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Sample records for viability ontario case

  1. The role of taxation policy and incentives in wind-based distributed generation projects viability. Ontario case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albadi, M.H.; El-Saadany, E.F.

    2009-01-01

    Taxation policy and incentives play a vital role in wind-based distributed generation projects viability. In this paper, a thorough techno-economical evaluation of wind-based distributed generation projects is conducted to investigate the effect of taxes and incentives in the economic viability of investments in this sector. This paper considers the effects of Provincial income taxes, capital cost allowance (CCA), property taxes, and wind power production Federal incentives. The case study is conducted for different wind turbines and wind speed scenarios. Given turbine and wind speed data, the Capacity Factor (CF) of each turbine and wind speed scenario was calculated. Net Present Value (NPV) and Internal Rate of Return (IRR) for different scenarios were then used to assess the project's viability considering Ontario Standard Offer Program (SOP) for wind power. (author)

  2. Impact of Ontario electricity industry structure on the viability of cogeneration projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chuddy, B.

    1999-01-01

    A review of Ontario Hydro's existing market structure and how its move toward a more competitive profile can be advantageous for cogeneration projects was presented. Ontario's existing electric power supply is as follows: 6 fossil fuels stations generate a total of 9, 969 MW of electricity, 23 NUG stations generate 1,541 MW, 3 nuclear stations generate a total of 9,028 MW and 69 hydro-electric stations generates 6,751 MW of electricity. The criteria and characteristics for cogeneration projects were listed. The paper also discussed other topics such as the market price of power, outstanding regulatory issues, market volatility and relative pricing. The prognosis for Ontario cogeneration projects for the early years from 1999-2004 is that for economic reasons, only big projects with large loads of 200 to 800 MW will be considered. In later years, other projects will become economic

  3. Challenges of rehabilitation case mix measurement in Ontario hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Jason Murray; Walker, Jan

    2008-03-01

    Case mix classification systems have been adopted in many countries as a method to manage and finance healthcare in acute care settings; the most popular systems are based on diagnosis related groups. The most successful of those case mix systems differentiate patient types by reflecting both the intensity of resources consumed and patient acuity. Case mix systems for use with non-acute hospital activity have not been as wide-spread; other than in the United States, little attention has been directed towards case mix classification for rehabilitation activity. In a province with over 13 million inhabitants with 2496 rehabilitation beds, inpatient rehabilitation is an important component of hospital care in Ontario, Canada, and consists of the spectrum of intensive rehabilitation activities intended to restore function. Although case mix adjusted activity has been the currency in Ontario's Integrated Population Based Allocation hospital funding formula, rehabilitation activity has not been subjected to case mix measurement. A project to examine case mix classification for adult inpatient rehabilitation activity was initiated by the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care whose outcome was a case mix system and associated cost weights that would result in rehabilitation activity being incorporated into the hospital funding formula. The process described in this study provides Ontario's provincial government with a case mix classification system for adult inpatient rehabilitation activity although there remain areas for improvement.

  4. Anatomy of a Tuition Freeze: The Case of Ontario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rexe, Deanna

    2015-01-01

    Using two conceptual frameworks from political science--Kingdon's (2003) multiple streams model and the advocacy coalition framework (Sabatier & Jenkins-Smith, 1993)--this case study examines the detailed history of a major tuition policy change in Ontario in 2004: a tuition freeze. The paper explores the social, political, and economic…

  5. Cooperatives and the State: The Case of Ontario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Laforest

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the early 2000s, the cooperative movement in Ontario came together in order to lobby its provincial government for active cooperative development support programs. Momentum was building for these types of programs. Already, many provincial governments had implemented active support programs in their jurisdiction. Despite having one of the largest cooperative sectors in Canada, Ontario was lagging behind. This article assesses the progress of the efforts of the Ontario cooperative movement to date. It details how the Ontario cooperative movement developed a sectoral identity for itself and framed its objectives in an effort to strengthen its relationship with the Ontario government. / Le mouvement coopératif en Ontario s'est rassemblé au début des années 2000 afin de faire pression sur le gouvernement provincial pour qu'il développe des programmes de soutient actif pour coopératives. Déjà plusieurs gouvernements provinciaux avaient mis en place de telles politiques. L'Ontario tardait malgré le fait qu'il avait un des plus grands secteurs coopératifs au Canada. Cet article examine le progrès qu'a connu le mouvement coopératif en Ontario dans ses efforts. Il décrit comment le mouvement coopératif a construit une identité sectorielle autour de laquelle il a pu ancrer ses demandes auprès du gouvernement ontarien.

  6. A case control study of fowl pox in southeastern Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, D M; Martin, S W

    1990-06-01

    An outbreak of fowl pox, which occurred in south-eastern Ontario between July 1988 and April 1989, was investigated in the spring of 1989 to determine factors associated with the spread of the disease. Clinical fowl pox was confirmed on five farms (cases). Twenty-seven farms, out of 35 egg producers with quota from Durham region to Northumberland county, provided information as controls. Bivariate analyses were performed on mail survey data using Fisher's exact test and odds ratios. Although the tests of hypotheses lacked statistical power because of the small number of case farms, and barns, a number of significant associations were found. At the farm level, fowl pox infection was associated with pullets purchased from a particular pullet grower. At the barn level, fowl pox infection was associated with pullets from a particular grower, mixing different groups of pullets, and a trend towards having birds early in the laying period, and higher numbers of birds placed. Fowl pox-infected barns had higher mortality and lower egg production postoutbreak. The results may indicate that the virus enters the laying barn at, or near, the time new birds are placed. Better communication among producers, catch-and-fill crews, and others associated with the egg industry, as well as more complete records of dates, sources, and persons involved with pullet placements, are recommended.

  7. Electricity market price volatility: The case of Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zareipour, Hamidreza; Bhattacharya, Kankar; Canizares, Claudio A.

    2007-01-01

    Price volatility analysis has been reported in the literature for most competitive electricity markets around the world. However, no studies have been published yet that quantify price volatility in the Ontario electricity market, which is the focus of the present paper. In this paper, a comparative volatility analysis is conducted for the Ontario market and its neighboring electricity markets. Volatility indices are developed based on historical volatility and price velocity concepts, previously applied to other electricity market prices, and employed in the present work. The analysis is carried out in two scenarios: in the first scenario, the volatility indices are determined for the entire price time series. In the second scenario, the price time series are broken up into 24 time series for each of the 24 h and volatility indices are calculated for each specific hour separately. The volatility indices are also applied to the locational marginal prices of several pricing points in the New England, New York, and PJM electricity markets. The outcomes reveal that price volatility is significantly higher in Ontario than the three studied neighboring electricity markets. Furthermore, comparison of the results of this study with similar findings previously published for 15 other electricity markets demonstrates that the Ontario electricity market is one of the most volatile electricity markets world-wide. This high volatility is argued to be associated with the fact that Ontario is a single-settlement, real-time market

  8. Source Water Protection Planning for Ontario First Nations Communities: Case Studies Identifying Challenges and Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie Collins

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available After the Walkerton tragedy in 2000, where drinking water contamination left seven people dead and many suffering from chronic illness, the Province of Ontario, Canada implemented policies to develop Source Water Protection (SWP plans. Under the Clean Water Act (2006, thirty-six regional Conservation Authorities were mandated to develop watershed-based SWP plans under 19 Source Protection Regions. Most First Nations in Ontario are outside of these Source Protection Regions and reserve lands are under Federal jurisdiction. This paper explores how First Nations in Ontario are attempting to address SWP to improve drinking water quality in their communities even though these communities are not part of the Ontario SWP framework. The case studies highlight the gap between the regulatory requirements of the Federal and Provincial governments and the challenges for First Nations in Ontario from lack of funding to implement solutions to address the threats identified in SWP planning. This analysis of different approaches taken by Ontario First Nations shows that the Ontario framework for SWP planning is not an option for the majority of First Nations communities, and does not adequately address threats originating on reserve lands. First Nations attempting to address on-reserve threats to drinking water are using a variety of resources and approaches to develop community SWP plans. However, a common theme of all the cases surveyed is a lack of funding to support implementing solutions for the threats identified by the SWP planning process. Federal government initiatives to address the chronic problem of boil water advisories within Indigenous communities do not recognize SWP planning as a cost-effective tool for improving drinking water quality.

  9. Operationalizing privacy by design: the Ontario smart grid case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-02-15

    The electrical industry is under perpetual evolution and the changes are becoming more and more complex. The current evolution of the Smart Grid in Ontario, Canada, will modify the entire utility infrastructure and it is therefore critical that the proposed solution also meets customer needs. The aim of this paper is to determine how best practices can be operationalized into smart grid systems. This study showed that the easiest, fastest and best way to implement privacy is in the earliest design stage. This study demonstrated the strategy of dealing with privacy after the fact makes it more difficult to satisfy privacy considerations.

  10. Sewage sludge pasteurization by gamma radiation: financial viability case studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swinwood, J.F.; Kotler, J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper examines the financial viability of sewage sludge pasteurization by gamma radiation, by examining the following three North American scenarios: 1. Small volume sewage treatment plant experiencing high sludge disposal costs; 2. Large volume sewage treatment plant experiencing low sludge disposal costs; 3. Large volume sewage treatment plant experiencing high sludge disposal costs. (author)

  11. Sewage sludge pasteurization by gamma radiation: financial viability case studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swinwood, J.F.; Kotler, J. (Nordion International Inc., Kanata, Ontario (Canada))

    1990-01-01

    This paper examines the financial viability of sewage sludge pasteurization by gamma radiation, by examining the following three North American scenarios: 1. Small volume sewage treatment plant experiencing high sludge disposal costs; 2. Large volume sewage treatment plant experiencing low sludge disposal costs; 3. Large volume sewage treatment plant experiencing high sludge disposal costs. (author).

  12. Sewage sludge pasteurization by gamma radiation: Financial viability case studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinwood, Jean F.; Kotler, Jiri

    This paper examines the financial viability of sewage sludge pasteurization by gamma radiation, by examining the following three North American scenarios: 1) Small volume sewage treatment plant experiencing high sludge disposal costs. 2) Large volume sewage treatment plant experiencing low sludge disposal costs. 3) Large volume sewage treatment plant experiencing high sludge disposal costs.

  13. Open pit coal exploitation viability. Margarita mine. Case of study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veloza, Julia; Molina, Jorge; Mejia, Humberto

    2006-01-01

    This paper provides an analysis of financial viability, planning and design for the new coal open pit exploitation for La Margarita mine, with coal-resources estimated on 440.139,7 ton. Dimension, design and economic evaluation were possible by three exploitation methods: (multiple bench, open cast contour, and terraces). Net present values (NVP) were calculated: $c 817,5; $c 518,5 and $c 645,2 respectively for each method (given in million current Colombian pesos $. $c 2380 are equivalent to $us 1) and rate of return (ROR) 78,33%; 34,0% and 38,62% respectively for each method. These indicators served as a parameter to choose the multiple bench method, which should be recalculated because it was necessary to work jointly with two pits and making feasible the project. in addition a general environmental evaluation was done, which is vital for the exploitation. Important impacts on the flower, animals, air, water were found, and measures of control, prevention and mitigation were stated. it is expected that this paper can be useful as a technical-economical support for the development of the open pit exploitation in the margarita mine

  14. Irresistible force meets immovable object : an Ontario case study on grid expansion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vegh, G.; Annis, K. [McCarthy Tetrault, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    This PowerPoint presentation discussed a case study of an Ontario grid expansion. The Green Energy and Green Economy Act was introduced in Ontario in 2009. The federal feed-in tariff (FIT) program has been successful, and has resulted in increased renewable energy capacity throughout the province. The expansion in distribution has resulted in the socialization of distribution expansion costs. A cost sharing mechanism has been established to ensure that the amount of rate protection is equal to investment costs. Costs that are the distributor's responsibility are considered to be eligible investment costs, and Green Energy Act plans are required to account for distribution expansion that is built to connect renewable generation. Details of Hydro One Networks' distribution expansion plans were presented. The methods used by the Ontario Energy Board (OEB) to determine which types of generation should be connected were reviewed. The presentation concluded by recommending the development of a generic process for addressing generation and connection cost considerations in order to increase transparency and predictability. Transmission projects and policy changes were also discussed. tabs., figs.

  15. Antimicrobial Resistance and Antimicrobial Use Associated with Laboratory-Confirmed Cases of Campylobacter Infection in Two Health Units in Ontario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne E Deckert

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available AIM: A population-based study was conducted over a two-year period in the Perth District (PD and Wellington-Dufferin-Guelph (WDG health units in Ontario to document antimicrobial resistance and antimicrobial use associated with clinical cases of laboratory-confirmed campylobacteriosis.

  16. Viability and Management Targets of Mediterranean Demersal Fisheries: The Case of the Aegean Sea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Tserpes

    Full Text Available Management of the Mediterranean demersal stocks has proven challenging mainly due to the multi-species character of the fisheries. In the present work, we focus on the multi-species demersal fisheries of the Aegean Sea (eastern Mediterranean aiming to study the effects of different management measures on the main commercial stocks, as well as to explore the economic viability of the fisheries depending upon these resources, by means of simulated projections. Utilizing the limited available data, our results demonstrated that, under the current exploitation pattern, the economic viability of the fleets is threatened, particularly if fuel prices increase. Additionally, the biological targets set for the most exploited species, such as hake, will not be met under the current management regime. The projections also showed that the only management scenario under which both resource sustainability and economic viability of the fisheries are ensured is the decrease of fleet capacity in terms of vessel numbers. In this case, however, measures to support the fisheries-dependent communities need to be implemented to prevent the collapse of local economies due to employment decrease. Scenarios assuming selectivity improvements would be also beneficial for the stocks but they showed low economic performance and their application would threaten the viability of the fleets, particularly that of the trawlers.

  17. Enabling the participation of marginalized populations: case studies from a health service organization in Ontario, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montesanti, Stephanie R; Abelson, Julia; Lavis, John N; Dunn, James R

    2017-08-01

    We examined efforts to engage marginalized populations in Ontario Community Health Centers (CHCs), which are primary health care organizations serving 74 high-risk communities. Qualitative case studies of community participation in four Ontario CHCs were carried out through key informant interviews with CHC staff to identify: (i) the approaches, strategies and methods used in participation initiatives aimed specifically at engaging marginalized populations in the planning of and decision making for health services; and (ii) the challenges and enablers for engaging these populations. The marginalized populations involved in the community participation initiatives studied included Low-German Speaking Mennonites in a rural town, newcomer immigrants and refugees in an urban downtown city, immigrant and francophone seniors in an inner city and refugee women in an inner city. Our analysis revealed that enabling the participation of marginalized populations requires CHCs to attend to the barriers experienced by marginalized populations that constrain their participation. Key informants outlined the features of a 'community development approach' that they rely on to address the barriers to marginalized peoples' involvement by strengthening their skills, abilities and leadership in capacity-building activities. The community development approach also shaped the participation methods that were used in the engagement process of CHCs. However, key informants also described the challenges of applying this approach, influenced by the cultural values of some groups, which shaped their willingness and motivation to participate. This study provides further insight into the approach, strategies and methods used in the engagement process to enable the participation of marginalized populations, which may be transferable to other health services settings. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Emissions trading in the context of electricity deregulation : a case study on Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johns, G.

    2003-01-01

    This presentation discussed the deregulation of the electric power industry in Ontario and Alberta with particular reference to emissions trading, emissions profiles for the two provinces, and current market rules. It was noted that deregulation in Ontario is the major impetus for developing an emission trading system. Alberta is also in the process of developing an emission trading system for all industry sectors. The author discussed Ontario's Bill 210 which places a 6 year cap on prices and which offers tax incentives for renewable energy sources. It was argued that Bill 210 negates new generation and inhibits participants and competition in emissions trading market. Ontario generators face competitiveness concerns with neighbouring jurisdictions. Current market rules were outlined for emission caps, allocation for nitrogen oxide and sulfur dioxide allowances, credit creation, emission trading, and credit use. 6 figs

  19. Relevance of control theory to design and maintenance problems in time-variant reliability: The case of stochastic viability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rougé, Charles; Mathias, Jean-Denis; Deffuant, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this paper is twofold: (1) to show that time-variant reliability and a branch of control theory called stochastic viability address similar problems with different points of view, and (2) to demonstrate the relevance of concepts and methods from stochastic viability in reliability problems. On the one hand, reliability aims at evaluating the probability of failure of a system subjected to uncertainty and stochasticity. On the other hand, viability aims at maintaining a controlled dynamical system within a survival set. When the dynamical system is stochastic, this work shows that a viability problem belongs to a specific class of design and maintenance problems in time-variant reliability. Dynamic programming, which is used for solving Markovian stochastic viability problems, then yields the set of design states for which there exists a maintenance strategy which guarantees reliability with a confidence level β for a given period of time T. Besides, it leads to a straightforward computation of the date of the first outcrossing, informing on when the system is most likely to fail. We illustrate this approach with a simple example of population dynamics, including a case where load increases with time. - Highlights: • Time-variant reliability tools cannot devise complex maintenance strategies. • Stochastic viability is a control theory that computes a probability of failure. • Some design and maintenance problems are stochastic viability problems. • Used in viability, dynamic programming can find reliable maintenance actions. • Confronting reliability and control theories such as viability is promising

  20. Economic and greenhouse gas consequences of nuclear phase-out: a case study of Japan, Germany, and Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedechko, R.T.; Khani, J.Y.; Toor, J.S.; Donev, J.M.K.C.

    2014-01-01

    Phasing out the use of nuclear energy for electricity production is often cited as a recommended policy strategy by anti-nuclear activists. This claim is very difficult to empirically test, however, Japan and Germany both offer interesting case studies into the economic, social, and greenhouse gas related consequences of phasing out nuclear energy on a rapid time scale. The results of the Japanese and German case studies inform a hypothetical phase out of nuclear energy from Ontario's energy mix. In all cases considered, rapid nuclear energy phase-out resulted in increased electricity costs, higher GHG emissions, and social externalities. (author)

  1. Perfusion Computed Tomography for the Assessment of Myocardial Viability — a Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morariu Mirabela

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Myocardial viability plays an important role in preventing the development of left ventricular remodeling following an acute myocardial infarction. A preserved viability in the infarcted area has been demonstrated to be associated with a lower amplitude of the remodeling process, while the extent of the non-viable myocardium is directly correlated with the amplitude of the remodeling process. A number of methods are currently in use for the quantification of the viable myocardium, and some of them are based on the estimation of myocardial perfusion during pharmacologic stress. 64-slice Multi-detector Computed Tomography (MDCT during vasodilator stress test, associated with CT Coronary Angiography (CCTA has a high diagnostic accuracy in evaluating myocardial perfusion. In this article, we present a sequence of 3 clinical cases that presented with symptoms of myocardial ischemia, who underwent 64-slice MDCT imaging at rest and during adenosine stress test, in order to assess the extent of the hypoperfused myocardial areas. Coronary artery anatomy and the Coronary Calcium Score was assessed for all 3 patients by performing CT Coronary Angiography. The combination of CT Angiography and adenosine stress CT myocardial perfusion imaging can accurately detect atherosclerosic lesions that cause perfusion abnormalities, compared with the combination of invasive angiography and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT.

  2. Case of disclosure of HIV status helps to clarify privacy law in Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Renée

    2008-07-01

    A judge in the Ontario Superior Court of Justice has dismissed a breach of privacy suit on the basis that the plaintiff failed to prove that the disclosure of his HIV status had caused him harm. The judgment set out guidelines for how future claims of breach of privacy should be addressed.

  3. Viability and resilience of complex systems concepts, methods and case studies from ecology and society

    CERN Document Server

    Deffuant, Guillaume

    2011-01-01

    One common characteristic of a complex system is its ability to withstand major disturbances and the capacity to rebuild itself. Understanding how such systems demonstrate resilience by absorbing or recovering from major external perturbations requires both quantitative foundations and a multidisciplinary view of the topic. This book demonstrates how new methods can be used to identify the actions favouring the recovery from perturbations on a variety of examples including the dynamics of bacterial biofilms, grassland savannahs, language competition and Internet social networking sites. The reader is taken through an introduction to the idea of resilience and viability and shown the mathematical basis of the techniques used to analyse systems. The idea of individual or agent-based modelling of complex systems is introduced and related to analytically tractable approximations of such models. A set of case studies illustrates the use of the techniques in real applications, and the final section describes how on...

  4. Not quite the end for Jatropha? : a case study of the financial viability of biodiesel production from Jatropha in Tanzania

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bryant, S.T.; Romijn, H.A.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the case study is to assess the financial viability of biodiesel production from Jatropha under real-life conditions, in contrast to the more generalised studies currently available. This assessment is modelled from the data of a Jatropha oil producer with a social entrepreneurial

  5. Citizen and consumer attitudes towards electricity industry restructuring : an Ontario (Canada) case-study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowlands, I.; Parker, P.; Scott, D.

    2001-01-01

    This report examines public attitudes regarding electricity restructuring in Ontario. A survey from the Waterloo region in western Ontario provided responses to questions about attitudes towards restructuring and strategies for advancing environmental goals. A 158-item survey was sent to 1,110 individuals, between September 2000 and April 2001. A total of 474 questionnaires were answered, for a response rate of 43 per cent. It was noted that although the response rate was high, the survey may not be representative because the respondents were older, better educated, and wealthier than the general population. In addition, the respondents had previously indicated they were willing to pay $25 for a home energy evaluation, suggesting a special interest in issues regarding energy and the environment. Respondents were first asked whether they agreed, disagreed or were not sure about the need to restructure, whether a single government power company should supply electricity, or whether they were pleased to choose a power company of their choice. The respondents were then asked to rank the importance of the price of electricity, the quality of customer service, whether the electricity is generated in southern Ontario, the environmental effects of the electricity produced by the company, the reputation of the company, and reliability of electricity. Price and reliability ranked as the highest priorities by respondents. Citizens' attitudes toward premium-priced green electricity were also examined. The general conclusion was that while many respondents wanted a sustainable electricity system, most of them will look for the cheapest electricity product once the market is opened. 6 refs., 3 tabs

  6. Comparable Worth Comes to the Private Sector: The Case of Ontario

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Baker; Nicole Fortin

    2000-01-01

    We investigate the effect of pro-active comparable worth legislation, covering both the public and private sectors, on wages, employment and the gender gap. Our focus is the pay equity initiative adopted by the Canadian province of Ontario in the early 1990s. Our preliminary finding is that the law fell short of its goal of reducing gender based wage differentials.Firm surveys indicate that the effect of the legislation was blunted by lack of compliance in small private firms, the low inciden...

  7. Evaluating risk factors for endemic human Salmonella Enteritidis infections with different phage types in Ontario, Canada using multinomial logistic regression and a case-case study approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varga Csaba

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identifying risk factors for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE infections in Ontario will assist public health authorities to design effective control and prevention programs to reduce the burden of SE infections. Our research objective was to identify risk factors for acquiring SE infections with various phage types (PT in Ontario, Canada. We hypothesized that certain PTs (e.g., PT8 and PT13a have specific risk factors for infection. Methods Our study included endemic SE cases with various PTs whose isolates were submitted to the Public Health Laboratory-Toronto from January 20th to August 12th, 2011. Cases were interviewed using a standardized questionnaire that included questions pertaining to demographics, travel history, clinical symptoms, contact with animals, and food exposures. A multinomial logistic regression method using the Generalized Linear Latent and Mixed Model procedure and a case-case study design were used to identify risk factors for acquiring SE infections with various PTs in Ontario, Canada. In the multinomial logistic regression model, the outcome variable had three categories representing human infections caused by SE PT8, PT13a, and all other SE PTs (i.e., non-PT8/non-PT13a as a referent category to which the other two categories were compared. Results In the multivariable model, SE PT8 was positively associated with contact with dogs (OR=2.17, 95% CI 1.01-4.68 and negatively associated with pepper consumption (OR=0.35, 95% CI 0.13-0.94, after adjusting for age categories and gender, and using exposure periods and health regions as random effects to account for clustering. Conclusions Our study findings offer interesting hypotheses about the role of phage type-specific risk factors. Multinomial logistic regression analysis and the case-case study approach are novel methodologies to evaluate associations among SE infections with different PTs and various risk factors.

  8. Forbearance, Regulation, and Market Power in Natural Gas Storage: The Case of Ontario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, D.; Ware, R.; Wetston, H.

    2007-07-01

    In late 2006 the Ontario Energy Board rendered a landmark decision to forbear from the price regulation of natural gas storage services. This paper examines the key issues and provides some economic analysis of the evidence. The decision followed a proceeding during which evidence was given on whether the market for storage is competitive or is subject to significant market power possessed by dominant and incumbent utility firms in the province. Intervenors in the proceeding were in broad agreement on the use of standard concepts from North American antitrust analysis of merger reviews: identification of the relevant product and geographic markets, analysis of market structure within the relevant market, and assessment of barriers to entry. A critical issue at the hearing was the extent of the geographic market; a broad market encompassing U.S. storage facilities in neighbouring states supports a finding of competition, whereas a narrower geographic market restricted to Ontario makes market power more likely. Since gas storage is only as functional as the pipelines connected to it, evidence was directed at assessing the availability of pipeline capacity in both primary and secondary markets. (auth)

  9. Tourism climatology for camping: a case study of two Ontario parks (Canada)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewer, Micah J.; Scott, Daniel; Gough, William A.

    2015-08-01

    Climate and weather act as central motivators for the travel decisions of tourists. Due to their seasonality, these factors determine the availability and quality of certain outdoor recreational activities. Park visitation in Ontario, Canada, has been identified as a weather sensitive tourism and recreation activity. This study used a survey-based approach to identify and compare stated weather preferences and thresholds, as well as weather-related decision-making for campers at two provincial parks in Ontario, Canada. The two parks were selected for differing physical and environmental characteristics (forested lake versus coastal beach). Statistically significant differences were detected between the two parks in relation to the importance of weather and weather-based decision-making. Specific temperatures that were considered ideal and thresholds that were too cool and too warm were identified for both parks, both during the day and the night. Heavy rain and strong winds were the most influential factors in weather-related decision-making and on-site behavioural adaptations. Beach campers placed greater importance on the absence of rain and the presence of comfortable temperatures compared to forest campers. In addition, beach campers were more likely to leave the park early due to incremental weather changes. The results of this study suggest that beach campers are more sensitive to weather than forest campers.

  10. Cogeneration markets in Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poredos, S.

    1993-01-01

    Cogeneration offers a key strategy which supports global competitiveness for Ontario businesses, encourages energy efficiency and environmental protection, and offers natural gas utilities and producers stable long-term incremental markets. By supporting cogeneration projects, electric utilities will benefit from increased flexibility. Natural gas is the fuel of choice for cogeneration, which can in most cases be easily integrated into existing operations. In Ontario, electric demand grew along with the gross domestic product until 1990, but has decreased with the recent economic recession. The provincial utility Ontario Hydro is resizing itself to stabilize total rate increases of 30% over the last three years and supporting reduction of its high debt load. Rate increases are supposed to be limited but this may be difficult to achieve without further cost-cutting measures. Cogeneration opportunities exist with many institutional and industrial customers who are trying to remain globally competitive by cutting operating costs. In general, cogeneration can save 20% or more of total annual energy costs. Due to excess capacity, Ontario Hydro is not willing to purchase electric power, thus only electric load displacement projects are valid at this time. This will reduce overall savings due to economies of scale. In southwestern Ontario, Union Gas Ltd. has been successful in developing 40 MW of electric displacement projects, providing a total load of 5 billion ft 3 of natural gas (50% of which is incremental). Over 3,000 MW of technical cogeneration potential is estimated to exist in the Union Gas franchise area

  11. Energy, cost, and emission end-use profiles of homes: An Ontario (Canada) case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aydinalp Koksal, Merih; Rowlands, Ian H.; Parker, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Hourly electricity consumption data of seven end-uses from 25 homes are analyzed. • Hourly load, cost, and emission profiles of end-uses are developed and categorized. • Side-by-side analysis of energy, cost, and environmental effects is conducted. • Behaviour and outdoor temperature based end-uses are determined. • Share of each end-use in the total daily load, cost, and emission is determined. - Abstract: Providing information on the temporal distributions of residential electricity end-uses plays a major role in determining the potential savings in residential electricity demand, cost, and associated emissions. While the majority of the studies on disaggregated residential electricity end-use data provided hourly usage profiles of major appliances, only a few of them presented analysis on the effect of hourly electricity consumption of some specific end-uses on household costs and emissions. This study presents side-by-side analysis of energy, cost, and environment effects of hourly electricity consumption of the main electricity end-uses in a sample of homes in the Canadian province of Ontario. The data used in this study are drawn from a larger multi-stakeholder project in which electricity consumption of major end-uses at 25 homes in Milton, Ontario, was monitored in five-minute intervals for six-month to two-year periods. In addition to determining the hourly price of electricity during the monitoring period, the hourly carbon intensity is determined using fuel type hourly generation and the life cycle greenhouse gas intensities specifically determined for Ontario’s electricity fuel mix. The hourly load, cost, and emissions profiles are developed for the central air conditioner, furnace, clothes dryer, clothes washer, dishwasher, refrigerator, and stove and then grouped into eight day type categories. The side-by-side analysis of categorized load, cost, and emission profiles of the seven electricity end-uses provided information on

  12. Mandated Community Service in High School and Subsequent Civic Engagement: The Case of the "Double Cohort" in Ontario, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Ailsa; Brown, Steven D.; Pancer, S. Mark; Ellis-Hale, Kimberly

    2007-01-01

    In 1999, the Ontario provincial government introduced into its high school curriculum a requirement that students complete 40 h of volunteer community service before graduation. At the same time, the high school curriculum was shortened from five years to four. Consequently, the 2003 graduating class of Ontario high school students contained two…

  13. Ideology and wildlands management: The case of Rondeau Provincial Park, Ontario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, D. L.; Nelson, J. G.

    1980-03-01

    This is a critical examination of some of the basic concepts that have guided management of parks and related reserves, often termed wildlands. Study is focussed on Rondeau Provincial Park, Ontario, and on concepts such as wilderness, primeval forest, and the Carolinian forest. Deer culling and other management policies and practices have been based upon the idea that the highly valued sassafras, tulip, and other species of the Carolinian forest are decreasing due to browsing. Field mapping and analysis of historic vegetation records indicate that this trend is not in fact occurring. Historic research also reveals difficulties in defining the Carolinian or other perceived types of forest for management purposes. A major reassessment of ideology and management policy and practice seem to be required in Rondeau and other wildlands. Vague or general concepts such as wilderness or preservation should be strongly complemented and supported by more precise statements of objectives, a learning attitude, and experimentation and research. As a result of the technical uncertainties and value judgments frequently involved, management should also be based upon the expressed preferences and continuing involvement of citizens.

  14. Diagnostic value of dobutamine echocardiography in myocardial viability of about 85 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Hammami, El Mondher

    2009-01-01

    Stress echocardiography in low-dose dobutamine is part of the proposed techniques for the identification of viable myocardium. Unlike isotopic techniques that analyze the viability in terms of perfusion and membrane integrity, the echo dobutamine studying the functional aspect of sustain ability is - to - say the existence of a reservation contraction in segments asynergic. To establish the diagnostic value of echo dobutamine in search of sustain ability we conducted a prospective study to nearly 85 patients all presented with a recent myocardial infarction whose average age is 55 years and the sex ratio is 0.95. The examination was performed for all our patients on average twelfth day of myocardial infarction, improved segmental kinetics at least one grade in at least two adjacent segments relative to the ground state is considered as ultrasound test of the viability.

  15. Association between cervical screening and prevention of invasive cervical cancer in Ontario: a population-based case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicus, Danielle; Sutradhar, Rinku; Lu, Yan; Kupets, Rachel; Paszat, Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the effect of cervical screening in the prevention of invasive cervical cancer among age groups, using a population-based case-control study in the province of Ontario, Canada. Exposure was defined as cervical cytology history greater than 3 months before the diagnosis date of cervical cancer (index date). Cases were women who were diagnosed with cervical cancer between January 1, 1998, and December 31, 2008. Controls were women without a diagnosis of cervical cancer on, or before, December 31, 2008. Two controls were matched to each case on year of birth and income quintile, as of the index date. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate the odds ratio for having been screened among those with cervical cancer. Cervical cancer screening performed between 3 and 36 months before the index date was protective against invasive cervical cancer in women aged 40 through 69 years. In women younger than 40 years, cervical cancer screening performed 3 to 36 months before the index date was not protective. Cervical screening is associated with a reduced risk for invasive cervical cancer among women older than 40 years. Cervical cancer resources should be focused on maximizing the risk reduction.

  16. Viability Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Aubin, Jean-Pierre; Saint-Pierre, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Viability theory designs and develops mathematical and algorithmic methods for investigating the adaptation to viability constraints of evolutions governed by complex systems under uncertainty that are found in many domains involving living beings, from biological evolution to economics, from environmental sciences to financial markets, from control theory and robotics to cognitive sciences. It involves interdisciplinary investigations spanning fields that have traditionally developed in isolation. The purpose of this book is to present an initiation to applications of viability theory, explai

  17. VIABILITY OF SOME APPLIED COST SYSTEMS IN MANUFACTURING FIRMS: EGYPT'S CASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karim Mamdouh ABBAS

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims to analyze viability of some applied cost systems. The population of the study is some Egyptian manufacturing firms. The number of received questionnaires was 385. The results indicated that , according to the application extent indicator, the currently cost systems in Egyptian manufacturing firms may be descendingly arranged as follows: Activity Based Costing (ABC system, Target Costing (TC system , Resource Consumption Accounting (RCA system, Activity Based Management (ABM ,Other systems, Theory of Constraints (TOC and Value Chain (VC analysis.

  18. Genetic incompatibility dampens hybrid fertility more than hybrid viability: yeast as a case study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meibo Xu

    Full Text Available Genetic incompatibility is believed to be the major cause of postzygotic reproductive isolation. Despite huge efforts seeking for speciation-related incompatibilities in the past several decades, a general understanding of how genetic incompatibility evolves in affecting hybrid fitness is not available, primarily due to the fact that the number of known incompatibilities is small. Instead of further mapping specific incompatible genes, in this paper we aimed to know the overall effects of incompatibility on fertility and viability, the two aspects of fitness, by examining 89 gametes produced by yeast S. cerevisiae-S. paradoxus F1 hybrids. Homozygous F2 hybrids formed by autodiploidization of F1 gametes were subject to tests for growth rate and sporulation efficiency. We observed much stronger defects in sporulation than in clonal growth for every single F2 hybrid strain, indicating that genetic incompatibility affects hybrid fertility more than hybrid viability in yeast. We related this finding in part to the fast-evolving nature of meiosis-related genes, and proposed that the generally low expression levels of these genes might be a cause of the observation.

  19. The Dishwater Menace: Healthy Drinking Spaces and the Public Good in Post-Prohibition Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malleck, Dan

    2017-01-01

    This paper examines inter-bureaucracy tension, negotiation, and resolution in the case of the oversight of beverage room sanitation in Ontario in the 1930s and 1940s. Both the Liquor Control Board of Ontario (LCBO) and various public health authorities claimed authority over the health status of public drinking spaces. But the LCBO had legislative priority. The ensuing debates regarding health and cleanliness linked issues of beverage room glass sanitation to a biopolitical approach to public drinking. Developing a more scientifically sophisticated approach to beverage glass cleaning required a balancing of administrative priorities. Perfect sanitation was expensive and complicated, and the LCBO's mandate demanded attention to the financial viability of beverage rooms. The LCBO needed to forge a trade off between safety and viability, while maintaining a public drinking system that dissuaded illegal drinking. The subsequent compromise in beverage room glass sanitation tied contemporary chemical sanitizers to the challenging economics of depression-era beverage room management.

  20. Economical Analysis of Different Clinical Approaches in Pre-Viability Amniorrhexis—A Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Engemise

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Prolonged oligohydramnios following extreme preterm prelabour rupture of membranes (EPPROM is traditionally associated with a high morbidity and mortality to both the mother and the baby. The clinical maternal evaluation and fetal ultrasound assessment may provide important prognostic information for the clinicians and should be taken into account when counselling the patients so as to provide them with enough information to make decision of continuing or interrupting the pregnancy. Current financial constraints on the National Healthcare Service (NHS resources make it imperative for clinical decision-makers and budgetary planners to make the right decision of continuing or terminating a second trimester pre-viability amniorrhexis for desperate parents. To assess the economic consequences following EPPROM, the risk of infection to both baby and mother, psychological impact on the parents and associated complications and further disability after delivery on this fragile group of patients to the NHS resources. We review the clinical course, outcome, and the challenges to parents and health care professionals on three pregnancies complicated by EPPROM, occurring before 24 weeks’ gestation with a membrane rupture to delivery interval (latent period of 14 days or more. The anticipated birth of an extremely premature infant poses many challenges for parents and health care professionals. As parents are faced with difficult decisions that can have a long-term impact on the infant, family and country’s resources, it is critical to provide the type of information and support that is needed by them. Taking all these into consideration with the period of ventilation and respiratory assistance in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU is essential to provide maximum chances for survival, minimizing the risk for long term sequelae of the neonate and provides the parents enough time to decide on making the right decision with the associated guidance of the

  1. Using a Bedside Video-assisted Test Tube Test to Assess Stoma Viability: A Report of 4 Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Sarwat; Turner, Keli; Shah, Paulesh; Diaz, Jose

    2016-07-01

    Mucosal discoloration of an intestinal stoma may indicate self-limited venous congestion or necrosis necessitating operative revision. A common bedside technique to assess stoma viability is the "test tube test". A clear tube is inserted into the stoma and a hand-held light is used to assess the color of the stoma. A technique (video-assisted test tube test [VATTT]) developed by the authors utilizes a standard video bronchoscope inserted into a clear plastic blood collection tube to visually inspect and assess the mucosa. This technique was evaluated in 4 patients (age range 49-72 years, all critically ill) with a discolored stoma after emergency surgery. In each case, physical exam revealed ischemic mucosa at the surface either immediately after surgery or after worsening hypotension weeks later. Serial test tube test assessments were ambiguous when trying to assess deeper mucosa. The VATTT assessment showed viable pink mucosa beneath the surface and until the fascia was revealed in 3 patients. One (1) patient had mucosal ischemia down to the fascia, which prompted operative revision of the stoma. The new stoma was assessed with a VATTT and was viable for the entire length of the stoma. VATTT provided an enhanced, magnified, and clearer way to visually assess stoma viability in the postoperative period that can be performed at the bedside with no adverse events. It may prevent unnecessary relaparotomy or enable earlier diagnosis of deep ostomy necrosis. Validity and reliability studies are warranted.

  2. Spread of porcine circovirus associated disease (PCVAD in Ontario (Canada swine herds: Part II. Matched case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Beth

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The emergence of porcine circovirus associated disease (PCVAD was associated with high mortality in swine populations worldwide. Studies performed in different regions identified spatial, temporal, and spatio-temporal trends as factors contributing to patterns of the disease spread. Patterns consistent with spatial trend and spatio-temporal clustering were already identified in this dataset. On the basis of these results, we have further investigated the nature of local spread in this report. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate risk factors for incidence cases of reported PCVAD. Results A time-matched case-control study was used as a study design approach, and conditional logistic regression as the analytical method. The main exposure of interest was local spread, which was defined as an unidentified mechanism of PCVAD spread between premises located within 3 kilometers of the Euclidean distance. Various modifications of variables indicative of local spread were also evaluated. The dataset contained 278 swine herds from Ontario originally sampled either from diagnostic laboratory submissions or directly from the target population. A PCVAD case was defined on the basis of the producer's recall. Existence of apparent local spread over the entire study period was confirmed (OR = 2.26, 95% CI: 1.06, 4.83, and was further identified to be time-varying in nature - herds experiencing outbreaks in the later part of the epidemic were more likely than control herds to be exposed to neighboring herds experiencing recent PCVAD outbreaks. More importantly, the pattern of local spread was driven by concurrent occurrence of PCVAD on premises under the same ownership (OREXACTwithin ownership = 25.6, 95% CI: 3.4, +inf; OREXACToutside ownership = 1.3, 95% CI: 0.45, 3.3. Other significant factors included PRRSv status of a herd (OREXACT = 1.9, 95% CI: 1.0, 3.9, after adjusting for geographical location by including the binary

  3. Rail transportation by hydrogen vs. electrification - Case study for Ontario, Canada, II: Energy supply and distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marin, G.D.; Naterer, G.F.; Gabriel, K. [University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering and Applied Sciences, 2000 Simcoe Street North, Oshawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2010-06-15

    Locomotives offer an efficient mode of transportation when compared to buses, personal vehicles or airplanes for mass transportation over frequent intercity distances. For example, a Bombardier Regina EMU train with 272 seats and a load factor of 53% will consume under 0.07 kWh/passenger-km, which is typically much lower than corresponding values for other transportation modes in similar circumstances. European countries have invested significantly over the years in train electrification. Environmentally friendly methods of transferring power to the wheels are direct electrification and hydrogen fuel cells. Various methods to produce hydrogen for utilization with fuel cell train operation are examined in this paper. This companion paper of a 2-paper set examines the overall impact of energy supply (hydrogen vs. electricity) and distribution on rail transportation, specifically in terms of costs and overall GHG emissions for a case study of GO transit along the Lakeshore corridor in Toronto. Although electrification of train services simplifies some aspects of the operation, when considered over the Lakeshore corridor alone, electrified trains lose their flexibility to serve cities outside the Lakeshore corridor. Hydrogen fuelled trains can provide a smoother transition and interoperability by operating the same routes and stations served by diesel trains today, without being limited to the Lakeshore corridor. This paper evaluates technological, operational and economic aspects of the electrification of the Lakeshore corridor, versus hydrogen train operation, including infrastructure requirements to provide service to a substantial ridership increase projected for the years 2015-2031. Various methods of hydrogen production and distribution are presented and analysed, in order to evaluate the overall life cycle of GHG emissions and costs for various train alternatives. (author)

  4. Factors That Are Important to Succession Planning: A Case Study of One Ontario College of Applied Arts and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrin, Arleen

    2013-01-01

    The Canadian population is aging; many are rapidly advancing towards the age of normal retirement (Miner, 2010). The demographics for Ontario colleges are similar; in 2009, 70 percent of administrators and faculty were baby boomers, and 40 percent of the workforce in the college sector was eligible for retirement (OCASA, 2009). In 2010, there were…

  5. A case study of bats and white-nose syndrome demonstrating how to model population viability with evolutionary effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslo, Brooke; Fefferman, Nina H

    2015-08-01

    Ecological factors generally affect population viability on rapid time scales. Traditional population viability analyses (PVA) therefore focus on alleviating ecological pressures, discounting potential evolutionary impacts on individual phenotypes. Recent studies of evolutionary rescue (ER) focus on cases in which severe, environmentally induced population bottlenecks trigger a rapid evolutionary response that can potentially reverse demographic threats. ER models have focused on shifting genetics and resulting population recovery, but no one has explored how to incorporate those findings into PVA. We integrated ER into PVA to identify the critical decision interval for evolutionary rescue (DIER) under which targeted conservation action should be applied to buffer populations undergoing ER against extinction from stochastic events and to determine the most appropriate vital rate to target to promote population recovery. We applied this model to little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus) affected by white-nose syndrome (WNS), a fungal disease causing massive declines in several North American bat populations. Under the ER scenario, the model predicted that the DIER period for little brown bats was within 11 years of initial WNS emergence, after which they stabilized at a positive growth rate (λ = 1.05). By comparing our model results with population trajectories of multiple infected hibernacula across the WNS range, we concluded that ER is a potential explanation of observed little brown bat population trajectories across multiple hibernacula within the affected range. Our approach provides a tool that can be used by all managers to provide testable hypotheses regarding the occurrence of ER in declining populations, suggest empirical studies to better parameterize the population genetics and conservation-relevant vital rates, and identify the DIER period during which management strategies will be most effective for species conservation. © 2015 Society for Conservation

  6. Ontario Hydro's nuclear program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCredie, J.

    1984-01-01

    This report briefly describes Ontario Hydro's nuclear program, examining the design and construction status, and the future from Ontario Hydro's perspective. Ontario Hydro relies heavily on nuclear power. Nuclear fuel was responsible for approximately 34% of Ontario Hydro's energy production in 1983. The nuclear proportion was supplied by twelve operating units located: NPD, Douglas Point, Pickering A and B. It is expected that by approximately 1992, 65% of the total energy needs will be generated through nuclear power

  7. State risk discourse and the regulatory preservation of traditional medicine knowledge: The case of acupuncture in Ontario, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ijaz, Nadine; Boon, Heather; Muzzin, Linda; Welsh, Sandy

    2016-12-01

    Several United Nations bodies have advised countries to actively preserve Traditional Medicine (TM) knowledge and prevent its misappropriation in regulatory structures. To help advance decision-making around this complex regulatory issue, we examine the relationship between risk discourse, epistemology and policy. This study presents a critical, postcolonial analysis of divergent risk discourses elaborated in two contrasting Ontario (Canada) government reports preceding that jurisdiction's regulation of acupuncture, the world's most widely practised TM therapy. The earlier (1996) report, produced when Ontario's regulatory lobby was largely comprised of Chinese medicine practitioners, presents a risk discourse inclusive of biomedical and TM knowledge claims, emphasizing the principle of regulatory 'equity' as well as historical and sociocultural considerations. Reflecting the interests of an increasingly biomedical practitioner lobby, the later (2001) report uses implicit discursive means to exclusively privilege Western scientific perspectives on risk. This report's policy recommendations, we argue, suggest misappropriation of TM knowledge. We advise regulators to consider equitable adaptations to existing policy structures, and to explicitly include TM evidentiary perspectives in their pre-regulatory assessments. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. Early detection of emerald ash borer infestation using multisourced data: a case study in the town of Oakville, Ontario, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kongwen; Hu, Baoxin; Robinson, Justin

    2014-01-01

    The emerald ash borer (EAB) poses a significant economic and environmental threat to ash trees in southern Ontario, Canada, and the northern states of the USA. It is critical that effective technologies are urgently developed to detect, monitor, and control the spread of EAB. This paper presents a methodology using multisourced data to predict potential infestations of EAB in the town of Oakville, Ontario, Canada. The information combined in this study includes remotely sensed data, such as high spatial resolution aerial imagery, commercial ground and airborne hyperspectral data, and Google Earth imagery, in addition to nonremotely sensed data, such as archived paper maps and documents. This wide range of data provides extensive information that can be used for early detection of EAB, yet their effective employment and use remain a significant challenge. A prediction function was developed to estimate the EAB infestation states of individual ash trees using three major attributes: leaf chlorophyll content, tree crown spatial pattern, and prior knowledge. Comparison between these predicted values and a ground-based survey demonstrated an overall accuracy of 62.5%, with 22.5% omission and 18.5% commission errors.

  9. Implications of climatic change for tourism and recreation in Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wall, G.; Harrison, R.; Kinnaird, V.; McBoyle, G.; Quinland, C.

    1988-01-01

    Scenarios for climatic change associated with a doubling of atmospheric carbon dioxide were employed in an assessment of the impacts of climate change on tourism and recreation in Ontario. A warmer climate resulting from such change may mean declining lake levels with associated changes in the ecological interest and recreational potential of wetlands, as shown by case studies on two parks near Great Lakes shorelines. In the skiing industry, the length of ski seasons will be reduced in the northern part of the province, but the key holiday periods (when a large portion of total business is conducted) should still fall within the reliable ski season. Further south, the ski season in the South Georgian Bay region could be eliminated. Summer recreational activities are likely to have extended seasons, and the viability of summer recreational enterprises may increase, with associated positive benefits to neighboring communities. 2 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs

  10. Ontario Hydro's DSP update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    Ontario Hydro's Demand/Supply Plan (DSP), the 25 year plan which was submitted in December 1989, is currently being reviewed by the Environmental Assessment Board (EAB). Since 1989 there have been several changes which have led Ontario Hydro to update the original Demand/Supply Plan. This information sheet gives a quick overview of what has changed and how Ontario Hydro is adapting to that change

  11. Implementing the first regional hospice palliative care program in Ontario: the Champlain region as a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, José; Contant, Jocelyne; Barton, Gwen; Klinger, Christopher

    2016-07-26

    Regionalization promotes planning and coordination of services across settings and providers to meet population needs. Despite the potential advantages of regionalization, no regional hospice palliative care program existed in Ontario, Canada, as of 2010. This paper describes the process and early results of the development of the first regional hospice palliative care program in Ontario. The various activities and processes undertaken and the formal agreements, policies and documents are described. A participative approach, started in April 2009, was used. It brought together over 26 health service providers, including residential hospices, a palliative care unit, community and hospital specialist consultation teams, hospitals, community health and social service agencies (including nursing), individual health professionals, volunteers, patients and families. An extensive stakeholder and community vetting process was undertaken that included work groups (to explore key areas such as home care, the hospital sector, hospice and palliative care unit beds, provision of care in rural settings, e-health and education), a steering committee and input from over 320 individuals via e-mail and town-halls. A Transitional Leadership Group was elected to steer the implementation of the Regional Program over the summer of 2010. This group established the by-laws and details regarding the governance structure of the Regional Program, including its role, responsibilities, reporting structures and initial performance indicators that the Local Health Integration Network (LHIN) approved. The Regional Program was formally established in November 2010 with a competency-based Board of 14 elected members to oversee the program. Early work involved establishing standards and performance indicators for the different sectors and settings in the region, and identifying key clinical needs such as the establishment of more residential hospice capacity in Ottawa and a rural framework to ensure

  12. Applications of Low Altitude Remote Sensing in Agriculture upon Farmers' Requests– A Case Study in Northeastern Ontario, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chunhua; Walters, Dan; Kovacs, John M.

    2014-01-01

    With the growth of the low altitude remote sensing (LARS) industry in recent years, their practical application in precision agriculture seems all the more possible. However, only a few scientists have reported using LARS to monitor crop conditions. Moreover, there have been concerns regarding the feasibility of such systems for producers given the issues related to the post-processing of images, technical expertise, and timely delivery of information. The purpose of this study is to showcase actual requests by farmers to monitor crop conditions in their fields using an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). Working in collaboration with farmers in northeastern Ontario, we use optical and near-infrared imagery to monitor fertilizer trials, conduct crop scouting and map field tile drainage. We demonstrate that LARS imagery has many practical applications. However, several obstacles remain, including the costs associated with both the LARS system and the image processing software, the extent of professional training required to operate the LARS and to process the imagery, and the influence from local weather conditions (e.g. clouds, wind) on image acquisition all need to be considered. Consequently, at present a feasible solution for producers might be the use of LARS service provided by private consultants or in collaboration with LARS scientific research teams. PMID:25386696

  13. Applications of low altitude remote sensing in agriculture upon farmers' requests--a case study in northeastern Ontario, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chunhua; Walters, Dan; Kovacs, John M

    2014-01-01

    With the growth of the low altitude remote sensing (LARS) industry in recent years, their practical application in precision agriculture seems all the more possible. However, only a few scientists have reported using LARS to monitor crop conditions. Moreover, there have been concerns regarding the feasibility of such systems for producers given the issues related to the post-processing of images, technical expertise, and timely delivery of information. The purpose of this study is to showcase actual requests by farmers to monitor crop conditions in their fields using an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). Working in collaboration with farmers in northeastern Ontario, we use optical and near-infrared imagery to monitor fertilizer trials, conduct crop scouting and map field tile drainage. We demonstrate that LARS imagery has many practical applications. However, several obstacles remain, including the costs associated with both the LARS system and the image processing software, the extent of professional training required to operate the LARS and to process the imagery, and the influence from local weather conditions (e.g. clouds, wind) on image acquisition all need to be considered. Consequently, at present a feasible solution for producers might be the use of LARS service provided by private consultants or in collaboration with LARS scientific research teams.

  14. Applications of low altitude remote sensing in agriculture upon farmers' requests--a case study in northeastern Ontario, Canada.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunhua Zhang

    Full Text Available With the growth of the low altitude remote sensing (LARS industry in recent years, their practical application in precision agriculture seems all the more possible. However, only a few scientists have reported using LARS to monitor crop conditions. Moreover, there have been concerns regarding the feasibility of such systems for producers given the issues related to the post-processing of images, technical expertise, and timely delivery of information. The purpose of this study is to showcase actual requests by farmers to monitor crop conditions in their fields using an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV. Working in collaboration with farmers in northeastern Ontario, we use optical and near-infrared imagery to monitor fertilizer trials, conduct crop scouting and map field tile drainage. We demonstrate that LARS imagery has many practical applications. However, several obstacles remain, including the costs associated with both the LARS system and the image processing software, the extent of professional training required to operate the LARS and to process the imagery, and the influence from local weather conditions (e.g. clouds, wind on image acquisition all need to be considered. Consequently, at present a feasible solution for producers might be the use of LARS service provided by private consultants or in collaboration with LARS scientific research teams.

  15. Implications of sustainability assessment for electricity system design: The case of the Ontario Power Authority's integrated power system plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winfield, Mark; Gibson, Robert B.; Markvart, Tanya; Gaudreau, Kyrke; Taylor, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores the results and implications of an illustrative application of a sustainability assessment framework in the design and evaluation of a major integrated power system plan. The paper examines the integrated power system plan developed by the Ontario Power Authority in 2007. The basic framework rests on a generic set of evaluation criteria reflecting basic requirements for progress towards sustainability that was adopted, reinterpreted and applied by the Authority in support of its proposed plan. In response to evident deficiencies in the Authority's work, the authors and colleagues undertook a re-examination using a more fully elaborated sustainability assessment framework, specified for application to power system planning. The results point to a plan and plan components substantially different from those proposed by the Authority. More generally, the results highlight three advantages of applying such a sustainability assessment framework: comprehensive coverage of key requirements for progress towards sustainability while ensuring careful attention to the context and concerns of the sector; emphasis on identifying plan options that avoid major trade-offs among the sustainability criteria and recognition of interactions among the social, ecological, economic and technological realms favouring options that offer multiple, mutually reinforcing and lasting benefits.

  16. Ontario electricity industry restructuring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The objective of Ontario's electricity industry restructuring was described as an effort to enhance Ontario's competitiveness. It is believed that restructuring can be accomplished without an increase in electricity rates. In a series of charts, the report provides the timeline of restructuring from the time of the Macdonald report in 1995 to the beginning of open competition in Ontario electricity markets. It oulines the principles underlying the financial restructuring and the financial results of restructuring, including the size of the stranded debt ($ 7.8 billion). It lists the changes that have occurred since October 1998, explains some key factors in valuing the successor companies and profiles the Ontario Electricity Financial Corporation. Restructuring of the industry is expected to have a neutral to positive impact on Ontario's fiscal position. The residual stranded debt of $7.8 billion will be retired through revenues generated by the electricity sector, without recourse to the Provincial Treasury. 9 figs

  17. Market surveillance in Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandler, H.

    2002-01-01

    On May 1, 2002 both wholesale and retail electricity markets in Ontario were opened to competition. Wholesale electricity market sales of 150 TWh were valued at over $11 billion with 27,500 MW in service installed capacity and 4,000 to 6,000 MW import/export capability with strong interconnections to the Quebec, the Midwest and the Northeast. The key players in Ontario's electricity market are the Ontario Energy Board (OEB), the Independent Electricity Market Operator (IMO), Ontario Power Generation, and Hydro One. The OEB regulatory framework includes licensing and front line, daily monitoring of whole sale market. Serious capacity problems in Ontario have manifested themselves in tight supply and demand situations and highly volatile prices. The paper included graphs of available reserves for 1996 to 2002, HOEP trends and frequency, HOEP comparison, and a sensitivity to demand forecast. 1 tab., 6 figs

  18. Ontario energy review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-03-01

    This publication provides a review of the developments in Ontario in relation to the national and international energy scene. Ontario is the largest energy consumer in Canada and is highly dependent on external energy sources. Several developments have significantly altered the Ontario energy scene. Oil and gas markets have become deregulated and market forces increasingly determine prices. A free trade agreement with the United States makes Ontario even more affected by international markets. Oil and gas prices have fallen from the high levels of the 1980s, but energy efficiency and conservation continue to be extremely important because they affect economic performance and the environment. In the next few years the greatest challenges will be to continue improving energy efficiency, to reduce the impact of energy on the environment, and to ensure the availability of sufficient energy supplies for future needs. This review contains statistics on energy in Ontario and explains them for the non-specialist. (7 tabs., figs.)

  19. The Impact of a Values-Based Supply Chain (VBSC on Farm-Level Viability, Sustainability and Resilience: Case Study Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Hooks

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The ‘Agriculture of the Middle’ (AotM development paradigm emphasises that in order to survive, family farms must transition from a supply chain approach to a values-based supply chain (VBSC approach, involving amendments to both product type and actor dynamics within the chain. This paper presents a qualitative case study of a beef co-operative integrated to a VBSC. We use an analytical framework of viability, sustainability and resilience to analyse impacts at farm-level. Our analysis highlights a number of positive effects on farm-level viability, sustainability and resilience. These benefits stemmed largely from improvements to market orientation, price stability, and members’ capacities in responding to problems. However, the autonomy of the co-operative was challenged by VBSC chain members, which impacted negatively on the stability of the co-operative.

  20. Differential temperature preferences and thresholds among summer campers in Ontario's southern provincial parks: a Canadian case study in tourism climatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewer, Micah J.; Scott, Daniel J.; Gough, William A.

    2017-08-01

    Weather and climate are important factors in relation to outdoor recreation and tourism. Camping and park visitation are weather sensitive activities very likely to be impacted by projected climate change. Temperature is the weather variable that has received the greatest attention within the tourism climatology literature and was the greatest predictor of park visitation within previous assessments. This study uses a stated climate preferences approach, relying on survey-based data, to explore differences for temperature preferences and thresholds among campers in Ontario parks. Statistically significant differences (at the 95% confidence level) in mean values for temperature preferences and thresholds were recorded based on various camper characteristics, such as the following: activity selection, age, gender, distance travelled, length of stay, life cycle stage, camping experience, and camping equipment. Swimmers preferred warmer day-time temperatures. Older campers preferred cooler temperatures and were more sensitive to heat stress, in the day and night time. Females preferred warmer temperatures and were less sensitive to heat stress during the night time. Campers who had travelled further distances to reach the park or planned to stay for longer periods were less sensitive to heat stress. Campers with children in their group preferred warmer temperatures and were less sensitive to heat stress, in the day and at night. Respondents with higher levels of camping experience preferred warmer temperatures at night. Tent campers were less sensitive to heat stress, in the day and at night. The results of this study have direct implications for previous and future climate change impact assessments on park visitation.

  1. Case series of fertility treatment in HIV-discordant couples (male positive, female negative: the Ontario experience.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trent Newmeyer

    Full Text Available The success of combination antiretroviral therapies for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV has resulted in prolonged life expectancy (over 40 years from diagnosis and an improved quality of life for people living with HIV. The risk of vertical HIV transmission during pregnancy has been reduced to less than 1%. As a result of these breakthroughs and as many of these individuals are of reproductive age, fertility issues are becoming increasingly important for this population. One population in which conception planning and reduction of horizontal HIV transmission warrants further research is HIV-discordant couples where the male partner is HIV-positive and the female partner is HIV-negative. Sperm washing is a technique carried out in a fertility clinic that separates HIV from the seminal fluid. Although sperm washing followed by intrauterine insemination significantly reduces the risk of horizontal HIV transmission, there has been limited access to the procedure in North America. Furthermore, little is known about the conception decision-making experiences of HIV-discordant couples who might benefit from sperm washing. Chart reviews and semi-structured interviews were completed with 12 HIV-discordant couples in Ontario, Canada. Couples were recruited through HIV clinics and one fertility clinic that offered sperm washing. Participants identified a number of factors that affected their decision-making around pregnancy planning. Access to sperm washing and other fertility services was an issue (cost, travel and few clinics. Participants identified a lack of information on the procedure (availability, safety. Sources of support (social networks, healthcare providers were unevenly distributed, especially among those who did not disclose their HIV status to friends and family. Finally, the stigmatisation of HIV continues to have a negative affect on HIV-discordant couples and their intentions to conceive. Access to sperm washing and

  2. The effect of Ontario's transmission system policies on cogeneration projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr, J.

    1999-01-01

    The impact that the establishment of transmission tariffs would have on the viability of cogeneration projects in Ontario was discussed. The proposal to establish such tariffs on the basis of a 'postage stamp' rate would ensure that all electricity users have access to electricity at the same price. However, this would unfairly penalize short-haul transmission transactions and would possibly result in the inappropriate location of new generation facilities. Electricity users would ultimately be burdened with these inefficiencies. This presentation also discussed another public policy which proposes to determine what parts of the electricity system should have their costs recovered at postage stamp rates. The costs would include not only transmission charges but also distribution and generation costs. The restructuring of Ontario Hydro into the Ontario Power Generation Company (OPGC) and the Ontario Hydro Services Company (OHSC) and its impact on the cogeneration projects was also discussed

  3. Conflict Management in Participatory Approaches to Water Management: A Case Study of Lake Ontario and the St. Lawrence River Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison Furber

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The International Joint Commission (IJC has been involved in a 14-year effort to formulate a new water regulation plan for the Lake Ontario St. Lawrence River (“LOSLR” area that balances the interests of a diverse group of stakeholders including shipping and navigation, hydropower, environment, recreational boating, municipal and domestic water supply, First Nations, and shoreline property owners. It has embraced the principles of collaborative and participatory management and, applying a Shared Visioning Planning (SVP approach, has worked closely with stakeholders throughout all stages of this process; however, conflicts between competing stakeholders have delayed and complicated this effort. The overarching aim of this paper is to consider the extent to which the SVP approach employed by the IJC was effective in managing conflict in the LOSLR context. Audio recordings and transcriptions of public and technical hearings held by the IJC in 2013 have been systematically analysed using stakeholder mapping and content analysis methods, to gain insight into the stakeholder universe interacting with the IJC on Plan 2014.  The principal conclusions of this paper are that (a the Shared Vision Planning approach employed by the IJC had some significant successes in terms of conflict management—particularly notable is the success that has been achieved with regards to integration of First Nation concerns; (b there is a distinct group of shoreline property owners, based in New York State, who remain opposed to Plan 2014—the IJC’s public outreach and participation efforts have not been successful in reconciling their position with that of other stakeholders due to the fact that this stakeholder group perceive that they can only lose out from any regulation change and are therefore unlikely to be motivated to engage productively in any planning dialogue; and (c a solution would require that the problem be reframed so that this stakeholder can see

  4. Bathymetry of Lake Ontario

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathymetry of Lake Ontario has been compiled as a component of a NOAA project to rescue Great Lakes lake floor geological and geophysical data and make it more...

  5. Evaluating the implementation of health and safety innovations under a regulatory context: a collective case study of Ontario's safer needle regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Andrea; Mustard, Cameron A; Breslin, Curtis; Holness, Linn; Nichol, Kathryn

    2013-01-22

    Implementation effectiveness models have identified important factors that can promote the successful implementation of an innovation; however, these models have been examined within contexts where innovations are adopted voluntarily and often ignore the socio-political and environmental context. In the field of occupational health and safety, there are circumstances where organizations must adopt innovations to comply with a regulatory standard. Examining how the external environment can facilitate or challenge an organization's change process may add to our understanding of implementation effectiveness. The objective of this study is to describe implementation facilitators and barriers in the context of a regulation designed to promote the uptake of safer engineered medical devices in healthcare. The proposed study will focus on Ontario's safer needle regulation (2007) which requires healthcare organizations to transition to the use of safer engineered medical devices for the prevention of needlestick injuries. A collective case study design will be used to learn from the experiences of three acute care hospitals in the province of Ontario, Canada. Interviews with management and front-line healthcare workers and analysis of supporting documents will be used to describe the implementation experience and examine issues associated with the integration of these devices. The data collection and analysis process will be influenced by a conceptual framework that draws from implementation science and the occupational health and safety literature. The focus of this study in addition to the methodology creates a unique opportunity to contribute to the field of implementation science. First, the study will explore implementation experiences under circumstances where regulatory pressures are influencing the organization's change process. Second, the timing of this study provides an opportunity to focus on issues that arise during later stages of implementation, a phase

  6. Air-cooling viability to increase the power in the thermal power stations of gas: Colombian case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amell, Andres; Bedoya, H. A

    2000-01-01

    Thermal power decreases as air temperature increases, which reduce both efficiency and projects yielding. Technologically it is possible to eliminate the environment temperature incidence on reduction of power and efficiency, cooling the input air to the turbine, obtaining important power and efficiency improvements. In this work, the technical and economical viability, when applying air cooling technologies (evaporative cooling, steam compression, and production and ice storage (TES) were studied, having in mind meteorological conditions and Colombian electric marketing features, in which, nearly 2800 MW of natural gas thermal power have been installed in the last decade. as a result of applying these cooling technologies the study determined: the mean potential of recoverable power at the second peak of the national demand curve, shows several schemes in which they are technically and economically viable in the Colombian context

  7. Dietary N-nitroso compounds and risk of colorectal cancer: a case-control study in Newfoundland and Labrador and Ontario, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yun; Wang, Peizhong Peter; Zhao, Jing; Green, Roger; Sun, Zhuoyu; Roebothan, Barbara; Squires, Josh; Buehler, Sharon; Dicks, Elizabeth; Zhao, Jinhui; Cotterchio, Michelle; Campbell, Peter T.; Jain, Meera; Parfrey, Patrick S.; Mclaughlin, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Several N-nitroso compounds (NOC) have been shown to be carcinogenic in a variety of laboratory animals, but evidence of their carcinogenicity in humans is lacking. We aimed to examine the association between NOC intake and colorectal cancer (CRC) risk and possible effect modification by vitamins C and E and protein in a large case-control study carried out in Newfoundland and Labrador, and Ontario, Canada. A total of 1760 case patients with pathologically confirmed adenocarcinoma and 2481 population controls were asked to complete a self-administered FFQ to evaluate their dietary intakes 1 year before diagnosis (for cases) or interview (for controls). Adjusted OR and 95% CI were calculated across the quintiles of NOC (measured by N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA)) intake and relevant food items using unconditional logistic regression. NDMA intake was found to be associated with a higher risk of CRC (highest vs lowest quintiles, OR: 1.42; 95% CI: 1.03,1.96; p-trend=0.005), specifically for rectal carcinoma (OR: 1.61; 95% CI: 1.11,2.35; p-trend=0.01). CRC risk also increased with the consumption of NDMA-containing meats when the highest tertile was compared with the lowest tertile (OR: 1.47; 95% CI: 1.03,2.10; p-trend=0.20). There was evidence of effect modification between dietary vitamin E and NDMA. Individuals with high NDMA and low vitamin E intakes had a significantly increased risk than those with both low NDMA and vitamin E intakes (OR:3.01; 95% CI: 1.43,6.51; p-interaction=0.017). The present results support the hypothesis that NOC intake may be positively associated with CRC risk in humans. Vitamin E, which inhibits nitrosation, could modify the effect of NDMA on CRC risk. PMID:24160559

  8. Nuclear power at Ontario Hydro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tapon, F.; Osborne, T.J.

    1980-01-01

    This case study shows that the diffusion of nuclear power in the electric public utility industry in Canada approximates the logistic growth curve, in agreement with previous results on technological innovation diffusion in the U.S. private sector. Many of the economic variables that affect this diffusion in the private sectors in the U.S. and Canada are also significant in the public sector in Canada. Too few utilities have adopted nuclear technology to permit using regression analysis to study the effect of environmental and regulatory factors on the growth of Ontario Hydro. Thus, cost-benefit analysis for each province might be more effective

  9. The Use of Surrogate Data in Demographic Population Viability Analysis: A Case Study of California Sea Lions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia J Hernández-Camacho

    Full Text Available Reliable data necessary to parameterize population models are seldom available for imperiled species. As an alternative, data from populations of the same species or from ecologically similar species have been used to construct models. In this study, we evaluated the use of demographic data collected at one California sea lion colony (Los Islotes to predict the population dynamics of the same species from two other colonies (San Jorge and Granito in the Gulf of California, Mexico, for which demographic data are lacking. To do so, we developed a stochastic demographic age-structured matrix model and conducted a population viability analysis for each colony. For the Los Islotes colony we used site-specific pup, juvenile, and adult survival probabilities, as well as birth rates for older females. For the other colonies, we used site-specific pup and juvenile survival probabilities, but used surrogate data from Los Islotes for adult survival probabilities and birth rates. We assessed these models by comparing simulated retrospective population trajectories to observed population trends based on count data. The projected population trajectories approximated the observed trends when surrogate data were used for one colony but failed to match for a second colony. Our results indicate that species-specific and even region-specific surrogate data may lead to erroneous conservation decisions. These results highlight the importance of using population-specific demographic data in assessing extinction risk. When vital rates are not available and immediate management actions must be taken, in particular for imperiled species, we recommend the use of surrogate data only when the populations appear to have similar population trends.

  10. The Use of Surrogate Data in Demographic Population Viability Analysis: A Case Study of California Sea Lions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Reliable data necessary to parameterize population models are seldom available for imperiled species. As an alternative, data from populations of the same species or from ecologically similar species have been used to construct models. In this study, we evaluated the use of demographic data collected at one California sea lion colony (Los Islotes) to predict the population dynamics of the same species from two other colonies (San Jorge and Granito) in the Gulf of California, Mexico, for which demographic data are lacking. To do so, we developed a stochastic demographic age-structured matrix model and conducted a population viability analysis for each colony. For the Los Islotes colony we used site-specific pup, juvenile, and adult survival probabilities, as well as birth rates for older females. For the other colonies, we used site-specific pup and juvenile survival probabilities, but used surrogate data from Los Islotes for adult survival probabilities and birth rates. We assessed these models by comparing simulated retrospective population trajectories to observed population trends based on count data. The projected population trajectories approximated the observed trends when surrogate data were used for one colony but failed to match for a second colony. Our results indicate that species-specific and even region-specific surrogate data may lead to erroneous conservation decisions. These results highlight the importance of using population-specific demographic data in assessing extinction risk. When vital rates are not available and immediate management actions must be taken, in particular for imperiled species, we recommend the use of surrogate data only when the populations appear to have similar population trends. PMID:26413746

  11. Assessing the financial positions of Ontario`s new electricity companies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connell, T. [Standard and Poor`s, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    1999-11-01

    This paper describes the methodology, including the criteria factors, comparable ratings and key credit issues used in assessing the financial positions of Ontario Power Generation Inc., and the Ontario Hydro Services Company. The rating criteria factors include both business factors (such as ownership structure, regulation, service area, operations, management, etc.,) and financial factors (e.g. financial policies and guidelines, recent financial performance, margin analysis, capital structure and borrowing plans, financial projections and sensitivities). Key credit issues include considerations of competitive dynamics, nuclear portfolio performance (for Genco), regulatory changes, cost control, capital spending program, retail business exposure, future financial performance. Comparisons are made with corresponding positions of comparable entities in Australia, Finland, New Zealand, the UK, and the USA. In the case of Ontario Power Generation Inc., the company is assessed to have significant advantages initially, but various uncertainties over the medium term warrant a more cautious view of the credit profile. For the Ontario Hydro Services Company the business risks appear to be low and moderate leverage entails a strong, stable credit profile. The overall assessment of the two companies is that while certain questions such as the workability and credibility of the new industry structure, the problem of stranded debt and questions about the liquidity of market participants remain unsolved, Ontario Power Generation Inc., and the Ontario Hydro Services Company ratings compare favorably with ratings of global industry peers.

  12. Ontario Hydro decontamination experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacy, C S; Patterson, R W; Upton, M S [Chemistry and Metallurgy Department, Central Production Services, Ontario Hydro, ON (Canada)

    1991-04-01

    Ontario Hydro currently operates 18 nuclear electric generating units of the CANDU design with a net capacity of 12,402 MW(e). An additional 1,762 MW(e) is under construction. The operation of these facilities has underlined the need to have decontamination capability both to reduce radiation fields, as well as to control and reduce contamination during component maintenance. This paper presents Ontario Hydro decontamination experience in two key areas - full heat transport decontamination to reduce system radiation fields, and component decontamination to reduce loose contamination particularly as practised in maintenance and decontamination centres. (author)

  13. Ontario Hydro decontamination experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacy, C.S.; Patterson, R.W.; Upton, M.S.

    1991-01-01

    Ontario Hydro currently operates 18 nuclear electric generating units of the CANDU design with a net capacity of 12,402 MW(e). An additional 1,762 MW(e) is under construction. The operation of these facilities has underlined the need to have decontamination capability both to reduce radiation fields, as well as to control and reduce contamination during component maintenance. This paper presents Ontario Hydro decontamination experience in two key areas - full heat transport decontamination to reduce system radiation fields, and component decontamination to reduce loose contamination particularly as practised in maintenance and decontamination centres. (author)

  14. Ontario Hydro statistical yearbook 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    Ontario Hydro was created in 1906 by a special statute of the Province of Ontario. It is a financially self-sustaining corporation without share capital. The yearbook is a compilation of financial data detailed by financial statements and sales and revenue figures for the year 1990. It is broken down by municipalities served in Ontario

  15. Ontario Hydro statistical yearbook 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1991-12-31

    Ontario Hydro was created in 1906 by a special statute of the Province of Ontario. It is a financially self-sustaining corporation without share capital. The yearbook is a compilation of financial data detailed by financial statements and sales and revenue figures for the year 1990. It is broken down by municipalities served in Ontario.

  16. An Investigation of GIS Overlay and PCA Techniques for Urban Environmental Quality Assessment: A Case Study in Toronto, Ontario, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamil Faisal

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The United Nations estimates that the global population is going to be double in the coming 40 years, which may cause a negative impact on the environment and human life. Such an impact may instigate increased water demand, overuse of power, anthropogenic noise, etc. Thus, modelling the Urban Environmental Quality (UEQ becomes indispensable for a better city planning and an efficient urban sprawl control. This study aims to investigate the ability of using remote sensing and Geographic Information System (GIS techniques to model the UEQ with a case study in the city of Toronto via deriving different environmental, urban and socio-economic parameters. Remote sensing, GIS and census data were first obtained to derive environmental, urban and socio-economic parameters. Two techniques, GIS overlay and Principal Component Analysis (PCA, were used to integrate all of these environmental, urban and socio-economic parameters. Socio-economic parameters including family income, higher education and land value were used as a reference to assess the outcomes derived from the two integration methods. The outcomes were assessed through evaluating the relationship between the extracted UEQ results and the reference layers. Preliminary findings showed that the GIS overlay represents a better precision and accuracy (71% and 65%, respectively, comparing to the PCA technique. The outcomes of the research can serve as a generic indicator to help the authority for better city planning with consideration of all possible social, environmental and urban requirements or constraints.

  17. Ontario's energy action plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-07-01

    In the fall of 2002, the government of Ontario announced an action plan designed to ensure stable electricity prices while additional electricity generating capacity is built. The action plan included a strategy for encouraging major private sector investments in wind, solar and other renewable energy sources. The strategies for new renewable energy projects include: property tax incentives, business income tax incentives, and sales tax rebates. Initiatives to increase supply include: Toronto's Portland 550 megawatt, natural gas-fired generating station, Niagara Falls' Beck Tunnel Project, and Windsor's 580 megawatt natural gas-fired generating station. The government is promoting energy conservation by reducing its electricity consumption by 10 per cent, and setting a target where 20 per cent of electricity consumed in the province must be from renewable energy sources. The use of interval meters by Ontario residents is being encouraged. A provincial sales tax rebate is being offered to customers buying select energy efficient appliances. In its commitment to environmental protection, the Ontario government is phasing out coal, offering rebates for solar energy systems, implementing measures to reduce acid rain, and investing $3.25 billion over ten years to renew and expand public transit. In Chatham, Ontario, a plant producing ethanol from corn was built, and others are planned for other parts of the province. Tax incentives are also offered for alternative fuel users. 1 ref., 1 tab

  18. Retailers test Ontario market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishewitsch, S.

    2000-01-01

    In anticipation of the full opening of the Ontario electricity market in November 2000, some of the newly-licensed electricity retailers are reported to be ready to begin testing the market early, hoping that all the uncertainties that still exist about pricing will be worked out in time. Among those jumping in now is Direct Energy Marketing, a retailer which claims 800,000 households in Ontario as electricity supply customers, as well as a wholesale gas marketing business. Direct Energy began retail electrical marketing on April 3, 2000, starting cautiously with small commercial operations as the initial target. Greengrid Electric, another of the new marketers, planned to begin marketing in mid-April, offering 100 per cent renewable-sourced electricity. Provident Energy Management, one of the new marketers whose licence is still pending, hopes to begin direct marketing as soon as its licence is confirmed. Another marketer ready to go as soon its license is issued is the former Sault Ste. Marie Hydro, now reorganized as PUC Energies Inc. PUC has the advantage of having a firm contract with a NUG (non-utility generator), Great Lakes Power, signed while PUC was still a municipal electric utility. As far as the other potential marketers are concerned, caution overrides opportunity for the present. Principal concerns are uncertainty over the retail settlement code, the electronic business data transfer system, transmission and distribution tariffs, whether existing non-utility generator contracts will allow for supply to another party, and over how quickly Ontario Power Generation Inc's (successor to Ontario Hydro) market power will be ratcheted down. Many of the potential marketers feel that despite the Ontario government's desire to see more competition, the power mitigation agreement, as it now reads, leaves little room for the small retailer to compete

  19. Retailers test Ontario market

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishewitsch, S.

    2000-04-01

    In anticipation of the full opening of the Ontario electricity market in November 2000, some of the newly-licensed electricity retailers are reported to be ready to begin testing the market early, hoping that all the uncertainties that still exist about pricing will be worked out in time. Among those jumping in now is Direct Energy Marketing, a retailer which claims 800,000 households in Ontario as electricity supply customers, as well as a wholesale gas marketing business. Direct Energy began retail electrical marketing on April 3, 2000, starting cautiously with small commercial operations as the initial target. Greengrid Electric, another of the new marketers, planned to begin marketing in mid-April, offering 100 per cent renewable-sourced electricity. Provident Energy Management, one of the new marketers whose licence is still pending, hopes to begin direct marketing as soon as its licence is confirmed. Another marketer ready to go as soon its license is issued is the former Sault Ste. Marie Hydro, now reorganized as PUC Energies Inc. PUC has the advantage of having a firm contract with a NUG (non-utility generator), Great Lakes Power, signed while PUC was still a municipal electric utility. As far as the other potential marketers are concerned, caution overrides opportunity for the present. Principal concerns are uncertainty over the retail settlement code, the electronic business data transfer system, transmission and distribution tariffs, whether existing non-utility generator contracts will allow for supply to another party, and over how quickly Ontario Power Generation Inc's (successor to Ontario Hydro) market power will be ratcheted down. Many of the potential marketers feel that despite the Ontario government's desire to see more competition, the power mitigation agreement, as it now reads, leaves little room for the small retailer to compete.

  20. Viability of permanent PMMA spacer with combined free fasciocutaneous tissue transfer for failed charcot reconstruction: A 38 month prospective case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tammer Elmarsafi

    Full Text Available Introduction: Charcot Neuroarthropathy is a complex lower extremity pathology which predisposes the afflicted limb to ulcerations, osteomyelitis, and risk of major amputation. Charcot Neuroarthropathy often requires osseous reconstruction, which can be complicated with osteomyelitis and hardware infection. When soft tissue and osseous deficits must be concomitantly addressed, the use of PMMA spacers can be combined with free tissue transfers. Presentation of case: 71 year old Caucasian male with Diabetic Charcot Neuroarthopathy underwent osseous reconstruction with internal hardware. The surgical site was complicated by acute infection, osteomyelitis, exposed hardware requiring removal, and multiple surgical débridement. The degree of soft tissue and osseous deficit post-débridement required complex reconstruction. Discussion: The osseous deficit was addressed with the use of a permanent PMMA cement spacer. The soft tissue deficit was reconstructed with a free tissue transfer. This case report demonstrates the long term viability and utility of the use of permanent cement spacers when combined with free tissue transfer for closure of complex diabetic foot wounds. This case is an example of a multidisciplinary team approach to limb salvage with successful long term outcome; a plantigrade stable functional foot in an ambulatory highly active patient. Follow up time since initial intervention was 38 months. Conclusion: The use of a permanent PMMA cement spacer does not preclude free tissue transfer in complex host lower extremity reconstruction. A multidisciplinary team approach is a vital component to successful salvage outcomes. Keywords: Diabetes, Charcot neuroarthropathy, Ulcer, Cement spacer, Free tissue transfer, Osteomyelitis

  1. The role of Project Finance in the viability of infrastructure projects: case of the petroleum and natural gas sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faria, Viviana Cardoso de Sa e; Rodrigues, Adriano Pires

    2000-01-01

    Project finance represents neither recent news nor a panacea in the fields of long term financing. It is not able to solve the chronicle scarcity of resources applied in big projects financing in developing countries. In fact, underdeveloped markets as the Brazilian one offer, at the beginning, almost no chances to the project finance solution. In this case a path full of barriers overcome the solutions that project finance may offer. The process to adapt this instrument to the Brazilian reality presents the following hindrances: a different law framework, capital market underdevelopment; economical instability; political and regulating risks; incapability of the national insurance companies to insure big projects; cultural differences and lack of know-how in this area, and lastly, the out of date tax system. (author)

  2. Ontario's uranium mining industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Runnalls, O.J.C.

    1981-01-01

    This report traces the Ontario uranium mining industry from the first discovery of uranium north of Sault Ste. Marie through the uranium boom of the 1950's when Elliot Lake and Bancroft were developed, the cutbacks of the 1960s, the renewed enthusiasm in exploration and development of the 1970s to the current position when continued production for the domestic market is assured. Ontario, with developed mines and operational expertise, will be in a position to compete for export markets as they reopen. The low level of expenditures for uranium exploration and the lack of new discoveries are noted. The report also reviews and places in perspective the development of policies and regulations governing the industry and the jurisdictional relationships of the Federal and Provincial governments

  3. Ontario Hydro annual report 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-04-01

    Ontario Hydro is a corporation without share capital created by a special statute of the Province of Ontario in 1906. It now operates under the authority of the Power Corporation Act, R.S.O. 1980, Chapter 384, as amended, with broad powers to generate, supply and deliver electric power throughout the province. It is also authorized to produce and sell steam and hot water as primary products. The Corporation's prime objective is to supply the people of Ontario with electricity at the lowest feasible cost consistent with high safety and quality of service standards. Ontario Hydro's main activity is wholesaling electric power to municipal utilities in urban areas who, in turn, retail it to customers in their service areas. In 1985, approximately 3,166,000 customers were served by Ontario Hydro and the municipal utilities in the province. Ontario Hydro operates 81 hydraulic, fossil and nuclear generating stations and an extensive power grid across Ontario to meet the province's demands for electric energy. Interconnections with other systems place the Corporation in an extensive electrical grid that covers a large segment of the North American continent. Ontario Hydro is a financially self-sustaining corporation. The Province of Ontario guarantees bonds and notes issued to the public by the Corporation

  4. Viability of conventional compact electric power substations in medium size cities - case study Sorocaba`s DTS; Viabilidade de subestacoes compactas convencionais em cidades de medio porte: caso pratico ETD Sorocaba

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guaraldo, N J; Goncalves, S M [Eletricidade de Sao Paulo SA, SP (Brazil); Sant` Anna, P B.E.; Fleury, V F; Moura Filho, W [CHROMA Engenharia (Brazil)

    1994-12-31

    This work presents the viability of compact transformers distributing power substations of in medium size cities, giving emphasis to three main aspects. The first aspect is generic and concerns the compactation economic viability, when compared to the conventional solution. The second, specific to the case of Sorocaba, in addition to present two compact disposal for the power substation, registers the opportunity for obtaining resources from the private enterprise. The third aspect takes into consideration the compatibility of technical proposals with the architecture of the cities. 2 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  5. An Outbreak of Foodborne Botulism in Ontario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona R Loutfy

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Botulism is a rare paralytic illness resulting from a potent neurotoxin produced by Clostridium botulinum. Botulism in Canada is predominately due to C botulinum type E and affects mainly the First Nations and Inuit populations. The most recent outbreak of botulism in Ontario was in Ottawa in 1991 and was caused by C botulinum type A. We report an outbreak of foodborne type B botulism in Ontario, which implicated home-canned tomatoes. The outbreak was characterized by mild symptoms in two cases and moderately severe illness in one case. The investigation shows the importance of considering the diagnosis of botulism in patients presenting with cranial nerve and autonomic dysfunction, especially when combined with gastrointestinal complaints; it also highlights the importance of proper home canning technique.

  6. Measles Outbreak with Unique Virus Genotyping, Ontario, Canada, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Shari; Hiebert, Joanne; Gubbay, Jonathan B; Gournis, Effie; Sharron, Jennifer; Severini, Alberto; Jiaravuthisan, Manisa; Shane, Amanda; Jaeger, Valerie; Crowcroft, Natasha S; Fediurek, Jill; Sander, Beate; Mazzulli, Tony; Schulz, Helene; Deeks, Shelley L

    2017-07-01

    The province of Ontario continues to experience measles virus transmissions despite the elimination of measles in Canada. We describe an unusual outbreak of measles in Ontario, Canada, in early 2015 that involved cases with a unique strain of virus and no known association among primary case-patients. A total of 18 cases of measles were reported from 4 public health units during the outbreak period (January 25-March 23, 2015); none of these cases occurred in persons who had recently traveled. Despite enhancements to case-patient interview methods and epidemiologic analyses, a source patient was not identified. However, the molecular epidemiologic analysis, which included extended sequencing, strongly suggested that all cases derived from a single importation of measles virus genotype D4. The use of timely genotype sequencing, rigorous epidemiologic investigation, and a better understanding of the gaps in surveillance are needed to maintain Ontario's measles elimination status.

  7. Ontario demand response scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowlands, I.H.

    2005-09-01

    Strategies for demand management in Ontario were examined via 2 scenarios for a commercial/institutional building with a normal summertime peak load of 300 kW between 14:00 and 18:00 during a period of high electricity demand and high electricity prices. The first scenario involved the deployment of a 150 kW on-site generator fuelled by either diesel or natural gas. The second scenario involved curtailing load by 60 kW during the same periods. Costs and benefits of both scenarios were evaluated for 3 groups: consumers, system operators and society. Benefits included electricity cost savings, deferred transmission capacity development, lower system prices for electricity, as well as environmental changes, economic development, and a greater sense of corporate social responsibility. It was noted that while significant benefits were observed for all 3 groups, they were not substantial enough to encourage action, as the savings arising from deferred generation capacity development do not accrue to individual players. The largest potential benefit was identified as lower prices, spread across all users of electricity in Ontario. It was recommended that representative bodies cooperate so that the system-wide benefits can be reaped. It was noted that if 10 municipal utilities were able to have 250 commercial or institutional customers engaged in distributed response, then a total peak demand reduction of 375 MW could be achieved, representing more than 25 per cent of Ontario's target for energy conservation. It was concluded that demand response often involves the investment of capital and new on-site procedures, which may affect reactions to various incentives. 78 refs., 10 tabs., 5 figs

  8. Ontario Hydro CANDU operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, H.A.; Woodhead, L.W.; Fanjoy, G.R.

    1984-03-01

    The CANDU Pressurized Heavy Water (CANDU-PHW) type of nuclear-electric generating station has been developed jointly by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited and Ontario Hydro. This report highlights Ontario Hydro's operating experience using the CANDU-PHW system, with a focus on the operating performance and costs, reliability of system components and nuclear safety considerations for the workers and the public

  9. Ontario Hydro CANDU operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartholomew, R.W.; Woodhead, L.W.; Horton, E.P.; Nichols, M.J.; Daly, I.N.

    1987-01-01

    The CANDU Pressurized Heavy Water (CANDU-PHW) type of nuclear-electric generating station has been developed jointly by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited and Ontario Hydro. This report highlights Ontario Hydro's operating experience using the CANDU-PHW system, with a focus on worker and public safety, operating performance and costs, and reliability of system components

  10. Ontario Hydro annual report 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A financial report and statistics on Ontario energy demand are presented. Efforts to secure a reliable supply of coal and uranium are described. Ontario Hydro's expansion is now controlled by capital availability and not power demand, and this has affected 11 construction projects, including heavy water plants and nuclear generating stations. (E.C.B.)

  11. Ontario regulatory update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, P.

    1998-01-01

    This paper provides a summary of recent events which when combined add up to a gradual but unmistakable movement of the energy sector in Ontario towards a fully competitive market. Some of the events precipitating this movement towards competition include the passing of the Energy Competition Act of 1998 (Bill 35), electricity deregulation, regulatory reform of the natural gas sector, and changes to the consumer protection legislation. The role of the Ontario Energy Board was also updated to bring it in line with the demands of the competitive marketplace. Among the new roles that the Board will assume are to facilitate competition, to maintain fair and reasonable rates, and to facilitate rational expansion. Another objective is to provide opportunities for including energy efficiency in government policies. Implications of the changes in the OEB's mandate for market participants were also discussed, including (1) regulated gas sales and delivery mechanisms, (2) transactional services, (3) contract restructuring, (4) consumer protection, (5) supervision of competitive market participants, and (6) market surveillance

  12. Ontario electricity bill review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Neill, G.

    2003-01-01

    Findings of an independent review of charges to electricity bills and recommendations to assist in the development of a standard, province-wide residential electricity bill for Ontario are discussed. The review was requested by the province's Minister of Energy in an effort to dispel growing confusion about the variations in customer billing practices used by the province's 90+ local distribution companies. Key recommendations and findings were as follows: (1)Consumer bill formats issued by local distribution companies should be more consumer-friendly, adhere to minimum design standards, adapt uniform terminology and common line charges; (2) charges on customer bills should be grouped into four standard line items, with full details available to customers: the four line items should be a basic service charge, a charge for delivering electricity to the customer, a charge for the electricity itself, and a separate charge for retiring the outstanding debt of the former Ontario Hydro; (3) bills should take advantage of opportunities for promoting province-wide energy conservation, such as encouraging the long-term use of interval meters, presenting historical consumption data on residential bills on a period-to-period basis, and education and communications initiatives. Details of the recommendations, including the calculation of the fixed and variable components of usage charges, an explanation of the concept of electricity system loss adjustments, a method for phasing in the recommendations, and the anticipated benefits to consumers are provided

  13. Clinical Telemedicine Utilization in Ontario over the Ontario Telemedicine Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Gorman, Laurel D; Hogenbirk, John C; Warry, Wayne

    2016-06-01

    Northern Ontario is a region in Canada with approximately 775,000 people in communities scattered across 803,000 km(2). The Ontario Telemedicine Network (OTN) facilitates access to medical care in areas that are often underserved. We assessed how OTN utilization differed throughout the province. We used OTN medical service utilization data collected through the Ontario Health Insurance Plan and provided by the Ministry of Health and Long Term Care. Using census subdivisions grouped by Northern and Southern Ontario as well as urban and rural areas, we calculated utilization rates per fiscal year and total from 2008/2009 to 2013/2014. We also used billing codes to calculate utilization by therapeutic area of care. There were 652,337 OTN patient visits in Ontario from 2008/2009 to 2013/2014. Median annual utilization rates per 1,000 people were higher in northern areas (rural, 52.0; urban, 32.1) than in southern areas (rural, 6.1; urban, 3.1). The majority of usage in Ontario was in mental health and addictions (61.8%). Utilization in other areas of care such as surgery, oncology, and internal medicine was highest in the rural north, whereas primary care use was highest in the urban south. Utilization was higher and therapeutic areas of care were more diverse in rural Northern Ontario than in other parts of the province. Utilization was also higher in urban Northern Ontario than in Southern Ontario. This suggests that telemedicine is being used to improve access to medical care services, especially in sparsely populated regions of the province.

  14. Ontario Hydro's nuclear program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, H.A.

    1982-06-01

    In 1981 Ontario Hydro generated over 100 billion KWh of electrical energy. Approximately one third of this was from nuclear units. There are ten CANDU units (5 250 MW) currently in operation, and another twelve (8 600 MW) are under construction. The presently committed nuclear expansion program is estimated to involve expenditures of 16 billion dollars over the next 10 years. About 10 000 people are employed in the nuclear design and construction program. All projects are generally on schedule, with the stations coming into service during the following time periods: Pickering B, 1983-85; Bruce B, 1984-87; Darlington, 1988-90. The status of each project is reviewed. Planning is underway for some retubing projects, as early as 1985 for Pickering A

  15. Energy, economic and environmental discourses and their policy impact: The case of Ontario's Green Energy and Green Economy Act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winfield, Mark; Dolter, Brett

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the debates around the Ontario's Green Energy and Green Economy Act (GEGEA) as an energy and economic development strategy through comparative public policy and discourse analysis approaches. The evidence regarding the economic impacts of the GEGEA is found to be almost entirely based on the results of economic modeling exercises. Critics and supporters of the legislation have arrived at very different conclusions through such exercises. These outcomes are similar to those seen in other jurisdictions pursuing renewable energy initiatives, such as Feed In Tariffs (FITs), renewables obligations and portfolio standards. A discourse analysis approach is employed to examine the reasons for the different conclusions being reached over the impacts of renewable energy initiatives. Differences in modeling approaches and assumptions are found to reflect differences in ideational perspectives on the part of the modelers with respect to the appropriate roles of markets and the state and the relationship between economic development and environmental sustainability in public policy. The paper concludes with suggestions regarding the gathering and availability of information regarding economic development in the renewable energy sector, and a discussion of potential ways to strengthen future efforts to understand the economic and environmental impact of renewable energy initiatives. - Highlights: • The discourse surrounding renewable energy initiatives is embedded within wider ideological debates. • The information that underpins the debates in Ontario is the result of economic modelling, not empirical data. • All of the existing modelling efforts suffer from significant shortcomings. • FITS are seen as politically feasible mechanisms for correcting biases in favour of conventional technologies. • The province's long-term commitment of renewable energy development is now uncertain

  16. Multifractal resilience and viability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchiguirinskaia, I.; Schertzer, D. J. M.

    2017-12-01

    The term resilience has become extremely fashionable and there had been many attempts to provide operational definition and in fact metrics going beyond a set of more or less ad-hoc indicators. The viability theory (Aubin and Saint-Pierre, 2011) have been used to give a rather precise mathematical definition of resilience (Deffuant and Gilbert, 2011). However, it does not grasp the multiscale nature of resilience that is rather fundamental as particularly stressed by Folke et al (2010). In this communication, we first recall a preliminary attempt (Tchiguirinskaia et al., 2014) to define multifractal resilience with the help of the maximal probable singularity. Then we extend this multifractal approach to the capture basin of the viability, therefore the resilient basin. Aubin, J P, A. Bayen, and P Saint-Pierre (2011). Viability Theory. New Directions. Springer, Berlin,. Deffuant, G. and Gilbert, N. (eds) (2011) Viability and Resilience of Complex Systems. Springer Berlin.Folke, C., S R Carpenter, B Walker, M Sheffer, T Chapin, and J Rockstroem (2010). Resilience thinking: integrating re- silience, adaptability and transformability. Ecology and So- ciety, 14(4):20, Tchiguirinskaia,I., D. Schertzer, , A. Giangola-Murzyn and T. C. Hoang (2014). Multiscale resilience metrics to assess flood. Proceedings of ICCSA 2014, Normandie University, Le Havre, France -.

  17. Viability, invariance and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Carja, Ovidiu; Vrabie, Ioan I

    2007-01-01

    The book is an almost self-contained presentation of the most important concepts and results in viability and invariance. The viability of a set K with respect to a given function (or multi-function) F, defined on it, describes the property that, for each initial data in K, the differential equation (or inclusion) driven by that function or multi-function) to have at least one solution. The invariance of a set K with respect to a function (or multi-function) F, defined on a larger set D, is that property which says that each solution of the differential equation (or inclusion) driven by F and issuing in K remains in K, at least for a short time.The book includes the most important necessary and sufficient conditions for viability starting with Nagumo's Viability Theorem for ordinary differential equations with continuous right-hand sides and continuing with the corresponding extensions either to differential inclusions or to semilinear or even fully nonlinear evolution equations, systems and inclusions. In th...

  18. Ontario perspective on interregional markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shalaby, A.

    2003-01-01

    On May 1, 2002, wholesale and retail electricity markets in Ontario were opened to competition. The industry structure has been completely unbundled into separate entities for power generation, distribution and transmission. There are currently 20 generators, 90 distributors and 4 transmitters in Ontario. Trade with neighbouring jurisdictions has increased and now accounts for 10 to 15 per cent of demand on summer peak days. Import/export capability with the United States (northeast and midwest) and other Canadian provinces (Quebec and Manitoba) is 4,000 to 6,000 MW. Ontario has not had new generation or transmission capacity in several years and the heat waves of summer 2002 resulted in a heavier power demand than forecasted. The province had to rely heavily on power imports resulting in high and volatile electricity prices. In response to customer complaints, the Ontario government froze retail rates and in a recent policy directive announced a public ownership policy for transmission with further consultation on improving supply competition in Ontario. FERC order 888 and the increased role of independent power producers has improved trading opportunities between Canada and the United States. The presentation highlighted recent trade trends and outlined the specific impact of the Standard Market Design on Canadian markets. It was noted that Ontario should work on ensuring power reliability, transmission planning, inter-regional coordination, and joint investments with neighbouring jurisdictions. 9 figs

  19. Economic and Financial Viability Plan for the Enterpreneurship of a Lyric Theatre Low-Cost Company: The Case of Zarzuela in Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Sancha Navarro Jesús Manuel

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Taking into account that one of the major handicaps when undertaken in the cultural sector is the problem of cost and demand volatility, this paper aims to implement a viability plan for the entrepreneurship of a lyric theatre low-cost company, dedicated to Zarzuela performance, a type of Spanish music like Opera. Firstly, the cultural sector data are analysed in terms of supply and demand and secondly a viability plan is carried out for three years. According to the results it is concluded that this type of venture is very risky if you do not have grant or other financial resources, due to the variability of demand and the increase in unit costs as the artistic performance has a fixed production technology that cannot absorb the technical progress of the rest of the economy.

  20. Policy communities and allocation of internalized cost : negotiation of the Ontario acid rain program, 1982-1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacDonald, D.C.

    1997-12-31

    The process of allocating the internalized cost of environmental protection amongst industrial concerns and governments was studied. The issue was addressed by reviewing the literature on the treatment of externalities by economists, and the literature describing the approach to policy analysis by the the policy communities. An examination of a case study in which the cost of sulphur dioxide emission reductions was allocated amongst the major Ontario sources during the development of the 1985 national and Ontario acid rain programs was presented. The study provided an insight into issues regarding Canadian environmental policy and policy communities theory and practice. The Ontario allocation was negotiated by Ontario alone, even though it was part of a national program. The environmental movement also had no role in this Ontario policy decisions. The power to influence the Ontario cabinet belonged to MOE, Inco, and Ontario Hydro through negotiations and compromise, which conforms to the basic premise of the policy communities approach.

  1. Comparison of municipal solid waste management systems in Canada and Ghana: A case study of the cities of London, Ontario, and Kumasi, Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asase, Mizpah; Yanful, Ernest K.; Mensah, Moses; Stanford, Jay; Amponsah, Samuel

    2009-01-01

    Integrated waste management has been accepted as a sustainable approach to solid waste management in any region. It can be applied in both developed and developing countries. The difference is the approach taken to develop the integrated waste management system. This review looks at the integrated waste management system operating in the city of London, Ontario-Canada and how lessons can be drawn from the system's development and operation that will help implement a sustainable waste management system in the city of Kumasi, Ghana. The waste management system in London is designed such that all waste generated in the city is handled and disposed of appropriately. The responsibility of each sector handling waste is clearly defined and monitored. All major services are provided and delivered by a combination of public and private sector forces. The sustainability of the waste management in the city of London is attributed to the continuous improvement strategy framework adopted by the city based on the principles of integrated waste management. It is perceived that adopting a strategic framework based on the principles of integrated waste management with a strong political and social will, can transform the current waste management in Kumasi and other cities in developing countries in the bid for finding lasting solutions to the problems that have plagued the waste management system in these cities.

  2. Ontario freight movement study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-11-01

    The freight (cargo) transportation sector accounts for a major use of fossil fuels and contributes significantly to greenhouse gas emissions. A study was conducted to estimate and forecast emissions from transportation in Ontario, by mode, over the next 15 years, and to examine ways in which those emissions could be reduced. Published data of freight transportation industries was used to examine the fuel consumption characteristics of each mode, followed by a review of emission rates. It was determined that truck transportation accounts for most CO 2 emissions (about 70%). Rail follows with 21% and the marine and air modes contribute relatively small shares (6% and 2%). New intermodal technologies being introduced by the railways were discussed. They have been designed to make intermodal transport more accessible to a wider segment of the freight market. A recommendation was made which would require all truck shipments over 500 km, accounting for fully one half of truck tonne-km, to have their line-haul component diverted to this new more fuel-efficient mode (i.e., from truck to rail). refs., tabs., figs

  3. Implications of climatic change for tourism and recreation in Ontario. Incidences du changement climatique sur le tourisme et les loisirs en Ontario; Sommaire de Phase 1 et 2. Le changement climatique et son incidence sur le tourisme et les loisirs en Ontario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wall, G; Harrison, R; Kinnaird, V; McBoyle, G; Quinland, C

    1988-01-01

    Scenarios for climatic change associated with a doubling of atmospheric carbon dioxide were employed in an assessment of the impacts of climate change on tourism and recreation in Ontario. A warmer climate resulting from such change may mean declining lake levels with associated changes in the ecological interest and recreational potential of wetlands, as shown by case studies on two parks near Great Lakes shorelines. In the skiing industry, the length of ski seasons will be reduced in the northern part of the province, but the key holiday periods (when a large portion of total business is conducted) should still fall within the reliable ski season. Further south, the ski season in the South Georgian Bay region could be eliminated. Summer recreational activities are likely to have extended seasons, and the viability of summer recreational enterprises may increase, with associated positive benefits to neighboring communities. 2 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. 34. annual conference Ontario Petroleum Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    A total of 18 papers, dealing with a variety of issues relevant to the petroleum industry, such as marketing strategies, feasibility studies and exploration technologies, were combined in this volume of proceedings of the 34th annual conference of the Ontario Petroleum Institute. Some of the papers presented case studies of hydrocarbon reserves in North America, along with their depositional histories. Oil yields and resource potential of fractured reservoirs was the subject of some presentations. Studies of cores from drilling sites and complete stratigraphic columns of some oil fields were also presented. (Papers are paged individually). refs., tabs., figs

  5. Impact of individual resilience and safety climate on safety performance and psychological stress of construction workers: A case study of the Ontario construction industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuting; McCabe, Brenda; Hyatt, Douglas

    2017-06-01

    The construction industry has hit a plateau in terms of safety performance. Safety climate is regarded as a leading indicator of safety performance; however, relatively little safety climate research has been done in the Canadian construction industry. Safety climate may be geographically sensitive, thus it is necessary to examine how the construct of safety climate is defined and used to improve safety performance in different regions. On the other hand, more and more attention has been paid to job related stress in the construction industry. Previous research proposed that individual resilience may be associated with a better safety performance and may help employees manage stress. Unfortunately, few empirical research studies have examined this hypothesis. This paper aims to examine the role of safety climate and individual resilience in safety performance and job stress in the Canadian construction industry. The research was based on 837 surveys collected in Ontario between June 2015 and June 2016. Structural equation modeling (SEM) techniques were used to explore the impact of individual resilience and safety climate on physical safety outcomes and on psychological stress among construction workers. The results show that safety climate not only affected construction workers' safety performance but also indirectly affected their psychological stress. In addition, it was found that individual resilience had a direct negative impact on psychological stress but had no impact on physical safety outcomes. These findings highlight the roles of both organizational and individual factors in individual safety performance and in psychological well-being. Construction organizations need to not only monitor employees' safety performance, but also to assess their employees' psychological well-being. Promoting a positive safety climate together with developing training programs focusing on improving employees' psychological health - especially post-trauma psychological

  6. Waste management practices in Ontario`s workplaces: An emerging industrial ecology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-09-01

    Describes a study commissioned to evaluate employee attitudes and behaviours with respect to participation in workplace initiatives in waste diversion/reduction, to examine management initiatives related to waste diversion and reduction/recycling/reuse, and to report on Ontario Ministry of Environment & Energy activities related to industrial, commercial, and institutional (ICI) waste diversion activities. Linkages between management and employees, management and government, and ICI activities and government were also studied. The study methodology included a literature review, a series of interviews with key stakeholders, industry associations, and waste management companies, and a series of 12 case studies spanning major industrial sectors in Ontario. Issues addressed in the study include the factors that trigger waste diversion activities by ICI establishments, barriers to the initiation of waste diversion practices, and the social aspects of waste reduction/recycling/reuse practices.

  7. Ontario pharmacists' crisis over Bill 16: A missed opportunity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Meagen; Austin, Zubin; Tsuyuki, Ross T

    2012-01-01

    In 2010, the Ontario government brought forward Bill 16, which, among other things, removed pharmacists' professional allowances. While many would disagree with this unilateral action by the Ontario government, it also could have served as a crisis for change towards patient-centred care. We sought to examine the response of the pharmacy profession in Ontario to this crisis as it relates to the vision outlined in the Blueprint for Pharmacy. We systematically examined publicly available responses to Schedule 5 of Ontario's Bill 16 during the period from April to June 16, 2010. A rapid textual analysis of the data using tag or word clouds and a qualitative content analysis were performed on all of the data collected. The rapid textual analysis revealed that the most frequently used terms were "pharmacist," "pharmacy" and "professional allowances"; the least used were "layoffs," "service cuts" and "patient care." Content analysis revealed 4 themes: the desire to maintain the status quo of practice, a focus on the business of pharmacy, pharmacy stakeholders' perceptions of government's attitude towards the profession and changes to patient services. It is notable that patient care was almost completely absent from the discussion, a reflection that our profession has not embraced patient-centred care. This also represents a missed opportunity - a crisis that could have been used to move the profession towards the Blueprint's vision. We thought that the Blueprint had already achieved this consensus, but the Ontario experience has shown that this may not be the case.

  8. Common Occupational Disability Tests and Case Law References: An Ontario MVA perspective on interpretation and best practice methodology supporting a holistic model, Part I of III (Pre-104 IRB).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, J Douglas; Gouws, Jacques J; Bachmann, Corina Anghel

    2016-05-01

    This three-part paper presents practical holistic models of determining impairment and occupational disability with respect to common "own occupation" and "any occupation" definitions. The models consider physical, emotional and cognitive impairments in unison, and draw upon case law support for empirically based functional assessment of secondary cognitive symptoms arising from psychological conditions, including chronic pain disorders. Case law is presented, primarily in the context of Ontario motor vehicle accident legislation, to demonstrate how triers of fact have addressed occupational disability in the context of chronic pain; and interpreted the "own occupation" and "any occupation" definitions. In interpreting the definitions of "own occupation" and "any occupation", courts have considered various concepts, such as: work as an integrated whole, competitive productivity, demonstrated job performance vs. employment, work adaptation relative to impairment stability, suitable work, retraining considerations, self-employment, and remuneration/socio-economic status. The first segment of the paper reviews the above concepts largely in the context of pre-104 Income Replacement Benefit (IRB) entitlement, while the second segment focuses on post-104 IRB entitlement. In the final segment, the paper presents a critical evaluation of computerized transferable skills analysis (TSAs) in the occupational disability context. By contrast, support is offered for the notion that (neuro) psychovocational assessments and situational work assessments should play a key role in "own occupation" disability determination, even where specific vocational rehabilitation/retraining recommendations are not requested by the referral source (e.g., insurer disability examination).

  9. Ontario Power Authority district energy research report : final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-02-01

    This paper presented an analysis of the technical and economic characteristics of district energy in Ontario. The market context for district energy was evaluated, and institutional issues that may influence the future development and operation of district energy systems in Ontario were explored. Technical, economic, and environmental analyses of district energy based on different neighbourhood sizes, types, and district energy systems were presented. Three case studies were included to demonstrate real world district energy applications. A set of interviews conducted with representatives of the province's district energy supply chain was also provided in order to provide a framework for district energy opportunities and challenges within the province. 22 tabs., 16 figs.

  10. Irregular Shelterwood Cuttings Promote Viability of European Yew Population Growing in a Managed Forest: A Case Study from the Starohorské Mountains, Slovakia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denisa Sedmáková

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The increasing probability of Taxus baccata (L. decline given climate change brings forth many uncertainties for conservation management decisions. In this article, the authors present the effects of applying regeneration cuttings since the year 2000 on the viability of the understory yew population. By collecting data from a stand located at the centre of the largest population of European yew in Slovakia, containing approximately 160,000 individuals, and analysing tree-ring records from 38 sampled trees, the improved performance of yews, including stem growth, seed production, and number of regenerated individuals, was revealed. Thinning the canopy by removing 15% of the growing stock volume per decade, combined with the subsequent irregular shelterwood cuttings, was assessed as a useful strategy. Moreover, lower radial growth of females compared to males, but simultaneously their similar response to climate, suggests a possible trade-off between reproduction and growth. Release cuttings of up to 30% of the standing volume in the vicinity of the female trees, executed in the rainy summers following warmer winters, and consistent elimination of deer browsing, can further enhance the positive effects of applied cuts on yew viability. Overall, the suggested active measures could be considered as an effective option to preserve the unique biodiversity of calcareous beech-dominated forests in Central Europe.

  11. Analyzing Sustainable Energy Opportunities for a Small Scale Off-Grid Facility: A Case Study at Experimental Lakes Area (ELA), Ontario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggirala, Bhanu

    This thesis explored the opportunities to reduce energy demand and renewable energy feasibility at an off-grid science "community" called the Experimental Lakes Area (ELA) in Ontario. Being off-grid, ELA is completely dependent on diesel and propane fuel supply for all its electrical and heating needs, which makes ELA vulnerable to fluctuating fuel prices. As a result ELA emits a large amount of greenhouse gases (GHG) for its size. Energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies can reduce energy consumption and consequently energy cost, as well as GHG. Energy efficiency was very important to ELA due to the elevated fuel costs at this remote location. Minor upgrades to lighting, equipment and building envelope were able to reduce energy costs and reduce load. Efficient energy saving measures were recommended that save on operating and maintenance costs, namely, changing to LED lights, replacing old equipment like refrigerators and downsizing of ice makers. This resulted in a 4.8% load reduction and subsequently reduced the initial capital cost for biomass by 27,000, by 49,500 for wind power and by 136,500 for solar power. Many alternative energies show promise as potential energy sources to reduce the diesel and propane consumption at ELA including wind energy, solar heating and biomass. A biomass based CHP system using the existing diesel generators as back-up has the shortest pay back period of the technologies modeled. The biomass based CHP system has a pay back period of 4.1 years at 0.80 per liter of diesel, as diesel price approaches $2.00 per liter the pay back period reduces to 0.9 years, 50% the generation cost compared to present generation costs. Biomass has been successfully tried and tested in many off-grid communities particularly in a small-scale off-grid setting in North America and internationally. Also, the site specific solar and wind data show that ELA has potential to harvest renewable resources and produce heat and power at competitive

  12. Ontario Hydro looks at security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, B.J.; Kee, B.

    1995-01-01

    Ontario Hydro operates 20 CANDU reactors on three different sites. Since 1984, a review of security arrangements on all the sites has taken place on a five-yearly basis. The review process for 1995 is outlined. The three objectives were as follows: to assess current security threats and risks to the stations; to assess the adequacy of the existing programme to protect against current threats; by comparing the security programme against those of comparable entities to establish benchmarks for good practice as a basis for improvements at Ontario Hydro. Valuable insights gained through the review are listed. These could be useful to other utilities. (UK)

  13. Transmission system planning in Ontario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrie, D; Macedo, F X; Mcconnach, J S [Ontario Hydro, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    1994-12-31

    In recent years, new and modified approaches to planning the large transmission system that serves the province of Ontario, Canada, have been necessary to accommodate the rapidly changing planning environment including slower uncertain growth, ageing of facilities, integration of demand side management and non utility generation options, increased competitiveness, increased financial stresses and affordable constraints. This paper describes some of the new and modified approaches and tools that have been adopted or are being developed by Ontario Hydro to cope with this changing environment. (author) 9 refs., 4 figs.

  14. Social Media for Enhancing Stakeholders' Innovation Networks in Ontario, Canada

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaushik, Pawandeep; Chowdhuy, Ataharul; Hambly Odame, Helen; Passen, van Annemarie

    2018-01-01

    This case study assessed local food stakeholders' use of Facebook and Twitter to support interaction and build their networks of innovation in Ontario. Data were collected using Netlytic − an online data mining tool from the social media platforms − and key informant interviews. Findings revealed

  15. Ontario Hydro annual report 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-04-01

    Ontario Hydro`s annual report of the financial position and activities for the year 1986 consists of their financial highlights; corporate profile; customer service and satisfaction; message from Chairman; message from President; 1986 in review; financial section; management report; five-year summary of financial statistics; and comparative statistics.

  16. Ontario Hydro annual report 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-04-01

    Ontario Hydro's annual report of the financial position and activities for the year 1986 consists of their financial highlights; corporate profile; customer service and satisfaction; message from Chairman; message from President; 1986 in review; financial section; management report; five-year summary of financial statistics; and comparative statistics

  17. [Ontario Hydro]. Corporate performance report, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    Summarizes Ontario Hydro's corporate performance for the year, with actual results being compared against planned values. Also includes additional indicators that illustrate noteworthy trends in corporate performance. Corporate results are reported under the new organizational structure implemented in 1993, beginning with overall results in such areas as customer service, environmental stewardship, human resources, and finance. This is followed by reports from the Generation Business Group, Customer Services Group, Corporate Business Group, General Counsel and Secretary, Ontario Hydro Audit, Strategic Planning, Environment and Communication Group, and Ontario Hydro enterprises (Ontario Hydro Technologies, Ontario Hydro International). The appendix includes summary financial statements

  18. Ontario Energy Corporation annual report 1981. [Monograph

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-01-01

    The Ontario Energy Corporation's mission of providing leadership and investment capital for selected energy ventures brought its total participation in projects from $16.4 million to $669 million, and its total assets increased from $44.4 million to $693 million during the year. The annual report review major operations with Ontario Energy Resources Ltd., Onexco Ltd., Ontario Alternate Energy Ltd., Ontario Power Share Ltd., and Ontario Energy in Transportation Ltd. The financial report includes a balance sheet, income and retained earnings statement, and a summary of financial changes during the reporting period. 1 figure, 4 tables. (DCK)

  19. The adoption of residential solar photovoltaic systems in the presence of a financial incentive: A case study of consumer experiences with the Renewable Energy Standard Offer Program in Ontario (Canada)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Christopher William Junji

    2009-12-01

    Traditionally, high initial capital costs and lengthy payback periods have been identified as the most significant barriers that limit the diffusion of solar photovoltaic (PV) systems. In response, the Ontario Government, through the Ontario Power Authority (OPA), introduced the Renewable Energy Standard Offer Program (RESOP) in November, 2006. The RESOP offers owners of solar PV systems with a generation capacity under 10MW a 20 year contract to sell electricity back to the grid at a guaranteed rate of $0.42/kWh. While it is the intent of incentive programs such as the RESOP to begin to lower financial barriers in order to increase the uptake of solar PV systems, there is no guarantee that the level of participation will in fact rise. The "on-the-ground" manner in which consumers interact with such an incentive program ultimately determines its effectiveness. The purpose of this thesis is to analyze the relationship between the RESOP and solar PV system consumers. To act on this purpose, the experiences of current RESOP participants are presented, wherein the factors that are either hindering or promoting utilization of the RESOP and the adoption of solar PV systems are identified. This thesis was conducted in three phases--a literature review, preliminary key informant interviews, and primary RESOP participant interviews--with each phase informing the scope and design of the subsequent stage. First, a literature survey was completed to identify and to understand the potential drivers and barriers to the adoption of a solar PV system from the perspective of a consumer. Second, nine key informant interviews were completed to gain further understanding regarding the specific intricacies of the drivers and barriers in the case of Ontario, as well as the overall adoption system in the province. These interviews were conducted between July and September, 2008. Third, interviews with 24 RESOP participants were conducted; they constitute the primary data set. These

  20. Analysis of 44 Cases before the Landlord and Tenant Board Involving Bed Bug Infestations in Ontario, Canada: Focus on Adjudicator Decisions Based on Entomological/Pest Management Evidence and Accountability under the Residential Tenancy Act and Other Applicable Legislation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryks, Sam

    2011-01-01

    The resurgence of bed bugs in major urban centres in North America has resulted in conflict between landlords and tenants. This is commonly focused on attribution of blame for source of infestation, on responsibility, on costs for preparation, treatment and losses, and for compensation as rent abatement and/or alternative temporary housing. In Ontario, Canada, these issues are often decided by adjudicators at the Landlord and Tenant Board hearing claims, counter-claims and defense by legal representation (lawyers and paralegals) as well as through mediation. Evidence in these hearings may include photographs, invoices for costs as well as testimony by tenants, landlords and “expert witnesses” who are most often pest control firms representing their landlord clients. A total of 44 Landlord and Tenant Board adjudicated cases available online were analyzed. The analysis included elements of the decisions such as adjudicator, claimant (landlord or tenant), basis of claim, review of evidence, amount of claim, amount awarded, and evaluation of the quality of the evidence. The results of the analysis of these findings are discussed. Recommendations for improvement of adjudicator decisions on the basis of knowledge of bed bug biology and Integrated Pest Management best practices are presented as well as the importance of education of tenants and landlords to a process of mutual trust, support and accountability. PMID:26467732

  1. Analysis of 44 Cases before the Landlord and Tenant Board Involving Bed Bug Infestations in Ontario, Canada: Focus on Adjudicator Decisions Based on Entomological/Pest Management Evidence and Accountability under the Residential Tenancy Act and Other Applicable Legislation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryks, Sam

    2011-07-19

    The resurgence of bed bugs in major urban centres in North America has resulted in conflict between landlords and tenants. This is commonly focused on attribution of blame for source of infestation, on responsibility, on costs for preparation, treatment and losses, and for compensation as rent abatement and/or alternative temporary housing. In Ontario, Canada, these issues are often decided by adjudicators at the Landlord and Tenant Board hearing claims, counter-claims and defense by legal representation (lawyers and paralegals) as well as through mediation. Evidence in these hearings may include photographs, invoices for costs as well as testimony by tenants, landlords and "expert witnesses" who are most often pest control firms representing their landlord clients. A total of 44 Landlord and Tenant Board adjudicated cases available online were analyzed. The analysis included elements of the decisions such as adjudicator, claimant (landlord or tenant), basis of claim, review of evidence, amount of claim, amount awarded, and evaluation of the quality of the evidence. The results of the analysis of these findings are discussed. Recommendations for improvement of adjudicator decisions on the basis of knowledge of bed bug biology and Integrated Pest Management best practices are presented as well as the importance of education of tenants and landlords to a process of mutual trust, support and accountability.

  2. Viability Assessment Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    Since May 1996, under its draft Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program Plan (DOE 1996), DOE has been carrying out a 5-year program of work to support the decision in 2001 by the Secretary of Energy on whether or not to recommend the site to the President. Part of this program was to address major unresolved technical issues and to complete an assessment of the viability of the Yucca Mountain site by 1998. Affirming the DOE plans, Congress directed DOE in the 1997 Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act to provide a viability assessment of the Yucca Mountain site to Congress and the President. This Viability Assessment (VA) document is the DOE report to Congress and the President. They are expected to use the VA to make an informed decision about program direction and funding. Drawing on 15 years of scientific investigation and design work at Yucca Mountain, the VA summarizes a large technical basis of field investigations, laboratory tests, models, analyses, and engineering, described in cited references. The VA identifies the major uncertainties relevant to the technical defensibility of DOE analyses and designs, the DOE approach to managing these uncertainties, and the status of work toward the site recommendation and LA. The VA also identifies DOE plans for the remaining work, and the estimated costs of completing an LA and constructing and operating a repository. The attention to uncertainties is important because DOE must evaluate how the repository will perform during the next 10,000 years or longer. Uncertainties exist because of variability in the natural (geologic and hydrologic) systems at Yucca Mountain and because of imperfect scientific understanding of the natural processes that might affect the repository system. This is Volume 1 and it covers, Introduction and Site Characteristics, includes a high-level summary of the results of the VA and some additional background information. (The overview is bound separately.) Section 1 of Volume

  3. Ontario electricity rates and industrial competitiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    Industrial electricity prices in Ontario rose significantly after the opening of the competitive Ontario electricity market in 2002, thereby widening the gap between industrial electricity prices in Ontario and those in other Canadian provinces. Navigant Consulting Ltd. conducted this study at the request of the Association of Major Power Consumers in Ontario (AMPCO) to research and compare current and historical electricity prices in Ontario and other jurisdictions in North America. The study provided an independent analysis of how industrial electricity prices in Ontario compare to those in other jurisdiction in which AMPCO members operate. It also formed the basis for comparing the impacts of electricity policy on the economic competitiveness of major power consumers in Ontario. The relative electricity intensity in the United States, Ontario and other Canadian provinces was reviewed for specific industries, including forest products, steel manufacturing, petroleum refining, chemical manufacturing and cement manufacturing. Publicly available aggregate data from Statistics Canada and the United States Bureau of the Census was then used to compare average electricity prices for industrial customers in Ontario. The data confirmed that Ontario has experienced a decline in its competitive price advantage in industrial electricity. Delivered industrial electricity prices in Ontario have increased by more than 60 per cent since 2001. Industrial electricity prices in Ontario rose above those in Quebec, Manitoba, British Columbia and New Brunswick. In addition, industrial electricity prices in Ontario rose above those in competing states such as Ohio and Illinois, in part due to the increase in the value of the Canadian dollar. It was concluded that the price increase may lead to a greater decline in economic output in Ontario compared to competing jurisdictions. 2 tabs., 14 figs., 1 appendix

  4. E-prescription as a tool for improving services and the financial viability of healthcare systems: the case of the Greek national e-prescription system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pangalos, G; Sfyroeras, V; Pagkalos, I

    2014-01-01

    E-prescription systems can help improve patient service, safety and quality of care. They can also help achieve better compliance for the patients and better alignment with the guidelines for the practitioners. The recently implemented national e-prescription system in Greece already covers approximately 85% of all prescriptions prescribed in Greece today (approximately 5.5 million per month). The system has not only contributed already in significant changes towards improving services and better monitoring and planning of public health, but also substantially helped to contain unnecessary expenditure related to medication use and improve transparency and administrative control. Such issues have gained increasing importance not only for Greece but also for many other national healthcare systems that have to cope with the continuous rise of medication expenditure. Our implementation has, therefore, shown that besides their importance for improving services, national e-prescription systems can also provide a valuable tool for better utilisation of resources and for containing unnecessary healthcare costs, thus contributing to the improvement of the financial stability and viability of the overall healthcare system.

  5. Cried because I had no shoes : The impact of price caps on the Ontario electricity market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, A.

    2002-01-01

    In late 2002, the Ontario Premier announced a Nine-Point response to the competitive electricity regime in the province, which was followed by the release of draft legislation. This draft legislation called for a government imposed retail price cap of 4.3 cent kilo watt hour for the cost of energy, effective December 1, 2002 to 2006. In addition, the Premier indicated a retroactive refund would be forwarded to customers from May 1, 2002, for charges above the price cap. In this document, the author argued for a lessening of the price cap proposals, and supporting a market allowed to hold its course toward competitive markets in the future. The arguments put forth by the author were: (1) the imposition of price caps will hinder long-term economic viability in Ontario, (2) the benefits of competition cannot be interrupted by politically-motivated responses, (3) if the current path is followed Ontario may be headed towards blackouts, (4) deregulation is essential if Ontario is to remain competitive in the electricity marketplace, and (5) upcoming downgrade in Ontario's red index score. 3 tabs

  6. Ontario Hydro Research Division, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work of the Research Division of Ontario Hydro provides technical and scientific support for the engineering and operation of a power system that includes hydraulic, fossil-fired, and nuclear generation. It also relates to the transmission and distribution of electricity and to the need to help customers use electricity with safety and economy. Among the examples of projects given are qualification of CANDU heat transport system components, pressure tube replacement, steam generator integrity, testing for earthquake resistance, and radioactive waste disposal

  7. Transforming Ontario's Power Generation Company

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manley, J.; Epp, J.; Godsoe, P.C.

    2004-01-01

    The OPG Review Committee was formed by the Ontario Ministry of Energy to provide recommendations and advice on the future role of Ontario Power Generation Inc. (OPG) in the electricity sector. This report describes the future structure of OPG with reference to the appropriate corporate governance and senior management structure. It also discusses the potential refurbishing of the Pickering A nuclear generating Units 1, 2 and 3. The electricity system in Ontario is becoming increasingly fragile. The province relies heavily on electricity imports and the transmission system is being pushed to near capacity. Three nuclear generating units are out of service. The problems can be attributed to the fact that the electricity sector has been subjected to unpredictable policy changes for more than a decade, and that the largest electricity generator (OPG) has not been well governed. OPG has had frequent senior management change, accountability has been weak, and cost overruns have delayed the return to service of the Pickering nuclear power Unit 4. It was noted that the generating assets owned and operated by OPG are capable of providing more than 70 per cent of Ontario's electricity supply. Decisive action is needed now to avoid a potential supply shortage of about 5,000 to 7,000 megawatts by 2007. In its current state, OPG risks becoming a burden on ratepayers. Forty recommendations were presented, some of which suggest that OPG should become a rate-regulated commercial utility focused on running and maintaining its core generating assets. This would require that the government act as a shareholder, and the company operate like a commercial business. It was also emphasized that the market must be allowed to bring in new players. refs., tabs., figs

  8. Politics of environmental regulation: acid rain in Ontario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hogarth Wood, G P

    1984-01-01

    This study looks at the case of the Ontario government and Inco Limited in order to explain political responses to the acid rain issue and to generalize about the dynamics of environmental regulation. Existing accounts of the acid rain situation neglect a systematic explanation of the political processes that guide the selection of policy. This reflects a tendency in Canadian public policy analysis generally. Most literature in this field is both apolitical and atheoretical. In addition, most models of public policy focus attention on a narrow range of policy determinants, making the models inappropriate as exclusive guides for public policy analysis. This study follows an approach that assumes that no variable can, a priori, be viewed as the primary determinant of a policy choice. Instead, relevant features of the economic, social, and political environment surrounding the policy process have to be examined in addition to that process itself. Accordingly, a number of potential influences on the acid rain policy outcome in Ontario are explored: the economic structure of Ontario, political-geographic factors, the role of science and technology, political power in the province, political values and attitudes, the institutional structure of Ontario politics, and finally, the policy process itself. This exercise points to the overriding influence of the political system environment, particularly the economic structure of the province, in explaining the policy choice. The findings of this study can be extended to explain regulatory responses to the issue in other political jurisdictions.

  9. [Ontario Hydro International Inc.]. Annual report 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    Ontario Hydro International Inc. is the international representative of Ontario Hydro. OHII operates as a global utility that markets Ontario Hydro's services and products. Its mission is to be the leader in energy efficiency and sustainable development in the international marketplace. This report describes the year's activities in the following areas: Energy management and environment, hydroelectric generation, nuclear products and services, fossil generation, grid (transmission) business, utility management, Asia Power Group Inc. The document also includes financial highlights and international and customer contracts

  10. The safety of Ontario's nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-06-01

    A Select Committee of the Legislature of Ontario was established to examine the affairs of Ontario Hydro, the provincial electrical utility. Extensive public hearings were held on several topics including the safety of nuclear power reactors operating in Ontario. The Committee found that these reactors are acceptably safe. Many of the 24 recommendations in this report deal with the licensing process and public access to information. (O.T.)

  11. Alternative models for restructuring Ontario's electric sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bright, D.; Salaff, S.

    1996-01-01

    The future of Ontario Hydro and the provincial electrical sector was discussed. Various models proposed for restructuring Ontario's electric sector were described and views of some of the stake holders were presented, among them the views of AMPCO, MEA, the Ontario Chamber of Commerce, IPPSO, Ontario Hydro Management, Energy Probe and the Power Workers' Union. In general, most stake holders were in favour of privatization to some degree except for the Power Workers' Union which was unalterably opposed to privatization, claiming that it would lead to quantum increases in electricity rates. 2 figs

  12. [Ontario Hydro]. Corporate performance report, 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    Summarizes Ontario Hydro's corporate performance for the year, with actual results being compared against planned values established in the approved corporate financial plan and work program budget. Also includes additional indicators that illustrate noteworthy trends in corporate performance. Corporate results are reported under the new organizational structure implemented in mid-1993, beginning with overall results in such areas as customer satisfaction, electricity sales, human resources, and environmental protection. This is followed by reports from the Electricity Group (supply, generation, transmission), the Energy Services and Environment Group (load saved and shifted, non-utility generation, retail distribution), and Ontario Hydro enterprises (Ontario Hydro Technologies, Ontario Hydro International). The appendix contains summary financial statements

  13. The restructuring of the Ontario electricity market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doucet, J.A.

    1999-01-01

    A summary of the current status of the deregulation of the electricity market in Ontario was presented. To follow global deregulation trends, the Ontario Government has embarked on a considerable restructuring of the Ontario electricity market. The monopoly position of Ontario Hydro has been removed by restructuring the provincial utility into two separate companies, GENCO and SERVCO, which will be responsible for the generation and transmission and distribution of electricity, respectively. Other mechanisms put in place to favour a free and competitive market for electricity in the province, such as the arrival on the market of other electricity producers, and the establishment of the independent market operator, are also discussed. 2 tabs

  14. The Education Act (Ontario) 1980: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodder, C. J.

    1984-01-01

    Ontario has provided special education legislation through the Education Amendment Act, 1980. Issues related to teacher preparation for special education and program planning and implementation are reviewed. (DF)

  15. Association of total energy intake and macronutrient consumption with colorectal cancer risk: results from a large population-based case-control study in Newfoundland and Labrador and Ontario, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhuoyu; Liu, Lin; Wang, Peizhong Peter; Roebothan, Barbara; Zhao, Jin; Dicks, Elizabeth; Cotterchio, Michelle; Buehler, Sharon; Campbell, Peter T; McLaughlin, John R; Parfrey, Patrick S

    2012-03-26

    Diet is regarded as one of the most important environmental factors associated with colorectal cancer (CRC) risk. A recent report comprehensively concluded that total energy intake does not have a simple relationship with CRC risk, and that the data were inconsistent for carbohydrate, cholesterol and protein. The objective of this study was to identify the associations of CRC risk with dietary intakes of total energy, protein, fat, carbohydrate, fiber, and alcohol using data from a large case-control study conducted in Newfoundland and Labrador (NL) and Ontario (ON), Canada. Incident colorectal cancer cases (n = 1760) were identified from population-based cancer registries in the provinces of ON (1997-2000) and NL (1999-2003). Controls (n = 2481) were a random sample of residents in each province, aged 20-74 years. Family history questionnaire (FHQ), personal history questionnaire (PHQ), and food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) were used to collect study data. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the association of intakes of total energy, macronutrients and alcohol with CRC risk. Total energy intake was associated with higher risk of CRC (OR: 1.56; 95% CI: 1.21-2.01, p-trend = 0.02, 5th versus 1st quintile), whereas inverse associations emerged for intakes of protein (OR: 0.85, 95%CI: 0.69-1.00, p-trend = 0.06, 5th versus 1st quintile), carbohydrate (OR: 0.81, 95%CI: 0.63-1.00, p-trend = 0.05, 5th versus 1st quintile) and total dietary fiber (OR: 0.84, 95% CI:0.67-0.99, p-trend = 0.04, 5th versus 1st quintile). Total fat, alcohol, saturated fatty acids, monounsaturated fatty acids, polyunsaturated fatty acids, and cholesterol were not associated with CRC risk. This study provides further evidence that high energy intake may increase risk of incident CRC, whereas diets high in protein, fiber, and carbohydrate may reduce the risk of the disease.

  16. Association of total energy intake and macronutrient consumption with colorectal cancer risk: results from a large population-based case-control study in Newfoundland and Labrador and Ontario, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Zhuoyu

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diet is regarded as one of the most important environmental factors associated with colorectal cancer (CRC risk. A recent report comprehensively concluded that total energy intake does not have a simple relationship with CRC risk, and that the data were inconsistent for carbohydrate, cholesterol and protein. The objective of this study was to identify the associations of CRC risk with dietary intakes of total energy, protein, fat, carbohydrate, fiber, and alcohol using data from a large case-control study conducted in Newfoundland and Labrador (NL and Ontario (ON, Canada. Methods Incident colorectal cancer cases (n = 1760 were identified from population-based cancer registries in the provinces of ON (1997-2000 and NL (1999-2003. Controls (n = 2481 were a random sample of residents in each province, aged 20-74 years. Family history questionnaire (FHQ, personal history questionnaire (PHQ, and food frequency questionnaire (FFQ were used to collect study data. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the association of intakes of total energy, macronutrients and alcohol with CRC risk. Results Total energy intake was associated with higher risk of CRC (OR: 1.56; 95% CI: 1.21-2.01, p-trend = 0.02, 5th versus 1st quintile, whereas inverse associations emerged for intakes of protein (OR: 0.85, 95%CI: 0.69-1.00, p-trend = 0.06, 5th versus 1st quintile, carbohydrate (OR: 0.81, 95%CI: 0.63-1.00, p-trend = 0.05, 5th versus 1st quintile and total dietary fiber (OR: 0.84, 95% CI:0.67-0.99, p-trend = 0.04, 5th versus 1st quintile. Total fat, alcohol, saturated fatty acids, monounsaturated fatty acids, polyunsaturated fatty acids, and cholesterol were not associated with CRC risk. Conclusion This study provides further evidence that high energy intake may increase risk of incident CRC, whereas diets high in protein, fiber, and carbohydrate may reduce the risk of the disease.

  17. The Ontario Energy Marketers Association

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, W.F.C.

    1998-01-01

    An overview of the role of the Ontario Energy Marketers Association (OEMA) and its future orientation was presented. Participants in the OEMA include agents, brokers, marketers, local distribution companies, public interest representatives, associations and government representatives. The role of the OEMA is to encourage open competition for the benefit and protection of all energy consumer and market participants. As well, the OEMA serves as a forum for key industry stakeholders to resolve market issues outside the regulatory arena, set standards and codes of practice, establish customer education programs, and develop industry input into public policy making

  18. Examining Competition in Ontario's Higher Education Market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhan, Bayan Yousef

    2017-01-01

    Financial challenges have forced many publicly funded academic institutions in Ontario to adopt a corporate model and to use market tools to compete in the higher education market and maintain their enrolment and revenue levels. This study has analyzed how competition affects publicly funded universities in Ontario. Competition was examined by…

  19. Ontario Hydro Research Division annual report 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The Research Division of Ontario Hydro conducts research in the fields of chemistry, civil engineering, electrical engineering, mechanical engineering, metallurgy, and operations. Much of the research has a bearing on the safe, environmentally benign operation of Ontario Hydro's nuclear power plants. Particular emphasis has been placed on nuclear plant component aging and plant life assurance

  20. [Overview of acupuncture development in Ontario Canada].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fang; Wu, Bin-jiang

    2012-04-01

    The history of acupuncture in Ontario, Canada was traced, and the current status as welI as the prospection were introduced in this paper. Statistics showed that the history of acupuncture in Ontario started in the 1880s, and it was only popular in China Town and Chinese community. In the 1970s, it gradually merged into the mainstream of the society, and entered into a growing period. With the tide of Chinese immigration in the 1980s and 1990s, acupuncture matured rapidly. In 2006, the "Traditional Chinese Medicine Act" was passed in Ontario, it was considered as a milestone in the history of acupuncture. At present, just like the other 23 health care professions, acupuncture has already be included into the legislation system, and become a component of Ontario's health care system. At the same time, the law and regulation may also promote the establishment of "pure Chinese Medicine" in Ontario.

  1. Ontario hydro radioactive material transportation field guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howe, W.

    1987-01-01

    The recent introduction of both the AECB Transport Packaging of Radioactive Material Regulations and Transport Canada's Transportation of Dangerous Goods Regulations have significantly altered the requirements for transporting radioactive material in Canada. Extensive additional training as well as certification of several hundred Ontario Hydro employees has been necessary to ensure compliance with the additional and revised regulatory requirements. To assist in the training of personnel, an 'active' corporate Ontario Hydro Field Guide for Radioactive Material Transport document has been developed and published. The contents of this Field Guide identify current Ontario Hydro equipment and procedures as well as the updated relevant regulatory requirements within Canada. In addition, to satisfying Ontario Hydro requirements for this type of information over two thousand of these Field Guides have been provided to key emergency response personnel throughout the province of Ontario to assist in their transportation accident response training

  2. Green power opportunities for Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elwell, C.; Rotenberg, E.; Torrie, R.; Poch, D.; Allen, G.

    2002-02-01

    Green energy is defined as the energy generated from renewable and environmentally benign sources. In this document, the authors demonstrated that Ontario possesses the potential to reduce energy waste on an economic basis while generating sufficient green energy to enable the province to decommission its coal burning power plants. In turn, this would lead to a more sustainable energy economy and a lesser reliance on nuclear generation. It was determined that a three-fold policy would enable the province to achieve this goal. First, there is a need to remove hidden subsidies to polluting forms of generation. The second aspect of this policy is the implementation of a robust Demand Side Management Program, and the third aspect calls for the reform of the price of electricity that includes all costs. In this manner, all forms of generation would compete on an equal footing. The authors identified an alternative to immediate price reform in the form of a legislated Renewable Portfolio Standard. A growing percentage of new renewable electricity in the supply portfolio offered by electricity providers would be required by the Renewable Portfolio Standard. It was suggested that the Ontario government adopt this measure before the opening of the electricity market in May 2002, as strong support for the measure is present. 13 refs

  3. The uranium deposits of Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    The principal types of uranium deposits in Ontario are carbonatites and fenites, alkalic volcanic rocks, pegiatites, calc-silicate rocks, pyritic quartz-pebble conglomerates, polymictic conglomerates and some pelitic rocks, and various 'pitchblende' deposits including late Precambrian unconformities, possibly late Precambrian diabase dikes, and other unconformities: carbonates, sandstones, lignites, and semi-pelitic rocks of middle and upper Precambrian age. Only red unzoned pegmatite and the pyritic quartz-pebble conglomerate have supported production. Ontario reasonably assured and estimated resources in the economic and subeconomic categories in 1977 amounted to 553 000 tonnes U, and 1977 production was 4000 tonnes U. Measured, indicated, and inferred resources in the Elliot Lake - Agnew Lake area are at least 400 000 tonnes U. The latter deposits are also a significant thorium resource. Geological features reflecting major changes in physics and chemistry are prime controls on distribution of uranium deposits. Geological province and subprovince boundaries, major faults, higher metamorphic grades, domain boundaries related to quartz monzonite batholiths, alkalic complexes, and the distribution of carbonate rocks are examples of such geological features

  4. Ontario Interns Fight Back: Modes of Resistance Against Unpaid Internships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Webb

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article I report on three ways that interns and those sympathetic to their plight are opposing unpaid internships, focusing on the Canadian province of Ontario as a case. First, I analyze the ways that interns engage in social activism to raise awareness about problems with unpaid internships. Second, I examine several lawsuits that interns have waged against companies in an attempt to secure back pay. Third, I analyze the Ontario Ministry of Labour’s response to the growing concerns surrounding unpaid internships, and recent proposals that aim to strengthen governmental regulations. Arguing that possibilities for change have arisen largely due to the efforts of interns themselves, I conclude each section by noting some of the strengths and limitations afforded by each type of resistance.

  5. Market readiness report : status of preparation for Ontario's competitive retail electricity market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The Ontario Energy Board (OEB) assumes a leadership role in the electricity sector to ensure the readiness of retail participants in Ontario's competitive electricity market. The Market Readiness Project Team is instrumental in this activity. The team, led by the Independent Electricity Market Operator, provides information and advice regarding the technical readiness of the retail industry, with particular focus on the readiness of distributors to carry out their important functions in a competitive market. This report provides an assessment of the team regarding the industry's technical readiness based on information as of December 14, 2001. The status of retail market readiness was reviewed in terms of the viability of the design of the new competitive market and on the status of Ontario distributors in enabling a competitive market. The workplan for the remaining industry activities needed to achieve market opening were then summarized along with the contingency arrangements for any distributors that are not ready for market opening. Based on several projections, an estimated 88 per cent of Ontario contracts will be served by a distributor starting on a May 1, 2002 market opening. tabs., figs., appendices

  6. Activities and results of the terrestrial effects program: acid precipitation in Ontario study (Apios)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linzon, S N

    1986-11-01

    Studies on the terrestrial effects of acidic precipitation in Ontario involve determining the effects on soils, crops, forests, lichens, mosses and biogeochemical systems. In the soils program, a baseline study was started in 1980 to establish a reliable and uniform data base for soils across the province, in order to identify future trends. Soil sensitivity criteria are being derived for mapping purposes. Starting in 1982, a complex, sophisticated mobile rain exclusion canopy system was constructed outdoors for controlled acid rain studies to determine the dose-response relationships of field crops. In response to numerous complaints a program was designed to determine the role that acidic precipitation is playing in the decline of sugar maple trees in Ontario. At 8 sites, tree conditions were noted, samples of foliage, bark, roots and soil were collected for chemical analysis, and increment cores and discs (from felled trees) were taken for radial growth patterns. Results from this study indicated that acidic precipitation was an additional stress to insect outbreaks and spring droughts. Intensive surveys have been conducted in selected areas in Ontario to identify the current viability and distribution of common denominator lichens and mosses. Biogeochemical studies are being conducted at four watersheds in Ontario. The different watersheds are located in progressively decreasing atmospheric deposition loadings from east to west across the province. The studies are attempting to document the role of contrasting terrestrial ecosystems in the process of lake acidification by atmospheric deposition. 9 references.

  7. Assessing the financial positions of Ontario's new electricity companies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connell, T. (Standard and Poor' s, Toronto, ON (Canada))

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the methodology, including the criteria factors, comparable ratings and key credit issues used in assessing the financial positions of Ontario Power Generation Inc., and the Ontario Hydro Services Company. The rating criteria factors include both business factors (such as ownership structure, regulation, service area, operations, management, etc.,) and financial factors (e.g. financial policies and guidelines, recent financial performance, margin analysis, capital structure and borrowing plans, financial projections and sensitivities). Key credit issues include considerations of competitive dynamics, nuclear portfolio performance (for Genco), regulatory changes, cost control, capital spending program, retail business exposure, future financial performance. Comparisons are made with corresponding positions of comparable entities in Australia, Finland, New Zealand, the UK, and the USA. In the case of Ontario Power Generation Inc., the company is assessed to have significant advantages initially, but various uncertainties over the medium term warrant a more cautious view of the credit profile. For the Ontario Hydro Services Company the business risks appear to be low and moderate leverage entails a strong, stable credit profile. The overall assessment of the two companies is that while certain questions such as the workability and credibility of the new industry structure, the problem of stranded debt and questions about the liquidity of market participants remain unsolved, Ontario Power Generation Inc., and the Ontario Hydro Services Company ratings compare favorably with ratings of global industry peers.

  8. Technical feasibility and economical viability of remote hybrid power systems in Northern Ontario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubbels, Jason Matthew

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with extraordinary properties and thus many potential applications have been predicted to be the best reinforcements for the next-generation multifunctional composite materials. Difficulties exist in transferring the most use of the unprecedented properties of individual CNTs to macroscopic forms of CNT assemblies. Therefore, this thesis focuses on two main goals: 1) discussing the issues that influence the performance of bulk CNT products, and 2) fabricating high-performance dry CNT films and composite films with an understanding of the fundamental structure-property relationship in these materials. Dry CNT films were fabricated by a winding process using CNT arrays with heights of 230 mum, 300 im and 360 mum. The structures of the as-produced films, as well as their mechanical and electrical properties were examined in order to find out the effects of different CNT lengths. It was found that the shorter CNTs synthesized by shorter time in the CVD furnace exhibited less structural defects and amorphous carbon, resulting in more compact packing and better nanotube alignment when made into dry films, thus, having better mechanical and electrical performance. A novel microcombing approach was developed to mitigate the CNT waviness and alignment in the dry films, and ultrahigh mechanical properties and exceptional electrical performance were obtained. This method utilized a pair of sharp surgical blades with microsized features at the blade edges as micro-combs to, for the first time, disentangle and straighten the wavy CNTs in the dry-drawn CNT sheet at single-layer level. The as-combed CNT sheet exhibited high level of nanotube alignment and straightness, reduced structural defects, and enhanced nanotube packing density. The dry CNT films produced by microcombing had a very high Young's modulus of 172 GPa, excellent tensile strength of 3.2 GPa, and unprecedented electrical conductivity of 1.8x10 5 S/m, which were records for CNT films or buckypapers. This novel technique could construct CNT films with reproducible properties, which also had the potential to be scale-up for industrial mass production. Based on the microcombing approach, dispersion issue of the long, straight, and highly aligned CNTs was investigated by adding PVA matrix into the microcombed CNT sheets. It was found although microcombing promoted the formation of agglomerated strands of the long, straight, and aligned CNTs, this was not an adverse problem in impairing the composite performance. When matrix was added, those agglomerated strands were wrapped together which maintained a more stable and better contact between nanotubes than those in the dry films. The as-produced CNT/PVA composite films exhibit an electrical conductivity of 1.84x105 S/m, Young's modulus of 119 GPa, tensile strength of 2.9 GPa, and toughness of 52.4 J/cm3, which represent improvements over those of uncombed samples by 300%, 100%, 120%, and 200%, respectively, demonstrating the effectiveness and reliability of microcombing in producing high-performance CNT/polymer composite films.

  9. Meeting Ontario's electricity needs : a critical review of the Ontario Power Authority's supply mix advice report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibbons, J.; Fracassi, J.

    2006-01-01

    In December, 2005 the Ontario Power Authority (OPA) outlined its proposed blueprint for meeting Ontario's electricity needs to 2025 in the document entitled Supply Mix Advice Report. As a result of the actions taken by the current government, the OPA believes that Ontario will have adequate electricity supplies to meet the province's needs until 2013. However, it stated that Ontario will require an additional 15,000 megawatts of new generation capacity between 2013 and 2025. The OPA also recommends that a significant proportion of this new generation capacity be nuclear. The Ontario Clean Air Alliance undertook a review of the OPA report and identified several discrepancies including an over-estimation of Ontario's rate of electricity load growth from 2005 to 2025; an under-estimation of the potential for electricity productivity improvements to reduce electricity demand and raise living standards; an under-estimation of renewable energy supply potential; an under-estimation of the potential for biomass and natural gas fired combined heat and power plants to meet electricity needs and increase the competitiveness of Ontario's industries; an under-estimation of the economic costs and risks of nuclear power; and a biased recommendation for a 70 million dollar resource acquisition budget against energy efficiency investments that would reduce demand and raise living standards. This report provides the Ontario Clean Air Alliances' analysis of the OPA report and presents it own recommendations for how Ontario can increase its electricity productivity and meet its electricity supply needs until 2025. The report concluded that the Government of Ontario should direct the OPA to develop a long-term strategy to raise the price of electricity up to its full cost without raising the electricity bills of low income consumers or impairing the competitiveness of Ontario's industries. It was suggested that Ontario's electricity productivity should be increased to the same level as

  10. Ontario energy market review and outlook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brett, J.T.

    1997-01-01

    The current status of the natural gas industry and the electric power industry in Ontario, in terms of deregulation, was described. Natural gas utilities will exit the regulated gas market over the next few years and transfer their existing residential and small commercial gas contracts to their unregulated affiliates. Nevertheless, a regulated gas supply option will remain until the regulator is assured that consumer protection issues have been properly addressed, and there is a truly competitive market. Ontario Hydro is a vertically integrated virtual monopoly. It lags behind B.C., Alberta, Quebec and Nova Scotia in terms of deregulation and restructuring, although the MacDonald Commission's recent report recommended sweeping changes to Ontario Hydro's monopoly over the electric power industry. A final response from the Ontario government is still pending. The convergence of the electric power and natural gas industries was also discussed

  11. Revitalizing the nuclear business at Ontario Hydro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talbot, K.

    1994-01-01

    Ontario Hydro, North America's largest electric power utility, with an installed capacity of 34,000 MW, has under gone a major restructuring over the past year to better align itself with a changing electricity market and evolving customer needs. The single largest new business unit within the new Ontario Hydro is Ontario Hydro Nuclear (OHN), responsible for engineering, operation and maintenance of the Corporation's 20 large nuclear units at three generating sites, OHN faces a significant challenge in returning Ontario's nuclear units to the world-leading performance levels they enjoyed in the past, particularly the older Pickering A and Bruce A plants. However, steady progress is being made as evidenced by improving peer reviews and overall capacity and financial performance

  12. X-ray safety in Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-03-01

    In July 1979 the Ontario Advisory Committee on Radiology was formed to develop a comprehensive strategy for x-ray safety in the province. At its hearings the committee recieved submissions from groups representing physicians, dentists, chiropractors, radiological technicians, physiotherapists, podiatrists, and consumers, among others; these briefs are included as appendices to the report. The report surveys the historical background and the current situation in Ontario, and makes recommendations for an organized safety program. (L.L.)

  13. Comments on nuclear reactor safety in Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-08-01

    The Chalk River Technicians and Technologists Union representing 500 technical employees at the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories of AECL submit comments on nuclear reactor safety to the Ontario Nuclear Safety Review. Issues identified by the Review Commissioner are addressed from the perspective of both a labour organization and experience in the nuclear R and D field. In general, Local 1568 believes Ontario's CANDU nuclear reactors are not only safe but also essential to the continued economic prosperity of the province

  14. Market prices for solar electricity in Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowlands, I.H.

    2006-01-01

    The Ontario electricity supply is facing considerable challenges while demand is increasing due to a growing population and increased economic growth needs. In response to these challenges, the government of Ontario established the Ontario Power Authority (OPA) in 2004 to ensure adequate, reliable and secure electricity supply and resources in Ontario. The OPA has also engaged in activities to facilitate the diversification of sources of electricity supply by promoting the use of cleaner energy sources and technologies, including alternative energy sources and renewable energy. The purpose of this paper was to advance discussions regarding the contribution that solar PV can make to Ontario's supply mix. In particular, it determined the value of the electricity that would have been produced by a PV system located in Waterloo, Ontario under the following 4 pricing regimes: (1) the conventional small user tariff system currently in place in Ontario, (2) the time-of-use pricing system that is voluntarily available to those who have smart meters installed in their facilities, (3) the spot market, hourly prices, to which some of Ontario's largest electricity users are exposed, and (4) the recently-proposed rate for standard offer contracts for PV systems. The study showed that a solar PV system that produces 3,000 kWh of electricity over the course of a year would generate different revenue amounts, ranging from the smallest amount of approximately $174.00 to $1,260.00, depending on the pricing regime. The pricing regime that reflects real, time-of-day electricity prices appears to be most advantageous to solar PV systems. It was recommended that additional work is needed regarding the other benefits of solar PV, such as avoided capacity/generation needs, avoided transmission and distribution cost and losses, environmental benefits, and job creation. 3 refs., 4 tabs., 8 figs

  15. Annual report 1993 (Ontario Hydro, Toronto)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    Ontario Hydro`s prime objective is to supply the people of Ontario with electricity at cost while maintaining high standards of safety and service. The annual report presents energy efficiency and competitiveness, operations in review, the environmental performance of the Corporation, the future, and choices for a sustainable future. A financial review and analysis is also provided, along with an auditor`s report and financial statements.

  16. Large catchment area recharges Titan's Ontario Lacus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhingra, Rajani D.; Barnes, Jason W.; Yanites, Brian J.; Kirk, Randolph L.

    2018-01-01

    We seek to address the question of what processes are at work to fill Ontario Lacus while other, deeper south polar basins remain empty. Our hydrological analysis indicates that Ontario Lacus has a catchment area spanning 5.5% of Titan's surface and a large catchment area to lake surface area ratio. This large catchment area translates into large volumes of liquid making their way to Ontario Lacus after rainfall. The areal extent of the catchment extends to at least southern mid-latitudes (40°S). Mass conservation calculations indicate that runoff alone might completely fill Ontario Lacus within less than half a Titan year (1 Titan year = 29.5 Earth years) assuming no infiltration. Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) observations of clouds over the southern mid and high-latitudes are consistent with precipitation feeding Ontario's large catchment area. This far-flung rain may be keeping Ontario Lacus filled, making it a liquid hydrocarbon oasis in the relatively dry south polar region.

  17. Ontario's power market post November 11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, P.

    2003-01-01

    This paper provides a review of Ontario's first year with an open electricity market. The year 2002 to 2003 had record energy demands with challenges on the supply side. In particular, generation availability was below expectations during the summer months. This demonstrated that price predictability and volatility needs to be addressed and investment in new power generation is needed in Ontario. Ontario demand forecasts outpace supply for the long term outlook. In addition, most of Ontario's generating plants are aging and will soon exceed their nominal service life, requiring major refurbishment or replacement. Decisions are needed now on the future of coal in Ontario's generation mix. It was also noted that transmission reinforcements are needed in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA). In the short term, consumers can expect delays in return to service of nuclear units, forced extensions to planned outages, and reduced outlook for energy from hydroelectric resources. It was noted that Ontario will continue to rely on imports, although emergency generation is being installed. 5 figs

  18. Proof of Economic Viability of Blended Learning Business Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druhmann, Carsten; Hohenberg, Gregor

    2014-01-01

    The discussion on economically sustainable business models with respect to information technology is lacking in many aspects of proven approaches. In the following contribution the economic viability is valued based on a procedural model for design and evaluation of e-learning business models in the form of a case study. As a case study object a…

  19. Echinococcus metacestode: in search of viability markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottstein, Bruno; Wang, Junhua; Blagosklonov, Oleg; Grenouillet, Frédéric; Millon, Laurence; Vuitton, Dominique A; Müller, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated that most humans infected with Echinococcus spp. exhibit resistance to disease. When infection leads to disease, the parasite is partially controlled by host immunity: in case of immunocompetence, the normal alveolar echinococcosis (AE) or cystic echinococcosis (CE) situation, the metacestode grows slowly, and first clinical signs appear years after infection; in case of impaired immunity (AIDS; other immunodeficiencies), uncontrolled proliferation of the metacestode leads to rapidly progressing disease. Assessing Echinococcus multilocularis viability in vivo following therapeutic interventions in AE patients may be of tremendous benefit when compared with the invasive procedures used to perform biopsies. Current options are F18-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET), which visualizes periparasitic inflammation due to the metabolic activity of the metacestode, and measurement of antibodies against recEm18, a viability-associated protein, that rapidly regresses upon metacestode inactivation. For Echinococcus granulosus, similar prognosis-associated follow-up parameters are still lacking but a few candidates may be listed. Other possible markers include functional and diffusion-weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), and measurement of products from the parasite (circulating antigens or DNA), and from the host (inflammation markers, cytokines, or chemokines). Even though some of them have been promising in pilot studies, none has been properly validated in an appropriate number of patients until now to be recommended for further use in clinical settings. There is therefore still a need to develop reliable tools for improved viability assessment to provide the sufficient information needed to reliably withdraw anti-parasite benzimidazole chemotherapy, and a basis for the development of new alternative therapeutic tools. © B. Gottstein et al., published by EDP Sciences, 2014.

  20. Introducing Physician Assistants to Ontario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meredith Vanstone

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In 2006, the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care (MOHLTC introduced Physician Assistants (PAs through the announcement of demonstration projects, education and training programs, and subsequent funding. PAs are directly supervised by physicians and act as physician extenders by performing acts as delegated to them by their supervising physicians. PAs were proposed as a potential solution to help improve access to health care and reduce wait times throughout the province. Prior to the 2006 Ministry announcement, there was little public discussion regarding the acceptance of the PA role or its sustainability. Opposition from nursing and other groups emerged in response to the 2006 announcement and flared again when stakeholder comments were solicited in 2012 as part of the PA application for status as regulated health professionals. As a health reform, the introduction of PAs has neither succeeded nor failed. In 2013, the majority of PA funding continues to be provided by the MOHLTC, and it is unknown whether the PA role will be sustainable when the MOHTLC withdraws salary funding and health system employers must decide whether or not to continue employing PAs at their own expense.

  1. Ontario Hydro annual report, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-04-01

    Ontario continues a strong growth in electricity consumption; over the past five years consumption has risen an average of 5 percent a year. In 1988 consumption rose by 6.5 percent to 133.1 billion kilowatt-hours. Peak demand was 23 million kilowatts. The top priority for the 1990s will be improving the energy efficiency of customers and the operating efficiency of the Corporation, with a target saving of 4500 megawatts through demand management and energy efficiency by the year 2000. A new environmental division has been formed, as well as a division for non-utility generation. Safety is of particular importance to the Nuclear Generating Division; in all nuclear operations, after 143 million hours worked from 1955 to 1988, there has never been a work-related fatality or a detectable injury due to radiation. The average radiation dose per worker continues to decline and is now under 10 percent of the legal dose limit. Retubing of Pickering Nuclear Generating Station unit 2 has been completed. Retubing of unit 1 is under way, and work on units 3 and 4 has been approved. Construction continues on the Darlington Nuclear Generating Station, where the first unit is expected to go into service in 1989. The Darlington Tritium Removal Facility was completed

  2. Implications of the Ontario government's white paper and competition strategies for Ontario's municipal electric utilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wills, D.L.

    1998-01-01

    The strategies that Municipal Electric Utilities (MEU) should follow to deal with competition were discussed. North Bay Hydro is the 34th largest MEU out of 300 in Ontario but it serves only 23,000 out of 4 million electrical customers in Ontario. Therefore, the main strategy for municipal utilities to ensure their future would be to become part of an alliance and association like the MEA and the SAC - the Strategic Alliance for Competition and Customer Choice. Strong criticism was voiced regarding the contents of the recent Ontario Government White Paper for being vague with regard to electrical distribution and the role of MEUs in Ontario. It was suggested that it is vitally important that MEUs ally themselves with other stakeholders, to resist an Ontario Hydro monopoly, to make sure that prices stay low, to avoid excessive debt and bureaucratic inefficiency, be innovative, and consumer oriented and be prepared to anticipate events and conditions. 3 figs

  3. Viability of infrared FEL facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwettman, H.A.

    2004-01-01

    Infrared FELs have broken important ground in optical science in the past decade. The rapid development of optical parametric amplifiers and oscillators, and THz sources, however, has changed the competitive landscape and compelled FEL facilities to identify and exploit their unique advantages. The viability of infrared FEL facilities depends on targeting unique world-class science and providing adequate experimental beam time at competitive costs

  4. Ontario's new electricity market and the future of OPG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howes, H.

    2002-01-01

    The recent measures taken by Ontario Power Generation since 1998 to deregulate the electricity market in the province of Ontario are reviewed. The opening of Ontario's power market in May 2002 will oblige Ontario Power Generation to reduce its market share. The author reviewed the current status of the energy market in Ontario and noted a modest growth in demand. A significant portion of the energy supply is being provided by nuclear, fossil fuels and hydro energy. The challenge facing Ontario Power Generation is to stay competitive in the new deregulated market and to participate in the energy market in the United States. 6 figs

  5. The safety of Ontario's nuclear power reactors. A scientific and technical review. Ontario Hydro Submission to the Ontario Nuclear Safety Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    Ontario Hydro is responsible for the safety of its nuclear stations: safety analysis, design and construction, training of operators, operating practices, and maintenance procedures. The utility must demonstrate to the regulatory body and the public that it is capable of operating nuclear stations safely. the dedicated attention of management and workers alike has been given to the achievement of an excellent safety record. Safety begins with well understood corporate goals, objectives and policies, and the clear assignment of responsibilities to well-trained, competent people who have the relevant experience and the right information and equipment. A prime cause of both the Chernobyl and the Three Mile Island accidents was a breakdown in operational procedures and human factors. On the contrary, the pressure tube failure at Pickering unit 2 in 1983 was understood almost immediately by the operators, who took the correct steps to shut down the reactor. This success is related to well-designed control room information systems and good understanding of fundamentals by the operators. Increasingly, in the design of nuclear plant control and instrumentation systems and in training in Ontario Hydro, the well-being, capabilities and limitations of humans are being taken into account. This report describes the series of barriers between the radioactive material in the fuel and the series of barriers between the radioactive material in the fuel and the environment, and the stringent quality control and technical measures taken to make the likelihood of malfunctions very small. Defence in depth protection for the public is a feature of all Ontario Hydro nuclear stations. As safety-related systems are updated in new stations, improvements are in some cases being backfitted to older stations

  6. Risk of colorectal cancer among immigrants to Ontario, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paszat, Lawrence; Sutradhar, Rinku; Liu, Ying; Baxter, Nancy N; Tinmouth, Jill; Rabeneck, Linda

    2017-07-06

    The risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) varies around the world and between females and males. We aimed to compare the risk of CRC among immigrants to Ontario, Canada, to its general population. We used an exposure-control matched design. We identified persons in the Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada Permanent Resident Database with first eligibility for the Ontario Health Insurance Plan between July 1, 1991 and June 30, 2008 at age 40 years or older, and matched five controls by year of birth and sex on the immigrant's first eligibility date. We identified CRC from the Ontario Cancer Registry between the index date and December 31, 2014. All analyses were stratified by sex. We calculated crude and relative rates of CRC. We estimated risk of CRC over time by the Kaplan-Meier method and compared immigrants to controls in age and sex stratified strata using log-rank tests. We modeled the hazard of CRC using Cox proportional hazards regression, accounting for within-cluster correlation by a robust sandwich variance estimation approach, and assessed an interaction with time since eligibility. Among females, 1877 cases of CRC were observed among 209,843 immigrants, and 16,517 cases among 1,049,215 controls; the crude relative rate among female immigrants was 0.623. Among males, 1956 cases of CRC were observed among 191,792 immigrants and 18,329 cases among 958,960 controls; the crude relative rate among male immigrants was 0.582.. Comparing immigrants to controls in all age and sex stratified strata, the log rank test p  = 75 years at index, where p = 0.01. The age-adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for CRC among female immigrants was 0.63 (95% CI 0.59, 0.67) during the first 10 years, and 0.66 (95% CI 0.59, 0.74) thereafter. Among male immigrants the age-adjusted HR = 0.55 (95% CI 0.52, 0.59) during the first 10 years and increased to 0.63 (95% CI 0.57, 0.71) thereafter. The adjusted HR > = 1 only among immigrants born in Europe and Central Asia. The risk

  7. Meeting Ontario's electricity supply challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, A.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a comparison between nuclear generation and other existing power generation, with particular reference to the natural gas industry. The aim of the paper was to present a rationale for an extensive nuclear restart in the near future in Ontario. An energy forecast was provided, generating capacity requirements were examined, with particular reference to requirements beyond conservation and renewable energy supplies. The cost effectiveness of nuclear rehabilitation was compared to combined cycle gas turbines (CCGT) in terms of capital and non-fuel costs. Future prospects of gas prices were discussed, as well as the possibilities of demand outstripping supply. CCGT costs were compared to nuclear rehabilitation in terms of overall electricity prices, including capital, non-fuel operating costs and fuel costs. Steps towards making the nuclear option a reality included a sustainable market environment; clear policy framework; a balanced energy mix; long term price certainty; and clear regulatory requirements. In was concluded that in order to regenerate its potential, the nuclear industry must demonstrate world class project management; fixed scope; fixed supplier prices; program commitment; guarantees; and realistic future production estimates. It was also concluded that nuclear restart and life extension was an extremely attractive option for consumers, offering long term stable competitive power, with fuel diversity and future reserves as well as zero greenhouse gas emissions and an optimization and use of existing facilities. Challenges in creating the right climate for nuclear rehabilitation were the difficulties in making the nuclear option attractive to investors as well as developing correct estimation of project times, costs, and scopes and allocation of project risks. tabs., figs

  8. Ontario Hydro 1982 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-05-01

    Due to the economic recession, primary electrical energy demand for the year failed to exceed that of the previous year for the first time since 1944. Actual demand was 100.8 billion kWh, 0.8 per cent below 1981. However, annual peak demand reached 18.1 million kW on January 18, an all-time high, and 5.4 per cent over January 1981. There were 104.1 billion kWh of electricity generated during the year, nearly equally from nuclear, coal, and water power. Nuclear generating units continued their outstanding performance. Bruce-3 completed a 494-day run at continuous power. NPD Generating Station celebrated 20 years of operation. Pickering B unit 5 started up and produced its first power. At Bruce A, a remote-controlled vehicle was used to remove damaged fuel to a shielded flask, completing the job in a short time with low staff radiation exposure. Bruce B construction progressed on schedule; while at Darlington, design and construction continued at a high level, with 1700 workers on site at year-end. Actual net income was $348 million, $38 million below forecast. Coal deliveries were 13.4 million Mg (23 per cent over 1981). Nuclear fuel deliveries to generating stations were 996 Mg (3 per cent over 1981). Agreements were negotiated for the supply of 5200 Mg of uranium concentrates during 1985-93. Nuclear fuel manufacturing contracts were awarded at lower prices than previously attained. Income totalling $163 million from electricity exports to the U.S.A. reduced overall cost of providing electricity to Ontario customers by 5.1 per cent. The Residential Energy Advisory Program surveyed 16,000 homeowners wishing to improve home energy efficiency. There were 20,000 residential customers who received grants to convert from oil to electric heating. Additional consumption resulting from these conversions is estimated at 280 million kWh

  9. Restructuring in Ontario : electricity sector reform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pospisil, S.

    2004-01-01

    Ontario's electricity reform strategy was outlined along with challenge facing Ontario's electricity supply and demand with particular focus on the issue of replacing coal-fired generation. According to reports by the Independent Electricity Market Operator, short-term reserve margins were higher in 2004 than they were in 2003 due to the return to service of some nuclear generating units and planned capacity additions. Ontario's long-term supply and demand situation was also examined. It was noted that lenders hesitate to finance the expansion of generation companies selling into the spot market. Many lenders are requiring that half of the project's output be sold in advance on contract. Other challenges include Ontario's aging generation infrastructure and rising energy prices. The presentation included graphs that compared electricity costs for residential and small business customers across various provinces and states. The main supply and conservation challenges revolve around the large investments required by 2020 to replace coal plants, retire nuclear plants and projected load growth. Ontario's current generation capacity is 154 TWh and the mix is represented by 40 per cent nuclear, 25 per cent coal, 25 per cent hydro, 8 per cent natural gas, 1 per cent oil, and 1 per cent biomass and other renewable energy sources. This paper also addressed the issue of coal generation and air pollution and emphasized the importance of looking at the broad externalities associated with air emissions. tabs., figs

  10. Marketing program for R2000 in Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Killins, B.L.

    1990-01-01

    In the Ontario new housing market, Ontario Hydro's goal is to reduce the demand for electricity, increase the utility's visibility in this market, and increase customer satisfaction. Analyses have demonstrated that it costs less to construct new houses according to R-2000 insulation standards than to install new power production and transmission facilities. Research has also shown that R-2000 houses have better air quality and energy efficiency than ordinary houses. Nevertheless, most home builders have little enthusiasm for R-2000 houses; the strictness of airtightness standards, the slowness of certification, excessive paperwork, and a lack of promised marketing support are cited as the reasons for this. Ontario Hydro and builders' associations have signed a cooperative agreement for certifying new houses with the object of self-financing the program. The program intends to see construction of 1,000 R-2000 houses in 1990. To carry out this objective, some elements have been added to Ontario Hydro's marketing program in order to make potential customers aware of the advantages of the R-2000 house. Field staff will receive rigorous training in order to prepare them for helping the diverse types of builders. A mail campaign, focusing on areas not served by natural gas where significant numbers of new houses are being built, intends to bring home builders and buyers together. In February 1990, Ontario Hydro signed agreements with four major housing manufacturers to construct a significant proportion of the R-2000 housing stock

  11. Abundance, viability and culturability of Antarctic bacteria

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    LokaBharathi, P.A.; DeSouza, M.J.B.D.; Nair, S.; Chandramohan, D.

    The viability of total number of bacteria decide the mineralisation rate in any ecosystem and ultimately the fertility of the region. This study aims at establishing the extent of viability in the standing stock of the Antarctic bacterial population...

  12. Electricity deregulation roundup : Ontario prepares for electricity deregulation and anxiously watches impact elsewhere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurst, R.

    2000-01-01

    As the time for deregulation of Ontario's electric power industry approaches, consumers are watching other Canadian and American jurisdictions to see what deregulation will mean in terms of energy costs. Albertans have expressed serious concerns about the impact of deregulating their electric power industry. They found that in the four years since deregulation in their province, electricity prices increased when markets opened to competition. The proposed start date for deregulation in Ontario is November 1, 2000. This paper suggests that if investors don't put out significant resources, problems such as power shortages and brownouts could occur, as was the case in Alberta. Potential investors in the Ontario electricity market are already sceptical because the Ontario government, in an effort to protect consumers from unreasonable price increases, has tabled legislation that restricts the efforts of municipal utility companies to raise distribution rates. One step that will inspire some confidence is the recently finalized deal between Ontario Power Generation and British Energy to operate the Bruce Nuclear Power Station. Independent consultants have warned that electricity prices will continue to increase with deregulation for a least the next few years. Industrial customers will be the hardest hit. In California, America's first deregulated electricity market, the power grid is strained and prices have doubled or tripled in one year

  13. Lessons learned from Ontario wind energy disputes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fast, Stewart; Mabee, Warren; Baxter, Jamie; Christidis, Tanya; Driver, Liz; Hill, Stephen; McMurtry, J. J.; Tomkow, Melody

    2016-02-01

    Issues concerning the social acceptance of wind energy are major challenges for policy-makers, communities and wind developers. They also impact the legitimacy of societal decisions to pursue wind energy. Here we set out to identify and assess the factors that lead to wind energy disputes in Ontario, Canada, a region of the world that has experienced a rapid increase in the development of wind energy. Based on our expertise as a group comprising social scientists, a community representative and a wind industry advocate engaged in the Ontario wind energy situation, we explore and suggest recommendations based on four key factors: socially mediated health concerns, the distribution of financial benefits, lack of meaningful engagement and failure to treat landscape concerns seriously. Ontario's recent change from a feed-in-tariff-based renewable electricity procurement process to a competitive bid process, albeit with more attention to community engagement, will only partially address these concerns.

  14. Assessing Ontario's Personal Support Worker Registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey Laporte

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In response to the growing role of personal support workers (PSWs in the delivery of health care services to Ontarians, the Ontario government has moved forward with the creation of a PSW registry. This registry will be mandatory for all PSWs employed by publicly funded health care employers, and has the stated objectives of better highlighting the work that PSWs do in Ontario, providing a platform for PSWs and employers to more easily access the labour market, and to provide government with information for human resources planning. In this paper we consider the factors that brought the creation of a PSW registry onto the Ontario government’s policy agenda, discuss how the registry is being implemented, and provide an analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of this policy change.

  15. Uranium and thorium deposits of Northern Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, J.A.; Gould, K.L.

    1983-01-01

    This, the second edition of the uranium-thorium deposit inventory, describes briefly the deposits of uranium and/or thorium in northern Ontario, which for the purposes of this circular is defined as that part of Ontario lying north and west of the Grenville Front. The most significant of the deposits described are fossil placers lying at or near the base of the Middle Precambrian Huronian Supergroup. These include the producing and past-producing mines of the Elliot Lake - Agnew Lake area. Also included are the pitchblende veins spatially associated with Late Precambrian (Keweenawan) diabase dikes of the Theano Point - Montreal River area. Miscellaneous Early Precambrian pegmatite, pitchblende-coffinite-sulphide occurrences near the Middle-Early Precambrian unconformity fringing the Lake Superior basin, and disseminations in diabase, granitic rocks, alkalic complexes and breccias scattered throughout northern Ontario make up the rest of the occurrences

  16. Tychastic measure of viability risk

    CERN Document Server

    Aubin, Jean-Pierre; Dordan, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    This book presents a forecasting mechanism of the price intervals for deriving the SCR (solvency capital requirement) eradicating the risk during the exercise period on one hand, and measuring the risk by computing the hedging exit time function associating with smaller investments the date until which the value of the portfolio hedges the liabilities on the other. This information, summarized under the term “tychastic viability measure of risk” is an evolutionary alternative to statistical measures, when dealing with evolutions under uncertainty. The book is written by experts in the field and the target audience primarily comprises research experts and practitioners.

  17. Ontario feed-in-tariff programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yatchew, Adonis; Baziliauskas, Andy

    2011-01-01

    Recent feed-in-tariff (FIT) programs in Ontario, Canada have elicited a very strong supply response. Within the first year of their inception, the Ontario Power Authority received applications totaling over 15,000 MW, equivalent to about 43% of current Ontario electricity generating capacity. The overwhelming share of applications is for wind-power (69%) and solar photovoltaic (28%) generating facilities. Wind generation is being remunerated at 14-19 cents /kWh. Solar facilities receive from 40 to 80 cents /kWh. The initiative, which responds to Provincial legislation is administratively divided into applications for facilities exceeding 10 kW (the FIT program) and those less than or equal to 10 kW (the microFIT program). This paper describes the programs and their features, compares them to their predecessors in Ontario as well as to programs elsewhere, analyses the reasons for the very strong response, and assesses their efficacy and sustainability. - Research highlights: → Recent feed-in-tariff (FIT) programs in Ontario, Canada have elicited a very strong supply response. Within the first year, applications totaled over 15,000 MW, equivalent to about 43% of current Ontario electricity generating capacity. → Most projects are either solar or wind. → Likely causes of strong supply response-preferred system access and favorable, secure tariffs. (Wind generation is being remunerated at 14-19 cents /kWh. Solar facilities receive from 40 to 80 cents /kWh.) → Long term political sustainability of present program is in question.

  18. The potential of solar PV in Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMonagle, R.

    2005-01-01

    Canada has lagged behind other industrialized nations in the growth of solar energy markets. Currently, over 78 per cent of the global market for solar energy is for grid-connected applications where power is fed into the electrical distribution network. Less than 3.5 per cent of the Canadian solar market is grid-connected. This report investigated the potential size of the photovoltaic (PV) market in Ontario given adequate support from both governments and utilities. The forecast was based on sustainable growth levels that the solar industry as a whole might maintain over an extended period of time. It was suggested that it is technically feasible to install over 3000 MW of PV in single, detached homes in the province, which could generate over 3200 GWh each year. If the right policy conditions were put in place, the technical potential for PV on all buildings in Ontario is over 14,000 MW by 2025, which would generate over 13,000 GWh annually. Support mechanisms such as the Advanced Renewable Tariff (ART) or Standard Offer Contracts (SOC) will enable the PV industry to build capacity. Future markets for PV include new homes, commercial buildings and the existing housing stock. With a properly designed system, it is forecasted that the deployment of PV by 2025 could result in the involvement of 400,000 homes with over 1200 MW of installed capacity and over 290 MW installed annually by 2025. Recommendations to Ontario Power Authority's (OPA) report supply mix report focused on the use of SOCs as the appropriate support mechanism to start building solar capacity in Ontario, as projections using SOCs would see Ontario following the growth patterns of other nations. It was concluded that the OPA report does not acknowledge the current growth rates of PV globally, nor does it fully consider the potential of PV in Ontario. 9 refs., 8 figs

  19. Application of reliability methods in Ontario Hydro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeppesen, R.; Ravishankar, T.J.

    1985-01-01

    Ontario Hydro have established a reliability program in support of its substantial nuclear program. Application of the reliability program to achieve both production and safety goals is described. The value of such a reliability program is evident in the record of Ontario Hydro's operating nuclear stations. The factors which have contributed to the success of the reliability program are identified as line management's commitment to reliability; selective and judicious application of reliability methods; establishing performance goals and monitoring the in-service performance; and collection, distribution, review and utilization of performance information to facilitate cost-effective achievement of goals and improvements. (orig.)

  20. Sparking investment in Ontario's power generation industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, J.

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses the business strategy needed to spark investment in Ontario's power generation industry. It examines the process of decision making and investing in an uncertain environment. The paper suggests that any strategy based on one view of the future courts trouble and that strategic flexibility can prepare for what cannot be predicted. Finally the paper suggests that Ontario needs to create a stable policy and regulatory environment that allows investors to fulfill reasonable expectations and investors need to place bets that provide the flexibility to respond quickly to changing market conditions

  1. Curricular Ethics in Early Childhood Education Programming: A Challenge to the Ontario Kindergarten Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydon, Rachel M.; Wang, Ping

    2006-01-01

    Through a case study of a key Canadian early childhood education program, The Kindergarten Program (Ontario Ministry of Education and Training, 1998a), we explore the relationship between curricular paradigms and early childhood education (ECE) models, and the opportunities that each creates for enacting ethical teaching and learning…

  2. An Exploration of the Implementation of Restorative Justice in an Ontario Public School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimer, Kristin

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative case study explores the implementation of restorative justice within one Ontario Public School. Restorative justice is a philosophy and a process for dealing with harmful behaviour, viewing such behaviour as a violation of relationships, not rules. My research seeks to present how restorative justice has been implemented in one…

  3. Epidemiology of serogroup B invasive meningococcal disease in Ontario, Canada, 2000 to 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dang Vica

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Invasive meningococcal disease (IMD caused by serogroup B is the last major serogroup in Canada to become vaccine-preventable. The anticipated availability of vaccines targeting this serogroup prompted an assessment of the epidemiology of serogroup B disease in Ontario, Canada. Methods We retrieved information on confirmed IMD cases reported to Ontario’s reportable disease database between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2010 and probabilistically-linked these cases to Public Health Ontario Laboratory records. Rates were calculated with denominator data obtained from Statistics Canada. We calculated a crude number needed to vaccinate using the inverse of the infant ( Results A total of 259 serogroup B IMD cases were identified in Ontario over the 11-year period. Serogroup B was the most common cause of IMD. Incidence ranged from 0.11 to 0.27/100,000/year, and fluctuated over time. Cases ranged in age from 13 days to 101 years; 21.4% occurred in infants, of which 72.7% were Conclusions Although rare, the proportion of IMD caused by serogroup B has increased and currently causes most IMD in Ontario, with infants having the highest risk of disease. Although serogroup B meningococcal vaccines are highly anticipated, our findings suggest that decisions regarding publicly funding serogroup B meningococcal vaccines will be difficult and may not be based on disease burden alone.

  4. Children in Need of Protection: Reporting Policies in Ontario School Boards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shewchuk, Samantha

    2014-01-01

    A clear, well defined policy can help empower school personnel to make informed decisions on how to handle cases of suspected child abuse. This article presents an analysis of (N = 64) school board child abuse reporting policies and procedures in Ontario and explored what training, resources, and support school boards state they will provide to…

  5. Communication Departments in (Pro) Action: A Case Study of an On-Campus Mini-Conference To Address Concerns about the Quality, Centrality and Viability of the Communication Major.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, Marcia; Rudd, Andrew E.

    The National Communication Association's Assessment Packet identified divisions between and among sub-fields of communication as threatening the viability of departments on many campuses and possibly even the integrity of the discipline. In 2000 James Applegate advocated in "Spectra" the importance of unity for developing a strong…

  6. Ontario's standard offer programs: moving toward a cleaner energy future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shervill, P.

    2006-01-01

    The Ontario Standard Offer Program is designed to ensure reliable, long-term electricity supply for Ontario. The functional areas of the program are planning, conservation and supply sector development. The long-term plan is to create a self-sustaining electricity market in Ontario with 2700 MW renewable sources by 2010 including wind, waterpower, solar photovoltaic (PV) and biomass

  7. "Strengthening" Ontario Universities: A Neoliberal Reconstruction of Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigas, Bob; Kuchapski, Renée

    2016-01-01

    This paper reviews neoliberalism as an ideology that has influenced higher education generally and Ontario higher education in particular. It includes a discourse analysis of "Strengthening Ontario's Centres of Creativity, Innovation and Knowledge" (Ontario Ministry of Training, Colleges, and Universities, 2012), a government discussion…

  8. Opening Doors to Nursing Degrees: A Proposal from Ontario's Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colleges Ontario, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Ontario needs to expand nursing education options to improve access to the nursing profession, create better pathways amongst all nursing occupations, and build Ontario's capacity to meet the province's long-term nursing needs. Ontario's colleges are capable of playing a larger role within a long-term provincial strategy for sustaining and…

  9. Direct medical costs of motorcycle crashes in Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pincus, Daniel; Wasserstein, David; Nathens, Avery B; Bai, Yu Qing; Redelmeier, Donald A; Wodchis, Walter P

    2017-11-20

    There is no reliable estimate of costs incurred by motorcycle crashes. Our objective was to calculate the direct costs of all publicly funded medical care provided to individuals after motorcycle crashes compared with automobile crashes. We conducted a population-based, matched cohort study of adults in Ontario who presented to hospital because of a motorcycle or automobile crash from 2007 through 2013. For each case, we identified 1 control absent a motor vehicle crash during the study period. Direct costs for each case and control were estimated in 2013 Canadian dollars from the payer perspective using methodology that links health care use to individuals over time. We calculated costs attributable to motorcycle and automobile crashes within 2 years using a difference-in-differences approach. We identified 26 831 patients injured in motorcycle crashes and 281 826 injured in automobile crashes. Mean costs attributable to motorcycle and automobile crashes were $5825 and $2995, respectively ( p motorcycle crashes compared with automobile crashes (2194 injured annually/100 000 registered motorcycles v. 718 injured annually/100 000 registered automobiles; incidence rate ratio [IRR] 3.1, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.8 to 3.3, p motorcycles v. 12 severe injuries annually/100 000 registered automobiles; IRR 10.4, 95% CI 8.3 to 13.1, p motorcycle in Ontario costs the public health care system 6 times the amount of each registered automobile. Medical costs may provide an additional incentive to improve motorcycle safety. © 2017 Joule Inc. or its licensors.

  10. Economic instruments for environmental policy making in Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barg, S.; Duraiappah, A.; Van Exan, S.

    2000-01-01

    The conditions and approaches required for a successful implementation of economic instruments in Ontario are reviewed. The advantages and disadvantages of economic instruments are discussed, as are some design issues. Some best practices and practical experiences from Canada, the United States, and Europe are examined through the use of nine specific case studies. Each one highlights a different environmental challenge, such as energy efficiency, air pollution, water pollution, waste management along with the solutions that were implemented. The situations described were not all successful, but there is much to be learned from unsuccessful episodes. Lessons learned from the review of the case studies were presented. The points to ponder when using economic instruments in Ontario were highlighted. The command and control policy instrument must be kept in context when considering economic instruments. The reasons that underline the preference of the economic theory for economic instruments are discussed. The different types of economic instruments are described, and the considerations related to the design and comparison of economic instruments is briefly discussed. The authors concluded with several points to ponder: there are a number of options available, details must not be neglected, consultation with the interested parties is important, there is a need for frequent reassessment, and using a number of instruments is helpful. 55 refs., tabs., figs

  11. Ontario Hydro's plan for used nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens-Guille, P.D.; Howes, H.A.; Freire-Canosa, J.

    1992-01-01

    A comprehensive plan for the management of used nuclear fuel has been published by Ontario Hydro. In this paper current practices are discussed and actions leading to disposal in a repository are outlined. Extended storage options are discussed should disposal be delayed

  12. Wind power and bats : Ontario guideline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGuiness, F. [Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources, Peterborough, ON (Canada). Renewable Energy Resources; Stewart, J. [Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources, Toronto, ON (Canada). Wildlife Section

    2008-07-01

    None of the 8 species of bats in Ontario are considered as species at risk. However, all bats in Ontario are protected under the Fish and Wildlife Conservation Act. The Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources (MNR) is responsible for identifying significant wildlife habitat for bats, including hibernacula and maternity roosts. The MNR's role in wind development includes environmental assessments (EA) and surveys. The MNR bat guideline includes a summary of Ontario species, a literature review of research related to wind turbines and bats, and a review of methods for assessing and monitoring bats. Guideline development includes a bat working group responsible for obtaining data on risk factors and monitoring requirements. The MNR has determined that site selection is critical for minimizing potential impacts. Wind farm proponents can use MNR data, information, and maps for their site selection process. Information requirements include bat species data; habitat data; and meteorological data. The presence of risk factors results in a sensitivity rating. The MNR is also developing a site sensitivity mapping project in order to assist proponents in making siting decisions. All proposed sites are required to conduct pre-construction site surveys. Acoustic detectors and radar are used to determine bat activity at the site. Monitoring and mitigation strategies include selective wind turbine shutdown during key periods or weather conditions. tabs., figs.

  13. Measuring Social Capital in Hamilton, Ontario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchen, Peter; Williams, Allison; Simone, Dylan

    2012-01-01

    Social capital has been studied by academics for more than 20 years and within the past decade there has been an explosion of growth in research linking social capital to health. This paper investigates social capital in Hamilton, Ontario by way of a telephone survey of 1,002 households in three neighbourhood groups representing high, mixed and…

  14. Poster - 27: Incident Learning Practices in Ontario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angers, Crystal; Medlam, Gaylene; Liszewski, Brian; Simniceanu, Carina [The Ottawa Hospital Cancer Centre, Mississauga Halton/Central West Regional Cancer Center, Odette Cancer Centre, Cancer Care Ontario (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: The Radiation Incident and Safety Committee (RISC), established and supported by Cancer Care Ontario (CCO), is responsible for advising the Provincial Head of the Radiation Treatment program on matters relating to provincial reporting of radiation incidents with the goal of improved risk mitigation. Methods: The committee is made up of Radiation Incident Leads (RILs) with representation from each of the 14 radiation medicine programs in the province. RISC routinely meets to review recent critical incidents and to discuss provincial reporting processes and future directions of the committee. Regular face to face meetings have provided an excellent venue for sharing incident learning practices. A summary of the incident learning practices across Ontario has been compiled. Results: Almost all programs in Ontario employ an incident learning committee to review incidents and identify corrective actions or process improvements. Tools used for incident reporting include: paper based reporting, a number of different commercial products and software solutions developed in-house. A wide range of classification schema (data taxonomies) are employed, although most have been influenced by national guidance documents. The majority of clinics perform root cause analyses but utilized methodologies vary significantly. Conclusions: Most programs in Ontario employ a committee approach to incident learning. However, the reporting tools and taxonomies in use vary greatly which represents a significant challenge to provincial reporting. RISC is preparing to adopt the National System for Incident Reporting – Radiation Therapy (NSIR-RT) which will standardize incident reporting and facilitate data analyses aimed at identifying targeted improvement initiatives.

  15. Ontario's Quality Assurance Framework: A Critical Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heap, James

    2013-01-01

    Ontario's Quality Assurance Framework (QAF) is reviewed and found not to meet all five criteria proposed for a strong quality assurance system focused on student learning. The QAF requires a statement of student learning outcomes and a method and means of assessing those outcomes, but it does not require that data on achievement of intended…

  16. The Status of Benthos in Lake Ontario

    Science.gov (United States)

    The benthic community of Lake Ontario was dominated by an amphipod (Diporeia spp.) prior to the 1990’s. Two dreissenid mussel species D. polymorpha (zebra) and D. bugensis (quagga) were introduced in 1989 and 1991 via ballast water exchange. D. bugensis was observed as deep as 85...

  17. Global warming: Towards a strategy for Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    A discussion paper is provided as background to a proposed public review of a strategy for Ontario's response to global warming. Global warming arises from the generation of greenhouse gases, which come from the use of fossil fuels, the use of chlorofluorocarbons, and deforestation. Energy policy is the backbone of achieving climate stability since the burning of fossil fuels releases most of the greenhouse gases, mainly carbon dioxide. Canada is, by international standards, a very energy-intensive country and is among the world's largest emitters of carbon dioxide on a per capita basis. Ontario is the largest energy-using province in Canada, and fossil fuels represent over 80% of provincial energy use. A proposed goal for Ontario is to provide leadership in stabilizing atmospheric concentrations of the greenhouse gases, while minimizing the social, economic, and environmental costs in Ontario of adapting to global warming. A proposed first step to address global warming is to achieve reductions in expected emissions of the greenhouse gases, especially carbon dioxide, so that levels by the year 2000 are lower than in 1989. Current policies and regulations helping to reduce the greenhouse effect include some of the current controls on automotive emissions and the adoption by the provincial electric utility of targets to reduce electricity demand. New initiatives include establishment of minimum energy efficiency standards and reduction of peak-day electricity use. Action steps for future consideration are detailed in the categories of greenhouse gas emissions reductions, carbon dioxide absorption, and research and analysis into global warming

  18. Seven steps to an energy efficient Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The future of the electricity market in Ontario is examined in light of the recent debate concerning deregulation. This report focuses on measures that would have to be taken to ensure that there will be sufficient electricity available to serve the needs of Ontario. Increasing supply, or decreasing demand are discussed as the obvious answers to the problem at hand. The report concludes that: (1) mechanisms to encourage Demand Side Management and Demand Response have all but disappeared since the opening of the competitive electricity market in Ontario, (2) the current market structure does nothing to stimulate increased supply, nor does it encourage measures to reduce demand; as such, the result is an unsustainable situation. The report further concludes that Demand Side Management and Demand Response programs are essential components of the success of Ontario's evolving electricity market, and recommends programs that are designed and implemented in a manner that dovetail with parallel policies dealing with supply challenges. Seven essential elements of such a policy are discussed. These are: (1) vision and a clear set of goals for demand side management; (2) appropriate market drivers, principles and pricing incentives; (3) a central co-ordinating authority for managing demand side management; (4) appropriate implementation agents to manage programs and processes; (5) incentives to motivate change; (6) widespread education of the market; and (7) appropriate tactics to enable demand side management in sectors

  19. Poster - 27: Incident Learning Practices in Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angers, Crystal; Medlam, Gaylene; Liszewski, Brian; Simniceanu, Carina

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The Radiation Incident and Safety Committee (RISC), established and supported by Cancer Care Ontario (CCO), is responsible for advising the Provincial Head of the Radiation Treatment program on matters relating to provincial reporting of radiation incidents with the goal of improved risk mitigation. Methods: The committee is made up of Radiation Incident Leads (RILs) with representation from each of the 14 radiation medicine programs in the province. RISC routinely meets to review recent critical incidents and to discuss provincial reporting processes and future directions of the committee. Regular face to face meetings have provided an excellent venue for sharing incident learning practices. A summary of the incident learning practices across Ontario has been compiled. Results: Almost all programs in Ontario employ an incident learning committee to review incidents and identify corrective actions or process improvements. Tools used for incident reporting include: paper based reporting, a number of different commercial products and software solutions developed in-house. A wide range of classification schema (data taxonomies) are employed, although most have been influenced by national guidance documents. The majority of clinics perform root cause analyses but utilized methodologies vary significantly. Conclusions: Most programs in Ontario employ a committee approach to incident learning. However, the reporting tools and taxonomies in use vary greatly which represents a significant challenge to provincial reporting. RISC is preparing to adopt the National System for Incident Reporting – Radiation Therapy (NSIR-RT) which will standardize incident reporting and facilitate data analyses aimed at identifying targeted improvement initiatives.

  20. Renewables without limits : moving Ontario to advanced renewable tariffs by updating Ontario's groundbreaking standard offer program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gipe, P.

    2007-11-01

    The Ontario Sustainable Energy Association (OSEA) promotes the development of community-owned renewable energy generation. It was emphasized that in order to achieve OSEA's original objectives of developing as much renewable energy as quickly as possible through community participation, changes are needed to Ontario's groundbreaking standard offer contract (SOC) program. This report examined the status of Ontario's SOC program and proposed changes to the program as part of the program's first two-year review. The report provided a summary of the program and discussed each of the program's goals, notably to encourage broad participation; eliminate barriers to distributed renewable generation; provide a stable market for renewable generation; stimulate new investment in renewable generation; provide a rigorous pricing model for setting the tariffs; create a program applicable to all renewable technologies; provide a simple, streamlined, and cost-effective application process; and provide a dispute resolution process. The program goals as developed by the Ontario Power Authority and Ontario Energy Board were discussed with reference to mixed results to date; simplicity; removing barriers; balancing targets with value to ratepayers; and building on the efforts of OSEA. Advanced renewable tariffs (ART) and tariff determination was also discussed along with ART's in Germany, France, Spain and Ontario. Inflation indexing; tariff degression; proposed new tariffs by technology; and other costs and factors affecting profitability were also reviewed. ref., tabs

  1. Ontario's Clean Air Action Plan : protecting environmental and human health in Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    Ontario's Clean Air Action Plan was launched in June 2000 in an effort to improve air quality and comply with the Canada-Wide Standards for Particulate Matter and Ozone. This paper describes Ontario's approach to reducing smog. Smog-related air pollution is linked to health problems such as premature death, respiratory and heart problems. Smog also contributes to environmental problems such as damage to forests, agricultural crops and natural vegetation. The two main ingredients of smog are ground level ozone and particulate matter. In order to reduce the incidence of smog, the following four key smog-causing pollutants must be reduced: nitrogen oxides, volatile organic compounds, sulphur dioxide and particular matter. This paper includes the 2001 estimates for Ontario's emissions inventory along with Ontario's smog reduction targets. It was noted that approximately half of all smog in Ontario comes from sources in the midwestern United States. The province of Ontario is committed to replacing coal-fired power plants with cleaner sources of energy. It is also considering emission caps for key industrial sectors. The key players in reducing smog include municipalities, industry, individuals, the federal government and programs that reduce emissions in the United States. 3 figs., 8 tabs., 1 appendix

  2. Deregulation experiences in Alberta and Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axford, D.

    2003-01-01

    A brief introduction of Nexen Chemicals, one of the largest producers of sodium chlorate in the world, was offered, and a map displaying its locations throughout the world was displayed. Nexen is one of Canada's largest independent oil and gas producers, while Nexen Marketing is involved in the marketing of natural gas in North America. In January 2001, the deregulated market opened in Alberta. High natural gas prices, generation shortages, high prices in California and an upcoming provincial election all combined to complicate the situation. A high degree of volatility characterized the market. A chart displaying weekly average Alberta power and gas prices from Jan 2002 to 13 Oct 2002 was shown. In Ontario, the market opened in May 2002, and the demand growth rate was in the 1 to 2 per cent range. The author indicated that approximately 20 per cent of homeowners in Ontario have signed deals with retailers, contrary to Alberta where very few have done so. A similar chart displaying weekly average Ontario power prices was presented. The issues in Ontario are: consistency in policy, increase market transparency, transmission / distribution price flexibility, overall transmission / distribution to industrial consumers high, and increasing costs of the system operator. In Alberta, the issues are: government intent, congestion management issues, and billing settlement errors that continue. The opportunities offered by a deregulated market include process responsiveness which is rewarded, the ability to look in forward prices when prices fit margin requirement, and gives companies the opportunity to participate in the development of the market. Various charts were also displayed to further illustrate the market in both Alberta and Ontario. figs

  3. Benthic prey fish assessment, Lake Ontario 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidel, Brian C.; Walsh, Maureen; Connerton, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    The 2013 benthic fish assessment was delayed and shortened as a result of the U.S. Government shutdown, however the assessment collected 51 of the 62 planned bottom trawls. Over the past 34 years, Slimy Sculpin abundance in Lake Ontario has fluctuated, but ultimately decreased by two orders of magnitude, with a substantial decline occurring in the past 10 years. The 2013 Slimy Sculpin mean bottom trawl catch density (0.001 ind.·m-2, s.d.= 0.0017, n = 52) and mean biomass density (0.015 g·m-2 , s.d.= 0.038, n = 52) were the lowest recorded in the 27 years of sampling using the original bottom trawl design. From 2011-2013, the Slimy Sculpin density and biomass density has decreased by approximately 50% each year. Spring bottom trawl catches illustrate Slimy Sculpin and Round Goby Neogobius melanostoma winter habitat overlaps for as much as 7 months out of a year, providing opportunities for competition and predation. Invasive species, salmonid piscivory, and declines in native benthic invertebrates are likely all important drivers of Slimy Sculpin population dynamics in Lake Ontario. Deepwater Sculpin Myoxocephalus thompsonii, considered rare or absent from Lake Ontario for 30 years, have generally increased over the past eight years. For the first time since they were caught in this assessment, Deepwater Sculpin density and biomass density estimates declined from the previous year. The 2013 abundance and density estimates for trawls covering the standard depths from 60m to 150m was 0.0001 fish per square meter and 0.0028 grams per square meter. In 2013, very few small (recruitment. Nonnative Round Gobies were first detected in the USGS/NYSDEC Lake Ontario spring Alewife assessment in 2002. Since that assessment, observations indicate their population has expanded and they are now found along the entire south shore of Lake Ontario, with the highest densities in U.S. waters just east of the Niagara River confluence. In the 2013 spring-based assessment, both the

  4. Economic viability of anaerobic digestion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wellinger, A. [INFOENERGIE, Ettenhausen (Switzerland)

    1996-01-01

    The industrial application of anaerobic digestion is a relatively new, yet proven waste treatment technology. Anaerobic digestion reduces and upgrades organic waste, and is a good way to control air pollution as it reduces methane and nitrous gas emissions. For environmental and energy considerations, anaerobic digestion is a nearly perfect waste treatment process. However, its economic viability is still in question. A number of parameters - type of waste (solid or liquid), digester system, facility size, product quality and end use, environmental requirements, cost of alternative treatments (including labor), and interest rates - define the investment and operating costs of an anaerobic digestion facility. Therefore, identical facilities that treat the same amount and type of waste may, depending on location, legislation, and end product characteristics, reveal radically different costs. A good approach for evaluating the economics of anaerobic digestion is to compare it to treatment techniques such as aeration or conventional sewage treatment (for industrial wastewater), or composting and incineration (for solid organic waste). For example, the cost (per ton of waste) of in-vessel composting with biofilters is somewhat higher than that of anaerobic digestion, but the investment costs 1 1/2 to 2 times more than either composting or anaerobic digestion. Two distinct advantages of anaerobic digestion are: (1) it requires less land than either composting or incinerating, which translates into lower costs and milder environmental and community impacts (especially in densely populated areas); and (2) it produces net energy, which can be used to operate the facility or sold to nearby industries.

  5. Electricity market readiness plan : Ontario Energy Board

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-03-01

    This document informs electric power market participants of the Ontario Energy Board's newly developed market readiness plan and target timelines that local distribution companies (LDCs) must meet for retail marketing. The Ontario Energy Board's plan incorporates relevant independent market operator (IMO)-administered market milestones with retail market readiness targeted for September 2001. The market readiness framework involves a self-certification process for LDCs by August 10, 2001, through which the Board will be able to monitor progress and assess the feasibility of meeting the target timelines. For retail market readiness, all LDCs will have to calculate settlement costs, produce unbundled bills, provide standard supply service, change suppliers and accommodate retail transactions. LDCs must be either authorized participants in the IMO-administered market or become retail customers of their host LDC. Unbundled bills will include itemized charges for energy price, transmission, distribution and debt retirement charge. 1 tab., 1 fig

  6. Life cycle management at Ontario Power Generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spekkens, P.

    2006-01-01

    This paper outlines the Life Cycle Management (LCM) program at Ontario Power Generation. LCM is carried out at different levels that includes components, systems, unit and fleet. A system involves cumulative effect of individual component aging. These components include steam generators, pressure tubes and feeders. A unit involves an overall unit aging strategy integrating all systems. At the fleet level, there is an optimal strategy for plant-level investments including end-of-life of a unit

  7. Interim report on nuclear power in Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    An exhaustive report is presented on the implications of nuclear electric generation for Ontario's energy future. Such aspects as electrical demand and power planning, the CANDU fuel cycle, the nuclear debate, health, environmental and safety concerns, economics, social impacts and the status of the nuclear industry, uranium resources, ethical and political issues, nuclear weapons proliferation and plant security, and the regulation of nuclear power are dealt with in detail. (E.C.B.)

  8. Pollen viability and membrane lipid composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bilsen, van D.G.J.L.

    1993-01-01

    In this thesis membrane lipid composition is studied in relation to pollen viability during storage. Chapter 1 reviews pollen viability, membranes in the dry state and membrane changes associated with cellular aging. This chapter is followed by a study of age-related changes in phospholipid

  9. Interconnection issues in Ontario : a status check

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helbronner, V.

    2010-01-01

    This PowerPoint presentation discussed wind and renewable energy interconnection issues in Ontario. The province's Green Energy Act established a feed-in tariff (FIT) program and provided priority connection access to the electricity system for renewable energy generation facilities that meet regulatory requirements. As a result of the province's initiatives, Hydro One has identified 20 priority transmission expansion projects and is focusing on servicing renewable resource clusters. As of October 2010, the Ontario Power Authority (OPA) has received 1469 MW of FIT contracts executed for wind projects. A further 5953 MW of wind projects are awaiting approval. A Korean consortium is now planning to develop 2500 MW of renewable energy projects in the province. The OPA has also been asked to develop an updated transmission expansion plan. Transmission/distribution availability tests (TAT/DAT) have been established to determine if there is sufficient connection availability for FIT application projects. Economic connection tests (ECTs) are conducted to assess whether grid upgrade costs to enable additional FIT capacity are justifiable. When projects pass the ECT, grid upgrades needed for the connection included in grid expansion plans. Ontario's long term energy plan was also reviewed. tabs., figs.

  10. Gas marketing strategies for Ontario producers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, P.R. [Energy Objective Ltd., London, ON (Canada)

    2000-07-01

    Activity in natural gas exploration and production in the province of Ontario has recently increased due to higher natural gas prices. This paper discussed the issue of how the gas from the new reserves should be marketed. A review of historical pricing and consumption patterns was also presented to better identify how prices of natural gas are determined in Ontario and to forecast the future demand for natural gas. The first trend of interest is the increased use of natural gas in generating electricity to meet cooling needs in the summer months. The second trend is the increase in gas consumption by the industrial sector resulting from increases in process load. Several marketing options are available to Ontario natural gas producers. They can market their gas to third parties at various trading points in the province or they can market it directly to Union Gas Limited, the local gas utility. This paper briefly described how a gas supply contract works with the union, how gas marketing agreement is conducted with a gas marketer, and how a gas marketing arrangement works with a consultant. Some of the pitfalls of marketing natural gas were also described and some recommended some strategies for selling natural gas in the future were presented. 7 figs.

  11. A fluvial mercury budget for Lake Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denkenberger, Joseph S; Driscoll, Charles T; Mason, Edward; Branfireun, Brian; Warnock, Ashley

    2014-06-03

    Watershed mercury (Hg) flux was calculated for ten inflowing rivers and the outlet for Lake Ontario using empirical measurements from two independent field-sampling programs. Total Hg (THg) flux for nine study watersheds that directly drain into the lake ranged from 0.2 kg/yr to 13 kg/yr, with the dominant fluvial THg load from the Niagara River at 154 kg/yr. THg loss at the outlet (St. Lawrence River) was 68 kg/yr and has declined approximately 40% over the past decade. Fluvial Hg inputs largely (62%) occur in the dissolved fraction and are similar to estimates of atmospheric Hg inputs. Fluvial mass balances suggest strong in-lake retention of particulate Hg inputs (99%), compared to dissolved total Hg (45%) and methyl Hg (22%) fractions. Wetland land cover is a good predictor of methyl Hg yield for Lake Ontario watersheds. Sediment deposition studies, coupled atmospheric and fluvial Hg fluxes, and a comparison of this work with previous measurements indicate that Lake Ontario is a net sink of Hg inputs and not at steady state likely because of recent decreases in point source inputs and atmospheric Hg deposition.

  12. Ontario's energy crisis brings out conflicting visions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishewitsch, S.

    2004-01-01

    Ontario's medium-term energy supply situation is discussed in light of the Ontario provincial government's insistence on phasing out coal-fired generation by 2007, and the somewhat longer term uncertainty about the aging nuclear fleet and the price tag associated with their overhauling or replacement. Centre to the discussion is the replacement of coal-fired plants by natural gas-fired generating plants, complicated by the fact is that there is already a surfeit of gas-fired plants sitting idle for lack of fuel available at an economically acceptable price. Recent statistics show that conventional gas supplies have already levelled off and unconventional sources, such as coalbed methane, and imports like LNG, are more abundant, but also significantly more expensive. The nuclear option is considered by knowledgeable insiders as a viable option for increased generation, although it is generally acknowledged as a serious public relations problem. The contributions of green power and cogeneration are also explored; the most optimistic estimates put the supply from this source at 50,000 GWh a year; less than the amount needed even in the absence of growth in demand. The overall conclusion is that Ontario's energy future can only be assured by aggressive pursuit of productivity improvements, financial and policy innovations, extensive use of cogeneration, strong development of renewables, energy conservation, efficiency, and demand management

  13. Gas marketing strategies for Ontario producers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walsh, P.R.

    2000-01-01

    Activity in natural gas exploration and production in the province of Ontario has recently increased due to higher natural gas prices. This paper discussed the issue of how the gas from the new reserves should be marketed. A review of historical pricing and consumption patterns was also presented to better identify how prices of natural gas are determined in Ontario and to forecast the future demand for natural gas. The first trend of interest is the increased use of natural gas in generating electricity to meet cooling needs in the summer months. The second trend is the increase in gas consumption by the industrial sector resulting from increases in process load. Several marketing options are available to Ontario natural gas producers. They can market their gas to third parties at various trading points in the province or they can market it directly to Union Gas Limited, the local gas utility. This paper briefly described how a gas supply contract works with the union, how gas marketing agreement is conducted with a gas marketer, and how a gas marketing arrangement works with a consultant. Some of the pitfalls of marketing natural gas were also described and some recommended some strategies for selling natural gas in the future were presented. 7 figs

  14. Ontario hydro waste storage concepts and facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, T.J.; Mentes, G.A.

    1976-01-01

    Ontario Hydro presently operates 2,200 MWe of CANDU heavy water reactors with a further 11,000 MWe under design or construction. The annual quantities of low and medium level solid wastes expected to be produced at these stations are tabulated. In order to manage these wastes, Ontario Hydro established a Radioactive Waste Operations Site within the Bruce Nuclear Power Development located on Lake Huron about 250 km northwest of Toronto. The Waste Operations Site includes a 19-acre Storage Site plus a Radioactive Waste Volume Reduction Facility consisting of an incinerator and waste compactor. Ontario has in use or under construction both in-ground and above-ground storage facilities. In-ground facilities have been used for a number of years while the above-ground facilities are a more recent approach. Water, either in the form of precipitation, surface or subsurface water, presents the greatest concern with respect to confinement integrity and safe waste handling and storage operations

  15. Reappraisal of the seismotectonics of southern Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohajer, A.A.

    1987-11-01

    The fundamental objectives of this study were to review and improve the seismological data base as an aid in more realistic evaluation of seismic hazard in southern Ontario. For this purpose, the following procedures have been undertaken: In the first stage, the types of errors in earthquake location files are identified, sources of uncertainties are discussed and a sensitivity analysis of the errors to different parameters is presented. In the second stage, a group location technique, Joint Hypocenter Determination (JHD), has been utilized to improve the locations of a group of 67 well-recorded events, mostly from the more active region near the Ottawa River and in western Quebec. The third stage, to relocate smaller and less reliably detected events in southern Ontario, utilized a nw algorithm, 'HYPOCENTER', which proved very efficient and flexible in the test runs for handling local explosion and natural events. A preliminary interpretation of the seismicity patterns in the study regions shows that earthquakes of magnitude 3 and larger tend to align along preferred seismic trends which may, in turn, be controlled by weakness planes in the Earth's crust. These inferred trends coincide with dominant northwesterly and northeasterly striking structural directions. For earthquakes smaller than magnitude 4 prior to 1970 and for microearthquakes (M<3) which occurred near the Lake Ontario shoreline, the detection coverage was not sufficient to conclusively discuss accurate locations and causative mechanisms

  16. Climate change impacts: an Ontario perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mortsch, L.

    1995-11-01

    Significant changes in the climate system which are likely to affect biophysical, social and economic systems in various ways, were discussed. Trends in greenhouse gas levels show that during the 20. century, human activity has changed the make-up of the atmosphere and its greenhouse effect properties. A pilot study on the impacts of climate change identified changes in the water regime such as declines in net basin supply, lake levels and outflows, as important concerns. These changes would have impacts on water quality, wetlands, municipal water supply, hydroelectric power generation, commercial shipping, tourism and recreation, and to a lesser extent, on food productions. Climate impact assessments suggest that world conditions will change significantly as a result. Those with less resources are likely to be most affected by climate change, and the impacts on other regions of the world will be more significant to Ontario than the direct impacts on Ontario itself. In an effort to keep pace with global changes, Ontario will have to limit emissions, conduct research in innovative technology and develop greater awareness of the risk of climate change. refs., tabs., figs

  17. Nuclear cluster strategy Carolinas - Ontario - Saskatchewan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oberth, R.

    2012-01-01

    Organization of Candu Industries (OCI) is an industry association representing the interests of 170 private sector suppliers of products and services to the Canadian and offshore nuclear industries. OCI member companies, mainly in Ontario, employ over 30,000 highly specialized workers with over 12,000 working in nuclear area. OCI's objectives are to sustain the domestic nuclear program by building support among political leaders, the public and local communities, assist OCI member companies in becoming the preferred suppliers for domestic nuclear projects (competitive), assist OCI member companies in international nuclear markets - trade missions and vendor workshops. OCI is at the heart of an 'Ontario nuclear cluster'. The Carolinas have shown what can be achieved when industry, academia, S&T centers and governments collaborate with a shared vision to achieve a common goals. Ontario has the assets to become a stronger center for nuclear excellence. OCI is working to bring the pieces together. Saskatchewan has the assets to become a center of excellence in Small Modular Reactors (SMR) by licensing and constructing the first SMR in Canada.

  18. Ontario is not ready to face a large-scale nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-07-01

    On paper, in Japan as elsewhere, nuclear emergency plans are based on international standards and all look similar. The counter measures are sheltering, potassium iodate prophylaxis, evacuation and control of foodstuffs. With 18 nuclear reactors to produce electricity and a research reactor, Ontario should be especially well prepared. Moreover, in USA, there are six power plants located at less than 100 km from the Canadian border. Would Ontario do better than Japan in case of a severe nuclear disaster? Ontario is not ready to face a severe nuclear accident and the population surrounding nuclear power stations are at risk. The large number of inhabitants will hamper protective response actions. Consequently, Canadian authorities keep lax protective action levels. Using more stringent levels would mean to extend the protection zone that would include a too large number of persons. Canadian authorities should openly acknowledge that a severe nuclear accident could happen in Ontario like in any other country and trigger a complete reorganisation of emergency preparedness and response (EP and R) to cope with such a possibility. New response plans should be defined with the involvement of stakeholders

  19. The epidemiology of travel-related Salmonella Enteritidis in Ontario, Canada, 2010–2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tighe Mary-Kathryn

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increases in the number of salmonellosis cases due to Salmonella Enteritidis (SE in 2010 and 2011 prompted a public health investigation in Ontario, Canada. In this report, we describe the current epidemiology of travel-related (TR SE, compare demographics, symptoms and phage types (PTs of TR and domestically-acquired (DA cases, and estimate the odds of acquiring SE by region of the world visited. Methods All incident cases of culture confirmed SE in Ontario obtained from isolates and specimens submitted to public health laboratories were included in this study. Demographic and illness characteristics of TR and DA cases were compared. A national travel survey was used to provide estimates for the number of travellers to various destinations to approximate rates of SE in travellers. Multivariate logistic regression was used to estimate the odds of acquiring SE when travelling to various world regions. Results Overall, 51.9% of SE cases were TR during the study period. This ranged from 35.7% TR cases in the summer travel period to 65.1% TR cases in the winter travel period. Compared to DA cases, TR cases were older and were less likely to seek hospital care. For Ontario travellers, the adjusted odds of acquiring SE was the highest for the Caribbean (OR 37.29, 95% CI 17.87-77.82 when compared to Europe. Certain PTs were more commonly associated with travel (e.g., 1, 4, 5b, 7a, Atypical than with domestic infection. Of the TR cases, 88.9% were associated with travel to the Caribbean and Mexico region, of whom 90.1% reported staying on a resort. Within this region, there were distinct associations between PTs and countries. Conclusions There is a large burden of TR illness from SE in Ontario. Accurate classification of cases by travel history is important to better understand the source of infections. The findings emphasize the need to make travellers, especially to the Caribbean, and health professionals who provide advice to

  20. Mental Health Consultation Among Ontario's Immigrant Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Farah; Khanlou, Nazilla; Macpherson, Alison; Tamim, Hala

    2017-11-16

    To determine the prevalence rates and characteristics of past-year mental health consultation for Ontario's adult (18 + years old) immigrant populations. The Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) 2012 was used to calculate the prevalence rates of past-year mental health consultation by service provider type. Characteristics associated with mental health consultation were determined by carrying out multivariable logistic regression analysis on merged CCHS 2008-2012 data. Adult immigrant populations in Ontario (n = 3995) had lower estimated prevalence rates of past-year mental health consultation across all service provider types compared to Canadian-born populations (n = 14,644). Amongst those who reported past-year mental health consultation, 57.89% of Ontario immigrants contacted their primary care physician, which was significantly higher than the proportion who consulted their family doctor from Canadian-born populations (45.31%). The factors of gender, age, racial/ethnic background, education level, working status, food insecurity status, self-perceived health status, smoking status, alcohol drinking status, years since immigration, and age at time of immigration were significantly associated with past-year mental health consultation for immigrant populations. Ontario's adult immigrant populations most commonly consult their family doctor for mental health care. Potential exists for expanding the mental health care role of primary care physicians as well as efforts to increase accessibility of specialized mental health services. Integrated, coordinated care where primary care physicians, specialized mental health professionals, social workers, and community educators, etc. working together in a sort of "one-stop-shop" may be the most effective way to mitigate gaps in the mental health care system. In order to effectively tailor mental health policy, programming, and promotion to suit the needs of immigrant populations initiatives that focus on

  1. Lake Ontario benthic prey fish assessment, 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidel, Brian C.; Walsh, Maureen; Holden, Jeremy P.; Connerton, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Benthic prey fishes are a critical component of the Lake Ontario food web, serving as energy vectors from benthic invertebrates to native and introduced piscivores. Since the late 1970’s, Lake Ontario benthic prey fish status was primarily assessed using bottom trawl observations confined to the lake’s south shore, in waters from 8 – 150 m (26 – 492 ft). In 2015, the Benthic Prey Fish Survey was cooperatively adjusted and expanded to address resource management information needs including lake-wide benthic prey fish population dynamics. Effort increased from 55 bottom trawl sites to 135 trawl sites collected in depths from 8 - 225m (26 – 738 ft). The spatial coverage of sampling was also expanded and occurred in all major lake basins. The resulting distribution of tow depths more closely matched the available lake depth distribution. The additional effort illustrated how previous surveys were underestimating lake-wide Deepwater Sculpin, Myoxocephalus thompsonii, abundance by not sampling in areas of highest density. We also found species richness was greater in the new sampling sites relative to the historic sites with 11 new fish species caught in the new sites including juvenile Round Whitefish, Prosopium cylindraceum, and Mottled sculpin, Cottus bairdii. Species-specific assessments found Slimy Sculpin, Cottus cognatus abundance increased slightly in 2015 relative to 2014, while Deepwater Sculpin and Round Goby, Neogobius melanostomus, dramatically increased in 2015, relative to 2014. The cooperative, lake-wide Benthic Prey Fish Survey expanded our understanding of benthic fish population dynamics and habitat use in Lake Ontario. This survey’s data and interpretations influence international resource management decision making, such as informing the Deepwater Sculpin conservation status and assessing the balance between sport fish consumption and prey fish populations. Additionally a significant Lake Ontario event occurred in May 2015 when a single

  2. Proceedings of the Ontario Energy Association's 2004 annual conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The Ontario Energy Association (OEA) is a unique trade association that represents key participants in Ontario's converging natural gas and electricity industries. Its members include energy producers, transmitters, distributors, marketers, and retailers. This conference provided a forum to discuss the role of energy policy and energy conservation in promoting competitive and efficient gas and electricity markets in Ontario. The conference featured 15 presentations, of which 3 have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database

  3. Reducing greenhouse gas emissions from the Ontario automotive sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-11-01

    A variety of options to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from the automotive sector in Ontario over the next decade were discussed. Each option was assessed in terms of practicality and implications for implementation. I was concluded that improvements in fuel economy anticipated from advancing technology, with or without new mandated standards, will not be enough to offset the impact of growth in vehicle fleet size and kilometres driven. If the goal is to stabilize greenhouse gas emissions, other measures such as reducing the fleet size and vehicle kilometres travelled and accelerated vehicle retirement (scrappage) programs must be considered. Key constraints on expansion of the alternative fuel fleet were identified. These include: (1) limited availability of an adequate range of alternative fuel vehicles at competitive prices, (2) limited refuelling facility infrastructure in the case of natural gas, limited range and fuel storage capacity for natural gas; (3)current limited fuel ethanol production capacity, and (4) market perceptions of performance, reliability and safety. tabs

  4. Incisional abdominal hernia repair with concomitant abdominoplasty: Maintaining umbilical viability

    OpenAIRE

    Robert Phan; Elan Kaplan; Jemma K. Porrett; Yik-Hong Ho; Warren M. Rozen

    2018-01-01

    Introduction: Abdominoplasty and abdominal hernia repair are often carried out in two-stage procedures, and those describing single-stage surgery require careful dissection to preserve often only partial blood supply to the umbilicus to maintain its viability. This paper aims to describe the surgical method of laparoscopic umbilical hernia repair in association with abdominoplasty. Case presentation: A patient presents with an incisional hernia at a previous periumbilical port site of size 14...

  5. Dancing the Two-Step in Ontario's Long-term Care Sector: More Deterrence-oriented Regulation = Ownership and Management Consolidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Tamara

    2015-03-01

    This paper explores shifts in public and private delivery over time through an analysis of Ontario's approach to LTC funding and regulation in relation to other jurisdictions in Canada and abroad. The case of Ontario's long-term care (LTC) policy evolution - from the 1940s until early 2013 -- shows how moving from compliance to deterrence oriented regulation can support consolidation of commercial providers' ownership and increase the likelihood of non-profit and public providers outsourcing their management.

  6. Terminology for pregnancy loss prior to viability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolte, A M; Bernardi, L A; Christiansen, O B

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy loss prior to viability is common and research in the field is extensive. Unfortunately, terminology in the literature is inconsistent. The lack of consensus regarding nomenclature and classification of pregnancy loss prior to viability makes it difficult to compare study results from...... different centres. In our opinion, terminology and definitions should be based on clinical findings, and when possible, transvaginal ultrasound. With this Early Pregnancy Consensus Statement, it is our goal to provide clear and consistent terminology for pregnancy loss prior to viability....

  7. Adequacy of the ophthalmology workforce under Ontario's Local Health Integration Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tony; Xu, Mark; Hooper, Philip L

    2016-06-01

    To determine the current distribution of ophthalmologists across Ontario's Local Health Integration Networks (LHINs) and the influence on LHIN-specific cataract surgery wait times. Cross-sectional study. Ophthalmologists listed in the College of Physicians and Surgeons (CPSO) database and the Canadian population. A list of ophthalmologists and their practice locations were obtained from the CPSO website. The total population count for Ontario was obtained from the Statistics Canada census. The population counts for the population aged 65 years and older were generated using the Canadian Socioeconomic Information Management System (CANSIM) table 109-5425. Cataract surgery wait times were obtained from the Ontario Ministry of Health. Statistical analysis was completed using Microsoft Excel using StatPlus software. There are currently 3.28 ophthalmologists per 100 000 total population in Ontario. LHIN-specific ratios ranged from 8.87 (Toronto Central) to 1.67 (Central West), with 3 out of 14 LHINs having met the previously recommended ratio of 3.37. Median cataract surgery wait times ranged from 30 to 72 days. Although the number of cataract surgeries performed was positively correlated with the population aged 65 years and older (p < 0.001), there was no statistically significant association between wait times and number of cataract cases per 1000 population (p = 0.41). Although Ontario appears to have a sufficient number of ophthalmologists overall, there is significant variation in the distribution of the ophthalmology workforce at the LHIN level. This variation did not appear to significantly influence LHIN-specific cataract surgery wait times. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Ophthalmological Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Life cycle cost and economic assessment of biochar-based bioenergy production and biochar land application in Northwestern Ontario, Canada

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Krish Homagain; Chander Shahi; Nancy Luckai; Mahadev Sharma

    2017-01-01

    Background:Replacement of fossil fuel based energy with biochar-based bioenergy production can help reduce greenhouse gas emissions while mitigating the adverse impacts of climate change and global warming.However,the production of biochar-based bioenergy depends on a sustainable supply of biomass.Although,Northwestern Ontario has a rich and sustainable supply of woody biomass,a comprehensive life cycle cost and economic assessment of biochar-based bioenergy production technology has not been done so far in the region.Methods:In this paper,we conducted a thorough life cycle cost assessment (LCCA) of biochar-based bioenergy production and its land application under four different scenarios:1) biochar production with low feedstock availability;2) biochar production with high feedstock availability;3) biochar production with low feedstock availability and its land application;and 4) biochar production with high feedstock availability and its land application-using SimaPro(R),EIOLCA(R) software and spreadsheet modeling.Based on the LCCA results,we further conducted an economic assessment for the break-even and viability of this technology over the project period.Results:It was found that the economic viability of biochar-based bioenergy production system within the life cycle analysis system boundary based on study assumptions is directly dependent on costs of pyrolysis,feedstock processing (drying,grinding and pelletization) and collection on site and the value of total carbon offset provided by the system.Sensitivity analysis of transportation distance and different values of C offset showed that the system is profitable in case of high biomass availability within 200 km and when the cost of carbon sequestration exceeds CAD S60 per tonne of equivalent carbon (CO2e).Conclusions:Biochar-based bioenergy system is economically viable when life cycle costs and environmental assumptions are accounted for.This study provides a medium scale slow-pyrolysis plant scenario and

  9. Economic viability of geriatric hip fracture centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, R Carter; Ahn, Jaimo; Mehta, Samir; Bernstein, Joseph

    2013-12-01

    Management of geriatric hip fractures in a protocol-driven center can improve outcomes and reduce costs. Nonetheless, this approach has not spread as broadly as the effectiveness data would imply. One possible explanation is that operating such a center is not perceived as financially worthwhile. To assess the economic viability of dedicated hip fracture centers, the authors built a financial model to estimate profit as a function of costs, reimbursement, and patient volume in 3 settings: an average US hip fracture program, a highly efficient center, and an academic hospital without a specific hip fracture program. Results were tested with sensitivity analysis. A local market analysis was conducted to assess the feasibility of supporting profitable hip fracture centers. The results demonstrate that hip fracture treatment only becomes profitable when the annual caseload exceeds approximately 72, assuming costs characteristic of a typical US hip fracture program. The threshold of profitability is 49 cases per year for high-efficiency hip fracture centers and 151 for the urban academic hospital under review. The largest determinant of profit is reimbursement, followed by costs and volume. In the authors’ home market, 168 hospitals offer hip fracture care, yet 85% fall below the 72-case threshold. Hip fracture centers can be highly profitable through low costs and, especially, high revenues. However, most hospitals likely lose money by offering hip fracture care due to inadequate volume. Thus, both large and small facilities would benefit financially from the consolidation of hip fracture care at dedicated hip fracture centers. Typical US cities have adequate volume to support several such centers.

  10. Economic Viability and Marketing Strategies of Periwinkle ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Economic Viability and Marketing Strategies of Periwinkle Tympanotonus Fuscatus in Rivers State, Nigeria. ... The results indicated that marketing strategies are enroute, through harvesters (collectors), ... EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT

  11. The Ontario Energy Board's proposed new mandate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laughren, F.

    1998-01-01

    The Ontario Energy Board's proposed new mandate was reviewed. The role of the Board will be to regulate the monopoly delivery components of the electricity and natural gas industry and to smooth the transition to competition. The Board will monitor market performance and will encourage electricity and natural gas monopoly services to be compatible where possible. The Board will also assist local restructuring efforts when called upon do so and ensure that the marketplace operates efficiently and effectively. Gas marketers' licensing is scheduled to begin in early 1999. Licenses will also apply to the electric industry. The objectives of the proposed licensing, the regulatory requirements and the proposed regulatory approach are described

  12. Main coolant pump testing at Ontario Hydro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartlen, R.

    1991-01-01

    This article describes Ontario Hydro Research Division's experience with a computerized data acquisition and analysis system for monitoring mechanical vibration in reactor coolant pumps. The topics covered include bench-marking of the computer system and the coolant pumps, signatures of normal and malfunctioning pumps, analysis of data collected by the monitoring system, simulation of faults, and concerns that have been expressed about data interpretation, sensor types and locations, alarm/shutdown limits and confirmation of nondestructive examination testing. This presentation consists of overheads only

  13. Ontario Power Generation Nuclear: results and opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dermarkar, F.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the accomplishments of Ontario Power Generation (OPG) Nuclear and outlines future opportunities. OPG's mandate is to cost effectively produce electricity, while operating in a safe, open and environmentally responsible manner. OPG's nuclear production has been increasing over the past three years - partly from the addition of newly refurbished Pickering A Units 1 and 4, and partly from the increased production from Darlington and Pickering B. OPG will demonstrate its proficiency and capability in nuclear by continuing to enhance the performance and cost effectiveness of its existing operations. Its priorities are to focus on performance excellence, commercial success, openness, accountability and transparency

  14. The Ontario Hydro mortality surveillance programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, T.W.

    1985-01-01

    The Ontario Hydro mortality surveillance programme was the first such study established in any group of radiation workers. Copies of annual reports are available to senior officials of both management and union and to members of the general public. Apart from an elevated Standardized Mortality Ratio in the 15.0 - 19.9 cSv range, there is no suggestion of any rising cancer death rate with increased lifetime radiation dose. It should be noted that employees who had left before pensionable age were not included in the study. Results of the study are presented in tabular form

  15. La implementación de programas de educación en medios: el caso Ontario Implementing Mandates in Media Education: The Ontario Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barry Duncan

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo expone un informe sobre la educación en alfabetización mediática en Ontario. Brinda una visión general del plan de estudios para la alfabetización mediática propuesta por el gobierno regional. Específicamente, describe varias aproximaciones para la enseñanza acerca de los medios, así como la teoría que apuntala los documentos del plan de estudios y las prácticas en el aula. También describe el trabajo de organizaciones y asociaciones clave que ayudaron a priorizar la educación en alfabetización mediática, y ofrece sugerencias para el desarrollo exitoso y la implementación de programas de alfabetización mediática. La conclusión discute los retos y el curso futuro de la alfabetización mediática más allá del caso Ontario, centrándose en nueve tesis clave para el éxito en su implementación en todo el mundo. This analysis presents a report on media literacy education in Ontario. It provides an overview of the curriculum for media literacy that is mandated by the provincial government. Specifically, it describes various approaches for teaching about the media as well as the theory that underpins curriculum documents and classroom practices. The analysis also describes the work of key organizations and partnerships that helped prioritize media literacy education, and offers suggestions for the successful development and implementation of media literacy programs. The conclusion discusses the challenges and future directions for media literacy beyond the Ontario case, focusing on nine key tenets for success in its implementation worldwide.

  16. Managing an oak decline crisis in Oakville, Ontario: lessons learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter A. Williams; John W. McNeil; Kurt W. Gottschalk; Robert A. Haack

    2013-01-01

    The town of Oakville, Ontario, is located along the north shore of Lake Ontario between Toronto and Hamilton. In the fall of 2002, significant oak (Quercus spp.) mortality was observed at Oakville's Iroquois Shoreline Woods Park, an environmentally significant forest remnant noted for its oak-dominated forests. Investigations suggested that oak...

  17. Colonoscopy resource availability and colonoscopy utilization in Ontario, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colleen Webber

    2017-04-01

    The availability of colonoscopy resources improved in Ontario between 2007 and 2013. However, the geographic variation in resource availability and findings that higher colonoscopy resource availability is associated with higher colonoscopy utilization suggest that certain areas of the province may be under-resourced. These areas may be appropriate targets for efforts to improve colonoscopy capacity in Ontario.

  18. Education Governance Reform in Ontario: Neoliberalism in Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattler, Peggy

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores the relationship between neoliberal ideology and the discourse and practice of education governance reform in Ontario over the last two decades. It focuses on changes in education governance introduced by successive Ontario governments: the NDP government from 1990 to 1995, the Progressive Conservative government from 1995 to…

  19. Province of Ontario nuclear emergency plan. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-06-01

    The Province of Ontario Nuclear Emergency Plan has been developed pursuant to Section 8 of the Emergency Plans Act, 1983. This plan replaces the Province of Ontario Nuclear Contingency Off-Site Plan (June 1980) which is no longer applicable. The wastes plan includes planning, preparation, emergency organization and operational responsibilities and policy

  20. Independent power and cogeneration in Ontario's new competitive electricity market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnstable, A.G.

    1999-01-01

    The factors influencing the initial market pricing in the early years of Ontario's new electricity market were discussed with particular insight on the potential for near term development of independent power and cogeneration. The major factors influencing prices include: (1) no increase in retail prices, (2) financial restructuring of Ontario Hydro, (3) the Market Power Mitigation Agreement, (4) tighter power plant emissions standards, and (5) an electricity supply and demand balance. Generation competition is not expected to influence market pricing in the early years of the new electricity market. Prices will instead reflect the restructuring decisions of the Ontario government. The decision to have Ontario Power Generation Inc. (OPGI) as a single generator for Ontario Hydro's generation assets will ensure that average spot market pricing in the early market years will be close to a 3.8 c/kWh revenue cap

  1. Deregulation, privatization and the Ontario power failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-09-01

    The Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE) has examined the history of deregulation of the electricity industry in the United States and presents lessons that could be learned from the California electricity crisis, the collapse of Enron, and the massive blackout that occurred in August 2003 across Ontario and northeastern United States. Unlike the United States, Canada's electricity system is mostly publicly owned and operated. This report emphasized that the need for public investment in the electricity system is greater than ever, and offers suggestions on how to strengthen the Canadian electricity system. It examines the attempts made to deregulate and privatize the electricity system in Ontario, Alberta, New Brunswick and British Columbia and exposes the reality of price caps and the debt of public utilities. It demonstrates that privatization has failed to provide a safe, reliable, affordable and adequate supply of electricity. The report claims that profit-seeking power producers want to keep supply and demand in their favour to sell electricity at the highest possible price. In addition to emphasizing the need for public investment in the electricity system, this report emphasizes the need for Canadian electricity cooperation, with particular mention of the large energy supplies in Manitoba and Quebec. 37 refs

  2. Public perceptions of energy issues in Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-11-01

    In October 2004, the Environics Research Group conducted a telephone survey of 608 adult Ontarians to collect information on matters regarding energy; consumer confidence and protection; responsibilities of the Ontario Energy Board; and consumer information preferences. This report summarizes the key findings of the survey. According to the survey, the most important electricity and natural gas issue was identified as being price and cost issues, followed by reliability of supply, conservation, keeping utilities publicly owned, finding renewable sources of energy, and over-consumption. The survey revealed that Ontarians show much interest in conserving energy to save money, to protect the environment and ensure future energy supply, but they are generally sceptical that their interests are being protected on electricity and natural gas price issues. At least 9 in 10 Ontarians consider the tasks of the Ontario Energy Board to be important. The majority of Ontarians prefer to receive energy conservation information through the mail and from public regulators over a government department or a company. 10 tabs

  3. Ontario Energy Board 2005 survey of stakeholders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    A survey was conducted among members of the Ontario Energy Board's (OEB) various stakeholder groups in order to measure the Board's performance and to help the Board identify areas for improvement in the way it operates. The survey included telephone interviews with consumer groups, advocacy groups, the energy sector, electricity and gas distributors, financial organizations as well as other stakeholders. The topics addressed in the survey were key energy issues and priority issues; the perceived role of the OEB; the OEB strengths and weaknesses; the importance of various OEB functions; the overall performance of the OEB; an evaluation of OEB communication with industry and consumers; an evaluation of service quality; and, awareness and participation in regulatory policy initiatives. Respondents used a 10-point scale in their evaluation. This report presented the main findings and their interpretations. Major stakeholders identified electricity supply issues and the price of electricity as being the most important energy issues facing Ontario. This report also presented the detailed findings for questions regarding the lack of generator capacity, policy stability, the coal phase out program, electricity blackouts, conservation, electricity restructuring and investment. The major finding of the survey was an overall increase in satisfaction with the OEB's performance. It was suggested that the OEB can improve in timeliness and providing consumer information. The major areas of strength were found to be its professionalism in conducting hearings and the fairness of the Board's decisions and regulations. tabs

  4. Coal-fired electricity generation in Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-03-01

    This report examines coal-fired electricity generation in Ontario and recommends actions to be taken by the provincial government to protect the environment. The recommendations are also designed to assist in making decisions about the environmental safeguards needed for a competitive electricity industry. The report examines air emissions from coal-fired generating plants in the larger context of air pollution in the province; summarizes background information on key air pollutants; provides an individual profile of all coal-fired power stations in the province; and benchmarks Ontario's emissions performance by comparing it with 19 nearby U.S. jurisdictions. Current and proposed environmental controls for fossil fuel power generation in the province are elaborated. Options for maximizing environmental performance and the framework for strengthening environmental protection are reviewed. The report also contains a series of findings and recommendations which are deemed necessary before the moratorium imposed on the sale of coal-fired electricity plants imposed in May 2000, can be lifted. tabs., figs

  5. Assessment of tissue viability by polarization spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, G.; Anderson, C.; Henricson, J.; Leahy, M.; O'Doherty, J.; Sjöberg, F.

    2008-09-01

    A new and versatile method for tissue viability imaging based on polarization spectroscopy of blood in superficial tissue structures such as the skin is presented in this paper. Linearly polarized light in the visible wavelength region is partly reflected directly by the skin surface and partly diffusely backscattered from the dermal tissue matrix. Most of the directly reflected light preserves its polarization state while the light returning from the deeper tissue layers is depolarized. By the use of a polarization filter positioned in front of a sensitive CCD-array, the light directly reflected from the tissue surface is blocked, while the depolarized light returning from the deeper tissue layers reaches the detector array. By separating the colour planes of the detected image, spectroscopic information about the amount of red blood cells (RBCs) in the microvascular network of the tissue under investigation can be derived. A theory that utilizes the differences in light absorption of RBCs and bloodless tissue in the red and green wavelength region forms the basis of an algorithm for displaying a colour coded map of the RBC distribution in a tissue. Using a fluid model, a linear relationship (cc. = 0.99) between RBC concentration and the output signal was demonstrated within the physiological range 0-4%. In-vivo evaluation using transepidermal application of acetylcholine by the way of iontophoresis displayed the heterogeneity pattern of the vasodilatation produced by the vasoactive agent. Applications of this novel technology are likely to be found in drug and skin care product development as well as in the assessment of skin irritation and tissue repair processes and even ultimately in a clinic case situation.

  6. The safety of Ontario's nuclear power reactors. A scientific and technical review. Selected consultants' reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hare, F.K.

    1988-01-01

    The Review commissioned 31 consultants to prepare detailed analyses of specific safety-related questions raised by the design and operation of Ontario Hydro's CANDU reactors. This volume presents 10 of these reports, which I judge to be of sufficient general importance to justify the cost of wide circulation. They have been reproduced precisely as they were submitted. They do not express the Review's own judgements, but do contain a major part of the evidence that influenced those judgements. In several cases the consultants have presented formal recommendations. Some of these have been incorporated, often in modified form, as Review recommendations, in the Minister's Report. Others remain simply as recommendations from the individual consultants. I agree with most of them, but have not seen them as central to the Review's conclusions. I suggest that appropriate institutions--most notably Ontario Hydro and Atomic Energy Control Board--study them, and act as they see fit

  7. Assessment of myocardial viability by MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandstede, Joern J.W.

    2003-01-01

    Diagnosis of myocardial viability after infarction focuses on the prediction of functional improvement of dysfunctional myocardium after revascularization therapy. Magnetic resonance imaging provides different approaches for the detection of myocardial viability. Measurement of end-diastolic wall thickness is easy to perform and has a high sensitivity, but a low specificity, and can only be used 4 months after myocardial infarction due to infarct healing processes. Low-dose dobutamine stress has a good sensitivity with a high specificity for the prediction of wall motion improvement, but this is only true for patients with a singular dysfunctional area and only slightly depressed cardiac function. Late enhancement allows for direct visualization of necrotic or scarred tissue. By measuring the transmural extent of late enhancement, the probability of mechanical improvement can precisely be given. Imaging of microvascular obstruction by first-pass perfusion or late enhancement gives additional information on viability and patient prognosis. Metabolic imaging techniques, such as 31 P-MR spectroscopy and 23 Na-MR imaging, provide further insights into the mechanisms of myocardial infarction and viability. In conclusion, cardiac MRI offers several clinically usable approaches for the assessment of myocardial viability and will probably become the method of choice in the near future. (orig.)

  8. Proceedings of the Ontario Petroleum Institute's 48. annual conference : Ontario oil, gas and storage conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    This conference discussed issues related to Ontario's petroleum industry and evaluated the province's potential hydrocarbon plays. Geological studies of interest to oil and gas operators were presented along with storage opportunities for hydrocarbons in underground formations. Regulatory issues related to the environmental impacts of oil and gas operations on soil and groundwater were reviewed, and various mitigation options for treating soils impacted by hydrocarbons were discussed. New technologies currently being used in Ontario's petroleum industry were presented together with various investment and exploration opportunities. An economic update of recent oil and gas activities in the region was also presented. The conference was divided into 7 sessions, and featured 17 presentations, of which 11 have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. tabs., figs.

  9. Optimization of biofuel production from corn stover under supply uncertainty in Ontario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Ranisau

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a biofuel production supply chain optimization framework is developed that can supply the fuel demand for 10% of Ontario. Different biomass conversion technologies are considered, such as pyrolysis and gasification and subsequent hydro processing and the Fischer-Tropsch process. A supply chain network approach is used for the modeling, which enables the optimization of both the biorefinery locations and the associated transportation networks. Gasification of corn stover is examined to convert waste biomass into valuable fuel. Biomass-derived fuel has several advantages over traditional fuels including substantial greenhouse gas reduction, generating higher quality synthetic fuels, providing a use for biomass waste, and potential for use without much change to existing infrastructure. The objective of this work is to show the feasibility of the use of corn stover as a biomass feedstock to a hydrocarbon biofuel supply chain in Ontario using a mixed-integer linear programming model while accounting for the uncertainty in the availability of corn stover. In the case study, the exact number of biorefineries is left as a policy decision and the optimization is carried out over a range of the possible numbers of facilities. The results obtained from the case study suggests implementing gasification technology followed by Fischer-Tropsch at two different sites in Ontario. The optimal solution satisfied 10% of the yearly fuel demand of Ontario with two production plants (14.8 billion L of fuel and requires an investment of $42.9 billion, with a payback period of about 3 years.

  10. Cross currents : hydroelectricity and the engineering of northern Ontario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manore, J.L. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada)

    1999-05-01

    The history of hydroelectric development in northern Ontario was reviewed and analysed with special emphasis on the developments along the Mattagami and Abitibi Rivers. The objective was to examine the important factors that shaped modern hydroelectric development in Canada. System builders, the privately owned Nesbitt Thomson Company, the publicly owned Hydro Electric Power Corporation of Ontario and the eventual evolution of the single power system under Ontario Hydro are chronicled. Broad historical themes such as the technological impacts, regionalism, indigenous rights, plus environmental and economic issues are examined, in addition to an appreciation of the importance of electricity in the manufacturing sector of Ontario, the impact of hydroelectric development on the northern environment and on the northern First Nations, who rely on rivers for their subsistence. Until fairly recently, government policies and interpretations of law often excluded the recognition of Aboriginal uses of river systems, thereby limiting First Nations` peoples ability to practice traditional ways of life. In essence, the book is an account of how the northeastern power system in Ontario shaped the social, political and natural environments and how the development of northeastern power sources by southern power developers shaped the regional interactions between Ontario`s north and south. refs., figs.

  11. The Efficacy of Key Performance Indicators in Ontario Universities as Perceived by Key Informants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Vivian

    2015-01-01

    The Ontario Ministry of Education and Training's Task Force on University Accountability first proposed key performance indicators (KPIs) for colleges and universities in Ontario in the early 1990s. The three main KPIs for Ontario universities are the rates of (1) graduation, (2) employment, and (3) Ontario Student Assistance Program loan default.…

  12. Feminism and women's health professions in Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Tracey L; Bourgeault, Ivy Lynn

    2003-01-01

    Historically, prevailing gender ideologies were an important element in both the exclusionary strategies employed by male occupational groups and the countervailing responses by female groups. The way in which evolving gender ideologies, and feminism in particular, influence the continuing struggle for greater status and recognition by female professions, however, remains to be fully explored. In this paper, we examine the impact and the role of feminism and feminist ideologies within three female professional projects: nursing, dental hygiene and midwifery in Ontario. We argue that feminism provides an ideology of opposition that enables leaders in these professions to battle against professional inequalities by laying bare the gender inequalities that underlie them. Framing their struggles in feminist terms, female professions also seek recognition for the uniquely female contribution they make to the health care division of labour. At the same time, there exists a tension between ideals of feminism and ideals of professionalism, that has the potential to undermine female professional projects.

  13. Ontario Hydro nuclear - challenges of the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field, R.

    1996-01-01

    The challenges facing Ontario Hydro Nuclear (OHN), as understood at the time of the conference, are discussed. OHN had many strengths to build on in preparing for the competition ahead, including: extremely competitive production costs, strong technical capabilities, advantages of multiple units, environmental advantages favoring nuclear, strong public support, and improving station performance. Even with these advantages, OHN faced the difficult challenge of improving overall performance in the face of a large debt burden, coupled with the reinvestment demands of aging units at Pickering A and Bruce A. At the time of the conference, Bruce 2 had already been shut down, because the cost of retubing it and replacing its boilers could not be justified. The ''drive to nuclear excellence'' involves the simultaneous achievement of top performance in safety, reliability and cost; and to this end, changes were being made to reverse the trends indicated by disappointing ''peer reviews''

  14. Physician recruitment in Ontario Provincial Psychiatric Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draper, R; Galbraith, D; Frost, B

    1989-11-01

    Recruitment of Physicians/Psychiatrists to staff the Ontario Provincial Psychiatric Hospitals remains an ongoing problem despite the introduction of measures such as University Affiliation and Incentive Grants. Historically there has been heavy reliance upon Foreign Medical Graduates (GOFM's) who have been denied the possibility of professional mobility and advancement because of restrictive licences. Recent changes in regulations have severely restricted the recruitment of GOFM's. During 1987, details of all physicians employed in the provincial hospitals during the preceeding five years were entered into a computerized data base. This paper presents some initial analyses which indicate that Canadian graduates have provided low levels of service, especially outside major urban centres, quite insufficient to replace the GOFM's. These findings raise urgent social and professional concerns.

  15. Implementation plan for smart meters in Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents Ontario Energy Board's implementation plan to install 800,000 smart meters by December 31, 2007. The objective is to help consumers control their electricity bills through conservation and demand response. The three conditions that will change power consumption habits are price changes in response to demand and supply forces; the ability of consumers to see and respond to the price signals; and, a measurement of the response so that consumers get credit for their actions. This paper identifies the mandatory technical requirements for smart meters and the support operations of distributors. It sets priorities, identifies barriers and regulatory mechanisms for cost recovery. It also discusses options for ownership of the meters. 18 refs., 1 tab., 2 figs

  16. Oil heritage district : Lambton County Ontario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shearer, W. [Wendy Shearer Landscape Architect, Kitchener, ON (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    This paper discussed a project conducted to assess the cultural heritage values of oil field equipment in Lambton County, Ontario. Oil was discovered in the region in 1858, after which a boom and bust cycle of exploration created a large rural-industrial landscape. The region now contains a unique collection of historic oil equipment. The region's industrial footprint is interwoven with village settlements, agricultural settlements, and a railway and road network linking the region to remote refineries. Oil wells in the region still operate using a jerker line system developed in the early twentieth century. The operational oil wells are subject to fluctuating oil prices and environmental protection requirements. The project presents a rare opportunity to place industrial heritage conservation directly in the hands of business operators and regulators, while also functioning as part of a living community. 2 figs.

  17. Ontario Hydro's integrated air management plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalvins, A.K.; Brown, D.; Camacho, F.; Howes, H.; Jantzi, B.; Lin, X.; Lui, P.; Melo, O.T.; Mortimer, W.P.; Reuber, B.

    1992-01-01

    Ontario Hydro is developing an integrated air management plan as a tool for comparing the environmental impacts of fossil-fuel power generation options. The goal is to relate equipment, location, emissions, and impacts and to identify the optimum way to manage the utility's fossil generation system in view of upcoming environmental regulations and public expectations. The eight steps of the plan are briefly described: definition of power generation scenarios (upgrading, conversion to natural gas, non-utility generation, alternative technologies); estimation of emissions for each generation and fuel option studied; identification of impact of air emissions on building materials, agriculture, forests, lakes, and fisheries; modelling of air emissions dispersion; quantification of damage to pollution receptors; quantification of full fuel cycle effects; and comparison of the scenarios. The scenario having the lowest overall environmental impact involved upgrading the existing fossil-fuel system with additional air emissions controls and two integrated gasification combined cycle plants. 9 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  18. Ontario freight movement study: component two

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hackston, D.; Lake, R.; Schwier, C.; Tardif, L.P.; English, G.; Bunting, M.

    1995-11-01

    The freight (cargo) transportation sector accounts for a major use of fossil fuels and contributes significantly to greenhouse gas emissions. A study was conducted to assess the prospects, in terms of CO 2 emission reduction, of alternatives to present freight distribution, especially alternatives involving the use of rail instead of truck. Statistical data for Ontario freight transportation were analyzed for fuel consumption, CO 2 emission and cost consequences. Railway fuel consumption was calculated for detailed routing descriptions using a model that computed route and service specific fuel use. The information was compared directly with truck fuel consumption. It was determined that shippers who needed quick, accurately timed shipments preferred trucking over rail, while price conscious shippers, or those with heavy loading commodities preferred rail. An important goal of the study was to identify the enormity of the challenges involved, and clarify the potential tradeoffs by showing different strategies, with respect to CO 2 reduction and related economic impacts. refs., tabs., figs

  19. Sulphate deposition by precipitation into Lake Ontario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, R W; Whelpdale, D M

    1973-01-01

    Measurements of sulphate concentration in precipitation from individual snow storms of several hours duration in the western Lake Ontario region indicate that approximately 9-66 mg/M/sub 2/ of SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ is being deposited into the lake per storm. This amount is up to several times more than daily average values over long periods found by other workers. Using a mean sulphate concentration of 4 mg/l and an annual accumulation of precipitation of 760 mm, the yearly sulphate deposition by precipitation is about 0.1% of the total mass of sulphate in the lake; however, more significantly, it is of the same order of magnitude as that discharged directly into the lake by industry.

  20. Forecasting Ontario's blood supply and demand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drackley, Adam; Newbold, K Bruce; Paez, Antonio; Heddle, Nancy

    2012-02-01

    Given an aging population that requires increased medical care, an increasing number of deferrals from the donor pool, and a growing immigrant population that typically has lower donation rates, the purpose of this article is to forecast Ontario's blood supply and demand. We calculate age- and sex-specific donation and demand rates for blood supply based on 2008 data and project demand between 2008 and 2036 based on these rates and using population data from the Ontario Ministry of Finance. Results indicate that blood demand will outpace supply as early as 2012. For instance, while the total number of donations made by older cohorts is expected to increase in the coming years, the number of red blood cell (RBC) transfusions in the 70+ age group is forecasted grow from approximately 53% of all RBC transfusions in 2008 (209,515) in 2008 to 68% (546,996) by 2036. A series of alternate scenarios, including projections based on a 2% increase in supply per year and increased use of apheresis technology, delays supply shortfalls, but does not eliminate them without active management and/or multiple methods to increase supply and decrease demand. Predictions show that demand for blood products will outpace supply in the near future given current age- and sex-specific supply and demand rates. However, we note that the careful management of the blood supply by Canadian Blood Services, along with new medical techniques and the recruitment of new donors to the system, will remove future concerns. © 2012 American Association of Blood Banks.

  1. The safety of Ontario's nuclear power reactors. A scientific and tecnical review. Vol. 1: Report to the Minister, technical report and annexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hare, F.K.

    1988-01-01

    In December 1986 a study of the safety of the design, operating procedures and emergency plans associated with Ontario Hydro's nuclear generating plants was commissioned by the government of the province of Ontario. After receiving briefs from many interested groups and individuals, visiting the power plants, and consulting with nuclear industry and regulatory representatives in Canada and other countries, the commissioner presented this report to the Minister of Energy for Ontario. His major conclusion is that Ontario Hydro reactors are being operated safely and at high standards of technical performance. No significant adverse impact has been detected in either the work force or the public. The risk of accidents serious enough to affect the public adversely can never be zero, but is very remote. Major recommendations are that: Ontario Hydro re-examine its operational organization closely and commission a study of factors affecting human performance; and, that priority be given to finding a solution to pressure tube performance problems and to improving in-reactor monitoring. Sixteen other recommendations are presented relating to research and development, information exchange with other organizations, reactor performance, training, severe accident analysis, the provincial nuclear emergency plan, epidemiological studies, the Atomic Energy Control Board, public hearings, and women in the nuclear industry. This volume contains a detailed technical analysis of the CANDU system, its associated safety procedures, emergency measures required in the case of a nuclear accident, and regulation of the Canadian nuclear industry. Annexes provide further details on the operation of the Ontario Nuclear Safety Review

  2. Economic Impacts of White Chick Syndrome in Ontario, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Kathleen E; Hastie, Gordon M; Ojkić, Davor; Brash, Marina L

    2017-09-01

    A cluster of 12 cases of White Chick Syndrome (WCS) in broiler breeder flocks producing affected progeny occurred from June to November 2015 in two broiler chicken hatcheries owned by a single company in Ontario, Canada. Cases were identified by the presence of typical chicks in the hatchery characterized by pale to white down, enlarged abdomens, and occasionally brown wiry fluff on the dorsum of the neck that were generally weak. Affected broiler breeder flocks experienced egg production drops of 0% to 15% and hatchability drops of 1.8% to 49.1%. Some flocks experienced increased feed clean-up duration and/or reduced hatching egg weight. The financial impacts of WCS to affected hatching egg producers averaged $5,912 CAD (US$4,417) per 10 000 hens and were as great as $16,788 CAD (US$12,544) per 10 000 hens. The financial impacts of WCS to the affected hatcheries averaged $1,723 CAD (US$1,287) per 10 000 broiler breeder hens and were as great as $4,096 (US$3,060) per 10 000 hens.

  3. The Need for Consensus and Transparency in Assessing Population-Based Rates of Positive Circumferential Radial Margins in Rectal Cancer: Data from Consecutive Cases in a Large Region of Ontario, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keng, Christine; Coates, Angela; Grubac, Vanja; Lovrics, Peter; DeNardi, Franco; Thabane, Lehana; Simunovic, Marko

    2016-02-01

    A positive circumferential radial margin (CRM) after rectal cancer surgery is an important predictor of local recurrence. The definition of a positive CRM differs internationally, and reported rates vary greatly in the literature. This study used time-series population-based data to assess positive CRM rates in a region over time and to inform future methods of CRM analysis in a defined geographic area. Chart reviews provided relevant data from consecutive patients undergoing rectal cancer surgery between 2006 and 2012 in all hospitals of the authors' region. Outcomes included rates for pathologic examination of CRM, CRM distance reporting, and positive CRM. The rate of positive CRM was calculated using various definitions. The variations included positive margin cutoffs of CRM at 1 mm or less versus 2 mm or less and inclusion or exclusion of cases without CRM assessment. In this study, 1222 consecutive rectal cancer cases were analyzed. The rate for pathology reporting of CRM distance increased from 54.7 to 93.2 % during the study. Depending on how the rate of positive CRM was defined, its value varied 8.5 to 19.4 % in 2006 and 6.0 to 12.5 % in 2012. Using a pre-specified definition, the rate of positive CRM decreased over time from 14.0 to 6.3 %. A marked increase in CRM distance reporting was observed, whereas the rates of positive CRM dropped, suggesting improved pathologist and surgeon performance over time. Changing definitions greatly influenced the rates of positive CRM, indicating the need for more transparency when such population-based rates are reported in the literature.

  4. Viability of mesenchymal stem cells during electrospinning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Zanatta

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Tissue engineering is a technique by which a live tissue can be re-constructed and one of its main goals is to associate cells with biomaterials. Electrospinning is a technique that facilitates the production of nanofibers and is commonly used to develop fibrous scaffolds to be used in tissue engineering. In the present study, a different approach for cell incorporation into fibrous scaffolds was tested. Mesenchymal stem cells were extracted from the wall of the umbilical cord and mononuclear cells from umbilical cord blood. Cells were re-suspended in a 10% polyvinyl alcohol solution and subjected to electrospinning for 30 min under a voltage of 21 kV. Cell viability was assessed before and after the procedure by exclusion of dead cells using trypan blue staining. Fiber diameter was observed by scanning electron microscopy and the presence of cells within the scaffolds was analyzed by confocal laser scanning microscopy. After electrospinning, the viability of mesenchymal stem cells was reduced from 88 to 19.6% and the viability of mononuclear cells from 99 to 8.38%. The loss of viability was possibly due to the high viscosity of the polymer solution, which reduced the access to nutrients associated with electric and mechanical stress during electrospinning. These results suggest that the incorporation of cells during fiber formation by electrospinning is a viable process that needs more investigation in order to find ways to protect cells from damage.

  5. Development and implementation of the Ontario Stroke System: the use of evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill I. Cameron

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The Ontario Stroke System was developed to enhance the quality and continuity of stroke care provided across the care continuum. Research Objective To identify the role evidence played in the development and implementation of the Ontario Stroke System. Methods This study employed a qualitative case study design. In-depth interviews were conducted with six members of the Ontario Stroke System provincial steering committee. Nine focus groups were conducted with: Regional Program Managers, Regional Education Coordinators, and seven acute care teams. To supplement these findings interviews were conducted with eight individuals knowledgeable about national and international models of integrated service delivery. Results Our analyses identified six themes. The first four themes highlight the use of evidence to support the process of system development and implementation including: 1 informing system development; 2 mobilizing governmental support; 3 getting the system up and running; and 4 integrating services across the continuum of care. The final two themes describe the foundation required to support this process: 1 human capacity and 2 mechanisms to share evidence. Conclusion This study provides guidance to support the development and implementation of evidence-based models of integrated service delivery.

  6. A Population-based Study of the Fractionation of Palliative Radiotherapy for Bone Metastasis in Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong, Weidong; Zhang-Salomons, Jina; Hanna, Timothy P.; Mackillop, William J.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the use of palliative radiotherapy (PRT) for bone metastases in Ontario between 1984 and 2001 and identify factors associated with the choice of fractionation. Methods and Materials: Electronic RT records from the nine provincial RT centers in Ontario were linked to the Ontario Cancer Registry to identify all courses of PRT for bone metastases. Results: Between 1984 and 2001, 44,884 patients received 74,432 courses of PRT for bone metastases in Ontario. The mean number of courses per patient was 1.7, and 65% of patients received only a single course of PRT for bone metastasis. The mean number of fractions per course was 3.9. The proportion of patients treated with a single fraction increased from 27.2% in 1984-1986 to 40.3% in 1987-1992 and decreased thereafter. Single fractions were used more frequently in patients with a shorter life expectancy, in older patients, and in patients who lived further from an RT center. Single fractions were used more frequently when the prevailing waiting time for RT was longer. There were wide variations in the use of single fractions among the different RT centers (intercenter range, 11.8-62.3%). Intercenter variations persisted throughout the study period and were not explained by differences in case mix. Conclusions: Despite increasing evidence of the effectiveness of single-fraction PRT for bone metastases, most patients continued to receive fractionated PRT throughout the two decades of this study. Single fractions were used more frequently when waiting times were longer. There was persistent, unexplained variation in the fractionation of PRT among different centers

  7. Inequalities in Sport and Physical Activity Programs in Ontario Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macintosh, Donald

    1981-01-01

    Two recent studies of interschool sports and physical education in Ontario secondary schools examine the issues of differences in interschool sports participation as a reflection of socioeconomic background, gender of the participants, degree of participation, and school size.

  8. Ontario: prostitution-related provisions of Criminal Code struck down.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Sandra Ka Hon

    2011-04-01

    In September 2010, the Ontario Superior Court of Justice held that three provisions of the Criminal Code dealing with prostitution violated sex workers' constitutional rights, were not in accordance with the principles of fundamental justice and must be struck down.

  9. 2001 USACE LRE Topobathy Lidar: Lake Ontario (NY)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA Office for Coastal Management received the 2001 Lake Ontario dataset with 2 separate metadata records in 2013 on a hard-drive device from the USGS Center for...

  10. Why we must move quickly to open Ontario's power market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, J.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presented issues regarding the reform in Ontario's electricity sector and why the Independent Power Producer's Society of Ontario (IPPSO) believes it is necessary to open the electricity market in the province as soon as possible. The 400 members of IPPSO include developers, suppliers, consultants and various professionals working in the fields of co-generation, small hydro, biomass, wind energy and other technologies with a total generating capacity of about 1600 MW in Ontario. The government of Ontario recently announced four principles for implementing competition in the electricity sector which were protecting the consumers and offering choice, creating a strong business climate, protecting the environment, and supporting innovation and alternative energy development. This paper described the possible indicators of success in implementing these four principles and provided a historical perspective on the motivation for bringing in competition

  11. Full cost accounting for decision making at Ontario Hydro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plagiannakos, T.

    1996-01-01

    Ontario Hydro's approach to full cost accounting (FCA) was outlined in response to questions raised earlier, in another forum, regarding Ontario Hydro's views on FCA. FCA was defined as an evaluation framework (as opposed to an accounting system) which tries to account for the internal (private) as well as the external (environment and human health) costs and benefits and integrate them into business decisions. When the external impacts cannot be monetized, qualitative evaluations are used based on the damage costing approach, which Ontario Hydro prefers to the cost of control method recommended by its critics. In general, however, Ontario Hydro is not opposed to FCA in so far as it puts the Utility in a better position to make more informed decisions, improve environmental cost management, avoid future costs, enhance revenue, improve environmental quality, contribute to environmental policy, and contribute to sustainable development. 1 fig

  12. Brief on nuclear emergency planning and preparedness in Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    Ontario has an excellent conceptual plan to ensure the safety of its inhabitants in the event of a nuclear accident anywhere in the world. This plan still needs to be translated into tangible preparedness to deal with such an emergency. The province is confident that, with the assistance of Ontario Hydro, a high level of nuclear emergency preparedness will soon be established for the people of the province

  13. New rules for competition: Ontario to cap power plant emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1999-01-01

    The Ontario government through the Dept. of the Environment announced on November 16, 1999 that it would cut the emissions from Ontario coal burning power plants that cause acid rain and smog. This announcement was a much anticipated clarification of the government's plans to clean up the power industry since the enactment of the Electricity Competition Act more than one year past. The announcement signals the beginning of a public discussion process between government and stakeholders on the environmental rules for electricity generation in Ontario. The Ontario government is expected to release draft regulations for controlling coal burning power plant emissions in the near future. Consulations with stakeholders on the regulations, as well as the rules for disclosure and labeling, are anticipated to begin in a few months. The announcement set out four principles for environmental performance in the competitive electricity market. Anti-smog requirements will be included in the stringent environmental requirements to be built into Ontario's new, competitive electricity market. The strong measures which the government will put into place when the market opens later in 2000 include: (1) regulations to cut smog and acid gas emissions for all Ontario electricity generators on the grid - these regulations will include Ontario Hydro's voluntary nitrogen oxide limits; (2) emission performance standards to define maximum acceptable emission levels for all generators wanting to sell in the Ontario market; (3) a framework to support opportunities to make greater use of more efficient, environmentally responsible technologies; and (4) disclosure requirements to ensure that electricity consumers can understand the environmental implications of their purchasing decisions

  14. A survey of medical quality assurance programs in Ontario hospitals.

    OpenAIRE

    Barrable, B

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence and types of medical quality assurance practices in Ontario hospitals. DESIGN: Survey. SETTING: All teaching, community, chronic care, rehabilitation and psychiatric hospitals that were members of the Ontario Hospital Association as of May 1990. PARTICIPANTS: The person deemed by the chief executive officer of each hospital to be most responsible for medical administration. INTERVENTION: A questionnaire to obtain information on each hospital's use of cri...

  15. New directions in nuclear waste disposal in Ontario Hydro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nash, K.

    1996-01-01

    Ontario Hydro Nuclear has financial, environmental, safety and public acceptance business objectives which must be met to achieve long term sustainable success. Short term objectives of achieving nuclear excellence in safety, cost and production are vital to this success. Ontario Hydro's nuclear waste and decommissioning liabilities must be managed within these objectives. This paper outlines the financial environmental and societal considerations and responsibility framework for managing these liabilities. (author)

  16. Cancer mortality among immigrant populations in Ontario, 1969 through 1973.

    OpenAIRE

    Newman, A. M.; Spengler, R. F.

    1984-01-01

    Ontario is home to a sizeable, recently established immigrant population whose cancer mortality has until now remained unexamined. The province's six largest immigrant groups (British, Italian, German, Dutch, Polish and Soviet) were investigated to compare their cancer mortality experience with that prevailing in Ontario and in their countries of birth for the period 1969 through 1973. Standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) were computed from data from Statistics Canada and the World Health Org...

  17. The Financial Feasibility of Anaerobic Digestion for Ontario's Livestock Industries

    OpenAIRE

    Weersink, Alfons; Mallon, Shawn

    2007-01-01

    This report is an investigation of the financial feasibility of farm based anaerobic digestion investments under Ontario's Standard Offer Contract electricity prices. Using Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs (OMAFRA) Agricultural Anaerobic Digestion Calculation Spreadsheet (AADCS) anaerobic digestion inputs, outputs, cost and revenues were estimated and used to conduct a financial analysis on the feasibility of four sized farm base anaerobic digestion investments. The res...

  18. Cross currents : hydroelectricity and the engineering of northern Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manore, J.L.

    1999-01-01

    The history of hydroelectric development in northern Ontario was reviewed and analysed with special emphasis on the developments along the Mattagami and Abitibi Rivers. The objective was to examine the important factors that shaped modern hydroelectric development in Canada. System builders, the privately owned Nesbitt Thomson Company, the publicly owned Hydro Electric Power Corporation of Ontario and the eventual evolution of the single power system under Ontario Hydro are chronicled. Broad historical themes such as the technological impacts, regionalism, indigenous rights, plus environmental and economic issues are examined, in addition to an appreciation of the importance of electricity in the manufacturing sector of Ontario, the impact of hydroelectric development on the northern environment and on the northern First Nations, who rely on rivers for their subsistence. Until fairly recently, government policies and interpretations of law often excluded the recognition of Aboriginal uses of river systems, thereby limiting First Nations' peoples ability to practice traditional ways of life. In essence, the book is an account of how the northeastern power system in Ontario shaped the social, political and natural environments and how the development of northeastern power sources by southern power developers shaped the regional interactions between Ontario's north and south. refs., figs

  19. Design, construction and operation of Ontario Hydro's CANDU plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, P.G.

    1981-06-01

    Ontario Hydro has been producing electricity commercially from nuclear power since 1968, using CANDU reactors which have proved enormously successful. The 206-MW Douglas Point station, nearly 10 times larger than the first Canadian power reactor, NPD-2, resulted from a cooperative effort between Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., the provincial government of Ontario, and Ontario Hydro. This approach led to a basic working relationship between the parties, with Ontario Hydro acting as project manager and builder, and AECL acting as consultant with respect to the nuclear components. Before Douglas Point was fully commissioned Ontario Hydro was ready to commit itself to more nuclear stations, and work was started on the four-unit Pickering nuclear generating station. Multi-unit stations were adopted to achieve economies of scale, and the concept has been retained for all subsequent nuclear power plants constructed in the province. The organization of Ontario Hydro's project management, construction, and operation of nuclear generating stations is described. Performance of the existing stations and cost of the power they produce have been entirely acceptable

  20. Cost Assessment Methodology and Economic Viability of Tidal Energy Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Segura

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The exploitation of technologies with which to harness the energy from ocean currents will have considerable possibilities in the future thanks to their enormous potential for electricity production and their high predictability. In this respect, the development of methodologies for the economic viability of these technologies is fundamental to the attainment of a consistent quantification of their costs and the discovery of their economic viability, while simultaneously attracting investment in these technologies. This paper presents a methodology with which to determine the economic viability of tidal energy projects, which includes a technical study of the life-cycle costs into which the development of a tidal farm can be decomposed: concept and definition, design and development, manufacturing, installation, operation and maintenance and dismantling. These cost structures are additionally subdivided by considering their sub-costs and bearing in mind the main components of the tidal farm: the nacelle, the supporting tidal energy converter structure and the export power system. Furthermore, a technical study is developed in order to obtain an estimation of the annual energy produced (and, consequently, the incomes generated if the electric tariff is known by considering its principal attributes: the characteristics of the current, the ability of the device to capture energy and its ability to convert and export the energy. The methodology has been applied (together with a sensibility analysis to the particular case of a farm composed of first generation tidal energy converters in one of the Channel Island Races, the Alderney Race, in the U.K., and the results have been attained by means of the computation of engineering indexes, such as the net present value, the internal rate of return, the discounted payback period and the levelized cost of energy, which indicate that the proposed project is economically viable for all the case studies.

  1. Ontario Business Survey Program on energy : impacts of power failure on Ontario businesses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The Ontario Chamber of Commerce conducted a survey for its members between August 19-23, 2003 to determine the impact of the massive power failure that took place on August 14, 2003. This paper presents the results of the survey which are based on a total of 929 respondents across Ontario. The primary businesses that participated in the survey were: manufacturing, service, technology, commercial, retail, automotive, steel, forestry, and resource businesses. 78 per cent of the respondents replied that the power disruption had a negative impact on their business. 48 per cent of the respondents were without power for 11-24 hours. 65 per cent of the businesses did not have a blackout contingency plan in place, but 63 per cent responded that they will likely develop a plan for future power failures. The survey also asked business members how they would rate the federal, provincial and municipal government's response to the emergency. The participants ranked the top 3 actions that governments can take to prevent future outages as follows: (1) review possible changes to the interconnected grid system, (2) ensure sufficient supply within Ontario, and (3) invest in alternative forms of energy such as solar and wind power. Other recommendations were to implement a sliding scale of energy pricing to reflect the true cost of energy. It was suggested that tax incentives should be offered to encourage energy conservation and the use of alternative energy sources. 2.6 per cent of the respondents suggested that excess energy should not be sold to neighbouring jurisdictions. 1 tab., 6 figs

  2. Expanding exports, increasing smog : Ontario Power Generation's and Hydro One's strategies to continue coal-fired electricity generation in Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibbons, J.

    2002-06-01

    The production of coal-fired electricity increased by approximately 150 per cent in Ontario between 1995 and 2000. As a result, the smog-causing emissions generated by the five coal-fired power plants operated by Ontario Power Generation caused an increase in smog and worsened air quality in the province as well as affecting air quality as far afield as the Atlantic provinces. Between 2002 and 2005, it is expected that the Pickering and Bruce nuclear plants will be returned to service, making the electricity generated by the coal plants surplus to Ontario's needs. Increasing this surplus are the planned natural gas generating stations. Ontario Power Generation is planning on using this surplus to export it to the United States rather than phasing out its reliance on coal. The increase in exports to the United States Northeast and Midwest is planned with Hydro One, already busy increasing its transmission capacity to the United States by 1,000 megawatt (MW). This plan involves laying 975 MW submarine cable from the Nanticoke Generating Station (operated by Ontario Power Generation) under Lake Erie to Pennsylvania, Ohio, or both states. At the moment, the exports are constrained by the government emissions limits imposed by the Ontario government on sulphur dioxide and nitrogen oxides. This constraint could be removed if Ontario Power Generation decides to pay further for pollution controls for sulphur dioxide and nitrogen oxides at its coal stations. Unfortunately, increasing the exports would also result in emissions increases for 28 other uncapped pollutants such as lead, mercury and arsenic. The author recommended that the Ontario government ban non-emergency coal-fired electricity exports to improve air quality in the province. refs., 8 figs

  3. Practice patterns in the management of patients with differentiated thyroid cancer in Ontario Canada 2000-2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The extent of treatment for differentiated thyroid cancer remains controversial. The objective of this study was to describe the variations in practice prior to diagnosis and for the first year after diagnosis, including the investigations, the extent of surgery and the use of RAI 131, for all patients with thyroid cancer (TC) treated Jan 1 2000 to Dec 2008 across Ontario Canada. Method Population-based study of all patients who had a therapeutic surgical procedure for TC based on the data holdings of the Institute of Clinical Investigative Sciences (ICES) linking the Ontario Cancer Registry to the Ontario Health Insurance Plan and to the Canadian Institutes of Health Information. The analysis includes comparisons between health care utilization/geographic regions and between treating specialties. The study population was 12957 patients. Results There was a 112% increase in case detection over 9 years. Overall the initial (index) surgery was less-than-total thyroidectomy (LTT) in 37.6% and 63.4% of the patients who had total thyroidectomy (TT) as an index surgery went on to adjuvant RAI, however there was wide variation in all aspects of patient care across the province, between Local Health Networks and between surgical specialties. Conclusion In Ontario, there was wide variation for most aspects of the management of TC and, as the incidence of TC is increasing at least 7% per year in females, these data provide a foundation for future discussions, the provision of health care services and research. PMID:25055715

  4. The cybernetics of viability: an overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nechansky, Helmut

    2011-10-01

    A three-level approach to viability is developed, considering (1) living systems, (2) a niche, understood as the area within the reach of their actions, and (3) an environment. A systematic analysis of the interrelations between these levels shows that living systems emerge with matter/energy processing systems. These can add controller structures when producing excess energy. A three-sensor controller structure enables a living system to deal with unfavourable and scarce environments. Further evolution of these controller structures offers improved ways to act on niches. Maintaining niches in scarce environments can require technology or economy. So social systems emerge, which are understood as aggregates of living systems. Basic patterns of interactions within social systems are analysed. So the introduction of the notion of the niche into the discussion of viability allows us to explain phenomena ranging from properties of single living systems to societal organization.

  5. Market Myths and Facts - the Ontario Context

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorey, S.

    2007-07-01

    The world has learned much about electricity markets and what they can and can't do over the past few years, but some myths persist. Why they persist is a subject for those who study politics, interests and influence. This paper provides a perspective on myths which have affected the reliable and economic delivery of electricity to customers, particularly with respect to transmission. Hydro One effectively provides the transmission network for the Province of Ontario, Canada. As Hydro One is a wires company, the paper is not intended to address the issues which affect the generation or conservation sectors of the industry, except where they directly relate to the wires. The proposition of this paper is that electricity transmission is best treated as an essential public good. Transmission as a market participant and a traded commodity has generally not worked with respect to assuring that the system continues to be developed to meet the basic need of customers for reliable and affordable electricity. (auth)

  6. Three new bachelors of photonics in Ontario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nantel, Marc; Beda, Johann; Grevatt, Treena; Chebbi, Brahim; Jessop, Paul; Song, Shaowen

    2004-10-01

    After the introduction in 2001 of community college programs at the Photonics Technician/Technologist levels, the need to cover the photonics educational space at the undergraduate level was addressed. In the last year, three very different new undergraduate degrees in photonics have started to develop in Ontario. These programs are presented in this paper. The Honours B.Sc. in Photonics at Wilfrid Laurier University (Waterloo) will develop a strong understanding of the theory and application of photonics, with practical hands-on exposure to optics, fibre optics, and lasers. This program benefits from the particularity that the department offering it combines both Physics and Computer Science. At McMaster University, the Engineering Physics program will provide students with a broad background in basic Engineering, Mathematics, Electronics, and Semiconductors, as well as an opportunity to pursue Photonics in greater depth and to have that fact recognized in the program designation. The Niagara and Algonquin College Bachelor of Applied Technology in Photonics program is co-op and joint between the two institutions. Emphasis is placed on the applied aspects of the field, with the more hands-on experimental learning taking precedence in the first years and the more advanced theoretical subjects following in the latter years.

  7. Post Chernobyl safety review at Ontario Hydro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frescura, G.M.; Luxat, J.C.; Jobe, C.

    1991-01-01

    It is generally recognized that the Chernobyl Unit 4 accident did not reveal any new phenomena which had not been previously identified in safety analyses. However, the accident provided a tragic reminder of the potential consequences of reactivity initiated accidents (RIAs) and stimulated nuclear plant operators to review their safety analyses, operating procedures and various operational and management aspects of nuclear safety. Concerning Ontario Hydro, the review of the accident performed by the corporate body responsible for nuclear safety policy and by the Atomic Energy Control Board (the Regulatory Body) led to a number of specific recommendations for further action by various design, analysis and operation groups. These recommendations are very comprehensive in terms of reactor safety issues considered. The general conclusion of the various studies carried out in response to the recommendations, is that the CANDU safety design and the procedures in place to identify and mitigate the consequences of accidents are adequate. Improvements to the reliability of the Pickering NGSA shutdown system and to some aspects of safety management and staff training, although not essential, are possible and would be pursued. In support of this conclusion, the paper describes some of the studies that were carried out and discusses the findings. The first part of the paper deals with safety design aspects. While the second is concerned with operational aspects

  8. Expanding the epidemiologic profile: risk factors for active tuberculosis in people immigrating to Ontario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wobeser, Wendy L.; Yuan, Lilian; Naus, Monika; Corey, Paul; Edelson, Jeff; Heywood, Neil; Holness, D. Linn

    2000-01-01

    Background Many people immigrating to Canada come from countries with a high burden of tuberculosis. The aim of this study was to develop a detailed epidemiologic profile of foreign-born people with tuberculosis living in Ontario. Methods In this population-based case-control study, cases of tuberculosis diagnosed in 1994-1995 were identified from the database of the Ontario Reportable Disease Information Service and were considered eligible for analysis if a record of landing (receipt of permission to establish residence in Canada) from the period 1986-1995 was found in the Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) database, if the person was at least 11 years of age at the time their visa was issued, and if the person had not been diagnosed with tuberculosis before becoming legally landed in Canada. Control subjects, who met the same criteria as the case subjects but who did not have tuberculosis in 1994-1995, were identified from a CIC database for landed immigrants. Results A total of 1341 cases of tuberculosis in foreign-born people were reported in Ontario in 1994-1995. A record of landing was found in CIC databases for 1099 of these people, 224 of whom were not legally landed at the time of diagnosis. In total, 602 cases met the inclusion criteria. The 2 strongest determinants of risk among those who had become landed within the preceding 10 years were referral for medical surveillance by immigration officials (odds ratio [OR] 3.8, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.6-6.0) and world region of origin (Somalia [OR 67.7, 95% CI 31.3-154.9], Vietnam [OR 25.0, 95% CI 12.5-50.0], the Philippines [OR 11.9, 95% CI 6.0-23.3], other sub-Saharan African countries [OR 11.6, 95% CI 5.7-23.2], India [OR 9.7, 95% CI 4.9-18.9], China [OR 6.1, 95% CI 3.1-12.1], other Asian countries [OR 4.7, 95% CI 2.4-9.1], the Middle East [OR 4.1, 95% CI 2.0-8.3], Latin America [OR 1.9, 95% CI 0.9-3.8), and the former socialist countries of Europe [OR 1.8, 95% CI 0.8-3.8]; the reference

  9. Myocardial viability assessment using nuclear imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsunari, Ichiro; Hisada, Kinichi; Taki, Junichi; Nakajima, Kenichi; Tonami, Norihisa

    2003-01-01

    Myocardial assessment continues to be an issue in patients with coronary artery disease and left ventricular dysfunction. Nuclear imaging has long played an important role in this field. In particular, PET imaging using 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose is regarded as the metabolic gold standard of tissue viability, which has been supported by a wide clinical experience. Viability assessment using SPECT techniques has gained more wide-spread clinical acceptance than PET, because it is more widely available at lower cost. Moreover, technical advances in SPECT technology such as gated-SPECT further improve the diagnostic accuracy of the test. However, other imaging techniques such as dobutamine echocardiography have recently emerged as competitors to nuclear imaging. It is also important to note that they sometimes may work in a complementary fashion to nuclear imaging, indicating that an appropriate use of these techniques may significantly improve their overall accuracy. In keeping these circumstances in mind, further efforts are necessary to further improve the diagnostic performance of nuclear imaging as a reliable viability test. (author) 107 refs

  10. Viability Test Device for anisakid nematodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Kroeger

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Up to now the visual inspection of mobility of isolated anisakid larvae serves as a measure of viability and possible risk of infection. This paper presents a new method to rule out unreliability – caused by the temporary immobility of the larvae and by the human uncertainty factor of visual observation. By means of a Near infrared (NIR imaging method, elastic curvature energies and geometric shape parameters were determined from contours, and used as a measure of viability. It was based on the modelling of larvae as a cylindrical membrane system. The interaction between curvatures, contraction of the longitudinal muscles, and inner pressure enabled the derivation of viability from stationary form data. From series of spectrally signed images within a narrow wavelength range, curvature data of the larvae were determined. Possible mobility of larvae was taken into account in statistical error variables. Experiments on individual living larvae, long-term observations of Anisakis larvae, and comparative studies of the staining method and the VTD measurements of larvae from the tissue of products confirmed the effectiveness of this method. The VTD differentiated clearly between live and dead nematode larvae isolated from marinated, deep-frozen and salted products. The VTD has been proven as excellent method to detect living anisakid nematode larvae in fishery products and is seen as useful tool for fish processing industry and control authorities. Keywords: Biophysics

  11. Is there a future for coal in Ontario?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, G.

    2004-01-01

    This PowerPoint presentation examined the efficacy of a governmental decision in 2003 to close all Ontario coal stations by 2007. Coal currently represents one quarter of Ontario's energy and capacity. Projected supply and demand gaps for Ontario were presented for up to 2020. Ontario's supply options were outlined. It was noted that between $30 and $40 billion in investment in the electricity sector will be needed over the next 10 to 15 years. It was observed that closing coal plants may reduce pollution by 6 per cent at a cost of $2 billion. More than half the smog affecting Ontario comes from the United States, while much of the remaining half is caused by transportation emissions. Details of energy strategies related to coal in the United States were discussed. New coal power plant technologies include supercritical combustion; advanced air pollution control; circulating fluidized bed combustion and integrated coal gasification combined cycles. Coal power plant performance criteria were presented. Various research programs in the United States were reviewed, and roadmap performance targets were presented. It was concluded that high prices and uncertainty for natural gas fired options may reinforce views on the need to rethink coal closures. A strategy was recommended in which Ontario pursued economic options for reducing emissions across all sectors. New investments in latest and best technology for emissions reduction in Ontario's coal-fired stations were recommended, as well as a North American agreement on clean air, and increased Canadian participation in U.S. technology development efforts for clean coal and zero emissions plants by 2025. tabs., figs

  12. Translating Research into Practice: Establishing a Network of Climate Change Practitioners in Ontario, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milner, G. A.

    2017-12-01

    Climate research and information continues to emerge at a rapid pace from the academic and scientific community. Decisions being made today by planners, engineers and staff across the Province of Ontario rely on science and information to plan and build our systems for the long term. Of course, as scientific information evolves continuously to produce lessons learned and new evidence, on the ground decisions often become entrenched in outdated information and need updating. Given this, bridging the gap between research to policy, and research to practice is of critical importance as the Province of Ontario upgrades its infrastructure, plans for long term growth in population within the Great Lakes Basin, and manages its natural systems and resources responsibly. The Ontario Climate Consortium (OCC) is an interdisciplinary network of academics and practitioners established in 2011 in the province that works to mobilize climate research findings towards building capacity, inspiring climate action, and training end-users with the latest science. The OCC has collaborated with more than 39 organizations throughout Ontario and across Canada, including government agencies at all levels (local, provincial and federal), non-profit organizations and private sector companies. This presentation will describe the foundations of climate action in Ontario, Canada including the landscape of climate adaptation practitioners from both public and private organizations. Furthermore, this presentation will feature lessons learned from the OCC network, including: 1) What comprises effective partnerships to undertake climate change adaptation planning for cities; 2) How to build the foundation for capacity at agencies with limited resources or expertise in the climate change field; and 3) How to successfully mobilize complex climate data for end-users to produce usable tools (through a case study research project). The latter will present findings from a two-year research project

  13. Projecting the success of plant restoration with population viability analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, T.J.; Bowles, M.L.; McEachern, A.K.; Brigham, C.A.; Schwartz, M.W.

    2003-01-01

    Conserving viable populations of plant species requires that they have high probabilities of long-term persistence within natural habitats, such as a chance of extinction in 100 years of less than 5% (Menges 1991, 1998; Brown 1994; Pavlik 1994; Chap. 1, this Vol.). For endangered and threatened species that have been severely reduces in range and whose habitats have been fragmented, important species conservation strategies may include augmenting existing populations or restoring new viable populations (Bowles and Whelan 1994; Chap. 2, this Vol.). Restoration objectives may include increasing population numbers to reduce extinction probability, deterministic manipulations to develop a staged cohort structure, or more complex restoration of a desired genetic structure to allow outcrossing or increase effective population size (DeMauro 1993, 1994; Bowles et al. 1993, 1998; Pavlik 1994; Knapp and Dyer 1998; Chap. 2, this Vol.). These efforts may require translocation of propagules from existing (in situ) populations, or from ex situ botanic gardens or seed storage facilities (Falk et al. 1996; Guerrant and Pavlik 1998; Chap. 2, this Vol.). Population viability analysis (PVA) can provide a critical foundation for plant restoration, as it models demographic projections used to evaluate the probability of population persistence and links plant life history with restoration strategies. It is unknown how well artificially created populations will meet demographic modeling requirements (e.g., due to artificial cohort transitions) and few, if any, PVAs have been applied to restorations. To guide application of PVA to restored populations and to illustrate potential difficulties, we examine effects of planting different life stages, model initial population sizes needed to achieve population viability, and compare demographic characteristics between natural and restored populations. We develop and compare plant population restoration viability analysis (PRVA) case studies of

  14. Clinical mastitis in dairy cattle in Ontario: frequency of occurrence and bacteriological isolates.

    OpenAIRE

    Sargeant, J M; Scott, H M; Leslie, K E; Ireland, M J; Bashiri, A

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the frequency of occurrence of clinical mastitis in dairy herds in Ontario. The study group consisted of 65 dairy farms involved in a 2-year observational study, which included recording all clinical mastitis cases and milk sampling of quarters with clinical mastitis. Lactational incidence risks of 9.8% for abnormal milk only, 8.2% for abnormal milk with a hard or swollen udder, and 4.4% for abnormal milk plus systemic signs of illness related to ma...

  15. The effects of storage conditions on the viability of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SARAKA DANIEL

    2015-01-07

    Jan 7, 2015 ... E-mail: ndsaraka@yahoo.fr, ndsaraka@gmail.com. Tel: 225 ..... sample viability and control of contaminants that may mask the ... viability and composition of the Escherichia coli flora in faecal ... Microbiologie alimentaire, 8e.

  16. Pollen diversity, viability and floral structure of some Musa genotypes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pollen diversity, viability and floral structure of some Musa genotypes. ... This experiment was designed to study the floral structure, pollen morphology and the potential pollen viability of five Musa genotypes obtained ... HOW TO USE AJOL.

  17. Heat wave generates questions about Ontario's generation capacity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horne, D.

    2005-01-01

    Concerns regarding Ontario's power generation capacity were raised following a major blackout which occurred in August 2003. Power demand reached 26,170 MW during the weeks leading to the blackout, forcing the Independent Electricity System Operator (IESO) to ask residents to reduce electricity use during the day. The grid operator had also issued a forecast that Toronto could face rolling blackouts during times of heavy power demand. Ontario power consumption records were set in June and July of 2003 due to a heat wave, with hourly demand exceeding 25,000 MW on 53 occasions. Ontario was forced to import up to 3,400 MW (13 per cent of its power needs) from neighbouring provinces and the United States. During that period, the price of power had risen sharply to over 30 cents a kilowatt hour, although household consumers were still charged in the 5 to 10 cent range per kilowatt hour. However, it was noted that taxpayers will eventually bear the cost of importing power. The IESO noted that importing electricity is cheaper than the generation available in Ontario and that it is more economical to import, based on the market clearing price of all generators. In 2004, the IESO purchased 6 per cent of their electricity from the United States. That figure is expected to increase for 2005. Ontario generators produced 26.9 million MWh more in the summer of 2005 than during the same period in 2004 to meet electricity demand levels. It was noted that although importing power presently meets peak demand, the IESO agrees there is a need for new generation within Ontario. In addition to restarting Ontario's Pickering and Bruce nuclear facilities, more than 3,300 MW of new gas-fired generation is under construction or approved, and more than 9,000 MW are in various stages of approval. This paper discussed the effect of high energy costs on industry and Ontario's ability to meet future electricity demand in comparison to neighbouring jurisdictions. Issues regarding grid maintenance

  18. Ontario hydro's aqueous discharge monitoring program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehdi, S.H.; Booth, M.R.; Massey, R.; Herrmann, O.

    1992-01-01

    The Province of Ontario has legislated a comprehensive monitoring program for waterborne trace contaminants called MISA - Municipal Industrial Strategy for Abatement. The electric power sector regulation applies to all generating stations (Thermal, Nuclear, Hydraulic). The program commenced in June, 1990. The current phase of the regulation requires the operators of the plants to measure the detailed composition of the direct discharges to water for a one year period. Samples are to be taken from about 350 identified streams at frequencies varying from continuous and daily to quarterly. The data from this program will be used to determine the scope of the ongoing monitoring program and control. This paper discusses the preparation and planning, commissioning, training and early operations phase of the MISA program. In response, the central Analytical Laboratory and Environmental staff worked to develop a sampling and analytical approach which uses the plant laboratories, the central analytical laboratory and a variety of external laboratories. The approach considered analytical frequency, sample stability, presence of radioactivity, suitability of staff, laboratory qualifications, need for long term internal capabilities, availability of equipment, difficulty of analysis, relationship to other work and problems, capital and operating costs. The complexity of the sampling program required the development of a computer based schedule to ensure that all required samples were taken as required with phase shifts between major sampling events at different plants to prevent swamping the capability of the central or external laboratories. New equipment has been purchased and installed at each plant to collect 24 hour composite samples. Analytical equipment has been purchased for each plant for analysis of perishable analytes or of samples requiring daily or thrice weekly analysis. Training programs and surveys have been implemented to assure production of valid data

  19. Investigating Summer Thermal Stratification in Lake Ontario

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, S. C.; Arifin, R. R.; Craig, P. M.; Hamlet, A. F.

    2017-12-01

    Seasonal temperature variations establish strong vertical density gradients (thermoclines) between the epilimnion and hypolimnion. Accurate simulation of vertical mixing and seasonal stratification of large lakes is a crucial element of the thermodynamic coupling between lakes and the atmosphere in integrated models. Time-varying thermal stratification patterns can be accurately simulated with the versatile Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (EFDC). Lake Ontario bathymetry was interpolated onto a 2-km-resolution curvilinear grid with vertical layering using a new approach in EFDC+, the so-called "sigma-zed" coordinate system which allows the number of vertical layers to be varied based on water depth. Inflow from the Niagara River and outflow to the St. Lawrence River in conjunction with hourly meteorological data from seven local weather stations plus three-hourly data from the North American Regional Reanalysis govern the hydrodynamic and thermodynamic responses of the Lake. EFDC+'s evaporation algorithm was updated to more accurately simulate net surface heat fluxes. A new vertical mixing scheme from Vinçon-Leite that implements different eddy diffusivity formulations above and below the thermocline was compared to results from the original Mellor-Yamada vertical mixing scheme. The model was calibrated by adjusting solar-radiation absorption coefficients in addition to background horizontal and vertical mixing parameters. Model skill was evaluated by comparing measured and simulated vertical temperature profiles at shallow (20 m) and deep (180 m) locations on the Lake. These model improvements, especially the new sigma-zed vertical discretization, accurately capture thermal-stratification patterns with low root-mean-squared errors when using the Vinçon-Leite vertical mixing scheme.

  20. Selling from Ontario into the U.S. midwest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, B.

    2002-01-01

    The market structure of the Midwest Independent System Operator (MISO) for the electric power grid was described with reference to physical bilateral markets, multi-control areas, and MISO services such as security coordination, congestion management, billing, generator interconnections, tariff administration, energy imbalance, market monitoring, and electronic scheduling. The drivers impacting MISO development include MISO-PJM-SPP common market initiative, the FERC Standard Market Design initiative, the integration of alliance companies with MISO, and the division of functional responsibilities between RTOs and ITCs. The characteristics of the Michigan market were described, along with participation in the midwest (Ohio and Michigan) wholesale and retail markets. It was noted that in order for Ontario to sell to the midwest, the Ontario market design would need a successful export bid each hour to get power out of the province. Sales of ancillary services from Ontario-based generation are not permitted in the initial Ontario market design. Energy and transmission is currently bundled in Ontario tariffs. 1 fig

  1. Selling from Ontario into the U.S. midwest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, B. [Ontario Power Generation Inc., Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2002-07-01

    The market structure of the Midwest Independent System Operator (MISO) for the electric power grid was described with reference to physical bilateral markets, multi-control areas, and MISO services such as security coordination, congestion management, billing, generator interconnections, tariff administration, energy imbalance, market monitoring, and electronic scheduling. The drivers impacting MISO development include MISO-PJM-SPP common market initiative, the FERC Standard Market Design initiative, the integration of alliance companies with MISO, and the division of functional responsibilities between RTOs and ITCs. The characteristics of the Michigan market were described, along with participation in the midwest (Ohio and Michigan) wholesale and retail markets. It was noted that in order for Ontario to sell to the midwest, the Ontario market design would need a successful export bid each hour to get power out of the province. Sales of ancillary services from Ontario-based generation are not permitted in the initial Ontario market design. Energy and transmission is currently bundled in Ontario tariffs. 1 fig.

  2. The Ontario Psychosocial Oncology Framework: a quality improvement tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Madeline; Green, Esther

    2013-05-01

    To overview the newly developed Psychosocial Health Care for Cancer Patients and Their Families: A Framework to Guide Practice in Ontario and Guideline Recommendations in the context of Canadian psychosocial oncology care and propose strategies for guideline uptake and implementation. Recommendations from the 2008 Institute of Medicine standard Cancer Care for the Whole Patient: Meeting Psychosocial Health Needs were adapted into the Ontario Psychosocial Oncology (PSO) Framework. Existing practice guidelines developed by the Canadian Partnership against Cancer and Cancer Care Ontario and standards developed by the Canadian Association of Psychosocial Oncology are supporting resources for adopting a quality improvement (QI) approach to the implementation of the framework in Ontario. The developed PSO Framework, including 31 specific actionable recommendations, is intended to improve the quality of comprehensive cancer care at both the provider and system levels. Important QI change management processes are described as Educate - raising awareness among medical teams of the significance of psychosocial needs of patients, Evidence - developing a research evidence base for patient care benefits from psychosocial interventions, and Electronics - using technology to collect patient reported outcomes of both physical and emotional symptoms. The Ontario PSO Framework is unique and valuable in providing actionable recommendations that can be implemented through QI processes. Overall, the result will be improved psychosocial health care for the cancer population. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Facing the challenges of nuclear power at Ontario Power Generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howes, H.

    1999-01-01

    Nuclear power represents a major portion of Ontario Power Generation's generation mix and it will be the bedrock upon which we build a successful, competitive company. Our nuclear units offer many environmental and economic benefits, the one most relevant to this meeting is their significant contribution to the relatively low carbon intensity of Ontario's and Canada's electricity supply. In recent weeks, we have listened with great interest to the endorsement by our federal Minister of the Environment of nuclear technology as a means of reducing global warming. But endorsements of this type alone are not sufficient to ensure that nuclear remains an acceptable option for managing greenhouse gas emissions. Without public acceptance and support, the entire nuclear investment is endangered. At OPG we face three challenges to building this public support: we must continue to improve our safety margins and operating performance; we must continue to improve the environmental performance at our stations; and we must increase our community outreach. Today I would like to focus on the last two challenges and the actions that we are taking to maintain our social and environmental 'licence to operate.' But before I describe these initiatives, I will tell you about: the new company - Ontario Power Generation; the changes in store for Ontario's electricity sector; and our greenhouse gas emissions - the legacy from Ontario Hydro. (author)

  4. Solar and the future of Ontario's electricity supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMonagle, R.

    2005-01-01

    The potential contribution of solar energy to Ontario's electricity supply was evaluated in this PowerPoint presentation. Only 3.5 per cent of Canada's photovoltaic (PV) systems are connected to the electricity grid. However, 47 per cent of all homes in Ontario have the potential to install 3 kW PV arrays, and the solar industry has the potential to achieve growth rates of between 50 to 75 per cent, with medium term sustainable growth estimated at 30 to 40 per cent annually. The benefits of grid-connected solar energy include employment and wealth creation in Ontario; reductions in peak demand; and improved grid efficiency. It was noted that the price of solar PV is declining. Various market niches for solar energy technologies were outlined, and the targeting of early adopters was recommended as a first market for PV growth. An overview of the value of PV build-ups in California was presented, as well details of international tariffs and rates. A 10 year program leading to the installation of 15,000 PV systems or 40 MWp of installed capacity in Ontario by 2015 was outlined, as well as a plan for solar financing. It was concluded that priming the market now will mean that solar will be prepared to contribute to Ontario's supply during the 2015-2025 period, when its price will be competitive. refs., tabs., figs

  5. Emission trading in Ontario : Understanding and managing compliance risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, A. [Mirant Canada Energy Marketing ltd., Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2002-07-01

    Mirant is one of the top five American energy marketer of power and gas, with more than 20,700 megawatts (MW) of electric generating capacity worldwide, of which 13,600 is in North America. The author presented a chart displaying nitrogen oxide emissions in Ontario, followed by another chart with the emissions of sulphur dioxide also in Ontario. The emission targets for the power sector were reviewed, as were the nitrogen oxide emission limits from 2002 to 2010. The major features of the Ontario legislation were discussed, covering allowance allocation, unlimited banking and limited provisions for credit. Ontario fossil capacity was reviewed, followed by emission allowance allocation. The issues and risks for Independent Power Producers were discussed. They included the emission rate compared to that of the competition, how much the facility was run last year and how much you expect to run it next year, the possibility of buying allowances or credits and at what cost. Looking to the future, the government of Ontario has announced bold actions on industry emissions. The initiatives include consultations, emission limits for both nitrogen oxide and sulphur dioxide from all major industrial emitters, and tighter province-wide targets and timelines for nitrogen oxide and sulphur dioxide. refs., tabs., figs.

  6. Staff report on Ontario gas distributor service quality regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-29

    This report provides the basis for consultation regarding a framework for building principles and minimum standards regarding service quality measures for gas distributors. It begins with a general overview of current concerns expressed by Ontario natural gas consumers regarding service quality. Customer complaints logged with the Ontario Energy Board between 2003 and 2004 include common issues such as slow telephone response time, failure to obtain regular meter reads, inaccurate billing, long payment processing times, long reconnection times, long new connection times, and slow response to emergencies. This report also presents the historical experience in Ontario's energy sector regarding performance monitoring of services within an incentive based rate making framework for electricity and gas distributors. The Ontario Energy Board's Natural Gas Forum report reveals that a service quality framework would ensure that cost saving initiatives are not implemented at the expense of customer service or safe operation of the distribution system. Although the Board intends to implement a service quality framework, it will not include direct financial incentives. Rather, it will monitor service quality performance and utilities will be subject to a compliance process. A brief summary was also included of service quality regulations in the electricity sector and in other jurisdictions such as Australia, the United Kingdom, Pennsylvania, and Alberta. A list of issues that remain to be addressed before implementing a framework in Ontario was then presented. 2 appendices.

  7. Emission trading in Ontario : Understanding and managing compliance risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, A.

    2002-01-01

    Mirant is one of the top five American energy marketer of power and gas, with more than 20,700 megawatts (MW) of electric generating capacity worldwide, of which 13,600 is in North America. The author presented a chart displaying nitrogen oxide emissions in Ontario, followed by another chart with the emissions of sulphur dioxide also in Ontario. The emission targets for the power sector were reviewed, as were the nitrogen oxide emission limits from 2002 to 2010. The major features of the Ontario legislation were discussed, covering allowance allocation, unlimited banking and limited provisions for credit. Ontario fossil capacity was reviewed, followed by emission allowance allocation. The issues and risks for Independent Power Producers were discussed. They included the emission rate compared to that of the competition, how much the facility was run last year and how much you expect to run it next year, the possibility of buying allowances or credits and at what cost. Looking to the future, the government of Ontario has announced bold actions on industry emissions. The initiatives include consultations, emission limits for both nitrogen oxide and sulphur dioxide from all major industrial emitters, and tighter province-wide targets and timelines for nitrogen oxide and sulphur dioxide. refs., tabs., figs

  8. Fifteen years of radioactive waste management at Ontario Hydro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, T.J.; Rao, P.K.M.

    1985-01-01

    Ontario Hydro is a large Canadian utility producing 84% (7394 MWe) of the Nuclear Electricity generated in Canada. The low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes generated by the Ontario Hydro program are currently being managed at the Bruce Nuclear Power Development with various volume reduction, packaging and interim storage systems. Ontario Hydro also owns and operates a radioactive waste transportation system. Studies are in progress for final disposal of these wastes in a suitable geology in Ontario. Since its inception in 1971, Ontario Hydro's radioactive waste management program has evolved into providing a full fledged radioactive waste management capability to the utility's two nuclear generation centres at Pickering and Bruce, and later in the decade, to Darlington. This paper summarizes the various developments in this program; highlights the major facilities both in-service and planned to be built; reviews the experiences gained over fifteen years of in-house waste management; and discusses the proposed reorientation towards ultimate disposal of these wastes. 2 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  9. Overview of surgery for oral cavity cancer in Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskander, Antoine; Irish, Jonathan; Gullane, Patrick; Gilbert, Ralph; de Almeida, John R; Freeman, Jeremy; Giuliani, Meredith; Urbach, David R; Goldstein, David P

    2016-07-01

    The pupose of this study was to describe variations in incidence and resection rates of patients with oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in Ontario. All oral cavity SCCs in Ontario between 2003 and 2010 were identified from the Ontario Cancer Registry. Incidence and resection rates along with variations in care were compared by sociodemographic factors and Ontario health regions. The 8-year incidence rates for oral cavity SCC was 21.3 per 100,000 with variations by sex, age group, neighborhood income, and community size. Seventy-four percent of patients underwent an oral cavity cancer resection, of which 91% were at a regional head and neck cancer center. Variations in resection rates existed by region of residence and treatment. Oral cavity cancer incidence rates vary by sex, age, neighborhood income, community size, and health region. Resection rates vary by age and health region. Oral cavity cancer care is highly regionalized in Ontario. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 38: 1113-1118, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Serological studies on the infection of dogs in Ontario with Borrelia burgdorferi, the etiological agent of Lyme disease

    OpenAIRE

    Artsob, Harvey; Barker, Ian K.; Fister, Richard; Sephton, Gregory; Dick, Daryl; Lynch, John A.; Key, Doug

    1993-01-01

    A serological study was undertaken to determine whether dogs in Ontario are being exposed to Borrelia burgdorferi, the etiological agent of Lyme disease. This study consisted of a survey of randomly selected dogs and testing of diagnostic submissions from candidate Lyme disease cases. The survey of 1,095 dogs, bled between January 1988 and August 1989, revealed a total of 65 (5.9%) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) reactors, of which 22 had immuno-fluorescent antibody assay (IFA) tite...

  11. Effects of ultraviolet radiation on viability of isolated Beta vulgaris and Hordeum vulgare protoplasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bornman, J.F.; Bjoern, L.O.; Bornman, C.H.

    1982-01-01

    Estimates of viability as measured by vital straining with fluorescein diacetate were carried out on freshly isolated and partially aged (16-hour-old) Beta vulgaris and Hordeum vulgare mesophyll protoplasts following irradiation with UV-B. Damage to the photosynthetic system by UV-B was determined by delayed light emission (DLE). In the case of freshly isolated Protoplasts Beta was approximately 30% more susceptible than Hordeum following 3h irradiation, with viability decreasing from 90% to 40%. After storage of protoplasts on ice for 16 h UV-B radiation markedly depressed viability in both species, but in the case of Hordeum there was a substantial initial loss of nearly 70% in viability over the first hour of irradiation. The first 10 min of UV-B radiation decreased the intensity of DLE by 40% without appreciably affecting the decay rate. Longer treatment times did not give a proportional effect so that even after 60 min of UV-B the inhibition did not exceed 60%. This suggested that although the enzyme system responsible for FDA hydrolysis may be partially inactivated (viability was 75-80% as compared with 90% in the control), the UV-B did not penetrate the innermost parts of the chloroplasts, but left some thylakoids undamaged. (orig.)

  12. Towards an understanding of the influence of national culture on organisational viability: An exploratory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awuzie Bankole O.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Viability connotes a system’s ability to become ultra-stable through effective self-regulation of its internal processes and information processing among its subsystems. Applying this to an infrastructure delivery system (IDS context, this study proposes that an IDS can successfully deliver on client requirements only if they attain and maintain viability. Research into the influence of National Culture (NC on an IDS’s viability appears to be lacking; hence this study. Adopting a multi-case study, qualitative research design, this study explores three IDSs involved in the delivery of infrastructure projects in two different NC contexts; Nigeria and the United Kingdom. 25 semi-structured interviews were conducted across the cases to provide for an in-depth understanding of existing interactions between participants in these delivery systems: client/project sponsor; main contractor and sub-contractors and to understand the influence of the prevailing national culture on such interactions, if any. Findings indicate that NC in project delivery environments influence the ability of IDSs to attain viability, especially as it pertains to the sustenance of Team Quality Attributes (TWQ within the system. Based on these findings, it is expected that in modelling IDSs for viability, adequate consideration should be given to the prevailing NC by project managers and planners.

  13. Nonnatural deaths of children under the age of 5 years in Ontario, Canada: A retrospective autopsy analysis of 10 years (2006-2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syeda Sakina Rizvi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study is to unravel the common patterns observed among nonnatural deaths of children under 5 years and suggest ways to prevent such unnecessary deaths. The study was confined to the province of Ontario to allow the identification of regional specific patterns. The database at the Office of the Chief Coroner of Ontario was searched for all pediatric deaths from the years 2006-2015. All nonnatural deaths for children under the age of 5 years, including sudden infant death syndrome, were selected for the study. Manner and cause of death along with the corresponding year were recorded in tables. In the 10-year period, 940 nonnatural deaths were identified in Ontario through autopsy records which are equal to approximately 36.7% of the total childhood deaths. There were 295 accidental cases (11.6% and 71 homicides (2.8%. The leading causes of nonnatural childhood deaths in Ontario were drowning, traffic accidents, blunt trauma, and asphyxia. Nonnatural deaths are preventable through education and training of parents. Implementation of educational interventions can significantly reduce nonnatural deaths of children in Ontario.

  14. Hydrogen and fuel cell research networking in Ontario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peppley, B.A. [Queen' s-RMC Fuel Cell Research Centre, Kingston, ON (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    This presentation reviewed the activities of the Ontario Fuel Cell Research and Innovation Network since its launch in 2006. Funded by the Ontario Ministry of Research and Innovation, the project involves 17 academic researchers from 8 universities and is supported by 8 industrial partners. The group of researchers has made progress in supporting the developing fuel cell industry in Ontario and in Canada. Their work has the potential to help deploy the province's automotive-oriented manufacturing sector in directions that address the issues of clean air and climate change. New initiatives in the development of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies are instrumental in expanding this network to leverage new business activities in the post financial crisis period. These activities are expected to result in economic benefits for job and economic growth.

  15. Ontario Hydro at the millennium : has monopoly's moment passed?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniels, R.J.

    1996-01-01

    This volume is a collection of 10 papers presented at a conference in which the challenges of restructuring the electric power industry in Ontario were discussed. Legal experts, policy makers, economists and stakeholders in the industry presented their views regarding the future of the industry in Ontario. The implications of privatization were discussed. There was general agreement on the need for some industry de-integration and privatization. However, agreement on the exact nature of the approach to take was more divided. For example, opinion was divided on what the logical endpoint of industry restructuring should be i.e. wholesale or retail competition. Also contentious was the question of what portion of Hydro's generating assets should be sold off to private enterprise if Hydro's generation and transmission assets are unbundled. Opinions were also divided about the environmental consequences of nuclear energy. Significant differences of opinion were evident concerning the privatization of Ontario Hydro's nuclear assets. refs., tabs., figs

  16. Proceedings of the Ontario Petroleum Institute's 46. annual conference : Ontario oil and gas conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    This conference provided a forum for industry leaders and researchers to discuss issues related to Ontario's oil and gas industry. Economic profiles of the oil, gas, and salt resource industries were presented along with issues related to underground storage and abandoned oil wells. New technologies designed to improve production efficiency were also presented with particular reference to issues related to climate change and global energy needs. Other topics of discussion included gas storage facilities, the environmental impacts of the oil and gas industry, and issues related to site security. The conference was divided into 5 sessions. Two thesis award papers were also presented along with a keynote address that provided an overview of the petroleum industry's economic outlook. The conference featured 16 presentations, of which 3 have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. tabs., figs

  17. The short-term impact of Ontario's generic pricing reforms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael R Law

    Full Text Available Canadians pay amongst the highest generic drug prices in the world. In July 2010, the province of Ontario enacted a policy that halved reimbursement for generic drugs from the public drug plan, and substantially lowered prices for private purchases. We quantified the impact of this policy on overall generic drug expenditures in the province, and projected the impact in other provinces had they mimicked this pricing change.We used quarterly prescription generic drug dispensing data from the IMS-Brogan CompuScript Audit. We used the price per unit in both the pre- and post-policy period and two economics price indexes to estimate the expenditure reduction in Ontario. Further, we used the post-policy Ontario prices to estimate the potential reduction in other provinces.We estimate that total expenditure on generic drugs in Ontario during the second half of 2010 was between $181 and $194 million below what would be expected if prices had remained at pre-policy level. Over half of the reduction in spending was due to savings on just 10 generic ingredients. If other provinces had matched Ontario's prices, their expenditures over during the latter half of 2010 would have been $445 million lower.We found that if Ontario's pricing scheme were adopted nationally, overall spending on generic drugs in Canada would drop at least $1.28 billion annually--a 5% decrease in total prescription drug expenditure. Other provinces should seriously consider both changes to their generic drug prices and the use of more competitive bulk purchasing policies.

  18. Future changes of temperature and heat waves in Ontario, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhong; Huang, Guohe; Huang, Wendy; Lin, Qianguo; Liao, Renfei; Fan, Yurui

    2018-05-01

    Apparent changes in the temperature patterns in recent years brought many challenges to the province of Ontario, Canada. As the need for adapting to climate change challenges increases, the development of reliable climate projections becomes a crucial task. In this study, a regional climate modeling system, Providing Regional Climates for Impacts Studies (PRECIS), is used to simulate the temperature patterns in Ontario. Three PRECIS runs with a resolution of 25 km × 25 km are carried out to simulate the present (1961-1990) temperature variations. There is a good match between the simulated and observed data, which validates the performance of PRECIS in reproducing temperature changes in Ontario. Future changes of daily maximum, mean, and minimum temperatures during the period 2071-2100 are then projected under the IPCC SRES A2 and B2 emission scenarios using PRECIS. Spatial variations of annual mean temperature, mean diurnal range, and temperature seasonality are generated. Furthermore, heat waves defined based on the exceedance of local climatology and their temporal and spatial characteristics are analyzed. The results indicate that the highest temperature and the most intensive heat waves are most likely to occur at the Toronto-Windsor corridor in Southern Ontario. The Northern Ontario, in spite of the relatively low projected temperature, would be under the risk of long-lasting heat waves, and thus needs effective measures to enhance its climate resilience in the future. This study can assist the decision makers in better understanding the future temperature changes in Ontario and provide decision support for mitigating heat-related loss.

  19. Impact of Immigration Status on Cancer Outcomes in Ontario, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Matthew C; Earle, Craig C; Fischer, Hadas D; Camacho, Ximena; Liu, Ning; Saskin, Refik; Shah, Baiju R; Austin, Peter C; Singh, Simron

    2017-07-01

    Prior studies have documented inferior health outcomes in vulnerable populations, including racial minorities and those with disadvantaged socioeconomic status. The impact of immigration on cancer-related outcomes is less clear. Administrative databases were linked to create a cohort of incident cancer cases (colorectal, lung, prostate, head and neck, breast, and hematologic malignancies) from 2000 to 2012 in Ontario, Canada. Cancer patients who immigrated to Canada (from 1985 onward) were compared with those who were Canadian born (or immigrated before 1985). Patients were followed from diagnosis until death (cancer-specific or all-cause). Cox proportional hazards models were estimated to determine the impact of immigration on mortality after adjusting for explanatory variables. Additional adjusted models studied the relationship of time since immigration and cancer-specific and overall mortality. From 2000 to 2012, 11,485 cancer cases were diagnosed in recent immigrants (0 to 10 years in Canada), 17,844 cases in nonrecent immigrants (11 to 25 years), and 416,118 cases in nonimmigrants. After adjustment, the hazard of mortality was lower for recent immigrants (hazard ratio [HR], 0.843; 95% CI, 0.814 to 0.873) and nonrecent immigrants (HR, 0.902; 95% CI, 0.876 to 0.928) compared with nonimmigrants. Cancer-specific mortality was also lower for recent immigrants (HR, 0.857; 95% CI, 0.823 to 0.893) and nonrecent immigrants (HR, 0.907; 95% CI, 0.875 to 0.94). Among immigrants, each year from the original landing was associated with increased mortality (HR, 1.004; 95% CI, 1.000 to 1.009) and a trend to increased cancer-specific mortality (HR, 1.005; 95% CI, 0.999 to 1.010). Immigrants demonstrate a healthy immigrant effect, with lower cancer-specific mortality compared with Canadian-born individuals. This benefit seems to diminish over time, as the survival of immigrants from common cancers potentially converges with the Canadian norm.

  20. Proceedings of the Recycling Council of Ontario's energy from waste forum : is there a role for advanced thermal technologies in effective waste management?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The lack of landfill capacity in Ontario and the threat of United States border closures to Canadian waste exportation has led to an increased interest in the viability of advanced thermal technologies for the management of waste residuals. Rising energy costs have also led governments and industries to examine the cost benefits of producing energy from waste (EFW) and using waste as a fuel replacement. This forum was held by the Recycling Council of Ontario to investigate the environmental and economic impacts of investing in EFW technologies. The forum was divided into 4 focus areas: (1) a comparison of the environmental and economic implications of landfilling and EFW technology; (2) an overview of facilities currently operating in Europe which included a policy and regulation background and an outline of technologies used; (3) an overview of EFW technologies currently used in Canada; (4) and an outline of municipal and privately-owned EFW pilot plants and proposed facilities in Ontario. Descriptions of facilities were provided, as well as a history of the policy decisions and processes needed to include EFW as a waste management tool. Issues concerning public consultation practices and the impact of EFW on waste diversion activities were reviewed, and a descriptions of EFW technologies were provided. Eleven presentations were given at the forum, 3 of which were catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. refs., tabs., figs

  1. The long-term outlook for nuclear capacity in Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Archinoff, G.H.

    1979-04-01

    This report derives three estimates of long-term nuclear growth in Ontario for use in strategy studies of alternate nuclear fuel cycles. The low and high estimates encompass the full range of possible long-term nuclear growth rates. The middle, or base growth, estimate represents the nuclear growth pattern which seems at the present time most likely to occur. For the base growth estimate, nuclear capacity in Ontario reaches 31 GWe in 2000, grows to 175 GWe by 2060, and then remains constant. For the high growth estimate, the capacity in 2000 is 33 GWe, and climbs continuously to 833 GWe by the year 2100. (auth)

  2. Exposure of Ontario workers to radiofrequency fields from dielectric heaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bitran, M.E.; Nishio, J.M.; Charron, D.E.

    1992-01-01

    As part of a program to assess and reduce the exposure of Ontario workers to non-ionizing radiations, stray electric and magnetic fields from 383 dielectric heaters were measured in 71 industrial establishments from 1988 to 1990. This represents a population of over 800 workers potentially exposed to radiofrequency (RE) electromagnetic fields. Electric and magnetic field strengths at the head, waist, and thigh levels of the operators, corrected by duty cycle, are presented for the different heater types surveyed. Worker exposure data and compliance with Ontario radiofrequency exposure guidelines are discussed. (author)

  3. A demand/supply and price outlook for electricity in Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalton, J.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents the demand/supply and price outlook for electricity in Ontario. The paper examines the near term outlook, critical demand and supply issues, the projected Ontario demand/supply balances and finally concludes by looking at the challenges for Ontario's new market structure

  4. Natural gas in 1927: Petroleum in 1927: The oil and gas fields of Ontario. Annual publication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harkness, R B

    1930-12-31

    This annual report presents figures for gas consumption in Ontario, gas wells and their production, and leakage. It includes licenses issued for the year and logs of wells. Information is also given on oil production in Ontario, petroleum refining and petroleum imported into Ontario.

  5. Compendium of Statistical and Financial Information: Ontario Universities, 2000-01.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Council of Ontario Universities, Toronto.

    This compendium presents data on various aspects of the Ontario University System, Canada. It is a companion to the Financial Report of Ontario Universities, the annual series of volumes prepared under the auspices of the Council of Financial Officers-Universities of Ontario (COFO-UO). This compendium contains supplementary information that helps…

  6. Compendium of Statistical and Financial Information: Ontario Universities, 2001-02.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Council of Ontario Universities, Toronto.

    This compendium presents data about aspects of the Ontario University System, Canada. It is a companion to the "Financial Report of Ontario Universities," the annual series of volumes prepared under the auspices of the Council of Financial OfficersUniversities of Ontario (COFO-UO). The Compendium contains supplementary information on…

  7. Opening Doors to Nursing Degrees: Time for Action. A Proposal from Ontario's Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colleges Ontario, 2015

    2015-01-01

    This report argues that Ontario must expand the educational options for people who want to become registered nurses (RNs). It argues that the change Ontario requires is to authorize colleges to offer their own high-quality nursing degrees. Until 2005, about 70 per cent of Ontario's RNs were educated at colleges. Today, tens of thousands of RNs who…

  8. Creating a cultural analysis tool for the implementation of Ontario's civil mental health laws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhand, Ruby

    2016-01-01

    Ethno-racial people with mental health disabilities experience multiple inequities and differential outcomes when interacting with Ontario's civil mental health laws. Given the increasing multi-racial population in Ontario, there is a need to develop mechanisms to address these intersecting issues. Other countries that have created evaluative tools for mental health legislation include the United Kingdom and Australia. Australia's Rights Analysis Tool, the United Kingdom's Race Equality Impact Assessment, the Scottish Recovery Tool, and the World Health Organization's Mental Health and Human Rights checklist are examples of evaluative tools developed for mental health legislation. Such a tool does not exist in Canada, let alone in Ontario specifically. Thus, this study developed a Cultural Analysis Tool (CAT) consisting of specific and meaningful thematic questions that can be used by practitioners when addressing issues of culture and equity for ethno-racial people with mental health disabilities interacting with Ontario's civil mental health laws. It is hoped that the CAT, and the research underlying its development, will enable practitioners to critically question whether cultural and intersecting concerns are being appropriately addressed within an ethno-racial client's case and, furthermore, how equitable outcomes can be achieved. This article describes and analyzes the methodology, research and qualitative data used to develop the CAT. It then presents and examines the CAT itself. The qualitative data was drawn from thirty-five semi-structured interviews with seven members of each of the following groups: (1) ethno-racial people with mental health disabilities including in-patients and ex-patients, (2) lawyers who practice in the area of mental health law, (3) health care professionals including psychiatrists, nurses and social workers, (4) service providers such as front-line case workers at mental health agencies and (5) adjudicators, government advisors

  9. Survey of the Definition of Fetal Viability and the Availability, Indications, and Decision Making Processes for Post-Viability Termination of Pregnancy for Fetal Abnormalities and Health Conditions in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Danna; Davies, Gregory; Armour, Christine M

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the definition of fetal viability and the availability, indications, and decision making processes for post-viability termination of pregnancy for fetal abnormalities and health conditions in Canada. An online survey of members of the Canadian Association of Genetic Counsellors, the Canadian College of Medical Geneticists, and the Canadian Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine who provide direct counselling to, or management of, prenatal patients in Canada (total sample size 815). Results of this study showed that the majority of respondents indicated that their centre will offer post-viability termination of pregnancy (98/123; 80 %). Sixty-seven percent (68/101) of respondents reported the definition of fetal viability to be 24 weeks' gestation. Most respondents reported that a collaborative decision making process was used to determine if post-viability termination of pregnancy would be offered (136/170; 80 %). For conditions presumed to be lethal/likely lethal, the majority of respondents would "sometimes" or "always" offer post-viability termination of pregnancy, whereas for conditions presumed to have a mild effect, the majority of respondents would "rarely" or "never" offer post-viability termination of pregnancy. Ninety percent (77/86) of respondents reported that perinatal hospice is offered as an alternative to termination of pregnancy. In conclusion, this study suggests that although post-viability termination is available in many provinces in Canada, variation in the definition of fetal viability and indications appear to exist. While these variations may lead to unequal access to post-viability termination of pregnancy across Canada, they might also represent the complexity of the decision making process and the importance of examining individual factors to ensure that the most appropriate decision is made in each case.

  10. Public Health Follow-up of Suspected Exposure to Echinococcus multilocularis in Southwestern Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotz-Williams, L A; Mercer, N J; Walters, J M; Wallace, D; Gottstein, B; Osterman-Lind, E; Boggild, A K; Peregrine, A S

    2017-09-01

    In the 3 years since the first report of canine alveolar echinococcosis (AE) in Ontario, three additional cases have been diagnosed in the province. Of the four cases reported to date, three have had no known history of travel outside the province. It is possible that this development is an indication of previously unrecognized environmental contamination with Echinococcus multilocularis eggs in some areas of the province. If so, there is the potential for an emerging threat to human health. This article describes a local public health department's investigation of the possible exposure to E. multilocularis of a number of individuals who had had contact with the latest of the four cases of canine AE, and summarizes a comprehensive decision process that can be used by public health departments to assist in the follow-up of such exposures. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  11. Myocardial Viability on Cardiac Magnetic Resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souto, Ana Luiza Mansur; Souto, Rafael Mansur; Teixeira, Isabella Cristina Resende; Nacif, Marcelo Souto

    2017-05-01

    The study of myocardial viability is of great importance in the orientation and management of patients requiring myocardial revascularization or angioplasty. The technique of delayed enhancement (DE) is accurate and has transformed the study of viability into an easy test, not only for the detection of fibrosis but also as a binary test detecting what is viable or not. On DE, fibrosis equal to or greater than 50% of the segmental area is considered as non-viable, whereas that below 50% is considered viable. During the same evaluation, cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) may also use other techniques for functional and perfusion studies to obtain a global evaluation of ischemic heart disease. This study aims to highlight the current concepts and broadly emphasize the use of CMR as a method that over the last 20 years has become a reference in the detection of infarction and assessment of myocardial viability. Resumo O estudo de viabilidade miocárdica é de grande importância para a orientação e manejo de pacientes que necessitam de cirurgia de revascularização miocárdica ou angioplastia. A técnica de realce tardio (RT) é precisa e transformou o estudo de viabilidade em um teste fácil, não só para a detecção de fibrose, mas também como um modelo binário para a detecção do que é ou não é viável. Uma fibrose identificada pelo RT é considerada como não viável quando igual ou maior do que 50% da área segmentar e como viável quando menor que 50%. A ressonância magnética cardíaca (RMC) também pode lançar mão de outras técnicas para estudo funcional e de perfusão para uma avaliação global da doença isquêmica do coração no mesmo exame. Este estudo tem como objetivo destacar os conceitos atuais e enfatizar amplamente o uso da RMC como um método que nos últimos 20 anos se tornou referência na detecção de infarto e avaliação de viabilidade miocárdica.

  12. Exercise regulates breast cancer cell viability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dethlefsen, Christine; Lillelund, Christian; Midtgaard, Julie

    2016-01-01

    .003) and cytokines. Yet, these systemic adaptations had no effect on breast cancer cell viability in vitro. During 2 h of acute exercise, increases in serum lactate (6-fold, p ... no impact. Our data question the prevailing dogma that training-dependent baseline reductions in risk factors mediate the protective effect of exercise on breast cancer. Instead, we propose that the cancer protection is driven by accumulative effects of repeated acute exercise responses.......Purpose: Exercise decreases breast cancer risk and disease recurrence, but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Training adaptations in systemic factors have been suggested as mediating causes. We aimed to examine if systemic adaptations to training over time, or acute exercise responses...

  13. The Viability of the Lactobacillus Rhamnosus IL4.2 Strain in Simulated Gastrointestinal Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuel Vamanu

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The viability maintenance of Lactobacillus rhamnosus IL4.2 strain in gastrointestinal conditions represents one of the most important characteristics regarding its use for obtaining probiotic products. The tests were performed with a cell suspension kept in 0.5% NaCl. The influence of pepsin (3 g/l at pH of 1.5, 2, 2.5 and 3, as well as of pancreatin (1 g/l in the presence of bile salts (1.5, 2, 3 and 5 mg/ml were determined. The influence of casein and mucin, in a concentration of 1 g/l, was also established in the aforementioned conditions. It was observed that mucin presented a longer viability maintenance, fact also confirmed by the calculation of the mathematical parameters of viability and mortality, when mucin was either used or not, especially in the case of gastric transit. The results proved that the tested strain maintained its viability even at pH between 1.8 - 2 and at an even higher concentration, of 2 mg/ml of bile salts, but up to two hours as of the exposure to the conditions of the simulated small intestinal juice. Such results were also confirmed by the cumulated effect of the simulated gastric and small intestinal juice, the strain thus increasing its viability with an average of 10% in the presence of mucin.

  14. Omitted Costs, Inflated Benefits: Renewable Energy Policy in Ontario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallant, Parker; Fox, Glenn

    2011-01-01

    The government of Ontario has adopted wind energy development as an alternative energy source. It enacted the Green Energy and Economy Act, May 2009, with the intention to fast track the approval process regarding industrial wind turbines. The Act legislated a centralized decision making process while removing local jurisdictional authority.…

  15. Revisiting Constructivist Teaching Methods in Ontario Colleges Preparing for Accreditation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Rachel A.

    2015-01-01

    At the time of writing, the first community colleges in Ontario were preparing for transition to an accreditation model from an audit system. This paper revisits constructivist literature, arguing that a more pragmatic definition of constructivism effectively blends positivist and interactionist philosophies to achieve both student centred…

  16. Provoking Dialogue: A Short History of Outdoor Education in Ontario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borland, James

    2011-01-01

    History helps educators more clearly describe the role of outdoor education in improving society by fostering awareness of human-nature interconnections. Five branches have shaped outdoor education in Ontario: (1) agricultural education; (2) environmental education; (3) outdoor adventure education; (4) ecological education; and (5) climate change…

  17. The economics of age-group swimming in Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eynon, R B; Kitchen, P D; Semotiuk, D M

    1980-09-01

    This study investigated the socio-economic status of the parents of Ontario swimmers and parental expenditures, in terms of time and money, in support of competitive swimming. Questionnaires were mailed to a sample of 400 families of Ontario competitive swimmers. Spearman rho analyses were used to determine the relationships of membership fee, total cost and total time spent by the parents to the ability and age of the swimmer and the number of hours of practice and swim meets. Parents of Ontario competitive swimmers are upper middle class and devote a great deal of their time (X = 433 hours) and money (X = $744.00) annually to competitive swimming. Total expenditures and time spend by the parents were greater for those children were young and also for those whose children demonstrated greater ability (i.e., closer to Ontario record). Spearman rho analyses suggested that membership fees are not determined on the basis of age, number of practice hours or number of swim meets.

  18. Implications of Key Performance Indicator Issues in Ontario Universities Explored

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Vivian

    2015-01-01

    Since 1998, the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities in Ontario, Canada, has required that data on specific key performance indicators (KPIs) be made public by its publicly funded universities. The information is intended to be used by universities to demonstrate their achievements, to improve their programmes and services, and to…

  19. Prevalence of Problematic Video Gaming among Ontario Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Nigel E.; Paglia-Boak, Angela; Ballon, Bruce; Cheung, Joyce T. W.; Adlaf, Edward M.; Henderson, Joanna; Chan, Vincy; Rehm, Jurgen; Hamilton, Hayley; Mann, Robert E.

    2012-01-01

    Video game playing has become a very popular activity among adolescents. Its impact on the mental health and well-being of players is just beginning to be explored. This paper reports on the prevalence of problematic gaming in a representative sample of 2,832 Ontario students in grades 7 to 12. The survey included questions about the school grade,…

  20. The radiation safety self-assessment program of Ontario Hydro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armitage, G.; Chase, W.J.

    1987-01-01

    Ontario Hydro has developed a self-assessment program to ensure that high quality in its radiation safety program is maintained. The self-assessment program has three major components: routine ongoing assessment, accident/incident investigation, and detailed assessments of particular radiation safety subsystems or of the total radiation safety program. The operation of each of these components is described

  1. Financial Literacy in Ontario: Neoliberalism, Pierre Bourdieu and the Citizen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, Chris

    2011-01-01

    Utilizing concepts from Pierre Bourdieu I argue that the implementation of financial literacy education in Ontario public schools will, if uncontested, support a neoliberal consumer habitus (subjectivity) at the expense of the critical citizen. This internalization of the neoliberal ethos assists state efforts to shift responsibility for…

  2. Restoring southern Ontario forests by managing succession in conifer plantations

    Science.gov (United States)

    William C. Parker; Ken A. Elliott; Daniel C. Dey; Eric Boysen

    2008-01-01

    Thinning and underplanting of conifer plantations to promote natural succession in southern Ontario's forests for restoration purposes was examined in a young red pine (Pinus resinosa Ait.) plantation. Eleven years after application of five thinning treatments, seedling diameter, height, and stem volume of planted white ash (Fraxinus...

  3. Institutional Diversity in Ontario's University Sector: A Policy Debate Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piché, Pierre G.; Jones, Glen A.

    2016-01-01

    In order to meet the demands in a cost-effective manner of an emerging knowledge society that is global in scope, structural higher education policy changes have been introduced in many countries with a focus on systemic and programmatic diversity. There has been an ongoing debate about institutional diversity in Ontario higher education,…

  4. Sulfur pollution: an environmental study of Welland, Ontario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael R. Moss

    1977-01-01

    The distribution of sulfur as an environmental pollutant is analysed in the vicinity of Welland, Ontario. A biogeochemical-cycle approach enables areas of excess accumulation to be compared among all linked ecosystem components. Although the patterns of distribution are similar, the amounts of sulfur accumulated in different ecosystems, grassland and woodland, show...

  5. Deregulation and the Alberta experience : the implications for Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desrochers, J.P.

    2002-01-01

    An overview of the first year of electric power industry deregulation in Alberta was presented. The way in which electricity is bought and sold in Ontario and throughout North America is changing. Costs are no longer fixed and regulated. Electricity is becoming a commodity with high levels of price volatility. The paper presented hedging options for Alberta consumers, contracting lessons, market issues and lessons for Ontario. A comparison of Alberta's deregulation schedule with that of Ontario's was included. One year after market opening in Alberta, power prices have dropped significantly. There is a greater than expected demand side response, increased development in power generation, and a decrease in natural gas prices. Issues that still need to be addressed in Alberta include billing and load settlement issues, invoicing/billing standards, the lack of competition at the retail level, and future balancing of pool charges. Energy Advantage Inc. (EA) does not foresee the same drastic increase in price as seen in Alberta market opening, but suggests that uncertainty and volatility will exist in Ontario. In Alberta, customers who did nothing and stayed on default were the ones who benefited, but took a great risk. EA suggests that customers must understand how and when they use electricity, how much is used during on- and off-peak hours, and in the summer versus the winter. When electricity is priced hourly, it is important to know consumption patterns. 7 figs

  6. Negotiated Wages and Working Conditions in Ontario Hospitals: 1973.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ontario Dept. of Labour, Toronto. Research Branch.

    This report is a statistical analysis of provisions in collective agreements covering approximately 38,000 full-time employees in 156 hospitals in the Province of Ontario. Part 1 consists of 56 tables giving information on the geographical distribution of hospital contracts, the unions that are party to them, their duration, and the sizes and…

  7. Shared Geospatial Metadata Repository for Ontario University Libraries: Collaborative Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forward, Erin; Leahey, Amber; Trimble, Leanne

    2015-01-01

    Successfully providing access to special collections of digital geospatial data in academic libraries relies upon complete and accurate metadata. Creating and maintaining metadata using specialized standards is a formidable challenge for libraries. The Ontario Council of University Libraries' Scholars GeoPortal project, which created a shared…

  8. Mapping the Early Intervention System in Ontario, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, Kathryn

    2012-01-01

    This study documents the wide range of early intervention services across the province of Ontario. The services are mapped across the province showing geographic information as well as the scope of services (clinical, family-based, resource support, etc.), the range of early intervention professionals, sources of funding and the populations served…

  9. Schedule and cost reduction of nuclear generating facilities in Ontario study overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huterer, J.

    1991-01-01

    During the five year period 1985 to 1990, Ontario Hydro conducted a major study with the objective to reduce the cost and construction duration for future nuclear generating facilities in Ontario. This paper reports on the study called Major Projects: Schedule and Cost Reduction Study (SCRS). Ontario Hydro is a public utility with the responsibility for meeting electricity need for the province of Ontario with a population of 9.6 million. In order to adequately address future electricity needs, Ontario Hydro has developed and submitted a demand/supply plan which covers the next 25 years. The SCRS for major projects contributed to this demand/supply plan

  10. Clinical guidelines and the fate of medical autonomy in Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappolt, S G

    1997-04-01

    Conceptually, clinical guidelines and professional autonomy have a paradoxical relationship. Despite being the quintessence of medical knowledge at the corporate level, guidelines diminish the clinical autonomy of individual practitioners, and therefore threaten medicine's justification for its autonomy. Theorists have argued that professional autonomy will be retained through elite dominance of practitioners, while comparative research suggests that economic autonomy can be traded off to retain clinical autonomy. Under government pressure to regulate the growth of Ontario physicians' fee-for-service public expenditure, the profession's representative organization, the Ontario Medical Association (OMA), promoted voluntary clinical guidelines, hoping to both constrain costs and preserve professional control over the content of medical care. The OMA collaborated with the Ministry of Health in developing guidelines and establishing a provincial centre for health service research. Ontario's practitioners disregarded the OMA's exhortations to implement clinical guidelines, suggesting that in the absence of external constraints, practitioners can subvert elite dominance. However, practitioners' unchecked clinical and economic autonomy, combined with evidence of wide provincial variations in medical care, served to legitimize the government's increasingly unilateral control over the schedule of insured medical services, and, in 1993, their imposition of a global cap on physicians' fee-for-service income pool. When analysed in the context of ongoing Ministry-OMA relations, the failure of the OMA's guidelines strategy to constrain medical service costs has expedited an overall decline in medical autonomy in Ontario. The emergence and course of Ontario's clinical guidelines movement is consistent with the view that medical autonomy is contingent upon broad class forces, and the conceptualization of professional organizations as instruments for mediated occupational control.

  11. Towards a sustainable electricity system for Ontario : interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-04-01

    More changes have occurred in Ontario's electricity sector in the past 5 years than over the preceding 9 decades since the creation of Ontario Hydro Electric Power Commission in 1906. The province's nuclear generating facilities were taken out of service in 1997 for safety and maintenance overhauls. The existing nuclear facilities, which account for 28 per cent of the province's generating capacity, will reach the end of their operational lifetimes by 2018. The government of Ontario also announced the phasing out of Ontario Power Generation's coal-fired plants by 2007 due to the environmental health impacts of their operation. These changes have ignited debate over the province's future electricity needs and how they might be met. This study examined by how much electricity demand in Ontario could be reduced through the adoption of energy efficient technologies, fuel switching, cogeneration and demand response measures. It also examined how much future supply could be obtained from renewable energy sources such as wind, the upgrading of existing hydroelectric facilities, and the development of new solar, biomass and small-scale hydro facilities. It also examined how to accommodate the remaining grid demand and which public policies should be adopted to maximize efficiency and other demand side measures. The impacts of the policies were simulated using the Canadian Integrated Modelling System (CIMS) computer model developed by the Energy and Materials Research Group at Simon Fraser University. The CIMS simulations were conducted under the assumptions that barriers to cogeneration would be removed, financial incentives would be provided along with innovative financing programs. The study revealed that capital investments of $18.2 billion over the 2005-2020 period would be required to reduce peak demand of 12,300 MW relative to the business and usual forecast through efficiency, fuel switching and cogeneration. 13 refs., 8 tabs

  12. More than energy: Ontario Hydro final annual report, January 1998 - March 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Ontario Hydro ceased operations on March 31, 1999 and its assets and functions were transferred by provincial statute to two successor corporations: Ontario Power Generation Corp. (OPG) and Ontario Hydro Services Inc. Its functions were also transferred to the Independent Electricity Market Operator and the Electrical Safety Authority, two not-for-profit agencies. The original act defining Ontario Hydro was replaced by the Energy Competition Act, 1998. Until the demerger of the company on April 1, 1999, Ontario Hydro served 108 direct industrial clients, almost one million retail clients and 255 municipal utilities. Ontario Power Generation inherited Ontario Hydro's generating portfolio, making it one of the largest power producers in North America in terms of installed capacity. The OPG system includes 69 hydroelectric stations, three nuclear sites, and six operating fossil fueled stations. Total installed system capacity is approximately 31,000 megawatts, and Ontario Hydro's total sales in 1998 were almost 139 terawatt hours. Ontario Hydro Services Company is an energy services-based transmission and distribution company. It owns and maintains 29,000 km of transmission lines, 114,700 km of distribution lines, 245 km of high-voltage underground cable, 256 transformer stations, 928 distribution and regulation stations, and 250 microwave stations. It also retains the retail business held by Ontario Hydro, which serves over 950,000 clients, and the transmission and generating business for 23 remote communities in Northern Ontario

  13. Cytotoxicity and Effects on Cell Viability of Nickel Nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Rodriguez, Jose E.

    2013-05-01

    Recently, magnetic nanoparticles are finding an increased use in biomedical applications and research. Nanobeads are widely used for cell separation, biosensing and cancer therapy, among others. Due to their properties, nanowires (NWs) are gaining ground for similar applications and, as with all biomaterials, their cytotoxicity is an important factor to be considered before conducting biological studies with them. In this work, the cytotoxic effects of nickel NWs (Ni NWs) were investigated in terms of cell viability and damage to the cellular membrane. Ni NWs with an average diameter of 30-34 nm were prepared by electrodeposition in nanoporous alumina templates. The templates were obtained by a two-step anodization process with oxalic acid on an aluminum substrate. Characterization of NWs was done using X-Ray diffraction (XRD) and energy dispersive X-Ray analysis (EDAX), whereas their morphology was observed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Cell viability studies were carried out on human colorectal carcinoma cells HCT 116 by the MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide) cell proliferation colorimetric assay, whereas the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) homogenous membrane fluorimetric assay was used to measure the degree of cell membrane rupture. The density of cell seeding was calculated to obtain a specific cell number and confluency before treatment with NWs. Optical readings of the cell-reduced MTT products were measured at 570 nm, whereas fluorescent LDH membrane leakage was recorded with an excitation wavelength of 525 nm and an emission wavelength of 580 - 640 nm. The effects of NW length, cell exposure time, as well as NW:cell ratio, were evaluated through both cytotoxic assays. The results show that cell viability due to Ni NWs is affected depending on both exposure time and NW number. On the other hand, membrane rupture and leakage was only significant at later exposure times. Both

  14. Viability of using multidimensional graphics in epidemiological data analysis: case study with respiratory diseases = Viabilidade do uso gráfico multidimensional para análise de dados epidemiológicos: estudo de caso com doenças respiratórias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Norberto Ferreira Santos

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The statistical methodology to be used in epidemiological data analysis is extremely important for obtaining reliable and plausible results that can be interpreted in the epidemiological context. In order to carry out a case study about the incidence of the main respiratory diseases in some cities with different climatic seasons, the present work aimed at studying the viability for applying the multidimensional graphic technique known as “h-plot” to identify the main variables that resulted in a higher contribution to the data dispersal. In accordance with the results obtained and discussed, we state that the h-plot graphics are viable to be applied as an alternative method as regards to the identification and collection of the variables.A metodologia estatística a ser utilizada na análise dos dados epidemiológicos é de suma importância para que os resultados obtidos sejam confiáveis e plausíveis de serem interpretados no contexto epidemiológico. Com o propósito de realizar um estudo de caso sobre a incidência das principais doenças respiratórias em algumas cidades com estações climáticas bem diferenciadas, o presente trabalho tem por objetivo estudar a viabilidade da aplicação da técnica gráfica multidimensional conhecida por “h-plot” para identificar principais variáveis que resultaram em maior contribuição na dispersão dos dados. Em consonância com os resultados obtidos e discutidos neste trabalho, recomendou-se que os gráficos h-plots são viáveis de serem aplicados como um método alternativo no que se refere à identificação e agrupamento das variáveis.

  15. An ecological study of cancer incidence in Port Hope, Ontario from 1992 to 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jing; Moir, Deborah; Lane, Rachel; Thompson, Patsy

    2013-01-01

    A plant processing radium and uranium ores has been operating in the town of Port Hope since 1932. Given the nuclear industry located in the community and ongoing public health concerns, cancer incidence rates in Port Hope were studied for a recent 16 year period (1992–2007) for continued periodic cancer incidence surveillance of the community. The cancer incidence in the local community for all cancers combined was similar to the Ontario population, health regions with similar socio-economic characteristics in Ontario and in Canada, and the Canadian population. No statistically significant differences in childhood cancer, leukaemia or other radiosensitive cancer incidence were observed, with the exception of statistically significant elevated lung cancer incidence among women. However, the statistical significance was reduced or disappeared when the comparison was made to populations with similar socio-economic characteristics. These findings are consistent with previous ecological, case-control and cohort studies conducted in Port Hope, environmental assessments, and epidemiological studies conducted elsewhere on populations living around similar facilities or exposed to similar environmental contaminants. Although the current study covered an extended period of time, the power to detect risk at the sub-regional level of analysis was limited since the Port Hope population is small (16 500). The study nevertheless indicated that large differences in cancer incidence are not occurring in Port Hope compared to other similar communities and the general population. (paper)

  16. An ecological study of cancer incidence in Port Hope, Ontario from 1992 to 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Moir, Deborah; Lane, Rachel; Thompson, Patsy

    2013-03-01

    A plant processing radium and uranium ores has been operating in the town of Port Hope since 1932. Given the nuclear industry located in the community and ongoing public health concerns, cancer incidence rates in Port Hope were studied for a recent 16 year period (1992-2007) for continued periodic cancer incidence surveillance of the community. The cancer incidence in the local community for all cancers combined was similar to the Ontario population, health regions with similar socio-economic characteristics in Ontario and in Canada, and the Canadian population. No statistically significant differences in childhood cancer, leukaemia or other radiosensitive cancer incidence were observed, with the exception of statistically significant elevated lung cancer incidence among women. However, the statistical significance was reduced or disappeared when the comparison was made to populations with similar socio-economic characteristics. These findings are consistent with previous ecological, case-control and cohort studies conducted in Port Hope, environmental assessments, and epidemiological studies conducted elsewhere on populations living around similar facilities or exposed to similar environmental contaminants. Although the current study covered an extended period of time, the power to detect risk at the sub-regional level of analysis was limited since the Port Hope population is small (16,500). The study nevertheless indicated that large differences in cancer incidence are not occurring in Port Hope compared to other similar communities and the general population.

  17. Reality check on Ontario electricity price procurement: a report from the trenches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodger, J.M.; Wegiel, H.; Ferns, T.; Bystrin, A.

    2003-01-01

    The approaches taken to manage energy price risks from three different perspectives were presented. The first perspective presented was that of a law firm specializing in assisting a wide variety of clients constituting retailers and large industrial, institutional, and commercial users. The second perspective presented was that of Dofasco, the largest industrial electricity consumer in Ontario, followed by the perspective offered by Oakville Hydro, representing one of few municipally owned electricity retailers in Ontario. The first order of business, from the lawyer's viewpoint, is to identify relevant considerations for consumers and retailers, such as how do you intend to participate in the new market, what are the desired outcomes, the appetite for risk. The formulation of an approach should take the following into consideration: historical context versus new market reality, experience with electricity suppliers, and dilemma for consumers and retailers on how to level the playing field. The chosen approach was that of a request for proposals process for electricity price procurement. In the case of Dofasco, the introduction of the deregulated electricity market meant business risks, which it chose to address using an integrated risk management approach. Oakville Hydro explained its reasons for jumping into a trench: earn financial rewards and prevent brand equity erosion. Retail business must be kept simple through identifying, understanding and limiting the risks; and moving carefully but expeditiously. To mitigate the risks, it advocated getting the best legal and economics advice possible, looking for experienced partners, and not betting the shop.tabs., figs

  18. Storage Viability and Optimization Web Service

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Christ; Lai, Judy; Siddiqui, Afzal; Limpaitoon, Tanachai; Phan, Trucy; Megel, Olivier; Chang, Jessica; DeForest, Nicholas

    2010-10-11

    Non-residential sectors offer many promising applications for electrical storage (batteries) and photovoltaics (PVs). However, choosing and operating storage under complex tariff structures poses a daunting technical and economic problem that may discourage potential customers and result in lost carbon and economic savings. Equipment vendors are unlikely to provide adequate environmental analysis or unbiased economic results to potential clients, and are even less likely to completely describe the robustness of choices in the face of changing fuel prices and tariffs. Given these considerations, researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) have designed the Storage Viability and Optimization Web Service (SVOW): a tool that helps building owners, operators and managers to decide if storage technologies and PVs merit deeper analysis. SVOW is an open access, web-based energy storage and PV analysis calculator, accessible by secure remote login. Upon first login, the user sees an overview of the parameters: load profile, tariff, technologies, and solar radiation location. Each parameter has a pull-down list of possible predefined inputs and users may upload their own as necessary. Since the non-residential sectors encompass a broad range of facilities with fundamentally different characteristics, the tool starts by asking the users to select a load profile from a limited cohort group of example facilities. The example facilities are categorized according to their North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code. After the load profile selection, users select a predefined tariff or use the widget to create their own. The technologies and solar radiation menus operate in a similar fashion. After these four parameters have been inputted, the users have to select an optimization setting as well as an optimization objective. The analytic engine of SVOW is LBNL?s Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM), which is a mixed

  19. Serological studies on the infection of dogs in Ontario with Borrelia burgdorferi, the etiological agent of Lyme disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artsob, Harvey; Barker, Ian K.; Fister, Richard; Sephton, Gregory; Dick, Daryl; Lynch, John A.; Key, Doug

    1993-01-01

    A serological study was undertaken to determine whether dogs in Ontario are being exposed to Borrelia burgdorferi, the etiological agent of Lyme disease. This study consisted of a survey of randomly selected dogs and testing of diagnostic submissions from candidate Lyme disease cases. The survey of 1,095 dogs, bled between January 1988 and August 1989, revealed a total of 65 (5.9%) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) reactors, of which 22 had immuno-fluorescent antibody assay (IFA) titers ≥1:32. All but one of the IFA-positive and 10 of the ELISA-positive, IFA-negative sera were further tested by western blot. Eight western blot positive and three equivocal reactors were obtained. Three of the eight confirmed reactors had visited areas known to be endemic for Lyme disease, leaving five reactors that might have been infected in previously undocumented areas for B. burgdorferi activity in Ontario. Diagnostic submissions of sera from 223 dogs were received between August 1987 and February 1992. Test results revealed 21 (9.4%) IFA reactors, of which only six had significant titers (≥1:256) and were reactive by an immunodot Borrelia test. All six dogs had travelled to known Lyme endemic areas. Based on results obtained from this study, it seems likely that the agent of Lyme disease is not widespread in Ontario. PMID:17424284

  20. Viability of fuel cells for car production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchel, J.-P. [Renault, Trappes (France); Lisse, J.-P. [P.S.A., Trappes (France); Bernard, S. [Alten, Trappes (France)

    2000-07-01

    The two French car manufacturers PSA Peugeot Citroen and Renault both sell pure electric cars in an effort to reduce pollutants and carbon dioxide emissions. In addition, they have each studied fuel cell car prototypes in relation to the FEVER program for Renault and the HYDRO-GEN program for PSA. In 1999, the two manufacturers joined forces in a common program to evaluate the technical, economical and environmental viability of the fuel cell vehicle potential. The joint program has active contributions by Air Liquid, the French Atomic Energy Agency, De Nora Fuel Cells, Elf-Antar-France, Totalfina and Valeo. This paper highlighted many of the components of this program and the suitability of this new technology for industrial production at a cost competitive price. Certain automotive constraints have to be considered to propose vehicles which could provide good performance in varying temperature and operating conditions. Safety is also an important concern given that the vehicles are powered by hydrogen and a high voltage power source. Another challenges is the choice of the fuel and the economic cost of a new refueling infrastructure. Recycling was suggested as a means to recover expensive fuel cell system components such as precious catalysts, bipolar plates, membranes and other main specific parts of the fuel cell vehicle. This paper also discussed issues regarding the thermal management of the fuel cell power plant and air conditioning of the vehicles. figs.

  1. Algae viability over time in a ballast water sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gollasch, Stephan; David, Matej

    2018-03-01

    The biology of vessels' ballast water needs to be analysed for several reasons, one of these being performance tests of ballast water management systems. This analysis includes a viability assessment of phytoplankton. To overcome logistical problems to get algae sample processing gear on board of a vessel to document algae viability, samples may be transported to land-based laboratories. Concerns were raised how the storage conditions of the sample may impact algae viability over time and what the most appropriate storage conditions were. Here we answer these questions with a long-term algae viability study with daily sample analysis using Pulse-Amplitude Modulated (PAM) fluorometry. The sample was analysed over 79 days. We tested different storage conditions: fridge and room temperature with and without light. It seems that during the first two weeks of the experiment the viability remains almost unchanged with a slight downwards trend. In the continuing period, before the sample was split, a slightly stronger downwards viability trend was observed, which occurred at a similar rate towards the end of the experiment. After the sample was split, the strongest viability reduction was measured for the sample stored without light at room temperature. We concluded that the storage conditions, especially regarding temperature and light exposure, have a stronger impact on algae viability compared to the storage duration and that inappropriate storage conditions reduce algal viability. A sample storage time of up to two weeks in a dark and cool environment has little influence on the organism viability. This indicates that a two week time duration between sample taking on board a vessel and the viability measurement in a land-based laboratory may not be very critical.

  2. Creating a competitive electricity market in Ontario - The energy consumer perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, M.

    1997-01-01

    The large consumers' perspective on the Ontario Government's decision to delay action on restructuring the electric power industry was provided, and recommendations were offered as to the best course of action that the Government ought to take. Ontario Hydro's proposal to restructure itself into separate generation, transmission and retail corporations, and to introduce competition into the Corporation was attacked as unworkable, in that it could not help but encourage price manipulation. The large consumer group also argued that retail distribution in Ontario needs major rationalization without an Ontario Hydro presence. In place of the Ontario Hydro proposal the Association of Major Power Consumers in Ontario (AMPCO) recommends a separate transmission system including an independent system operator, a restructuring of local distribution within a definite time frame and consistent criteria, to be worked out by municipal utilities and Ontario Hydro Retail, and establishment of a Transition Authority independent of Ontario Hydro with a mandate to carry out these changes. While the Ontario Government appears to be unlikely to undertake such a'risky' initiative at this stage of its mandate, significant change, including competition, remains inevitable. It is not a question of whether, but when a fully competitive energy market in Ontario will become a reality. tabs., figs

  3. Adverse respiratory outcome after premature rupture of membranes before viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verspyck, Eric; Bisson, Violene; Roman, Horace; Marret, Stéphane

    2014-03-01

    To determine whether preterm premature rupture of membranes (PPROM) before 24 weeks is an independent risk factor for poor outcome in preterm neonates. A retrospective comparative cohort study was conducted, including viable premature infants born between 25 and 34-weeks gestation. Each preterm case with early PPROM was matched with two preterm controls of the same gestational age at birth, sex and birth date and who were born spontaneously with intact membranes. Logistic regression was performed to identify independent risk factors associated with composite respiratory and perinatal adverse outcomes for the overall population of preterm infants. Thirty-five PPROM cases were matched with 70 controls. Extreme prematurity (26-28 weeks) was an independent risk factor for composite perinatal adverse outcomes [odds ratio (OR) 43.9; p = 0.001]. Extreme prematurity (OR 42.9; p = 0.001), PPROM (OR 7.1; p = 0.01), male infant (OR 5.2; p = 0.02) and intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR, OR 4.8; p = 0.04) were factors for composite respiratory adverse outcomes. Preterm premature rupture of membranes before viability represents an independent risk factor for composite respiratory adverse outcomes in preterm neonates. Extreme prematurity may represent the main risk factor for both composite respiratory and perinatal adverse outcomes. ©2013 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Beware: The empire striking back: An update of regulatory changes in Ontario`s gas and electricity business as at February 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenberg, K. [Gowling, Strathy and Henderson, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    1998-09-01

    A review of what is happening with regard to deregulation of the gas and electricity industry in Ontario was presented. Recently, a series of government actions in Ontario have recommended fundamental changes in the gas and electric power sector. Prior to the October 31, 1985 agreement, no competitive market existed within local distribution franchises in Ontario or elsewhere in Canada. The Agreement created gas on gas competition and enabled consumers to purchase natural gas from producers at negotiated prices. The Ontario government`s proposed legislation and implementation schedule forecasts even more fundamental changes for the province`s electric power industry. Essentially, the legislation proposes to break up Ontario Hydro into several different entities and transfer regulatory authority to the Ontario Energy Board. The pending legislation also envisages the structural separation of local distribution companies into natural monopolies which will compete in the marketplace. The possibility of privatizing part or all of Ontario`s nuclear assets is also part of the ongoing debate. It was the author`s view that unless there is immediate and complete structural separation of all monopoly services within the gas and electric utilities, the market will not be truly competitive. Instead, regulated monopoly pricing would be replaced by unregulated oligopoly pricing. 1 tab.

  5. Pollen viability and germination in Jatropha ribifolia and Jatropha ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this work is to assess pollen viability using the staining technique and in vitro germination with different concentrations of sucrose in Jatropha ribifolia and Jatropha mollissima, contributing to the knowledge of the reproductive biology and subsidizing their conservation, management and utilization. Pollen viability ...

  6. Sperm viability staining in ecology and evolution: potential pitfalls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holman, Luke

    2009-01-01

    The causes and consequences of variation in sperm quality, survival and ageing are active areas of research in ecology and evolution. In order to address these topics, many recent studies have measured sperm viability using fluorescent staining. Although sperm viability staining has produced a nu...

  7. Viability of dielectrophoretically trapped neuronal cortical cells in culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heida, Tjitske; Vulto, P; Rutten, Wim; Marani, Enrico

    2001-01-01

    Negative dielectrophoretic trapping of neural cells is an efficient way to position neural cells on the electrode sites of planar micro-electrode arrays. The preservation of viability of the neural cells is essential for this approach. This study investigates the viability of postnatal cortical rat

  8. Flow cytometric assessment of viability of lactic acid bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bunthof, C.J.; Bloemen, K.; Breeuwer, P.; Rombouts, F.M.; Abee, T.

    2001-01-01

    The viability of lactic acid bacteria is crucial for their applications as dairy starters and as probiotics. We investigated the usefulness of flow cytometry (FCM) for viability assessment of lactic acid bacteria. The esterase substrate carboxyfluorescein diacetate (cFDA) and the dye exclusion DNA

  9. Fisheries and Oceans Canada - habitat management program in Ontario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    On May 5, 2011, the Ontario Waterpower Association hosted the emergent hydro workshop in Peterborough. In the course of the workshop, Fisheries and Oceans Canada presented the habitat management program in Ontario. Fisheries and Oceans Canada explained that their role is to protect water resources. The Fisheries Act was passed to manage fisheries and fish habitats in Canada and to protect them from harmful alteration, disruption or destruction. The policy for the management of fish was written to interpret the Fisheries Act and enhance the productive capacity of fish habitats. In addition, two other Acts were passed, the Species at Risk Act and the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act, designed to protect species from extinction and improve coordination of, and public access to EA information. This presentation highlighted the different existing policies aimed at protecting fisheries and fish habitats in Canada.

  10. Comparison of Ontario Hydro's performance with world power reactors - 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumka, B.R.

    1982-04-01

    The performance of Ontario Hydro's CANDU reactors in 1981 is compared with that of 123 world nuclear power reactors rated at 500 MW(e) or greater. The report is based on data extracted from publications, as well as correspondence with a number of utilities. The basis used is the gross capacity factor, which is defined as gross unit generation divided by the perfect gross output for the period of interest. The lowest of the published turbine and generator design ratings is used to determine the perfect gross output, unless the unit has been proven capable of consistently exceeding this value. The first six reactors in the rankings were CANDU reactors operated by Ontario Hydro

  11. Stroke rehabilitation in ontario: an opportunity for health care transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Matthew J; Meyer, John P; Foley, Norine; Salter, Katherine; McClure, J Andrew; Teasell, Robert

    2011-11-01

    In this article, Ontario's stroke rehabilitation system is used to exemplify the challenges faced by rehabilitation and healthcare systems across Canada who are attempting to provide quality care to patients in the face of increasing demands. Currently, Ontario's rehabilitation system struggles in its efforts to provide accessible and comprehensive care to patients recovering from stroke. We begin our exploration by identifying both the primary stakeholders and the underlying factors that have contributed to the current challenges. The framework put forward in the Canadian Medical Association's recommendations for transformation is then used to suggest a vision for a more patient-focused system incorporating three key principles: a broader perspective, a patient-first approach, and greater unity. The use of health information technology, proper incentives, and greater accountability are discussed as mechanisms to improve the quality and efficiency of care.

  12. Ontario's Poverty Reduction Strategy: A Critical Discourse Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benbow, Sarah; Gorlick, Carolyne; Forchuk, Cheryl; Ward-Griffin, Catherine; Berman, Helene

    2016-01-01

    This article overviews the second phase of a two-phase study which examined experiences of health and social exclusion among mothers experiencing homelessness in Ontario, Canada. A critical discourse analysis was employed to analyze the policy document, Realizing Our Potential: Ontario's Poverty Reduction Strategy, 2014-2019. In nursing, analysis of policy is an emerging form of scholarship, one that draws attention to the macro levels influencing health and health promotion, such as the social determinants of health, and the policies that impact them. The clear neo-liberal underpinnings, within the strategy, with a focus on productivity and labor market participation leave little room for an understanding of poverty reduction from a human rights perspective. Further, gender-neutrality rendered the poverty experienced by women, and mothers, invisible. Notably, there were a lack of deadlines, target dates, and thorough action and evaluation plans. Such absence troubles whether poverty reduction is truly a priority for the government, and society as a whole.

  13. Ontario Hydro's transportation of radioactive material and emergency response plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karmali, N.

    1993-01-01

    Ontario Hydro has been transporting radioactive material for almost 30 years without any exposure to the public or release to the environment. However, there have been three accidents involving Hydro's shipments of radioactive material. In addition to the quality packaging and shipping program, Ontario Hydro has an Emergency Response Plan and capability to deal with an accident involving a shipment of radioactive material. The Corporation's ability to respond, to effectively control and contain the situation, site remediation, and to provide emergency public information in the event of a road accident minimizes the risk to the public and the environment. This emphasizes their commitment to worker safety, public safety and impact to the environment. Response capability is mandated under various legislation and regulations in Canada

  14. New avenues in cobalt-60 production at Ontario Hydro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mylvaganam, C.K.; Ronchka, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    Ontario Hydro produces cobalt-60 in the control rods of twelve power reactors. These reactors have a typical flux of 2 x 10 14 neutrons/cm 2 /s, making them efficient producers of cobalt-60. Current annual production is 45 million curies. Since the primary function of these reactors is the production of electricity, their flexibility to meet the needs of commercial cobalt production by the control rod route is limited. Ontario Hydro is therefore developing innovative production techniques, making use of the CANDU reactor's unique ability to be fuelled on-power. These techniques will enable production to better respond to the market's requirements for quantity and specific activity. As it is supplementary to control rod production, annual supply could potentially reach 165 million curies. (author)

  15. Naturalization of landscaped parkland at Ontario Hydro's Nanticoke generating station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKenna, G.R.

    1998-01-01

    The implementation of a program for the naturalization of Nanticoke Park, a 30 hectare area located on the property of Ontario Hydro's Nanticoke Generating Station was discussed. The station, which is located in southern Ontario very near to noted wildlife areas, is the largest coal-fired generating station in North America. Naturalization of Nanticoke Park began with passive naturalization of interior areas. An active naturalization program involving four to five hectare size areas annually was begun in 1997, to be completed over a five -year period. This presentation described the site preparation, planting methods, post-planting tending methods, survival assessment of planted areas, and scientific research initiatives including mulch trials with zebra mussel shells to increase soil moisture. The lessons learned from the two year experiment in determining the optimum planting strategy and methods were described. 7 refs., 1 tab

  16. Deregulation and the Alberta experience : the implications for Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charach, L.

    2002-01-01

    This paper provides a 15 month assessment of Alberta's new competitive electricity market. It also presents lessons that Ontario customers could learn from Alberta's experience. The goal for restructuring is to achieve lower electricity prices, competitive retail markets, increased flexibility of contracts, and to remove investment risks from consumers. Alberta's restructured market includes power generation, high voltage transmission, low voltage transmission and retail sales. Economists agree that deregulation has brought lower prices and other consumer benefits despite some imperfections. After one year, prices in Alberta have gone down from $130/MWh to $30/MWh. Power supply has increased along with demand response, market competitiveness, liquidity, and thermal and economic efficiency. In 2001, Alberta was a net exporter of electricity. In 2001, it was ranked by the Center for Advancement of Energy Markets (CAEM) which ranks states and provinces by 22 attributes for how they are restructuring their power markets. Alberta ranked first overall in North America. Ontario ranked sixteenth. 4 tabs., 5 figs

  17. Job Satisfaction Among Gerontological Social Workers in Ontario, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Kelsey; An, Sofiya

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about job satisfaction among Canada's social work workforce in aging, although social workers remain a key component of interdisciplinary care in health and social service settings. This study begins to address this gap in knowledge by examining individual, interpersonal, and job-design factors influencing the job satisfaction of gerontological social workers in Ontario. Data were collected via two online surveys with a sample drawn from the Ontario Association of Social Workers' membership list (N = 104). A multiple regression model explained 37% of the variance in job satisfaction, F = 5.47[10, 93], p social work clinicians, and providing educational and clinical supports to clinicians.

  18. International human rights for mentally ill persons: the Ontario experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckerberg, Joaquin

    2007-01-01

    This article is part of a working project which assesses Ontario's mental health legislation and practice vis-à-vis international human rights standards. The paper focuses on procedural safeguards provided by the major international human rights instruments in the field of mental health law such as the UN Principles for the Protection of Persons with Mental Illness (MI Principles) and the European Convention on Human Rights as interpreted by the European Human Rights Court. In analysing Ontario's compliance with international standards, the paper will explore some problems arising from the implementation of the legislation with which the author is familiar with from his experience as counsel for the Consent and Capacity Board. The paper aims to generate discussion for potential reforms in domestic legal systems and to provide a methodology to be used as a tool to assess similar mental health legislation in other local contexts.

  19. The Economics of Renewable Electricity Policy in Ontario

    OpenAIRE

    Donald N. Dewees

    2013-01-01

    Economic evaluation of green or renewable power should compare the cost of renewable power with the cost savings from displaced fossil generation plus the avoided harm from reduced emissions of air pollution and greenhouse gases. We use existing estimates of the values of the harm and we calculate cost savings from renewable power based on wholesale spot prices of power in Ontario and steady-state estimates of the cost of new gas generation to estimate the value or affordability of various fo...

  20. Adaptation to climate change in the Ontario public health sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paterson Jaclyn A

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Climate change is among the major challenges for health this century, and adaptation to manage adverse health outcomes will be unavoidable. The risks in Ontario – Canada’s most populous province – include increasing temperatures, more frequent and intense extreme weather events, and alterations to precipitation regimes. Socio-economic-demographic patterns could magnify the implications climate change has for Ontario, including the presence of rapidly growing vulnerable populations, exacerbation of warming trends by heat-islands in large urban areas, and connectedness to global transportation networks. This study examines climate change adaptation in the public health sector in Ontario using information from interviews with government officials. Methods Fifty-three semi-structured interviews were conducted, four with provincial and federal health officials and 49 with actors in public health and health relevant sectors at the municipal level. We identify adaptation efforts, barriers and opportunities for current and future intervention. Results Results indicate recognition that climate change will affect the health of Ontarians. Health officials are concerned about how a changing climate could exacerbate existing health issues or create new health burdens, specifically extreme heat (71%, severe weather (68% and poor air-quality (57%. Adaptation is currently taking the form of mainstreaming climate change into existing public health programs. While adaptive progress has relied on local leadership, federal support, political will, and inter-agency efforts, a lack of resources constrains the sustainability of long-term adaptation programs and the acquisition of data necessary to support effective policies. Conclusions This study provides a snapshot of climate change adaptation and needs in the public health sector in Ontario. Public health departments will need to capitalize on opportunities to integrate climate change into

  1. Neotectonic investigations in southern Ontario: Prince Edward County. Phase I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McFall, G.H.; Allam, A.

    1989-03-01

    This report summarizes the preliminary results of geological and geophysical investigations of possible neotectonic features in Prince Edward County, southern Ontario, made by the Ontario Geological Survey during 1988. Low magnitude seismic events indicative of contemporary stress relief occurred during 1987-88 near Salmon Point and Consecon (M 2.2). These events were located proximal to a major regional fault system crossing Lake Ontario and consisting of the Clarendon-Linden Fault System in New York State and the Salmon River-Picton fault systems in Ontario. Detailed observations were made of regional jointing orientations (predominantly 60 degrees and 125 degrees), erosion of surficial deposits adjacent to open fractures, a local fault displacement (post-glacially), dome structures located at Point Petre, and dissolution/karst terrains in the eastern part of the study area. Excavations of four pop-up structures indicate that three are classical pop-ups and one is atypical in structure. Level transects were conducted across complex structures in the eastern part of the study area. Detailed refraction seismic and resistivity surveys were conducted on pop-up and fault features. Preliminary results indicate that the Picton Fault is a complex zone of fractures with differing bedrock on each side. The central zone of the East Duck Pond pop-up is fractured and may contain variable amounts of water. Overturned and upright folds in the Consecon Quarry located outside of the primary research area were documented and found to be trending in a west-northwest to northwest direction. This fold orientation is compatible both with a glacial shove origin and with the present stress field orientations. Although glacial shove can produce overturned folds, it cannot form upright folds. A regional, tectonic deformation oriented northeasterly is therefore suggested as the causative mechanism

  2. Wastewater quality control at Sarnia (Ontario, Canada) petrochemical industries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vianna, Arlinda C. [Servico Nacional de Aprendizagem Industrial (SENAI), Salvador, BA (Brazil); Souza, Eliane S.; Himmelman, William [Lambton College, Sarnia, ON (Canada)

    1993-12-31

    Ontario industries are required by law to meet strict regulations under the provinces under MISA initiative (Municipal-Industrial Strategy for Abatement). The petroleum-petrochemical area was selected as a leader in the development of new environmental objectives, and monitoring and training programs. Sarnia has become a world leader in industrial environmental control systems and the approach toward zero emissions. 4 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. The Hydroelectric Business Unit of Ontario Power Generation Inc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaboury, J.

    2001-01-01

    The focus of this presentation was on the generation and sale of electricity. Prior to deregulation, companies that generated electricity had a readily available customer base to whom the electricity could be sold. The author discussed some of the changes affecting the industry as a result of deregulation of the electricity market in Ontario: the increasing number of companies, as well as the increased number of generators supplying power within the province. Currently 85 per cent of the generation in Ontario is met by Ontario Power Generation (OPG) and this percentage will decrease through de-control. De-control can be achieved in a variety of ways, either through the sale of assets, leases, asset swaps. The market rules dictate that OPG not control in excess of 35 per cent of the generation supply in Ontario, OPG is examining the situation. New supply being constructed or new interconnections with neighboring markets could affect the total assets that would have to be de-controlled. OPG has a mix of generation that includes hydroelectric, fossil, and nuclear, as well as a single wind turbine. Green power, defined as electricity generation deemed less intrusive environmentally than most traditional generation, includes wind, water, landfill gas, solar and others, and could affect the mix of generation. It is expected that there will be a niche market for green power, especially when one considers the reduction in emissions. It could represent a viable option for smaller startup companies, as less capital is required. The options for selling the power, either to the spot market or by entering into a bilateral contract with another customer, were explained

  4. 137Cs radioactive dating of Lake Ontario sediment cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, T.E.; Breeden, J.; Komisarcik, K.; Porter, R.; Czuczwa, J.; Kaminski, R.; McVeety, B.D.

    1987-12-01

    The distribution of 137 Cs in sediment cores from Lake Ontario provides estimates of the sediment accumulation rates. Geochronology with 210 Pb dating and distribution of Ambrosia (ragweed) pollen compare well with 137 Cs dating. These methods can determine with precision, changes in sedimentation occurring over the past 100 years or so. Typical sedimentation rates of 0.18-0.36 cm/yr were measured. 16 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  5. An Evaluation of Provincial Infectious Disease Surveillance Reports in Ontario

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, Ellen; Barnes, Morgan E.; Sharif, Omar

    2017-01-01

    Context: Public Health Ontario (PHO) publishes various infectious disease surveillance reports, but none have yet been formally evaluated. Objective: PHO evaluated its monthly and annual infectious disease surveillance reports to assess public health stakeholders' current perception of the products and to develop recommendations for improving future products. Design: An evaluation consisting of an online survey and a review of public Web sites of other jurisdictions with similar annual report...

  6. Adaptation to climate change in the Ontario public health sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Climate change is among the major challenges for health this century, and adaptation to manage adverse health outcomes will be unavoidable. The risks in Ontario – Canada’s most populous province – include increasing temperatures, more frequent and intense extreme weather events, and alterations to precipitation regimes. Socio-economic-demographic patterns could magnify the implications climate change has for Ontario, including the presence of rapidly growing vulnerable populations, exacerbation of warming trends by heat-islands in large urban areas, and connectedness to global transportation networks. This study examines climate change adaptation in the public health sector in Ontario using information from interviews with government officials. Methods Fifty-three semi-structured interviews were conducted, four with provincial and federal health officials and 49 with actors in public health and health relevant sectors at the municipal level. We identify adaptation efforts, barriers and opportunities for current and future intervention. Results Results indicate recognition that climate change will affect the health of Ontarians. Health officials are concerned about how a changing climate could exacerbate existing health issues or create new health burdens, specifically extreme heat (71%), severe weather (68%) and poor air-quality (57%). Adaptation is currently taking the form of mainstreaming climate change into existing public health programs. While adaptive progress has relied on local leadership, federal support, political will, and inter-agency efforts, a lack of resources constrains the sustainability of long-term adaptation programs and the acquisition of data necessary to support effective policies. Conclusions This study provides a snapshot of climate change adaptation and needs in the public health sector in Ontario. Public health departments will need to capitalize on opportunities to integrate climate change into policies and programs

  7. Wastewater quality control at Sarnia (Ontario, Canada) petrochemical industries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vianna, Arlinda C [Servico Nacional de Aprendizagem Industrial (SENAI), Salvador, BA (Brazil); Souza, Eliane S; Himmelman, William [Lambton College, Sarnia, ON (Canada)

    1994-12-31

    Ontario industries are required by law to meet strict regulations under the provinces under MISA initiative (Municipal-Industrial Strategy for Abatement). The petroleum-petrochemical area was selected as a leader in the development of new environmental objectives, and monitoring and training programs. Sarnia has become a world leader in industrial environmental control systems and the approach toward zero emissions. 4 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Neotectonic investigations in Southern Ontario. Prince Edward County - Phase 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McFall, G.H.; Allam, A.

    1991-06-01

    This report summarizes the preliminary results of geological and geophysical investigations and offshore side scan sonar surveys of the bedrock and unconsolidated sediments in Prince Edward County, Southern Ontario, by the Ontario Geological Survey in 1989. Investigations were focused on deformations in the bedrock and the surficial deposits. Some of these deformations may be neotectonic in origin. Low magnitude seismicity in the Prince Edward County region appears to be spatially related to a major regional fault system that crosses Lake Ontario and consists of the seismically active Clarendon-Linden Fault System in New York State, the Picton-Napanee and Rideau Faults, the Frontenac-Sharbot Lake Terrane Boundary and the assumed Salmon River Fault in Ontario. Detailed observations were made in the Long Point study area and the Mountain View and Picton Quarries. Bedrock structural features were documented, including: joints; normal, reverse and strike strip faults; brittle folds; and Jurassic age ultramafic dyke. Detailed refraction seismic surveys were conducted across a local fault and possible fold structures. Magnetic surveys, conducted in conjunction with the offshore side scan sonar surveys, documented large magnetic anomalies southeast of Point Petre and at the northeast end of Long Reach. Side scan sonar surveys of the lake bottom to the east of Point Petre confirm the presence of pop-ups in that area of the lake bottom which is immediately adjacent to where pop-ups are observed on land. The pop-ups present in the lake bottom have similar orientations to those mapped in the study area

  9. Costs of health care across primary care models in Ontario

    OpenAIRE

    Laberge, Maude; Wodchis, Walter P; Barnsley, Jan; Laporte, Audrey

    2017-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study is to analyze the relationship between newly introduced primary care models in Ontario, Canada, and patients? primary care and total health care costs. A specific focus is on the payment mechanisms for primary care physicians, i.e. fee-for-service (FFS), enhanced-FFS, and blended capitation, and whether providers practiced as part of a multidisciplinary team. Methods Utilization data for a one year period was measured using administrative databases for a 1...

  10. Pollen Viability and Autogamy Fitness in Bauhinia forficata Link (Fabaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luana Camila Capitani

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Bauhinia forficata (Fabaceae occurs in many phytophysiognomies of southern Brazil, however its ecological relevance is not well understood. The present study was developed in the Central Depression of Rio Grande do Sul and aimed to determine variations in pollen viability along flowering, ability to perform autogamy and dye efficiency for the viability test. Pollen viability was determined by colorimetry as well as the ability to perform autogamy by isolating floral buds, being evaluated in eleven matrices. Average pollen viability was 81.43%, with the highest average value obtained with the dye 2,3,5- Triphenyltetrazolium Chloride (TTC (84.11%. Safranin was not a good indicator at the tested concentration. No correlation was found between pollen viability and flowering time. The species demonstrated an inability to perform autogamy.

  11. Population viability analysis for endangered Roanoke logperch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, James H.; Angermeier, Paul; Anderson, Gregory B.

    2016-01-01

    A common strategy for recovering endangered species is ensuring that populations exceed the minimum viable population size (MVP), a demographic benchmark that theoretically ensures low long-term extinction risk. One method of establishing MVP is population viability analysis, a modeling technique that simulates population trajectories and forecasts extinction risk based on a series of biological, environmental, and management assumptions. Such models also help identify key uncertainties that have a large influence on extinction risk. We used stochastic count-based simulation models to explore extinction risk, MVP, and the possible benefits of alternative management strategies in populations of Roanoke logperch Percina rex, an endangered stream fish. Estimates of extinction risk were sensitive to the assumed population growth rate and model type, carrying capacity, and catastrophe regime (frequency and severity of anthropogenic fish kills), whereas demographic augmentation did little to reduce extinction risk. Under density-dependent growth, the estimated MVP for Roanoke logperch ranged from 200 to 4200 individuals, depending on the assumed severity of catastrophes. Thus, depending on the MVP threshold, anywhere from two to all five of the logperch populations we assessed were projected to be viable. Despite this uncertainty, these results help identify populations with the greatest relative extinction risk, as well as management strategies that might reduce this risk the most, such as increasing carrying capacity and reducing fish kills. Better estimates of population growth parameters and catastrophe regimes would facilitate the refinement of MVP and extinction-risk estimates, and they should be a high priority for future research on Roanoke logperch and other imperiled stream-fish species.

  12. Section 60 revisited (The Ontario Electrical Safety Code)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olechna, T.

    2003-06-01

    Recent changes to the Ontario Electrical Safety Code (OESC), specifically the deletion of Section 60, Electrical Communication Systems, are discussed in an effort to explain the history behind the decision and the time frame of the changes. Communication systems include telephone, telegraph, data communications, intercommunications, wired music and paging systems. In brief, the deletion of Section 60 occurred in 1983, and resulted from the fact that communication-type wiring was historically the property of the communications utility and under federal jurisdiction. Since such equipment was under federal jurisdiction, they were not inspected in Ontario, hence the deletion of Section 60 from the Ontario Code. It should be noted that although Section 60 is deleted, a number of rules applicable to communications circuits are spread throughout various sections of the Code, notably in Rule 1-032 dealing with damage and interference, Rule 4-022 involving harmonics issues, Rule 12-904(2) regulates the use of conductors that are of different sources of voltage, and Rule 10-708 which specifies the spacing and bonding requirements for communications systems. The end result is that even though Section 60 was deleted, there are these and other rules in the OESC that have direct impact on communications circuits and in effect help to protect the integrity of the system.

  13. The distribution of physiotherapists in ontario: understanding the market drivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holyoke, Paul; Verrier, Molly C; Landry, Michel D; Deber, Raisa B

    2012-01-01

    To understand the factors that affect the distribution of physiotherapists in Ontario by examining three potential influences in the multi-payer physiotherapy (PT) market: population need, critical mass (related to academic health science centres [AHSCs]), and market forces. Physiotherapist density and distribution were calculated from 2003 and 2005 College of Physiotherapists of Ontario registration data. Physiotherapists' workplaces were classified as not-for-profit (NFP) hospitals, other NFP, or for-profit (FP), and their locations were classified by census division (CD) types (cities and counties). Physiotherapist density varied significantly and distribution was neither uniformly responsive to population need, nor driven primarily by market forces. The largest factor was an AHSC in a CD; physiotherapists locate disproportionately in NFP hospitals in AHSCs rather than in the growing FP sector. While some patterns can be discerned in the distribution and densities of physiotherapists across Ontario, further work needs to be done to identify why population need and market forces appear to be less influential, and why CDs with AHSCs are so attractive to physiotherapists. With this additional information, it may be possible to identify ways to influence uneven distribution in the future.

  14. AECB workshop on seismic hazard assessment in southern Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepp, J.C.; Price, R.A.; Coppersmith, K.J.; Klimkiewicz, G.C.; McGuire, R.K.

    1995-10-01

    The purpose of the workshop was to review available geological and seismological data which could affect earthquake occurrence in southern Ontario and to develop a consensus on approaches that should be adopted for characterization of seismic hazard. The workshop was structured in technical sessions to focus presentations and discussions on four technical issues relevant to seismic hazard in southern Ontario, as follows: (1) The importance of geological and geophysical observations for the determination of seismic sources, (2) Methods and approaches which may be adopted for determining seismic sources based on integrated interpretations of geological and seismological information, (3) Methods and data which should be used for characterizing the seismicity parameters of seismic sources, and (4) Methods for assessment of vibratory ground motion hazard. The format of each session involved invited presentations of relevant data followed by open presentations by participants, a general discussion focusing on the relevance of the presented information for seismic hazard assessment in southern Ontario, then development of conclusions and recommendations. In the final session, the conclusions and recommendations were summarized and an open discussion was held to develop consensus. This report presents perspective summaries of the workshop technical sessions together with conclusions and recommendations prepared by the session chairs and the general chairman. 2 refs

  15. Ontario Select Committee on Alternative Fuel Sources : Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galt, D.

    2002-06-01

    On June 28, 2001, the Ontario Legislative Assembly appointed the Select Committee an Alternative Fuel Sources, comprised of representatives of all parties, with a broad mandate to investigate, report and offer recommendations with regard to the various options to support the development and application of environmentally sustainable alternatives to the fossil fuel sources already existing. The members of the Committee elected to conduct extensive public hearings, conduct site visits, attend relevant conferences, do some background research to examine a vast number of alternative fuel and energy sources that could be of relevance to the province of Ontario. A discussion paper (interim report) was issued by the Committee in November 2001, and the present document represents the final report, containing 141 recommendations touching 20 topics. The information contained in the report is expected to assist in the development and outline of policy and programs designed to specifically support alternative fuels and energy sources and applicable technologies. Policy issues were discussed in Part A of the report, along with the appropriate recommendations. The recommendations on specific alternative fuels and energy sources were included in Part B of the report. It is believed that the dependence of Ontario on traditional petroleum-based fuels and energy sources can be reduced through aggressive action on alternative fuels and energy. The benefits of such action would be felt in the area of air quality, with social, and economic benefits as well. 3 tabs

  16. Changes in Characteristics and Practice Patterns of Ontario Psychiatrists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurdyak, Paul; Zaheer, Juveria; Cheng, Joyce; Rudoler, David; Mulsant, Benoit H

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the changes in demographic, geographic, and practice characteristics of all Ontario psychiatrists between 2003 and 2013 and their implication for access to psychiatrists. We included all psychiatrists who were clinically active in Ontario in any year from 2003 to 2013. For each psychiatrist, we reported age, sex, years since medical school graduation, geographic practice region, and practice characteristics such as total number of inpatients, outpatients, and outpatient visit frequencies. In 2013, there were 2070 psychiatrists, with nearly half (47%) more than 30 years since medical school graduation. Female psychiatrists comprised 41% of all psychiatrists in 2013 but 56% of all psychiatrists within 15 years of medical school graduation. Between 2003 and 2013, there was a 17% increase in the total number of psychiatrists, with the largest growth in psychiatrists occurring in the group more than 30 years from medical school graduation. Over these 11 years, the mean (SD) number of unique outpatients seen by a psychiatrist annually increased from 208 (228) to 249 (275) (19.5%; P = 0.001), with male psychiatrists, on average, seeing more outpatients annually than female psychiatrists. The number of outpatients seen by psychiatrists is slowly increasing. However, the large proportion of aging psychiatrists, the high concentration of psychiatrists in urban settings, and the increase in the number of female psychiatrists with smaller practices suggest that without radical changes to the way psychiatrists practice, access to psychiatrists will remain a challenge in Ontario.

  17. Alternative pricing regimes in Ontario : exploring the impacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowlands, I.H.

    2006-01-01

    Legislative goals were recently established in Ontario to promote reliability and quality of electricity service and to ensure that distribution rates for customers remain reasonable. This presentation explored the effect of changing electricity pricing structures on residential customers in Ontario. This study investigated a period between May to December 2005, in the town of Milton, Ontario. Monthly demand was measured for each month, and monthly weighted averages were presented. Residents with electric heating were removed from the sample. Four pricing structure scenarios were examined: (1) flat rates; (2) time-of-use pricing regimes; (3) real time pricing regimes; and (4) critical peak pricing. Average monthly consumption rates for July and August for all 4 scenarios were presented. Results for time-of-use were compared to flat rates, which showed a slight increase in monthly costs. Real time average monthly electricity costs were significantly higher. Time-of-use costs increased by 57 per cent during the periods examined. Real time pricing regimes resulted in a 196 per cent rise in costs. It was concluded that more research must be done to explore the policy implications of pricing regimes and their effect on consumer behaviour. refs., tabs., figs

  18. Groundwater impact studies at three Ontario Hydro coal ash landfills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnston, H.M.; Vorauer, A.G.; Chan, H.T.

    1992-01-01

    Ontario Hydro has produced on the order of 21 million Mg of coal fly ash over the past 40 years, of which, 80% has gone to various landfill sites in the province of Ontario. Hydrogeologic investigations have been performed in the vicinity of three Ontario Hydro coal ash landfill sites to assess the environmental impact of fly ash landfilling on the local groundwater regime. Two of the waste management facilities are associated with thermal generating stations (Lambton TGS and Nanticoke TGS) and are founded on relatively impermeable clay deposits. The third site, Birchwood Park, is a former sand and gravel pit for which the landfill design did not incorporate the use of a liner material. The rates of groundwater flow through the overburden materials a the three sites vary from less than 1 cm/a at the Lambton TGS site, to between 3.45 cm/a and 115 cm/a at contaminant transport at these sites also varies from being controlled by molecular diffusion to advection. This paper discusses the migration rates of contaminants from fly ash leachate at each of the three sites with implications to landfill containment and design

  19. Ontario Energy Board : 2000-2001 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-10-01

    Fiscal 2000-2001 was a busy period for the Ontario Energy Board (OEB) as it was preparing for Ontario's new, competitive electricity market. The OEB's roles and responsibilities have been changing in recent years in preparation for more administrative responsibilities in the deregulated electricity market. In 2000, the OEB distributed a proposed gas distribution access rule for comment by industry and other stakeholders. Another major highlight of the year's work was the development of the 2000 Model Gas Franchise Agreement. The OEB also assumed a leadership role in the electricity sector to ensure the readiness of retail participants in Ontario's competitive electricity market. The Market Readiness Task Force was instrumental in this activity. This Task Force was led by the Independent Electricity Market Operator. Various rules, codes, handbooks and guidelines were also developed, based on the advise of various stakeholders. The Board also continued its work to improve the efficiency of its regulatory procedures and processes by encouraging electronic business transactions and paperless hearings. These efficient ways of doing business should contribute to the cost-effectiveness of the Board. In 2000 the Board began its review of the first unbundled rate applications from electricity distributors and approved 69 out of 114 applications for mergers and acquisition in the electricity sector. The customary consolidated financial statement including balance sheets, assets, liabilities and capital were also included in this report. tabs., figs.

  20. Ontario electricity outlook : smaller reserve margins and higher prices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, C.; Kalevar, P.

    2002-01-01

    Privatization of Hydro One has been delayed, but this will not postpone the scheduled launch of restructuring the electricity markets in Ontario on May 1, 2002. The main concern of Ontario consumers is whether they will undergo an energy crisis such as the one experienced in California. A report released in February 2002 stated that electricity bills will be higher under the new electricity regime. It appears that electricity supply reserve margins will be tighter than originally thought, raising price volatility in the summer and fall. The authors claim that the chance for an energy crisis are low because of the added generating capacity. However, regardless of whether consumers sign a fixed term price contract with retailers, it is likely that electricity bills will be higher in 2002 and 2003. The Independent Electricity Market Operator (IMO) is assuring the public that the power generation resources currently available are sufficient to meet expected demand. However, in June through July, it is possible that reserves will fall short. It is also evident that charges for distribution, transmission and other services will be higher under the restructured system. Electricity bills are likely to be about 5 to 15 per cent higher in 2003 than they were before March 1, 2002. Higher prices might not last indefinitely. Initially, they will be used to pay off the debt, but competition and opportunities for profit should allow for greater efficiencies and innovation in Ontario's electricity system and prices could potentially fall lower than pre-deregulation prices. 1 tab., 3 figs

  1. Carbon storage in Ontario's forests, 2000-2100

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colombo, S.J.; Chen, J.; Ter-Mikaelian, M.T.

    2007-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges facing modern society is rapid climate change resulting from greenhouse gases emissions to the atmosphere, primarily in the form of carbon dioxide from the burning of fossil fuels. The effects of climate change on natural environments will inevitably affect people as well, if left unchanged. In addition to many other societal benefits, forests store large amounts of carbon. As a result, it is necessary to understand how forest management and natural processes affect forest carbon storage. Such information can be utilized to manage forests so that they function as carbon sinks and help reduce greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere. This report employed data about Ontario's forest structure and information from the forest management planning process and past harvests to describe carbon in forests and wood products today and through to the end of this century. The paper described the methods used for the study which included modification of the United States national forest carbon model, FORCARB2, to predict Ontario's forest carbon budgets in order to make carbon projections congruent with forest management plans. The modified forest carbon model, which is called FORCARB-ON, predicts carbon in live trees, understory vegetation, forest floor, standing and down dead wood, and soil. Ontario's managed forests are projected to increase carbon storage by 433 million tonnes from 2000 to 2100. The largest forest sink will be in wood products, accounting for 364 million tonnes of carbon storage over the century. 22 refs., 1 tab., 3 figs

  2. The journey towards decarbonization: Exploring socio-technical transitions in the electricity sector in the province of Ontario (1885–2013) and potential low-carbon pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenbloom, Daniel; Meadowcroft, James

    2014-01-01

    This article employs the multi-level perspective on socio-technical transitions to explore the historical evolution of the electricity regime in the province of Ontario from 1885-2013 and to interpret the potential for future movement towards decarbonization. With an emphasis on the political and social dimensions of transitions, this analysis traces the key features influencing change within Ontario's electricity system over the past century. This paper uses multiple criteria (the phase of electrification; role of the electricity system in economic development; structures of ownership, market and regulation; dominant technologies; and the relative stability of arrangements) to characterize distinct regime configurations and periods of instability which separate relatively stable system orientations. Lessons are drawn from the historical case with implications for future decarbonization in the province, including the importance of: (1) residual momentum; (2) embedded guiding principles; and, (3) politico-economic coalitions. - Highlights: • Investigates transitions in the electricity sector using the multi-level perspective. • Explores the socio-technical evolution of the electricity system in Ontario. • Draws lessons relevant for low-carbon transitions. • Poses key questions for the development of low-carbon pathways in Ontario. • Provides insights on the political dimensions of low-carbon transitions

  3. Sustainable model for financial viability of decentralized biomass gasifier based power projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palit, Debajit; Malhotra, Ramit; Kumar, Atul

    2011-01-01

    This paper made a modest attempt for designing a sustainable model for financial viability of biomass gasifier power projects for enhancing electricity access in India and other developing countries. For long term sustainability of distributed generation projects in remote rural areas, viability from both project implementing agency (PIA) and the end-users need to be ensured. The minimum required prices of electricity from both PIA and end-user perspective have been estimated. While for PIA the cost recovery is the key for viability, the affordability to pay the electricity cost is crucial for the end users. Analysis carried out in this paper on the basis of data obtained from operational projects implemented in India reveal that it is essential to operate the system at a higher capacity utilization factor. While this can be achieved though creating convergence with locally relevant economic activity, it is also observed that micro-enterprises cannot pay beyond a certain price of electricity to keep it sustainable. This paper sets forth a case for developing a regulatory mechanism to extend the tariff fixation for the projects and providing cross-subsidies to ensure long term sustainability of off-grid project. - Highlights: → We design sustainable financial model for viability of biomass gasifier projects. → Analysis based on field data obtained from operational projects in India. Estimated electricity pricing from both implementing agency and end-users perspective. → A regulatory mechanism for tariff fixation and cross subsidization is recommended.

  4. An overview of the transportation of radioactive waste at Ontario Power Generation facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, P.

    2006-01-01

    The Radioactive Material Transportation Department (RMT) ensures regulatory compliance in radioactive material shipping within Ontario Power Generation (OPG). OPG provides a radioactive shipping program, high quality carrier service, stringent packaging maintenance, and quality assurance oversight to the corporation's nuclear facilities and its customers. This paper will speak to the transport of radioactive waste in Ontario Power Generation. It will also mention non-waste shipments and the quality assurance programme used at Ontario Power Generation to ensure a high quality transportation system. (author)

  5. A critical review of financial measures as reported in the Ontario hospital balanced scorecard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, John; Tsasis, Peter; Porporato, Marcela

    2007-01-01

    For Ontario hospitals in Canada, the Financial Performance and Condition measures in the Ontario hospital balanced scorecard are especially of interest since in the foreseeable future, they may be linked to provincial government funding decisions. However, we find that these measures lack valuable information on key attributes that affect organizational performance. We suggest changes that focus on key drivers of performance and reflect the operational realities of Ontario hospitals.

  6. Epidemiology of multiple sclerosis in London and Middlesex County, Ontario, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hader, W J; Elliot, M; Ebers, G C

    1988-04-01

    A case-controlled epidemiologic study of multiple sclerosis (MS) was carried out in London, Ontario, and its surrounding Middlesex County for the period 1974-1983. The prevalence rates for clinically definite/probable MS on January 1, 1984 were 94/100,000 for the city and 91/100,000 for the county. The estimated annual incidence rate for the decade 1974-83 was 3.4/100,000. The female-to-male sex ratio was 2.5:1. A familial history of MS was recorded in 14.4% of close relatives and a total of 17% when distant relatives are included. The MS group is predominantly of British (70%) and European (23%) origin. The urban-rural residence pattern analysis indicates no significant regional influence on the risk of developing MS.

  7. Mortality from myocardial infarction following postlumpectomy radiotherapy for breast cancer: a population-based study in Ontario, Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paszat, Lawrence F.; Mackillop, William J.; Groome, Patti A.; Schulze, Karleen; Holowaty, Eric

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the risk of mortality from myocardial infarction (MI) after left-sided postlumpectomy radiotherapy (RT) to the risk after right-sided postlumpectomy RT. Methods: We conducted a population-based cohort study of cases of invasive female breast cancer in Ontario, diagnosed between January 1, 1982 and December 31, 1987 (n = 25,570). Records of the Ontario Cancer Registry (OCR) were linked to hospital procedure and discharge abstracts and to RT records from Ontario cancer centers. A case was labelled as lumpectomy if this was the maximum breast surgery within 4 months of diagnosis. Postlumpectomy RT occurred up to 1 year postdiagnosis. Laterality was assigned from the laterality descriptor of the RT records. A case was labelled as having had a fatal MI if ICD code 410 (myocardial infarction) was recorded as the cause of death in the OCR. We used logistic regression to compare the likelihood of utilization of : 1. Dose per fraction > 2.00 Gy; 2. cobalt vs. linac; and 3. boost RT. We used life table analysis and the log rank test comparing the time to fatal MI from diagnosis of breast cancer between women who received left-sided postlumpectomy RT and women who received right-sided. We used Cox proportional hazards models to study the relative risk for left-sided cases overall, and stratified by age, RT characteristics, and among conditional survival cohorts. Results: Postlumpectomy RT was received by 1,555 left-sided and 1,451 right-sided cases. With follow-up to December 31, 1995, 2% of women with left-sided RT had a fatal MI compared to 1% of women with right-sided RT. Comparison of the time to failure between women who had left-sided RT and women who had right-sided RT showed the left-sided RT group to be associated with a higher risk of fatal MI (p = 0.02). Adjusting for age at diagnosis, the relative risk for fatal MI with left-sided postlumpectomy RT was 2.10 (1.11, 3.95). Conclusion: Among women who received postlumpectomy RT for breast cancer

  8. Link overlap, viability, and mutual percolation in multiplex networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, Byungjoon; Lee, Sangchul; Lee, Kyu-Min; Goh, K.-I.

    2015-01-01

    Many real-world complex systems are best modeled by multiplex networks. The multiplexity has proved to have broad impact on the system’s structure and function. Most theoretical studies on multiplex networks to date, however, have largely ignored the effect of the link overlap across layers despite strong empirical evidences for its significance. In this article, we investigate the effect of the link overlap in the viability of multiplex networks, both analytically and numerically. After a short recap of the original multiplex viability study, the distinctive role of overlapping links in viability and mutual connectivity is emphasized and exploited for setting up a proper analytic framework. A rich phase diagram for viability is obtained and greatly diversified patterns of hysteretic behavior in viability are observed in the presence of link overlap. Mutual percolation with link overlap is revisited as a limit of multiplex viability problem, and the controversy between existing results is clarified. The distinctive role of overlapping links is further demonstrated by the different responses of networks under random removals of overlapping and non-overlapping links, respectively, as well as under several link-removal strategies. Our results show that the link overlap facilitates the viability and mutual percolation; at the same time, the presence of link overlap poses a challenge in analytical approaches to the problem

  9. Compensatory selection for roads over natural linear features by wolves in northern Ontario: Implications for caribou conservation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica J Newton

    Full Text Available Woodland caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou in Ontario are a threatened species that have experienced a substantial retraction of their historic range. Part of their decline has been attributed to increasing densities of anthropogenic linear features such as trails, roads, railways, and hydro lines. These features have been shown to increase the search efficiency and kill rate of wolves. However, it is unclear whether selection for anthropogenic linear features is additive or compensatory to selection for natural (water linear features which may also be used for travel. We studied the selection of water and anthropogenic linear features by 52 resident wolves (Canis lupus x lycaon over four years across three study areas in northern Ontario that varied in degrees of forestry activity and human disturbance. We used Euclidean distance-based resource selection functions (mixed-effects logistic regression at the seasonal range scale with random coefficients for distance to water linear features, primary/secondary roads/railways, and hydro lines, and tertiary roads to estimate the strength of selection for each linear feature and for several habitat types, while accounting for availability of each feature. Next, we investigated the trade-off between selection for anthropogenic and water linear features. Wolves selected both anthropogenic and water linear features; selection for anthropogenic features was stronger than for water during the rendezvous season. Selection for anthropogenic linear features increased with increasing density of these features on the landscape, while selection for natural linear features declined, indicating compensatory selection of anthropogenic linear features. These results have implications for woodland caribou conservation. Prey encounter rates between wolves and caribou seem to be strongly influenced by increasing linear feature densities. This behavioral mechanism-a compensatory functional response to anthropogenic

  10. Predicting the outcome of pregnancy in threatened abortion using ultrasound in detecting the viability of foetus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, R

    1992-06-01

    Between December 1990 and May 1991 in Malaysia, clinicians at the Sultanah Aminah Hospital in Johor Bahru screened 200 women with a diagnosis of threatened miscarriage with ultrasound to determine whether ultrasound could evaluate the viability of the fetus and thus the outcome of pregnancy in cases of threatened abortion. A fetal heartbeat was absent in 65% of cases with the remaining 35% of cases having a fetal heartbeat. Nonviability of the fetus or an abnormal or very early pregnancy may have accounted for an absent fetal heartbeat. The pregnancy of 46% of cases continued while 41% experienced spontaneous abortion. Just 6.2% of cases with a fetal heartbeat suffered from spontaneous abortion compared with 69.7% of those without a fetal heartbeat. 93.8% of cases with a fetal heartbeat continued their pregnancies compared with 30.3% of those without a fetal heartbeat. Inability of ultrasound to detect fetal heartbeats during early pregnancy probably accounted for the somewhat high percentage of those without a fetal heartbeat who continued their pregnancies. Among patients with a fetal heartbeat, the number of pregnancies that continued. Ultrasound detected 13% abnormal pregnancies (i.e., molar pregnancy or ectopic pregnancy). Surgery on these cases confirmed the ultrasound findings. These results showed that ultrasound should be used in every case of threatened miscarriage and that a fetal heartbeat does indicate the viability of the fetus.

  11. Viability and Virulence of Entomopathogenic Nematodes Exposed to Ultraviolet Radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro-Ilan, David I; Hazir, Selcuk; Lete, Luis

    2015-09-01

    Entomopathogenic nematodes (EPNs) can be highly effective biocontrol agents, but their efficacy can be reduced due to exposure to environmental stress such as from ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Our objectives were to 1) compare UV tolerance among a broad array of EPN species, and 2) investigate the relationship between reduced nematode viability (after exposure to UV) and virulence. Nematodes exposed to a UV radiation (254 nm) for 10 or 20 min were assessed separately for viability (survival) and virulence to Galleria mellonella. We compared 9 different EPN species and 15 strains: Heterorhabditis bacteriophora (Baine, fl11, Oswego, and Vs strains), H. floridensis (332), H. georgiana (Kesha), H. indica (HOM1), H. megidis (UK211), Steinernema carpocapsae (All, Cxrd, DD136, and Sal strains), S. feltiae (SN), S. rarum (17C&E), and S. riobrave (355). In viability assessments, steinernematids, particularly strains of S. carpocapsae, generally exhibited superior UV tolerance compared with the heterorhabditids. However, some heterorhabditids tended to be more tolerant than others, e.g., H. megidis and H. bacteriophora (Baine) were most susceptible and H. bacteriophora (Vs) was the only heterorhabditid that did not exhibit a significant effect after 10 min of exposure. All heterorhabditids experienced reduced viability after 20 min exposure though several S. carpocapsae strains did not. In total, after 10 or 20 min exposure, the viability of seven nematode strains did not differ from their non-UV exposed controls. In virulence assays, steinernematids (particularly S. carpocapsae strains) also tended to exhibit higher UV tolerance. However, in contrast to the viability measurements, all nematodes experienced a reduction in virulence relative to their controls. Correlation analysis revealed that viability among nematode strains is not necessarily related to virulence. In conclusion, our results indicate that the impact of UV varies substantially among EPNs, and viability alone

  12. A viability analysis for a stock/price model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerry, Chakib; Raissi, Nadia

    2012-09-01

    We examine the conditions for the sustainability of a stock/price system based on the use of a marine renewable resource. Instead of studying the environmental and economic interactions in terms of optimal control, we focus on the viability of the system. These viability/crisis situations are defined by a set of economic state constraints. This constraints combine a guaranteed consumption and a minimum income for fishermen. Using the mathematical concept of viability kernel, we reveal that with only economics constraints we guarantee a perennial stock/price system.

  13. Thyroid cancer incidence among Asian immigrants to Ontario, Canada: A population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Baiju R; Griffiths, Rebecca; Hall, Stephen F

    2017-09-01

    The highest rates of thyroid cancer are observed in Pacific Island nations as well as Australia and Asian countries bordering the Pacific. The objective of this study was to determine the risk for thyroid cancer among immigrants to Canada from Southeast and East Asia compared with immigrants from other regions and nonimmigrants. This was a population-based, longitudinal cohort study using health care administrative data to examine all residents of Ontario without pre-existing thyroid cancer. Individuals were followed from January 1997 or 5 years after they became eligible for health care coverage in Ontario, whichever came later. Patients were followed until March 2015 for incident-differentiated thyroid cancer, and then for recurrence. The study followed 14,659,733 individuals for a median of 17 years. Thyroid cancer incidence was 43.8 cases per 100,000 person-years among Southeast Asian immigrants, 28.6 cases per 100,000 person-years among East Asian immigrants, 21.5 cases per 100,000 person-years among other immigrants, and 14.5 cases per 100,000 person-years among nonimmigrants. Incidence was highest among immigrants from the Philippines (52.7 cases per 100,000 person-years), South Korea (33.5 cases per 100,000 person-years), and China (30.0 cases per 100,000 person-years). Adjusted hazard ratios for thyroid cancer compared with nonimmigrants were 2.66 (95% confidence interval, 2.48-2.84) for Southeast Asian immigrants, 1.87 (95% confidence interval, 1.75-2.00) for East Asian immigrants, and 1.51 (95% confidence interval, 1.45-1.57) for other immigrants. Immigrants were more likely to have papillary histology and stage I cancer. East Asian immigrants, but not Southeast Asian immigrants, had a lower risk of recurrence (hazard ratio, 0.73 [95% confidence interval, 0.57-0.94] and 1.01 [95% confidence interval, 0.81-1.26], respectively). Immigrants from Southeast and East Asia had markedly higher thyroid cancer incidence than nonimmigrants. At particularly elevated

  14. The social construction of risk in a rural community: Responses of local residents to the 1990 Hagersville (Ontario) tire fire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eyles, J.; Taylor, S.M.; Baxter, J.; Sider, D.; Willms, D.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents the findings of research relating to the 1990 Hagersville (Ontario) tire fire. After reviewing the literature on risk and risk perception, it begins by describing the event as well as the community in which it occurred. The reasons for adopting a qualitative research design are then established practical, conceptual, and methodological. The residents' accounts of the fire, evacuation, and aftermath in terms of concerns, anxieties, and responses are described. Five themes emerge: economic, community, health, environmental, and governance. The paper concludes by putting forward a case study-derived model of risk appraisal and management, and by relating the findings to policy issues. 48 refs., 1 fig

  15. Report on investigation of remedial measures for the radiation reduction and radioactive decontamination of Elliot Lake, Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-02-01

    This is the fourth annual report on a program to monitor and reduce radon daughter exposures in the town of Elliot Lake, Ontario. Twelve month's WL survey measurements were completed in 1980 and showed that 22 houses exceeded the remedial action criterion of 0.02 WL. In a few cases gamma radiation levels were high enough to require remedial action in driveways and public areas, but not inside houses. During 1980 remedial work was carried out on 85 buildings; work was completed on 58. The most frequent routes of entry for radon and radon daughters were untrapped weeping tile connected to a floor drain or sump, and the wall to floor joint

  16. Critical Factors Influencing Viability of Wave Energy Converters in Off-Grid Luxury Resorts and Small Utilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aksel Botne Sandberg

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines technical and non-technical factors that are critical to the viability of commercialization of wave energy converters in off-grid luxury resorts and small utilities. Critical factors are found by investigating Levelized Cost of Energy, and using the tools PESTEL and Porter’s five competitive forces. Identified factors are then applied on three business cases to investigate their impact on viability. The results show that one of the main challenges facing off-grid commercialization is the few wave energy converter units installed per location, negating the economy of scale that large wave energy farms count on to achieve competitive cost levels. In addition, factors like current cost of energy, available wave resources, distance from shore, infrastructure, supply chain logistics, and electricity demand are found to be deciding factors for viability. Despite these challenges, it is found that there are potentially viable off-grid business cases for commercialization of wave energy converters.

  17. Viability of bull semen extended with commercial semen extender ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Andrea Raseona

    stored at 24 °C. Sperm motility parameters, morphology, and viability were analysed ... body size, slow average daily weight gain, decreased fertility, extended .... were determined by counting a total of 200 spermatozoa per each stained slide.

  18. Evaluation of pollen viability, stigma receptivity and fertilization ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJL

    2013-11-13

    Nov 13, 2013 ... by field artificial pollination were analyzed in this study. The maximum pollen viability .... the day before anthesis to avoid self-pollination. Subsequently, between ..... The Lagerstroemia handbook/checklist. Ameri. Association ...

  19. Influence of gamma irradiation on pollen viability, germination ability ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-12-15

    Dec 15, 2009 ... minor cross-incompatibilities and physiological studies of incompatibility ... campanula shape of the flowers attractive for insect. (bees are ..... irradiation of cacao (Theobroma cacao L.) pollen: Effect on pollen grain viability ...

  20. In vitro pollen quantity, viability and germination tests in quince

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    2011-11-21

    Nov 21, 2011 ... rootstock pollens were collected in April from the unopened pink balloon-stage flowers on mature trees ..... their pollen characteristics to be used in cross breeding ... viability and germination levels for pistachio and terebinth in.

  1. Equine ovarian tissue viability after cryopreservation and in vitro culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    The efficiency of several cryoprotective agents were compared using both slow-freezing and vitrification methods. Results indicate that the viability of ovarian tissue cells increases when DMSO (slow-freezing) and ethylene glycol (vitrification) are used....

  2. Approximate viability for nonlinear evolution inclusions with application to controllability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Benniche

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We investigate approximate viability for a graph with respect to fully nonlinear quasi-autonomous evolution inclusions. As application, an approximate null controllability result is given.

  3. Puget Sound steelhead life cycle model analyses - Population Viability Analysis

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This research was initiated by the Puget Sound Steelhead Technical Recovery Team to develop viability criteria for threatened Puget Sound steelhead and to support...

  4. STUDY ON POLLEN VIABILITY AS BIOINDICATOR OF AIR QUALITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florentina ŞTEFLEA

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research is to estimate the relationship between pollen viability and atmospheric pollution (in polluted and non-polluted conditions. The study was carried out in the city of Timisoara. Two areas, with different intensity of road traffic (very high and absent but all characterized by the presence of the same plant species, were selected. The pollen of herbaceous spontaneous species, arboreal species and a shrub species was used (Robinia pseudacacia, Aesculus x carnea, Catalpa bignonioides, Albizzia julibrissin, Rosa canina, Sambucus nigra, Malva neglecta, Ranunculus acer, Trifolium repens, Cichorium intybus. The pollen of these species was treated with TTC (2, 3, 5 Tryphenil-Tetrazolium-Chloride staining solution and viability was then estimated by light microscopy. The results of the mean pollen viability percentage of the examined species are reported. Pollen viability of herbaceous plants is significantly different between the two environments.

  5. Pollen diversity, viability and floral structure of some Musa genotypes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Ogunji

    Pollen diversity, viability and floral structure of some Musa genotypes ... at the Faculty of Agriculture & Natural Resources Management farm, Ebonyi State University,. Abakaliki. ..... Roots, tuber, plantains and bananas in human nutrition. Rome,.

  6. Competency assessment of microbiology medical laboratory technologists in Ontario, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desjardins, Marc; Fleming, Christine Ann

    2014-08-01

    Accreditation in Ontario, Canada, requires that licensed clinical laboratories participate in external quality assessment (also known as proficiency testing) and perform competency evaluation of their staff. To assess the extent of ongoing competency assessment practices, the Quality Management Program--Laboratory Services (QMP-LS) Microbiology Committee surveyed all 112 licensed Ontario microbiology laboratories. The questionnaire consisted of a total of 21 questions that included yes/no, multiple-choice, and short-answer formats. Participants were asked to provide information about existing programs, the frequency of testing, what areas are evaluated, and how results are communicated to the staff. Of the 111 responding laboratories, 6 indicated they did not have a formal evaluation program since they perform only limited bacteriology testing. Of the remaining 105 respondents, 87% perform evaluations at least annually or every 2 years, and 61% include any test or task performed, whereas 16% and 10% focus only on problem areas and high-volume complex tasks, respectively. The most common methods of evaluation were review of external quality assessment (EQA) challenges, direct observation, and worksheet review. With the exception of one participant, all communicate results to staff, and most take remedial action to correct the deficiencies. Although most accredited laboratories have a program to assess the ongoing competency of their staff, the methods used are not standardized or consistently applied, indicating that there is room for improvement. The survey successfully highlighted potential areas for improvement and allowed the QMP-LS Microbiology Committee to provide guidance to Ontario laboratories for establishing or improving existing microbiology-specific competency assessment programs. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  7. New Ontario power legislation aims to protect consumers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2000-09-01

    New legislation designed to improve regulation of the electricity sector in Ontario was introduced by the provincial government in June 2000, the first such legislation since the government mandated an open electricity market with the Energy Competition Act of 1998. The new legislation is described as narrowly focused on putting limits on local power rate increases. The legislation was introduced in combination with a directive to the Ontario Energy Board, and is designed to ensure that the Board approves municipal electric utility rates only when certain conditions are met. The Energy Minister was at great pains to point out that the legislation should not be interpreted as the government interfering in the marketplace, it is merely to help the utility wires side of the business during a two-year transition period. Municipal authorities reacted unfavorably to the legislation because it appears to require them to return significant assets to their utilities, assets that they considered as theirs under municipal restructuring. Energy Probe, an environmental advocacy group, suggested an alternative to the legislation, i. e., the government should allow the price increases requested by the municipal utilities to go through, but to leave consumers whole, it should impose a windfall profits tax on municipal governments, use the proceeds to reduce debt retirement taxes in the electricity bill, a leftover from Ontario Hydro's debt and stranded nuclear waste liabilities, and eliminate the province's own electricity tax on consumers. No direct reaction has been received from the Minister to date. If the legislation is passed in its present form it will prevent municipalities from using windfall profits from their utilities to justify rate hikes.

  8. Physics education: Understanding the barriers for young women in Ontario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainhood, Lindsay Ann

    In nearly all countries of the world, at every level of education, physics as a field of science is failing to recruit and retain women. This phenomenon is believed to relate to girls' educational experiences from K-12, but the reasons for the gender gap in physics are not fully understood. The purpose of this phenomenological research is to explore and understand the barriers encountered by Ontario female high school students during their physics education and the meanings attributed to those barriers by these young women. This research is guided by social cognitive career theory (SCCT) and uses the concept of physics identity as a lens through which the influence of contextual barriers can be understood. Nine participants, selected via snowball sampling from an Eastern Ontario university, together participated in four semi-structured focus group meetings and individually participated in a single in-depth, one-on-one interview. Audio data was transcribed verbatim and analyzed using a general inductive approach. Emergent themes are descriptively presented as the findings of the research study: perceiving the high school physics experience, experiencing high school physics education, and identity and gender in the high school physics experience. Sub-themes presented include limited prior experiences, negative perceptions of physics, images of physics learners, decision-making, reactions to pedagogy, learning needs, physics identity, gender-dependent influences, and making meaning of the experiences in high school physics. The shared experience of high school physics education for young women is understood as both a richly challenging and rewarding experience. Based on the findings of this research, recommendations are made for practical and research settings, and for future work in this area. Drawing on literature on underrepresentation of women in physics, this research contributes to the physics education research community and beyond; it offers voices of Ontario

  9. Costs of health care across primary care models in Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laberge, Maude; Wodchis, Walter P; Barnsley, Jan; Laporte, Audrey

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze the relationship between newly introduced primary care models in Ontario, Canada, and patients' primary care and total health care costs. A specific focus is on the payment mechanisms for primary care physicians, i.e. fee-for-service (FFS), enhanced-FFS, and blended capitation, and whether providers practiced as part of a multidisciplinary team. Utilization data for a one year period was measured using administrative databases for a 10% sample selected at random from the Ontario adult population. Primary care and total health care costs were calculated at the individual level and included costs from physician services, hospital visits and admissions, long term care, drugs, home care, lab tests, and visits to non-medical health care providers. Generalized linear model regressions were conducted to assess the differences in costs between primary care models. Patients not enrolled with a primary care physicians were younger, more likely to be males and of lower socio-economic status. Patients in blended capitation models were healthier and wealthier than FFS and enhanced-FFS patients. Primary care and total health care costs were significantly different across Ontario primary care models. Using the traditional FFS as the reference, we found that patients in the enhanced-FFS models had the lowest total health care costs, and also the lowest primary care costs. Patients in the blended capitation models had higher primary care costs but lower total health care costs. Patients that were in multidisciplinary teams (FHT), where physicians are also paid on a blended capitation basis, had higher total health care costs than non-FHT patients but still lower than the FFS reference group. Primary care and total health care costs increased with patients' age, morbidity, and lower income quintile across all primary care payment types. The new primary care models were associated with lower total health care costs for patients compared to the

  10. Influence of an independent quarterly audit on publicly reported vancomycin-resistant enterocococi bacteremia data in Ontario, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prematunge, Chatura; Policarpio, Michelle E; Johnstone, Jennie; Adomako, Kwaku; Nadolny, Emily; Lam, Freda; Li, Ye; Brown, Kevin A; Garber, Gary

    2018-04-13

    All Ontario hospitals are mandated to self-report vancomycin-resistant enterocococi (VRE) bacteremias to Ontario's Ministry of Health and Long-term Care for public reporting purposes. Independent quarterly audits of publicly reported VRE bacteremias between September 2013 and June 2015 were carried out by Public Health Ontario. VRE bacteremia case-reporting errors between January 2009 and August 2013 were identified by a single retrospective audit. Employing a quasiexperimental pre-post study design, the relative risk of VRE bacteremia reporting errors before and after quarterly audits were modeled using Poisson regression adjusting for hospital type, case counts reported to the Ministry of Health and Long-term Care, and autocorrelation via generalized estimating equation. Overall, 24.5% (126 out of 514) of VRE bacteremias were reported in error; 114 out of 367 (31%) VRE bacteremias reported before quarterly audits and 12 out of 147 (8.1%) reported after audits were found to be incorrect. In adjusted analysis, quarterly audits of VRE bacteremias were associated with significant reductions in reporting errors when compared with before quarterly auditing (relative risk, 0.17; 95% confidence interval, 0.05-0.63). Risk of reporting errors among community hospitals were greater than acute teaching hospitals of the region (relative risk, 4.39; 95% CI, 3.07-5.70). This study found independent quarterly audits of publicly reported VRE bacteremias to be associated with significant reductions in reporting errors. Public reporting systems should consider adopting routine data audits and hospital-targeted training to improve data accuracy. Crown Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. How the physical electricity markets will work in Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, P.

    1998-01-01

    The issue of how the physical electricity markets in Ontario will operate was the focus of this presentation. Principal topics addressed included a definition of the physical market, (a mechanism through which the terms and conditions, including price, for the physical exchange of a commodity are established, and delivery is realized); a discussion on the role of the Independent Market Operator; wholesale and retail electricity markets; retail market proposals; the staging of congestion pricing; and the life cycle of physical transactions and payments. Market price components were summarized, and a typical transaction from bids and offers to billing and fund transfer was illustrated

  12. Direct cost associated with acquired brain injury in Ontario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Amy

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acquired Brain Injury (ABI from traumatic and non traumatic causes is a leading cause of disability worldwide yet there is limited research summarizing the health system economic burden associated with ABI. The objective of this study was to determine the direct cost of publicly funded health care services from the initial hospitalization to three years post-injury for individuals with traumatic (TBI and non-traumatic brain injury (nTBI in Ontario Canada. Methods A population-based cohort of patients discharged from acute hospital with an ABI code in any diagnosis position in 2004 through 2007 in Ontario was identified from administrative data. Publicly funded health care utilization was obtained from several Ontario administrative healthcare databases. Patients were stratified according to traumatic and non-traumatic causes of brain injury and whether or not they were discharged to an inpatient rehabilitation center. Health system costs were calculated across a continuum of institutional and community settings for up to three years after initial discharge. The continuum of settings included acute care emergency departments inpatient rehabilitation (IR complex continuing care home care services and physician visits. All costs were calculated retrospectively assuming the government payer’s perspective. Results Direct medical costs in an ABI population are substantial with mean cost in the first year post-injury per TBI and nTBI patient being $32132 and $38018 respectively. Among both TBI and nTBI patients those discharged to IR had significantly higher treatment costs than those not discharged to IR across all institutional and community settings. This tendency remained during the entire three-year follow-up period. Annual medical costs of patients hospitalized with a brain injury in Ontario in the first follow-up year were approximately $120.7 million for TBI and $368.7 million for nTBI. Acute care cost accounted for 46

  13. Mount Sinai Hospital's approach to Ontario's Health System Funding Reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalk, Tyler; Lau, Davina; Morgan, Matthew; Dietrich, Sandra; Beduz, Mary Agnes; Bell, Chaim M

    2014-01-01

    In April 2012, the Ontario government introduced Health System Funding Reform (HSFR), a transformational shift in how hospitals are funded. Mount Sinai Hospital recognized that moving from global funding to a "patient-based" model would have substantial operational and clinical implications. Adjusting to the new funding environment was set as a top corporate priority, serving as the strategic basis for re-examining and redesigning operations to further improve both quality and efficiency. Two years into HSFR, this article outlines Mount Sinai Hospital's approach and highlights key lessons learned. Copyright © 2014 Longwoods Publishing.

  14. Settlements and the future Ontario wholesale electricity market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozlik, K.

    1998-01-01

    Settlement system processes which are likely to be in place in Ontario's new deregulated electricity market are discussed. Electricity settlements, i. e. the collection of metered and operational data, the processing of that data to ensure its integrity, the analysis of the data, the determination of payment, and the administration of the required transfer of funds, are analyzed. Some of the actions that those processes will require of prospective wholesale market participants are outlined. The paper also explains why it is that the settlement processes drove certain pivotal market design decisions

  15. Some effects of smelter pollution northeast of Falconbridge, Ontario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorham, E

    1960-01-01

    A study along a line northwest from the metal smelter at Falconbridge, Ontario, reveals that strong sulphate accumulation in the surface soil occurs only within about one mile of the chimneys emitting sulphur dioxide pollution while effects upon the soil drainage waters are marked to a distance of nearly two miles, and still clearly evident 10 or more miles away. The number of species present in the flora declines sharply within about four miles of the smelter, but certain species (e.g. Pinus strobus, Vaccinium myrtilloides) disappear at much greater distances. Among the most tolerant species are Acer rubrum, Quercus rubra, Sambucus pubens, and Polygonum cilinode.

  16. Preservation of seed viability during 25 years of storage under standard genebank conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Treuren, van R.; Groot, de E.C.; Hintum, van T.J.L.

    2013-01-01

    Maintaining sufficient viability is critical to the sustainability of ex situ conserved seed collections. For this reason, accessions are regenerated when viability falls below a predefined threshold. Viability is monitored by determining the germination ability of accessions at predefined time

  17. The Status of School Psychology in Ontario School Boards: 2016 Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lean, Debra

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on the status of school psychology in Ontario. School psychology practice in Ontario has continued to evolve since the previous report was published in 2001. School psychologists have varied roles, and although the most prominent one remains as assessing students for entry into certain special education services, school-based…

  18. Endoscopic Follow-Up of Positive Fecal Occult Blood Testing in the Ontario FOBT Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence Paszat

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Ontario FOBT Project is a pilot study of fecal occult blood testing (FOBT for colorectal cancer screening conducted among age-eligible volunteers (50 to 75 years in 12 of 37 public health regions in Ontario.

  19. Hepatic alveolar hydatid disease (Echinococcus multilocularis) in a boxer dog from southern Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skelding, Alicia; Brooks, Andrew; Stalker, Margaret; Mercer, Nicola; de Villa, Eileen; Gottstein, Bruno; Peregrine, Andrew S

    2014-06-01

    A 2-year-old boxer dog from southern Ontario was evaluated because of acute onset lethargy. Exploratory laparotomy revealed a hemorrhagic, destructive, liver mass. Histology, immunohistochemistry, and polymerase chain reaction confirmed Echinococcus multilocularis as the cause of the hepatic mass. This constitutes the first description of endemic E. multilocularis in Ontario.

  20. Tectonic implications of seismic activity recorded by the northern Ontario seismograph network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wetmiller, R.J.; Cajka, M.G.

    1989-01-01

    The northern Ontario seismograph network, which has operated under the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program since 1982, has provided valuable data to supplement those recorded by the Canadian national networks on earthquake activity, rockburst activity, the distribution of regional seismic velocities, and the contemporary stress field in northern Ontario. The combined networks recorded the largest earthquake known in northwestern Ontario, M 3.9 near Sioux Lookout on February 11, 1984, and many smaller earthquakes in northeastern Ontario. Focal mechanism solutions of these and older events showed high horizontal stress and thrust faulting to be dominant features of the contemporary tectonics of northern Ontario. The zone of more intense earthquake activity in western Quebec appeared to extend northwestward into the Kapuskasing area of northeastern Ontario, where an area of persistent microearthquake activity had been identified by a seismograph station near Kapuskasing. Controlled explosions of the 1984 Kapuskasing Uplift seismic profile experiment recorded on the northern Ontario seismograph network showed the presence of anomalously high LG velocities in northeastern Ontario (3.65 km/s) that when properly taken into account reduced the mislocation errors of well-recorded seismic events by 50% on average

  1. The Quality Assurance System for Ontario Postsecondary Education: 2010-2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qin

    2015-01-01

    The period of 2010 to 2014 marked a relatively stable stage in the evolving quality assurance system for Ontario postsecondary education, particularly following massive changes after 2000. The current system consists of three frameworks overseen respectively by three quality assurance agencies--the Ontario Universities Council on Quality…

  2. Ontario's changing electrical sector : implications for air quality and human health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrota, K.; De Leon, F.

    1999-03-01

    Concerns regarding the changes to Ontario's electricity sector and the impacts that these changes may have on the environment and public health are discussed. Two of the major changes include the implementation of the Nuclear Asset Optimization Plan, and the introduction of competition to Ontario's electrical market. Both changes could have profound impacts on air quality in Toronto and the rest of Ontario. This report recommends that the Ontario Minister of Environment and the Ontario Minister of Energy, Science and Technology establish: a regulatory framework to ensure that competition in Ontario's electrical sector does not lead to greater reliance on coal-fired generating stations and further degradation of air quality, human health and the environment in Toronto and the rest of southern Ontario; annual air emission caps for the entire electrical sector to limit the volume of air pollutants released each year; a renewable energy standard which defines the percentage of electricity that must be generated with renewable energies by electrical suppliers serving Ontario consumers; and a public benefit fund to support the promotion of energy conservation and the development of renewable energies with a surcharge on the transmission of electricity. 35 refs., 5 tabs

  3. Meanings of Success and Successful Leadership in Ontario, Canada, in Neo-Liberal Times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winton, Sue; Pollock, Katina

    2016-01-01

    The provincial government of Ontario, Canada, has committed itself to raising student achievement, closing achievement gaps, and increasing the public's confidence in public education. It has introduced many policies, including the Ontario Leadership Strategy (OLS), to support these goals. Our study examined how teachers, administrators, support…

  4. Development of FVSOntario: A Forest Vegetation Simulator Variant and application software for Ontario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray E. Woods; Donald C. E. Robinson

    2008-01-01

    The Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources is leading a government-industry partnership to develop an Ontario variant of the Forest Vegetation Simulator (FVS). Based on the Lake States variant and the PrognosisBC user-interface, the FVSOntarioproject is motivated by a need to model the impacts of intensive forest management...

  5. Sor/88-391, 21 July 1988, uranium mines (Ontario) occupational health and safety regulations, amendment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-08-01

    These Regulations (SOR/84-435) were made to establish uniformity in the laws governing occupational health and safety in mines in the Province of Ontario. To ensure conformity, the legal references in the Regulations have been amended to accord with the 1987 amendment of the Ontario Occupational Health and Safety Act [fr

  6. Report of a Study of Ontario Medical School Admissions Policies and Practices, 1975.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Council of Ontario Universities, Toronto.

    Presented are the results of a study of admissions policies and practices in the five Ontario schools of medicine. The study consists of a review of published information and a detailed examination of 1975 statistics from the Ontario Medical School Application Service, supplemented by a series of interviews with medical school admissions officers,…

  7. Ontario School Principals and Diversity: Are They Prepared to Lead for Equity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuters, Stephanie; Portelli, John

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Ontario is the most ethnically diverse province in Canada. School educators cannot disregard the reality of diversity in all its senses. The question that directs the focus of this paper is: to what extent are leaders in Ontario formally prepared to lead schools that support the students of today? The paper aims to discuss this issue.…

  8. 77 FR 30451 - Safety Zone; Olcott Fireworks, Lake Ontario, Olcott, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-23

    ... Lake Ontario, Olcott, NY. This proposed rule is intended to restrict vessels from a portion of Lake Ontario during the Olcott fireworks display. The safety zone established by this proposed rule is necessary to protect spectators, participants, and vessels from the hazards associated with firework display...

  9. Did Ontario's Zero Tolerance & Graduated Licensing Law Reduce Youth Drunk Driving?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Christopher

    2006-01-01

    On April 1, 1994, Ontario, Canada, instituted a new graduated driver license (GDL) system that effectively set the legal blood alcohol content (BAC) threshold at zero for the first few years of a youth's driving eligibility. I use data from the 1983-2001 Ontario Student Drug Use Surveys (OSDUS) to examine whether the Zero Tolerance (ZT) policy…

  10. Economic Viability Study of an On-Road Wireless Charging System with a Generic Driving Range Estimation Method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shekhar, A.; Prasanth, V.; Bauer, P.; Bolech, M.

    2016-01-01

    The economic viability of on-road wireless charging of electric vehicles (EVs) strongly depends on the choice of the inductive power transfer (IPT) system configuration (static or dynamic charging), charging power level and the percentage of road coverage of dynamic charging. In this paper, a case

  11. Economic viability study of an on-road wireless charging system with a generic driving range estimation method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shekhar, A.; Prasanth, V.; Bauer, P.; Bolech, M.

    2016-01-01

    The economic viability of on-road wireless charging of electric vehicles (EVs) strongly depends on the choice of the inductive power transfer (IPT) system configuration (static or dynamic charging), charging power level and the percentage of road coverage of dynamic charging. In this paper, a case

  12. The Devil Is in the Details: A Response to the Report of the Postsecondary Review in Ontario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantinou, Peter; Drea, Catherine

    2005-01-01

    This article discusses the recommendations of the Postsecondary Review Panel's Final Report--"Ontario: A Leader in Learning." The Postsecondary Review was announced by the government in the Ontario Budget 2004 to "review the design and funding of Ontario's postsecondary education system and recommend innovative ways in which its…

  13. Respirable dust and respirable silica exposure in Ontario gold mines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Dave K; Rajhans, Gyan S; Malik, Om P; des Tombe, Karen

    2014-01-01

    A comprehensive survey of respirable dust and respirable silica in Ontario gold mines was conducted by the Ontario Ministry of Labor during 1978-1979. The aim was to assess the feasibility of introducing gravimetric sampling to replace the assessment method which used konimeters, a device which gave results in terms of number of particles per cubic centimeter (ppcc) of air. The study involved both laboratory and field assessments. The field assessment involved measurement of airborne respirable dust and respirable silica at all eight operating gold mines of the time. This article describes the details of the field assessment. A total of 288 long-term (7-8 hr) personal respirable dust air samples were collected from seven occupational categories in eight gold mines. The respirable silica (α-quartz) was determined by x-ray diffraction method. The results show that during 1978-1979, the industry wide mean respirable dust was about 1 mg/m(3), and the mean respirable silica was 0.08 mg/m(3.)The mean% silica in respirable dust was 7.5%. The data set would be useful in future epidemiological and health studies, as well as in assessment of workers' compensation claims for occupational diseases such as silicosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and autoimmune diseases such as renal disease and rheumatoid arthritis.

  14. Transitional rates, risk and the Ontario wholesale power market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothman, M.

    2001-01-01

    Navigant Consulting is a large investor-owned management consulting firm specializing in energy-based and other networked and regulated industries across Canada. The company works with clients to create delivery and protect shareholder value in the face of uncertainty and change. This presentation discussed the issue of price volatility in competitive electricity markets. The points to keep in mind for pricing in competitive power markets is that: (1) electricity should be generated simultaneously with use, (2) rates in administered markets are average over some time period, (3) competitive pool markets do not average costs, (4) in competitive pool markets, prices are set in very short (hourly or less) intervals, (5) prices in competitive markets are more volatile than in administered markets for both economic and market structure reasons, and (6) the degree of volatility and price levels can change quickly. The Ontario power market was also discussed with reference to price volatility in Ontario and what this means for electricity customers. tabs., figs

  15. Paramyxovirus-1 in feral pigeons (Columba livia) in Ontario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Kathleen M.; Key, Douglas W.

    1992-01-01

    Paramyxovirus-1 (PMV-1) infection was diagnosed in racing pigeons in Ontario during 1985, but it was not until January 1989, that the virus was isolated from feral pigeons (Columba livia) in this province. During an 18 month period beginning January 1988, a total of 43 feral pigeons was submitted to the Wildlife Diseases Laboratory, Pathology Department, Ontario Veterinary College. A history of neurological signs accompanied most of the birds. Tissues from 29 birds were submitted for PMV-1 isolation. Allantoic inoculation of embryonated chicken eggs yielded PMV-1 in 10 of the pigeons submitted. On the basis of histological criteria, we believe that 12 other birds were also infected with PMV-1. Gross pathological changes were unremarkable. Lymphplasmacytic interstitial nephritis was observed histologically in all birds from which PMV-1 was isolated. Other lesions seen, in decreasing frequency of occurrence, were lymphoplasmacytic interstitial hepatitis and multifocal hepatic necrosis, lymphoplasmacytic interstitial pancreatitis, nonsuppurative encephalitis and myelitis. The existence of PMV-1 in feral pigeons poses a potential threat to the poultry population since there is ample opportunity for mingling with poultry under open housing management. There is also a concern that pigeons may harbor the virus, perhaps in the kidney, and become chronic carriers and potential long-term disseminators of the disease. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2. PMID:17424132

  16. The Ontario-Manitoba clean energy transfer initiative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarkson, J.

    2006-01-01

    Manitoba currently generates 5500 MW of electricity, and has the potential to add another 5000 MW of clean energy. Nearly 2000 MW of Manitoba's electricity is currently being sold to the United States. New transmission sites will ensure both grid reliability and energy security for Ontario, and power exchanges are expected to reduce costs. This presentation provided details of a memorandum of understanding (MOU) between Ontario and Manitoba concerning energy sales across existing and future transmission infrastructure. Peak energy sales were expected to reach 1000 MW in the near future. Options for the interconnection included direct high voltage direct current (HVDC) lines to Sudbury as well as lines through Thunder Bay and Winnipeg. Manitoba's existing hydro sites were outlined, and potential sites were reviewed. In addition to presenting new supply options, this presentation described generation and transmission approval processes, as well as construction schedules for new sites and interconnection points. It was concluded that while there is currently a provincial focus on electricity supply and demand, new generation technologies will make interprovincial electricity agreements economically viable. tabs., figs

  17. Tobacco Retail Outlets and Vulnerable Populations in Ontario, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael O. Chaiton

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Interest has been increasing in regulating the location and number of tobacco vendors as part of a comprehensive tobacco control program. The objective of this paper is to examine the distribution of tobacco outlets in a large jurisdiction, to assess: (1 whether tobacco outlets are more likely to be located in vulnerable areas; and (2 what proportion of tobacco outlets are located close to schools. Retail locations across the Province of Ontario from Ministry of Health Promotion data were linked to 2006 Census data at the neighbourhood level. There was one tobacco retail outlet for every 1,000 people over age 15 in Ontario. Density of outlets varied by public health unit, and was associated with the number of smokers. Tobacco outlets were more likely to be located in areas that had high neighbourhood deprivation, in both rural and urban areas. Outlets were less likely to be located in areas with high immigrant populations in urban areas, with the reverse being true for rural areas. Overall, 65% of tobacco retailers were located within 500 m of a school. The sale of tobacco products is ubiquitous, however, neighbourhoods with lower socio-economic status are more likely to have easier availability of tobacco products and most retailers are located within walking distance of a school. The results suggest the importance of policies to regulate the location of tobacco retail outlets.

  18. Psychotherapy: a profile of current occupational therapy practice in Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moll, Sandra E; Tryssenaar, Joyce; Good, Colleen R; Detwiler, Lisa M

    2013-12-01

    Psychotherapy can be an important part of psychosocial occupational therapy practice; however, it requires specialized training to achieve and maintain competence. Regulation varies by province, and in Ontario, occupational therapists were recently authorized to perform psychotherapy. The purpose of this study was to explore the psychotherapy practice, training, and support needs of Ontario occupational therapists. An online survey was sent to occupational therapists who had clients with mental health or chronic pain issues, asking about their expertise and support needs in relation to nine psychotherapy approaches. Of the 331 therapists who responded, there were variations in the nature and frequency of psychotherapy practice. Experienced therapists in outpatient settings were more likely to practice psychotherapy, and cognitive-behaviour therapy, motivational interviewing, and mindfulness were the most common approaches. Supervision and training varied, with many therapists interested in occupational therapy-specific training. Recommendations for a framework of support include education about the nature of psychotherapy, training and supervision guidelines, and advocacy for occupational therapy and psychotherapy.

  19. Total quality culture in radiotherapy departments across Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitera, Gunita; Whitton, Anthony; Gutierrez, Eric; Robson, Sheila

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the prevalence of total quality culture (TQC) within radiation therapy (RT) departments across Ontario, Canada. Methods: A prospective quantitative survey was distributed within RT departments across Ontario, Canada using the Miller Consulting Group Quality Culture survey. Findings: Ninety percent of managers (9/10) and 50% of employees (261/519) participated. There was concordance between managers and staff that overall RT departments exhibit a work culture that somewhat resembles TQC. Both groups scored 55% of the categories as somewhat agree with TQC and 9% of categories as no TQC. There was discordance in views for 36% of the categories, where managers scored a higher prevalence of TQC compared to their therapists. Larger RT departments (>50 employees) had more prevalence of discrepancy between group scores. Conclusions: This is the first study to report on the prevalence of TQC within RT departments. Strategies designed for on-going continuous improvement will benefit staff, RT managers, continuity of patient care and patient safety within RT departments.

  20. Electricity transmission and distribution in Ontario : a look ahead

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This paper addressed changes and challenges that can guide the Ontario government in developing a policy framework for sustainable development in the electric power industry, particularly the power distribution and transmission sector. The government is taking action to adopt a balanced approach to energy policy that combines features of both regulated and competitive industries. It is taking a more responsible approach to electricity pricing that ends subsidies in order to reflect the true cost of electricity. The major issues facing the wires sector are: improving efficiencies by consolidating activities, streamlining operations and unbundling power transmission and distribution into separate entities; developing distributed generation; and, investing in new transmission to relieve congestion. It was noted that distributed generation will become more important as coal-fired generation facilities are replaced. Distributed generation offers many benefits for the wires sector, including delaying the need to upgrade the existing wires network, offering local solutions to transmission constraints, reducing system losses, improving load factor and improving the reliability of supply. An increase in distributed generation will likely mean that more of Ontario's electricity supply will come from small-scale renewable generation facilities. The government promotes private sector investment to assist in the rebuilding of the electricity sector

  1. Deregulation and the Alberta experience : the implications for Ontario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spearman, C. [Industrial Association of Southern Alberta, Lethbridge, AB (Canada)

    2002-07-01

    The government of Alberta deregulated its electric power industry to introduce industry structure and regulatory reforms that would promote competitive electricity prices. The objective was to ensure fairness for customers and generating facilities. A graph depicting power pool prices shows the reality of soaring prices at the onset of deregulation in Alberta. Today, there remains uncertainty in the development of retail choice, additional rate riders, new generation, transmission expansion, other jurisdictions and future prices. Consumers are still poorly equipped to make decisions and farmers have no means of protection from fluctuating electricity prices. They see deregulation as a complete failure because costs are up and benefits are nowhere to be seen. Ontario can learn from the Alberta experience by adopting the recommendations to set financial penalties for incompetence, financial compensation to customers for errors, and to be fully ready with systems tested ahead of deregulation. Anticipated customer benefits should be clearly identified in advance. The future electric power industry in Ontario needs vision, stability, a cohesive plan, and leadership devoid of complacency. 1 fig.

  2. Deregulation and the Alberta experience : the implications for Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spearman, C.

    2002-01-01

    The government of Alberta deregulated its electric power industry to introduce industry structure and regulatory reforms that would promote competitive electricity prices. The objective was to ensure fairness for customers and generating facilities. A graph depicting power pool prices shows the reality of soaring prices at the onset of deregulation in Alberta. Today, there remains uncertainty in the development of retail choice, additional rate riders, new generation, transmission expansion, other jurisdictions and future prices. Consumers are still poorly equipped to make decisions and farmers have no means of protection from fluctuating electricity prices. They see deregulation as a complete failure because costs are up and benefits are nowhere to be seen. Ontario can learn from the Alberta experience by adopting the recommendations to set financial penalties for incompetence, financial compensation to customers for errors, and to be fully ready with systems tested ahead of deregulation. Anticipated customer benefits should be clearly identified in advance. The future electric power industry in Ontario needs vision, stability, a cohesive plan, and leadership devoid of complacency. 1 fig

  3. Hypothesis carbon flow through the deepwater Lake Ontario foodweb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flint, R.W.

    1986-01-01

    Several accounts in recent years have attempted to conceptualize foodwebs in valuable fishery systems, producing useful heuristic tools to help shape research and management policy. Here a mass balance conceptual model of the Lake Ontario deepwater foodweb is developed to evaluate energy pathways and determine available nutrition for predatory salmonines. A number of different trophic links were defined from phytoplankton, through the various forage species, to the tertiary consumers. Phytoplankton photosynthesis resulted in 178 g C/m/sup 2//yr production at the base of the foodweb. Approximately 60% of primary production was counted as required support for pelagic zooplankton and benthos. Dominant forage fish (alewife, smelt and sculpin) annually appeared to consume all smaller zooplankton carbon production, 93% of mysid production, 66% of most benthic community production, and, more specifically, 94% of amphipod carbon production. The model indicated that approximately 1.22 g C/m/sup 2//yr was available for support of top level predators. Based upon historic fishery records and stocking rates, these predators required approximately half of the annual carbon available as nutritional support. Impacts of trophic rearrangements in the Lake Ontario foodweb are discussed based upon model results

  4. Smoke and mirrors: used oil management policy in Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valiante, U.

    1997-01-01

    The burning of used oil for space heating is a practice that has been increasing since 1992 when the waste fuel regulation was amended to give northern generators without access to used oil collection an option for managing their used oil. In 1996, about 10 million litres of used oil was burned in Ontario at over 600 locations, in garages, automotive repair facilities, industrial locations and greenhouses. The modified space heaters that burn used motor oils operate without pollution controls. In addition to emissions associated with pollution from uncontrolled combustion, used oil fired space heaters burn what should be a reusable commodity that is high in value added chemical and energy content. A comparison of emissions in grams per 1000 hours of use of a used oil heater and a natural gas heater was presented. It was suggested that as the preferred environmental strategy, the Ontario government should encourage used oil collectors and re-refiners to make used oil management convenient, accessible, and cost-effective in order to protect the health of communities in which used oil is generated

  5. Financial treatment of demand management expenditures at Ontario Hydro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ariss, D.G.

    1990-01-01

    Ontario Hydro's demand side management (DSM) plan comprises reduction of load, load shifting, and peak shaving. It includes an accounting policy applied only to measures which reduce demand by the increase in the efficiency of electricity of utilization or by the shifting of load from peak periods to off-peak periods. In order to choose the pertinent periods for which the DSM expenditures should be recovered, the utility has considered three accounting options: expensing all DSM expenditures as incurred; deferring all DSM expenditures; or deferring only those DSM expenditures that meet specified criteria. Ontario Hydro has chosen the last option, since it is in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles. This option is based on the matching principle, under which costs and revenues that are linked to each other in a cause-and-effect relationship should be recognized in the same accounting period. It has also been judged advantageous to amortize the deferred expenses corresponding to each measure over appropriate periods. It has also been established that the amortization period should begin immediately after each measure has been put into operation. This accounting policy ensures that expenses relating to DSM are accounted in a pertinent and uniform manner. 6 refs

  6. Municipal green fleet management in Ontario: best practices manual 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felder, M.

    2008-07-01

    When households, institutional and commercial buildings, industry, and especially auto transportation use fossil fuel based energy, they generate carbon dioxide emissions. Considering the environmental concerns and the soaring fuel prices, this could be the opportunity for the municipal fleet operator to assume a leadership position regarding environmental issues and look for new cost efficiencies. To begin, a meticulous examination of the fuel expenditures, a good management approach of fleet operations and a clearly defined system or guidance for lowering fleet fuel costs would be helpful for municipal fleet managers. This document is involved in a pilot program aimed at helping Ontario municipalities understand and promote fleet efficiencies and obtain related environmental benefits. Existing and cost-effective automotive fleet management policies and practices that can mitigate pollution causing global warming are given in this guide. These policies and practices also allow money savings and contribute to a better workplace health and livability of the community. This document is based on the experience of fleet management experts and local governments in Ontario. 54 refs.

  7. A look forward to the competitive landscape of Ontario's electricity supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr, J.

    1998-01-01

    The government of Ontario is a shareholder in Ontario Hydro and is responsible for ensuring that the public receives electricity service at the lowest, most prudent price. The current monopoly arrangement provides Ontario with a revenue stream that is predictable and amenable to control. However, the emerging restructuring of Ontario's electricity supply system will be strongly dependent on the direction determined by government policy. Other factors that will have significant influence on developments will be the restructuring initiatives outside the province, and the attractiveness of the electricity sector to investors. In November 1997, Ontario released a white paper by the Minister of Energy, Science and Technology, entitled 'Direction for change'. This document is a preliminary statement of potential policy regarding electricity restructuring in Ontario. Some of the key elements of the White Paper were: (1) the creation of a competitive market in the year 2000 for both wholesale and retail customers, (2) separating monopoly operations from competitive business activities throughout the electricity sector, (3) expanding the role on the Ontario Energy Board to give it regulatory power over the electricity sector, and (4) introducing measures to ensure environmental protection. Three other relevant reports were also released in December 1997: (1) Report of the Select Committee on Ontario Hydro Nuclear Affairs, (2) Ontario Energy Board Advisory Report on Legislative Change Requirements for Natural Gas Deregulation, and (3) Report of the Toronto Transition Team. The government policy indicated by these various reports appear to represent a careful balance of many conflicting interests and obligations. According to expert observers, the emerging policy appears to have the necessary technical, financial and political support to ensure a successful competitive electricity supply system in Ontario. 4 refs

  8. Multispectral imaging of organ viability during uterine transplantation surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, Neil T.; Saso, Srdjan; Stoyanov, Danail; Sauvage, Vincent; Corless, David J.; Boyd, Michael; Noakes, David E.; Thum, Meen-Yau; Ghaem-Maghami, Sadaf; Smith, J. R.; Elson, Daniel S.

    2014-02-01

    Uterine transplantation surgery has been proposed as a treatment for permanent absolute uterine factor infertility (AUFI) in the case of loss of the uterus. Due to the complexity of the vasculature correct reanastomosis of the blood supply during transplantation surgery is a crucial step to ensure reperfusion and viability of the organ. While techniques such as fluorescent dye imaging have been proposed to visualise perfusion there is no gold standard for intraoperative visualisation of tissue oxygenation. In this paper results from a liquid crystal tuneable filter (LCTF)-based multispectral imaging (MSI) laparoscope are described. The system was used to monitor uterine oxygen saturation (SaO2) before and after transplantation. Results from surgeries on two animal models (rabbits and sheep) are presented. A feature-based registration algorithm was used to correct for misalignment induced by breathing or peristalsis in the tissues of interest prior to analysis. An absorption spectrum was calculated at each spatial pixel location using reflectance data from a reference standard, and the relative contributions from oxy- and deoxyhaemoglobin were calculated using a least squares regression algorithm with non-negativity constraints. Results acquired during animal surgeries show that cornual oxygenation changes are consistent with those observed in point measurements taken using a pulse oximeter, showing reduced SaO2 following reanastomosis. Values obtained using the MSI laparoscope were lower than those taken with the pulse oximeter, which may be due to the latter's use of the pulsatile arterial blood signal. Future work incorporating immunological test results will help to correlate SaO2 levels with surgical outcomes.

  9. Case law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    This section treats of the following case laws: 1 - Canada: Decision of the Canadian Federal Court of Appeal dismissing an appeal related to an environmental assessment of a project to refurbish and extend the life of an Ontario nuclear power plant; 2 - Poland: Decision of the Masovian Voivod of 28 December 2015 concerning the legality of the resolution on holding a local referendum in the Commune of Rozan regarding a new radioactive waste repository (2015); 3 - United States: Commission authorises issuance of construction permit for the Shine Medical Isotope Facility in Janesville, Wisconsin; 4 - United States: Commission authorises issuance of combined licences for the South Texas Project site in Matagorda County, Texas

  10. Importance of Donor Chondrocyte Viability for Osteochondral Allografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, James L; Stannard, James P; Stoker, Aaron M; Bozynski, Chantelle C; Kuroki, Keiichi; Cook, Cristi R; Pfeiffer, Ferris M

    2016-05-01

    Osteochondral allograft (OCA) transplantation provides a biological treatment option for functional restoration of large articular cartilage defects in multiple joints. While successful outcomes after OCA transplantation have been linked to viable donor chondrocytes, the importance of donor cell viability has not been comprehensively validated. To use a canine model to determine the importance of donor chondrocyte viability at the time of implantation with respect to functional success of femoral condylar OCAs based on radiographic, gross, cell viability, histologic, biochemical, and biomechanical outcome measures. Controlled laboratory study. After approval was obtained from the institutional animal care and use committee, adult female dogs (N = 16) were implanted with 8-mm cylindrical OCAs from male dogs in the lateral and medial femoral condyles of 1 knee. OCAs were preserved for 28 or 60 days after procurement, and chondrocyte viability was quantified before implantation. Two different storage media, temperatures, and time points were used to obtain a spectrum of percentage chondrocyte viability at the time of implantation. A successful outcome was defined as an OCA that was associated with graft integration, maintenance of hyaline cartilage, lack of associated cartilage disorder, and lack of fibrillation, fissuring, or fibrous tissue infiltration of the allograft based on subjective radiographic, gross, and histologic assessments at 6 months after implantation. Chondrocyte viability ranged from 23% to 99% at the time of implantation. All successful grafts had >70% chondrocyte viability at the time of implantation, and no graft with chondrocyte viability <70% was associated with a successful outcome. Live-dead stained sections and histologic findings with respect to cell morphological features suggested that successful grafts were consistently composed of viable chondrocytes in lacunae, while grafts that were not successful were composed of nonviable

  11. Study of the health effects of low-level exposure to environmental radiation contamination in Port Hope, Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steele, R.; Lees, R.E.M.; Roberts, J.H.

    1984-06-01

    From 1939 to 1948 residues from radium production at Eldorado Nuclear Ltd.'s plant in Port Hope, Ontario were disposed of in and around the town of Port Hope. In 1980 a study was set up to determine the health effects of these residues. This report concerns phase two a case- control study of lung cancer in the exposed population. Doses for the 118 cases and controls were reconstructed to give the final year of exposure, the residences occupied during the period of exposure, and the total estimated exposure for various latency periods. Statistical analysis of the data gathered could not give coherent results or show an identifiable increased risk of lung cancer from elevated alpha radiation levels due to the confounding effect of cigarette smoking. Ninety percent of the cases of lung cancer found were attributable to smoking

  12. A Classification Method for Seed Viability Assessment with Infrared Thermography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen Men

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a viability assessment method for Pisum sativum L. seeds based on the infrared thermography technique. In this work, different artificial treatments were conducted to prepare seeds samples with different viability. Thermal images and visible images were recorded every five minutes during the standard five day germination test. After the test, the root length of each sample was measured, which can be used as the viability index of that seed. Each individual seed area in the visible images was segmented with an edge detection method, and the average temperature of the corresponding area in the infrared images was calculated as the representative temperature for this seed at that time. The temperature curve of each seed during germination was plotted. Thirteen characteristic parameters extracted from the temperature curve were analyzed to show the difference of the temperature fluctuations between the seeds samples with different viability. With above parameters, support vector machine (SVM was used to classify the seed samples into three categories: viable, aged and dead according to the root length, the classification accuracy rate was 95%. On this basis, with the temperature data of only the first three hours during the germination, another SVM model was proposed to classify the seed samples, and the accuracy rate was about 91.67%. From these experimental results, it can be seen that infrared thermography can be applied for the prediction of seed viability, based on the SVM algorithm.

  13. Primary care physician referral patterns in Ontario, Canada: a descriptive analysis of self-reported referral data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddy, Clare; Arbab-Tafti, Sadaf; Moroz, Isabella; Keely, Erin

    2017-08-22

    In many countries, the referral-consultation process faces a number of challenges from inefficiencies and rising demand, resulting in excessive wait times for many specialties. We collected referral data from a sample of family doctors across the province of Ontario, Canada as part of a larger program of research. The purpose of this study is to describe referral patterns from primary care to specialist and allied health services from the primary care perspective. We conducted a prospective study of patient referral data submitted by primary care providers (PCP) from 20 clinics across Ontario between June 2014 and January 2016. Monthly referral volumes expressed as a total number of referrals to all medical and allied health professionals per month. For each referral, we also collected data on the specialty type, reason for referral, and whether the referral was for a procedure. PCPs submitted a median of 26 referrals per month (interquartile range 11.5 to 31.8). Of 9509 referrals eligible for analysis, 97.8% were directed to medical professionals and 2.2% to allied health professionals. 55% of medical referrals were directed to non-surgical specialties and 44.8% to surgical specialties. Medical referrals were for procedures in 30.8% of cases and non-procedural in 40.9%. Gastroenterology received the largest share (11.2%) of medical referrals, of which 62.3% were for colonoscopies. Psychology received the largest share (28.3%) of referrals to allied health professionals. We described patterns of patient referral from primary care to specialist and allied health services for 30 PCPs in 20 clinics across Ontario. Gastroenterology received the largest share of referrals, nearly two-thirds of which were for colonoscopies. Future studies should explore the use of virtual care to help manage non-procedural referrals and examine the impact that procedural referrals have on wait times for gastroenterology.

  14. Air quality in Ontario: a concise report on the state of air quality in the province of Ontario 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    Major achievements in reducing total sulphur compounds, carbon monoxide, sulphur dioxide and nitrogen dioxide are reported, notwithstanding sharp increases in the province's population, economic activity and vehicular traffic since the first report in 1971. Despite the reported improvements and the impressive results of the 'Drive Clean' program, air pollution still impacts the health and well-being of Ontarians, with smog, resulting from an increase in ground-level ozone and inhalable particles emissions, being of particular concern. The 'Drive Clean' program is the province's principal weapon in the fight to reduce smog-causing emissions from the No. 1 domestic source, namely cars, trucks and buses. Some 2.5 million light-duty vehicles had been tested as of March 2001, with almost 86 per cent of them passing on the first try. Repairs mandated by the program during its first year led to a reduction of 6.7 per cent in smog-related emissions from light-duty vehicles, as well as an 18,500-tonne reduction in emission of carbon dioxide. When fully implemented by 2004, the 'Drive Clean' program is expected to cover some five million light-duty vehicles in southern Ontario and 200,000 heavy-duty trucks across the province. Mandatory tracking and reporting of all harmful air emissions by industrial and commercial enterprises and tough new emission limits for smog and acid rain-causing pollutants have been announced in April 2000. Power generating plants are also now obliged to monitor and report some 28 substances of concern which include sulphur dioxide, nitrogen oxides and carbon dioxide. In addition to mandatory reporting, the province also introduced new regulated emission limits for nitrogen oxides and sulphur dioxide from coal and oil-fired power stations. More than four million dollars have been invested by the province since 1995 to develop a state-of-the-art air monitoring system. Air quality information is now being provided by 28 communities across Ontario

  15. Doctors' perspectives on the viability of rural practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, J A; Humphreys, J S; Adena, M A

    2004-01-01

    Private practitioners play a vital role in meeting the health needs of rural communities. However, the prospect of operating a private practice business in rural Australia seems to be increasingly unattractive, because many communities are forced to recruit salaried or overseas-trained doctors. This study focuses on rural practices as businesses whose viability influences their attractiveness for the recruitment and retention of practitioners. The specific objectives are to ascertain which factors contribute to or threaten practice viability in rural areas, and whether they vary according to the degree of rurality or geographical remoteness. This study is based on data collected from a national study into the viability of rural general practice undertaken jointly by the Rural Doctors Association of Australia and Monash University School of Rural Health Bendigo. The Rural Remote and Metropolitan Area (RRMA) classification was used as the indicator of rurality. The study surveyed all general practitioners practising in rural or remote regions of Australia (RRMAs 3 to 7). Only practitioners with some financial interest in the practice were selected for this analysis. Free-text responses to the two questions 'What are the key factors contributing to the viability of your practice?' and 'What factors would put the viability of your practice at risk?' were analysed using qualitative content analysis. Factors were derived iteratively through higher-level aggregation of responses. Chi-square tests were used to make comparisons across the RRMA categories. The national survey achieved a response rate of 35% of the entire population of GPs practising in RRMA 3 to 7 regions. Of these, 1050 respondents were relevant to this analysis. Seven major factors were identified by practitioners as the main contributors to practice viability. 'Practice characteristics' was nominated by 59% of respondents, followed by 'Income' (31%), 'Personal circumstances', 'Workforce' and 'Community

  16. Viability of seeds of two representatives from Apocynaceae family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.A. Aviekin

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The viability of some Apocynaceae seeds depending on the duration of storage under conditions of low temperature was studied. Extracted embryos from the seeds of Pachypodium lamerei Drake and Adenium obesum (Forssk. Roem. et Schult with different storage history were analyzed. Embryos were stained by acidic fuchsine what allows identification of viable and destructed cells. Destructed cells were stained much more intensively, while viable cells remained unstained. Observed results showed dependence of viability of P. lamerei and A. obesum seeds from term of storage. It was obtained that the seeds of investigated succulent species, just like in many other tropical plants, rapidly lost their viability and should be described as microbiotic.

  17. Population viability analysis on domestic horse breeds (Equus caballus)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thirstrup, Janne Pia; Bach, Lars; Loeschcke, Volker

    2009-01-01

    simulation package was used for the population viability analysis. First, we investigated the future viability of these breeds based on present demographic and environmental parameters. Second, a sensitivity analysis revealed the most important variables for the viability of these breeds. Third, we examined...... concerning reproduction of the mares had the greatest impact, with the number of mares actively breeding being the most influential on the population forecasts. The results suggest that closing the Knabstrupper studbooks can be done only if increasing the number of mares actively breeding counteracts...... the loss of genetic variation attributable to such a management strategy. It is recommended, based on these results, that the number of Frederiksborg and Knabstrupper mares actively breeding must be increased to approximately 30% in the 2 breeds that are presently using only 13%, while leaving the third...

  18. [New valvular homografts. Prospects and limits of their viability. Report of 42 implantations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloch, G; Mesnildrey, P; Hanotel, M C; Heurtematte, Y; Cachera, J P; Paul, M; Astier, A; Beaujean, F; Dubertret, L; Galle, P

    1990-10-01

    The regain of interest in aortic homograft bioprostheses is related to the prospects of improved viability resulting from explanation from organ donors, preservation in rich tissue culture media, together with the progress made in techniques of cryopreservation. Viability studies examining morphology of electron microscopy and tests of tissue culture confirm this notion of longer viability. These properties raise hopes of satisfactory long-term results while acknowledging outstanding antigenic problems which require strict A-B-O system compatibility. The results of a preliminary series of 42 valve homografts implanted at Henri Mondor Hospital over the last 5 years are reported. Twenty-one bioprostheses were implanted on the right side in congenital heart disease with good results in every case. Twenty-one were implanted in the aortic position in children and show no signs of degeneration as yet. One poor result was related to a technical error in calibration. The rebirth of this technique raises certain hopes, especially in aortic valve replacement.

  19. Cost-Effectiveness of Interventions for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Using an Ontario Policy Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, K; Blackhouse, G; McCurdy, BR; Bornstein, M; Campbell, K; Costa, V; Franek, J; Kaulback, K; Levin, L; Sehatzadeh, S; Sikich, N; Thabane, M; Goeree, R

    2012-01-01

    . Patients were assigned different costs and utilities depending on their severity health state during each model cycle. In addition to moving between health states, patients were at risk of acute exacerbations of COPD in each model cycle. During each cycle, patients could have no acute exacerbation, a minor acute exacerbation, or a major exacerbation. For the purposes of the model, a major exacerbation was defined as one that required hospitalization. Patients were assigned different costs and utilities in each model cycle, depending on whether they experienced an exacerbation, and its severity. Starting cohorts reflected the various patient populations from the trials analyzed. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs)—that is, costs per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY)—were estimated for each intervention using clinical parameters and summary estimates of relative risks of (re)hospitalization, as well as mortality and abstinence rates, from the COPD mega-analysis evidence-based analyses. A budget impact analysis was also conducted to project incremental costs already being incurred or resources already in use in Ontario. Using provincial data, medical literature, and expert opinion, health system impacts were calculated for the strategies investigated. All costs are reported in Canadian dollars. Results All smoking cessation programs were dominant (i.e., less expensive and more effective overall). Assuming a base case cost of $1,041 and $1,527 per patient for MDC and PR, the ICER was calculated to be $14,123 per QALY and $17,938 per QALY, respectively. When the costs of MDC and PR were varied in a 1-way sensitivity analysis to reflect variation in resource utilization reported in the literature, the ICER increased to $55,322 per QALY and $56,270 per QALY, respectively. Assuming a base case cost of $2,261 per year per patient for LTOT as reported by data from the Ontario provincial program, the ICER was calculated to be $38,993 per QALY. Ventilation strategies

  20. Present assessment of myocardial viability by nuclear imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, G B; MacIntyre, W J; Brunken, R C; Go, R T; Raja, S; Wong, C O; Chen, E Q

    1996-10-01

    Prospective delineation of viable from nonviable myocardium in patients with coronary artery disease in an important factor in deciding whether a patient should be revascularized or treated medically. Two common techniques--single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron-emission computed tomography (PET)--are used in nuclear medicine using various radiopharmaceuticals for the detection of myocardial viability in patients. Thallium-201 (201Tl) and technetium-99m (99mTc)-sestamibi are the common radiopharmaceuticals used in different protocols using SPECT, whereas fluoride-18 (18F)-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and rubidium-82 (82Rb) are most widely used in PET. The SPECT protocols involve stress/redistribution, stress/redistribution/reinjection, and rest/redistribution imaging techniques. Many studies have compared the results of 201Tl and (99mTc)-sestamibi SPECT with those of FDG PET; in some studies, concordant results have been found between delayed thallium and FDG results, indicating that 201Tl, although considered a perfusion agent, shows myocardial viability. Discordant results in a number of studies have been found between sestamibi and FDG, suggesting that the efficacy of sestamibi as a viability marker has yet to be established. Radiolabeled fatty acids such as iodine-123 (123I)-para-iodophenylpentadecanoic acid and carbon-11 (11C)-palmitic acid have been used for the assessment of myocardial viability with limited success. 11C-labeled acetate is a good marker of oxidative metabolism in the heart and has been used to predict the reversibility of wall motion abnormalities. (18F)-FDG is considered the marker of choice for myocardial viability, although variable results are obtained under different physiological conditions. Detection of myocardial viability can be greatly improved by developing new equipment and radiopharmaceuticals of better quality.

  1. Analysis of Regional GPS Networks in Eastern Ontario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samadi Alinia, H.; Tiampo, K. F.

    2014-12-01

    Although stable, intraplate region of eastern Canada is considered low rate deformation area in the North American plate, the retreat of large ice sheets during deglaciation in the last 20 ka has resulted in horizontal and vertical deformation of the Earth's in eastern Ontario. Present-day glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) uplift rates approach 10 mm/yr or more at Hudson Bay and decrease with distance southeastward. Current GIA models forecast that the hinge line between uplift to the northwest and subsidence to the southeast lies somewhere near the Saint Lawrence valley in eastern Canada [Tushingham and Peltier, 1991; Peltier, 2002]. Employing continuous Global Positioning System (cGPS) observations and high precision tools for processing and then analyzing each component of derived time series are important tools to monitor the associated regional crustal deformation with good accuracies. Here we describe the analysis of coordinate time series of cGPS stations scattered sparsely throughout southeastern Ontario and between Ottawa and the east coast of Hudson Bay. Here, the two most reliable local networks, each including 4 to 6 reference stations, were selected for analysis. Data for period of approximately five years, 2008-2012.9, was processed with Bernese 5.0 over several campaigns. Individual cGPS coordinate time series were generated for each station and basic parameters, such as mean, variance and repeatability, were estimated. The time series are corrected with respect to the rigid plate motion and seasonal variations and advanced time series analysis techniques, including spectral analysis and principal component analysis were implemented. Post-processing of the time series reproduces the general GIA spatial pattern. Results also show that the vertical velocities of all stations in the solution are consistent with the GIA model uplift rate and are consistent with other cGPS sites in eastern Canada and increases from north of lake of Ontario (approximately

  2. Avian metapneumovirus subtype C in Wild Waterfowl in Ontario, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardine, C M; Parmley, E J; Buchanan, T; Nituch, L; Ojkic, D

    2018-02-18

    Avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) is an emerging poultry pathogen that has a significant economic impact on poultry production worldwide. The geographic range of the virus continues to expand, and wild birds have been implicated as reservoirs of aMPV that have the potential to spread the virus over long distances. Our objective was to determine the apparent prevalence of aMPV subtype C in wild waterfowl in Ontario, Canada. Wild waterfowl were captured in August and September, 2016 as part of routine migratory waterfowl population monitoring by the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry. Oropharyngeal and cloacal swabs were collected from each bird and placed together for aMPV testing using real-time RT-PCR. A total of 374 live wild birds from 23 lakes were sampled and tested for aMPV. Among all ducks tested, 84 (22%) were positive for aMPV. The proportion of samples that tested positive ranged from 0% in ring-necked ducks (Aythya collaris) and green-winged teal (Anas carolinensis) to 44% (8 of 18) in American black ducks (A. rubripes). Waterfowl positive for aMPV were found at 14 of 23 lakes in the study area and the percent positive at these 14 lakes ranged between 5% and 84%. Although subtype C aMPV has been detected in a variety of wild birds in North America, this is the first report of aMPV in wild ducks in Ontario, Canada. The high apparent prevalence, particularly in mallards and American black ducks (37 and 44%, respectively), suggests that these species may be important reservoirs of aMPV. Given the potential impact of aMPV on domestic poultry and the potential role of wild birds as reservoirs of the virus, further investigation of the geographic distribution, risk factors associated with aMPV carriage in wild waterfowl and potential role of other birds in the epidemiology of aMPV in Canada is warranted. © 2018 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  3. Respiratory virus infection and risk of invasive meningococcal disease in central Ontario, Canada.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashleigh R Tuite

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In temperate climates, invasive meningococcal disease (IMD incidence tends to coincide with or closely follow peak incidence of influenza virus infection; at a seasonal level, increased influenza activity frequently correlates with increased seasonal risk of IMD. METHODS: We evaluated 240 cases of IMD reported in central Ontario, Canada, from 2000 to 2006. Associations between environmental and virological (influenza A, influenza B and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV exposures and IMD incidence were evaluated using negative binomial regression models controlling for seasonal oscillation. Acute effects of weekly respiratory virus activity on IMD risk were evaluated using a matched-period case-crossover design with random directionality of control selection. Effects were estimated using conditional logistic regression. RESULTS: Multivariable negative binomial regression identified elevated IMD risk with increasing influenza A activity (per 100 case increase, incidence rate ratio = 1.18, 95% confidence interval (CI: 1.06, 1.31. In case-crossover models, increasing weekly influenza A activity was associated with an acute increase in the risk of IMD (per 100 case increase, odds ratio (OR  = 2.03, 95% CI: 1.28 to 3.23. Increasing weekly RSV activity was associated with increased risk of IMD after adjusting for RSV activity in the previous 3 weeks (per 100 case increase, OR = 4.31, 95% CI: 1.14, 16.32. No change in disease risk was seen with increasing influenza B activity. CONCLUSIONS: We have identified an acute effect of influenza A and RSV activity on IMD risk. If confirmed, these finding suggest that influenza vaccination may have the indirect benefit of reducing IMD risk.

  4. Economic Viability of Brewery Spent Grain as a Biofuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrow, Charles [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-01-01

    This report summarizes an investigation into the technical feasibility and economic viability of use grain wastes from the beer brewing process as fuel to generate the heat needed in subsequent brewing process. The study finds that while use of spent grain as a biofuel is technically feasible, the economics are not attractive. Economic viability is limited by the underuse of capital equipment. The investment in heating equipment requires a higher utilization that the client brewer currently anticipates. It may be possible in the future that changing factors may swing the decision to a more positive one.

  5. Radiopeptide internalisation and externalization assays: cell viability and radioligand integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naqvi, Syed Ali Raza; Sosabowski, Jane K; Nagra, Saeed Ahamad; Ishfaq, Malik M; Mather, Stephen J; Matzow, Torkjel

    2011-01-01

    Various aspects of radiopeptide receptor-mediated cell internalisation and externalization assays were assessed, including the integrity of externalized peptides and the effect of varying the pH and incubation time of the acid wash step (to remove surface receptor-bound ligand) on efficacy and cell viability. The observed intact proportion of externalized peptide was 5-10%, and acid wash buffers with pH 2.8 or below were found to be detrimental to cell viability and integrity, particularly following prolonged incubation times. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Radiopeptide internalisation and externalisation assays: Cell viability and radioligand integrity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raza Naqvi, Syed Ali; Sosabowski, Jane K.; Ahamad Nagra, Saeed; Ishfaq, Malik M.; Mather, Stephen J.; Matzow, Torkjel

    2011-01-01

    Various aspects of radiopeptide receptor-mediated cell internalisation and externalisation assays were assessed, including the integrity of externalised peptides and the effect of varying the pH and incubation time of the acid wash step (to remove surface receptor-bound ligand) on efficacy and cell viability. The observed intact proportion of externalised peptide was 5-10%, and acid wash buffers with pH 2.8 or below were found to be detrimental to cell viability and integrity, particularly following prolonged incubation times.

  7. Population-specific life histories contribute to metapopulation viability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halsey, Samniqueka J.; Bell, Timothy J.; McEachern, A. Kathryn; Pavlovic, Noel B.

    2016-01-01

    Restoration efforts can be improved by understanding how variations in life-history traits occur within populations of the same species living in different environments. This can be done by first understanding the demographic responses of natural occurring populations. Population viability analysis continues to be useful to species management and conservation with sensitivity analysis aiding in the understanding of population dynamics. In this study, using life-table response experiments and elasticity analyses, we investigated how population-specific life-history demographic responses contributed to the metapopulation viability of the Federally threatened Pitcher's thistle (Cirsium pitcheri). Specifically, we tested the following hypotheses: (1) Subpopulations occupying different environments within a metapopulation have independent demographic responses and (2) advancing succession results in a shift from a demographic response focused on growth and fecundity to one dominated by stasis. Our results showed that reintroductions had a positive contribution to the metapopulation growth rate as compared to native populations which had a negative contribution. We found no difference in succession on the contribution to metapopulation viability. In addition, we identified distinct population-specific contributions to metapopulation viability and were able to associate specific life-history demographic responses. For example, the positive impact of Miller High Dunes population on the metapopulation growth rate resulted from high growth contributions, whereas increased time of plant in stasis for the State Park Big Blowout population resulted in negative contributions. A greater understanding of how separate populations respond in their corresponding environment may ultimately lead to more effective management strategies aimed at reducing extinction risk. We propose the continued use of sensitivity analyses to evaluate population-specific demographic influences on

  8. Effect of Chlorine on Giardia lamblia Cyst Viability

    OpenAIRE

    Jarroll, Edward L.; Bingham, Alan K.; Meyer, Ernest A.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of chlorine concentration on Giardia lamblia cyst viability was tested under a variety of conditions. The ability of Giardia cysts to undergo excystation was used as the criterion of viability. The experimental variables employed included temperature (25, 15, and 5°C), pH (6, 7, and 8), chlorine-cyst contact time (10, 30, and 60 min), and chlorine concentration (1 to 8 mg/liter). In the pH range studied, cyst survival generally was observed to increase as buffer pH increased. Water...

  9. Challenge testing of gametes to enhance their viability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Callesen, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    of survival mechanism that enables them to come through the process. The details of the mechanism remain unknown but, if identified, it could have immense potential as a new way to improve the viability of embryos produced by ART. However, few publications describe systematic ways to challenge test gametes...... and then to use the results as a basis for improving gamete viability. Furthermore, new methods to monitor the reactions of gametes to such challenge tests are needed. In the present review, these two issues are discussed, as are some of the conditions necessary before a challenge test protocol can be part...

  10. The economic and financing viability of the OPR-1000 construction at Muria Peninsula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moch Djoko Birmano; Mochamad Nasrullah

    2005-01-01

    The study of the economic and financing viability of the OPR-1000 construction at Muria Peninsula have been done. This study is carried out with steps as follows: updating of newest OPR-1000 technical and economic data; survey of financing sources; the calculation of electricity generation cost, electricity tariff, construction cost of OPR-1000; and calculation of OPR-1000 financing viability by using feasibility criteria such as Net Present Value (NPV), Internal Rate of Return (IRR) and capital payback period. The calculation of generation cost, electricity tariff, construction cost and financing viability criteria (IRR, NPV, Payback Period)by using KEPCO Spread Sheet. From the results of calculations how that the electricity generation cost is 4.0866 cent/kWh, while the electricity tariff is 6.6399 cent/kWh(after Value Added Tax). The total construction cost of OPR-1000 is US $4,092.09 million (included interest and financial fee, excluded initial nuclear fuel). The calculation of financing viability in base case obtained that value of IRR, NPV and Payback Period for total investment is 10.37%. US$90.52 million and 12.11 years respectively. From these results can be concluded that with the electricity tariff of 6.640 cent/kWh or 0.0664 US$/kWh, basically this project of OPR-1000 construction is very feasible and beneficial. From investment side, this project can attract investor because the rate of capital return is high enough, profit in the end of economic life is big enough and payback period is short. (author)

  11. The effect of Aloe vera gel on viability of dental pulp stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sholehvar, Fatemeh; Mehrabani, Davood; Yaghmaei, Parichehr; Vahdati, Akbar

    2016-10-01

    Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) can play a prominent role in tissue regeneration. Aloe vera L. (Liliaceae) contains the polysaccharide of acemannan that was shown to be a trigger factor for cell proliferation, differentiation, mineralization, and dentin formation. This study sought to determine the viability of DPSCs in Aloe vera in comparison with Hank's balanced salt solution (HBSS). Twelve rabbits underwent anesthesia, and their incisor teeth were extracted; the pulp tissue was removed, chopped, treated with collagenase and plated in culture flasks. DPSCs from passage 3 were cultured in 24-well plates, and after 3 days, the culture media changed to 10, 25, 50, and 100% concentrations of Aloe vera at intervals of 45 and 90 min and 3 and 6 h. Distilled water was used as negative and HBSS as positive control for comparison. The cell morphology, viability, population doubling time (PDT), and growth kinetics were evaluated. RT-PCR was carried out for characterization and karyotyping for chromosomal stability. Aloe vera showed a significant higher viability than HBSS (74.74%). The 50% Aloe vera showed higher viability (97.73%) than other concentrations. PDT in 50% concentration was 35.1 h and for HBSS was 49.5 h. DPSCs were spindle shaped and were positive for CD73 and negative for CD34 and CD45. Karyotyping was normal. Aloe vera as an inexpensive and available herb can improve survival of avulsed or broken teeth in emergency cases as a transfer media. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. The first three years of screening for medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MCADD by newborn screening ontario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fisher Lawrence

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MCADD is a disorder of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation and is one of the most common inborn errors of metabolism. Identification of MCADD via newborn screening permits the introduction of interventions that can significantly reduce associated morbidity and mortality. This study reports on the first three years of newborn screening for MCADD in Ontario, Canada. Methods Newborn Screening Ontario began screening for MCADD in April 2006, by quantification of acylcarnitines (primarily octanoylcarnitine, C8 in dried blood spots using tandem mass spectrometry. Babies with positive screening results were referred to physicians at one of five regional Newborn Screening Treatment Centres, who were responsible for diagnostic evaluation and follow-up care. Results From April 2006 through March 2009, approximately 439 000 infants were screened for MCADD in Ontario. Seventy-four infants screened positive, with a median C8 level of 0.68 uM (range 0.33-30.41 uM. Thirty-one of the screen positive infants have been confirmed to have MCADD, while 36 have been confirmed to be unaffected. Screening C8 levels were higher among infants with MCADD (median 8.93 uM compared to those with false positive results (median 0.47 uM. Molecular testing was available for 29 confirmed cases of MCADD, 15 of whom were homozygous for the common c.985A > G mutation. Infants homozygous for the common mutation tended to have higher C8 levels (median 12.13 uM relative to compound heterozygotes for c.985A > G and a second detectable mutation (median 2.01 uM. Eight confirmed mutation carriers were identified among infants in the false positive group. The positive predictive value of a screen positive for MCADD was 46%. The estimated birth prevalence of MCADD in Ontario is approximately 1 in 14 000. Conclusions The birth prevalence of MCADD and positive predictive value of the screening test were similar to those

  13. Wood-fired electricity generation in Eastern Ontario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-07-01

    The feasibility of using large areas of currently unproductive rural land in Ontario for poplar plantations which would supply fuel for wood-fired power plants was examined. Information is included on the productive potential of such poplar plantations, the technology of wood-fired steam-electric plants, costs of wood and water supplies, location of plants, cost of power generation, and socio-economic effects. It was concluded that approximately 1.7 million acres of unused land are available which could produce 7 to 10 million tons of wood fuel per year which in turn could be converted to 1600 MW/yr over the next 10 yr. No adverse environmental effects are expected. The project would economically benefit an area of high unemployment. It is recommended that a more detailed feasibility study be undertaken to establish land availability and acquisition, cost of power generation in wood-fired plants, and the economic impact of such a project. (LCL)

  14. Developments in steam generator leak detection at Ontario Hydro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maynard, K.J.; Singh, V.P. [Ontario Hydro Technologies, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    1998-07-01

    A method for locating small tube leaks in steam generators has been developed and implemented at Ontario Hydro. The technique utilizes both helium leak detection and moisture leak detection. The combination of these two methods allows tube leaks to be detected in any part of the tube bundle, including those submerged below water near the tubesheet. The estimated detection limits for the helium and moisture leak detection systems are 0.001 kg/hr and 0.05 kg/hr respectively, expressed as leak rates measured at typical boiler operating conditions. This technology is best utilized in situations where the leak rate under operating conditions is smaller than the practical limit for fluorescein dye techniques ({approx}2 kg/hour). Other novel techniques have been utilized to increase the reliability and speed of the boiler leak search process. These include the use of argon carrier gas to stabilize the buoyant helium gas in the boiler secondary. (author)

  15. Developments in steam generator leak detection at Ontario Hydro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maynard, K.J.; Singh, V.P.

    1998-01-01

    A method for locating small tube leaks in steam generators has been developed and implemented at Ontario Hydro. The technique utilizes both helium leak detection and moisture leak detection. The combination of these two methods allows tube leaks to be detected in any part of the tube bundle, including those submerged below water near the tubesheet. The estimated detection limits for the helium and moisture leak detection systems are 0.001 kg/hr and 0.05 kg/hr respectively, expressed as leak rates measured at typical boiler operating conditions. This technology is best utilized in situations where the leak rate under operating conditions is smaller than the practical limit for fluorescein dye techniques (∼2 kg/hour). Other novel techniques have been utilized to increase the reliability and speed of the boiler leak search process. These include the use of argon carrier gas to stabilize the buoyant helium gas in the boiler secondary. (author)

  16. Medical staffing in Ontario neonatal intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paes, B; Mitchell, A; Hunsberger, M; Blatz, S; Watts, J; Dent, P; Sinclair, J; Southwell, D

    1989-06-01

    Advances in technology have improved the survival rates of infants of low birth weight. Increasing service commitments together with cutbacks in Canadian training positions have caused concerns about medical staffing in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) in Ontario. To determine whether an imbalance exists between the supply of medical personnel and the demand for health care services, in July 1985 we surveyed the medical directors, head nurses and staff physicians of nine tertiary level NICUs and the directors of five postgraduate pediatric residency programs. On the basis of current guidelines recommending an ideal neonatologist:patient ratio of 1:6 (assuming an adequate number of support personnel) most of the NICUs were understaffed. Concern about the heavy work pattern and resulting lifestyle implications has made Canadian graduates reluctant to enter this subspecialty. We propose strategies to correct staffing shortages in the context of rapidly increasing workloads resulting from a continuing cutback of pediatric residency positions and restrictions on immigration of foreign trainees.

  17. The low enriched uranium fuel cycle in Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Archinoff, G.H.

    1979-02-01

    Six fuel-cycle strategies for use in CANDU reactors are examined in terms of their uranium-conserving properties and their ease of commercialization for three assumed growth rates of installed nuclear capacity in Ontario. The fuel cycle strategies considered assume the continued use of the natural uranium cycle up to the mid-1990's. At that time, the low-enriched uranium (LEU) cycle is gradually introduced into the existing power generation grid. In the mid-2020's one of four advanced cycles is introduced. The advanced cycles considered are: mixed oxide, intermediate burn-up thorium (Pu topping), intermediate burn-up thorium (U topping), and LMFBR. For comparison purposes an all natural uranium strategy and a natural uranium-LEU strategy (with no advanced cycle) are also included. None of the strategies emerges as a clear, overall best choice. (LL)

  18. Procurement of alcohol and underage drinking among adolescents in Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, R G; Adlaf, E M; Walsh, G W

    1996-07-01

    The purpose of this article is to examine the procurement of alcohol among underage drinkers. The data are based on a survey of 3,571 students in Ontario schools. Underage drinkers were those younger than 19 years of age. Data were gathered with an anonymous questionnaire administered in classrooms in 1992. The data include descriptive analysis of underage procurement and a cluster analysis of underage drinker types (n = 1,125: 566 female). Most students found alcohol easy to obtain, with the most common access being from parents' supplies or older friends. Four types of underage drinkers were identified: bar drinkers (5%), frequent purchasers (10%), frequent obtainers (3%) and infrequent obtainers (83%). Frequent self purchasers and infrequent secondary purchasers have the highest levels of consumption and problems. However, most underage drinkers report no problems.

  19. Service water electrochemical monitoring development at Ontario Hydro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brennenstuhl, A.M.

    1994-01-01

    Ontario Hydro (OH) is currently investigating the feasibility of using electrochemical techniques for the corrosion monitoring of service water systems. To date all evaluations have been carried out in a field simulator. The studies include examining the effects of; system startup after periods of stagnation, sodium hypochlorite injection, and zebra mussel settlement on metallic surfaces. Carbon steel and Type 304L stainless steel have been evaluated. Electrochemical potential noise (EPN), electrochemical current noise (ECN) potential and coupling current were semi-continuously monitored over a period of up to one year. Data obtained from the electrochemical noise monitoring has given OH valuable insights into the mechanisms of degradation in service water systems. The high sensitivity of the electrochemical noise technique, particularly to localized corrosion has proved to be the major attraction of the system

  20. Drinking, cannabis use and driving among Ontario students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adlaf, Edward M; Mann, Robert E; Paglia, Angela

    2003-03-04

    Little is known about the risk of injury among adolescents who drive after the use of alcohol or cannabis or ride in cars driven by drunk drivers. We examined data from self-administered interviews with 1846 students in grades 7 to 13 who participated in the 2001 Ontario Student Drug Use Survey about their experiences related to alcohol, cannabis and driving during the 12 months preceding the survey. In all, 31.9% of the students reported being a passenger in a car driven by a drunk driver; of the students in grades 10 to 13 who had a driver's licence, 15.1% reported driving within an hour after consuming 2 or more drinks, and 19.7% reported driving within an hour after using cannabis. Our study shows that a sizeable proportion of adolescents are exposed to alcohol- and drug-related driving risks.