martina; Krüger, Jörg

    2017-10-01

    Single-pulse femtosecond laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT, 30 fs, 790 nm) is used to deposit micron-sized dots of copper and/or indium onto a molybdenum layer on glass. Such systems can serve as precursors for the bottom-up manufacturing of micro-concentrator solar cells based on copper-indium-gallium-diselenide. The influence of the thickness of the copper, indium, and combined copper-indium donor layers on the quality of the transferred dots was qualified by scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray analysis, and optical microscopy. The potential for manufacturing of a spatial arrangement adapted to the geometry of micro-lens arrays needed for micro-concentrator solar cells is demonstrated.

  14. Method of monitoring CO concentrations in hydrogen feed to a PEM fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grot, Stephen Andreas; Meltser, Mark Alexander; Gutowski, Stanley; Neutzler, Jay Kevin; Borup, Rodney Lynn; Weisbrod, Kirk

    2000-01-01

    The CO concentration in the H.sub.2 feed stream to a PEM fuel cell stack is monitored by measuring current and/or voltage behavior patterns from a PEM-probe communicating with the reformate feed stream. Pattern recognition software may be used to compare the current and voltage patterns from the PEM-probe to current and voltage telltale outputs determined from a reference cell similar to the PEM-probe and operated under controlled conditions over a wide range of CO concentrations in the H.sub.2 fuel stream. The PEM-probe is intermittently purged of any CO build-up on the anode catalyst (e.g., by (1) flushing the anode with air, (2) short circuiting the PEM-probe, or (3) reverse biasing the PEM-probe) to keep the PEM-probe at peak performance levels.

  15. AlGaInP/GaAs Tandem Solar Cells for Power Conversion at 400 degrees C and High Concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steiner, Myles A [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Perl, Emmett [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Simon, John D [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Friedman, Daniel J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Jain, Nikhil [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Sharps, Paul [SolAero Technologies Corp.; McPheeters, Claiborne [SolAero Technologies Corp.; Lee, Minjoo L. [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

    2017-09-06

    We demonstrate dual junction (Al)GaInP/GaAs solar cells that are designed to operate at 400 degrees C and 1000X concentration in a hybrid photovoltaic-solar thermal concentrator system. The cells have a front metallization and anti-reflection coating that are stable under 400 degrees C operation. We show how the cell performance degrades with increasing aluminum compositions in the top cell. Our best cell is a GaInP/GaAs tandem that demonstrated 15+/-1% efficiency at 400 degrees C over a concentration range of 300-1000 suns, with several pathways to improved performance.

  16. Effects of Nonuniform Incident Illumination on the Thermal Performance of a Concentrating Triple Junction Solar Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahad Al-Amri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A numerical heat transfer model was developed to investigate the temperature of a triple junction solar cell and the thermal characteristics of the airflow in a channel behind the solar cell assembly using nonuniform incident illumination. The effects of nonuniformity parameters, emissivity of the two channel walls, and Reynolds number were studied. The maximum solar cell temperature sharply increased in the presence of nonuniform light profiles, causing a drastic reduction in overall efficiency. This resulted in two possible solutions for solar cells to operate in optimum efficiency level: (i adding new receiver plate with higher surface area or (ii using forced cooling techniques to reduce the solar cell temperature. Thus, surface radiation exchanges inside the duct and Re significantly reduced the maximum solar cell temperature, but a conventional plain channel cooling system was inefficient for cooling the solar cell at medium concentrations when the system was subjected to a nonuniform light distribution. Nonuniformity of the incident light and surface radiation in the duct had negligible effects on the collected thermal energy.

  17. Optical analysis and thermal management of 2-cell strings linear concentrating photovoltaic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, K. S.; Kamnapure, Nikhilesh R.

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents the optical and thermal analyses for a linear concentrating photovoltaic/thermal collector under different operating conditions. Linear concentrating photovoltaic system (CPV) consists of a highly reflective mirror, a receiver and semi-dual axis tracking mechanism. The CPV receiver embodies two strings of triple-junction cells (100 cells in each string) adhered to a mild steel circular tube mounted at the focal length of trough. This system provides 560 W of electricity and 1580 W of heat which needs to be dissipated by active cooling. The Al2O3/Water nanofluid is used as heat transfer fluid (HTF) flowing through circular receiver for CPV cells cooling. Optical analysis of linear CPV system with 3.35 m2 aperture and geometric concentration ratio (CR) of 35 is carried out using Advanced System Analysis Program (ASAP) an optical simulation tool. Non-uniform intensity distribution model of solar disk is used to model the sun in ASAP. The impact of random errors including slope error (σslope), tracking error (σtrack) and apparent change in sun's width (σsun) on optical performance of collector is shown. The result from the optical simulations shows the optical efficiency (ηo) of 88.32% for 2-cell string CPV concentrator. Thermal analysis of CPV receiver is carried out with conjugate heat transfer modeling in ANSYS FLUENT-14. Numerical simulations of Al2O3/Water nanofluid turbulent forced convection are performed for various parameters such as nanoparticle volume fraction (φ), Reynolds number (Re). The addition of the nanoparticle in water enhances the heat transfer in the ranges of 3.28% - 35.6% for φ = 1% - 6%. Numerical results are compared with literature data which shows the reasonable agreement.

  18. A selective electrocatalyst?based direct methanol fuel cell operated at high concentrations of methanol

    OpenAIRE

    FENG, Yan; Liu, Hui; Yang, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Owing to the serious crossover of methanol from the anode to the cathode through the polymer electrolyte membrane, direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) usually use dilute methanol solutions as fuel. However, the use of high-concentration methanol is highly demanded to improve the energy density of a DMFC system. Instead of the conventional strategies (for example, improving the fuel-feed system, membrane development, modification of electrode, and water management), we demonstrate the use of se...

  19. Measurement of plasma cell-free DNA concentrations in dogs with sepsis, trauma, and neoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letendre, Jo-Annie; Goggs, Robert

    2017-05-01

    To determine if cell-free DNA (cfDNA) was identifiable in canine plasma, to evaluate 3 techniques for the measurement of plasma cfDNA concentrations in dogs presented to an emergency service, and to compare the plasma cfDNA concentrations of healthy dogs to those with sepsis, trauma, and neoplasia. Retrospective study of banked canine plasma samples collected between May 2014 and December 2014. Dogs presented to the emergency service of a university veterinary teaching hospital. Plasma cfDNA was measured on residual plasma samples obtained from 15 dogs with sepsis, 15 dogs with moderate-severe trauma, 15 dogs diagnosed with a sarcoma. Plasma cfDNA was also measured in 15 healthy dogs. None. Assay linearity, repeatability, and reproducibility were evaluated. Quantification of cfDNA was performed in duplicate on diluted citrated plasma and following DNA purification using 2 fluorescence assays (SYBR-Gold; Quant-iT) and by ultraviolet absorbance spectroscopy. Fluorescence intensities (FIs) were converted to cfDNA concentrations using standard curves. Median FI values and cfDNA concentrations were compared to healthy controls using the Kruskal-Wallis test, with adjustment for multiple comparisons. Alpha was set at 0.05. Both assays had excellent linearity, and acceptable repeatability and reproducibility. Compared to controls, plasma cfDNA concentrations were significantly increased in dogs with sepsis or moderate-severe trauma with both assays (P ≤ 0.003). Dogs with neoplasia had significantly increased cfDNA concentrations with the Quant-iT assay only (P = 0.003). When measurements were performed on purified DNA, only dogs with moderate-severe trauma had significantly increased cfDNA concentrations (P plasma using 2 fluorescence assays. DNA extraction offers no advantage over direct measurement. Compared to healthy controls, dogs with sepsis or moderate-severe trauma have significantly increased plasma cfDNA concentrations. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care

  20. Population red blood cell folate concentrations for prevention of neural tube defects: Bayesian model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crider, Krista S; Devine, Owen; Hao, Ling; Dowling, Nicole F; Li, Song; Molloy, Anne M; Li, Zhu; Zhu, Jianghui; Berry, Robert J

    2014-07-29

    To determine an optimal population red blood cell (RBC) folate concentration for the prevention of neural tube birth defects. Bayesian model. Data from two population based studies in China. 247,831 participants in a prospective community intervention project in China (1993-95) to prevent neural tube defects with 400 μg/day folic acid supplementation and 1194 participants in a population based randomized trial (2003-05) to evaluate the effect of folic acid supplementation on blood folate concentration among Chinese women of reproductive age. Folic acid supplementation (400 μg/day). Estimated RBC folate concentration at time of neural tube closure (day 28 of gestation) and risk of neural tube defects. Risk of neural tube defects was high at the lowest estimated RBC folate concentrations (for example, 25.4 (95% uncertainty interval 20.8 to 31.2) neural tube defects per 10,000 births at 500 nmol/L) and decreased as estimated RBC folate concentration increased. Risk of neural tube defects was substantially attenuated at estimated RBC folate concentrations above about 1000 nmol/L (for example, 6 neural tube defects per 10,000 births at 1180 (1050 to 1340) nmol/L). The modeled dose-response relation was consistent with the existing literature. In addition, neural tube defect risk estimates developed using the proposed model and population level RBC information were consistent with the prevalence of neural tube defects in the US population before and after food fortification with folic acid. A threshold for "optimal" population RBC folate concentration for the prevention of neural tube defects could be defined (for example, approximately 1000 nmol/L). Population based RBC folate concentrations, as a biomarker for risk of neural tube defects, can be used to facilitate evaluation of prevention programs as well as to identify subpopulations at elevated risk for a neural tube defect affected pregnancy due to folate insufficiency. © Crider et al 2014.

  1. Evidence for a bimodal distribution of Escherichia coli doubling times below a threshold initial cell concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Chin-Yi

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the process of developing a microplate-based growth assay, we discovered that our test organism, a native E. coli isolate, displayed very uniform doubling times (τ only up to a certain threshold cell density. Below this cell concentration (≤ 100 -1,000 CFU mL-1 ; ≤ 27-270 CFU well-1 we observed an obvious increase in the τ scatter. Results Working with a food-borne E. coli isolate we found that τ values derived from two different microtiter platereader-based techniques (i.e., optical density with growth time {=OD[t]} fit to the sigmoidal Boltzmann equation or time to calculated 1/2-maximal OD {=tm} as a function of initial cell density {=tm[CI]} were in excellent agreement with the same parameter acquired from total aerobic plate counting. Thus, using either Luria-Bertani (LB or defined (MM media at 37°C, τ ranged between 17-18 (LB or 51-54 (MM min. Making use of such OD[t] data we collected many observations of τ as a function of manifold initial or starting cell concentrations (CI. We noticed that τ appeared to be distributed in two populations (bimodal at low CI. When CI ≤100 CFU mL-1 (stationary phase cells in LB, we found that about 48% of the observed τ values were normally distributed around a mean (μτ1 of 18 ± 0.68 min (± στ1 and 52% with μτ2 = 20 ± 2.5 min (n = 479. However, at higher starting cell densities (CI>100 CFU mL-1, the τ values were distributed unimodally (μτ = 18 ± 0.71 min; n = 174. Inclusion of a small amount of ethyl acetate to the LB caused a collapse of the bimodal to a unimodal form. Comparable bimodal τ distribution results were also observed using E. coli cells diluted from mid-log phase cultures. Similar results were also obtained when using either an E. coli O157:H7 or a Citrobacter strain. When sterile-filtered LB supernatants, which formerly contained relatively low concentrations of bacteria(1,000-10,000 CFU mL-1, were employed as a diluent, there was an evident

  2. Ketamine Metabolites Enantioselectively Decrease Intracellular D-Serine Concentrations in PC-12 Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagendra S Singh

    Full Text Available D-Serine is an endogenous NMDA receptor co-agonist that activates synaptic NMDA receptors modulating neuronal networks in the cerebral cortex and plays a key role in long-term potentiation of synaptic transmission. D-serine is associated with NMDA receptor neurotoxicity and neurodegeneration and elevated D-serine concentrations have been associated with Alzheimer's and Parkinsons' diseases and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Previous studies have demonstrated that the ketamine metabolites (rac-dehydronorketamine and (2S,6S-hydroxynorketamine decrease intracellular D-serine concentrations in a concentration dependent manner in PC-12 cells. In the current study, PC-12 cells were incubated with a series of ketamine metabolites and the IC50 values associated with attenuated intracellular D-serine concentrations were determined. The results demonstrate that structural and stereochemical features of the studied compounds contribute to the magnitude of the inhibitory effect with (2S,6S-hydroxynorketamine and (2R,6R-hydroxynorketamine displaying the most potent inhibition with IC50 values of 0.18 ± 0.04 nM and 0.68 ± 0.09 nM. The data was utilized to construct a preliminary 3D-QSAR/pharmacophore model for use in the design of new and more efficient modulators of D-serine.

  3. Is telomerase a viable target in cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buseman, C.M.; Wright, W.E.; Shay, J.W.

    2012-01-01

    The ideal cancer treatment would specifically target cancer cells yet have minimal or no adverse effects on normal somatic cells. Telomerase, the ribonucleoprotein reverse transcriptase that maintains the ends of human chromosome, is an attractive cancer therapeutic target for exactly this reason [1]. Telomerase is expressed in more than 85% of cancer cells, making it a nearly universal cancer marker, while the majority of normal somatic cells are telomerase negative. Telomerase activity confers limitless replicative potential to cancer cells, a hallmark of cancer which must be attained for the continued growth that characterizes almost all advanced neoplasms [2]. In this review we will summarize the role of telomeres and telomerase in cancer cells, and how properties of telomerase are being exploited to create targeted cancer therapies including telomerase inhibitors, telomerase-targeted immunotherapies and telomerase-driven virotherapies. A frank and balanced assessment of the current state of telomerase inhibitors with caveats and potential limitations will be included. PMID:21802433

  4. A high-performance photovoltaic concentrator array - The mini-dome Fresnel lens concentrator with 30 percent efficient GaAs/GaSb tandem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piszczor, M. F.; Brinker, D. J.; Flood, D. J.; Avery, J. E.; Fraas, L. M.; Fairbanks, E. S.; Yerkes, J. W.; O'Neill, M. J.

    1991-01-01

    A high-efficiency, lightweight space photovoltaic concentrator array is described. Previous work on the minidome Fresnel lens concentrator concept is being integrated with Boeing's 30 percent efficient tandem GaAs/GaSb concentrator cells into a high-performance photovoltaic array. Calculations indicate that, in the near term, such an array can achieve 300 W/sq m at a specific power of 100 W/kg. Emphasis of the program has now shifted to integrating the concentrator lens, tandem cell, and supporting panel structure into a space-qualifiable array. A description is presented of the current status of component and prototype panel testing and the development of a flight panel for the Photovoltaic Array Space Power Plus Diagnostics (PASP PLUS) flight experiment.

  5. Evaluation of various glyphosate concentrations on DNA damage in human Raji cells and its impact on cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Michelle; Peck, Connor; Meng, Wei; Heaton, Matthew; Robison, Richard; O'Neill, Kim

    2017-04-01

    Glyphosate is a highly used active compound in agriculturally based pesticides. The literature regarding the toxicity of glyphosate to human cells has been highly inconsistent. We studied the resulting DNA damage and cytotoxicity of various glyphosate concentrations on human cells to evaluate DNA damaging potential. Utilizing human Raji cells, DNA damage was quantified using the comet assay, while cytotoxicity was further analyzed using MTT viability assays. Several glyphosate concentrations were assessed, ranging from 15 mM to 0.1 μM. We found that glyphosate treatment is lethal to Raji cells at concentrations above 10 mM, yet has no cytotoxic effects at concentrations at or below 100 μM. Treatment concentrations of 1 mM and 5 mM induce statistically significant DNA damage to Raji cells following 30-60 min of treatment, however, cells show a slow recovery from initial damage and cell viability is unaffected after 2 h. At these same concentrations, cells treated with additional compound did not recover and maintained high levels of DNA damage. While the cytotoxicity of glyphosate appears to be minimal for physiologically relevant concentrations, the compound has a definitive cytotoxic nature in human cells at high concentrations. Our data also suggests a mammalian metabolic pathway for the degradation of glyphosate may be present. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. [Biologic effects of different concentrations of putrescine on human umbilical vein endothelial cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianxia; Rong, Xinzhou; Fan, Guicheng; Li, Songze; Zhang, Tao; Li, Qinghui

    2015-12-01

    To explore the effects of different concentrations of putrescine on proliferation, migration, and apoptosis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). HUVECs were routinely cultured in vitro. The 3rd to the 5th passage of HUVECs were used in the following experiments. (1) Cells were divided into 500, 1 000, and 5 000 µg/mL putrescine groups according to the random number table (the same grouping method was used for following grouping), with 3 wells in each group, which were respectively cultured with complete culture solution containing putrescine in the corresponding concentration for 24 h. Morphology of cells was observed by inverted optical microscope. (2) Cells were divided into 0.5, 1.0, 5.0, 10.0, 50.0, 100.0, 500.0, 1 000.0 µg/mL putrescine groups, and control group, with 4 wells in each group. Cells in the putrescine groups were respectively cultured with complete culture solution containing putrescine in the corresponding concentration for 24 h, and cells in control group were cultured with complete culture solution with no additional putrescine for 24 h. Cell proliferation activity (denoted as absorption value) was measured by colorimetry. (3) Cells were divided (with one well in each group) and cultured as in experiment (2), and the migration ability was detected by transwell migration assay. (4) Cells were divided (with one flask in each group) and cultured as in experiment (2), and the cell apoptosis rate was determined by flow cytometer. Data were processed with one-way analysis of variance, Kruskal-Wallis test, and Dunnett test. (1) After 24-h culture, cell attachment was good in 500 µg/mL putrescine group, and no obvious change in the shape was observed; cell attachment was less in 1 000 µg/mL putrescine group and the cells were small and rounded; cells in 5 000 µg/mL putrescine group were in fragmentation without attachment. (2) The absorption values of cells in 0.5, 1.0, 5.0, 10.0, 50.0, 100.0, 500.0, 1 000.0 µg/mL putrescine groups

  7. Parejas viables que perduran en el tiempo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan José Cuervo Rodríguez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available El presente artículo científico presenta resultados del proceso llevado a cabo en el proyecto de investigación docente "Mecanismos de autorregulación en parejas viables que perduran en el tiempo". Se soporta en una mirada compleja de la psicología basada en una epistemología de la construcción. En el ámbito metodológico, se inscribe en los estudios de terapia familiar desde una perspectiva de la comunicación humana como un todo integrado. Participaron nueve parejas. Los criterios de inclusión fueron: cinco o más años de convivencia, participación voluntaria, no presentar (ni haber presentado problemáticas especiales que ameriten intervención psicoterapéutica y la obtención de un porcentaje significativo en el uso de estrategias de comunicación asertiva en la resolución de conflictos. El método general utilizado fue el análisis de la comunicación en tarea de conversación. Los principales hallazgos señalan una estrecha relación entre el contexto de desarrollo de las parejas, la emergencia de códigos comunicacionales propios y la posibilidad de perdurar en el tiempo; también, se resalta el tipo de comunicación asertiva o constructiva, la construcción de valores como el respeto y la aceptación de las diferencias, y el deseo por vivir y construir bienestar común, como elementos constitutivos de su identidad como pareja.

  8. A selective electrocatalyst–based direct methanol fuel cell operated at high concentrations of methanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yan; Liu, Hui; Yang, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Owing to the serious crossover of methanol from the anode to the cathode through the polymer electrolyte membrane, direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) usually use dilute methanol solutions as fuel. However, the use of high-concentration methanol is highly demanded to improve the energy density of a DMFC system. Instead of the conventional strategies (for example, improving the fuel-feed system, membrane development, modification of electrode, and water management), we demonstrate the use of selective electrocatalysts to run a DMFC at high concentrations of methanol. In particular, at an operating temperature of 80°C, the as-fabricated DMFC with core-shell-shell Au@Ag2S@Pt nanocomposites at the anode and core-shell Au@Pd nanoparticles at the cathode produces a maximum power density of 89.7 mW cm−2 at a methanol feed concentration of 10 M and maintains good performance at a methanol concentration of up to 15 M. The high selectivity of the electrocatalysts achieved through structural construction accounts for the successful operation of the DMFC at high concentrations of methanol. PMID:28695199

  9. A selective electrocatalyst-based direct methanol fuel cell operated at high concentrations of methanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yan; Liu, Hui; Yang, Jun

    2017-06-01

    Owing to the serious crossover of methanol from the anode to the cathode through the polymer electrolyte membrane, direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) usually use dilute methanol solutions as fuel. However, the use of high-concentration methanol is highly demanded to improve the energy density of a DMFC system. Instead of the conventional strategies (for example, improving the fuel-feed system, membrane development, modification of electrode, and water management), we demonstrate the use of selective electrocatalysts to run a DMFC at high concentrations of methanol. In particular, at an operating temperature of 80°C, the as-fabricated DMFC with core-shell-shell Au@Ag 2 S@Pt nanocomposites at the anode and core-shell Au@Pd nanoparticles at the cathode produces a maximum power density of 89.7 mW cm -2 at a methanol feed concentration of 10 M and maintains good performance at a methanol concentration of up to 15 M. The high selectivity of the electrocatalysts achieved through structural construction accounts for the successful operation of the DMFC at high concentrations of methanol.

  10. Preservation of high glycolytic phenotype by establishing new acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines at physiologic oxygen concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheard, Michael A., E-mail: msheard@chla.usc.edu [Developmental Therapeutics Program, USC-CHLA Institute for Pediatric Clinical Research, Division of Hematology-Oncology, Children' s Hospital Los Angeles, 4650 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90027 (United States); Ghent, Matthew V., E-mail: mattghent@gmail.com [Department of Pathology, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Health Sciences Campus, Los Angeles, CA 90089 (United States); Cabral, Daniel J., E-mail: dcabral14@gmail.com [Cancer Center and Departments of Cell Biology & Biochemistry, Pharmacology & Neuroscience, Internal Medicine and Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Lubbock, TX 79430 (United States); Lee, Joanne C., E-mail: joannebarnhart@gmail.com [Cancer Center and Departments of Cell Biology & Biochemistry, Pharmacology & Neuroscience, Internal Medicine and Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Lubbock, TX 79430 (United States); Khankaldyyan, Vazgen, E-mail: khangaldian@yahoo.com [Developmental Therapeutics Program, USC-CHLA Institute for Pediatric Clinical Research, Division of Hematology-Oncology, Children' s Hospital Los Angeles, 4650 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90027 (United States); Ji, Lingyun, E-mail: lingyun.ji@med.usc.edu [Developmental Therapeutics Program, USC-CHLA Institute for Pediatric Clinical Research, Division of Hematology-Oncology, Children' s Hospital Los Angeles, 4650 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90027 (United States); Wu, Samuel Q., E-mail: swu@chla.usc.edu [Medical Genetics, Children' s Hospital Los Angeles, 4650 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90027 (United States); Kang, Min H., E-mail: min.kang@ttuhsc.edu [Cancer Center and Departments of Cell Biology & Biochemistry, Pharmacology & Neuroscience, Internal Medicine and Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Lubbock, TX 79430 (United States); and others

    2015-05-15

    Cancer cells typically exhibit increased glycolysis and decreased mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, and they continue to exhibit some elevation in glycolysis even under aerobic conditions. However, it is unclear whether cancer cell lines employ a high level of glycolysis comparable to that of the original cancers from which they were derived, even if their culture conditions are changed to physiologically relevant oxygen concentrations. From three childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients we established three new pairs of cell lines in both atmospheric (20%) and physiologic (bone marrow level, 5%) oxygen concentrations. Cell lines established in 20% oxygen exhibited lower proliferation, survival, expression of glycolysis genes, glucose consumption, and lactate production. Interestingly, the effects of oxygen concentration used during cell line initiation were only partially reversible when established cell cultures were switched from one oxygen concentration to another for eight weeks. These observations indicate that ALL cell lines established at atmospheric oxygen concentration can exhibit relatively low levels of glycolysis and these levels are semi-permanent, suggesting that physiologic oxygen concentrations may be needed from the time of cell line initiation to preserve the high level of glycolysis commonly exhibited by leukemias in vivo. - Highlights: • Establishing new ALL cell lines in 5% oxygen resulted in higher glycolytic expression and function. • Establishing new ALL cell lines in 5% oxygen resulted in higher proliferation and lower cell death. • The divergent metabolic phenotypes selected in 5% and 20% oxygen are semi-permanent.

  11. Photochemical decontamination of red cell concentrates with the silicon phthalocyanine Pc 4 and red light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Hur, Ehud; Zuk, Maria M.; Oetjen, Joyce; Chan, Wai-Shun; Lenny, Leslie; Horowitz, Bernard

    1999-07-01

    Virus inactivation in red blood cells concentrates (RBCC) is being studied in order to increase the safety of the blood supply. For this purpose we have been studying the silicon phthalocyanine (Pc 4), a photosensitizer activated with red light. Two approaches were used to achieve enhanced selectivity of Pc 4 for virus inactivation. One was formulation of Pc 4 in liposomes that reduce its binding to red cells. The other was the use of a light emitting diode (LED) array emitting at 700 nm. Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) infectivity served as an endpoint for virus kill in treated RBCC. Red cell hemolysis and circulatory survival in rabbits served as measures for red cell damage. Treatment of small aliquots of human RBCC with 2 (mu) M Pc 4 in liposomes and 10 J/cm2 of 700 nm LED light in the presence of the quenches of reactive oxygen species glutathione and trolox resulted in 6 log10 inactivation of VSV. Under these conditions hemolysis of treated red cells stored at 4 degree(s)C for 21 days was only slightly above that of control cells. Rabbit RBCC similarly treated circulated with a half life of 7.5 days compared with 10.5 days of control. It is concluded that Pc 4 used as described here may be useful for viral decontamination of RBCC, pending toxicological and clinical studies.

  12. A fluorescence anisotropy method for measuring protein concentration in complex cell culture media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groza, Radu Constantin; Calvet, Amandine; Ryder, Alan G

    2014-04-22

    The rapid, quantitative analysis of the complex cell culture media used in biopharmaceutical manufacturing is of critical importance. Requirements for cell culture media composition profiling, or changes in specific analyte concentrations (e.g. amino acids in the media or product protein in the bioprocess broth) often necessitate the use of complicated analytical methods and extensive sample handling. Rapid spectroscopic methods like multi-dimensional fluorescence (MDF) spectroscopy have been successfully applied for the routine determination of compositional changes in cell culture media and bioprocess broths. Quantifying macromolecules in cell culture media is a specific challenge as there is a need to implement measurements rapidly on the prepared media. However, the use of standard fluorescence spectroscopy is complicated by the emission overlap from many media components. Here, we demonstrate how combining anisotropy measurements with standard total synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy (TSFS) provides a rapid, accurate quantitation method for cell culture media. Anisotropy provides emission resolution between large and small fluorophores while TSFS provides a robust measurement space. Model cell culture media was prepared using yeastolate (2.5 mg mL(-1)) spiked with bovine serum albumin (0 to 5 mg mL(-1)). Using this method, protein emission is clearly discriminated from background yeastolate emission, allowing for accurate bovine serum albumin (BSA) quantification over a 0.1 to 4.0 mg mL(-1) range with a limit of detection (LOD) of 13.8 μg mL(-1). Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. “Limits of Control” – Crucial Parameters for a Reliable Quantification of Viable Campylobacter by Real-Time PCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, Nora-Johanna; Buhler, Christiane; Iwobi, Azuka N.; Huber, Ingrid; Ellerbroek, Lüppo; Appel, Bernd; Stingl, Kerstin

    2014-01-01

    The unsuitability of the “CFU” parameter and the usefulness of cultivation-independent quantification of Campylobacter on chicken products, reflecting the actual risk for infection, is increasingly becoming obvious. Recently, real-time PCR methods in combination with the use of DNA intercalators, which block DNA amplification from dead bacteria, have seen wide application. However, much confusion exists in the correct interpretation of such assays. Campylobacter is confronted by oxidative and cold stress outside the intestine. Hence, damage caused by oxidative stress probably represents the most frequent natural death of Campylobacter on food products. Treatment of Campylobacter with peroxide led to complete loss of CFU and to significant entry of any tested DNA intercalator, indicating disruption of membrane integrity. When we transiently altered the metabolic state of Campylobacter by abolishing the proton-motive force or by inhibiting active efflux, CFU was constant but enhanced entry of ethidium bromide (EtBr) was observed. Consistently, ethidium monoazide (EMA) also entered viable Campylobacter, in particular when nutrients for bacterial energization were lacking (in PBS) or when the cells were less metabolically active (in stationary phase). In contrast, propidium iodide (PI) and propidium monoazide (PMA) were excluded from viable bacterial cells, irrespective of their metabolic state. As expected for a diffusion-limited process, the extent of signal reduction from dead cells depended on the temperature, incubation time and concentration of the dyes during staining, prior to crosslinking. Consistently, free protein and/or DNA present in varying amounts in the heterogeneous matrix lowered the concentration of the DNA dyes at the bacterial membrane and led to considerable variation of the residual signal from dead cells. In conclusion, we propose an improved approach, taking into account principles of method variability and recommend the implementation of

  14. "Limits of control"--crucial parameters for a reliable quantification of viable campylobacter by real-time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, Nora-Johanna; Buhler, Christiane; Iwobi, Azuka N; Huber, Ingrid; Ellerbroek, Lüppo; Appel, Bernd; Stingl, Kerstin

    2014-01-01

    The unsuitability of the "CFU" parameter and the usefulness of cultivation-independent quantification of Campylobacter on chicken products, reflecting the actual risk for infection, is increasingly becoming obvious. Recently, real-time PCR methods in combination with the use of DNA intercalators, which block DNA amplification from dead bacteria, have seen wide application. However, much confusion exists in the correct interpretation of such assays. Campylobacter is confronted by oxidative and cold stress outside the intestine. Hence, damage caused by oxidative stress probably represents the most frequent natural death of Campylobacter on food products. Treatment of Campylobacter with peroxide led to complete loss of CFU and to significant entry of any tested DNA intercalator, indicating disruption of membrane integrity. When we transiently altered the metabolic state of Campylobacter by abolishing the proton-motive force or by inhibiting active efflux, CFU was constant but enhanced entry of ethidium bromide (EtBr) was observed. Consistently, ethidium monoazide (EMA) also entered viable Campylobacter, in particular when nutrients for bacterial energization were lacking (in PBS) or when the cells were less metabolically active (in stationary phase). In contrast, propidium iodide (PI) and propidium monoazide (PMA) were excluded from viable bacterial cells, irrespective of their metabolic state. As expected for a diffusion-limited process, the extent of signal reduction from dead cells depended on the temperature, incubation time and concentration of the dyes during staining, prior to crosslinking. Consistently, free protein and/or DNA present in varying amounts in the heterogeneous matrix lowered the concentration of the DNA dyes at the bacterial membrane and led to considerable variation of the residual signal from dead cells. In conclusion, we propose an improved approach, taking into account principles of method variability and recommend the implementation of

  15. "Limits of control"--crucial parameters for a reliable quantification of viable campylobacter by real-time PCR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora-Johanna Krüger

    Full Text Available The unsuitability of the "CFU" parameter and the usefulness of cultivation-independent quantification of Campylobacter on chicken products, reflecting the actual risk for infection, is increasingly becoming obvious. Recently, real-time PCR methods in combination with the use of DNA intercalators, which block DNA amplification from dead bacteria, have seen wide application. However, much confusion exists in the correct interpretation of such assays. Campylobacter is confronted by oxidative and cold stress outside the intestine. Hence, damage caused by oxidative stress probably represents the most frequent natural death of Campylobacter on food products. Treatment of Campylobacter with peroxide led to complete loss of CFU and to significant entry of any tested DNA intercalator, indicating disruption of membrane integrity. When we transiently altered the metabolic state of Campylobacter by abolishing the proton-motive force or by inhibiting active efflux, CFU was constant but enhanced entry of ethidium bromide (EtBr was observed. Consistently, ethidium monoazide (EMA also entered viable Campylobacter, in particular when nutrients for bacterial energization were lacking (in PBS or when the cells were less metabolically active (in stationary phase. In contrast, propidium iodide (PI and propidium monoazide (PMA were excluded from viable bacterial cells, irrespective of their metabolic state. As expected for a diffusion-limited process, the extent of signal reduction from dead cells depended on the temperature, incubation time and concentration of the dyes during staining, prior to crosslinking. Consistently, free protein and/or DNA present in varying amounts in the heterogeneous matrix lowered the concentration of the DNA dyes at the bacterial membrane and led to considerable variation of the residual signal from dead cells. In conclusion, we propose an improved approach, taking into account principles of method variability and recommend the

  16. Improving accuracy of cell and chromophore concentration measurements using optical density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, John A; Curtis, Brandon S; Curtis, Wayne R

    2013-04-22

    UV-vis spectrophotometric optical density (OD) is the most commonly-used technique for estimating chromophore formation and cell concentration in liquid culture. OD wavelength is often chosen with little thought given to its effect on the quality of the measurement. Analysis of the contributions of absorption and scattering to the measured optical density provides a basis for understanding variability among spectrophotometers and enables a quantitative evaluation of the applicability of the Beer-Lambert law. This provides a rational approach for improving the accuracy of OD measurements used as a proxy for direct dry weight (DW), cell count, and pigment levels. For pigmented organisms, the choice of OD wavelength presents a tradeoff between the robustness and the sensitivity of the measurement. The OD at a robust wavelength is primarily the result of light scattering and does not vary with culture conditions; whereas, the OD at a sensitive wavelength is additionally dependent on light absorption by the organism's pigments. Suitably robust and sensitive wavelengths are identified for a wide range of organisms by comparing their spectra to the true absorption spectra of dyes. The relative scattering contribution can be reduced either by measurement at higher OD, or by the addition of bovine serum albumin. Reduction of scattering or correlation with off-peak light attenuation provides for more accurate assessment of chromophore levels within cells. Conversion factors between DW, OD, and colony-forming unit density are tabulated for 17 diverse organisms to illustrate the scope of variability of these correlations. Finally, an inexpensive short pathlength LED-based flow cell is demonstrated for the online monitoring of growth in a bioreactor at culture concentrations greater than 5 grams dry weight per liter which would otherwise require off-line dilutions to obtain non-saturated OD measurements. OD is most accurate as a time-saving proxy measurement for biomass

  17. Concentration effects of grape seed extracts in anti-oral cancer cells involving differential apoptosis, oxidative stress, and DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Ching-Yu; Hou, Ming-Feng; Yang, Zhi-Wen; Tang, Jen-Yang; Li, Kun-Tzu; Huang, Hurng-Wern; Huang, Yu-Hsuan; Lee, Sheng-Yang; Fu, Tzu-Fun; Hsieh, Che-Yu; Chen, Bing-Hung; Chang, Hsueh-Wei

    2015-03-29

    Grape seeds extract (GSE) is a famous health food supplement for its antioxidant property. Different concentrations of GSE may have different impacts on cellular oxidative/reduction homeostasis. Antiproliferative effect of GSE has been reported in many cancers but rarely in oral cancer. The aim of this study is to examine the antioral cancer effects of different concentrations of GSE in terms of cell viability, apoptosis, reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial function, and DNA damage. High concentrations (50-400 μg/ml) of GSE dose-responsively inhibited proliferation of oral cancer Ca9-22 cells but low concentrations (1-10 μg/ml) of GSE showed a mild effect in a MTS assay. For apoptosis analyses, subG1 population and annexin V intensity in high concentrations of GSE-treated Ca9-22 cells was increased but less so at low concentrations. ROS generation and mitochondrial depolarization increased dose-responsively at high concentrations but showed minor changes at low concentrations of GSE in Ca9-22 cells. Additionally, high concentrations of GSE dose-responsively induced more γH2AX-based DNA damage than low concentrations. Differential concentrations of GSE may have a differentially antiproliferative function against oral cancer cells via differential apoptosis, oxidative stress and DNA damage.

  18. Concentration-dependent gene expression responses to flusilazole in embryonic stem cell differentiation cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dartel, Dorien A M; Pennings, Jeroen L A; de la Fonteyne, Liset J J; Brauers, Karen J J; Claessen, Sandra; van Delft, Joost H; Kleinjans, Jos C S; Piersma, Aldert H

    2011-03-01

    The murine embryonic stem cell test (EST) is designed to evaluate developmental toxicity based on compound-induced inhibition of embryonic stem cell (ESC) differentiation into cardiomyocytes. The addition of transcriptomic evaluation within the EST may result in enhanced predictability and improved characterization of the applicability domain, therefore improving usage of the EST for regulatory testing strategies. Transcriptomic analyses assessing factors critical for risk assessment (i.e. dose) are needed to determine the value of transcriptomic evaluation in the EST. Here, using the developmentally toxic compound, flusilazole, we investigated the effect of compound concentration on gene expression regulation and toxicity prediction in ESC differentiation cultures. Cultures were exposed for 24 h to multiple concentrations of flusilazole (0.54-54 μM) and RNA was isolated. In addition, we sampled control cultures 0, 24, and 48 h to evaluate the transcriptomic status of the cultures across differentiation. Transcriptomic profiling identified a higher sensitivity of development-related processes as compared to cell division-related processes in flusilazole-exposed differentiation cultures. Furthermore, the sterol synthesis-related mode of action of flusilazole toxicity was detected. Principal component analysis using gene sets related to normal ESC differentiation was used to describe the dynamics of ESC differentiation, defined as the 'differentiation track'. The concentration-dependent effects on development were reflected in the significance of deviation of flusilazole-exposed cultures from this transcriptomic-based differentiation track. Thus, the detection of developmental toxicity in EST using transcriptomics was shown to be compound concentration-dependent. This study provides further insight into the possible application of transcriptomics in the EST as an improved alternative model system for developmental toxicity testing. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc

  19. Gravity sedimentation of granulocytapheresis concentrates with hydroxyethyl starch efficiently removes red blood cells and retains neutrophils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Barbara J.; Yau, Yu Ying; Byrne, Phyllis J.; Stroncek, David F.; Leitman, Susan F.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Transfusion of granulocytapheresis concentrates can be limited by the volume of incompatible donor red blood cells (RBCs) in the component. Efficient reduction of RBCs in granulocyte units would result in safe transfusion of RBC-incompatible units. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS Granulocyte concentrates were collected by continuous-flow apheresis from granulocyte–colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and dexamethasone-stimulated volunteer donors, with 6% hydroxyethyl starch (HES) added continuously during apheresis as a RBC sedimenting agent to enhance granulocyte collection efficiency. After collection, the component was placed in a plasma extractor for 4 hours. A sharp line of demarcation between the starch-sedimented RBCs and the granulocyte-rich supernatant developed, and the supernatant was transferred to a sterilely docked transfer pack. RBC reduction and white blood cell recovery were determined. RESULTS Gravity sedimentation was performed on 165 granulocyte concentrates. Mean sedimentation time was 267 minutes (range, 150–440 min). RBC depletion was 92% (range, 71%–99%) with mean residual RBC content of 3.2 ± 1.4 mL. Twelve percent of components contained less than 2 mL of RBCs. Mean granulocyte and platelet (PLT) recoveries were 80 and 81%, respectively. There were no transfusion reactions or signs of hemolysis after transfusion of 66 RBC-incompatible granulocyte concentrates (RBC volume, 1.6–8.2 mL). The remaining concentrates were used for topical or intrapleural applications. CONCLUSIONS RBCs were significantly reduced and granulocytes and PLTs effectively retained in G-CSF/ steroid–mobilized granulocyte components collected with HES and processed by gravity sedimentation. This procedure allows safe transfusion of RBC-incompatible sedimented granulocyte units and may be used to expand the pool of available granulocyte donors for specific recipients. PMID:20113453

  20. Effect of molecular weight and concentration of hyaluronan on cell proliferation and osteogenic differentiation in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Ningbo, E-mail: curl-zhao@163.com; Wang, Xin, E-mail: 394041230@qq.com; Qin, Lei, E-mail: qinlei30@126.com; Guo, Zhengze, E-mail: zhzeguo@163.com; Li, Dehua, E-mail: lidehuafmmu@163.com

    2015-09-25

    Hyaluronan (HA), the simplest glycosaminoglycan and a major component of the extracellular matrix, exists in various tissues. It is involved in some critical biological procedures, including cellular signaling, cell adhesion and proliferation, and cell differentiation. The effect of molecular weight (MW) and concentration of HA on cell proliferation and differentiation was controversial. In this study, we investigated the effect of MW and concentration of HA on the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of rabbit bone marrow-derived stem cells in vitro. Results showed that high MW HA decreased the cell adhesion rate in a concentration-dependant manner. The cell adhesion rate was decreased by increasing MW of HA. Cell proliferation was significantly enhanced by low MW HA (P < 0.05). The factorial analysis indicated that MW and concentration had an interactive effect on the cell adhesion rate and cell proliferation (P < 0.05). High MW HA increased the mRNA expressions of ALP, RUNX-2 and OCN. The higher the MW was, the higher the mRNA expressions were. The factorial analysis indicated that MW and concentration had an interactive effect on ALP mRNA expression (P < 0.05). HA of higher MW and higher concentration promoted bone formation. These findings provide some useful information in understanding the mechanism underlying the effect of MW and concentration of HA on cell proliferation and differentiation. - Highlights: • Effect of hyaluronan on cell proliferation and differentiation is evaluated in vitro. • Hyaluronan of low molecular weight increases cell proliferation. • Hyaluronan of high molecular weight promotes cell osteogenic differentiation. • Molecular weight and concentration of hyaluronan show interactive effect.

  1. High iodine concentration attenuates RET/PTC3 oncogene activation in thyroid follicular cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiore, Ana Paula Zen Petisco; Fuziwara, Cesar Seigi; Kimura, Edna Teruko

    2009-11-01

    Papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) is frequently associated with a RET gene rearrangement that generates a RET/PTC oncogene. RET/PTC is a fusion of the tyrosine kinase domain of RET to the 5' portion of a different gene. This fusion results in a constitutively active MAPK pathway, which plays a key role in PTC development. The RET/PTC3 fusion is primarily associated with radiation-related PTC. Epidemiological studies show a lower incidence of PTC in radiation-exposed regions that are associated with an iodine-rich diet. Since the influence of excess iodine on the development of thyroid cancer is still unclear, the aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of high iodine concentrations on RET/PTC3-activated thyroid cells. PTC3-5 cells, a rat thyroid cell lineage harboring doxycycline-inducible RET/PTC3, were treated with 10(-3) M NaI. Cell growth was analyzed by cell counting and the MTT assay. The expression and phosphorylation state of MAPK pathway-related (Braf, Erk, pErk, and pRet) and thyroid-specific (natrium-iodide symporter [Nis] and thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor [Tshr]) proteins were analyzed by Western blotting. Thyroid-specific gene expression was further analyzed by quantitative reverse transcription (RT)-polymerase chain reaction. A significant inhibition of proliferation was observed, along with no significant variation in cell death rate, in the iodine-treated cells. Further, iodine treatment attenuated the loss of Nis and Tshr gene and protein expression induced by RET/PTC3 oncogene induction. Finally, iodine treatment reduced Ret and Erk phosphorylation, without altering Braf and Erk expression. Our results indicate an antioncogenic role for excess iodine during thyroid oncogenic activation. These findings contribute to a better understanding of the effect of iodine on thyroid follicular cells, particularly how it may play a protective role during RET/PTC3 oncogene activation.

  2. Evaluating the impact of substrate and product concentration on a whole-cell biocatalyst during a Baeyer-Villiger reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shitu, J. O.; Chartrain, M.; Woodley, John

    2009-01-01

    The presence of high concentrations of substrate or product may impede the optimal functioning of a biocatalyst, more so in the case of whole cell biocatalysts where the metabolic status of the cells may be compromised. In this article we investigate these effects using as an example the Baeyer...... the observed reaction rate.......-one) associated cell damage was concentration dependent. One of the two regio-isomeric products [(-)-1(S),5(R)-2-oxabicyclo[3.3.0]oct-6-en-3-one] was also used to identify that product associated cell damage was time dependent. In addition, both substrate and product concentrations affected...

  3. Red blood cells sensitivity to oxidative stress in the presence of low concentrations of uranium compound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shevchenko, O.G. [Institute of Biology, Komi Scientific Centre, Ural Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, 167982, Syktyvkar (Russian Federation)

    2014-07-01

    Uranium is a natural radioactive element widespread in biosphere. There are a few works that examined cellular and molecular mechanisms of uranium toxicity. Red blood cells are classical model to investigate toxicity mechanisms on cell membrane system. The aim of present work is to study the effect of uranyl ion in nano-molar concentrations on erythrocytes sensitivity (in vitro) to factors provoking acute oxidative stress. Uranyl ions were added to suspension of mice red blood cells in PBS as UO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} solution. Samples were incubated in a thermostatic shaker at 37 deg. C during 3-5 hours. Than acute oxidative stress was induced by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (0.9 mM) or AAPH (5 mM) solutions. Destabilization of the membrane was induced by nonionic detergent Triton X-100. The hemolysis degree and the content of LPO secondary products reacting with 2-thiobarbituric acid in the incubation mixture were determined spectrophotometrically. The ratio of hemoglobin various forms (oxyHb, metHb and ferrylHb) was calculated taking into account extinction coefficients. It was shown that uranyl chloride enhances cell sensitivity to nonionic detergent Triton X-100 effects, indicating alterations of membrane acyl chain order due to contact with the radionuclide ions. Uranium exposure also caused an increase in the cell sensitivity to the AAPH effects, resulted in a decrease in red cell survival rate, a sharp increase in accumulation of hemoglobin oxidation products and a slight increase in the concentration of LPO secondary products. Thus, uranyl ions change physicochemical properties of the erythrocyte membranes that resulted in increased sensitivity to effects of peroxyl radicals formed by thermal decomposition of AAPH. On the contrary, use of another source of free radicals - H{sub 2}O{sub 2} - after uranyl ions exposure resulted in marked decrease of oxidative hemolysis, inhibition of LPO and hemoglobin oxidation. Since the uranium chemical properties similar to properties of

  4. The effect of light direction and suspended cell concentrations on algal biofilm growth rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnurr, Peter J; Espie, George S; Allen, D Grant

    2014-10-01

    Algae biofilms were grown in a semicontinuous flat plate biofilm photobioreactor to study the effects of light direction and suspended algal cell populations on algal biofilm growth. It was determined that, under the growth conditions and biofilm thicknesses studied, light direction had no effect on long-term algal biofilm growth (26 days); however, light direction did affect the concentration of suspended algal cells by influencing the photon flux density in the growth medium in the photobioreactors. This suspended algal cell population affected short-term (7 days) algae cell recruitment and algal biofilm growth, but additional studies showed that enhanced suspended algal cell populations did not affect biofilm growth rates over the long term (26 days). Studying profiles of light transmittance through biofilms as they grew showed that most of the light became attenuated by the biomass after just a few days of growth (88 % after 3 days). The estimated biofilm thicknesses after these few days of growth were approximately 150 μm. The light attenuation data suggests that, although the biofilms grew to 700-900 μm, under these light intensities, only the first few hundred micrometers of the biofilm is receiving enough light to be photosynthetically active. We postulate that this photosynthetically active layer of the biofilm grows adjacent to the light source, while the rest of the biofilm is in a stationary growth phase. The results of this study have implications for algal biofilm photobioreactor design and operation.

  5. Modulation of the Differentiation of Dental Pulp Stem Cells by Different Concentrations of β-Glycerophosphate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiping Hu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Dentinogenesis is a necessary prerequisite for dental tissue engineering. One of the steps for dentinogenesis is to obtain large quantities of highly purified odontoblasts. Therefore, we have undertaken an experiment applying different concentrations of β-glycerophosphate (β-GP to induce the differentiation of dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs in a long-term 28-day culture. In the meanwhile, we have studied the time- and maturation-dependent expression of matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein (MEPE and that of the odontoblast-like marker-dentin sialoprotein (DSP, in order to investigate an optimized mineralized condition. Western blot results revealed that the expression of DSP became lower when accompanied by the increase of the β-GP concentration, and there was also an influence on MEPE expression when different concentrations of β-GP were applied. Meanwhile, the mineralized groups had an inhibitory function on the expression of MEPE as compared with the control group. Above all, all experimental groups successfully generated mineralized nodules by Alizarin Red S and the 5 mM β-GP group formed more mineralized nodules quantitated using the CPC extraction method. In conclusion, there is a significant modulation of the β-GP during the differentiation of the DPSCs. The degree of odontoblast differentiation is β-glycerophosphate concentration dependent. A low concentration of β-GP (5 mM has been shown to be the optimal concentration for stimulating the maturation of the DPSCs. Moreover, MEPE accompanied with DSP clearly demonstrates the degree of the differentiation.

  6. PUREX (Plutonium-Uranium Extraction) L-Cell concentrator corrosion evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Compton, J. A.; Delegard, C. H.

    1990-05-01

    Problems with solids plugging the piping associated with the E-L7-1 concentrator at the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant were experienced shortly after it was put into use in 1971. The transfer line from the concentrator was first plugged in 1972. The PUREX Plant was shut down shortly thereafter after processing of available feed was finished. The plant was restarted in 1983, and plugging occurred again in early 1985. Both times, the transfer line was cleared by pulsing the fluid. The transfer line was replaced because of plugging in mid-1986 when pulsing failed to remove the plug. The concentrator, which is made of titanium, is used for the final concentration of the plutonium nitrate solution. The solids plugging the transfer line were identified as both the rutile and anatase forms of titanium dioxide. Ultrasonic examinations of titanium equipment in L-Cell showed that the concentrator wall thickness was decreasing as the acid refluxing area of the E-L7-1 tower was approached. The PUREX Plant Systems and Technology then requested the Plutonium Process Support Laboratories (PPSL) to set up and perform experiments to determine the cause(s) and possible corrective actions for the E-L7-1 corrosion. After testing samples of titanium and other metals under controlled conditions identical to E-L7-1 concentrator operation, zirconium was selected for long-term testing as a replacement for the tower section. Two long-term test apparatus were then built and tested on a pilot scale. 9 refs., 13 figs., 5 tabs.

  7. Manipulation of lipoplex concentration at the cell surface boosts transfection efficiency in hard-to-transfect cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palchetti, Sara; Pozzi, Daniela; Marchini, Cristina; Amici, Augusto; Andreani, Cristina; Bartolacci, Caterina; Digiacomo, Luca; Gambini, Valentina; Cardarelli, Francesco; Di Rienzo, Carmine; Peruzzi, Giovanna; Amenitsch, Heinz; Palermo, Rocco; Screpanti, Isabella; Caracciolo, Giulio

    2017-02-01

    To date, efficiency upon non-viral DNA delivery remains low and this implies the existence of unidentified transfection barriers. Here we explore the mechanisms of action of multicomponent (MC) cationic liposome/DNA complexes (lipoplexes) by a combination of reporter technologies, dynamic light scattering (DLS), synchrotron small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis and laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) in live cells. Lipofectamine - the gold standard among transfection reagents - was used as a reference. On the basis of our results, we suggest that an additional transfection barrier impairs transfection efficiency, that is: low lipoplex concentration at the cell surface. Based on the acquired knowledge we propose an optimized transfection protocol that allowed us to efficiently transfect DND41, JURKAT, MOLT3, P12-ICHIKAWA, ALL-SILL, TALL-1 human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cell lines known to be difficult-to-transfect by using non-viral vectors and where LFN-based technologies fail to give satisfactory results. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Improving optical performance of concentrator cells by means of a deposited nanopattern layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García-Linares, Pablo, E-mail: pablo.garcia-linares@cea.fr; Besson, Pierre; Weick, Clément; Baudrit, Mathieu [CEA-LITEN, Laboratoire de Photovoltaïque à Concentration, INES, Le Bourget du Lac (France); Dominguez, César [CEA-LITEN, Laboratoire de Photovoltaïque à Concentration, INES, Le Bourget du Lac (France); Instituto de Energía Solar - Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid (Spain); Dellea, Olivier [CEA-LITEN, Laboratoire de Surfaces Nanostructurées, Grenoble (France); Kämpfe, Thomas; Jourlin, Yves [Laboratoire Hubert Curien UMR CNRS, Université de Lyon, St. Etienne (France)

    2015-09-28

    Multijunction solar cells (MJSC) use anti-reflective coatings (ARC) to minimize Fresnel reflection losses for a family of light incidence angles. These coatings adapt the refractive index of the cell to that of the surrounding medium. Patterns with sizes in the range of the light wavelength can be used to further reduce reflections through diffraction. Transparent nanopatterns with a gradual profile, called moth-eye nanostructures, can adapt the refractive index of the optical interfaces (often with n∼1.5) used to encapsulate concentrator solar cells to that of the air (n{sub air}∼1). Here we show the effect of a nanometric moth-eye ARC with a round motif deposited on commercial MJSC that achieves short-circuit current (I{sub SC}) gains greater than 2% at normal incidence and even higher in the case of tilted illumination. In this work, MJSC with different moth-eye ARC are characterized under quantum efficiency (QE) as well as under concentrated illumination I-V in order to assess their potential. Simulations based on coupled wave analysis (RCWA) are used to fit the experimental results with successful results.

  9. Perfluoroalkyl substances in human bone: concentrations in bones and effects on bone cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskela, A; Koponen, J; Lehenkari, P; Viluksela, M; Korkalainen, M; Tuukkanen, J

    2017-07-28

    Perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), including two most commonly studied compounds perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), are widely distributed environmental pollutants, used extensively earlier. Due to their toxicological effects the use of PFAS is now regulated. Based on earlier studies on PFOA's distribution in bone and bone marrow in mice, we investigated PFAS levels and their possible link to bone microarchitecture of human femoral bone samples (n = 18). Soft tissue and bone biopsies were also taken from a 49-year old female cadaver for PFAS analyses. We also studied how PFOA exposure affects differentiation of human osteoblasts and osteoclasts. PFAS were detectable from all dry bone and bone marrow samples, PFOS and PFOA being the most prominent. In cadaver biopsies, lungs and liver contained the highest concentrations of PFAS, whereas PFAS were absent in bone marrow. Perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) was present in the bones, PFOA and PFOS were absent. In vitro results showed no disturbance in osteogenic differentiation after PFOA exposure, but in osteoclasts, lower concentrations led to increased resorption, which eventually dropped to zero after increase in PFOA concentration. In conclusion, PFAS are present in bone and have the potential to affect human bone cells partly at environmentally relevant concentrations.

  10. Fabrication Processes to Generate Concentration Gradients in Polymer Solar Cell Active Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaba, Shusei; Vohra, Varun

    2017-01-01

    Polymer solar cells (PSCs) are considered as one of the most promising low-cost alternatives for renewable energy production with devices now reaching power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) above the milestone value of 10%. These enhanced performances were achieved by developing new electron-donor (ED) and electron-acceptor (EA) materials as well as finding the adequate morphologies in either bulk heterojunction or sequentially deposited active layers. In particular, producing adequate vertical concentration gradients with higher concentrations of ED and EA close to the anode and cathode, respectively, results in an improved charge collection and consequently higher photovoltaic parameters such as the fill factor. In this review, we relate processes to generate active layers with ED–EA vertical concentration gradients. After summarizing the formation of such concentration gradients in single layer active layers through processes such as annealing or additives, we will verify that sequential deposition of multilayered active layers can be an efficient approach to remarkably increase the fill factor and PCE of PSCs. In fact, applying this challenging approach to fabricate inverted architecture PSCs has the potential to generate low-cost, high efficiency and stable devices, which may revolutionize worldwide energy demand and/or help develop next generation devices such as semi-transparent photovoltaic windows. PMID:28772878

  11. Optimization of catholyte concentration and anolyte pHs in two chamber microbial electrolysis cells

    KAUST Repository

    Nam, Joo-Youn

    2012-12-01

    The hydrogen production rate in a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) using a non-buffered saline catholyte (NaCl) can be optimized through proper control of the initial anolyte pH and catholyte NaCl concentration. The highest hydrogen yield of 3.3 ± 0.4 mol H2/mole acetate and gas production rate of 2.2 ± 0.2 m3 H2/m3/d were achieved here with an initial anolyte pH = 9 and catholyte NaCl concentration of 98 mM. Further increases in the salt concentration substantially reduced the anolyte pH to as low as 4.6, resulting in reduced MEC performance due to pH inhibition of exoelectrogens. Cathodic hydrogen recovery was high (rcat > 90%) as hydrogen consumption by hydrogenotrophic methanogens was prevented by separating the anode and cathode chambers using a membrane. These results show that the MEC can be optimized for hydrogen production through proper choices in the concentration of a non-buffered saline catholyte and initial anolyte pH in two chamber MECs. Copyright © 2012, Hydrogen Energy Publications, LLC. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Concentration-dependent effect of fumonisin B1 on apoptosis in oesophageal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, R B; Phulukdaree, A; Chuturgoon, A A

    2017-01-01

    The geographical distribution of oesophageal cancer is linked to the exposure of fumonisin B1 (FB1), a mycotoxin produced by fungi that contaminates staple food worldwide. Non-genotoxic carcinogens like FB1 disturb homeostasis through increased cell proliferation or suppression of apoptosis. This study investigated the involvement of FB1 (0-20 μM) in spindle-shaped N-cadherin (+) CD45 (-) osteoblastic (SNO) cell death. Cell viability and death were assessed using the MTS and Annexin V-Fluos assays, respectively. Caspase activities were determined luminometrically and the comet assay assessed DNA damage. Induction of oxoguanine glycosylase 1 (OGG1) was measured using quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR), while cleaved poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1) and Bax were determined by western blotting. Cell viability and PARP-1 cleavage were not affected by 1.25 μM FB1, but phosphatidylserine externalization, Bax protein expression, caspase activity, comet tail length and OGG1 transcripts were increased. The reduced cell viability in 10 μM FB1-treated cells was accompanied by corresponding increases in externalized phosphatidylserine, Bax, caspase-3/7 activity and cleaved PARP-1. The OGG1 transcripts were not significantly increased, but comet tails were increased. Bax, caspase-3/7 activities and cleaved PARP-1 were inhibited at 20 μM FB1. In addition, the OGG1 transcript levels were decreased ( p < 0.0001) along with comet lengths ( p < 0.0001). This study showed that FB1-induced apoptosis in SNO cells may be caspase-dependent or caspase-independent; the pathway used depends on the exposure concentration.

  13. Inhibitory effect of extracellular purine nucleotide and nucleoside concentrations on T cell proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiler, Monica [Department of Medicine III and Transfusion Medicine, University Hospital Grosshadern, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich (Germany); Schmetzer, Helga [Helmholtz Center Munich (Germany); German Research Center for Environmental Health, Munich (Germany); Braeu, Marion; Buhmann, Raymund [Helmholtz Center Munich (Germany); German Research Center for Environmental Health, Munich (Germany); Department of Medicine III and Transfusion Medicine, University Hospital Grosshadern, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    The release of nucleic acids and derivatives after tissue-injury may affect cellular immune-response. We studied the impact of extracellular ribo-, desoxyribonucleotides and nucleosides on T-cell immunity. Peripheral-blood-mononuclear-cells (PBMCs) or isolated CD3{sup +}T-cells obtained from 6 healthy donors were stimulated via CD3/CD28 Dynabeads or dendritic cells (DCs) in the presence or absence of pyrimidine-, purine-nucleotides and -nucleosides (range 2–200 µM). Addition of deoxy-, guanosine-triphosphate (dGTP, GTP) and guanosine resulted concentration dependent in a complete, adenosine-triphosphate (ATP) in a partial inhibition of the induced T-cell-proliferation. Deoxyadenosine-triphosphate (dATP), adenosine and the pyrimidine-ribo- and -deoxyribonucleotides displayed no inhibitory capacity. Inhibitory effects of dGTP and GTP, but not of guanosine and ATP were culture-media-dependent and could be almost abrogated by use of the serum-free lymphocyte-culture-media X-Vivo15 instead of RPMI1640 with standard-supplementation. In contrast to RPMI1640, X-Vivo15 resulted in a significant down-regulation of the cell-surface-located ectonucleotidases CD39 (Ecto-Apyrase) and CD73 (Ecto-5′-Nucleotidase), critical for the extracellular nucleotides-hydrolysis to nucleosides, explaining the loss of inhibition mediated by dGTP and GTP, but not Guanosine. In line with previous findings ATP was found to exert immunosuppressive effects on T-cell-proliferation. Purine-nucleotides, dGTP and GTP displayed a higher inhibitory capacity, but seem to be strictly dependent on the microenvironmental conditions modulating the responsiveness of the respective T-lymphocytes. Further evaluation of experimental and respective clinical settings should anticipate these findings.

  14. A Rapid Method for Quantifying Viable Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Cellular Infection Assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pooley, Hannah B.; de Silva, Kumudika; Purdie, Auriol C.; Begg, Douglas J.; Whittington, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Determining the viability of bacteria is a key outcome of in vitro cellular infection assays. Currently, this is done by culture, which is problematic for fastidious slow-growing bacteria such as Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, where it can take up to 4 months to confirm growth. This study aimed to identify an assay that can rapidly quantify the number of viable M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis cells in a cellular sample. Three commercially available bacterial viability assays along with a modified liquid culture method coupled with high-throughput quantitative PCR growth detection were assessed. Criteria for assessment included the ability of each assay to differentiate live and dead M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis organisms and their accuracy at low bacterial concentrations. Using the culture-based method, M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis growth was reliably detected and quantified within 2 weeks. There was a strong linear association between the 2-week growth rate and the initial inoculum concentration. The number of viable M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis cells in an unknown sample was quantified based on the growth rate, by using growth standards. In contrast, none of the commercially available viability assays were suitable for use with samples from in vitro cellular infection assays. IMPORTANCE Rapid quantification of the viability of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in samples from in vitro cellular infection assays is important, as it allows these assays to be carried out on a large scale. In vitro cellular infection assays can function as a preliminary screening tool, for vaccine development or antimicrobial screening, and also to extend findings derived from experimental animal trials. Currently, by using culture, it takes up to 4 months to obtain quantifiable results regarding M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis viability after an in vitro infection assay; however, with the quantitative PCR and liquid culture method

  15. Interdependence of initial cell density, drug concentration and exposure time revealed by real-time impedance spectroscopic cytotoxicity assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caviglia, Claudia; Zor, Kinga; Canepa, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    between the rate of cell death and the initial cell seeding density was found at 2.5 μM doxorubicin concentration, whereas this was not observed at 5 or 100 μM. By sensing the changes in the cell–substrate interaction using impedance spectroscopy under static conditions, the onset of cytotoxicity......We investigated the combined effect of the initial cell density (12 500, 35 000, 75 000, and 100 000 cells cm−2) and concentration of the anti-cancer drug doxorubicin on HeLa cells by performing timedependent cytotoxicity assays using real-time electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. A correlation...

  16. Serum iron concentration and total iron binding capacity in patients of oral squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shakhawat Hossain

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The serum iron concentration and Total Iron Binding Capacity (TIBC status of 24 patients of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC were compared with the findings of 13 healthy subjects. OSCC was found to have association with low serum iron level. More patients were found to be with significantly lower iron content in serum (p<0.05. But no association between serum TIBC and increased risk of cancer was found (p>0.05. Irrespective of age, sex, smoking and betel nut chewing habit of subjects, low serum iron level significantly increase the risk of oral malignancy.

  17. Temporal Microbial Community Dynamics in Microbial Electrolysis Cells – Influence of Acetate and Propionate Concentration

    KAUST Repository

    Rao, Hari Ananda

    2017-07-20

    Microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) are widely considered as a next generation wastewater treatment system. However, fundamental insight on the temporal dynamics of microbial communities associated with MEC performance under different organic types with varied loading concentrations is still unknown, nevertheless this knowledge is essential for optimizing this technology for real-scale applications. Here, the temporal dynamics of anodic microbial communities associated with MEC performance was examined at low (0.5 g COD/L) and high (4 g COD/L) concentrations of acetate or propionate, which are important intermediates of fermentation of municipal wastewaters and sludge. The results showed that acetate-fed reactors exhibited higher performance in terms of maximum current density (I: 4.25 ± 0.23 A/m), coulombic efficiency (CE: 95 ± 8%), and substrate degradation rate (98.8 ± 1.2%) than propionate-fed reactors (I: 2.7 ± 0.28 A/m; CE: 68 ± 9.5%; substrate degradation rate: 84 ± 13%) irrespective of the concentrations tested. Despite of the repeated sampling of the anodic biofilm over time, the high-concentration reactors demonstrated lower and stable performance in terms of current density (I: 1.1 ± 0.14 to 4.2 ± 0.21 A/m), coulombic efficiency (CE: 44 ± 4.1 to 103 ± 7.2%) and substrate degradation rate (64.9 ± 6.3 to 99.7 ± 0.5%), while the low-concentration reactors produced higher and dynamic performance (I: 1.1 ± 0.12 to 4.6 ± 0.1 A/m; CE: 52 ± 2.5 to 105 ± 2.7%; substrate degradation rate: 87.2 ± 0.2 to 99.9 ± 0.06%) with the different substrates tested. Correlating reactor\\'s performance with temporal dynamics of microbial communities showed that relatively similar anodic microbial community composition but with varying relative abundances was observed in all the reactors despite differences in the substrate and concentrations tested. Particularly, Geobacter was the predominant bacteria on the anode biofilm of all MECs over time suggesting its

  18. Temporal Microbial Community Dynamics in Microbial Electrolysis Cells - Influence of Acetate and Propionate Concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hari, Ananda Rao; Venkidusamy, Krishnaveni; Katuri, Krishna P; Bagchi, Samik; Saikaly, Pascal E

    2017-01-01

    Microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) are widely considered as a next generation wastewater treatment system. However, fundamental insight on the temporal dynamics of microbial communities associated with MEC performance under different organic types with varied loading concentrations is still unknown, nevertheless this knowledge is essential for optimizing this technology for real-scale applications. Here, the temporal dynamics of anodic microbial communities associated with MEC performance was examined at low (0.5 g COD/L) and high (4 g COD/L) concentrations of acetate or propionate, which are important intermediates of fermentation of municipal wastewaters and sludge. The results showed that acetate-fed reactors exhibited higher performance in terms of maximum current density (I: 4.25 ± 0.23 A/m2), coulombic efficiency (CE: 95 ± 8%), and substrate degradation rate (98.8 ± 1.2%) than propionate-fed reactors (I: 2.7 ± 0.28 A/m2; CE: 68 ± 9.5%; substrate degradation rate: 84 ± 13%) irrespective of the concentrations tested. Despite of the repeated sampling of the anodic biofilm over time, the high-concentration reactors demonstrated lower and stable performance in terms of current density (I: 1.1 ± 0.14 to 4.2 ± 0.21 A/m2), coulombic efficiency (CE: 44 ± 4.1 to 103 ± 7.2%) and substrate degradation rate (64.9 ± 6.3 to 99.7 ± 0.5%), while the low-concentration reactors produced higher and dynamic performance (I: 1.1 ± 0.12 to 4.6 ± 0.1 A/m2; CE: 52 ± 2.5 to 105 ± 2.7%; substrate degradation rate: 87.2 ± 0.2 to 99.9 ± 0.06%) with the different substrates tested. Correlating reactor's performance with temporal dynamics of microbial communities showed that relatively similar anodic microbial community composition but with varying relative abundances was observed in all the reactors despite differences in the substrate and concentrations tested. Particularly, Geobacter was the predominant bacteria on the anode biofilm of all MECs over time suggesting its

  19. Temporal Microbial Community Dynamics in Microbial Electrolysis Cells – Influence of Acetate and Propionate Concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ananda Rao Hari

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Microbial electrolysis cells (MECs are widely considered as a next generation wastewater treatment system. However, fundamental insight on the temporal dynamics of microbial communities associated with MEC performance under different organic types with varied loading concentrations is still unknown, nevertheless this knowledge is essential for optimizing this technology for real-scale applications. Here, the temporal dynamics of anodic microbial communities associated with MEC performance was examined at low (0.5 g COD/L and high (4 g COD/L concentrations of acetate or propionate, which are important intermediates of fermentation of municipal wastewaters and sludge. The results showed that acetate-fed reactors exhibited higher performance in terms of maximum current density (I: 4.25 ± 0.23 A/m2, coulombic efficiency (CE: 95 ± 8%, and substrate degradation rate (98.8 ± 1.2% than propionate-fed reactors (I: 2.7 ± 0.28 A/m2; CE: 68 ± 9.5%; substrate degradation rate: 84 ± 13% irrespective of the concentrations tested. Despite of the repeated sampling of the anodic biofilm over time, the high-concentration reactors demonstrated lower and stable performance in terms of current density (I: 1.1 ± 0.14 to 4.2 ± 0.21 A/m2, coulombic efficiency (CE: 44 ± 4.1 to 103 ± 7.2% and substrate degradation rate (64.9 ± 6.3 to 99.7 ± 0.5%, while the low-concentration reactors produced higher and dynamic performance (I: 1.1 ± 0.12 to 4.6 ± 0.1 A/m2; CE: 52 ± 2.5 to 105 ± 2.7%; substrate degradation rate: 87.2 ± 0.2 to 99.9 ± 0.06% with the different substrates tested. Correlating reactor’s performance with temporal dynamics of microbial communities showed that relatively similar anodic microbial community composition but with varying relative abundances was observed in all the reactors despite differences in the substrate and concentrations tested. Particularly, Geobacter was the predominant bacteria on the anode biofilm of all MECs over time

  20. Buffer layer between a planar optical concentrator and a solar cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solano, Manuel E. [Departamento de Ingeniería Matemática and CI" 2 MA, Universidad de Concepción, Concepción, Casilla 160-C (Chile); Barber, Greg D. [Penn State Institute of Energy and the Environment, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Lakhtakia, Akhlesh [Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Faryad, Muhammad [Department of Physics, Lahore University of Management Sciences, Lahore 54792 (Pakistan); Monk, Peter B. [Department of Mathematical Sciences, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Mallouk, Thomas E. [Department of Chemistry, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    The effect of inserting a buffer layer between a periodically multilayered isotropic dielectric (PMLID) material acting as a planar optical concentrator and a photovoltaic solar cell was theoretically investigated. The substitution of the photovoltaic material by a cheaper dielectric material in a large area of the structure could reduce the fabrication costs without significantly reducing the efficiency of the solar cell. Both crystalline silicon (c-Si) and gallium arsenide (GaAs) were considered as the photovoltaic material. We found that the buffer layer can act as an antireflection coating at the interface of the PMLID and the photovoltaic materials, and the structure increases the spectrally averaged electron-hole pair density by 36% for c-Si and 38% for GaAs compared to the structure without buffer layer. Numerical evidence indicates that the optimal structure is robust with respect to small changes in the grating profile.

  1. Critical Filler Concentration in Sulfated Titania-Added Nafion™ Membranes for Fuel Cell Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirko Sgambetterra

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this communication we present a detailed study of Nafion™ composite membranes containing different amounts of nanosized sulfated titania particles, synthesized through an optimized one-step synthesis procedure. Functional membrane properties, such as ionic exchange capacity and water uptake (WU ability will be described and discussed, together with thermal analysis, atomic force microscopy and Raman spectroscopy data. Also electrochemical properties such as proton conductivity and performances in hydrogen fuel cells will be presented. It has been demonstrated that a critical concentration of filler particles can boost the fuel cell performance at low humidification, exhibiting a significant improvement of the maximum power and current density delivered under 30% low-relative humidity (RH and 70 °C with respect to bare Nafion™-based systems.

  2. Improving the efficiency of organic solar cells by varying the material concentration in the photoactive layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latimer, Kevin Anthony

    Polymer-fullerene bulk heterojunction solar cells have been a rapidly improving technology over the past decade. To further improve the relatively low energy conversion efficiencies of these solar cells, several modifications need to be made to the overall device structure. Emerging technologies include cells that are fabricated with interfacial layers to facilitate charge transport, and tandem structures are being introduced to harness the absorption spectrum of polymers with varying bandgap energies. When new structures are implemented, each layer of the cell must be optimized in order for the entire device to function efficiently. The most volatile layer of these devices is the photoactive layer solution of poly-3(hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT) and [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PC 61BM). Even slight variations in pre-application and post-treatment will lead to large variations in the electrical, physical, and optical properties of the solar cell module. To improve the effectiveness of the photoactive layer, the material concentration of P3HT and PC61BM in the liquid phase, prior to application, was altered. The weight ratio of P3HT to PC61BM was kept at a constant 1 to 0.8, while the amounts of each dissolved in 2 mL of chlorobenzene were varied. Solar cells were fabricated, and J-V characterizations were performed to determine the electrical traits of the devices. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements were done on the photoactive layer films to determine the physical characteristics of the films such as overall surface topology and RMS roughness. Also, variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry (VASE) was used to determine film thickness and extinction coefficient of the active layers. To further understand the optical properties of the polymer-fullerene blend, the absorption spectrum of the films were calculated through UV-VIS spectrophotometry. It was found that an increased concentration of the polymer-fullerene blend prior to application

  3. Analyzing free zinc(II) ion concentrations in cell biology with fluorescent chelating molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maret, Wolfgang

    2015-02-01

    Essential metal ions are tightly controlled in biological systems. An understanding of metal metabolism and homeostasis is being developed from quantitative information of the sizes, concentrations, and dynamics of cellular and subcellular metal ion pools. In the case of human zinc metabolism, minimally 24 proteins of two zinc transporter families and a dozen metallothioneins participate in cellular uptake, extrusion, and re-distribution among cellular compartments. Significantly, zinc(ii) ions are now considered signaling ions in intra- and intercellular communication. Such functions require transients of free zinc ions. It is experimentally quite challenging to distinguish zinc that is protein-bound from zinc that is not bound to proteins. Measurement of total zinc is relatively straightforward with analytical techniques such as atomic absorption/emission spectroscopy or inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Total zinc concentrations of human cells are 200-300 μM. In contrast, the pool of non-protein bound zinc is mostly examined with fluorescence microscopy/spectroscopy. There are two widely applied fluorescence approaches, one employing low molecular weight chelating agents ("probes") and the other metal-binding proteins ("sensors"). The protein sensors, such as the CALWY, Zap/ZifCY, and carbonic anhydrase-based sensors, can be genetically encoded and have certain advantages in terms of controlling intracellular concentration, localization, and calibration. When employed correctly, both probes and sensors can establish qualitative differences in free zinc ion concentrations. However, when quantitative information is sought, the assumptions underlying the applications of probes and sensors must be carefully examined and even then measured pools of free zinc ions remain methodologically defined. A consensus is building that the steady-state free zinc ion concentrations in the cytosol are in the picomolar range but there is no consensus on their

  4. On the use of the serial dilution culture method to enumerate viable phytoplankton in natural communities of plankton subjected to ballast water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, John J; MacIntyre, Hugh L

    2016-01-01

    Discharge standards for ballast water treatment (BWT) systems are based on concentrations of living cells, for example, as determined with vital stains. Ultraviolet radiation (UV) stops the reproduction of microorganisms without killing them outright; they are living, but not viable, and ecologically as good as dead. Consequently, UV-treated discharge can be compliant with the intent of regulation while failing a live/dead test. An alternative evaluation of BWT can be proposed based on the assessment of viable, rather than living, cells in discharge water. In principle, the serial dilution culture-most probable number (SDC-MPN) method provides the appropriate measure for phytoplankton. But, the method has been criticized, particularly because it is thought that many phytoplankton species cannot be cultured. A review of the literature shows that although SDC-MPN has been used for more than 50 years-generally to identify and count phytoplankton species that cannot be preserved-its application to enumerate total viable phytoplankton seems to be new, putting past criticisms of the method in a different light. Importantly, viable cells need to grow only enough to be detected, not to be brought into sustained culture, and competition between species in a dilution tube is irrelevant as long as the winner is detectable. Thorough consideration of sources of error leads to recommendations for minimizing and quantifying uncertainties by optimizing growth conditions and conducting systematic comparisons. We conclude that with careful evaluation, SDC-MPN is potentially an effective method for assessing the viability of phytoplankton after BWT.

  5. A multicenter study of viable PCR using propidium monoazide to detect Legionella in water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaturro, Maria; Fontana, Stefano; Dell'eva, Italo; Helfer, Fabrizia; Marchio, Michele; Stefanetti, Maria Vittoria; Cavallaro, Mario; Miglietta, Marilena; Montagna, Maria Teresa; De Giglio, Osvalda; Cuna, Teresa; Chetti, Leonarda; Sabattini, Maria Antonietta Bucci; Carlotti, Michela; Viggiani, Mariagabriella; Stenico, Alberta; Romanin, Elisa; Bonanni, Emma; Ottaviano, Claudio; Franzin, Laura; Avanzini, Claudio; Demarie, Valerio; Corbella, Marta; Cambieri, Patrizia; Marone, Piero; Rota, Maria Cristina; Bella, Antonino; Ricci, Maria Luisa

    2016-07-01

    Legionella quantification in environmental samples is overestimated by qPCR. Combination with a viable dye, such as Propidium monoazide (PMA), could make qPCR (named then vPCR) very reliable. In this multicentre study 717 artificial water samples, spiked with fixed concentrations of Legionella and interfering bacterial flora, were analysed by qPCR, vPCR and culture and data were compared by statistical analysis. A heat-treatment at 55 °C for 10 minutes was also performed to obtain viable and not-viable bacteria. When data of vPCR were compared with those of culture and qPCR, statistical analysis showed significant differences (P 0.05). Overall this study provided a good experimental reproducibility of vPCR but also highlighted limits of PMA in the discriminating capability of dead and live bacteria, making vPCR not completely reliable. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of the ethanol concentration in the anode on the direct ethanol fuel cell performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belchor, Pablo Martins; Loeser, Neiva; Forte, Maria Madalena de Camargo [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Carpenter, Deyse [Fundacao Universidade Regional de Blumenau (FURB), Blumenau, SC (Brazil)], Email: rafarstv@hotmail.com

    2010-07-01

    Changes in the climate, sources and development of renewable energy are issues that have gain greater importance, and fuel cells have been investigated as an alternative source to produce energy through electrochemical reactions. Among the fuel cells types the Proton Exchange Membrane (PEMFC), fed with pure hydrogen at the anode and oxygen at the cathode, seen be the more promising ones as an electrolyte for portable, mobile and stationary applications due to its low emissions, low operating temperature, high power density and quick configuration. To avoid inconvenience of storage and transportation of pure hydrogen a PEMFC fed with alcohols has been developed, named Direct Alcohol Fuel Cells (DAFC). One way to increase the performance of DAFC is added water in the alcohol inserted into the anode, because the water keeps the membrane hydrated. In this work, the performance of a DAFC was evaluated by following the loss in the polarization curve and cell power by varying the ethanol/water ratio. The aim of this study was determine the optimal water/ethanol ratio to be feed in a DEFC prototype mounted in the lab. By the results it was possible to point that the best concentration of ethanol aqueous solution for the DEFC tested was around 1 mol.L-1. (author)

  7. Determination of viable Salmonellae from potable and source water through PMA assisted qPCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gulshan; Vajpayee, Poornima; Bhatti, Saurabh; Ronnie, Nirmala; Shah, Nimish; McClure, Peter; Shanker, Rishi

    2013-07-01

    Resource constrained countries identified as endemic zones for pathogenicity of Salmonella bear an economic burden due to recurring expenditure on medical treatment. qPCR used for Salmonella detection could not discriminate between viable and nonviable cells. Propidium monoazide (PMA) that selectively penetrates nonviable cells to cross-link their DNA, was coupled with ttr gene specific qPCR for quantifying viable salmonellae in source/potable waters collected from a north Indian city. Source water (raw water for urban potable water supply) and urban potable water exhibited viable salmonellae in the range of 2.1×10(4)-2.6×10(6) and 2-7160CFU/100mL, respectively. Potable water at water works exhibited DNA from dead cells but no viable cells were detected. PMA assisted qPCR could specifically detect low numbers of live salmonellae in Source and potable waters. This strategy can be used in surveillance of urban potable water distribution networks to map contamination points for better microbial risk management. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Evaluation of droplet digital PCR for quantification of residual leucocytes in red blood cell concentrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doescher, A; Loges, U; Petershofen, E K; Müller, T H

    2017-11-01

    Enumeration of residual white blood cells in leucoreduced blood components is essential part of quality control. Digital PCR has substantially facilitated quantitative PCR and was thus evaluated for measurements of leucocytes. Target for quantification of leucocytes by digital droplet PCR was the blood group gene RHCE. The SPEF1 gene was added as internal control for the entire assay starting with automated DNA extraction. The sensitivity of the method was determined by serial dilutions of standard samples. Quality control samples were analysed within 24 h, 7 days and 6 months after collection. Routine samples from leucodepleted red blood cell concentrates (n = 150) were evaluated in parallel by flow-cytometry (LeucoCount) and by digital PCR. Digital PCR reliably detected at least 0·4 leucocytes per assay. The mean difference between PCR and flow-cytometric results from 150 units was -0·01 (±1·0). DNA samples were stable for up to at least six months. PCR measurement of leucocytes in samples from plasma and platelet concentrates also provided valid results in a pilot study. Droplet digital PCR to enumerate leucocytes offers an alternative for quality control of leucoreduced blood products. Sensitivity, specificity and reproducibility are comparable to flow-cytometry. The option to collect samples over an extended period of time and the automatization introduce attractive features for routine quality control. © 2017 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  9. Bone marrow-derived cell concentrates have limited effects on osteochondral reconstructions in the mini pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagodzinski, Michael; Liu, Chaoxu; Guenther, Daniel; Burssens, Arne; Petri, Maximilian; Abedian, Reza; Willbold, Elmar; Krettek, Christian; Haasper, Carl; Witte, Frank

    2014-03-01

    This study investigates the effects of seeding a chondrogenic and osteogenic scaffold with a bone marrow-derived cell concentrate (BMCC) and reports the histological and mechanical properties 3 months after implantation in the miniature pig. Twenty defects (7×10 mm) were created in the femoral condyles of 10 miniature pigs. The defects were left empty (E), filled with the grafted cylinder upside down (U) or with a combined scaffold (S) containing a spongious bone cylinder (Tutobone®) covered with a collagen membrane (Chondrogide®). In a fourth group, the same scaffolds were implanted but seeded with a stem cell concentrate (S+ BMCC). The animals were stained with calcein green after 2 weeks and xylenol orange after 4 weeks. After 3 months, the animals were sacrificed, and a mechanical analysis (Young's modulus), macroscopic, and histologic (ICRS Score) examination of the specimens was conducted. Young's modulus in the periphery was significantly lower for group E (67.5±15.3 kPa) compared with untreated controls (171.7±21.6 kPa, ptrend toward smaller bony defects on comparing groups E and S+ BMCC (11%±8%; p=0.07). More red fluorescence was detected in group S+ BMCC (2.3%±1.1%) compared with groups E (0.4%±0.2%) and U (0.5%±0.2%, pappearance of cartilage regenerates in critical-sized defects.

  10. Subinhibitory concentrations of triclosan promote Streptococcus mutans biofilm formation and adherence to oral epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Telma Blanca Lombardo Bedran

    Full Text Available Triclosan is a general membrane-active agent with a broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity that is commonly used in oral care products. In this study, we investigated the effect of sub-minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs of triclosan on the capacity of the cariogenic bacterium Streptococcus mutans to form biofilm and adhere to oral epithelial cells. As quantified by crystal violet staining, biofilm formation by two reference strains of S. mutans was dose-dependently promoted, in the range of 2.2- to 6.2-fold, by 1/2 and 1/4 MIC of triclosan. Observations by scanning electron microscopy revealed the presence of a dense biofilm attached to the polystyrene surface. Growth of S. mutans in the presence of triclosan at sub-MICs also increased its capacity to adhere to a monolayer of gingival epithelial cells. The expression of several genes involved in adherence and biofilm formation in S. mutans was investigated by quantitative RT-PCR. It was found that sub-MICs of triclosan significantly increased the expression of comD, gtfC, and luxS, and to a lesser extent of gtfB and atlA genes. These findings stress the importance of maintaining effective bactericidal concentrations of therapeutic triclosan since sub-MICs may promote colonization of the oral cavity by S. mutans.

  11. Subinhibitory concentrations of triclosan promote Streptococcus mutans biofilm formation and adherence to oral epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedran, Telma Blanca Lombardo; Grignon, Louis; Spolidorio, Denise Palomari; Grenier, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Triclosan is a general membrane-active agent with a broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity that is commonly used in oral care products. In this study, we investigated the effect of sub-minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of triclosan on the capacity of the cariogenic bacterium Streptococcus mutans to form biofilm and adhere to oral epithelial cells. As quantified by crystal violet staining, biofilm formation by two reference strains of S. mutans was dose-dependently promoted, in the range of 2.2- to 6.2-fold, by 1/2 and 1/4 MIC of triclosan. Observations by scanning electron microscopy revealed the presence of a dense biofilm attached to the polystyrene surface. Growth of S. mutans in the presence of triclosan at sub-MICs also increased its capacity to adhere to a monolayer of gingival epithelial cells. The expression of several genes involved in adherence and biofilm formation in S. mutans was investigated by quantitative RT-PCR. It was found that sub-MICs of triclosan significantly increased the expression of comD, gtfC, and luxS, and to a lesser extent of gtfB and atlA genes. These findings stress the importance of maintaining effective bactericidal concentrations of therapeutic triclosan since sub-MICs may promote colonization of the oral cavity by S. mutans.

  12. From Development to Implementation: Adjusting the Hematocrit of Deglycerolized Red Cell Concentrates to Meet Regulatory Standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Tracey; Hansen, Adele; Kurach, Jayme; Acker, Jason P

    2017-01-01

    Before transfusion, thawed frozen red cell concentrates (RCCs) must be deglycerolized. In order to ensure that these products meet regulatory standards for hematocrit, an approach to manipulate hematocrit post deglycerolization was developed and implemented. Glycerolized and frozen RCCs were thawed and deglycerolized using the COBE 2991 cell processor, and the final product's hematocrit was adjusted by addition of various volumes of 0.9% saline / 0.2% dextrose. The in vitro quality of RCCs (hematocrit, hemolysis, hemoglobin content, volume, recovery, ATP, supernatant potassium, and others) were compared to Canadian Standards Association (CSA) and other standards for deglycerolized RCCs. Addition of saline/dextrose re-suspension solution in a range of 65-90 g post deglycerolization led to acceptable hematocrits. In the pilot study, this approach resulted in RCCs meeting all CSA standards for deglycerolized RCCs, with stimulation of RBC metabolism demonstrated by increased ATP concentration. In the validation phase, results were similar, although the CSA hemolysis standard was not met. Pre- and post-implementation data confirmed that manipulated RCCs met CSA hematocrit standards. This process was implemented at Canadian Blood Services to provide deglycerolized RCCs that meet the CSA hematocrit standard. However, pre- and post-implementation data reveal that this deglycerolization process is not sufficient to have RCCs consistently meet hemolysis standards.

  13. The influence of statins on the free intracellular calcium concentration in human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Figulla Hans R

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Statins are cholesterol-lowering drugs that are widely used to reduce the risk of cardiac infarction. Their beneficial clinical effects, however, are not restricted to their influence on cholesterol production. As several studies have shown that they have a potency of relaxing blood vessels. Methods We measured the effects of statins on the intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC after acute application and 24-h-preincubation of statins. Results Incubation of the cells for 24 h with cerivastatin or fluvastatin significantly increased the resting [Ca2+]i. For cerivastatin this effect manifested at a concentration of 1 μM. Increase of resting [Ca2+]i in the presence of cerivastatin also occurred when the nitric oxide synthase was inhibited. Transient Ca2+ release induced by histamine was not affected. Conclusions The increase of resting [Ca2+]i after incubation with cerivastatin or fluvastatin may provide an explanation for the direct effects of statins on the endothelial-dependent vasodilatation and restoration of endothelial activity in vivo.

  14. Quasi-Fermi level splitting evaluation based on electroluminescence analysis in multiple quantum-well solar cells for investigating cell performance under concentrated light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Tomoyuki; Toprasertpong, Kasidit; Delamarre, Amaury; Watanabe, Kentaroh; Paire, Myriam; Lombez, Laurent; Guillemoles, Jean-François; Sugiyama, Masakazu; Nakano, Yoshiaki

    2016-03-01

    Insertion of InGaAs/GaAsP strain-balanced multiple quantum wells (MQWs) into i-regions of GaAs p-i-n solar cells show several advantages against GaAs bulk p-i-n solar cells. Particularly under high-concentration sunlight condition, enhancement of the open-circuit voltage with increasing concentration ratio in thin-barrier MQW cells has been reported to be more apparent than that in GaAs bulk cells. However, investigation of the MQW cell mechanisms in terms of I-V characteristics under high-concentration sunlight suffers from the increase in cell temperature and series resistance. In order to investigate the mechanism of the steep enhancement of open-circuit voltage in MQW cells under high-concentration sunlight without affected by temperature, the quasi-Fermi level splitting was evaluated by analyzing electroluminescence (EL) from a cell. Since a cell under current injection with a density Jinjhas similar excess carrier density to a cell under concentrated sunlight with an equivalent short-circuit current Jsc = Jinj, EL measurement with varied Jinj can approximately evaluate a cell performance under a variety of concentration ratio. In addition to the evaluation of quasi-Fermi level splitting, the external luminescence efficiency was also investigated with the EL measurement. The MQW cells showed higher external luminescence efficiency than the GaAs reference cells especially under high-concentration condition. The results suggest that since the MQW region can trap and confine carriers, the localized excess carriers inside the cells make radiative recombination more dominant.

  15. Effects of orally administered viable Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and Propionibacterium freudenreichii subsp. shermanii JS on mouse lymphocyte proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirjavainen, P V; ElNezami, H S; Salminen, S J; Ahokas, J T; Wright, P F

    1999-11-01

    Immunomodulation by probiotics is a subject of growing interest, but the knowledge of dose response and time profile relationships is minimal. In this study we examined the effects of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) and Propionibacterium freudenreichii subsp. shermanii JS (PJS) on the proliferative activity of murine lymphocytes ex vivo. Dose dependency was assessed by treating animals perorally with a low or a high dose (i.e., 10(9) or 10(12) viable bacteria/kg of body weight) for 7 days. The lower dose levels of each strain appeared to enhance T-cell proliferation at the optimal concanavalin A (ConA) concentration (by 69 to 84%) and B-cell proliferation at the optimal and supraoptimal concentrations of lipopolysaccharide (by 57 to 82%). B-cell proliferation was also enhanced by the high LGG dose (by 32 to 39%) but was accompanied by a marginal decrease in T-cell proliferation (by 8%) at the optimal ConA concentration. The time profiles of the immune responses were assessed after daily treatment with the higher dose for 3, 7, and 14 days. A significant decrease in basal lymphoproliferation (by 32 to 42%) was observed with PJS treatment after the 3- and 7-day periods; however, this activity returned to control levels after 14 days of treatment, which also resulted in significantly enhanced T-cell proliferation at optimal and supraoptimal ConA concentrations (by 24 to 80%). The 14-day LGG treatment also enhanced the latter activity (by 119%). In conclusion, LGG and PJS have specific dose- and duration-dependent immunomodulatory effects on the proliferative activity of B and T lymphocytes and may also reduce lymphocyte sensitivity to the cytotoxic effects of lectin mitogens.

  16. Asouzu's Complementary Ontology as a Foundation for a Viable ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper on “Asouzu's Complementary Ontology as a foundation for a viable Ethic of the Environment”, posits that an ethic of the environment can be seen as viable if it considers the whole of reality as ontologically relevant. This point of view would free environmental ethics of anthropocentric bias and its attendant ...

  17. An Advanced Model to Precisely Estimate the Cell-Free Fetal DNA Concentration in Maternal Plasma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiongbin Kang

    Full Text Available With the speedy development of sequencing technologies, noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT has been widely applied in clinical practice for testing for fetal aneuploidy. The cell-free fetal DNA (cffDNA concentration in maternal plasma is the most critical parameter for this technology because it affects the accuracy of NIPT-based sequencing for fetal trisomies 21, 18 and 13. Several approaches have been developed to calculate the cffDNA fraction of the total cell-free DNA in the maternal plasma. However, most approaches depend on specific single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP allele information or are restricted to male fetuses.In this study, we present an innovative method to accurately deduce the concentration of the cffDNA fraction using only maternal plasma DNA. SNPs were classified into four maternal-fetal genotype combinations and three boundaries were added to capture effective SNP loci in which the mother was homozygous and the fetus was heterozygous. The median value of the concentration of the fetal DNA fraction was estimated using the effective SNPs. A depth-bias correction was performed using simulated data and corresponding regression equations for adjustments when the depth of the sequencing data was below 100-fold or the cffDNA fraction is less than 10%.Using our approach, the median of the relative bias was 0.4% in 18 maternal plasma samples with a median sequencing depth of 125-fold. There was a significant association (r = 0.935 between our estimations and the estimations inferred from the Y chromosome. Furthermore, this approach could precisely estimate a cffDNA fraction as low as 3%, using only maternal plasma DNA at the targeted region with a sequencing depth of 65-fold. We also used PCR instead of parallel sequencing to calculate the cffDNA fraction. There was a significant association (r = 98.2% between our estimations and those inferred from the Y chromosome.

  18. Low salt concentrations activate AMP-activated protein kinase in mouse macula densa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Natasha; Fraser, Scott A; Katerelos, Marina; Katsis, Frosa; Gleich, Kurt; Mount, Peter F; Steinberg, Gregory R; Levidiotis, Vicki; Kemp, Bruce E; Power, David A

    2009-04-01

    The energy-sensing kinase AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is associated with the sodium-potassium-chloride cotransporter NKCC2 in the kidney and phosphorylates it on a regulatory site in vitro. To identify a potential role for AMPK in salt sensing at the macula densa, we have used the murine macula densa cell line MMDD1. In this cell line, AMPK was rapidly activated by isosmolar low-salt conditions. In contrast to the known salt-sensing pathway in the macula densa, AMPK activation occurred in the presence of either low sodium or low chloride and was unaffected by inhibition of NKCC2 with bumetanide. Assays using recombinant AMPK demonstrated activation of an upstream kinase by isosmolar low salt. The specific calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase kinase inhibitor STO-609 failed to suppress AMPK activation, suggesting that it was not part of the signal pathway. AMPK activation was associated with increased phosphorylation of the specific substrate acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) at Ser(79), as well as increased NKCC2 phosphorylation at Ser(126). AMPK activation due to low salt concentrations was inhibited by an adenovirus construct encoding a kinase dead mutant of AMPK, leading to reduced ACC Ser(79) and NKCC2 Ser(126) phosphorylation. This work demonstrates that AMPK activation in macula densa-like cells occurs via isosmolar changes in sodium or chloride concentration, leading to phosphorylation of ACC and NKCC2. Phosphorylation of these substrates in vivo is predicted to increase intracellular chloride and so reduce the effect of salt restriction on tubuloglomerular feedback and renin secretion.

  19. Optimization of Culture Medium Enhances Viable Biomass Production and Biocontrol Efficacy of the Antagonistic Yeast, Candida diversa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Liu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Viable biomass production is a key determinant of suitability of antagonistic yeasts as potential biocontrol agents. This study investigated the effects of three metal ions (magnesium, ferrous, and zinc on biomass production and viability of the antagonistic yeast, Candida diversa. Using response surface methodology to optimize medium components, a maximum biomass was obtained, when the collective Mg2+, Fe2+, and Zn2+ concentrations were adjusted in a minimal mineral (MM medium. Compared with the unmodified MM, and three ion-deficient MM media, yeast cells cultured in the three ion-modified MM medium exhibited a lower level of cellular oxidative damage, and a higher level of antioxidant enzyme activity. A biocontrol assay indicated that C. diversa grown in the ion-modified MM exhibited the greatest level of control of gray mold on apple fruit. These results provide new information on culture medium optimization to grow yeast antagonists in order to improve biomass production and biocontrol efficacy.

  20. Optimization of Culture Medium Enhances Viable Biomass Production and Biocontrol Efficacy of the Antagonistic Yeast, Candida diversa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia; Li, Guangkun; Sui, Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Viable biomass production is a key determinant of suitability of antagonistic yeasts as potential biocontrol agents. This study investigated the effects of three metal ions (magnesium, ferrous, and zinc) on biomass production and viability of the antagonistic yeast, Candida diversa. Using response surface methodology to optimize medium components, a maximum biomass was obtained, when the collective Mg(2+), Fe(2+), and Zn(2+) concentrations were adjusted in a minimal mineral (MM) medium. Compared with the unmodified MM, and three ion-deficient MM media, yeast cells cultured in the three ion-modified MM medium exhibited a lower level of cellular oxidative damage, and a higher level of antioxidant enzyme activity. A biocontrol assay indicated that C. diversa grown in the ion-modified MM exhibited the greatest level of control of gray mold on apple fruit. These results provide new information on culture medium optimization to grow yeast antagonists in order to improve biomass production and biocontrol efficacy.

  1. Experimental human-like model to assess the part of viable Legionella reaching the thoracic region after nebulization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérémie Pourchez

    Full Text Available The incidence of Legionnaires' disease (LD in European countries and the USA has been constantly increasing since 1998. Infection of humans occurs through aerosol inhalation. To bridge the existing gap between the concentration of Legionella in a water network and the deposition of bacteria within the thoracic region (assessment of the number of viable Legionella, we validated a model mimicking realistic exposure through the use of (i recent technology for aerosol generation and (ii a 3D replicate of the human upper respiratory tract. The model's sensitivity was determined by monitoring the deposition of (i aerosolized water and Tc99m radio-aerosol as controls, and (ii bioaerosols generated from both Escherichia coli and Legionella pneumophila sg 1 suspensions. The numbers of viable Legionella prior to and after nebulization were provided by culture, flow cytometry and qPCR. This study was designed to obtain more realistic data on aerosol inhalation (vs. animal experimentation and deposition at the thoracic region in the context of LD. Upon nebulization, 40% and 48% of the initial Legionella inoculum was made of cultivable and non-cultivable cells, respectively; 0.7% of both populations reached the filter holder mimicking the thoracic region in this setup. These results are in agreement with experimental data based on quantitative microbial risk assessment methods and bring new methods that may be useful for preventing LD.

  2. Limitations of the whole cell patch clamp technique in the control of intracellular concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathias, R T; Cohen, I S; Oliva, C

    1990-09-01

    Recent experimental studies (Pusch and Neher, 1988) and theoretical studies (Oliva et al., 1988) have found that the pipette tip is a significant barrier to diffusion in the whole cell patch clamp configuration. In this paper, we extend the theoretical analysis of fluxes between the pipette and cell to include transmembrane fluxes. The general conclusions are: (a) within the pipette, ion fluxes are driven primarily by diffusion rather than voltage gradients. (b) At steady state there is a concentration difference between the bulk pipette and intracellular solution that is described by delta c = jRp/Dp, where delta c = 1 mM for a flux, j = 1 fmol/s, through a pipette of resistance, Rp = 1 M omega, filled with a solution of resistivity, p = 100 omega --cm, given a solute diffusion coefficient, D = 10(-5) cm2/s. (c) The time to steady state is always accelerated by membrane transport, regardless of the direction of transport. We apply our analysis to the measurement of transport by the Na/K pump and Na/Ca exchanger in cells from the ventricles of mammalian heart. We find that the binding curve for intracellular Na+ to the Na/K pump will appear significantly less steep and more linear if one does not correct for the concentration difference between intracellular and pipette Na+. Similar shifts in the binding curve for extracellular Na+ to the Na/Ca exchanger can occur due to depletion of intracellular Ca(+)+ when the exchanger is stimulated. Lastly, in Appendix we analyze the effects of mobile and fixed intracellular buffers on the movement of Ca(+)+ between the pipette and cell. Fixed buffers greatly slow the time for equilibration of pipette and intracellular Ca(+)+. Mobile buffers act like a shuttle system, as they carry Ca(+)+ from pipette to cell then diffuse back when they are empty. Vigorous transport by the Na/Ca exchanger depletes mobile buffered calcium, thus stimulating diffusion from the pipette to match the rate of Ca(+)+ transport. Moreover, we find that

  3. Direct measurement of local dissolved oxygen concentration spatial profiles in a cell culture environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagawa, Yuki; Matsuura, Katsuhisa; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Tsuneda, Satoshi

    2015-06-01

    Controlling local dissolved oxygen concentration (DO) in media is critical for cell or tissue cultures. Various biomaterials and culture methods have been developed to modulate DO. Direct measurement of local DO in cultures has not been validated as a method to test DO modulation. In the present study we developed a DO measurement system equipped with a Clark-type oxygen microelectrode manipulated with 1 μm precision in three-dimensional space to explore potential applications for tissue engineering. By determining the microelectrode tip position precisely against the bottom plane of culture dishes with rat or human cardiac cells in static monolayer culture, we successfully obtained spatial distributions of DO in the medium. Theoretical quantitative predictions fit the obtained data well. Based on analyses of the variance between samples, we found the data reflected "local" oxygen consumption in the vicinity of the microelectrode and the detection of temporal changes in oxygen consumption rates of cultured cells was limited by the diffusion rate of oxygen in the medium. This oxygen measuring system monitors local oxygen consumption and production with high spatial resolution, and can potentially be used with recently developed oxygen modulating biomaterials to design microenvironments and non-invasively monitor local DO dynamics during culture. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Performance and Degradation of A Lithium-Bromine Rechargeable Fuel Cell Using Highly Concentrated Catholytes

    CERN Document Server

    Bai, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Lithium-air batteries have been considered as ultimate solutions for the power source of long-range electrified transportation, but state-of-the-art prototypes still suffer from short cycle life, low efficiency and poor power output. Here, a lithium-bromine rechargeable fuel cell using highly concentrated bromine catholytes is demonstrated with comparable specific energy, improved power density, and higher efficiency. The cell is similar in structure to a hybrid-electrolyte Li-air battery, where a lithium metal anode in nonaqueous electrolyte is separated from aqueous bromine catholytes by a lithium-ion conducting ceramic plate. The cell with a flat graphite electrode can discharge at a peak power density around 9mW cm-2 and in principle could provide a specific energy of 791.8 Wh kg-1, superior to most existing cathode materials and catholytes. It can also run in regenerative mode to recover the lithium metal anode and free bromine with 80-90% voltage efficiency, without any catalysts. Degradation of the sol...

  5. Separation of viable and non-viable tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) seeds using single seed near-infrared spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shrestha, Santosh; Deleuran, Lise Christina; Gislum, René

    2017-01-01

    -viable tomato seeds of two cultivars using chemometrics. The data exploration were performed by principal component analysis (PCA). Subsequently, viable and non-viable seeds were classified by partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) and interval PLS-DA (iPLS-DA). The indication of clustering...... of viable and non-viable seeds were observed in the PCA of each cultivar and the pooled samples. However, the PCA did not exhibit a pattern of separation among the early, normal and late germinated tomato seeds. The NIR spectral regions of 1160–1170, 1383–1397, 1647–1666, 1860–1884 and 1915–1940 nm were...... identified as important for classification of viable and non-viable tomato seeds by iPLS-DA. The sensitivity i.e. ability to correctly identify the positive samples and specificity i.e. ability to reject the negative samples of the (iPLS-DA) model on identified spectral regions for prediction of viable...

  6. Dynamics of glucose and insulin concentration connected to the βcell cycle: model development and analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Gallenberger Martina; Castell Wolfgang zu; Hense Burkhard A; Kuttler Christina

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Diabetes mellitus is a group of metabolic diseases with increased blood glucose concentration as the main symptom. This can be caused by a relative or a total lack of insulin which is produced by the β‐cells in the pancreatic islets of Langerhans. Recent experimental results indicate the relevance of the β‐cell cycle for the development of diabetes mellitus. Methods This paper introduces a mathematical model that connects the dynamics of glucose and insulin concentration w...

  7. High Concentrations of TNF-α Induce Cell Death during Interactions between Human Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Li

    Full Text Available Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stromal cells (hUC-MSCs are currently being used as novel therapeutic agents in numerous clinical trials. Previous works have shown that hUC-MSCs possess profound immunomodulatory capacities through IL-1 stimulation produced by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs, their main cellular partner in most pathophysiological and therapeutic situations. The present study was designed to explore the role of TNF-α in these interactions. In these experiments, we demonstrated that TNF-α originated from PBMCs under the influence of IL-1. We also showed that TNF-α acted differently depending upon the concentrations reached. At low concentrations it clearly contributed to IL-6 and monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1 production. At high concentrations, used alone or in association with the TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand, TNF-α also stimulated hUC-MSC IL-6 but, more intensely, MCP-1 production. This stimulation was associated but independent of apoptosis induction in a process involving Inhibitor of Apoptosis Proteins. Interferon gamma (IFN-γ, tested to stimulate PBMC and tissue activation, amplified IL-6 and MCP-1 production and cell death by, apparently, a different process involving necrosis. Our findings bring new insights into the complex interactions between hUC-MSCs and PBMCs, involving cytokines, chemokines and cell death, and are of fundamental importance for tissue homeostasis.

  8. Differential concentration-specific effects of caffeine on cell viability, oxidative stress, and cell cycle in pulmonary oxygen toxicity in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiwari, Kirti Kumar; Chu, Chun; Couroucli, Xanthi; Moorthy, Bhagavatula; Lingappan, Krithika, E-mail: lingappa@bcm.edu

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • Caffeine at 0.05 mM decreases oxidative stress in hyperoxia. • Caffeine at 1 mM decreases cell viability, increases oxidative stress in hyperoxia. • Caffeine at 1 but not 0.05 mM, abrogates hyperoxia-induced G2/M arrest. - Abstract: Caffeine is used to prevent bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) in premature neonates. Hyperoxia contributes to the development of BPD, inhibits cell proliferation and decreases cell survival. The mechanisms responsible for the protective effect of caffeine in pulmonary oxygen toxicity remain largely unknown. A549 and MLE 12 pulmonary epithelial cells were exposed to hyperoxia or maintained in room air, in the presence of different concentrations (0, 0.05, 0.1 and 1 mM) of caffeine. Caffeine had a differential concentration-specific effect on cell cycle progression, oxidative stress and viability, with 1 mM concentration being deleterious and 0.05 mM being protective. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation during hyperoxia was modulated by caffeine in a similar concentration-specific manner. Caffeine at 1 mM, but not at the 0.05 mM concentration decreased the G2 arrest in these cells. Taken together this study shows the novel funding that caffeine has a concentration-specific effect on cell cycle regulation, ROS generation, and cell survival in hyperoxic conditions.

  9. Effects of ammonium concentration and charge exchange on ammonium recovery from high strength wastewater using a microbial fuel cell

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuntke, P.; Geleij, M.; Bruning, H.; Zeeman, G.; Hamelers, H.V.M.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2011-01-01

    Ammonium recovery using a 2 chamber microbial fuel cell (MFC) was investigated at high ammonium concentration. Increasing the ammonium concentration (from 0.07 g to 4 g ammonium-nitrogen/L) by addition of ammonium chloride did not affect the performance of the MFC. The obtained current densities by

  10. Real-Time Monitoring of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Concentration Using a Novel Electromagnetic Sensors Microfluidic Cell Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakey, Richard; Nakouti, Ismini; Korostynska, Olga; Mason, Alex; Al-Shamma'a, Ahmed

    2013-12-01

    This study demonstrates an electromagnetic wave-based sensor embedded within a fluidic cell for the purposes of quantifying Pseudomonas aeruginosa in real time, which implies it could be applied for provision of point-of-care diagnostics. The sensors operates through the interaction of the electromagnetic field with the analyte flowing through the fluidic system, and via the sensor head which has a specifically designed planar pattern to maximize the sensor sensitivity for the given bacteria type. The sensor is demonstrated to respond linearly (R(2) = 0.9942) to OD(550) 25 × 10(-3) - 1.0 bacteria concentration through changing resonant frequency and peak quality factor. This innovative approach is expected to contribute to better provision of healthcare services, minimizing the need for hospital visits through real-time point-of-care diagnostics as opposed to lengthy laboratory assays.

  11. Kinetics of ethanol production from sugarcane bagasse enzymatic hydrolysate concentrated with molasses under cell recycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Andrade, Rafael Ramos; Maugeri Filho, Francisco; Maciel Filho, Rubens; da Costa, Aline Carvalho

    2013-02-01

    In this work, a kinetic model for ethanol fermentation from sugarcane bagasse enzymatic hydrolysate concentrated with molasses was developed. A model previously developed for fermentation of pure molasses was modified by the inclusion of a new term for acetic acid inhibition on microorganism growth rate and the kinetic parameters were estimated as functions of temperature. The influence of the hydrolysate on the kinetic parameters is analyzed by comparing with the parameters from fermentation of pure molasses. The impact of cells recycling in the kinetic parameters is also evaluated, as well as on the ethanol yield and productivity. The model developed described accurately most of the fermentations performed in several successive batches for temperatures from 30 to 38°C. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Highly Variable Plasma Concentrations of Voriconazole in Pediatric Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfs, Tom; Jonker, Martine; de Waal, Marjolein; Egberts, Toine C. G.; Ververs, Tessa T.; Boelens, Jaap J.; Bierings, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Invasive fungal infections are of great concern in pediatric hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) recipients. Voriconazole is usually the drug of first choice for treating or preventing invasive aspergillosis. Optimum trough levels (Ctroughs) are between 1 and 5 mg/liter. It is unclear whether these levels are reached with currently advised pediatric dosing schedules. Between 2007 and 2011, 11 patients voriconazole in the HSCT unit of UMC Utrecht. For children 12 years) (P = 0.034). The intrapatient variability in Ctrough ranged between 1 and 238%. Voriconazole was discontinued in six patients due to toxicity. These patients had a median Ctrough of 0.5 mg/liter at the initial dose (ranging from 0.5 to 2.6 mg/liter), and a medium maximal concentration of 4 mg/liter was reached. Inter- and intrapatient variability is a major concern in voriconazole treatment and necessitates therapeutic drug monitoring of dosing, especially in young children. PMID:23114771

  13. Effects of solution mass transport on the ECC ozonesonde background current. [Electrochemical Concentration Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, D. C.; Niazy, N.

    1983-01-01

    A technique is developed to measure the effective mass transport parameter for the electrochemical concentration cell (ECC) ozonesonde in order to determine the mass transport rate constant for the ECC as a function of pressure. It is shown that a pressure dependent factor in the background current originates in a convective mass transport parameter. It is determined that for atmospheric pressures greater than 100 mb the mass transport parameter is a constant, while at pressures less than 100 mb it decreases logarithmically with pressure. It is suggested that the background current correction is directly correlated to the mass transport parameter pressure dependence. The presently used background current correction, which is based on the partial pressure of oxygen, is found to lead to an overestimation of the integrated ozone value in the troposphere for the ECC ozonesonde data.

  14. Oxygen deficiency and salinity affect cell-specific ion concentrations in adventitious roots of barley (Hordeum vulgare).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotula, Lukasz; Clode, Peta L; Striker, Gustavo G; Pedersen, Ole; Läuchli, André; Shabala, Sergey; Colmer, Timothy D

    2015-12-01

    Oxygen deficiency associated with soil waterlogging adversely impacts root respiration and nutrient acquisition. We investigated the effects of O2 deficiency and salinity (100 mM NaCl) on radial O2 concentrations and cell-specific ion distributions in adventitious roots of barley (Hordeum vulgare). Microelectrode profiling measured O2 concentrations across roots in aerated, aerated saline, stagnant or stagnant saline media. X-ray microanalysis at two positions behind the apex determined the cell-specific elemental concentrations of potassium (K), sodium (Na) and chloride (Cl) across roots. Severe O2 deficiency occurred in the stele and apical regions of roots in stagnant solutions. O2 deficiency in the stele reduced the concentrations of K, Na and Cl in the pericycle and xylem parenchyma cells at the subapical region. Near the root apex, Na declined across the cortex in roots from the aerated saline solution but was relatively high in all cell types in roots from the stagnant saline solution. Oxygen deficiency has a substantial impact on cellular ion concentrations in roots. Both pericycle and xylem parenchyma cells are involved in energy-dependent K loading into the xylem and in controlling radial Na and Cl transport. At root tips, accumulation of Na in the outer cell layers likely contributed to reduction of Na in inner cells of the tips. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  15. Production of Concentrated Pickering Emulsions with Narrow Size Distributions Using Stirred Cell Membrane Emulsification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manga, Mohamed S; York, David W

    2017-09-12

    Stirred cell membrane emulsification (SCME) has been employed to prepare concentrated Pickering oil in water emulsions solely stabilized by fumed silica nanoparticles. The optimal conditions under which highly stable and low-polydispersity concentrated emulsions using the SCME approach are highlighted. Optimization of the oil flux rates and the paddle stirrer speeds are critical to achieving control over the droplet size and size distribution. Investigating the influence of oil volume fraction highlights the criticality of the initial particle loading in the continuous phase on the final droplet size and polydispersity. At a particle loading of 4 wt %, both the droplet size and polydispersity increase with increasing of the oil volume fraction above 50%. As more interfacial area is produced, the number of particles available in the continuous phase diminishes, and coincidently a reduction in the kinetics of particle adsorption to the interface resulting in larger polydisperse droplets occurs. Increasing the particle loading to 10 wt % leads to significant improvements in both size and polydispersity with oil volume fractions as high as 70% produced with coefficient of variation values as low as ∼30% compared to ∼75% using conventional homogenization techniques.

  16. Miniaturized Antimicrobial Susceptibility Test by Combining Concentration Gradient Generation and Rapid Cell Culturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel C. Kim

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Effective treatment of bacterial infection relies on timely diagnosis and proper prescription of antibiotic drugs. The antimicrobial susceptibility test (AST is one of the most crucial experimental procedures, providing the baseline information for choosing effective antibiotic agents and their dosages. Conventional methods, however, require long incubation times or significant instrumentation costs to obtain test results. We propose a lab-on-a-chip approach to perform AST in a simple, economic, and rapid manner. Our assay platform miniaturizes the standard broth microdilution method on a microfluidic device (20 × 20 mm that generates an antibiotic concentration gradient and delivers antibiotic-containing culture media to eight 30-nL chambers for cell culture. When tested with 20 μL samples of a model bacterial strain (E. coli ATCC 25922 treated with ampicillin or streptomycin, our method allows for the determination of minimum inhibitory concentrations consistent with the microdilution test in three hours, which is almost a factor of ten more rapid than the standard method.

  17. Reductions in Red Blood Cell 2,3-Diphosphoglycerate Concentration during Continuous Renal Replacment Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugnara, Carlo; Betensky, Rebecca A.; Waikar, Sushrut S.

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives Hypophosphatemia is a frequent complication during continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT), a dialytic technique used to treat AKI in critically ill patients. This study sought to confirm that phosphate depletion during CRRT may decrease red blood cell (RBC) concentration of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG), a crucial allosteric effector of hemoglobin’s (Hgb’s) affinity for oxygen, thereby leading to impaired oxygen delivery to peripheral tissues. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Phosphate mass balance studies were performed in 20 patients with severe AKI through collection of CRRT effluent. RBC concentrations of 2,3-DPG, venous blood gas pH, and oxygen partial pressure required for 50% hemoglobin saturation (P50) were measured at CRRT initiation and days 2, 4, and 7. Similar measurements were obtained on days 0 and 2 in a reference group of 10 postsurgical patients, most of whom did not have AKI. Associations of 2,3-DPG with laboratory parameters and clinical outcomes were examined using mixed-effects and Cox regression models. Results Mean 2,3-DPG levels decreased from a mean (±SD) of 13.4±3.4 µmol/g Hgb to 11.0±3.1 µmol/g Hgb after 2 days of CRRT (PCRRT were not significantly lower than those in the reference group on day 2. Among patients receiving CRRT, 2,3-DPG decreased by 0.53 µmol/g Hgb per 1 g phosphate removed (95% confidence interval 0.38 to 0.68 µmol/g Hgb; PCRRT-induced phosphate depletion is associated with measurable reductions in RBC 2,3-DPG concentration and a shift in the O2:Hgb affinity curve even in the absence of overt hypophosphatemia. 2,3-DPG reductions may be associated with higher risk for in-hospital death and represent a potentially avoidable complication of CRRT. PMID:25538269

  18. Characterization of the Viable but Nonculturable (VBNC State in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Salma

    Full Text Available The Viable But Non Culturable (VBNC state has been thoroughly studied in bacteria. In contrast, it has received much less attention in other microorganisms. However, it has been suggested that various yeast species occurring in wine may enter in VBNC following sulfite stress.In order to provide conclusive evidences for the existence of a VBNC state in yeast, the ability of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to enter into a VBNC state by applying sulfite stress was investigated. Viable populations were monitored by flow cytometry while culturable populations were followed by plating on culture medium. Twenty-four hours after the application of the stress, the comparison between the culturable population and the viable population demonstrated the presence of viable cells that were non culturable. In addition, removal of the stress by increasing the pH of the medium at different time intervals into the VBNC state allowed the VBNC S. cerevisiae cells to "resuscitate". The similarity between the cell cycle profiles of VBNC cells and cells exiting the VBNC state together with the generation rate of cells exiting VBNC state demonstrated the absence of cellular multiplication during the exit from the VBNC state. This provides evidence of a true VBNC state. To get further insight into the molecular mechanism pertaining to the VBNC state, we studied the involvement of the SSU1 gene, encoding a sulfite pump in S. cerevisiae. The physiological behavior of wild-type S. cerevisiae was compared to those of a recombinant strain overexpressing SSU1 and null Δssu1 mutant. Our results demonstrated that the SSU1 gene is only implicated in the first stages of sulfite resistance but not per se in the VBNC phenotype. Our study clearly demonstrated the existence of an SO2-induced VBNC state in S. cerevisiae and that the stress removal allows the "resuscitation" of VBNC cells during the VBNC state.

  19. First study on the formation and resuscitation of viable but nonculturable state and beer spoilage capability of Lactobacillus lindneri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Junyan; Li, Lin; Li, Bing; Peters, Brian M; Deng, Yang; Xu, Zhenbo; Shirtliff, Mark E

    2017-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate the spoilage capability of Lactobacillus lindneri during the induction and resuscitation of viable but nonculturable (VBNC) state. L. lindneri strain was identified by sequencing the PCR product (amplifying 16S rRNA gene) using ABI Prism 377 DNA Sequencer. During the VBNC state induction by low temperature storage and beer adaption, total, culturable, and viable cells were assessed by acridine orange direct counting, plate counting, and Live/Dead BacLight bacterial viability kit, respectively. Organic acids and diacetyl concentration were measured by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography and head dpace gas chromatography, respectively. VBNC state of L. lindneri was successfully induced by both beer adaption and low temperature storage, and glycerol frozen stock was the optimal way to maintain the VBNC state. Addition of catalase was found to be an effective method for the resuscitation of VBNC L. lindneri cells. Furthermore, spoilage capability remained similar during the induction and resuscitation of VBNC L. lindneri. This is the first report of induction by low temperature storage and resuscitation of VBNC L. lindneri strain, as well as the first identification of spoilage capability of VBNC and resuscitated L. lindneri cells. This study indicated that the potential colonization of L. lindneri strain in brewery environment, formation and resuscitation of VBNC state, as well as maintenance in beer spoilage capability, may be an important risk factor for brewery environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Differential concentration-specific effects of caffeine on cell viability, oxidative stress, and cell cycle in pulmonary oxygen toxicity in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Kirti Kumar; Chu, Chun; Couroucli, Xanthi; Moorthy, Bhagavatula; Lingappan, Krithika

    2014-08-08

    Caffeine is used to prevent bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) in premature neonates. Hyperoxia contributes to the development of BPD, inhibits cell proliferation and decreases cell survival. The mechanisms responsible for the protective effect of caffeine in pulmonary oxygen toxicity remain largely unknown. A549 and MLE 12 pulmonary epithelial cells were exposed to hyperoxia or maintained in room air, in the presence of different concentrations (0, 0.05, 0.1 and 1mM) of caffeine. Caffeine had a differential concentration-specific effect on cell cycle progression, oxidative stress and viability, with 1mM concentration being deleterious and 0.05 mM being protective. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation during hyperoxia was modulated by caffeine in a similar concentration-specific manner. Caffeine at 1mM, but not at the 0.05 mM concentration decreased the G2 arrest in these cells. Taken together this study shows the novel funding that caffeine has a concentration-specific effect on cell cycle regulation, ROS generation, and cell survival in hyperoxic conditions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Paralytic shellfish toxin concentration and cell density changes in Pyrodinium bahamense -Noctiluca scintillans feeding experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azanza, Rhodora V; Cruz, Lourdes J; Cariño, Flerida A; Blanco, Alelea G; Butardo, Vito M

    2010-05-01

    For the first time the potential of Noctiluca scintillans, a non-toxic mixotrophic dinoflagellate, in bioconverting and/or excreting saxitoxin has been illustrated, thus contributing to the limited knowledge on the aspects of toxin pathways in the food chain/web and predator-prey preferences. Noctiluca growth rate increased with higher Pyrodinium concentration but the ratio of Noctiluca to Pyrodinium should at least be 1:250 cells per mL. Noctiluca fed with Pyrodinium alone was found to decrease in number suggesting that the nutrients from this prey were insufficient. This was confirmed by the improved cell density of Noctiluca upon addition of 0.01% casitone to the Pyrodinium-fed Noctiluca. The alternative prey (Gymnodinium sanguineum) slowed down the grazing impact of Noctiluca on Pyrodinium. Noctiluca depleted Gymnodinium earlier than Pyrodinium showing preference over a prey with less saxitoxin. After the feeding experiments, total saxitoxin levels decreased to 72% in the Noctiluca-Pyrodinium setup whereas no saxitoxin was detected in the Noctiluca culture fed with Pyrodinium and G. sanguineum. It is possible that Gymnodinium can provide some nutrients needed to make Noctiluca more efficient in bioconverting saxitoxin. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. High concentration calcitriol induces endoplasmic reticulum stress related gene profile in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkaya, Ali Burak; Ak, Handan; Aydin, Hikmet Hakan

    2017-04-01

    Calcitriol, the active form of vitamin D, is known for its anticancer properties including induction of apoptosis as well as the inhibition of angiogenesis and metastasis. Understanding the mechanisms of action for calcitriol will help with the development of novel treatment strategies. Since vitamin D exerts its cellular actions via binding to its receptor and by altering expressions of a set of genes, we aimed to evaluate the effect of calcitriol on transcriptomic profile of breast cancer cells. We previously demonstrated that calcitriol alters endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress markers, therefore in this study we have focused on ER-stress-related genes to reveal calcitriols action on these genes in particular. We have treated breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 with previously determined IC50 concentrations of calcitriol and evaluated the transcriptomic alterations via microarray. During analysis, only genes altered by at least 2-fold with a P value < 0.05 were taken into consideration. Our findings revealed an ER-stress-associated transcriptomic profile induced by calcitriol. Induced genes include genes with a pro-survival function (NUPR1, DNAJB9, HMOX1, LCN2, and LAMP3) and with a pro-death function (CHOP (DDIT3), DDIT4, NDGR1, NOXA, and CLGN). These results suggest that calcitriol induces an ER-stress-like response inducing both pro-survival and pro-death transcripts in the process.

  3. Non-viable Borrelia burgdorferi induce inflammatory mediators and apoptosis in human oligodendrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parthasarathy, Geetha; Fevrier, Helene B; Philipp, Mario T

    2013-11-27

    In previous studies, exposure to live Borrelia burgdorferi was shown to induce inflammation and apoptosis of human oligodendrocytes. In this study we assessed the ability of non-viable bacteria (heat killed or sonicated) to induce inflammatory mediators and cell death. Both heat-killed and sonicated bacteria induced release of CCL2, IL-6, and CXCL8 from oligodendrocytes in a dose dependent manner. In addition, non-viable B. burgdorferi also induced cell death as evaluated by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) and another cell viability assay. These results suggest that spirochetal residues left after bacterial demise, due to treatment or otherwise, may continue to be pathogenic to the central nervous system. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Effect of atrophy and contractions on myogenin mRNA concentration in chick and rat myoblast omega muscle cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, J. M.; Denney, R. M.

    1997-01-01

    The skeletal rat myoblast omega (RMo) cell line forms myotubes that exhibit spontaneous contractions under appropriate conditions in culture. We examined if the RMo cells would provide a model for studying atrophy and muscle contraction. To better understand how to obtain contractile cultures, we examined levels of contraction under different growing conditions. The proliferation medium and density of plating affected the subsequent proportion of spontaneously contracting myotubes. Using a ribonuclease protection assay, we found that exponentially growing RMo myoblasts contained no detectable myogenin or herculin mRNA, while differentiating myoblasts contained high levels of myogenin mRNA but no herculin mRNA. There was no increase in myogenin mRNA concentration in either primary chick or RMo myotubes whose contractions were inhibited by depolarizing concentrations of potassium (K+). Thus, altered myogenin mRNA concentrations are not involved in atrophy of chick myotubes. Depolarizing concentrations of potassium inhibited spontaneous contractions in both RMo cultures and primary chick myotube cultures. However, we found that the myosin concentration of 6-d-old contracting RMo cells fed medium plus AraC was 11 +/- 3 micrograms myosin/microgram DNA, not significantly different from 12 +/- 4 micrograms myosin/microgram DNA (n = 3), the myosin concentration of noncontracting RMo cells (treated with 12 mM K+ for 6 d). Resolving how RMo cells maintained their myosin content when contraction is inhibited may be important for understanding atrophy.

  5. Pilot study on novel blood containers with alternative plasticizers for red cell concentrate storage.

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    Yuki Morishita

    Full Text Available Di (2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP, a typical plasticizer used for polyvinyl chloride (PVC blood containers, is eluted from the blood containers and exerts protective effects on red blood cells. However, a concern for detrimental effects of DEHP on human health has led to the development of potential DEHP substitutes. Here, we compared the red blood cell preservation ability of two types of non-DEHP blood containers with safe alternative plasticizers to that of DEHP blood containers. Red cell concentrates in mannitol-adenine-phosphate solution (MAP/RCC were stored for 6 weeks in PVC blood bags containing DEHP, di-isononyl-cyclohexane-1,2-dicarboxylate (DINCH and di (2-ethylhexyl 4-cyclohexene-1,2-dicarboxylate (DOTH, or 4-cyclohexene-1,2-dicarboxylic acid dinonyl ester (DL9TH and DOTH. There was no significant difference in the total amount of plasticizer eluted into MAP/RCC (till 3 weeks from the beginning of the experiment, hemolysis of MAP/RCC, and osmotic fragility of MAP/RCC between the non-DEHP blood containers and DEHP blood containers. Hematological and blood chemical indices of MAP/RCC in all containers were nearly the same. Thus, DOTH/DINCH and DOTH/DL9TH blood containers demonstrate the same quality of MAP/RCC storing as the DEHP blood containers. Since DOTH, DINCH, and DL9TH were reported to be safe, DOTH/DINCH and DOTH/DL9TH blood containers are promising candidate substitutes for DEHP blood containers.

  6. Low concentrations of metformin selectively inhibit CD133⁺ cell proliferation in pancreatic cancer and have anticancer action.

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    Shanmiao Gou

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer related deaths in the United States. The prognosis remains dismal with little advance in treatment. Metformin is a drug widely used for the treatment of type II diabetes. Recent epidemiologic data revealed that oral administration of metformin is associated with a reduced risk of pancreatic cancer, suggesting its potential as a novel drug for this disease. Many studies have demonstrated the in vitro anticancer action of metformin, but the typically used concentrations were much higher than the in vivo plasma and tissue concentrations achieved with recommended therapeutic doses of metformin, and low concentrations of metformin had little effect on the proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells. We examined the effect of low concentrations of metformin on different subpopulations of pancreatic cancer cells and found that these selectively inhibited the proliferation of CD133⁺ but not CD24⁺CD44⁺ESA⁺ cells. We also examined the effect of low concentrations of metformin on cell invasion and in vivo tumor formation, demonstrating in vitro and in vivo anticancer action. Metformin was associated with a reduction of phospho-Erk and phospho-mTOR independent of Akt and AMPK phosphorylation. CD133⁺ pancreatic cancer cells are considered to be cancer stem cells that contribute to recurrence, metastasis and resistance to adjuvant therapies in pancreatic cancer. Our results provide a basis for combination of metformin with current therapies to improve the prognosis of this disease.

  7. Low concentrations of metformin selectively inhibit CD133⁺ cell proliferation in pancreatic cancer and have anticancer action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, Shanmiao; Cui, Pengfei; Li, Xiangsheng; Shi, Pengfei; Liu, Tao; Wang, Chunyou

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer related deaths in the United States. The prognosis remains dismal with little advance in treatment. Metformin is a drug widely used for the treatment of type II diabetes. Recent epidemiologic data revealed that oral administration of metformin is associated with a reduced risk of pancreatic cancer, suggesting its potential as a novel drug for this disease. Many studies have demonstrated the in vitro anticancer action of metformin, but the typically used concentrations were much higher than the in vivo plasma and tissue concentrations achieved with recommended therapeutic doses of metformin, and low concentrations of metformin had little effect on the proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells. We examined the effect of low concentrations of metformin on different subpopulations of pancreatic cancer cells and found that these selectively inhibited the proliferation of CD133⁺ but not CD24⁺CD44⁺ESA⁺ cells. We also examined the effect of low concentrations of metformin on cell invasion and in vivo tumor formation, demonstrating in vitro and in vivo anticancer action. Metformin was associated with a reduction of phospho-Erk and phospho-mTOR independent of Akt and AMPK phosphorylation. CD133⁺ pancreatic cancer cells are considered to be cancer stem cells that contribute to recurrence, metastasis and resistance to adjuvant therapies in pancreatic cancer. Our results provide a basis for combination of metformin with current therapies to improve the prognosis of this disease.

  8. THE EFFECT OF BLOOD AND MILK SERUM ZINC CONCENTRATION ON MILK SOMATIC CELL COUNT IN DAIRY COWS

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    Ivana Davidov

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of blood and milk zinc concentration on somatic cell count and occurrence of subclinical mastitis cases. The study was performed on thirty Holstein cows approximate same body weight, ages 3 to 5 years, with equally milk production. Blood samples were taken after the morning milking from the caudal vein and milk from all four quarters was taken before morning milking. All samples of blood and milk were taken to determined zinc, using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. 37.67% (11/30 cows have blood serum zinc concentration below 7µmol/l, and 63.33% or 19/30 cows have blood serum zinc concentration higher then 13µmol/l. Also 30% (9/30 cows have somatic cell count lower then 400.000/ml which indicate absence of subclinical mastitis, but 70% (21/30 cows have somatic cell count higher then 400.000/ml which indicate subclinical mastitis. Results indicate that cows with level of zinc in blood serum higher then 13 µmol/l have lower somatic cell count. Cows with lower zinc blood serum concentration then 7 µmol/l have high somatic cell count and high incidence of subclinical mastitis. According to results in this research there is no significant effect of milk serum zinc concentration on somatic cell count in dairy cows.

  9. Suitable Concentrations of Uric Acid Can Reduce Cell Death in Models of OGD and Cerebral Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bin; Yang, Ning; Lin, Shao-Peng; Zhang, Feng

    2017-07-01

    Cerebral infarction (CI) is a common clinical cerebrovascular disease, and to explore the pathophysiological mechanisms and seek effective treatment means are the hotspot and difficult point in medical research nowadays. Numerous studies have confirmed that uric acid plays an important role in CI, but the mechanism has not yet been clarified. When treating HT22 and BV-2 cells with different concentrations of uric acid, uric acid below 450 μM does not have significant effect on cell viability, but uric acid more than 500 μM can significantly inhibit cell viability. After establishing models of OGD (oxygen-glucose deprivation) with HT22 and BV-2 cells, uric acid at a low concentration (50 μM) cannot improve cell viability and apoptosis, and Reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels during OGD/reoxygenation; a suitable concentration (300 μM) of uric acid can significantly improve cell viability and apoptosis, and reduce ROS production during OGD/reoxygenation; but a high concentration (1000 μM) of uric acid can further reduce cell viability and enhance ROS production. After establishing middle cerebral artery occlusion of male rats with suture method, damage and increase of ROS production in brain tissue could be seen, and after adding suitable concentration of uric acid, the degree of brain damage and ROS production was reduced. Therefore, different concentrations of uric acid should have different effect, and suitable concentrations of uric acid have neuroprotective effect, and this finding may provide guidance for study on the clinical curative effect of uric acid.

  10. Persistence and potential Viable but Non-culturable state of pathogenic bacteria during storage of digestates from agricultural biogas plants

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    Geraldine Maynaud

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite the development of on-farm anaerobic digestion as a process for making profitable use of animal by-products, factors leading to the inactivation of pathogenic bacteria during storage of digestates remain poorly described. Here, a microcosm approach was used to evaluate the persistence of three pathogenic bacteria (Salmonella enterica Derby, Campylobacter coli and Listeria monocytogenes in digestates from farms, stored for later land spreading. Nine samples, including raw digestates, liquid fractions of digestate and composted digestates, were inoculated with each pathogen and maintained for 40 days at 24°C. Concentrations of pathogens were monitored using culture and qPCR methods. The persistence of L. monocytogenes, detected up to 20 days after inoculation, was higher than that of Salmonella Derby, detected for 7-20 days, and of C. coli (not detected after 7 days. In some digestates, the concentration of the pathogens by qPCR assay was several orders of magnitude higher than the concentration of culturable cells, suggesting a potential loss of culturability and induction of Viable but Non-Culturable (VBNC state. The potential VBNC state which was generally not observed in the same digestate for the three pathogens, occurred more frequently for C. coli and L. monocytogenes than for Salmonella Derby. Composting a digestate reduced the persistence of seeded L. monocytogenes but promoted the maintenance of Salmonella Derby. The effect of NH4+/NH3 on the culturability of C. coli and Salmonella Derby was also shown.The loss of culturability may be the underlying mechanism for the regrowth of pathogens. We have also demonstrated the importance of using molecular tools to monitor pathogens in environmental samples since culture methods may underestimate cell concentration. Our results underline the importance of considering VBNC cells when evaluating the sanitary effect of an anaerobic digestion process and the persistence of pathogens during

  11. Stomatal and pavement cell density linked to leaf internal CO2 concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santrůček, Jiří; Vráblová, Martina; Simková, Marie; Hronková, Marie; Drtinová, Martina; Květoň, Jiří; Vrábl, Daniel; Kubásek, Jiří; Macková, Jana; Wiesnerová, Dana; Neuwithová, Jitka; Schreiber, Lukas

    2014-08-01

    Stomatal density (SD) generally decreases with rising atmospheric CO2 concentration, Ca. However, SD is also affected by light, air humidity and drought, all under systemic signalling from older leaves. This makes our understanding of how Ca controls SD incomplete. This study tested the hypotheses that SD is affected by the internal CO2 concentration of the leaf, Ci, rather than Ca, and that cotyledons, as the first plant assimilation organs, lack the systemic signal. Sunflower (Helianthus annuus), beech (Fagus sylvatica), arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and garden cress (Lepidium sativum) were grown under contrasting environmental conditions that affected Ci while Ca was kept constant. The SD, pavement cell density (PCD) and stomatal index (SI) responses to Ci in cotyledons and the first leaves of garden cress were compared. (13)C abundance (δ(13)C) in leaf dry matter was used to estimate the effective Ci during leaf development. The SD was estimated from leaf imprints. SD correlated negatively with Ci in leaves of all four species and under three different treatments (irradiance, abscisic acid and osmotic stress). PCD in arabidopsis and garden cress responded similarly, so that SI was largely unaffected. However, SD and PCD of cotyledons were insensitive to Ci, indicating an essential role for systemic signalling. It is proposed that Ci or a Ci-linked factor plays an important role in modulating SD and PCD during epidermis development and leaf expansion. The absence of a Ci-SD relationship in the cotyledons of garden cress indicates the key role of lower-insertion CO2 assimilation organs in signal perception and its long-distance transport. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Genotoxic effects of daily personal exposure to particle mass and number concentrations on buccal cells

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    de Almeida, Daniela S.; da Costa, Silvano César; Ribeiro, Marcos; Moreira, Camila A. B.; Beal, Alexandra; Squizzato, Rafaela; Rudke, Anderson Paulo; Rafee, Sameh Adib Abou; Martins, Jorge A.; Palioto, Graciana Freitas; Kumar, Prashant; Martins, Leila D.

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this study is to assess personal exposure to Particle Number Concentrations (PNC) in four size ranges between 0.3 and 10 μm, and particulate matter (PM1; PM2.5; PM4; PM10) in order to evaluate possible genotoxic effects through a comet assay in buccal cells. A convenience cohort of 30 individuals from a Brazilian medium-sized city was selected. These individuals aged between 20 and 61 and worked in typical job categories (i.e., administrative, commerce, education, general services and transport). They were recruited to perform personal exposure measurements during their typical daily routine activities, totaling 240 h of sampling. The 8-h average mass concentrations in air for volunteers ranged from 2.4 to 31.8 μg m-3 for PM1, 4.2-45.1 μg m-3 for PM2.5, 7.9-66.1 μg m-3 for PM4 and from 23.1 to 131.7 μg m-3 for PM10. The highest PNC variation was found for 0.3-0.5 range, between 14 and 181 particles cm-3, 1 to 14 particles cm-3 for the 0.5-1.0 range, 0.2 to 2 particles cm-3 for the 1.0-2.5 range, and 0.06 to 0.7 particles cm-3 for the 2.5-10 range. Volunteers in the 'education' category experienced the lowest inhaled dose of PM2.5, as opposed to those involved in 'commercial' activities with the highest doses for PM10 (1.63 μg kg-1 h-1) and PM2.5 (0.61 μg kg-1 h-1). The predominant cause for these high doses was associated with the proximity of the workplace to the street and vehicle traffic. The comet assay performed in buccal cells indicated that the volunteers in 'commerce' category experienced the highest damage to their DeoxyriboNucleic Acid (DNA) compared with the control category (i.e. 'education'). These results indicate the variability in personal exposure of the volunteers in different groups, and the potential damage to DNA was much higher for those spending time in close proximity to the vehicle sources (e.g. commercial services) leading to exposure to a higher fraction of fine particles. This study builds understanding on the exposure

  13. Quality control of buffy coat removed red cell concentrates--a Croatian experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuk, T; Očić, T; Patko, M Strauss; Jukić, I

    2014-12-01

    Results are presented of the statistical quality control of red cell concentrate buffy coat removed in additive solution (RCC/BC/AS) and red cell concentrate buffy coat removed and leucoreduced in additive solution (RCC/BC/LR/AS) produced at the Croatian Institute of Transfusion Medicine during an 8-year period (2005-2012). The aim was to assess quality conformity of these products with specified requirements, as well as the suitability and justification of current regulations on the minimal quality requirements. The measurements of all the study parameters of the products analysed are expressed using descriptive statistics and graphs showing the distributions of observed parameters. In RCC/BC/AS, the mean (± SD) volume was 279 ± 17 mL; haematocrit, 0.60 ± 0.03 L L(-1); haemoglobin content, 55 ± 5 g; leucocyte count, 0.65 ± 0.41 × 10(9); and haemolysis at expiry date, 0.16 ± 0.13%. In RCC/BC/LR/AS (post-production filtration), the mean (± SD) volume was 255 ± 14 mL; haematocrit, 0.60 ± 0.02 L L(-1); haemoglobin content, 51 ± 4 g; leucocyte count, 0.11 ± 0.16 × 10(6); and haemolysis at expiry date, 0.11 ± 0.07%. In RCC/BC/LR/AS (inline filtration), the mean (± SD) volume was 254 ± 15 mL; haematocrit, 0.61 ± 0.02 L L(-1); haemoglobin content, 51 ± 5 g; leucocyte count, 0.04 ± 0.06 × 10(6); and haemolysis at expiry date, 0.16 ± 0.10%. The standards were just met for leucocyte count in RCC/BC/AS (90%), whereas for all other parameters satisfactory results were obtained in at least 99% of products analysed. Total incidence of bacterial contamination was 0.23% for all products. Results of the RCC/BC/AS and RCC/BC/LR/AS quality control showed very high conformity with the specified requirements in the majority of study parameters, suggesting that the current requirements could be redefined and improved at the institutional level. © 2014 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  14. Erythroxylum pungens elicits vasorelaxation by reducing intracellular calcium concentration in vascular smooth muscle cells of rats

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    Aurylene C. Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The cardiovascular effects elicited by the ethanolic extract obtained from the roots of Erythroxylum pungens O.E. Schulz, Erythroxylaceae (EEEP and the vasorelaxant effect induced by its main tropane alkaloid (pungencine were investigated. In normotensive rats, administration of EEEP (1, 10, 30 and 60 mg/kg i.v., randomly produced dose-dependent hypotension (-2±1, -7±0.5 -17.6±1, -24±1 Δ mmHg, n=5 followed by tachycardia (3±0.5, 7±2, 7.1±1, 10±5 Δ bpm, n=5. In intact phenylephrine (Phe, 10 µM-pre-contracted rings, EEEP (0.01-500 µg/mL induced concentration-dependent vasorelaxation (EC50 13.7±5.5 µg/mL, Maximal Response= 92±2.6%, and this effect was unchanged after the removal of the vascular endothelium (EC50 27.2±4.7 µg/ml, Maximal Response= 88.3±3.3 %. In KCl (80 mM-pre-contracted-endothelium-denuded rings, EEEP elicited concentration-dependent relaxation (EC50= 128.2±11.2 µg/mL, Maximal Response 76.8±3.4%. Vasorelaxation has also been achieved with tonic contractions evoked by the L-type Ca2+ channel agonist Bay K 8644 (EC50 80.2±9.1 µg/mL, Maximal Response 86.3±8.3%. In addition, in a depolarizing medium, EEEP inhibited CaCl2 (30-500 µg/mL induced contractions and caused a concentration-dependent rightward shift of the relaxation curves. Lastly, the tropane alkaloid pungencine caused vasorelaxation in mesenteric arteries resembling to the EEEP responses. These results suggests that EEEP induces hypotension and vasorelaxation, at least in part, due to the reduction in [Ca2+]i in vascular smooth muscle cells.

  15. Fate of viable but non-culturable Listeria monocytogenes in pig manure microcosms

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    Jeremy eDesneux

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The fate of two strains of L. monocytogenes and their ability to become viable but non-culturable (VBNC was investigated in microcosms containing piggery effluents (two raw manures and two biologically treated manures stored for two months at 8°C and 20°C. Levels of L. monocytogenes were estimated using the culture method, qPCR, and propidium monoazide treatment combined with qPCR (qPCRPMA. The chemical composition and the microbial community structure of the manures were also analysed. The strains showed similar decline rates and persisted up to 63 days. At day zero, the percentage of VBNC cells among viable cells was higher in raw manures (81.5-94.8% than in treated manures (67.8-79.2%. The changes in their proportion over time depended on the temperature and on the type of effluent: the biggest increase was observed in treated manures at 20°C and the smallest increase in raw manures at 8°C. The chemical parameters had no influence on the behaviour of the strains, but decrease of the persistence of viable cells was associated with an increase in the microbial richness of the manures. This study demonstrated that storing manure altered the culturability of L. monocytogenes, which rapidly entered the VBNC state, and underlines the importance of including VBNC cells when estimating the persistence of the pathogens in farm effluents.

  16. Glioma Surgical Aspirate: A Viable Source of Tumor Tissue for Experimental Research

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    Perry F. Bartlett

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Brain cancer research has been hampered by a paucity of viable clinical tissue of sufficient quality and quantity for experimental research. This has driven researchers to rely heavily on long term cultured cells which no longer represent the cancers from which they were derived. Resection of brain tumors, particularly at the interface between normal and tumorigenic tissue, can be carried out using an ultrasonic surgical aspirator (CUSA that deposits liquid (blood and irrigation fluid and resected tissue into a sterile bottle for disposal. To determine the utility of CUSA-derived glioma tissue for experimental research, we collected 48 CUSA specimen bottles from glioma patients and analyzed both the solid tissue fragments and dissociated tumor cells suspended in the liquid waste fraction. We investigated if these fractions would be useful for analyzing tumor heterogeneity, using IHC and multi-parameter flow cytometry; we also assessed culture generation and orthotopic xenograft potential. Both cell sources proved to be an abundant, highly viable source of live tumor cells for cytometric analysis, animal studies and in-vitro studies. Our findings demonstrate that CUSA tissue represents an abundant viable source to conduct experimental research and to carry out diagnostic analyses by flow cytometry or other molecular diagnostic procedures.

  17. Stearic acid at physiologic concentrations induces in vitro lipotoxicity in circulating angiogenic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spigoni, Valentina; Fantuzzi, Federica; Fontana, Alessia; Cito, Monia; Derlindati, Eleonora; Zavaroni, Ivana; Cnop, Miriam; Bonadonna, Riccardo C; Dei Cas, Alessandra

    2017-10-01

    Saturated free fatty acids (SFAs) can induce lipotoxicity in different cells. No studies have investigated the effects of SFA in circulating angiogenic cells (CACs), which play a key role in endothelial repair processes. The aim of the study was to assess the effects of SFAs, specifically stearic acid (SA), on viability and function of CACs and to investigate potential underlying molecular mechanisms. CACs were isolated from healthy subjects by established methods. CACs were incubated with BSA-complexed stearate (100 μM) to assess the time course (from 8 to 24 h exposure) of the effects on viability and apoptosis (activation of caspases 3/7), angiogenic function (tube formation assay), pro-inflammatory cytokine (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, MCP-1 and TNFα) gene expression (qPCR) and secretion (ELISA), activation of MAPK (JNK, p38 and Erk1/2) by Western blot and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress marker (CHOP, BIP, ATF4, XBP-1 and sXBP-1) gene expression by qPCR. Stearic acid activates effector caspases in CACs in a dose- and time-dependent manner. SA also impairs CAC function and increases pro-inflammatory molecule (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, MCP-1 and TNFα) gene expression and secretion in CACs starting from 3 h of incubation. The activation of JNK by SA mediates pro-inflammatory response, but it may be not necessary for apoptosis. Moreover, SA induces the expression of ER stress markers across the three branches of the ER stress response. In humans, both function and viability of CACs are exquisitely vulnerable to physiologic concentrations of stearate; lipotoxic impairment of endothelial repair processes may be implicated in vascular damage caused by SFAs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The in vitro quality of washed, prestorage leucocyte-depleted red blood cell concentrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisbach, V; Riego, W; Strasser, E; Zingsem, J; Ringwald, J; Zimmermann, R; Eckstein, R

    2004-07-01

    No data are currently available on the quality of washed prestorage leucocyte-depleted red blood cell concentrates (RCCs). Five groups of RCCs stored in additive solution (SAG-M) were washed. The groups differed in the age of RCCs (2-5 days or 11-15 days), the temperature during the washing procedure and a 6-h storage period (4 degrees C or room temperature) and the washing solution (saline, SAG-M or 5% albumin). We measured ATP, 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG), haemolysis, blood cell count, Na(+), K(+), pH, pO(2), pCO(2) and lactate, before and after the washing procedure and hourly during the 6-h postwash storage period. The erythrocyte ATP content increased by 2-13%, relative to the baseline value, during the washing procedure. The 2,3-DPG level decreased by 15-35% in 2-6-day-old RCCs and by 30-40% in 11-15-day-old RCCs (relative to baseline values) during the washing procedure. In RCCs that were washed and stored at room temperature, and in 2-week-old RCCs, a further decrease in 2,3-DPG of up to 40%, relative to the baseline value, was observed during the 6-h postwash time-period. Washing of RCCs stored in SAG-M results in a considerable, significant loss of erythrocyte 2,3-DPG, especially in older RCCs. This loss increases in during a 6-h storage period postwash, even at 4 degrees C. This loss of erythrocyte quality might well outweigh the benefits of washed SAG-M RCCs during massive transfusion in neonates.

  19. Supplementation with concentrated milk protein in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrone, Ana Carolina Amaral de São José; Barbosa, Thaís Rodrigues; da Silva, Fernanda Lopes; Perrone, Ítalo Tuler; de Carvalho, Antônio Fernandes; Stephani, Rodrigo; Dos Santos, Kelli Borges; Atalla, Ângelo; Hallack Neto, Abrahão Elias

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the influence of dietary supplementation with whey protein concentrate (WPC) in the incidence of oral mucositis (OM) in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Patients were supplemented with a daily intake of WPC delivering 50% of the daily protein requirements (DPR) according to the Dietary Reference Intakes and classified later based on the amount of ingested supplement until OM median onset. We evaluated 73 patients. Forty-three were part of the historical control and 30 were supplemented with WPC. The OM had a mean duration of 5.3 d (SD 4.5), ranging from the day of the infusion of stem cells until the 17th day after infusion and a median of 5 d after infusion. OM duration was influenced by the conditioning protocol (P < 0.01) and WPC (P = 0.01). Patients who consumed the WPC in an amount ≥40% of DPR had a 35% reduction in duration of OM, and the incidence of OM grades 3 and 4 was 11 times smaller. Body mass index, serum albumin, and adverse reactions, such as diarrhea, nausea and vomiting, dysphagia, dry mouth and drooling, showed no statistically significant differences. WPC intake ≥40% of DPR helped to reduce the severity and duration of OM. The use of WPC in patients undergoing HSCT was shown to be safe, encouraging new studies in this population to assess its action mechanism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Transient increase in neuronal chloride concentration by neuroactive amino acids released from glioma cells

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    Cristina eBertollini

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal chloride concentration ([Cl-]i is known to be dynamically modulated and alterations in Cl- homeostasis may occur in the brain at physiological and pathological conditions, being also likely involved in glioma-related seizures. However, the mechanism leading to changes in neuronal [Cl-]i during glioma invasion are still unclear. To characterize the potential effect of glioma released soluble factors on neuronal [Cl-]i, we used genetically encoded CFP/YFP-based ratiometric Cl-Sensor transiently expressed in cultured hippocampal neurons. Exposition of neurons to glioma conditioned medium (GCM caused rapid and transient elevation of [Cl-]i, resulting in the increase of fluorescence ratio, which was strongly reduced by blockers of ionotropic glutamate receptors APV and NBQX. Furthermore, in HEK cells expressing GluR1-AMPA receptors, GCM activated ionic current with efficacy similar to those caused by glutamate, supporting the notion that GCM contains glutamate or glutamatergic agonists, which cause neuronal depolarization, activation of NMDA and AMPA/KA receptors leading to elevation of [Cl-]i. Chromatographic analysis of the GCM showed that it contained several aminoacids, including glutamate, whose release from glioma cells did not occur via the most common glial mechanisms of transport, or in response to hypoosmotic stress. GCM also contained glycine, whose action contrasted the glutamate effect. Indeed, strychnine application significantly increased GCM-induced depolarization and [Cl-]i rise. GCM-evoked [Cl-]i elevation was not inhibited by antagonists of Cl- transporters and significantly reduced in the presence of anion channels blocker NPPB, suggesting that Cl-selective channels are a major route for GCM-induced Cl- influx. Altogether, these data show that glioma released aminoacids may dynamically alter Cl- equilibrium in surrounding neurons, deeply interfering with their inhibitory balance, likely leading to physiological and

  1. Low concentration thresholds of plasma membranes for rapid energy-independent translocation of a cell-penetrating peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Catherine L; Schmaljohann, Dirk; Futaki, Shiroh; Jones, Arwyn T

    2009-05-13

    The exact mechanisms by which cell-penetrating peptides such as oligo-arginines and penetratin cross biological membranes has yet to be elucidated, but this is required if they are to reach their full potential as cellular delivery vectors. In the present study, qualitative and quantitative analysis of the influence of temperature, peptide concentration and plasma membrane cholesterol on the uptake and subcellular distribution of the model cell-penetrating peptide octa-arginine was performed in a number of suspension and adherent cell lines. When experiments were performed on ice, the peptide at 2 microM extracellular concentration efficiently entered and uniformly labelled the cytoplasm of all the suspension cells studied, but a 10-fold higher concentration was required to observe similar results in adherent cells. At 37 degrees C and at higher peptide concentrations, time-lapse microscopy experiments showed that the peptide rapidly penetrated the entire plasma membrane of suspension cells, with no evidence of a requirement for nucleation zones to promote this effect. Cholesterol depletion with methyl-beta-cyclodextrin enhanced translocation of octa-arginine across the plasma membrane of suspension cells at 37 degrees C, but decreased overall peptide accumulation. Under the same conditions in adherent cells this agent had no effect on peptide uptake or distribution. Cholesterol depletion increased the overall accumulation of the peptide at 4 degrees C in KG1a cells, but this effect could be reversed by re-addition of cholesterol as methyl-beta-cyclodextrin-cholesterol complexes. The results highlight the relatively high porosity of the plasma membrane of suspension cells to this peptide, especially at low temperatures, suggesting that this feature could be exploited for delivering bioactive entities.

  2. Changes in Intracellular Calcium Concentration and pH of Target Cells During the Cytotoxic Process: A Quantitative Study at the Single Cell Level

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Grooth, B.G.; Radosevic, Katarina; Greve, Jan; Radosevic, K.

    1995-01-01

    This study reports on the changes in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]in) and intracellular pH ([pH]in) that occur in K562 target cells during interaction with human Natural Killer (NK) cells. The data were obtained using a quantitative fluorescence microscope and fluorescent ratio probes

  3. Low Concentration of Exogenous Carbon Monoxide Modulates Radiation-Induced Bystander Effect in Mammalian Cell Cluster Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenqing Wu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available During radiotherapy procedures, radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE can potentially lead to genetic hazards to normal tissues surrounding the targeted regions. Previous studies showed that RIBE intensities in cell cluster models were much higher than those in monolayer cultured cell models. On the other hand, low-concentration carbon monoxide (CO was previously shown to exert biological functions via binding to the heme domain of proteins and then modulating various signaling pathways. In relation, our previous studies showed that exogenous CO generated by the CO releasing molecule, tricarbonyldichlororuthenium (CORM-2, at a relatively low concentration (20 µM, effectively attenuated the formation of RIBE-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSB and micronucleus (MN. In the present work, we further investigated the capability of a low concentration of exogenous CO (CORM-2 of attenuating or inhibiting RIBE in a mixed-cell cluster model. Our results showed that CO (CORM-2 with a low concentration of 30 µM could effectively suppress RIBE-induced DSB (p53 binding protein 1, p53BP1, MN formation and cell proliferation in bystander cells but not irradiated cells via modulating the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS andcyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2. The results can help mitigate RIBE-induced hazards during radiotherapy procedures.

  4. Low Concentration of Exogenous Carbon Monoxide Modulates Radiation-Induced Bystander Effect in Mammalian Cell Cluster Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wenqing; Nie, Lili; Yu, K N; Wu, Lijun; Kong, Peizhong; Bao, Lingzhi; Chen, Guodong; Yang, Haoran; Han, Wei

    2016-12-08

    During radiotherapy procedures, radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) can potentially lead to genetic hazards to normal tissues surrounding the targeted regions. Previous studies showed that RIBE intensities in cell cluster models were much higher than those in monolayer cultured cell models. On the other hand, low-concentration carbon monoxide (CO) was previously shown to exert biological functions via binding to the heme domain of proteins and then modulating various signaling pathways. In relation, our previous studies showed that exogenous CO generated by the CO releasing molecule, tricarbonyldichlororuthenium (CORM-2), at a relatively low concentration (20 µM), effectively attenuated the formation of RIBE-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) and micronucleus (MN). In the present work, we further investigated the capability of a low concentration of exogenous CO (CORM-2) of attenuating or inhibiting RIBE in a mixed-cell cluster model. Our results showed that CO (CORM-2) with a low concentration of 30 µM could effectively suppress RIBE-induced DSB (p53 binding protein 1, p53BP1), MN formation and cell proliferation in bystander cells but not irradiated cells via modulating the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) andcyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). The results can help mitigate RIBE-induced hazards during radiotherapy procedures.

  5. Sertoli Cells Modulate Testicular Vascular Network Development, Structure, and Function to Influence Circulating Testosterone Concentrations in Adult Male Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebourcet, Diane; Wu, Junxi; Cruickshanks, Lyndsey; Smith, Sarah E; Milne, Laura; Fernando, Anuruddika; Wallace, Robert J; Gray, Calum D; Hadoke, Patrick W F; Mitchell, Rod T; O'Shaughnessy, Peter J; Smith, Lee B

    2016-06-01

    The testicular vasculature forms a complex network, providing oxygenation, micronutrients, and waste clearance from the testis. The vasculature is also instrumental to testis function because it is both the route by which gonadotropins are delivered to the testis and by which T is transported away to target organs. Whether Sertoli cells play a role in regulating the testicular vasculature in postnatal life has never been unequivocally demonstrated. In this study we used models of acute Sertoli cell ablation and acute germ cell ablation to address whether Sertoli cells actively influence vascular structure and function in the adult testis. Our findings suggest that Sertoli cells play a key role in supporting the structure of the testicular vasculature. Ablating Sertoli cells (and germ cells) or germ cells alone results in a similar reduction in testis size, yet only the specific loss of Sertoli cells leads to a reduction in total intratesticular vascular volume, the number of vascular branches, and the numbers of small microvessels; loss of germ cells alone has no effect on the testicular vasculature. These perturbations to the testicular vasculature leads to a reduction in fluid exchange between the vasculature and testicular interstitium, which reduces gonadotropin-stimulated circulating T concentrations, indicative of reduced Leydig cell stimulation and/or reduced secretion of T into the vasculature. These findings describe a new paradigm by which the transport of hormones and other factors into and out of the testis may be influenced by Sertoli cells and highlights these cells as potential targets for enhancing this endocrine relationship.

  6. Strategies to decolorize high concentrations of methyl orange using growing cells of Lactobacillus casei TISTR 1500.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantiwa, Nidtaya; Seesuriyachan, Phisit; Kuntiya, Ampin

    2013-01-01

    Batch, fed-batch, and continuous fermentation was used in the processing of methyl orange decolorization using growing cells of Lactobacillus casei TISTR 1500. This report presents the optimal conditions for methyl orange decolorization by the strain TISTR 1500 in modified MRS via a central composite design (CCD) experiment. In particular, the highest decolorization efficiencies were obtained with 13.41 g/L of meat extract, and with 10.89 g/L of yeast extract at pH 6.88 at 35 °C. Under the optimal conditions, the rate of decolorization increased to 322% of that obtained for un-optimized MRS medium. The high concentration of methyl orange (5 g/L) was completely degraded within 9 h in batch fermentation. The total methyl orange load with 8.075 g/L was also decolorized in fed-batch fermentation within 13 h, and the biomass of the strain dramatically decreased after an incubation time of 8 h due to a shortage of sucrose. In the continuous system with a dye-loading rate of 600 mg/L/h and a total of loaded azo dye of 7.2 g/L, high efficiency of methyl orange removal was significantly high, at 98%.

  7. Series integration of the diaphragm cell transport equation when the diffusion coefficient is a function of concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Judith B.; Baird, James K.

    1992-01-01

    An integral of the form, t = B0 + BL ln(Delta-c) + B1(Delta-c) + B2(Delta-c)-squared + ..., where t is the time and Delta-c is the concentration difference across the frit, is derived in the case of the diaphragm cell transport equation where the interdiffusion coefficient is a function of concentration. The coefficient, B0, is a constant of the integration, while the coefficients, BL, B1, B2,..., depend in general upon the constant, the compartment volumes, and the interdiffusion coefficient and various of its concentration derivatives evaluated at the mean concentration for the cell. Explicit formulas for BL, B1, B2,... are given.

  8. Reduction of front-metallization grid shading in concentrator cells through laser micro-grooved cover glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Linares, Pablo; Voarino, Philippe; Dominguez, César; Dellea, Olivier; Besson, Pierre; Fugier, Pascal; Baudrit, Mathieu

    2015-09-01

    Concentrator solar cell front-grid metallizations are designed so that the trade-off between series resistance and shading factor (SF) is optimized for a particular irradiance. High concentrator photovoltaics (CPV) typically requires a metallic electrode pattern that covers up to 10% of the cell surface. The shading effect produced by this front electrode results in a significant reduction in short-circuit current (ISC) and hence, in a significant efficiency loss. In this work we present a cover glass (originally meant to protect the cell surface) that is laser-grooved with a micrometric pattern that redirects the incident solar light towards interfinger regions and away from the metallic electrodes, where they would be wasted in terms of photovoltaic generation. Quantum efficiency (QE) and current (I)-voltage (V) characterization under concentration validate the proof-of-concept, showing great potential for CPV applications.

  9. Reduction of front-metallization grid shading in concentrator cells through laser micro-grooved cover glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García-Linares, Pablo, E-mail: pablo.garcia-linares@cea.fr; Voarino, Philippe; Besson, Pierre; Baudrit, Mathieu [CEA-LITEN, Laboratoire de Photovoltaïque à Concentration, INES, Le Bourget du Lac (France); Dominguez, César [CEA-LITEN, Laboratoire de Photovoltaïque à Concentration, INES, Le Bourget du Lac (France); Instituto de Energía Solar - Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid (Spain); Dellea, Olivier; Fugier, Pascal [CEA-LITEN, Laboratoire de Surfaces Nanostructurées, Grenoble (France)

    2015-09-28

    Concentrator solar cell front-grid metallizations are designed so that the trade-off between series resistance and shading factor (SF) is optimized for a particular irradiance. High concentrator photovoltaics (CPV) typically requires a metallic electrode pattern that covers up to 10% of the cell surface. The shading effect produced by this front electrode results in a significant reduction in short-circuit current (I{sub SC}) and hence, in a significant efficiency loss. In this work we present a cover glass (originally meant to protect the cell surface) that is laser-grooved with a micrometric pattern that redirects the incident solar light towards interfinger regions and away from the metallic electrodes, where they would be wasted in terms of photovoltaic generation. Quantum efficiency (QE) and current (I)-voltage (V) characterization under concentration validate the proof-of-concept, showing great potential for CPV applications.

  10. DYS-REGULATION OF EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX PROTEINS TURNOVER BY HIGH GLUCOSE CONCENTRATIONS IN CULTURED HUMAN GLOMERULAR MESANGIAL CELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ROHOLLAH HOSSEINI

    1999-10-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic glomerulopathy is generally believed to be the major cause for the development of chronic renal failure in diabetes mellitus. Diabetic glomerulosclerosis is characterized by the accumulation of extracellular matrix proteins such as fibronectin and type IV collagen in the mesangium. In this study, the effect of high glucose (33.6 mM on fibronectin and type IV collagen concentrations in the supernatant of human glomerular mesangial cell culture was studied. The concentrations of fibronection and type IV collagen in tissue culture supernatant, assayed by ELISA techniques increased significantly (P<0.01 by the high glucose level (33.6 mM after 6 days incubation. Direct cell counting and thymidine incorporation methods showed that high glucose concentrations (33.6 mM, 56 mM and 112 mM inhibit the mesangial cell (MC proliferation in concentration-dependent manner. To study the osmotic effect of high glucose concentrations, the mesangial cells were also cultured in the presence of manitol and it was found that manitol did not have effect on cellular proliferation but increased fibronectin and type IV collagen concentrations significantly (P<0.05 in the supernatants. These results indicate that the increase of synthesis and/or decrease degradation of fibronectin and type IV collagen by MCs may, in part, result from changes in osmolarity induced by high glucose concentration. These results suggest that elevation of fibronectin and type IV collagen production and/or decrease their degradation by the mesangial cells may play an important role in the accumulation of these extracellular matrix proteins which is common to diabetic glomerulosclerosis.

  11. Combinations of parabens at concentrations measured in human breast tissue can increase proliferation of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Amelia K; Darbre, Philippa D

    2013-05-01

    The alkyl esters of p-hydroxybenzoic acid (parabens), which are used as preservatives in consumer products, possess oestrogenic activity and have been measured in human breast tissue. This has raised concerns for a potential involvement in the development of human breast cancer. In this paper, we have investigated the extent to which proliferation of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells can be increased by exposure to the five parabens either alone or in combination at concentrations as recently measured in 160 human breast tissue samples. Determination of no-observed-effect concentrations (NOEC), lowest-observed-effect concentrations (LOEC), EC50 and EC100 values for stimulation of proliferation of MCF-7 cells by five parabens revealed that 43/160 (27%) of the human breast tissue samples contained at least one paraben at a concentration ≥ LOEC and 64/160 (40%) > NOEC. Proliferation of MCF-7 cells could be increased by combining all five parabens at concentrations down to the 50(th) percentile (median) values measured in the tissues. For the 22 tissue samples taken at the site of ER + PR + primary cancers, 12 contained a sufficient concentration of one or more paraben to stimulate proliferation of MCF-7 cells. This demonstrates that parabens, either alone or in combination, are present in human breast tissue at concentrations sufficient to stimulate the proliferation of MCF-7 cells in vitro, and that functional consequences of the presence of paraben in human breast tissue should be assessed on the basis of all five parabens and not single parabens individually. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Electrochemical treatment of reverse osmosis concentrate on boron-doped electrodes in undivided and divided cell configurations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagastyo, Arseto Y. [Advanced Water Management Centre, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, QLD 4072 (Australia); Department of Environmental Engineering, Institut Teknologi Sepuluh Nopember, Surabaya 60111 (Indonesia); Batstone, Damien J. [Advanced Water Management Centre, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, QLD 4072 (Australia); Kristiana, Ina [Curtin Water Quality Research Centre, Resources and Chemistry Precinct, Department of Chemistry, Curtin University, Bentley, Perth, WA 6102 (Australia); Escher, Beate I. [National Research Centre for Environmental Toxicology (Entox), The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4108 (Australia); Joll, Cynthia [Curtin Water Quality Research Centre, Resources and Chemistry Precinct, Department of Chemistry, Curtin University, Bentley, Perth, WA 6102 (Australia); Radjenovic, Jelena, E-mail: j.radjenovic@uq.edu.au [Advanced Water Management Centre, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, QLD 4072 (Australia)

    2014-08-30

    Highlights: • 100% of COD and ∼70% of DOC was removed in both cell configurations. • ∼21.7 mg L{sup −1} of AOCl and ∼2.3 mg L{sup −1} of AOBr was formed regardless of the membrane use. • The TEQ was far lower than expected given the high AOCl concentrations. • The undivided cell consumed lower energy compared to the divided cell. - Abstract: An undivided electrolytic cell may offer lower electrochlorination through reduction of chlorine/hypochlorite at the cathode. This study investigated the performance of electrooxidation of reverse osmosis concentrate using boron-doped diamond electrodes in membrane-divided and undivided cells. In both cell configurations, similar extents of chemical oxygen demand and dissolved organic carbon removal were obtained. Continuous formation of chlorinated organic compounds was observed regardless of the membrane presence. However, halogenation of the organic matter did not result in a corresponding increase in toxicity (Vibrio fischeri bioassay performed on extracted samples), with toxicity decreasing slightly until 10 Ah L{sup −1}, and generally remaining near the initial baseline-toxicity equivalent concentration (TEQ) of the raw concentrate (i.e., ∼2 mg L{sup −1}). The exception was a high range toxicity measure in the undivided cell (i.e., TEQ = 11 mg L{sup −1} at 2.4 Ah L{sup −1}), which rapidly decreased to 4 mg L{sup −1}. The discrepancy between the halogenated organic matter and toxicity patterns may be a consequence of volatile and/or polar halogenated by-products formed in oxidation by OH· electrogenerated at the anode. The undivided cell exhibited lower energy compared to the divided cell, 0.25 kWh gCOD{sup −1} and 0.34 kWh gCOD{sup −1}, respectively, yet it did not demonstrate any improvement regarding by-products formation.

  13. Mitochondrial respiration in human viable platelets-Methodology and influence of gender, age and storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjövall, Fredrik; Ehinger, Johannes K H; Marelsson, Sigurður E

    2013-01-01

    Studying whole cell preparations with intact mitochondria and respiratory complexes has a clear benefit compared to isolated or disrupted mitochondria due to the dynamic interplay between mitochondria and other cellular compartments. Platelet mitochondria have a potential to serve as a source...... of human viable mitochondria when studying mitochondrial physiology and pathogenic mechanisms, as well as for the diagnostics of mitochondrial diseases. The objective of the present study was to perform a detailed evaluation of platelet mitochondrial respiration using high-resolution respirometry. Further...

  14. Effects of inoculum type and bulk dissolved oxygen concentration on achieving partial nitrification by entrapped-cell-based reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rongsayamanont, Chaiwat; Limpiyakorn, Tawan; Khan, Eakalak

    2014-07-01

    An entrapment of nitrifiers into gel matrix is employed as a tool to fulfill partial nitrification under non-limiting dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations in bulk solutions. This study aims to clarify which of these two attributes, inoculum type and DO concentration in bulk solutions, is the decisive factor for partial nitrification in an entrapped-cell based system. Four polyvinyl alcohol entrapped inocula were prepared to have different proportions of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) and nitrite-oxidizing activity. At a DO concentration of 3 mg l(-1), the number of active NOB cells in an inoculum was the decisive factor for partial nitrification enhancement. However, when the DO concentration was reduced to 2 mg l(-1), all entrapped cell inocula showed similar degrees of partial nitrification. The results suggested that with the lower bulk DO concentration, the preparation of entrapped cell inocula is not useful as the DO level becomes the decisive factor for achieving partial nitrification. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Syntheses of nicotinamide riboside and derivatives: effective agents for increasing nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide concentrations in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tianle; Chan, Noel Yan-Ki; Sauve, Anthony A

    2007-12-27

    A new two-step methodology achieves stereoselective synthesis of beta-nicotinamide riboside and a series of related amide, ester, and acid nucleosides. Compounds were prepared through a triacetylated-nicotinate ester nucleoside, via coupling of either ethylnicotinate or phenylnicotinate with 1,2,3,5-tetra-O-acetyl-beta-D-ribofuranose. Nicotinamide riboside, nicotinic acid riboside, O-ethylnicotinate riboside, O-methylnicotinate riboside, and several N-alkyl derivatives increased NAD+ concentrations from 1.2-2.7-fold in several mammalian cell lines. These findings establish bioavailability and potent effects of these nucleosides in stimulating the increase of NAD+ concentrations in mammalian cells.

  16. Variation in the excitability of developed D. discoideum cells as a function of agar concentration in the substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oikawa, Noriko; Bae, Albert; Amselem, Gabriel; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2010-03-01

    In the absence of nutrients, Dictyostelium discoideum cells enter a developmental cycle--they signal each other, aggregate, and ultimately form fruiting bodies. During the signaling stage, the cells relay waves of cyclic adenosine 3',5' monophosphate (cAMP). We observed a transition from spiral to circular patterns in the signaling wave, depending on the agar concentration of the substrate. In this talk we will present the changes in the times for the onset of signaling and synchronization versus agar concentration, as measured by spectral entropy. We also will discuss the origin of these effects.

  17. High therapeutic concentration of prazosin up-regulates angiogenic IL6 and CCL2 genes in hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zu-Yau; Chuang, Wan-Long

    2012-12-01

    Alteration of the oxidative stress of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells can influence the expressions of genes favored angiogenesis. Quinone reductase 2 which can activate quinones leading to reactive oxygen species production is a melatonin receptor known as MT3. Prazosin prescribed for benign prostate hyperplasia and hypertension is a potent antagonist for MT3. This study was to investigate the influence of therapeutic concentrations of prazosin (0.01 and 0.1μM) on cell proliferation and differential expressions of CCL2, CCL20, CXCL6, CXCL10, IL8 and IL6 genes related to inflammation and/or oxidative stress in human HCC cell lines. Two HCC cell lines including one without susceptible to amphotericin B-induced oxidative stress (cell line A; HCC24/KMUH) and one with this effect (cell line B; HCC38/KMUH) were investigated by 0.01 and 0.1μM prazosin. The premixed WST-1 cell proliferation reagent was applied for proliferation assay. Differential expressions of genes were examined by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Our results showed that both 0.01 and 0.1μM prazosin did not influence cell proliferation in both cell lines. Both 0.01 and 0.1μM prazosin in cell line A and 0.01μM prazosin in cell line B did not cause differential expressions of tested genes. However, 0.1μM prazosin caused remarkable up-regulation of IL6 gene and slightly up-regulation of CCL2 gene in cell line B. In conclusion, high therapeutic concentration of prazosin can up-regulate angiogenic IL6 and CCL2 genes in human HCC cells susceptible to amphotericin B-induced oxidative stress. Clinical application of prazosin in patients with HCC should consider this possibility. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Correlation of Pain and Fluoride Concentration in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients on Voriconazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barajas, Megan R; McCullough, Kristen B; Merten, Julianna A; Dierkhising, Ross A; Bartoo, Gabriel T; Hashmi, Shahrukh K; Hogan, William J; Litzow, Mark R; Patnaik, Mrinal M; Wilson, John W; Wolf, Robert C; Wermers, Robert A

    2016-03-01

    Supportive care guidelines recommend antimold prophylaxis in hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients deemed to have high risk for invasive fungal infection, leading to long-term use of voriconazole after allogeneic HSCT in patients who remain immunocompromised. Voriconazole has been associated with periostitis, exostoses, and fluoride excess in patients after solid organ transplantation, HSCT, and leukemia therapy. The aims of this study were to describe the frequency and clinical presentation of patients presenting with pain and fluoride excess among allogeneic HSCT patients taking voriconazole, to identify when a plasma fluoride concentration was measured with respect to voriconazole initiation and onset of pain, and to describe the outcomes of patients with fluoride excess in the setting of HSCT. A retrospective review was conducted of all adult allogeneic HSCT patients receiving voriconazole at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, between January 1, 2009 and July 31, 2012. Of 242 patients included, 32 had plasma fluoride measured to explore the etiology of musculoskeletal pain. In 31 patients with fluoride measurement while on voriconazole, 29 (93.5%) had elevated levels. The median plasma fluoride was 11.1 μmol/L (range, 2.4 to 24.7). The median duration of voriconazole was 163 days (range, 2 to 1327). The median time to fluoride measurement was 128 days after voriconazole initiation (range, 28 to 692). At 1 year after the start of voriconazole after HSCT, 15.3% of patients had developed pain associated with voriconazole use and 35.7% developed pain while on voriconazole after 2 years. Of the patients with an elevated fluoride level, 22 discontinued voriconazole; pain resolved or improved in 15, stabilized in 3, and worsened in 4 patients. Ten patients continued voriconazole; pain resolved or improved in 7, was attributable to alternative causes in 2, and undefined in 1. Serum creatinine, estimated glomerular filtration rate, alkaline phosphatase

  19. Concentrator Photovoltaics

    CERN Document Server

    Luque, Antonio L

    2007-01-01

    Photovoltaic solar-energy conversion is one of the most promising technologies for generating renewable energy, and conversion of concentrated sunlight can lead to reduced cost for solar electricity. In fact, photovoltaic conversion of concentrated sunlight insures an efficient and cost-effective sustainable power resource. This book gives an overview of all components, e.g. cells, concentrators, modules and systems, for systems of concentrator photovoltaics. The authors report on significant results related to design, technology, and applications, and also cover the fundamental physics and market considerations. Specific contributions include: theory and practice of sunlight concentrators; an overview of concentrator PV activities; a description of concentrator solar cells; design and technology of modules and systems; manufacturing aspects; and a market study.

  20. Investigation of Annealing and Blend Concentration Effects of Organic Solar Cells Composed of Small Organic Dye and Fullerene Derivative

    OpenAIRE

    Yasser A. M. Ismail; Tetsuo Soga; Takashi Jimbo

    2011-01-01

    We have fabricated bulk heterojunction organic solar cells using coumarin 6 (C6) as a small organic dye, for light harvesting and electron donation, with fullerene derivative [6,6]-phenyl-C61 butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM), acting as an electron acceptor, by spin-coating technique. We have investigated thermal annealing and blend concentration effects on light harvesting, photocurrent, and performance parameters of the solar cells. In this work, we introduced an experimental method by which...

  1. Ultra high open circuit voltage (>1 V) of poly-3-hexylthiophene based organic solar cells with concentrated light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tromholt, Thomas; Madsen, Morten Vesterager; Krebs, Frederik C

    2013-01-01

    One approach to increasing polymer solar cell efficiency is to blend poly-(3-hexyl-thiophene) with poorly electron accepting fullerene derivatives to obtain higher open circuit voltage (Voc). In this letter concentrated light is used to study the electrical properties of cell operation at up to 2...... logarithmic Voc evolution is observed from 0.4 to 2000 suns, where a maximum Voc of 1019 mV was obtained. © 2013 American Institute of Physics....

  2. Soluble Mediators in Platelet Concentrates Modulate Dendritic Cell Inflammatory Responses in an Experimental Model of Transfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perros, Alexis J; Christensen, Anne-Marie; Flower, Robert L; Dean, Melinda M

    2015-10-01

    The transfusion of platelet concentrates (PCs) is widely used to treat thrombocytopenia and severe trauma. Ex vivo storage of PCs is associated with a storage lesion characterized by partial platelet activation and the release of soluble mediators, such as soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L), RANTES, and interleukin (IL)-8. An in vitro whole blood culture transfusion model was employed to assess whether mediators present in PC supernatants (PC-SNs) modulated dendritic cell (DC)-specific inflammatory responses (intracellular staining) and the overall inflammatory response (cytometric bead array). Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was included in parallel cultures to model the impact of PC-SNs on cell responses following toll-like receptor-mediated pathogen recognition. The impact of both the PC dose (10%, 25%) and ex vivo storage period was investigated [day 2 (D2), day 5 (D5), day 7 (D7)]. PC-SNs alone had minimal impact on DC-specific inflammatory responses and the overall inflammatory response. However, in the presence of LPS, exposure to PC-SNs resulted in a significant dose-associated suppression of the production of DC IL-12, IL-6, IL-1α, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1β and storage-associated suppression of the production of DC IL-10, TNF-α, and IL-8. For the overall inflammatory response, IL-6, TNF-α, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, and inflammatory protein (IP)-10 were significantly suppressed and IL-8, IL-10, and IL-1β significantly increased following exposure to PC-SNs in the presence of LPS. These data suggest that soluble mediators present in PCs significantly suppress DC function and modulate the overall inflammatory response, particularly in the presence of an infectious stimulus. Given the central role of DCs in the initiation and regulation of the immune response, these results suggest that modulation of the DC inflammatory profile is a probable mechanism contributing to transfusion-related complications.

  3. Time- and concentration-dependent effects of resveratrol in HL-60 and HepG2 cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stervbo, Ulrik; Vang, Ole; Bonnesen, Christine

    2006-01-01

    Resveratrol, a phytochemical present in grapes, has been demonstrated to inhibit tumourigenesis in animal models. However, the specific mechanism by which resveratrol exerts its anticarcinogenic effect has yet to be elucidated. In the present study, the inhibitory effects of resveratrol on cell...... proliferation and apoptosis were evaluated in the human leukaemia cell line HL-60 and the human hepatoma derived cell line HepG2. We found that after a 2 h incubation period, resveratrol inhibited DNA synthesis in a concentration-dependent manner. The IC50 value was 15 μM in both HL-60 and HepG2 cells. When...... the time of treatment was extended, an increase in IC50 value was observed; for example, at 24 h the IC50 value was 30 μM for HL-60 cells and 60 μM for HepG2 cells. Flow cytometry revealed that cells accumulated in different phases of the cell cycle depending on the resveratrol concentration. Furthermore...

  4. Physiological and hypoxic oxygen concentration differentially regulates human c-Kit+ cardiac stem cell proliferation and migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellio, Michael A; Rodrigues, Claudia O; Landin, Ana Marie; Hatzistergos, Konstantinos E; Kuznetsov, Jeffim; Florea, Victoria; Valasaki, Krystalenia; Khan, Aisha; Hare, Joshua M; Schulman, Ivonne Hernandez

    2016-12-01

    Cardiac stem cells (CSCs) are being evaluated for their efficacy in the treatment of heart failure. However, numerous factors impair the exogenously delivered cells' regenerative capabilities. Hypoxia is one stress that contributes to inadequate tissue repair. Here, we tested the hypothesis that hypoxia impairs cell proliferation, survival, and migration of human CSCs relative to physiological and room air oxygen concentrations. Human endomyocardial biopsy-derived CSCs were isolated, selected for c-Kit expression, and expanded in vitro at room air (21% O2). To assess the effect on proliferation, survival, and migration, CSCs were transferred to physiological (5%) or hypoxic (0.5%) O2 concentrations. Physiological O2 levels increased proliferation (P air and hypoxia, a significant reduction of β-galactosidase activity (-4,203 fluorescent units, P air and hypoxia, and treatment with mesenchymal stem cell-conditioned media rescued CSC migration under hypoxia to levels comparable to physiological O2 migration (2-fold, P air may diminish cell regenerative potential. This study provides novel insights into the modulatory effects of O2 concentration on CSC biology and has important implications for refining stem cell therapies. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  5. Synovial fluid cell counts and total protein concentration in clinically normal fetlock joints of young dromedarian camels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bani Ismail, Z; Al-Rukibat, R

    2006-06-01

    Twenty-seven 9-12 months old healthy male dromedarian camels were used to determine total nucleated leucocyte count (TNCC), absolute and percentages of polymorphonuclear (PMN) and mononuclear leucocytes, and total protein (TP) concentration in synovial fluid from grossly and radiographically normal fetlock joints. Arthrocentesis was performed bilaterally from the fetlock joints of the forelimbs and hindlimbs. Blood contaminated samples and samples obtained from grossly or radiographically abnormal joints were excluded. The mean +/- SD of TNCC in 108 samples of fetlock joint synovial fluids was 500 +/- 400 cells/microl. Monocytes/macrophages were the predominant cell type. There were no significant differences in mean TNCC, absolute numbers and percentages of various leucocytes and TP concentrations between the right and left fetlock joints of the forelimbs and hindlimbs or between the fetlock joints of the forelimbs and hindlimbs. The mean +/- SD of absolute numbers and percentages of various cell types were: PMN leucocytes 1 +/- 2 cells/microl (2%), lymphocytes 116 +/- 167 cells/microl (26%), and monocytes/macrophages 383 +/- 323 cells/microl (72%). The mean +/- SD of TP concentration was 2 +/- 1 g/dl.

  6. Electrochemical treatment of reverse osmosis concentrate on boron-doped electrodes in undivided and divided cell configurations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagastyo, Arseto Y; Batstone, Damien J; Kristiana, Ina; Escher, Beate I; Joll, Cynthia; Radjenovic, Jelena

    2014-08-30

    An undivided electrolytic cell may offer lower electrochlorination through reduction of chlorine/hypochlorite at the cathode. This study investigated the performance of electrooxidation of reverse osmosis concentrate using boron-doped diamond electrodes in membrane-divided and undivided cells. In both cell configurations, similar extents of chemical oxygen demand and dissolved organic carbon removal were obtained. Continuous formation of chlorinated organic compounds was observed regardless of the membrane presence. However, halogenation of the organic matter did not result in a corresponding increase in toxicity (Vibrio fischeri bioassay performed on extracted samples), with toxicity decreasing slightly until 10AhL(-1), and generally remaining near the initial baseline-toxicity equivalent concentration (TEQ) of the raw concentrate (i.e., ∼2mgL(-1)). The exception was a high range toxicity measure in the undivided cell (i.e., TEQ=11mgL(-1) at 2.4AhL(-1)), which rapidly decreased to 4mgL(-1). The discrepancy between the halogenated organic matter and toxicity patterns may be a consequence of volatile and/or polar halogenated by-products formed in oxidation by OH electrogenerated at the anode. The undivided cell exhibited lower energy compared to the divided cell, 0.25kWhgCOD(-1) and 0.34kWhgCOD(-1), respectively, yet it did not demonstrate any improvement regarding by-products formation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Influences of dissolved oxygen concentration on biocathodic microbial communities in microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rago, Laura; Cristiani, Pierangela; Villa, Federica; Zecchin, Sarah; Colombo, Alessandra; Cavalca, Lucia; Schievano, Andrea

    2017-08-01

    Dissolved oxygen (DO) at cathodic interface is a critical factor influencing microbial fuel cells (MFC) performance. In this work, three MFCs were operated with cathode under different DO conditions: i) air-breathing (A-MFC); ii) water-submerged (W-MFC) and iii) assisted by photosynthetic microorganisms (P-MFC). A plateau of maximum current was reached at 1.06±0.03mA, 1.48±0.06mA and 1.66±0.04mA, increasing respectively for W-MFC, P-MFC and A-MFC. Electrochemical and microbiological tools (Illumina sequencing, confocal microscopy and biofilm cryosectioning) were used to explore anodic and cathodic biofilm in each MFC type. In all cases, biocathodes improved oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) as compared to abiotic condition and A-MFC was the best performing system. Photosynthetic cultures in the cathodic chamber supplied high DO level, up to 16mg O2 L -1 , which sustained aerobic microbial community in P-MFC biocathode. Halomonas, Pseudomonas and other microaerophilic genera reached >50% of the total OTUs. The presence of sulfur reducing bacteria (Desulfuromonas) and purple non-sulfur bacteria in A-MFC biocathode suggested that the recirculation of sulfur compounds could shuttle electrons to sustain the reduction of oxygen as final electron acceptor. The low DO concentration limited the cathode in W-MFC. A model of two different possible microbial mechanisms is proposed which can drive predominantly cathodic ORR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. A novel protein, ubiquitous in marine phytoplankton, concentrates iron at the cell surface and facilitates uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissey, Joe; Sutak, Robert; Paz-Yepes, Javier; Tanaka, Atsuko; Moustafa, Ahmed; Veluchamy, Alaguraj; Thomas, Yann; Botebol, Hugo; Bouget, François-Yves; McQuaid, Jeffrey B; Tirichine, Leila; Allen, Andrew E; Lesuisse, Emmanuel; Bowler, Chris

    2015-02-02

    Numerous cellular functions including respiration require iron. Plants and phytoplankton must also maintain the iron-rich photosynthetic electron transport chain, which most likely evolved in the iron-replete reducing environments of the Proterozoic ocean [1]. Iron bioavailability has drastically decreased in the contemporary ocean [1], most likely selecting for the evolution of efficient iron acquisition mechanisms among modern phytoplankton. Mesoscale iron fertilization experiments often result in blooms dominated by diatoms [2], indicating that diatoms have adaptations that allow survival in iron-limited waters and rapid multiplication when iron becomes available. Yet the genetic and molecular bases are unclear, as very few iron uptake genes have been functionally characterized from marine eukaryotic phytoplankton, and large portions of diatom iron starvation transcriptomes are genes encoding unknown functions [3-5]. Here we show that the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum utilizes ISIP2a to concentrate Fe(III) at the cell surface as part of a novel, copper-independent and thermodynamically controlled iron uptake system. ISIP2a is expressed in response to iron limitation several days prior to the induction of ferrireductase activity, and it facilitates significant Fe(III) uptake during the initial response to Fe limitation. ISIP2a is able to directly bind Fe(III) and increase iron uptake when heterologously expressed, whereas knockdown of ISIP2a in P. tricornutum decreases iron uptake, resulting in impaired growth and chlorosis during iron limitation. ISIP2a is expressed by diverse marine phytoplankton, indicating that it is an ecologically significant adaptation to the unique nutrient composition of marine environments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Detection of viable Salmonella in lettuce by propidium monoazide real-time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Ningjian; Dong, Jin; Luo, Laixin; Li, Yong

    2011-05-01

    Contamination of lettuce by Salmonella has caused serious public health problems. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) allows rapid detection of pathogenic bacteria in food, but it is inaccurate as it might amplify DNA from dead target cells as well. This study aimed to investigate the stability of DNA of dead Salmonella cells in lettuce and to develop an approach to detecting viable Salmonella in lettuce. Salmonella-free lettuce was inoculated with heat-killed Salmonella Typhimurium cells and stored at 4 °C. Bacterial DNA extracted from the sample was amplified by real-time PCR targeting the invA gene. Our results indicate that DNA from the dead cells remained stable in lettuce for at least 8 d. To overcome this limitation, propidium monoazide (PMA), a dye that can selectively penetrate dead bacterial cells and cross-link their DNA upon light exposure, was combined with real-time PCR. Lettuce samples inoculated with different levels of dead or viable S. Typhimurium cells were treated or untreated with PMA before DNA extraction. Real-time PCR suggests that PMA treatment effectively prevented PCR amplification from as high as 10(8) CFU/g dead S. Typhimurium cells in lettuce. The PMA real-time PCR assay could detect viable Salmonella at as low as 10(2) CFU/mL in pure culture and 10(3) CFU/g in lettuce. With 12-h enrichment, S. Typhimurium of 10(1) CFU/g in lettuce was detectable. In conclusion, the PMA real-time PCR assay provides an alternative to real-time PCR assay for accurate detection of Salmonella in food. © 2011 Institute of Food Technologists®

  10. An advanced PCR method for the specific detection of viable total coliform bacteria in pasteurized milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soejima, Takashi; Minami, Jun-ichi; Yaeshima, Tomoko; Iwatsuki, Keiji

    2012-07-01

    Pasteurized milk is a complex food that contains various inhibitors of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and may contain a large number of dead bacteria, depending on the milking conditions and environment. Ethidium monoazide bromide (EMA)-PCR is occasionally used to distinguish between viable and dead bacteria in foods other than pasteurized milk. EMA is a DNA-intercalating dye that selectively permeates the compromised cell membranes of dead bacteria and cleaves DNA. Usually, EMA-PCR techniques reduce the detection of dead bacteria by up to 3.5 logs compared with techniques that do not use EMA. However, this difference may still be insufficient to suppress the amplification of DNA from dead Gram-negative bacteria (e.g., total coliform bacteria) if they are present in pasteurized milk in large numbers. Thus, false positives may result. We developed a new method that uses real-time PCR targeting of a long DNA template (16S-23S rRNA gene, principally 2,451 bp) following EMA treatment to completely suppress the amplification of DNA of up to 7 logs (10(7) cells) of dead total coliforms. Furthermore, we found that a low dose of proteinase K (25 U/ml) removed PCR inhibitors and simultaneously increased the signal from viable coliform bacteria. In conclusion, our simple protocol specifically detects viable total coliforms in pasteurized milk at an initial count of ≥1 colony forming unit (CFU)/2.22 ml within 7.5 h of total testing time. This detection limit for viable cells complies with the requirements for the analysis of total coliforms in pasteurized milk set by the Japanese Sanitation Act (which specifies <1 CFU/2.22 ml).

  11. Engineering biomechanically functional neocartilage derived from expanded articular chondrocytes through the manipulation of cell-seeding density and dexamethasone concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Brian J; Huey, Daniel J; Hu, Jerry C; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A

    2017-08-01

    Recent work has established methods to engineer self-assembled, scaffold-free neocartilage from an expanded articular chondrocyte (AC) cell source. In continuing such work, the objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of cell-seeding density and dexamethasone concentration on these neocartilage constructs. Neocartilage discs (5 mm diameter) were formed by self-assembling passaged leporine articular chondrocytes into non-adherent agarose moulds. The cell-seeding densities (2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 million cells/construct) and dexamethasone concentrations (10 and 100 nm) in the culture medium were varied in a full-factorial study. After 4 weeks, the neocartilage constructs were assessed for morphological, biochemical and biomechanical properties. The cell-seeding density profoundly affected neocartilage properties. The two dexamethasone concentrations explored did not induce overall significant differences. Constructs formed using lower cell-seeding densities possessed much higher biochemical and biomechanical properties than constructs seeded with higher cell densities. Notably, the 2 million cells/construct group formed hyaline-like neocartilage with a collagen wet weight (WW) content of ~7% and a Young's modulus of ~4 MPa, representing the high end of values achieved in self-assembled neocartilage. Excitingly, the mechanical properties of these constructs were on a par with that of native cartilage tissues tested under similar conditions. Through optimization of cell-seeding density, this study shows for the first time the use of expanded ACs to form homogeneous self-assembled neocartilage with exceptionally high tensile strength. With such functional properties, these engineered neocartilage constructs provide a promising alternative for treating articular lesions. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Passage and concentration-dependent effects of Indomethacin on tendon derived cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scutt Andy

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID are commonly used in the treatment of tendinopathies such as tendonitis and tendinosis. Despite this, little is known of their direct actions on tendon-derived cells. As NSAIDs have been shown to delay healing in a number of mesenchymal tissues we have investigated the direct effects of indomethacin on the proliferation of tendon-derived cells. Results and Discussion The results obtained were dependent on both the type of cells used and the method of measurement. When measured using the Alamar blue assay, a common method for the measurement of cell proliferation and viability, no effect of indomethacin was seen regardless of cell source. It is likely that this lack of effect was due to a paucity of mitochondrial enzymes in tendon cells. However, when cell number was assessed using the methylene blue assay, which is a simple nuclear staining technique, an Indomethacin-induced inhibition of proliferation was seen in primary cells but not in secondary subcultures. Conclusion These results suggest that firstly, care must be taken when deciding on methodology used to investigate tendon-derived cells as these cells have a quite different metabolism to other mesenchymal derive cells. Secondly, Indomethacin can inhibit the proliferation of primary tendon derived cells and that secondary subculture selects for a population of cells that is unresponsive to this drug.

  13. White blood cell fragments in platelet concentrates prepared by the platelet-rich plasma or buffy-coat methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra-Tiekstra, M. J.; van der Schoot, C. E.; Pietersz, R. N. I.; Reesink, H. W.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: White blood cell (WBC) fragments in platelet concentrates (PCs) may induce allo-immunization in the recipient. MATERIALS AND METHODS: As the level of WBC fragments can differ between PCs produced using different methods, we compared PCs prepared by using the buffy-coat

  14. Role of parietal and principal gastric mucosa cells in the phenomenon of concentration of aluminum and indium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maghraoui, Samira; Ayadi, Ahlem; Audinot, Jean-Nicolas; Ben Ammar, Aouatef; Jaafoura, Mohamed-Habib; El Hili, Ali; Migeon, Henri-Noël; Tekaya, Leila

    2012-02-01

    The subcellular behavior of aluminum and indium, used in medical and industrial fields, was studied in the gastric mucosa and the liver after their intragastric administration to rats, using, two of the most sensitive methods of observation and microanalysis, the transmission electron microscopy, and the secondary ion mass spectrometry. The ultrastructural study showed the presence of electron dense deposits, in the lysosomes of parietal and principal gastric mucosa cells but no loaded lysosomes were observed in the different studied hepatic territories. The microanalytical study allowed the identification of the chemical species present in those deposits as aluminum or indium isotopes and the cartography of their distribution. No modification was observed in control rats tissues. In comparison to previous studies describing the mechanism of aluminum concentration in the gastric mucosa and showing that this element was concentrated in the lysosomes of fundic and antral human gastric mucosa, our study provided additional informations about the types of cells involved in the phenomenon of concentration of aluminum and indium, which are the parietal and the principal cells of the gastric mucosa. Our study demonstrated that these cells have the ability to concentrate selectively aluminum and indium in their lysosomes, as a defensive reaction against intoxication by foreign elements. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Direct observation of single amyloid-β(1-40 oligomers on live cells: binding and growth at physiological concentrations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin D Johnson

    Full Text Available Understanding how amyloid-β peptide interacts with living cells on a molecular level is critical to development of targeted treatments for Alzheimer's disease. Evidence that oligomeric Aβ interacts with neuronal cell membranes has been provided, but the mechanism by which membrane binding occurs and the exact stoichiometry of the neurotoxic aggregates remain elusive. Physiologically relevant experimentation is hindered by the high Aβ concentrations required for most biochemical analyses, the metastable nature of Aβ aggregates, and the complex variety of Aβ species present under physiological conditions. Here we use single molecule microscopy to overcome these challenges, presenting direct optical evidence that small Aβ(1-40 oligomers bind to living neuroblastoma cells at physiological Aβ concentrations. Single particle fluorescence intensity measurements indicate that cell-bound Aβ species range in size from monomers to hexamers and greater, with the majority of bound oligomers falling in the dimer-to-tetramer range. Furthermore, while low-molecular weight oligomeric species do form in solution, the membrane-bound oligomer size distribution is shifted towards larger aggregates, indicating either that bound Aβ oligomers can rapidly increase in size or that these oligomers cluster at specific sites on the membrane. Calcium indicator studies demonstrate that small oligomer binding at physiological concentrations induces only mild, sporadic calcium leakage. These findings support the hypothesis that small oligomers are the primary Aβ species that interact with neurons at physiological concentrations.

  16. Phase I/II safety study of transfusion of prion-filtered red cell concentrates in transfusion-dependent patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cahill, M R

    2010-08-01

    Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob (vCJD) is a fatal transfusion transmissible prion infection. No test for vCJD in the donor population is currently available. Therefore, prion removal by filtration of red cell concentrate (RCC) is an attractive option for prevention.

  17. Increasing Fuel Efficiency of Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Systems with Feedforward Control of the Operating Concentration

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Youngseung Na; Federico Zenith; Ulrike Krewer

    2015-01-01

    .... To improve the efficiency of direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) systems, several modifications to system layouts and operating strategies are considered in this paper, rather than modifications to the fuel cell itself...

  18. The concentration of TNF-alpha correlate with number of inflammatory cells and degree of vascularization in radicular cysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurisic, V; Terzic, T; Colic, S; Jurisic, M

    2008-10-01

    To correlate values of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) depending on the count of inflammatory cells with degree of vascularization in cystic fluid of radicular cysts. We investigated TNF-alpha concentration in 43 radicular cysts obtained from patients undergoing surgery, under local anaesthesia, and after aspiration of cystic fluid from non-ruptured cysts by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay assay in respect of different clinical parameters as well as by histomorphometric analyses. Significantly higher concentration of TNF-alpha is associated with smaller radicular cysts, higher protein concentration in cystic fluid as well as with higher presence of inflammatory cells, and increased degree of vascularization in pericystic tissues and cyst wall thickness. We believe that determination of TNF-alpha in cystic fluid simultaneously with other parameters can be an additional parameter for clinical diagnosis of inflammed cysts.

  19. A direct viable count method for the enumeration of attached bacteria and assessment of biofilm disinfection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, F. P.; Pyle, B. H.; McFeters, G. A.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes the adaptation of an in situ direct viable count (in situ DVC) method in biofilm disinfection studies. The results obtained with this technique were compared to two other enumeration methods, the plate count (PC) and conventional direct viable count (c-DVC). An environmental isolate (Klebsiella pneumoniae Kp1) was used to form biofilms on stainless steel coupons in a stirred batch reactor. The in situ DVC method was applied to directly assess the viability of bacteria in biofilms without disturbing the integrity of the interfacial community. As additional advantages, the results were observed after 4 h instead of the 24 h incubation time required for colony formation and total cell numbers that remained on the substratum were enumerated. Chlorine and monochloramine were used to determine the susceptibilities of attached and planktonic bacteria to disinfection treatment using this novel analytical approach. The planktonic cells in the reactor showed no significant change in susceptibility to disinfectants during the period of biofilm formation. In addition, the attached cells did not reveal any more resistance to disinfection than planktonic cells. The disinfection studies of young biofilms indicated that 0.25 mg/l free chlorine (at pH 7.2) and 1 mg/l monochloramine (at pH 9.0) have comparable disinfection efficiencies at 25 degrees C. Although being a weaker disinfectant, monochloramine was more effective in removing attached bacteria from the substratum than free chlorine. The in situ DVC method always showed at least one log higher viable cell densities than the PC method, suggesting that the in situ DVC method is more efficient in the enumeration of biofilm bacteria. The results also indicated that the in situ DVC method can provide more accurate information regarding the cell numbers and viability of bacteria within biofilms following disinfection.

  20. The search for viable local government system in Nigeria: an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The history of the Nigerian local government system has been one long episode of trails and errors aimed at achieving viable local government institution without much success. Local government in the country began its long series of reforms from the colonial period when the colonial government attempted to ...

  1. Comment: Towards a Viable Local Government Structure in Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Local governments are principally established for development at the grassroots and they must be structured in a manner that makes them viable and capable of achieving this purpose. The objective of this comment is to appraise the current local government structure under the Nigerian constitutional framework with a view ...

  2. Cultivation and multiplication of viable axenic Trypanosoma vivax in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-09-01

    Sep 1, 2009 ... Cultivation and multiplication of viable axenic. Trypanosoma vivax in vitro and in vivo. O. A. Idowu, A. B. Idowu, C. F. Mafiana and S. O. Sam-Wobo*. Parasitology Laboratory, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Agriculture, Abeokuta, Nigeria. Accepted 13 April, 2006. Trypanosoma vivax was ...

  3. Dynamics of glucose and insulin concentration connected to the β‐cell cycle: model development and analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gallenberger Martina

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diabetes mellitus is a group of metabolic diseases with increased blood glucose concentration as the main symptom. This can be caused by a relative or a total lack of insulin which is produced by the β‐cells in the pancreatic islets of Langerhans. Recent experimental results indicate the relevance of the β‐cell cycle for the development of diabetes mellitus. Methods This paper introduces a mathematical model that connects the dynamics of glucose and insulin concentration with the β‐cell cycle. The interplay of glucose, insulin, and β‐cell cycle is described with a system of ordinary differential equations. The model and its development will be presented as well as its mathematical analysis. The latter investigates the steady states of the model and their stability. Results Our model shows the connection of glucose and insulin concentrations to the β‐cell cycle. In this way the important role of glucose as regulator of the cell cycle and the capability of the β‐cell mass to adapt to metabolic demands can be presented. Simulations of the model correspond to the qualitative behavior of the glucose‐insulin regulatory system showed in biological experiments. Conclusions This work focusses on modeling the physiological situation of the glucose‐insulin regulatory system with a detailed consideration of the β‐cell cycle. Furthermore, the presented model allows the simulation of pathological scenarios. Modification of different parameters results in simulation of either type 1 or type 2 diabetes.

  4. Physiological responses of wild type and putrescine-overproducing transgenic cells of poplar to variations in the form and concentration of nitrogen in the medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakesh Minocha; Jae Soon Lee; Stephanie Long; Pratiksha Bhatnagar; Subhash C. Minocha

    2004-01-01

    We determined: (a) the physiological consequences of overproduction of putrescine in transgenic poplar (Populus nigra x mnrimoviczir) cells expressing an omithine decarboxylase transgene; and (b) effects of variation in nitrogen (N) concentration of the medium on cellular polyamine concentration in transgenic and non-transgenic cells. Cells grown in...

  5. Development of a specific immunomagnetic capture-PCR for rapid detection of viable Mycoplasma agalactiae in sheep milk samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanna, G; Lecca, V; Foddai, A; Tola, S

    2014-12-01

    To develop an immunomagnetic capture (IMC) to detect viable Mycoplasma agalactiae in routine ovine milk samples. Polyclonal antibodies against two M. agalactiae membrane surface proteins (P80 and P55) were covalently conjugated to magnetic beads (MBs) to form MB-Ab80 and MB-Ab55. Mycoplasma agalactiae cells were captured by a specific antigen-antibody reaction and magnetic separation. Immunomagnetic capture (IMC) was used to isolate and concentrate M. agalactiae in serial decimal dilutions and in artificially contaminated milk to facilitate subsequent detection by PCR. A 375-bp fragment of M. agalactiae was amplified using a pair of M. agalactiae-specific primers in PCR. The limit of detection of IMC-PCR method ranged from 10 to 10(2)  CCU ml(-1) when mycoplasmas were resuspended in PBS and from 10(2) to 10(3)  CCU ml(-1) when mycoplasmas were resuspended in uncontaminated ovine milk. This study also describes the application of IMC-PCR method to test for M. agalactiae in 516 milk samples collected from sheep with suspected contagious agalactia. Its performance was evaluated relative to culture. This report has demonstrated for the first time, the effective use of rapid and reliable IMC combined with PCR assay for the detection of viable M. agalactiae. The method IMC-PCR provides an alternative to conventional microbiological detection, method and it could be applied to quick detection of M. agalactiae in routine sheep milk samples. © 2014 The Authors published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society for Applied Microbiology.

  6. Comparison of fibroblast cell regeneration in three different concentrations of Wharton’s Jelly mesenchymal stem cells conditioned medium (WJMSCs-CM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Untoro, E. G.; Asrianti, D.; Usman, M.; Meidyawati, R.; Margono, A.

    2017-08-01

    Wharton’s Jelly-derived mesenchymal stem cells (WJMSCs) have gained interest as an alternative source of stem cells for regenerative medicine. Although many studies have characterized Wharton’s Jelly biologically, the effects of different concentrations in a cultured medium have not yet been compared. Damaged fibroblasts, the primary components of irreversible dental pulpitis, irreversibly impair the ability to regenerate and lead to the disruption of extracellular matrix. This study was performed to evaluate the potency of three WJMSCs-CM concentrations in improving serum-starved fibroblasts. Fibroblasts were cultivated in five passages, and divided into four groups. The first group (the control group) consisted of fibroblast cells that had been treated using starvation methods. The other groups (the treatment groups) were treated with various concentration of WJMSCs-CM (50%, 25% and 12.5%). Proliferative ability was evaluated using a cell count method and analyzed with a one-way ANOVA. Cultivation of serum-starved fibroblasts produced significantly higher cell counts in 12.5% WJMSCs-CM compared to the 50% group. It can be concluded that 12.5% WJMSCs-CM is the most efficient concentration for fibroblast proliferation.

  7. Cell density dependence of Microcystis aeruginosa responses to copper algaecide concentrations: Implications for microcystin-LR release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinley, Ciera M; Iwinski, Kyla J; Hendrikse, Maas; Geer, Tyler D; Rodgers, John H

    2017-11-01

    Along with mechanistic models, predictions of exposure-response relationships for copper are often derived from laboratory toxicity experiments with standardized experimental exposures and conditions. For predictions of copper toxicity to algae, cell density is a critical factor often overlooked. For pulse exposures of copper-based algaecides in aquatic systems, cell density can significantly influence copper sorbed by the algal population, and consequent responses. A cyanobacterium, Microcystis aeruginosa, was exposed to a copper-based algaecide over a range of cell densities to model the density-dependence of exposures, and effects on microcystin-LR (MC-LR) release. Copper exposure concentrations were arrayed to result in a gradient of MC-LR release, and masses of copper sorbed to algal populations were measured following exposures. While copper exposure concentrations eliciting comparable MC-LR release ranged an order of magnitude (24-h EC50s 0.03-0.3mg Cu/L) among cell densities of 10 6 through 10 7 cells/mL, copper doses (mg Cu/mg algae) were similar (24-h EC50s 0.005-0.006mg Cu/mg algae). Comparisons of MC-LR release as a function of copper exposure concentrations and doses provided a metric of the density dependence of algal responses in the context of copper-based algaecide applications. Combined with estimates of other site-specific factors (e.g. water characteristics) and fate processes (e.g. dilution and dispersion, sorption to organic matter and sediments), measuring exposure-response relationships for specific cell densities can refine predictions for in situ exposures and algal responses. These measurements can in turn decrease the likelihood of amending unnecessary copper concentrations to aquatic systems, and minimize risks for non-target aquatic organisms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Caffeic Acid Reduces the Viability and Migration Rate of Oral Carcinoma Cells (SCC-25 Exposed to Low Concentrations of Ethanol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arkadiusz Dziedzic

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol increases the risk of carcinoma originated from oral epithelium, but the biological effects of ultra-low doses of ethanol on existing carcinoma cells in combination with natural substances are still unclear. A role for ethanol (EtOH, taken in small amounts as an ingredient of some beverages or mouthwashes to change the growth behavior of established squamous cell carcinoma, has still not been examined sufficiently. We designed an in vitro study to determine the effect of caffeic acid (CFA on viability and migration ability of malignant oral epithelial keratinocytes, exposed to ultra-low concentrations (maximum 100 mmol/L EtOH. MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-dimethyltetrazolium bromide and LDH (lactate dehydrogenase assays were used to assess the cytotoxic effect of EtOH/CFA and the viability of squamous carcinoma SCC-25 cells (ATCC CRL-1628, mobile part of the tongue. Tested EtOH concentrations were: 2.5, 5, 10, 25, 50, and 100 mmol/L, along with an equal CFA concentration of 50 μmol/L. Carcinoma cells’ migration was investigated by monolayer “wound” healing assay. We demonstrated that very low concentrations of EtOH ranging between 2.5 and 10 mmol/L may induce the viability of oral squamous cell carcinoma cells, while the results following addition of CFA reveal an antagonistic effect, attenuating pro-proliferative EtOH activity. The migration rate of oral squamous carcinoma cells can be significantly inhibited by the biological activity of caffeic acid.

  9. Effect of KOH concentration on LEO cycle life of IPV nickel-hydrogen flight cells-update 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smithrick, John J.; Hall, Stephen W.

    An update of validation test results confirming the breakthrough in low earth orbit (LEO) cycle life of nickel-hydrogen cells containing 26 percent KOH electrolyte is presented. A breakthrough in the LEO cycle life of individual pressure vessel (IPV nickel-hydrogen cells has been previously reported. The cycle life of boiler plate cells containing 26 percent potassium hydroxide (KOH) electrolyte was about 40 000 LEO cycles compared to 3500 cycles for cells containing 31 percent KOH. This test was conducted at Hughes Aircraft Company under a NASA Lewis contract. The purpose was to investigate the effect of KOH concentration on cycle life. The cycle regime was a stressful accelerated LEO, which consisted of a 27.5 min charge followed by a 17.5 min discharge (2x normal rate). The depth of discharge (DOD) was 80 percent. The cell temperature was maintained at 23 C. The boiler plate test results are in the process of being validated using flight hardware and real time LEO test at the Naval Weapons Support Center (NWSC), Crane, Indiana under a NASA Lewis Contract. Six 48 Ah Hughes recirculation design IPV nickel-hydrogen flight battery cells are being evaluated. Three of the cells contain 26 percent KOH (test cells), and three contain 31 percent KOH (control cells). They are undergoing real time LEO cycle life testing. The cycle regime is a 90-min LEO orbit consisting of a 54-min charge followed by a 36-min discharge. The depth-of-discharge is 80 percent. The cell temperature is maintained at 10 C. The three 31 percent KOH cells failed (cycles 3729, 4165, and 11355). One of the 26 percent KOH cells failed at cycle 15314. The other two 26 percent KOH cells were cycled for over 16600 cycles during the continuing test.

  10. Optimization of gain and energy conversion efficiency using front-facing photovoltaic cell luminescent solar concentrator design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, Melissa; Corrado, Carley; Woei Leow, Shin; Chan, Emory; Balaban, Ben; Carter, Sue

    2013-03-01

    Luminescent solar concentrator (LSC) windows with front-facing photovoltaic (PV) cells were built and their gain and power efficiency were investigated. Conventional LSCs employ a photovoltaic (PV) cell that is placed on the edge of the LSC, facing inward. This paper describes a new design with the PV cells on the front-face allowing them to receive both direct solar irradiation and wave-guided photons emitted from a dye embedded in an acrylic sheet, which is optically coupled to the PV cells. Parameters investigated include the thickness of the waveguide, edge treatment of the window, cell width, and cell placement. The data allowed us to make projections that aided in designing windows for maximized overall efficiency. A gain in power of 2.2x over the PV cells alone was obtained with PV cell coverage of 5%, and a power conversion efficiency as high as 6.8% was obtained with a PV cell coverage of 31%. Balancing the trade-offs between gain and efficiency, the design with the lowest cost per watt attained a power efficiency of 3.8% and a gain of 1.6x.

  11. Molecular approaches for viable bacterial population and transcriptional analyses in a rodent model of dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, M I; Scott-Anne, K M; Gregoire, S; Rosalen, P L; Koo, H

    2012-10-01

    Culturing methods are the primary approach for microbiological analysis of plaque biofilms in rodent models of dental caries. In this study, we developed strategies for the isolation of DNA and RNA from plaque biofilms formed in vivo to analyse the viable bacterial population and gene expression. Plaque biofilm samples from rats were treated with propidium monoazide to isolate DNA from viable cells, and the purified DNA was used to quantify total bacteria and the Streptococcus mutans population via quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and specific primers; the same samples were also analysed by counting colony-forming units (CFU). In parallel, RNA was isolated from plaque-biofilm samples (from the same animals) and used for transcriptional analyses via reverse transcription-qPCR. The viable populations of both S. mutans and total bacteria assessed by qPCR were positively correlated with the CFU data (P  0.8). However, the qPCR data showed higher bacterial cell counts, particularly for total bacteria (vs. CFU). Moreover, S. mutans proportion in the plaque biofilm determined by qPCR analysis showed strong correlation with incidence of smooth-surface caries (P = 0.0022, r = 0.71). The purified RNAs presented high RNA integrity numbers (> 7), which allowed measurement of the expression of genes that are critical for S. mutans virulence (e.g. gtfB and gtfC). Our data show that the viable microbial population and the gene expression can be analysed simultaneously, providing a global assessment of the infectious aspect of dental caries. Our approach could enhance the value of the current rodent model in further understanding the pathophysiology of this disease and facilitating the exploration of novel anti-caries therapies. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  12. Concurrent detection of other respiratory viruses in children shedding viable human respiratory syncytial virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliardi, T B; Paula, F E; Iwamoto, M A; Proença-Modena, J L; Santos, A E; Camara, A A; Cervi, M C; Cintra, O A L; Arruda, E

    2013-10-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) is an important cause of respiratory disease. The majority of studies addressing the importance of virus co-infections to the HRSV-disease have been based on the detection of HRSV by RT-PCR, which may not distinguish current replication from prolonged shedding of remnant RNA from previous HRSV infections. To assess whether co-detections of other common respiratory viruses are associated with increased severity of HRSV illnesses from patients who were shedding viable-HRSV, nasopharyngeal aspirates from children younger than 5 years who sought medical care for respiratory infections in Ribeirão Preto (Brazil) were tested for HRSV by immunofluorescence, RT-PCR and virus isolation in cell culture. All samples with viable-HRSV were tested further by PCR for other respiratory viruses. HRSV-disease severity was assessed by a clinical score scale. A total of 266 samples from 247 children were collected and 111 (42%) were HRSV-positive. HRSV was isolated from 70 (63%), and 52 (74%) of them were positive for at least one additional virus. HRSV-positive diseases were more severe than HRSV-negative ones, but there was no difference in disease severity between patients with viable-HRSV and those HRSV-positives by RT-PCR. Co-detection of other viruses did not correlate with increased disease severity. HRSV isolation in cell culture does not seem to be superior to RT-PCR to distinguish infections associated with HRSV replication in studies of clinical impact of HRSV. A high rate of co-detection of other respiratory viruses was found in samples with viable-HRSV, but this was not associated with more severe HRSV infection. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Concentrations of stromal cell-derived factor-1 in serum, plasma, and synovial fluid of horses with osteochondral injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dymock, David C; Brown, Murray P; Merritt, Kelly A; Trumble, Troy N

    2014-08-01

    To determine whether stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) concentrations in serum, plasma, and synovial fluid differed among untrained, race-trained, and osteochondral-injured Thoroughbred racehorses. 22 racehorses without osteochondral injury and 37 racehorses with osteochondral injury. Horses without osteochondral injury were examined before and after 5 to 6 months of race training. Horses with osteochondral injury were undergoing arthroscopic surgery for removal of osteochondral fragments from carpal or metacarpophalangeal or metatarsophalangeal joints (fetlock joints). Serum, plasma, and fetlock or carpal synovial fluid samples were obtained and analyzed for SDF-1 concentration by use of an ELISA. In horses with fetlock or carpal joint injury, mean synovial fluid SDF-1 concentrations were significantly higher, serum SDF-1 concentrations were significantly lower, and synovial fluid-to-serum SDF-1 ratios were significantly higher than in untrained and trained horses. Synovial fluid SDF-1 concentrations were not significantly different between trained and untrained horses. Plasma SDF-1 concentrations were not different among the 3 groups. Results obtained with serum, compared with synovial fluid and plasma, had better sensitivity for differentiating between osteochondral-injured horses and uninjured horses. In horses with fetlock joint osteochondral injury, serum SDF-1 concentrations were correlated with radiographic and arthroscopic inflammation scores, but not arthroscopic cartilage scores. Results suggested that serum SDF-1 concentrations were more sensitive than plasma and synovial fluid concentrations for detection of osteochondral injury in the fetlock or carpal joint of racehorses. Analysis of serum and synovial SDF-1 concentrations in horses with experimentally induced joint injury may help define the onset and progression of post-traumatic osteoarthritis and aid in the evaluation of anti-inflammatory treatments.

  14. (Al)GaInP/GaAs Tandem Solar Cells for Power Conversion at Elevated Temperature and High Concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perl, Emmett E.; Simon, John; Friedman, Daniel J.; Jain, Nikhil; Sharps, Paul; McPheeters, Claiborne; Sun, Yukun; Lee, Minjoo L.; Steiner, Myles A.

    2018-03-01

    We demonstrate dual-junction (Al)GaInP/GaAs solar cells designed for operation at 400 degrees C and 1000x concentration. For the top junction, we compare (Al)GaInP solar cells with room-temperature bandgaps ranging from 1.9 to 2.0 eV. At 400 degrees C, we find that ~1.9 eV GaInP solar cells have a higher open-circuit voltage and a lower sheet resistance than higher bandgap (Al)GaInP solar cells, giving them a clear advantage in a tandem configuration. Dual-junction GaInP/GaAs solar cells are fabricated, and we show temperature-dependent external quantum efficiency, illuminated current-voltage, and concentrator measurements from 25 degrees C to 400 degrees C. We measure a power conversion efficiency of 16.4% +/- 1% at 400 degrees C and 345 suns for the best dual-junction cell, and discuss multiple pathways to improve the performance further. After undergoing a 200 h soak at 400 degrees C, the dual-junction device shows a relative loss in efficiency of only ~1%.

  15. Nutrient-Enhanced Production of Remarkably High Concentrations of Ethanol by Saccharomyces bayanus through Soy Flour Supplementation

    OpenAIRE

    Viegas, Cristina A.; Sá-Correia, Isabel; Novais, Julio M.

    1985-01-01

    The supplementation of a simple medium with soy flour led to an increase in the specific growth rate and viable cell concentration of Saccharomyces bayanus during fermentation. Increasing the amount of soy flour led to an increase in the maximum number of viable yeast cells and the percentage of glucose fermented. It was possible in 64 h to reach 12.8% (wt/vol) ethanol by adding 4% soy flour (wt/vol) to a simple medium with 300 g of glucose per liter. The aqueous extract from soy flour was ne...

  16. [Cell concentration of individual cow's milk: effect of the status of mammary infection, parity, lactation stage and milk production].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serieys, F

    1985-01-01

    The relative effect of the intramammary infections and of different factors related to the cow (parity, stage of lactation, milk yield) on the individual cell counts, were studied for 30 months on the 62 black-and-white Holstein cows of an experimental herd. During this period, the cows were regularly submitted to bacteriological tests for intramammary infections, individual cell counts and controls of the milk yield. The infection status of the cows at the time of counting was the main factor affecting the cell concentrations in the milk: the values ranged from around 5 X 10(4) cells/ml in the absence of infection in the four quarters, to values that were on average twice as high in the case of infection by a minor pathogen and ten times as high in the case of infection by a major pathogen. The mean cell concentrations in the milk of uninfected cows were significantly lower during the first lactation; they varied during the lactation according to a curve which had the form of an inverted lactation curve. The mean cell count during a lactation was independent of the mean milk yield per day of lactation. In cows infected by a major pathogen, the effect of the number and stage of lactation was different. Only the variation apparently associated with the stage of lactation had a sufficient amplitude to bring the mean cell concentrations of uninfected cows close to the values recorded in cows infected by a minor pathogen. The average results from cows infected by a major pathogen were, however, much higher at all stages of lactation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Monte Carlo Simulations of Luminescent Solar Concentrators with Front-Facing Photovoltaic Cells for Building Integrated Photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leow, Shin; Corrado, Carley; Osborn, Melissa; Carter, Sue

    2013-03-01

    Luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs) have the ability to receive light from a wide range of angles and concentrate the captured light on to small photo active areas. This enables LSCs to be integrated more extensively into buildings as windows and wall claddings on top of roof installations. LSCs with front facing PV cells collect both direct and concentrated light ensuring a gain factor greater than one. It also allows for flexibility in determining the placement and percentage coverage of PV cells when designing panels to balance reabsorption losses, power output and the level of concentration desired. A Monte-Carlo ray tracing program was developed to study the transport of photons and loss mechanisms in LSC panels and aid in design optimization. The program imports measured absorption/emission spectra and transmission coefficients as simulation parameters. Interactions of photons with the LSC panel are determined by comparing calculated probabilities with random number generators. Simulation results reveal optimal panel dimensions and PV cell layouts to achieve maximum power output.

  18. [Effect of reduced oxygen concentrations and hydrogen sulfide on the amino acid metabolism and mesenchymal cells proliferation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotnikova, L N; Berezovskii, V A; Veselskii, S P

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effect of hydrogen sulfide donor (10(-12) mol/l NaHS--I group) alone and together with the reduced oxygen concentrations (5% O2--II group, 3% O2--III group, 24 h) on the biological processes of human stem cells culture. It was shown that the cells proliferation by the third day of cultivation in I, II and III group decreased 1,7; 2,8 and 4,2 times. On the 4th day of culture proliferation inhibited in I, II and III group by 29; 33 and 54% compared to the control. Thus, adverse effects NaHS enhanced by reducing the oxygen concentration. It was established that in all experimental versions rapidly absorbed from the culture medium amino acids: cysteine and cystine, serine and aspartic acid, valine and tryptophan, proline and hydroxyproline, which are involved in the synthesis of proteins, in particular collagen. In the culture medium increased the concentration of free amino acids of the three factions: arginine, histidine and taurine; glycine and methionine; alanine and glutamine. We believe that in the applied concentration of hydrogen sulfide donor in conditions of low oxygen in a gaseous medium incubation inhibits the proliferation and alters the amino acid metabolism of human cells line 4BL.

  19. Ozone sonde cell current measurements and implications for observations of near-zero ozone concentrations in the tropical upper troposphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Vömel

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory measurements of the Electrochemical Concentration Cell (ECC ozone sonde cell current using ozone free air as well as defined amounts of ozone reveal that background current measurements during sonde preparation are neither constant as a function of time, nor constant as a function of ozone concentration. Using a background current, measured at a defined timed after exposure to high ozone may often overestimate the real background, leading to artificially low ozone concentrations in the upper tropical troposphere, and may frequently lead to operator dependent uncertainties. Based on these laboratory measurements an improved cell current to partial pressure conversion is proposed, which removes operator dependent variability in the background reading and possible artifacts in this measurement. Data from the Central Equatorial Pacific Experiment (CEPEX have been reprocessed using the improved background treatment based on these laboratory measurements. In the reprocessed data set near-zero ozone events no longer occur. At Samoa, Fiji, Tahiti, and San Cristóbal, nearly all near-zero ozone concentrations occur in soundings with larger background currents. To a large extent, these events are no longer observed in the reprocessed data set using the improved background treatment.

  20. Acetoacetate reduces growth and ATP concentration in cancer cell lines which over-express uncoupling protein 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quadros Edward V

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent evidence suggests that several human cancers are capable of uncoupling of mitochondrial ATP generation in the presence of intact tricarboxylic acid (TCA enzymes. The goal of the current study was to test the hypothesis that ketone bodies can inhibit cell growth in aggressive cancers and that expression of uncoupling protein 2 is a contributing factor. The proposed mechanism involves inhibition of glycolytic ATP production via a Randle-like cycle while increased uncoupling renders cancers unable to produce compensatory ATP from respiration. Methods Seven aggressive human cancer cell lines, and three control fibroblast lines were grown in vitro in either 10 mM glucose medium (GM, or in glucose plus 10 mM acetoacetate [G+AcA]. The cells were assayed for cell growth, ATP production and expression of UCP2. Results There was a high correlation of cell growth with ATP concentration (r = 0.948 in a continuum across all cell lines. Controls demonstrated normal cell growth and ATP with the lowest density of mitochondrial UCP2 staining while all cancer lines demonstrated proportionally inhibited growth and ATP, and over-expression of UCP2 (p Conclusion Seven human cancer cell lines grown in glucose plus acetoacetate medium showed tightly coupled reduction of growth and ATP concentration. The findings were not observed in control fibroblasts. The observed over-expression of UCP2 in cancer lines, but not in controls, provides a plausible molecular mechanism by which acetoacetate spares normal cells but suppresses growth in cancer lines. The results bear on the hypothesized potential for ketogenic diets as therapeutic strategies.

  1. Salicylic acid induces apoptosis in colon carcinoma cells grown in-vitro: Influence of oxygen and salicylic acid concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zitta, Karina; Meybohm, Patrick; Bein, Berthold; Huang, Ying; Heinrich, Christin; Scholz, Jens; Steinfath, Markus; Albrecht, Martin, E-mail: Albrecht@anaesthesie.uni-kiel.de

    2012-04-15

    In solid tumors the hypoxic environment can promote tumor progression and resistance to therapy. Recently, acetylsalicylic acid a major component of analgesic drugs and its metabolite salicylic acid (SA) have been shown to reduce the risk of colon cancer, but the mechanisms of action remain still unclear. Here we elucidate the effects of physiologically relevant concentrations of SA on colon carcinoma cells (CaCo-2) grown under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Western blotting, caspase-3/7 apoptosis assays, MTS cell-proliferation assays, LDH cytotoxicity assays and hydrogen peroxide measurements were performed to investigate the effects of 1 and 10 {mu}M SA on CaCo-2 cells grown under normoxic conditions and cells exposed to hypoxia. Under normoxic conditions, SA did not influence cell proliferation or LDH release of CaCo-2 cells. However, caspase-3/7 activity was significantly increased. Under hypoxia, cell proliferation was reduced and LDH release and caspase-3/7 activities were increased. None of these parameters was altered by the addition of SA under hypoxic conditions. Hypoxia increased hydrogen peroxide concentrations 300-fold and SA significantly augmented the release of hydrogen peroxide under normoxic, but not under hypoxic conditions. Phosphorylation of the pro-survival kinases akt and erk1/2 was not changed by SA under hypoxic conditions, whereas under normoxia SA reduced phosphorylation of erk1/2 after 2 hours. We conclude that in colon carcinoma cells effects of SA on apoptosis and cellular signaling are dependent on the availability of oxygen. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effects of salicylic acid on colon carcinoma cells grown under normoxic and hypoxic conditions Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Salicylic acid increases caspase-3/7 activity and hydrogen peroxide release under normoxia Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Salicylic acid decreases pro-survival erk-1/2 phosphorylation under normoxia Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Salicylic acid does

  2. Selective detection of viable seed-borne Acidovorax citrulli by real-time PCR with propidium monoazide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Qian; Feng, Jian-jun; Hu, Jie; Zhao, Wen-jun

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, use of the DNA-intercalating dye propidium monoazide (PMA) in real-time PCR has been reported as a novel method to detect viable bacteria in different types of samples, such as food, environmental, and microbiological samples. In this study, viable cells of Acidovorax citrulli, the causal agent of bacterial seedling blight and fruit blotch, were selectively detected and differentiated from dead cells by real-time fluorescent polymerase chain reaction amplification after the bacterial solution was treated with the DNA-binding dye PMA. The primers and TaqMan probe were based on the A. citrulli genome (Aave_1909, Gene ID: 4669443) and were highly specific for A. citrulli. The detection threshold of this assay was 103 colony-forming units per mL (CFU/mL) in pure cell suspensions containing viable and dead cells and infected watermelon seeds. Application of this assay enables the selective detection of viable cells of A. citrulli and facilitates monitoring of the pathogen in watermelon and melon seeds. PMID:27739469

  3. Determination of viable wine yeast using DNA binding dyes and quantitative PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andorrà, Imma; Esteve-Zarzoso, Braulio; Guillamón, José M; Mas, Albert

    2010-12-15

    The detection and quantification of wine yeast can be misleading due to under or overestimation of these microorganisms. Underestimation may be caused by variable growing rates of different microorganisms in culture media or the presence of viable but non-cultivable microorganisms. Overestimation may be caused by the lack of discrimination between live and dead microorganisms if quantitative PCR is used to quantify with DNA as the template. However, culture-independent methods that use dyes have been described to remove the DNA from dead cells and then quantify the live microorganisms. Two dyes have been studied in this paper: ethidium monoazide bromide (EMA) and propidium monoazide bromide (PMA). The technique was applied to grape must fermentation and ageing wines. Both dyes presented similar results on yeast monitoring. Membrane cell recovery was necessary when yeasts were originated from ethanol-containing media. When applied to grape must fermentation, differences of up to 1 log unit were seen between the QPCR estimation with or without the dye during the stationary phase. In ageing wines, good agreement was found between plating techniques and QPCR. Most of the viable cells were also culturable and no differences were observed with the methods, except for Zygosaccharomyces bailii and Dekkera bruxellensis where much higher counts were occasionally detected by QPCR. The presence of excess dead cells did not interfere with the quantification of live cells with either of the dyes. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. High Physiological Concentrations of Progesterone Reverse Estradiol-Mediated Changes in Differentiation and Functions of Bone Marrow Derived Dendritic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiu, Fangming; Anipindi, Varun C; Nguyen, Philip V; Boudreau, Jeanette; Liang, Hong; Wan, Yonghong; Snider, Denis P; Kaushic, Charu

    2016-01-01

    Female sex steroids, estradiol (E2) and progesterone (P4), play a key role in regulating immune responses in women, including dendritic cell (DC) development, and functions. Although the two hormones co-occur in the body of women throughout the reproductive years, no studies have explored their complex combinatorial effects on DCs, given their ability to regulate each other's actions. We examined murine bone marrow derived dendritic cells (BMDC) differentiation and functions, in the presence of a wide range of physiological concentrations of each hormone, as well as the combination of the two hormones. E2 (10(-12) to 10(-8)M) enhanced the differentiation of CD11b+CD11c+ DCs from BM precursor cells, and promoted the expression of CD40 and MHC Class-II, in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, P4 (10(-9) to 10(-5)M) inhibited DC differentiation, but only at the highest concentrations. These effects on BMDCs were observed both in the presence or absence of LPS. When both hormones were combined, higher concentrations of P4, at levels seen in pregnancy (10(-6)M) reversed the E2 effects, regardless of the concentration of E2, especially in the absence of LPS. Functionally, antigen uptake was decreased and pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL-12, IL-1 and IL-6 production by CD11b+CD11c+ DCs, was increased in the presence of E2 and these effects were reversed by high concentrations of P4. Our results demonstrate the distinct effects of E2 and P4 on differentiation and functions of bone marrow myeloid DCs. The dominating effect of higher physiological concentrations of P4 provides insight into how DC functions could be modulated during pregnancy.

  5. Evaluation of metal biouptake from the analysis of bulk metal depletion kinetics at various cell concentrations: theory and application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotureau, Elise; Billard, Patrick; Duval, Jérôme F L

    2015-01-20

    Bioavailability of trace metals is a key parameter for assessment of toxicity on living organisms. Proper evaluation of metal bioavailability requires monitoring the various interfacial processes that control metal partitioning dynamics at the biointerface, which includes metal transport from solution to cell membrane, adsorption at the biosurface, internalization, and possible excretion. In this work, a methodology is proposed to quantitatively describe the dynamics of Cd(II) uptake by Pseudomonas putida. The analysis is based on the kinetic measurement of Cd(II) depletion from bulk solution at various initial cell concentrations using electroanalytical probes. On the basis of a recent formalism on the dynamics of metal uptake by complex biointerphases, the cell concentration-dependent depletion time scales and plateau values reached by metal concentrations at long exposure times (>3 h) are successfully rationalized in terms of limiting metal uptake flux, rate of excretion, and metal affinity to internalization sites. The analysis shows the limits of approximate depletion models valid in the extremes of high and weak metal affinities. The contribution of conductive diffusion transfer of metals from the solution to the cell membrane in governing the rate of Cd(II) uptake is further discussed on the basis of estimated resistances for metal membrane transfer and extracellular mass transport.

  6. High glucose concentration induces elevated expression of anti-oxidant and proteolytic enzymes in cultured human retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Tomoko; Yamane, Ken; Minamoto, Atsushi; Tsukamoto, Hidetoshi; Yamashita, Hidetoshi; Izumi, Shunsuke; Hoppe, George; Sears, Jonathan E; Mishima, Hiromu K

    2006-09-01

    We investigated the differential protein expression patterns of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells exposed to increased glucose concentrations. Cultured human RPE cells (ARPE-19) were exposed for 4 days with normal blood glucose concentration (5.5 mM D-glucose), followed by exposure to either normal (5.5 mM) or high (33 mM) concentrations of D-glucose for 48h. Protein extracts of glucose-treated RPE cells were then subjected to comparative proteome analysis based on 2-D gel electrophoresis. Protein spots were visualized by silver staining. The differentially expressed proteins were excised and digested in-gel with trypsin, then analysed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). The expression levels of cathepsin B, glutathione peroxidase and heat shock protein 27 were increased, and that of protein disulfide isomerase decreased in high glucose treated RPE compared to normal glucose. The isoelectric point of copper/zinc-containing superoxide dismutase (Cu/Zn-SOD) shifted toward acidic region in response to high glucose. Cu/Zn-SOD activity in high glucose group was significantly lower than that in normal glucose group (P<0.05, Mann-Whitney U-test). Systematic survey of protein expression has revealed that RPE cells respond to acute, pathologically high glucose levels by the elevated expression of anti-oxidant and proteolytic enzymes.

  7. Poly(3-Hydroxybutyrate) Production in Repeated fed-Batch with Cell Recycle Using a Medium with low Carbon Source Concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ienczak, Jaciane Lutz; Schmidt, Mélodi; Quines, Luci Kelin; Zanfonato, Kellen; da Cruz Pradella, José Geraldo; Schmidell, Willibaldo; de Aragao, Glaucia Maria Falcao

    2016-01-01

    Among approaches applied to obtain high productivity and low production costs in bioprocesses are high cell density and the use of low cost substrates. Usually low cost substrates, as waste/agroindustrial residues, have low carbon concentration, which leads to a difficulty in operating bioprocesses. Real time control of process for intracellular products is also difficult. The present study proposes a strategy of repeated fed-batch with cell recycle to attain high cell density of Cupriavidus necator and high poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (P(3HB)) productivity, using a substrate with low carbon source concentration (90 g l(-1)). Also, the use of the oxygen uptake rate data was pointed out as an on line solution for process control, once P(3HB) is an intracellular product. The results showed that total biomass (X), residual biomass (Xr) and P(3HB) values at the end of the culture were 61.6 g l(-1), 19.3 g l(-1) and 42.4 g l(-1) respectively, equivalent to 68.8 % of P(3HB) in the cells, and P(3HB) productivity of 1.0 g l(-1) h(-1). Therefore, the strategy proposed was efficient to achieve high productivity and high polymer content from a medium with low carbon source concentration.

  8. On-sun concentrator performance of GaInP/GaAs tandem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedman, D.J.; Kurtz, S.R.; Sinha, K.; McMahon, W.E.; Olson, J.M. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)] [and others

    1996-05-01

    The GaInP/GaAs concentrator device has been adapted for and tested in a prototype {open_quotes}real-world{close_quotes} concentrator power system. The device achieved an on-sun efficiency of 28% {+-} 1% in the range of approximately 200-260 suns with device operating temperatures of 38{degrees}C to 42{degrees}C. The authors discuss ways of further improving this performance for future devices.

  9. Review and advances of direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) part I: Design, fabrication, and testing with high concentration methanol solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xianglin; Faghri, Amir

    2013-03-01

    A review of the experimental studies on passive and semi-passive direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) is conducted, with an emphasis on high concentration methanol and pure methanol. Key issues such as methanol transport, water management, oxygen transport, and carbon dioxide release in the DMFC are analyzed in detail. The design and fabrication, development approaches, challenges and opportunities on DMFCs passively fed with high concentration methanol are discussed. The advances of DMFC stacks and prototype developments are presented. Several unresolved issues and challenges in DMFCs are identified and reviewed in detail.

  10. Cytotoxicity and inhibitory effects of low-concentration triclosan on adipogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Li-Wu [Division of Personalized Nutrition and Medicine, National Center for Toxicological Research, Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Wu, Qiangen [Division of Biochemical Toxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research, Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Green, Bridgett; Nolen, Greg [Division of Personalized Nutrition and Medicine, National Center for Toxicological Research, Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Shi, Leming [Division of Systems Biology, National Center for Toxicological Research, Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); LoSurdo, Jessica [Division of Cellular and Gene Therapies, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Deng, Helen [Arkansas Department of Health, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States); Bauer, Steven [Division of Cellular and Gene Therapies, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Fang, Jia-Long, E-mail: jia-long.fang@fda.hhs.gov [Division of Biochemical Toxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research, Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Ning, Baitang, E-mail: baitang.ning@fda.hhs.gov [Division of Personalized Nutrition and Medicine, National Center for Toxicological Research, Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Humans at all ages are continually exposed to triclosan (TCS), a widely used antimicrobial agent that can be found in many daily hygiene products, such as toothpastes and shampoos; however, the toxicological and biological effects of TCS in the human body after long-term and low-concentration exposure are far from being well understood. In the current study, we investigated the effects of TCS on the differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) by measuring the cytotoxicity, morphological changes, lipid accumulation, and the expression of adipocyte differentiation biomarkers during 21-day adipogenesis. Significant cytotoxicity was observed in un-induced hMSCs treated with high-concentration TCS (≥ 5.0 μM TCS), but not with low-concentration treatments (≤ 2.5 μM TCS). TCS inhibited adipocyte differentiation of hMSCs in a concentration-dependent manner in the 0.156 to 2.5 μM range as indicated by morphological changes with Oil Red O staining, which is an index of lipid accumulation. The inhibitory effect was confirmed by a decrease in gene expression of specific adipocyte differentiation biomarkers including adipocyte protein 2, lipoprotein lipase, and adiponectin. Our study demonstrates that TCS inhibits adipocyte differentiation of hMSCs under concentrations that are not cytotoxic and in the range observed in human blood. -- Highlights: ► TCS is cytotoxic to un-induced hMSCs at concentrations ≥ 5.0 μM. ► TCS at concentrations ≤ 2.5 μM is not cytotoxic to induced hMSCs. ► TCS at non-cytotoxic concentrations inhibits lipid formation in induced hMSCs. ► TCS decreases the expression of specific biomarkers of adipocyte differentiation. ► TCS at concentrations observed in human blood inhibits adipogenesis of hMSCs.

  11. Effects of Temperature and Concentration Mono and Polycrystalline Silicon Solar Cells: Extraction Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalis, M.; Masrour, R.; Khrypunov, G.; Kirichenko, M.; Kudiy, D.; Zazoui, M.

    2016-10-01

    The simple and efficient method for the extraction of all the parameters of a solar cell from a single current-voltage curve under one constant illumination level based on the Lambert W function. On calculating the lsqcurvefit function with constraints, between the experimental current-voltage characteristic and a theoretical arbitrary characteristic based on Lambert W-function. It is significant to understand the effect of the light intensity and temperature on output performance of the crystalline solar cells. The effect of light intensity and temperature on performance parameters of mc-si and pc-si solar cells is discusses. The experiments have been carried out under a solar simulator for various intensity levels in the range 1-2.5 sun and 25-60°C, respectively. The experiment was carried out employing solar cell simulator with varying cell temperature at constant light intensity. The results show that cell temperature has a significant effect on the photovoltaic parameters and it controls the quality and performance of the solar cell. The maximum power and efficiency are found to be decreased with cell temperature and the temperature coefficient of the efficiency and maximum output power is found to be negative.

  12. Effect of contact time and inhibitor concentration on the affinity mediated adsorption of cells to surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, A; Cao, X; Eisenthal, R; Hubble, J

    2001-07-05

    Cell detachment by shear stress under conditions of laminar flow was used to investigate the effect of incubation time and soluble binding competitors on affinity mediated cell/surface interactions. Fractional attachment between yeast and a Concanavalin A (Con A) coated surface was studied as a function of adhesion time prior to exposure to shear in a parallel plate flow chamber. Two, four and sixteen hours adhesion times gave rise to significantly different fractional attachment profiles, with four hours giving greater cell retention.The effect of dextran as a competitive displacer of pre-attached cells was also examined using a number of exposure regimes. While the presence of dextran in the displacement buffer led to higher fractional displacement of pre-attached cells, this effect was magnified if an equilibration period between dextran solution and pre-attached cells was allowed before detachment was attempted. The decline in fractional attachment increased with incubation time up to 30 min, with longer periods resulting in a smaller effect. Pre-incubation of the Con A surface with dextran prior to the introduction of cells led to a 60% reduction in attachment.Attempts to determine critical shear values were complicated by the presence of a tightly bound cell fraction of approximately 15% that was not removed at the highest shear values used.

  13. Assessment of cell proliferation with resazurin-based fluorescent dye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czekanska, Ewa M

    2011-01-01

    The Alamar Blue assay is based on enzymatic reduction of indicator dye by viable cells and serves as an effective tool for assessing cell proliferation and as a screening technique. It can be applied in studies concentrating on animal, plant, yeast, and bacteria cells. Among the various methods for cell viability and cytotoxicity, it utilises all features of ideal and reliable test; it is one-step, sensitive, safe, non-toxic for cells, and cost-effective.

  14. Viable group A streptococci in macrophages during acute soft tissue infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pontus Thulin

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Group A streptococcal severe soft tissue infections, such as necrotizing fasciitis, are rapidly progressive infections associated with high mortality. Group A streptococcus is typically considered an extracellular pathogen, but has been shown to reside intracellularly in host cells.We characterized in vivo interactions between group A streptococci (GAS and cells involved in innate immune responses, using human biopsies (n = 70 collected from 17 patients with soft tissue infections. Immunostaining and in situ image analysis revealed high amounts of bacteria in the biopsies, even in those collected after prolonged antibiotic therapy. Viability of the streptococci was assessed by use of a bacterial viability stain, which demonstrated viable bacteria in 74% of the biopsies. GAS were present both extracellularly and intracellularly within phagocytic cells, primarily within macrophages. Intracellular GAS were predominantly noted in biopsies from newly involved tissue characterized by lower inflammation and bacterial load, whereas purely extracellular GAS or a combination of intra- and extracellular GAS dominated in severely inflamed tissue. The latter tissue was also associated with a significantly increased amount of the cysteine protease streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin SpeB. In vitro studies confirmed that macrophages serve as reservoirs for viable GAS, and infection with a speB-deletion mutant produced significantly lower frequencies of cells with viable GAS following infection as compared to the wild-type bacteria.This is the first study to demonstrate that GAS survive intracellularly in macrophages during acute invasive infections. This intracellular presence may have evolved as a mechanism to avoid antibiotic eradication, which may explain our finding that high bacterial load is present even in tissue collected after prolonged intravenous antibiotic therapy. This new insight into the pathogenesis of streptococcal soft tissue infections

  15. Viable Group A Streptococci in Macrophages during Acute Soft Tissue Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Group A streptococcal severe soft tissue infections, such as necrotizing fasciitis, are rapidly progressive infections associated with high mortality. Group A streptococcus is typically considered an extracellular pathogen, but has been shown to reside intracellularly in host cells. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We characterized in vivo interactions between group A streptococci (GAS and cells involved in innate immune responses, using human biopsies (n = 70 collected from 17 patients with soft tissue infections. Immunostaining and in situ image analysis revealed high amounts of bacteria in the biopsies, even in those collected after prolonged antibiotic therapy. Viability of the streptococci was assessed by use of a bacterial viability stain, which demonstrated viable bacteria in 74% of the biopsies. GAS were present both extracellularly and intracellularly within phagocytic cells, primarily within macrophages. Intracellular GAS were predominantly noted in biopsies from newly involved tissue characterized by lower inflammation and bacterial load, whereas purely extracellular GAS or a combination of intra- and extracellular GAS dominated in severely inflamed tissue. The latter tissue was also associated with a significantly increased amount of the cysteine protease streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin SpeB. In vitro studies confirmed that macrophages serve as reservoirs for viable GAS, and infection with a speB-deletion mutant produced significantly lower frequencies of cells with viable GAS following infection as compared to the wild-type bacteria. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first study to demonstrate that GAS survive intracellularly in macrophages during acute invasive infections. This intracellular presence may have evolved as a mechanism to avoid antibiotic eradication, which may explain our finding that high bacterial load is present even in tissue collected after prolonged intravenous antibiotic therapy. This new insight into the pathogenesis

  16. Rapid preparation and single-cell analysis of concentrated blood smears using a high-throughput blood cell separator and a microfabricated grid film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Dongwon; Oh, Sein; Kim, Byeongyeon; Hahn, Young Ki; Choi, Sungyoung

    2017-07-21

    Cytological examination of peripheral white blood cells inhomogeneously distributed on a blood smear is currently limited by the low abundance and random sampling of the target cells. To address the challenges, we present a new approach to prepare and analyze concentrated blood smears by rapidly enriching white blood cells up to 32-fold with 92% recovery on average at a high throughput (1mL/min) using a deterministic migration-based separator and by systematically analyzing a large number of the cells distributed over a blood slide using a microfabricated grid film. We anticipate that our approach will improve the clinical utility of blood smear tests, while offering the capability to detect rare cell populations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. THE EFFECT OF MAGNETIC FIELD ON THE EFFICIENCY OF A SILICON SOLAR CELL UNDER AN INTENSE LIGHT CONCENTRATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoungrana Martial

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This work put in evidence, magnetic field effect the electrical parameters of a silicon solar cell illuminated by an intense light concentration: external load electric power, conversion efficiency, fill factor, external optimal charge load. Due to the high photogeneration of carrier in intense light illumination mode, in addition of magnetic field, we took into account the carrier gradient electric field in the base of the solar cell. Taking into account this electric field and the applied magnetic field in our model led to new analytical expressions of the continuity equation, the photocurrent and the photovoltage.

  18. Acupuntura un tratamiento viable para las adicciones en Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernán López Seuscún

    2013-07-01

    Los tratamientos con auriculoterapia, como el protocolo NADA (National Acupuncture Detoxification Association, son los métodos más usados para las adicciones en el mundo, y aunque no se ha logrado evidenciar su efectividad, por su costo, facilidad y el poco riesgo de efectos adversos se hace viable en un país con pocos recursos económicos como Colombia.

  19. Academic Pediatric Dentistry is a Rewarding, Financially Viable Career Path.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Janice A; Chi, Donald L

    2017-09-15

    Newly graduated pediatric dentists have unprecedented levels of debt. High levels of student debt may be perceived as an obstacle to pursue an academic career. However, opportunities exist through faculty compensation models and loan repayment programs that make an academic career financially viable. The purpose of this paper is to outline the benefits of a career in academic dentistry and provide examples of young pediatric dentistry faculty members who have been able to manage student debt while pursuing meaningful and rewarding careers.

  20. How Can We Prevent Violence Becoming a Viable Political Strategy?

    OpenAIRE

    Patricia Justino

    2009-01-01

    A basic issue that conflict analysis investigates is how non-peaceful ways of living and governing become viable political strategies. Macro-level studies provide some important insights but micro-level analysis is vital to understand the mechanisms that make violence possible. This briefing outlines some preliminary findings in this respect from MICROCON, a major research programme analysing violent conflict at the micro level. It also discusses their implications for policies aimed at preve...

  1. Estimation of CO concentration in high temperature PEM fuel cells using electrochemical impedance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Hans-Christian Becker; Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2013-01-01

    Storing electrical energy is one of the main challenges for modern society grid systems containing increasing amounts of renewable energy from wind, solar and wave sources. Although batteries are excellent storage devices for electrical energy, their usage is often limited by a low energy density......) fuel cells can eciently run on the reformed hydrogen rich gas, although with reduced performance depending on the contaminants, such as CO, in the gas. By estimating the amount of CO in the fuel cell, it could be possible to adjust the fuel cell system operating parameters to increase performance...

  2. Mice carrying a complete deletion of the talin2 coding sequence are viable and fertile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debrand, Emmanuel; Conti, Francesco J.; Bate, Neil; Spence, Lorraine; Mazzeo, Daniela; Pritchard, Catrin A.; Monkley, Susan J. [Department of Biochemistry, University of Leicester, Lancaster Road, Leicester LE1 9HN (United Kingdom); Critchley, David R., E-mail: drc@le.ac.uk [Department of Biochemistry, University of Leicester, Lancaster Road, Leicester LE1 9HN (United Kingdom)

    2012-09-21

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mice lacking talin2 are viable and fertile with only a mildly dystrophic phenotype. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Talin2 null fibroblasts show no major defects in proliferation, adhesion or migration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Maintaining a colony of talin2 null mice is difficult indicating an underlying defect. -- Abstract: Mice homozygous for several Tln2 gene targeted alleles are viable and fertile. Here we show that although the expression of talin2 protein is drastically reduced in muscle from these mice, other tissues continue to express talin2 albeit at reduced levels. We therefore generated a Tln2 allele lacking the entire coding sequence (Tln2{sup cd}). Tln2{sup cd/cd} mice were viable and fertile, and the genotypes of Tln2{sup cd/+} intercrosses were at the expected Mendelian ratio. Tln2{sup cd/cd} mice showed no major difference in body mass or the weight of the major organs compared to wild-type, although they displayed a mildly dystrophic phenotype. Moreover, Tln2{sup cd/cd} mouse embryo fibroblasts showed no obvious defects in cell adhesion, migration or proliferation. However, the number of Tln2{sup cd/cd} pups surviving to adulthood was variable suggesting that such mice have an underlying defect.

  3. Cytotoxicity of β-D-glucose/sucrose-coated silver nanoparticles depends on cell type, nanoparticles concentration and time of incubation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergallo, Cristian; Panzarini, Elisa; Carata, Elisabetta; Ahmadi, Meysam; Mariano, Stefania; Tenuzzo, Bernardetta Anna; Dini, Luciana

    2016-06-01

    The use of silver NanoParticles (AgNPs) in several consumer commercialized products, like food contact materials, medical devices and cosmetics has increased significantly, owing to their antibacterial and antifungal properties. Even though the NPs are widely diffused, due to the great variety in size, coating or shape, controversial data on their possible detrimental health effects still exist. Herein, by performing an easy and fast green method synthesis, we used β-D-glucose/sucrose to stabilize AgNPs and avoid the release of cytotoxic soluble silver ions Ag+ in the culture medium. The cytotoxic effects of these β-D-Glucose/Sucrose-Coated AgNPs (AgNPs-GS) was assessed on two cell culture models, which are human liver HepG2 and human Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes (PBLs) cells. AgNPs-GS, as determined by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) analyses, had an average diameter of 30±5 nm, a spherical shape and were well-dispersed in the freshly-prepared solution. In addition, they were found spectrophotometrically stable throughout the experiment. Cytotoxicity, determined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) reduction assay, was evaluated by using two AgNPs-GS amounts, indicated as highest (10×103 of NPs/cell) and lowest (2×103 NPs/cell) concentration for 6, 12 and 24 h. The highest concentration of AgNPs-GS was significantly cytotoxic for both HepG2 and PBLs cells at all times, when compared with the negative control; conversely, the lowest amount of AgNPs-GS was toxic only for HepG2 cells. A significant increase of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) levels, determined by Nitro Blue Tetrazolium (NBT) reduction assay, was observed only in PBLs after treatment with NPs, by reaching maximum levels after the incubation with the lowest amount of NPs for 24 h. Significant morphological changes, depending on NPs/cell amount, characteristic of cell toxicity, like shape, cytoplasm, and nucleus alterations, were observed in lymphocytes and Hep

  4. Chronic arsenic exposure increases TGFalpha concentration in bladder urothelial cells of Mexican populations environmentally exposed to inorganic arsenic☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela, Olga L.; Germolec, Dori R.; Borja-Aburto, Víctor H.; Contreras-Ruiz, José; García-Vargas, Gonzalo G.; Del Razo, Luz M.

    2009-01-01

    Inorganic arsenic (iAs) is a well-established carcinogen and human exposure has been associated with a variety of cancers including those of skin, lung, and bladder. High expression of transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-α) has associated with local relapses in early stages of urinary bladder cancer. iAs exposures are at least in part determined by the rate of formation and composition of iAs metabolites (MAsIII, MAsV, DMAsIII, DMAsV). This study examines the relationship between TGF-α concentration in exfoliated bladder urothelial cells (BUC) separated from urine and urinary arsenic species in 72 resident women (18-51 years old) from areas exposed to different concentrations of iAs in drinking water (2-378 ppb) in central Mexico. Urinary arsenic species, including trivalent methylated metabolites were measured by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry method. The concentration of TGF-α in BUC was measured using an ELISA assay. Results show a statistically significant positive correlation between TGF-α concentration in BUC and each of the six arsenic species present in urine. The multivariate linear regression analyses show that the increment of TGF-α levels in BUC was importantly associated with the presence of arsenic species after adjusting by age, and presence of urinary infection. People from areas with high arsenic exposure had a significantly higher TGF-α concentration in BUC than people from areas of low arsenic exposure (128.8 vs. 64.4 pg/mg protein; p<0.05). Notably, exfoliated cells isolated from individuals with skin lesions contained significantly greater amount of TGF-α than cells from individuals without skin lesions: 157.7 vs. 64.9 pg/mg protein (p=0.003). These results suggest that TGF-α in exfoliated BUC may serve as a susceptibility marker of adverse health effects on epithelial tissue in arsenic-endemic areas. PMID:17267001

  5. Boric acid solution concentration influencing p-type emitter formation in n-type crystalline Si solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singha, Bandana; Singh Solanki, Chetan

    2016-09-01

    Boric acid (BA) is a spin on dopant (BSoD) source which is used to form p+ emitters in n-type c-Si solar cells. High purity boric acid powder (99.99% pure) when mixed with deionized (DI) water can result in high quality p-type emitter with less amount of surface defects. In this work, we have used different concentrations of boric acid solution concentrations to fabricate p-type emitters with sheet resistance values < 90 Ω/□. The corresponding junction depths for the same are less than 500 nm as measured by SIMS analysis. Boron rich layer (BRL), which is considered as detrimental in emitter performance is found to be minimal for BA solution concentration less than 2% and hence useful for p-type emitter formation.

  6. Limitations of the whole cell patch clamp technique in the control of intracellular concentrations.

    OpenAIRE

    Mathias, R T; Cohen, I.S.; Oliva, C.

    1990-01-01

    Recent experimental studies (Pusch and Neher, 1988) and theoretical studies (Oliva et al., 1988) have found that the pipette tip is a significant barrier to diffusion in the whole cell patch clamp configuration. In this paper, we extend the theoretical analysis of fluxes between the pipette and cell to include transmembrane fluxes. The general conclusions are: (a) within the pipette, ion fluxes are driven primarily by diffusion rather than voltage gradients. (b) At steady state there is a con...

  7. Ethanol metabolism by HeLa cells transduced with human alcohol dehydrogenase isoenzymes: control of the pathway by acetaldehyde concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Michinaga; Cyganek, Izabela; Sanghani, Paresh C; Cho, Won Kyoo; Liangpunsakul, Suthat; Crabb, David W

    2011-01-01

    Human class I alcohol dehydrogenase 2 isoenzymes (encoded by the ADH1B locus) have large differences in kinetic properties; however, individuals inheriting the alleles for the different isoenzymes exhibit only small differences in alcohol elimination rates. This suggests that other cellular factors must regulate the activity of the isoenzymes. The activity of the isoenzymes expressed from ADH1B*1, ADH1B*2, and ADH1B*3 cDNAs was examined in stably transduced HeLa cell lines, including lines which expressed human low K(m) aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2). The ability of the cells to metabolize ethanol was compared with that of HeLa cells expressing rat class I alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) (HeLa-rat ADH cells), rat hepatoma (H4IIEC3) cells, and rat hepatocytes. The isoenzymes had similar protein half-lives in the HeLa cells. Rat hepatocytes, H4IIEC3 cells, and HeLa-rat ADH cells oxidized ethanol much faster than the cells expressing the ADH1B isoenzymes. This was not explained by high cellular NADH levels or endogenous inhibitors; but rather because the activity of the β1 and β2 ADHs was constrained by the accumulation of acetaldehyde, as shown by the increased rate of ethanol oxidation by cell lines expressing β2 ADH plus ALDH2. The activity of the human β2 ADH isoenzyme is sensitive to inhibition by acetaldehyde, which likely limits its activity in vivo. This study emphasizes the importance of maintaining a low steady-state acetaldehyde concentration in hepatocytes during ethanol metabolism. Copyright © 2010 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  8. Tumor cell concentration and tumor burden in relation to histopathologic subtype and other prognostic factors in early stage Hodgkin's disease. The Danish National Hodgkin Study Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Specht, L.; Lauritzen, A.F.; Nordentoft, A.M.

    1990-01-01

    . Initial biopsy material was classified according to the Rye histopathologic classification, the grading and subclassification proposed by the British National Lymphoma Investigation (BNLI), and tumor cell concentration in sections. Tumor cell concentration as a prognostic factor turned out to be better...... than the other classifications. However, if macroscopic tumor burden was taken into account both tumor cell concentration and the other histopathologic classification systems lost their prognostic significance. Significantly, however, a combination of macroscopic tumor burden and tumor cell...... concentration, yielding an estimate of the total tumor cell burden, was even better than the macroscopic tumor burden as a prognostic factor. In conclusion, a simple tumor cell concentration count seems to be the most useful form of histopathologic subtyping for prognostic purposes in early stage Hodgkin...

  9. Relation between mast cells concentration and serotonin expression in chagasic megacolon development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, M A R; Segatto, N; Tischler, N; de Oliveira, E C; Brehmer, A; da Silveira, A B M

    2017-03-01

    Chagas' disease is still reaching about 10 million people in the world. In South America, one of the most severe forms of this disease is the megacolon, characterized by severe constipation, dilated sigmoid colon and rectum and severe malnutrition. Previous data suggested that mast cells and serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine [5-HT]) expression could be involved in intestinal homeostasis control, avoiding the chagasic megacolon development. The aim at this study was to characterize the presence of mast cells and expression of serotonin in chagasic patients with and without megacolon and evaluate the relation between mast cells, serotonin and megacolon development. Our results demonstrated that patients without megacolon feature a large amount of serotonin and few mast cells, while patients with megacolon feature low serotonin expression and a lot of mast cells. We believe that serotonin may be involved in the inflammatory process control, triggered by mast cells, and the presence of this substance in large quantities of the intestine could represent a mechanism of megacolon prevention. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Toluene disruption of the functions of L1 cell adhesion molecule at concentrations associated with occupational exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Kimberly M R; Sabatino, Julia A; He, Min; Davis, Natalie; Tang, Ningfeng; Bearer, Cynthia F

    2016-07-01

    Prenatal toluene exposure can cause neurodevelopmental disabilities similar to fetal alcohol syndrome. Both share neuroanatomic pathologies similar to children with mutations in L1 cell adhesion molecule (L1). L1 mediates neurite outgrowth (NOG) via signaling through ERK1/2, which require trafficking of L1 through lipid rafts. Our objective is to determine if toluene inhibits L1-mediated NOG and toluene inhibits L1 signaling at concentrations achieved during occupational exposure. Concentrations of toluene reflective of blood concentrations achieved in solvent abusers and occupational settings are used. Cerebellar granule neurons (CGN) harvested from postnatal day 6 rat pups are plated on coverslips coated with poly-L-lysine (PLL) alone or PLL followed by laminin. L1 is added to the media of CGN plated on PLL alone. Toluene is added 2 h after plating. Cells are fixed at 24 h and neurite length is measured. ERK1/2 activation by L1 in CGN is analyzed by immunoblot. Toluene significantly reduced mean neurite length of CGN exposed to L1 but not laminin. Toluene significantly reduced L1-mediated ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Results suggest that toluene inhibits L1-lipid raft interactions at occupationally relevant concentrations and may lead to a fetal solvent spectrum disorder similar to fetal alcohol spectrum disorder.

  11. Controlled-rate freezer cryopreservation of highly concentrated peripheral blood mononuclear cells results in higher cell yields and superior autologous T-cell stimulation for dendritic cell-based immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhl, Timo; Legler, Tobias J; Rosenberger, Albert; Schardt, Anke; Schön, Michael P; Haenssle, Holger A

    2012-11-01

    Availability of large quantities of functionally effective dendritic cells (DC) represents one of the major challenges for immunotherapeutic trials against infectious or malignant diseases. Low numbers or insufficient T-cell activation of DC may result in premature termination of treatment and unsatisfying immune responses in clinical trials. Based on the notion that cryopreservation of monocytes is superior to cryopreservation of immature or mature DC in terms of resulting DC quantity and immuno-stimulatory capacity, we aimed to establish an optimized protocol for the cryopreservation of highly concentrated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) for DC-based immunotherapy. Cryopreserved cell preparations were analyzed regarding quantitative recovery, viability, phenotype, and functional properties. In contrast to standard isopropyl alcohol (IPA) freezing, PBMC cryopreservation in an automated controlled-rate freezer (CRF) with subsequent thawing and differentiation resulted in significantly higher cell yields of immature and mature DC. Immature DC yields and total protein content after using CRF were comparable with results obtained with freshly prepared PBMC and exceeded results of standard IPA freezing by approximately 50 %. While differentiation markers, allogeneic T-cell stimulation, viability, and cytokine profiles were similar to DC from standard freezing procedures, DC generated from CRF-cryopreserved PBMC induced a significantly higher antigen-specific IFN-γ release from autologous effector T cells. In summary, automated controlled-rate freezing of highly concentrated PBMC represents an improved method for increasing DC yields and autologous T-cell stimulation.

  12. Portraying the Effect of Calcium-Binding Proteins on Cytosolic Calcium Concentration Distribution Fractionally in Nerve Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Brajesh Kumar; Joshi, Hardik; Dave, Devanshi D

    2016-11-23

    Nerve cells like neurons and astrocytes in central nervous system (CNS) take part in the signaling process which means the transformation of the information from one cell to another via signals. The signaling process is affected by various external parameters like buffers calcium-binding proteins, voltage-gated calcium channel. In the present paper, the role of buffers in the cytoplasmic calcium concentration distribution is shown. The elicitation in calcium concentration is due to the presence of lower amount calcium-binding proteins which can be shown graphically. The mathematical model is designed by keeping in mind the physiological condition taking place in CNS of mammalian brain. The thing to be noted here is that the more elicitation in the calcium concentration distribution results in the cell death which finally give neurodegenerative disease to the mammalian brain. The present paper gives a glimpse of Parkinson's diseases in particular. Computational results are performed in Wolfram Mathematica 9.0 and simulated on core(TM) i5-3210M CPU @ 2.50 GHz processing speed and 4 GB memory. It is found that the different types of buffer like ethylene glycol-bis([Formula: see text]-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid, 1,2-bis(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid and calmodulin have noteworthy effect at different fractions of time.

  13. Measuring, modeling, and increasing the free Concentration of test Chemicals in cell assays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kramer, N.I.

    2010-01-01

    Difficulties arise when extrapolating in vitro derived toxicity data to in vivo acute toxicity data because in vitro results are highly variable and occasionally less sensitive. Differences in the free concentration of a test chemical between in vitro and in vivo systems and within in vitro systems

  14. Estimation of CO concentration in high temperature PEM fuel cells using electrochemical impedance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Hans-Christian Becker; Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    This work presents the results of using the electrochemical impedance to analyse the behaviour of a BASF Celtec P2100 MEA operated under varying operating conditions with different temperatures and gas concentrations. Figure 1 shows the experimental setup used for these measurements....

  15. Low concentrations of hydrogen peroxide or nitrite induced of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis cell proliferation in a Ras-dependent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Eliza Coronel Janu Haniu

    Full Text Available Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, a causative agent of paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM, should be able to adapt to dramatic environmental changes inside the infected host after inhalation of air-borne conidia and transition to pathogenic yeasts. Proteins with antioxidant functions may protect fungal cells against reactive oxygen (ROS and nitrogen (RNS species generated by phagocytic cells, thus acting as potential virulence factors. Ras GTPases are involved in stress responses, cell morphology, and differentiation in a range of organisms. Ras, in its activated form, interacts with effector proteins and can initiate a kinase cascade. In lower eukaryotes, Byr2 kinase represents a Ras target. The present study investigated the role of Ras in P. brasiliensis after in vitro stimulus with ROS or RNS. We have demonstrated that low concentrations of H2O2 (0.1 mM or NO2 (0.1-0.25 µM stimulated P. brasiliensis yeast cell proliferation and that was not observed when yeast cells were pre-incubated with farnesyltransferase inhibitor. We constructed an expression plasmid containing the Byr2 Ras-binding domain (RBD fused with GST (RBD-Byr2-GST to detect the Ras active form. After stimulation with low concentrations of H2O2 or NO2, the Ras active form was observed in fungal extracts. Besides, NO2 induced a rapid increase in S-nitrosylated Ras levels. This alternative posttranslational modification of Ras, probably in residue Cys123, would lead to an exchange of GDP for GTP and consequent GTPase activation in P. brasiliensis. In conclusion, low concentrations of H2O2 or NO2 stimulated P. brasiliensis proliferation through Ras activation.

  16. Improvement of mammalian cell culture performance through surfactant enabled concentrated feed media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossler, Patrick; McDermott, Sean; Racicot, Christopher; Fann, John C H

    2013-01-01

    The design of basal and feed media in mammalian cell culture is paramount towards ensuring acceptable upstream process performance in various operation modes, especially fed-batch culture. Mammalian cell culture media designs have evolved from the classical formulations designed by Eagle and Ham, to today's formulations designed from continuous improvement and statistical frameworks. Feed media is especially important for ensuring robust cell growth, productivity, and ensuring the product quality of recombinant therapeutics are within acceptable ranges. Numerous studies have highlighted the benefit of various media designs, supplements, and feed addition strategies towards the resulting cell culture process. In this work we highlight the use of a top-down level approach towards feed media design enabled by the use of select surfactants for the targeted enrichment of a chemically defined feed media. The use of the enriched media was able to improve product titers at g/L levels, without adversely impacting the growth of multiple Chinese Hamster Ovary cell lines or the product quality of multiple recombinant antibodies. © 2013 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  17. Impact of rituximab on immunoglobulin concentrations and B cell numbers after cyclophosphamide treatment in patients with ANCA-associated vasculitides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nils Venhoff

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the impact of immunosuppressive therapy with cyclophosphamide (CYC and rituximab (RTX on serum immunoglobulin (Ig concentrations and B lymphocyte counts in patients with ANCA-associated vasculitides (AAVs. METHODS: Retrospective analysis of Ig concentrations and peripheral B cell counts in 55 AAV patients. RESULTS: CYC treatment resulted in a decrease in Ig levels (median; interquartile range IQR from IgG 12.8 g/L (8.15-15.45 to 9.17 g/L (8.04-9.90 (p = 0.002, IgM 1.05 g/L (0.70-1.41 to 0.83 g/L (0.60-1.17 (p = 0.046 and IgA 2.58 g/L (1.71-3.48 to 1.58 g/L (1-31-2.39 (p = 0.056 at a median follow-up time of 4 months. IgG remained significantly below the initial value at 14.5 months and 30 months analyses. Subsequent RTX treatment in patients that had previously received CYC resulted in a further decline in Ig levels from pre RTX IgG 9.84 g/L (8.71-11.60 to 7.11 g/L (5.75-8.77; p = 0.007, from pre RTX IgM 0.84 g/L (0.63-1.18 to 0.35 g/L (0.23-0.48; p<0.001 and from pre RTX IgA 2.03 g/L (1.37-2.50 to IgA 1.62 g/L (IQR 0.84-2.43; p = 0.365 14 months after RTX. Treatment with RTX induced a complete depletion of B cells in all patients. After a median observation time of 20 months median B lymphocyte counts remained severely suppressed (4 B-cells/µl, 1.25-9.5, p<0.001. Seven patients (21% that had been treated with CYC followed by RTX were started on Ig replacement because of severe bronchopulmonary infections and serum IgG concentrations below 5 g/L. CONCLUSIONS: In patients with AAVs, treatment with CYC leads to a decline in immunoglobulin concentrations. A subsequent RTX therapy aggravates the decline in serum immunoglobulin concentrations and results in a profoundly delayed B cell repopulation. Surveying patients with AAVs post CYC and RTX treatment for serum immunoglobulin concentrations and persisting hypogammaglobulinemia is warranted.

  18. Performance and failure analysis of concentrator solar cells after intensive stressing with thermal, electrical, and combined load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eltermann, Fabian; Ziegler, Lisa; Wiesenfarth, Maike; Wilde, Jürgen; Bett, Andreas W.

    2017-09-01

    In this work, we investigated the impact of intensive heat loads on concentrator solar cells assemblies. As test samples, we employed lattice-matched and lattice-mismatched triple-junction solar cells made of GaInP/GaInAs/Ge. The thermal loads were induced by different manners. We used drying cabinets, external power supplies, and a combination of both to achieve maximum test temperatures of 180 °C. For the performance analysis, we utilized flash light solar simulators and an electroluminescence (EL) imaging tool. Our experiments revealed a significant difference depending on the applied manner of heating. The highest impact was observed for the pure heat treatment in drying cabinets. This was particularly visible in the spatial EL images, but also in the IV curves. In contrast, running the concentrator solar cells as forward-biased diodes using an external current supply of 2000 mA, which corresponds to 2000 suns, did not lead to any significant changes in EL and IV curves. However, deformation of the front metallization was observed. In conclusion, pure heat treatment can be considered as a cost-efficient alternative to pinpoint weak points in solar cell receivers.

  19. Interactions between intracellular chloride concentrations, intracellular pH and energetic status in rat lactotrope cells in primary culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartor, P; Madec, F; Garcia, L; Dejean, L; Beauvoit, B; Dufy, B; Rigoulet, M

    2004-06-01

    Rat lactotrope cells in primary cultures have a higher intracellular Cl- concentration ([Cl-]i) than that predicted by a passive distribution across the membrane. This suggests that active cellular mechanisms ensure this ionic equilibrium. In this study, we examined the interactions between pHi, [Cl-]i regulation and cell energetics. We analyzed: 1. the interactions between extracellular Cl- concentrations, [Cl-]i and cellular energy; 2. the influence of [Cl-]i on respiratory chain function; 3. the correlation with glycolysis and; 4. the role played by pHi in these cellular mechanisms. We show that low [Cl-]i decreases ATP cell content, ATP/ADP ratio and modify phosphorylative oxidations. ATP production is rather due to the anaerobic pathway of the glucose metabolism than the aerobic one and depends also on other metabolic substrates among which glutamine probably has a special role. Finally, pHi appears as a determinant in the balance between aerobic and anaerobic pathways. These results are discussed in relation to the role of Cl- in normal and pathological (effect of hypoxia on mature and immature neurons) cell situations.

  20. Sorption and precipitation of Mn2+ by viable and autoclaved Shewanella putrefaciens: Effect of contact time

    KAUST Repository

    Chubar, Natalia

    2013-01-01

    The sorption of Mn(II) by viable and inactivated cells of Shewanella putrefaciens, a non-pathogenic, facultative anaerobic, gram-negative bacterium characterised as a Mn(IV) and Fe(III) reducer, was studied under aerobic conditions, as a function of pH, bacterial density and metal loading. During a short contact time (3-24h), the adsorptive behaviour of live and dead bacteria toward Mn(II) was sufficiently similar, an observation that was reflected in the studies on adsorption kinetics at various metal loadings, effects of pH, bacteria density, isotherms and drifting of pH during adsorption. Continuing the experiment for an additional 2-30days demonstrated that the Mn(II) sorption by suspensions of viable and autoclaved cells differed significantly from one another. The sorption to dead cells was characterised by a rapid equilibration and was described by an isotherm. In contrast, the sorption (uptake) to live bacteria exhibited a complex time-dependent uptake. This uptake began as adsorption and ion exchange processes followed by bioprecipitation, and it was accompanied by the formation of polymeric sugars (EPS) and the release of dissolved organic substances. FTIR, EXAFS/XANES and XPS demonstrated that manganese(II) phosphate was the main precipitate formed in 125ml batches, which is the first evidence of the ability of microbes to synthesise manganese phosphates. XPS and XANES spectra did not detect Mn(II) oxidation. Although the release of protein-like compounds by the viable bacteria increased in the presence of Mn2+ (and, by contrast, the release of carbohydrates did not change), electrochemical analyses did not indicate any aqueous complexation of Mn(II) by the organic ligands. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  1. N/P GaAs concentrator solar cells with an improved grid and bushbar contact design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desalvo, G. C.; Mueller, E. H.; Barnett, A. M.

    1985-01-01

    The major requirements for a solar cell used in space applications are high efficiency at AMO irradiance and resistance to high energy radiation. Gallium arsenide, with a band gap of 1.43 eV, is one of the most efficient sunlight to electricity converters (25%) when the the simple diode model is used to calculate efficiencies at AMO irradiance, GaAs solar cells are more radiation resistant than silicon solar cells and the N/P GaAs device has been reported to be more radiation resistant than similar P/N solar cells. This higher resistance is probably due to the fact that only 37% of the current is generated in the top N layer of the N/P cell compared to 69% in the top layer of a P/N solar cell. This top layer of the cell is most affected by radiation. It has also been theoretically calculated that the optimized N/P device will prove to have a higher efficiency than a similar P/N device. The use of a GaP window layer on a GaAs solar cell will avoid many of the inherent problems normally associated with a GaAlAs window while still proving good passivation of the GaAs surface. An optimized circular grid design for solar cell concentrators has been shown which incorporates a multi-layer metallization scheme. This multi-layer design allows for a greater current carrying capacity for a unit area of shading, which results in a better output efficiency.

  2. Gene expression microarray data from human microvascular endothelial cells supplemented with a low concentration of niacin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer M. Hughes-Large

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The systemic lipid modifying drug, niacin, can directly improve human microvascular endothelial cell angiogenic function under lipotoxic conditions, possibly through activation of niacin receptors “Niacin receptor activation improves human microvascular endothelial cell angiogenic function during lipotoxicity” (Hughes-Large et al. 2014. Here we provide accompanying data collected using Affymetrix GeneChip microarrays to identify changes in gene expression in human microvascular endothelial cells treated with 10 μM niacin. Statistical analyses of robust multi-array average (RMA values revealed that only 16 genes exhibited greater than 1.3-fold differential expression. Of these 16, only 5 were identified protein coding genes, while 3 of the remaining 11 genes appeared to be small nuclear/nucleolar RNAs. Altered expression of EFCAB4B, NAP1L2, and OR13C8 was confirmed by real time quantitative PCR.

  3. Device characterization for design optimization of 4 junction inverted metamorphic concentrator solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geisz, John F.; France, Ryan M.; Steiner, Myles A.; Friedman, Daniel J. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO 80401 (United States); García, Iván [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO 80401 USA and Instituto de Energía Solar, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Avda Complutense s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-09-26

    Quantitative electroluminescence (EL) and luminescent coupling (LC) analysis, along with more conventional characterization techniques, are